WorldWideScience

Sample records for gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms

  1. Respiratory and laryngeal symptoms secondary to gastro-oesophageal reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, G; Mainie, I; McGarvey, L P A

    2011-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux may cause a range of laryngeal and respiratory symptoms. Mechanisms responsible include the proximal migration of gastric refluxate beyond the upper oesophageal sphincter causing direct irritation of the larynx and lower airway. Alternatively, refluxate entering the distal oesophagus alone may stimulate oesophageal sensory nerves and indirectly activate airway reflexes such as cough and bronchospasm. Recognising reflux as a cause for these extraoesophageal symptoms can be difficult as many patients do not have typical oesophageal symptoms (eg, heartburn) and clinical findings on laryngoscopy are not very specific. Acid suppression remains an effective treatment in the majority of patients but there is growing appreciation of the need to consider and treat non-acid and volume reflux. New opinions about the role of existing medical and surgical (laparoscopic techniques) treatment are emerging and a number of novel anti-reflux treatments are under development. PMID:28839612

  2. Detection of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, T.; Ravnsbaek, J.; Toettrup, A.; Funch-Jensen, P.; Thommesen, P.; Aarhus Kommunehospital

    1986-01-01

    In a prospective study a barium examination combined with food stimulation was compared with the acid reflux test in 30 consecutive patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux. Both methods were further compared with endoscopy and histology. Gastro-oesophageal reflux could be demonstrated by the radiologic examination in 22 patients and by the acid reflux test in 23 patients. By combining the two methods gastro-oesophageal reflux could be demonstrated in 27 patients. Comparing the two methods with symptoms, endoscopy, and histology they seemed to be of equal value. Accordingly, a food-stimulated barium examination is recommended as the first method for demonstrating gastro-oesophageal reflux because it is simple and well-tolerated by the patient. (orig.)

  3. Motor disorders of the oesophagus in gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahony, M J; Migliavacca, M; Spitz, L; Milla, P J

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms of gastro-oesophageal reflux were studied by oesophageal manometry and pH monitoring in 33 children: nine controls, 15 with gastro-oesophageal reflux alone, and nine with reflux oesophagitis. A total of 122 episodes of reflux were analysed in detail: 82 (67%) were synchronous with swallowing and 40 (33%) asynchronous. Infants with trivial symptoms had gastro-oesophageal reflux synchronous with swallowing, whereas those with serious symptoms had slower acid clearance and asynchronou...

  4. Radiologic quantitation of gastro-oesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, T.; Funch-Jensen, P.; Jacobsen, N.O.; Thommesen, P.; Kommunehospitalet, Aarhus; Kommunehospitalet, Aarhus

    1987-01-01

    In a prospective study, 26 patients with symptoms of reflux oesophagitis underwent a barium examination for gastro-oesophageal reflux after food stimulation, and endoscopy with biopsy from different levels of the oesophagus. Radiologic grading of the gastro-oesophageal reflux depending on the height of the reflux into the oesophagus was performed, and this was correlated to the microscopic appearance at different levels in the oesophagus. Complete agreement between the radiologic grading and the histology was found in 69 per cent of the cases, and when gastro-oesophageal reflux was demonstrated the agreement was 75 per cent. Accordingly, the results showed a good accordance between the two variants, indicating that the height of the reflux during the food stimulated test may be truly indicative of the reflux height under non-test conditions. (orig.)

  5. Global prevalence of, and risk factors for, gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusebi, Leonardo H; Ratnakumaran, Raguprakash; Yuan, Yuhong; Solaymani-Dodaran, Masoud; Bazzoli, Franco; Ford, Alexander C

    2018-03-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms are common in the community, but there has been no definitive systematic review and meta-analysis of data from all studies to estimate their global prevalence, or potential risk factors for them. Medline, Embase and Embase Classic were searched (until September 2016) to identify population-based studies that reported the prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms in adults (≥15 years); gastro-oesophageal reflux was defined using symptom-based criteria or questionnaires. The prevalence was extracted for all studies, and according to the criteria used to define it. Pooled prevalence, according to study location and certain other characteristics, OR and 95% CIs were calculated. Of the 14 132 citations evaluated, 102 reported the prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms in 108 separate study populations, containing 460 984 subjects. Prevalence varied according to country (from 2.5% in China to 51.2% in Greece) and criteria used to define gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms. When only studies using a weekly frequency of heart burn or regurgitation to define presence were considered, pooled prevalence was 13.3% (95% CI 12.0% to 14.6%). Prevalence was higher in subjects ≥50 years (OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.12 to 1.54), smokers (OR 1.26; 95% CI 1.04 to 1.52), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)/aspirin users (OR 1.44; 95% CI 1.10 to 1.88) and obese individuals (OR 1.73; 95% CI 1.46 to 2.06). The prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms varied strikingly among countries, even when similar definitions were used to define their presence. Prevalence was significantly higher in subjects ≥50 years, smokers, NSAID users and obese individuals, although these associations were modest. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Achalasia following gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, H L; Mayberry, J F; Atkinson, M

    1986-01-01

    Five patients initially presenting with symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux, proven by radiology or pH monitoring, subsequently developed achalasia, confirmed by radiology and manometry, after an interval of 2-10 years. During this period dysphagia, present as a mild and intermittent symptom accompanying the initial reflux in 3 of the 5, became severe and resulted in oesophageal stasis of food in all. Three of the 5 had a demonstrable hiatal hernia. In none was reflux a troublesome symptom after Rider-Moeller dilatation or cardiomyotomy undertaken for the achalasia. Gastro-oesophageal reflux does not protect against the subsequent development of achalasia. It is suggested that the autonomic damage eventually leading to achalasia may in its initial phases cause gastro-oesophageal reflux. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 2. PMID:3950898

  7. Pathophysiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2003-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD), defined as symptoms or mucosal damage caused by reflux of gastric contents into the esophageal body, is a multifactorial disorder. Malfunctioning of the anti-reflux barrier at the esophagogastric junction, consisting of the right diaphragmatic crus and the

  8. Heartburn, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and non-erosive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heartburn, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and non-erosive reflux disease. Haley Smith. Abstract. Reflux is a normal process that occurs in healthy infants, children and adults. Most episodes are short-lived and do not cause bothersome symptoms of complications. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) develops ...

  9. Prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms and reflux-associated respiratory symptoms in asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Silva H Janaka

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD symptoms are common in asthma and have been extensively studied, but less so in the Asian continent. Reflux-associated respiratory symptoms (RARS have, in contrast, been little-studied globally. We report the prevalence of GORD symptoms and RARS in adult asthmatics, and their association with asthma severity and medication use. Methods A cross-sectional analytical study. A validated interviewer-administered GORD scale was used to assess frequency and severity of seven GORD symptoms. Subjects were consecutive asthmatics attending medical clinics. Controls were matched subjects without respiratory symptoms. Results The mean (SD composite GORD symptom score of asthmatics was significantly higher than controls (21.8 (17.2 versus 12.0 (7.6; P P Conclusions GORD symptoms and RARS were more prevalent in a cohort of Sri Lankan adult asthmatics compared to non-asthmatics. Increased prevalence of RARS is associated with both typical and atypical symptoms of GORD. Asthma disease and its severity, but not asthma medication, appear to influence presence of GORD symptoms.

  10. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, Albert J.; Pandolfino, John E.; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2013-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is one of the most common disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Over past decades, considerable shifts in thinking about the disease have taken place. At a time when radiology was the only diagnostic test available, reflux disease was regarded as synonymous with

  11. Prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms and reflux-associated respiratory symptoms in asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) symptoms are common in asthma and have been extensively studied, but less so in the Asian continent. Reflux-associated respiratory symptoms (RARS) have, in contrast, been little-studied globally. We report the prevalence of GORD symptoms and RARS in adult asthmatics, and their association with asthma severity and medication use. Methods A cross-sectional analytical study. A validated interviewer-administered GORD scale was used to assess frequency and severity of seven GORD symptoms. Subjects were consecutive asthmatics attending medical clinics. Controls were matched subjects without respiratory symptoms. Results The mean (SD) composite GORD symptom score of asthmatics was significantly higher than controls (21.8 (17.2) versus 12.0 (7.6); P < 0.001) as was frequency of each symptom and RARS. Prevalence of GORD symptoms in asthmatics was 59.4% (95% CI, 59.1%-59.6%) versus 28.5% in controls (95% CI, 29.0% - 29.4%). 36% of asthmatics experienced respiratory symptoms in association with both typical and atypical GORD symptoms, compared to 10% of controls (P < 0.001). An asthmatic had a 3.5 times higher risk of experiencing a GORD symptom after adjusting for confounders (OR 3.5; 95% CI 2.5-5.3). Severity of asthma had a strong dose-response relationship with GORD symptoms. Asthma medication use did not significantly influence the presence of GORD symptoms. Conclusions GORD symptoms and RARS were more prevalent in a cohort of Sri Lankan adult asthmatics compared to non-asthmatics. Increased prevalence of RARS is associated with both typical and atypical symptoms of GORD. Asthma disease and its severity, but not asthma medication, appear to influence presence of GORD symptoms. PMID:20843346

  12. [Gastro-oesophageal reflux in infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Trudy; Kamphuis, Mascha; Kivit-Schwengle, Lilly

    2014-01-01

    A more prominent role for the youth healthcare physician: Youth Healthcare physicians reflect on the Dutch Paediatric Association (NVK) guideline entitled 'Gastro-oesophageal reflux (disease) in children aged 0-18 years'. This guideline states that medicinal treatment is given to these children too often. Dutch Youth Healthcare physicians see a large number of children with gastro-oesophageal reflux, with or without additional symptoms. The most common symptoms (crying and diminished weight gain) might be present even in the absence of reflux. Parents should be given advice and support when they are worried about reflux, crying or low weight gain. A lower weight gain curve on the growth chart is normal in breastfed children, and crying might be due to factors such as lack of routine or stimulus reduction. Overfeeding might also be the cause. Parents should be supported and followed up, with or without treatment, as necessary. Youth Healthcare professionals could perform this task.

  13. Motor disorders of the oesophagus in gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahony, M J; Migliavacca, M; Spitz, L; Milla, P J

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms of gastro-oesophageal reflux were studied by oesophageal manometry and pH monitoring in 33 children: nine controls, 15 with gastro-oesophageal reflux alone, and nine with reflux oesophagitis. A total of 122 episodes of reflux were analysed in detail: 82 (67%) were synchronous with swallowing and 40 (33%) asynchronous. Infants with trivial symptoms had gastro-oesophageal reflux synchronous with swallowing, whereas those with serious symptoms had slower acid clearance and asynchronous reflux. There were significant differences in lower oesophageal sphincter pressure and amplitude of oesophageal contractions between controls and patients with both gastro-oesophageal reflux and reflux oesophagitis. In reflux oesophagitis there was a decrease in lower oesophageal sphincter pressure and the contractions had a bizarre waveform suggesting a neuropathic process. PMID:3202640

  14. Psychometric evaluation of a daily gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptom measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Reimer, Christina; Smith, Gary

    2017-01-01

    was demonstrated by moderate to high correlations with ReQuest™ change scores and time with symptoms. An HRDQ cut-off value of 0.70 for definition of ‘bad day’ was also evaluated. Conclusions: Based on existing evidence, the HRDQ is a valid and reliable measure of GORD symptoms that can be used as a study outcome...... (Cronbach’s alpha range.83–.88) and test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient range.71–.90). Convergent and discriminant validity were supported by high correlations with ReQuest™ and ability to differentiate between groups based on ReQuest™ cut-off values. Responsiveness of HRDQ......Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the validity of the Heartburn Reflux Dyspepsia Questionnaire (HRDQ), a newly developed measure of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) symptoms. Specifically, the HRDQ was developed for patients, who still experience symptoms with proton...

  15. Vomiting and gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, J Y; Nanayakkhara, C S; Simpson, H

    1988-01-01

    During radionuclide scans in 82 infants and children gastro-oesophageal reflux extending to the upper oesophageal/laryngeal level was detected in 636 one minute frames. Only 61 (9.6%) of these frames were associated with vomiting, defined as the appearance of milk at the mouth. Thus the absence of vomiting does not preclude appreciable gastro-oesophageal reflux. PMID:3415303

  16. The effect of baclofen on gastro-oesophageal reflux, lower oesophageal sphincter function and reflux symptoms in patients with reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herwaarden, M. A.; Samsom, M.; Rydholm, H.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Baclofen decreases gastro-oesophageal reflux episodes in healthy subjects by reducing the incidence of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations. AIM: To investigate the effect of baclofen on reflux symptoms, oesophageal pH and lower oesophageal sphincter manometry in patients

  17. Landmark reading alterations in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms undergoing diagnostic gastroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Mustafa; Tanoglu, Alpaslan; Sakin, Yusuf Serdar; Akyol, Taner; Oncu, Kemal; Kara, Muammer; Yazgan, Yusuf

    2016-12-01

    There is still a debate about the exact measurement of the oesophagogastric junction and the diaphragmatic hiatus among clinicians. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences between landmark readings of gastroscopy on intubation and extubation, and to correlate these readings with a gastro-oesophageal reflux questionnaire. 116 cases who underwent diagnostic gastroscopy between January 2013 and June 2013 were included in this study. Landmark measurements were noted while withdrawing the endoscope and were also evaluated after the gastric air was fully emptied. We first used a frequency scale for the gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms (FSSG) questionnaire in order to investigate dysmotility and acid reflux symptoms in the study population and correlated the FSSG questionnaire with intubation and extubation measurements at endoscopic examination. Mean age of included subjects was 49.41±17.7 (19-82) years. Males and females were equally represented. On FSSG scores, the total dysmotility score was 7.99±5.06 and the total score was 15.18±10.11. The difference between intubation and extubation measurements ranged from -3cm to +2cm (mean: -0.4). When an FSSG score of 30 was accepted as a cut-off value, we detected a significant difference between the measurements (p<0.05; t: 0.048). Accuracy of landmark measurements during gastroscopy is clearly affected from insertion or withdrawal of the endoscope. When differences in measurements between insertion and withdrawal were evident, comparable with the FSSG scores, the results became significantly different. In conclusion, according to FSSG scores, these measurements should be performed at the end of the endoscopy. Copyright © 2016 Pan-Arab Association of Gastroenterology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Gastro-oesophageal reflux and cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulqawi, Rayid; Houghton, Lesley A; Smith, Jaclyn A

    2013-05-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux, either singly or in association with postnasal drip and/or asthma is considered to be a cause of chronic cough. The amount and nature of gastro-oesophageal reflux however is often normal with acid suppression having very little, if any therapeutic effect in these patients. This review examines the challenges posed when exploring the reflux-cough link, and discusses the merits and limitations of the proposed mechanisms of reflux leading to cough.

  19. Associations between respiratory symptoms, lung function and gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms in a population-based birth cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbison G Peter

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have reported an association between asthma and gastro-oesophageal reflux, but it is unclear which condition develops first. The role of obesity in mediating this association is also unclear. We explored the associations between respiratory symptoms, lung function, and gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms in a birth cohort of approximately 1000 individuals. Methods Information on respiratory symptoms, asthma, atopy, lung function and airway responsiveness was obtained at multiple assessments from childhood to adulthood in an unselected birth cohort of 1037 individuals followed to age 26. Symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux and irritable bowel syndrome were recorded at age 26. Results Heartburn and acid regurgitation symptoms that were at least "moderately bothersome" at age 26 were significantly associated with asthma (odds ratio = 3.2; 95% confidence interval = 1.6–6.4, wheeze (OR = 3.5; 95% CI = 1.7–7.2, and nocturnal cough (OR = 4.3; 95% CI = 2.1–8.7 independently of body mass index. In women reflux symptoms were also associated with airflow obstruction and a bronchodilator response to salbutamol. Persistent wheezing since childhood, persistence of asthma since teenage years, and airway hyperresponsiveness since age 11 were associated with a significantly increased risk of heartburn and acid regurgitation at age 26. There was no association between irritable bowel syndrome and respiratory symptoms. Conclusion Reflux symptoms are associated with respiratory symptoms in young adults independently of body mass index. The mechanism of these associations remains unclear.

