WorldWideScience

Sample records for gastroenteritis viruses occurring

  1. Molecular Diagnosis Of Human Boca virus Gastroenteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassem, N.N.; Kamel, E.M.; Ismail, G.A.; Emam, E.K.; Saber, S.M.; EL Ashry, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    The idea that human boca virus (HBoV) infection possibly plays a role in gastroenteritis has been suggested because of the frequent manifestation of gastrointestinal symptoms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of HBoV In children with gastroenteritis. We studied the etiologic agents in 100 fecal samples in children suffered from acute gastroenteritis. Bacterial etiological agents were dtected by conventional bacteriological culture, and viral etiologic agents were detected by rotavirus latex agglutination and conventional PCR for HBoV and enteric adenovirus. Enteropathogenic E-Coli (EPEC) was detected in 4% of cases. Rotatavirus, enteric adenovirus and co infection between rotavirus and adenovirus were detected in 14%, 6% and 2% respectively. Human boca virus was detected in 1% of cases without associated respiratory symptoms or co infection with other pathogen which suggests its role in children gastroenteritis

  2. Norwalk virus gastroenteritis following raw oyster consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, R A; Janowski, H T; Lieb, S; Prather, E C; Greenberg, H B

    1982-03-01

    In January, 1980, six out of 13 persons (46%) attending a party in a small northwest Florida town near the Gulf of Mexico became ill with Norwalk virus gastroenteritis after eating raw oysters. Symptoms experienced by the ill persons were principally nausea (100%), vomiting (83%) and diarrhea (50%) and were of brief duration. The symptom complex and epidemiology of Norwalk virus infection closely resemble the gastrointestinal illness commonly referred to as the 24-hour intestinal flu or "stomach flu." Norwalk virus infection was identified in this outbreak by application of a recently developed sensitive and specific serologic radioimmunoassay. Oysters from the incriminated batch had fecal coliform levels above recommended standards; however, recent studies of oyster-harvesting waters have shown only a weak correlation between fecal coliforms and the presence of enteric viruses. Further studies are needed to determine whether modifications of monitoring modalities for oyster-harvesting waters are needed.

  3. Development of a multiplex real-time PCR assay for detection of human enteric viruses other than norovirus using samples collected from gastroenteritis patients in Fukui Prefecture, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowada, Kazuaki; Takeuchi, Kenji; Hirano, Eiko; Toho, Miho; Sada, Kiyonao

    2018-01-01

    There are many varieties of gastroenteritis viruses, of which norovirus (NoV) accounts for over 90% of the viral food poisoning incidents in Japan. However, protocols for rapidly identifying other gastroenteritis viruses need to be established to investigate NoV-negative cases intensively. In this study, a multiplex real-time PCR assay targeting rotavirus A, rotavirus C, sapovirus, astrovirus, adenovirus, and enterovirus was developed using stool samples collected from gastroenteritis patients between 2010 and 2013 in Fukui Prefecture, Japan. Of the 126 samples collected sporadically from pediatric patients with suspected infectious gastroenteritis, 51 were positive for non-NoV target viruses, whereas 27 were positive for NoV, showing a high prevalence of non-NoV viruses in pediatric patients. In contrast, testing in 382 samples of 58 gastroenteritis outbreaks showed that non-NoV viruses were detected in 13 samples, with NoV in 267. Of the 267 NoV-positive patients, only two were co-infected with non-NoV target viruses, suggesting that testing for non-NoV gastroenteritis viruses in NoV-positive samples was mostly unnecessary in outbreak investigations. Given these results, multiplex real-time PCR testing for non-NoV gastroenteritis viruses, conducted separately from NoV testing, may be helpful to deal with two types of epidemiological investigations, regular surveillance of infectious gastroenteritis and urgent testing when gastroenteritis outbreaks occur. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Multiple enteropathogenic viruses in a gastroenteritis outbreak in a military exercise of the Portuguese Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-João, António; Costa, Inês; Mesquita, João R; Oleastro, Mónica; Penha-Gonçalves, Carlos; Nascimento, Maria S J

    2015-07-01

    Gastroenteritis is one of the most common infectious diseases in the military populations and can diminish operational effectiveness and impede force readiness. The present study investigates the cause and the source of an acute gastroenteritis outbreak that occurred during a military exercise of the Portuguese Army, in February 2013. A retrospective investigation was performed and stool samples, food items and water were screened for common foodborne bacteria and viruses, namely Norovirus GI, Norovirus GII, Astrovirus, Rotavirus, Adenovirus and Sapovirus. From the total of 160 soldiers that participated in the military exercise 20 developed gastroenteritis (attack rate of 12.5%). Symptoms were predominantly vomiting (n=17, 85%) and diarrhoea (n=9, 45%). The first cases occurred 24-48h after drinking water from the creek, the plausible origin of the outbreak. The epidemic peak was registered 2 days after and the last cases 6 days after, upon returning to base. No pathogenic bacteria were found in stools however virological analysis revealed the presence of multiple enteropathogenic viruses, namely Norovirus GI (GI.3), Norovirus GII (GII.4 New Orleans 2009), Astrovirus and Sapovirus, as single or co-infections. Food and water samples were not tested for the presence of viruses due to exhaustion of samples on bacteriological analysis. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of a viral gastroenteritis outbreak among military personnel in the Portuguese Army. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Waterborne Outbreak of Norwalk-Like Virus Gastroenteritis at a Tourist Resort, Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Boccia, Della; Tozzi, Alberto Eugenio; Cotter, Benvon; Rizzo, Caterina; Russo, Teresa; Buttinelli, Gabriele; Caprioli, Alfredo; Marziano, Maria Luisa; Ruggeri, Franco Maria

    2002-01-01

    In July 2000, an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred at a tourist resort in the Gulf of Taranto in southern Italy. Illness in 344 people, 69 of whom were staff members, met the case definition. Norwalk-like virus (NLV) was found in 22 of 28 stool specimens tested. The source of illness was likely contaminated drinking water, as environmental inspection identified a breakdown in the resort water system and tap water samples were contaminated with fecal bacteria. Attack rates were increased (5...

  6. The Etiology and Pathogenesis of Viral Gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-31

    with subsequent seroconversion or susceptibility to illness in a naturally occurring outbreak of Norwalk virus gastroenteritis among American teen ... anorexia , myalgia and malaise. It can be severe, indeed fatal, in the elderly, infant, debilitated or malnourished pa- tient. Viral gastroenteritis

  7. Diversity in the Enteric Viruses Detected in Outbreaks of Gastroenteritis from Mumbai, Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Bhardwaj

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Faecal specimens collected from two outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis that occurred in southern Mumbai, India in March and October, 2006 were tested for seven different enteric viruses. Among the 218 specimens tested, 95 (43.6% were positive, 73 (76.8% for a single virus and 22 (23.2% for multiple viruses. Single viral infections in both, March and October showed predominance of enterovirus (EV, 33.3% and 40% and rotavirus A (RVA, 33.3% and 25%. The other viruses detected in these months were norovirus (NoV, 12.1% and 10%, rotavirus B (RVB, 12.1% and 10%, enteric adenovirus (AdV, 6.1% and 7.5%, Aichivirus (AiV, 3% and 7.5% and human astrovirus (HAstV, 3% and 0%. Mixed viral infections were largely represented by two viruses (84.6% and 88.9%, a small proportion showed presence of three (7.7% and 11% and four (7.7% and 0% viruses in the two outbreaks. Genotyping of the viruses revealed predominance of RVA G2P[4], RVB G2 (Indian Bangladeshi lineage, NoV GII.4, AdV-40, HAstV-8 and AiV B types. VP1/2A junction region based genotyping showed presence of 11 different serotypes of EVs. Although no virus was detected in the tested water samples, examination of both water and sewage pipelines in gastroenteritis affected localities indicated leakages and possibility of contamination of drinking water with sewage water. Coexistence of multiple enteric viruses during the two outbreaks of gastroenteritis emphasizes the need to expand such investigations to other parts of India.

  8. Diversity in the enteric viruses detected in outbreaks of gastroenteritis from Mumbai, Western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitambar, Shobha; Gopalkrishna, Varanasi; Chhabra, Preeti; Patil, Pooja; Verma, Harsha; Lahon, Anismrita; Arora, Ritu; Tatte, Vaishali; Ranshing, Sujata; Dhale, Ganesh; Kolhapure, Rajendra; Tikute, Sanjay; Kulkarni, Jagannath; Bhardwaj, Renu; Akarte, Sulbha; Pawar, Sashikant

    2012-03-01

    Faecal specimens collected from two outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis that occurred in southern Mumbai, India in March and October, 2006 were tested for seven different enteric viruses. Among the 218 specimens tested, 95 (43.6%) were positive, 73 (76.8%) for a single virus and 22 (23.2%) for multiple viruses. Single viral infections in both, March and October showed predominance of enterovirus (EV, 33.3% and 40%) and rotavirus A (RVA, 33.3% and 25%). The other viruses detected in these months were norovirus (NoV, 12.1% and 10%), rotavirus B (RVB, 12.1% and 10%), enteric adenovirus (AdV, 6.1% and 7.5%), Aichivirus (AiV, 3% and 7.5%) and human astrovirus (HAstV, 3% and 0%). Mixed viral infections were largely represented by two viruses (84.6% and 88.9%), a small proportion showed presence of three (7.7% and 11%) and four (7.7% and 0%) viruses in the two outbreaks. Genotyping of the viruses revealed predominance of RVA G2P[4], RVB G2 (Indian Bangladeshi lineage), NoV GII.4, AdV-40, HAstV-8 and AiV B types. VP1/2A junction region based genotyping showed presence of 11 different serotypes of EVs. Although no virus was detected in the tested water samples, examination of both water and sewage pipelines in gastroenteritis affected localities indicated leakages and possibility of contamination of drinking water with sewage water. Coexistence of multiple enteric viruses during the two outbreaks of gastroenteritis emphasizes the need to expand such investigations to other parts of India.

  9. Temporal distribution of gastroenteritis viruses in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso: seasonality of rotavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafissatou Ouedraogo

    2017-03-01

    = 0.08 respectively, but, no correlation was observed between the temperature and the rainfall. Conclusion This study extends knowledge on the monthly fluctuations on the prevalence of viral gastroenteritis. These results can provide valuable information necessary to alert health care providers when a period of infection in the community is likely to occur. The transmission of these viruses in Burkina Faso could depends on multiple factors including climatic variables.

  10. Outbreak of viral gastroenteritis due to drinking water contaminated by Norwalk-like viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukkula, M; Maunula, L; Silvennoinen, E; von Bonsdorff, C H

    1999-12-01

    Heinävesi, a Finnish municipality with a population of 4860 inhabitants, had an outbreak of gastroenteritis in March 1998. On the basis of an epidemiologic survey, an estimated 1700-3000 cases of acute gastroenteritis occurred during the outbreak. Municipal water consumption was found to be associated with illness (risk ratio [RR]=3.5, 95% confidence interval, 3.11>RR>3.96). Norwalk-like virus (NLV) genogroup II (GGII) was identified in untreated water, treated water, and 4 tap water samples by use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. This was the first time NLVs had been detected in municipal tap water. Fifteen of 27 patient stool samples had NLV GGII, with an identical amplification product to that found in the water samples, indicating that the outbreak was caused by this virus. In some patients, NLV genogroup I was also encountered. This virus, however, could not be detected in the water samples. Inadequate chlorination contributed to the survival of the virus in the water.

  11. Gastroenteritis: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Gastroenteritis: First aid Gastroenteritis: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Gastroenteritis is an inflammation of your stomach and intestines. Common causes are: Viruses. Food or water contaminated by ...

  12. Multistate outbreak of Norwalk-like virus gastroenteritis associated with a common caterer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A D; Garrett, V D; Sobel, J; Monroe, S S; Fankhauser, R L; Schwab, K J; Bresee, J S; Mead, P S; Higgins, C; Campana, J; Glass, R I

    2001-12-01

    In February 2000, an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred among employees of a car dealership in New York. The same meal was also supplied to 52 dealerships nationwide, and 13 states reported illness at dealerships where the banquet was served. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to identify risk factors associated with the illness. Stool samples were collected to detect Norwalk-like virus, and sera were drawn and tested for immunoglobulin A antibodies to the outbreak strain. By univariate analysis, illness was significantly associated with consumption of any of four salads served at the banquet (relative risk = 3.8, 95% confidence interval: 2.5, 5.6). Norwalk-like virus was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay in 32 of 59 stool samples from eight states. Nucleotide sequences of a 213-base pair fragment from 16 stool specimens collected from cases in eight states were identical, confirming a common source outbreak. Two of 15 workers at caterer A had elevated immunoglobulin A titers to an antigenically related Norwalk-like virus strain. This study highlights the value of molecular techniques to complement classic epidemiologic methods in outbreak investigations and underscores the critical role of food handlers in the spread of foodborne disease associated with Norwalk-like virus.

  13. Viruses Causing Gastroenteritis: The Known, The New and Those Beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Munnink, Bas B.; van der Hoek, Lia

    2016-01-01

    The list of recently discovered gastrointestinal viruses is expanding rapidly. Whether these agents are actually involved in a disease such as diarrhea is the essential question, yet difficult to answer. In this review a summary of all viruses found in diarrhea is presented, together with the

  14. Detection and characterisation of novel bocavirus (genus Bocaparvovirus and gastroenteritis viruses from asymptomatic pigs in Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynda Gunn

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Livestock animals have been the assumed source of several human epidemics in recent years, for example, influenza H1N1, rotavirus G8/G9, and MERS-CoV. Surveillance of novel viruses in animals is essential to evaluate the risk to human and animal health and to determine any economic impact, for example, failure to thrive. There is a paucity of data regarding detection and characterisation of gastroenteritis viruses, particularly novel viruses, in porcines in Ireland. Recently, a number of small novel porcine DNA viruses have emerged globally, for example, torque teno sus virus, porcine bocavirus, and parvoviruses 2 & 4, and little is known about the biology and potential pathogenicity of these viruses. Bocaparvovirus is a genetically distinct group of viruses which has been recently detected in humans and animals. Methods: In this study, the presence of gastroenteritis viruses (rotavirus A, porcine circovirus, adenovirus, and porcine bocavirus was investigated in a selection of archived faecal samples from asymptomatic piglets from a commercial farm in Ireland. A total of 104 specimens were pooled and screened using conventional molecular techniques (PCR and RT-PCR, a subset of specimens (n=44 were then examined individually. Viral diversity was then investigated using statistical and phylogenetic techniques. Results: Initial screening showed a high prevalence of PBoV in this farm, with the formation of three distinct groups in phylogenetic analysis. Other viruses were also investigated in this study with the first report of PCV, PAdV and lineage I G5 RVA in Ireland. Some specimens contained >1 virus, with statistical analysis indicating a strong correlation for mixed infections of PBoV and PAdV on this farm. Conclusion: Investigating the diversity of circulating enteric viruses on Irish porcine farms is important to improve the prophylactic tools available and to facilitate the early detection of changes in circulating viruses.

  15. Small, round-structured viruses (SRSVs) associated with acute gastroenteritis outbreaks in Gifu, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, H; Hasegawa, S; Sawatari, S; Miwa, C; Morita, O; Hosokawa, T; Tanaka, H

    1993-01-01

    Two outbreaks of non-bacterial gastroenteritis occurred in Gifu prefecture in January 1989 and in January 1991. Both outbreaks were closely related to the consumption of raw oysters, and showed similar clinical features. Small, round-structured virus particles were found in patient stools in both outbreaks by electron microscopy. The role of these particles as the causative agents of the outbreaks were strongly suggested by immune electron microscopy and/or western-blotting immunoassay. When compared with SRSV-9 (Tokyo/SRSV/86-510) reported previously (Hayashi et al, J. Clin. Microbiol., 27: 1728-1733, 1989), it was found that these viral particles were antigenically similar to SRSV-9, and had a major structural protein of 63 kilodaltons (kDa). Further, the prevalence of this agent in Gifu area was examined by western blot antibody assay using 67 serum samples collected from the inhabitants in 1991. The results indicated the circulation of the same or antigenically similar agent in this area.

  16. Brote de gastroenteritis por virus Norwalk en una residencia de ancianos de Granada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almagro Nievas Diego

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento: Los brotes de gastroenteritis aguda de origen vírico son actualmente uno de los problemas de salud que más están afectando a las personas residentes en instituciones de la tercera edad. El objetivo del estudio es investigar las causas del origen y transmisión de un brote de gastroenteritis aguda por virus Norwal-Like. Método: En una residencia de ancianos con 141 residentes y 71 trabajadores expuestos, se investigó la relación entre un brote de gastroenteritis aguda y distintas variables: características personales, de lugar, fecha de inicio de los síntomas, clínica de la enfermedad y factores causales (alimentos y agua de consumo. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo, tabla de contingencia y test de hipótesis 2, diseño de casos y controles con el calculo de Odds Ratio cruda y posteriormente ajustada (IC al 95% utilizando regresión logística. Resultados: No se observaron diferencias significativas en las variables de características personales y de lugar. La tasa de ataque en los residentes fue del 30,1% y en trabajadores fue del 21,12%. En el calculo de la Odds Ratio ajustada sólo tuvo valores de relación causal la mousse de nata (Odds Ratio ajustada=4,66; IC-95% 1,15-18,91; p=0,031. Se remitieron 10 muestras de heces de enfermos para su análisis, no detectándose ninguna bacteria patógena, pero si se aisló en 3 de ellas virus Norwal-Like. Conclusiones: El hallazgo de la mousse de nata como posible responsable del brote supone una primicia en la presencia de virus Norwalk, pero este resultado está sujeto a limitaciones, como el posible sesgo de clasificación por no recuerdo de consumo de alimentos. Aún así, supone un elemento a tener en cuenta en el control de gastroenteritis agudas por virus.

  17. A large outbreak of gastroenteritis associated with a small round structured virus among schoolchildren and teachers in Japan.

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, S.; Morishita, T.; Yamashita, T.; Sakae, K.; Nishio, O.; Miyake, T.; Ishihara, Y.; Isomura, S.

    1991-01-01

    In March 1989 a large outbreak of acute gastroenteritis occurred simultaneously among schoolchildren and teachers at nine elementary schools in Toyota City, Japan. Illness was observed in 3236 (41.5%) of 7801 schoolchildren and 117 (39.4%) of 297 teachers. The main clinical symptoms were diarrhoea, vomiting, nausea and abdominal pain. Gastroenteritis was significantly associated with the consumption of school lunch served by one particular lunch preparation centre. One food handler at the cen...

  18. BROTE DE GASTROENTERITIS POR VIRUS NORWALK EN UNA RESIDENCIA DE ANCIANOS DE GRANADA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Almagro Nievas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available vírico son actualmente uno de los problemas de salud que más están afectando a las personas residentes en instituciones de la tercera edad. El objetivo del estudio es investigar las causas del origen y transmisión de un brote de gastroenteritis aguda por virus Norwal- Like. Método: En una residencia de ancianos con 141 residentes y 71 trabajadores expuestos, se investigó la relación entre un brote de gastroenteritis aguda y distintas variables: características personales, de lugar, fecha de inicio de los síntomas, clínica de la enfermedad y factores causales (alimentos y agua de consumo. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo, tabla de contingencia y test de hipótesis 2, diseño de casos y controles con el calculo de Odds Ratio cruda y posteriormente ajustada (IC al 95% utilizando regresión logística. Resultados: No se observaron diferencias significativas en las variables de características personales y de lugar. La tasa de ataque en los residentes fue del 30,1% y en trabajadores fue del 21,12%. En el calculo de la Odds Ratio ajustada sólo tuvo valores de relación causal la mousse de nata (Odds Ratio ajustada=4,66; IC-95% 1,15- 18,91; p=0,031. Se remitieron 10 muestras de heces de enfermos para su análisis, no detectándose ninguna bacteria patógena, pero si se aisló en 3 de ellas virus Norwal-Like. Conclusiones: El hallazgo de la mousse de nata como posible responsable del brote supone una primicia en la presencia de virus Norwalk, pero este resultado está sujeto a limitaciones, como el posible sesgo de clasificación por no recuerdo de consumo de alimentos. Aún así, supone un elemento a tener en cuenta en el control de gastroenteritis agudas por virus.

  19. Nipah virus entry can occur by macropinocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernet, Olivier; Pohl, Christine; Ainouze, Michelle; Kweder, Hasan; Buckland, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a zoonotic biosafety level 4 paramyxovirus that emerged recently in Asia with high mortality in man. NiV is a member, with Hendra virus (HeV), of the Henipavirus genus in the Paramyxoviridae family. Although NiV entry, like that of other paramyxoviruses, is believed to occur via pH-independent fusion with the host cell's plasma membrane we present evidence that entry can occur by an endocytic pathway. The NiV receptor ephrinB2 has receptor kinase activity and we find that ephrinB2's cytoplasmic domain is required for entry but is dispensable for post-entry viral spread. The mutation of a single tyrosine residue (Y304F) in ephrinB2's cytoplasmic tail abrogates NiV entry. Moreover, our results show that NiV entry is inhibited by constructions and drugs specific for the endocytic pathway of macropinocytosis. Our findings could potentially permit the rapid development of novel low-cost antiviral treatments not only for NiV but also HeV.

  20. [Gastroenteritis outbreak associated with water consumption, possibly caused by Norwalk or Norwalk-like virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chover Lara, J L; Pastor Vicente, S; Roig Sena, J; Roselló Pérez, M; Salvo Samanes, C; Castellanos Martínez, I

    1995-01-01

    It is described an acute gastroenteritis outbreak of probable hydric transmission in Ontinyent (Valencia). It was declared on the 31st of January, 1992 and affected 3541 people according to the declaration done by the sanitary services who attended the patients. The clinical situation was characterized by the presence of profuse and watery diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and fever or febricula. A preliminary study of the cases has been done, the information being treated with the classical method of descriptive epidemiology and a later study of the transversal observation type by means of a telephone inquiry. The results show that this outbreak affected approximately to a 30% of the population, and show the relation between consumption of water from the municipal water system and the outbreak, as well as the existence of a control population not affected for receiving a different water supply. Once rejected the bacterial origin for the results of the copro-cultivation done the analysis of the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of the outbreak, show a total agreement with the criteria described by Kaplan to characterize acute gastroenteritis outbreaks because of Norwalk-like virus.

  1. Detection of antibodies to transmissible gastroenteritis virus of swine by modified autoradiographic test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanek, J; Hampl, J; Franz, J; Mensik, P; Skrobak, F [Vyzkumny Ustav Veterinarniho Lekarstvi, Brno-Medlanky (Czechoslovakia)

    1982-08-01

    A modified method of autoradiographic determination of virus antibodies of gastroenteritis of swine was developed. It is based on the actual reaction between antigen bound in cells of the infected cell cultures and antibodies in tested sera, which is visualized by rabbit antibodies labelled with /sup 125/I (/sup 125/I RaSw IgG antibody) to porcine IgG, on a sensitive radiograph and evaluated by darkening at the point of positive immunological reaction. Specificity of the test and mutual comparability and reproducibility of the results were confirmed by examining the known positive and negative sera and by a comparison with the results of the virus-neutralization test. Of the 36 examined porcine blood sera, antibodies were only proved autoradiographically in the samples positive also by virus-neutralization. In experimentally infected pigs, the same dynamics of antibody production was recorded by the two tests. They were, however, demonstrated autoradiographically the eighth day after infection, while by virus neutralization test as late as 14th day. Their level increased gradually till 35th day after infection.

  2. Small round structured virus associated with an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in Chiba, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, K; Tokieda, M; Ohtawara, M; Utagawa, E; Yamazaki, S

    1990-08-01

    In an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis which originated in a restaurant in Chiba, Japan, in December, 1987, small round structured virus (SRSV) particles were observed by electron microscopy in 14 of 16 stool specimens from patients. The particles were 30 to 35 nm in diameter, possessed amorphous surface structure surrounded by fine projections and had a buoyant density of 1.36 to 1.37 g/ml in cesium chloride. Serological responses to the SRSV were found by immune electron microscopy and Western blot (WB) assay in paired sera of 12 of 19 patients. Furthermore, WB analysis revealed that the antibody against SRSV was cross-reactive to other SRSV, Tokyo 86/510.

  3. Sialic Acid Binding Properties of Soluble Coronavirus Spike (S1 Proteins: Differences between Infectious Bronchitis Virus and Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Winter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The spike proteins of a number of coronaviruses are able to bind to sialic acids present on the cell surface. The importance of this sialic acid binding ability during infection is, however, quite different. We compared the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV and the spike protein of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV. Whereas sialic acid is the only receptor determinant known so far for IBV, TGEV requires interaction with its receptor aminopeptidase N to initiate infection of cells. Binding tests with soluble spike proteins carrying an IgG Fc-tag revealed pronounced differences between these two viral proteins. Binding of the IBV spike protein to host cells was in all experiments sialic acid dependent, whereas the soluble TGEV spike showed binding to APN but had no detectable sialic acid binding activity. Our results underline the different ways in which binding to sialoglycoconjugates is mediated by coronavirus spike proteins.

  4. General properties of grapevine viruses occurring in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eszter Cseh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The past fifty years important advances have been made in the field of grapevine virus research, including characterization of pathogens and control measurements. Still the occurrence of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV, Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV, Tomato black ring virus (TBRV, Grapevine chrome mosaic virus (GCMV, Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV, Grapevine Bulgarian latent virus (GBLV, Grapevine fleck virus (GFkV, Grapevine leafroll- associated viruses (GLRaV1-4, Grapevine virus A (GVA, Grapevine virus B (GVB and Grapevine rupestris stem pitting- associated virus (GRSPaV have been reported in Hungary and characterized by conventional methods as woody indexing, herbaceous indexing and serological methods. Among grapevine viruses the Grapevine line pattern virus (GLPV seems to be uncial; because it was reported only in Hungary. Causal agents of several grapevine diseases, like enation, vein necrosis and vein mosaic remained undiscovered. These virus-like diseases occurred only sporadically, without economic importance.

  5. Widespread environmental contamination with Norwalk-like viruses (NLV) detected in a prolonged hotel outbreak of gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheesbrough, J S; Green, J; Gallimore, C I; Wright, P A; Brown, D W

    2000-08-01

    A protracted outbreak of Norwalk-like virus (NLV)-associated gastroenteritis occurred in a large hotel in North-West England between January and May 1996. We investigated the pattern of environmental contamination with NLV in the hotel during and after the outbreak. In the ninth week, 144 environmental swabs taken from around the hotel were tested for NLV by nested RT-PCR. The sites were categorized according to the likelihood of direct contamination with vomit/faeces. The highest proportion of positive samples were detected in directly contaminated carpets, but amplicons were detected in sites above 1.5 m which are unlikely to have been contaminated directly. The trend in positivity of different sites paralleled the diminishing likelihood of direct contamination. A second environmental investigation of the same sites 5 months after the outbreak had finished were all negative by RT-PCR. This study demonstrates for the first time the extent of environmental contamination that may occur during a large NLV outbreak.

  6. Outbreak of small round structured virus gastroenteritis arose after kitchen assistant vomited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, W; Haswell, P; Fryers, P T; Green, J

    1997-06-27

    A wedding reception at a North Yorkshire hotel was followed by an explosive outbreak of gastroenteritis. The attack rate among the 111 guests was 50% and vomiting was a predominant feature. The results of laboratory and epidemiological investigations were consistent with a common source outbreak of small round structured virus (SRSV) infection genotype II. The source of the outbreak was traced to a kitchen assistant who suddenly became ill on the eve of the reception and vomited into a sink used for preparing vegetables. The sink was cleaned with a chlorine based disinfectant and used the next morning to prepare a potato salad, subsequently identified as the vehicle of infection in a cohort study of guests (odds ratio 3.21; CI 1.78-5.78, p = 0.0001). No other food was associated with illness. The outbreak provides further supporting evidence of the importance of vomiting in the transmission of SRSV infection, highlights the virulence of this group of viruses, and indicates their relative resistance to environmental disinfection and decontamination. It also highlights the need for the adequate training of catering staff and the implementation and enforcement of food hygiene regulations.

  7. Coronavirus infection in mink (Mustela vison). Serological evidence of infection with a coronavirus related to transmissible gastroenteritis virus and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, P; Moving, V; Svansson, V

    1992-01-01

    Antibodies to a transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV)-related coronavirus have been demonstrated in mink sera by indirect immunofluorescence, peroxidase-linked antibody assays and immunoblotting. This is the first serological evidence of a specific coronavirus infection in mink. The putative...

  8. Bacillus subtilis and surfactin inhibit the transmissible gastroenteritis virus from entering the intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Hu, Weiwei; Zhu, Liqi; Yang, Qian

    2017-04-28

    Intestinal epithelial cells are the targets for transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) virus (TGEV) infection. It is urgent to develop a novel candidate against TGEV entry. Bacillus subtilis is a probiotic with excellent anti-microorganism properties and one of its secretions, surfactin, has been regarded as a versatile weapon for most plant pathogens, especially for the enveloped virus. We demonstrate for the first time that B. subtilis OKB105 and its surfactin can effectively inhibit one animal coronavirus, TGEV, entering the intestinal porcine epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2). Then, several different experiments were performed to seek the might mechanisms. The plaque assays showed that surfactant could reduce the plaque generation of TGEV in a dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, after incubation with TGEV for 1.5 h, B. subtilis could attach TGEV particles to their surface so that the number of virus to bind to the host cells was declined. Furthermore, our data showed that the inhibition of B. subtilis was closely related to the competition with TGEV for the viral entry receptors, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and aminopeptidase N (APN) protein. In addition, Western blotting and apoptosis analysis indicated that B. subtilis could enhance the resistance of IPEC-J2 cells by up-regulating the expression of toll-like receptor (TLR)-6 and reducing the percentage of apoptotic cells. Taken together, our results suggest that B. subtilis OKB105 and its surfactin can antagonize TGEV entry in vitro and may serve as promising new candidates for TGEV prevention. © 2017 The Author(s).

  9. [Nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinosci, A; Doit, C; Koehl, B; Belhacel, K; Mariani Kurkdjian, P; Melki, I; Renaud, A; Lemaitre, C; Ammar Khodja, N; Blachier, A; Bonacorsi, S; Faye, A; Lorrot, M

    2016-11-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis in children requiring hospitalization. It is a very resistant and contagious virus causing nosocomial gastroenteritis. In France, the vaccine against rotavirus has been available since 2006, but the vaccine is not recommended for infant vaccination. The aim of this retrospective study was to describe nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis (NRGE) and to assess its impact on children hospitalized in the General Pediatrics Department of Robert-Debré Hospital (Paris) between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013. We analyzed the demographic characteristics of children (age, term birth, underlying diseases) and the severity of the NRGE (oral or intravenous hydration), and assessed whether these children could benefit from vaccination against rotavirus. One hundred thirty-six children presented nosocomial rotavirus infection, with an incidence of 2.5 NRGE per 1000 days of hospitalization. The incidence of NRGE was stable between 2009 and 2013 despite the introduction of specific hygiene measures. The average age of the children was 7 months (range: 0.5-111 months). Most often NRGE occurred in children hospitalized for respiratory diseases (65% of cases) and requiring prolonged hospitalization (median: 18 days). One-third of children were born premature (25%). Hydration was oral in 80 patients (59%), by intravenous infusion in 18 patients (13%), and intraosseous in one patient. Half of the patients were aged less than 5 months and could benefit from the protection afforded by vaccination. NRGE are common. Rotavirus mass vaccination should have a positive impact on the incidence of NRGE by reducing the number of children hospitalized for gastroenteritis, therefore indirectly reducing the number of hospital cross-infections of hospitalized children who are too young to be vaccinated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulation of ROS in transmissible gastroenteritis virus-activated apoptotic signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Li [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); College of Life Sciences, Hainan Normal University, Haikou, Hainan 571158 (China); Zhao, Xiaomin; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Dong, Feng; Zhang, Hongling; Song, Xiangjun; Zhang, Wenlong [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Tong, Dewen, E-mail: dwtong@nwsuaf.edu.cn [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China)

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •TGEV infection induced ROS accumulation. •ROS accumulation is involved in TGEV-induced mitochondrial integrity impairment. •ROS is associated with p53 activation and apoptosis occurrence in TGEV-infected cells. -- Abstract: Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), an enteropathogenic coronavirus, causes severe lethal watery diarrhea and dehydration in piglets. Previous studies indicate that TGEV infection induces cell apoptosis in host cells. In this study, we investigated the roles and regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TGEV-activated apoptotic signaling. The results showed that TGEV infection induced ROS accumulation, whereas UV-irradiated TGEV did not promote ROS accumulation. In addition, TGEV infection lowered mitochondrial transmembrane potential in PK-15 cell line, which could be inhibited by ROS scavengers, pyrrolidinedithiocarbamic (PDTC) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Furthermore, the two scavengers significantly inhibited the activation of p38 MAPK and p53 and further blocked apoptosis occurrence through suppressing the TGEV-induced Bcl-2 reduction, Bax redistribution, cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. These results suggest that oxidative stress pathway might be a key element in TGEV-induced apoptosis and TGEV pathogenesis.

  11. Prevalence of human cosavirus and saffold virus with an emergence of saffold virus genotype 6 in patients hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Chiang Mai, Thailand, 2014-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menage, Lucy; Yodmeeklin, Arpaporn; Khamrin, Pattara; Kumthip, Kattareeya; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2017-09-01

    Human cosavirus and saffold virus are both newly discovered members of the Picornaviridae family. It has been suggested that these viruses may be the causative agents of acute gastroenteritis. In this study, 1093 stool samples collected from patients with acute gastroenteritis between January 2014 and December 2016, were screened for cosavirus and saffold virus using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The viral genotypes were then established via nucleotide sequencing. Here, cosavirus was detected in 16 of 1093 stool samples (1.5%) and saffold virus was detected in 18 of 1093 stool samples (1.6%). The saffold virus genotypes 1 (16.7%), 2 (50%) and 6 (33.3%), and the cosavirus genetic groups A (87.5%), C (6.25%) and D (6.25%), were all identified across the three-year study period. Interestingly, saffold virus genotype 6 has now been detected for the first time in Thailand. The present study provides the prevalence of cosavirus and saffold virus with the emergence of saffold virus genotype 6 in Thailand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The coronavirus transmissible gastroenteritis virus causes infection after receptor-mediated endocytosis and acid-dependent fusion with an intracellular compartment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Delmas, B; Besnardeau, L

    1998-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N is a species-specific receptor for transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), which infects piglets, and for the 229E virus, which infects humans. It is not known whether these coronaviruses are endocytosed before fusion with a membrane of the target cell, causing a productive...

  13. The incidence and genetic variability of Small Round-Structured Viruses (SRSV) in outbreaks of gastroenteritis in 1996 in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinje J; Altena SA; Lodder WJ; Koopmans MPG; LIO; MGB

    1997-01-01

    Small round-structured viruses (SRSV), ook wel Norwalk-achtige virussen genoemd, zijn belangrijke verwekkers van explosies van gastroenteritis. De detectie van deze groep genetisch uiterst variabele virussen is door de recente ontwikkeling van een generische RT-PCR test sterk vereenvoudigd. Om de

  14. Immune responses induced by recombinant Bacillus subtilis expressing the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Chunxiao; Zhu, Liqi; Xing, Xianping; Lin, Jian; Yang, Qian

    2016-07-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) causes severe diarrhea in suckling piglets, results in enormous economic loss in swine-producing areas of the world. To develop an effective, safe, and convenient vaccine for the prevention of TGE, we have constructed a recombinant Bacillus subtilis strain (B. subtilis CotGSG) displaying the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) spike (S) protein and discussed its immune function to intestinal submucosal dendritic cells (DCs). Our results showed that the recombinant B. subtilis had the ability to recruit more DCs to sample B. subtilis CotGSG, migrate to MLNs, and induce immune responses. Immunized piglets with B. subtilis CotGSG could significantly elevate the specific SIgA titers in feces, IgG titers and neutralizing antibodies in serum. Collectively, our results suggested that recombinant B. subtilis CotGSG expressing the TGEV S protein could effectively induce immune responses via DCs, and provided a perspective on potential novel strategy and approach that may be applicable to the development of the next generation of TGEV vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Epidemiological investigation of a food-borne gastroenteritis outbreak caused by Norwalk-like virus in 30 day-care centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Hannelore; de Jong, Birgitta; Lindbäck, Johan; Parment, Per Arne; Hedlund, Kjell Olof; Torvén, Maria; Ekdahl, Karl

    2002-01-01

    In March 1999, an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred affecting 30 day-care centres served by the same caterer. A retrospective cohort study was performed in 13 randomly selected day-care centres to determine the source and mode of transmission. Electron microscopy and PCR were used to verify the diagnosis. The overall attack rate (AR) was 37% (195/524): 30% in children and 62% in adults. Modified by the age of the patient, eating pumpkin salad served on 1 March was associated with becoming an early case (odds ratio = 3.9; 95% confidence interval 1.8-8.8). No significant association was found between food consumption and becoming a late case. The primary food-borne AR was 27% and the secondary AR was 14%. The same genotype of Norwalk-like virus was found in 5 cases and in 1 ill and 1 asymptomatic food-handler. Contamination by 1 of the food-handlers seems the most likely route of spread of the virus and underlines the importance of strict hygienic routines.

  16. General properties of grapevine viruses occurring in Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    Eszter Cseh; András Takács; László Kocsis; Richard Gáborjányi

    2012-01-01

    The past fifty years important advances have been made in the field of grapevine virus research, including characterization of pathogens and control measurements. Still the occurrence of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV), Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV), Tomato black ring virus (TBRV), Grapevine chrome mosaic virus (GCMV), Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), Grapevine Bulgarian latent virus (GBLV), Grapevine fleck virus (GFkV), Grapevine leafroll- associated viruses (GLRaV1-4), Grapevine virus A (GVA), Grape...

  17. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 340. Craig SA. Gastroenteritis. In: Marx ... Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 94. Mody RK, Griffin PM. ...

  18. Occurance and distribution of poty viruses infecting garlic in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilani, S.T.; Hameed, S.; Shah, H.

    2016-01-01

    The study was designed to detect and determine the prevalence, incidence and distribution of the poty viruses causing diseases in garlic (Allium sativum) from major garlic growing areas of Pakistan. The yellow stripes, mosaic and chlorotic spot symptoms of the disease resemble the viral infection in garlic reported to occur worldwide. Altogether 690 samples were collected from 29 locations of Punjab and 40 locations of Khyber Pukhtunkhwa to determine the prevalence of Onion Yellow Dwarf Virus (OYDV) and Leek Yellow Stripe Virus (LYSV). Serological testing DAS-ELISA technique was used to test the samples collected from the farmer fields. Based on the DAS-ELISA poty viruses OYDV and LYSV were detected from both provinces although the percentage incidence varied from location to location. Few areas of district Punjab were found free of LYSV but OYDV was prevalent in all locations irrespective of the varieties cultivated. Maximum disease incidence was detected in Swabi (KPK) where OYDV was 90percent and LYSV was 38 percent while in Punjab major disease incidence of OYDV (87.14 percent) and LYSV (91.44 percent) was found in Sialkot. (author)

  19. Epidemiological features and genetic characterization of virus strains in rotavirus associated gastroenteritis in children of Odisha in Eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Eileena; Dwibedi, Bhagirathi; Kar, S K; Acharya, A S

    2017-09-01

    We have studied the clinical characteristics, severity and seasonality of rotavirus infection and prevalent genotypes in 652 non-rota vaccinated children in Odisha in eastern India. P genotypes were analysed for their association with host blood group antigens. P type of the virus is determined by the VP8* gene, and specific recognition of A - type of Histo - blood group antigen by P[14]VP8* has been reported. VP4, VP7 and VP6 genes of commonly identified G1P[8] strain were compared with genes of the same strain isolated from other parts of India, elsewhere and strains used for Rotarix and Rotateq vaccines. In 54.75% of children with gastroenteritis, rota virus was found. 9.65% of children had moderate, 78.07% severe, and 12.28% very severe disease as assessed using the Vesikari scoring system. The incidence of infection was highest during winter months. There was no association between any blood group and specific P genotypes. G1P[8] was the commonest cause of gastroenteritis, followed by G1P[11], G3P[8], G9P[8], G2P[4], G2P[6], G9P[4], G9P[11] and G1P[6]. Predominant G genotypes identified were G1 (72.9%), G9 (10.81%), G2 (8.10%) and G3 (8.10%). Sequence analysis of the VP7 gene, placed the G1P[8] strain in lineage 1 and of VP6 gene placed nine G1P[8] strains in subgroup II and one in subgroup I. The VP7 gene segment of two Odisha G1P[8] strains were found to cluster relatively close to the VP7 sequences of Rotarix vaccine. Antigenic differences were found with vaccine strains. Ten G1P[8] strains sequenced for the VP4 gene had 91-93% nucleotide and 92-96% amino acid identity with Rotateq vaccine P[8]). Rotarix vaccine VP4 had 89-91% nucleotide and 90-92% amino acid identity. Our findings indicate genetic variability of rotavirus strains circulating in the region and are significant, given the introduction of rota vaccination in the State. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A sensitive duplex nanoparticle-assisted PCR assay for identifying porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus from clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu; Liang, Lin; Luo, Yakun; Wang, Guihua; Wang, Chunren; Cui, Yudong; Ai, Xia; Cui, Shangjin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a novel duplex nanoparticle-assisted polymerase chain reaction (nanoPCR) assay was developed to detect porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) and porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV). Two pairs of primers were designed based on the conserved region within the N gene of PEDV and TGEV. In a screening of 114 clinical samples from four provinces in China for PEDV and TGEV, 48.2 and 3.5 % of the samples, respectively, tested positive. Under optimized conditions, the duplex nanoPCR assay had a detection limit of 7.6 × 10 1 and 8.5 × 10 1 copies μL -1 for PEDV and TGEV, respectively. The sensitivity of the duplex nanoPCR assay was ten times higher than that of a conventional PCR assay. Moreover, no fragments were amplified when the duplex nanoPCR assay was used to test samples containing other porcine viruses. Our results indicate that the duplex nanoPCR assay described here is useful for the rapid detection of PEDV and TGEV and can be applied in clinical diagnosis.

  1. Characteristics of Watermelon Mosaic Virus Transmission Occurring in Korean Ginseng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Kook Choi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Korean ginseng (Panax ginseng is the most popular herb for medical purpose in Korea. Recently, viral diseases from Korean ginseng showing various degrees of severe mottling, variegation and mosaic symptoms have caused quantity losses of Korean ginseng in a large number of farms. Watermelon mosaic virus (named WMVgin was identified as a causal agent for the disease of Korean ginseng. Interestingly, WMV-gin failed to infect both Korean ginseng plant and susceptible host species including cucurbitaceous plants by mechanical inoculation. However, WMV-gin could successfully infect Korean ginseng by transmission of two aphid species (Myzus persicae and Aphis gossypii. It is likely that transmission of WMV-gin was done by both the aphid species during feeding behavior of the two aphid species on Korean ginseng, though the aphids dislike feeding in Korea ginseng. Similarly, a strain of WMV (WMV-wm isolated from watermelon was transmitted successfully to Korean ginseng plant by the two aphid species, but not by mechanical inoculations. Transmission assays using M. persicae and A. gossypii clearly showed both WMV-gin and WMV-wm were not transmitted from infected Korean ginseng plant to cucurbit species that are good host species for WMV. These results suggest WMV disease occurring in Korean ginseng plant can be controlled by ecological approaches.

  2. Comparative genome and evolutionary analysis of naturally occurring Beilong virus in brown and black rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Wong, Annette Y P; Wong, Beatrice H L; Lam, Carol S F; Fan, Rachel Y Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-11-01

    Recently, we reported the presence of Beilong virus in spleen and kidney samples of brown rats and black rats, suggesting that these rodents could be natural reservoirs of Beilong virus. In this study, four genomes of Beilong virus from brown rats and black rats were sequenced. Similar to the Beilong virus genome sequenced from kidney mesangial cell line culture, those of J-virus from house mouse and Tailam virus from Sikkim rats, these four genomes from naturally occurring Beilong virus also contain the eight genes (3'-N-P/V/C-M-F-SH-TM-G-L-5'). In these four genomes, the attachment glycoprotein encoded by the G gene consists of 1046 amino acids; but for the original Beilong virus genome sequenced from kidney mesangial cell line, the G CDS was predicted to be prematurely terminated at position 2205 (TGG→TAG), resulting in a 734-amino-acid truncated G protein. This phenomenon of a lack of nonsense mutation in naturally occurring Beilong viruses was confirmed by sequencing this region of 15 additional rodent samples. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the cell line and naturally occurring Beilong viruses were closely clustered, without separation into subgroups. In addition, these viruses were further clustered with J-virus and Tailam virus, with high bootstrap supports of >90%, forming a distinct group in Paramyxoviridae. Brown rats and black rats are natural reservoirs of Beilong virus. Our results also supports that the recently proposed genus, Jeilongvirus, should encompass Beilong virus, J-virus and Tailam virus as members. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Noroviruses associated with acute gastroenteritis in a children's day care facility in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallimore C.I.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Noroviruses (Norwalk-like viruses are an important cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. They are the most common cause of outbreaks of gastroenteritis in the adult population and occur in nursing homes for the elderly, geriatric wards, medical wards, and in hotel and restaurant settings. Food-borne outbreaks have also occurred following consumption of contaminated oysters. This study describes the application of a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay using random primers (PdN6 and specific Ni and E3 primers, directed at a small region of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase-coding region of the norovirus genome, and DNA sequencing for the detection and preliminary characterisation of noroviruses in outbreaks of gastroenteritis in children in Brazil. The outbreak samples were collected from children <5 years of age at the Bertha Lutz children's day care facility at Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, that occurred between 1996 and 1998, where no pathogen had been identified. At the Bertha Lutz day care center facility, only Fiocruz's employee children are provided for, and they come from different social, economic and cultural backgrounds. Three distinct genogroup II strains were detected in three outbreaks in 1997/98 and were most closely related to genotypes GII-3 (Mexico virus and GII-4 (Grimsby virus, both of which have been detected in paediatric and adult outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide.

  4. Persistent Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus Infection Enhances Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 Adhesion by Promoting Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lu; Dai, Lei; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2017-11-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) is a coronavirus characterized by diarrhea and high morbidity rates, and the mortality rate is 100% in piglets less than 2 weeks old. Pigs infected with TGEV often suffer secondary infection by other pathogens, which aggravates the severity of diarrhea, but the mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we hypothesized that persistent TGEV infection stimulates the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and thus enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) can more easily adhere to generating cells. Intestinal epithelial cells are the primary targets of TGEV and ETEC infections. We found that TGEV can persistently infect porcine intestinal columnar epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and cause EMT, consistent with multiple changes in key cell characteristics. Infected cells display fibroblast-like shapes; exhibit increases in levels of mesenchymal markers with a corresponding loss of epithelial markers; have enhanced expression levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNAs; and demonstrate increases in migratory and invasive behaviors. Additional experiments showed that the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways via TGF-β is critical for the TGEV-mediated EMT process. Cellular uptake is also modified in cells that have undergone EMT. TGEV-infected cells have higher levels of integrin α5 and fibronectin and exhibit enhanced ETEC K88 adhesion. Reversal of EMT reduces ETEC K88 adhesion and inhibits the expression of integrin α5 and fibronectin. Overall, these results suggest that TGEV infection induces EMT in IPEC-J2 cells, increasing the adhesion of ETEC K88 in the intestine and facilitating dual infection. IMPORTANCE Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) causes pig diarrhea and is often followed by secondary infection by other pathogens. In this study, we showed

  5. Virus fitness differences observed between two naturally occurring isolates of Ebola virus Makona variant using a reverse genetics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albariño, César G; Guerrero, Lisa Wiggleton; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Kainulainen, Markus H; Whitmer, Shannon L M; Welch, Stephen R; Nichol, Stuart T

    2016-09-01

    During the large outbreak of Ebola virus disease that occurred in Western Africa from late 2013 to early 2016, several hundred Ebola virus (EBOV) genomes have been sequenced and the virus genetic drift analyzed. In a previous report, we described an efficient reverse genetics system designed to generate recombinant EBOV based on a Makona variant isolate obtained in 2014. Using this system, we characterized the replication and fitness of 2 isolates of the Makona variant. These virus isolates are nearly identical at the genetic level, but have single amino acid differences in the VP30 and L proteins. The potential effects of these differences were tested using minigenomes and recombinant viruses. The results obtained with this approach are consistent with the role of VP30 and L as components of the EBOV RNA replication machinery. Moreover, the 2 isolates exhibited clear fitness differences in competitive growth assays. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Acute gastroenteritis: from guidelines to real life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung M Chow

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Chung M Chow1, Alexander KC Leung2, Kam L Hon11Department of Paediatrics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, PR China; 2Department of Pediatrics, The University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Acute gastroenteritis is a very common disease. It causes significant mortality in developing countries and significant economic burden to developed countries. Viruses are ­responsible for approximately 70% of episodes of acute gastroenteritis in children and rotavirus is one of the best studied of these viruses. Oral rehydration therapy is as effective as i­ntravenous therapy in treating mild to moderate dehydration in acute gastroenteritis and is strongly r­ecommended as the first line therapy. However, the oral rehydration solution is described as an underused simple solution. Vomiting is one of the main reasons to explain the underuse of oral rehydration therapy. Antiemetics are not routinely recommended in treating acute gastroenteritis, though they are still commonly prescribed. Ondansetron is one of the best studied antiemetics and its role in enhancing the compliance of oral rehydration therapy and decreasing the rate of hospitalization has been proved recently. The guidelines regarding the recommendation on antiemetics have been changed according to the evidence of these recent studies.Keywords: gastroenteritis, vomiting, antiemetic, ondansetron, rotavirus, oral rehydration therapy, intravenous therapy, guideline

  7. Host range and symptomatology of Pepino mosaic virus strains occurring in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blystad, Dag Ragnar; Vlugt, van der René; Alfaro-Fernández, Ana; Carmen Córdoba, del María; Bese, Gábor; Hristova, Dimitrinka; Pospieszny, Henryk; Mehle, Nataša; Ravnikar, Maja; Tomassoli, Laura; Varveri, Christina; Nielsen, Steen Lykke

    2015-01-01

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) has caused great concern in the greenhouse tomato industry after it was found causing a new disease in tomato in 1999. The objective of this paper is to investigate alternative hosts and compare important biological characteristics of the three PepMV strains occurring

  8. Host range of symptomatology of Pepino mosaic virus strains occurring in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blystad, Dag-Ragnar; van der Vlugt, René; Alfaro-Fernández, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) has caused great concern in the greenhouse tomato industry after it was found causing a new disease in tomato in 1999. The objective of this paper is to investigate alternative hosts and compare important biological characteristics of the three PepMV strains occurring...

  9. Experimental evidence that RNA recombination occurs in the Japanese encephalitis virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, C.-K.; Chen, W.-J.

    2009-01-01

    Due to the lack of a proofreading function and error-repairing ability of genomic RNA, accumulated mutations are known to be a force driving viral evolution in the genus Flavivirus, including the Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus. Based on sequencing data, RNA recombination was recently postulated to be another factor associated with genomic variations in these viruses. We herein provide experimental evidence to demonstrate the occurrence of RNA recombination in the JE virus using two local pure clones (T1P1-S1 and CJN-S1) respectively derived from the local strains, T1P1 and CJN. Based on results from a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay on the C/preM junction comprising a fragment of 868 nucleotides (nt 10-877), the recombinant progeny virus was primarily formed in BHK-21 cells that had been co-infected with the two clones used in this study. Nine of 20 recombinant forms of the JE virus had a crossover in the nt 123-323 region. Sequencing data derived from these recombinants revealed that no nucleotide deletion or insertion occurred in this region favoring crossovers, indicating that precisely, not aberrantly, homologous recombination was involved. With site-directed mutagenesis, three stem-loop secondary structures were destabilized and re-stabilized in sequence, leading to changes in the frequency of recombination. This suggests that the conformation, not the free energy, of the secondary structure is important in modulating RNA recombination of the virus. It was concluded that because RNA recombination generates genetic diversity in the JE virus, this must be considered particularly in studies of viral evolution, epidemiology, and possible vaccine safety.

  10. Failure of cooking to prevent shellfish-associated viral gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, S; Kirkland, K B; Hlady, W G; Aristeguieta, C; Hopkins, R S; Monroe, S S; Glass, R I

    1997-01-13

    In January 1995, Florida experienced the largest outbreak of oyster-associated gastroenteritis ever reported. We interviewed both the cohort of persons from 38 gatherings where illness was reported and a sample of harvesters and harvest-area residents. Oysters were traced by means of tags and dealer records, and water quality measures in harvest areas were reviewed. We examined stool specimens for small round structured viruses by means of electron microscopy and amplification of RNA by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. We also tested serum specimens for antibodies to Norwalk virus. Of 223 oyster eaters, 58% (129/223) became ill, compared with 3% (2/76) of non-oyster eaters (relative risk, 22; 95% confidence interval, 5.6-87.0). Most oyster eaters (67% [149/223]) ate only cooked (grilled, stewed, or fried) oysters. Oyster eaters who reported eating only thoroughly cooked oysters were as likely to become ill as those who ate raw oysters (relative risk, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.45-1.0; P = .1). In 29 clusters, implicated oysters were from Apalachicola Bay, Florida. A community outbreak occurred in 2 bayside communities before the oyster harvest, leading to an increase in the reportedly common practice of overboard dumping of feces. Small round structured viruses were identified in the stool specimens of 2 harvest-area residents and 9 persons from 8 clusters. Results of water quality tests for fecal coliforms were within acceptable limits. This large outbreak of gastroenteritis associated with oysters may have resulted from overboard dumping of feces during a community outbreak of diarrheal illness. Our findings of acceptable water quality measures for fecal contamination and the lack of appreciable protective effect from cooking leave the consumer with no assurance of safety.

  11. Epidemiology of Classic and Novel Human Astrovirus: Gastroenteritis and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diem-Lan Vu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Since they were identified in 1975, human astroviruses have been considered one of the most important agents of viral acute gastroenteritis in children. However, highly divergent astroviruses infecting humans have been recently discovered and associated with extra-intestinal infections. The report of cases of fatal meningitis and encephalitis, especially in immunocompromised individuals, has broadened their disease spectrum. Although zoonotic transmission among animal and human astroviruses has not been clearly recognized, the genetic similarity between some human and animal viruses makes it likely to occur. This review provides an update on the epidemiology of both classic and novel human astroviruses, and a comprehensive view on confirmed or potential association between astrovirus and human disease.

  12. Antibody-mediated neutralization of Ebola virus can occur by two distinct mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shedlock, Devon J.; Bailey, Michael A.; Popernack, Paul M.; Cunningham, James M.; Burton, Dennis R.; Sullivan, Nancy J.

    2010-01-01

    Human Ebola virus causes severe hemorrhagic fever disease with high mortality and there is no vaccine or treatment. Antibodies in survivors occur early, are sustained, and can delay infection when transferred into nonhuman primates. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from survivors exhibit potent neutralizing activity in vitro and are protective in rodents. To better understand targets and mechanisms of neutralization, we investigated a panel of mAbs shown previously to react with the envelope glycoprotein (GP). While one non-neutralizing mAb recognized a GP epitope in the nonessential mucin-like domain, the rest were specific for GP1, were neutralizing, and could be further distinguished by reactivity with secreted GP. We show that survivor antibodies, human KZ52 and monkey JP3K11, were specific for conformation-dependent epitopes comprising residues in GP1 and GP2 and that neutralization occurred by two distinct mechanisms; KZ52 inhibited cathepsin cleavage of GP whereas JP3K11 recognized the cleaved, fusion-active form of GP.

  13. Acute bee paralysis virus occurs in the Asian honey bee Apis cerana and parasitic mite Tropilaelaps mercedesae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanpanitkitchote, Pichaya; Chen, Yanping; Evans, Jay D; Li, Wenfeng; Li, Jianghong; Hamilton, Michele; Chantawannakul, Panuwan

    2018-01-01

    Viruses, and especially RNA viruses, constantly change and adapt to new host species and vectors, posing a potential threat of new and reemerging infectious diseases. Honey bee Acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV) and Deformed wing virus (DWV) are two of the most common honey bee viruses found in European honey bees Apis mellifera and have been implicated in worldwide Varroa-associated bee colony losses. Previous studies have shown that DWV has jumped hosts several times in history causing infection in multiple host species. In the present study, we show that DWV infection could be detected in the Asian honey bee, A. cerana, and the parasitic mite Tropilaelaps mercedesae, confirming previous findings that DWV is a multi-host pathogen and supporting the notion that the high prevalence of DWV in honey bee host populations could be attributed to the high adaptability of this virus. Furthermore, our study provides the first evidence that ABPV occurs in both A. cerana and T. mercedesae in northern Thailand. The geographical proximity of host species likely played an important role in the initial exposure and the subsequent cross-species transmission of these viruses. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that ABPV might have moved from T. mercedesae to A. mellifera and to A. cerana while DWV might have moved in the opposite direction from A. cerana to A. mellifera and T. mercedesae. This result may reflect the differences in virus life history and virus-host interactions, warranting further investigation of virus transmission, epidemiology, and impacts of virus infections in the new hosts. The results from this study indicate that viral populations will continue to evolve and likely continue to expand host range, increasing the need for effective surveillance and control of virus infections in honey bee populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Naturally Occurring Domestic Cat APOBEC3 Variant Confers Resistance to Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Izumi, Taisuke; Yamada, Eri; Nakano, Yusuke; Misawa, Naoko; Ren, Fengrong; Carpenter, Michael A; Ikeda, Terumasa; Münk, Carsten; Harris, Reuben S; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Sato, Kei

    2016-01-01

    immunodeficiency virus [SIV]) if its activity is not counteracted by the viral Vif protein. Here we investigate the ability of 7 naturally occurring variants of feline APOBEC3, APOBEC3Z3 (A3Z3), to inhibit FIV replication. Interestingly, one feline A3Z3 variant is dominant, restrictive, and naturally resistant to FIV Vif-mediated degradation. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the ancestral change that generated this variant could have been caused by positive Darwinian selection, presumably due to an ancestral FIV infection. The experimental-phylogenetic investigation sheds light on the evolutionary history of the domestic cat, which was likely influenced by lentiviral infection. Copyright © 2015 Yoshikawa et al.

  15. Characteristics associated with clinical severity and inflammatory phenotype of naturally occurring virus-induced exacerbations of asthma in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Asger; Laing, Ingrid A; Poulsen, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In experimental studies viral infections have been shown to induce type 2 inflammation in asthmatics, but whether this is a feature of naturally occurring virus-induced asthma exacerbations is unknown. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) released from the airway epithelium in response...... occurring virus-induced exacerbations of asthma and whether TSLP is associated with this type 2 inflammation. METHODS: Patients presenting to hospital with acute asthma were examined during the exacerbation, and after 4 weeks recovery. The assessments included spirometry, FeNO and induced sputum...... in patients during virus-induced asthma exacerbations, to the same degree as non-viral exacerbations, and correlate negatively with FEV1. However, in virus-positive patients, high TSLP expression during exacerbation was associated with low sputum eosinophils, suggesting that the effect of TSLP in vivo...

  16. Viruses Occur Incorporated in Biogenic High-Mg Calcite from Hypersaline Microbial Mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wit, Rutger; Gautret, Pascale; Bettarel, Yvan; Roques, Cécile; Marlière, Christian; Ramonda, Michel; Nguyen Thanh, Thuy; Tran Quang, Huy; Bouvier, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Using three different microscopy techniques (epifluorescence, electronic and atomic force microscopy), we showed that high-Mg calcite grains in calcifying microbial mats from the hypersaline lake “La Salada de Chiprana”, Spain, contain viruses with a diameter of 50–80 nm. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer analysis revealed that they contain nitrogen and phosphorus in a molar ratio of ~9, which is typical for viruses. Nucleic acid staining revealed that they contain DNA or RNA. As characteristic for hypersaline environments, the concentrations of free and attached viruses were high (>1010 viruses per g of mat). In addition, we showed that acid treatment (dissolution of calcite) resulted in release of viruses into suspension and estimated that there were ~15 × 109 viruses per g of calcite. We suggest that virus-mineral interactions are one of the possible ways for the formation of nano-sized structures often described as “nanobacteria” and that viruses may play a role in initiating calcification. PMID:26115121

  17. Esophageal involvement in eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzinger, M A; Daneman, A

    1983-02-01

    The radiologic appearance of esophageal involvement due to eosinophilic gastroenteritis in a 15-year-old boy is presented. The lower two thirds of the esophagus was narrowed and the peristalsis diminished. The mucosa appeared smooth. This is the fourth reported case of esophageal involvement in eosinophilic gastroenteritis.

  18. Impact of a Hurricane Shelter Viral Gastroenteritis Outbreak on a Responding Medical Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaither, Joshua B; Page, Rianne; Prather, Caren; Paavola, Fred; Garrett, Andrew L

    2015-08-01

    Introduction In late October of 2012, Hurricane Sandy struck the northeast United States and shelters were established throughout the impacted region. Numerous cases of infectious viral gastroenteritis occurred in several of these shelters. Such outbreaks are common and have been well described in the past. Early monitoring for, and recognition of, the outbreak allowed for implementation of aggressive infection control measures. However, these measures required intensive medical response team involvement. Little is known about how such outbreaks affect the medical teams responding to the incident. Hypothesis/Problem Describe the impact of an infectious viral gastroenteritis outbreak within a single shelter on a responding medical team. The number of individuals staying in the single shelter each night (as determined by shelter staff) and the number of patients treated for symptoms of viral gastroenteritis were recorded each day. On return from deployment, members of a single responding medical team were surveyed to determine how many team members became ill during, or immediately following, their deployment. The shelter population peaked on November 5, 2012 with 811 individuals sleeping in the shelter. The first patients presented to the shelter clinic with symptoms of viral gastroenteritis on November 4, 2012, and the last case was seen on November 21, 2012. A total of 64 patients were treated for nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea over the 17-day period. A post-deployment survey was sent to 66 deployed medical team members and 45 completed the survey. Twelve (26.7%) of the team members who responded to the survey experienced symptoms of probable viral gastroenteritis. Team members reported onset of symptoms during deployment as well as after returning home. Symptoms started on days 4-8, 8-14, on the trip home, and after returning home in four, four, two, and two team members, respectively. Medical teams providing shelter care during viral gastroenteritis outbreaks are

  19. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Dephosphorylation Occurs during Pregenomic RNA Encapsidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiong; Hu, Zhanying; Cheng, Junjun; Wu, Shuo; Luo, Yue; Chang, Jinhong; Hu, Jianming; Guo, Ju-Tao

    2018-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein consists of an N-terminal assembly domain and a C-terminal domain (CTD) with seven conserved serines or threonines that are dynamically phosphorylated/dephosphorylated during the viral replication cycle. Sulfamoylbenzamide derivatives are small molecular core protein allosteric modulators (CpAMs) that bind to the heteroaryldihydropyrimidine (HAP) pocket between the core protein dimer-dimer interfaces. CpAM binding alters the kinetics and pathway of capsid assembly and can result in the formation of morphologically "normal" capsids devoid of viral pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) and DNA polymerase. In order to investigate the mechanism underlying CpAM inhibition of pgRNA encapsidation, we developed an immunoblotting assay that can resolve core protein based on its phosphorylation status and demonstrated, for the first time, that core protein is hyperphosphorylated in free dimers and empty capsids from both mock-treated and CpAM-treated cells but is hypophosphorylated in pgRNA- and DNA-containing nucleocapsids. Interestingly, inhibition of pgRNA encapsidation by a heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitor prevented core protein dephosphorylation. Moreover, core proteins with point mutations at the wall of the HAP pocket, V124A and V124W, assembled empty capsids and nucleocapsids with altered phosphorylation status. The results thus suggest that core protein dephosphorylation occurs in the assembly of pgRNA and that interference with the interaction between core protein subunits at dimer-dimer interfaces during nucleocapsid assembly alters not only capsid structure, but also core protein dephosphorylation. Hence, inhibition of pgRNA encapsidation by CpAMs might be due to disruption of core protein dephosphorylation during nucleocapsid assembly. IMPORTANCE Dynamic phosphorylation of HBV core protein regulates multiple steps of viral replication. However, the regulatory function was mainly investigated by phosphomimetic mutagenesis, which

  20. Identification and molecular characterization of a naturally occurring RNA virus mutant defective in the initiation of host recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xin Hongwu; Ding Shouwei

    2003-01-01

    The host recovery response is characterized by the disappearance of disease symptoms and activation of the RNA silencing virus resistance in the new growth following an initial symptomatic infection. However, it is not clear what triggers the initiation of recovery, which occurs naturally only in some virus-host interactions. Here we report the identification and characterization of a spontaneous mutant of Tobacco streak virus (TSV) that became defective in triggering recovery in tobacco plants. Infectious full-length cDNA clones corresponding to the tripartite RNA genome were constructed from both the wild-type and the nonrecovery mutant of TSV (TSVnr), the first sets of infectious cDNA clones from an Ilarvirus. Genetic and molecular analyses identified an A → G mutation in the TSVnr genome that was sufficient to confer nonrecovery when introduced into TSV. The mutation was located in the intergenic region of RNA 3 upstream of the mapped transcriptional start site of the coat protein mRNA. Intriguingly, induction of recovery by TSV was not accompanied by virus clearance and TSV consistently accumulated to significantly higher levels than TSVnr did even though TSVnr-infected plants displayed severe symptoms throughout the course of infection. Thus, our findings indicate that recovery of host can be initiated by minimal genetic changes in a viral genome and may occur in the absence of virus clearance. Mechanisms possibly involved in the initiation of host recovery are discussed

  1. Epstein-Barr virus associated central nervous system leiomyosarcoma occurring after renal transplantation: case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahri, A.; Noel, G.; Feuvret, L.; Jauffret, E.; Brun, B.; Mazeron, J.J.; Baillet, F.; Noel, G.; Mazeron, J.J.; Feuvret, L.; Figuerella-Branger, D.; Goncalves, A.

    2003-01-01

    Central nervous system leiomyosarcomas are extremely rare, however, they became more frequent among immuno-deficient patients, either in a patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), or after organ transplantation. The data of the literature indicate that the infection by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays a causal role in the development of these tumours but its precise role in the onco-genesis remains unresolved. We report a new case of EBV associated leiomyosarcoma of the left cavernous sinus occurring after renal transplantation. The epidemiological, clinical, pathological and therapeutic characteristics of these tumours are discussed. (authors)

  2. Lung Irradiation Increases Mortality After Influenza A Virus Challenge Occurring Late After Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, Casey M. [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Johnston, Carl J. [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Reed, Christina K. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Lawrence, B. Paige [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Williams, Jacqueline P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Finkelstein, Jacob N., E-mail: Jacob_Finkelstein@urmc.rochester.edu [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To address whether irradiation-induced changes in the lung environment alter responses to a viral challenge delivered late after exposure but before the appearance of late lung radiation injury. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6J mice received either lung alone or combined lung and whole-body irradiation (0-15 Gy). At 10 weeks after irradiation, animals were infected with 120 HAU influenza virus strain A/HKx31. Innate and adaptive immune cell recruitment was determined using flow cytometry. Cytokine and chemokine production and protein leakage into the lung after infection were assessed. Results: Prior irradiation led to a dose-dependent failure to regain body weight after infection and exacerbated mortality, but it did not affect virus-specific immune responses or virus clearance. Surviving irradiated animals displayed a persistent increase in total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and edema. Conclusions: Lung irradiation increased susceptibility to death after infection with influenza virus and impaired the ability to complete recovery. This altered response does not seem to be due to a radiation effect on the immune response, but it may possibly be an effect on epithelial repair.

  3. Characterization of Melon necrotic spot virus Occurring on Watermelon in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Ryun Kwak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV was recently identified on watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris in Korea, displaying as large necrotic spots and vein necrosis on the leaves and stems. The average occurrence of MNSV on watermelon was found to be 30–65% in Hapcheon and Andong City, respectively. Four isolates of the virus (MNSV-HW, MNSV-AW, MNSV-YW, and MNSV-SW obtained from watermelon plants in different areas were non-pathogenic on ten general indicator plants, including Chenopodium quinoa, while they infected systemically six varieties of Cucurbitaceae. The virus particles purified by 10–40% sucrose density gradient centrifugation had a typical ultraviolet spectrum, with a minimum at 245 nm and a maximum at 260 nm. The morphology of the virus was spherical with a diameter of 28–30 nm. Virus particles were observed scattered throughout the cytoplasm of watermelon cells, but no crystals were detected. An ELISA was conducted using antiserum against MNSV-HW; the optimum concentrations of IgG and conjugated IgG for the assay were 1 μl/ml and a 1:8,000–1:10,000 dilutions, respectively. Antiserum against MNSV-HW could capture specifically both MNSV-MN from melon and MNSV-HW from watermelon by IC/RT-PCR, and they were effectively detected with the same specific primer to produce product of 1,172 bp. The dsRNA of MNSV-HW had the same profile (4.5, 1.8, and 1.6 kb as that of MNSV-MN from melon. The nucleotide sequence of the coat protein of MNSV-HW gave a different phylogenetic tree, having 17.2% difference in nucleotide sequence compared with MNSV isolates from melon.

  4. Guillain–Barré Syndrome (42 Cases) Occurring During a Zika Virus Outbreak in French Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watrin, Louise; Ghawché, Frédéric; Larre, Philippe; Neau, Jean-Philippe; Mathis, Stéphane; Fournier, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Zika virus (transmitted by mosquitoes) reached French Polynesia for the first time in 2013, leading to an epidemic affecting 10% of the total population. So far, it has not been known to induce any neurological complications, but, a few weeks after the outbreak, an unexpectedly high number of 42 patients presented with Guillain–Barré syndrome. We report the clinical and electrophysiological characteristics of this series. Males predominated with a sex ratio of 2.82 (mean age: 46). All patients (except 2) were native Polynesian. At admission, 55% were able to walk unaided against 38% at nadir, 24% had swallowing troubles (nadir: 45%), 74% had motor weakness of the limbs (nadir: 86%) and deep tendon reflexes were diminished or not found in the vast majority of patients. Mean duration of the progressive phase and of the plateau phase was respectively 7 and 9 days. Thirty-eight percent of the patients were admitted in intensive care unit and 10 patients underwent tracheotomy. Nerve electrophysiological studies at admission showed marked distal motor conduction alterations, which had almost completely disappeared at the 4th month; this pattern was more suggestive of acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN) than of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP). Lumbar puncture showed elevated proteins in 90% of the cases, with cell count always inferior to 50/μL. This epidemic raises several questions, such as the potential existence of interactions between Zika virus and Polynesian HLA system and/or the consequences of several recombination events of this virus. This situation should call for increased vigilance, especially in countries where Aedes mosquitoes are present. PMID:27057874

  5. Guillain-Barré Syndrome (42 Cases) Occurring During a Zika Virus Outbreak in French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watrin, Louise; Ghawché, Frédéric; Larre, Philippe; Neau, Jean-Philippe; Mathis, Stéphane; Fournier, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    Zika virus (transmitted by mosquitoes) reached French Polynesia for the first time in 2013, leading to an epidemic affecting 10% of the total population. So far, it has not been known to induce any neurological complications, but, a few weeks after the outbreak, an unexpectedly high number of 42 patients presented with Guillain-Barré syndrome.We report the clinical and electrophysiological characteristics of this series. Males predominated with a sex ratio of 2.82 (mean age: 46). All patients (except 2) were native Polynesian. At admission, 55% were able to walk unaided against 38% at nadir, 24% had swallowing troubles (nadir: 45%), 74% had motor weakness of the limbs (nadir: 86%) and deep tendon reflexes were diminished or not found in the vast majority of patients. Mean duration of the progressive phase and of the plateau phase was respectively 7 and 9 days. Thirty-eight percent of the patients were admitted in intensive care unit and 10 patients underwent tracheotomy. Nerve electrophysiological studies at admission showed marked distal motor conduction alterations, which had almost completely disappeared at the 4th month; this pattern was more suggestive of acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN) than of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP). Lumbar puncture showed elevated proteins in 90% of the cases, with cell count always inferior to 50/μL.This epidemic raises several questions, such as the potential existence of interactions between Zika virus and Polynesian HLA system and/or the consequences of several recombination events of this virus. This situation should call for increased vigilance, especially in countries where Aedes mosquitoes are present.

  6. CMV - gastroenteritis/colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may include: Drugs to prevent or reduce diarrhea Painkillers (analgesics) Nutritional supplements or nutrition given through a ... used to fight the virus may cause side effects. The type of side effect depends on the ...

  7. Viral etiology and incidence of acute gastroenteritis in young children attending day-care centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfeldt, Vibeke; Vesikari, Timo; Pang, Xiao-Li

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to investigate the frequency, morbidity and cause of acute gastroenteritis in children attending day-care centers in Denmark. METHODS: Children with acute diarrhea (> or =2 consecutive loose stools in 24 hours, with duration of ... 19 day-care centers, were included. Gastroenteritis viruses, group A rotavirus, sapoviruses, noroviruses and astroviruses were detected with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays. In addition, stool specimens were cultured for bacterial pathogens. Children who were brought...

  8. Phylogenetic characterisation of naturally occurring feline immunodeficiency virus in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samman, A; McMonagle, E L; Logan, N; Willett, B J; Biek, R; Hosie, M J

    2011-06-02

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a significant pathogen of domestic and non-domestic felids worldwide. In domestic cats, FIV is classified into five distinct subtypes (A-E) with subtypes A and B distributed most widely. However, little is known about the degree of intrasubtype viral diversity and this may prove critical in determining whether monovalent vaccines are likely to protect against FIV strains within a single subtype. Here, we characterise novel env sequences from 47 FIV strains recovered from infected cats in the United Kingdom and its environs. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that all bar one sequence belonged to subtype A, the predominant subtype in Western Europe. A single sequence was identified as a likely subtype A/C recombinant, intriguing given that subtype C does not appear to exist in either the UK or North Western Europe and suggestive of a recombination event predating its introduction into the UK. Subtype A strains from the UK were not significantly differentiated from representative subtype A isolates found elsewhere suggesting multiple introductions of FIV into the country. Divergence among isolates was comparable to that observed for subtype A isolates worldwide, indicating that FIV in the UK covers the full spectrum of subtype A diversity seen globally. This study demonstrates that while subtype A is predominant in the UK, novel introductions may result in the emergence of novel subtypes or intersubtype recombinants, potentially circumventing vaccine strategies. However, the dominance of subtype A suggests that the development of a regional or subtype-specific protective vaccine for the UK could be achievable. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Outbreaks of gastroenteritis linked to lettuce, Denmark, January 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ethelberg, S.; Lisby, M.; Bottiger, B.

    2010-01-01

    At least 11 linked outbreaks of gastroenteritis with a total of 260 cases have occurred in Denmark in mid January 2010. Investigations showed that the outbreaks were caused by norovirus of several genotypes and by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. Lettuce of the lollo bionda type grown in France...

  10. Naturally occurring Influenza A virus subtype H1N2 infection in a Midwest United States mink (Mustela vison) ranch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Schwartz, Kent; Sun, Dong; Zhang, Jianqiang; Hildebrandt, Hugh

    2012-03-01

    Influenza A virus (FLUAV) causes acute respiratory disease in humans and a variety of animal species. The virus tends to remain within the species of origin; nonetheless, naturally occurring cross-species transmission of FLUAV has been periodically documented. Multiple cross-species transmissions of FLUAV have been reported from companion animals and captive wild animals, neither of which is historically considered as natural hosts of FLUAV. In the fall of 2010, mink (Mustela vison) inhabiting a 15,000-head mink farm in the Midwest United States experienced persistent severe respiratory distress and nose and/or mouth bleeding. Mink losses averaged approximately 10 animals per day. Six dead mink at 6 months of age were submitted to the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for diagnostic investigation. Gross and microscopic examinations revealed that all 6 mink had hemorrhagic bronchointerstitial pneumonia. Hemolytic Escherichia coli was isolated from lungs, probably accounting for hemorrhagic pneumonia. All animals tested negative for Canine distemper virus and Aleutian mink disease virus. Interestingly, FLUAV of H1N2 subtype, which contained the matrix gene of swine lineage, was detected in the lungs. Serological follow-up on mink that remained in the ranch until pelting also confirmed that the ranch had been exposed to FLUAV of H1 subtype (δ clade). The case study suggests that FLUAV should be included in the differential diagnosis when mink experience epidemics of respiratory disease. Since the source of FLUAV appeared to be uncooked turkey meat, feeding animals fully cooked ration should be considered as a preventive measure.

  11. Human Noroviruses and Sporadic Gastroenteritis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, Dan Rutz speaks with Dr. Manish Patel, a medical officer with the Division of Viral Diseases at CDC, about an article in August 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases reporting on nororviruses. Dr. Patel reviewed 235 studies and identified 31 original studies about noroviruses. Norovirus is the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis.

  12. Gastroenteritis outbreaks on cruise ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouchtouri, Varvara A; Verykouki, Eleni; Zamfir, Dumitru

    2017-01-01

    When an increased number of acute gastroenteritis (AG) cases is detected among tourists staying at the same accommodation, outbreak management plans must be activated in a timely manner to prevent large outbreaks. Syndromic surveillance data collected between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2013...

  13. Proton pump inhibitors and gastroenteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassing, Robert-Jan; Verbon, Annelies; Visser, Herman de; Hofman, Albert; Stricker, Bruno H.

    2016-01-01

    An association between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and bacterial gastroenteritis has been suggested as well as contradicted. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the use of PPIs and occurrence of bacterial gastroenteritis in the prospective Rotterdam Study. The Rotterdam Study is a population-based cohort study among 14,926 subjects aged 45 years and older with up to 24 years of follow-up. Analyses were performed with a generalized estimating equations method in participants who handed-in a diagnostic stool sample. Furthermore, a nested case–control analysis was performed using the total cohort as a reference group. A bacterial microorganism was isolated in 125 samples, whereas 1174 samples were culture negative. In the generalized estimating equations analysis, we found that participants with a bacterial gastroenteritis were more likely than controls to be current users of PPIs (adjusted OR 1.94; 95 % CI 1.15–3.25). Different sensitivity analyses did not change this result. A considerably higher effect was observed (adjusted OR 6.14; 95 % CI 3.81–9.91), using the total cohort as a reference in a nested case–control analysis. Current PPI therapy is associated with an increased risk of bacterial gastroenteritis. However, by reducing the risk of selection and information bias in our study design, we demonstrated that the effect is lower than previously assumed.

  14. Plasma Epstein-Barr virus and Hepatitis B virus in non-Hodgkin lymphomas: Two lymphotropic, potentially oncogenic, latently occurring DNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mahua; Rao, Clementina Rama; Premalata, C S; Shafiulla, Mohammed; Lakshmaiah, K C; Jacob, Linu Abraham; Babu, Govind K; Viveka, B K; Appaji, L; Subramanyam, Jayshree R

    2016-01-01

    There is a need to study potential infective etiologies in lymphomas. Lymphocyte-transforming viruses can directly infect lymphocytes, disrupt normal cell functions, and promote cell division. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is known to be associated with several lymphomas, especially Hodgkin lymphomas (HLs). And recently, the lymphocyte-transforming role of hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been emphasized. The aim of this study was to elucidate the association of two potentially oncogenic, widely prevalent latent DNA viruses, EBV and HBV, in non-HL (NHL). In this prospective study, we estimated plasma EBV and HBV DNA in NHL patients. Peripheral blood was obtained from newly diagnosed, treatment na ïve, histologically confirmed NHL patients. Plasma EBV DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting Epstein-Barr Nucleic acid 1 while the plasma HBV DNA was detected using nested PCR targeting HBX gene. In a small subset of patients, follow-up plasma samples post-anticancer chemotherapy were available and retested for viral DNA. Of the 110 NHL patients, ~79% were B-cell NHL and ~21% were T-cell NHL. Plasma EBV-DNA was detected in 10% NHLs with a higher EBV association in Burkitt lymphoma (33.3%) than other subtypes. Pretherapy HBV DNA was detected in 21% NHLs; most of them being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Moreover, 42% of DLBCL patients had HBV DNA in plasma. Since all patients were HBV surface antigen seronegative at diagnosis, baseline plasma HBV-DNAemia before chemotherapy was indicative of occult hepatitis B infection. Our findings indicate a significant association of HBV with newly diagnosed DLBCL.

  15. Naturally occurring NS3 resistance-associated variants in hepatitis C virus genotype 1: Their relevance for developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverría, Natalia; Betancour, Gabriela; Gámbaro, Fabiana; Hernández, Nelia; López, Pablo; Chiodi, Daniela; Sánchez, Adriana; Boschi, Susana; Fajardo, Alvaro; Sóñora, Martín; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Cristina, Juan; Moreno, Pilar

    2016-09-02

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of global morbidity and mortality, with an estimated 130-150 million infected individuals worldwide. HCV is a leading cause of chronic liver diseases including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Current treatment options in developing countries involve pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin as dual therapy or in combination with one or more direct-acting antiviral agents (DAA). The emergence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs) after treatment reveals the great variability of this virus leading to a great difficulty in developing effective antiviral strategies. Baseline RAVs detected in DAA treatment-naïve HCV-infected patients could be of great importance for clinical management and outcome prediction. Although the frequency of naturally occurring HCV NS3 protease inhibitor mutations has been addressed in many countries, there are only a few reports on their prevalence in South America. In this study, we investigated the presence of RAVs in the HCV NS3 serine protease region by analysing a cohort of Uruguayan patients with chronic hepatitis C who had not been treated with any DAAs and compare them with the results found for other South American countries. The results of these studies revealed that naturally occurring mutations conferring resistance to NS3 inhibitors exist in a substantial proportion of Uruguayan treatment-naïve patients infected with HCV genotype 1 enrolled in these studies. The identification of these baseline RAVs could be of great importance for patients' management and outcome prediction in developing countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hepatitis B virus DNA integration occurs early in the viral life cycle in an in vitro infection model via NTCP-dependent uptake of enveloped virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Thomas; Budzinska, Magdalena A; Vondran, Florian W R; Shackel, Nicholas A; Urban, Stephan

    2018-02-07

    Chronic infection by the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is the major contributor to liver disease worldwide. Though HBV replicates via a nuclear episomal DNA (cccDNA), integration of HBV DNA into the host cell genome is regularly observed in the liver of infected patients. While reported as a pro-oncogenic alteration, the mechanism(s) and timing of HBV DNA integration are not well-understood, chiefly due to the lack of in vitro infection models that have detectable integration events. Here, we have established an in vitro system in which integration can be reliably detected following HBV infection. We measured HBV DNA integration using inverse nested PCR in primary human hepatocytes, HepaRG-NTCP, HepG2-NTCP, and Huh7-NTCP cells after HBV infection. Integration was detected in all cell types at a rate of >1 per 10000 cells, with the most consistent detection in Huh7-NTCP cells. Integration rate remained stable between 3 and 9 days post-infection. HBV DNA integration was efficiently blocked by treatment with 200nM of the HBV entry inhibitor Myrcludex B, but not with 10μM Tenofovir, 100U Interferon alpha, or 1μM of the capsid assembly inhibitor GLS4. This suggests integration of HBV DNA occurs immediately after infection of hepatocytes and is likely independent of de novo HBV replication in this model. Site analysis revealed that HBV DNA integrations were distributed over the entire human genome. Further, integrated HBV DNA sequences were consistent with double-stranded linear HBV DNA being the major precursor. Thus, we have established an in vitro system to interrogate the mechanisms of HBV DNA integration. Importance Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is a common blood-borne pathogen and, following a chronic infection, can cause liver cancer and liver cirrhosis. Integration of HBV DNA into the host genome occurs in all known members of the hepadnaviridae family, despite this form not being necessary for viral replication. HBV DNA integration has been reported to drive liver cancer

  17. Development of rhabdomyolysis in a child after norovirus gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Tomohiro; Yonetani, Ryoko; Ito, Eisuke; Yoneta, Makiko; Maruo, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Tokiko; Sugimoto, Tohru

    2016-11-04

    In children, the most significant cause of rhabdomyolysis or muscle breakdown is viral infection. However, there are no reports that norovirus, a gastroenteric virus that commonly infects children, specifically causes rhabdomyolysis. Here, we report the first pediatric case of norovirus-associated rhabdomyolysis. The patient, a 2-year-old boy with fever, diarrhea, and vomiting, was referred to our hospital with dysstasia and transaminitis. He was diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis. Additionally, norovirus genogroup GII was detected from stool samples by real-time quantitative reverse transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction, and thereafter, the norovirus GII.4 variant was identified. However, the association between rhabdomyolysis and the isolated norovirus variant was not clarified. After treatment the patient recovered without renal failure or disseminated intravascular coagulation. Rhabdomyolysis is a disease for which there is a need for early detection and treatment. If abnormal posture or muscle weakness is observed during the course of gastroenteritis, blood and urinary tests should be performed to rule out rhabdomyolysis.

  18. [Noroviruses: leading cause of gastroenteritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacour, H; Dubrous, P; Koeck, J L

    2010-04-01

    Although noroviruses were the first viral agents to be linked to gastrointestinal disease, they were long considered a secondary cause far behind rotaviruses. Development of molecular-based diagnostic techniques has provided clearer insight into the epidemiological impact of noroviruses that are now recognized not only as the leading cause of non-bacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks but also as an important cause of sporadic gastroenteritis in both children and adults. Norovirus infection is generally characterized by mild acute vomiting and diarrhea usually lasting for only a few days, but it can lead to more severe and potentially life-threatening symptoms in high-risk groups such as young children, elderly, and immunodeficient persons. It has been demonstrated that they are present in tropical countries. Molecular epidemiological studies have documented the great genetic diversity of noroviruses with regular emergence of variants. Since no vaccine is available, prevention on norovirus infection depends mainly on strict personal and community hygiene measures.

  19. Human Noroviruses and Sporadic Gastroenteritis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-08-05

    In this podcast, Dan Rutz speaks with Dr. Manish Patel, a medical officer with the Division of Viral Diseases at CDC, about an article in August 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases reporting on nororviruses. Dr. Patel reviewed 235 studies and identified 31 original studies about noroviruses. Norovirus is the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis.  Created: 8/5/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 7/30/2008.

  20. Enhanced mutagenesis of UV-irradiated simian virus 40 occurs in mitomycin C-treated host cells only at a low multiplicity of infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarasin, A.; Benoit, A.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of monkey kidney cells with mitomycin C (MMC) 24 h prior to infection with UV-irradiated simian virus 40 (SV40) enhanced both virus survival and virus mutagenesis. The use of SV40 as a biological probe has been taken as an easy method to analyse SOS response of mammalian cells to the stress caused by DNA damage or inhibition of DNA replication. The mutation assay we used was based on the reversion from a temperature-sensitive phenotype (tsA58 mutant) to a wild-type phenotype. The optimal conditions for producing enhanced survival and mutagenesis in the virus progeny were determined with regard to the multiplicity of infection (MOI). Results showed that the level of enhanced mutagenesis observed for UV-irradiated virus grown in MMC-treated cells was an inverse function of the MOI, while enhanced survival was observed at nearly the same level regardless of the MOI. For the unirradiated virus, almost no increase in the mutation of virus progeny issued from MMC-treated cells was observed, while a small amount of enhanced virus survival was obtained. These results show that enhanced virus mutagenesis and enhanced virus survival can be dissociated under some experimental conditions. Enhanced virus mutagenesis, analogous to the error-prone replication of phages in SOS-induced bacteria, was observed, at least for SV40, only when DNA of both virus and host cells was damaged and when infection occurred with a small number of viral particles. We therefore hypothesize that an error-prone replication mode of UV-damaged templates is observed in induced monkey kidney cells

  1. A Gastroenteritis Outbreak Caused by Noroviruses in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiannis Alamanos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In June 2006, an outbreak alert regarding cases of acute gastroenteritis in a region in North Eastern Greece (population 100,882 inhabitants, triggered investigations to guide control measures. The outbreak started the first days of June, and peaked in July. A descriptive epidemiological study, a virological characterization of the viral agent identified from cases as well as a phylogenetic analysis was performed. From June 5 to September 3, 2006 (weeks 23–44, 1,640 cases of gastroenteritis (45.2% male and 54.8% female, aged 3 months to 89 years were reported. The overall attack rate for the period was 16.3 cases/1,000 inhabitants. About 57% of cases observed were under the age of 15 years. Αnalysis of faecal samples identified Norovirus GII strains. Fifteen different Norovirus GII strains were recorded, presenting a homology of 94.8% (86–97% to GII strains obtained from GenBank. The long duration of the outbreak suggests an important role of person-to-person transmission, while the emergence of the outbreak was possibly due to contaminated potable water, although no viruses were detected in any tested water samples. This outbreak underscores the need for a national surveillance system for acute non-bacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks.

  2. Shewanella algae in acute gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Dey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella algae is an emerging bacteria rarely implicated as a human pathogen. Previously reported cases of S. algae have mainly been associated with direct contact with seawater. Here we report the isolation of S. algae as the sole etiological agent from a patient suffering from acute gastroenteritis with bloody diarrhoea. The bacterium was identified by automated identification system and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Our report highlights the importance of looking for the relatively rare aetiological agents in clinical samples that does not yield common pathogens. It also underscores the usefulness of automated systems in identification of rare pathogens.

  3. Prevalence of group a rotavirus, enteric adenovirus, norovirus and astrovirus infections among children with acute gastroenteritis in al-qassim, saudi arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meqdam, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of Rotavirus, Adenovirus, Norovirus, and Astrovirus among Saudi children with gastroenteritis. This study was conducted at the Department of Medical Laboratories, Qassim University during the winter seasons of the years 2004 and 2005. A total of 284 diarrhoeal fecal specimens collected from children were tested for the gastroenteritis causing viruses using enzyme immunoassay. Of the 284 specimens, 142 (50%) were found to be positive for viruses causing gastroenteritis. Rotavirus (66.2%) was the most frequently detected, followed by adenovirus (15.5%), norovirus and astrovirus each with 9.2%. All of rotavirus detected belonged to group A. Eight specimens were found positive by two viruses. The introduction of simple and rapid tests for diagnosis of viruses causing gastroenteritis in our pediatric hospitals will improve patient care by reducing unnecessary treatments and hospital stay for patients. (author)

  4. Brachyspira Species and Gastroenteritis in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerman, L.J.; Boer, de R.F.; Roelfsema, J.H.; Friesema, I.H.M.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Bonten, M.J.M.; Kusters, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Brachyspira species have been implicated as a potential cause of gastroenteritis in humans; this is, however, controversial. In 733 gastroenteritis cases and 464 controls, we found 29 samples positive for Brachyspira species (2.3% of cases and 2.6% of controls; P = 0.77). Brachyspira species were

  5. Gastroenteritis in sentinel general practices, the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, M.A.S. de; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Leeuwen, N.J. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Duynhoven, Y.T.H.P. van

    2001-01-01

    From 1996 to 1999, the incidence of gastroenteritis in general practices and the role of a broad range of pathogens in the Netherlands were studied. All patients with gastroenteritis who had visited a general practitioner were reported. All patients who had visited a general practitioner for

  6. Brachyspira Species and Gastroenteritis in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerman, L J; de Boer, R F; Roelfsema, J H; Friesema, I H M; Kortbeek, L M; Wagenaar, J A; Bonten, M J M; Kusters, J G

    Brachyspira species have been implicated as a potential cause of gastroenteritis in humans; this is, however, controversial. In 733 gastroenteritis cases and 464 controls, we found 29 samples positive for Brachyspira species (2.3% of cases and 2.6% of controls; P = 0.77). Brachyspira species were

  7. Unexpectedly high burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in very young infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reilly Megan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highest incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis has generally been reported in children 6-24 months of age. Young infants are thought to be partially protected by maternal antibodies acquired transplacentally or via breast milk. The purpose of our study was to assess the age distribution of children with confirmed community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis presenting to an urban referral hospital. Methods Children presenting to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia with acute gastroenteritis have been monitored for the presence of rotavirus antigen in the stool by ELISA (followed by genotyping if ELISA-positive since the 1994-95 epidemic season. Results Over the last 12 rotavirus seasons prior to the introduction of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in 2006, stool specimens from 1646 patients tested positive for community-acquired rotavirus infection. Gender or age was not recorded in 6 and 5 cases, respectively. Overall, 58% of the cases occurred in boys. G1 was the predominant VP7 serotype, accounting for 72% of cases. The median (IQR age was 11 (5-21 months. A total of 790 (48% cases occurred in children outside the commonly quoted peak age range, with 27% in infants 24 months of age. A total of 220 (13% cases occurred during the first 3 months of life, and the highest number of episodes per month of age [97 (6%] was observed during the second month of life. Conclusions The incidence of community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis monitored over 12 seasons in the prevaccine era at a major university hospital was nearly constant for each month of age during the first year of life, revealing an unexpectedly high incidence of symptomatic rotavirus disease in infants

  8. Outbreak of acute gastroenteritis of unknown etiology caused by contaminated drinking water in a rural village in Austria, August 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusburger, Stefan; Reichart, Sandra; Kapfer, Sabine; Schableger, Karl; Fretz, Rainer; Allerberger, Franz

    2007-01-01

    In August 2006 a physician from a rural village reported an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis. An investigation was undertaken in order to determine the magnitude of the outbreak, the source of infection and to prevent further disease. This is the first published outbreak of acute gastroenteritis caused by contaminated drinking water in Austria. For descriptive epidemiology, the investigators had to rely on voluntary cooperation from physicians and patients, data collected by a police officer and data on sick leave reported by physicians to the health insurance system. Microbiological testing of water samples indicated that this cluster was caused by fecal contamination of untreated drinking water. Age and sex distributions were available for 146 of 160 cases: ages ranged from 5 to 91 years (median 45) and 81 cases (55.5%) were female. Stool samples from 14 patients were sent for microbiological analysis: all tested negative for Salmonella, Campylobacter, Shigella and Yersinia enterocolitica. Specimens were not tested for viruses, parasites or enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. In this outbreak no identification was made of pathogenic microorganisms in stool samples from affected patients, despite the occurrence of fecal indicator organisms in samples of drinking water. In outbreaks of gastroenteritis, medical practitioners should encourage microbiological testing beyond the limited routine program. Public health officers must be made aware that the spectrum of routine laboratory tests on stool specimens does not cover the wide array of pathogens capable of causing waterborne outbreaks. The springs serving the affected village originate in a mountainous area of karst formations, and heavy falls of rain that occurred at the beginning of the outbreak may explain introduction of fecal bacteria. In view of the unsolved problem of possible future contamination of springs in karst areas, the water department of this district authority has issued an order requesting

  9. Etiology and Risk Factors of Acute Gastroenteritis in a Taipei Emergency Department: Clinical Features for Bacterial Gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chao-Chih; Ji, Dar-Der; Wu, Fang-Tzy; Mu, Jung-Jung; Yang, Ji-Rong; Jiang, Donald Dah-Shyong; Lin, Wen-Yun; Chen, Wei-Ting; Yen, Muh-Yong; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    Background The causative pathogen is rarely identified in the emergency department (ED), since the results of cultures are usually unavailable. As a result, antimicrobial treatment may be overused. The aim of our study was to investigate the pathogens, risk factors of acute gastroenteritis, and predictors of acute bacterial gastroenteritis in the ED. Methods We conducted a matched case-control study of 627 stool samples and 612 matched pairs. Results Viruses (41.3%) were the leading cause of gastroenteritis, with noroviruses (32.2%) being the most prevalent, followed by bacteria (26.8%) and Giardia lamblia (12.4%). Taking antacids (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.57–6.53), household members/classmates with gastroenteritis (aOR 4.69; 95% CI, 2.76–7.96), attending a banquet (aOR 2.29; 95% CI, 1.64–3.20), dining out (aOR 1.70; 95% CI, 1.13–2.54), and eating raw oysters (aOR 3.10; 95% CI, 1.61–5.94) were highly associated with gastroenteritis. Elders (aOR 1.04; 05% CI, 1.02–1.05), those with CRP >10 mg/L (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15–3.62), or those who were positive for fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15–3.62) or fecal occult blood (aOR 1.97; 95% CI, 1.03–3.77) were more likely to be hospitalized in ED. In addition, presence of fecal leukocytes (time ratio [TR] 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06–1.41), abdominal pain (TR 1.20; 95% CI, 1.07–1.41), and frequency of vomiting (TR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64–0.98) were significantly associated with the duration of acute gastroenteritis. Presence of fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.08; 95% CI, 1.42–3.05), winter season (aOR 0.45; 95% CI, 0.28–0.74), frequency of diarrhea (aOR 1.69; 95% CI, 1.01–2.83), and eating shrimp or crab (aOR 1.53; 95% CI, 1.05–2.23) were highly associated with bacterial gastroenteritis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the final model was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.55–0.63). Conclusions Acute bacterial gastroenteritis was highly associated with season

  10. Morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus in human primary nasal ciliated epithelial cells occurs at surface membrane microdomains that are distinct from cilia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumat, Muhammad Raihan; Yan, Yan; Ravi, Laxmi Iyer; Wong, Puisan; Huong, Tra Nguyen; Li, Chunwei; Tan, Boon Huan; Wang, De Yun; Sugrue, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of cilia and the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) nucleocapsid (N) protein, fusion (F) protein, attachment (G) protein, and M2-1 protein in human ciliated nasal epithelial cells was examined at between 1 and 5 days post-infection (dpi). All virus structural proteins were localized at cell surface projections that were distinct from cilia. The F protein was also trafficked into the cilia, and while its presence increased as the infection proceeded, the N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time of infection. The presence of the F protein in the cilia correlated with cellular changes in the cilia and reduced cilia function. At 5 dpi extensive cilia loss and further reduced cilia function was noted. These data suggested that although RSV morphogenesis occurs at non-cilia locations on ciliated nasal epithelial cells, RSV infection induces changes in the cilia body that leads to extensive cilia loss. - Highlights: • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects nasal ciliated epithelial cells. • Virus morphogenesis occurs within filamentous projections distinct from cilia. • The RSV N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time during infection. • Trafficking of the F protein into the cilia occurred early in infection. • Presence of the F protein in cilia correlated with impaired cilia function

  11. Morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus in human primary nasal ciliated epithelial cells occurs at surface membrane microdomains that are distinct from cilia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jumat, Muhammad Raihan [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Yan, Yan [Department of Otolaryngology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119228 (Singapore); Ravi, Laxmi Iyer [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Wong, Puisan [Detection and Diagnostics Laboratory, DSO National Laboratories, 27 Medical Drive, Singapore 117510 (Singapore); Huong, Tra Nguyen [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Li, Chunwei [Department of Otolaryngology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119228 (Singapore); Tan, Boon Huan [Detection and Diagnostics Laboratory, DSO National Laboratories, 27 Medical Drive, Singapore 117510 (Singapore); Wang, De Yun [Department of Otolaryngology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119228 (Singapore); Sugrue, Richard J., E-mail: rjsugrue@ntu.edu.sg [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore)

    2015-10-15

    The distribution of cilia and the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) nucleocapsid (N) protein, fusion (F) protein, attachment (G) protein, and M2-1 protein in human ciliated nasal epithelial cells was examined at between 1 and 5 days post-infection (dpi). All virus structural proteins were localized at cell surface projections that were distinct from cilia. The F protein was also trafficked into the cilia, and while its presence increased as the infection proceeded, the N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time of infection. The presence of the F protein in the cilia correlated with cellular changes in the cilia and reduced cilia function. At 5 dpi extensive cilia loss and further reduced cilia function was noted. These data suggested that although RSV morphogenesis occurs at non-cilia locations on ciliated nasal epithelial cells, RSV infection induces changes in the cilia body that leads to extensive cilia loss. - Highlights: • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects nasal ciliated epithelial cells. • Virus morphogenesis occurs within filamentous projections distinct from cilia. • The RSV N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time during infection. • Trafficking of the F protein into the cilia occurred early in infection. • Presence of the F protein in cilia correlated with impaired cilia function.

  12. Intermolecular RNA Recombination Occurs at Different Frequencies in Alternate Forms of Brome Mosaic Virus RNA Replication Compartments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernan Garcia-Ruiz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses replicate their genomes in membrane-bound replication compartments. Brome mosaic virus (BMV replicates in vesicular invaginations of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. BMV has served as a productive model system to study processes like virus-host interactions, RNA replication and recombination. Here we present multiple lines of evidence showing that the structure of the viral RNA replication compartments plays a fundamental role and that recruitment of parental RNAs to a common replication compartment is a limiting step in intermolecular RNA recombination. We show that a previously defined requirement for an RNA recruitment element on both parental RNAs is not to function as a preferred crossover site, but in order for individual RNAs to be recruited into the replication compartments. Moreover, modulating the form of the replication compartments from spherular vesicles (spherules to more expansive membrane layers increased intermolecular RNA recombination frequency by 200- to 1000-fold. We propose that intermolecular RNA recombination requires parental RNAs to be recruited into replication compartments as monomers, and that recruitment of multiple RNAs into a contiguous space is much more common for layers than for spherules. These results could explain differences in recombination frequencies between viruses that replicate in association with smaller spherules versus larger double-membrane vesicles and convoluted membranes.

  13. [Waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis transmitted through the public water supply].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, P; Borrull, C; Palà, M; Caubet, I; Bach, P; Nuín, C; Espinet, L; Torres, J; Mirada, G

    2003-01-01

    The chlorination of public water supplies has led researchers to largely discard drinking water as a potential source of gastroenteritis outbreaks. The aim of this study was to investigate an outbreak of waterborne disease associated with drinking water from public supplies. A historical cohort study was carried out following notification of a gastroenteritis outbreak in Baqueira (Valle de Arán, Spain). We used systematic sampling to select 87 individuals staying at hotels and 67 staying in apartments in the target area. Information was gathered on four factors (consumption of water from the public water supply, sandwiches, water and food in the ski resorts) as well as on symptoms. We assessed residual chlorine in drinking water, analyzed samples of drinking water, and studied stool cultures from 4 patients. The risk associated with each water source and food type was assessed by means of relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The overall attack rate was 51.0% (76/149). The main symptoms were diarrhea 87.5%, abdominal pain 80.0%, nausea 50.7%, vomiting 30.3%, and fever 27.0%. The only factor associated with a statistically significant risk of disease was consumption of drinking water (RR = 11.0; 95% CI, 1.6-74.7). No residual chlorine was detected in the drinking water, which was judged acceptable. A problem associated with the location of the chlorinator was observed and corrected. We also recommended an increase in chlorine levels, which was followed by a reduction in the number of cases. The results of stool cultures of the four patients were negative for enterobacteria. This study highlights the potential importance of waterborne outbreaks of gastroenteritis transmitted through drinking water considered acceptable and suggests the need to improve microbiological research into these outbreaks (viruses and protozoa detection).

  14. High frequency RNA recombination in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus occurs preferentially between parental sequences with high similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Vugt, Joke .J.F.A.; Storgaard, Torben; Oleksiewicz, Martin B.

    2001-01-01

    Two types of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) exist, a North American type and a European type. The co-existence of both types in some countries, such as Denmark, Slovakia and Canada, creates a risk of inter-type recombination. To evaluate this risk, cell cultures were co......, but no recombination was detected between the European and North American types. Calculation of the maximum theoretical risk of European-American recombination, based on the sensitivity of the RT-PCR system, revealed that RNA recombination between the European and North American types of PRRSV is at least 10000 times...

  15. Proteome profile of swine testicular cells infected with porcine transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruili Ma

    Full Text Available The interactions occurring between a virus and a host cell during a viral infection are complex. The purpose of this paper was to analyze altered cellular protein levels in porcine transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV-infected swine testicular (ST cells in order to determine potential virus-host interactions. A proteomic approach using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ-coupled two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identification was conducted on the TGEV-infected ST cells. The results showed that the 4-plex iTRAQ-based quantitative approach identified 4,112 proteins, 146 of which showed significant changes in expression 48 h after infection. At 64 h post infection, 219 of these proteins showed significant change, further indicating that a larger number of proteomic changes appear to occur during the later stages of infection. Gene ontology analysis of the altered proteins showed enrichment in multiple biological processes, including cell adhesion, response to stress, generation of precursor metabolites and energy, cell motility, protein complex assembly, growth, developmental maturation, immune system process, extracellular matrix organization, locomotion, cell-cell signaling, neurological system process, and cell junction organization. Changes in the expression levels of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1, caspase-8, and heat shock protein 90 alpha (HSP90α were also verified by western blot analysis. To our knowledge, this study is the first time the response profile of ST host cells following TGEV infection has been analyzed using iTRAQ technology, and our description of the late proteomic changes that are occurring after the time of vigorous viral production are novel. Therefore, this study provides a solid foundation for further investigation, and will likely help us to better understand the mechanisms of TGEV infection and pathogenesis.

  16. Radiographic and pathologic observations of eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Lae Won [Busan Nationa University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sook Hee; Lee, Jung Dal [Busan Gospel Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-10-15

    This report presents two cases with eosinophilic gastroenteritis in detail. The radiographic and pathologic features of eosinophilic gastroenteritis are summarized with emphasis on the differential diagnostic features. Radiographic eosinophilic gastritis should be differentiated from gastric carcinoma and lymphoma, and eosinophilic enteritis from intestinal tuberculosis and intussusception of the small bowel in Korea where these entities are prevent. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is pathologically characterized by diffuse infiltration of the submucosa and muscle coats with eosinophilic in conjunction with hypertrophy of individual muscle fibers. This leads to thickening of the gastrointestinal wall resulting in narrowing and obstruction of the lumen. Eosinophilic venulitis is another characteristic feature which is helpful for differentiation this entity from a parasitic infection.

  17. Radiographic and pathologic observations of eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Lae Won; Hong, Sook Hee; Lee, Jung Dal

    1974-01-01

    This report presents two cases with eosinophilic gastroenteritis in detail. The radiographic and pathologic features of eosinophilic gastroenteritis are summarized with emphasis on the differential diagnostic features. Radiographic eosinophilic gastritis should be differentiated from gastric carcinoma and lymphoma, and eosinophilic enteritis from intestinal tuberculosis and intussusception of the small bowel in Korea where these entities are prevent. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is pathologically characterized by diffuse infiltration of the submucosa and muscle coats with eosinophilic in conjunction with hypertrophy of individual muscle fibers. This leads to thickening of the gastrointestinal wall resulting in narrowing and obstruction of the lumen. Eosinophilic venulitis is another characteristic feature which is helpful for differentiation this entity from a parasitic infection

  18. A naturally occurring cowpox virus with an ectromelia virus A-type inclusion protein gene displays atypical A-type inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, Malachy Ifeanyi; Hansen, Hilde; Traavik, Terje

    2012-01-01

    Human orthopoxvirus (OPV) infections in Europe are usually caused by cowpox virus (CPXV). The genetic heterogeneity of CPXVs may in part be due to recombination with other OPV species. We describe the characterization of an atypical CPXV (CPXV-No-H2) isolated from a human patient in Norway. CPXV-No-H2 was characterized on the basis of A-type inclusion (ATI) phenotype as well as the DNA region containing the p4c and atip open reading frames. CPXV-No-H2 produced atypical V(+/) ATI, in which virions are on the surface of ATI but not within the ATI matrix. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the atip gene of CPXV-No-H2 clustered closely with that of ectromelia virus (ECTV) with a bootstrap support of 100% whereas its p4c gene is diverged compared to homologues in other OPV species. By recombination analysis we identified a putative crossover event at nucleotide 147, downstream the start of the atip gene. Our results suggest that CPXV-No-H2 originated from a recombination between CPXV and ECTV. Our findings are relevant to the evolution of OPVs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Infectious Gastroenteritis and the Need for Strict Contact Precaution Procedures in Adults Presenting in the Emergency Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyum, Florence; Andersen, Vibeke; Chen, Ming

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute infectious gastroenteritis requires contact precautions to prevent spreading. On acute admission the cause of diarrhoea is unknown, so the decision of whom to isolate has to be made on clinical information with a risk of inexpedient use of contact precautions. AIM: The aims...... of the study were to investigate how often gastroenteritis occurs, and thus the isolation indication has to be assessed, in Danish emergency departments, and how often patients have to remain on contact precaution according to the results of the faecal samples. METHODS: This Danish register based retrospective......: Among 66,885 acute admissions 4.3% patients had at least one feature of gastroenteritis: admission with a chief complaint of diarrhoea (1.6%); faecal sample microbiology examination (2.8%); discharged with a gastroenteritis diagnosis (1.7%). 19% of those who had a faecal sample tested were norovirus...

  20. Biased hypermutation occurred frequently in a gene inserted into the IC323 recombinant measles virus during its persistence in the brains of nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otani, Sanae [Department of Virology and Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, 1-4-3 Asahimachi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, Osaka (Japan); Ayata, Minoru, E-mail: maverick@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Virology and Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, 1-4-3 Asahimachi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Takeuchi, Kaoru [Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Division of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Takeda, Makoto [Department of Virology 3, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo (Japan); Shintaku, Haruo [Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, Osaka (Japan); Ogura, Hisashi [Department of Virology and Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, 1-4-3 Asahimachi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Measles virus (MV) is the causative agent of measles and its neurological complications, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and measles inclusion body encephalitis (MIBE). Biased hypermutation in the M gene is a characteristic feature of SSPE and MIBE. To determine whether the M gene is the preferred target of hypermutation, an additional transcriptional unit containing a humanized Renilla reniformis green fluorescent protein (hrGFP) gene was introduced into the IC323 MV genome, and nude mice were inoculated intracerebrally with the virus. Biased hypermutation occurred in the M gene and also in the hrGFP gene when it was inserted between the leader and the N gene, but not between the H and L gene. These results indicate that biased hypermutation is usually found in a gene whose function is not essential for viral proliferation in the brain and that the location of a gene in the MV genome can affect its mutational frequency. - Highlights: • Wild-type MV can cause persistent infections in nude mice. • Biased hypermutation occurred in the M gene. • Biased hypermutation occurred in an inessential gene inserted between the leader and the N gene.

  1. Biased hypermutation occurred frequently in a gene inserted into the IC323 recombinant measles virus during its persistence in the brains of nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, Sanae; Ayata, Minoru; Takeuchi, Kaoru; Takeda, Makoto; Shintaku, Haruo; Ogura, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) is the causative agent of measles and its neurological complications, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and measles inclusion body encephalitis (MIBE). Biased hypermutation in the M gene is a characteristic feature of SSPE and MIBE. To determine whether the M gene is the preferred target of hypermutation, an additional transcriptional unit containing a humanized Renilla reniformis green fluorescent protein (hrGFP) gene was introduced into the IC323 MV genome, and nude mice were inoculated intracerebrally with the virus. Biased hypermutation occurred in the M gene and also in the hrGFP gene when it was inserted between the leader and the N gene, but not between the H and L gene. These results indicate that biased hypermutation is usually found in a gene whose function is not essential for viral proliferation in the brain and that the location of a gene in the MV genome can affect its mutational frequency. - Highlights: • Wild-type MV can cause persistent infections in nude mice. • Biased hypermutation occurred in the M gene. • Biased hypermutation occurred in an inessential gene inserted between the leader and the N gene

  2. Naturally occurring mutations in large surface genes related to occult infection of hepatitis B virus genotype C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Kim

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanisms related to occult hepatitis B virus (HBV infection, particularly those based on genotype C infection, have rarely been determined thus far in the ongoing efforts to determine infection mechanisms. Therefore, we aim to elucidate the mutation patterns in the surface open reading frame (S ORF underlying occult infections of HBV genotype C in the present study. Nested PCRs were applied to 624 HBV surface antigen (HBsAg negative Korean subjects. Cloning and sequencing of the S ORF gene was applied to 41 occult cases and 40 control chronic carriers. Forty-one (6.6% of the 624 Korean adults with HBsAg-negative serostatus were found to be positive for DNA according to nested PCR tests. Mutation frequencies in the three regions labeled here as preS1, preS2, and S were significantly higher in the occult subjects compared to the carriers in all cases. A total of two types of deletions, preS1 deletions in the start codon and preS2 deletions as well as nine types of point mutations were significantly implicated in the occult infection cases. Mutations within the "a" determinant region in HBsAg were found more frequently in the occult subjects than in the carriers. Mutations leading to premature termination of S ORF were found in 16 occult subjects (39.0% but only in one subject from among the carriers (2.5%. In conclusion, our data suggest that preS deletions, the premature termination of S ORF, and "a" determinant mutations are associated with occult infections of HBV genotype C among a HBsAg-negative population. The novel mutation patterns related to occult infection introduced in the present study can help to broaden our understanding of HBV occult infections.

  3. Prevalence of rotavirus in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Imam Sajjad Hospital of Yasuj, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Khodadadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & Aim: Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of dehydrating and gastroenteritis among children worldwide. . The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of rotavirus in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Imam Sajjad Hospital of Yasuj. Methods: This cross sectional – descriptive study was done on 184 stool samples of children younger than 7 years of age hospitalized at Imam Sajjad hospital of Yasuj in 2011 due to acute gastroenteritis. All samples were routinely analyzed for detection of rotavirus by Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA test. Data was analyzed by SPSS version 16, Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Results: Of the 184 samples analyzed, 52(28.26% were positive.The Results showed significant relationship between the seasonal distribution and virus detection (p=0/001. The highest incidence of rotavirus was seen in autumn with frequency of (48.08% and the lowest in spring (5.77%. Conclusions: According to high prevalence of rotavirus infection, continual surveillance is necessary to provide useful data for formulating effective vaccines and perform diarrhea prevention programs. Key words: Rotavirus, Gastroenteritis, Prevalence, Elisa

  4. Serum bicarbonate and dehydration severity in gastroenteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Narchi, H.

    1998-01-01

    The concentration of bicarbonate was measured in serum samples from 106 children with gastroenteritis and dehydration. A concentration less than 22 mmol/l was more common in children with severe dehydration, but the magnitude of bicarbonate reduction was not significantly different with increasing degrees of dehydration. Doctors should not rely on the serum bicarbonate concentration when assessing fluid deficit.



  5. EPA METHODS FOR VIRUS DETECTION IN WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of different types of human enteric viruses cause waterborne outbreaks when individuals are exposed to contaminated drinking and recreational waters. Members of the enterovirus group cause numerous diseases, including gastroenteritis, encephalitis, meningitis, myocard...

  6. Community incidence of pathogen-specific gastroenteritis: reconstructing the surveillance pyramid for seven pathogens in seven European Union member states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagsma, J. A.; Geenen, P. L.; Ethelberg, S.

    2013-01-01

    By building reconstruction models for a case of gastroenteritis in the general population moving through different steps of the surveillance pyramid we estimated that millions of illnesses occur annually in the European population, leading to thousands of hospitalizations. We used data on the hea......By building reconstruction models for a case of gastroenteritis in the general population moving through different steps of the surveillance pyramid we estimated that millions of illnesses occur annually in the European population, leading to thousands of hospitalizations. We used data...

  7. Clinical dehydration and glomerular filtration rate in acute paediatric gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Gregorio P; Fossali, Emilio F; Perri, Alessandra; Vettori, Arianna; Grillo, Paolo; Agostoni, Carlo

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate changes in glomerular filtration rate in acute gastroenteritis. The correlation between two clinical diagnostic scales and glomerular filtration rate has been investigated in 113 children with acute gastroenteritis in a paediatric emergency setting. A significant reduction of GFR was found in 10% children less than, and 5% children higher than, 2 years of age with acute gastroenteritis. The differences observed as for risk of renal hypoperfusion suggests to consider the age of children as an important determinant to consider the dehydration status in acute gastroenteritis. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Year-round screening of noncommercial and commercial oysters for the presence of human pathogenic viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodder-Verschoor, F.; Husman, A.M.R.; Berg, van den H.H.J.L.; Stein, A.; Pelt-Heerschap, van H.M.L.; Poel, van der W.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Consumption of virus-contaminated shellfish has caused numerous outbreaks of gastroenteritis and hepatitis worldwide. In The Netherlands, oysters are cultured and imported both for consumption and export; therefore, the presence of noroviruses, rotaviruses, astroviruses, hepatitis A viruses, and

  9. Epidemiology and genotype analysis of sapovirus associated with gastroenteritis outbreaks in Alberta, Canada: 2004-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaoli L; Lee, Bonita E; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Preiksaitis, Jutta K

    2009-02-15

    This study describes the epidemiology and circulating strains of sapovirus associated with gastroenteritis outbreaks in Alberta, Canada, from 2004 to 2007. Sapovirus was an important cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks, accounting for 43 (17.6%) of 244 outbreaks in which all samples tested were negative for norovirus. All 4 human sapovirus genotypes, GI, GII, GIV, and GV, were found in samples during these outbreaks. The greatest amount of sapovirus-associated outbreak activity occurred in 2007, after the emergence of genotype GIV in December 2006. The majority of sapovirus-associated outbreaks in Alberta during this period (27 [62.8%] of 43) occurred in hospitals, community long-term care facilities, and senior lodges. Adults>65 years of age were the age group most commonly affected.

  10. Identification of group B rotavirus as an etiological agent in the gastroenteritis outbreak in Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Madhuri S; Ganorkar, Nital N; Ranshing, Sujata S; Basu, Atanu; Chavan, Nutan A; Gopalkrishna, Varanasi

    2017-12-01

    Acute gastroenteritis outbreak occurred at Pargaon, Maharashtra, India in 1789 cases with an attack rate of 32.5% between November to December 2015. The stool specimens (n = 32) were investigated for different enteric viral agents using conventional methods. Transmission electron microscopy and RNA polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis respectively identified morphologically distinct rotavirus particles in 28% and RNA migration pattern of Group B Rotavirus (GBR) in 72% of the specimens. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and nucleotide sequencing confirmed presence of GBR in 97% of the samples analyzed. The predominance of GBR infections and absence or insignificant presence of other agents confirmed GBR as an etiological agent of the gastroenteritis outbreak occurred in Maharashtra, India. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [Nasogastric rehydration for treating children with gastroenteritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rébeillé-Borgella, B; Barbier, C; Moussaoui, R; Faisant, A; Michard-Lenoir, A-P; Rubio, A

    2017-06-01

    When oral rehydration is not feasible, enteral rehydration via the nasogastric route has been the ESPGHAN recommended method of rehydration since 2008, rather than intravenous rehydration (IVR), for children with acute gastroenteritis. However, these recommendations are rarely followed in France. Since 2011, in case of failure of oral rehydration, enteral rehydration has been used as a first-line therapy in the Children's Emergency Department at the Grenoble-Alpes University Hospital. The aims of the study were to compare the length of the hospital stay, the duration of initial rehydration, and the incidence of complications and failure with the use of enteral nasogastric versus intravenous rehydration. This study compared two cohorts of children (rehydration via the oral route. The first group (winter 2010-2011) was managed according to the previous protocol (intravenous rehydration). The second group (winter 2011-2012) was managed according the new protocol (nasogastric tube rehydration [NGR]). The rest of the gastroenteritis management was identical in both groups. A total of 132 children were included, 65 were treated with nasogastric tube rehydration (NGR) and 67 with intravenous rehydration. There was a significant reduction in the duration of hospitalization in the post-emergency unit in the NGR group: 23.6h vs 40.1h (Prehydration was also significantly reduced (10.5h vs 22.0h). There was no significant difference regarding serious adverse events. However, the NGR group presented more mild adverse events (22 vs 7, Prehydration reduces the duration of rehydration and the length of the hospital stay without increasing the incidence of serious adverse events for dehydrated children hospitalized for acute gastroenteritis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Svaer hyperkaliaemi ved gastroenteritis hos kolektomeret patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lasse Bremholm; Winkel, Rasmus; Hansen, Erik Feldager

    2010-01-01

    Severe hyperkalemia is a life-threatening condition that causes primarily cardiac and muscular dysfunction with potentially fatal consequences. This case report describes a case of severe hyperkalemia (9,1 mmol/l) caused by acute prerenal failure due to dehydration. The severe dehydration was cau...... was caused by a combination of reduced fluid intake due to gastroenteritis and a hampered capacity for intestinal fluid absorption, due to previous colectomy. The patient developed classic signs of hyperkalemia with electrocardiogram changes and muscular dysfunction....

  13. Evidence of Recombinant Citrus tristeza virus Isolate Occurring in Acid Lime cv. Pant Lemon Orchard in Uttarakhand Terai Region of Northern Himalaya in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaywant Kumar; Tarafdar, Avijit; Sharma, Susheel Kumar; Biswas, Kajal Kumar

    2013-06-01

    The present study for the first time describes biological and molecular characterization of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) occurring in the Terai area of Uttarakhand State in Northern Himalaya region of India. Direct antigen coated-ELISA and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detected the CTV infection in Acid lime cv. Pant lemon (Citrus aurantifolia) orchards of Pantnagar with an estimated disease incidence of 16.6-20.5 %. To know the biological and genetic properties, an isolate, CTV Pant 4 was characterized. Isolate Pant 4 could be graft transmitted to Kinnow, Nagpur and Darjeeling mandarins, Mosambi sweet orange, Kagzi lime, Sweet lime, Sour orange but not to Rough lemon. The sequence analyses of the 5'ORF1a (3038 nucleotides) of LPro domain and 3'end (2058 nt) covering ORF7-ORF10 regions of the CTV genome revealed that Pant 4 was closely related to the previously reported Indian CTV isolate, Kpg3 from Northeastern Himalaya region with 97 and 98 % sequence identity, respectively. Whereas, it differed from the previously reported CTV isolate B165 from Southern India with 79 and 92 % identity, respectively for 5'ORF1a and 3' end regions. Recombination and SplitsTree decomposition analyses indicated that CTV isolate Pant 4 was a recombinant isolate originating from Kpg3 as a major and B165 as a minor donor.

  14. [Recurrent epidemics of gastroenteritis caused by norovirus GI.3 in a small hotel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soini, Jani; Hemminki, Kaisa; Pirnes, Aija; Roivainen, Merja; Al-Hello, Haider; Maunula, Leena; Kauppinen, Ari; Miettinen, Likka; Smit, Pieter W; Huusko, Sari; Toikkanen, Salla; Rimhanen-Finne, Ruska

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent cases of gastroenteritis occurred in a small hotel. The causative agent of disease could not be detected. The cause and the source of the disease were established through epidemiological investigations and laboratory diagnosis. The causative agent of the disease was norovirus GI.3. Norovirus GI was detected in the water from the well and on surfaces at the hotel. Both epidemiological investigations and laboratory diagnostics are needed in resolving epidemics. Continuous development of laboratory methods is important.

  15. Severe Rotavirus gastroenteritis in a patient with infant leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Uygun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children. Reports about the clinical relevance of rotavirus in immunocompromised children are rare. We herein presented a case of life-threatening Rotavirus gastroenteritis in an infant with acute myeloblastic leukemia which could be prevented by recently recommended Rotavirus vaccination.

  16. Human rotavirus group a serotypes causing gastroenteritis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rotavirus remains a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis in children worldwide with an estimated 2000 deaths each day in developing countries. Due to HIV/AIDS scourge in Kenya, it is possible that rotavirus-related gastroenteritis has been aggravated in adults. The Global Alliance for Immunizations has ...

  17. Diffuse eosinophilic gastroenteritis with antral obstruction: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Sung Hee; Kim, Young Bok; Lee, Koung Hee

    2000-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare disease characterized by tissue eosinophilia that can involve different layers of the gut wall and cause various gastrointestinal symptoms. We describe the UGI and CT findings of a case of diffuse eosinophilic gastroenteritis with tumor-like antral obstruction due to thickening of the submucosa and muscle layer in a 21-year-old male. (author)

  18. Diffuse eosinophilic gastroenteritis with antral obstruction: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Hee; Kim, Young Bok; Lee, Koung Hee [National Police Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-02-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare disease characterized by tissue eosinophilia that can involve different layers of the gut wall and cause various gastrointestinal symptoms. We describe the UGI and CT findings of a case of diffuse eosinophilic gastroenteritis with tumor-like antral obstruction due to thickening of the submucosa and muscle layer in a 21-year-old male. (author)

  19. Activation of type I and III interferon signalling pathways occurs in lung epithelial cells infected with low pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sutejo

    Full Text Available The host response to the low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI H5N2, H5N3 and H9N2 viruses were examined in A549, MDCK, and CEF cells using a systems-based approach. The H5N2 and H5N3 viruses replicated efficiently in A549 and MDCK cells, while the H9N2 virus replicated least efficiently in these cell types. However, all LPAI viruses exhibited similar and higher replication efficiencies in CEF cells. A comparison of the host responses of these viruses and the H1N1/WSN virus and low passage pH1N1 clinical isolates was performed in A549 cells. The H9N2 and H5N2 virus subtypes exhibited a robust induction of Type I and Type III interferon (IFN expression, sustained STAT1 activation from between 3 and 6 hpi, which correlated with large increases in IFN-stimulated gene (ISG expression by 10 hpi. In contrast, cells infected with the pH1N1 or H1N1/WSN virus showed only small increases in Type III IFN signalling, low levels of ISG expression, and down-regulated expression of the IFN type I receptor. JNK activation and increased expression of the pro-apoptotic XAF1 protein was observed in A549 cells infected with all viruses except the H1N1/WSN virus, while MAPK p38 activation was only observed in cells infected with the pH1N1 and the H5 virus subtypes. No IFN expression and low ISG expression levels were generally observed in CEF cells infected with either AIV, while increased IFN and ISG expression was observed in response to the H1N1/WSN infection. These data suggest differences in the replication characteristics and antivirus signalling responses both among the different LPAI viruses, and between these viruses and the H1N1 viruses examined. These virus-specific differences in host cell signalling highlight the importance of examining the host response to avian influenza viruses that have not been extensively adapted to mammalian tissue culture.

  20. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics in hospitalized young children with acute gastroenteritis in southern Taiwan: According to major pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Chung

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute gastroenteritis (AGE can be caused by a wide array of pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, and parasites. A prospective study to investigate the epidemiology and clinical presentation in young children hospitalized with AGE was conducted in a medical center in southern Taiwan. Methods: Patients aged less than 5 years who was hospitalized due to AGE in National Cheng Kung University Hospital were enrolled from July 2014 to June 2016. The demographic information, clinical features and laboratory data were collected by chart reviews, and stool samples were sent to Centers of Disease Control, Taiwan (Taiwan CDC for a panel of pathogen identification consisting of two viruses, nine bacteria, and five parasites. Results: Totally 441 patients were enrolled in this study. Salmonella spp. was the leading cause of disease (21.8%, followed by norovirus (17.0%, Clostridium difficile (9.5%, and rotavirus (9.3%. Norovirus identification rate was the highest among patients less than 6 months of age, while Salmonella was highest among patients between 2 and 3 years old. Patients with Salmonella infection frequently presented with fever, lethargy, bloody stool, and elevated serum level of C-reactive protein (CRP; norovirus and rotavirus infection frequently presented with vomiting. Salmonella gastroenteritis also resulted in longer hospitalization and more frequent antibiotics administration. C. difficile could be isolated from both gastroenteritis patients and control children. Conclusion: Salmonella spp. was the most common pathogen of AGE in hospitalized children in southern Taiwan during 2014–2016, followed by norovirus and rotavirus. Further monitoring of epidemiology characteristics among cardinal pathogens of pediatric gastroenteritis is necessary. Keywords: Acute gastroenteritis, Children, Epidemiology, Taiwan

  1. Outbreak of SRSV gastroenteritis at an international conference traced to food handled by a post-symptomatic caterer.

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, T.; Hutchings, P.; Palmer, S.

    1993-01-01

    In an outbreak of small round structured virus (SRSV) gastroenteritis at an international AIDS conference 67 people were ill with diarrhoea or vomiting, one requiring admission to hospital. Epidemiological investigations demonstrated that the vehicle of infection was food prepared by a foodhandler who was recovering from a mild gastrointestinal illness. The food most strongly associated with illness, coronation chicken, was prepared by the food handler on the second day after symptoms ceased....

  2. DIAGNOSTICS AND THERAPY IN CHILDREN'S ACUTE GASTROENTERITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.D. Bakradze

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The work aimed at studying a series of diagnostic aspects and determination of the possible treatment of children with acute gastroenetrites according to the protocol based on international recommendations and standards. The study involved 130 children, of whom in 71 patients the presence of rotavirus antigen in coprofilters was checked via latex particle agglutination method. In 85% rotavirus infection was confirmed. It was shown that the majority of cases fall on November to may. Infant and early children are the most susceptible to rotavirus gastroenteritis. The analysis of therapy results showed that antibioticsfree treatment of watery diarrhea patients worked well, and prescription of antibacterial therapy for the concomitant bacterial infection does not influence the time of gastroenteritis reduction. The results of dehydration therapy show that oral rehydration is not always effective for the 2nd stage dehydration, especially with late treatment. However, the time of recovery (diarrhea reduction does not depend on the type of rehydration or symptomatic therapy. A diagnostic algorithm that helps use the minimum diagnostic methods in stationary conditions and at the same time provides the optimum scope of therapeutic intervention was worked out.Key words: rotavirus infection, children, rehydration, antibacterial therapy.

  3. Leaching of viruses and other microorganisms naturally occurring in pig slurry to tile drains on a well-structured loamy field in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog, Jesper Schak; Forslund, Anita; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2017-01-01

    The amount of animal manure used in modern agriculture is increasing due to the increase in global animal production. Pig slurry is known to contain zoonotic bacteria such as E. coli, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp., and viruses such as hepatitis E virus and group A rotavirus. Coliform...

  4. Drought occurence

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Coulston

    2007-01-01

    Why Is Drought Important? Drought is an important forest disturbance that occurs regularly in the Western United States and irregularly in the Eastern United States (Dale and others 2001). Moderate drought stress tends to slow plant growth while severedrought stress can also reduce photosynthesis (Kareiva and others 1993). Drought can also interact with...

  5. Naturally Occurring Resistance-Associated Variants to Hepatitis C Virus Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents in Treatment-Naive HCV Genotype 6a-Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanyi Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. The direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs antiviral therapy has drastically improved the prognosis of hepatitis C virus (HCV patients. However, the viral drug resistance-associated variants (RAVs can limit the efficacy of DAAs. For the HCV-6a is not the predominant prevalent genotype; the data on the prevalence of naturally occurring RAVs in it is scarce. Our study aims to assess the prevalence of RAVs in treatment-naive HCV-6a patients. Methods. Nested PCR assays were performed on 95 HCV-6a patients to amplify HCV viral regions of NS3, NS5A, and NS5B. Results. In NS3/4A region, we detected Q80K in 95.5% isolates (84/88 and D168E in 2.3% isolates (2/88. In NS5A region, we detected Q30R in 93.2% isolates (82/88, L31M in 4.6% isolates (4/88, and H58P in 6.8% isolates (6/88. In NS5B region, we detected A15G in 2.3% isolates (2/88, S96T in 1.1% isolates (1/88, and S282T in 20.7% isolates (17/88 and we detected I482L in 100% isolates (4/4, V494A in 50% isolates (2/4, and V499A in 100% isolates (4/4. Conclusions. RAVs to DAAs preexist in treatment-naive HCV-6a patients. Further studies should address the issue of the impact of RAVs in response to DAA therapies for HCV-6a patients.

  6. Host cell virus entry mediated by Australian bat lyssavirus G envelope glycoprotein occurs through a clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway that requires actin and Rab5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Dawn L; Laing, Eric D; Smith, Ina L; Wang, Lin-Fa; Broder, Christopher C

    2014-02-27

    Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV), a rhabdovirus of the genus Lyssavirus which circulates in both pteropid fruit bats and insectivorous bats in mainland Australia, has caused three fatal human infections, the most recent in February 2013, manifested as acute neurological disease indistinguishable from clinical rabies. Rhabdoviruses infect host cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis and subsequent pH-dependent fusion mediated by their single envelope glycoprotein (G), but the specific host factors and pathways involved in ABLV entry have not been determined. ABLV internalization into HEK293T cells was examined using maxGFP-encoding recombinant vesicular stomatitis viruses (rVSV) that express ABLV G glycoproteins. A combination of chemical and molecular approaches was used to investigate the contribution of different endocytic pathways to ABLV entry. Dominant negative Rab GTPases were used to identify the endosomal compartment utilized by ABLV to gain entry into the host cell cytosol. Here we show that ABLV G-mediated entry into HEK293T cells was significantly inhibited by the dynamin-specific inhibitor dynasore, chlorpromazine, a drug that blocks clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and the actin depolymerizing drug latrunculin B. Over expression of dominant negative mutants of Eps15 and Rab5 also significantly reduced ABLV G-mediated entry into HEK293T cells. Chemical inhibitors of caveolae-dependent endocytosis and macropinocytosis and dominant negative mutants of Rab7 and Rab11 had no effect on ABLV entry. The predominant pathway utilized by ABLV for internalization into HEK293T cells is clathrin-and actin-dependent. The requirement of Rab5 for productive infection indicates that ABLV G-mediated fusion occurs within the early endosome compartment.

  7. CARBOHYDRATE MALABSORPTION SYNDROME IN CHILDREN WITH VIRAL GASTROENTERITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. R. Meskina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enteric viruses (mainly rotaviruses are the most common cause of infectious diarrhea in infants. One  of the  pathophysiologic mechanisms in rotaviral gastroenteritis is the  reduction of the  surface  activity of enterocyte disaccharidases  and  osmotic  diarrhea. Aim: To determine the clinical significance of metabolic activity of intestinal microbiota in the formation of the osmotic component of viral diarrhea in children of various ages. Materials and methods: The study involved 139 children aged  from 1 month  to 14 years admitted to the hospital in the first 24 to 72 hours of moderate-degree  viral gastroenteritis.  Rotaviral infection was the most prevalent  (90%. Viral etiology was confirmed  by the  reaction  of indirect hemagglutination and multiplex real-time PCR (in feces. Total carbohydrate content in the feces was measured and fecal microflora was investigated by two methods: bacteriological and gas liquid chromatography with the determination of short-chain fatty acids. Results: The mean carbohydrate content in the feces of children below 1.5 years of age was higher than  that  in older children (p = 0.014. There was an inverse correlation between the concentration of rotaviral antigens  and carbohydrate   contents (r = -0,43, p < 0.05 and the production of acetic and propionic acids (R = -0,35, p < 0.01. The carbohydrate content in acute stage of the disease was linearly associated with time to normalization of the stool (r = +0,47, p < 0.01. Previous acute  respiratory or intestinal  infections within 2 months (odds ratio [OR], 14.10; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.86–51.53, previous  hospitalizations  (OR = 14.17; 95% CI 2.74–74.32 and  past  history of intestinal dysfunction (OR 5.68; 95% CI 1.67–19.76 were predictive of severe  carbohydrate malabsorption in children below 1.5 years of age. Conclusion: The lack of microbiota functional activity (assessed by production of short

  8. Long-term patency of experimental magnetic compression gastroenteric anastomoses achieved with covered stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, C; Ginsberg, G G

    2001-06-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of a prototype "YO-YO"-shaped covered stent for keeping experimental magnetic compression gastroenteric fistulas patent for 6 months. Magnets were introduced perorally with endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance and were mated across the gastric and jejunal walls of 5 dogs. After a mean of 5.5 days a 12-mm diameter YO-YO stent was placed perorally in the resulting fistula. The gastroenteric anastomosis (GEA) with stent was observed endoscopically and gastrographically at 1- to 2-month intervals. There was no morbidity and there were no significant weight changes. The GEA was widely patent at necropsy at 6 months (n = 4); partial membrane separation occurred at 5 months in the fifth dog. There was minor breakage of the stent prongs in 2 animals. Peroral creation of a stented magnetic compression GEA is safe and provides long-term patency. This technique may be potentially useful for managing gastric outlet obstruction caused by malignancy.

  9. Leaching of viruses and other microorganisms naturally occurring in pig slurry to tile drains on a well-structured loamy field in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog, Jesper Schak; Forslund, Anita; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2017-01-01

    The amount of animal manure used in modern agriculture is increasing due to the increase in global animal production. Pig slurry is known to contain zoonotic bacteria such as E. coli, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp., and viruses such as hepatitis E virus and group A rotavirus. Coliform...... sets out to investigate the leaching potential of six different microorganisms: E. coli and Enterococcus spp. (detected by colony assay), somatic coliphages (using plaque assays), and hepatitis E virus, porcine circovirus type 2, and group A rotavirus (by real-time polymerase chain reaction). All six...... microorganisms leached through the soil entering the tile drains situated at 1-m depth the first day following pig slurry application. The leaching pattern of group A rotavirus differed substantially from the pattern for somatic coliphages, which are otherwise used as indicators for virus contamination...

  10. Clinical research of benign infantile convulsions with mild gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-bing LI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cases of benign infantile convulsions with mild gastroenteritis (BICE treated in our hospital from 2008 to 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. Among the 65 cases of convulsions with acute diarrhea, there were 18 cases of BICE, 15 cases of febrile seizures, 13 cases of epilepsy, 6 cases of viral encephalitis, 6 cases of hyponatremia encephalopathy, 3 cases of hypernatremia encephalopathy, 2 cases of toxic encephalopathy, and 2 cases of hypocalcemia convulsion. The convulsion occurred mostly during the first 2 d of the illness and was in a generalized tonic or tonic-clonic form. Positive rotavirus antigens in the BICE patients were detected in 83.33% (15/18. Phenobarbital was administered after the first convulsion (5-10 mg/kg, and diazepam was given intravenously in case of recurrence (0.10-0.30 mg/kg. BICE occurs frequently in infantile and controlling relapse is the main purpose. The prognosis is good. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.03.019

  11. Naturally occurring hepatitis C virus protease inhibitors resistance-associated mutations among chronic hepatitis C genotype 1b patients with or without HIV co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ying; Zhang, Yu; Bao, Yi; Zhang, Renwen; Zhang, Xiaxia; Xia, Wei; Wu, Hao; Xu, Xiaoyuan

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the frequency of natural mutations in hepatitis C virus (HCV) mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected protease inhibitor (PI)-naive patients. Population sequence of the non-structural (NS)3 protease gene was evaluated in 90 HCV mono-infected and 96 HIV/HCV co-infected PI treatment-naive patients. The natural prevalence of PI resistance mutations in both groups was compared. Complete HCV genotype 1b NS3 sequence information was obtained for 152 (81.72%) samples. Seven sequences (8.33%) of the 84 HCV mono-infected patients and 21 sequences (30.88%) of the 68 HIV/HCV co-infected patients showed amino acid substitutions associated with HCV PI resistance. There was a significant difference in the natural prevalence of PI resistance mutations between these two groups (P = 0.000). The mutations T54S, R117H and N174F were observed in 1.19%, 5.95% and 1.19% of HCV mono-infected patients. The mutations F43S, T54S, Q80K/R, R155K, A156G/V, D168A/E/G and V170A were found in 1.47%, 4.41%, 1.47%/1.47%, 2.94%, 23.53%/1.47%, 1.47%/1.47%/1.47% and 1.47% of HIV/HCV co-infected patients, respectively. In addition, the combination mutations in the NS3 region were detected only in HIV/HCV genotype 1b co-infected patients. Naturally occurring HCV PI resistance mutations existed in HCV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected genotype 1b PI-naive patients. HIV co-infection was associated with a greater frequency of PI resistance mutations. The impact of HIV infection on baseline HCV PI resistance mutations and treatment outcome in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients should be further analyzed. © 2015 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  12. A Waterborne Gastroenteritis Outbreak Caused by Norovirus GII.17 in a Hotel, Hebei, China, December 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Meng; Dong, Xiao-Gen; Jing, Yan-Yan; Wei, Xiu-Xia; Wang, Zhao-E; Feng, Hui-Ru; Yu, Hong; Li, Jin-Song; Li, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is responsible for an estimated 90 % of all epidemic nonbacterial outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide. Waterborne outbreaks of NoV are commonly reported. A novel GII.17 NoV strain emerged as a major cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks in China during the winter of 2014/2015. During this time, an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred at a hotel in a ski park in Hebei Province, China. Epidemiological investigations indicated that one water well, which had only recently been in use, was the probable source. GII.17 NoV was detected by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction from samples taken from cases, from concentrated water samples from water well, and from the nearby sewage settling tank. Nucleotide sequences of NoV extracted from clinical and water specimens were genetically identical and had 99 % homology with Beijing/CHN/2015. All epidemiological data indicated that GII.17 NoV was responsible for this outbreak. This is the first reported laboratory-confirmed waterborne outbreak caused by GII.17 NoV genotype in China. Strengthening management of well drinking water and systematica monitoring of NoV is essential for preventing future outbreaks.