  20. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with high prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miele, Luca; Cammarota, Giovanni; Vero, Vittoria; Racco, Simona; Cefalo, Consuelo; Marrone, Giuseppe; Pompili, Maurizio; Rapaccini, Gianlodovico; Bianco, Alessandro; Landolfi, Raffaele; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Grieco, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms are usually reported by patients with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and clinical characteristics of gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms in subjects with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Cross-sectional, case-control study of 185 consecutive patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and an age- and sex-matched control group of 112 healthy volunteers. Participants were interviewed with the aid of a previously validated questionnaire to assess lifestyle and reflux symptoms in the 3 months preceding enrolment. Odds ratios were determined before and after adjustment for body mass index, increased waist circumference, physical activity, metabolic syndrome and proton pump inhibitors and/or antiacid medication. The prevalence of heartburn and/or regurgitation and of at least one of gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms was significantly higher in the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease group. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease subjects were associated to higher prevalence of heartburn (adjusted odds ratios: 2.17, 95% confidence intervals: 1.16-4.04), regurgitation (adjusted odds ratios: 2.61, 95% confidence intervals: 1.24-5.48) and belching (adjusted odds ratios: 2.01, 95% confidence intervals: 1.12-3.59) and had higher prevalence of at least one GER symptom (adjusted odds ratios: 3.34, 95% confidence intervals: 1.76-6.36). Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with a higher prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms. Copyright © 2012 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Minimal differences in prevalence and spectrum of organic disease at upper gastrointestinal endoscopy between selected secondary care patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux or dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Andrew J; Pinto-Sanchez, Maria Ines; Bercik, Premysl; Moayyedi, Paul; Ford, Alexander C

    2017-04-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux and dyspepsia are felt to be separate upper gastrointestinal (GI) conditions. We aimed to measure the degree of overlap between them, and assess whether endoscopic findings differed. Demographic, symptom, upper GI endoscopy and histology data were collected from consecutive adults in secondary care. Patients were categorised according to whether they reported gastro-oesophageal reflux alone, dyspepsia alone or both, and patient demographics and endoscopic findings were compared. Of 1167 patients, 97 (8.3%) had gastro-oesophageal reflux alone, 571 (48.9%) dyspepsia alone, and 499 (42.8%) overlap. Patients with overlap symptoms were more likely to smoke, compared with those with gastro-oesophageal reflux alone, or dyspepsia alone (p = .009), but there were no other differences. Patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux alone or overlap had a higher prevalence of erosive oesophagitis (18.6% and 15.4% respectively, p Gastro-oesophageal reflux and dyspepsia symptoms commonly overlap. There were minimal differences in demographics or spectrum of underlying organic disease between various symptom groups, suggesting that restrictive classifications according to predominant symptom may not be clinically useful.

  2. Gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms and coeliac disease: no role for routine duodenal biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Peter D; Evans, Kate E; Kurien, Matthew; Hopper, Andrew D; Sanders, David S

    2015-06-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) has been linked to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). Previous studies have demonstrated an increased prevalence of reflux in patients with CD. However data on the risk for CD in patients presenting with reflux are conflicting. The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of CD in patients with GORD and to elucidate the mechanisms for reflux symptoms in newly diagnosed CD patients. Group A: patients who had undergone routine duodenal biopsy were prospectively recruited between 2004 and 2014. Diagnostic yield was compared with that of a screening cohort. Group B: 32 patients with newly diagnosed CD who had undergone oesophageal manometry and 24-h pH studies were prospectively recruited. Group A: 3368 patients (58.7% female, mean age 53.4 years) underwent routine duodenal biopsy. Of these patients, 850 (25.2%) presented with GORD. The prevalence of CD among GORD patients was 1.3% (0.7-2.4%), which was not significantly higher than that in the general population (P=0.53). Within the context of routine duodenal biopsy at endoscopy (when corrected for concurrent symptoms, age and sex), reflux was found to be negatively associated with CD [adjusted odds ratio 0.12 (0.07-0.23), Preflux. On manometry, 9% had a hypotensive lower oesophageal sphincter and 40.6% had oesophageal motor abnormalities, with 25% significantly hypocontractile. On pH studies, 33% demonstrated reflux episodes. The prevalence of undiagnosed CD among GORD patients is similar to that in the general population, and routine duodenal biopsy cannot be recommended. A significant number of patients with newly diagnosed CD were found to have reflux and/or oesophageal dysmotility on pH/manometry studies; this may explain the high prevalence of reflux symptoms in CD.

  3. Prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease with upper gastrointestinal symptoms without heartburn and regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Nimish; Wernersson, Börje; Ohlsson, Lis; Dent, John

    2014-06-01

    Symptomatically 'silent' gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) may be underdiagnosed. To determine the prevalence of untreated GORD without heartburn and/or regurgitation in primary care. Patients were included if they had frequent upper gastrointestinal symptoms and had not taken a proton pump inhibitor in the previous 2 months (Diamond study: NCT00291746). GORD was diagnosed based on the presence of reflux oesophagitis, pathological oesophageal acid exposure, and/or a positive symptom-acid association probability. Patients completed the Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ) and were interviewed by physicians using a prespecified symptom checklist. GORD was diagnosed in 197 of 336 patients investigated. Heartburn and/or regurgitation were reported in 84.3% of patients with GORD during the physician interviews and in 93.4% of patients with GORD when using the RDQ. Of patients with heartburn and/or regurgitation not identified at physician interview, 58.1% (18/31) reported them at a 'troublesome' frequency and severity on the RDQ. Nine patients with GORD did not report heartburn or regurgitation either at interview or on the RDQ. Structured patient-completed questionnaires may help to identify patients with GORD not identified during physician interview. In a small proportion of consulting patients, heartburn and regurgitation may not be present in those with GORD.

  4. Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Disease: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Murphy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a disorder in which reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications and which affects health-related quality of life. It is one of the commonest disorders and appears to be increasing in incidence. The mechanisms leading to reflux are complex and multifactorial. The lower oesophageal sphincter (LES is an important part of the gastro-oesophageal barrier. Transient LES relaxations (TLESRs lead to reflux as these vagally mediated motor patterns cause relaxation of the LES and also result in oesophageal shortening and inhibition of the crural diaphragm. Heartburn and regurgitation are the characteristic symptoms of GERD. A clinical diagnosis of GERD can be made with typical symptoms. Oesophagitis is seen in a minority of patients with GERD. Lifestyle modification is widely advocated for patients with GERD. For short-term relief of symptoms of mild GERD, antacids/alginates are frequently used but they do not heal oesophagitis. Both histamine 2 receptor antagonists (H2RA and proton pump inhibitors (PPI have been shown to heal and prevent relapse of oesophagitis, although PPIs have been shown to be superior. The PPIs are the recommended first-line therapy for erosive oesophagitis and initial management of non-erosive reflux disease. Maintenance PPI therapy should be given to patients with oesophagitis, those who have recurrence of symptoms after discontinuation of medication and for those with complications of GERD.

  5. Gastro-oesophageal reflux and worse asthma control in obese children: a case of symptom misattribution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jason E; Hossain, Jobayer; Holbrook, Janet T; Teague, W Gerald; Gold, Benjamin D; Wise, Robert A; Lima, John J

    2016-03-01

    Obese children for unknown reasons report greater asthma symptoms. Asthma and obesity both independently associate with gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms (GORS). Determining if obesity affects the link between GORS and asthma will help elucidate the obese-asthma phenotype. Extend our previous work to determine the degree of associations between the GORS and asthma phenotype. We conducted a cross-sectional study of lean (20%-65% body mass index, BMI) and obese (≥95% BMI) children aged 10-17 years old with persistent, early-onset asthma. Participants contributed demographics, GORS and asthma questionnaires and lung function data. We determined associations between weight status, GORS and asthma outcomes using multivariable linear and logistic regression. Findings were replicated in a second well-characterised cohort of asthmatic children. Obese children had seven times higher odds of reporting multiple GORS (OR=7.7, 95% CI 1.9 to 31.0, interaction p value=.004). Asthma symptoms were closely associated with GORS scores in obese patients (r=0.815, pgastro-oesophageal reflux and asthma symptoms suggests that misattribution of GORS to asthma may be a contributing mechanism to excess asthma symptoms in obese children. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Psychometric evaluation of a daily gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptom measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bytzer, Peter; Reimer, Christina; Smith, Gary; Anatchkova, Milena D; Hsieh, Ray; Wilkinson, Joanne; Thomas, S Jane; Lenderking, William R

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the validity of the Heartburn Reflux Dyspepsia Questionnaire (HRDQ), a newly developed measure of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) symptoms. Specifically, the HRDQ was developed for patients, who still experience symptoms with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. The psychometric properties of HRDQ were evaluated based on data from two clinical trials of patients with GORD with a partial response to PPIs, one from the UK and one from Denmark and Germany. The HRDQ had good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha range .83-.88) and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient range .71-.90). Convergent and discriminant validity were supported by high correlations with ReQuest™ and ability to differentiate between groups based on ReQuest™ cut-off values. Responsiveness of HRDQ was demonstrated by moderate to high correlations with ReQuest™ change scores and time with symptoms. An HRDQ cut-off value of 0.70 for definition of 'bad day' was also evaluated. Based on existing evidence, the HRDQ is a valid and reliable measure of GORD symptoms that can be used as a study outcome in clinical trials.

  7. Nocturnal gastro-oesophageal reflux, asthma and symptoms of OSA: a longitudinal, general population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilsson, Össur I; Bengtsson, Anna; Franklin, Karl A; Torén, Kjell; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Farkhooy, Amir; Weyler, Joost; Dom, Sandra; De Backer, Wilfried; Gislason, Thorarinn; Janson, Christer

    2013-06-01

    Nocturnal gastro-oesophageal reflux (nGOR) is associated with asthma and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Our aim was to investigate whether nGOR is a risk factor for onset of asthma and onset of respiratory and OSA symptoms in a prospective population-based study. We invited 2640 subjects from Iceland, Sweden and Belgium for two evaluations over a 9-year interval. They participated in structured interviews, answered questionnaires, and underwent spirometries and methacholine challenge testing. nGOR was defined by reported symptoms. Subjects with persistent nGOR (n=123) had an independent increased risk of new asthma at follow-up (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.1-4.9). Persistent nGOR was independently related to onset of respiratory symptoms (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.6-5.6). The risk of developing symptoms of OSA was increased in subjects with new and persistent nGOR (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.3-1.6, and OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.0-3.7, respectively). No significant association was found between nGOR and lung function or bronchial responsiveness. Persistent symptoms of nGOR contribute to the development of asthma and respiratory symptoms. New onset of OSA symptoms is higher among subjects with symptoms of nGOR. These findings provide evidence that nGOR may play a role in the genesis of respiratory symptoms and diseases.

  8. Meta-analysis: the association of oesophageal adenocarcinoma with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, J. H.; Taylor, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Endoscopic screening has been proposed for patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the hope of reducing mortality from oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Assessing the net benefits of such a strategy requires a precise understanding of the cancer risk in the screened population. Aim To estimate precisely the association between symptoms of GERD and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Methods Systematic review and meta-analysis of population-based studies with strict ascertainment of exposure and outcomes. Results Five eligible studies were identified. At least weekly symptoms of GERD increased the odds of oesophageal adenocarcinoma fivefold (odds ratio = 4.92; 95% confidence interval = 3.90, 6.22), and daily symptoms increased the odds sevenfold (random effects summary odds ratio = 7.40, 95% confidence interval = 4.94, 11.1), each compared with individuals without symptoms or less frequent symptoms. Duration of symptoms was also associated with oesophageal adenocarcinoma, but with very heterogeneous results, and unclear thresholds. Conclusions Frequent GERD symptoms are strongly associated with oesophageal adenocarcinoma. These results should be useful in developing epidemiological models of the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma, and in models of interventions aimed at reducing mortality from this cancer. PMID:20955441

  9. Effect of coffee on gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with reflux disease and healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, P. J.; Samsom, M.; Smout, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) report that coffee aggravates their symptoms and doctors tend to discourage its use in GORD. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of coffee ingestion on gastro-oesophageal acid reflux. DESIGN: A randomized, controlled, crossover

  10. Persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Daphne; How, Choon How; Ang, Tiing Leong

    2016-10-01

    About one-third of patients with suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) do not respond symptomatically to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Many of these patients do not suffer from GERD, but may have underlying functional heartburn or atypical chest pain. Other causes of failure to respond to PPIs include inadequate acid suppression, non-acid reflux, oesophageal hypersensitivity, oesophageal dysmotility and psychological comorbidities. Functional oesophageal tests can exclude cardiac and structural causes, as well as help to confi rm or exclude GERD. The use of PPIs should only be continued in the presence of acid reflux or oesophageal hypersensitivity for acid reflux-related events that is proven on functional oesophageal tests. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  11. Gastro-oesophageal reflux and belching revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, Albert Jan

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis recent studies into the pathophysiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and belching are described. The thesis is divided into four parts. Part I describes studies in which the technique of impedance monitoring is validated. With impedance monitoring reflux of liquid and gas can

  12. Relationship between dental erosion and respiratory symptoms in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Geng-Ru; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Zhong-Gao; Jiang, Guang-Shui; Guo, Cheng-Hao

    2010-11-01

    Both dental erosion and respiratory symptoms are extra-oesophageal manifestations of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The aim of this study was to determine whether dental erosion was correlated with respiratory symptoms in GERD patients. 88 GERD patients were recruited and assigned to three groups mainly according to the frequency of respiratory symptoms: Group I: never; Group II: occasional (1-2 days a week or less); Group III: frequent (3-5 days a week or more). All patients underwent medical evaluations, including medical history, questionnaire answering and alimentary tract examinations. Dental examinations were carried out on these patients and 36 healthy controls. Dental erosions were measured by modified method of Smith and Knight Tooth Wear Index (TWI). Location and severity of dental erosion were recorded. The prevalence of dental erosion in Group III (64.52%) was higher (pdental erosion with TWI scores ranging from 1 to 4. Though proportion of dental erosion with Score 2 (7/20) in Group III was higher than that in Group I (2/11) and Group II (3/12), there was no statistical significance in the proportions of erosion scores among three patient groups. Correlation coefficient between airway symptoms and scores of dental erosion was 0.231 (perosion of upper incisor was seen in 8 persons (72.7%) in Group I, 9 persons (75%) in Group II and 16 persons (80%) in Group III (p>0.05). Labial erosion of upper incisors was found in 1 person in Groups I and II respectively and 4 persons in Group III. All patients with labial erosion on upper incisors had palatal erosion, except 1 patient in Group III. In GERD patients, dental erosions are more prevalent in patients with frequent respiratory symptoms than those in patients with occasional and without respiratory symptoms. Palatal erosion of upper incisor is the main manifestation in patients. Acid reflux is the main causative factor of dental erosion in GERD patients with airway symptoms. Copyright © 2010

  13. Radiologic diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fransson, S.G.; Soekjer, H.; Johansson, K.E.; Tibbling, L.

    In 149 patients, a standardized radiologic method for the detection of gastro-oesophageal reflux was applied and compared with the results obtained at endoscopy and by a manometric reflux test. Radiologic reflux was recorded in 53 patients, of whom 25 had reflux without abdominal compression and 51 with compression. At least one of the other two types of examination disclosed pathologic conditions in all but 2 of 53 patients. Oesophagitis was significantly more severe among the patients with reflux observed at radiography. The presence of hiatal incompetence with reflux only to the hiatal hernia but not to the oesophagus was not a strong indicator of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Hiatal hernia was present in a significantly larger number of the patients with reflux at radiography than in those without reflux. Increased width of the hiatus gave stronger evidence for reflux disease than in patients with a normal hiatus. Thus, the width of the hiatus also had a bearing on the diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

  14. Upper aerodigestive tract disorders and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciorba, Andrea; Bianchini, Chiara; Zuolo, Michele; Feo, Carlo Vittorio

    2015-02-16

    A wide variety of symptoms and diseases of the upper aerodigestive tract are associated to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). These disorders comprise a large variety of conditions such as asthma, chronic otitis media and sinusitis, chronic cough, and laryngeal disorders including paroxysmal laryngospasm. Laryngo-pharyngeal reflux disease is an extraoesophageal variant of GORD that can affect the larynx and pharynx. Despite numerous research efforts, the diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux often remains elusive, unproven and controversial, and its treatment is then still empiric. Aim of this paper is to review the current literature on upper aerodigestive tract disorders in relation to pathologic gastro-oesophageal reflux, focusing in particular on the pathophysiology base and results of the surgical treatment of GORD.

  15. Oesophagitis, signs of reflux, and gastric acid secretion in patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, K.E.; Ask, P.; Boeryd, B.; Fransson, S.G.; Tibbling, L.