  13. Acute gastroenteritis: evidence-based management of pediatric patients [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, KeriAnne; Pade, Kathryn H

    2018-02-01

    Although most cases of acute gastroenteritis require minimal medical intervention, severe dehydration and hypoglycemia may develop in cases of prolonged vomiting and diarrhea. The mainstay of treatment for mild-to-moderately dehydrated patients with acute gastroenteritis should be oral rehydration solution. Antiemetics allow for improved tolerance of oral rehydration solution, and, when used appropriately, can decrease the need for intravenous fluids and hospitalization. This issue reviews the common etiologies of acute gastroenteritis, discusses more-severe conditions that should be considered in the differential diagnosis, and provides evidence-based recommendations for management of acute gastroenteritis in patients with mild-to-moderate dehydration, severe dehydration, and hypoglycemia. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  14. An outbreak of Norwalk-like viral gastroenteritis in a frequently penalized food service operation: a case for mandatory training of food handlers in safety and hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassa, H

    2001-12-01

    In 1999, in Toledo, Ohio, an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred among people who had attended a Christmas dinner banquet and had eaten food prepared by a local caterer. Overall, 93 of the 137 attendees (67.9 percent) reported illness. Eight sought medical care, and one was hospitalized. Case-control studies revealed that the illness was associated with eating tossed salad (odds ratio [OR] = 2.5, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 1.02-6.26). Eleven of 12 stool specimens that were taken from ill people tested positive for a Norwalk-like virus (NLV) but were negative for E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Shigella. The primary source of the outbreak was not determined, but an infected food handler may have played a role in the transmission of the virus. The catering facility had been cited frequently for food safety and hygiene violations. None of the personnel or food handlers at this facility had been appropriately trained in safe food-handling practices, nor had the personnel at another local caterer that had prepared food items suspected of causing a multistate outbreak of NLVs. In Toledo, food service operations with trained personnel/food handlers received better inspection reports than food service operations without trained personnel and were less likely to contribute to foodborne outbreaks. Training of personnel and food handlers may be important for preventing outbreaks.

  15. A large outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, 1972 revisited: evidence for common source exposure to a recombinant GII.Pg/GII.3 norovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J A; Parra, G I; Levenson, E A; Green, K Y

    2017-06-01

    Historical outbreaks can be an important source of information in the understanding of norovirus evolution and epidemiology. Here, we revisit an outbreak of undiagnosed gastroenteritis that occurred in Shippensburg, Pennsylvania in 1972. Nearly 5000 people fell ill over the course of 10 days. Symptoms included diarrhea, vomiting, stomach cramps, and fever, lasting for a median of 24 h. Using current techniques, including next-generation sequencing of full-length viral genomic amplicons, we identified an unusual norovirus recombinant (GII.Pg/GII.3) in nine of 15 available stool samples from the outbreak. This particular recombinant virus has not been reported in recent decades, although GII.3 and GII.Pg genotypes have been detected individually in current epidemic strains. The consensus nucleotide sequences were nearly identical among the four viral genomes analysed, although each strain had three to seven positions in the genome with heterogenous non-synonymous nucleotide subpopulations. Two of these resulting amino acid polymorphisms were conserved in frequency among all four cases, consistent with common source exposure and successful transmission of a mixed viral population. Continued investigation of variant nucleotide populations and recombination events among ancestral norovirus strains such as the Shippensburg virus may provide unique insight into the origin of contemporary strains.

  16. ABO blood grouping in Egyptian children with rotavirus gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Gouda Elnady

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Rotavirus gastroenteritis is an important public health problem all over the world, causing a notable economic burden in both developing and developed countries. Aim: To explore the relationship between blood group typing, rotavirus gastroenteritis, and its severity in Egyptian children. Material and methods: A cross sectional case control study was conducted on 231 cases of acute gastroenteritis attending the outpatient clinic of Al-Zahraa University Hospital. Full history taking, clinical examination, and clinical data collection were done. Blood samples were collected for an ABO grouping. Stool samples were tested for viral gastroenteritis agents. Results : Rota positive cases of GE were significantly more prevalent among cases with blood group A (p < 0.05 and significantly less among cases with blood group B (p < 0.05. The rate of hospitalisation was highly significantly greater among cases with group A (p < 0.005, and significantly lower among cases with group AB and O (p < 0.05. As regards the degree of dehydration, moderate and severe cases were highly significant in groups A and O (p < 0.005. Rota-positive gastroenteritis showed significant positive correlations with indicators of severity such as hospitalisation, degree of dehydration, and duration of fever (p < 0.005. Conclusions : Blood group A is highly associated with paediatric rotavirus gastroenteritis. This could highlight an important risk factor, which could play a significant role for the pathogenesis of rotavirus gastroenteritis and severity as well. Furthermore, more intervention care could be needed for blood group A paediatric patients, if gastroenteritis especially rotavirus affect this group to avoid comorbidities.

  17. Socio-demographic, Clinical and Laboratory Features of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Children Treated in Pediatric Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Berisha, Majlinda; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Kolgeci, Selim; Avdiu, Muharrem; Jakupi, Xhevat; Hoxha, Rina; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of work was presentation of several socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics of gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. The examinees and methods: The examinees were children under the age of five years treated at the Pediatric Clinic due to acute gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. Rotavirus is isolated by method chromatographic immunoassay by Cer Test Biotec. Results: From the total number of patients (850) suffering from acute gastroenteritis, feces test on bacteria, viruses. protozoa and fungi was positive in 425 (49.76%) cases. From this number the test on bacteria was positive in 248 (58.62%) cases, on viruses it was positive in 165 (39.0%), on protozoa in 9 (2.12%) cases and on fungi only one case. Rotavirus was the most frequent one in viral test, it was isolated in 142 (86.06%) cases, adenoviruses were found in 9 (5.45%) cases and noroviruses in only one case. The same feces sample that contained rotavirus and adenoviruses were isolated in five cases, whereas rotavirus with bacteria was isolated in the same feces sample in five cases. The biggest number of cases 62 (43.66%) were of the age 6-12 months, whereas the smallest number 10 (7.04%) cases were of the age 37-60 months. There were 76 (53.52%) of cases of male gender, from rural areas there were 81 (57.04%) cases and there were 58 (40.80%) cases during the summer period. Among the clinical symptoms the most prominent were diarrhea, vomiting, high temperature, whereas the different degree of dehydration were present in all cases (the most common one was moderate dehydration). The most frequent one was isonatremic dehydration in 91 (64.08%) cases, less frequent one was hypernatremic dehydration in 14 (9.85%) cases. The majority of cases (97.89%) had lower blood pH values, whereas 67 (47.17%) cases had pH values that varied from 7.16 -7.20 (curve peak), normal values were registered in only 3 (2.11%) cases. Urea values were increased in 45 (31.07%) cases (the maximum value

  18. Pancreatic hyperamylasemia during acute gastroenteritis: incidence and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pignattari Elena

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many case reports of acute pancreatitis have been reported but, up to now, pancreatic abnormalities during acute gastroenteritis have not been studied prospectively. Objectives To evaluate the incidence and the clinical significance of hyperamylasemia in 507 consecutive adult patients with acute gastroenteritis. Methods The clinical significance of hyperamylasemia, related predisposing factors and severity of gastroenteritis were assessed. Results Hyperamylasemia was detected in 10.2 % of patients studied. Although amylasemia was found over four times the normal values in three cases, the clinical features of acute pancreatitis were recorded in only one case (0.1%. Hyperamylasemia was more likely (17% where a microorganism could be identified in the stools (p Salmonella spp. and in particular S. enteritidis, was the microorganism most frequently associated with hyperamylasemia [17/84 (20.2 % and 10/45 (22.2%, respectively], followed by Rotavirus, Clostridium difficile and Campylobacter spp. Patients with hyperamylasemia had more severe gastroenteritis with an increased incidence of fever (80 % vs 50.6 %, O.R. 3.0; P Conclusions Hyperamylasemia is relatively frequent, and is associated with severe gastroenteritis. However, acute pancreatitis in the setting of acute gastroenteritis, is a rare event.

  19. Naturally occurred frame-shift mutations in the tvb receptor gene are responsible for decreased susceptibility to subgroups B, D, and E avian leukosis virus infection in chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    The group of highly related avian leukosis viruses (ALVs) in chickens were thought to have evolved from a common retroviral ancestor into six subgroups, A to E and J. These ALV subgroups use diverse cellular proteins encoded by four genetic loci in chickens as receptors to gain entry into host cells...

  20. The Control of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in The United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Roger I.; Parashar, Umesh; Patel, Manish; Tate, Jacqueline; Jiang, Baoming; Gentsch, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Since 2006, two new vaccines have been licensed to prevent rotavirus, the cause of 20% to 50% of severe acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. These vaccines have been implemented in national immunization programs in about 30 high- and middle-income countries, including the United States, and vaccine use has led to substantial decreases in diarrhea-related health care visits. In addition to reductions in diarrhea burden in vaccinated children, decreases have been observed in older, unvaccinated age groups in many settings, suggesting indirect benefits (i.e., herd immunity) from vaccination. Although the efficacy of these oral rotavirus vaccines is expectedly lower in developing countries in Asia and Africa, the public health benefits of vaccination in these settings, where more than 90% of the estimated 453,000 annual deaths from rotavirus occur, are likely to be substantial. Efforts continue to develop alternative rotavirus vaccines that could have a better efficacy and safety profile and may be less expensive. PMID:23303967

  1. Small round structured viruses (SRSVs) and transmission electron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    immune-electron microscopy (IEM) from patients' feces. They reported this virus particle as the causative agent of winter vomiting outbreaks in Norwalk (Kapikian et al.,. 1972). This is the remarkable landmark study of non- bacterial gastroenteritis viruses, especially for small round structured viruses (SRSVs). After that, many.

  2. Gastroenteric tube feeding: Techniques, problems and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstein, Irina; Shastri, Yogesh M; Stein, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Gastroenteric tube feeding plays a major role in the management of patients with poor voluntary intake, chronic neurological or mechanical dysphagia or gut dysfunction, and patients who are critically ill. However, despite the benefits and widespread use of enteral tube feeding, some patients experience complications. This review aims to discuss and compare current knowledge regarding the clinical application of enteral tube feeding, together with associated complications and special aspects. We conducted an extensive literature search on PubMed, Embase and Medline using index terms relating to enteral access, enteral feeding/nutrition, tube feeding, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy/jejunostomy, endoscopic nasoenteric tube, nasogastric tube, and refeeding syndrome. The literature showed common routes of enteral access to include nasoenteral tube, gastrostomy and jejunostomy, while complications fall into four major categories: mechanical, e.g., tube blockage or removal; gastrointestinal, e.g., diarrhea; infectious e.g., aspiration pneumonia, tube site infection; and metabolic, e.g., refeeding syndrome, hyperglycemia. Although the type and frequency of complications arising from tube feeding vary considerably according to the chosen access route, gastrointestinal complications are without doubt the most common. Complications associated with enteral tube feeding can be reduced by careful observance of guidelines, including those related to food composition, administration rate, portion size, food temperature and patient supervision. PMID:25024606

  3. One-step Multiplex RT-PCR Method for Simultaneous Detection of Seed Transmissible Bacterium and Virus Occurring on Brassicaceae Crop Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyusik Jeong

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to develop specific and sensitive PCR-based procedures for simultaneous detection of economically important plant pathogenic bacteria and seed borne virus in commercial Brassicaceae crop seeds, Xanthomonns campestris pv. campestris (Xcc and Lettuce Mosaic Virus (LMV. Bacterial and virus diseases of Brassicaceae leaves are responsible for heavy losses. PCR with arbitral primers: selection of specific primers, performance of PCR with specific primers and determination of the threshold level for pathogens detection. To detect simultaneously the Xcc and LMV in commercial Brassicaceae crop seeds (lettuce, kohlrabi, radish, chinese cabbage and cabbage, two pairs of specific primer (LMV-F/R, Xcc-F/R were synthesized by using primer-blast program (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/tools/ primer-blast/. The multiplex PCR for the two pathogens in Brassicaceae crop seeds could detect specifically without interference among primers and/or cDNA of other plant pathogens. The pathogen detection limit was determined at 1 ng of RNA extracted from pathogens. In the total PCR results for pathogen detection using commercial kohlrabi (10 varieties, lettuce (50 varieties, radish (20 varieties, chinese cabbage (20 varieties and cabbage (20 varieties, LMV and Xcc were detected from 39 and 2 varieties, respectively. In the PCR result of lettuce, LMV and Xcc were simultaneously detected in 8 varieties.

  4. Aetiology of acute paediatric gastroenteritis in Bulgaria during summer months: prevalence of viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenova, Zornitsa; Steyer, Andrej; Steyer, Adela Fratnik; Ganesh, Balasubramanian; Petrov, Petar; Tchervenjakova, Tanja; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren

    2015-03-01

    Paediatric acute gastroenteritis is a global public health problem. Comprehensive laboratory investigation for viral, bacterial and parasitic agents is helpful for improving management of acute gastroenteritis in health care settings and for monitoring and controlling the spread of these infections. Our study aimed to investigate the role of various pathogens in infantile diarrhoea in Bulgaria outside the classical winter epidemics of rotavirus and norovirus. Stool samples from 115 hospitalized children aged 0-3 years collected during summer months were tested for presence of 14 infectious agents - group A rotavirus, astrovirus, Giardia, Cryptosporidium and Entamoeba using ELISAs; norovirus by real-time RT-PCR; picobirnavirus and sapovirus by RT-PCR; adenovirus using PCR, and Salmonella, Shigella, Escherichia coli, Yersinia and Campylobacter using standard bacterial cultures. Infectious origin was established in a total of 92 cases and 23 samples remained negative. A single pathogen was found in 67 stools, of which rotaviruses were the most prevalent (56.7 %), followed by noroviruses (19.4 %), enteric adenoviruses (7.5 %), astroviruses (6.0 %), bacteria and parasites (4.5 % each) and sapoviruses (1.4 %). Rotavirus predominant genotypes were G4P[8] (46.3 %) and G2P[4] (21.4 %); for astroviruses, type 1a was the most common, while the GII.4/2006b variant was the most prevalent among noroviruses. Bacteria were observed in five cases, with Salmonella sp. as the most prevalent, while parasites were found in ten stool samples, with Giardia intestinalis in five cases. The results demonstrated high morbidity associated with viral infections and that rotavirus and norovirus remain the most common pathogens associated with severe gastroenteritis during summer months in Bulgaria, a country with a temperate climate, and significant molecular diversity among circulating virus strains. © 2015 The Authors.

  5. Sampling methods for recovery of human enteric viruses from environmental surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnage, Nicole L; Gibson, Kristen E

    2017-10-01

    Acute gastroenteritis causes the second highest infectious disease burden worldwide. Human enteric viruses have been identified as leading causative agents of acute gastroenteritis as well as foodborne illnesses in the U.S. and are generally transmitted by fecal-oral contamination. There is growing evidence of transmission occurring via contaminated fomite including food contact surfaces. Additionally, human enteric viruses have been shown to remain infectious on fomites over prolonged periods of time. To better understand viral persistence, there is a need for more studies to investigate this phenomenon. Therefore, optimization of surface sampling methods is essential to aid in understanding environmental contamination to ensure proper preventative measures are being applied. In general, surface sampling studies are limited and highly variable among recovery efficiencies and research parameters used (e.g., virus type/density, surface type, elution buffers, tools). This review aims to discuss the various factors impacting surface sampling of viruses from fomites and to explore how researchers could move towards a more sensitive and standard sampling method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular Epidemiology of Viral Gastroenteritis in Hajj pilgrimage

    KAUST Repository

    Padron Regalado, Eriko

    2014-05-01

    Hajj is the annual gathering of Islam practitioners in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. During the event, gastrointestinal infections are usually experienced and outbreaks have always been a concern; nevertheless, a deep and integrative study of the etiological agents has never been carried out. Here, I describe for the first time the epidemiology of pathogenic enteric viruses during Hajj 2011, 2012 and 2013. The focus of this study was the common enteric viruses Astrovirus, Norovirus, Rotavirus and Adenovirus. An enzyme Immunoassay established their presence in 14.9%, 15.0% and 6.6% of the reported cases of acute diarrhea for 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively. For the three years of study, Astrovirus accounted for the majority of the viral infections. To our knowledge, this is the first time an epidemiological study depicts Astrovirus as the main viral agent of gastroenteritis in a mass gathering event. Hajj is rich in strains of Astrovirus, Norovirus and Rotavirus. A first screening by RT-PCR resulted in ten different genotypes. Strains HAstV 2, HAstV 1 and HAstV 5 were identified for Astrovirus. GI.6, GII.3, GII.4 and GII.1 were described for Norovirus and G1P[8], G4P[8] and G3P[8] were found for Rotavirus. The majority of the Astrovirus isolates could not be genotyped suggesting the presence of a new variant(s). Cases like this encourage the use of metagenomics (and nextgeneration sequencing) as a state-of-the-art technology in clinical diagnosis. A sample containing Adenovirus particles is being used to standardize a process for detection directly from stool samples and results will be obtained in the near future. The overall findings of the present study support the concept of Hajj as a unique mass gathering event that potentiates the transmission of infectious diseases. The finding of Norovirus GII.4 Sydney, a variant originated from Australia, suggests that Hajj is a receptor of infectious diseases worldwide. This work is part of the Hajj project, a collaborative

  7. Naturally Occurring Frameshift Mutations in the tvb Receptor Gene Are Responsible for Decreased Susceptibility of Chicken to Infection with Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroups B, D, and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinjian; Chen, Weiguo; Zhang, Huanmin; Li, Aijun; Shu, Dingming; Li, Hongxing; Dai, Zhenkai; Yan, Yiming; Zhang, Xinheng; Lin, Wencheng; Ma, Jingyun; Xie, Qingmei

    2018-04-15

    The group of highly related avian leukosis viruses (ALVs) in chickens are thought to have evolved from a common retroviral ancestor into six subgroups, A to E and J. These ALV subgroups use diverse cellular proteins encoded by four genetic loci in chickens as receptors to gain entry into host cells. Hosts exposed to ALVs might be under selective pressure to develop resistance to ALV infection. Indeed, resistance alleles have previously been identified in all four receptor loci in chickens. The tvb gene encodes a receptor, which determines the susceptibility of host cells to ALV subgroup B (ALV-B), ALV-D, and ALV-E. Here we describe the identification of two novel alleles of the tvb receptor gene, which possess independent insertions each within exon 4. The insertions resulted in frameshift mutations that reveal a premature stop codon that causes nonsense-mediated decay of the mutant mRNA and the production of truncated Tvb protein. As a result, we observed that the frameshift mutations in the tvb gene significantly lower the binding affinity of the truncated Tvb receptors for the ALV-B, ALV-D, and ALV-E envelope glycoproteins and significantly reduce susceptibility to infection by ALV-B, ALV-D and ALV-E in vitro and in vivo Taken together, these findings suggest that frameshift mutation can be a molecular mechanism of reducing susceptibility to ALV and enhance our understanding of virus-host coevolution. IMPORTANCE Avian leukosis virus (ALV) once caused devastating economic loss to the U.S. poultry industry prior the current eradication schemes in place, and it continues to cause severe calamity to the poultry industry in China and Southeast Asia, where deployment of a complete eradication scheme remains a challenge. The tvb gene encodes the cellular receptor necessary for subgroup B, D, and E ALV infection. Two tvb allelic variants that resulted from frameshift mutations have been identified in this study, which have been shown to have significantly reduced

  8. Canine parvovirus type 2c identified from an outbreak of severe gastroenteritis in a litter in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A litter of recently-vaccinated puppies in Sweden experienced signs of severe haemorrhagic gastroenteritis. Canine parvovirus (CPV) was suspected as the cause of this outbreak on the basis of the clinical signs and the presence of parvoviral antigen in the faeces from one of the affected pups - confirmed using a commercial in-clinic faecal antigen ELISA test kit. A concern was raised about whether the vaccine (which contained a live, attenuated strain of CPV) could have caused the disease and so further faecal samples from the affected pups were submitted for laboratory virus isolation and identification. On cell culture, two out of four faecal samples were found to be virus-positive. This was confirmed as being canine parvovirus by immuno-staining with CPV specific monoclonal antibody. The virus was then tested using a series of PCR probes designed to confirm the identity of CPV and to distinguish the unique vaccine strain from field virus. This confirmed that the virus was indeed CPV but that it was not vaccine strain. The virus was then typed by sequencing the 426 amino acid region of the capsid gene which revealed this to be a type 2c virus. Since its emergence in the late 1970s, canine parvovirus 2 (CPV2) has spread worldwide and is recognised as an important canine pathogen in all countries. The original CPV2 rapidly evolved into two antigenic variants, CPV2a and CPV2b, which progressively replaced the original CPV2. More recently a new antigenic variant, CPV2c, has appeared. To date this variant has been identified in many countries worldwide but there have been no reports yet of its presence in any Scandinavian countries. This case report therefore represents the first published evidence of the involvement of CPV2c in a severe outbreak of typical haemorrhagic gastroenteritis in a susceptible litter of pups in Scandinavia. PMID:24016358

  9. Canine parvovirus type 2c identified from an outbreak of severe gastroenteritis in a litter in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, David; Vinberg, Carina; Gustafsson, Agneta; Pearce, Jacqueline; Greenwood, Neil

    2013-09-10

    A litter of recently-vaccinated puppies in Sweden experienced signs of severe haemorrhagic gastroenteritis. Canine parvovirus (CPV) was suspected as the cause of this outbreak on the basis of the clinical signs and the presence of parvoviral antigen in the faeces from one of the affected pups - confirmed using a commercial in-clinic faecal antigen ELISA test kit. A concern was raised about whether the vaccine (which contained a live, attenuated strain of CPV) could have caused the disease and so further faecal samples from the affected pups were submitted for laboratory virus isolation and identification.On cell culture, two out of four faecal samples were found to be virus-positive. This was confirmed as being canine parvovirus by immuno-staining with CPV specific monoclonal antibody. The virus was then tested using a series of PCR probes designed to confirm the identity of CPV and to distinguish the unique vaccine strain from field virus. This confirmed that the virus was indeed CPV but that it was not vaccine strain. The virus was then typed by sequencing the 426 amino acid region of the capsid gene which revealed this to be a type 2c virus.Since its emergence in the late 1970s, canine parvovirus 2 (CPV2) has spread worldwide and is recognised as an important canine pathogen in all countries. The original CPV2 rapidly evolved into two antigenic variants, CPV2a and CPV2b, which progressively replaced the original CPV2. More recently a new antigenic variant, CPV2c, has appeared. To date this variant has been identified in many countries worldwide but there have been no reports yet of its presence in any Scandinavian countries. This case report therefore represents the first published evidence of the involvement of CPV2c in a severe outbreak of typical haemorrhagic gastroenteritis in a susceptible litter of pups in Scandinavia.

  10. A Study Of Hospitalised Cases Of Acute Gastroenteritis Admitted In Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad During The Epidemic Of 1988.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar P

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available An epidemic of gastroenteritis occurred between July and November 1988 in Ahmedabad City. The epidemic originated from Saijpur Bocha locality of the city and thereafter several new foci also development. The city has a number of Government and Municipal Corporation run hospitals as well as private treatment centers where these cases were treated. The Corporation also took measures to control this epidemic. The present study analysis the cases of gastroenteritis (2008 and cholera (112 admitted to the Civil Hospital during this period. The cases occurred in all age groups and both sexes. However, when compared with hospital records of previous non- epidemic years, more cases were found in the adult population and the case fatality rate was low during this epidemic. The study details the various control measures taken by the Municipal Corporation.

  11. An outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis associated with asymptomatic food handlers in Kinmen, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Yu Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In February 2015 an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred in a distillery in Kinmen, Taiwan. At least 450 affected employees developed the symptoms of diarrhea and vomiting after attending a lunch banquet on 6 February. Epidemiological, laboratory and environmental investigations were conducted to identify the agent and source of this outbreak. Methods A case–control study was carried out among lunch attendees from the distillery. Using a semi-structured questionnaire, food and beverage consumption in the lunch banquet was assessed, as well as demographic and clinical data of the exposed people. An outbreak case was defined as a diner who developed at least three following symptoms: diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, nausea, chills and/or weakness in the 72 h following the lunch. Controls were defined as lunch attendees who did not have any of the above symptoms. Rectal swabs or stool samples of the symptomatic exposed diners and food handlers as well as food and environmental samples were collected to test potential bacteria and viruses. Norovirus was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis. An environmental assessment, including environmental inspection of the restaurant and a review of work practices of food workers, was undertaken. Results Of 363 respondents with complete data, 169 met the case definition and 111 met the control definition. Consumption of pork liver in cold appetizers (adjusted odd ratio (aOR 3.23; 95 % confidence interval (CI: 1.26–8.30 and lamb chops (aOR: 3.98, 95 % CI: 1.74–9.11 were each associated with increased risk of illness. No cases but two asymptomatic food handlers who prepared or cooked the implicated foods tested positive for norovirus genotype I.6. Food and environmental samples were negative for any bacteria. Environmental assessment indicated that hand washing facilities were not properly accessible to food handlers. Inappropriate

  12. A Systematic Approach to Elucidate Causes of Gastroenteritis Outbreaks of Suspected Viral Etiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Svraka-Latifovic (Sanela)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe main objective of this thesis was to investigate the etiology of outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis that remained without diagnosis after testing for common viral pathogens causing gastroenteritis, e.g. noroviruses, rotaviruses, sapoviruses, adenoviruses, and astroviruses. No

  13. Management strategies in the treatment of neonatal and pediatric gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciccarelli S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Simona Ciccarelli,1 Ilaria Stolfi,1 Giuseppe Caramia2 1Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 2Division of Neonatology and Pediatrics, Maternal and Child Hospital "G. Salesi", Ancona, Italy Abstract: Acute gastroenteritis, characterized by the onset of diarrhea with or without vomiting, continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children in mostly resource-constrained nations. Although generally a mild and self-limiting disease, gastroenteritis is one of the most common causes of hospitalization and is associated with a substantial disease burden. Worldwide, up to 40% of children aged less than 5 years with diarrhea are hospitalized with rotavirus. Also, some microorganisms have been found predominantly in resource-constrained nations, including Shigella spp, Vibrio cholerae, and the protozoan infections. Prevention remains essential, and the rotavirus vaccines have demonstrated good safety and efficacy profiles in large clinical trials. Because dehydration is the major complication associated with gastroenteritis, appropriate fluid management (oral or intravenous is an effective and safe strategy for rehydration. Continuation of breastfeeding is strongly recommended. New treatments such as antiemetics (ondansetron, some antidiarrheal agents (racecadotril, and chemotherapeutic agents are often proposed, but not yet universally recommended. Probiotics, also known as “food supplement,” seem to improve intestinal microbial balance, reducing the duration and the severity of acute infectious diarrhea. The European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the European Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases guidelines make a stronger recommendation for the use of probiotics for the management of acute gastroenteritis, particularly those with documented efficacy such as Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus reuteri, and Saccharomyces boulardii. To date, the

  14. Gravimetric Viral Diagnostics: : QCM Based Biosensors for Early Detection of Viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afzal, Adeel; Mujahid, Adnan; Schirhagl, Romana; Bajwa, Sadia Z.; Latif, Usman; Feroz, Saima

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are pathogenic microorganisms that can inhabit and replicate in human bodies causing a number of widespread infectious diseases such as influenza, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, meningitis, pneumonia, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) etc. A majority of these viral diseases are

  15. Stresshyperglykaemi hos et barn med svaer akut gastroenteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jesper V.

    2002-01-01

    A case of a two years and ten months old girl with severe acute gastroenteritis, dehydration, and hyperglycaemia is described. Transient hyperglycaemia is a common clinical finding in children under stress. We discuss the distinction between hyperglycaemia as a prediabetic state and that as a phy......A case of a two years and ten months old girl with severe acute gastroenteritis, dehydration, and hyperglycaemia is described. Transient hyperglycaemia is a common clinical finding in children under stress. We discuss the distinction between hyperglycaemia as a prediabetic state...

  16. Outbreak of SRSV gastroenteritis at an international conference traced to food handled by a post-symptomatic caterer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, T; Hutchings, P; Palmer, S

    1993-08-01

    In an outbreak of small round structured virus (SRSV) gastroenteritis at an international AIDS conference 67 people were ill with diarrhoea or vomiting, one requiring admission to hospital. Epidemiological investigations demonstrated that the vehicle of infection was food prepared by a foodhandler who was recovering from a mild gastrointestinal illness. The food most strongly associated with illness, coronation chicken, was prepared by the food handler on the second day after symptoms ceased. The investigation confirms the view that foodhandlers may contaminate food with SRSVs after cessation of symptoms and should remain off work until at least 48 h after recovery.

  17. Evolution of naturally occurring 5'non-coding region variants of Hepatitis C virus in human populations of the South American region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Aguirre Laura

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV has been the subject of intense research and clinical investigation as its major role in human disease has emerged. Previous and recent studies have suggested a diversification of type 1 HCV in the South American region. The degree of genetic variation among HCV strains circulating in Bolivia and Colombia is currently unknown. In order to get insight into these matters, we performed a phylogenetic analysis of HCV 5' non-coding region (5'NCR sequences from strains isolated in Bolivia, Colombia and Uruguay, as well as available comparable sequences of HCV strains isolated in South America. Methods Phylogenetic tree analysis was performed using the neighbor-joining method under a matrix of genetic distances established under the Kimura-two parameter model. Signature pattern analysis, which identifies particular sites in nucleic acid alignments of variable sequences that are distinctly representative relative to a background set, was performed using the method of Korber & Myers, as implemented in the VESPA program. Prediction of RNA secondary structures was done by the method of Zuker & Turner, as implemented in the mfold program. Results Phylogenetic tree analysis of HCV strains isolated in the South American region revealed the presence of a distinct genetic lineage inside genotype 1. Signature pattern analysis revealed that the presence of this lineage is consistent with the presence of a sequence signature in the 5'NCR of HCV strains isolated in South America. Comparisons of these results with the ones found for Europe or North America revealed that this sequence signature is characteristic of the South American region. Conclusion Phylogentic analysis revealed the presence of a sequence signature in the 5'NCR of type 1 HCV strains isolated in South America. This signature is frequent enough in type 1 HCV populations circulating South America to be detected in a phylogenetic tree analysis as a distinct

  18. Dynamics and genotypic composition of Emiliania huxleyi and their co-occurring viruses during a coccolithophore bloom in the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Joaquín Martínez; Schroeder, Declan C; Wilson, William H

    2012-08-01

    We studied the temporal succession of vertical profiles of Emiliania huxleyi and their specific viruses (EhVs) during the progression of a natural phytoplankton bloom in the North Sea in June 1999. Genotypic richness was assessed by exploiting the variations in a gene encoding a protein with calcium-binding motifs (GPA) for E. huxleyi and in the viral major capsid protein gene for EhVs. Using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing analysis, we showed at least three different E. huxleyi and EhV genotypic profiles during the period of study, revealing a complex, and changing assemblage at the molecular level. Our results also indicate that the dynamics of EhV genotypes reflect fluctuations in abundance of potential E. huxleyi host cells. The presence and concentration of specific EhVs in the area prior to the bloom, or EhVs transported into the area by different water masses, are significant factors affecting the structure and intraspecific succession of E. huxleyi during the phytoplankton bloom. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of the convergent receptor utilization of a retargeted feline leukemia virus envelope with a naturally-occurring porcine endogenous retrovirus A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazari, Peter M; Argaw, Takele; Valdivieso, Leonardo; Zhang, Xia; Marcucci, Katherine T; Salomon, Daniel R; Wilson, Carolyn A; Roth, Monica J

    2012-06-05

    In vitro screening of randomized FeLV Envelope libraries identified the CP isolate, which enters cells through HuPAR-1, one of two human receptors utilized by porcine endogenous retrovirus-A (PERV-A), a distantly related gammaretrovirus. The CP and PERV-A Envs however, share little amino acid homology. Their receptor utilization was examined to define the common receptor usage of these disparate viral Envs. We demonstrate that the receptor usage of CP extends to HuPAR-2 but not to the porcine receptor PoPAR, the cognate receptor for PERV-A. Reciprocal interference between virus expressing CP and PERV-A Envs was observed on human cells. Amino acid residues localized to within the putative second extracellular loop (ECL-2) of PAR-1 and PAR-2 are found to be critical for CP envelope function. Through a panel of receptor chimeras and point mutations, this area was also found to be responsible for the differential usage of the PoPAR receptor between CP and PERV-A. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence of naturally occurring protease inhibitor resistance-associated variants in hemodialysis and renal transplant patients with hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Rita C F; Feldner, Ana C C A; Pinho, João R R; Uehara, Silvia N O; Emori, Christini T; Carvalho-Filho, Roberto J; Silva, Ivonete S S; Santana, Rúbia A F; de Castro, Vanessa F D; Castoli, Gregório T F; Cristovão, Charliana U; Ferraz, Maria L C G

    2017-07-01

    Background NS3 protease inhibitors (PIs) were the first direct antiviral agents used for the treatment of hepatitis C virus. The combination of second-wave PIs with other direct antiviral agents enabled the use of interferon-free regimens for chronic kidney disease patients on dialysis and renal transplant (RTx) recipients, populations in which the use of interferon and ribavirin is limited. However, the occurrence of PI resistance-associated variants (RAVs), both baseline and induced by therapy, has resulted in the failure of many treatment strategies. Methods The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of PI RAVs and of the Q80K polymorphism in chronic kidney disease patients on hemodialysis and RTx recipients. Direct sequencing of the NS3 protease was performed in 67 patients (32 hemodialysis and 35 RTx).Results RAVs to PIs were detected in 18% of the patients: V55A (9%), V36L (1.5%), T54S (1.5%), S122N (1.5%), I170L (1.5%), and M175L (1.5%). Only 1.5% of the patients carried the Q80K polymorphism. The frequency of these mutations was more than two times higher in patients infected with GT1a (25%) than GT1b (9.7%) (P=0.1). The mutations were detected in 20% of treatment-naive patients and in 15.6% of peginterferon/ribavirin-experienced patients (P=0.64). Furthermore, no mutation that would confer high resistance to PIs was detected.Conclusion The Q80K polymorphism was rare in the population studied. The occurrence of RAVs was common, with predominance in GT1a. However, the variants observed were those associated with a low level of resistance to PIs, facilitating the use of these drugs in this special group of patients.

  1. Campylobacter concisus and Acute Gastroenteritis in Children: Lack of Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmanne, Anne; Martiny, Delphine; Hallin, Marie; Cornelius, Angela; Wautier, Magali; Quach, Caroline; Lepage, Philippe; Vandenberg, Olivier

    2018-03-29

    The role of Campylobacter concisus as a cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) remains to be demonstrated. This prospective study includes 184 cases and 176 controls. It shows no evidence that C. concisus plays a role in AGE. Considering the very low prevalence in cases and controls, if there is an etiological link, it would be moderate and difficult to demonstrate.

  2. Perforated duodenal ulcer: an unusual complication of gastroenteritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, J M; Darby, C R

    1990-01-01

    A 7 year old boy was admitted to hospital with gastroenteritis, which was complicated by an acute perforated duodenal ulcer. After oversewing of the perforation he made an uncomplicated recovery. Peptic ulceration is under-diagnosed in childhood and this leads to delay in diagnosis and appropriate management. Ulceration is associated with severe illness and viral infections, but perforation is rare.

  3. How to Predict Oral Rehydration Failure in Children With Gastroenteritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.F. Geurts (Dorien); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte); R. Oostenbrink (Rianne)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES:: Oral rehydration is the standard in most current guidelines for young children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE). Failure of oral rehydration can complicate the disease course, leading to morbidity due to severe dehydration. We aimed to identify prognostic factors of oral

  4. The role of Campylobacter jejuni cytolethal distending toxin in gastroenteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ninell P; Schiellerup, Peter; Boisen, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    The role of Campylobacter jejuni cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) on clinical outcome after gastroenteritis was investigated. Clinical data, blood serum samples, and Campylobacter spp. isolated, from each of 30 patients were collected over a period of 6 months. The CDT encoding genes, cdt...

  5. The impact of rotavirus gastroenteritis on the family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Claudia M

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea in young children and causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Although the clinical aspects have been well described, little information is available regarding the emotional, social, and economic impact of rotavirus gastroenteritis on the family of a sick child. The objectives of this study were to: 1 assess the family impact of rotavirus gastroenteritis through qualitative interviews with parents; 2 compare the clinical severity of rotavirus-positive and negative gastroenteritis; 3 test a questionnaire asking parents to rank the importance of various factors associated with a case of rotavirus gastroenteritis. Methods The study enrolled parents and children (2–36 months of age brought to one of the study sites (outpatient clinic or ER if the child experienced ≥ 3 watery or looser-than normal stools and/or forceful vomiting within any 24-hour period within the prior 3 days. The clinical severity of each child's illness was rated using a clinical scoring system and stool samples were tested for rotavirus antigen. Parents of rotavirus-positive children were invited to participate in focus group or individual interviews and subsequently completed a questionnaire regarding the impact of their child's illness. Results Of 62 enrolled children, 43 stool samples were collected and 63% tested positive for rotavirus. Illness was more severe in children with rotavirus-positive compared to rotavirus-negative gastroenteritis (92% vs. 37.5% rated as moderate/severe. Seventeen parents of rotavirus-positive children participated in the interviews and completed the written questionnaire. Parents were frightened by the severity of vomiting and diarrhea associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis, and noted that family life was impacted in several ways including loss of sleep, missed work, and an inability to complete normal household tasks. They expressed frustration at the lack of a

  6. Absence of E protein arrests transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus maturation in the secretory pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortego, Javier; Ceriani, Juan E.; Patino, Cristina; Plana, Juan; Enjuanes, Luis

    2007-01-01

    A recombinant transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (rTGEV) in which E gene was deleted (rTGEV-ΔE) has been engineered. This deletion mutant only grows in cells expressing E protein (E + cells) indicating that E was an essential gene for TGEV replication. Electron microscopy studies of rTGEV-ΔE infected BHK-pAPN-E - cells showed that only immature intracellular virions were assembled. These virions were non-infectious and not secreted to the extracellular medium in BHK-pAPN-E - cells. RNA and protein composition analysis by RNase-gold and immunoelectron microscopy showed that rTGEV-ΔE virions contained RNA and also all the structural TGEV proteins, except the deleted E protein. Nevertheless, full virion maturation was blocked. Studies of the rTGEV-ΔE subcellular localization by confocal and immunoelectron microscopy in infected E - cells showed that in the absence of E protein virus trafficking was arrested in the intermediate compartment. Therefore, the absence of E protein in TGEV resulted in two actions, a blockade of virus trafficking in the membranes of the secretory pathway, and prevention of full virus maturation

  7. Detection of poliovirus infection in children with acute gastroenteritis in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumthip, Kattareeya; Khamrin, Pattara; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2017-05-01

    Poliovirus (PV) is typically transmitted by the fecal-oral route, which means that the risk of infection and virus distribution could be achieved by exposure to the virus contaminated in food and water. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of PV strains by detecting the virus in pediatric patients who admitted to the hospitals with diarrhea in Chiang Mai, Thailand during 2010-2015. By applying a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and nucleotide sequencing analysis of 1,300 stool specimens collected from pediatric patients, PVs were detected at 0.61% (8 out of 1,300 specimens). Among eight PV positive samples, mixed infection with norovirus or human bocavirus was detected in one each out of eight cases. All PV strains detected in this study were characterized further by phylogenetic analysis of 343 bp of the 5' UTR and 315 bp of the partial VP1 sequences. The results revealed that eight PV strains detected in the present study two of each were PV1 and PV2, and four were PV3 serotypes of the Sabin vaccine strains. The data demonstrated the presence of PV1, PV2, and PV3 Sabin vaccine strains in children with acute gastroenteritis in Chiang Mai, Thailand. J. Med. Virol. 89:775-781, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Brote de gastroenteritis por agua potable de suministro público Waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis transmitted through the public water supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Godoy

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La potabilidad del agua induce a descartar el posible origen hídrico de los brotes. El objetivo fue investigar un brote de gastroenteritis por agua potable de suministro público. Métodos: Después de la notificación de un brote de gastroenteritis en el municipio de Baqueira (Valle de Arán se diseñó un estudio epidemiológico de cohortes retrospectivo. Mediante un muestreo sistemático se eligió a 87 personas hospedadas en los hoteles y a 62 alojadas en diferentes apartamentos. Se recogió información sobre 4 factores (consumo de agua de la red, bocadillos, agua y alimentos en las pistas de esquí y presencia de síntomas. Se determinó la existencia de cloro, se analizó el agua de la red y se realizó un coprocultivo a 4 enfermos. La implicación de cada factor se determinó con el riesgo relativo (RR y su intervalo de confianza (IC del 95%. Resultados: La incidencia de gastroenteritis fue del 51,0% (76/149. Los porcentajes de los síntomas fueron los siguientes: fiebre, 27,0%; diarrea, 87,5%; náuseas, 50,7%; vómitos, 30,3%, y dolor abdominal, 80,0%. El único factor que presentó un riesgo estadísticamente significativo fue el consumo de agua de la red (RR = 11,0; IC del 95%, 1,6-74,7. La calificación sanitaria del agua fue de potabilidad. Se observó un defecto de situación del clorador en el depósito, que fue corregido. Se recomendó incrementar aún más las concentraciones de cloro, lo cual se acompañó de una disminución de los casos. Los coprocultivos de los 4 enfermos fueron negativos para las enterobacterias investigadas. Conclusiones: El estudio demuestra la posibilidad de presentación de brotes hídricos por agua cualificada como potable y sugiere la necesidad de mejorar la investigación microbiológica (determinación de protozoos y virus en este tipo de brotes.Introduction: The chlorination of public water supplies has led researchers to largely discard drinking water as a potential source of

  9. Hospitalizations due to rotavirus gastroenteritis in Catalonia, Spain, 2003-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis among young children in Spain and worldwide. We evaluated hospitalizations due to community and hospital-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) and estimated related costs in children under 5 years old in Catalonia, Spain. Results We analyzed hospital discharge data from the Catalan Health Services regarding hospital admissions coded as infectious gastroenteritis in children under 5 for the period 2003-2008. In order to estimate admission incidence, we used population estimates for each study year published by the Statistic Institut of Catalonia (Idescat). The costs associated with hospital admissions due to rotavirus diarrhea were estimated for the same years. A decision tree model was used to estimate the threshold cost of rotavirus vaccine to achieve cost savings from the healthcare system perspective in Catalonia. From 2003 through 2008, 10655 children under 5 years old were admitted with infectious gastroenteritis (IGE). Twenty-two percent of these admissions were coded as RVGE, yielding an estimated average annual incidence of 104 RVGE hospitalizations per 100000 children in Catalonia. Eighty seven percent of admissions for RVGE occurred during December through March. The mean hospital stay was 3.7 days, 0.6 days longer than for other IGE. An additional 892 cases of presumed nosocomial RVGE were detected, yielding an incidence of 2.5 cases per 1000 child admissions. Total rotavirus hospitalization costs due to community acquired RVGE for the years 2003 and 2008 were 431,593 and 809,224 €, respectively. According to the estimated incidence and hospitalization costs, immunization would result in health system cost savings if the cost of the vaccine was 1.93 € or less. At a vaccine cost of 187 € the incremental cost per hospitalization prevented is 195,388 € (CI 95% 159,300; 238,400). Conclusions The burden of hospitalizations attributable to rotavirus appeared to be lower in

  10. Viral gastroenteritis in daily pediatric practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kracmarova, R.; Plisek, S.

    2011-01-01

    Diarrhoeal disease is one of the most common causes of an acute examination and hospitalisation of a child. Portion of a viral etiology of intestinal diseases is increasing in connection with an improvement of social and economical conditions. The most common viral agents are rotaviruses, caliciviruses, adenoviruses and astroviruses, but also other viruses cause an intestinal disease. The most severe clinical course is expected from the rotaviral and noroviral infection. The dehydratation, which could be less or more severe, often complicated the infection. The treatment is symptomatic. The most important role for the prevention of rotavirus disease is played by the vaccination. (author)

  11. Epstein-Barr virus associated central nervous system leiomyosarcoma occurring after renal transplantation: case report and review of the literature; Leiomyosarcome primitif du systeme nerveux central associe au virus d'Epstein-Barr (EBV) et survenu apres transplantation renale: a propos d'un cas et revue de la litterature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahri, A.; Noel, G.; Feuvret, L.; Jauffret, E.; Brun, B.; Mazeron, J.J.; Baillet, F. [Centre des Tumeurs, Groupe Hospitalier Universitaire Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Feuvret, L. [Centre de Protontherapie d' Orsay, 91 (France); Figuerella-Branger, D. [Hopital de la Timone, Service d' Anatomopathologie, 13 - Marseille (France); Goncalves, A. [Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Service d' Oncologie Medicale, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2003-10-01

    Central nervous system leiomyosarcomas are extremely rare, however, they became more frequent among immuno-deficient patients, either in a patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), or after organ transplantation. The data of the literature indicate that the infection by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays a causal role in the development of these tumours but its precise role in the onco-genesis remains unresolved. We report a new case of EBV associated leiomyosarcoma of the left cavernous sinus occurring after renal transplantation. The epidemiological, clinical, pathological and therapeutic characteristics of these tumours are discussed. (authors)

  12. Chikungunya virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikungunya virus infection; Chikungunya ... Where Chikungunya is Found Before 2013, the virus was found in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Indian and Pacific oceans. In late 2013, outbreaks occurred for the first time in the ...

  13. Nosocomial outbreak of neonatal gastroenteritis caused by a new serotype 4, subtype 4B human rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerna, G; Forster, J; Parea, M; Sarasini, A; Di Matteo, A; Baldanti, F; Langosch, B; Schmidt, S; Battaglia, M

    1990-07-01

    A nosocomial outbreak of rotavirus gastroenteritis involving 52 newborns occurred between June and September 1988 at the University Children's Hospital of Freiburg, Federal Republic of Germany. Stools from 27 representative patients were examined for rotavirus serotypes, using a monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The electropherotype was also examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of genomic RNA. As many as 18 patients were found to be infected by serotype 4, subtype 4B strain, and in all of them the same electropherotype was detected. Although rotavirus from the remaining nine patients could not be typed, the electropherotype in four was identical to that of the serotype 4, subtype 4B strain. Thus, most of the patients in the outbreak were infected by the same rotavirus strain. Retrospective epidemiological studies showed that the 4B strain began to circulate at the hospital in January 1988, whereas only rotavirus serotypes 1, 3, and 4A were detected in 1985-1987. The primary case of the outbreak was presumably a newborn with acute gastroenteritis, admitted to the hospital from a small maternity unit in the same urban area. During the outbreak, 12 of 44 healthy newborns in the nurseries of the Children's Hospital and other maternity hospitals were found to be asymptomatic rotavirus carriers, and in three of the newborns the same 4B strain was detected. This is the first reported outbreak caused by a serotype 4, subtype 4B strain.

  14. International Standardisation of a Method for Detection of Human Pathogenic Viruses in Molluscan Shellfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lees, David; Schultz, Anna Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    The viruses primarily associated with shellfish-borne illness are norovirus, causing gastroenteritis and hepatitis A virus (HAV). Recent years have seen a proliferation of publications on methods for detection of these viruses in shellfish using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, currently...

  15. Brote de gastroenteritis por agua potable de suministro público

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godoy P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La potabilidad del agua induce a descartar el posible origen hídrico de los brotes. El objetivo fue investigar un brote de gastroenteritis por agua potable de suministro público. Métodos: Después de la notificación de un brote de gastroenteritis en el municipio de Baqueira (Valle de Arán se diseñó un estudio epidemiológico de cohortes retrospectivo. Mediante un muestreo sistemático se eligió a 87 personas hospedadas en los hoteles y a 62 alojadas en diferentes apartamentos. Se recogió información sobre 4 factores (consumo de agua de la red, bocadillos, agua y alimentos en las pistas de esquí y presencia de síntomas. Se determinó la existencia de cloro, se analizó el agua de la red y se realizó un coprocultivo a 4 enfermos. La implicación de cada factor se determinó con el riesgo relativo (RR y su intervalo de confianza (IC del 95%. Resultados: La incidencia de gastroenteritis fue del 51,0% (76/149. Los porcentajes de los síntomas fueron los siguientes: fiebre, 27,0%; diarrea, 87,5%; náuseas, 50,7%; vómitos, 30,3%, y dolor abdominal, 80,0%. El único factor que presentó un riesgo estadísticamente significativo fue el consumo de agua de la red (RR = 11,0; IC del 95%, 1,6-74,7. La calificación sanitaria del agua fue de potabilidad. Se observó un defecto de situación del clorador en el depósito, que fue corregido. Se recomendó incrementar aún más las concentraciones de cloro, lo cual se acompañó de una disminución de los casos. Los coprocultivos de los 4 enfermos fueron negativos para las enterobacterias investigadas. Conclusiones: El estudio demuestra la posibilidad de presentación de brotes hídricos por agua cualificada como potable y sugiere la necesidad de mejorar la investigación microbiológica (determinación de protozoos y virus en este tipo de brotes.

  16. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis Presenting as Intestinal Obstruction - A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Krishnappa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis is a rare disease characterized by infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract by an increased number of eosinophils as compared to the normal. The anatomic location and intensity of the infiltrate decides the varied clinical symptomatology with which these patients present. The present report deals with four cases, all presenting with clinical signs of intestinal obstruction A laparotomy performed revealed a stricture in the first case, superficial ulcers and adhesions in the second case, an ileocaecal mass in the third case and volvulus formation in the fourth case. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis was confirmed on histopathology in all the four cases. All the four patients experienced relief of symptoms after resection. It is essential to diagnose the disease to differentiate it from other conditions presenting as intestinal obstruction. The cases are presented because of the rarity of occurrence and presentation. Relevant literature has been reviewed.

  17. An Atypical Case of Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis Presenting as Hypovolemic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martillo, Miguel; Abed, Jean; Herman, Michael; Abed, Elie; Shi, Wenjing; Munot, Khushboo; Mankal, Pavan Kumar; Gurunathan, Rajan; Ionescu, Gabriel; Kotler, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon condition characterized by focal or diffuse infiltration of eosinophils in the gastrointestinal tract in the absence of secondary causes. The pathogenesis of this condition is not well understood and its clinical presentation depends on the segment and layer of the gastrointestinal tract affected. The definition of eosinophilic gastroenteritis may be difficult, as the normal ranges of eosinophil numbers in normal and abnormal gastric and intestinal mucosa are not standardized. We present the case of a 59-year-old male who came to the hospital with hypovolemic shock and lethargy secondary to severe diarrhea. Laboratory analysis was significant for peripheral eosinophilia, and pathology from both the duodenum and colon showed marked eosinophilic infiltration.

  18. An Atypical Case of Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis Presenting as Hypovolemic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Martillo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon condition characterized by focal or diffuse infiltration of eosinophils in the gastrointestinal tract in the absence of secondary causes. The pathogenesis of this condition is not well understood and its clinical presentation depends on the segment and layer of the gastrointestinal tract affected. The definition of eosinophilic gastroenteritis may be difficult, as the normal ranges of eosinophil numbers in normal and abnormal gastric and intestinal mucosa are not standardized. We present the case of a 59-year-old male who came to the hospital with hypovolemic shock and lethargy secondary to severe diarrhea. Laboratory analysis was significant for peripheral eosinophilia, and pathology from both the duodenum and colon showed marked eosinophilic infiltration.

  19. MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE GASTROENTERITIS IN CHILDREN: WHAT IS NEW?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Zakharova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High prevalence of acute enteric infections in children, the majority of which affects infants, determines the necessity of development of modern recommendation on diagnostics and treatment of such conditions. The authors show data on etiology of enteric infections and results of various Russian and international research on efficacy of treatment of acute gastroenteritis, including information about sorbents, probiotics, antiemetic agents and antibacterial drugs usage. Recommendations on treatment of acute gastroenteritis are based on the modern protocol of the European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterologists, Hepatologists and Nutritionists (ESPGHAN, which was published in 2008. According to these recommendations, oral rehydration is one of the main components of treatment, decreasing children’s mortality rates. However due to the absence of the effect of this measure on the intestinal peristalsis, duration of the diarrhea and concomitant symptoms (abdominal pain and distension, additional therapy is necessary. In Russia combinations of enterosorbents and probiotics are used in order to relieve such conditions.

  20. ROTAVIRUS INFECTION. HOW TO REALLY PROTECT CHILDREN FROM SEVERE GASTROENTERITIS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Grechukha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the statistics of the recent 5 years, the share of rotavirus gastroenterites is 44-47% of all acute intestinal infections in children under 5 years of age in the Russian Federation. Up to 5% of mortality rate in children under 5 years of age is connected with rotavirus gastroenteritis. Rotavirus gastroenteritis takes an especially severe course in children of 6-24 months of age. The only reliable method of preventing this infection is vaccination. The authors present information on the rotavirus strains dominant in Russia and abroad, efficacy and safety of immunization with a pentavalent vaccine and the recommended schemes of its administration. This vaccine is registered in the Russian Federation; it is to be first used in the nearest future.

  1. An outbreak of Salmonella gastroenteritis in an urban jail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcabes, P; O'Sullivan, B; Nadal, E; Mouzon, M

    1988-12-01

    An outbreak of gastroenteritis in New York City's largest jail involved 145 cases over a two-month period. The outbreak was unusual in that two Salmonella strains (serogroups B and D) were involved. Management of the outbreak involved screening kitchen workers by culture of stool samples, and education regarding personal hygiene. Obstacles to investigation and management of the outbreak arose out of the special nature of the jail environment; these included jurisdictional problems and high turnover of the inmate population.

  2. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis as a Rare Cause of Recurrent Epigastric Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Safari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE is a rare inflammatory disorder of gastrointestinal tract characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the bowel wall. It can mimic many gastrointestinal disorders due to its wide spectrum of presentations. Diagnose is mostly based on excluding other disorders and a high suspicion. Here we report a case of 26 year old man with a history of sever epigastric pain followed by nausea, vomiting since a few days before admission with final diagnosis of EGE.

  3. Salmonella Typhimurium gastroenteritis leading to chronic prosthetic vascular graft infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinan, Milo; Clarke, Michael; Dallman, Tim; Peart, Steven; Wilson, Deborah; Weiand, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Introduction. It is estimated up to 6 % of prosthetic vascular grafts become infected. Staphylococcus aureus is predominant in early infection and coagulase-negative staphylococci are predominant in late infections. Enterobacteriaceae cause 14-40 % of prosthetic vascular graft infections. This is, to our knowledge the first reported case of Salmonella gastroenteritis causing chronic prosthetic vascular graft infection (PVGI). Case presentation. A 57 years old lady presented with signs and symptoms of prosthetic vascular graft infection. Three years earlier, she had undergone a prosthetic axillo-femoral bypass graft for critical limb ischaemia. The infected prosthetic vascular graft was removed and Salmonella Typhimurium was isolated on culture. In the intervening period, Salmonella Typhimurium was isolated from a faecal specimen, collected during an episode of acute gastroenteritis. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) showed that the respective Salmonella Typhimurium isolates differed by only a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Salmonella Typhimurium was not isolated on culture of a faecal specimen collected five days following cessation of antimicrobial therapy. Six months after removal of the prosthetic graft, the patient remains under follow-up for her peripheral vascular disease, which currently requires no further surgical intervention. Conclusion. This case has clear implications for the management of chronic PVGI. It is vital to collect high-quality surgical specimens for microbiological analysis and empirical choices of antibiotics are unlikely to cover all potential pathogens. It may also be prudent to enquire about a history of acute gastroenteritis when assessing patients presenting with chronic PVGI.

  4. The sialic acid binding activity of the S protein facilitates infection by porcine transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enjuanes Luis

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV has a sialic acid binding activity that is believed to be important for enteropathogenicity, but that has so far appeared to be dispensable for infection of cultured cells. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of sialic acid binding for the infection of cultured cells under unfavorable conditions, and comparison of TGEV strains and mutants, as well as the avian coronavirus IBV concerning their dependence on the sialic acid binding activity. Methods The infectivity of different viruses was analyzed by a plaque assay after adsorption times of 5, 20, and 60 min. Prior to infection, cultured cells were either treated with neuraminidase to deplete sialic acids from the cell surface, or mock-treated. In a second approach, pre-treatment of the virus with porcine intestinal mucin was performed, followed by the plaque assay after a 5 min adsorption time. A student's t-test was used to verify the significance of the results. Results Desialylation of cells only had a minor effect on the infection by TGEV strain Purdue 46 when an adsorption period of 60 min was allowed for initiation of infection. However, when the adsorption time was reduced to 5 min the infectivity on desialylated cells decreased by more than 60%. A TGEV PUR46 mutant (HAD3 deficient in sialic acid binding showed a 77% lower titer than the parental virus after a 5 min adsorption time. After an adsorption time of 60 min the titer of HAD3 was 58% lower than that of TGEV PUR46. Another TGEV strain, TGEV Miller, and IBV Beaudette showed a reduction in infectivity after neuraminidase treatment of the cultured cells irrespective of the virion adsorption time. Conclusions Our results suggest that the sialic acid binding activity facilitates the infection by TGEV under unfavorable environmental conditions. The dependence on the sialic acid binding activity for an efficient infection differs in the analyzed TGEV strains.

  5. Viral Etiologies of Acute Dehydrating Gastroenteritis in Pakistani Children: Confounding Role of Parechoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Masroor Alam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite substantial interventions in the understanding and case management of acute gastroenteritis, diarrheal diseases are still responsible for a notable amount of childhood deaths. Although the rotavirus is known to cause a considerable burden of pediatric diarrheal cases, the roles of other viruses remain undefined for the Pakistani population. This study was based on tertiary care hospital surveillance, from January 2009 to December 2010, including the detection of rotavirus, norovirus, astrovirus, and human parechovirus in children under the age of five using serological or molecular assays. Rotavirus, human parechovirus, norovirus, and astrovirus were detected in 66%, 21%, 19.5%, and 8.5% subjects, respectively. Human parechovirus genotypes, determined through analysis of VP1 gene sequences, showed a great diversity among co-circulating strains. Eighty percent of hospitalized children had dual or multiple viral infections, while 98% parechovirus positive cases were co-infected with rotavirus. The remarkable diversity of viruses associated with the childhood diarrhea in Pakistan calls for large-scale epidemiological surveys, coupled with case control studies, to ascertain their role in clinical manifestations. In addition, these findings also highlight the need for the implementation of up-to-date health interventions, such as the inclusion of a rotavirus vaccine in routine immunization programs for the improvement of quality in child health care.

  6. Prevalence of naturally occurring NS5A resistance-associated substitutions in patients infected with hepatitis C virus subtype 1a, 1b, and 3a, co-infected or not with HIV in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta, Fernanda; Gaspareto, Karine Vieira; Lisboa-Neto, Gaspar; Carrilho, Flair José; Mendes-Correa, Maria Cássia; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2017-11-13

    Non-structural 5A protein (NS5A) resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) have been identified in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), even prior to exposure to direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). Selection for these variants occurs rapidly during treatment and, in some cases, leads to antiviral treatment failure. DAAs are currently the standard of care for hepatitis C treatment in many parts of the world. Nevertheless, in Brazil, the prevalence of pre-existing NS5A RASs is largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the frequency of naturally occurring NS5A RASs in Brazilian patients infected with HCV as either a monoinfection or coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Direct Sanger sequencing of the NS5A region was performed in 257 DAA-naïve patients chronically infected with HCV (156 monoinfected with HCV and 101 coinfected with HIV/HCV). The frequencies of specific RASs in monoinfected patients were 14.6% for HCV GT-1a (M28 V and Q30H/R), 6.0% for GT-1b (L31F/V and Y93H), and 22.6% for GT-3a (A30K and Y93H). For HIV/HCV-coinfected patients, the frequencies of RAS were 3.9% for GT-1a (M28 T and Q30H/R), and 11.1% for GT-1b (Y93H); no RASs were found in GT-3a sequences. Substitutions that may confer resistance to NS5A inhibitors exist at baseline in Brazilian DAA-naïve patients infected with HCV GT-1a, -1b, and -3a. Standardization of RAS definitions is needed to improve resistance analyses and to facilitate comparisons of substitutions reported across studies worldwide. Therapeutic strategies should be optimized to efficiently prevent DAA treatment failure due to selection for RASs, especially in difficult-to-cure patients.

  7. Comprehensive Screening for Naturally Occurring Hepatitis C Virus Resistance to Direct-Acting Antivirals in the NS3, NS5A, and NS5B Genes in Worldwide Isolates of Viral Genotypes 1 to 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño-Galindo, Juan Ángel; Salvatierra, Karina; González-Candelas, Fernando; López-Labrador, F Xavier

    2016-04-01

    There is no comprehensive study available on the natural hepatitis C virus (HCV) polymorphism in sites associated with resistance including all viral genotypes which may present variable susceptibilities to particular direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). This study aimed to analyze the frequencies, genetic barriers, and evolutionary histories of naturally occurring resistance-associated variants (RAVs) in the six main HCV genotypes. A comprehensive analysis of up to 103 RAVs was performed in 2,901, 2,216, and 1,344 HCV isolates for the NS3, NS5A, and NS5B genes, respectively. We report significant intergenotypic differences in the frequencies of natural RAVs for these three HCV genes. In addition, we found a low genetic barrier for the generation of new RAVs, irrespective of the viral genotype. Furthermore, in 1,126 HCV genomes, including sequences spanning the three genes, haplotype analysis revealed a remarkably high frequency of viruses carrying more than one natural RAV to DAAs (53% of HCV-1a, 28.5% of HCV-1b, 67.1% of HCV-6, and 100% of genotype 2, 3, 4, and 5 haplotypes). With the exception of HCV-1a, the most prevalent haplotypes showed RAVs in at least two different viral genes. Finally, evolutionary analyses revealed that, while most natural RAVs appeared recently, others have been efficiently transmitted over time and cluster in well-supported clades. In summary, and despite the observed high efficacy of DAA-based regimens, we show that naturally occurring RAVs are common in all HCV genotypes and that there is an overall low genetic barrier for the selection of resistance mutations. There is a need for natural DAA resistance profiling specific for each HCV genotype. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Socio-demographic, Clinical and Laboratory Features of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Children Treated in Pediatric Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Berisha, Majlinda; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Kolgeci, Selim; Avdiu, Muharrem; Jakupi, Xhevat; Hoxha, Rina; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of work was presentation of several socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics of gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. The examinees and methods: The examinees were children under the age of five years treated at the Pediatric Clinic due to acute gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. Rotavirus is isolated by method chromatographic immunoassay by Cer Test Biotec. Results: From the total number of patients (850) suffering from acute gastroenteritis, feces test on bac...

  9. Socio-demographic, Epidemiological and Environmental Determinants of Acute Gastroenteritis in Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir Prafulbhai Rupani

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Socio-demographic factors (higher socio-economic status, epidemiological correlates (change in taste of water, another family member been affected with acute gastroenteritis and eating outside food and environmental determinants (waste disposal in a common dump and waste accumulation around house significantly determines the occurrence of cases of acute gastroenteritis. Keywords: case-control studies;diarrhea; epidemiologic determinants; gastroenteritis; social determinants of health. | PubMed

  10. Effect of non-stationary climate on infectious gastroenteritis transmission in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Onozuka, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Local weather factors are widely considered to influence the transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. Few studies, however, have examined the non-stationary relationships between global climatic factors and transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. We analyzed monthly data for cases of infectious gastroenteritis in Fukuoka, Japan from 2000 to 2012 using cross-wavelet coherency analysis to assess the pattern of associations between indices for the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El Niño Sou...

  11. Community-Acquired Rotavirus Gastroenteritis Compared with Adenovirus and Norovirus Gastroenteritis in Italian Children: A Pedianet Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Donà

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rotavirus (RV is the commonest pathogen in the hospital and primary care settings, followed by Adenovirus (AV and Norovirus (NV. Only few studies that assess the burden of RV gastroenteritis at the community level have been carried out. Objectives. To estimate incidence, disease characteristics, seasonal distribution, and working days lost by parents of RV, AV, and NV gastroenteritis leading to a family pediatrician (FP visit among children < 5 years. Methods. 12-month, observational, prospective, FP-based study has been carried out using Pedianet database. Results. RVGE incidence was 1.04 per 100 person-years with the highest incidence in the first 2 years of life. Incidences of AVGEs (1.74 and NVGEs (1.51 were slightly higher with similar characteristics regarding age distribution and symptoms. Risk of hospitalisation, access to emergency room (ER, and workdays lost from parents were not significantly different in RVGEs compared to the other viral infections. Conclusions. Features of RVGE in terms of hospitalisation length and indirect cost are lower than those reported in previous studies. Results of the present study reflect the large variability of data present in the literature. This observation underlines the utility of primary care networks for AGE surveillance and further studies on community-acquired gastroenteritis in children.

  12. An outbreak of norovirus-associated acute gastroenteritis associated with contaminated barrelled water in many schools in Zhejiang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Minyang; Song, Jianqiang; He, Fan; Qiu, Yinwei; Wu, Haocheng; Lu, Qinbao; Feng, Yan; Lin, Junfen; Chen, Enfu; Chai, Chengliang

    2017-01-01

    Objectives More than 900 students and teachers at many schools in Jiaxing city developed acute gastroenteritis in February 2014. An immediate epidemiological investigation was conducted to identify the pathogen, infection sources and route of transmission. Methods The probable cases and confirmed cases were defined as students or teachers with diarrhoea or vomiting present since the term began in February 2014. An active search was conducted for undiagnosed cases among students and teachers. Details such as demographic characteristics, gastrointestinal symptoms, and drinking water preference and frequency were collected via a uniform epidemiological questionnaire. A case-control study was implemented, and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Rectal swabs from several patients, food handlers and barrelled water factory workers, as well as water and food samples, were collected to test for potential bacteria and viruses. Results A total of 924 cases fit the definition of the probable case, including 8 cases of laboratory-confirmed norovirus infection at 13 schools in Jiaxing city between February 12 and February 21, 2014. The case-control study demonstrated that barrelled water was a risk factor (OR: 20.15, 95% CI: 2.59–156.76) and that bottled water and boiled barrelled water were protective factors (OR: 0.31, 95% CI: 0.13–0.70, and OR: 0.36, 95% CI: 0.16–0.77). A total of 11 rectal samples and 8 barrelled water samples were detected as norovirus-positive, and the genotypes of viral strains were the same (GII). The norovirus that contaminated the barrelled water largely came from the asymptomatic workers. Conclusions This acute gastroenteritis outbreak was caused by barrelled water contaminated by norovirus. The outbreak was controlled after stopping the supply of barrelled water. The barrelled water supply in China represents a potential source of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks due to the lack of surveillance and supervision

  13. Prospective study of the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in Danish children and their families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Iturriza, Miren; Faaborg-Andersen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    This was the first study to characterize the total burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) at both hospital and general physician (GP) clinics in Denmark, and also the first to confirm rotavirus (RV) as the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (GE) among children......This was the first study to characterize the total burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) at both hospital and general physician (GP) clinics in Denmark, and also the first to confirm rotavirus (RV) as the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (GE) among children...

  14. Molecular characterization of norovirus GII.17 detected in healthy adult, intussusception patient, and acute gastroenteritis children in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamrin, Pattara; Kumthip, Kattareeya; Yodmeeklin, Arpaporn; Supadej, Kanittapon; Ukarapol, Nuthapong; Thongprachum, Aksara; Okitsu, Shoko; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2016-10-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) have been recognized as a leading cause of sporadic cases and outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in all age groups. During the surveillance of NoVs in Chiang Mai, Thailand, four cases of the novel GII.17 NoVs were sporadically detected by RT-PCR in 2014-2015. The first case of GII.17 was detected in a healthy adult who worked for a restaurant. The second case was found in a pediatric patient who admitted to the hospital with intussusception. The third and fourth cases were found in acute gastroenteritis children. Phylogenetic analysis clearly demonstrated that GII.17 NoVs detected in this study were genetically closely related with the novel GII.17 Kawasaki reference strains. These four GII.17 NoV positive specimens were also tested by two immunochromatographic test kits in order to evaluate the sensitivity for GII.17 NoV detection. The viral loads in those specimens were determined by real-time RT-PCR. The sensitivity of GII.17 NoV detection varies by individual test kits and also depending on the amount of the viruses contained in the fecal specimens. In summary, our study reported the detection of novel GII.17 NoVs in a wide range of subjects with and without diarrhea. Therefore, continued comprehensive screening and genetic molecular characterization of NoV strains circulating in this area need to be further investigated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. An outbreak of gastroenteritis associated with astrovirus serotype 1 in a day care center, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMV Silva

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Between June 4th and June 20th1996 rotavirus, adenovirus, and astrovirus (HAstrV were investigated in fecal samples from 27 children under three years old with acute diarrhea, attending the Bertha Lutz day care center, in Rio de Janeiro. All fecal samples were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, enzyme immunoassays (EIA, and electron microscopy (EM. Nine of them (33% showed positive results for HAstrV by at least one of the employed methodologies. Eight were positive by RT-PCR and EIA, and six by EM. All positive samples were inoculated onto HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma cultured cells for HAstrV isolation and seven were positive after three passages. The sequencing analysis of eight RT-PCR products (449 bp from gene that codifies VP2 protein, showed a total nucleotide identity among them and 98% with HAstrV-1 (strain Oxford type 1. This is the first report of a gastroenteritis outbreak associated with HAstrv-1 in a day care center in Rio de Janeiro and it reinforces the importance of this virus in association with infantile acute gastroenteritis.

  16. Computer Viruses: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmion, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the early history and current proliferation of computer viruses that occur on Macintosh and DOS personal computers, mentions virus detection programs, and offers suggestions for how libraries can protect themselves and their users from damage by computer viruses. (LRW)

  17. An epidemiological perspective on gastroenteritis in child day care centers : Assessment of impact and risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enserink, R.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of gastroenteritis related to Dutch DCCs is substantial, particularly among the very young attendees. Attending a DCC roughly doubles a child’s probability of experiencing an episode of gastroenteritis that requires a visit to a general practitioner or hospital. A child might experience a

  18. Gastroenteritis and the novel picornaviruses aichi virus, cosavirus, saffold virus, and salivirus in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Alex Christian Yde; Gyhrs, Mette Louise; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2013-01-01

    During the last few years many new human picornaviruses have been discovered due to advances in metagenomics and other molecular biological approaches. The clinical significance and the occurrence are only sparsely described....

  19. Detection of rotavirus and other enteropathogens in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Havana, Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, María de Los Angeles; Tejero, Yahisel; Cordero, Yanislet; de Los Angeles León, María; Rodriguez, Misladys; Perez-Lastre, Jorge; Triana, Thelma; Guerra, Mabel; Ayllón, Lucía; Escalante, Gladys; Hadad, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to diagnose infections with rotavirus and other enteric pathogens in children under five years old with acute gastroenteritis and to identify the most common epidemiological and clinical characteristics of these pathogens. The study was conducted using 110 stool samples from the same number of children under five years old who were inpatients at three paediatric hospitals in Havana, Cuba, between October and December 2011. The samples were tested for rotavirus and other enteric pathogens using traditional and molecular microbiological methods. Pathogens were detected in 85 (77.3 %) of the children. Rotavirus was the most commonly found, appearing in 54.5 % of the children, followed by bacteria (29 %) and parasites (10.9 %). Other viral pathogens detected included adenovirus (6.4 %) and astrovirus (3.6 %). In rotavirus-positives cases, at least one other pathogen was detected, usually a bacterium (26.6 %). More than three episodes of watery diarrhea in 24 hours were observed in 78.3 % of the cases. Dehydration was found in 30 (50 %) rotavirus-positive children, of whom seven (11.6 %) were transferred to an intensive care unit due to complications of metabolic acidosis. Rotavirus was most commonly observed among children under 12 months old (65 %). The highest incidence of infection occurred in children who were under the care of a relative at home (78.3 %), had not been breastfed (65 %), or had been breastfed for less than six months (28.3 %). The genotype combinations most frequently found were G9P8 (28.3 %) and G1P8 (10 %). This study demonstrates the presence of rotavirus and other enteric pathogens as causes of gastroenteritis in hospitalized infants and young children in Cuba.

  20. Transmissible Gastroenteritis Coronavirus Genome Packaging Signal Is Located at the 5′ End of the Genome and Promotes Viral RNA Incorporation into Virions in a Replication-Independent Process

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, Lucia; Mateos-Gomez, Pedro A.; Capiscol, Carmen; del Palacio, Lorena; Enjuanes, Luis; Sola, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Preferential RNA packaging in coronaviruses involves the recognition of viral genomic RNA, a crucial process for viral particle morphogenesis mediated by RNA-specific sequences, known as packaging signals. An essential packaging signal component of transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) has been further delimited to the first 598 nucleotides (nt) from the 5′ end of its RNA genome, by using recombinant viruses transcribing subgenomic mRNA that included potential packaging signals. Th...

  1. Waterborne gastroenteritis outbreak at a scouting camp caused by two norovirus genogroups: GI and GII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Waarbeek, Henriëtte L G; Dukers-Muijrers, Nicole H T M; Vennema, Harry; Hoebe, Christian J P A

    2010-03-01

    A cross-border gastroenteritis outbreak at a scouting camp was associated with drinking water from a farmer's well. A retrospective cohort study was performed to identify size and source of the outbreak, as well as other characteristics. Epidemiological investigation included standardized questionnaires about sex, age, risk exposures, illness and family members. Stool and water (100mL) samples were analyzed for bacteria, viruses and parasites. Questionnaires were returned by 84 scouts (response rate 82%), mean age of 13 years. The primary attack rate was 85% (diarrhoea and/or vomiting). Drinking water was the strongest independent risk factor showing a dose-response effect with 50%, 75%, 75%, 93% and 96% case prevalence for 0, 1, 2-3, 4-5 and >5 glasses consumed, respectively. Norovirus (GI.2 Southampton and GII.7 Leeds) was detected in 51 stool specimens (75%) from ill scouts. Water analysis showed fecal contamination, but no norovirus. The secondary attack rate was 20%. This remarkable outbreak was caused by a point-source infection with two genogroups of noroviruses most likely transmitted by drinking water from a well. Finding a dose-response relationship was striking. Specific measures to reduce the risk of waterborne diseases, outbreak investigation and a good international public health network are important.

  2. Prevalence of enteropathogens and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern in puppies with hemorrhagic gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kokila Priya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Hemorrhagic gastroenteritis (HGE ranging from mild to severe forms is commonly encountered in puppies. The aim of the study was to identify the prevalence of common enteropathogens and the antibiotic sensitivity pattern in puppies reported with HGE. Materials and Methods: The canine HGE activity index, with little modification, was adopted to identify Grade III/ severely affected puppies below 6 months of age. Fecal polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay was employed to screen and compare the enteropathogens in puppies with hemorrhagic diarrhea and healthy control. Results: Canine parvovirus 2b was identified in 90.3% of the diarrheic and 10% of the non-diarrheic healthy puppies. Clostridium difficile was identified in all the diarrheic puppies and in 80% of the healthy puppies. Among the diarrheic puppies, 17.7% were positive for Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin, 9.7% were positive for C. perfringens alpha toxin, 6.4% were positive for Escherichia coli shiga toxin, 6.4% were positive for E. coli enterotoxin (LT, and 3.2% were positive for canine distemper virus. Whereas, none of the healthy puppies were positive for these bacteria and toxins. Fecal antibiotic sensitivity test pattern revealed gentamicin to be sensitive in 95% of the cases, azithromycin in 50%, enrofloxacin in 25%, cefotaxime in 20%, and tetracycline in 5% of the cases. Conclusion: Parvoviral enteritis is predominant among puppies. Yet, bacteria and their toxins also play an important role in HGE. Gentamicin has higher sensitivity against the enteropathogens associated with the condition.

  3. Comparison of 2 Assays for Diagnosing Rotavirus and Evaluating Vaccine Effectiveness in Children with Gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Tam, Ka Ian; Lyde, Freda C.; Payne, Daniel C.; Szilagyi, Peter; Edwards, Kathryn; Staat, Mary Allen; Weinberg, Geoffrey A.; Hall, Caroline B.; Chappell, James; McNeal, Monica; Gentsch, Jon R.; Bowen, Michael D.; Parashar, Umesh D.

    2013-01-01

    We compared rotavirus detection rates in children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and in healthy controls using enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) and semiquantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). We calculated rotavirus vaccine effectiveness using different laboratory-based case definitions to determine which best identified the proportion of disease that was vaccine preventable. Of 648 AGE patients, 158 (24%) were EIA positive, and 157 were also qRT-PCR positive. An additional 65 (10%) were qRT-PCR positive but EIA negative. Of 500 healthy controls, 1 was EIA positive and 24 (5%) were qRT-PCR positive. Rotavirus vaccine was highly effective (84% [95% CI 71%–91%]) in EIA-positive children but offered no significant protection (14% [95% CI −105% to 64%]) in EIA-negative children for whom virus was detected by qRT-PCR alone. Children with rotavirus detected by qRT-PCR but not by EIA were not protected by vaccination, suggesting that rotavirus detected by qRT-PCR alone might not be causally associated with AGE in all patients. PMID:23876518

  4. Effect of non-stationary climate on infectious gastroenteritis transmission in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke

    2014-06-01

    Local weather factors are widely considered to influence the transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. Few studies, however, have examined the non-stationary relationships between global climatic factors and transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. We analyzed monthly data for cases of infectious gastroenteritis in Fukuoka, Japan from 2000 to 2012 using cross-wavelet coherency analysis to assess the pattern of associations between indices for the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Infectious gastroenteritis cases were non-stationary and significantly associated with the IOD and ENSO (Multivariate ENSO Index [MEI], Niño 1 + 2, Niño 3, Niño 4, and Niño 3.4) for a period of approximately 1 to 2 years. This association was non-stationary and appeared to have a major influence on the synchrony of infectious gastroenteritis transmission. Our results suggest that non-stationary patterns of association between global climate factors and incidence of infectious gastroenteritis should be considered when developing early warning systems for epidemics of infectious gastroenteritis.

  5. Experimental infection of Hawai'i 'Amakihi (hemignathus virens) with West Nile virus and competence of a co-occurring vector, culex quinquefasciatus: potential impacts on endemic Hawaiian avifauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Dennis; Hofmeister, Erik K.; Atkinson, C.T.; Porter, R.E.; Dusek, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduced mosquito-borne avian disease is a major limiting factor in the recovery and restoration of native Hawaiian forest birds. Annual epizootics of avian pox (Avipoxvirus) and avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) likely led to the extinction of some species and continue to impact populations of susceptible Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae). The introduction of a novel pathogen, such as West Nile virus (WNV), could result in further population declines and extinctions. During September and October 2004, we infected Hawai'i' Amakihi (Hemignathus virens) with a North American isolate of WNV by needle inoculation and mosquito bite to observe susceptibility, mortality, and illness in this endemic passerine, and to determine the vector competence of the co-occurring, introduced mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus. All experimentally infected Hawai'i ;Amakihi became viremic, with a mean titer >10(5) plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml, and they experienced clinical signs ranging from anorexia and lethargy to ataxia. The fatality rate among needle-inoculated Hawai'i' Amakihi (n=16) was 31.3%, but mortality in free-ranging birds is likely to increase due to predation, starvation, thermal stress, and concomitant infections of avian malaria and pox. Surviving Hawai'i' Amakihi seem to clear WNV from the peripheral blood by 7-10 days postinfection (DPI), and neutralizing antibodies were detected from 9 to 46 DPI. In transmission trials, Hawaiian Cx. quinquefasciatus proved to be a competent vector and Hawai'i Amakihi an adequate amplification host of WNV, suggesting that epizootic WNV could readily become an additional limiting factor of some native Hawaiian bird populations.

  6. Oral versus intravenous rehydration therapy in severe gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, J; Ghavami, F; Nowrouzi, Z; Fouladvand, B; Malek, M; Rezaeian, M; Emami, M

    1985-01-01

    A controlled, randomised trial comparing the results of oral rehydration therapy with those of intravenous fluid treatment in 470 children with severe gastroenteritis was undertaken. The oral rehydration therapy was divided into two phases--a rehydration phase that used high sodium isotonic fluid at 40 ml/kg per hour and a maintenance phase using low sodium isotonic fluid (sodium 40, potassium 30, bicarbonate 25, chloride 45, and dextrose 130 mmol/l). The results indicate that oral rehydration treatment, used according to this protocol, is successful in treating severe diarrhoea and dehydration, and has considerable advantages over intravenous fluid therapy in reducing complications associated with the treatment of hypernatraemia, in promoting rapid correction of hypokalaemia and acidosis, in decreasing the duration of diarrhoea, and in promoting a greater weight gain at hospital discharge. PMID:3901934

  7. Evaluation of Urinary Tract Infection in Children With Gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleimani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Urinary tract infection (UTI is the second most common bacterial infection in infancy and childhood with peaking in infancy and toilet training. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate UTI in patients with diarrhea. Patients and Methods This case-control study was conducted on 200 participants, 100 were patients with acute gastroenteritis and the other 100 were controls who referred to the clinic for routine checkup. UTI was defined as two positive urine cultures with > 105 cfu/mL. If white blood cells were more than 10/mm3 in un-centrifuged urine it would be considered pyuria and more than one microorganism in 10 oil immersion fields as bacteriuria. Analysis was conducted using SPSS ver. 16 with application of chi-square test and 0.05 as significant levels. Results The distribution of these 200 children were 115 (57.5% and 85 (42.5% for females and males respectively. The gender and age distribution in case and control groups showed non-significant association. In urine culture it was observed that 27 individuals were positive and there were seven healthy children. The number of children with positive urine culture was higher than that of their counterparts significantly (P = 0.0001. Relationship between urine culture and age groups showed that the number of participants with positive urine culture was higher in children with age of two months to two years but it was not significant (P = 0.54. Conclusions It was demonstrated that, considerable percentage of UTI existed in the gastroenteritis diseases. Early treatment of UTI in patients would reduce UTI complications.

  8. Comparison between specific and multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for detection of hepatitis A virus, poliovirus and rotavirus in experimentally seeded oysters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Coelho

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of gastroenteritis have occurred among consumers of raw or undercooked shellfish harvested from faecally polluted waters. A multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was applied for the simultaneous detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV, poliovirus (PV and simian rotavirus (RV-SA11 and compared with specific primers for each genome sequence. Three amplified DNA products representing HAV (192 bp, PV (394 bp and RV (278 bp were identified when positive controls were used. However, when tested on experimentally contaminated raw oysters, this method was not able to detect the three viruses simultaneously. This is probably due to the low concentration of viral RNAs present in oyster extract which were partially lost during the extracts preparation.

  9. Co-Occurring Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the mental health field. Alcohol and Drug Abuse, Addiction and Co-occurring Disorders: Co-occurring Disorders and ... 500 Montgomery Street, Suite 820 Alexandria, VA 22314 Phone (703) 684.7722 Toll Free (800) 969.6642 ...

  10. Viruses of foodborne origin: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd EC

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ewen CD Todd,1,2 Judy D Greig3 1Ewen Todd Consulting LLC, Okemos, MI, USA; 2Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon; 3Division of Public Health Risk Sciences, Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Public Health Agency of Canada, Guelph, ON, Canada Abstract: Enteric viruses are major contributors to foodborne disease, and include adenovirus, astrovirus, rotavirus, sapovirus, hepatitis A and E viruses, and norovirus. From a foodborne transmission perspective, norovirus is the most important; however, hepatitis A is associated with more serious illness. Foodborne viruses are transmitted through contaminated food, but also in combination with person-to-person contact or through environmental contamination. These viruses survive well in the environment, are excreted in abundance in feces, and have a low infectious dose, all of which facilitate spread within a community. Many colonized individuals experience mild gastroenteritis lasting a few days or are asymptomatic, although viral excretion may continue over days or weeks. Severe illness tends to be restricted to the very young and elderly, especially in closed communities such as schools and homes for the aged. In the USA, norovirus is considered to be responsible for two thirds of all foodborne illnesses occurring in a wide range of institutional settings, including schools, colleges, child care centers, cruise ships, prisons, and soldiers on campaign. Norovirus outbreaks also occur at one-time events, such as banquets, wedding receptions, birthday parties, and potluck meals, and are most often introduced by infected food workers producing, preparing, or serving food, or through self-service buffets. Often the infections are introduced from the community into institutions where they can infect the majority of residents unless quickly controlled. In countries where economic assessments have been completed

  11. Intestinal perforation in a two-year-old child with eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agertoft, A; Husby, S; Høst, A

    1991-01-01

    A two-year-old boy underwent a laparatomy for an intestinal perforation due to eosinophilic gastroenteritis. He had marked peripheral blood eosinophilia and a small duodenal biopsy showed heavy eosinophilic infiltration in the mucosa. After 1 1/2 year on a restricted diet, a control duodenal biopsy...... showed only slight eosinophilia. Perforation of the small intestine is a rare but serious complication in eosinophilic gastroenteritis....

  12. Management of acute gastroenteritis in healthy children in Lebanon - A national survey

    OpenAIRE

    Alameddine, Aouni; Mourad, Sawsan; Rifai, Nahida

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute gastroenteritis remains a common condition among infants and children throughout the world. In 1996, The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) revised its recommendations for the treatment of infants and children with acute gastroenteritis. Aim: The purpose of this survey was to determine how closely current treatment among Lebanese pediatricians compares with the AAP recommendations and to determine the impact of such management on the healthcare system. Patients and Methods...

  13. Enterobiliary Fistula as a Complication of Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis: a Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han Myun; Woo, Ji Young [Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon disease with variable clinical features characterized by eosinophilic infiltration. Clinical manifestations range from non-specific gastrointestinal complaints such as nausea, vomiting, crampy abdominal pain, and diarrhea to specific findings such as malabsorption, protein loosing enteropathy, luminal obstruction, eosinophilic ascites and effusion. We report here on a case of eosinophilic gastroenteritis causing enterobiliary fistula which is an extremely unusual complication

  14. Enterobiliary Fistula as a Complication of Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis: a Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Myun; Woo, Ji Young

    2008-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon disease with variable clinical features characterized by eosinophilic infiltration. Clinical manifestations range from non-specific gastrointestinal complaints such as nausea, vomiting, crampy abdominal pain, and diarrhea to specific findings such as malabsorption, protein loosing enteropathy, luminal obstruction, eosinophilic ascites and effusion. We report here on a case of eosinophilic gastroenteritis causing enterobiliary fistula which is an extremely unusual complication

  15. Gastroenteritis attributable to rotavirus in hospitalized Saudi Arabian children in the period 2007–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohamed; Azhar, Esam; Kao, Moujahed; Al-Kaiedi, Noura; Alhani, Hatim; Al Olayan, Ibrahim; Pawinski, Robert; Gopala, Kusuma; Kandeil, Walid; Anis, Sameh; Van Doorn, Leen Jan; DeAntonio, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Rotavirus (RV) is a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis (GE) in children across the world. As there is a lack of epidemiological data for RV gastroenteritis (RVGE) in Saudi Arabia, this hospital-based study was designed to estimate the disease burden of RVGE and assess the prevalent RV types in Saudi children younger than 5 years of age. Patients and methods Children hospitalized for acute GE were enrolled at four pediatric referral hospitals in Saudi Arabia. The study was conducted from February 2007 to March 2008 and used the World Health Organization’s generic protocol for RVGE surveillance. The Vesikari severity scale was used to assess the severity of RVGE. Stool samples were tested for RV using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Samples were further typed by reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction and hybridization assay for determining the G and P types. Results A total of 1,007 children were enrolled; the final analysis included 970 children, of whom 395 were RV positive, 568 were RV negative, and seven had unknown RV status. The proportion of RVGE among GE hospitalizations was 40.7% (95% confidence interval: 37.6–43.9). The highest percentage of RVGE hospitalizations (83.1%) was seen in children younger than 2 years of age. The highest proportion of RV among GE hospitalizations was in June 2007 with 57.1%. The most common RV types detected were G1P[8] (49.3%), G1G9P[8] (13.2%), and G9P[8] (9.6%). Before hospitalization, severe GE episodes occurred in 88.1% RV-positive and 79.6% RV-negative children. Overall, 94% children had recovered by the time they were discharged. Two children (one RV positive and one RV negative) died due to GE complications. Conclusion RVGE is responsible for a high proportion of hospitalizations in Saudi children younger than 5 years of age. Routine RV vaccination has therefore been introduced into the national immunization program and may help reduce the morbidity, mortality, and disease burden

  16. Intravenous rehydration for gastroenteritis: how long does it really take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Brenda J; Ozuah, Philip O

    2004-04-01

    For treatment of mild to moderate dehydration arising from viral gastroenteritis, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends oral rehydration therapy over a 4-hour period. However, oral rehydration therapy remains largely underused by emergency physicians. Studies suggest that a major barrier is a perception that the time requirement for oral rehydration therapy is too long relative to intravenous (IV) hydration. : To test the hypothesis that children who receive IV hydration for gastroenteritis spend significantly less than 4 hours in the emergency department (ED). A prospective case series involving a consecutive sample of 549 children treated with IV hydration for mild to moderate dehydration at an urban pediatric ED. Treatment time was defined as period elapsed between when a physician placed a patient in an ED room and when he/she discharged the patient. We excluded time spent in the waiting room before seeing a physician. Using a standardized procedure, we collected data in September/October 2000 (fall), November 2000 to January 2001 (winter), and April/May 2001 (spring). To provide a measure of average pass-through time at this ED, we also collected data on all patients treated during consecutive 7-day periods in the fall (n = 502), winter (n = 776), and spring (n = 653). We performed univariate analysis of continuous variables using t tests for independent samples. 549 subjects received IV treatment for dehydration; of whom 55% were female, and mean age was 9.7 years. Treatment time for patients undergoing IV hydration exceeded 4 hours (mean = 5.4 +/- 2.4 hours; median = 5.0 hours). Mean time for IV treatment of dehydration was significantly longer than the mean time for treating other patients (5.4 vs. 1.2 hours, P Pediatrics for oral rehydration. The data did not support the perception by emergency physicians that children treated with IV hydration spend significantly less time than 4 hours in the ED. These findings have implications for addressing one

  17. An atypical rotavirus detected in a child with gastroenteritis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. G. Pereira

    1983-09-01

    Full Text Available Particles morphologically identical to rotaviruses were found in the faeces of a nine week-old child with gastroenteritis. Analysis of the viral RNA genome by polyacrylamine gel electrophoresis revealed 10 bands (probably 11 segments some of wich differed in migration rate from those of the great majority of rotaviruses infecting man and other animal hosts. The virus was not detected by a highly sensitive enzyme immunoassay (ELISA and therefore probably lacked the crossreactive antigen(s shared by the majority rotaviruses. This was the only strain with such behaviour among 230 rotaviruses of human origin examined in this laboratory since 1979. The implications of the existence of non-crossreactive rotaviruses are discussed.Partículas morfologicamente idênticas a rotavirus foram encontradas nas fezes de uma criança de dois meses com gastroenterite. Análise do genoma viral por eletroforese em gel de poliacrilamida revelou 10 faixas (provavelmente 11 segmentos de RNA, algumas das quais diferem em velocidade de migração das observadas na grande maioria de rotavirus de hospedeiros humanos e de diversas espécies de animais. O vírus não foi revelado por um ensaio imuno-enzimático de alta sensibilidade, o que sugere a ausência do antígeno de grupo que da reações cruzadas entre a maioria dos rotavirus. O vírus descrito no presente trabalho foi o único com tal comportamento entre 230 amostras analisadas por nós desde 1979. A relevância de existência de rotavirus não relacionados antigenicamente a outros membros do grupo é discutida.

  18. Large multistate outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis associated with frozen strawberries, Germany, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, H; Faber, M; Wilking, H; Haller, S; Höhle, M; Schielke, A; Ducomble, T; Siffczyk, C; Merbecks, S S; Fricke, G; Hamouda, O; Stark, K; Werber, D

    2014-02-27

    From 20 September through 5 October 2012, the largest recorded food-borne outbreak in Germany occurred. Norovirus was identified as the causative agent. We conducted four analytical epidemiological studies, two case–control studies and two surveys (in total 150 cases) in secondary schools in three different federal states. Overall, 390 institutions in five federal states reported nearly 11,000 cases of gastroenteritis. They were predominantly schools and childcare facilities and were supplied almost exclusively by one large catering company. The analytical epidemiological studies consistently identified dishes containing strawberries as the most likely vehicle, with estimated odds ratios ranging from 2.6 to 45.4. The dishes had been prepared in different regional kitchens of the catering company and were served in the schools two days before the peaks of the respective outbreaks. All affected institutions had received strawberries of one lot, imported frozen from China. The outbreak vehicle was identified within a week, which led to a timely recall and prevented more than half of the lot from reaching the consumer. This outbreak exemplifies the risk of large outbreaks in the era of global food trade. It underlines the importance of timely surveillance and epidemiological outbreak investigations for food safety.

  19. Infection and cross-infection in a Paediatric Gastro-enteritis unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Bowen Jones

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available A two month study to investigate the incidence o f nosocomial infection was conducted in a paediatric gastroenteritis ward o f a black academic hospital. Enteric pathogens were identified on admission in 61 (47,2% o f 129 patients; 56 bacterial and 25 viral. Six per cent o f patients had a combination o f bacterial and viral pathogens. Enteric pathogens most frequently identified on admission were Campylobacter jejuni in 22%, Rotavirus in 19,3%, EPEC in 10,8% and Shigella spp. in 6,9% patients. Twenty six (20% patients had more than 1 enteric pathogen. The nosocomial infection rate was recorded at 17,1%. EPEC occurred most commonly in 5,3% patients, Salmonella typhimurium in 4,6% and Shigella spp. in 2,3%. Nosocomial infections increased the mean length o f hospital stay from 7,2- 20,2 days. Contributory factors to the spread o f nosocomial infection were the unsatisfactory methods o f bathing patients and giving naso-gastric feeds.

  20. How to Predict Oral Rehydration Failure in Children With Gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Dorien; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Moll, Henriëtte; Oostenbrink, Rianne

    2017-11-01

    Oral rehydration is the standard in most current guidelines for young children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE). Failure of oral rehydration can complicate the disease course, leading to morbidity due to severe dehydration. We aimed to identify prognostic factors of oral rehydration failure in children with AGE. A prospective, observational study was performed at the Emergency department, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 2010-2012, including 802 previously healthy children, ages 1 month to 5 years with AGE. Failure of oral rehydration was defined by secondary rehydration by a nasogastric tube, or hospitalization or revisit for dehydration within 72 hours after initial emergency department visit. We observed 167 (21%) failures of oral rehydration in a population of 802 children with AGE (median 1.03 years old, interquartile range 0.4-2.1; 60% boys). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, independent predictors for failure of oral rehydration were a higher Manchester Triage System urgency level, abnormal capillary refill time, and a higher clinical dehydration scale score. Early recognition of young children with AGE at risk of failure of oral rehydration therapy is important, as emphasized by the 21% therapy failure in our population. Associated with oral rehydration failure are higher Manchester Triage System urgency level, abnormal capillary refill time, and a higher clinical dehydration scale score.

  1. Uric acid and dehydration in children with gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuge, Rie; Morikawa, Yoshihiko; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2017-11-01

    Clinical assessment of dehydration in children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is crucial for treatment. The gold standard for assessment is acute weight loss. Dehydration severity, as determined by weight loss, significantly correlates with serum urea nitrogen (UN) in children with AGE. The disadvantage of using serum UN as a marker of dehydration severity, however, is that the level can be affected by nutrition. Serum uric acid (UA) theoretically could serve as an alternative in this regard, but there have been no reports on the direct relationship between serum UA and weight loss. The aim of this study was therefore to assess the relationship between serum UA and weight loss in patients with AGE. This was a prospective observational study of children 1-71 months of age admitted to Tokyo Metropolitan Children's Medical Center with AGE between 1 December 2010 and 31 March 2015. Patients with symptoms of AGE ≥ 8 days, chronic disease, or incomplete data were excluded from the study. Pre-post-rehydration weight change was used as an alternative, gold standard marker for the assessment of dehydration severity. The study participants consisted of 97 children. Serum UA correlated significantly with weight change, and increased significantly along with dehydration severity. Serum UA can be considered as an adjunct to the clinical assessment of dehydration in children with AGE. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  2. Pediatric acute gastroenteritis: understanding caregivers' experiences and information needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Lauren; Hartling, Lisa; Scott, Shannon D

    2017-05-01

    Pediatric acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a common condition with high health care utilization, persistent practice variation, and substantial family burden. An initial approach to resolve these issues is to understand the patient/caregiver experience of this illness. The objective of this study was to describe caregivers' experiences of pediatric AGE and identify their information needs, preferences, and priorities. A qualitative, descriptive study was conducted. Caregivers of a child with AGE were recruited for this study in the pediatric emergency department (ED) at a tertiary hospital in a major urban centre. Individual interviews were conducted (n=15), and a thematic analysis of interview transcripts was completed using a hybrid inductive/deductive approach. Five major themes were identified and described: 1) caregiver management strategies; 2) reasons for going to the ED; 3) treatment and management of AGE in the ED; 4) caregivers' information needs; and 5) additional factors influencing caregivers' experiences and decision-making. A number of subthemes within each major theme were identified and described. This qualitative descriptive study has identified caregiver information needs, preferences, and priorities regarding pediatric AGE. This study also identified inconsistencies in the treatment and management of pediatric AGE at home and in the ED that influence health care utilization and patient outcomes related to pediatric AGE.

  3. [Campylobacter and Salmonella acute gastroenteritis: epidemiology and health care utilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala Farré, Maria Rosa; Osorio Sánchez, Dimelza; Arias Varela, Cesar; Simó Sanahuja, Maria; Recasens Recasens, Assumpta; Pérez Jové, Josefa

    2015-10-05

    In Catalonia the current surveillance systems do not allow to know the true incidence or the health care utilization of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) caused by Campylobacter and Salmonella infections. The aim of this study is to analyze these characteristics. Descriptive study of Campylobacter and Salmonella infections reported in 2002 and 2012 in Catalonia, Spain. We included cases isolated and reported by the laboratory to a regional Surveillance Unit. The estimated incidence of Salmonella and Campylobacter AGE decreased by almost 50% and 20% respectively in 2012. Children between one and 4 years old were the most affected in both years. Significant differences in the clinical characteristics and disease duration were observed between Campylobacter and Salmonella. Visits to the Emergency Department and hospitalization rates were 63.7% and 15%, being more frequent among salmonellosis cases. The estimated incidence of Campylobacter and Salmonella infections has decreased, however rates are still important, as well as it is the health care utilization in both diseases. Current surveillance systems need appropriateness improvements to reach a better control of these infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Community incidence of pathogen-specific gastroenteritis: reconstructing the surveillance pyramid for seven pathogens in seven European Union member states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haagsma, J A; Geenen, P L; Ethelberg, S; Fetsch, A; Hansdotter, F; Jansen, A; Korsgaard, H; O'Brien, S J; Scavia, G; Spitznagel, H; Stefanoff, P; Tam, C C; Havelaar, A H

    2013-08-01

    By building reconstruction models for a case of gastroenteritis in the general population moving through different steps of the surveillance pyramid we estimated that millions of illnesses occur annually in the European population, leading to thousands of hospitalizations. We used data on the healthcare system in seven European Union member states in relation to pathogen characteristics that influence healthcare seeking. Data on healthcare usage were obtained by harmonized cross-sectional surveys. The degree of under-diagnosis and underreporting varied by pathogen and country. Overall, underreporting and under-diagnosis were estimated to be lowest for Germany and Sweden, followed by Denmark, The Netherlands, UK, Italy and Poland. Across all countries, the incidence rate was highest for Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. Incidence estimates resulting from the pyramid reconstruction approach are adjusted for biases due to different surveillance systems and are therefore a better basis for international comparisons than reported data.

  5. Effect of Dilute Apple Juice and Preferred Fluids vs Electrolyte Maintenance Solution on Treatment Failure Among Children With Mild Gastroenteritis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Stephen B; Willan, Andrew R; Boutis, Kathy; Schuh, Suzanne

    2016-05-10

    Gastroenteritis is a common pediatric illness. Electrolyte maintenance solution is recommended to treat and prevent dehydration. Its advantage in minimally dehydrated children is unproven. To determine if oral hydration with dilute apple juice/preferred fluids is noninferior to electrolyte maintenance solution in children with mild gastroenteritis. Randomized, single-blind noninferiority trial conducted between the months of October and April during the years 2010 to 2015 in a tertiary care pediatric emergency department in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Study participants were children aged 6 to 60 months with gastroenteritis and minimal dehydration. Participants were randomly assigned to receive color-matched half-strength apple juice/preferred fluids (n=323) or apple-flavored electrolyte maintenance solution (n=324). Oral rehydration therapy followed institutional protocols. After discharge, the half-strength apple juice/preferred fluids group was administered fluids as desired; the electrolyte maintenance solution group replaced losses with electrolyte maintenance solution. The primary outcome was a composite of treatment failure defined by any of the following occurring within 7 days of enrollment: intravenous rehydration, hospitalization, subsequent unscheduled physician encounter, protracted symptoms, crossover, and 3% or more weight loss or significant dehydration at in-person follow-up. Secondary outcomes included intravenous rehydration, hospitalization, and frequency of diarrhea and vomiting. The noninferiority margin was defined as a difference between groups of 7.5% for the primary outcome and was assessed with a 1-sided α=.025. If noninferiority was established, a 1-sided test for superiority was conducted. Among 647 randomized children (mean age, 28.3 months; 331 boys [51.1%]; 441 (68.2%) without evidence of dehydration), 644 (99.5%) completed follow-up. Children who were administered dilute apple juice experienced treatment failure less often than those

  6. Stent placement of gastroenteric anastomoses formed by magnetic compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, C; Clark, T W; Ginsberg, G; Habecker, P

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the use of stents for prolonging the patency of gastroenteric anastomoses (GEA) induced by magnet compression. Rare earth magnets were inserted perorally and serially in 15 dogs so as to mate across the gastric and jejunal walls. After magnet excretion, the resulting GEA was identified endoscopically, dilated (n = 1), and stented with bare (n = 2) or partially covered (n = 6) flared 10-mm or 12-mm Z stents. The GEA was followed at 2-4-week intervals for patency; malfunctioning shunts were irrigated, or dilated with angioplasty balloons. Gross and histologic examination of the anastomotic tissues was performed in 14 animals. Magnet pairs were excreted in 5-7 days. Of the 19 magnet placements in 15 animals, stent placement was not possible because of early GEA closure (n = 6), failure to locate (n = 2), pancreatic abscess (n = 1), and magnet perforation with peritonitis (n = 1). Estimated duration of GEA patency was 19 days after balloon dilation, 40-64 days with bare Z stents, and 58-147 days (mean, 90 days) with partially covered Z stents. Shunt function was commonly hindered by bezoars. Stent narrowing or occlusion was caused by tissue overgrowth through bare stents (n = 2), between covered stent struts and through partially detached membrane (n = 2). Serious morbidity (n = 2) was due to malpositioned magnets across the pancreas in one animal and gastric perforation in the other. One dog was euthanized because of unsuspected kidney infection. Partially covered stents significantly extend the anatomic patency rate of magnetic GEA to 7 weeks or more. Functional patency is frequently impaired by bezoars. Ongoing improvements in covered stent design should provide longer-term GEA patency.

  7. Detection of Acute Gastroenteritis Agents By Molecular Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şafak Göktaş

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Gastroenteritis is the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in all age groups all over the world. Multiplex PCR tests give sensitive and specific results in the investigation of bacterial, viral, parasitic agents. In this study, it was aimed to determine the agents of the stool specimens of patients with acute diarrhea by multiplex PCR. Materials and Methods: Stool sample taken from 471 patients sent to Istanbul Gelişim Laboratories between January 1, 2015 and September 30, 2016 was included in the study. All stool samples were processed according to manufacturer’s instructions with GastroFinder SMART 18 FAST multiplex PCR test (Pathofinder, Holland. 18 different gastrointestinal pathogens were diagnosed in one study. Results: Of the 471 patients stool sample included in the study. The agent was negative in 241 (51.2%, while the agent was isolated in 230 (48.8%. 190 (82% had a single pathogen, 40 had two or more pathogens. Of the 190 samples detected with single agent, 149 (31.6% were bacterial, 26 (5.5% were parasitic and 15 (3.1% were viral agents. Of the 149 bacterial agents, 108 (23% was detected as Salmonella spp, 14 (6% as EHEC, 8 (3.5% as Clostridium difficile toxin A / B, 8 (3.5% as Campylobacter spp., 7 (3% Aeromonas spp., 2 (0.8% Yersinia enterocolitica, 2 (0.8% Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC. Of 26 parasitic agents, 18 (7.8% was detected as Giardia lamblia, 6 (2.6% as Dientamoeba fragilis and 2 (0.8% as Cryptosporidium spp. Conclusion: Identification of enteric pathogens by multiplex PCR will avoids the use of unnecessary antibiotic treatments

  8. Household catastrophic healthcare expenditure and impoverishment due to rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Tharani; Lee, Way-Seah; Lee, Kok-Foo; Jit, Mark; Ng, Chiu-Wan

    2015-01-01

    While healthcare costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization may be burdensome on households in Malaysia, exploration on the distribution and catastrophic impact of these expenses on households are lacking. We assessed the economic burden, levels and distribution of catastrophic healthcare expenditure, the poverty impact on households and inequities related to healthcare payments for acute gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia. A two-year prospective, hospital-based study was conducted from 2008 to 2010 in an urban (Kuala Lumpur) and rural (Kuala Terengganu) setting in Malaysia. All children under the age of 5 years admitted for acute gastroenteritis were included. Patients were screened for rotavirus and information on healthcare expenditure was obtained. Of the 658 stool samples collected at both centers, 248 (38%) were positive for rotavirus. Direct and indirect costs incurred were significantly higher in Kuala Lumpur compared with Kuala Terengganu (US$222 Vs. US$45; pMalaysia.

  9. Using external magnet guidance and endoscopically placed magnets to create suture-free gastro-enteral anastomoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Christopher; Yellen, Benjamin; Evans, John; DeMaria, Eric; Pryor, Aurora

    2010-05-01

    To facilitate endolumenal and natural orifice procedures, this study evaluated a novel technique using external and endoscopically placed magnets to create suture-free gastroenteral anastomoses. Seven anesthetized adult swine underwent endoscopic placement of magnets into the small bowel and stomach. Using external magnets, the endoscopically placed internal magnets were brought into opposition under endoscopic view. After 1-2 weeks, the pigs were killed and analyzed. At laparotomy and under sterile conditions, peritoneal cultures were obtained. The anastomoses were evaluated endoscopically and tested using an air insufflation test. Finally, the anastomoses were resected and evaluated microscopically. The average operative time for endoscopic placement of the magnets was 34.3 +/- 14.8 min. Successful placement and creation of anastomoses occurred in six of the pigs. One pig did not form an anastomosis because the magnets were too large to pass through the pylorus at the time of attempted magnet placement. Six swine experienced uncomplicated postoperative courses. One pig's postoperative course involved constipation for several days, requiring additional fluids and fiber supplementation. The findings at endoscopy showed that the magnets were adhered to the anastomosis, which were easily freed, or within the stomach. The air insufflation test results were negative for all the pigs. At laparotomy, there was no evidence of infection, abscess, or leak, but two peritoneal culture results were positive with scant growth of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococcus, presumably contaminants. Microscopically, the anastomoses illustrated granulation and fibrous connective tissue without evidence of infection or leak. Endoscopically placed magnets with external magnet guidance is a feasible and novel approach to creating patent gastroenteral anastomoses without abdominal incisions or sutures.

  10. Prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis in infants and children: rotavirus vaccine safety, efficacy, and potential impact of vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Chandran

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aruna Chandran1, Sean Fitzwater1, Anjie Zhen2, Mathuram Santosham11Department of International Health, Division of Health Systems, 2Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis globally, with greater than 86% of deaths occurring in low-income and middle-income countries. There are two rotavirus vaccines currently licensed in the United States and prequalified by the World Health Organization. RV1 is a monovalent attenuated human rotavirus strain, given orally in two doses. RV5 is a pentavalent human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine, given orally in three doses. A third rotavirus vaccine, LLV, is a lamb rotavirus strain given orally as a single dose, which is currently available only in China. RV1 and RV5 have been shown to be highly efficacious in developed countries, and initial results from trials in Africa and Asia are promising as well. At least three other vaccines are in development, which are being developed by manufacturers of developing countries. Further studies are needed to clarify issues including administration of oral rotavirus vaccines with breastfeeding and other oral vaccines, and alterations in dosing schedule. Using new data on global diarrheal burden, rotavirus is estimated to cause 390,000 deaths in children younger than 5 years. Should rotavirus vaccines be introduced in the routine immunization programs of all countries, a potential of 170,000 deaths could be prevented annually. The largest impact on mortality would be seen in low-income and middle-income countries, despite poor immunization coverage and lower efficacy. Therefore, international efforts are needed to ensure that rotavirus vaccines reach the populations with highest burden of rotavirus disease.Keywords: vaccination, mortality, rotavirus, gastroenteritis

  11. Hematemesis as Initial Presentation in a 10-Week-Old Infant with Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Shetty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare condition characterized by eosinophilic inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract resulting in a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms. There is currently a dearth of information on this topic in the pediatric literature, as very few cases have been reported. In this report, we present a case of eosinophilic gastroenteritis in a 10-week-old patient with initial presenting symptom of hematemesis. To our knowledge, this is the youngest case reported in the literature and is unique in its initial presentation.

  12. Analysis by rotavirus gene 6 reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay of rotavirus-positive gastroenteritis cases observed during the vaccination phase of the Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial (REST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, David O; Vesikari, Timo; Dennehy, Penelope; Dallas, Michael D; Goveia, Michelle G; Itzler, Robbin F; Ciarlet, Max

    2014-01-01

    During the vaccination phase of the Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial (REST), the period between the administration of dose 1 through 13 days after the administration of dose 3, there were more wild-type rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) cases among vaccine recipients compared with placebo recipients using the protocol-specified microbiological plaque assay in the clinical-efficacy cohort, a subset of subjects where vaccine efficacy against RVGE of any severity was assessed. In this study, a rotavirus genome segment 6-based reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction assay was applied post hoc to clarify the accuracy of type categorization of all these RVGE cases in vaccine recipients during the vaccination phase of REST. The assay characterized 147 (90%) of 163 re-assayed RVGE cases or rotavirus-associated health care contacts as type-determinable: either wild-type or vaccine-type rotavirus strains. In the clinical-efficacy cohort (N = 5673), 19 (18.8%) of 101 samples from RVGE cases contained wild-type rotavirus, 70 (69.3%) vaccine virus, and 12 (11.9%) were indeterminable. In the large-scale cohort (N = 68,038), 10 (34.5%) of 29 samples from RVGE-related health care contacts contained wild-type rotavirus strains, 15 (51.7%) vaccine-type rotavirus strains, and 4 (13.8%) were indeterminable. Of the 33 samples from RVGE cases in placebo recipients, all were confirmed to contain wild-type rotaviruses. Altogether, this post-hoc re-evaluation showed that the majority (75%) of type-determinable RVGE cases or health care contacts that occurred during the vaccination phase of REST in vaccine recipients were associated with vaccine-type rotavirus strains rather than wild-type rotavirus strains. PMID:25424931

  13. Analysis by rotavirus gene 6 reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay of rotavirus-positive gastroenteritis cases observed during the vaccination phase of the Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial (REST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, David O; Vesikari, Timo; Dennehy, Penelope; Dallas, Michael D; Goveia, Michelle G; Itzler, Robbin F; Ciarlet, Max

    2014-01-01

    During the vaccination phase of the Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial (REST), the period between the administration of dose 1 through 13 days after the administration of dose 3, there were more wild-type rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) cases among vaccine recipients compared with placebo recipients using the protocol-specified microbiological plaque assay in the clinical-efficacy cohort, a subset of subjects where vaccine efficacy against RVGE of any severity was assessed. In this study, a rotavirus genome segment 6-based reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay was applied post hoc to clarify the accuracy of type categorization of all these RVGE cases in vaccine recipients during the vaccination phase of REST. The assay characterized 147 (90%) of 163 re-assayed RVGE cases or rotavirus-associated health care contacts as type-determinable: either wild-type or vaccine-type rotavirus strains. In the clinical-efficacy cohort (N = 5673), 19 (18.8%) of 101 samples from RVGE cases contained wild-type rotavirus, 70 (69.3%) vaccine virus, and 12 (11.9%) were indeterminable. In the large-scale cohort (N = 68,038), 10 (34.5%) of 29 samples from RVGE-related health care contacts contained wild-type rotavirus strains, 15 (51.7%) vaccine-type rotavirus strains, and 4 (13.8%) were indeterminable. Of the 33 samples from RVGE cases in placebo recipients, all were confirmed to contain wild-type rotaviruses. Altogether, this post-hoc re-evaluation showed that the majority (75%) of type-determinable RVGE cases or health care contacts that occurred during the vaccination phase of REST in vaccine recipients were associated with vaccine-type rotavirus strains rather than wild-type rotavirus strains.

  14. Bolus fluid therapy and sodium homeostasis in paediatric gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Stephen B; Geary, Denis F

    2013-03-01

    The study aims to assess the risk of developing hyponatraemia when large-volume bolus fluid rehydration therapy is administered. We conducted a prospective randomised study in a tertiary-care centre emergency department. Participants included children with gastroenteritis and dehydration requiring intravenous rehydration. They were randomised to receive 60 mL/kg (large) or 20 mL/kg (standard) 0.9% saline bolus followed by maintenance 0.9% saline for 3 h. Biochemical tests were performed at baseline and 4 h. The primary outcome measure was the development of hyponatraemia at 4 h. Secondary outcome measures were (i) change in sodium relative to baseline value; (ii) magnitude of decrease among those who experienced a decrease; (iii) risk of hypernatraemia; (iv) correlations between urine parameters and hyponatraemia; and (v) fluid overload. Eighty-four of 224 (38%) participants were hyponatraemic at baseline. At 4 h, 22% (48/217) had a dysnatraemia, and similar numbers of children were hyponatraemic in both groups: large (23% (26/112)) versus standard (21% (22/105)) (P = 0.69). Among initially hyponatraemic children, 63% (30/48) who received large-volume rehydration and 44% (15/34) of those administered standard rehydration were isonatraemic at 4 h (P = 0.10). Overall, children who received 60 mL/kg experienced a larger mean increase (1.6 ± 2.4 mEq/L vs. 0.9 ± 2.2 mEq/L; P = 0.04) and were less likely to experience a sodium decrease of ≥2 mEq/L (8/112 vs. 17/105; P = 0.04) than those administered 20 mL/kg. Large-volume bolus rehydration therapy with 0.9% saline is safe. It does not promote the development of hyponatraemia over the short term, but hastens the resolution of baseline hyponatraemia. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  15. Intervention methods to control the transmission of noroviruses and other enteric and respiratory viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, E.

    2014-01-01

    Intervention methods to control the transmission of noroviruses and other enteric and respiratory viruses

    Era Tuladhar

    Abstract

    Human noroviruses are the leading cause of acute and outbreak associated gastroenteritis worldwide. The outbreaks

  16. A novel method for concentrating hepatitis A virus and caliciviruses from bottled water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovač, K; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, I; Banjac, M

    2009-01-01

    Human enteric viruses are detected frequently in various types of environmental water samples, such as irrigation water, wastewater, recreational water, ground or subsurface water and even drinking water, constituting a primary source of gastroenteritis or hepatitis outbreaks. Only a few, but still...

  17. Sensitive detection of multiple hepatitis A virus genotypes with a single polony-based assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is one of the major causes of non-bacterial gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. HAV is mostly transmitted via direct person-to-person contact, or by consumption of contaminated foods and water. Since only a few viral particles may cause disease, detection of low levels of HA...

  18. High pressure treatment of human norovirus virus-like particles: factors affecting destruction efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human norovirus (NoV) accounts for more than 90% of nonbacterial gastroenteritis. To date, the efficacy of human NoV inactivation interventions cannot be accurately evaluated because the virus is nonculturable. In this study, we aimed to estimate inactivation of human NoV by high pressure processing...

  19. An outbreak of foodborne norovirus gastroenteritis linked to a restaurant in Melbourne, Australia, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun P. Coutts

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In May 2014 an outbreak of norovirus occurred among patrons of a restaurant in Melbourne, Australia. Investigations were conducted to identify the infectious agent, mode of transmission and source of illness, and to implement controls to prevent further transmission. Methods: A retrospective case-control study was conducted to test the hypothesis that food served at the restaurant between 9 and 15 May 2014 was the vehicle for infection. A structured questionnaire was used to collect demographic, illness and food exposure data from study participants. To ascertain whether any food handlers had experienced gastroenteritis symptoms and were a possible source of infection, investigators contacted and interviewed staff who had worked at the restaurant between 9 and 16 May 2014. Results: Forty-six cases (including 16 laboratory-confirmed cases of norovirus and 49 controls were interviewed and enrolled in the study. Results of the analysis revealed a statistically significant association with illness and consumption of grain salad (OR: 21.6, 95% CI: 1.8–252.7, p = 0.015 and beetroot dip (OR: 22.4, 95% CI: 1.9–267.0, p = 0.014. An interviewed staff member who reported an onset of acute gastrointestinal illness on 12 May 2014 had prepared salads on the day of onset and the previous two days. Discussion: The outbreak was likely caused by person-to-food-to-person transmission. The outbreak emphasizes the importance of the exclusion of symptomatic food handlers and strict hand hygiene practices in the food service industry to prevent contamination of ready-to-eat foods and the kitchen environment.

  20. Molecular characterization of group A rotaviruses detected in children with gastroenteritis in Ireland in 2006-2009.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, O

    2012-02-01

    SUMMARYCommunity and hospital-acquired cases of human rotavirus are responsible for millions of gastroenteritis cases in children worldwide, chiefly in developing countries, and vaccines are now available. During surveillance activity for human rotavirus infections in Ireland, between 2006 and 2009, a total of 420 rotavirus strains were collected and analysed. Upon either PCR genotyping and sequence analysis, a variety of VP7 (G1-G4 and G9) and VP4 (P[4], P[6], P[8] and P[9]) genotypes were detected. Strains G1P[8] were found to be predominant throughout the period 2006-2008, with slight fluctuations seen in the very limited samples available in 2008-2009. Upon either PCR genotyping and sequence analysis of selected strains, the G1, G3 and G9 viruses were found to contain E1 (Wa-like) NSP4 and I1 VP6 genotypes, while the analysed G2 strains possessed E2 NSP4 and I2 VP6 genotypes, a genetic make-up which is highly conserved in the major human rotavirus genogroups Wa- and Kun-like, respectively. Upon sequence analysis of the most common VP4 genotype, P[8], at least two distinct lineages were identified, both unrelated to P[8] Irish rotaviruses circulating in previous years, and more closely related to recent European humans rotaviruses. Moreover, sequence analysis of the VP7 of G1 rotaviruses revealed the onset of a G1 variant, previously unseen in the Irish population.

  1. The Presence of Norovirus and Adenovirus on Environmental Surfaces in Relation to the Hygienic Level in Food Service Operations Associated with a Suspected Gastroenteritis Outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maunula, Leena; Rönnqvist, M; Åberg, R; Lunden, J; Nevas, M

    2017-09-01

    Norovirus (NoV) gastroenteritis outbreaks appear frequently in food service operations (FSOs), such as in restaurants and canteens. In this study the presence of NoV and adenovirus (AdV) genomes was investigated on the surfaces of premises, especially in kitchens, of 30 FSOs where foodborne gastroenteritis outbreaks were suspected. The objective was to establish a possible association between the presence of virus genomes on surfaces and a visual hygienic status of the FSOs. NoV genome was found in 11 and AdV genome in 8 out of 30 FSOs. In total, 291 swabs were taken, of which 8.9% contained NoV and 5.8% AdV genome. The presence of NoV genomes on the surfaces was not found to associate with lower hygiene level of the premises when based on visual inspection; most (7/9) of the FSOs with NoV contamination on surfaces and a completed evaluation form had a good hygiene level (the best category). Restaurants had a significantly lower proportion of NoV-positive swabs compared to other FSOs (canteens, cafeteria, schools etc.) taken together (p = 0.00014). The presence of a designated break room for the workers was found to be significantly more common in AdV-negative kitchens (p = 0.046). Our findings suggest that swabbing is necessary for revealing viral contamination of surfaces and emphasis of hygiene inspections should be on the food handling procedures, and the education of food workers on virus transmission.

  2. Performance of a Mobile Phone App-Based Participatory Syndromic Surveillance System for Acute Febrile Illness and Acute Gastroenteritis in Rural Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Daniel; Lamb, Molly; Lopez, Maria Renee; Colborn, Kathryn; Paniagua-Avila, Alejandra; Zacarias, Alma; Zambrano-Perilla, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Castro, Sergio Ricardo; Cordon-Rosales, Celia; Asturias, Edwin Jose

    2017-11-09

    With their increasing availability in resource-limited settings, mobile phones may provide an important tool for participatory syndromic surveillance, in which users provide symptom data directly into a centralized database. We studied the performance of a mobile phone app-based participatory syndromic surveillance system for collecting syndromic data (acute febrile illness and acute gastroenteritis) to detect dengue virus and norovirus on a cohort of children living in a low-resource and rural area of Guatemala. Randomized households were provided with a mobile phone and asked to submit weekly reports using a symptom diary app (Vigilant-e). Participants reporting acute febrile illness or acute gastroenteritis answered additional questions using a decision-tree algorithm and were subsequently visited at home by a study nurse who performed a second interview and collected samples for dengue virus if confirmed acute febrile illness and norovirus if acute gastroenteritis. We analyzed risk factors associated with decreased self-reporting of syndromic data using the Vigilant-e app and evaluated strategies to improve self-reporting. We also assessed agreement between self-report and nurse-collected data obtained during home visits. From April 2015 to June 2016, 469 children in 207 households provided 471 person-years of observation. Mean weekly symptom reporting rate was 78% (range 58%-89%). Households with a poor (mobile phones for text messaging at study enrollment (61%, 35/57 vs 76.7%, 115/150; RR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-0.9), and were less likely to access care at the local public clinic (35%, 20/57 vs 67.3%, 101/150; RR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.6). Parents of female enrolled participants were more likely to have low response rate (57.1%, 84/147 vs 43.8%, 141/322; RR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.9). Several external factors (cellular tower collapse, contentious elections) were associated with periods of decreased reporting. Poor response rate (mobile phone app-based participatory syndromic

  3. Significant Depletion of CD4+ T Cells Occurs in the Oral Mucosa during Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection with the Infected CD4+ T Cell Reservoir Continuing to Persist in the Oral Mucosa during Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffy George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human and simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV and SIV infections are characterized by manifestation of numerous opportunistic infections and inflammatory conditions in the oral mucosa. The loss of CD4+ T cells that play a critical role in maintaining mucosal immunity likely contributes to this process. Here we show that CD4+ T cells constitute a minor population of T cells in the oral mucosa and display a predominantly central memory phenotype mirroring other mucosal sites such as the rectal mucosa. Chronic SIV infection was associated with a near total depletion of CD4+ T cells in the oral mucosa that appear to repopulate during antiretroviral therapy (ART. Repopulating CD4+ T cells harbored a large fraction of Th17 cells suggesting that ART potentially reconstitutes oral mucosal immunity. However, a minor fraction of repopulating CD4+ T cells harbored SIV DNA suggesting that the viral reservoir continues to persist in the oral mucosa during ART. Therapeutic approaches aimed at obtaining sustainable CD4+ T cell repopulation in combination with strategies that can eradicate the latent viral reservoir in the oral mucosa are essential for better oral health and long-term outcome in HIV infected patients.

  4. Pediatric gastroenteritis in the emergency department: Practice evaluation in Belgium, France, The Netherlands and Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Pelc (Isidore); S. Redant (Sébastien); S. Julliand (Sébastien); X. Llor; M. Lorrot (Mathie); R. Oostenbrink (Rianne); V. Gajdos (Vincent); F. Angoulvant (François)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Based on European recommendations of ESPGHAN/ESPID from 2008, first line therapy for dehydration caused by acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is oral rehydration solution (ORS). In case of oral route failure, nasogastric tube enteral rehydration is as efficient as intra-venous

  5. Sensor, a population-based cohort study on gastroenteritis in the Netherlands: incidence and etiology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, M.A.S. de; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Wannet, W.J.B.; Vinje, J; Leusden, F. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Duynhoven, Y.T.H.P. van

    2001-01-01

    A prospective population-based cohort study with a nested case- control study was conducted to estimate the incidence of gastroenteritis and the associated pathogens in the general Dutch population. Follow-up of two consecutive cohorts was performed by weekly reporting cards from december 1998 to

  6. Clinical information on admission is insufficient to determine the appropriate isolation regimen for acute gastroenteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyum, Florence; Abed, Osama Karim; Backer Mogensen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The number of admissions for acute gastroenteritis (GE) is increasing. The majority of patients pass through a single high-flow emergency department (ED) area which increases the risk of spreading GE. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and aetiology of GE for acutely...

  7. An outbreak of gastroenteritis due to Escherichia coli 0142 H6 in a neonatal department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerards, L. J.; Hennekam, R. C.; von Dijk, W. C.; Roord, J. J.; Fleer, A.

    1984-01-01

    An outbreak of gastroenteritis due to Escherichia coli 0142 H6 in a neonatal ward is described. The epidemic affected 16 of 24 infants (infection-rate 66 per cent), of whom one died due to necrotizing enterocolitis. Administration of antibiotics was of limited value in treatment or in eradicating E.

  8. Additional value of typing Noroviruses in gastroenteritis outbreaks in Amsterdam, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, A. G.; Bovée, L. P. M. J.; van den Hoek, J. A. R.; Bos, A. J.; Bruisten, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    In Amsterdam, 17 of the 55 gastroenteritis (GI) outbreaks reported from January 2002 to May 2003 were confirmed to be caused by noroviruses (NV). In this study, we describe the molecular epidemiology of a group of nine outbreaks associated with a catering firm and two outbreaks, 5 months apart, in

  9. The successful medical management of severe duodenal strictures secondary to eosinophilic gastroenteritis in an infant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, H. L.; Sithasanan, N.; Foley, P.; Davidson, G. P.

    2003-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon condition of unknown etiology that has only been relatively recently reported. Its clinical manifestations range from a mild disease to more severe forms resembling Crohn's disease. Enteric strictures are a rare but recognized complication of this

  10. Plasma water as a diagnostic tool in the assessment of dehydration in children with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisier, Annemarie; Maingay-de Groof, Femke; Mast-Harwig, Roechama; Kalkman, Patricia M J; Wulkan, Remi W; Verwers, Renee; Neele, Marjolein; Hop, Wim C J; Groeneweg, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is common in childhood. The estimation of the degree of dehydration is essential for management of acute gastroenteritis. Plasma water was assessed as a diagnostic tool in children with acute gastroenteritis and dehydration admitted to hospital. In a prospective cohort study, 101 patients presenting at the emergency department with dehydration were included. Clinical assessment, routine laboratory tests, and plasma water measurement were performed. Plasma water was measured as a percentage of water content using dry weight method. During admission, patients were rehydrated in 12 h. Weight gain at the end of the rehydration period and 2 weeks thereafter was used to determine the percentage of weight loss as a gold standard for the severity of dehydration. Clinical assessment of dehydration was not significantly associated with the percentage of weight loss. Blood urea nitrogen (r = 0.3, p = 0.03), base excess (r =-0.31, p = 0.03), and serum bicarbonate (r = 0.32, p = 0.02) were significantly correlated with the percentage of weight loss. Plasma water did not correlate with the percentage of weight loss. On the basis of the presented data, plasma water should not be used as a diagnostic tool in the assessment of dehydration in children with acute gastroenteritis.

  11. A community-based gastroenteritis outbreak after Typhoon Haiyan, Leyte, Philippines, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Justin Ventura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Three weeks after Typhoon Haiyan, an increasing number of acute gastroenteritis cases were reported in Kananga, Leyte, an area where evacuated residents had returned home two days after the disaster. An outbreak investigation was conducted to identify the source and risk factors associated with the increase of gastroenteritis. Methods: A case was defined as any person in Kananga who developed acute diarrhoea (≥ 3 times/24 hours and any of the following symptoms: fever, nausea, vomiting or abdominal pain from 11 November 2013 to 10 December 2013. Active case finding was conducted by reviewing medical records, and a case-control study was conducted. Rectal swabs and water samples were tested for bacteriological examination. Results: One hundred and five cases were identified. Multivariate analysis revealed that consumption of untreated drinking-water was associated with illness (adjusted odds ratio: 18.2. Both rectal swabs and municipal water samples tested positive for Aeromonas hydrophila. On inspection of the municipal water system, breaks in the distribution pipes were found with some submerged in river water. Conclusion: This acute gastroenteritis outbreak was most likely caused by Aeromonas hydrophila and transmitted through a contaminated water source. This study highlights that areas less damaged by a disaster that do not require ongoing evacuation centres can still have acute gastroenteritis outbreaks. All affected areas should be monitored during a disaster response, not just those with evacuation centres. Boiling or chlorinating of water should also be recommended for all areas affected by disaster.

  12. The Comparition of the Efficacy of Two Different Probiotics in Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Erdoğan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the study is to compare the clinical effectiveness of the probiotics—Saccharomyces boulardii and Bifidobacterium lactis—in children who had been diagnosed with rotavirus gastroenteritis. Materials and methods. Seventy five patients aged between 5 months–5 years diagnosed as rotavirus gastroenteritis were included in the study. The patients diagnosed as rotavirus gastroenteritis by latex agglutination test in stool were divided into 3 groups of twenty-five patients each: First group was given oral rehydration therapy and rapid refeeding with a normal diet with Saccharomyces boulardii (spp. I-745, second group was given oral rehydration therapy and rapid refeeding with a normal diet with Bifidobacterium lactis (spp. B94, culture number:∘118529 and third group received only oral rehydration therapy and rapid refeeding with a normal diet. Results. The duration of diarrhea was shorter in the group given oral rehydration therapy and rapid refeeding with a normal diet with Bifidobacterium lactis and Saccharomyces boulardii than the group given only oral rehydration therapy and rapid refeeding with a normal diet. Conclusion. Bifidobacterium lactis has a complemental role in the treatment of rotavirus gatroenteritis and other probiotics may also have a beneficial effect in rotavirus gastroenteritis compared with the therapy included only oral rehydration therapy and rapid refeeding with a normal diet.

  13. Outbreak of rotavirus gastroenteritis with high mortality, Nicaragua, 2005 Brote de gastroenteritis por rotavirus con alta mortalidad, Nicaragua, 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Amador

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We investigated a nationwide outbreak of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in Nicaragua in children under 5 years old, leading to many consultations, hospitalizations, and deaths. We questioned whether a vaccine might have prevented these illnesses and deaths, sought to identify risk factors for death, and developed a clinical profile of children hospitalized with diarrhea. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study to determine whether children who died had access to routine immunizations, a proxy predicting access to a rotavirus vaccine. We identified risk factors for death among children who died in the outbreak compared with surviving age-matched controls with diarrhea. We collected stools, clinical data, and immunization data on children hospitalized for diarrhea to test for rotavirus, develop the profile, and forecast future access to a rotavirus vaccine. RESULTS: The outbreak from February to April 2005 caused 47 470 consultations and 52 deaths. Approximately 80% of cases and controls and 60% of children hospitalized with diarrhea had access to routine immunizations and would likely have had access to a rotavirus vaccine. With a vaccine efficacy of 85%, up to 51% of severe rotavirus cases and up to 68% of deaths could have been prevented if a rotavirus vaccine were available as part of routine child-hood immunizations. Study of 35 case-control pairs indicated that severe illnesses, malnutrition, and care by traditional healers were risk factors for death. Rotavirus was found in 42% of samples from hospitalized children and was associated with severe disease and dehydration. CONCLUSIONS: The impact of the seasonal outbreaks of rotavirus disease could be diminished with a rotavirus vaccine, improvements in oral rehydration programs, and training of traditional healers in the proper management of children with acute diarrhea.OBJETIVOS: Se investigó un brote nacional de gastroenteritis grave por rotavirus en niños menores de 5 a

  14. Household catastrophic healthcare expenditure and impoverishment due to rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharani Loganathan

    Full Text Available While healthcare costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization may be burdensome on households in Malaysia, exploration on the distribution and catastrophic impact of these expenses on households are lacking.We assessed the economic burden, levels and distribution of catastrophic healthcare expenditure, the poverty impact on households and inequities related to healthcare payments for acute gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia.A two-year prospective, hospital-based study was conducted from 2008 to 2010 in an urban (Kuala Lumpur and rural (Kuala Terengganu setting in Malaysia. All children under the age of 5 years admitted for acute gastroenteritis were included. Patients were screened for rotavirus and information on healthcare expenditure was obtained.Of the 658 stool samples collected at both centers, 248 (38% were positive for rotavirus. Direct and indirect costs incurred were significantly higher in Kuala Lumpur compared with Kuala Terengganu (US$222 Vs. US$45; p<0.001. The mean direct and indirect costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis consisted 20% of monthly household income in Kuala Lumpur, as compared with only 5% in Kuala Terengganu. Direct medical costs paid out-of-pocket caused 141 (33% households in Kuala Lumpur to experience catastrophic expenditure and 11 (3% households to incur poverty. However in Kuala Terengganu, only one household (0.5% experienced catastrophic healthcare expenditure and none were impoverished. The lowest income quintile in Kuala Lumpur was more likely to experience catastrophic payments compared to the highest quintile (87% vs 8%. The concentration index for out-of-pocket healthcare payments was closer to zero at Kuala Lumpur (0.03 than at Kuala Terengganu (0.24.While urban households were wealthier, healthcare expenditure due to gastroenteritis had more catastrophic and poverty impact on the urban poor. Universal rotavirus vaccination would reduce both disease burden and health

  15. Rotavirus vaccine and health-care utilization for rotavirus gastroenteritis in Tsu City, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Hajime; Suga, Shigeru; Nagao, Mizuho; Ichimi, Ryoji; Fujisawa, Takao; Umemoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Takaaki; Ito, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Shigeki; Ido, Masaru; Taniguchi, Koki; Ihara, Toshiaki; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background Rotavirus vaccines were introduced in Japan in November 2011. We evaluated the subsequent reduction of the health-care burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis. Methods We conducted active surveillance for rotavirus gastroenteritis among children under 5 years old before and after the vaccine introduction. We surveyed hospitalization rates for rotavirus gastroenteritis in children in Tsu City, Mie Prefecture, Japan, from 2007 to 2015 and surveyed the number of outpatient visits at a Tsu City clinic from 2010 to 2015. Stool samples were obtained for rotavirus testing and genotype investigation. We assessed rotavirus vaccine coverage for infants living in Tsu City. Results In the pre-vaccine years (2007–2011), hospitalization rates for rotavirus gastroenteritis in children under 5 years old were 5.5, 4.3, 3.1 and 3.9 cases per 1000 person-years, respectively. In the post-vaccine years (2011–2015), the rates were 3.0, 3.5, 0.8 and 0.6 cases per 1000 person-years, respectively. The hospitalization rate decreased significantly in the 2013–2014 and 2014–2015 seasons compared to the average of the seasons before vaccine introduction (P rotavirus infection was 66. In the post-vaccine years (2011–2015), the numbers for each season was 23, 23, 7 and 5, respectively. The most dominant rotavirus genotype shifted from G3P[8] to G1P[8] and to G2P[4]. The coverage of one dose of rotavirus vaccine in Tsu City was 56.5% in 2014. Conclusion After the vaccine introduction, the hospitalization rates and outpatient visits for rotavirus gastroenteritis greatly decreased. PMID:28246579

  16. Efficacy of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in infants in developing countries in sub-Saharan Africa: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armah, George E; Sow, Samba O; Breiman, Robert F; Dallas, Michael J; Tapia, Milagritos D; Feikin, Daniel R; Binka, Fred N; Steele, A Duncan; Laserson, Kayla F; Ansah, Nana A; Levine, Myron M; Lewis, Kristen; Coia, Michele L; Attah-Poku, Margaret; Ojwando, Joel; Rivers, Stephen B; Victor, John C; Nyambane, Geoffrey; Hodgson, Abraham; Schödel, Florian; Ciarlet, Max; Neuzil, Kathleen M

    2010-08-21

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis causes many deaths in infants in sub-Saharan Africa. Because rotavirus vaccines have proven effective in developed countries but had not been tested in developing countries, we assessed efficacy of a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine against severe disease in Ghana, Kenya, and Mali between April, 2007, and March, 2009. In our multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, undertaken in rural areas of Ghana and Kenya and an urban area of Mali, we randomly assigned infants aged 4-12 weeks without symptoms of gastrointestinal disorders in a 1:1 ratio to receive three oral doses of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine 2 mL or placebo at around 6 weeks, 10 weeks, and 14 weeks of age. Infants with HIV infection were not excluded. Randomisation was done by computer-generated randomisation sequence in blocks of six. We obtained data for gastrointestinal symptoms from parents on presentation to health-care facilities and clinical data were obtained prospectively by clinicians. The primary endpoint was severe rotavirus gastroenteritis (Vesikari score >or=11), detected by enzyme immunoassay, arising 14 days or more after the third dose of placebo or vaccine to end of study (March 31, 2009; around 21 months of age). Analysis was per protocol; infants who received scheduled doses of vaccine or placebo without intervening laboratory-confirmed naturally occurring rotavirus disease earlier than 14 days after the third dose and had complete clinical and laboratory results were included in the analysis. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00362648. 5468 infants were randomly assigned to receive pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (n=2733) or placebo (n=2735). 2357 infants assigned to vaccine and 2348 assigned to placebo were included in the per-protocol analysis. 79 cases of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis were reported in 2610.6 person-years in the vaccine group, compared with 129 cases in 2585.9 person-years in the placebo group, resulting

  17. Effect of radiation on certain animal viruses in liquid swine manure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, J.; Mocsari, E.; di Gleria, M.; Felkai, V. (Phylaxia Oltoanyag- es Tapszertermeloe Vallalat, Budapest (Hungary); Orszagos Allategeszseguegyi Intezet, Budapest (Hungary))

    1983-03-01

    The virucidal effect of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation was studied in cell culture medium and in liquid swine manure involving the most important porcine viruses that can be spread by liquid manure. The radiation doses (20 kGy and 30 kGy) were determined in preliminary experiments employing a porcine enterovirus from the serogroup 1 (Teschen group). In the main experiment, the following viruses were employed: swine vesicular disease (SVD) virus, type C foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus, a field strain of Aujeszky's disease (AD) virus, transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) virus, as well as bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) virus. The latter strain served as a model for hog cholera virus. The results of the experiments indicate that safe disinfection of the virus infected liquid swine manure by ionizing radiation requires a radiation dose of 30 kGy.