    1986-01-01

    In a study comprising 100 patients referred to a surgical clinic with symptons suggestive of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, the value of different diagnostic procedures was investigated. Positive acid perfusion and 24-h pH tests were the commonest findings. Forty-nine per cent showed normal oesophageal mucosa or diffuse oesophagitis at endoscopy. The severity of heartburn and regurgitation did not differ between patients with normal oesophageal mucosa and oesophagitis of various severities. The severity of macroscopic oesophagitis was significantly corelated to the total reflux time, the presence of reflux or a hiatal hernia at radiology, an open cardia or reflux at endoscopy, pressure transmission or reflux, and low lower oesophageal sphincter pressure at manometry. Gastric hypersecretion was found in 66% of the patients. Gastric acid secretion was not correlated to the severity of oesophagitis or to the findings at 24-h pH test. In patients with severe oesophagitis the sensivity for radiologic, manometric and endoscopic signs of incompetence of the gastro-oesophageal junction was 94%.

  16. Oesophagitis, signs of reflux, and gastric acid secretion in patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, K.E.; Ask, P.; Boeryd, B.; Fransson, S.G.; Tibbling, L.

    1986-01-01

    In a study comprising 100 patients referred to a surgical clinic with symptons suggestive of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, the value of different diagnostic procedures was investigated. Positive acid perfusion and 24-h pH tests were the commonest findings. Forty-nine per cent showed normal oesophageal mucosa or diffuse oesophagitis at endoscopy. The severity of heartburn and regurgitation did not differ between patients with normal oesophageal mucosa and oesophagitis of various severities. The severity of macroscopic oesophagitis was significantly corelated to the total reflux time, the presence of reflux or a hiatal hernia at radiology, an open cardia or reflux at endoscopy, pressure transmission or reflux, and low lower oesophageal sphincter pressure at manometry. Gastric hypersecretion was found in 66% of the patients. Gastric acid secretion was not correlated to the severity of oesophagitis or to the findings at 24-h pH test. In patients with severe oesophagitis the sensivity for radiologic, manometric and endoscopic signs of incompetence of the gastro-oesophageal junction was 94%

  17. Complications of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasa, S; Sharma, P

    2013-06-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is on the rise with more than 20% of the western population reporting symptoms and is the most common gastrointestinal disorder in the United States. This increase in GORD is not exactly clear but has been attributed to the increasing prevalence of obesity, changing diet, and perhaps the decreasing prevalence of H. pylori infection. Complications of GORD could be either benign or malignant. Benign complications include erosive oesophagitis, bleeding and peptic strictures. Premalignant and malignant lesions include Barrett's metaplasia, and oesophageal cancer. Management of both the benign and malignant complications can be challenging. With the use of proton-pump inhibitors, peptic strictures (i.e., strictures related to reflux) have significantly declined. Several aspects of Barrett's management remain controversial including the stage in the disease process which needs to be intervened, type of the intervention and surveillance of these lesions to prevent development of high grade dysplasia and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiologic quantitation of gastro-oesophageal reflux. Correlation between height of food stimulated gastro-oesophageal reflux and level of histologic changes in reflux oesophagitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, T.; Funch-Jensen, P.; Jacobsen, N.O.; Thommesen, P.

    In a prospective study, 26 patients with symptoms of reflux oesophagitis underwent a barium examination for gastro-oesophageal reflux after food stimulation, and endoscopy with biopsy from different levels of the oesophagus. Radiologic grading of the gastro-oesophageal reflux depending on the height of the reflux into the oesophagus was performed, and this was correlated to the microscopic appearance at different levels in the oesophagus. Complete agreement between the radiologic grading and the histology was found in 69 per cent of the cases, and when gastro-oesophageal reflux was demonstrated the agreement was 75 per cent. Accordingly, the results showed a good accordance between the two variants, indicating that the height of the reflux during the food stimulated test may be truly indicative of the reflux height under non-test conditions.

  19. The management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keung, Charlotte; Hebbard, Geoffrey

    2016-02-01

    If there are no features of serious disease, suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease can be initially managed with a trial of a proton pump inhibitor for 4-8 weeks. This should be taken 30-60 minutes before food for optimal effect. Once symptoms are controlled, attempt to withdraw acid suppression therapy. If symptoms recur, use the minimum dose that controls symptoms. Patients who have severe erosive oesophagitis, scleroderma oesophagus or Barrett's oesophagus require long-term treatment with a proton pump inhibitor. Lifestyle modification strategies can help gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Weight loss has the strongest evidence for efficacy. Further investigation and a specialist referral are required if there is no response to proton pump inhibitor therapy. Atypical symptoms or signs of serious disease also need investigation.

  20. Gastro-oesophageal reflux in children--what's the worry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Katie; Ho, Shaun S C

    2012-05-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux is common and benign in children, especially during infancy. Distinguishing between gastrooesophageal reflux, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and other illnesses presenting as chronic vomiting can be difficult. The general practitioner has a key role to play in identifying if a child requires referral for further investigation. This article outlines the main differential diagnoses to be considered in children presenting with chronic vomiting and/ or regurgitation. We also discuss key management decisions regarding gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in children and when to refer to a specialist for further investigation. Chronic vomiting and regurgitation frequently occurs in infancy and is most commonly due to simple, benign gastrooesophageal reflux, which is usually self limiting without requirement for further investigation. In contrast, gastrooesophageal reflux disease requires considered management and may be a presenting symptom of food allergy requiring more intensive therapy than simple acid suppression. Regular review by the general practitioner to ascertain warning signs will ensure that other serious illnesses are not overlooked and that appropriate investigation and specialist referral are made.

  1. Don't eat tomatoes: patient's self-reported experiences of causes of symptoms in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibley, Lesley B; Norton, Christine; Jones, Roger

    2010-08-01

    About 30-50% of patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) experience refractory symptoms despite taking proton pump inhibitors regularly. Epidemiology studies suggest lifestyle risks, but these are under-represented in existing guidelines. The potential for changes to positively impact on symptoms may be underestimated. Lifestyle advice currently appears to be ineffective. To inform the future design of a behaviour change intervention aimed at improving symptoms for patients with GORD, by exploring patient understanding and experiences of lifestyle influences on GORD symptoms. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 23 patients (12 women and 11 men) aged 30-86 years, aiming to identify lifestyle influences perceived by patients to affect their symptoms. Patients reported a wide range of daily influences on their symptoms, including diet, drinking with a meal, body position, alcohol, gaining weight, stress and anxiety. Dietary influences included types of food eaten and eating pattern-including speed of eating and meal size. Many foods were identified as troublesome, but not all foods affected all patients. Eating late and daytime tiredness were not recognized as causes or consequences of night-time reflux. Patients stated that daily living patterns affected their reflux symptoms, but influences were highly variable between respondents. Lifestyle factors appear to combine in unique patterns for individuals, but GORD patients may not be able to identify potential triggers and make changes for themselves. A behaviour change intervention might prove beneficial to these patients.

  2. Dental erosions and other extra-oesophageal symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: Evidence, treatment response and areas of uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Ans

    2015-04-01

    Extra-oesophageal symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) are often studied, but remain a subject of debate. It has been clearly shown that there is a relationship between the extra-oesophageal symptoms chronic cough, asthma, laryngitis and dental erosion and GORD. Literature is abundant concerning reflux-related cough and reflux-related asthma, but much less is known about reflux-related dental erosions. The prevalence of dental erosion in GORD and vice versa, the prevalence of GORD in patients with dental erosion is high but the exact mechanism of reflux-induced tooth wear erosion is still under review.

  3. Dynamic characteristic of gastro-oesophageal reflux in ambulatory patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and normal control subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusten, B. L.; Akkermans, L. M.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Smout, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to investigate the dynamic characteristics of pathologic gastro-oesophageal reflux. METHODS: Five-channel ambulatory 24-h oesophageal pH monitoring was performed in 19 gastro-oesophageal reflux disease patients (age, 21-74 years) and in 19 healthy volunteers

  4. The natural history of gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms in the community and its effects on survival: a longitudinal 10-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, A C; Forman, D; Bailey, A G; Axon, A T R; Moayyedi, P

    2013-02-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS) are common in the community. However, few studies have examined their long-term natural history, or impact on survival. To examine these issues in individuals recruited into a community-based screening programme for Helicobacter pylori in 1994. Data on mortality and cause of death at 10 years were obtained from the Office for National Statistics. Baseline demographic data, lifestyle factors, gastrointestinal symptoms and quality of life were recorded at study entry. The effect of all these factors on persistent and new-onset GERS, and 10-year mortality, were examined using univariate and multivariate analysis, with results expressed as odds ratios (ORs) or hazard ratios (HR) with 99% confidence intervals (CI). Of 3967 individuals providing complete GERS data at baseline and 10 years, 549 (13.8%) had GERS at baseline. Of these, 183 (33.3%) had persistent symptoms. Among 3418 individuals asymptomatic at baseline, approximately 0.8% per year developed new-onset GERS. No predictors of persistent GERS were identified. New-onset symptoms were associated with lower quality of life or presence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) at baseline, and higher body mass index (BMI) at 10 years. There were 8331 (99.1%) of 8407 subjects providing complete GERS data at baseline, 1289 (15.5%) of whom were symptomatic. Presence of GERS at baseline did not affect survival (HR: 0.84; 99% CI: 0.44-1.59). Gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms persisted in one-third of individuals, whilst new-onset gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms were associated with poor quality of life, irritable bowel syndrome and higher body mass index. Gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms did not impact adversely on survival. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Gender differences in symptoms in partial responders to proton pump inhibitors for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, N; Niklasson, A; Denison, H; Rydén, A

    2015-10-01

    Gender differences may exist in the symptom experience of patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who have a partial response to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The purpose of this study was to analyse gender differences in partial responders to PPIs. Patients with GERD who responded partially to PPIs (n = 580; NCT00703534) completed the Reflux Symptom Questionnaire 7-day recall (RESQ-7) and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). Anxiety and depression were evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Women had significantly higher RESQ-7 domain scores than men for Heartburn (frequency: 4.3 vs 3.9; intensity: 3.1 vs 2.8), Burping (frequency: 4.9 vs 4.4; intensity: 3.1 vs 2.8) and Hoarseness, cough and difficulty swallowing (frequency: 2.6 vs 2.2; intensity: 1.8 vs 1.5), and had higher GSRS domain discomfort scores than men for Abdominal pain (3.51 vs 3.23), Indigestion (3.80 vs 3.45) and Constipation (2.69 vs 2.17) (all p < 0.05). Anxiety and depression were significantly more prevalent in women than in men. In this population of partial responders, women had more frequent/intense heartburn and extra-oesophageal symptoms and more discomfort from abdominal pain, indigestion and constipation than men. Comorbid anxiety and depression may contribute to the increased symptom burden in women.

  6. Clinical and pH-metric characteristics of gastro-oesophageal reflux secondary to cows' milk protein allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavataio, F; Iacono, G; Montalto, G; Soresi, M; Tumminello, M; Carroccio, A

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: The primary aim was to assess whether there were differences in symptoms, laboratory data, and oesophageal pH-metry between infants with primary gastro-oesophageal reflux and those with reflux secondary to cows' milk protein allergy (CMPA). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 96 infants (mean(SD) age 7.8(2.0) months) with either primary gastro-oesophageal reflux, reflux with CMPA, CMPA only, or none of these (controls) were studied. Symptoms, immunochemical data, and oesophageal pH were compared between the four groups and the effect of a cows' milk protein-free diet on the severity of symptoms was also assessed. RESULTS: 14 out of 47(30%) infants with gastro-oesophageal reflux had CMPA. These infants had similar symptoms to those with primary gastro-oesophageal reflux but higher concentrations of total IgE and circulating eosinophils (p gastro-oesophageal reflux secondary to CMPA and in 24 of 25 infants with CMPA only. No infants with primary gastro-oesophageal reflux and none of the controls had this pattern. A cows' milk protein-free diet was associated with a significant improvement in symptoms only in infants with gastro-oesophageal reflux with CMPA. CONCLUSION: A characteristic oesophageal pH pattern is useful in distinguishing infants with gastro-oesophageal reflux associated with CMPA. PMID:8813871

  7. if, when and how to treat gastro-oesophageal reflux

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    persistent occult gastro-oesophageal reflux; (iiz) persistence ... deterioration of bronchopulmonary disease. From this the reader ... problem by means of simple barium studies, to management ... Gastroesophageal reflux in the preterm infant.

  8. Food-stimulated gastro-oesophageal reflux demonstrated by barium examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, T.; Thommesen, P.

    A prospective investigation on gastro-oesophageal reflux in 97 consecutive patients has been carried out by means of a barium examination employing the conventional method and after food stimulation. Gastro-oesophageal reflux was observed in 38 patients with and 15 patients without oesophageal symptoms. Gastro-oesophageal reflux was induced by two mechanisms, an active component after food stimulation and a passive component after the conventional method including respiratory manoeuvres and leg raising. In 32 patients, only the active component could be demonstrated and in 6 patients only the passive component. In the remaining 15 patients both active and passive components occurred. The clinical significance of the active and passive components in gastro-oesophageal reflux needs further investigation.

  9. Food-stimulated gastro-oesophageal reflux demonstrated by barium examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, T.; Thommesen, P.

    1986-01-01

    A prospective investigation on gastro-oesophageal reflux in 97 consecutive patients has been carried out by means of a barium examination employing the conventional method and after food stimulation. Gastro-oesophageal reflux was observed in 38 patients with and 15 patients without oesophageal symptoms. Gastro-oesophageal reflux was induced by two mechanisms, an active component after food stimulation and a passive component after the conventional method including respiratory manoeuvres and leg raising. In 32 patients, only the active component could be demonstrated and in 6 patients only the passive component. In the remaining 15 patients both active and passive components occurred. The clinical significance of the active and passive components in gastro-oesophageal reflux needs further investigation. (orig.)

  10. Tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness-Jensen, Eivind; Lagergren, Jesper

    2017-10-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) develops when reflux of gastric content causes troublesome symptoms or complications. The main symptoms are heartburn and acid regurgitation and complications include oesophagitis, strictures, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. In addition to hereditary influence, GORD is associated with lifestyle factors, mainly obesity. Tobacco smoking is regarded as an aetiological factor of GORD, while alcohol consumption is considered a triggering factor of reflux episodes and not a causal factor. Yet, both tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption can reduce the lower oesophageal sphincter pressure, facilitating reflux. In addition, tobacco smoking reduces the production of saliva rich in bicarbonate, which is important for buffering and clearance of acid in the oesophagus. Alcohol also has a direct noxious effect on the oesophageal mucosa, which predisposes to acidic injury. Tobacco smoking cessation reduces the risk of GORD symptoms and avoidance of alcohol is encouraged in individuals where alcohol consumption triggers reflux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Gastro-oesophageal reflux. Part 1: smoking and alcohol reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Talalwah, Narmeen; Woodward, Sue

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is defined as an abnormal reflux of the stomach contents into the oesophagus, which provokes symptoms and impairs the quality of life. GORD has a high prevalence and incurs costs to the healthcare system. This is the first paper in a series of three exploring the conservative, medical and surgical treatment of GORD. This first paper presents a review of the effect of smoking and alcohol on reflux symptoms and the impact of smoking and alcohol reduction on symptoms of GORD. A search for English language studies on adults was conducted using three databases, MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL). Eleven relevant studies were included in the review. The effect of alcohol on the stimulation of reflux has been debated over the years in different studies. Some studies state that alcohol consumption induces reflux and moderate amounts exacerbate nocturnal gastro-oesophageal heartburn reflux. However, other studies have found no association between alcohol consumption and reflux. Most reflux occurs during smoking because nicotine causes the lower oesophageal sphincter to relax, which increases the risk of reflux. Similarly, the number of cigarettes smoked is associated with the risk of reflux. Nurses need to be aware of the effect of smoking and alcohol on reflux to provide evidence-based advice to empower patients to change their lifestyle, which results in increased therapeutic compliance and a better clinical status. There is no evidence that reducing alcohol consumption decreases symptoms and only limited evidence on the effectiveness of smoking cessation. Further research into the effectiveness of these lifestyle modifications is therefore required.

  12. [Proton pump inhibitors in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: what is the further step?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Mireille; Zerbib, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Optimisation of proton pump inhibitors use may improve reflux symptoms in 20-25% of the patients. Pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux should be documented in a patient with refractory reflux symptoms using upper endoscopy and/or pH testing. While on proton pump inhibitors twice daily, persistent symptoms are not related to gastro-oesophageal refluxdisease(GERD) in 50% of the patients. The new anti-reflux compounds have yet a limited efficacy and side effects that currently limit their development. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. There is no correlation between signs of reflux laryngitis and reflux oesophagitis in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenik, K; Kajzrlikova, I M; Vitek, P; Urban, O; Hanousek, M; Kominek, P

    2017-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine if there is correlation between signs of reflux laryngitis (RL) and reflux oesophagitis (RE) in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) symptoms. Laryngeal photography obtained from patients during oesophagogastroduodenoscopy were examined by two otolaryngologists experienced in the field of extra-oesophageal reflux regarding the presence and severity of RL. The presence of RE was evaluated by gastroenterologist. Smokers, heavy drinkers and patients with bronchial asthma were excluded from the statistical analysis. A total of 681 patients were analysed. RL was diagnosed in 367 (53.9%) cases, of whom 182 patients had mild, 118 moderate and 67 severe (Reflux Finding Score > 7) RL. RE was diagnosed in 103 (28.1%) patients with RL and in 80 (25.7%) patients without RL. Neither the difference between the overall group of patients with RL and those without (OR 1.141, 95% CI 0.811-1.605, p = 0.448), nor the differences between the respective subgroups of patients with mild, moderate and severe RL and those without RL were statistically significant. The OR and 95% CI for mild, moderate and severe RL were 1.042, 95% CI 0.712-1.526, p = 0.834, 1.182, 95% CI 0.764-1.831, p = 0.453 and 1.0, 95% CI 0.566-1.766, p = 0.999 respectively. It can be concluded that there is no correlation between RL and RE in patients with GORD symptoms. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  14. Respiratory manifestations of gastro-oesophageal reflux in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Benedictis, Fernando Maria; Bush, Andrew

    2018-03-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is a complex problem in children. Suspected respiratory manifestations of GORD, such as asthma, chronic cough and laryngitis, are commonly encountered in the paediatric practice, but continue to be entities with more questions than answers. The accuracy of diagnostic tests (ie, pH or pH-impedance monitoring, laryngoscopy, endoscopy) for patients with suspected extraoesophageal manifestations of GORD is suboptimal and therefore whether there is a causal relationship between these conditions remains largely undetermined. An empiric trial of proton pump inhibitors can help individual children with undiagnosed respiratory symptoms and suspicion of GORD, but the response to therapy is unpredictable, and in any case what may be being observed is spontaneous improvement. Furthermore, the safety of these agents has been called into question. Poor response to antireflux therapy is an important trigger to search for non-gastro-oesophageal reflux causes for patients' symptoms. Evidence for the assessment of children with suspected extraoesophageal manifestations of GORD is scanty and longitudinal studies with long-term follow-up are urgently required. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Detection of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. The clinical value of a barium examination after food stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, T.; Ravnsbaek, J.; Toettrup, A.; Funch-Jensen, P.; Thommesen, P.

    In a prospective study a barium examination combined with food stimulation was compared with the acid reflux test in 30 consecutive patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux. Both methods were further compared with endoscopy and histology. Gastro-oesophageal reflux could be demonstrated by the radiologic examination in 22 patients and by the acid reflux test in 23 patients. By combining the two methods gastro-oesophageal reflux could be demonstrated in 27 patients. Comparing the two methods with symptoms, endoscopy, and histology they seemed to be of equal value. Accordingly, a food-stimulated barium examination is recommended as the first method for demonstrating gastro-oesophageal reflux because it is simple and well-tolerated by the patient.

  16. Influence of Cisapride on food-stimulated gastro-oesophageal reflux: A radiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelineck, J.; Aksglade, K.; Funch-Jensen, P.; Thommesen, P.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of Cisapride on food-stimulated gastro-oesophageal reflux meachanisms was studied in a double-blind cross-over investigation in 24 consecutive patients selected by endoscopy, 12 with microscopical evidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux and 12 with additional macroscopic oesoghagitis. 63% had food-stimulated gastro-oesophageal reflux, and Cisapride significantly reduced the tendency to gastro-oesophageal reflux and mucosal contact time between gastric content and the oesophageal mucosa in 73% of these patients. It is concluded that Cisapride could be valuable in the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux. (orig.) [de

  17. Incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux in geriatric clinical patients - a radiological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brackins-Romero, J.; Bruening, B.; Beyer, H.K.

    1984-05-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux is obviously caused by an insufficiency of the dilatable lower end of the oesophagus. The physiological pressure acting on it corresponds to 15-30 mm Hg so that the gastric juice is prevented from entering the oesophagus. Reflux is associated with a reduction of that pressure. Many causes may be responsible, although hiatal hernia, where confirmed, will only play a secondary part. In half of the 74 examined elderly patients, gastro-oesophageal reflux was confirmed by radiology. About half of these suffered also from hiatal hernia which was a sliding hernia in 75 per cent of the cases. In about 25 per cent of the patients suffering from gastro-oesophageal reflux, signs of oesophagitis were discovered by radiology. There was no correlation between overweight and the incidence of reflux, but hiatus hernia and a positive Broca test were distinctly related to one another. In patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux, vomiting as a key symptom was more frequently confirmed than in patients without reflux.

  18. Incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux in geriatric clinical patients - a radiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackins-Romero, J.; Bruening, B.; Beyer, H.K.

    1984-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux is obviously caused by an insufficiency of the dilatable lower end of the oesophagus. The physiological pressure acting on it corresponds to 15-30 mm Hg so that the gastric juice is prevented from entering the oesophagus. Reflux is associated with a reduction of that pressure. Many causes may be responsible, although hiatal hernia, where confirmed, will only play a secondary part. In half of the 74 examined elderly patients, gastro-oesophageal reflux was confirmed by radiology. About half of these suffered also from hiatal hernia which was a sliding hernia in 75 per cent of the cases. In about 25 per cent of the patients suffering from gastro-oesophageal reflux, signs of oesophagitis were discovered by radiology. There was no correlation between overweight and the incidence of reflux, but hiatus hernia and a positive Broca test were distinctly related to one another. In patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux, vomiting as a key symptom was more frequently confirmed than in patients without reflux. (orig./WU) [de

  19. Randomised clinical trial: daily pantoprazole magnesium 40 mg vs. esomeprazole 40 mg for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, assessed by endoscopy and symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes-Filho, J P; Pedroso, M; Quigley, E M M

    2014-01-01

    Pantoprazole magnesium (pantoprazole-Mg) may display extended inhibition of the proton pump with the potential for improved clinical efficacy in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD). To compare the efficacy of pantoprazole-Mg and esomeprazole in GERD. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (Los Angeles grades A-D) patients were randomised to 4 weeks of treatment with pantoprazole-Mg (n = 290) or esomeprazole (n = 288), both 40 mg once daily, in this multicentre (14 Brazilian sites in 9 cities), double-blind study, with an additional 4 weeks' treatment in nonresponding patients. Severity of oesophagitis (at endoscopy) and GERD-related symptoms (ReQuest-GI) were assessed. The primary end point was the proportion of patients in complete remission (ReQuest-GI score <1.73 plus endoscopic healing) at week 4. Complete remission occurred in 61% of patients in each treatment group at 4 weeks (primary endpoint) and in 81% and 79% of patients in the pantoprazole-Mg and esomeprazole groups at 8 weeks, with no significant differences. Mucosal healing rates were high and not significantly different. At 8 weeks, symptom relief with pantoprazole-Mg was significantly greater than that with esomeprazole (91.6% vs. 86.0%, P = 0.0370) because of continued improvement in symptoms with pantoprazole-Mg from week 4 to week 8 (P = 0.0206). Pantoprazole-Mg 40 mg was at least as effective as esomeprazole 40 mg for complete remission and the mucosal healing rate was high. Symptom relief with pantoprazole-Mg continued to improve from 4 to 8 weeks and was greater than that with esomeprazole at week 8, suggesting an extended period of treatment effect (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01132638). © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A proposition for the diagnosis and treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in children: A report from a working group on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Vandenplas (Yvan); A. Ashkenazi (A.); D. Belli (D.); N. Boige (N.); J. Bouquet (Jan); S. Cadranel (S.); J.P. Cezard (J.); S. Cucchiara (S.); C. Dupont (C.); K. Geboes (K.); F. Gottrand; H.S.A. Heymans (Hugo); C. Jasinski (C.); C.M.F. Kneepkens (Frank); S. Koletzko (Sybille); P. Milla (Peter); J.F. Mougenot (J.); D. Nusslé (D.); J. Navarro (J.); S.J. Newell (S.); E. Olafsdottir (E.); S. Peeters (S.); A. Ravelli (A.); I. Polanco (I.); B. Sandhu; J.J. Tolboom (Jules)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, a Working Group on Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux discusses recommendations for the first line diagnostic and therapeutic approach of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in infants and children. All members of the Working Group agreed that infants with uncomplicated

  1. Postprandial gastro-oesophageal reflux demonstrated by radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, P.R.; Mohr Madsen, K.; Naeser, A.; Thommesen, P. (Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1991-05-01

    An investigation to detect food-stimulated gastro-oesophageal (GE) reflux was carried out in 54 consecutive fasting patients, 35 of whom experienced reflux while 19 did not. All patients then received a standard meal (566 kcal), and the investigation was repeated 1 h afterward. Of the 35 with GE reflux in the fasting state, 33 also had GE reflux in the postprandial state, and 17 of the 19 patients with no GE reflux while fasting also had none in the postprandial state. It is concluded that the radiological method can identify most patients in whom food-stimulated GE reflux could be of clinical significance. (orig.).

  2. Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux in Noncystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie L. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical presentation of noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis may be complicated by concomitant conditions, including gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR. Increased acidic GOR is principally caused by gastro-oesophageal junction incompetence and may arise from lower oesophageal sphincter hypotension, including transient relaxations, hiatus hernia, and oesophageal dysmotility. Specific pathophysiological features which are characteristic of respiratory diseases including coughing may further increase the risk of GOR in bronchiectasis. Reflux may impact on lung disease severity by two mechanisms, reflex bronchoconstriction and pulmonary microaspiration. Symptomatic and clinically silent reflux has been detected in bronchiectasis, with the prevalence of 26 to 75%. The cause and effect relationship has not been established, but preliminary reports suggest that GOR may influence the severity of bronchiectasis. Further studies examining the implications of GOR in this condition, including its effect across the disease spectrum using a combination of diagnostic tools, will clarify the clinical significance of this comorbidity.

  3. Epidemiology and natural history of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spechler, S J

    1992-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) are confounded by the lack of a standardized definition and a diagnostic 'gold-standard' for the disorder. In Western countries, 20-40% of the adult population experience heartburn, which is the cardinal symptom of GORD, but only some 2% of adults have objective evidence of reflux oesophagitis. The incidence of GORD increases with age, rising dramatically after 40 years of age. There is also wide geographical variation in prevalence. Complications, including oesophageal ulcer and stricture, and Barrett's oesophagus, are found in up to 20% of patients with verified reflux oesophagitis. The signs and symptoms of GORD often wax and wane in intensity, and spontaneous remissions have been reported. In most cases, however, GORD is a chronic condition that returns shortly after discontinuing therapy. Although GORD causes substantial morbidity, the annual mortality rate due to GORD is very low (approximately 1 death per 100,000 patients), and even severe GORD has no apparent effect on longevity, although the quality of life can be significantly impaired. There are data to suggest that the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) contributes to oesophagitis and stricture formation in patients with GORD. Although these data are not conclusive, it seems prudent, if possible, to avoid the use of NSAIDs in patients with GORD, particularly those with oesophageal stricture.

  4. Scintimetric objectification of the pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobl, R.

    1981-01-01

    In this investigation, the author initially made animal experiments to find out: - if and how the gastro-oesophageal reflux in a cardiac insufficiency caused by cardiomyotomy could be proven quantitatively by scintiscanning as often as wanted and how the course of the arising oesophagitis correlated with the findings of the scintiscanning. For the clinical examinations, he referred to patients complaining the reflux difficulties or patients who had had a Balanced Operation because of a reflux disease. The main concern was to clarify the special characteristics and the reliability of reflux scintiscanning and to compare them to conventional methods of radiological and endoscopic reflux diagnostics. (orig./MG) [de

  5. Systematic review: relationships between sleep and gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, J; Holloway, R H; Eastwood, P R

    2013-10-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) adversely impacts on sleep, but the mechanism remains unclear. To review the literature concerning gastro-oesophageal reflux during the sleep period, with particular reference to the sleep/awake state at reflux onset. Studies identified by systematic literature searches were assessed. Overall patterns of reflux during the sleep period show consistently that oesophageal acid clearance is slower, and reflux frequency and oesophageal acid exposure are higher in patients with GERD than in healthy individuals. Of the 17 mechanistic studies identified by the searches, 15 reported that a minority of reflux episodes occurred during stable sleep, but the prevailing sleep state at the onset of reflux in these studies remains unclear owing to insufficient temporal resolution of recording or analysis methods. Two studies, in healthy individuals and patients with GERD, analysed sleep and pH with adequate resolution for temporal alignment of sleep state and the onset of reflux: all 232 sleep period reflux episodes evaluated occurred during arousals from sleep lasting less than 15 s or during longer duration awakenings. Six mechanistic studies found that transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations were the most common mechanism of sleep period reflux. Contrary to the prevailing view, subjective impairment of sleep in GERD is unlikely to be due to the occurrence of reflux during stable sleep, but could result from slow clearance of acid reflux that occurs during arousals or awakenings from sleep. Definitive studies are needed on the sleep/awake state at reflux onset across the full GERD spectrum. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Long-term symptom control of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease 12 years after laparoscopic Nissen or 180° anterior partial fundoplication in a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roks, D J; Broeders, J A; Baigrie, R J

    2017-06-01

    Laparoscopic 180° anterior fundoplication has been shown to achieve similar reflux control to Nissen fundoplication, with fewer side-effects, up to 5 years. However, there is a paucity of long-term follow-up data on this technique and antireflux surgery in general. This study reports 12-year outcomes of a double-blind RCT comparing laparoscopic Nissen versus 180° laparoscopic anterior fundoplication for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). Patients with proven GORD were randomized to laparoscopic Nissen or 180° anterior fundoplication. The 12-year outcome measures included reflux control, dysphagia, gas-related symptoms and patient satisfaction. Measures included scores on a visual analogue scale, a validated Dakkak score for dysphagia and Visick scores. Of the initial 163 patients randomized (Nissen 84, anterior 79), 90 (55·2 per cent) completed 12-year follow-up (Nissen 52, anterior 38). There were no differences in heartburn, dysphagia, gas-related symptoms, patient satisfaction or surgical reintervention rate. Use of acid-suppressing drugs was less common after Nissen than after 180° anterior fundoplication: four of 52 (8 per cent) and 11 of 38 (29 per cent) respectively (P = 0·008). The proportion of patients with absent or only mild symptoms was slightly higher after Nissen fundoplication: 45 of 50 (90 per cent) versus 28 of 38 (74 per cent) (P = 0·044). The two surgical procedures provided similar control of heartburn and post-fundoplication symptoms, with similar patient satisfaction and reoperation rates on long-term follow-up. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Diagnostic value of the proton pump inhibitor test for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, M. C.; Weusten, B. L. A. M.; Numans, M. E.; de Wit, N. J.; Baron, A.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of the proton pump inhibitor test in a primary care population as well as its additional value over reflux history, using the symptom association probability outcome during 24-h oesophageal pH recording as reference test for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

  8. Gastro-oesophageal reflux in young babies: who should be treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puntis, John W

    2015-10-01

    Recent guidelines focus on a non-interventionist approach to management of gastro-oesophageal reflux in infancy and emphasise the importance of explanation, reassurance and simple measures such as attention to feeding. Relying on clinical history alone leads to over diagnosis of disease, and widely used medications are often ineffective for symptom relief and carry significant risk of harm. The association between vomiting in infancy and other problems such as crying and poor feeding should not be interpreted as implying causality. When there are strong pointers to underlying gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, invasive investigations are required in order to formulate appropriate intervention. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Systematic review and meta-analysis of laparoscopic Nissen (posterior total) versus Toupet (posterior partial) fundoplication for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeders, J. A. J. L.; Mauritz, F. A.; Ahmed Ali, U.; Draaisma, W. A.; Ruurda, J. P.; Gooszen, H. G.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Broeders, I. A. M. J.; Hazebroek, E. J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) is currently considered the surgical approach of choice for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). Laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication (LTF) has been said to reduce troublesome dysphagia and gas-related symptoms. A systematic review and

  10. Preoperative endoscopy may reduce the need for revisional surgery for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhok, B M; Carr, W R J; McCormack, C; Boyle, M; Jennings, N; Schroeder, N; Balupuri, S; Small, P K

    2016-08-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is a safe and effective bariatric operation, but postoperative reflux symptoms can sometimes necessitate revisional surgery. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the preferred operation in morbidly obese patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. In 2011, we introduced preoperative endoscopy to assess for hiatus hernia or evidence of oesophagitis in conjunction with an assessment of gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms for all patients undergoing bariatric surgery with a view to avoid sleeve gastrectomy for these patients. A prospectively maintained database was used to identify patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy before and after we changed the unit policy. The need for revisional surgery in patients with troublesome gastro-oesophageal reflux disease was examined. Prior to 2011, 130 patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy, and 11 (8.5%) of them required conversion to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for symptomatic reflux disease. Following the policy change, 284 patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy, and to date, only five (1.8%) have required revisional surgery (p = 0.001). Baseline demographics were comparable between the groups, and average follow-up period was 47 and 33 months, respectively, for each group. Preoperative endoscopy and a detailed clinical history regarding gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms may improve patient selection for sleeve gastrectomy. Avoiding sleeve gastrectomy in patients with reflux disease and/or hiatus hernia may reduce the incidence of revisional surgery. © 2016 World Obesity.