  18. Effect of radiation on certain animal viruses in liquid swine manure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, J.; Mocsari, E.; di Gleria, M.; Felkai, V.

    1983-01-01

    The virucidal effect of 60 Co gamma radiation was studied in cell culture medium and in liquid swine manure involving the most important porcine viruses that can be spread by liquid manure. The radiation doses (20 kGy and 30 kGy) were determined in preliminary experiments employing a porcine enterovirus from the serogroup 1 (Teschen group). In the main experiment, the following viruses were employed: swine vesicular disease (SVD) virus, type C foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus, a field strain of Aujeszky's disease (AD) virus, transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) virus, as well as bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) virus. The latter strain served as a model for hog cholera virus. The results of the experiments indicate that safe disinfection of the virus infected liquid swine manure by ionizing radiation requires a radiation dose of 30 kGy. (author)

  19. Effect of radiation on certain animal viruses in liquid swine manure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, J; Mocsari, E; di Gleria, M; Felkai, V [Phylaxia Oltoanyag- es Tapszertermeloe Vallalat, Budapest (Hungary); Orszagos Allategeszseguegyi Intezet, Budapest [Hungary

    1983-03-01

    The virucidal effect of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation was studied in cell culture medium and in liquid swine manure involving the most important porcine viruses that can be spread by liquid manure. The radiation doses (20 kGy and 30 kGy) were determined in preliminary experiments employing a porcine enterovirus from the serogroup 1 (Teschen group). In the main experiment, the following viruses were employed: swine vesicular disease (SVD) virus, type C foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus, a field strain of Aujeszky's disease (AD) virus, transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) virus, as well as bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) virus. The latter strain served as a model for hog cholera virus. The results of the experiments indicate that safe disinfection of the virus infected liquid swine manure by ionizing radiation requires a radiation dose of 30 kGy.

  20. [Nosocomial virus infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, H J

    1986-12-01

    Enveloped viruses, e.g. influenza- or varicella viruses may cause highly contagious airborne infections. Their spread is difficult to control, also in hospitals. In the case of influenza and varicella immune prophylaxis and chemotherapy/chemoprophylaxis are possible. This is of particular significance, since varicella and zoster are of increasing importance for immunocompromized patients. Diarrhea is caused to a large extent by viruses. Rotavirus infections play an important role in infancy, and are frequently acquired in the hospital. In a study on infectious gastroenteritis of infants in a hospital we were able to show that 30 percent of all rotavirus infections were of nosocomial origin. Admission of a rotavirus-excreting patient (or personnel) may start a long chain of rotavirus infections on pediatric wards. Even careful hygienic measures in the hospital can hardly prevent the spread of enterovirus infections. Such infections may be severe and lethal for newborns, as shown by us in a study on an outbreak of echovirus 11 disease on a maternity ward. We have recently obtained data on the "stickiness" of enteroviruses on human skin. This could explain essential features of the spread of enteroviruses in the population.

  1. A food-borne outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by norovirus GII in a university located in Xiamen City, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhinan Guo

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: The outbreak of gastroenteritis was caused mainly by bread products contaminated with norovirus GII. A food handler with an asymptomatic norovirus GII infection was the possible source of infection.

  2. Detection of Pathogenic Viruses in Sewage Provided Early Warnings of Hepatitis A Virus and Norovirus Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmér, Maria; Paxéus, Nicklas; Magnius, Lars; Enache, Lucica; Arnholm, Birgitta; Johansson, Annette; Bergström, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Most persons infected with enterically transmitted viruses shed large amounts of virus in feces for days or weeks, both before and after onset of symptoms. Therefore, viruses causing gastroenteritis may be detected in wastewater, even if only a few persons are infected. In this study, the presence of eight pathogenic viruses (norovirus, astrovirus, rotavirus, adenovirus, Aichi virus, parechovirus, hepatitis A virus [HAV], and hepatitis E virus) was investigated in sewage to explore whether their identification could be used as an early warning of outbreaks. Samples of the untreated sewage were collected in proportion to flow at Ryaverket, Gothenburg, Sweden. Daily samples collected during every second week between January and May 2013 were pooled and analyzed for detection of viruses by concentration through adsorption to milk proteins and PCR. The largest amount of noroviruses was detected in sewage 2 to 3 weeks before most patients were diagnosed with this infection in Gothenburg. The other viruses were detected at lower levels. HAV was detected between weeks 5 and 13, and partial sequencing of the structural VP1protein identified three different strains. Two strains were involved in an ongoing outbreak in Scandinavia and were also identified in samples from patients with acute hepatitis A in Gothenburg during spring of 2013. The third strain was unique and was not detected in any patient sample. The method used may thus be a tool to detect incipient outbreaks of these viruses and provide early warning before the causative pathogens have been recognized in health care. PMID:25172863

  3. Magnitude, distribution, and estimated level of underreporting of acute gastroenteritis in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Stephanie M; Lewis-Fuller, Eva; Williams, Hank; Miller, Zahra; Scarlett, Henroy P; Cooper, Collin; Gordon-Johnson, Kelly-Ann; Vickers, Ivan; Shaw, Karen; Wellington, Iyanna; Thame, Jennifer; Pérez, Enrique; Indar, Lisa

    2013-12-01

    Jamaica is the third largest island in the Caribbean. The epidemiology of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is important to Jamaica, particularly in the areas of health, tourism, and because of the potential impact on the local workforce and the economy. Data collected by the National Surveillance Unit on the prevalence of AGE transmitted by food are not accurate. To determine the true magnitude, risk factors, and the extent of underreporting of AGE in Jamaica, we conducted a cross-sectional, population-based retrospective survey during the periods of 21 February-7 March and 14-27 June 2009, corresponding to high- and low-AGE season respectively. Of the total 1,920 persons selected randomly by a multistage cluster-sampling process, 1,264 responded (response rate 65.8%). Trained interviewers administered a standardized, validated questionnaire during face-to-face interviews. The overall prevalence of self-reported AGE was 4.0% (95% CI 2.9-5.1) at a rate of 0.5 episodes/per person-year. The highest monthly prevalence of AGE (14.6%) was found among the 1-4 year(s) age-group and the lowest (2.1%) among the 25-44 years age-group. Of the 18 cases (36%) who sought medical care, 11% were hospitalized, 33% were treated with antibiotics, and 66.7% received oral rehydration fluids. Only 2 cases who sought medical care reportedly submitted stool specimens. The mean duration of diarrhoea was 3.1 days, which resulted in a mean loss of 4 productive days, with over half of the cases requiring someone to care for them. The burden of syndromic AGE for 2009 was extrapolated to be 122,711 cases, showing an underreporting factor of 58.9. For every laboratory-confirmed AGE case, it was estimated that 383 more cases were occurring in the population. This research confirms that the prevalence of AGE is underreported in Jamaica and not being adequately detected by the current surveillance system. The components of the integrated surveillance system for AGE in Jamaica, particularly the laboratory

  4. Clinical and laboratory assessment of dehydration severity in children with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Patricia C; Macarthur, Colin; Khambalia, Amina; Goldman, Ran D; Friedman, Jeremy N

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate clinical and laboratory assessment of dehydration severity in children, 1 to 36 months, with acute gastroenteritis. Clinical and laboratory measures and weight change following rehydration were collected for enrolled children. Pediatric emergency department. Likelihood ratio (LR+) and 95% confidence interval (CI): for a clinical score of 0, the LR+ was 2.2 (95% CI = 0.9-5.3); for a clinical score of 1 to 4, the LR+ was 1.3 (95% CI = 0.90-1.74); for a clinical score of 5 to 8, the LR+ was 5.2 (95% CI = 2.2-12.8); for a venous pH Dehydration Scale and laboratory measures into clinical decision-making algorithms to assess dehydration severity in children with acute gastroenteritis.

  5. Clinical Presentation of Acute Gastroenteritis in Children With Functional Abdominal Pain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saps, Miguel; Mintjens, Stijn; Pusatcioglu, Cenk K; Cohen, Daniel M; Sternberg, Petra

    2017-08-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity and abnormal coping are common in children with functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPDs). Thus, it would be expected that children with visceral hypersensitivity would report more pain if their gut is acutely inflamed. The aim of the study was to compare clinical symptoms and somatization of children with and without FAPDs at time of an episode of acute gastroenteritis. Seventy children with acute gastroenteritis and their parents completed the Rome III Diagnostic Questionnaire for Pediatric Functional GI Disorders and the Children's Somatization Inventory. Twenty-one percent of children were diagnosed with an FAPD. Children with FAPDs showed significantly more nongastrointestinal somatic symptoms than children without FAPDs. There were no significant differences in abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, or school absenteeism between both groups at time of consultation.

  6. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis: Case Report and Review in Search for Diagnostic Key Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo López-Medina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is considered an uncommon disease with a low incidence rate that remains as a diagnostic challenge for the clinician, in spite of the fact that seventy years have passed since its original description. Hereby we present the case of a 29-year-old male without history of allergies who was evaluated for unspecific gastrointestinal symptoms, without relevant findings on physical examination and presenting an initial complete blood count (CBC with severe eosinophilia. The patient was evaluated and the diagnosis of eosinophilic gastroenteritis was confirmed by histopathological findings. The relevance of the case resides in highlighting the lack of guidelines or consensus for histological diagnosis being virtually the only one available. To a similar extent, treatment evidence is based on case series with a reasonable number of patients and case reports.

  7. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis: Case Report and Review in Search for Diagnostic Key Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Medina, Guillermo; Gallo, Manuel; Prado, Alejandro; Vicuña-Honorato, Iliana; Castillo Díaz de León, Roxana

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is considered an uncommon disease with a low incidence rate that remains as a diagnostic challenge for the clinician, in spite of the fact that seventy years have passed since its original description. Hereby we present the case of a 29-year-old male without history of allergies who was evaluated for unspecific gastrointestinal symptoms, without relevant findings on physical examination and presenting an initial complete blood count (CBC) with severe eosinophilia. The patient was evaluated and the diagnosis of eosinophilic gastroenteritis was confirmed by histopathological findings. The relevance of the case resides in highlighting the lack of guidelines or consensus for histological diagnosis being virtually the only one available. To a similar extent, treatment evidence is based on case series with a reasonable number of patients and case reports. PMID:26075112

  8. Discriminatory potential of C-reactive protein, cytokines, and fecal markers in infectious gastroenteritis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weh, Julia; Antoni, Christoph; Weiß, Christel; Findeisen, Peter; Ebert, Matthias; Böcker, Ulrich

    2013-09-01

    This study evaluates potential markers in blood and stools for their ability to distinguish bacterial from viral gastroenteritis. A total of 108 patients were prospectively recruited, of which 27 showed bacterial, 30 viral, and 51 no detectable pathogen, respectively. Cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cells as well as the 2 fecal markers lactoferrin and calprotectin were determined. Statistics comprised Kruskal-Wallis test and U test in addition to an assessment of receiver operating characteristic. Interferon γ (IFNγ) levels were significantly increased in the viral group compared to the bacterial and nonspecific group. For the bacterial group, both fecal markers lactoferrin and calprotectin as well as CRP were significantly higher in comparison to the other 2 groups. To differentiate between bacterial and viral gastroenteritis, CRP, serum IFNγ, and the fecal proteins lactoferrin and calprotectin may be useful. A corresponding algorithm should be evaluated prospectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence of rotavirus, adenovirus, hepatitis A virus and enterovirus in water samples collected from different region of Peshawar, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tahir; Arshad, Najma; Adnan, Fazal; Sadaf Zaidi, Najam-Us-Sahar; Shahid, Muhammad Talha; Zahoor, Usman; Afzal, Muhammad S; Anjum, Sadia

    2016-12-23

    Viral gastroenteritis and other water-borne diseases are the most neglected areas of research in Pakistan. To determine the quality of water, 4 enteric viruses were studied from different localities of Peshawar, Pakistan. The study validates the viral detection method for Rotavirus (RV), Human adenovirus (HAdV), Enterovirus (EV) and Hepatitis A virus (HAV), directly from water sources of rural areas of Peshawar, KPK, Pakistan. Overall, 95 five water samples were tested; among them, 9.47% were positive for RV, 38.94% for HAdV, 48.42% for EV and 12.63% for HAV. The presence of these viruses in water was directly correlated with meteorological data. High prevalence of EV and HAdV was detected frequently in the wet season from May - September, which can be the potential cause of spreading of gastroenteritis in the population. Environmental surveillance is an additional tool to evaluate the epidemiology of enteric viruses circulating in a given community.

  10. Rapid Intravenous Rehydration Therapy in Children With Acute Gastroenteritis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toaimah, Fatihi Hassan Soliman; Mohammad, Hala Mohammad Fathi

    2016-02-01

    Rapid intravenous (IV) rehydration is commonly used for the management of pediatric gastroenteritis in the emergency department. The current practice shows wide variation in the volume and rate of rapid IV hydration. The aim of this review was to assess the efficacy of rapid IV rehydration compared with standard method in children with gastroenteritis. MEDLINE (1946-2014), EMBASE (1974-2014), and CENTRAL via the Cochrane Library (Issue 8, 2014) were systematically searched to identify eligible studies. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials of rapid IV rehydration in children with gastroenteritis. A total of 1513 articles were retrieved, and our inclusion criteria were met by 3 studies, with a total of 464 participants. The percentage of children who were successfully rehydrated and tolerated oral fluids at 2 to 4 hours after starting IV fluid therapy ranged from 69% to 100% in both rapid IV rehydration and standard method. Time to discharge ranged from 2 to 6 hours (rapid rehydration) versus 2 to 5 hours (standard rehydration). Emergency department revisits ranged from 3% to 16% (rapid rehydration) versus 5% to 14% (standard). Summarized results suggested that rapid IV rehydration may be associated with longer time-to-discharge and higher readmission rates. The new evidence fails to demonstrate superiority of large-volume (60 mL/kg/h) over standard (20 mL/kg/h) IV rehydration. Standard volume IV rehydration for 1 to 4 hours followed by oral hydration or maintenance IV fluids seems sufficient for most children with gastroenteritis requiring IV fluid administration. However, more evidence is needed to establish an optimal IV rehydration regimen.

  11. Identification of co-infection by rotavirus and parvovirus in dogs with gastroenteritis in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Flores Ortega

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This is the first report on circulating canine rotavirus in Mexico. Fifty samples from dogs with gastroenteritis were analyzed used polymerase chain reaction and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in order to identify parvovirus and rotavirus, respectively; 7% of dogs were infected with rotavirus exclusively, while 14% were co-infected with both rotavirus and parvovirus; clinical signs in co-infected dogs were more severe.

  12. Use of bedside ultrasound to assess degree of dehydration in children with gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Hsiao, Allen; Langhan, Melissa; Riera, Antonio; Santucci, Karen A

    2010-10-01

    Prospectively identifying children with significant dehydration from gastroenteritis is difficult in acute care settings. Previous work by our group has shown that bedside ultrasound (US) measurement of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and the aorta (Ao) diameter ratio is correlated with intravascular volume. This study was designed to validate the use of this method in the prospective identification of children with dehydration by investigating whether the IVC/Ao ratio correlated with dehydration in children with acute gastroenteritis. Another objective was to investigate the interrater reliability of the IVC/Ao measurements. A prospective observational study was carried out in a pediatric emergency department (PED) between November 2007 and June 2009. Children with acute gastroenteritis were enrolled as subjects. A pair of investigators obtained transverse images of the IVC and Ao using bedside US. The ratio of IVC and Ao diameters (IVC/Ao) was calculated. Subjects were asked to return after resolution of symptoms. The difference between the convalescent weight and ill weight was used to calculate the degree of dehydration. Greater than or equal to 5% difference was judged to be significant. Linear regression was performed with dehydration as the dependent variable and the IVC/Ao as the independent variable. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the degree of agreement between observers. A total of 112 subjects were enrolled. Seventy-one subjects (63%) completed follow-up. Twenty-eight subjects (39%) had significant dehydration. The linear regression model resulted in an R² value of 0.21 (p dehydration. Forty-eight paired measurements of IVC/Ao ratios were made. The Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.76.   In this pilot study the ratio of IVC to Ao diameters, as measured by bedside US, was a marginally accurate measurement of acute weight loss in children with dehydration from gastroenteritis. The technique demonstrated good interrater

  13. Value of point-of-care ketones in assessing dehydration and acidosis in children with gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Jason A; Waltzman, Mark; Monuteaux, Michael C; Bachur, Richard G

    2013-11-01

    Children with gastroenteritis often develop dehydration with metabolic acidosis. Serum ketones are frequently elevated in this population. The goal was to determine the relationship between initial serum ketone concentration and both the degree of dehydration and the magnitude of acidosis. This was a secondary analysis of a prospective trial of crystalloid administration for rapid rehydration. Children 6 months to 6 years of age with gastroenteritis and dehydration were enrolled. A point-of-care serum ketone (beta-hydroxybutyrate) concentration was obtained at the time of study enrollment. The relationship between initial serum ketone concentration and a prospectively assigned and previously validated clinical dehydration score, and serum bicarbonate concentration, was analyzed. A total of 188 patients were enrolled. The median serum ketone concentration was elevated at 3.1 mmol/L (interquartile range [IQR] = 1.2 to 4.6 mmol/L), and the median dehydration score was consistent with moderate dehydration. A significant positive relationship was found between serum ketone concentration and the clinical dehydration score (Spearman's rho = 0.22, p = 0.003). Patients with moderate dehydration had a higher median serum ketone concentration than those with mild dehydration (3.6 mmol/L vs. 1.4 mmol/L, p = 0.007). Additionally, the serum ketone concentration was inversely correlated with serum bicarbonate concentration (ρ = -0.26, p Children with gastroenteritis and dehydration have elevated serum ketone concentrations that correlate with both degree of dehydration and magnitude of metabolic acidosis. Point-of-care serum ketone measurement may be a useful tool to inform management decisions at the point of triage or in the initial evaluation of children with gastroenteritis and dehydration. © 2013 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  14. Identification of co-infection by rotavirus and parvovirus in dogs with gastroenteritis in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Ariadna Flores; Martínez-Castañeda, José Simón; Bautista-Gómez, Linda G; Muñoz, Raúl Fajardo; Hernández, Israel Quijano

    This is the first report on circulating canine rotavirus in Mexico. Fifty samples from dogs with gastroenteritis were analyzed used polymerase chain reaction and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in order to identify parvovirus and rotavirus, respectively; 7% of dogs were infected with rotavirus exclusively, while 14% were co-infected with both rotavirus and parvovirus; clinical signs in co-infected dogs were more severe. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Group A rotavirus gastroenteritis: post-vaccine era, genotypes and zoonotic transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchs, Adriana; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article provides a review of immunity, diagnosis, and clinical aspects of rotavirus disease. It also informs about the changes in epidemiology of diarrheal disease and genetic diversity of circulating group A rotavirus strains following the introduction of vaccines. Group A rotavirus is the major pathogen causing gastroenteritis in animals. Its segmented RNA genome can lead to the emergence of new or unusual strains in human populations via interspecies transmission and/or reassortment events. PMID:27462899

  16. [Waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by Norovirus transmitted through drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, P; Nuín, C; Alsedà, M; Llovet, T; Mazana, R; Domínguez, A

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct an investigation into an outbreak of waterborne disease caused by Norovirus due to the consumption of contaminated drinking water. The first week after the school summer holidays we detected an outbreak of gastroenteritis at a school in Borges Blanques (Lleida, Spain). A retrospective cohort study was carried out to investigate: water consumption and food (six items). We assessed RNA Norovirus by RT-PCR in 6 stool samples. The risk of gastroenteritis was assessed by applying adjusted risk ratio (RRa) analysis at 95% confidence intervals (CI). The overall attack rate was 45% (96/213). The main symptoms were: abdominal pain, 88.4% (84/95); nausea, 65.9% (62/94), and vomiting, 64.6% (62/96). The consumption of school drinking water was statistically associated with the disease (RRa: 2.8; 95% CI: 1.3-6.2). The school water tank was dirty, but this drinking water was qualified as potable. Six stool samples gave positive results for Norovirus. Norovirus caused this waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis transmitted through treated drinking water. It should be obligatory to regularly clean school drinking water deposit tanks, especially after the summer holidays.

  17. [Gastroenteritis due to Plesiomonas shigelloides--rare cases in the Western world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knebel, U; Sloot, N; Eikenberg, M; Borsdorf, H; Höffler, U; Riemann, J F

    2001-02-15

    Plesiomonas shigelloides is a common pathogen in tropical regions, whereas it is rarely isolated in temperate climates. It is most often found in surface water and fish. During the last 10 years it was found to cause gastroenteritis 6 times in Ludwigshafen. Not all of these patients reported a trip to foreign countries. A 54-year-old male patient was hospitalized after a trip to Malaysia with strong greenish watery diarrhea and chills. On physical examination we saw a dehydrated patient in severely reduced general condition. The stool frequency was 30/d. The laboratory examinations only showed elevated parameters of inflammation. Plesiomonas shigelloides was cultivated in the stool cultures. With appropriate substitution of fluid and electrolytes, and antidiarrheal therapy the patient resumed a normal diet without any complications. Three days later his bowel movements were normal and his general condition was greatly improved. We withheld antibiotic therapy because of the noncomplicated course of illness. In Germany infections with Plesiomonas shigelloides are rare, an increase is observed because of increasing tourism to tropical regions. The course of infection is sometimes asymptomatic, but usually patients develop an acute gastroenteritis. Especially immunocompromised patients can show serious courses of infection. Plesiomonas shigelloides should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis after journeys to tropical regions. Some of our patients, however, denied traveling to tropical regions. They also denied consuming seafood, which indicates a risk of infection in Germany. Still an infection with Plesiomonas shigelloides seems to be rare in northern European countries.

  18. ENTERIC ADENOVIRUS INFECTION IN INFANTS AND YOUNG CHILDREN WITH ACUTE GASTROENTERITIS IN TEHRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jam-Afzon S. Modarres

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are one of the most important etiological agents of serious gastroenteritis among infants and young children. Fecal specimens from patients with an acute gastroenteritis were evaluated for the presence of adenovirus (Ad40, 41 from April 2002 to February 2004. During the study, 1052 samples were collected from children under the age of 5 years in six educational and therapeutic pediatric centers. The specimens were tested for adenovirus (Ad40, 41 by EIA technique in the Virology Department of Pasteur Institute of Iran. Adenoviruses (Ad40, 41 were detected from 27(2.6% samples, but were not detected in 150 samples of healthy control group. In this study the highest rate of adenovirus was found in children aged 6 to 12 months (40.7%, but the male to female ratio inpatients was approximately equal. Adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infections peaked in the winter as 48.1% was detected from December to March. There were a statistically significant difference between age and infection (P < 0.001, also between season with adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infection (P = 0.005. Breast-feeding had a protective action against adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infection. This study revealed that enteric adenovirus (Ad40, 41 is an etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis among children in Tehran.

  19. Lack of nonspecific protection against all-cause nonrotavirus gastroenteritis by vaccination with orally administered rotavirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Lindsay; Watt, James; Moulton, Lawrence; Weatherholtz, Robert; Reid, Raymond; Santosham, Mathuram; O'Brien, Katherine

    2013-06-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is recognized as a global, common threat to child survival, especially in developing countries. Rotavirus, in particular, has been implicated as a leading cause of severe AGE; however, there are numerous other pathogens that also cause AGE. Several studies have demonstrated that oral vaccination against rotavirus has generated the unanticipated benefit of protecting against AGE caused by nonrotavirus pathogens. Safety and efficacy of the pentavalent bovine-human reassortant rotavirus vaccine were studied in multiple populations, including children of the Navajo and White Mountain Apache tribes in the southwestern United States. Stool specimens were collected from children with AGE and tested for rotavirus using an enzyme immunoassay. Analyses were conducted to detect the presence or absence of a vaccine effect on incidence, severity, and duration of AGE in which rotavirus was not detected. The majority of AGE (N = 558: 472 nonrotavirus vs 86 rotavirus) occurred between August 2002 and March 2004 among children ranging from ages 4 to 23 months. The incidence of nonrotavirus AGE was similar by vaccine groups with an incidence rate ratio of 1.07 (incidence rate ratio = vaccinated/unvaccinated, 95% confidence interval 0.89-1.29). The hazards of first, second, third, or any AGE in which rotavirus was not detected differed little by vaccination status (P > 0.05). Duration of symptoms and severity of nonrotavirus AGE were similar by vaccine group. There was no vaccine effect on frequency or severity of nonrotavirus AGE.

  20. Management of acute gastroenteritis in healthy children in Lebanon - A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alameddine, Aouni; Mourad, Sawsan; Rifai, Nahida

    2010-11-01

    Acute gastroenteritis remains a common condition among infants and children throughout the world. In 1996, The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) revised its recommendations for the treatment of infants and children with acute gastroenteritis. The purpose of this survey was to determine how closely current treatment among Lebanese pediatricians compares with the AAP recommendations and to determine the impact of such management on the healthcare system. The outline of the study was based on a telephone questionnaire that addressed the management of healthy infants and children below five years of age with acute gastroenteritis complicated by mild to moderate dehydration. In addition, the costs of medical treatment and requested laboratory studies were calculated. A total of 238 pediatricians completed the questionnaire. Most pediatricians prescribed Oral Rehydration Solutions (ORS) for rehydration (92.4%), advised breastfeeding during acute gastroenteritis (81.5%), and avoided parenteral rehydration for mild to moderate dehydration (89.1%). In addition to ORS, oral fluids such as soda, juices, and rice water were allowed for rehydration by 43.7% of pediatricians. Thirty-one percent of pediatricians delayed re-feeding for more than 6 hours after initiation of rehydration. Only 32.8% of pediatricians kept their patients on regular full-strength formulas, and only 21.8% permitted full-calorie meals for their patients. 75.4% of pediatricians did not order any laboratory studies in cases of mild dehydration and 50.4% did not order any laboratory studies for moderate dehydration. Stool analysis and culture were ordered by almost half of the pediatricians surveyed. Seventy-seven percent prescribed anti-emetics, 61% prescribed probiotics, 26.3% prescribed antibiotics systematically and local antiseptic agents, 16.9% prescribed zinc supplements, and 11% percent prescribed antidiarrheal agents. Pediatricians in Lebanon are aware of the importance of ORS and the positive

  1. Zika virus disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel I Al-Afaleq

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Zika virus is an arbovirus belonging to the virus family Flaviviridae. The virus was isolated in 1947 from a rhesus monkey in the Zika Forest of Uganda. The virus causes sporadic mild human infections in Africa and later in Asia. However, by 2007 a major shift in its infection pattern was noticed and thousands of human infections were reported in the State of Yap and Federated States of Micronesia. In the last 3 years, major outbreaks have continued to occur and the virus has spread to several Pacific and American countries. These outbreaks were mostly asymptomatic; however, there were more severe clinical signs associated with the infections. Those signs included microcephaly and Guillain–Barre syndrome. It is believed that various species of mosquitoes can biologically transmit the virus. However, Aedes aegypti is most widely associated with the Zika virus. Recently, new modes of virus transmission have been reported, including mother-to-fetus, sexual, blood transfusion, animal bites, laboratory exposure and breast milk. Differential diagnosis is very important as some other arboviruses such as yellow fever virus, West Nile virus, dengue virus, and chikungunya virus have similar clinical manifestations to the Zika virus infection as well as relating serologically to some of these viruses. Established laboratory diagnostic tests to detect the Zika virus are limited, with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction being the most widely used test. Taking into consideration the quickness of the spread of infection, size of the infected population and change of the infection severity pattern, the Zika virus infection merits collective efforts on all levels to prevent and control the disease. Limited research work and data, concurrent infection with other arboviruses, involvement of biological vectors, mass crowd events, human and trade movements and lack of vaccines are some of the challenges that we face in our efforts to prevent and

  2. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebola virus and Marburg virus Overview Ebola virus and Marburg virus are related viruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers — illnesses marked by severe bleeding (hemorrhage), organ failure and, in many ...

  3. A comparison between PCR and Immunochromatography assay (ICA in diagnosis of hemorrhagic gastroenteritis caused by Canine parvovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vakili , N.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2 is one of the most common viruses responsible for acute hemorrhagic enteritis in dogs. A rapid and accurate diagnosis of CPV-2 infection is especially important in kennels in order to isolate infected dogs. The aim of the present study was to compare two laboratory tests i.e., Polymerase Change Reaction (PCR and Immunochromatography assay (ICA most commonly used for the diagnosis of canine parvovirus infection in companion dogs. Fecal samples were collected from fifty five dogs (50=hemorrhagic diarrheic and 5= healthy between 2011 and 2012 in Ahvaz district, southwest of Iran. The studied dogs were divided into two age groups (6 months, four different breeds (Terriers, German shepherds, Doberman pinschers and Mixed and based on environment into two groups (open and close also. All samples were tested by ICA and PCR methods and the results were analyzed by using Kappa test, Mc Nemar and Chi-square analysis. ICA and PCR were able to detect CPV-2 antigen or nucleic acid in 33 and 50 of the hemorrhagic diarrheic samples, respectively. Samples of healthy dogs were negative by both tests. Although sensitivity of ICA compared with PCR method was determined to be 66% (PCR more sensitive than ICA, nevertheless statistical analysis showed that the difference between two techniques were not significant (P>0.05. Kappa test was obtained 0.38 between two techniques. CBC showed that most infected dogs had leucopenia, lymphopenia and neutropenia also (82%; 41 out of 50 samples.Obtained results of this survey showed that accurate standardization of laboratory tests is required to provide veterinarian with an effective tool for a precise etiological diagnosis of hemorrhagic gastroenteritis due to CPV infection. Although Immunochromatography is a simple and quick method for screening of fecal samples of dogs suspected of CPV infection, but PCR is more sensitive and reliable than ICA. Moreover, the subtypes of the virus determined by

  4. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay Targeting Eight Parasites Customized to the Korean Population: Potential Use for Detection in Diarrheal Stool Samples from Gastroenteritis Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Jeong Won

    Full Text Available Intestinal parasitic diseases occur worldwide and can cause diarrhea or gastroenteritis; however, their diagnosis is quite difficult, especially in low-endemism countries. We developed a multiplex real-time PCR assay for detection of eight intestinal parasites and prospectively evaluated it for patients with gastroenteritis. The assay targeted Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, Blastocystis hominis, Dientamoeba fragilis, Clonorchis sinensis, Metagonimus yokogawai, and Gymnophalloides seoi. Performance characteristics were evaluated based on recovery after DNA extraction, analytical sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, cross-reactivity, and interference characteristics. Clinical performance was validated against microscopy on 123 diarrheal samples. The assay demonstrated strong correlations between DNA concentrations and Ct values (R2, 0.9924-0.9998, and had a high PCR efficiency (83.3%-109.5%. Polymerase chain reactions detected as few as 10-30 copies of genomic DNA, and coefficient of variance was 0-7%. There was no cross-reactivity to the other 54 microorganisms tested. Interference occurred only in presence of high concentrations of erythrocytes or leukocytes. This assay had a higher correct identification rate (100.0% vs. 90.2% and lower incorrect ID rate (0.0% vs. 9.8% when compared to microscopy. Overall, this assay showed a higher sensitivity (100.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI] of 80.5-100.0 than microscopy (29.4%; 95% CI 10.31-55.96, and the specificity levels were comparable for both methods (100.0%; 95% CI 96.58-100.0. This newly developed multiplex real-time PCR assay offers a potential use for detecting intestinal parasitic pathogens customized to the Korean population.

  5. Rota virus Diarrhea in Hospitalized Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, M. I.; Khan, K. M. A.; Zia, N.; Kazi, S. G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and clinical features of Rota virus diarrhea in children presenting in a tertiary care hospital. Study Design: A cross-sectional, observational study. Place and Duration of Study: National Institute of Child Health, Karachi, from January to June 2007. Methodology: A total of three hundred children of either gender aged 1 month to 5 years, who presented with diarrhea of < 7 days as a primary illness were enrolled. Children with bloody diarrhea or nosocomial gastroenteritis acquired during hospitalization for other disease were not included. Detection of Rota virus in stool was done by enzyme linked immunoassay. Results: Out of 300 children, 188 (63%) tested positive and 112 (37%) tested negative for Rota virus. Positive Rota virus cases in 7 - 12 months of age was (n = 34, 18.08%). Overall, 151 (80.3%) children with Rota virus were less than 3 years old. 182 (60.7%) had fever, 118 (39.3%) had vomiting and 156 (82.9%) children had both fever and vomiting. Conclusion: This study shows that Rota virus is a common organism causing diarrhea in children less than 3 years of age. There is a need to incorporate Rota virus vaccine in the national EPI program to decrease the disease burden as highlighted in this study. (author)

  6. Virus Diseases Infecting Almond Germplasm in Lebanon

    OpenAIRE

    Adeeb Saad; Yusuf Abou-Jawdah; Zahi Kanaan-Atallah

    2000-01-01

    Cultivated and wild almond species were surveyed for virus diseases. Four viruses infected cultivated almonds (Prunus dulcis): Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV), Prune dwarf virus (PDV), Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV) and Apple mosaic virus (ApMV). Only ACLSV and ApMV were detected on wild almonds, (Prunus orientalis and P. korschinskii). The occurence of PNRSV or PDV on seeds used for the production of rootstocks, on seedlings in nurseries, and on mother plants reve...

  7. Impact of community-acquired paediatric rotavirus gastroenteritis on family life: data from the REVEAL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Wielen, Marie; Giaquinto, Carlo; Gothefors, Leif; Huelsse, Christel; Huet, Frédéric; Littmann, Martina; Maxwell, Melanie; Talayero, José M P; Todd, Peter; Vila, Miguel T; Cantarutti, Luigi; Van Damme, Pierre

    2010-03-15

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and the most frequent cause of severe diarrhoea in children aged less than 5 years. Although the epidemiology of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) is well documented, there are few data on the impact of RVGE on the families of affected children. Data associated with the burden of RVGE, including number of working days lost, levels of parental stress, the need for alternative childcare arrangements and additional nappies used, were extracted from questionnaires completed by parents of children participating in a prospective, multicentre, observational study (Rotavirus gastroenteritis Epidemiology and Viral types in Europe Accounting for Losses in public health and society, REVEAL), conducted during 2004-2005 in selected areas of Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom to estimate the incidence of RVGE in children aged less than 5 years seeking medical care as a result of AGE. 1102 children with RVGE were included in the present analysis. The proportion of RVGE cases that required at least one parent or other person to be absent from work was 39%-91% in the hospital setting, 44%-64% in the emergency department, and 20%-64% in primary care. Self-reported levels of parental stress were generally high (mean stress levels, > or = 5 on a 10-point visual analogue scale). Additional childcare arrangements were required in up to 21% of RVGE episodes. The mean number of nappies used per day during RVGE episodes was approximately double that used when the child was not ill. Paediatric RVGE cases cause disruption to families and parental stress. The burden of RVGE on children and their families could be substantially reduced by routine rotavirus vaccination of infants.

  8. [An outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by poisonous Boletus mushroom in Sichuan, China, 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ya-jun; Yuan, Wei; Liu, Lun-guang; Zhang, Li-jie; Shi, Guo-qing; Wang, Qi-xing

    2012-12-01

    To identify the source of infection and risk factors and to provide control measures regarding an outbreak of gastroenteritis involving 30 villagers. Who attended the same wedding party held on March 5(th), 2012, a survey was carried out. Case was defined as having onset of vomiting, nausea, stomachache or diarrhea among the attendees of a wedding party. We randomly selected and interviewed 140 from 470 attendees on their symptoms and food exposures at the wedding. We compared food-specific attack rates (AR) for gastroenteritis in a retrospective cohort study. The leftover foods were tested for Salmonella, Shigella, and Staphylococcus aureus. The leftover Boletus mushrooms were examined and species determined by the Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Of the 140 attendees 61% (85) developed gastroenteritis. Case-attendees had vomiting (94%), nausea (89%), stomachache (53%), and diarrhea (51%). The AR among attendees who ate Boletus mushroom was 69% (81/118), compared to 18% (4/22) of those who did not (RR = 3.8, 95%CI: 1.5 - 9.2). When comparing the ARs between the attendees on consumption of other foods, data did not show statistically significant differences. Among the 7 species of Boletus identified from the leftover mushrooms, 3 (B. venenatus, B. sinicus and B. magnificus) were toxic. Store keepers bought dried or fresh mushrooms from local villagers who had picked up them from the mountains. Salmonella, Shigella, and Staphylococcus aureus tests on those leftover food showed negative results. Poisonous Boletus mushroom contributed to this outbreak. We recommended that education should be targeted on mushroom-pickers regarding how to recognize the poisonous mushrooms. Regulations and laws should also be developed to facilitate the necessary process.

  9. Impact of community-acquired paediatric rotavirus gastroenteritis on family life: data from the REVEAL study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talayero José MP

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus is the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE and the most frequent cause of severe diarrhoea in children aged less than 5 years. Although the epidemiology of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE is well documented, there are few data on the impact of RVGE on the families of affected children. Methods Data associated with the burden of RVGE, including number of working days lost, levels of parental stress, the need for alternative childcare arrangements and additional nappies used, were extracted from questionnaires completed by parents of children participating in a prospective, multicentre, observational study (Rotavirus gastroenteritis Epidemiology and Viral types in Europe Accounting for Losses in public health and society, REVEAL, conducted during 2004-2005 in selected areas of Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom to estimate the incidence of RVGE in children aged less than 5 years seeking medical care as a result of AGE. Results 1102 children with RVGE were included in the present analysis. The proportion of RVGE cases that required at least one parent or other person to be absent from work was 39%-91% in the hospital setting, 44%-64% in the emergency department, and 20%-64% in primary care. Self-reported levels of parental stress were generally high (mean stress levels, ≥ 5 on a 10-point visual analogue scale. Additional childcare arrangements were required in up to 21% of RVGE episodes. The mean number of nappies used per day during RVGE episodes was approximately double that used when the child was not ill. Conclusions Paediatric RVGE cases cause disruption to families and parental stress. The burden of RVGE on children and their families could be substantially reduced by routine rotavirus vaccination of infants.

  10. Validation of the clinical dehydration scale for children with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Ran D; Friedman, Jeremy N; Parkin, Patricia C

    2008-09-01

    We previously created a clinical dehydration scale. Our objective was to validate the clinical dehydration scale with a new cohort of patients with acute gastroenteritis who were assessed in a tertiary emergency department in a developed country. A prospective observational study was performed in an emergency department at a large pediatric tertiary center in Canada. Children 1 month to 5 years of age with symptoms of acute gastroenteritis who were assessed in the emergency department were enrolled consecutively during a 4-month period. The main outcome measures were length of stay, proportion of children receiving intravenous fluid rehydration, and proportions of children with abnormal serum pH values or bicarbonate levels. A total of 205 children were enrolled, with a mean age of 22.4 +/- 14.9 months; 103 (50%) were male. The distribution of severity categories was as follows: no dehydration (score of 0), n = 117 (57%); some dehydration (score of 1-4), n = 83 (41%); moderate/severe dehydration (score of 5-8), n = 5 (2%). The 3 dehydration categories were significantly different with respect to the validation hypotheses (length of stay, mean +/- SD: none, 245 +/- 181 minutes; some, 397 +/- 302 minutes; moderate/severe, 501 +/- 389 minutes; treatment with intravenous fluids: none, n =17, 15%; some, n = 41, 49%; moderate/severe, n = 4, 80%; number of vomiting episodes in the 7 days before the emergency department visit: none, 8.4 +/- 7.7 episodes; some, 13 +/- 10.7 episodes; moderate/severe, 30.2 +/- 14.8 episodes). The clinical dehydration scale and the 3 severity categories were valid for a prospectively enrolled cohort of patients who were assessed in our tertiary emergency department. The scoring system was valuable in predicting a longer length of stay and the need for intravenous fluid rehydration for children with symptoms of acute gastroenteritis.

  11. Simultaneous detection of enteropathogenic viruses in buffalos faeces using multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Pagnini

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A multiplex reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR assay that detects Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus, Bovine Coronavirus, and Group A Rotaviruses in infected cell-culture fluids and clinical faecal samples is described. One hundred twenty faecal samples from buffalo calves with acute gastroenteritis were tested. The mRT-PCR was validated against simplex RT-PCR with published primers for Pestivirus, Coronavirus and Rotavirus. The multiplex RT-PCR was equally sensitive and specific in detecting viral infections compared with simplex RT-PCR. The mRT-PCR readily identified viruses by discriminating the size of their amplified gene products. This mRT-PCR may be a sensitive and rapid assay for surveillance of buffalo enteric viruses in field specimens. This novel multiplex RT-PCR is an attractive technique for the rapid, specific, and cost-effective laboratory diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis.

  12. Pediatric Rotavirus Gastroenteritis: A 2 year Analysis to Understand Current Prevalence in Mumbai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Nerurkar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have established the high prevalence of paediatric Rotavirus gastroenteritis in India. The importance of rapid diagnosis of rotavirus infection has also been stressed upon, to initiate prompt rehydration therapy and prevent unnecessary use of antibiotics .We undertook a retrospective analysis of 327 paediatric stool specimens to understand the current prevalence and seasonal distribution of cases in Mumbai and its surrounding areas. Overall Rotavirus positivity rate was 37.9 %, with peak positivity in winter seasons. Infections were more common upto 2 years of age. Incidence of bacterial and parasitic coinfections was low.

  13. Genetic Relatedness Among Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolated Along the Animal Food Supply Chain and in Gastroenteritis Cases in Qatar Using Multilocus Sequence Typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, Srikanth; Chang, YuChen; Scaria, Joy; Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; Peters, Kenlyn E; Doiphode, Sanjay H; Sultan, Ali; Mohammed, Hussni O

    2017-06-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli has been listed among the most important bacteria associated with foodborne illnesses around the world. We investigated the genetic relatedness among Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) isolated along the animal food supply chain and from humans diagnosed with gastroenteritis in Qatar. Samples were collected from different sources along the food supply chain and from patients admitted to the hospital with complaints of gastroenteritis. All samples were screened for the presence of E. coli O157:H7 and non-O157 STEC using a combination of bacterial enrichment and molecular detection techniques. A proportional sampling approach was used to select positive samples from each source for further multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis. Seven housekeeping genes described for STEC were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, sequenced, and analyzed by MLST. Isolates were characterized by allele composition, sequence type (ST) and assessed for epidemiologic relationship within and among different sources. Nei's genetic distance was calculated at the allele level between sample pools in each site downstream. E. coli O157:H7 occurred at a higher rate in slaughterhouse and retail samples than at the farm or in humans in our sampling. The ST171, an ST common to enterotoxigenic E. coli and atypical enteropathogenic E. coli, was the most common ST (15%) in the food supply chain. None of the genetic distances among the different sources was statistically significant. Enterohemorrhagic E. coli pathogenic strains are present along the supply chain at different levels and with varying relatedness. Clinical isolates were the most diverse, as expected, considering the polyclonal diversity in the human microbiota. The high occurrence of these food adulterants among the farm products suggests that implementation of sanitary measures at that level might reduce the risk of human exposure.

  14. Oxidation mechanisms occurring in wines

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Carla Maria; Ferreira, António César Silva; Freitas, Victor De; Silva, Artur M. S.

    2011-01-01

    The present review aims to show the state of the art on the oxidation mechanisms occurring in wines, as well as the methods to monitor, classify and diagnose wine oxidation. Wine oxidation can be divided in enzymatic oxidation and non-enzymatic oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation almost entirely occurs in grape must and is largely correlated with the content of hydroxycinnamates, such as caffeoyltartaric acid and paracoumaroyltartaric acid, and flavan-3-ols. Non-enzymatic oxidation, al...

  15. Changes in the epidemiology of gastroenteritis in a paediatric short stay unit following the introduction of rotavirus immunisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akikusa, Jonathan D; Hopper, Sandy M; Kelly, Julian J; Kirkwood, Carl D; Buttery, Jim P

    2013-02-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) has been a significant component of the clinical load in the short stay unit (SSU) at the Royal Children's Hospital (RCH) since its establishment in 2004. Since the introduction of routine rotavirus immunisation in Australia in 2007 there has been a clinical impression of a substantial reduction in AGE managed in the SSU. This study aimed to examine changes in the epidemiology of AGE in the SSU, and RCH overall, between 2005 and 2009 and explore whether this reflects a change specifically in AGE due to rotavirus. Discharge coding data for AGE from all inpatient wards, the SSU and emergency department (ED) at the RCH were examined. Stool virology results for the same period were analysed. Since 2007 there has been a 58% reduction in AGE admissions to the SSU. The median age of patients admitted to the RCH with rotaviral enteritis has increased from 1.3 years to 3.8 years. Presentations to the ED for AGE have fallen from 53 to 34 cases per 1000 attendances between 2004 and 2009, and admission rates from the ED have fallen from 23 to 13% of AGE presentations. Detection rates of rotavirus fell from 13.1 to 6.7% between 2005 and 2009. A marked decrease in AGE-related clinical activity and reduction in rotavirus detection at the RCH has occurred since the introduction of routine rotavirus immunisation in Australia. This has significant resource planning implications for units based on short stay models of care. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  16. Outbreak investigation in two groups of coach passengers with gastroenteritis returning from Germany to the Netherlands in February 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, H; Verhoef, L; Schop, W; Götz, H M

    2010-07-15

    In February 2009, an outbreak of 38 cases of gastroenteritis occurred among the participants of two Dutch coach trips (A and B) who visited the same hotel in Germany. We initiated an outbreak investigation to determine possible risk of food-borne infection. A retrospective cohort study was performed among 87 passengers using a self-administered questionnaire. The response rate was 75 of 87 (86%). Mean age was 65 years. Cases were defined as participants of the two coach trips who had diarrhoea and/or vomiting at least once within 24 hours in the period between 7 and 14 February 2009. We distinguished early and late cases, with symptoms starting within or after 72 hours of arrival in the hotel. Overall attack-rate was 38 of 75 (51%). Microbiological investigation was performed on stool samples of two passengers from Coach A and two passengers from Coach B. Identical norovirus genotype II.4 sequences were detected in all four samples. Univariate analysis revealed a potential risk for early cases from juice consumption , which was most clearly seen for Coach B on day of arrival (juice at lunch: relative risk (RR): 3.9, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3-11.7; juice at dinner: RR: 5.5, 95% CI: 1.6-18.1). A dose-response relationship was found. This outbreak was probably caused by using the taps of juice served in large containers with a tap for self-service, due to environmental contamination through person-to-person transmission. Still the role of either contaminated juice or contact with contaminated juice cannot be ruled out.

  17. Prospective evaluation of indirect costs due to acute rotavirus gastroenteritis in Spain: the ROTACOST study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzón-Alejandro, Marta; Redondo-Collazo, Lorenzo; Sánchez-Lastres, Juan Manuel; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2011-09-14

    The effect of rotavirus in developed countries is mainly economic. This study aimed to assess the indirect costs induced by rotavirus acute gastroenteritis (RVAGE) in Spain. A prospective observational study was conducted from October 2008 to June 2009. It included 682 children up to 5 years of age with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) who attended primary care (n = 18) and emergency room/hospital settings (n = 10), covering the regions of Galicia and Asturias (North-west Spain). All non-medical expenses incurred throughout the episode were recorded in detail using personal interviews and telephone contact. Among the 682 enrolled children, 207 (30.4%) were rotavirus positive and 170 (25%) had received at least one dose of rotavirus vaccine. The mean (standard deviation) indirect cost caused by an episode of AGE was estimated at 135.17 (182.70) Euros. Costs were 1.74-fold higher when AGE was caused by rotavirus compared with other etiologies: 192.7 (219.8) Euros vs. 111.6 (163.5) Euros (p purchase of material. Patients with RVAGE were admitted to hospital more frequently than those with other etiologies (47.8% vs 14%, p decision-making process of the eventual inclusion of rotavirus vaccine in the national immunization schedule of well developed countries.

  18. Ascites in a Young Woman: A Rare Presentation of Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Santos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE is a rare idiopathic disease that can affect one or more organs of the digestive tract. It has an estimated incidence of 1–20 cases per 100,000 patients. Klein et al. classified EGE into 3 subtypes: predominant mucosal, muscular, or subserosal. Clinical Case. We report a case of a 32-year-old woman, who presented with diffuse abdominal pain, nausea, postprandial infarction, diarrhea, and moderate ascites of three-week evolution. The rest of physical examination did not show alterations. The past medical history was unremarkable. Laboratory test results revealed peripheral blood eosinophilia. Abdominal CT scan revealed diffuse and concentric parietal thickening of the distal 2/3 of esophagus, moderate volume ascites, and small bowel wall thickening and distension on the left quadrants. The paracentesis revealed 93.3% of eosinophils. The colon biopsies evidenced an increase in the number of eosinophils. Secondary causes of eosinophilia were excluded. The patient was treated with oral prednisolone 40 mg/day with immediate clinical and analytical improvement. Conclusion. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare condition with a nonspecific and highly variable clinical presentation, which requires a high level of clinical suspicion. It is a diagnosis of exclusion. Secondary causes of eosinophilia such as intestinal tuberculosis, parasitosis, and malignant neoplasms should be excluded.

  19. Diapers in war zones: ethnomedical factors in acute childhood gastroenteritis in Peshawar, Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saira H Zaidi

    Full Text Available This article considers ethnomedical knowledge and practices among parents related to contraction of acute gastroenteritis among children in Peshawar, Pakistan. Research methods included analysis of the Emergency Pediatric Services' admission register, a structured interview administered to 47 parents of patients seen in the Khyber Medical College Teaching Hospital, semi-structured interviews of 12 staff, and four home visits among families with children treated at the hospital. The use of native research assistants and participant observation contributed to the reliability of the findings, though the ethnographic, home-visit sample is small. Our research indicated that infection rates are exacerbated in homes through two culturally salient practices and one socioeconomic condition. Various misconceptions propagate the recurrence or perserverance of acute gastroenteritis including assumptions about teething leading to poor knowledge of disease etiology, rehydration solutions leading to increased severity of disease, and diaper usage leading to the spread of disease. In our Discussion, we suggest how hospital structures of authority and gender hierarchy may impact hospital interactions, the flow of information, and its respective importance to the patient's parents leading to possible propagation of disease. These ethnographic data offer a relatively brief but targeted course of action to improve the effectiveness of prevention and treatment efforts.

  20. Prospective evaluation of indirect costs due to acute rotavirus gastroenteritis in Spain: the ROTACOST study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Lastres Juan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of rotavirus in developed countries is mainly economic. This study aimed to assess the indirect costs induced by rotavirus acute gastroenteritis (RVAGE in Spain. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted from October 2008 to June 2009. It included 682 children up to 5 years of age with acute gastroenteritis (AGE who attended primary care (n = 18 and emergency room/hospital settings (n = 10, covering the regions of Galicia and Asturias (North-west Spain. All non-medical expenses incurred throughout the episode were recorded in detail using personal interviews and telephone contact. Results Among the 682 enrolled children, 207 (30.4% were rotavirus positive and 170 (25% had received at least one dose of rotavirus vaccine. The mean (standard deviation indirect cost caused by an episode of AGE was estimated at 135.17 (182.70 Euros. Costs were 1.74-fold higher when AGE was caused by rotavirus compared with other etiologies: 192.7 (219.8 Euros vs. 111.6 (163.5 Euros (p Conclusions Rotavirus generates a significant indirect economic burden. Our data should be considered in the decision-making process of the eventual inclusion of rotavirus vaccine in the national immunization schedule of well developed countries.

  1. Nationwide variation in the effects of temperature on infectious gastroenteritis incidence in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2015-08-01

    Although several studies have investigated the effects of temperature on the incidence of infectious gastrointestinal disease in a single city or region, few have investigated variations in this association using nationwide data. We obtained weekly data, gathered between 2000 and 2012, pertaining to infectious gastroenteritis cases and weather variability in all 47 Japanese prefectures. A two-stage analysis was used to assess the nonlinear and delayed relationship between temperature and morbidity. In the first stage, a Poisson regression allowing for overdispersion in a distributed lag nonlinear model was used to estimate the prefecture-specific effects of temperature on morbidity. In the second stage, a multivariate meta-analysis was applied to pool estimates at the national level. The pooled overall relative risk (RR) was highest in the 59.9th percentile of temperature (RR, 1.08; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.15). Meta-analysis results also indicated that the estimated pooled RR at lower temperatures (25th percentile) began immediately but did not persist, whereas an identical estimate at a higher temperature (75th percentile) was delayed but persisted for several weeks. Our results suggest that public health strategies aimed at controlling temperature-related infectious gastroenteritis may be more effective when tailored according to region-specific weather conditions.

  2. A large common-source outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis in a hotel in Singapore, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, P; Tay, J; Ang, L W; Tien, W S; Thu, M; Lee, P; Pang, Q Y; Tang, Y L; Lee, K Y; Maurer-Stroh, S; Gunalan, V; Cutter, J; Goh, K T

    2017-02-01

    An outbreak of gastroenteritis affected 453 attendees (attack rate 28·5%) of six separate events held at a hotel in Singapore. Active case detection, case-control studies, hygiene inspections and microbial analysis of food, environmental and stool samples were conducted to determine the aetiology of the outbreak and the modes of transmission. The only commonality was the food, crockery and cutlery provided and/or handled by the hotel's Chinese banquet kitchen. Stool specimens from 34 cases and 15 food handlers were positive for norovirus genogroup II. The putative index case was one of eight norovirus-positive food handlers who had worked while they were symptomatic. Several food samples and remnants tested positive for Escherichia coli or high faecal coliforms, aerobic plate counts and/or total coliforms, indicating poor food hygiene. This large common-source outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis was caused by the consumption of contaminated food and/or contact with contaminated crockery or cutlery provided or handled by the hotel's Chinese banquet kitchen.

  3. Transmesocolic double gastro-enteric fistulas due to ingestion of 28 magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Surd

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Accidental ingestion of magnetic foreign bodies has become more common due to increased availability of objects and toys with magnetic elements. The majority of them traverse the gastrointestinal system spontaneously without complication. However, ingestion of multiple magnets may require surgical resolution. Magnet ingestion usually does not cause serious complications, but in case of multiple magnet ingestion or ingestion of magnet and a metal object, it could cause intestinal obstruction, fistula formation or even perforation. Case report: We report case of a transmesocolic double gastro-enteric fistula formation following ingestion of 28 small magnets in a 17 months old boy. No history of foreign body ingestion could be obtained from parents therefore the patient was treated conservatively in a pediatric clinic for vomiting, dehydration, upper respiratory tract infection and suspicion of upper digestive tract bleeding. After 48 h he was sent in our clinic for surgical evaluation. Intraoperatively double transmesocolic gastro-enteric fistula was found. After separation of de gastric and enteral walls, resection of gastric wall and intestinal segment containing the two perforations was performed, followed by gastric suture in two layers and entero-enteric anastomosis. A total of 28 magnets were removed from the stomach and small intestine. Conclusion: Single magnet ingestion is treated as non-magnetic foreign body. Multiple magnet ingestion should be closely monitored and surgical approach could be the best option to prevent or to cure its complications. Keywords: Ingestion, Magnetic foreign body, Multiple magnets, Intestinal fistula, Children

  4. Modulation of rotavirus severe gastroenteritis by the combination of probiotics and prebiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Ochoa, Guadalupe; Flores-Mendoza, Lilian K; Icedo-Garcia, Ramona; Gomez-Flores, Ricardo; Tamez-Guerra, Patricia

    2017-09-01

    Annual mortality rates due to infectious diarrhea are about 2.2 million; children are the most vulnerable age group to severe gastroenteritis, representing group A rotaviruses as the main cause of disease. One of the main factors of rotavirus pathogenesis is the NSP4 protein, which has been characterized as a viral toxin involved in triggering several cellular responses leading to diarrhea. Furthermore, the rotavirus protein NSP1 has been associated with interferon production inhibition by inducing the degradation of interferon regulatory factors IRF3, IRF5, and IRF7. On the other hand, probiotics such as Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus species in combination with prebiotics such as inulin, HMO, scGOS, lcFOS have been associated with improved generalized antiviral response and anti-rotavirus effect by the reduction of rotavirus infectivity and viral shedding, decreased expression of NSP4 and increased levels of specific anti-rotavirus IgAs. Moreover, these probiotics and prebiotics have been related to shorter duration and severity of rotavirus diarrhea, to the prevention of infection and reduced incidence of reinfections. In this review we will discuss in detail about the rotavirus pathogenesis and immunity, and how probiotics such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species in combination with prebiotics have been associated with the prevention or modulation of rotavirus severe gastroenteritis.

  5. Group A rotavirus genotypes in hospital-acquired gastroenteritis in Italy, 2012-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianiro, G; Delogu, R; Fiore, L; Monini, M; Ruggeri, F M

    2017-07-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young (aged rotavirus are presently known, most RVA infections in humans worldwide are related to five major G/P combinations: G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], G4P[8], and G9P[8]. To provide the hospitals of the Italian surveillance network with update information on RVA AGE. During RVA gastroenteritis surveillance in Italy in 2012-14, a total of 2341 RVA-positive faecal samples were collected from children hospitalized with AGE, and RVA strains were genotyped following standard EuroRotaNet protocols. Most strains analysed belonged to the five major human genotypes and 118 out of 2341 (5.0%) were reported to be hospital-acquired. Comparison of the distributions of the RVA genotypes circulating in the community or associated with nosocomial infections showed a different distribution of genotypes circulating inside the hospital wards, with respect to those observed in the community. G1P[8] and G9P[8] RVA strains were detected frequently, whereas G12P[8] caused a single large nosocomial outbreak. The information from this study will be useful to implement guidelines for preventing RVA AGE and optimizing the management of patients in hospital wards. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Antigenic characterization of small, round-structured viruses by immune electron microscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Okada, S; Sekine, S; Ando, T; Hayashi, Y; Murao, M; Yabuuchi, K; Miki, T; Ohashi, M

    1990-01-01

    Small, round-structured viruses (SRSVs) detected from nonbacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks in Tokyo and Saitama Prefecture, Japan, during the period from 1977 to 1988 were tentatively classified into nine antigenic patterns from SRSV-1 (S-1) to SRSV-9 (S-9) by cross-immune electron microscopy (IEM). S-1 and S-2 appeared pattern specific, while S-3 to S-9, distinguishable from each other in their reactivity, appeared somewhat antigenically related. Their antigenic relatedness to the Norwal, ...

  7. Getah Virus Infection among Racehorses, Japan, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannai, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Koji; Kobayashi, Minoru; Kikuchi, Takuya; Yamanaka, Takashi; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of Getah virus infection occurred among racehorses in Japan during September and October 2014. Of 49 febrile horses tested by reverse transcription PCR, 25 were positive for Getah virus. Viruses detected in 2014 were phylogenetically different from the virus isolated in Japan in 1978. PMID:25898181

  8. Horizontal transmissible protection against myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease by using a recombinant myxoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcena, J; Morales, M; Vázquez, B; Boga, J A; Parra, F; Lucientes, J; Pagès-Manté, A; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M; Blasco, R; Torres, J M

    2000-02-01

    We have developed a new strategy for immunization of wild rabbit populations against myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease (RHD) that uses recombinant viruses based on a naturally attenuated field strain of myxoma virus (MV). The recombinant viruses expressed the RHDV major capsid protein (VP60) including a linear epitope tag from the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) nucleoprotein. Following inoculation, the recombinant viruses induced specific antibody responses against MV, RHDV, and the TGEV tag. Immunization of wild rabbits by the subcutaneous and oral routes conferred protection against virulent RHDV and MV challenges. The recombinant viruses showed a limited horizontal transmission capacity, either by direct contact or in a flea-mediated process, promoting immunization of contact uninoculated animals.

  9. Rapid Intravenous Rehydration to Correct Dehydration and Resolve Vomiting in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoush AZARFAR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Objectives: The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of rapid intravenous rehydration to resolve vomiting in children with acute gastroenteritis. Methods: This randomized control trial was conducted in the pediatric emergency department in a tertiary care center in Tabriz, North-West of Iran. The study participants' were 150 children with acute gastroenteritis and vomiting who were moderately dehydrated, had not responded to oral rehydration therapy and without any electrolyte abnormalities. 20–30 cc/kg of a crystalloid solution was given intravenously over 2 hours and the control group was admitted in the emergency department (ED for a standard 24 hour hydration. Effectiveness of rapid intravenous rehydration in the resolution of vomiting in children with acute gastroenteritis was evaluated. Results: In 63 children of the intervention group (out of 75 vomiting was resolved after rapid IV rehydration and they were discharged. Among them, 12 that did not tolerate oral fluids were admitted. In the control group, 62 patients' vomiting was resolved in the first 4 hours after admission, and there was no significant difference between the two groups regarding resolution of vomiting. Conclusions: Rapid intravenous rehydration in children with moderate dehydration and vomiting due to gastroenteritis is effective in reducing admission rates in the ED. ÖZET: Amaç: Bu çalışmanın amacı, akut gastroenteritli çocuklarda, hızlı intravenöz rehidratasyon tedavisinin kusma üzerine etkisini değerlendirmektir. Gereç ve Yöntem: Bu randomize kontrollü çalışma İran'ın Kuzeybatısındaki Tebriz ilinde üçüncü basamak çocuk acil servisinde gerçekleştirildi. Çalışmaya orta derecede dehidrate, elektrolit anormalliği olmayan ve oral rehidrasyon tedavisine yanıt vermemiş akut gastroenteritli 150 çocuk katıldı. İki saat içinde intravenöz yolla 20–30 cc/kg kristaloid çözelti verildi ve kontrol grubu standart

  10. Epidemiology of Human Parechovirus Type1 in Clinical Samples from Children with Gastroenteritis Using RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabirmanesh B

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Human parechovirus type-1 (HPeV-1 is a genus of picornaviridea with a single stranded positive sense RNA genome. In general it seems to be responsible for more gastrointestinal and respiratory syndromes and less responsible for central nervous system (CNS symptoms. Since there is no accurate information about diagnosis and epidemiology of HPeV-1 in Iran and it is very important to distinguish between viral and bacterial diarrhea to decrease the unnecessary use of antibiotics, this study aimed at rapid detection and epidemiology of HPeV-1 in stool samples from children with gastroenteritis using specific RT-PCR. Methods: Viral RNA was isolated from 472 stool samples from children (under 4 years old with diarrhea; CDNA was prepared and amplified using specific primers from 5′untranslated region (5′ UTR of HPeV-1 genome by nested RT-PCR. Amplified DNA product was electrophoresed on 1% agarose gel and a single band of 265 bp was obtained. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. We also performed a comparison between the cell culture (Vero and RT-PCR method for HPeV1 detection.Results: Out of 472 samples examined during two years, 112 samples were HpeV-1 positive (23.7%. The results showed that the prevalence of this virus was in children under one year (6-12 months old with diarrhea (p=0.036 in spring and autumn (p<0.001. Boys had more positive cases than the girls (p<0.001. Out of 20 samples which were found positive by HPeV1 RT-PCR only three of them showed CPE on Vero Cells after a week.Conclusion: The results revealed that RT-PCR is a more practical and sensitive technique for HPeV-1 detection directly from clinical samples, which is valuable for epidemiology. Also, the rapid detection of HPeV1 by RT-PCR can decrease both the unnecessary use of antibiotics and the costs in clinical practice

  11. Epidemiology of Human Parechovirus Type1 in Clinical Samples from Children with Gastroenteritis Using RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Ghazi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Human parechovirus type-1 (HPeV-1 is a genus of picornaviridea with a single stranded positive sense RNA genome. In general it seems to be responsible for more gastrointestinal and respiratory syndromes and less responsible for central nervous system (CNS symptoms. Since there is no accurate information about diagnosis and epidemiology of HPeV-1 in Iran and it is very important to distinguish between viral and bacterial diarrhea to decrease the unnecessary use of antibiotics, this study aimed at rapid detection and epidemiology of HPeV-1 in stool samples from children with gastroenteritis using specific RT-PCR.

     

    Methods: Viral RNA was isolated from 472 stool samples from children (under 4 years old with diarrhea; CDNA was prepared and amplified using specific primers from 5untranslated region (5 UTR of HPeV-1 genome by nested RT-PCR. Amplified DNA product was electrophoresed on 1% agarose gel and a single band of 265 bp was obtained. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. We also performed a comparison between the cell culture (Vero and RT-PCR method for HPeV1 detection.

     

    Results: Out of 472 samples examined during two years, 112 samples were HpeV-1 positive (23.7%. The results showed that the prevalence of this virus was in children under one year (6-12 months old with diarrhea (p=0.036 in spring and autumn (p<0.001. Boys had more positive cases than the girls (p<0.001. Out of 20 samples which were found positive by HPeV1 RT-PCR only three of them showed CPE on Vero Cells after a week.

     

    Conclusion: The results revealed that RT-PCR is a more practical and sensitive technique for HPeV-1 detection directly from clinical samples, which is valuable for epidemiology. Also, the rapid

  12. Narrowing of the Diagnostic Gap of Acute Gastroenteritis in Children 0-6 Years of Age Using a Combination of Classical and Molecular Techniques, Delivers Challenges in Syndromic Approach Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyer, Andrej; Jevšnik, Monika; Petrovec, Miroslav; Pokorn, Marko; Grosek, Štefan; Fratnik Steyer, Adela; Šoba, Barbara; Uršič, Tina; Cerar Kišek, Tjaša; Kolenc, Marko; Trkov, Marija; Šparl, Petra; Duraisamy, Raja; Lipkin, W Ian; Terzić, Sara; Kolnik, Mojca; Mrvič, Tatjana; Kapoor, Amit; Strle, Franc

    2016-09-01

    Twenty-five percent to 50% of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) cases remain etiologically undiagnosed. Our main aim was to determine the most appropriate list of enteric pathogens to be included in the daily diagnostics scheme of AGE, ensuring the lowest possible diagnostic gap. Two hundred ninety seven children ≤6 years of age, admitted to hospital in Slovenia, October 2011 to October 2012, with AGE, and 88 ≤6 years old healthy children were included in the study. A broad spectrum of enteric pathogens was targeted with molecular methods, including 8 viruses, 6 bacteria and 2 parasites. At least one enteric pathogen was detected in 91.2% of cases with AGE and 27.3% of controls. Viruses were the most prevalent (82.5% and 15.9%), followed by bacteria (27.3% and 10.2%) and parasites (3.0% and 1.1%) in cases and controls, respectively. A high proportion (41.8%) of mixed infections was observed in the cases. For cases with undetermined etiology (8.8%), stool samples were analyzed with next generation sequencing, and a potential viral pathogen was detected in 17 additional samples (5.8%). Our study suggests that tests for rotaviruses, noroviruses genogroup II, adenoviruses 40/41, astroviruses, Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella sp. should be included in the initial diagnostic algorithm, which revealed the etiology in 83.5% of children tested. The use of molecular methods in diagnostics of gastroenteritis is preferable because of their high sensitivity, specificity, fast performance and the possibility of establishing the concentration of the target. The latter may be valuable for assessing the clinical significance of the detected enteric, particularly viral pathogens.

  13. A novel RT-multiplex PCR for enteroviruses, hepatitis A and E viruses and influenza A virus among infants and children with diarrhea in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, T G; Nguyen, T A; Yan, H; Okitsu, S; Ushijima, H

    2005-06-01

    A novel reverse transcription-multiplex polymerase chain reaction (RT-multiplex PCR) assay that can detect enteroviruses, hepatitis A and E viruses and influenza A virus from various hosts (avian species, human, swine and horse) was developed. The identification of that group of viruses was performed with the mixture of four pairs of published specific primers (F1 and R1, P3 and P4, 2s and 2as, MMU42 and MMU43) for amplifying viral genomes and specifically generated four different amplicon sizes of 440, 267, 146 and 219 bp for enteroviruses, hepatitis A and E viruses and influenza A virus, respectively. A total of 276 fecal specimens (previously screened for rotavirus, adenovirus, norovirus, sapovirus and astrovirus-negative) from infants and children admitted into hospital with acute gastroenteritis in Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam during October 2002 and September 2003 were collected and further tested for the presence of those viruses by RT-multiplex PCR. Enteroviruses were identified in 27 specimens and this represented 9.8%. No hepatitis A and E viruses and influenza A virus was found among these subjects. The sensitivity and specificity of RT-multiplex PCR were also assessed and demonstrated the strong validation against RT-monoplex PCR. Taken together, the findings clearly indicated that this novel RT-multiplex PCR is a simple and potential assay for rapid, sensitive, specific and cost-effective laboratory diagnosis to investigate molecular epidemiology of acute gastroenteritis caused by enteroviruses, hepatitis A and E viruses and influenza A virus. This report is the first, to our knowledge, detecting these kinds of viruses in diarrheal feces from infants and children in Vietnam.