  11. Pharmacological treatment of children with gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighe, Mark; Afzal, Nadeem A; Bevan, Amanda; Hayen, Andrew; Munro, Alasdair; Beattie, R Mark

    2014-11-24

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is a common disorder, characterised by regurgitation of gastric contents into the oesophagus. GOR is a very common presentation in infancy in both primary and secondary care settings. GOR can affect approximately 50% of infants younger than three months old (Nelson 1997). The natural history of GOR in infancy is generally that of a functional, self-limiting condition that improves with age; gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and its precise distinction from GOR are debated, but consensus guidelines from the North American Society of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN-ESPGHAN guidelines 2009) define GORD as 'troublesome symptoms or complications of GOR.' This Cochrane review aims to provide a robust analysis of currently available pharmacological interventions used to treat children with GOR by assessing all outcomes indicating benefit or harm. We sought to identify relevant published trials by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2014, Issue 5), MEDLINE and EMBASE (1966 to 2014), the Centralised Information Service for Complementary Medicine (CISCOM), the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Science Citation Index (on BIDS-UK General Science Index) and the ISI Web of Science. We also searched for ongoing trials in the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com).Reference lists from trials selected by electronic searching were handsearched for relevant paediatric studies on medical treatment of children with gastro-oesophageal reflux, as were published abstracts from conference proceedings (published in Gut and Gastroenterology) and reviews published over the past five years.No language restrictions were applied. Abstracts were reviewed by two review authors, and relevant RCTs on study participants (birth to 16 years) with GOR receiving a pharmacological treatment were selected. Subgroup analysis was considered for children up to 12 months of age

  12. Validation of the GerdQ questionnaire for the diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonasson, C; Wernersson, B; Hoff, D A L; Hatlebakk, J G

    2013-03-01

    The diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) remains a challenge as both invasive methods and symptom-based strategies have limitations. The symptom-based management of GERD in primary care may be further optimised with the use of a questionnaire. To assess the diagnostic validity of the GerdQ questionnaire in patients with symptoms suggestive of GERD. Patients with symptoms suggestive of GERD without alarm features, underwent upper endoscopy, and if normal, pH-metry. Patients were followed for 4 weeks and GerdQ was completed blinded to the investigator at both visits. Reflux oesophagitis or pathological acid exposure was used as diagnostic references for GERD. The diagnostic accuracy for GERD on symptom response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) was assessed. Among the 169 patients, a GerdQ cutoff ≥9 gave the best balance with regard to sensitivity, 66% (95% CI: 58-74), and specificity, 64% (95% CI: 41-83), for GERD. The high prevalence of reflux oesophagitis (81%) resulted in a high proportion of true positives, but at the same time a high proportion of false-negatives. Consequently, GerdQ had a high positive predictive value, 92% (95% CI: 86-97), but a low negative predictive value, 22% (95% CI: 13-34), for GERD. Symptom resolution on PPI therapy had high sensitivity, 76% (95% CI: 66-84), but low specificity, 33% (95% CI: 17-53), for GERD. GerdQ is a useful complementary tool for the diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in primary care. The implementation of GerdQ could reduce the need for upper endoscopy and improve resource utilisation. Symptom resolution on proton pump inhibitor did not predict gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Relationship between sleep and acid gastro-oesophageal reflux in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammari, Mohamed; Djeddi, Djamal; Léké, André; Delanaud, Stéphane; Stéphan-Blanchard, Erwan; Bach, Véronique; Telliez, Frédéric

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of gastro-oesophageal acid reflux on sleep in neonates and, reciprocally, the influence of wakefulness (W) and sleep stages on the characteristics of the reflux (including the retrograde bolus migration of oesophageal acid contents). The pH and multichannel intraluminal impedance were measured during nocturnal polysomnography in 25 infants hospitalised for suspicion of gastro-oesophageal reflux. Two groups were constituted according to whether or not the infants displayed gastro-oesophageal reflux (i.e. a reflux group and a control group). There were no differences between the reflux and control groups in terms of sleep duration, sleep structure and sleep state change frequency. Vigilance states significantly influenced the gastro-oesophageal reflux pattern: the occurrence of gastro-oesophageal reflux episodes was greater during W (59 ± 32%) and active sleep (AS; 35 ± 30%) than during quiet sleep (QS; 6 ± 11%), whereas the mean duration of gastro-oesophageal reflux episodes was higher in QS than in W and AS. The percentage of retrograde bolus migrations of distal oesophageal acid content was significantly higher in AS (62 ± 26%) than in W (42 ± 26%) and QS (4.5 ± 9%). In neonates, gastro-oesophageal reflux occurred more frequently during W, whereas the physiological changes associated with sleep state increase the physiopathological impact of the gastro-oesophageal reflux. The duration of oesophagus-acid contact was greater during sleep; AS facilitated the retrograde migration of oesophageal acid content, and QS was characterised by the risk of prolonged acid mucosal contact. © 2011 European Sleep Research Society.

  14. Detection of gastro-oesophageal reflux in the neonatal unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossor, Thomas; Lingam, Ingran; Douiri, Abdel; Bhat, Ravindra; Greenough, Anne

    2018-03-13

    To determine whether a pH probe or multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) more frequently detected gastro-oesophageal reflux and test the hypothesis that acid reflux was associated with lower baseline impedance. A prospective study of infants in whom reflux was suspected and evaluated using combined pH and multichannel impedance. Studies were considered abnormal if the acid index was >10% or there were >79MII reflux events in 24 hours. The acid index was the percentage of total study time with a pHacid clearance time (ACT) the time from the pH falling below four to rising above four. Forty-two infants [median gestational age 31 (range 23-42) weeks] were assessed. Only nine infants (21%) had abnormal studies, seven detected by pH monitoring, one by MII monitoring and one by both techniques (p = 0.04). After correcting for gestational age and post-natal age, baseline impedance remained negatively correlated with the acid index (r = -0.34, p = 0.038) and the maximum ACT (r = -0.44, p = 0.006). Clinical suspicion of reflux was frequently incorrect, and reflux was more frequently detected by a pH probe. The inverse relationship of acid reflux to baseline impedance suggests that mucosal disruption may result from acid reflux in this population. ©2018 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Review article: oesophageal complications and consequences of persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisegna, J.; Holtmann, G.; Howden, C. W.; Katelaris, P. H.; Sharma, P.; Spechler, S.; Triadafilopoulos, G.; Tytgat, G.

    2004-01-01

    The major oesophageal complications associated with persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) include erosive oesophagitis, ulceration, strictures and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Although the causes of these complications are uncertain, studies indicate that erosive oesophagitis may

  16. Acid suppressants for managing gastro-oesophageal reflux and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in infants: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jane C; Schneuer, Francisco J; Harrison, Christopher; Trevena, Lyndal; Hiscock, Harriet; Elshaug, Adam G; Nassar, Natasha

    2018-02-22

    To evaluate the diagnosis and management of reflux and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in infants aged reflux and GORD and their management including prescribing of acid-suppressant medicines (proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine receptor antagonists (H2RAs)) and counselling, advice or education. Of all infants' visits, 512 (2.7%) included a diagnosis of reflux (n=413, 2.2%) or GORD (n=99, 0.5%). From 2006 to 2016, diagnostic rates decreased for reflux and increased for GORD. Prescribing of acid suppressants occurred in 43.6% visits for reflux and 48.5% visits for GORD, similar to rates of counselling, advice or education (reflux: 38.5%, GORD: 43.4% of visits). Prescribing of PPIs increased (statistically significant only for visits for reflux), while prescribing of H2RAs decreased. Overprescribing of acid suppressants to infants may be occurring. In infants, acid-suppressant medicines are no better than placebo and may have significant negative side effects; however, guidelines are inconsistent. Clear, concise and consistent guidance is needed. GPs and parents need to understand what is normal and limitations of medical therapy. We need a greater understanding of the influences on GP prescribing practices, of parents' knowledge and attitudes and of the pressures on parents of infants with these conditions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring is helpful in managing children with suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Paolo; Isoldi, Sara; Mallardo, Saverio; Papoff, Paola; Rossetti, Danilo; Dilillo, Anna; Oliva, Salvatore

    2018-04-05

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux is very common in the paediatric age group. There is no single and reliable test to distinguish between physiologic and pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux, and this lack of clear distinction between disease and normal can have a negative impact on the management of children. To evaluate the usefulness of 24-h oesophageal pH-impedance study in infants and children with suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Patients were classified by age groups (A-C) and reflux-related symptoms (typical and atypical). All underwent pH-impedance study. If the latter suggested an abnormal reflux, patients received therapy in accordance with NASPGHAN/ESPGHAN recommendations, while those with normal study had an additional diagnostic work-up. The efficacy of therapy was evaluated with a specific standardized questionnaire for different ages. The study was abnormal in 203/428 patients (47%) while normal in 225/428 (53%). Of those with abnormal study, 109 exhibited typical symptoms (54%), and 94 atypical (46%). The great majority of the patients with abnormal study were responsive to medical anti-reflux therapy. We confirm the utility of prolonged oesophageal pH-impedance study in detecting gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in children and in guiding therapy. Performing oesophageal pH-impedance monitoring in children with suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is helpful to establish the diagnosis and avoid unnecessary therapy. Copyright © 2018 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiologic diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux. Comparison of barium and low-density contrast medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fransson, S.G.; Soekjer, H.; Johansson, K.E.; Tibbling, L.

    It has been proposed that the high density of ordinary barium suspension may complicate the radiologic diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux. For this reason P-contrast was developed (Ferring AB); a contrast medium with the same density as water (1 g/cm/sup 3/). A comparison of P-contrast and barium (Mixobar Ventrikel 400 mg/ml) was performed in 82 patients. All patients were examined with both contrast media and the findings were compared with those at reflux test at manometry, endoscopy and 24-hour pH monitoring. Another 40 patients and 15 symptom-free controls were examined with two different amounts of barium, 100 ml and 200 ml, to study if the radiologic diagnosis of reflux varied with the volume of contrast medium administered. P-contrast was found to have no advantages over barium for the diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux. The outcome of the radiologic examination was not influenced by the different volumes of barium used.

  19. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Anan; Hungin, A Pali S; Wooff, David; Childs, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To ascertain the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and its association with the disease. Design Systematic review of studies reporting the prevalence of H pylori in patients with and without gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Data sources Four electronic databases, searched to November 2001, experts, pharmaceutical companies, and journals. Main outcome measure Odds ratio for prevalence of H pylori in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Results 20 studies were included. The pooled estimate of the odds ratio for prevalence of H pylori was 0.60 (95% confidence interval 0.47 to 0.78), indicating a lower prevalence in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Substantial heterogeneity was observed between studies. Location seemed to be an important factor, with a much lower prevalence of H pylori in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in studies from the Far East, despite a higher overall prevalence of infection than western Europe and North America. Year of study was not a source of heterogeneity. Conclusion The prevalence of H pylori infection was significantly lower in patients with than without gastro-oesophageal reflux, with geographical location being a strong contributor to the heterogeneity between studies. Patients from the Far East with reflux disease had a lower prevalence of H pylori infection than patients from western Europe and North America, despite a higher prevalence in the general population. What is already known on this topicThe relation between H pylori infection and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is controversialStudies on the prevalence of H pylori in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease have given conflicting resultsRecent guidelines recommend eradication of H pylori in patients requiring long term proton pump inhibitors, essentially for reflux diseaseWhat this study addsDespite heterogeneity between studies, the prevalence of H pylori was

  20. Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations--a pharmacological target for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, D. P.; Tytgat, G. N. J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E. E.

    2002-01-01

    The oesophago-gastric junction functions as an anti-reflux barrier preventing increased exposure of the oesophageal mucosa to gastric contents. Failure of this anti-reflux barrier results in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, and may lead to complications such as oesophagitis, Barrett's oesophagus

  1. Review article: The measurement of non-acid gastro-oesophageal reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oesophageal pH monitoring has been used for three decades to study gastro-oesophageal reflux, but it does not allow detection of non-acid reflux episodes. AIM: To discuss the techniques by which non-acid reflux can be measured and to evaluate the clinical relevance of such measurements.

  2. Atrial Fibrillation and Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease - Controversies and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floria, Mariana; Barboi, Oana; Rezus, Ciprian; Ambarus, Valentin; Cijevschi-Prelipcean, Cristina; Balan, Gheorghe; Drug, Vasile Liviu

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation and gastro-oesophageal reflux are common manifestations in daily practice. The atria and the oesophagus are closely located and have similar nerve innervations. Over the last years, it has been observed that atrial fibrillation development and reflux disease could be related. Atrial fibrillation occurrence could be due to vagal nerve overstimulation. This, in association with vagal nerve-mediated parasympathetic stimulation, has also been observed in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux. These mechanisms, in addition to inflammation, seem to be implicated in the pathophysiology of both diseases. Despite these associations supported by clinical and experimental studies, this relationship is still considered controversial. This review summarizes critical data regarding the association of gastro-oesophageal reflux and atrial fibrillation as well as their clinical implications.

  3. Sleeve gastrectomy and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a complex relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahawar, Kamal K; Jennings, Neil; Balupuri, Shlok; Small, Peter K

    2013-07-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy is rapidly becoming popular as a standalone bariatric operation. At the same time, there are valid concerns regarding its long-term durability and postoperative gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Though gastric bypass remains the gold standard bariatric operation, it is not suitable for all patients. Sleeve gastrectomy is sometimes the only viable option. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease, liver cirrhosis, significant intra-abdominal adhesions involving small bowel and those reluctant to undergo gastric bypass could fall in this category. It is widely recognised that some patients report worsening of their gastro-oesophageal reflux disease after sleeve gastrectomy. Still, others develop de novo reflux. This review examines if it is possible to identify these patients prior to surgery and thus prevent postoperative gastro-oesophageal reflux disease after sleeve gastrectomy.

  4. Cardiac mucosa at the gastro-oesophageal junction: indicator of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease? Data from a prospective central European multicentre study on histological and endoscopic diagnosis of oesophagitis (histoGERD trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, Cord; Schneider, Nora I; Plieschnegger, Wolfgang; Schmack, Bertram; Bordel, Hartmut; Höfler, Bernd; Eherer, Andreas J; Wolf, Eva-Maria; Rehak, Peter; Vieth, Michael

    2014-07-01

    The origin and significance of cardiac mucosa at the gastro-oesophageal junction are controversial. In the prospective Central European multicentre histoGERD trial, we aimed to assess the prevalence of cardiac mucosa, characterized by the presence of glands composed of mucous cells without parietal cells, and to relate its presence to features related to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). One thousand and seventy-one individuals (576 females and 495 males; median age 53 years) were available for analysis. Overall, in biopsy specimens systematically taken from above and below the gastro-oesophageal junction, cardiac mucosa was observed in 713 (66.6%) individuals. Its presence was associated with patients' symptoms and/or complaints (P = 0.0025), histological changes of the squamous epithelium (P gastro-oesophageal junction. Its association with reflux symptoms, histological changes indicating GORD and the endoscopic diagnosis of oesophagitis suggests that injury and repair related to GORD contribute to its development and/or expansion. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Review article: gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broers, C; Tack, J; Pauwels, A

    2018-01-01

    When gastro-oesophageal reflux is causing symptoms or lesions in the oesophagus, this is referred to as gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD). GERD can manifest itself through typical symptoms (heartburn, regurgitation) or may lead to extra-oesophageal symptoms. Extra-oesophageal manifestations of GERD gained increasing attention over the last decade, especially respiratory disorders, because of the prevalent co-occurrence with GERD. The role of GERD in the pathogenesis of respiratory disorders has become a topic of intense discussion. To provide an overview of the current knowledge on the role of GERD in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PubMed was searched for relevant articles using the keywords: GERD, asthma, COPD, prevalence, treatment. Case reports were excluded, only English language articles were considered. Estimates for the prevalence of GERD in asthma range from 30% to 90%, compared to an average of 24% in controls. In COPD patients, the prevalence of GERD ranges from 19% to 78% compared to an average of 18% in controls. These data indicate an increased prevalence of GERD in patients with asthma and COPD, although causality is not established and GERD treatment yielded inconsistent effects. Literature supports GERD as a risk factor for COPD-exacerbations and a predictor of the 'frequent-exacerbator'-phenotype. Despite the high prevalence of GERD in asthma and COPD, a causal link is lacking. The results of anti-reflux therapy on pulmonary outcome are inconsistent and contradictory. Future studies will need to identify subgroups of asthmatics and COPD patients that may benefit from anti-reflux therapy (nocturnal or silent reflux). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Lifestyle measures in the management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: clinical and pathophysiological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J H-E; Kang, J Y

    2015-03-01

    Several lifestyle and dietary factors are commonly cited as risk factors for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and modification of these factors has been advocated as first-line measures for the management of GORD. We performed a systematic review of the literature from 2005 to the present relating to the effect of these factors and their modification on GORD symptoms, physiological parameters of reflux as well as endoscopic appearances. Conflicting results existed for the association between smoking, alcohol and various dietary factors in the development of GORD. These equivocal findings are partly due to methodology problems. There is recent good evidence that weight reduction and smoking cessation are beneficial in reducing GORD symptoms. Clinical and physiological studies also suggest that some physical measures as well as modification of meal size and timing can also be beneficial. However, there is limited evidence for the role of avoiding alcohol and certain dietary ingredients including carbonated drinks, caffeine, fat, spicy foods, chocolate and mint.

  7. The role of hiatus hernia in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herwaarden, Margot A.; Samsom, Melvin; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2004-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the role of sliding hiatus hernia in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). The crural diaphragm acts as an external sphincter of the anti-reflux barrier. Contractions of the crural diaphragm increase lower-oesophageal-sphincter (LOS) pressure during each

  8. Gastro-oesophageal reflux is common in oligosymptomatic patients with dental erosion: A pH-impedance and endoscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Clive H; Materna, Andrea; Martig, Lukas; Lussi, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    Dental erosion is a complication of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) according to the Montreal consensus statement. However, GORD has not been comprehensively characterized in patients with dental erosions and pH-impedance measures have not been reported. Characterize GORD in patients with dental erosions using 24-h multichannel intraluminal pH-impedance measurements (pH-MII) and endoscopy. This single-centre study investigated reflux in successive patients presenting to dentists with dental erosion using pH-MII and endoscopy. Of the 374 patients, 298 (80%) reported GORD symptoms reflux episodes were 71 (63-79), 43 (38-49) and 31 (26-35), respectively. Of the reflux episodes, 19% (17-21) reached the proximal oesophagus. In 241 (69%) patients reflux was abnormal using published normal values for acid exposure time and reflux episodes. No significant associations between the severity of dental erosions and any reflux variables were found. The presence of GORD symptoms and of oesophagitis or a hiatal hernia was associated with greater reflux, but not with increased dental erosion scores. Significant oligosymptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux occurs in the majority of patients with dental erosion. The degree of dental erosion did not correlate with any of the accepted quantitative reflux indicators. Definition of clinically relevant reflux parameters by pH-MII for dental erosion and of treatment guidelines are outstanding. Gastroenterologists and dentists need to be aware of the widely prevalent association between dental erosion and atypical GORD.

  9. Induced viscosity fibre system for the treatment or prevention of gastro-oesophageal reflux (gor)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belle, F.N.; Harthoorn, L.F.; Venema, P.; Choi, W.M.C.

    2014-01-01

    The invention pertains to the use of pectin and alginate in the manufacture of a liquid nutritional composition in the treatment or prevention of gastro-oesophageal reflux in a patient, said composition comprising pectin and alginate, said composition exhibiting a maximum gel strength at a pH in the

  10. The role of hiatus hernia in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herwaarden, MA; Samsom, M; Smout, AJPM

    This article gives an overview of the role of sliding hiatus hernia in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). The crural diaphragm acts as an external sphincter of the antireflux barrier. Contractions of the crural diaphragm increase lower-oesophageal-sphincter (LOS) pressure during each

  11. Comparison of barium swallow and ultrasound in diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, D R; Bolia, A; Moore, D J

    1985-01-01

    Fifty one infants and older children with suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux entered a study comparing the diagnostic accuracy of a standard barium swallow examination with that of ultrasound scanning. All children were examined by both techniques. In 40 cases there was unequivocal agreement between the examinations. Of the remaining patients, four had definite reflux by ultrasonic criteria but showed no evidence of reflux on barium swallow examination, four had positive findings on ultrasound but showed only minimal reflux on barium swallow, and one showed minimal reflux on ultrasound but had a negative barium meal result. In two children the ultrasound study was inconclusive. Ultrasound has an important role in the diagnosis and follow up of patients under the age of 5 years with gastro-oesophageal reflux. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 PMID:3924317

  12. Factors Affecting the Prevalence of Gastro-oesophageal Reflux in Childhood Corrosive Oesophageal Strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar H. İskit

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastro-oesophageal reflux may accompany the corrosive oesophageal damage caused by the ingestion of corrosive substances and affect its treatment. The factors that affect the development of reflux in these cases and their effects on treatment still remain unclear. Aims: Our aim is to investigate the prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux in children with corrosive oesophageal strictures, the risk factors affecting this prevalence and the effects of gastro-oesophageal reflux on treatment. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: We enrolled 52 patients with oesophageal stricture due to corrosive substance ingestion who were referred to our clinic between 2003 and 2010. Groups, which were determined according to the presence of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER, were compared with each other in terms of clinical findings, results of examination methods, characteristics of the stricture and success of the treatment. Results: The total number of patients in our study was 52; 30 of them were male and 22 of them were female. The mean age of our study population was 4.2±2.88 years. Thirty-three patients had gastro-oesophageal reflux (63.5%. Patients who had strictures caused by the ingestion of alkali substances were 1.6-times more likely to have reflux. There were no differences between patients with or without reflux in terms of number and localisation of strictures. Mean distance of stricture was longer in patients with reflux (3.7±1.8 cm than in patients without (2.2±1.0 cm (p0.05. Conclusion: Corrosive oesophageal stricture was usually accompanied by gastro-oesophageal reflux and the length of stricture is an important risk factor. Negative effects of reflux over dilatation treatment have not yet been demonstrated in the short-term. Nevertheless, this frequent rate of reflux may eventually increase the risk of oesophagitis and Barrett’s oesophagus; therefore, we suggest that these effects should be prospectively evaluated in a

  13. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and non-asthma lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Morehead

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common disorder in Western countries, and its relationship to airways disorders (e.g. asthma has been well established. Lung diseases other than asthma have also been associated with GERD, but the nature and scope of this relationship has not been fully defined. Diseases that have been associated with GERD include bronchiolitis syndromes, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, scleroderma and nontubercular mycobacterial infection. Diagnostic evaluation centres upon proving both reflux and pulmonary aspiration, which may be accomplished in some cases by lung biopsy. However, in many cases a compatible clinical and radiographic picture coupled with proof of proximal reflux by combined oesophageal probe testing may suffice for a provisional diagnosis and allow institution of anti-reflux measures. Proton-pump inhibitors are the medications of choice for GERD; other interventions shown to reduce reflux are weight loss, elevation of the head of the bed and avoidance of recumbency after meals. However, acid suppression therapy does not address non-acid reflux that may be important in disease pathogenesis in select patients, and lifestyle modifications often fail. Laparoscopic fundoplication is the procedure of choice for medically refractory GERD with excellent short-term results with respect to respiratory symptoms associated with GERD; however, long-term studies document a significant percentage of patients requiring ongoing acid suppression therapy.

  14. Systematic review: role of acid, weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, G. E.; Smout, A.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is gaining recognition. To quantify the proportions of reflux episodes that are acidic (pH <4), weakly acidic (pH 4-7) and weakly alkaline (pH >7) in adult patients with GERD, and to evaluate their

  15. Randomised clinical trial: relief of upper gastrointestinal symptoms by an acid pocket-targeting alginate-antacid (Gaviscon Double Action) - a double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot study in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E; Wade, A; Crawford, G; Jenner, B; Levinson, N; Wilkinson, J

    2014-03-01

    The alginate-antacid, Gaviscon Double Action (Gaviscon DA; Reckitt Benckiser, Slough, UK) suppresses reflux after meals by creating a gel-like barrier that caps and displaces the acid pocket distal to the oesophago-gastric junction. The effect of Gaviscon DA on reflux and dyspepsia symptoms has not yet been demonstrated with a modern trial design. A pilot study to assess the efficacy and safety of Gaviscon DA compared with matched placebo for decreasing upper gastrointestinal symptoms in symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients. A randomised, double-blind, parallel group study was performed in 110 patients with symptoms of GERD. Patients received Gaviscon DA or placebo tablets for 7 consecutive days. The primary endpoint compared the change in overall Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ) symptom score (combined heartburn/regurgitation/dyspepsia). Secondary endpoints assessed individual dimensions, GERD dimension (heartburn and regurgitation) and overall treatment evaluation (OTE). There was a greater decrease in overall RDQ symptom score in the Gaviscon DA group compared with the placebo group (Least Squares Mean difference -0.55; P = 0.0033), and for each of the dimensions independently. Patients in the Gaviscon DA group evaluated their overall treatment response higher than patients in the placebo group [mean (standard deviation) OTE 4.1 (2.44) vs. 1.9 (3.34); P = 0.0005]. No differences in the incidence of adverse events were observed between treatment groups. Gaviscon DA decreases reflux and dyspeptic symptoms in GERD patients compared with matched placebo and has a favourable benefit-risk balance. Larger scale clinical investigations of medications targeting the acid pocket are warranted. (EudraCT, 2012-002188-84). © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Factors Affecting the Prevalence of Gastro-oesophageal Reflux in Childhood Corrosive Oesophageal Strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskit, Serdar H; Ozçelik, Zerrin; Alkan, Murat; Türker, Selcan; Zorludemir, Unal

    2014-06-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux may accompany the corrosive oesophageal damage caused by the ingestion of corrosive substances and affect its treatment. The factors that affect the development of reflux in these cases and their effects on treatment still remain unclear. Our aim is to investigate the prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux in children with corrosive oesophageal strictures, the risk factors affecting this prevalence and the effects of gastro-oesophageal reflux on treatment. Case-control study. We enrolled 52 patients with oesophageal stricture due to corrosive substance ingestion who were referred to our clinic between 2003 and 2010. Groups, which were determined according to the presence of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER), were compared with each other in terms of clinical findings, results of examination methods, characteristics of the stricture and success of the treatment. The total number of patients in our study was 52; 30 of them were male and 22 of them were female. The mean age of our study population was 4.2±2.88 years. Thirty-three patients had gastrooesophageal reflux (63.5%). Patients who had strictures caused by the ingestion of alkali substances were 1.6-times more likely to have reflux. There were no differences between patients with or without reflux in terms of number and localisation of strictures. Mean distance of stricture was longer in patients with reflux (3.7±1.8 cm) than in patients without (2.2±1.0 cm) (preflux. Patients with long stricture were 1.9-times more likely to have reflux. Dilatation treatment was successful in 69.6% of patients with reflux and in 78.9% of patients without. The mean treatment period was 8.41±6.1 months in patients with reflux and 8.21±8.4 months in the other group. There was no significant difference between groups in terms of frequency of dilatation and dilator diameters (p>0.05). Corrosive oesophageal stricture was usually accompanied by gastro-oesophageal reflux and the length of stricture is an

  17. Hormone replacement therapy is associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Close Helen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oestrogen and progestogen have the potential to influence gastro-intestinal motility; both are key components of hormone replacement therapy (HRT. Results of observational studies in women taking HRT rely on self-reporting of gastro-oesophageal symptoms and the aetiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD remains unclear. This study investigated the association between HRT and GORD in menopausal women using validated general practice records. Methods 51,182 menopausal women were identified using the UK General Practice Research Database between 1995–2004. Of these, 8,831 were matched with and without hormone use. Odds ratios (ORs were calculated for GORD and proton-pump inhibitor (PPI use in hormone and non-hormone users, adjusting for age, co-morbidities, and co-pharmacy. Results In unadjusted analysis, all forms of hormone use (oestrogen-only, tibolone, combined HRT and progestogen were statistically significantly associated with GORD. In adjusted models, this association remained statistically significant for oestrogen-only treatment (OR 1.49; 1.18–1.89. Unadjusted analysis showed a statistically significant association between PPI use and oestrogen-only and combined HRT treatment. When adjusted for covariates, oestrogen-only treatment was significant (OR 1.34; 95% CI 1.03–1.74. Findings from the adjusted model demonstrated the greater use of PPI by progestogen users (OR 1.50; 1.01–2.22. Conclusions This first large cohort study of the association between GORD and HRT found a statistically significant association between oestrogen-only hormone and GORD and PPI use. This should be further investigated using prospective follow-up to validate the strength of association and describe its clinical significance.

  18. Heartburn during sleep: a clinical marker of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in morbidly obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornari, F; Madalosso, C A S; Callegari-Jacques, S M; Gurski, R R

    2009-02-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and morbid obesity are entities with increasing prevalence. New clinical strategies are cornerstones for their management. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of heartburn during sleep (HDS) and whether this symptom predicts the presence of objective GORD parameters and increased heartburn perception in morbidly obese patients. Ninety-one consecutive morbidly obese patients underwent clinical evaluation, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and oesophageal pH monitoring. HDS was characterized when patients replied positively to the question, 'Does heartburn wake you from sleep?'. A General Score for Heartburn (GSH) ranging between 0 and 5 was assessed with the question 'How bad is your heartburn?'. HDS was reported by 33 patients (36%). More patients with HDS had abnormal acid contact time or reflux oesophagitis than patients without HDS (94%vs 57%, P heartburn preceded by acid reflux in diurnal (39%vs 9%; P heartburn. HDS occurs in a significant minority of patients with morbid obesity and has high positive predictive value for GORD. Symptomatic reflux during the sleep seems to be a marker of increased heartburn perception in this population.

  19. Gastro-oesophageal reflux associated with duodenum inversum: two case reports and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dhiren; Agarwal, Roshani; Powell, William; Al-Ansari, Namir

    2017-08-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is a very common paediatric disorder and the majority of patients are treated successfully by primary care physicians. Two infants aged 2 months with GORD which did not respond to conventional medical management are reported; they were diagnosed with duodenum inversum. The first infant failed medical management and required Nissen's fundoplication to control his symptoms. The second infant improved on maximizing medical management without the need for a surgical procedure. These two cases highlight the need for further work-up in patients who do not respond to conventional GORD therapy and/or present with atypical clinical symptoms.

  20. Dental erosion, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and saliva: how are they related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzez, Rebecca; Bartlett, David; Anggiansah, Angela

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of tooth wear, symptoms of reflux and salivary parameters in a group of patients referred for investigation of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) compared with a group of control subjects. Tooth wear, stimulated salivary flow rate and buffering capacity and symptoms of GORD were assessed in patients attending an Oesophageal Laboratory. Patients had manometry and 24-h pH tests, which are the gold standard for the diagnosis of GORD. Tooth wear was assessed using a modification of the Smith and Knight tooth wear index. The results were compared to those obtained from a group of controls with no symptoms of GORD. Patients with symptoms of GORD and those subsequently diagnosed with GORD had higher total and palatal tooth wear (p<0.05). The buffering capacity of the stimulated saliva from the control subjects was greater than patients with symptoms of GORD (p<0.001). Patients with hoarseness had a lower salivary flow rate compared with those with no hoarseness. Tooth wear involving dentine was more prevalent in patients complaining of symptoms of GORD and those diagnosed as having GORD following 24-h pH monitoring than controls. Patients had poorer salivary buffering capacity than control subjects. Patients complaining of hoarseness had lower salivary flow rate than controls.