  14. Quantitative farm-to-fork risk assessment model for norovirus and hepatitis A virus in European leafy green vegetable and berry fruit supply chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwknegt, Martijn; Verhaelen, Katharina; Rzeżutka, Artur; Kozyra, Iwona; Maunula, Leena; von Bonsdorff, Carl-Henrik; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Kokkinos, Petros; Petrovic, Tamas; Lazic, Sava; Pavlik, Ivo; Vasickova, Petra; Willems, Kris A; Havelaar, Arie H; Rutjes, Saskia A; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2015-04-02

    Fresh produce that is contaminated with viruses may lead to infection and viral gastroenteritis or hepatitis when consumed raw. It is thus important to reduce virus numbers on these foods. Prevention of virus contamination in fresh produce production and processing may be more effective than treatment, as sufficient virus removal or inactivation by post-harvest treatment requires high doses that may adversely affect food quality. To date knowledge of the contribution of various potential contamination routes is lacking. A risk assessment model was developed for human norovirus, hepatitis A virus and human adenovirus in raspberry and salad vegetable supply chains to quantify contributions of potential contamination sources to the contamination of produce at retail. These models were used to estimate public health risks. Model parameterization was based on monitoring data from European supply chains and literature data. No human pathogenic viruses were found in the soft fruit supply chains; human adenovirus (hAdV) was detected, which was additionally monitored as an indicator of fecal pollution to assess the contribution of potential contamination points. Estimated risks per serving of lettuce based on the models were 3×10(-4) (6×10(-6)-5×10(-3)) for NoV infection and 3×10(-8) (7×10(-10)-3×10(-6)) for hepatitis A jaundice. The contribution to virus contamination of hand-contact was larger as compared with the contribution of irrigation, the conveyor belt or the water used for produce rinsing. In conclusion, viral contamination in the lettuce and soft fruit supply chains occurred and estimated health risks were generally low. Nevertheless, the 97.5% upper limit for the estimated NoV contamination of lettuce suggested that infection risks up to 50% per serving might occur. Our study suggests that attention to full compliance for hand hygiene will improve fresh produce safety related to virus risks most as compared to the other examined sources, given the

  15. Viral Gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... still have diarrhea. Most experts do not recommend fasting or following a restricted diet. Clinical Trials The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct and support research into many diseases ...

  16. Detection and genetic characterization of norovirus strains circulating among infants and children with acute gastroenteritis in Japan during 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Tung Gia; Takanashi, Sayaka; Kaneshi, Kunio; Ueda, Yuichi; Nakaya, Shigekazu; Nishimura, Shuichi; Sugita, Kumiko; Nishimura, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Atsuko; Yagyu, Fumihiro; Okitsu, Shoko; Maneekarn, Niwat; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    A total of 752 fecal specimens collected during the period of July 2004 to June 2005 from infants and children with acute gastroenteritis from four different regions (Maizuru, Tokyo, Sapporo, and Osaka) of Japan were tested for the presence of norovirus by RT-PCR. It was found that 139 (18.5%) fecal specimens were positive for norovirus. Norovirus infection was detected almost all year round with the highest prevalence in January. Norovirus GII was the most predominant genogroup (98.6%; 137 of 139). The genotypes detected in this study were GI/1, GII/1, GII/3, GII/4, and GII/6. Of these, NoV GII/4 (known as the Lordsdale virus cluster) was re-emerging and became the leading genotype (77.7%). Meanwhile, the incidence of NoV GII/3 (known as the Arg320 virus cluster) has dropped rapidly, accounting for only 15.8%. Another interesting feature of the study was the identification of Picton03/AU-like recombinant NoV for the first time in Japan. Based on the genetic analysis, it was interesting to note that NoV GII/4 in 2004-2005 made a distinct cluster in comparison to other NoV GII/4 circulating in 2002-2003 and 2003-2004. Of note, "new recombinant variant designated GIIb" within NoV GII/3, which was first detected in Saga City, Japan in 2003-2004 in only one case, had increased, spreading widely in Japan and representing 45.5% (10 of 22). Further epidemiological studies should be conducted to determine whether this new recombinant variant strain will be dominant in Japan in the coming year.

  17. Transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus genome packaging signal is located at the 5' end of the genome and promotes viral RNA incorporation into virions in a replication-independent process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Lucia; Mateos-Gomez, Pedro A; Capiscol, Carmen; del Palacio, Lorena; Enjuanes, Luis; Sola, Isabel

    2013-11-01

    Preferential RNA packaging in coronaviruses involves the recognition of viral genomic RNA, a crucial process for viral particle morphogenesis mediated by RNA-specific sequences, known as packaging signals. An essential packaging signal component of transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) has been further delimited to the first 598 nucleotides (nt) from the 5' end of its RNA genome, by using recombinant viruses transcribing subgenomic mRNA that included potential packaging signals. The integrity of the entire sequence domain was necessary because deletion of any of the five structural motifs defined within this region abrogated specific packaging of this viral RNA. One of these RNA motifs was the stem-loop SL5, a highly conserved motif in coronaviruses located at nucleotide positions 106 to 136. Partial deletion or point mutations within this motif also abrogated packaging. Using TGEV-derived defective minigenomes replicated in trans by a helper virus, we have shown that TGEV RNA packaging is a replication-independent process. Furthermore, the last 494 nt of the genomic 3' end were not essential for packaging, although this region increased packaging efficiency. TGEV RNA sequences identified as necessary for viral genome packaging were not sufficient to direct packaging of a heterologous sequence derived from the green fluorescent protein gene. These results indicated that TGEV genome packaging is a complex process involving many factors in addition to the identified RNA packaging signal. The identification of well-defined RNA motifs within the TGEV RNA genome that are essential for packaging will be useful for designing packaging-deficient biosafe coronavirus-derived vectors and providing new targets for antiviral therapies.

  18. Differential sensitivity of bat cells to infection by enveloped RNA viruses: coronaviruses, paramyxoviruses, filoviruses, and influenza viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Bats (Chiroptera host major human pathogenic viruses including corona-, paramyxo, rhabdo- and filoviruses. We analyzed six different cell lines from either Yinpterochiroptera (including African flying foxes and a rhinolophid bat or Yangochiroptera (genera Carollia and Tadarida for susceptibility to infection by different enveloped RNA viruses. None of the cells were sensitive to infection by transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV, a porcine coronavirus, or to infection mediated by the Spike (S protein of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV incorporated into pseudotypes based on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV. The resistance to infection was overcome if cells were transfected to express the respective cellular receptor, porcine aminopeptidase N for TGEV or angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 for SARS-CoV. VSV pseudotypes containing the S proteins of two bat SARS-related CoV (Bg08 and Rp3 were unable to infect any of the six tested bat cell lines. By contrast, viral pseudotypes containing the surface protein GP of Marburg virus from the family Filoviridae infected all six cell lines though at different efficiency. Notably, all cells were sensitive to infection by two paramyxoviruses (Sendai virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus and three influenza viruses from different subtypes. These results indicate that bat cells are more resistant to infection by coronaviruses than to infection by paramyxoviruses, filoviruses and influenza viruses. Furthermore, these results show a receptor-dependent restriction of the infection of bat cells by CoV. The implications for the isolation of coronaviruses from bats are discussed.

  19. Naturally occurring flavonoids against human norovirus surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaowei; D'Souza, Doris H

    2013-06-01

    Naturally occurring plant-derived flavonoids are reported to have antibacterial, antiviral, and pharmacological activities. The objectives of this study were to determine the antiviral effects of four flavonoids (myricetin, L-epicatechin, tangeretin, and naringenin) on the infectivity of food borne norovirus surrogates after 2 h at 37 °C. The lab-culturable surrogates, feline calicivirus (FCV-F9) at titers of ~7 log₁₀ PFU/ml (high titer) or ~5 log₁₀ PFU/ml (low titer) and murine norovirus (MNV-1) at ~5 log₁₀ PFU/ml, were mixed with equal volumes of myricetin, L-epicatechin, tangeretin, or naringenin at concentrations of 0.5 or 1 mM, and incubated for 2 h at 37 °C. Treatments of viruses were neutralized in cell culture medium containing 10 % heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum, serially diluted, and plaque assayed. Each treatment was replicated thrice and assayed in duplicate. FCV-F9 (low titer) was not found to be reduced by tangeretin or naringenin, but was reduced to undetectable levels by myricetin at both concentrations. Low titer FCV-F9 was also decreased by 1.40 log₁₀ PFU/ml with L-epicatechin at 0.5 mM. FCV-F9 at high titers was decreased by 3.17 and 0.72 log₁₀ PFU/ml with myricetin and L-epicatechin at 0.5 mM, and 1.73 log10 PFU/ml with myricetin at 0.25 mM, respectively. However, MNV-1 showed no significant inactivation by the four tested treatments. The antiviral effects of the tested flavonoids are dependent on the virus type, titer, and dose. Further research will focus on understanding the antiviral mechanism of myricetin and L-epicatechin.

  20. Permeability of the small intestine to [51Cr]EDTA in children with acute gastroenteritis or eczema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forget, P.; Sodoyez-Goffaux, F.; Zappitelli, A.

    1985-01-01

    Increased gut permeability to macromolecules is thought to be an important factor in the development of food hypersensitivity. The latter can develop in the course of acute gastroenteritis and could play a role in infantile eczema. The authors studied gut permeability in 10 normal adults, 11 control children, 7 children with acute gastroenteritis, and 8 patients with infantile eczema, making use of [ 51 Cr]EDTA as probe molecule. [ 51 Cr]EDTA was given orally (50-100 microCi); 24-h urinary excretion of [ 51 Cr]EDTA was measured and expressed as a percentage of the oral dose. Mean and standard error were 2.35 +/- 0.24, 2.51 +/- 0.21, 9.96 +/- 3.44, and 10.90 +/- 2.05 in normal adults, control children, and gastroenteritis and eczema patients, respectively. Differences between controls and either gastroenteritis (p less than 0.001) or eczema (p less than 0.001) patients are significant. The results support the hypothesis that increased gut permeability could play a role in food hypersensitivity

  1. Efficacy of intravenous ondansetron to prevent vomiting episodes in acute gastroenteritis: a randomized, double blind, and controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanguansak Rerksuppaphol

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute gastroenteritis is one of the most common infectious diseases of childhood. Its symptoms are vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration. In the emergency ward, intravenous rather than oral rehydration is usually preferred because of the high likelihood of emesis. Treatments to reduce emesis are of value in improving the rehydration procedure. Our study is a double-blind randomized trial and proposes the use of ondansetron as an anti-emetic drug to treat children with acute gastroenteritis. Seventy-four in-patients, aged 3 months to 15 years, were enrolled and randomly assigned to an ondansetron or placebo group. Inclusion criteria were the diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis and the absence of other diseases or allergies to drugs. A single bolus (0.15 mg/kg of ondansetron was injected intravenously; normal 0.9% saline solution was used as a placebo. This treatment induced vomiting cessation in the ondansetron group significantly in comparison to the placebo group. The length of the hospital stay and the oral rehydration fluid volume were similar in the two groups and no adverse effects were noticed. Thus, safety, low cost, and overall bene­fit of ondansetron treatment suggests that this drug can be administered successfully to children with acute gastroenteritis.

  2. Guidelines on acute gastroenteritis in children: A critical appraisal of their quality and applicability in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van den Berg (José); M.Y. Berger (Marjolein)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Reasons for poor guideline adherence in acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in children in high-income countries are unclear, but may be due to inconsistency between guideline recommendations, lack of evidence, and lack of generalizability of the recommendations to general practice.

  3. Implementation of clinical decision support in young children with acute gastroenteritis: a randomized controlled trial at the emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.F. Geurts (Dorien); E. De Vos-Kerkhof (Evelien); S. Polinder (Suzanne); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J. van der Lei (Johan); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte); R. Oostenbrink (Rianne)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAcute gastroenteritis (AGE) is one of the most frequent reasons for young children to visit emergency departments (EDs). We aimed to evaluate (1) feasibility of a nurse-guided clinical decision support system for rehydration treatment in children with AGE and (2) the impact on

  4. [Clinical analysis on an outbreak of SRSV-gastroenteritis with 644 patients emerged in Shizuoka Prefecture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N; Sugieda, M; Miyamoto, H

    1999-04-01

    Small round structured viruses (SRSV) are the major cause of acute non-bacterial enterogastritis and have a characteristic of breaking out with mass victims as food poisoning. The outbreak usually occurs among school children from school lunches in Japan. A case in adults is relatively rare. The SRSV food poisoning with 644 adult victims carried through lunch box broke out, which may be the biggest number in adult cases in the world. This is the report describing its outlines, analytical result of clinical symptoms and fecal microbial examination. The average latent period was 37 hours, the time was mostly (47%) between 24-36 hours. The most emerged symptom was diarrhea and followed nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting and high fever. The older patients showed a higher rate of diarrhea and fewer one of nausea and fever. 15 patients complained of eye symptom. This number should not be neglected. It may be a characteristic of the disease. SRSV detection test with PT-PCR method of feces was done on 36 patients and 24 patients were positive. The most sensitive primer was Yuri/nested/22F/R. In Japan, lunch-service has become a industry advancing monopolization and wide areazation. SRSV make easily contamination to food, therefore if mass victim food-poisoning occurs, this should be considered initially.

  5. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training)

  6. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, P. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

  7. External validation of the clinical dehydration scale for children with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Benoit; Gravel, Jocelyn; Goldman, Ran D; Friedman, Jeremy N; Parkin, Patricia C

    2010-06-01

    The objective was to validate the clinical dehydration scale (CDS) for children with gastroenteritis in a different pediatric emergency department (ED) from where it was initially derived and validated. A prospective cohort study was performed in a tertiary care pediatric ED over a 1-year period. A sample of triage nurses were trained in applying the CDS. The CDS consists of four clinical characteristics (general appearance, eyes, mucous membranes, and tears), each of which are scored 0, 1, or 2 for a total score of 0 to 8, with 0 representing no dehydration; 1 to 4, some dehydration; and 5 to 8, moderate/severe dehydration. Children 1 month to 5 years of age with vomiting and/or diarrhea who had the CDS documented at triage and a final diagnosis of gastroenteritis, gastritis, or enteritis were enrolled. Exclusion criteria included a chronic disease, treatment with intravenous (IV) rehydration within the previous 24 hours, visit to the ED for the same illness in the 7 days prior to arrival, and diarrhea of more than 10 days' duration. The primary outcome was the length of stay (LOS) in the ED from the time of seeing a physician to discharge, analyzed with a Kruskal-Wallis test. From April 2008 to March 2009, 150 patients with a mean (+/-SD) age of 22 (+/-14) months (range = 4 months to 4 years) were enrolled. Fifty-six patients had no dehydration, 74 had some dehydration, and 20 had moderate/severe dehydration. The median LOS in the ED after being seen by a physician was significantly longer as children appeared more dehydrated according to the CDS: 54 minutes (interquartile range [IQR] = 26-175 minutes), 128 minutes (IQR = 25-334 minutes), and 425 minutes (IQR = 218-673 minutes) for the no, some, and moderate/severe dehydration groups, respectively (p children with gastroenteritis in a different pediatric center than the original one where it was developed. It is a good predictor of LOS in the ED after being seen by a physician. (c) 2010 by the Society for

  8. Secondary efficacy endpoints of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine against gastroenteritis in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Milagritos D; Armah, George; Breiman, Robert F; Dallas, Michael J; Lewis, Kristen D C; Sow, Samba O; Rivers, Stephen B; Levine, Myron M; Laserson, Kayla F; Feikin, Daniel R; Victor, John C; Ciarlet, Max; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Steele, A Duncan

    2012-04-27

    The efficacy of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (PRV), RotaTeq(®), was evaluated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter Phase III clinical trial conducted (April 2007-March 2009) in 3 low-income countries in Africa: Ghana, Kenya, and Mali. In total, 5468 infants were randomized 1:1 to receive 3 doses of PRV/placebo at approximately 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age; concomitant administration with routine EPI vaccines, including OPV, was allowed. HIV-infected infants were not excluded. The primary endpoint, vaccine efficacy (VE) against severe-rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE), as measured by Vesikari scoring system (VSS, score ≥11), from ≥14 days following Dose 3 through a follow-up period of nearly 2 years in the combined 3 African countries, and secondary endpoints by total follow-up period have been previously reported. In this study, we report post hoc subgroup analyses on secondary endpoints of public health importance. VE against RVGE of any severity was 49.2% (95%CI: 29.9, 63.5) through the first year of life and 30.5% (95%CI: 16.7, 42.2) through the complete follow-up period. VE against severe-gastroenteritis of any etiology was 21.5% (95%CI: vaccine-contained G and P types (G1-G4, P1A[8]), (ii) non-vaccine G types (G8, G9, G10), and (iii) non-vaccine P types (P1B[4], P2A[6]) was 34.0% (95%CI:11.2, 51.2), 81.8% (95%CI:16.5, 98.0) and 40.7% (95%CI:8.4, 62.1), respectively. There was a trend towards higher VE with higher disease severity, although in some cases the numbers were small. In African countries with high under-5 mortality rates, PRV significantly reduced RVGE through nearly 2 years of follow-up; more modest reductions were observed against gastroenteritis of any etiology. PRV provides protection against severe-RVGE caused by diverse rotavirus genotypes, including those not contained in the vaccine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Naturally occurring radionuclides in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djujic, I.

    1995-01-01

    The naturally occurring radionuclides are the major source of radiation exposure to humans. The principal way of natural radiation exposure is the inhalation of 222 Rn decay products (about 85% of the total). The remainder is equally divided between internally deposited radionuclides, cosmic and terrestrial sources. In the present study, the content of 40 K, 210 Pb, 226 Ra, 230 Th, 232 Th and 238 U in representative food samples (milk, pork, beef, potatoes, wheat and corn flour) and samples of different food items that do not represent entire national production but provide interesting additional data for approximative calculation of naturally occurring radionuclide intake is presented. Daily weight of food eaten, participation of food groups, as well as daily intake by food of mentioned naturally occurring radionuclides in the Serbian diet was obtained on the base of house hold budget surveys. The result obtained for daily intake estimates in mBq for Serbian population are 78.1 ( 40 K), 38.2( 210 Pb), 52.3( 226 Ra), 2.0( 230 Th) and 12.5( 238 U). (author)

  10. Acute viral gastroenteritis in children hospitalized in Iksan, Korea during December 2010 - June 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol Whoan So

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Viral etiology is common in cases of children with acute diarrhea, and antibiotic therapy is usually not required. Therefore, it is important to determine the distribution of common viruses among children hospitalized with acute diarrhea. Methods: We included 186 children who suffered from acute diarrhea and were hospitalized at the Wonkwang University Hospital Pediatric ward from December 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011 in this study. Stool samples were collected and multiplex reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (multiplex RT-PCR was used to simultaneously determine the viral etiology such as rotavirus, norovirus, astrovirus, or adenovirus.&lt;br&gt; Results: Causative viruses were detected in 72 of the 186 cases (38.7%. The mean age of the viruspositive cases was 1 year and 9 months (range, 1 month to 11 years. Rotavirus was detected in 50/186 (26.9%; norovirus, in 18/186 (9.7%; and astrovirus, in 3/186 cases (1.6%. Adenovirus was not detected in any of the cases. Proportions of norovirus genogroups I and II were 21.1% and 78.9%, respectively. Four of the 51 rotavirus-positive cases (7.8% had received rotavirus vaccination at least once. The mean duration of diarrhea was 2.8 days (range, 1 to 10 days and vomiting occurred in 39 of the 72 cases (54.2%.&lt;br&gt; Conclusion: Viral etiology was confirmed in about one-third of the children with acute diarrhea, and the most common viral agent was rotavirus, followed by norovirus.

  11. Salmonella Gastroenteritis Due to Rhabdomyolysis and Acute Renal Failure with Acute Pancreatitis Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şenay Canikli Adıgüzel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we are reporting a case of acute pancreatitis, acute renal failure (ARF and rhabdomyolysis which are rare serious complications of the Salmonella gastroenteritis. A patient presented as an emergency with fever, abdominal pain, and ARF complexion was operated urgently by ileus pre-diagnosis. There was not surgical pathology detected during the operation. However, Salmonella paratyphi A in feces of patient with high levels of amylase, lipase, and creatinine were reported during intensive care unit (ICU admission. The patient was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis due to Salmonella infection. During ICU stay, the levels of amylase and lipase were reduced and the kidney functions improved without hemodialysis. On the 7th day, patient was transferred to the general surgical service.

  12. HYPERGLYCEMIA IN GRADE III AND GRADE IV MALNUTRITION WITH DEHYDRATING GASTROENTERITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallesh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY: To study the incidence of hyperglycemia in grade III AND IV malnutrition with no signs and some signs of dehydration. SETTING: Tertiary care center located in north Karnataka. DESIGN: Prospective observational study involving 21 children. METHODS: All the children with grade III and grade IV malnutrition presenting with diarrhea of less than 14 days duration, having no signs to some signs of dehydration. RESULTS: Hyperglycemia was observed in three of 21 children hypoglycemia was observed in six children. CONCLUSION: Although hypoglycemia is common finding in moderate and severely malnourished children with dehydrating gastroenteritis, hyperglycemia should also be suspected and treated. Long term follow up of these children is needed involving larger number of people in multicenter studies.

  13. [Practical lessons from the risk management of an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in a public school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillo-García, Aurea; Sillero-Sánchez, Rocío; Aldana-Espinal, Josefa María; Nieto-Cervera, Pilar

    2005-01-01

    We present our reflections on the management of an acute gastroenteritis outbreak in a public school, which caused a public health crisis, and the conclusions drawn from this experience. The methodology of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis was used. This article describes the epidemiology of the incident and the policy decisions made, but focuses on operational aspects of outbreak management. The experience of the outbreak control team, liaison with other organizations, and data management are discussed. The difficulties encountered by the outbreak team related to delay in declaring in the outbreak, lack of training in some of the entities involved, and incorrect use of the surveillance circuits. Current protocols and specific action plans for the management of outbreaks should be improved through self-evaluation and updating of resources and knowledge.

  14. Gastroenteritis: a waterborne outbreak affecting 1600 people in a small Danish town.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, E; Mygind, O; Rasmussen, B; Rønne, T

    1994-10-01

    To examine (i) the extent of illness caused by contamination of a waterworks with waste water due to overflow, and its correlation with precipitation; (ii) the potential secondary spread; (iii) economic losses due to sick leave. A historical follow up study with structured postal questionnaires. A small community on the outskirts of greater Copenhagen at the end of 1991 and the beginning of 1992. The main study group comprised all 703 households supplied by the waterworks (response rate: 89% of households). There was a control group of 200 randomly chosen households in neighbouring communities with a different water supply source (response rate: 64% of households). A day care group of all 149 children (response rate: 78%) and 30 teachers (response rate: 83%) who lived in central Copenhagen, but spent the day in four day care centres supplied by the waterworks, and members of their household was also studied. Altogether 1455 people (88% of respondents in the main study group) reported having had symptoms of gastroenteritis, particularly diarrhoea (83%) and vomiting (55%). In the control group, 10% had had symptoms of gastroenteritis. The onset of episodes with diarrhoea correlated well with precipitation (Spearman's correlation coefficient: 0.75; p = 0.0002). The secondary attack rate in household contacts was 12%. No pathogens were found. Affected people stayed home from work for a total of 1658 days. The cost of loss of production because of sick leave amounted to 1,600,000 Danish kroner (180,000 pounds). The outbreak caused extensive illness correlated with precipitation, showed secondary spread, and was associated with major economic losses. Increased awareness among local physicians and waterworks personnel of the possibility of contamination of the water could have led to earlier intervention and reduced the extent of illness. Outbreaks are often caused by several factors, many of a technical nature, which in this case acted together. It is recommended that

  15. An outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis traced to cream cakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee Tai Goh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper describes the epidemiological, microbiological and environmental investigations conducted during an outbreak of Salmonella gastroenteritis in Singapore.Methods: A case-control study was undertaken to identify the vehicle of transmission. Microbiological testing was performed on faecal, food and environmental samples. Isolates of Salmonella were further characterized by phage typing and ribotyping.Results: There were 216 gastroenteritis cases reported from 20 November to 4 December 2007. The causative agent was identified as Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Enteritidis for 14 out of 20 cases tested. The vehicle of transmission was traced to cream cakes produced by a bakery and sold at its retail outlets (P < 0.001, OR = 143.00, 95% Cl = 27.23–759.10. More than two-thirds of the 40 Salmonella strains isolated from hospitalized cases, food samples and asymptomatic food handlers were of phage type 1; the others reacted but did not conform to any phage type. The phage types correlated well with their unique antibiograms. The ribotype patterns of 22 selected isolates tested were highly similar, indicating genetic relatedness. The dendrogram of the strains from the outbreak showed distinct clustering and correlation compared to the non-outbreak strains, confirming a common source of infection.Discussion: The cream cakes were likely contaminated by one of the ingredients used in the icing. Cross-contamination down the production line and subsequent storage of cakes at ambient temperatures for a prolonged period before consumption could have resulted in the outbreak.

  16. Burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in the Middle Eastern and North African pediatric population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Yinghui

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE is the most common cause of severe childhood diarrhea worldwide. Objectives were to estimate the burden of RVGE among children less than five years old in the Middle East (Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, UAE, Yemen, North Africa (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia and Turkey. Methods A comprehensive literature search was conducted in major databases on the epidemiology and burden of rotavirus among children less than five years old between 1999 and 2009. Data from each country was extracted and compared. Results The search identified 43 studies. RVGE was identified in 16-61% of all cases of acute gastroenteritis, with a peak in the winter. RVGE-related hospitalization rates ranged from 14% to 45%, compared to 14%-28% for non-RVGE. Annually, RVGE caused up to 112 fatalities per 100,000 in certain countries in the region. Hospitalization costs ranged from $1.8 to $4.6 million annually, depending on the country. The most recent literature available showed that G1P[8] was the most prevalent genotype combination in 8 countries (range 23%-56%. G2P[4] was most prevalent in 4 countries (26%-48%. G9P[8] and G4P[8] were also frequently detected. Conclusions RVGE is a common disease associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and economic burden. Given the variety and diverse rotavirus types in the region, use of a vaccine with broad and consistent serotype coverage would be important to help decrease the burden of RVGE in the Middle East and North Africa.

  17. Burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in the Middle Eastern and North African pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Hanane; Ogilvie, Isla; El Khoury, Antoine C; Duan, Yinghui; Goetghebeur, Mireille M

    2011-01-07

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) is the most common cause of severe childhood diarrhea worldwide. Objectives were to estimate the burden of RVGE among children less than five years old in the Middle East (Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, UAE, Yemen), North Africa (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia) and Turkey. A comprehensive literature search was conducted in major databases on the epidemiology and burden of rotavirus among children less than five years old between 1999 and 2009. Data from each country was extracted and compared. The search identified 43 studies. RVGE was identified in 16-61% of all cases of acute gastroenteritis, with a peak in the winter. RVGE-related hospitalization rates ranged from 14% to 45%, compared to 14%-28% for non-RVGE. Annually, RVGE caused up to 112 fatalities per 100,000 in certain countries in the region. Hospitalization costs ranged from $1.8 to $4.6 million annually, depending on the country. The most recent literature available showed that G1P[8] was the most prevalent genotype combination in 8 countries (range 23%-56%). G2P[4] was most prevalent in 4 countries (26%-48%). G9P[8] and G4P[8] were also frequently detected. RVGE is a common disease associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and economic burden. Given the variety and diverse rotavirus types in the region, use of a vaccine with broad and consistent serotype coverage would be important to help decrease the burden of RVGE in the Middle East and North Africa.

  18. Effectiveness of granisetron in controlling pediatric gastroenteritis-related vomiting after discharge from the ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Khajista; BinSalleeh, Hashim M; Shah, Ubaid H; AlGhamedi, Najwa; Tamim, Hani; Mubasher, Mohamed; Alrasheed, Faris; Alkanhal, Abdulrahman; AlTamimi, Saleh A

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of oral granisetron (a long-acting 5-HT3 receptor antagonist) in stopping vomiting subsequent to discharge from emergency department (ED), in 6-month-old to 8-year-old patients with gastroenteritis-related vomiting and dehydration, who had failed an initial trial of oral rehydration (ORT). Eligible patients were offered ORT on a slowly advancing schedule. Patients who tolerated the initial ORT were discharged home. Patients who vomited were randomized to receive either 40 μg/kg of granisetron or placebo, and ORT was resumed. Patients who tolerated the postrandomization ORT were discharged home with another dose of the study drug. Parents were contacted by telephone every 24 hours until complete resolution of symptoms. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with vomiting at 24 hours. Of the 900 eligible patients, 537 (60%) tolerated the initial ORT and were discharged home. Of the patients who vomited during the initial ORT, 165 were included in the final study sample (placebo, n = 82; granisetron, n = 83). There was no statistically significant difference in the proportion of patients with vomiting at 24 hours (granisetron, n = 38; placebo, n = 45; odds ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.34-1.19; P = .16). A similar trend in the proportion of patients with vomiting was noted for the entire follow-up period (granisetron, n = 43; placebo, n = 47; odds ratio, 0.73; P = .33; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-1.36). Granisetron was not effective in controlling gastroenteritis-related vomiting subsequent to discharge from ED. It did not change the expected course of the illness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The management of children with gastroenteritis and dehydration in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colletti, James E; Brown, Kathleen M; Sharieff, Ghazala Q; Barata, Isabel A; Ishimine, Paul

    2010-06-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is characterized by diarrhea, which may be accompanied by nausea, vomiting, fever, and abdominal pain. To review the evidence on the assessment of dehydration, methods of rehydration, and the utility of antiemetics in the child presenting with acute gastroenteritis. The evidence suggests that the three most useful predictors of 5% or more dehydration are abnormal capillary refill, abnormal skin turgor, and abnormal respiratory pattern. Studies are conflicting on whether blood urea nitrogen (BUN) or BUN/creatinine ratio correlates with dehydration, but several studies found that low serum bicarbonate combined with certain clinical parameters predicts dehydration. In most studies, oral or nasogastric rehydration with an oral rehydration solution was equally efficacious as intravenous (i.v.) rehydration. Many experts discourage the routine use of antiemetics in young children. However, children receiving ondensetron are less likely to vomit, have greater oral intake, and are less likely to be treated by intravenous rehydration. Mean length of Emergency Department (ED) stay is also less, and very few serious side effects have been reported. In the ED, dehydration is evaluated by synthesizing the historical and physical examination, and obtaining laboratory data points in select patients. No single laboratory value has been found to be accurate in predicting the degree of dehydration and this is not routinely recommended. The evidence suggests that the majority of children with mild to moderate dehydration can be treated successfully with oral rehydration therapy. Ondansetron (orally or intravenously) may be effective in decreasing the rate of vomiting, improving the success rate of oral hydration, preventing the need for i.v. hydration, and preventing the need for hospital admission in those receiving i.v. hydration. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Evaluation of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in pediatric patients with acute rotavirus gastroenteritis and dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Tanju; Altekin, Emel; İşgüder, Rana; Kenesari, Yasin; Duman, Murat; Arslan, Nur

    2013-09-03

    Dehydration caused by acute rotavirus gastroenteritis is a frequent finding in pediatric patients. The most important treatment modality in these patients is recognising and treating dehydration, electrolyte imbalance and acute kidney injury. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is used widely as a biomarker for the diagnosis of acute or chronic renal injury in numerous clinical studies. It is recognized as an early marker of acute renal failure before the elevation of routine biochemical tests such as creatinine. The aim of this study is to investigate the plasma and urine NGAL concentrations in mildly or moderately dehydrated patients with acute rotavirus gastroenteritis. A total of 30 patients (13 girls, mean age 62.5 ± 46.2 months) with diarrhea and mild/moderate dehydration and 35 healthy controls (17 girls, mean age 81.1 ± 41.8 months) were enrolled in the study. Plasma and urine NGAL levels of the two groups were compared. The mean age, gender and serum creatinine levels of the patients and healthy controls were similar. The mean plasma and urine NGAL levels of the patients were significantly higher than controls (plasma: 118.6 ± 81.2 vs. 66.5 ± 11.3, p = 0.001 and urine: 17.7 ± 17.5 vs. 10.6 ± 7.9, p = 0.035, respectively). Mildly or moderately dehydrated children have higher plasma and urine NGAL levels compared to control subjects. Plasma and/or urine NGAL levels can be used for the early prediction of renal impairment in children with mild or moderate dehydration.

  1. Intravenous dextrose for children with gastroenteritis and dehydration: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Jason A; Bachur, Richard G; Monuteaux, Michael C; Waltzman, Mark

    2013-03-01

    We seek to determine whether an initial intravenous bolus of 5% dextrose in normal saline solution compared with normal saline solution will lead to a lower proportion of hospitalized patients and a greater reduction in serum ketone levels in children with gastroenteritis and dehydration. We enrolled children aged 6 months to 6 years in a double-blind, randomized controlled trial of patients presenting to a pediatric emergency department. Subjects were randomized to receive a 20 mL/kg infusion of either 5% dextrose in normal saline solution or normal saline solution. Serum ketone levels were measured before and at 1- and 2-hour intervals after the initial study fluid bolus administration. Primary outcome was the proportion of children hospitalized. Secondary outcome was change in serum ketone levels over time. One hundred eighty-eight children were enrolled. The proportion of children hospitalized did not differ between groups (35% in the 5% dextrose in normal saline solution group versus 44% in the normal saline solution group; risk difference 9%; 95% confidence interval [CI] -5% to 22%). Compared with children who received normal saline solution, those who received 5% dextrose in normal saline solution had a greater reduction in mean serum ketone levels at both 1 hour (mean Δ 1.2 versus 0.1 mmol/L; mean difference 1.1 mmol/L; 95% CI 0.4 to 1.9 mmol/L) and 2 hours (mean Δ 1.9 versus 0.3 mmol/L; mean difference 1.6 mmol/L; 95% CI 0.9 to 2.3 mmol/L). Administration of a dextrose-containing bolus compared with normal saline did not lead to a lower rate of hospitalization for children with gastroenteritis and dehydration. There was, however, a greater reduction in serum ketone levels in patients who received 5% dextrose in normal saline solution. Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  2. How Hepatitis D Virus Can Hinder the Control of Hepatitis B Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiridiou, M.; Borkent-Raven, B.; Hulshof, J.; Wallinga, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis D (or hepatitis delta) virus is a defective virus that relies on hepatitis B virus (HBV) for transmission; infection with hepatitis D can occur only as coinfection with HBV or superinfection of an existing HBV infection. Because of the bond between the two viruses, control

  3. Early occurring and continuing effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.R.; Hahn, F.F.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter deals with health-risk estimates for early and continuing effects of exposure to ionizing radiations that could be associated with light water nuclear power plants accidents. Early and continuing effects considered are nonneoplastic diseases and symptoms that normally occur soon after radiation exposure, but may also occur after years have passed. They are generally associated with relatively high (greater than 1 Gy) doses. For most of the effects considered, there is a practical dose threshold. Organs of primary interest, because of their high sensitivity or the likelihood of receiving a large radiation dose, are bone marrow, gastrointestinal tract, thyroid glands, lungs, skin, gonads, and eyes. In utero exposure of the fetus is also considered. New data and modeling techniques available since publication of the Reactor Safety Study (WASH 1400, 1975) were used along with data cited in the Study to develop improved health-risk models for morbidity and mortality. The new models are applicable to a broader range of accident scenarios, provide a more detailed treatment of dose protraction effects, and include morbidity effects not considered in the Reactor Safety Study. 115 references, 20 figures, 19 tables

  4. Naturally-occurring alpha activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayneord, W V

    1960-12-01

    In view of the difficulties of assessing the significance of man-made radioactivity it is important to study for comparison the background of natural radioactivity against which the human race has evolved and lives. It is also important to define the present levels of activity so that it will be possible to detect and study as quickly as possible any changes which may occur owing to the release into the environment of new radioactive materials. Moreover, by the study of the behaviour of natural radioactivity light may be shed upon that of the artificially produced isotopes and a number of analogies traced between the two groups. These concepts have led to studies of naturally-occurring radioactive materials alongside a programme of research into fission products in food, water and air, as well as studies of the metabolism of both sets of materials in the human body. Since the last report there has been a useful increase in our knowledge of natural radioactivity in the biosphere, and its levels relative to the new man-made activities. These studies have necessitated technical developments, particularly in the methods of measuring and identifying alpha-ray emitters, to which group many of the more important natural radioactive materials belong.

  5. ECHO virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that can lead ...

  6. Naturally occurring methyl salicylate glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ping; Liu, Zizhen; Xie, Meng; Jiang, Rui; Liu, Weirui; Wang, Xiaohong; Meng, Shen; She, Gaimei

    2014-01-01

    As an important part of non steroids anti-inflammation drug (NSAIDs), salicylate has developed from natural substance salicylic acid to natrium salicylicum, to aspirin. Now, methyl salicylate glycoside, a new derivative of salicylic acid, is modified with a -COOH group integrated one methyl radical into formic ether, and a -OH linked with a monosaccharide, a disaccharide or a trisaccharide unit by glycosidic linkage. It has the similar pharmacological activities, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic and antithrombotic as the previous salicylates' without resulting in serious side effects, particularly the gastrointestinal toxicity. Owing to the superiority of those significant bioactivities, methyl salicylate glycosides have became a hot research area in NSAIDs for several years. This paper compiles all 9 naturally occurring methyl salicylate glycosides, their distribution of the resource and pharmacological mechanism, which could contribute to the new drug discovery.

  7. Oral rehydration versus intravenous therapy for treating dehydration due to gastroenteritis in children: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellemare, Steven; Hartling, Lisa; Wiebe, Natasha; Russell, Kelly; Craig, William R; McConnell, Don; Klassen, Terry P

    2004-01-01

    Background Despite treatment recommendations from various organizations, oral rehydration therapy (ORT) continues to be underused, particularly by physicians in high-income countries. We conducted a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to compare ORT and intravenous therapy (IVT) for the treatment of dehydration secondary to acute gastroenteritis in children. Methods RCTs were identified through MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, authors and references of included trials, pharmaceutical companies, and relevant organizations. Screening and inclusion were performed independently by two reviewers in order to identify randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing ORT and IVT in children with acute diarrhea and dehydration. Two reviewers independently assessed study quality using the Jadad scale and allocation concealment. Data were extracted by one reviewer and checked by a second. The primary outcome measure was failure of rehydration. We analyzed data using standard meta-analytic techniques. Results The quality of the 14 included trials ranged from 0 to 3 (Jadad score); allocation concealment was unclear in all but one study. Using a random effects model, there was no significant difference in treatment failures (risk difference [RD] 3%; 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0, 6). The Mantel-Haenzsel fixed effects model gave a significant difference between treatment groups (RD 4%; 95% CI: 2, 5) favoring IVT. Based on the four studies that reported deaths, there were six in the IVT groups and two in ORT. There were no significant differences in total fluid intake at six and 24 hours, weight gain, duration of diarrhea, or hypo/hypernatremia. Length of stay was significantly shorter for the ORT group (weighted mean difference [WMD] -1.2 days; 95% CI: -2.4,-0.02). Phlebitis occurred significantly more often with IVT (number needed to treat [NNT] 33; 95% CI: 25,100); paralytic ileus occurred more often with ORT (NNT 33; 95% CI: 20,100). These results

  8. Oral rehydration versus intravenous therapy for treating dehydration due to gastroenteritis in children: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McConnell Don

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite treatment recommendations from various organizations, oral rehydration therapy (ORT continues to be underused, particularly by physicians in high-income countries. We conducted a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs to compare ORT and intravenous therapy (IVT for the treatment of dehydration secondary to acute gastroenteritis in children. Methods RCTs were identified through MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, authors and references of included trials, pharmaceutical companies, and relevant organizations. Screening and inclusion were performed independently by two reviewers in order to identify randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing ORT and IVT in children with acute diarrhea and dehydration. Two reviewers independently assessed study quality using the Jadad scale and allocation concealment. Data were extracted by one reviewer and checked by a second. The primary outcome measure was failure of rehydration. We analyzed data using standard meta-analytic techniques. Results The quality of the 14 included trials ranged from 0 to 3 (Jadad score; allocation concealment was unclear in all but one study. Using a random effects model, there was no significant difference in treatment failures (risk difference [RD] 3%; 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0, 6. The Mantel-Haenzsel fixed effects model gave a significant difference between treatment groups (RD 4%; 95% CI: 2, 5 favoring IVT. Based on the four studies that reported deaths, there were six in the IVT groups and two in ORT. There were no significant differences in total fluid intake at six and 24 hours, weight gain, duration of diarrhea, or hypo/hypernatremia. Length of stay was significantly shorter for the ORT group (weighted mean difference [WMD] -1.2 days; 95% CI: -2.4,-0.02. Phlebitis occurred significantly more often with IVT (number needed to treat [NNT] 33; 95% CI: 25,100; paralytic ileus occurred more often with ORT (NNT 33; 95% CI: 20

  9. Oral rehydration versus intravenous therapy for treating dehydration due to gastroenteritis in children: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellemare, Steven; Hartling, Lisa; Wiebe, Natasha; Russell, Kelly; Craig, William R; McConnell, Don; Klassen, Terry P

    2004-04-15

    Despite treatment recommendations from various organizations, oral rehydration therapy (ORT) continues to be underused, particularly by physicians in high-income countries. We conducted a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to compare ORT and intravenous therapy (IVT) for the treatment of dehydration secondary to acute gastroenteritis in children. RCTs were identified through MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, authors and references of included trials, pharmaceutical companies, and relevant organizations. Screening and inclusion were performed independently by two reviewers in order to identify randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing ORT and IVT in children with acute diarrhea and dehydration. Two reviewers independently assessed study quality using the Jadad scale and allocation concealment. Data were extracted by one reviewer and checked by a second. The primary outcome measure was failure of rehydration. We analyzed data using standard meta-analytic techniques. The quality of the 14 included trials ranged from 0 to 3 (Jadad score); allocation concealment was unclear in all but one study. Using a random effects model, there was no significant difference in treatment failures (risk difference [RD] 3%; 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0, 6). The Mantel-Haenzsel fixed effects model gave a significant difference between treatment groups (RD 4%; 95% CI: 2, 5) favoring IVT. Based on the four studies that reported deaths, there were six in the IVT groups and two in ORT. There were no significant differences in total fluid intake at six and 24 hours, weight gain, duration of diarrhea, or hypo/hypernatremia. Length of stay was significantly shorter for the ORT group (weighted mean difference [WMD] -1.2 days; 95% CI: -2.4,-0.02). Phlebitis occurred significantly more often with IVT (number needed to treat [NNT] 33; 95% CI: 25,100); paralytic ileus occurred more often with ORT (NNT 33; 95% CI: 20,100). These results may not be generalizable to

  10. What occurred in the reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Described is what occurred in the reactors of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant at the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami (Mar. 11, 2011) from the aspect of engineering science. The tsunami attacked the Plant 1 hr after the quake. The Plant had reactors in buildings no.1-4 at 10 m height from the normal sea level which was flooded by 1.5-5.5 m high wave. All reactors in no.1-6 in the Plant were the boiling water type, and their core nuclear reactions were stopped within 3 sec due to the first quake by control rods inserted automatically. Reactors in no.1-5 lost their external AC power sources by the breakdown and subsequent submergence (no.1-4) of various equipments and in no.1, 2 and 4, the secondary DC power was then lost by the battery death. Although the isolation condenser started to cool the reactor in no.1 after DC cut, its valve was then kept closed to heat up the reactor, leading to the reaction of heated Zr in the fuel tube and water to yield H 2 which was accumulated in the building: the cause of hydrogen explosion on 12th. The reactor in no.2 had the reactor core isolation cooling system (RCIC) which operated normally for few hrs, then probably stopped to heat up the reactor, resulting in meltdown of the core but no explosion occurred because of the opened door of the blowout panel on the wall by the blast of no.1 explosion. The reactor in no.3 had RCIC and high pressure coolant injection system, but their works stopped to result in the core damage and H 2 accumulation leading to the explosion on 14th. The reactor in no.4 had not been operated because of its periodical annual examination, but was explored on 15th, of which cause was thought to be due to backward flow of H 2 from no.3. Finally, the author discusses about this accident from the industrial aspect of the design of safety level (defense in depth) on international views, and problems and tasks given. (T.T.)

  11. Epidemiologic Association Between FUT2 Secretor Status and Severe Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Children in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Daniel C.; Currier, Rebecca L.; Staat, Mary A.; Sahni, Leila C.; Selvarangan, Rangaraj; Halasa, Natasha B.; Englund, Janet A.; Weinberg, Geoffrey A.; Boom, Julie A.; Szilagyi, Peter G.; Klein, Eileen J.; Chappell, James; Harrison, Christopher J.; Davidson, Barbara S.; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Moffatt, Mary D.; McNeal, Monica; Wikswo, Mary; Bowen, Michael D.; Morrow, Ardythe L.; Parashar, Umesh D.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE A genetic polymorphism affecting FUT2 secretor status in approximately one-quarter of humans of European descent affects the expression of histo-blood group antigens on the mucosal epithelia of human respiratory, genitourinary, and digestive tracts. These histo-blood group antigens serve as host receptor sites necessary for attachment and infection of some pathogens, including norovirus. OBJECTIVE We investigated whether an association exists between FUT2 secretor status and laboratory-confirmed rotavirus infections in US children. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Multicenter case-control observational study involving active surveillance at 6 US pediatric medical institutions in the inpatient and emergency department clinical settings. We enrolled 1564 children younger than 5 years with acute gastroenteritis (diarrhea and/or vomiting) and 818 healthy controls frequency matched by age and month, from December 1, 2011, through March 31, 2013. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Paired fecal-saliva specimens were tested for rotavirus and for secretor status. Comparisons were made between rotavirus test–positive cases and healthy controls stratified by ethnicity and vaccination status. Adjusted multivariable analyses assessed the preventive association of secretor status against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis. RESULTS One (0.5%) of 189 rotavirus test–positive cases was a nonsecretor, compared with 188 (23%) of 818 healthy control participants (P < .001). Healthy control participants of Hispanic ethnicity were significantly less likely to be nonsecretors (13%) compared with healthy children who were not of Hispanic ethnicity (25%) (P < .001). After controlling for vaccination and other factors, children with the nonsecretor FUT2 polymorphism appeared statistically protected (98% [95% CI, 84%–100%]) against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Severe rotavirus gastroenteritis was virtually absent among US children who had a genetic

  12. Earl occurring and continuing effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.R.; Hahn, F.F.

    1989-01-01

    This chapter develops health-risk models for early and continuing effects of exposure to beta or gamma radiation that could be associated with light water nuclear power plant accidents. The main purpose of the chapter is to provide details on each health-risk model and on the data used. Early and continuing effects considered are prodromal symptoms and nonneoplastic diseases that usually occur soon after a brief radiation exposure. These effects are generally associated with relatively high (greater than 1 Gy) absorbed organ doses. For most of the effects considered, there is an absorbed organ dose threshold below which no effects are seen. Some information is provided on health effects observed in victims of the Chernobyl power plant accident. Organs of primary interest, because of their high sensitivity or their potential for receiving large doses, are bone marrow, gastrointestinal tract, thyroid glands, lungs, skin, gonads, and eyes. Exposure of the fetus is also considered. Additional data and modeling techniques available since publication of the Reactor Safety Study were used to obtain models for morbidity and mortality

  13. Does overtraining occur in triathletes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Margaritis

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available 1. Objective: Long distance triathlon training is characterized by considerably high volume training loads. This volume can provoke an overtraining state. The aim of the study was to determine whether overtraining occurs in well-trained male triathletes in relation with their volume training loads. 2. Experimental design: A questionnaire investigation was completed two days before the Nice long-distance triathlon (October 1995: 4-km swim, 120-km bike ride and 30-km run. 3. Participants: Ninety-three well-trained male triathletes who took part in the triathlon race. 4. Measures: A questionnaire to relate clinical symptoms, which are known to appear in case of overtraining, was collected. 5. Results: 39.8% of the questioned triathletes reported a decrease in triathlon performances within the last month preceding the race. Moreover, these triathletes exhibited significantly more overtraining-relied symptoms than the others (5.9±3.8 vs 3.4±2.6, P<0.05. Surprisingly, the occurrence of overtraining in triathletes appears not to depend on the volume training loads. 6. Conclusions: These results suggest that overtraining has to be considered in the case of triathletes. This preliminary study evidences the need for further investigation in order to monitor triathletes training respond and prevent overtraining.

  14. Viruses in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Ellen

    2011-09-21

    The etiology of reptilian viral diseases can be attributed to a wide range of viruses occurring across different genera and families. Thirty to forty years ago, studies of viruses in reptiles focused mainly on the zoonotic potential of arboviruses in reptiles and much effort went into surveys and challenge trials of a range of reptiles with eastern and western equine encephalitis as well as Japanese encephalitis viruses. In the past decade, outbreaks of infection with West Nile virus in human populations and in farmed alligators in the USA has seen the research emphasis placed on the issue of reptiles, particularly crocodiles and alligators, being susceptible to, and reservoirs for, this serious zoonotic disease. Although there are many recognised reptilian viruses, the evidence for those being primary pathogens is relatively limited. Transmission studies establishing pathogenicity and cofactors are likewise scarce, possibly due to the relatively low commercial importance of reptiles, difficulties with the availability of animals and permits for statistically sound experiments, difficulties with housing of reptiles in an experimental setting or the inability to propagate some viruses in cell culture to sufficient titres for transmission studies. Viruses as causes of direct loss of threatened species, such as the chelonid fibropapilloma associated herpesvirus and ranaviruses in farmed and wild tortoises and turtles, have re-focused attention back to the characterisation of the viruses as well as diagnosis and pathogenesis in the host itself.

  15. Outbreak of foodborne gastroenteritis in a senior high school in South-eastern Ghana: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donne K. Ameme

    2016-07-01

    foodborne gastroenteritis outbreak occurred in a Senior High School in Fanteakwa District from 4th to 7th February 2015. The most probable aetiologic agent was C. perfringens with contaminated water at canteen as the vehicle of transmission. Concurrent Salmonella spp infection could not be ruled out. Rapid outbreak response helped in controlling the outbreak.

  16. Rotavirus specific plasma secretory immunoglobulin in children with acute gastroenteritis and children vaccinated with an attenuated human rotavirus vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Daniel; Vásquez, Camilo; Corthésy, Blaise; Franco, Manuel A; Angel, Juana

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV)–specific secretory immunoglobulin (RV-SIg) has been previously detected in serum of naturally RV infected children and shown to reflect the intestinal Ig immune response. Total plasma SIgA and plasma RV-SIg were evaluated by ELISA in children with gastroenteritis due or not due to RV infection and in 50 children vaccinated with the attenuated RIX4414 human RV vaccine and 62 placebo recipients. RV-SIg was only detected in children with evidence of previous RV infection or with acute RV gastroenteritis. Vaccinees had higher RV-SIg titers than placebo recipients and RV-SIg titers increased after the second vaccine dose. RV-SIg measured after the second dose correlated with protection when vaccinees and placebo recipients were analyzed jointly. RV-SIg may serve as a valuable correlate of protection for RV vaccines. PMID:23839157

  17. Acute enteritis or gastroenteritis in young dogs as a predisposing factor for intestinal intussusception: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallis, T S; Papazoglou, L G; Adamama-Moraitou, K K; Prassinos, N N

    2000-10-01

    Various types of intestinal intussusception were diagnosed in 29 of 220 young dogs with acute enteritis or gastroenteritis, due to canine parvovirus (85 cases) or presumably to other infectious agents, inflammation or less common hypermotility and metabolic derangements (135 cases). As the other causes of the disease were excluded, acute enteritis or gastroenteritis was considered to be the most likely predisposing factor for the intestinal intussusception. The most common type of intussusception was found to be the ileocolic. Of the 21 dogs that underwent surgical resection and anastomosis of the intestine, 18 dogs recovered completely and three died due to complications. The high survival rate was due to the effective pre-operative, surgical and post-operative therapy.

  18. The Hidden Health and Economic Burden of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Malaysia: An Estimation Using Multiple Data Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Tharani; Ng, Chiu-Wan; Lee, Way-Seah; Jit, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) results in substantial mortality and morbidity worldwide. However, an accurate estimation of the health and economic burden of RVGE in Malaysia covering public, private and home treatment is lacking. Data from multiple sources were used to estimate diarrheal mortality and morbidity according to health service utilization. The proportion of this burden attributable to rotavirus was estimated from a community-based study and a meta-analysis we conducted of primary hospital-based studies. Rotavirus incidence was determined by multiplying acute gastroenteritis incidence with estimates of the proportion of gastroenteritis attributable to rotavirus. The economic burden of rotavirus disease was estimated from the health systems and societal perspective. Annually, rotavirus results in 27 deaths, 31,000 hospitalizations, 41,000 outpatient visits and 145,000 episodes of home-treated gastroenteritis in Malaysia. We estimate an annual rotavirus incidence of 1 death per 100,000 children and 12 hospitalizations, 16 outpatient clinic visits and 57 home-treated episodes per 1000 children under-5 years. Annually, RVGE is estimated to cost US$ 34 million to the healthcare provider and US$ 50 million to society. Productivity loss contributes almost a third of costs to society. Publicly, privately and home-treated episodes consist of 52%, 27% and 21%, respectively, of the total societal costs. RVGE represents a considerable health and economic burden in Malaysia. Much of the burden lies in privately or home-treated episodes and is poorly captured in previous studies. This study provides vital information for future evaluation of cost-effectiveness, which are necessary for policy-making regarding universal vaccination.

  19. Canine parvovirus type 2c identified from an outbreak of severe gastroenteritis in a litter in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, David; Vinberg, Carina; Gustafsson, Agneta; Pearce, Jacqueline; Greenwood, Neil

    2013-01-01

    A litter of recently-vaccinated puppies in Sweden experienced signs of severe haemorrhagic gastroenteritis. Canine parvovirus (CPV) was suspected as the cause of this outbreak on the basis of the clinical signs and the presence of parvoviral antigen in the faeces from one of the affected pups - confirmed using a commercial in-clinic faecal antigen ELISA test kit. A concern was raised about whether the vaccine (which contained a live, attenuated strain of CPV) could have caused the disease and...

  20. Outbreak of gastroenteritis in Tibetan transit school, dharamshala, Himachal Pradesh, India, 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Surender

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: On 28 th June, 2006, 55 cases of the gastroenteritis were reported among the hostellers of the Tibetan Transit School, Dharamshala. We investigated the outbreak to identify the source, propose control and preventive measures. Materials and Methods: We defined a case of the gastroenteritis as the occurrence of more than three smelly loose motions between 28 th June to 2 nd July, 2006 among some sections of the resident hostellers. We determined age and sex specific attack rate. We hypothesized it as a food borne beef meat outbreak. We conducted the case control study and collected the information about the food items consumed inside and outside the hostel at dinner using the standardized questionnaire. We calculated floor wise incidences of four hostels, odds ratios and attributable fractions. We interviewed food handlers. We lifted the seven rectal stool, four water and three samples from floor, kitchen and meat chopper room for culture and sensitivity. Results: 116 cases patients of 802 hostellers met the case definition. The maximum attack rate (16% was in the youngest group (15-20yrs and nil in staff and 31-40 years age group with 5 overall attack rate as 14%. Sex specific attack rate was more (18% in females. The floor wise incidences of the case patients were the highest in 2nd and 3rd floors, occupied by the youngest group. The median age was 20 yrs (Range 17-40 yrs. The most common symptoms were watery diarrhea (71/116, 61% and bloody diarrhea-(45/116, 39%; abdominal pains- (87/116, 75%. Of the six food/water items examined, the food specific attack rate was highly statistically significant in the beef meat eaters (82% with PAF 71%, and Odds Ratio 19.19 (95% C.I. as 9.3-140. The food handlers & their cooking conditions in the kitchen were unhygienic. The food was not available for testing. Escherichia coli were detected in the samples from rectal stools, kitchen and meat chopper room. No fatality was reported. Conclusion

  1. Prevalence of adenovirus and rotavirus infection in immunocompromised patients with acute gastroenteritis in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Joana; Ferreira, Delfim; Arrabalde, Célia; Almeida, Sandra; Baldaque, Inês; Sousa, Hugo

    2015-11-12

    To characterize the prevalence of rotavirus (RV) and adenovirus (AdV) infections in immunocompromised patients with acute gastroenteritis. The presence of RV and AdV (serotypes 40 and 41) was evaluated in 509 stool samples obtained between January 2009 and December 2010 from 200 immunocompromised patients (83 females and 117 males; median age 21 years old, range 0-72. The diagnosis of infection was performed as a routine procedure and the presence of RV and AdV (serotypes 40 and 41) was determined by immunochromatography using the RIDA(®) Quick Rota-Adeno-Kombi kit (r-Biopharm, Darmstadt, Germany). The data analysis and description of seasonal frequencies were performed using computer software IBM(®) SPSS(®) (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) Statistics version 20.0 for Mac. The frequencies of infection were compared into different age and gender groups by χ(2) test. The study revealed 12.4% AdV positive samples and 0.8% RV positive samples, which correspond to a prevalence of 6.5% and 1.5%, respectively. AdV was more frequent between October 2009 and April 2010, while RV was identified in April 2010 and July 2010. The stool analysis revealed that from the 509 samples, 63 (12.4%) were positive for AdV and 4 (0.8%) positive for RV, which by resuming the information of each patient, lead to an overall prevalence of AdV and RV of 6.5% (13/200 patients) and 1.5% (3/200 patients), respectively. The stratification of the analysis regarding age groups showed a tendency to an increased prevalence of infection in paediatric patients between 0-10 years old. Considering the seasonal distribution of these infections, our study revealed that AdV infection was more frequent between October 2009 and April 2010, while RV infection was characterized by two distinct peaks (April 2010 and July 2010). The overall prevalence of AdV and RV infection in immunocompromised patients with acute gastroenteritis was 8% and AdV was the most prevalent agent.

  2. General practitioner practices in requesting laboratory tests for patients with gastroenteritis in the Netherlands, 2001–2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koopmans Marion PG

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to estimate the (selective proportion of patients consulting their GP for an episode of gastroenteritis for whom laboratory tests were requested. In addition adherence of GPs to the guidelines for diagnostic test regime was ascertained. Methods Data were collected from a GP network in the Netherlands. Information was also collected on the reason for requesting the test, test specifications, and test results. Results For 12% of the GP patients with gastroenteritis, a stool sample was requested and tested for enteric pathogens. In most patients, the duration, followed by severity of complaints or a visit to a specific, high-risk country were reported as reasons to request laboratory diagnostics. Tests were requested most often in summer months and in February. Campylobacter (requested for 87% of the tests, Salmonella (84%, Shigella (78% and Yersinia (56% were most frequently included in the stool tests. Campylobacter was detected most often in patients. Conclusion Test requests did not always comply with existing knowledge of the etiology of gastroenteritis in GP patients and were not always consistent with the Dutch GP guidelines. Therefore, the data of this study can be used to develop educational approaches for GP's as well as for revision of the guidelines.

  3. Are Salmonella-Induced Gastroenteritis Neglected in Developing Countries? Feedback from Microbiological Investigations in N'Djamena Hospitals, Chad.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djim-Adjim Tabo

    Full Text Available Salmonella is considered to be one of the main pathogens causing human gastroenteritis worldwide. Looking for Salmonella in Africa in patients suffering from gastroenteritis is rather unusual, and the use of antibiotics is not subject to any regulation. This study intends for stressing the possible prominent importance of Salmonella in digestive diseases in Africa as well as identifying antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella isolates from faeces samples of human origin. All samples were collected from five N'Djamena hospitals, from patients suffering from diarrhoea. The collecting was undertaken over two periods of six months each: from August 2010 to January 2011 and from September 2011 to February 2012. Salmonella isolates were obtained by standard cultivation and serotyping methods. A total of 43 Salmonella isolates were identified, belonging to 21 different serovars. The most prevalent serovar was Salmonella Stanleyville (n = 7, followed by S. Anatum (n = 4 and S. Kottbus (n = 3. The other serovars were under-represented. The majority of these isolates were susceptible to all antibiotics tested (CLSI Standards, except two S. Enteritidis isolates that exhibited resistance to fluoroquinolones. The different serovars and antibiotic resistance profiles that were observed highlight the substantial diversity of Salmonella in N'Djamena, Chad. Roughly, one out of ten patients who consulted for gastroenteritis was shedding Salmonella spp. and none of them would have been diagnosed outside the context of this research program. This study may encourage local clinicians to explore more often salmonellosis suspicion in their daily practice.

  4. A large community outbreak of gastroenteritis associated with consumption of drinking water contaminated by river water, Belgium, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeye, T; DE Schrijver, K; Wollants, E; van Ranst, M; Verhaegen, J

    2015-03-01

    SUMMARY On 6 December 2010 a fire in Hemiksem, Belgium, was extinguished by the fire brigade with both river water and tap water. Local physicians were asked to report all cases of gastroenteritis. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among 1000 randomly selected households. We performed a statistical and geospatial analysis. Human stool samples, tap water and river water were tested for pathogens. Of the 1185 persons living in the 528 responding households, 222 (18·7%) reported symptoms of gastroenteritis during the time period 6-13 December. Drinking tap water was significantly associated with an increased risk for gastroenteritis (relative risk 3·67, 95% confidence interval 2·86-4·70) as was place of residence. Campylobacter sp. (2/56), norovirus GI and GII (11/56), rotavirus (1/56) and Giardia lamblia (3/56) were detected in stool samples. Tap water samples tested positive for faecal indicator bacteria and protozoa. The results support the hypothesis that a point-source contamination of the tap water with river water was the cause of the multi-pathogen waterborne outbreak.

  5. Coxsackievirus-mediated hyperglycemia is enhanced by reinfection and this occurs independent of T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Marc S.; Ilic, Alex; Fine, Cody; Rodriguez, Enrique; Sarvetnick, Nora

    2003-01-01

    The induction of autoimmunity by viruses has been hypothesized to occur by a number of mechanisms. Coxsackievirus B4 (CB4) induces hyperglycemia in SJL mice resembling diabetes in humans. While virus is effectively cleared within 2 weeks, hyperglycemia does not appear until about 8-12 weeks postinfection at a time when replicative virus is no longer detectable. In SJL mice, reinfection with CB4 enhanced the development of hyperglycemia. As predicted, the immune system responded more rapidly to the second infection and virus was cleared more swiftly. However, while infiltrating T cells were found within the pancreas, depletion of the CD4 T cell population prior to secondary infection or use of CD8 knock-out mice had no effect on the development of virus-mediated hyperglycemia. In conclusion, enhanced hyperglycemia induced by CB4 occurs independent of the T cell response

  6. An outbreak of febrile gastroenteritis associated with corn contaminated by Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureli, P; Fiorucci, G C; Caroli, D; Marchiaro, G; Novara, O; Leone, L; Salmaso, S

    2000-04-27

    On May 21, 1997, numerous cases of febrile gastrointestinal illness were reported among the students and staff of two primary schools in northern Italy, all of whom had eaten at cafeterias served by the same caterer. We interviewed people who ate at the cafeterias about symptoms and foods consumed on May 20. There were no samples of foods left at the cafeterias, but we tested routine samples taken on May 20 by the caterer and environmental specimens at the catering plant. The hospitalized patients were tested for common enteropathogens and toxins. Of the 2189 persons interviewed (82 percent of those exposed), 1566 (72 percent) reported symptoms; of these, 292 (19 percent) were hospitalized. Among samples obtained from hospitalized patients, all but two of the stool specimens and all blood specimens were negative for common enteropathogens. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from one blood specimen and from 123 of the 141 stool specimens. Consumption of a cold salad of corn and tuna was associated with the development of symptoms (relative risk, 6.19; 95 percent confidence interval, 4.81 to 7.98; Pcaterer's sample of the salad and from environmental specimens collected from the catering plant. All listeria isolates were serotype 4b and were found to be identical on DNA analysis. Experimental contamination of sterile samples of the implicated foods showed that L. monocytogenes grew on corn when kept for at least 10 hours at 25 degrees C. Food-borne infection with L. monocytogenes can cause febrile illness with gastroenteritis in immunocompetent persons.

  7. Additional value of typing Noroviruses in gastroenteritis outbreaks in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koek, A G; Bovée, L P M J; van den Hoek, J A R; Bos, A J; Bruisten, S M

    2006-02-01

    In Amsterdam, 17 of the 55 gastroenteritis (GI) outbreaks reported from January 2002 to May 2003 were confirmed to be caused by noroviruses (NV). In this study, we describe the molecular epidemiology of a group of nine outbreaks associated with a catering firm and two outbreaks, 5 months apart, in an Amsterdam hospital. All outbreaks were typed to confirm their linkage, and the hospital-related cases were studied to see if the two outbreaks were caused by one persisting NV strain or by a reintroduction after 5 months. For the outbreaks associated with the catering firm one NV genogroup I strain was found which was identical in sequence among customers and employees of the caterer. This was not the strain that predominantly circulated in 2002/2003 in and around Amsterdam, which was the NV genogroup II4 "new variant" (GgII4nv) strain. In the Amsterdam hospital, the two outbreaks were caused by this predominant GgII4nv type, and we argue that NV was most likely reintroduced in the second outbreak from the Amsterdam community.

  8. An extensive gastroenteritis outbreak after drinking-water contamination by sewage effluent, Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, J; Huovinen, E; Virtanen, M J; Snellman, M; Lumio, J; Ruutu, P; Kujansuu, E; Vuento, R; Pitkänen, T; Miettinen, I; Herrala, J; Lepistö, O; Antonen, J; Helenius, J; Hänninen, M-L; Maunula, L; Mustonen, J; Kuusi, M

    2011-07-01

    An inappropriate cross-connection between sewage- and drinking-water pipelines contaminated tap water in a Finnish town, resulting in an extensive waterborne gastroenteritis outbreak in this developed country. According to a database and a line-list, altogether 1222 subjects sought medical care as a result of this exposure. Seven pathogens were found in patient samples of those who sought treatment. To establish the true disease burden from this exposure, we undertook a population-based questionnaire investigation with a control population, infrequently used to study waterborne outbreaks. The study covered three areas, contaminated and uncontaminated parts of the town and a control town. An estimated 8453 residents fell ill during the outbreak, the excess number of illnesses being 6501. Attack rates were 53% [95% confidence interval (CI) 49.5-56.4] in the contaminated area, 15.6% (95% CI 13.1-18.5) in the uncontaminated area and 6.5% (95% CI 4.8-8.8) in the control population. Using a control population allowed us to differentiate baseline morbidity from the observed morbidity caused by the water contamination, thus enabling a more accurate estimate of the disease burden of this outbreak.

  9. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus fusion core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Guangpeng; Feng Youjun; Gao Feng; Wang Jinzi; Liu Cheng; Li Yijing

    2005-01-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) is one of the most destructive agents, responsible for the enteric infections that are lethal for suckling piglets, causing enormous economic loss to the porcine fostering industry every year. Although it has been known that TGEV spiker protein is essential for the viral entry for many years, the detail knowledge of the TGEV fusion protein core is still very limited. Here, we report that TGEV fusion core (HR1-SGGRGG-HR2), in vitro expressed in GST prokaryotic expression system, shares the typical properties of the trimer of coiled-coil heterodimer (six α-helix bundle), which has been confirmed by a combined series of biochemical and biophysical evidences including size exclusion chromatography (gel-filtration), chemical crossing, and circular diagram. The 3D homologous structure model presents its most likely structure, extremely similar to those of the coronaviruses documented. Taken together, TGEV spiker protein belongs to the class I fusion protein, characterized by the existence of two heptad-repeat (HR) regions, HR1 and HR2, and the present knowledge about the truncated TGEV fusion protein core may facilitate in the design of the small molecule or polypeptide drugs targeting the membrane fusion between TGEV and its host

  10. Human health implications of norovirus acute gastroenteritis as a result of hydric pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgadillo Espinoza, Brenda; Moreira Segura, Cristian; Araya Rodriguez, Freddy

    2011-01-01

    An investigation, in Ciudad Quesada of Costa Rica, has been carried out to explore and characterize the outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in the area. Surveillance data and medical records of the patients were analyzed to develop a descriptive study between July 8 and July 14, 2010 in the canton of San Carlos. A fact sheet was applied to obtain information from patients. ELISA test was performed to the stool samples to detect the presence of enteropathogens. Water samples were analyzed for bacteria and fecal coliform in the distribution system. A total of 352 cases were confirmed in the studied region. The most frequent symptoms among confirmed cases were: diarrhea (94,2%), nausea (92,7%) and vomiting (91,7%). The average age of patients is 29 years (15,8%) and (50,8%) has been female. The age group that has been most affected are infants of 1-4 years (attack rate 18,2/1,000 population). The area that has been most affected is the central area of Ciudad Quesada. In five out of six stool tests has been possible to isolate the norovirus. In water Escherichia coli has been witnessed by what has been suggested that the norovirus has been transmitted by water contaminated with fecal matter. Water quality monitoring has been recommended and promote the use of potable water as well as the sensitization of rural communities about hygiene and disease prevention. (author) [es

  11. Rotavirus gastroenteritis in children in 4 regions in Brazil: a hospital-based surveillance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munford, Veridiana; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; de Souza, Eloisa Correa; Cardoso, Debora Morais; Cardoso, Divina das Dores de Paula; Borges, Ana Maria Tavares; Costa, Paulo Sergio Sucasas da; Melgaço, Irene Angela Melo; Rosa, Humberto; Carvalho, Paulo Roberto Antonacci; Goldani, Marcelo Zubaran; Moreira, Edson Duarte; Santana, Ciria; El Khoury, Antoine; Ikedo, Fabio; Rácz, Maria Lucia

    2009-11-01

    Rotavirus is a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Knowledge of rotavirus genotypes is important for vaccination strategies. During 2005-2006, rotavirus surveillance studies were conducted in São Paulo, Salvador, Goiânia, and Porto Alegre, Brazil. Stool samples were collected from children <5 years of age who had diarrhea and were screened by the Rotaclone Enzyme Immunoassay for the presence of rotavirus. Confirmed rotavirus-positive samples were characterized for P and G genotypes by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. A total of 510 stool samples were collected. Of these, 221 (43.3%) were positive for rotavirus. Overall, G9 was the predominant G type, followed by G2, and G1; P[4] and P[8] were the predominant P types. The most frequent G/P genotype combination detected was G2P[4], followed by G9P[8], G9P[4], and G1P[8]. G2P[4] was the predominant type in Goiânia and Salvador; G9P[8] and G1P[8] were predominant in São Paulo and Porto Alegre, respectively. The prevalence, seasonality, and genotype distribution of rotavirus infection varied in different regions in Brazil. With immunization programs, continuous monitoring of rotavirus types is important to detect novel and emerging strains.

  12. Allergic Mastocytic Gastroenteritis and Colitis: An Unexplained Etiology in Chronic Abdominal Pain and Gastrointestinal Dysmotility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Akhavein M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal pain, bloating, early satiety, and changes in bowel habits are common presenting symptoms in individuals with functional GI disorders. Emerging data suggests that these symptoms may be associated with mast cell excess and/or mast cell instability in the GI tract. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the contribution of mast cells to the aforementioned symptoms in individuals with a history of atopic disease. A retrospective chart review of individuals seen in a university GI practice was conducted and twenty-four subjects were identified. The majority had abdominal pain, early satiety, and nocturnal awakening. 66.7% and 37.5% had a history of environmental and/or food allergy. Solid gastric emptying was increased as were the mean number of mast cells reported on biopsies from the stomach, small bowel, and colon (>37/hpf by CD117 staining. Mean whole blood histamine levels were uniformly elevated. This study suggests that in individuals with these characteristics, consideration should be given to staining their gastrointestinal biopsies for mast cells as this may provide them with relatively non-toxic but highly targeted treatment options. Allergic gastroenteritis and colitis may represent a third type of GI mast cell disorder along with mast cell activation syndrome and mastocytic enterocolitis.

  13. Parental views on childhood vaccination against viral gastroenteritis-a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugg, Fiona V; Butler, Christopher C; Evans, Meirion R; Wood, Fiona; Francis, Nick A

    2015-08-01

    Gastroenteritis (GE) causes significant morbidity, especially in young children. A vaccine against rotavirus, a common cause of viral GE (vGE), was added to the childhood immunization schedule in the UK in July 2013 and further related vaccines are under development. To explore parents' beliefs about vGE and their attitudes towards vaccinating. Qualitative interview study with parents of children who had recently experienced an episode of GE. Twenty-eight semi-structured interviews were conducted over the phone with parents. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using standard thematic approaches. Parents varied in their perception of the threat posed by GE, and parents who did not perceive GE as serious were less enthusiastic about vaccines. Other parents were supportive of vaccines in general and considered benefits to their child, their family and the wider community. Many parents said that they lacked knowledge about efficacy and effectiveness of GE vaccines but their underlying belief about the seriousness of illness motivated their attitudes. Acceptability of GE vaccines to parents could be improved by providing more information on both the burden of illness and the impact of rotavirus vaccine in other comparable countries. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Estimating healthcare costs of acute gastroenteritis and human campylobacteriosis in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutz, C; Mäusezahl, D; Bless, P J; Hatz, C; Schwenkglenks, M; Urbinello, D

    2017-03-01

    Rising numbers of campylobacteriosis case notifications in Switzerland resulted in an increased attention to acute gastroenteritis (AG) in general. Patients with a laboratory-confirmed Campylobacter infection perceive their disease as severe and around 15% of these patients are hospitalized. This study aimed at estimating healthcare costs due to AG and campylobacteriosis in Switzerland. We used official health statistics, data from different studies and expert opinion for estimating individual treatment costs for patients with different illness severity and for extrapolating overall costs due to AG and campylobacteriosis. We estimated that total Swiss healthcare costs resulting from these diseases amount to €29-45 million annually. Data suggest that patients with AG consulting a physician without a stool diagnostic test account for €9·0-24·2 million, patients with a negative stool test result for Campylobacter spp. for €12·3 million, patients testing positive for Campylobacter spp. for €1·8 million and hospitalized campylobacteriosis patients for €6·5 million/year. Healthcare costs of campylobacteriosis are high and most likely increasing in Switzerland considering that campylobacteriosis case notifications steadily increased in the past decade. Costs and potential cost savings for the healthcare system should be considered when designing sectorial and cross-sectorial interventions to reduce the burden of human campylobacteriosis in Switzerland.

  15. Unusual presentations of eosinophilic gastroenteritis: Case series and review of literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rafiq A Sheikh; Thomas P Prindiville; R Erick Pecha; Boris H Ruebner

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is an uncommon disease characterized by focal or diffuse eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract, and is usually associated with dyspepsia, diarrhea and peripheral eosinophilia. Diffuse gastrointestinal tract and colonic involvement are uncommon. The endoscopic appearance may vary from normal to mucosal nodularity and ulceration. Gastrointestinal obstruction is unusual and is associated with predominantly muscular disease. We present five unusual cases of EG associated with gastric outlet and duodenal obstruction. Two cases presented with acute pancreatitis and one had a history of pancreatitis. Four cases responded well to medical therapy and one had recurrent gastric outlet obstruction that required surgery. Four out of the five cases had endoscopic and histological evidence of esophagitis and two had colitis. Two patients had ascites. These cases reaffirm that EG is a disorder with protean manifestations and may involve the entire gastrointestinal tract. Gastric outlet and/or small bowel obstruction is an important though uncommon presentation of EG. It may also present as esophagitis, gastritis with polypoid lesions, ulcers or erosions, colitis and pancreatitis and may mimic malignancy.

  16. Ibuprofen-associated acute kidney injury in dehydrated children with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestracci, Alejandro; Ezquer, Mauricio; Elmo, María Eugenia; Molini, Andrea; Thorel, Claudia; Torrents, Milagros; Toledo, Ismael

    2015-10-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) induce acute kidney injury (AKI) in volume-depleted patients; however the prevalence of this complication is likely underestimated. We assessed the impact of ibuprofen exposure on renal function among dehydrated children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) to further characterize NSAID-associated AKI. Over a 1-year period dehydrated children with AGE (n = 105) were prospectively enrolled and grouped as cases, presenting with AKI (n = 46) or controls, not presenting with AKI (n = 59). AKI was defined by pediatric RIFLE (pRIFLE) criteria. Among the children enrolled in the study, AKI prevalence was 44 %, and 34 (54 %) of the 63 patients who received ibuprofen developed renal impairment. Relative to the controls, children presenting with AKI were younger (median age 0.66 vs. 1.74 years; p dehydration, ibuprofen exposure remained an independent risk factor for AKI (p dehydrated children with AGE. Drug exposure increased the risk for developing AKI by more than twofold, independent of the magnitude of the dehydration.

  17. Group A rotavirus gastroenteritis: post-vaccine era, genotypes and zoonotic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchs, Adriana; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACTThis article provides a review of immunity, diagnosis, and clinical aspects of rotavirus disease. It also informs about the changes in epidemiology of diarrheal disease and genetic diversity of circulating group A rotavirus strains following the introduction of vaccines. Group A rotavirus is the major pathogen causing gastroenteritis in animals. Its segmented RNA genome can lead to the emergence of new or unusual strains in human populations via interspecies transmission and/or reassortment events.RESUMOEste artigo fornece uma revisão sobre imunidade, diagnóstico e aspectos clínicos da doença causada por rotavírus. Também aponta as principais mudanças no perfil epidemiológico da doença diarreica e na diversidade genética das cepas circulantes de rotavírus do grupo A, após a introdução vacinal. O rotavírus do grupo A é o principal patógeno associado à gastroenterite em animais. Seu genoma RNA segmentado pode levar ao surgimento de cepas novas ou incomuns na população humana, por meio de transmissão entre espécies e eventos de rearranjo.

  18. Biochemical characterization of a catalase from Vibrio vulnificus, a pathogen that causes gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Jihua; Wang, Haijun; Wu, Limin; Xia, Shenglong; Xu, Changlong; Zheng, Bo; Li, Tianya; Jiang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a virulent human pathogen causing gastroenteritis and possibly life threatening septicemia in patients. Most V. vulnificus are catalase positive and can deactivate peroxides, thus allowing them to survive within the host. In the study presented here, a catalase from V. vulnificus (CAT-Vv) was purified to homogeneity after expression in Escherichia coli. The kinetics and function of CAT-Vv were examined. CAT-Vv catalyzed the reduction of H 2 O 2 at an optimal pH of 7.5 and temperature of 35°C. The V max and K m values were 65.8±1.2 U/mg and 10.5±0.7 mM for H 2 O 2 , respectively. Mutational analysis suggests that amino acids involved in heme binding play a key role in the catalysis. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR revealed that in V. vulnificus, transcription of CAT-Vv was upregulated by low salinity, heat, and oxidative stresses. This research gives new clues to help inhibit the growth of, and infection by V. vulnificus.

  19. Importance of rotavirus as a cause of gastroenteritis in Jordan: a hospital based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuri-Bulos, Najwa; Al Khatib, Mohammad

    2006-01-01

    Rotavirus is recognized to be a very important cause of GE in younger children in both developed as well as developing countries, but causes most of the mortality and morbidity in the latter. The recent introduction of a rotavirus vaccine in some parts of the world makes it necessary for us to determine the impact of this organism in our population with the aim of determining the need for the vaccine. In order to determine this, a study was conducted at the JUH and 3 other private hospitals. At the JUH, 64/256 (25%) of children with GE had rotavirus in 1995. The proportions of cases attributed to rotavirus in the other 3 y were 70/199 (35.2%), 69/279 (24.7%) and 76/294 (25.8%) for 2002, 2003 and 2004, respectively. The cumulative proportion of cases attributable to rotavirus gastroenteritis in all the y was 27.14%. With regard to the 3 private hospitals, rotavirus accounted for 38/225 (16.9%), 140/664 (21%) and 668/1496 (44.6%) at the Khalidy, Jordan and Islamic hospitals, respectively. It is concluded that rotavirus is a significant cause of GE in Jordanian children regardless of their social background, and attempt at controlling this infection may be warranted.

  20. Effectiveness of a multifactorial handwashing program to reduce school absenteeism due to acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azor-Martínez, Ernestina; Cobos-Carrascosa, Elena; Gimenez-Sanchez, Francisco; Martínez-López, Jose Miguel; Garrido-Fernández, Pablo; Santisteban-Martínez, Joaquin; Seijas-Vazquez, Maria Luisa; Campos-Fernandez, Maria Amparo; Bonillo-Perales, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is one of the most common diseases among children and an important cause of school absenteeism. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a handwashing program using hand sanitizers for the prevention of school absenteeism due to AGE. A randomized, controlled and open study of a sample of 1341 children between 4 and 12 years of age, attending 5 state schools in Almería (Spain), with an 8-month follow up (academic year). The experimental group (EG) washed their hands with soap and water, complementing this with the use of a hand sanitizer, and the control group (CG) followed the usual handwashing procedure. Absenteeism rates due GI were compared between the 2 groups through the multivariate Poisson regression analysis. Percent days absent in both groups were compared with a Z-test. 446 cases of school absenteeism due to AGE were registered. The school children from the EG had a 36% lower risk of absenteeism due to AGE (IRR: 0.64, 95% confidence interval: 0.52-0.78) and a decrease in absenteeism of 0.13 episodes/child/academic year (0.27 of EG vs 0.40 CG/episodes/child/academic year, P absenteeism cases due to AGE.

  1. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis with Splendore-Hoeppli material in the ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J G; Palley, L S; Rose, R

    1992-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis, focal or diffuse with eosinophilic infiltrations of the stomach or intestine, has been described in human beings, cats, dogs, and horses. In this paper, we describe infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract with eosinophils accompanied by a circulating eosinophilia in six ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Clinical signs included chronic weight loss, anorexia, and diarrhea. The small intestines from five ferrets had diffuse infiltrates of eosinophils. This resulted in focal or multifocal loss of the muscular tunic in three ferrets. Two of these ferrets also had eosinophilic gastritis. Eosinophilic granulomas with Splendore-Hoeppli material were present in mesenteric lymph nodes in four ferrets. Two ferrets had multiple organ involvement; one had eosinophilic granulomas in the liver, mesentery, and choroid plexus as well as moderate parapancreatic segmental arteritis with infiltration of eosinophils and mural thrombosis. The second ferret had, in addition to moderate diffuse gastric and small intestinal eosinophilic mucosal infiltrations, interstitial eosinophilic pulmonary infiltrates. Examination of all tissues failed to reveal an infectious agent.

  2. Major Change in the Predominant Type of “Norwalk-Like Viruses” in Outbreaks of Acute Nonbacterial Gastroenteritis in Osaka City, Japan, between April 1996 and March 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iritani, Nobuhiro; Seto, Yoshiyuki; Haruki, Kosuke; Kimura, Masatsugu; Ayata, Minoru; Ogura, Hisashi

    2000-01-01

    In Osaka City, Japan, between April 1996 and March 1999, a total of 350 fecal specimens from 64 outbreaks of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis were examined to investigate infection by “Norwalk-like viruses” (NLVs). By reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, 182 samples (52.0%) from 47 outbreaks (73.4%) were NLV positive. During those three years, the incidence of NLV-associated outbreaks showed seasonality, being higher during January to March (winter to early spring). The ingestion of contaminated oysters was the most common transmission mode (42.6%). The amplicons of the 47 outbreak strains that were NLV positive by RT-PCR were tested using Southern hybridization with four probe sets (Ando et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 33:64–71, 1995). Forty of the outbreak strains were classified as 4 probe 1-A (P1-A) strains, 6 P1-B strains, 10 P2-A strains, 17 P2-B strains, and 3 untypeable strains, and the other 7 outbreaks were determined to be mixed-probe-type strains. Probe typing and partial sequence analysis of the outbreak strains indicated that a predominant probe type of NLVs in Osaka City had drastically changed; P2-B strains (77.8%) with multiple genetic clusters were observed during the 1996–97 season, the P2-A common strain (81.3%) related to the Toronto virus cluster was observed during the 1997–98 season, and P1-B strains (75.0%) with a genetic similarity were observed during the 1998–99 season. For the three untypeable outbreak strains (96065, 97024, and 98026), the 98026 outbreak strain had Southampton virus (SOV)-like sequences, and each of the other outbreak strains had a unique 81-nucleotide sequence. Newly designed probes (SOV probe for the 98026 outbreak strain and the 96065 probe for the 96065 and 97024 outbreak strains) were hybridized with relative strains and without other probe type strains. The prevalent NLV probe types in Osaka City during those three years were classified in six phylogenetic groups: P1-A, P1-B, P2-A, P2-B, SOV, and 96065 probe

  3. A Naturally Occurring Recombinant Enterovirus Expresses a Torovirus Deubiquitinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Pengcheng; Misra, Saurav; Hause, Ben; Fang, Ying

    2017-07-15

    identified a special case of cross-order recombination between enterovirus G (order Picornavirales ) and torovirus (order Nidovirales ). This naturally occurring recombination event may have broad implications for other picornaviral and/or nidoviral species. Importantly, we demonstrated that the exogenous ToV-PLP gene that was inserted into the EVG genome encodes a deubiquitinase/deISGylase and potentially suppresses host cellular innate immune responses. Our results provide insights into how a gain of function through genetic recombination, in particular cross-order recombination, may improve the ability of a virus to evade host immunity. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Nontyphi Salmonella Empyema with Bronchopleural Fistula in a Patient with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Bretzing

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV have an increased risk of inoculation with nontyphoid Salmonella compared to the general population. While nontyphoid Salmonella commonly manifests as gastroenteritis, Salmonella bacteremia can be seen in patients with HIV. We present a case of disseminated Salmonellosis in a patient with HIV complicated by bronchopleural fistula and secondary empyema. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old African American male with HIV noncompliant with HAART therapy presented with complaints of generalized weakness, weight loss, cough, night sweats, and nonbloody, watery diarrhea of four weeks’ duration. A computed tomography (CT scan demonstrated a bilobed large, thick-walled cavitary lesion in the right upper lobe communicating with the pleural space to form a bronchopleural fistula. Thoracentesis yielded growth of nontyphi Salmonella species consistent with empyema; he was treated with intravenous Ceftriaxone and underwent placement of chest tube for drainage of empyema with instillation of alteplase/dornase twice daily for three days. Repeat CT chest showed a hydropneumothorax. The patient subsequently underwent video-assisted thoracoscopy with decortication. The patient continued to improve and follow-up CT chest demonstrated improved loculated right pneumothorax with resolution of the right bronchopleural fistula and resolution of the cavitary lesions. Discussion. We describe one of the few cases of development of bronchopulmonary fistula and the formation of empyema in the setting of disseminated Salmonella. Empyema complicated by bronchopulmonary fistula likely led to failure of intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy and the patient ultimately required decortication in addition to antibiotics. While Salmonella bacteremia can be seen in immunocompromised patients, extraintestinal manifestations of Salmonella infection such as empyema and bronchopleural fistulas are uncommon. Bronchopleural fistulas most commonly

  5. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through blood transfusions. There have been outbreaks of Zika virus in the United States, Africa, Southeast Asia, the ... not travel to areas where there is a Zika virus outbreak. If you do decide to travel, first ...

  6. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funding CDC Activities For Healthcare Providers Clinical Evaluation & Disease Sexual Transmission HIV Infection & Zika Virus Testing for Zika Test Specimens – At Time of Birth Diagnostic Tests Understanding Zika Virus Test Results ...

  7. Emerging tropical diseases in Australia. Part 5. Hendra virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulsiani, Suhella; Graham, G C; Moore, P R

    2011-01-01

    gene of the virus and the discovery that the virus had an exceptionally large genome subsequently led to HeV being assigned to a new genus, Henipavirus, along with Nipah virus (a newly emergent virus in pigs). The regular outbreaks of HeV-related disease that have occurred in Australia since 1994 have...

  8. Outbreaks of Tilapia Lake Virus Infection, Thailand, 2015-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surachetpong, Win; Janetanakit, Taveesak; Nonthabenjawan, Nutthawan; Tattiyapong, Puntanat; Sirikanchana, Kwanrawee; Amonsin, Alongkorn

    2017-06-01

    During 2015-2016, several outbreaks of tilapia lake virus infection occurred among tilapia in Thailand. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the virus from Thailand grouped with a tilapia virus (family Orthomyxoviridae) from Israel. This emerging virus is a threat to tilapia aquaculture in Asia and worldwide.

  9. Outbreaks of Tilapia Lake Virus Infection, Thailand, 2015?2016

    OpenAIRE

    Surachetpong, Win; Janetanakit, Taveesak; Nonthabenjawan, Nutthawan; Tattiyapong, Puntanat; Sirikanchana, Kwanrawee; Amonsin, Alongkorn

    2017-01-01

    During 2015?2016, several outbreaks of tilapia lake virus infection occurred among tilapia in Thailand. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the virus from Thailand grouped with a tilapia virus (family Orthomyxoviridae) from Israel. This emerging virus is a threat to tilapia aquaculture in Asia and worldwide.

  10. Thermoactivation of viruses by microwaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahnel, H.; von Brodorotti, H.S.

    1981-01-01

    Eight different viruses, suspended in drinking water, were examined for their ability to be inactivated by microwaves from a microwave oven. Up to a virus content of 10/sup 5/ TCID/sub 50//ml inactivation was successful within a few minutes of microwave treatment and occurred in parallel to the heat stability of the viruses. Evidence for direct effects of microwaves on viruses could not be detected. 7 of the viruses studied were inactivated rapidly when temperatures of 50 to 65/sup 0/C under microwave treatment were reached in the flowing water, while a bovine parvovirus was only inactivated by temperatures above 90/sup 0/C. The advantages of a thermal virus-decontamination of fluids and material by microwaves are discussed.

  11. Rapid versus standard intravenous rehydration in paediatric gastroenteritis: pragmatic blinded randomised clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Patricia C; Willan, Andrew R; Schuh, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine if rapid rather than standard intravenous rehydration results in improved hydration and clinical outcomes when administered to children with gastroenteritis. Design Single centre, two arm, parallel randomised pragmatic controlled trial. Blocked randomisation stratified by site. Participants, caregivers, outcome assessors, investigators, and statisticians were blinded to the treatment assignment. Setting Paediatric emergency department in a tertiary care centre in Toronto, Canada. Participants 226 children aged 3 months to 11 years; complete follow-up was obtained on 223 (99%). Eligible children were aged over 90 days, had a diagnosis of dehydration secondary to gastroenteritis, had not responded to oral rehydration, and had been prescribed intravenous rehydration. Children were excluded if they weighed less than 5 kg or more than 33 kg, required fluid restriction, had a suspected surgical condition, or had an insurmountable language barrier. Children were also excluded if they had a history of a chronic systemic disease, abdominal surgery, bilious or bloody vomit, hypotension, or hypoglycaemia or hyperglycaemia. Interventions Rapid (60 mL/kg) or standard (20 mL/kg) rehydration with 0.9% saline over an hour; subsequent fluids administered according to protocol. Main outcome measures Primary outcome: clinical rehydration, assessed with a validated scale, two hours after the start of treatment. Secondary outcomes: prolonged treatment, mean clinical dehydration scores over the four hour study period, time to discharge, repeat visits to emergency department, adequate oral intake, and physician’s comfort with discharge. Data from all randomised patients were included in an intention to treat analysis. Results 114 patients were randomised to rapid rehydration and 112 to standard. One child was withdrawn because of severe hyponatraemia at baseline. There was no evidence of a difference between the rapid and standard rehydration groups in the

  12. [Outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by Campylobacter jejuni transmitted through drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Pere; Artigues, Antoni; Nuín, Carmen; Aramburu, Jesús; Pérez, Montse; Domínguez, Angela; Salleras, Lluís

    2002-11-23

    The aim of this study was to conduct a clinical-epidemiological and microbiological investigation into an outbreak of waterborne disease caused by Campylobacter jejuni due to the consumption of drinking water. A historical cohort study was carried out among 237 residents of Torres de Segre (Lleida, Spain) who were selected using a systematic sample. We conducted a telephone interview about water consumption, symptoms and the onset of disease. We investigated samples of drinking water and stools from 14 patients. The risk associated with each water source was assessed by applying relative risk (RR) analysis at 95% confidence (CI) intervals. The overall attack rate was 18.3% (43/237). The symptoms were: diarrhoea, 93.0% (18/43); abdominal pain, 80.9% (34/42); nausea; 56,1% (23/41); vomits, 42.9% (18/42), and fever, 11.9% (5/42). Only 5.8% of patients contact with his physician. The consumption of drinking water was statistically associated with the disease (RR = 3.0; 95% CI, 1.7-5.3), while the consumption of bottled water (RR = 0.6; 95% CI 0.3-1.0) and water from other villages (RR = 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1-1.1) were a protection factor. The day of outbreak notification we did not detect any residual chlorine in the drinking water: it was qualified as no potable and we isolated Campylobacter jejuni in 8 samples stools. This research highlights the potential importance of waterborne outbreaks of gastroenteritis due to Campylobacter jejuni transmitted through untreated drinking water and suggests to need systematic controls over drinking water and the proper register of their results.

  13. Yogurt for treating acute gastroenteritis in children: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patro-Gołąb, Bernadeta; Shamir, Raanan; Szajewska, Hania

    2015-10-01

    In May 2014, the updated guidelines for the management of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) were published. The use of yogurt in the nutritional management of AGE was not addressed, although it is frequently used in many countries for this purpose. We aimed to systematically evaluate the efficacy of yogurt consumption for the management of AGE in children. In this systematic review, a number of databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library, with no language restrictions, were searched up to July 2014 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of yogurt consumption in children with AGE. The risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Four RCTs (n = 448) that were generally low in methodological quality, all performed in hospital setting, were included. Compared with placebo/no intervention, yogurt consumption had no significant effect on stool volume. The data on the effect of yogurt consumption on the duration of diarrhea and stool frequency were not consistent. The chance of treatment success (or failure) was similar in both groups. Compared with placebo, the duration of hospitalization was shorter in children who received yogurt, but the difference was of a borderline significance. Total weight gain increased for those treated with yogurt. The consumption of yogurt had a positive effect on weight gain, but no consistent effect on AGE outcomes in hospitalized children. Given the limited data and the methodological limitations of the included trials, the evidence should be viewed with caution. The effect of yogurt consumption in the ambulatory setting is unknown. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  14. Decreased Urinary Sodium-to-urinary Creatinine Ratio Identifies Sodium Depletion in Pediatric Acute Gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz-Erian, P; Akdar, Z; Haerter, B; Waldegger, S; Giner, T; Scholl-Bürgi, S; Mueller, T

    2016-01-01

    In acute gastroenteritis (AG) fecal losses may cause depletion of sodium (NaD) which may not be recognized because of normal plasma Na (pNa) concentrations. We studied the incidence of this state of normonatremic sodium depletion (NNaD) and the suitability of the urinary Na/urinary creatinine ratio (uNa/uCr) for diagnosing NNaD. 16 AG- and 16 healthy control children aged 0.8-15.0 years. Prospective cross sectional pilot study. Measurements of Na, K and creatinine in plasma (p) and urine (u). Calculation of uNa/uCr Ratio, fractional excretion of Na (FENa) and uNa/uK ratio as the hitherto best known parameters of prerenal Na depletion, respectively. pNa concentrations were normal in 15/16 AG patients (93.8%) with only one subnormal value of 133 mmol/L, and a mean value of 137.9±2.3 mmol/L not different from the normal control group (139.4±2.2 mmol/L). Also, mean uNa concentrations and uNa/uK ratios did not differ between both groups. However, uNa/uCr ratios were below normal in 13/16 AG children (81.3%) but normal in all healthy controls with a significantly lower mean value in the AG group (12.6±8.8 vs. 31.2±8.3 mmol/mmol; phigh correlation coefficient of r=0.9333. The majority of AG patients was found to have NNaD as determined by uNa/uCr and FENa. Calculation of uNa/uCr may be useful for diagnosing NNaD in AG. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Rotavirus vaccine effectiveness in preventing hospitalizations due to gastroenteritis: a descriptive epidemiological study from Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, C; Liebert, U G

    2018-04-10

    Rotavirus infections are common causes of infant hospitalization. The present study examined the effectiveness of anti-rotavirus vaccination in preventing rotavirus-related hospitalizations in Germany, following its state and nationwide introductions in 2008 and 2013, respectively. During 15 consecutive seasons 9557 stool samples of hospitalized children of 5 years and younger with acute gastroenteritis were screened for rotavirus A. Rotavirus G and P genotypes were assessed after vaccine introduction. Vaccine effectiveness was determined by comparison of rotavirus incidence in pre-vaccine and post-vaccine cohorts. The herd effect was calculated as the difference between the observed reduction of rotavirus-related hospitalizations and the expected direct vaccine effect. The number of rotavirus-related hospitalizations declined after vaccine introduction. Approximately 26% (503/1955) of prevented cases could be attributed to the herd effect. Human rotaviruses of genotypes G3P[8], G1P[8], G9P[8], G4P[8], G2P[4] and G12P[8] were most frequent. Uncommon genotypes remained rare. The direct, indirect, total and overall vaccine effectiveness was 86% (95% confidence interval (CI) 83.2-89.1%), 48% (95% CI 42.8-52.6%), 93% (95% CI 91.3-94.3%) and 69% (95% CI 66.5-72.0%), respectively. There was no significant difference in vaccine-type or in genotype-specific vaccine effectiveness. Anti-rotavirus vaccination efficiently reduced rotavirus-related hospitalizations in Germany in the past decade. The vaccines analysed in this article provide a broadly heterologous and long-lasting protection. The herd effect substantially contributed to the observed drop in the number of incidences of severe rotavirus infections. Presumably, constant high vaccine coverage will lead to a continued upward trend in the overall vaccine efficiency. Copyright © 2018 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis: effects on sick leaves and cost of lost workdays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaana I Halonen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2007, part of a drinking water distribution system was accidentally contaminated with waste water effluent causing a gastroenteritis outbreak in a Finnish town. We examined the acute and cumulative effects of this incidence on sick leaves among public sector employees residing in the clean and contaminated areas, and the additional costs of lost workdays due to the incidence. METHODS: Daily information on sick leaves of 1789 Finnish Public Sector Study participants was obtained from employers' registers. Global Positioning System-coordinates were used for linking participants to the clean and contaminated areas. Prevalence ratios (PR for weekly sickness absences were calculated using binomial regression analysis. Calculations for the costs were based on prior studies. RESULTS: Among those living in the contaminated areas, the prevalence of participants on sick leave was 3.54 (95% confidence interval (CI 2.97-4.22 times higher on the week following the incidence compared to the reference period. Those living and working in the clean area were basically not affected, the corresponding PR for sick leaves was 1.12, 95% CI 0.73-1.73. No cumulative effects on sick leaves were observed among the exposed. The estimated additional costs of lost workdays due to the incidence were 1.8-2.1 million euros. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of sickness absences among public sector employees residing in affected areas increased shortly after drinking water distribution system was contaminated, but no long-term effects were observed. The estimated costs of lost workdays were remarkable, thus, the cost-benefits of better monitoring systems for the water distribution systems should be evaluated.

  17. Intravenous rehydration of malnourished children with acute gastroenteritis and severe dehydration: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Kirsty A; Gibb, Jack G; Maitland, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Background: Rehydration strategies in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and severe dehydration are extremely cautious. The World Health Organization (WHO) SAM guidelines advise strongly against intravenous fluids unless the child is shocked or severely dehydrated and unable to tolerate oral fluids. Otherwise, guidelines recommend oral or nasogastric rehydration using low sodium oral rehydration solutions. There is limited evidence to support these recommendations. Methods: We conducted a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies on 15 th June 2017 comparing different strategies of rehydration therapy in children with acute gastroenteritis and severe dehydration, specifically relating to intravenous rehydration, using standard search terms. Two authors assessed papers for inclusion. The primary endpoint was evidence of fluid overload. Results: Four studies were identified, all published in English, including 883 children, all of which were conducted in low resource settings. Two were randomised controlled trials and two observational cohort studies, one incorporated assessment of myocardial and haemodynamic function. There was no evidence of fluid overload or other fluid-related adverse events, including children managed on more liberal rehydration protocols. Mortality was high overall, and particularly in children with shock managed on WHO recommendations (day-28 mortality 82%). There was no difference in safety outcomes when different rates of intravenous rehydration were compared. Conclusions: The current 'strong recommendations' for conservative rehydration of children with SAM are not based on emerging evidence. We found no clinical trials providing a direct assessment of the current WHO guidelines, and those that were available suggested that these children have a high mortality and remain fluid depleted on current therapy. Recent studies have reported no evidence of fluid overload or heart failure with more

  18. Estimates of economic burden of providing inpatient care in childhood rotavirus gastroenteritis from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Way Seah; Poo, Muhammad Izzuddin; Nagaraj, Shyamala

    2007-12-01

    To estimate the cost of an episode of inpatient care and the economic burden of hospitalisation for childhood rotavirus gastroenteritis (GE) in Malaysia. A 12-month prospective, hospital-based study on children less than 14 years of age with rotavirus GE, admitted to University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, was conducted in 2002. Data on human resource expenditure, costs of investigations, treatment and consumables were collected. Published estimates on rotavirus disease incidence in Malaysia were searched. Economic burden of hospital care for rotavirus GE in Malaysia was estimated by multiplying the cost of each episode of hospital admission for rotavirus GE with national rotavirus incidence in Malaysia. In 2002, the per capita health expenditure by Malaysian Government was US$71.47. Rotavirus was positive in 85 (22%) of the 393 patients with acute GE admitted during the study period. The median cost of providing inpatient care for an episode of rotavirus GE was US$211.91 (range US$68.50-880.60). The estimated average cases of children hospitalised for rotavirus GE in Malaysia (1999-2000) was 8571 annually. The financial burden of providing inpatient care for rotavirus GE in Malaysian children was estimated to be US$1.8 million (range US$0.6 million-7.5 million) annually. The cost of providing inpatient care for childhood rotavirus GE in Malaysia was estimated to be US$1.8 million annually. The financial burden of rotavirus disease would be higher if cost of outpatient visits, non-medical and societal costs are included.

  19. The survival and inactivation of enteric viruses on soft surfaces: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeargin, Thomas; Buckley, David; Fraser, Angela; Jiang, Xiuping

    2016-11-01

    Worldwide, enteric viruses are the main cause of acute gastroenteritis. In humans, these viruses spread via person-to-person contact, food, water, and/or the environment. Their survival and inactivation on hard surfaces have been extensively studied; however, nonlaunderable soft surfaces, such as upholstery and carpet, have received little attention. The aim of this systematic review was to determine factors that influence the survival and inactivation of enteric viruses on nonlaunderable soft surfaces. EBSCO and Web of Science were searched for experimental studies published between 1965 and 2015 using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses methods. Titles and abstracts were screened using 3 eligibility criteria. The quality of all study methods was also assessed. Our search yielded 12 articles. Viruses survived between 0 hours and 140 days depending on surface and environment conditions. Virus survival was influenced by temperature, relative humidity, organic content, and deposition method. A variety of chemistries were tested across studies and were shown to have a varied effect on enteric viruses. Chlorine, glutaraldehyde, vaporous ozone, and hydrogen peroxide were the most efficacious against enteric viruses (> 3-log reduction). Environmental factors, such as temperature and relative humidity, can influence survival of enteric viruses on nonlaunderable soft surfaces. The efficacy of liquid and vaporous chemistries are associated with surface and virus type. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Viruses in reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Ellen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The etiology of reptilian viral diseases can be attributed to a wide range of viruses occurring across different genera and families. Thirty to forty years ago, studies of viruses in reptiles focused mainly on the zoonotic potential of arboviruses in reptiles and much effort went into surveys and challenge trials of a range of reptiles with eastern and western equine encephalitis as well as Japanese encephalitis viruses. In the past decade, outbreaks of infection with West Nile virus in human populations and in farmed alligators in the USA has seen the research emphasis placed on the issue of reptiles, particularly crocodiles and alligators, being susceptible to, and reservoirs for, this serious zoonotic disease. Although there are many recognised reptilian viruses, the evidence for those being primary pathogens is relatively limited. Transmission studies establishing pathogenicity and cofactors are likewise scarce, possibly due to the relatively low commercial importance of reptiles, difficulties with the availability of animals and permits for statistically sound experiments, difficulties with housing of reptiles in an experimental setting or the inability to propagate some viruses in cell culture to sufficient titres for transmission studies. Viruses as causes of direct loss of threatened species, such as the chelonid fibropapilloma associated herpesvirus and ranaviruses in farmed and wild tortoises and turtles, have re-focused attention back to the characterisation of the viruses as well as diagnosis and pathogenesis in the host itself. 1. Introduction 2. Methods for working with reptilian viruses 3. Reptilian viruses described by virus families 3.1. Herpesviridae 3.2. Iridoviridae 3.2.1 Ranavirus 3.2.2 Erythrocytic virus 3.2.3 Iridovirus 3.3. Poxviridae 3.4. Adenoviridae 3.5. Papillomaviridae 3.6. Parvoviridae 3.7. Reoviridae 3.8. Retroviridae and inclusion body disease of Boid snakes 3.9. Arboviruses 3.9.1. Flaviviridae 3

  1. A novel imaging technique to measure capillary-refill time: improving diagnostic accuracy for dehydration in young children with gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavit, Itai; Brant, Rollin; Nijssen-Jordan, Cheri; Galbraith, Roger; Johnson, David W

    2006-12-01

    Assessment of dehydration in young children currently depends on clinical judgment, which is relatively inaccurate. By using digital videography, we developed a way to assess capillary-refill time more objectively. Our goal was to determine whether digitally measured capillary-refill time assesses the presence of significant dehydration (> or = 5%) in young children with gastroenteritis more accurately than conventional capillary refill and overall clinical assessment. We prospectively enrolled children with gastroenteritis, 1 month to 5 years of age, who were evaluated in a tertiary-care pediatric emergency department and judged by a triage nurse to be at least mildly dehydrated. Before any treatment, we measured the weight and digitally measured capillary-refill time of these children. Pediatric emergency physicians determined capillary-refill time by using conventional methods and degree of dehydration by overall clinical assessment by using a 7-point Likert scale. Postillness weight gain was used to estimate fluid deficit; beginning 48 hours after assessment, children were reweighed every 24 hours until 2 sequential weights differed by no more than 2%. We compared the accuracy of digitally measured capillary-refill time with conventional capillary refill and overall clinical assessment by determining sensitivities, specificities, likelihood ratios, and area under the receiver operator characteristic curves. A total of 83 patients were enrolled and had complete follow-up; 13 of these patients had significant dehydration (> or = 5% of body weight). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curves for digitally measured capillary-refill time and overall clinical assessment relative to fluid deficit ( or = 5%) were 0.99 and 0.88, respectively. Positive likelihood ratios were 11.7 for digitally measured capillary-refill time, 4.5 for conventional capillary refill, and 4.1 for overall clinical assessment. Results of this prospective cohort study suggest

  2. Efficacy of a pentavalent human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine against rotavirus gastroenteritis among American Indian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Lindsay R; Watt, James P; Weatherholtz, Robert C; Moulton, Lawrence H; Reid, Raymond; Santosham, Mathuram; O'Brien, Katherine L

    2012-02-01

    Before the widespread use of rotavirus vaccines, rotavirus was a leading cause of gastroenteritis among children. Navajo and White Mountain Apache children suffer a disproportionate burden of severe rotavirus disease compared with the general U.S. population. We enrolled Navajo and White Mountain Apache infants in a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of pentavalent human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine (PRV). Subjects received 3 doses of vaccine or placebo at 4 to 10 week intervals, with the first dose given between 6 and 12 weeks of age. Gastroenteritis episodes were identified by active surveillance. Disease severity was determined by a standardized scoring system. There were 509 and 494 randomized children who received vaccine and placebo, respectively. Among placebo recipients, the incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis was 34.2 episodes/100 child-years (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 25.8-38.9) versus 8.1 episodes/100 child-years (95% CI: 5.4-12.5) in the vaccine group. The percentage of rotavirus episodes caused by serotypes G1, G2, and G3 was 72.3%, 23.4%, and 2.1%, respectively. There were no severe rotavirus episodes among vaccinees and 4 among placebo recipients. PRV was 77.1% (95% CI: 59.7-87.6), 89.5% (95% CI: 65.9-97.9), and 82.9% (95% CI: 61.1-93.6) effective against G1-G4 rotavirus disease, severe and moderate rotavirus disease combined, and outpatient visits for rotavirus disease, respectively. The risk of adverse events was similar for the vaccine and placebo groups. PRV was highly effective in preventing rotavirus disease and related health care utilization in these American Indian infants. Vaccine efficacy and immunogenicity were similar to the overall study population enrolled in the multicenter trial.

  3. Monitoring virus entry into living cells using DiD-labeled dengue virus particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayala Nunez, Vanesa; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2011-01-01

    A variety of approaches can be applied to investigate the multiple steps and interactions that occur during virus entry into the host cell. Single-virus tracking is a powerful real-time imaging technique that offers the possibility to monitor virus-cell binding, internalization, intracellular

  4. High Rates of All-cause and Gastroenteritis-related Hospitalization Morbidity and Mortality among HIV-exposed Indian Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathy Srikanth

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-infected and HIV-exposed, uninfected infants experience a high burden of infectious morbidity and mortality. Hospitalization is an important metric for morbidity and is associated with high mortality, yet, little is known about rates and causes of hospitalization among these infants in the first 12 months of life. Methods Using data from a prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT trial (India SWEN, where HIV-exposed breastfed infants were given extended nevirapine, we measured 12-month infant all-cause and cause-specific hospitalization rates and hospitalization risk factors. Results Among 737 HIV-exposed Indian infants, 93 (13% were HIV-infected, 15 (16% were on HAART, and 260 (35% were hospitalized 381 times by 12 months of life. Fifty-six percent of the hospitalizations were attributed to infections; gastroenteritis was most common accounting for 31% of infectious hospitalizations. Gastrointestinal-related hospitalizations steadily increased over time, peaking around 9 months. The 12-month all-cause hospitalization, gastroenteritis-related hospitalization, and in-hospital mortality rates were 906/1000 PY, 229/1000 PY, and 35/1000 PY respectively among HIV-infected infants and 497/1000 PY, 107/1000 PY, and 3/1000 PY respectively among HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. Advanced maternal age, infant HIV infection, gestational age, and male sex were associated with higher all-cause hospitalization risk while shorter duration of breastfeeding and abrupt weaning were associated with gastroenteritis-related hospitalization. Conclusions HIV-exposed Indian infants experience high rates of all-cause and infectious hospitalization (particularly gastroenteritis and in-hospital mortality. HIV-infected infants are nearly 2-fold more likely to experience hospitalization and 10-fold more likely to die compared to HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. The combination of scaling up HIV PMTCT programs and implementing proven health

  5. The percentage of nosocomial-related out of total hospitalizations for rotavirus gastroenteritis and its association with hand hygiene compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisbourd-Zinman, Orith; Ben-Ziony, Shiri; Solter, Ester; Chodick, Gabriel; Ashkenazi, Shai; Livni, Gilat

    2011-03-01

    Because the absolute numbers of both community-acquired and nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) vary, we studied the percentage of hospitalizations for RVGE that were transmitted nosocomially as an indicator of in-hospital acquisition of the infection. In a 4-year prospective study, the percentage of nosocomial RVGE declined steadily, from 20.3% in 2003 to 12.7% in 2006 (P = .001). Concomitantly, the rate of compliance with hand hygiene increased from 33.7% to 49% (P = .012), with a significant (P Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Studies on the serological relationships between avian pox, sheep pox, goat pox and vaccinia viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, P. K.; Nilakantan, P. R.

    1970-01-01

    By using neutralization, complement fixation and immunogel-diffusion tests, it has been demonstrated that cross-reactions occur between various avian pox viruses and between sheep pox and goat pox viruses. No such reactions were demonstrated between avian pox viruses and vaccinia virus or between avian pox and sheep pox and goat pox viruses. Furthermore, no serological relationship was demonstrable between vaccinia virus and sheep pox and goat pox viruses. PMID:4989854

  7. Pesti Des Petits ruminants virus infection in animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chauhan H.C.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available For centuries morbillivirus infections have had a huge impact on both human beings and animals. Morbilliviruses are highly contagious pathogens that cause some of the most devastating viral diseases of humans and animals world wide. They include measles virus (MV, canine distemper virus (CDV, rinderpest virus (RPV and peste des petits ruminants (PPRV virus. Furthermore, new emerging infectious diseases of morbilliviruses with significant ecological consequences of marine mammals have been discovered in the past decades. Phocid distemper virus (PDV in seals and the cetacean morbillivirus (CMV have been found in dolphins, whales and porpoises. Peste des petits ruminants (PPR is a highly contagious ,infectious , an acute or sub acute viral disease of domestic and wild small ruminants characterized by fever, oculonasal discharges, stomatitis, conjunctivitis, gastroenteritis and pneumonia. Goats are more severely affected than sheep. It is also known as pseudorinderpest of small ruminants, pest of small ruminants, pest of sheep and goats, kata, stomatitis- pneumoentritis syndrome, contagious pustular stomatitis and pneumoentritis complex. It is one of the major notifiable diseases of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE. [Vet. World 2009; 2(4.000: 150-155

  8. The incidence of gastroenteritis diagnosis among sick dogs presented to the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital correlated with meteorological data : research communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Shakespeare

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The number of sick dogs diagnosed with and without gastroenteritis presented to the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital situated north of Pretoria is reported from counts extracted from the records of the Outpatients clinic for 6 years, 1988 to 1993. The average percentage of sick dogs diagnosed with gastroenteritis was 11.51 % and the average percentage of sick dogs that were admitted to the parvovirus isolation hospital ward was 2.8 %. A strong correlation exists between the number of dogs admitted to the parvovirus ward and average monthly wind speed and inverse humidity values.

  9. Real-Time Evolution of Zika Virus Disease Outbreak, Roatán, Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Trevor; Roy-Burman, Arup; Tuholske, Cascade; Busch, Michael P; Bakkour, Sonia; Stone, Mars; Linnen, Jeffrey M; Gao, Kui; Coleman, Jayleen; Bloch, Evan M

    2017-08-01

    A Zika virus disease outbreak occurred in Roatán, Honduras, during September 2015-July 2016. Blood samples and clinical information were obtained from 183 patients given a clinical diagnosis of suspected dengue virus infection. A total of 79 patients were positive for Zika virus, 13 for chikungunya virus, and 6 for dengue virus.

  10. Occurrence of severe gastroenteritis in pups after canine parvovirus vaccine administration: a clinical and laboratory diagnostic dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaro, Nicola; Desario, Costantina; Elia, Gabriella; Campolo, Marco; Lorusso, Alessio; Mari, Viviana; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2007-01-26

    A total of 29 faecal samples collected from dogs with diarrhoea following canine parvovirus (CPV) vaccination were tested by minor groove binder (MGB) probe assays for discrimination between CPV vaccine and field strains and by diagnostic tests for detection of other canine pathogens. Fifteen samples tested positive only for CPV field strains; however, both vaccine and field strains were detected in three samples. Eleven samples were found to contain only the vaccine strain, although eight of them tested positive for other pathogens of dogs. Only three samples were found to contain the vaccine strain without evidence of canine pathogens. The present study confirms that most cases of parvovirus-like disease occurring shortly after vaccination are related to infection with field strains of canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) rather than to reversion to virulence of the modified live virus contained in the vaccine.

  11. Unspecified gastroenteritis illness and deaths in the elderly associated with norovirus epidemics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asten, L. van; Siebenga, J.; Wijngaard, C. van den; Verheij, R.; Vliet, H. van; Kretzschmar, M.; Boshuizen, H.; Pelt, W. van; Koopmans, M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: New variant strains of norovirus have emerged worldwide in recent years, evolving by mutation much like influenza viruses. These strains have been associated with a notable increase in the number of annual norovirus outbreaks. However, the impact of such increased norovirus activity on

  12. Unspecified gastroenteritis illness and deaths in the elderly associated with norovirus epidemics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asten, van L.; Siebenga, J.; Wijngaard, van den C.; Verheij, R.; Vliet, van H.; Kretzschmar, M.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Pelt, van W.; Koopmans, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: New variant strains of norovirus have emerged worldwide in recent years, evolving by mutation much like influenza viruses. These strains have been associated with a notable increase in the number of annual norovirus outbreaks. However, the impact of such increased norovirus activity on

  13. Post-earthquake outbreak of rotavirus gastroenteritis in Kashmir (India): an epidemiological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Somenath; Rathore, Abhilakh Singh; Kadri, Syed Manzoor; Dutt, Som; Khare, Shashi; Lal, Shiv

    2008-10-01

    An earthquake struck Kashmir on 8 October 2005. A central team of public health specialists was sent to Kashmir to assess the public health measures required following the earthquake, and to assist in institution of public health measures. Epidemiological and environmental investigation in Tangdar block (Kupwara district) and Uri Tehsil (Baramula district). Visits to villages affected by the earthquake, rehabilitation camps and health care, examination of cases with acute diarrhoeal disease (ADD), environmental observations, collection of clinical samples from ADD cases and environmental samples from drinking water sources, and laboratory methods. In total, 1783 cases of ADD were reported between 14 October and 17 December 2005 in Tangdar (population 65000). The overall attack rate was 20% in children under 4 years of age. Twelve cases of ADD with loose motions without blood were studied, and 11 rectal swabs and one stool sample were processed. No bacterial enteropathogens could be isolated, but three of the 12 samples yielded rotavirus antigen on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Twelve of 13 (92.3%) water samples, collected from various stream or tap water (source: spring/stream) sources, were unsatisfactory (P=0.001) using the H(2)S strip method compared with other sources (well/mineral water). All eight water sources in Tangdar block were unsatisfactory, indicated by blackening of H(2)S filter paper strips. Following the earthquake, drinking stream water or tap water without boiling or chlorination may have led to a common source water-borne outbreak of rotavirus gastroenteritis. Other contributing factors were: overcrowding; poor sanitation; open-air defaecation; poor hygiene; and living in makeshift camps near streams. Person-to-person transmission may also have contributed to perpetuation of the outbreak. Following the establishment of medical camps and information, education and communication regarding the need to drink boiled water and follow safer

  14. Iatrogenic Dysnatremias in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis in High-Income Countries: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silviu Grisaru

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAcute gastroenteritis (AGE causing dehydration with or without dysnatremias is a common childhood health challenge. While it is accepted that oral rehydration therapy is preferred, clinical factors or parent and healthcare provider preferences may lead to intravenous rehydration (IVR. Isotonic solutions are increasingly recommended in most scenarios requiring IVR. Nevertheless, children with AGE, having ongoing losses of water and electrolytes, represent a unique population.ObjectivesTo evaluate the association between acquired dysnatremias and IVR in children with AGE.MethodsA systematic search of MEDLINE database was conducted through September 14, 2016. Observational studies and clinical trials conducted in high-income countries were included. The Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach was used to evaluate the overall quality of evidence for each outcome.Results603 papers were identified of which 6 were included (3 randomized controlled trials and 3 observational studies. Pooling of patient data was not possible due to significantly different interventions or exposures. Single studies results demonstrated that within 24 h, administration of isotonic saline was not associated with a significant decline in serum sodium while hypotonic solutions (0.2–0.45% saline were associated, in one study, with mean serum sodium declines from 1.3 mEq/L (139.2, SD 2.9–137.9, SD 2.5 in 133 young infants (aged 1–28 months, to 5.7 (SD 3.1 mEq/L in a subgroup of 18 older children (age mean 5.8, SD 2.7 years. Both isotonic and hypotonic saline were shown to be associated with improvement of baseline hyponatremia in different studies. Baseline hypernatremia was corrected within 4–24 h in 81/83 (99.6% children using hypotonic saline IVR.ConclusionThere is a paucity of publications assessing the risk for acquired dysnatremias associated with IVR in children with AGE. Current high-quality evidence

  15. Epidemiology and genetic diversity of rotavirus strains in children with acute gastroenteritis in Lahore, Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Masroor Alam

    Full Text Available Pakistan harbors high disease burden of gastro-enteric infections with majority of these caused by rotavirus. Unfortunately, lack of proper surveillance programs and laboratory facilities have resulted in scarcity of available data on rotavirus associated disease burden and epidemiological information in the country. We investigated 1306 stool samples collected over two years (2008-2009 from hospitalized children under 5 years of age for the presence of rotavirus strains and its genotypic diversity in Lahore. The prevalence rate during 2008 and 2009 was found to be 34% (n = 447 out of 1306. No significant difference was found between different age groups positive for rotavirus (p>0.05. A subset of EIA positive samples was further screened for rotavirus RNA through RT-PCR and 44 (49.43% samples, out of total 89 EIA positive samples, were found positive. G and P type prevalence was found as follows: G1P [4] = 3(6.81%; G1P [6] = 9(20.45%; G1P [8] = 1(2.27%; G2P [4] = 21(47.72%; G2P [8] = 1(2.27%; G9P [4] = 1(2.27%; G9P [6] = 1(2.27% and G9P [8] = 7(15.90%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the VP7 and VP4 sequences clustered closely with the previously detected strains in the country as well as Belgian rotaviruses. Antigenic characterization was performed by analyzing major epitopes in the immunodominant VP7 and VP4 gene segments. Although the neutralization conferring motifs were found variable between the Pakistani strains and the two recommended vaccines strains (Rotarix™ and RotaTeq™, we validate the use of rotavirus vaccine in Pakistan based on the proven and recognized vaccine efficacy across the globe. Our findings constitute the first report on rotavirus' genotype diversity, their phylogenetic relatedness and epidemiology during the pre-vaccination era in Lahore, Pakistan and support the immediate introduction of rotavirus vaccine in the routine immunization program of the country.

  16. The diagnostic accuracy of Clinical Dehydration Scale in identifying dehydration in children with acute gastroenteritis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falszewska, Anna; Dziechciarz, Piotr; Szajewska, Hania

    2014-10-01

    To systematically update diagnostic accuracy of the Clinical Dehydration Scale (CDS) in clinical recognition of dehydration in children with acute gastroenteritis. Six databases were searched for diagnostic accuracy studies in which population were children aged 1 to 36 months with acute gastroenteritis; index test was the CDS; and reference test was post-illness weight gain. Three studies involving 360 children were included. Limited evidence showed that in high-income countries the CDS provides strong diagnostic accuracy for ruling in moderate and severe (>6%) dehydration (positive likelihood ratio 5.2-6.6), but has limited value for ruling it out (negative likelihood ratio 0.4-0.55). In low-income countries, the CDS has limited value either for ruling moderate or severe dehydration in or out. In both settings, the CDS had limited value for ruling in or out dehydration dehydration 3% to 6%. The CDS can help assess moderate to severe dehydration in high-income settings. Given the limited data, the evidence should be viewed with caution. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. An Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm, Intramural Thrombus and Moderate Leak in an Asian Man Presenting with Acute Gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla Khalil

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Missing a leaking abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is common in medical practice because few at-risk patients have a history of AAA and many have an unusual presentation. Background: AAA is less common among Asians than white Caucasians of the same age. Our patient had no significant risk factors apart from age and sex and had an unusual presentation. Patient and Methods: A 67-year-old Asian man presented to the emergency room (ER with a 1-day history of nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, fever and abdominal pain. He was febrile, dehydrated. and had marked tenderness at the right iliac fossa. Laboratory findings suggested bacterial gastroenteritis but this did not explain the localized tenderness at the right iliac fossa. Result and Discussion: A CT scan of the abdomen revealed an AAA arising above the origins of the renal arteries, an intramural thrombus, a retroperitoneal haematoma and a leak extending to the right iliac fossa. The patient was transferred to another hospital and underwent exploratory laparotomy, surgical repair of the aneurysm, and aortobi-iliac grafting with removal of the thrombus. The patient was discharged in good shape 3 weeks after surgery. Without the CT scan of the abdomen, the AAA could have been missed and the patient treated for severe gastroenteritis.

  18. Outbreak of febrile gastroenteritis caused by Listeria monocytogenes 1/2a in sliced cold beef ham, Italy, May 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurella, Cristiana; Gallina, Silvia; Ru, Giuseppe; Adriano, Daniela; Bellio, Alberto; Bianchi, Daniela Manila; Chiavacci, Laura; Crescio, Maria Ines; Croce, Margherita; D'Errico, Valeria; Dupont, Maria Franca; Marra, Alessandro; Natangelo, Ubaldo; Pomilio, Francesco; Romano, Angelo; Stanzione, Stefano; Zaccaria, Teresa; Zuccon, Fabio; Caramelli, Maria; Decastelli, Lucia

    2018-01-01

    In May 2016, two separate clusters of febrile gastroenteritis caused by Listeria monocytogenes were detected by the local health authority in Piedmont, in northern Italy. We carried out epidemiological, microbiological and traceback investigations to identify the source. The people affected were students and staff members from two different schools in two different villages located in the Province of Turin; five of them were hospitalised. The epidemiological investigation identified a cooked beef ham served at the school canteens as the source of the food-borne outbreak. L. monocytogenes was isolated from the food, the stools of the hospitalised pupils and the environment of the factory producing the cooked beef ham. All isolates except one were serotype 1/2a, shared an indistinguishable PFGE pattern and were 100% identical by whole genome sequencing (WGS). By combining a classical epidemiological approach with both molecular subtyping and WGS techniques, we were able to identify and confirm a Listeria gastroenteritis outbreak associated with consumption of sliced cold beef ham. PMID:29536831

  19. Severity of infection and seasonal variation of non-typhoid Salmonelle occurence in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradel, K.O.; Dethlefsen, Claus; Schønheyder, H.C.

    2007-01-01

    Non-typhoid Salmonella infections may present as severe gastroenteritis necessitatinghospitalization and some patients become septic with bacteraemia. We hypothesized that theseasonal variation of non-typhoid Salmonella occurrence in humans diminishes with increasedseverity of infection. We...... examined the seasonal variation of non-typhoid Salmonella infections inthree patient groups with differing severity of infection: outpatients treated for gastroenteritis(n=1490); in-patients treated for gastroenteritis (n=492); and in-patients treated for bacteraemia(n=113). The study was population......-based and included all non-typhoid Salmonella patients ina Danish county from 1994 to 2003. A periodic regression model was used to compute thepeak-to-trough ratio for the three patient groups. The peak-to-trough ratios were 4·3 [95%confidence interval (CI) 3·6–5.0] for outpatients with gastroenteritis, 3·2 (95% CI...

  20. Incidence of Norovirus and Other Viral Pathogens That Cause Acute Gastroenteritis (AGE among Kaiser Permanente Member Populations in the United States, 2012-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P Grytdal

    Full Text Available Noroviruses and other viral pathogens are increasingly recognized as frequent causes of acute gastroenteritis (AGE. However, few laboratory-based data are available on the incidence of AGE caused by viral pathogens in the U.S. This study examined stool specimens submitted for routine clinical diagnostics from patients enrolled in Kaiser Permanente (KP health plans in metro Portland, OR, and the Maryland, District of Columbia, and northern Virginia geographic areas to estimate the incidence of viral enteropathogens in these populations. Over a one-year study period, participating laboratories randomly selected stools submitted for routine clinical diagnostics for inclusion in the study along with accompanying demographic and clinical data. Selected stools were tested for norovirus, rotavirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus using standardized real-time RT-PCR protocols. Each KP site provided administrative data which were used in conjunction with previously published data on healthcare utilization to extrapolate pathogen detection rates into population-based incidence rates. A total of 1,099 specimens collected during August 2012 to September 2013 were included. Mean age of patients providing stool specimens was 46 years (range: 0-98 years. Noroviruses were the most common viral pathogen identified among patients with AGE (n = 63 specimens, 6% of specimens tested. In addition, 22 (2% of specimens were positive for rotavirus; 19 (2% were positive for sapovirus; and 7 (1% were positive for astrovirus. Incidence of norovirus-associated outpatient visits was 5.6 per 1,000 person-years; incidence of norovirus disease in the community was estimated to be 69.5 per 1,000 person-years. Norovirus incidence was highest among children 65 years (outpatient incidence = 7.8 per 1,000 person-years; community incidence = 75.8 per 1,000 person-years. Outpatient incidence rates of rotavirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus were 2.0, 1.6, 0.6 per 1,000 person

  1. Zika virus from a Southeast Asian perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nitwara Wikan; Duncan R. Smith

    2017-01-01

    Phylogenic evidence suggests that the strain of Zika virus causing an unprecedented outbreak of disease in the Americas had its origin in Southeast Asia, where reports of isolated cases of Zika virus infection have occurred since 2010. Why there has been no large outbreak of Zika infection in Southeast Asia remains unclear and whether such an outbreak will occur in the future is a question of significant concern. This review looks at Zika virus from a Southeast Asian perspective and highlights some of the possible scenarios with regards to Zika virus in this part of the world as well as highlighting some of the research questions that need to be urgently addressed.

  2. Impacto de la introducción de la vacuna contra el rotavirus en la hospitalización por gastroenteritis aguda grave en el Hospital del Niño de la Ciudad de Panamá Impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on hospital admissions for severe acute gastroenteritis at the Children's Hospital in Panama City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Nieto Guevara

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Determinar si la introducción de la vacunación infantil contra el rotavirus en Panamá permitió reducir la tasa de hospitalización por gastroenteritis en niños menores de 5 años. MÉTODOS: Estudio observacional de corte transversal en dos períodos: del 1 de enero al 31 de agosto de 2005 (antes de la introducción de la vacunación contra el rotavirus y del 1 de enero al 31 de agosto de 2007 (un año después de la introducción. Se estudiaron todos los niños y niñas entre 2 meses y 5 años de edad hospitalizados con diagnóstico de gastroenteritis aguda grave en la sala de corta estancia de gastroenteritis del Hospital del Niño, en Ciudad de Panamá, Panamá. Las variables fueron: número de episodios de gastroenteritis, número de casos hospitalizados por gastroenteritis aguda grave, días de hospitalización y uso de antibióticos, según dos grupos de edad (de 2 meses a 1 año y de más de 1 año a 5 años. Se calculó el riesgo relativo (RR con intervalos de confianza de 95% (IC95% y un nivel de significación P OBJECTIVES: To determine if infant rotavirus vaccination in Panama has reduced the rate of hospital admission for gastroenteritis among children under 5 years of age. METHODS: An observational, cross-sectional study of two time periods: 1 January-31 August 2005 (prior to initiating rotavirus vaccination and 1 January-31 August 2007 (one year after introducing rotavirus vaccination. All the children from 2 months-5 years of age admitted with a diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis to the short-stay gastroenteritis area of the Children's Hospital in Panama City, Panama, were studied. The variables were: number of gastroenteritis episodes; number of cases admitted for severe acute gastroenteritis; number of days hospitalized; and antibiotics treatment for each of the two age groups (2 months-1 year and >1-5 years. The relative risk (RR was calculated with a 95% confidence interval (95%CI and a significance level of P

  3. Transmissible Gastroenteritis Coronavirus Genome Packaging Signal Is Located at the 5′ End of the Genome and Promotes Viral RNA Incorporation into Virions in a Replication-Independent Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Lucia; Mateos-Gomez, Pedro A.; Capiscol, Carmen; del Palacio, Lorena; Sola, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Preferential RNA packaging in coronaviruses involves the recognition of viral genomic RNA, a crucial process for viral particle morphogenesis mediated by RNA-specific sequences, known as packaging signals. An essential packaging signal component of transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) has been further delimited to the first 598 nucleotides (nt) from the 5′ end of its RNA genome, by using recombinant viruses transcribing subgenomic mRNA that included potential packaging signals. The integrity of the entire sequence domain was necessary because deletion of any of the five structural motifs defined within this region abrogated specific packaging of this viral RNA. One of these RNA motifs was the stem-loop SL5, a highly conserved motif in coronaviruses located at nucleotide positions 106 to 136. Partial deletion or point mutations within this motif also abrogated packaging. Using TGEV-derived defective minigenomes replicated in trans by a helper virus, we have shown that TGEV RNA packaging is a replication-independent process. Furthermore, the last 494 nt of the genomic 3′ end were not essential for packaging, although this region increased packaging efficiency. TGEV RNA sequences identified as necessary for viral genome packaging were not sufficient to direct packaging of a heterologous sequence derived from the green fluorescent protein gene. These results indicated that TGEV genome packaging is a complex process involving many factors in addition to the identified RNA packaging signal. The identification of well-defined RNA motifs within the TGEV RNA genome that are essential for packaging will be useful for designing packaging-deficient biosafe coronavirus-derived vectors and providing new targets for antiviral therapies. PMID:23966403

  4. Phytophthora viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guohong; Hillman, Bradley I

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora sp. is a genus in the oomycetes, which are similar to filamentous fungi in morphology and habitat, but phylogenetically more closely related to brown algae and diatoms and fall in the kingdom Stramenopila. In the past few years, several viruses have been characterized in Phytophthora species, including four viruses from Phytophthora infestans, the late blight pathogen, and an endornavirus from an unnamed Phytophthora species from Douglas fir. Studies on Phytophthora viruses have revealed several interesting systems. Phytophthora infestans RNA virus 1 (PiRV-1) and PiRV-2 are likely the first members of two new virus families; studies on PiRV-3 support the establishment of a new virus genus that is not affiliated with established virus families; PiRV-4 is a member of Narnaviridae, most likely in the genus Narnavirus; and Phytophthora endornavirus 1 (PEV1) was the first nonplant endornavirus at the time of reporting. Viral capsids have not been found in any of the above-mentioned viruses. PiRV-1 demonstrated a unique genome organization that requires further examination, and PiRV-2 may have played a role in late blight resurgence in 1980s-1990s. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Schmallenberg Virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    explore the potential of this infection crossing the species barrier and thereby .... The virus targets mainly the brain of the unborn animal resulting in neurological ... The virus is located in the blood of the adult infected animal or in the central ...

  6. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Zika Virus Credit: NIAID A female Aedes mosquito. This type of mosquito can transmit Zika, ... transmitted to humans through the bite of infected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Zika virus can be transmitted from an infected pregnant woman ...

  7. CHANDIPURA VIRUS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. CHANDIPURA VIRUS. First isolated from a village called Chandipura near Nagpur in 1965 in India. Belongs to rhabdoviridae family. Used as a Model System to study RNA virus multiplication in the infected cell at molecular level. Notes:

  8. Positive /sup 67/Ga-citrate scintigraphy: Vertebral, satellite lymph node and gallbladder foci in a case of gastroenteritis with salmonella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popa, N; Lens, E; Dubois, J L; Blase, F

    1982-03-01

    We report a case of salmonella gastroenteritis with recurrent fever and sepsis, slight transient lumbar pain and positive /sup 67/Ga-citrate scintigraphy. The /sup 67/Ga scan made a major contribution to the positive diagnosis of a subclinical spondylodiscite and to the correct treatment leading to the disappearance of the infectious foci.

  9. Guidelines on acute gastroenteritis in children : a critical appraisal of their quality and applicability in primary care Epidemiology and research methodology in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Jose; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Reasons for poor guideline adherence in acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in children in high-income countries are unclear, but may be due to inconsistency between guideline recommendations, lack of evidence, and lack of generalizability of the recommendations to general practice. The aim of

  10. Implantation of modified Y-shaped self-expandable stent for the treatment of stenosis of gastroenteric stoma: preliminary results in five cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Gang; Si Jiangtao; Han Xinwei; Jiao Dechao; Ding Pengxu; Fu Mingti; Li Zhen; Ma Ji

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility and therapeutic effect of stenting therapy by using modified Y-shaped self-expandable metal stent for the stenosis of gastroenteric stoma. Methods: According to the particular anatomic structures and the pathological features of the narrowed gastroenteric stoma,the authors designed a modified Y-shaped self-expandable metal stent. Under the fluoroscopic guidance, implantation of modified Y-shaped self-expandable metal stent was performed in 5 patients with narrowed gastroenteric stoma. The technical safety and the clinical results were evaluated. Results: The modified Y-shaped self-expandable metal stent was successfully implanted with one procedure in all five patients. After the implantation the symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension were promptly relieved, and the patients' living quality was markedly improved. Conclusion: The stenting therapy with modified Y-shaped self-expandable metal stent can rapidly relieve the stenosis of gastroenteric stoma once for all. The technique is feasible and the short-term effect is reliable, therefore, it is worth popularizing this therapy in clinical practice. (authors)

  11. Biennial pattern of rotavirus gastroenteritis in the Netherlands and a shifting age distribution following a low rotavirus season, 2010-2016.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberk, J.D.M.; Pijnacker, R.; Bruijning-Verhagen, P.; Franz, E.; Vennema, H.; Hooiveld, M.; Hahné, S.J.M.; Melker, H.E. de

    2017-01-01

    A hyper-endemic rotavirus season was expected after a low-endemic 2014 season in the Netherlands. Rotavirus detections were however similar in 2015 and lower in 2016 compared with 2010-2013. Gastroenteritis consultations rates were also similar in 2015, but the age-distribution shifted to older

  12. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella and Shigella spp. among children with gastroenteritis in an Iranian referral hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Shima; Pourakbari, Babak; Moradzadeh, Mina; Eshaghi, Hamid; Ramezani, Amitis; Haghi Ashtiani, Mohammad Taghi; Keshavarz Valian, Sepideh; Mamishi, Setareh

    2017-08-01

    Gastroenteritis is one of the leading cause of illnesses through the world, especially in developing countries.Salmonella and Shigella infections are considered as the main public health problems in children. The aim of this study was to detect the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella and Shigella spp. among children with gastroenteritis in an Iranian referral hospital. During April 2013 to April 2014, all medical records of children with gastroenteritis admitted to a pediatric medical center were evaluated. Positive stool cultures of children were evaluated and frequency of Salmonella and Shigella spp. and their antimicrobial susceptibility were detected. In this study, 676 patients with the mean age of 24.94 months were enrolled. Eighty-eight (42%) Salmonella spp., 85 (40%) Shigella spp., 33 (16%) E. coli and 5(2%) candida albicans were isolated from 211 positive stool cultures. Among 85 Shigella spp. isolates, S. sonnei, S. flexneri and other Shigella spp. were isolated from 39 (46%) isolates, 36(42%) and 10(12%), respectively. Among 88 isolated Salmonella spp., 36 (41%) isolates were Salmonella Serogroup D, 26 (30%) were Salmonella Serogroup B, 20 (23%) isolates were Salmonella Serogroup C and 6 (7%) were other Salmonella spp. isolates. Thirty-eight percent of Salmonella serogroup B were resistant to nalidixic acid, while higher frequency of nalidixic acid resistant was found in Salmonella serogroup C and Salmonella serogroup D. The higher frequency of ampicillin resistant was found in Shigella spp. than Salmonella spp. High frequency of cefotaxime resistant was seen in S. sonei and S. flexneri (77% and 56%, respectively), whereas more than 90% of Salmonella serogroup B, C and D were susceptible to this antibiotic. In conclusion, Shigella and Salmonella serogroups can be considered as important etiological agents of acute diarrhea in children. Since the prevalence of antibiotic resistance is increasing in recent years in Iran, further

  13. Genomic analysis reveals Nairobi sheep disease virus to be highly diverse and present in both Africa, and in India in the form of the Ganjam virus variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Pragya D; Vincent, Martin J; Khristova, Marina; Kale, Charuta; Nichol, Stuart T; Mishra, Akhilesh C; Mourya, Devendra T

    2011-07-01

    Nairobi sheep disease (NSD) virus, the prototype tick-borne virus of the genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae is associated with acute hemorrhagic gastroenteritis in sheep and goats in East and Central Africa. The closely related Ganjam virus found in India is associated with febrile illness in humans and disease in livestock. The complete S, M and L segment sequences of Ganjam and NSD virus and partial sequence analysis of Ganjam viral RNA genome S, M and L segments encoding regions (396 bp, 701 bp and 425 bp) of the viral nucleocapsid (N), glycoprotein precursor (GPC) and L polymerase (L) proteins, respectively, was carried out for multiple Ganjam virus isolates obtained from 1954 to 2002 and from various regions of India. M segments of NSD and Ganjam virus encode a large ORF for the glycoprotein precursor (GPC), (1627 and 1624 amino acids in length, respectively) and their L segments encode a very large L polymerase (3991 amino acids). The complete S, M and L segments of NSD and Ganjam viruses were more closely related to one another than to other characterized nairoviruses, and no evidence of reassortment was found. However, the NSD and Ganjam virus complete M segment differed by 22.90% and 14.70%, for nucleotide and amino acid respectively, and the complete L segment nucleotide and protein differing by 9.90% and 2.70%, respectively among themselves. Ganjam and NSD virus, complete S segment differed by 9.40-10.40% and 3.2-4.10 for nucleotide and proteins while among Ganjam viruses 0.0-6.20% and 0.0-1.4%, variation was found for nucleotide and amino acids. Ganjam virus isolates differed by up to 17% and 11% at the nucleotide level for the partial S and L gene fragments, respectively, with less variation observed at the deduced amino acid level (10.5 and 2%, S and L, respectively). However, the virus partial M gene fragment (which encodes the hypervariable mucin-like domain) of these viruses differed by as much as 56% at the nucleotide level. Phylogenetic

  14. [Naturally occurring oseltamivir resistance in influenza A.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Laura; Nielsen, Alex; Lundgren, Jens

    2010-01-01

    in the development of resistance. The best prevention strategy remains vaccination of the general population to avoid immunity. Future antiviral treatment calls for knowledge about resistance to existing types of influenza and the availability of all three types of antiviral medication. Udgivelsesdato: 2010-Aug......During the last two influenza seasons, one of the predominant influenza A types (H1N1) has developed complete resistance to oseltamivir, the primary treatment option. The virus does, however, remain sensitive to zanamavir and amantadine. There is no unequivocal explanation for this slide...