  1. Study of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in patients with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, Nitish L; Khan, Naushad A; Kumar, Naresh; Nayak, Hemanta K; Daga, Mradul K

    2013-04-01

    To study the incidence and pattern of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in patients with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using dual-probe 24-h oesophageal pH recording. This was a prospective study of 50 patients with mild-to-moderate stage COPD based on the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guidelines. A detailed history of illness along with spirometry was done in all patients. In the study group, reflux symptoms were measured using a validated scoring system. All the patients underwent oesophageal manometry and dual-probe 24-h oesophageal pH recording. Symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux were present in 38 patients. Twenty-four-hour oesophageal pH monitoring revealed pathological reflux in 31 out of 38 symptomatic and 8 out of 12 asymptomatic patients. The overall rate of GORD was 78% in our study. Only distal GORD was observed in 11 (28.9%), and both distal and proximal GORD was observed in 20 (52.6%) out of the 38 symptomatic subjects. In the remaining 12 asymptomatic patients, eight had GORD. Distal GORD was present in six (50%) patients, and two (16.6%) had both distal and proximal GORD in this group. Isolated proximal GORD was not observed in any patient. There is an increased occurrence of GORD in patients with even mild-to-moderate COPD. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  2. Gastro-oesophageal reflux is common in oligosymptomatic patients with dental erosion: A pH-impedance and endoscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materna, Andrea; Martig, Lukas; Lussi, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Background Dental erosion is a complication of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) according to the Montreal consensus statement. However, GORD has not been comprehensively characterized in patients with dental erosions and pH-impedance measures have not been reported. Objectives Characterize GORD in patients with dental erosions using 24-h multichannel intraluminal pH-impedance measurements (pH-MII) and endoscopy. Methods This single-centre study investigated reflux in successive patients presenting to dentists with dental erosion using pH-MII and endoscopy. Results Of the 374 patients, 298 (80%) reported GORD symptoms reflux episodes were 71 (63–79), 43 (38–49) and 31 (26–35), respectively. Of the reflux episodes, 19% (17–21) reached the proximal oesophagus. In 241 (69%) patients reflux was abnormal using published normal values for acid exposure time and reflux episodes. No significant associations between the severity of dental erosions and any reflux variables were found. The presence of GORD symptoms and of oesophagitis or a hiatal hernia was associated with greater reflux, but not with increased dental erosion scores. Conclusions Significant oligosymptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux occurs in the majority of patients with dental erosion. The degree of dental erosion did not correlate with any of the accepted quantitative reflux indicators. Definition of clinically relevant reflux parameters by pH-MII for dental erosion and of treatment guidelines are outstanding. Gastroenterologists and dentists need to be aware of the widely prevalent association between dental erosion and atypical GORD. PMID:25922678

  3. Gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with chronic rhino-sinusitis investigated with multichannel impedance - pH monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katle, E J; Hatlebakk, J G; Grimstad, T; Kvaløy, J T; Steinsvåg, S K

    2017-03-01

    The pathophysiology of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is unclear. It has been discussed for decades whether gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) may be a contributing factor for some patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the level of GOR in an unselected group of patients with CRS using multichannel impedance-pH monitoring. Consecutive patients with CRS diagnosed using the EPOS2012 criteria, completed questionnaires on GOR symptoms and were offered 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII)-pH monitoring. The results were compared with a group of healthy controls. Forty-six patients completed MII-pH-monitoring and were compared with 45 control subjects, with comparable age and gender distributions. The median number of reflux episodes in the patients was 56.5 compared with 33 in controls, while, the numbers of proximal reflux episodes was 27.5 versus 3, respectively. Thirty nine patients had abnormal pH-impedance recordings compared with five controls. The CRS patients had significantly higher incidences of gastro-oesophageal reflux compared with asymptomatic controls. The results of this study suggest that GOR may be a causative or contributing factor of CRS.

  4. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in 20 dogs (2012 to 2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenster, M; Hoerauf, A; Vieth, M

    2017-05-01

    To describe the clinical features of canine gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. A search of our medical records produced 20 dogs with clinical signs attributable to oesophageal disease, hyper-regeneratory oesophagopathy and no other oesophageal disorders. The clinical, endoscopic and histological findings of the dogs were analysed. The 3-year incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease was 0·9% of our referral dog population. Main clinical signs were regurgitation, discomfort or pain (each, 20/20 dogs) and ptyalism (18/20 dogs). Oesophagoscopy showed no (5/20 dogs) or minimal (13/20 dogs) mucosal lesions. In oesophageal mucosal biopsy specimens, there were hyperplastic changes of the basal cell layer (13/20 dogs), stromal papillae (14/20 dogs) and entire epithelium (9/20 dogs). Eleven dogs received omeprazole or pantoprazole and regurgitation and ptyalism improved in eight and pain diminished in six of these dogs within three to six weeks. Our findings suggest that canine gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is a more common clinical problem than hitherto suspected. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  5. The influence of the speed of food intake on multichannel impedance in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Serhat; Bayrakci, Berna; Erdogan, Askin; Yildirim, Esra; Vardar, Rukiye

    2013-10-01

    There is a general belief that gastro-oesophageal reflux increases after meals and especially following a rapid intake. To evaluate the impact of rapid vs. slow food intake on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) patients. Forty-six GORD patients with heartburn and / or acid regurgitation once a week or more often common were included in this study. Participants were asked to eat the same standard meal within either 5 or 30 minutes under observation in a random order on 2 consecutive days. A total of 28 hours of recording were obtained by intraoesophageal impedance pH and number of liquid and mixed reflux episodes within 3 hours of the slow- and fast-eating postprandial periods were calculated. While all patients defined GORD symptoms, 10 (21.7%) had pathological 24-h intraoesophageal impedance measurement, 15 (32.6%) had pathological DeMeester and 21.7% had erosive oesophagitis. No difference has been shown according to the eating speed when all reflux episodes were taken together (754 vs. 733). Speed of food intake also did not have an impact on patients with normal vs. pathological 24-h intraoesophageal impedance or erosive vs. non-erosive. During the first postprandial hour, approximately half of the reflux events were non-acid, compared to 34.2% during the second hour and 26.8% during the third hour (p reflux episodes was significantly higher than non-acid reflux especially during the second and third hours and in total for 3 hours. This first study addressing the effect of eating speed on reflux episodes in GORD patients did not support the general belief that reflux increases following fast eating. Acid and non-acid reflux were similar at the first postprandial hour, then acid reflux episodes were predominantly higher, which implicate the importance of acid pockets.

  6. Relationship between the mechanism of gastro-oesophageal reflux and oesophageal acid exposure in patients with reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, R. C. H.; Wassenaar, E. B.; Herwaarden, M. A.; Holloway, R. H.; Samsom, M.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Akkermans, L. M. A.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the oesophageal acid exposure time and the underlying manometric motor events in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). In 31 patients, 3-hour oesophageal motility and pH were measured after a test meal. Ten patients underwent 24-hour

  7. Outcome of gastro-oesophageal reflux-related respiratory manifestations after laparoscopic fundoplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaba, Franklin; Ang, Chin W; Perry, Anthony; Wadley, Martin S; Robertson, Charles S

    2014-01-01

    Patients with refractory respiratory symptoms related to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) such as asthma and cough are being referred for laparoscopic fundoplication (LFP), as recommended by the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES). However there are limited data regarding symptomatic response to fundoplication in this group of patients. A 7 year retrospective review was performed to study the efficacy of LFP in the treatment of patients with respiratory manifestations of GORD. Patients were followed up from 4 to 6 weeks (short-term) to 6-12 months (long-term) post-operatively. Of 208 patients who underwent LFP, 73 (35%) patients were eligible for inclusion into the study. 55 (75%) patients had improved respiratory symptoms at short-term follow-up. At long-term follow-up, 7 of these patients had recurrence of respiratory symptoms, while 4 patients had improvement not initially apparent. No significant predictive factor for the success or failure of surgery was identified. 190 (91%) of 208 patients had symptomatic improvement in GORD at short-term follow-up. LFP is effective with the response rates over 75% in the control of respiratory manifestation of GORD, compared to over 91% response rate in the control GOR symptoms alone. More research is needed to identify factors to aid patient selection to improve response rate. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Systematic review: frequency and reasons for consultation for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungin, A P S; Hill, C; Raghunath, A

    2009-08-15

    Upper gastrointestinal symptoms impose a substantial illness burden and management costs. Understanding perceptions and reasons for seeking healthcare is a prerequisite for meeting patients' needs effectively. To review systematically findings on consultation frequencies for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and dyspepsia and patients' reasons for consultation. Systematic literature searches. Reported consultation rates ranged from 5.4% to 56% for GERD and from 26% to 70% for dyspepsia. Consultation for GERD was associated with increased symptom severity and frequency, interference with social activities, sleep disturbance, lack of timetabled work, higher levels of comorbidity, depression, anxiety, phobia, somatization and obsessionality. Some consulted because of fears that their symptoms represented serious disease; others avoided consultation because of this. Inconsistent associations were seen with medication use. Patients were less likely to consult if they felt that their doctor would trivialize their symptoms. Few factors were consistently associated with dyspepsia consultation. However, lower socio-economic status and Helicobacter pylori infection were associated with increased consultation. Patients' perceptions of their condition, comorbid factors and external reasons such as work and social factors are related to consultation rates for GERD. Awareness of these factors can guide the clinician towards a more effective strategy than one based on drug therapy alone.

  9. Randomised controlled trial of effects of Helicobacter pylori infection and its eradication on heartburn and gastro-oesophageal reflux: Bristol helicobacter project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Richard F; Lane, J Athene; Murray, Liam J; Harvey, Ian M; Donovan, Jenny L; Nair, Prakash

    2004-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of Helicobacter pylori infection and its eradication on heartburn and gastro-oesophageal reflux. Design Cross sectional study, followed by a randomised placebo controlled trial. Setting Seven general practices in Bristol, England. Participants 10 537 people, aged 20-59 years, with and without H pylori infection (determined by the 13C-urea breath test). Main outcome measures Prevalence of heartburn and gastro-oesophageal acid reflux at baseline and two years after treatment to eradicate H pylori infection. Results At baseline, H pylori infection was associated with increased prevalence of heartburn (odds ratio 1.14, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.23) but not reflux (1.05, 0.97 to 1.14). In participants with H pylori infection, active treatment had no effect on the overall prevalence of heartburn (0.99, 0.88 to 1.12) or reflux (1.04, 0.91 to 1.19) and did not improve pre-existing symptoms of heartburn or reflux. Conclusions H pylori infection is associated with a slightly increased prevalence of heartburn but not reflux. Treatment to eradicate H pylori has no net benefit in patients with heartburn or gastro-oesophageal reflux. PMID:15126313

  10. Gastro-oesophageal reflux - an important causative factor of severe tooth wear in Prader-Willi syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeves, Ronnaug; Strøm, Finn; Sandvik, Leiv; Nordgarden, Hilde

    2018-04-23

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is the most common genetic human obesity syndrome and is characterized by hypotonia, endocrine disturbances, hyperphagia, obesity and mild mental retardation. Oral abnormalities, such as decreased salivary flow rates and extreme tooth wear, have also been described. Studies have shown a significant increase in reflux symptoms in individuals with obstuctive sleep apnoea syndrome and increased BMI, both of which are typical findings in PWS. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) has been identified in some individuals with PWS and is a significant intrinsic factor in dental tooth wear. The aim of this study was therefore to estimate the prevalence of GORD in adults and children and to evaluate a possible correlation between GORD and tooth wear in adults with PWS. They were all registered at the TAKO-centre. Twenty-nine individuals, 17 adults with a mean age of 32.6 years (range 18-48) and 12 children with a mean age of 8.8 years (range 3-17), agreed to undergo 24-hour oesophageal pH monitoring, and 90% of those enrolled managed to complete the examination. Four children and eleven adults were diagnosed with pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux, which is defined as acid exposure (pH less than 4) more than 3.6 or 4.3 percent of the time, respectively. Manometry performed in the adult group showed a pathologically high lower oesophageal sphincter pressure in four of the five individuals who had normal oesophageal pH values (pH under 4 less than 4.3% of the time). The two groups (reflux and non-reflux) were well balanced according to BMI, genotype, tooth grinding and hyposalivation. However, twice as many individuals in the reflux group as in the non-reflux group reported high consumption of acidic foods and drinks. Increased tooth wear was significantly correlated with GORD in the two groups (reflux n=6 and non-reflux n=6). The prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux is high in individuals with PWS. Tooth wear was strongly associated with

  11. Gastric emptying and gastro-oesophageal reflux in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Bruno; De Schepper, Jean; Malfroot, Anne; De Wachter, Elke; De Schutter, Iris; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2016-07-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is common in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between gastric emptying (GE) and GOR in children with CF. Multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring (MII-pH) to measure GOR and GE breath test (GEBT) to measure GE were performed in 28 children with symptoms suggestive for GOR disease (GORD) (group 1). GEBT was performed in another 28 children with/without GOR symptoms who agreed to undergo GEBT but not MII-pH (group 2). In group 1, we found increased acid GOR (AGOR) in 46.4% and delayed GE (DGE) in 21.4% but no relationship between increased AGOR and DGE. There was no DGE in group 2. We found DGE in 10.7% and rapid GE in 12.5% of the whole group. Almost half of the children with CF and symptoms suggestive for GORD have increased AGOR and almost a quarter has DGE. However, there was no relation between GOR and GE. Copyright © 2015 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence and characteristics of acid gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in Jackhammer oesophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, Anne-Laure; Ropert, Alain; Bouguen, Guillaume; Siproudhis, Laurent; Boutroux, Dominique; Bretagne, Jean-François; Brochard, Charlène

    2016-10-01

    An association between acid gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and Jackhammer oesophagus has been suggested. To assess the prevalence and characteristics of acid-GERD in Jackhammer oesophagus and the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors. Data and outcomes of patients with Jackhammer oesophagus were assessed. Two groups were compared: (i) GERD, defined by endoscopic oesophagitis or by an increase in acid exposure time or by an acid-hypersensitive oesophagus and (ii) non-GERD defined by normal oesophageal acid exposure without acid-hypersensitive oesophagus. Among the 1994 high-resolution manometries performed, 44 Jackhammer oesophagus (2.2%) were included (sex ratio M/F: 19/25; median age: 66 [61-75] years). Nineteen patients (43.2%) had GERD, 16 (36.4%) had no GERD and 9 patients (20.4%) were undetermined. Dysphagia was the predominant symptom (37/43 (86%)). After a median follow-up of 25.3 months [9.6-31.4], dysphagia was improved in 22/36 (61.1%) patients. Dysphagia improvement as well as other symptoms improvement was not associated with GERD status or proton-pump inhibitors use. The prevalence of GERD is high among patients with Jackhammer oesophagus. The rates of symptom improvement in Jackhammer oesophagus were high regardless of the use of proton-pump inhibitors treatment or of the presence of GERD. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Asia-Pacific consensus on the management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: an update focusing on refractory reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fock, Kwong Ming; Talley, Nicholas; Goh, Khean Lee; Sugano, Kentaro; Katelaris, Peter; Holtmann, Gerald; Pandolfino, John E; Sharma, Prateek; Ang, Tiing Leong; Hongo, Michio; Wu, Justin; Chen, Minhu; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Law, Ngai Moh; Sheu, Bor-Shyang; Zhang, Jun; Ho, Khek Yu; Sollano, Jose; Rani, Abdul Aziz; Kositchaiwat, Chomsri; Bhatia, Shobna

    2016-09-01

    Since the publication of the Asia-Pacific consensus on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in 2008, there has been further scientific advancement in this field. This updated consensus focuses on proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus. A steering committee identified three areas to address: (1) burden of disease and diagnosis of reflux disease; (2) proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease; (3) Barrett's oesophagus. Three working groups formulated draft statements with supporting evidence. Discussions were done via email before a final face-to-face discussion. We used a Delphi consensus process, with a 70% agreement threshold, using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria to categorise the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. A total of 32 statements were proposed and 31 were accepted by consensus. A rise in the prevalence rates of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in Asia was noted, with the majority being non-erosive reflux disease. Overweight and obesity contributed to the rise. Proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease was recognised to be common. A distinction was made between refractory symptoms and refractory reflux disease, with clarification of the roles of endoscopy and functional testing summarised in two algorithms. The definition of Barrett's oesophagus was revised such that a minimum length of 1 cm was required and the presence of intestinal metaplasia no longer necessary. We recommended the use of standardised endoscopic reporting and advocated endoscopic therapy for confirmed dysplasia and early cancer. These guidelines standardise the management of patients with refractory gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus in the Asia-Pacific region. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Gastro-oesophageal reflux demonstrated by radiography: a supplement to 24-h pH monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, E.; Aksglaede, K.; Jacobsen, N.O.; Funch-Jensen, P.; Thommesen, P. [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark)

    2001-09-01

    Purpose: Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is demonstrated by radiography as a supplement to 24-h pH monitoring. Material and Methods: Forty-two patients (mean age 44 years) with suspicion of GOR disease were assessed according to a standard questionnaire. GOR was investigated by 24-h pH-monitoring and by radiography. Oesophageal emptying and the presence of rings or strictures were registered as well. Mucosal biopsies, classified as normal, light oesophagitis, severe oesophagitis, or Barrett's oesophagus, were correlated to age, gender, symptomatology, pH monitoring, and oesophageal emptying. GOR and morphological changes demonstrated by radiography were correlated to pH monitoring and mucosa biopsies. Results: Based on pH monitoring, patients with severe oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus had a significantly higher acid exposure compared to patients with normal mucosa and light oesophagitis, with no difference concerning age, gender, and symptoms. Severe oesophagitis, including Barrett's oesophagus, was found only in patients with a positive test for radiologic GOR. Eleven patients had rings or strictures independent of oesophageal mucosal changes. Conclusion: GOR demonstrated by radiography identified patients where complications could be expected, which was not possible by pH monitoring alone.