  15. [Naturally occurring oseltamivir resistance in influenza A.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Laura; Nielsen, Alex; Lundgren, Jens

    2010-01-01

    During the last two influenza seasons, one of the predominant influenza A types (H1N1) has developed complete resistance to oseltamivir, the primary treatment option. The virus does, however, remain sensitive to zanamavir and amantadine. There is no unequivocal explanation for this slide...... in the development of resistance. The best prevention strategy remains vaccination of the general population to avoid immunity. Future antiviral treatment calls for knowledge about resistance to existing types of influenza and the availability of all three types of antiviral medication. Udgivelsesdato: 2010-Aug...

  16. Herramientas para afrontar las situaciones de crisis en un brote de gastroenteritis aguda en un colegio público Practical lessons from the risk management of an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in a public school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Áurea Morillo-García

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo describimos las reflexiones y conclusiones extraídas del análisis de un brote de gastroenteritis en un centro escolar, que ocasionó una crisis de salud pública. El análisis realizado tuvo como base la metodología de las matrices de "debilidades, amenazas, fortalezas y oportunidades" (DAFO. Se describe la epidemiología de los sucesos y decisiones tomadas, basadas en aspectos operativos durante una situación de crisis. Incluye la experiencia del equipo responsable del brote, las relaciones con otras entidades y la gestión de la información. Las dificultades encontradas por el equipo coordinador consistieron en el retraso de la declaración, la falta de formación de algunas entidades implicadas y el mal uso de los circuitos establecidos. Es necesario un entrenamiento específico en los actuales protocolos de manejo de crisis y fomentar la mejora continua de los circuitos de coordinación mediante la autoevaluación y actualización de conocimientos y recursos.We present our reflections on the management of an acute gastroenteritis outbreak in a public school, which caused a public health crisis, and the conclusions drawn from this experience. The methodology of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT analysis was used. This article describes the epidemiology of the incident and the policy decisions made, but focuses on operational aspects of outbreak management. The experience of the outbreak control team, liaison with other organizations, and data management are discussed. The difficulties encountered by the outbreak team related to delay in declaring in the outbreak, lack of training in some of the entities involved, and incorrect use of the surveillance circuits. Current protocols and specific action plans for the management of outbreaks should be improved through self-evaluation and updating of resources and knowledge.

  17. Variations in status of preparation of personal protective equipment for preventing norovirus gastroenteritis in long-term care facilities for the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiki, Saori; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Nakayama, Takeo

    2017-12-01

    Residents of long-term care facilities are highly susceptible to norovirus gastroenteritis, and each facility is concerned about the need to implement norovirus infection control. Among control measures, personal protective equipment (PPE), such as disposable gloves and masks, plays a major role in reducing infectious spread. However, the preparation status of PPE in facilities before infection outbreaks has not been reported. The aim was to clarify the implementation status of preventive measures for norovirus gastroenteritis and the cost of preparing the necessary PPE in long-term care facilities. A questionnaire survey of facilities affiliated with the Kyoto Prefecture and Osaka Prefecture branches of the Japan Association of Geriatric Health Services Facilities was conducted. The survey items were the characteristics of the facility, whether preventive measures had been implemented for norovirus gastroenteritis from October through the following March in both 2009 and 2010, and the quantities and unit prices of PPE prepared for preventive measures. Twenty-six (11.2%) of 232 surveyed facilities (as of August 2011) answered the survey. Among them, 24 (92.3%) in 2009 and 25 (96.2%) in 2010 reported having implemented preventive measures for norovirus gastroenteritis, while 21 facilities (80.8%) in 2009 and 22 facilities (84.6%) in 2010 had prepared PPE. The median total cost for preparing the PPE needed for the preventive measures was US $2601 (range US $221-9192) in 2009 and US $3904 (range US $305-6427) in 2010. Although the results need careful interpretation because of the low response rate, most of the surveyed long-term care facilities had implemented preventive measures for norovirus gastroenteritis. However, the cost of preparing the PPE needed for the preventive measures varied among the facilities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Type C virus activation in nontransformed mouse cells by uv-irradiated herpes simplex virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampar, B.; Hatanaka, M.; Aulakh, G.; Derge, J.G.; Lee, L.; Showalter, S.

    1977-01-01

    Infection of nontransformed mouse cells with uv-irradiated herpes simplex virus (uv-HSV) resulted in the activation of an endogenous xenotropic (x-tropic) type C virus. Synthesis of type C virus persisted for only a few days, with most of the virus remaining cell associated. The levels of type C virus activated by uv-HSV varied depending on the multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) and the uv dose. At low uv doses, where cell killing occurred, little or no type C virus synthesis was observed. Maximum levels of type C virus synthesis were observed with the minimum uv dose which eliminated cell killing by HSV. Synthesis of type C virus, albeit at lower levels, was still observed at uv doses beyond those required to prevent cell killing

  19. Type C virus activation in nontransformed mouse cells by uv-irradiated herpes simplex virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampar, B. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD); Hatanaka, M.; Aulakh, G.; Derge, J.G.; Lee, L.; Showalter, S.

    1977-02-01

    Infection of nontransformed mouse cells with uv-irradiated herpes simplex virus (uv-HSV) resulted in the activation of an endogenous xenotropic (x-tropic) type C virus. Synthesis of type C virus persisted for only a few days, with most of the virus remaining cell associated. The levels of type C virus activated by uv-HSV varied depending on the multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) and the uv dose. At low uv doses, where cell killing occurred, little or no type C virus synthesis was observed. Maximum levels of type C virus synthesis were observed with the minimum uv dose which eliminated cell killing by HSV. Synthesis of type C virus, albeit at lower levels, was still observed at uv doses beyond those required to prevent cell killing.

  20. New frontiers in oncolytic viruses: optimizing and selecting for virus strains with improved efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundstrom K

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth Lundstrom PanTherapeutics, Lutry, Switzerland Abstract: Oncolytic viruses have demonstrated selective replication and killing of tumor cells. Different types of oncolytic viruses – adenoviruses, alphaviruses, herpes simplex viruses, Newcastle disease viruses, rhabdoviruses, Coxsackie viruses, and vaccinia viruses – have been applied as either naturally occurring or engineered vectors. Numerous studies in animal-tumor models have demonstrated substantial tumor regression and prolonged survival rates. Moreover, clinical trials have confirmed good safety profiles and therapeutic efficacy for oncolytic viruses. Most encouragingly, the first cancer gene-therapy drug – Gendicine, based on oncolytic adenovirus type 5 – was approved in China. Likewise, a second-generation oncolytic herpes simplex virus-based drug for the treatment of melanoma has been registered in the US and Europe as talimogene laherparepvec. Keywords: immunotherapy, viral vectors, clinical trials, drug approval

  1. Lichen striatus occurring after a tetanus vaccine: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül Yalçınkaya İyidal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lichen striatus (LS is an uncommon, acquired, self-limiting, linear inflammatory dermatosis. The eruption typically presents as pink or tan papules along Blaschko’s lines. It usually occurs in children, rarely affects adults. The rashes usually suddenly emerge in a single extremity and may regress within a few months or years. The incidence is slightly higher among women. The etiology of LS is not exactly known, however, it is thought to be a T cell-mediated autoimmune reaction. Trauma, infection, pregnancy, drugs, vaccination, and atopy have been reported as triggering factors. In the literature, four cases of LS developing after vaccination (3 children and 1 adult have been reported. It was the only reported adult case of LS developing after hepatitis B virus vaccination. Herein, we present a 36-year-old woman with LS which was thought to be triggered by a tetanus vaccine.

  2. Anaphylactoid Purpura Manifested after Acute Gastroenteritis with Severe Dehydration in an 8-Year-Old Male Child: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Umang G; Vanikar, Aruna V; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2015-12-01

    Anaphylactoid purpura, also known as Henoch-Schönleinpurpura (HSP), is an IgA-mediated vasculitis that tends to be a benign disease of childhood. Up to 50% of cases are preceded by an upper tract respiratory infection caused by group-A beta-hemolytic streptococcus and present with the common tetrad of abdominal pain, arthritis, purpuric rash, and renal involvement. The majority of patients recover completely. Here we document a rare case of anaphylactoid purpura which manifested with skin lesions in the form of palpable purpura following about of acute gastroenteritis with severe dehydration; it was treated with a short regimen of steroid therapy, which resulted in the complete remission of the disease. We conclude that prompt diagnosis and multidisciplinary intervention will lead to appropriate management-consisting of the installation of early short-course steroid therapy and thus, prevent further complications and the recurrence of the disease.

  3. Introduction of an Oral Fluid Challenge Protocol in the Management of Children with Acute Gastroenteritis: A Regional Hospital Experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Umana, E

    2018-06-01

    Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) remains the ideal first line therapy for acute gastroenteritis (AGE). Our aim was to assess the impact of introducing an Oral Fluid Challenge (OFC) protocol on outcomes such as intravenous fluid use and documentation in our institution. A single centre study with data collected retrospectively pre-implementation (April 2015) of the OFC protocol and post implementation (April 2016). Consecutive sampling of the first 55 patients presenting with GE like symptoms and underwent OFC were recruited. One hundred and ten patients were included in this study with 55 patients per cycle. The rates of IVF use decreased from 22% (12) in cycle one to 18% (10) in cycle two. There was an improvement in documentation by 26% (14) for level of dehydration and 52% (31) for OFC volume from cycle one to two. Overall, the addition of the OFC protocol to the management of patients with uncomplicated AGE would help streamline and improve care.

  4. Implicaciones en la salud humana de la gastroenteritis aguda por norovirus como producto de la contaminación hídrica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Delgadillo Espinoza

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available En julio del 2010, un brote de gastroenteritis Aguda surgió entre los residentes de la ciudad principal de la Región Norte de Costa Rica: Ciudad Quesada. Esta investigación se llevó a cabo para explorar y caracterizar el brote en esa zona rural. Los datos de vigilancia y los registros médicos de los pacientes fueron analizados para elaborar un estudio descriptivo entre el 08 de julio y 14 de julio del 2010 en el Cantón de San Carlos. Una hoja de datos (Ficha Colectiva de Investigación VE 0.2 fue aplicada para obtener información de los pacientes. Con el fin de detectar la presencia de enteropatógenos, una prueba de ELISA fue aplicada a las muestras de heces tomadas. Las muestras de agua también se analizaron para detectar bacterias y coliformes fecales en el sistema de distribución. Un total de 352 casos fueron confirmados en la región estudiada con la presencia de síntomas frecuentes entre los casos confirmados; estos síntomas fueron diarrea (94,2%, náuseas (92,7% y vómitos (91,7%. La edad media de los pacientes fue de 29 años (15,8 y el 50,8% correspondió a sujetos del sexo femenino. El grupo de edad más afectado es el representado por los lactantes de 1 a 4 años (tasa de ataque 18,2 / 1000 habitantes La zona con más afectación fue el área central de Ciudad Quesada. En cinco de cada seis pruebas de heces fue posible aislar el norovirus. Por otra parte, en las pruebas aplicadas al agua solo se identifica la presencia de Escherichia coli. Los resultados sugieren que el norovirus fue transmitido por agua contaminada con materia fecal. Este es el primer brote documentado que ha sido causado por este virus en la región norte del país. Se recomienda mejorar la vigilancia de la calidad del agua, promover el uso de agua potable entre los residentes, generar un plan de educación que fomente prácticas seguras de manejo y distribución de agua; así como campañas de sensibilización en comunidades rurales como ésta en temas

  5. Year-round prevalence of norovirus in the environment of catering companies without a recently reported outbreak of gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxman, Ingeborg L A; Verhoef, Linda; Dijkman, Remco; Hägele, Geke; Te Loeke, Nathalie A J M; Koopmans, Marion

    2011-05-01

    Food handlers play an important role in the transmission of norovirus (NoV) in food-borne outbreaks of gastroenteritis (GE). In a year-round prevalence study, the prevalence of NoV in catering companies without recently reported outbreaks of GE was investigated and compared to the observed prevalence in catering companies with recently reported outbreaks. Swab samples were collected from surfaces in the kitchens and (staff) bathrooms in 832 randomly chosen companies and analyzed for the presence of NoV RNA. In total, 42 (1.7%) out of 2,496 environmental swabs from 35 (4.2%) catering companies tested positive. In contrast, NoV was detected in 147 (39.7%) of the 370 samples for 44 (61.1%) of the 72 establishments associated with outbreaks of gastroenteritis. NoV-positive swabs were more frequently found in winter, in specific types of companies (elderly homes and lunchrooms), and in establishments with separate bathrooms for staff. We found a borderline association with population density but no relation to the number of employees. Sequence analysis showed that environmental strains were interspersed with strains found in outbreaks of illness in humans. Thus, the presence of NoV in catering companies seemed to mirror the presence in the population but was strongly increased when associated with food-borne GE. Swabs may therefore serve as a valuable tool in outbreak investigations for the identification of the causative agent, although results should be interpreted with care, taking into account all other epidemiological data.

  6. Implementation of clinical decision support in young children with acute gastroenteritis: a randomized controlled trial at the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Dorien; de Vos-Kerkhof, Evelien; Polinder, Suzanne; Steyerberg, Ewout; van der Lei, Johan; Moll, Henriëtte; Oostenbrink, Rianne

    2017-02-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is one of the most frequent reasons for young children to visit emergency departments (EDs). We aimed to evaluate (1) feasibility of a nurse-guided clinical decision support system for rehydration treatment in children with AGE and (2) the impact on diagnostics, treatment, and costs compared with usual care by attending physician. A randomized controlled trial was performed in 222 children, aged 1 month to 5 years at the ED of the Erasmus MC-Sophia Children's hospital in The Netherlands ( 2010-2012). Outcome included (1) feasibility, measured by compliance of the nurses, and (2) length of stay (LOS) at the ED, the number of diagnostic tests, treatment, follow-up, and costs. Due to failure of post-ED weight measurement, we could not evaluate weight difference as measure for dehydration. Patient characteristics were comparable between the intervention (N = 113) and the usual care group (N = 109). Implementation of the clinical decision support system proved a high compliance rate. The standardized use of oral ORS (oral rehydration solution) significantly increased from 52 to 65%(RR2.2, 95%CI 1.09-4.31 p children with AGE showed high compliance and increase standardized use of ORS, without differences in other outcome measures. What is Known: • Acute gastroenteritis is one of the most frequently encountered problems in pediatric emergency departments. • Guidelines advocate standardized oral treatment in children with mild to moderate dehydration, but appear to be applied infrequently in clinical practice. What is New: • Implementation of a nurse-guided clinical decision support system on treatment of AGE in young children showed good feasibility, resulting in a more standardized ORS use in children with mild to moderate dehydration, compared to usual care. • Given the challenges to perform research in emergency care setting, the ED should be experienced and adequately equipped, especially during peak times.

  7. Economic costs of outbreaks of acute viral gastroenteritis due to norovirus in Catalonia (Spain), 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Encarna; Torner, Nuria; Broner, Sonia; Godoy, Pere; Martínez, Ana; Bartolomé, Rosa; Domínguez, Angela

    2015-10-01

    To determine the direct and indirect costs of outbreaks of acute viral gastroenteritis (AVG) due to norovirus in closed institutions (hospitals, social health centers or nursing homes) and the community in Catalonia in 2010-11. Information on outbreaks were gathered from the reports made by epidemiological surveillance units. Direct costs (medical visits, hospital stays, drug treatment, sample processing, transport, diagnostic tests, monitoring and control of the outbreaks investigated) and indirect costs (lost productivity due to work absenteeism, caregivers time and working hours lost due to medical visits) were calculated. Twenty-seven outbreaks affecting 816 people in closed institutions and 74 outbreaks affecting 1,940 people in the community were detected. The direct and indirect costs of outbreaks were € 131,997.36 (€ 4,888.79 per outbreak) in closed institutions and € 260,557.16 (€ 3,521.04 per outbreak) in community outbreaks. The cost per case was € 161.76 in outbreaks in closed institutions and € 134.31 in community outbreaks. The main costs were surveillance unit monitoring (€ 116,652.93), laboratory diagnoses (€ 119,950.95), transport of samples (€ 69,970.90), medical visits (€ 25,250.50) and hospitalization (€ 13,400.00). The cost of outbreaks of acute viral gastroenteritis due to norovirus obtained in this study was influenced by the number of people affected and the severity of the outbreak, which determined hospitalizations and work absenteeism. Urgent reporting of outbreaks would allow the implementation of control measures that could reduce the numbers affected and the duration of the illness and thus the costs derived from them.

  8. Cryptosporidium spp. and rotavirus gastroenteritis and change of incidence after rotavirus vaccination among children in Raparin Pediatrics Hospital, Erbil, Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally S. Azeez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Watery diarrhea is the most common medical problem among infants and young children, caused by different microbial etiology including Cryptosporidium spp. and rotavirus, which are usually misdiagnosed in conventional stool test. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of Cryptosporidium and rotavirus gastroenteritis among children in Erbil as well as evaluate the efficacy of rotavirus vaccination procedure applied in Erbil.Methods: Fecal specimens were collected from 400 children (boys and girls, aged one month to five years old, who attended Raparin Pediatrics Hospital in Erbil complaining from diarrhea, between January to August 2014. Modified Ziehl Neelsen technique and nested PCR were used for detection of cryptosporidiosis while rotavirus infection was detected by rapid CerTest.Results: Rate of detection of cryptosporidiosis was remarkably higher using PCR than Ziehl-Neelsen stain (0% versus 6%, and the infection was slightly higher among boys (6.25% vs 5.55% and children ≤2 years (11.7%. The peak of infection reached during spring season (March and April (9.5%. The detection rate of rotavirus was 32.0%, which was slightly higher among males (34.4% vs 30.0% and in children between one to three years old (39.3%. The highest detection rate (38.6% was recorded during winter season (January and February. The infection was significantly higher among non-vaccinated children (65.9% vs 14.1%; p<0.05.Conclusion: The incidence of cryptosporidiosis is declining. However, rotavirus gastroenteritis was relatively high among young children in Erbil. Rotateq vaccine significantly reduced the incidence of rotavirus infection.

  9. Drill machine guidance using natural occurring radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, H.D.; Schroeder, R.L.; Williams, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    A drilling machine guidance system is described which uses only the naturally occuring radiation within the seam or stratum of interest. The apparatus can be used for guiding horizontal drilling machines through coal seams and the like. (U.K.)

  10. Multiple Primary Cancers: Simultaneously Occurring Prostate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-20

    May 20, 2016 ... occurring prostate cancer and other primary tumors-our experience and literature ..... thyroid cancers, pancreatic tumors, renal cancers, and melanoma. ... Hsing AW, Yeboah E, Biritwum R, Tettey Y, De Marzo AM,. Adjei A, et ...

  11. An immunohistochemical analysis of naturally occurring chancroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, R; Gough, J; Ronald, A; Nasio, J; Ndinya-Achola, J O; Plummer, F; Wilkins, J A

    1996-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is a major cause of genital ulcer disease in many developing countries and is associated with augmented transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, the mechanisms through which H. ducreyi produces ulceration are poorly understood. The characteristics of the host response to H. ducreyi and the pathobiology of its potential contribution to increased HIV susceptibility are not known. Chancroid ulcer biopsies from 8 patients were analyzed histologically and immunohistochemically. All biopsies had perivascular and interstitial mononuclear cell infiltrates that extended deep into the dermis. The infiltrate, which contained macrophages and CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, was consistent with a delayed hypersensitivity type cell-mediated immune response. The recruitment of CD4 T lymphocytes and macrophages may in part explain the facilitation of HIV transmission in patients with chancroid.

  12. Ganjam virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudeep, A B; Jadi, R S; Mishra, A C

    2009-11-01

    Ganjam virus (GANV), a member of genus Nairovirus of family Bunyavirdae is of considerable veterinary importance in India. Though, predominantly tick borne, GANV was also isolated from mosquitoes, man and sheep. Neutralizing and complement fixing antibodies to GANV have been detected in animal and human sera collected from different parts of the country. Thirty three strains of GANV have been isolated from India, mainly from Haemaphysalis ticks. The virus replicated in certain vertebrate and mosquito cell lines and found pathogenic to laboratory animals. One natural infection and five laboratory-acquired infections in men were also reported. GANV is antigenically related to Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV) of Africa, which is highly pathogenic for sheep and goats causing 70-90 per cent mortality among the susceptible population. Recent molecular studies have demonstrated that GANV is an Asian variant of NSDV and both these viruses are related to the dreaded Crimean Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) group viruses. The versatility of the virus to replicate in different arthropod species, its ability to infect sheep, goat and man makes it an important zoonotic agent.

  13. Simultaneous detection of Apple mosaic virus in cultivated hazelnuts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most economically damaging ilarvirus affecting hazelnut on a worldwide scale is the related apple mosaic virus (ApMV). Attempts were made to isolate the virus RNA from hazelnut tissues using different extraction methods. The most suitable extraction method that could detect the virus occurring naturally in hazelnut by ...

  14. Efficacy of human rotavirus vaccine against severe gastroenteritis in Malawian children in the first two years of life: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunliffe, Nigel A; Witte, Desiree; Ngwira, Bagrey M; Todd, Stacy; Bostock, Nancy J; Turner, Ann M; Chimpeni, Philips; Victor, John C; Steele, A Duncan; Bouckenooghe, Alain; Neuzil, Kathleen M

    2012-04-27

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among African infants and young children. A phase III, placebo-controlled, multi-centre clinical trial of a live, oral G1P[8] human rotavirus vaccine (RIX4414) undertaken in Malawi and South Africa significantly reduced the incidence of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in the first year of life. We now report on vaccine efficacy in the Malawi cohort of children who were followed into the second year of life. A total of 1773 healthy infants were enrolled in Blantyre, Malawi into three groups. Two groups received three doses of RIX4414 or placebo at age 6, 10, and 14 weeks and the third group received placebo at 6 weeks and RIX4414 at age 10 and 14 weeks. Subjects were followed by weekly home visits for episodes of gastroenteritis until 1 year of age, and were then re-consented for further follow-up to 18-24 months of age. Severity of gastroenteritis episodes was graded according to the Vesikari scoring system. Seroconversion for anti-rotavirus IgA was determined on a subset of children by using ELISA on pre- and post-vaccine blood samples. Rotavirus VP7 (G) and VP4 (P) genotypes were determined by RT-PCR. A total of 70/1030 (6.8%, 95% CI 5.3-8.5) subjects in the pooled (2 dose plus 3 dose) RIX4414 group compared with 53/483 (11.0%, 8.3-14.1) subjects in the placebo group developed severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in the entire follow-up period (vaccine efficacy 38.1% (9.8-57.3)). The point estimate of efficacy in the second year of life (17.6%; -59.2 to 56.0) was lower than in the first year of life (49.4%; 19.2-68.3). There were non-significant trends towards a higher efficacy in the second year of life among children who received the three-dose schedule compared with the two-dose schedule, and a higher anti-rotavirus IgA seroresponse rate in the three-dose RIX4414 group. Rotavirus strains detected included genotype G12 (31%); G9 (23%); and G8 (18%); only 18% of strains belonged to the G1P[8

  15. Powassan (POW) Virus Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Professionals Related Topics For International Travelers Powassan Virus Disease Basics Download this fact sheet formatted for ... Virus Disease Fact Sheet (PDF) What is Powassan virus? Powassan virus is a tickborne flavivirus that is ...

  16. Development of a method for bacteria and virus recovery from heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, James E; Goyal, Sagar M; Kim, Seung Won; Kuehn, Thomas H; Raynor, Peter C; Ramakrishnan, M A; Anantharaman, Senthilvelan; Tang, Weihua

    2006-10-01

    The aim of the work presented here is to study the effectiveness of building air handling units (AHUs) in serving as high volume sampling devices for airborne bacteria and viruses. An HVAC test facility constructed according to ASHRAE Standard 52.2-1999 was used for the controlled loading of HVAC filter media with aerosolized bacteria and virus. Nonpathogenic Bacillus subtilis var. niger was chosen as a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis. Three animal viruses; transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), avian pneumovirus (APV), and fowlpox virus were chosen as surrogates for three human viruses; SARS coronavirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and smallpox virus; respectively. These bacteria and viruses were nebulized in separate tests and injected into the test duct of the test facility upstream of a MERV 14 filter. SKC Biosamplers upstream and downstream of the test filter served as reference samplers. The collection efficiency of the filter media was calculated to be 96.5 +/- 1.5% for B. subtilis, however no collection efficiency was measured for the viruses as no live virus was ever recovered from the downstream samplers. Filter samples were cut from the test filter and eluted by hand-shaking. An extraction efficiency of 105 +/- 19% was calculated for B. subtilis. The viruses were extracted at much lower efficiencies (0.7-20%). Our results indicate that the airborne concentration of spore-forming bacteria in building AHUs may be determined by analyzing the material collected on HVAC filter media, however culture-based analytical techniques are impractical for virus recovery. Molecular-based identification techniques such as PCR could be used.

  17. Determination of natural occurring radionuclides concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stajic, J.; Markovic, V.; Krstic, D.; Nikezic, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tobacco smoke contains certain concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from radioactive chains of uranium and thorium - 214 Pb, 214 Bi, 228 Ac, 208 Tl, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K. Inhaling of tobacco smoke leads to internal exposure of man. In order to estimate absorbed dose of irradiation it is necessary to determine concentrations of radionuclides present in the tobacco leaves. In this paper specific activities of naturally occurring radionuclides were measured in tobacco samples from cigarettes which are used in Serbia. [sr

  18. Naturally occurring Vpr inhibitors from medicinal plants of Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Nwet Nwet; Ngwe, Hla; Abe, Ikuro; Morita, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) is a lentiviral family member that encodes the retroviral Gag, Pol, and Env proteins, along with six additional accessory proteins, Tat, Rev, Vpu, Vif, Nef, and Vpr. The currently approved anti-HIV drugs target the Pol and Env encoded proteins. However, these drugs are only effective in reducing viral replication. Furthermore, the drugs' toxicities and the emergence of drug-resistant strains have become serious worldwide problems. Resistance eventually arises to all of the approved anti-HIV drugs, including the newly approved drugs that target HIV integrase (IN). Drug resistance likely emerges because of spontaneous mutations that occur during viral replication. Therefore, new drugs that effectively block other viral components must be developed to reduce the rate of resistance and suppress viral replication with little or no long-term toxicity. The accessory proteins may expand treatment options. Viral protein R (Vpr) is one of the promising drug targets among the HIV accessory proteins. However, the search for inhibitors continues in anti-HIV drug discovery. In this review, we summarize the naturally occurring compounds discovered from two Myanmar medicinal plants as well as their structure-activity relationships. A total of 49 secondary metabolites were isolated from Kaempferia pulchra rhizomes and Picrasama javanica bark, and the types of compounds were identified as isopimarane diterpenoids and picrasane quassinoids, respectively. Among the isolates, 7 diterpenoids and 15 quassinoids were found to be Vpr inhibitors lacking detectable toxicity, and their potencies varied according to their respective functionalities.

  19. Concentration of enteric virus indicator from seawater using granular activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Jiemin; Gutierrez, Miguel; Goodridge, Lawrence; Janes, Marlene

    2014-02-01

    Fecal contamination of shellfish growing seawater with enteric viruses is often associated with human outbreaks of gastroenteritis. Male specific bacteriophage MS2 is correlated with those of enteric viruses in a wide range of water environments and has been used widely as a surrogate for pathogenic waterborne viruses. Since viruses in contaminated water are usually at low levels, the development of methods to concentrate viruses from water is crucial for detection purposes. In the present study, granular activated carbon was evaluated for concentration of MS2 from artificial seawater, and different parameters of the seawater were also compared. Recovery of MS2 from warm seawater (37°C) was found to be significantly greater than from cold seawater (4 and 20°C), and even greater than from fresh water (4, 20 and 37°C); the difference between seawater and fresh water became less profound when the temperatures of both were below 37°C. Although not of statistical significance, recovery of MS2 from low salinity seawater (10 and 20 parts per thousand, ppt) was greater than from high salinity seawater (30 and 40ppt). One gram of granular activated carbon was able to extract 6-log plaque forming units (PFU) of MS2 from 500ml seawater at 37°C. This study demonstrated that granular activated carbon can concentrate an enteric virus indicator from shellfish growing seawater effectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Detection of Harmonic Occurring using Kalman Filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar; Shoro, Ghulam Mustafa; Imran, Raja Muhammed

    2014-01-01

    /current characteristic. These harmonics are not to be allowed to grow beyond a certain limit to avoid any grave consequence to the customer’s main supply. Filters can be implemented at the power source or utility location to eliminate these harmonics. In this paper we detect the instance at which these harmonics occur...

  1. Formal synthesis of naturally occurring norephedrine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A concise and simple synthesis of 1-hydroxy-phenethylamine derivatives has been achieved following classical organic transformations using commercially available chiral pools. The said derivatives were explored for the synthesis of naturally occurring bio-active small molecules. Formal synthesis of norephedrine, virolin ...

  2. Percieved functions of naturally occurring autobiographical memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treebak, L. S.; Henriksen, J. R.; Lundhus, S.

    2005-01-01

    The main empirical reference on functions of autobiographical memories is still Hyman & Faries (1992) who used the cue-word-method and retrospective judgements. We used diaries to sample naturally occurring autobiographical memories and participants? perceived use of these. Results partly replicate...

  3. A naturally occurring trap for antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eades, J.; Morita, N.; Ito, T.M.

    1993-05-01

    The phenomenon of delayed annihilation of antiprotons in helium is the first instance of a naturally occurring trap for antimatter in ordinary matter. Recent studies of this effect at CERN are summarized, and plans are described for laser excitation experiments to test its interpretation in terms of metastable exotic helium atom formation. (author)

  4. Jerky periods: myoclonus occurring solely during menses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijink, Arthur W. G.; Gelauff, Jeannette M.; van der Salm, Sandra M. A.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur

    2013-01-01

    In this case report, we describe an unusual case of a patient with myoclonus only occurring during menses. A 41-year-old female, known to have neurological sequelae after a car accident 1 year earlier, presented with myoclonic movements of the right arm and hand only during menses. Brain magnetic

  5. Encephalomyocarditis virus in a captive Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercammen, Francis; Bosseler, Leslie; Tignon, Marylène; Cay, Ann Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    A 5-month-old female captive Malayan tapir ( Tapirus indicus ) died suddenly without preceding symptoms. Gross necropsy revealed numerous white circular and linear foci in the myocard. Differential diagnosis all turned out negative, except for encephalomyocarditis virus. Histopathology revealed mineralisation of myocardial cells and interstitial infiltration of lymphocytes, plasma cells and less neutrophils. Encephalomyocarditis virus was detected by PCR. Although encephalomyocarditis virus occurs in many mammals, this is the first published description of this virus in a Malayan tapir.

  6. Encephalomyocarditis virus in a captive Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Vercammen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A 5-month-old female captive Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus died suddenly without preceding symptoms. Gross necropsy revealed numerous white circular and linear foci in the myocard. Differential diagnosis all turned out negative, except for encephalomyocarditis virus. Histopathology revealed mineralisation of myocardial cells and interstitial infiltration of lymphocytes, plasma cells and less neutrophils. Encephalomyocarditis virus was detected by PCR. Although encephalomyocarditis virus occurs in many mammals, this is the first published description of this virus in a Malayan tapir.

  7. Preferential flow occurs in unsaturated conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Because it commonly generates high-speed, high-volume flow with minimal exposure to solid earth materials, preferential flow in the unsaturated zone is a dominant influence in many problems of infiltration, recharge, contaminant transport, and ecohydrology. By definition, preferential flow occurs in a portion of a medium – that is, a preferred part, whether a pathway, pore, or macroscopic subvolume. There are many possible classification schemes, but usual consideration of preferential flow includes macropore or fracture flow, funneled flow determined by macroscale heterogeneities, and fingered flow determined by hydraulic instability rather than intrinsic heterogeneity. That preferential flow is spatially concentrated associates it with other characteristics that are typical, although not defining: it tends to be unusually fast, to transport high fluxes, and to occur with hydraulic disequilibrium within the medium. It also has a tendency to occur in association with large conduits and high water content, although these are less universal than is commonly assumed. Predictive unsaturated-zone flow models in common use employ several different criteria for when and where preferential flow occurs, almost always requiring a nearly saturated medium. A threshold to be exceeded may be specified in terms of the following (i) water content; (ii) matric potential, typically a value high enough to cause capillary filling in a macropore of minimum size; (iii) infiltration capacity or other indication of incipient surface ponding; or (iv) other conditions related to total filling of certain pores. Yet preferential flow does occur without meeting these criteria. My purpose in this commentary is to point out important exceptions and implications of ignoring them. Some of these pertain mainly to macropore flow, others to fingered or funneled flow, and others to combined or undifferentiated flow modes.

  8. Recent progress in West Nile virus diagnosis and vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Filette Marina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract West Nile virus (WNV is a positive-stranded RNA virus belonging to the Flaviviridae family, a large family with 3 main genera (flavivirus, hepacivirus and pestivirus. Among these viruses, there are several globally relevant human pathogens including the mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV, yellow fever virus (YFV, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV and West Nile virus (WNV, as well as tick-borne viruses such as tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV. Since the mid-1990s, outbreaks of WN fever and encephalitis have occurred throughout the world and WNV is now endemic in Africa, Asia, Australia, the Middle East, Europe and the Unites States. This review describes the molecular virology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and highlights recent progress regarding diagnosis and vaccination against WNV infections.

  9. Molecular confirmation of Maize rayado fino virus as the Brazilian corn streak virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hammond,Rosemarie Wahnbaeck; Bedendo,Ivan Paulo

    2005-01-01

    Maize rayado fino virus (MRFV), present in various countries in Latin America, has shown similarities to corn streak virus that occurs in Brazil, regarding pathogenic, serological and histological characteristics. In the current report both virus were molecularly compared to confirm the similarities between them. MRFV was identified by nucleic acid hybridization in samples of maize tissues exhibiting symptoms of "corn stunt" disease, collected from two Brazilian States - São Paulo and Minas G...

  10. Ebola Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Rangare Lakshman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The disease Ebola takes its name from the Ebola River situated near a village in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where the disease first appeared in 1976. It is caused by a virus from the Filoviridae family (filovirus. The present outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD concerns four countries in West Africa, namely Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria till date. Further to widespread transmission of the disease, it has been declared as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern by the World Health Organisation on 8 August 2014. As of 4 August 2014, countries have reported 1,711 cases (1,070 confirmed, 436 probable, 205 suspect, including 932 deaths. This review paper enlightens about the awareness of Ebola virus and its preventive measures. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(3.000: 296-305

  11. Burden, duration and costs of hospital bed closures due to acute gastroenteritis in England per winter, 2010/11-2015/16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, F G; Jit, M; Robotham, J V; Deeny, S R

    2017-09-01

    Bed closures due to acute gastroenteritis put hospitals under pressure each winter. In England, the National Health Service (NHS) has monitored the winter situation for all acute trusts since 2010/11. To estimate the burden, duration and costs of hospital bed closures due to acute gastroenteritis in winter. A retrospective analysis of routinely collected time-series data of bed closures due to diarrhoea and vomiting was conducted for the winters 2010/11 to 2015/16. Two key issues were addressed by imputing non-randomly missing values at provider level, and filtering observations to a range of dates recorded in all six winters. The lowest and highest values imputed were taken to represent the best- and worst-case scenarios. Bed-days were costed using NHS reference costs, and potential staff absence costs were based on previous studies. In the best-to-worst case, a median of 88,000-113,000 beds were closed due to gastroenteritis each winter. Of these, 19.6-20.4% were unoccupied. On average, 80% of providers were affected, and had closed beds for a median of 15-21 days each winter. Hospital costs of closed beds were £5.7-£7.5 million, which increased to £6.9-£10.0 million when including staff absence costs due to illness. The median number of hospital beds closed due to acute gastroenteritis per winter was equivalent to all general and acute hospital beds in England being unavailable for a median of 0.88-1.12 days. Costs for hospitals are high but vary with closures each winter. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Gastroenteritis Aggressive Versus Slow Treatment For Rehydration (GASTRO). A pilot rehydration study for severe dehydration: WHO plan C versus slower rehydration

    OpenAIRE

    Houston, Kirsty A.; Gibb, Jack G.; Mpoya, Ayub; Obonyo, Nchafatso; Olupot-Olupot, Peter; Nakuya, Margeret; Evans, Jennifer A; George, Elizabeth C; Gibb, Diana M; Maitland, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) rehydration management guidelines (Plan C) for children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and severe dehydration are widely practiced in resource-poor settings, yet have never been formally evaluated in a clinical trial. A recent audit of outcome of AGE at Kilifi County Hospital, Kenya noted that 10% of children required high dependency care (20% mortality) and a number developed fluid-related complications. The fluid resuscitation trial, FEAST, ...

  13. Epidemiological and clinical features of rotavirus among children younger than 5 years of age hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montrasio Giovanni

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis and severe dehydrating diarrhea in young children. Methods To estimate the proportion of hospital admissions for rotavirus acute gastroenteritis and identify the circulating G and P genotypes among children under five years of age, we conducted a prospective observational study from January to December 2008, recruiting children consecutively admitted to six hospitals in Milan and nearby towns in northern Italy. Typing was done on stool samples by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction amplification. Results Of the 521 stool samples from children with acute gastroenteritis, 34.9% (95%CI, 30.8 to 39.2% were rotavirus-positive. Two thirds (67.6% were under two years of age, and 13.2% were under six months. The predominant G type was G1 (40.7%, followed by G9 (22.5%, G2 (13.2%, G3 (5.5%, G4 (3.8% and G10 (1.6%. Twenty-one (11.7% mixed-G infections were identified: G1+G10 (8.8%; G1+G9 (1.6%; and G2+G10 (1.2%. Only P[8] (67.6% and P[4] (12.6% types were P genotyped. The predominant single G/P combination was G1P[8] (39.7%, followed by G9P[8] (25.3%, G2P[4] (14.3%, and G3P[8] (4.1%. All G-mixed types combined with P[8]. Conclusions These findings show an high prevalence of rotavirus infections among children admitted to hospital for acute gastroenteritis caused by different rotavirus strains circulating in the area studied.

  14. Natural occurring radioactive substances. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emara, A E [National Center for radiation Research and Technology Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive substances produced by cosmic rays of those of terrestrial origin are surveyed. The different radioactive decay series are discussed. Special emphasis is given to the element radium as regards its properties and distribution in different environmental samples. The properties of naturally occurring k-40 and its distribution in different natural media are also outlined. Induced radionuclides which are formed as a result of the interaction of cosmic rays with the constituents of the atmosphere are mentioned. In this respect the intensity of natural background radiation and the dose at different locations and levels is surveyed. Some regions of exceptionally high radioactivity which result in high exposure rates are mentioned. Monazite deposits and water springs are mentioned in some detail. The Oklo phenomenon as a natural reactor is also discussed. 8 tabs.

  15. Natural occurring radioactive substances. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emara, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive substances produced by cosmic rays of those of terrestrial origin are surveyed. The different radioactive decay series are discussed. Special emphasis is given to the element radium as regards its properties and distribution in different environmental samples. The properties of naturally occurring k-40 and its distribution in different natural media are also outlined. Induced radionuclides which are formed as a result of the interaction of cosmic rays with the constituents of the atmosphere are mentioned. In this respect the intensity of natural background radiation and the dose at different locations and levels is surveyed. Some regions of exceptionally high radioactivity which result in high exposure rates are mentioned. Monazite deposits and water springs are mentioned in some detail. The Oklo phenomenon as a natural reactor is also discussed. 8 tabs

  16. Outbreaks of Acute Gastroenteritis Transmitted by Person-to-Person Contact, Environmental Contamination, and Unknown Modes of Transmission--United States, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikswo, Mary E; Kambhampati, Anita; Shioda, Kayoko; Walsh, Kelly A; Bowen, Anna; Hall, Aron J

    2015-12-11

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a major cause of illness in the United States, with an estimated 179 million episodes annually. AGE outbreaks propagated through direct person-to-person contact, contaminated environmental surfaces, and unknown modes of transmission were not systematically captured at the national level before 2009 and thus were not well characterized. 2009-2013. The National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS) is a voluntary national reporting system that supports reporting of all waterborne and foodborne disease outbreaks and all AGE outbreaks resulting from transmission by contact with contaminated environmental sources, infected persons or animals, or unknown modes. Local, state, and territorial public health agencies within the 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia (DC), five U.S. territories, and three Freely Associated States report outbreaks to CDC via NORS using a standard online data entry system. A total of 10,756 AGE outbreaks occurred during 2009-2013, for which the primary mode of transmission occurred through person-to-person contact, environmental contamination, and unknown modes of transmission. NORS received reports from public health agencies in 50 U.S. states, DC, and Puerto Rico. These outbreaks resulted in 356,532 reported illnesses, 5,394 hospitalizations, and 459 deaths. The median outbreak reporting rate for all sites in a given year increased from 2.7 outbreaks per million population in 2009 to 11.8 outbreaks in 2013. The etiology was unknown in 31% (N = 3,326) of outbreaks. Of the 7,430 outbreaks with a suspected or confirmed etiology reported, norovirus was the most common, reported in 6,223 (84%) of these outbreaks. Other reported suspected or confirmed etiologies included Shigella (n = 332) and Salmonella (n = 320). Outbreaks were more frequent during the winter, with 5,716 (53%) outbreaks occurring during December-February, and 70% of the 7,001 outbreaks with a reported setting of exposure occurred in long

  17. Jerky Periods - Myoclonus Occurring Solely During Menses

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur W. Buijink; Jeannette M. Gelauff; Sandra M. van der Salm; Marina A. Tijssen; Anne-Fleur van Rootselaar

    2013-01-01

    Background: In this case report, we describe an unusual case of a patient with myoclonus only occurring during menses. Case Report: A 41-year-old female, known to have neurological sequelae after a car accident 1 year earlier, presented with myoclonic movements of the right arm and hand only during menses. Brain magnetic resonance imaging is compatible with head trauma. Electromyography shows brief irregular bursts with a duration of about 20 ms. Discussion: This appears to be the first descr...

  18. Control of feline leukaemia virus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Weijer (Kees); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractFeline leukaemia virus (FeLV) usually occurs in its natural species, the domestic cat. FeLV is also important to human individuals as a comparative model, as it may cause a variety of diseases, some malignant and some benign, such as immunosuppression, which bears a resemblance to AIDS

  19. Comparative Study of Campylobacter spp. Isolated from Children With Gastroenteritis in Bahonar Hospital, Karaj, Using PCR and RFLP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arefeh Abdi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Campylobacter species are responsible for the majority of cases of food-borne gastroenteritis. The sources of the disease outbreaks are often contaminated water or milk, and consumption of undercooked poultry product is the main cause of sporadic campylobacteriosis cases. Objectives: The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of Campylobacter gastroenteritis in children and to differentiate the interfering species using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP methods at the Bahonar hospital in Karaj, Iran. Patients and Methods: A total of 150 stool samples were collected from children under 10 years old during the summer of 2014. PCR was performed using genus- and species-specific primers and RFLP was done using AluI and TasI enzymes. Results: The results showed the amplification of 400 and 491 bp segments and Campylobacter contamination in 30 (20% samples; 5 out of 30 Campylobacter positive samples (16.66% were identified as C. jejuni, 20 (66.66% as C. coli, 3 (10% as C. jejuni and C. coli (mixed infection, and 2 (6.66% were identified as non-jejuni, non-coli Campylobacter using the PCR method. Following the evaluation of RFLP results, 7 positive samples (23.33% showed the electrophoretic pattern of C. jejuni, 21 (70% showed the electrophoretic pattern of C. coli, and 2 (6.6% showed both of the patterns and mixed contamination with jejuni and coli species. The results of digestion with TasI did not show any C. lari or C. upsaliensis patterns. Conclusions: The results of this study showed high percentage of Campylobacter contamination in the tested stool samples. The other surprising finding was the high rate of Campylobacter coli positive samples; the difference between the results of PCR using species-specific primers (hipo and asp and the RFLP method (electrophoretic patterns in some of the positive samples confirms the hypothesis of variations in nucleotide sequences of the

  20. Coronavirus gene 7 counteracts host defenses and modulates virus virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazmina L G Cruz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV genome contains three accessory genes: 3a, 3b and 7. Gene 7 is only present in members of coronavirus genus a1, and encodes a hydrophobic protein of 78 aa. To study gene 7 function, a recombinant TGEV virus lacking gene 7 was engineered (rTGEV-Δ7. Both the mutant and the parental (rTGEV-wt viruses showed the same growth and viral RNA accumulation kinetics in tissue cultures. Nevertheless, cells infected with rTGEV-Δ7 virus showed an increased cytopathic effect caused by an enhanced apoptosis mediated by caspase activation. Macromolecular synthesis analysis showed that rTGEV-Δ7 virus infection led to host translational shut-off and increased cellular RNA degradation compared with rTGEV-wt infection. An increase of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α phosphorylation and an enhanced nuclease, most likely RNase L, activity were observed in rTGEV-Δ7 virus infected cells. These results suggested that the removal of gene 7 promoted an intensified dsRNA-activated host antiviral response. In protein 7 a conserved sequence motif that potentially mediates binding to protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit (PP1c, a key regulator of the cell antiviral defenses, was identified. We postulated that TGEV protein 7 may counteract host antiviral response by its association with PP1c. In fact, pull-down assays demonstrated the interaction between TGEV protein 7, but not a protein 7 mutant lacking PP1c binding motif, with PP1. Moreover, the interaction between protein 7 and PP1 was required, during the infection, for eIF2α dephosphorylation and inhibition of cell RNA degradation. Inoculation of newborn piglets with rTGEV-Δ7 and rTGEV-wt viruses showed that rTGEV-Δ7 virus presented accelerated growth kinetics and pathology compared with the parental virus. Overall, the results indicated that gene 7 counteracted host cell defenses, and modified TGEV persistence increasing TGEV survival. Therefore, the

  1. Naturally occurring, tumor-specific, therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argiris, Konstantinos; Panethymitaki, Chrysoula; Tavassoli, Mahvash

    2011-05-01

    The emerging approach to cancer treatment known as targeted therapies offers hope in improving the treatment of therapy-resistant cancers. Recent understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of cancer has led to the development of targeted novel drugs such as monoclonal antibodies, small molecule inhibitors, mimetics, antisense and small interference RNA-based strategies, among others. These compounds act on specific targets that are believed to contribute to the development and progression of cancers and resistance of tumors to conventional therapies. Delivered individually or combined with chemo- and/or radiotherapy, such novel drugs have produced significant responses in certain types of cancer. Among the most successful novel compounds are those which target tyrosine kinases (imatinib, trastuzumab, sinutinib, cetuximab). However, these compounds can cause severe side-effects as they inhibit pathways such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or platelet-derived growth factor receptor, which are also important for normal functions in non-transformed cells. Recently, a number of proteins have been identified which show a remarkable tumor-specific cytotoxic activity. This toxicity is independent of tumor type or specific genetic changes such as p53, pRB or EGFR aberrations. These tumor-specific killer proteins are either derived from common human and animal viruses such as E1A, E4ORF4 and VP3 (apoptin) or of cellular origin, such as TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) and MDA-7 (melanoma differentiation associated-7). This review aims to present a current overview of a selection of these proteins with preferential toxicity among cancer cells and will provide an insight into the possible mechanism of action, tumor specificity and their potential as novel tumor-specific cancer therapeutics.

  2. Incidence of Norovirus and Other Viral Pathogens That Cause Acute Gastroenteritis (AGE) among Kaiser Permanente Member Populations in the United States, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytdal, Scott P; DeBess, Emilio; Lee, Lore E; Blythe, David; Ryan, Patricia; Biggs, Christianne; Cameron, Miriam; Schmidt, Mark; Parashar, Umesh D; Hall, Aron J

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses and other viral pathogens are increasingly recognized as frequent causes of acute gastroenteritis (AGE). However, few laboratory-based data are available on the incidence of AGE caused by viral pathogens in the U.S. This study examined stool specimens submitted for routine clinical diagnostics from patients enrolled in Kaiser Permanente (KP) health plans in metro Portland, OR, and the Maryland, District of Columbia, and northern Virginia geographic areas to estimate the incidence of viral enteropathogens in these populations. Over a one-year study period, participating laboratories randomly selected stools submitted for routine clinical diagnostics for inclusion in the study along with accompanying demographic and clinical data. Selected stools were tested for norovirus, rotavirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus using standardized real-time RT-PCR protocols. Each KP site provided administrative data which were used in conjunction with previously published data on healthcare utilization to extrapolate pathogen detection rates into population-based incidence rates. A total of 1,099 specimens collected during August 2012 to September 2013 were included. Mean age of patients providing stool specimens was 46 years (range: 0-98 years). Noroviruses were the most common viral pathogen identified among patients with AGE (n = 63 specimens, 6% of specimens tested). In addition, 22 (2%) of specimens were positive for rotavirus; 19 (2%) were positive for sapovirus; and 7 (1%) were positive for astrovirus. Incidence of norovirus-associated outpatient visits was 5.6 per 1,000 person-years; incidence of norovirus disease in the community was estimated to be 69.5 per 1,000 person-years. Norovirus incidence was highest among children age (outpatient incidence = 25.6 per 1,000 person-years; community incidence = 152.2 per 1,000 person-years), followed by older adults aged >65 years (outpatient incidence = 7.8 per 1,000 person-years; community incidence = 75.8 per 1,000 person

  3. Incidence of Norovirus and Other Viral Pathogens That Cause Acute Gastroenteritis (AGE) among Kaiser Permanente Member Populations in the United States, 2012–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytdal, Scott P.; Biggs, Christianne; Cameron, Miriam; Schmidt, Mark; Parashar, Umesh D.; Hall, Aron J.

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses and other viral pathogens are increasingly recognized as frequent causes of acute gastroenteritis (AGE). However, few laboratory-based data are available on the incidence of AGE caused by viral pathogens in the U.S. This study examined stool specimens submitted for routine clinical diagnostics from patients enrolled in Kaiser Permanente (KP) health plans in metro Portland, OR, and the Maryland, District of Columbia, and northern Virginia geographic areas to estimate the incidence of viral enteropathogens in these populations. Over a one-year study period, participating laboratories randomly selected stools submitted for routine clinical diagnostics for inclusion in the study along with accompanying demographic and clinical data. Selected stools were tested for norovirus, rotavirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus using standardized real-time RT-PCR protocols. Each KP site provided administrative data which were used in conjunction with previously published data on healthcare utilization to extrapolate pathogen detection rates into population-based incidence rates. A total of 1,099 specimens collected during August 2012 to September 2013 were included. Mean age of patients providing stool specimens was 46 years (range: 0–98 years). Noroviruses were the most common viral pathogen identified among patients with AGE (n = 63 specimens, 6% of specimens tested). In addition, 22 (2%) of specimens were positive for rotavirus; 19 (2%) were positive for sapovirus; and 7 (1%) were positive for astrovirus. Incidence of norovirus-associated outpatient visits was 5.6 per 1,000 person-years; incidence of norovirus disease in the community was estimated to be 69.5 per 1,000 person-years. Norovirus incidence was highest among children incidence = 25.6 per 1,000 person-years; community incidence = 152.2 per 1,000 person-years), followed by older adults aged >65 years (outpatient incidence = 7.8 per 1,000 person-years; community incidence = 75.8 per 1,000 person

  4. Jerky periods: myoclonus occurring solely during menses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijink, Arthur W G; Gelauff, Jeannette M; van der Salm, Sandra M A; Tijssen, Marina A J; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur

    2013-01-01

    In this case report, we describe an unusual case of a patient with myoclonus only occurring during menses. A 41-year-old female, known to have neurological sequelae after a car accident 1 year earlier, presented with myoclonic movements of the right arm and hand only during menses. Brain magnetic resonance imaging is compatible with head trauma. Electromyography shows brief irregular bursts with a duration of about 20 ms. This appears to be the first description of myoclonus appearing only during menses. We suggest a cortical origin for myoclonus.

  5. Jerky Periods - Myoclonus Occurring Solely During Menses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur W. Buijink

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this case report, we describe an unusual case of a patient with myoclonus only occurring during menses. Case Report: A 41-year-old female, known to have neurological sequelae after a car accident 1 year earlier, presented with myoclonic movements of the right arm and hand only during menses. Brain magnetic resonance imaging is compatible with head trauma. Electromyography shows brief irregular bursts with a duration of about 20 ms. Discussion: This appears to be the first description of myoclonus appearing only during menses. We suggest a cortical origin for myoclonus.

  6. SARS virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... consequence.Protein spike similar. HE gene absent. 2787 nucleotides. Largest genome. Jumps species by genetic deletion. < 300 compounds screened. Glycyrrhizin (liquorics/mullatha) seems attractive. Antivirals not effective. Vaccines – animal model only in monkeys. Killed corona or knockout weakened virus as targets.

  7. Changes in human parechovirus profiles in hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis after a three-year interval in Lanzhou, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Guo

    Full Text Available The changing profile of infection over time for Human Parechoviruses (HPeVs is not well known and no detailed study has been reported to date in China. This investigation on HPeV infection in hospitalized children in Lanzhou, China revealed variations in epidemiological characteristics after a three-year interval. To assess the changes that had occurred, epidemiological and clinical characteristics of HPeVs were characterized and compared with previously reported data by our group. A comparable positivity rate (25.3%, 73/289 was revealed after the three-year interval with the majority of the infected children (95.9%, 70/73 being younger than two years of age. While a temporal change in the seasonal distribution was noted in the current study, HPeVs were more frequently detected during July to November compared to September to December in the previous study. Changes in HPeV genotypes patterns, a temporal change in the prevalence of HPeV1, a younger susceptible age to HPeV3 compared with HPeV1 and a tendency of older children to be infected with HPeV4 are in contrast to our previous report. HPeV2, a rarely reported genotype, was identified for the first time in China. In addition, an exclusive trinucleotide (GAT insertion in the HPeV4 nucleotide sequence was identified. However, the profiles of co-infection with other enteric related viruses were similar to our previous findings. In summary, these data suggest temporal variation in the seasonal distribution of HPeV and changing patterns of HPeV genotypes over time in the study region.

  8. Impact on Health-Related Quality of Life in Adults with Eosinophilic Gastritis and Gastroenteritis: A Qualitative Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedell, Alyse; Taft, Tiffany; Craven, Meredith R; Guadagnoli, Livia; Hirano, Ikuo; Gonsalves, Nirmala

    2018-05-01

    Eosinophilic gastritis (EG) and eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) are chronic immune-mediated conditions of the digestive tract, which affect the stomach only, or the stomach and small intestines, respectively. Though these disorders are uncommon, they are being increasingly recognized and diagnosed. While health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has been evaluated in other eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases, this study is the first to describe HRQOL impacts unique to EG/EGE. This study aims to qualitatively describe experiences of adults diagnosed with EG and EGE. We aim to identify impacts on HRQOL in this population in order to inform clinical care and assessment. Seven patients diagnosed with EG or EGE participated in semi-structured interviews assessing common domains of HRQOL. Four distinct themes emerged from qualitative analyses, which represent impacts to HRQOL: the psychological impact of the diagnosis, impact on social relationships, financial impact, and impact on the body. These generally improved over time and with effective treatment. This study demonstrated that patients with EG/EGE experience impacts to HRQOL, some of which differ from HRQOL of other eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases. These results support the development of a disease-specific measure, or adaptation of an existing measure, to assess HRQOL in EG/EGE.

  9. Etiología y manejo de la gastroenteritis aguda infecciosa en niños y adultos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yalda Lucero, DRA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available La Gastroenteritis Aguda (GEA infecciosa es una patología frecuente y de alto impacto, especialmente en niños menores de cinco años y adultos mayores. En nuestro medio, la causa más frecuente es viral (rotavirus y norovirus seguido de Salmonella, Shigella, E.coli diarreogénicas y Campylobacter. Habitualmente son cuadros autolimitados que no requieren estudio de laboratorio específico y cuyo manejo debe centrarse en la reposición hidro-electrolítica de acuerdo al grado de deshidratación. Existe evidencia sobre beneficio sintomático del uso de probióticos (Lactobacillus GG y S.boulardii; racecadotrilo en cuanto a la diarrea; y ondasetrón para los vómitos. En caso de sospecha de agente invasor (bacteria o parásito debe realizarse un estudio etiológico e iniciar terapia antimicrobiana de acuerdo al microorganismo identificado. La prevención de contagio mediante medidas de saneamiento y adecuada manipulación de agua y alimentos es fundamental. Actualmente se dispone de vacunas efectivas contra algunos de los agentes involucrados (ej. rotavirus, que deben recomendarse en grupos de riesgo.

  10. The Impact of E-Learning on Adherence to Guidelines for Acute Gastroenteritis: A Single-Arm Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicastro, Emanuele; Lo Vecchio, Andrea; Liguoro, Ilaria; Chmielewska, Anna; De Bruyn, Caroline; Dolinsek, Jernej; Doroshina, Elena; Fessatou, Smaragdi; Pop, Tudor Lucian; Prell, Christine; Tabbers, Merit Monique; Tavares, Marta; Urenden-Elicin, Pinar; Bruzzese, Dario; Zakharova, Irina; Sandhu, Bhupinder; Guarino, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Objective E-learning is a candidate tool for clinical practice guidelines (CPG) implementation due to its versatility, universal access and low costs. We aimed to assess the impact of a five-module e-learning course about CPG for acute gastroenteritis (AGE) on physicians’ knowledge and clinical practice. Study design This work was conceived as a pre/post single-arm intervention study. Physicians from 11 European countries registered for the online course. Personal data, pre- and post-course questionnaires and clinical data about 3 to 5 children with AGE managed by each physician before and after the course were collected. Primary outcome measures included the proportion of participants fully adherent to CPG and number of patients managed with full adherence. Results Among the 149 physicians who signed up for the e-learning course, 59 took the course and reported on their case management of 519 children E-learning is effective in increasing knowledge and improving clinical practice in paediatric AGE and is an effective tool for implementing clinical practice guidelines. PMID:26148301

  11. Leachability of naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desideri, D.; Feduzi, L.; Meli, M.A.; Roselli, C.

    2006-01-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are present in the environment and can be concentrated by technical activities, particularly those involving natural resources. These NORM deposits are highly stable and very insoluble under environmental conditions at the earth's surface. However, reducing or oxidant conditions or pH changes may enable a fraction of naturally occurring radionuclides to eventually be released to the environment. Leachability of 210 Pb and 210 Po was determined in three samples coming from a refractories production plant (dust, sludge, finished product), in one dust sample from a steelwork and in one ash sample coming from an electric power station. A sequential extraction method consisting of five operationally-defined fractions was used. The average leaching potential observed in the samples from the refractory industry is very low (mean values: 5.8% for 210 Pb and 1.7% for 210 Po). The 210 Pb and 210 Po leachability increases for the ash sample coming from an electric power plant using carbon (17.8% for 210 Pb and 10.0% for 210 Po); for the dust sample coming from a steelwork, the percent soluble fraction is 41.1% for 210 Pb and 8.5% for 210 Po. For all samples the results obtained show that 210 Pb is slightly more soluble than 210 Po. (author)

  12. Mayaro virus: the jungle flu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izurieta RO

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ricardo O Izurieta,1 David A DeLacure,1 Andres Izurieta,2 Ismael A Hoare,1 Miguel Reina Ortiz,1,3 1Department of Global Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 2Department of Computer Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 3Fundación Raíces, Esmeraldas, Ecuador Abstract: Mayaro fever is an emerging acute viral disease endemic in Central and South America. Mayaro virus (MAYV is classified in the Semliki Forest virus antigenic complex and shares similarities with the alphavirus Chikungunya virus and the flavivirus Dengue virus. MAYV is an arbovirus transmitted by Haemagogus janthinomys, with competence also demonstrated in Aedes aegypti, Aedes scapularis, and Anopheles quadrimaculatus. Outbreaks and small epidemics of Mayaro fever have occurred in several countries in northern South America and the Caribbean. In addition, travel-associated cases have been reported in European nationals returning from endemic areas. Clinical features of Mayaro fever include fever, chills, persistent arthralgia, retro-orbital pain, maculopapular rash, itching, dizziness, and, rarely, lymphadenopathy. Methods of control for MAYV are similar to those used for other sylvatic arboviruses. Although MAYV was discovered as long ago as the 1950s and continues to be prevalent in the tropical areas of the Americas, it remains neglected and under-studied. This paper provides a thorough and current review of the published MAYV literature ranging from its original description to modern outbreaks, and from the basic virus characteristics to the clinical and epidemiological aspects of this disease. Keywords: Mayaro virus, emerging arbovirus, dengue-like virus, arthrogenic virus

  13. Wegener's granulomatosis occurring de novo during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfhaily, F; Watts, R; Leather, A

    2009-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is rarely diagnosed during the reproductive years and uncommonly manifests for the first time during pregnancy. We report a case of de novo WG presenting at 30 weeks gestation with classical symptoms of WG (ENT, pulmonary). The diagnosis was confirmed by radiological, laboratory, and histological investigations. With a multidisciplinary approach, she had a successful vaginal delivery of a healthy baby. She was treated successfully by a combination of steroids, azathioprine and intravenous immunoglobulin in the active phase of disease for induction of remission and by azathioprine and steroids for maintenance of remission. The significant improvement in her symptoms allowed us to continue her pregnancy to 37 weeks when delivery was electively induced. Transplacental transmission of PR3-ANCA occurred but the neonate remained well. This case of de novo WG during pregnancy highlights the seriousness of this disease and the challenge in management of such patients.

  14. Introduction to naturally occurring radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egidi, P.

    1997-01-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is everywhere; we are exposed to it every day. It is found in our bodies, the food we eat, the places where we live and work, and in products we use. Some industrial practices involving natural resources concentrate these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. This session will concentrate on diffuse sources of technologically-enhanced (TE) NORM, which are generally large-volume, low-activity waste streams produced by industries such as mineral mining, ore benefication, production of phosphate Fertilizers, water treatment and purification, and oil and gas production. The majority of radionuclides in TENORM are found in the uranium and thorium decay chains. Radium and its subsequent decay products (radon) are the principal radionuclides used in characterizing the redistribution of TENORM in the environment by human activity. We will briefly review other radionuclides occurring in nature (potassium and rubidium) that contribute primarily to background doses. TENORM is found in many waste streams; for example, scrap metal, sludges, slags, fluids, and is being discovered in industries traditionally not thought of as affected by radionuclide contamination. Not only the forms and volumes, but the levels of radioactivity in TENORM vary. Current discussions about the validity of the linear no dose threshold theory are central to the TENORM issue. TENORM is not regulated by the Atomic Energy Act or other Federal regulations. Control and regulation of TENORM is not consistent from industry to industry nor from state to state. Proposed regulations are moving from concentration-based standards to dose-based standards. So when is TENORM a problem? Where is it a problem? That depends on when, where, and whom you talk to exclamation point We will start by reviewing background radioactivity, then we will proceed to the geology, mobility, and variability of these

  15. Introduction to naturally occurring radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egidi, P.

    1997-08-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is everywhere; we are exposed to it every day. It is found in our bodies, the food we eat, the places where we live and work, and in products we use. We are also bathed in a sea of natural radiation coming from the sun and deep space. Living systems have adapted to these levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources concentrate these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Other activities, such as flying at high altitudes, expose us to elevated levels of NORM. This session will concentrate on diffuse sources of technologically-enhanced (TE) NORM, which are generally large-volume, low-activity waste streams produced by industries such as mineral mining, ore benefication, production of phosphate Fertilizers, water treatment and purification, and oil and gas production. The majority of radionuclides in TENORM are found in the uranium and thorium decay chains. Radium and its subsequent decay products (radon) are the principal radionuclides used in characterizing the redistribution of TENORM in the environment by human activity. We will briefly review other radionuclides occurring in nature (potassium and rubidium) that contribute primarily to background doses. TENORM is found in many waste streams; for example, scrap metal, sludges, slags, fluids, and is being discovered in industries traditionally not thought of as affected by radionuclide contamination. Not only the forms and volumes, but the levels of radioactivity in TENORM vary. Current discussions about the validity of the linear no dose threshold theory are central to the TENORM issue. TENORM is not regulated by the Atomic Energy Act or other Federal regulations. Control and regulation of TENORM is not consistent from industry to industry nor from state to state. Proposed regulations are moving from concentration-based standards to dose

  16. Russell Body Gastroenteritis: An Aberrant Manifestation of Chronic Inflammation in Gastrointestinal Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feriyl Bhaijee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available First described in 1998, Russell body gastritis is a rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by abundant intramucosal polyclonal plasma cells, which contain intracytoplasmic eosinophilic globules of immunoglobulins (Russell bodies that displace the nucleus, with an accompanying chronic inflammatory infiltrate. Russell bodies represent a cellular response to overstimulation of plasma cells, leading to the accumulation of abundant, nondegradable, condensed immunoglobulin in dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum cisternae. Russell body gastritis usually occurs in the gastric antrum, but two cases of Russell body duodenitis have been recently described. Herein, we report an unusual case of Barrett esophagus with prominent lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and Russell bodies, which expands the current spectrum of Russell body gastritis/duodenitis. Given the various anatomic locations in which Russell body gastritis may arise, we suggest that “Russell body gastroenteritis” may be a more appropriate designation for this uncommon reactive condition.

  17. Fungi of genus Alternaria occurring on tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Marcinkowska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tomato early blight in central Poland was caused by Alternaria solani (A. porri f. sp., solani and A. alernata (A. tenuis. A. alternata was isolated more often than A. solani. All isolates of A. solani in controlled conditions killed tomato seedlings, while pathogenic isolates of A. alternata caused only slight seedling blight. In greenhouse tests A. solani proved to be strongly pathogenic for leaves and stems of tomato but A. alternata was weakly pathogenic. The latter species attacked only injured fruits while, A. solanicould penetrate through undamaged peel of fruits. Both of these species caused the same type of symptoms; the differences consisted only in intensification of disease symptoms. During 1974 and 1975 field tomatoes were moderately attacked by early blight. Thebest development of this disease occurred by the turn of August and September. Determinate variety 'New Yorker' was distinguished by more severe infection of stem parts of tomato whereas the fruits of a stock variety 'Apollo' were more strongly attacked.

  18. Uranium occurence in California near Bucaramanga (Columbia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heider Polania, J.

    1980-01-01

    The mining district of California, Bucaramanga, is on the west side of the Cordillera Oriental in the Santander massif region. The oldest rocks of the area form a complex of metamorphites and migmatites of the predevonic age. Amphibolite various types of paragneiss and orthogneiss are represented. Several stages of metamorphism can be documented in some rocks, as well as double anatexis. Triassic to jurassic quarz diorites and leukogranites show wide distribution. Porphyric rocks of granodioritic to granitic composition, to which the uranium mineralization is mainly bonded, intruded into the sediments of the lower cretaceous. Atomic absorption spectral analyses were carried out for the elements Cu, Zn and Li, as well as the uranium contents of some samples using fluorimetry. Uranium is primarily bonded to pitch blende and coffinite. The latter mostly occur in fine distribution grown in quarz and belong to the most recent mineralization phase. Autunite, meta-autunite, torbernite, meta-torbernite, zeunerite, meta-zeunerite and meta uranocircite detected as secondary uranium minerals. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Bioassay of naturally occurring allelochemicals for phytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leather, G R; Einhellig, F A

    1988-10-01

    The bioassay has been one of the most widely used tests to demonstrate allelopathic activity. Often, claims that a particular plant species inhibits the growth of another are based entirely on the seed germination response to solvent extracts of the suspected allelopathic plant; few of these tests are of value in demonstrating allelopathy under natural conditions. The veracity of the bioassay for evaluating naturally occurring compounds for phytotoxicity depends upon the physiological and biochemical response capacity of the bioassay organism and the mechanism(s) of action of the allelochemicals. The possibility that more than one allelochemical, acting in concert at very low concentrations, may be responsible for an observed allelopathic effect makes it imperative that bioassays be extremely sensitive to chemical growth perturbation agents. Among the many measures of phytotoxicity of allelochemicals, the inhibition (or stimulation) of seed germination, radicle elongation, and/or seedling growth have been the parameters of choice for most investigations. Few of these assays have been selected with the view towards the possible mechanism of the allelopathic effect.

  20. Influenza (Flu) Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Influenza (Flu) Viruses Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook ... influenza circulate and cause illness. More Information about Flu Viruses Types of Influenza Viruses Influenza A and ...