  15. Proximal and distal gastro-oesophageal reflux in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Annemarie L; Button, Brenda M; Denehy, Linda; Roberts, Stuart J; Bamford, Tiffany L; Ellis, Samantha J; Mu, Fi-Tjen; Heine, Ralf G; Stirling, Robert G; Wilson, John W

    2014-02-01

    The aims of this observational study were (i) to examine the prevalence of symptomatic and clinically silent proximal and distal gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or bronchiectasis, (ii) the presence of gastric aspiration, and (iii) to explore the possible clinical significance of this comorbidity in these conditions. Twenty-seven participants with COPD, 27 with bronchiectasis and 17 control subjects completed reflux symptom evaluation and dual-channel 24 h oesophageal pH monitoring. In those with lung disease, pepsin levels in sputum samples were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, with disease severity (lung function and high-resolution computed tomography) also measured. The prevalence of GOR in COPD was 37%, in bronchiectasis was 40% and in control subjects was 18% (P = 0.005). Of those diagnosed with GOR, clinically silent reflux was detected in 20% of participants with COPD and 42% with bronchiectasis. While pepsin was found in 33% of COPD and 26% of bronchiectasis participants, the presence of pepsin in sputum was not related to a diagnosis of GOR based on oesophageal pH monitoring in either condition. Neither a diagnosis of GOR nor the presence of pepsin was associated with increased severity of lung disease in COPD or bronchiectasis. The prevalence of GOR in COPD or bronchiectasis is twice that of the control population, and the diagnosis could not be based on symptoms alone. Pepsin was detected in sputum in COPD and bronchiectasis, suggesting a possible role of pulmonary aspiration, which requires further exploration. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  16. Efficacy and safety of lesogaberan in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Nicholas J; Denison, Hans; Björck, Karin; Karlsson, Maria; Silberg, Debra G

    2013-09-01

    Lesogaberan (AZD3355) is a novel γ-aminobutyric acid B-type receptor agonist designed to treat gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) by inhibiting transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-centre phase IIb study was performed to assess the efficacy and safety of lesogaberan as an add-on to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy in patients with GERD who are partially responsive to PPI therapy (ClinicalTrials.gov reference: NCT01005251). In total, 661 patients were randomised to receive 4 weeks of placebo or 60, 120, 180 or 240 mg of lesogaberan twice daily, in addition to ongoing PPI therapy. Symptoms were measured using the Reflux Symptom Questionnaire electronic Diary. Response to treatment was defined as having an average of ≥ 3 additional days per week of not more than mild GERD symptoms during treatment compared with baseline. In the primary analysis, 20.9%, 25.6%, 23.5% and 26.2% of patients responded to the 60, 120, 180 and 240 mg twice daily lesogaberan doses, respectively, and 17.9% responded to placebo. The response to the 240 mg twice daily dose was statistically significantly greater than the response to placebo using a one-sided test at the predefined significance level of p < 0.1. However, the absolute increases in the proportions of patients who responded to lesogaberan compared with placebo were low. Lesogaberan was generally well tolerated, although six patients receiving lesogaberan developed reversible elevated alanine transaminase levels. In patients with GERD symptoms partially responsive to PPI therapy, lesogaberan was only marginally superior to placebo in achieving an improvement in symptoms.

  17. Feed thickener for infants up to six months of age with gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, T'ng Chang; Ojha, Shalini; Dorling, Jon

    2017-12-05

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is common in infants, and feed thickeners are often used to manage it in infants as they are simple to use and perceived to be harmless. However, conflicting evidence exists to support the use of feed thickeners. To evaluate the use of feed thickeners in infants up to six months of age with GOR in terms of reduction in a) signs and symptoms of GOR, b) reflux episodes on pH probe monitoring or intraluminal impedance or a combination of both, or c) histological evidence of oesophagitis. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 2), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 22 November 2016), Embase (1980 to 22 November 2016), and CINAHL (1982 to 22 November 2016). We also searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials. We included randomised controlled trials if they examined the effects of feed thickeners as compared to unthickened feeds (no treatment or placebo) in treating GOR in term infants up to six months of age or six months of corrected gestational age for those born preterm. Two review authors independently identified eligible studies from the literature search. Two review authors independently performed data extraction and quality assessments of the eligible studies. Differences in opinion were resolved by discussion with a third review author, and consensus was reached among all three review authors. We used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of the evidence. Eight trials recruiting a total of 637 infants met the inclusion criteria for the systematic review. The infants included in the review were mainly formula-fed term infants. The trials were of variable methodological quality. Formula-fed term infants with GOR on feed thickeners had nearly two fewer episodes of regurgitation per day (mean difference -1.97 episodes per day

  18. Pepsin in saliva for the diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Jamal O; Gabieta-Somnez, Shirley; Yazaki, Etsuro; Kang, Jin-Yong; Woodcock, Andrew; Dettmar, Peter; Mabary, Jerry; Knowles, Charles H; Sifrim, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Current diagnostic methods for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) have moderate sensitivity/specificity and can be invasive and expensive. Pepsin detection in saliva has been proposed as an 'office-based' method for GORD diagnosis. The aims of this study were to establish normal values of salivary pepsin in healthy asymptomatic subjects and to determine its value to discriminate patients with reflux-related symptoms (GORD, hypersensitive oesophagus (HO)) from functional heartburn (FH). 100 asymptomatic controls and 111 patients with heartburn underwent MII-pH monitoring and simultaneous salivary pepsin determination on waking, after lunch and dinner. Cut-off value for pepsin positivity was 16 ng/mL. Patients were divided into GORD (increased acid exposure time (AET), n=58); HO (normal AET and + Symptom Association Probability (SAP), n=26) and FH (normal AET and-SAP, n=27). 1/3 of asymptomatic subjects had pepsin in saliva at low concentration (0(0-59)ng/mL). Patients with GORD and HO had higher prevalence and pepsin concentration than controls (HO, 237(52-311)ng/mL and GORD, 121(29-252)ng/mL)(p210 ng/mL pepsin suggested presence of GORD+HO with 98.2% specificity (likelihood ratio: 25.1). Only 18/84 (21.4%) of GORD+HO patients had 3 negative samples. In patients with symptoms suggestive of GORD, salivary pepsin testing may complement questionnaires to assist office-based diagnosis. This may lessen the use of unnecessary antireflux therapy and the need for further invasive and expensive diagnostic methods. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Impact of gastro-oesophageal reflux on microRNA expression, location and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cameron M; Michael, Michael Z; Watson, David I; Tan, Grace; Astill, David St J; Hummel, Richard; Hussey, Damian J

    2013-01-08

    Ulceration of the oesophageal squamous mucosa (ulcerative oesophagitis) is a pathological manifestation of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, and is a major risk factor for the development of Barrett's oesophagus. Barrett's oesophagus is characterised by replacement of reflux-damaged oesophageal squamous epithelium with a columnar intestinal-like epithelium. We previously reported discovery of microRNAs that are differentially expressed between oesophageal squamous mucosa and Barrett's oesophagus mucosa. Now, to better understand early steps in the initiation of Barrett's oesophagus, we assessed the expression, location and function of these microRNAs in oesophageal squamous mucosa from individuals with ulcerative oesophagitis. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to compare miR-21, 143, 145, 194, 203, 205 and 215 expression levels in oesophageal mucosa from individuals without pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux to individuals with ulcerative oesophagitis. Correlations between microRNA expression and messenger RNA differentiation markers BMP-4, CK8 and CK14 were analyzed. The cellular localisation of microRNAs within the oesophageal mucosa was determined using in-situ hybridisation. microRNA involvement in proliferation and apoptosis was assessed following transfection of a human squamous oesophageal mucosal cell line (Het-1A). miR-143, miR-145 and miR-205 levels were significantly higher in gastro-oesophageal reflux compared with controls. Elevated miR-143 expression correlated with BMP-4 and CK8 expression, and elevated miR-205 expression correlated negatively with CK14 expression. Endogenous miR-143, miR-145 and miR-205 expression was localised to the basal layer of the oesophageal epithelium. Transfection of miR-143, 145 and 205 mimics into Het-1A cells resulted in increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation. Elevated miR-143, miR-145 and miR-205 expression was observed in oesophageal squamous mucosa of individuals with ulcerative oesophagitis. These mi

  20. Impact of gastro-oesophageal reflux on microRNA expression, location and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Cameron M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ulceration of the oesophageal squamous mucosa (ulcerative oesophagitis is a pathological manifestation of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, and is a major risk factor for the development of Barrett’s oesophagus. Barrett’s oesophagus is characterised by replacement of reflux-damaged oesophageal squamous epithelium with a columnar intestinal-like epithelium. We previously reported discovery of microRNAs that are differentially expressed between oesophageal squamous mucosa and Barrett’s oesophagus mucosa. Now, to better understand early steps in the initiation of Barrett’s oesophagus, we assessed the expression, location and function of these microRNAs in oesophageal squamous mucosa from individuals with ulcerative oesophagitis. Methods Quantitative real-time PCR was used to compare miR-21, 143, 145, 194, 203, 205 and 215 expression levels in oesophageal mucosa from individuals without pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux to individuals with ulcerative oesophagitis. Correlations between microRNA expression and messenger RNA differentiation markers BMP-4, CK8 and CK14 were analyzed. The cellular localisation of microRNAs within the oesophageal mucosa was determined using in-situ hybridisation. microRNA involvement in proliferation and apoptosis was assessed following transfection of a human squamous oesophageal mucosal cell line (Het-1A. Results miR-143, miR-145 and miR-205 levels were significantly higher in gastro-oesophageal reflux compared with controls. Elevated miR-143 expression correlated with BMP-4 and CK8 expression, and elevated miR-205 expression correlated negatively with CK14 expression. Endogenous miR-143, miR-145 and miR-205 expression was localised to the basal layer of the oesophageal epithelium. Transfection of miR-143, 145 and 205 mimics into Het-1A cells resulted in increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation. Conclusions Elevated miR-143, miR-145 and miR-205 expression was observed in

  1. Heartburn, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and non-erosive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-31

    Jan 31, 2010 ... hypersensitivity.7,8. Management of GORD. Depending on how ... reflux include lifestyle changes, dietary modification and using non-prescription ... acid clearance, minimising the incidence of reflux events, or both.8 Lifestyle ...

  2. Diversity in the oesophageal phenotypic response to gastro-oesophageal reflux: immunological determinants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, R C; Onwuegbusi, B A; Bajaj-Elliott, M; Saeed, I T; Burnham, W R; Farthing, M J G

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: Approximately 10% of adults experience gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms with a variable oesophageal response. A total of 60% have no endoscopic abnormality, 30% have oesophagitis, and 10% have Barrett's oesophagus. We investigated whether the inflammatory cell infiltrate and cytokine profiles of these clinical phenotypes merely vary in severity or are fundamentally different. Methods: Patients with reflux symptoms and a normal oesophagus (n=18), oesophagitis (n=26), and Barrett's oesophagus (n=22 newly diagnosed, n=28 surveillance) were recruited. Endoscopic and histopathological degrees of inflammation were scored. Cytokine expression was determined by competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Results: In oesophagitis, endoscopic and histopathological grades of inflammation correlated highly. mRNA expression of proinflammatory interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, and interferon γ (IFN-γ) were increased 3–10-fold compared with non-inflamed squamous or Barrett's oesophageal samples. There was a modest increase in anti-inflammatory IL-10 but no increase in IL-4. In Barrett's oesophagus, 29/50 had no endoscopic evidence of inflammation and histopathological inflammation was mild in 17/50 and moderate in 24/50, independent of acid suppressants. Expression of IL-1β, IL-8, and IFN-γ was similar to non-inflamed squamous mucosa. IL-10 was increased 1.6-fold similar to oesophagitis. IL-4 was increased fourfold, with 100-fold increase in IL-4/T cell receptor expression, compared with squamous oesophagus or oesophagitis. Conclusions: Barrett's oesophagus is characterised by a distinct Th-2 predominant cytokine profile compared with the proinflammatory nature of oesophagitis. The specific oesophageal immune responses may influence disease development and progression. PMID:11889061

  3. Dental complications of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: guidance for physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert J; Aminian, Amin; Brunton, Paul

    2017-06-01

    There is potential for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) to be under-diagnosed by physicians. A quick, focused examination, requiring no special equipment, of a patients' dentition can assist in making a more accurate diagnosis where GORD is suspected. Guidance is provided for physicians as to what intra-oral signs are suggestive of intrinsic dental erosion, which is a clinical feature of GORD and its associated conditions. Use of this information will, it is suggested, improve outcomes for patients where GORD is suspected. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  4. Non-nutritive sucking for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in preterm and low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaila, Kim; Foster, Jann P; Richards, Robyn; Jeffery, Heather E

    2014-10-15

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is commonly diagnosed in the neonatal population (DiPietro 1994), and generally causes few or no symptoms (Vandenplas 2009). Conversely, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) refers to GOR that causes troublesome symptoms with or without complications such as damage to the oesophagus (Vandenplas 2009). Currently there is no evidence to support the range of measures recommended to help alleviate acid reflux experienced by infants. Non-nutritive sucking (NNS) has been used as an intervention to modulate neonatal state behaviours through its pacifying effects such as decrease infant fussiness and crying during feeds (Boiron 2007; Pickler 2004). To determine if NNS reduces GORD in preterm infants (less than 37 weeks' gestation) and low birth weight (less than 2500 g) infants, three months of age and less, with signs or symptoms suggestive of GORD, or infants with a diagnosis of GORD. We performed computerised searches of the electronic databases of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 9, 2013), MEDLINE (1966 to September 2013), CINAHL (1982 to September 2013), and EMBASE (1988 to September 2013). We applied no language restrictions. Controlled trials using random or quasi-random allocation of preterm infants (less than 37 weeks' gestation) and low birth weight (less than 2500 g) infants three months of age and less with signs or symptoms suggestive of GORD, or infants with a diagnosis of GORD. We included studies reported only by abstracts, and cluster and cross-over randomised trials. Two review authors independently reviewed and selected trials from searches, assessed and rated study quality and extracted relevant data. We identified two studies from the initial search. After further review, we excluded both studies. We identified no studies examining the effects of NNS for GORD in preterm and low birth weight infants There was insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of NNS for GORD

  5. Proton pump inhibitor failure in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a perspective aided by the Gartner hype cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heading, Robert C

    2017-04-01

    Some patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) experience symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. In the early years of their availability, these drugs were thought to be a highly effective treatment for GORD and realisation that symptom relief was often incomplete came as a disappointment. This review considers the evolution of thinking with the aid of the Gartner hype cycle - a graphical depiction of the process of innovation, evolution and adoption of new technologies. Acknowledging that over-simplistic concepts of GORD have been largely responsible for inflated expectations of PPI therapy is an important step forward in establishing how patients with persistent symptoms, despite PPIs, should be assessed and treated. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical trial: esomeprazole for moderate-to-severe nighttime heartburn and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease-related sleep disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D; Crawley, J A; Hwang, C; Brown, K

    2010-07-01

    Nighttime heartburn, common among patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD), is associated with substantial clinical effects. GERD-related sleep disturbances are underappreciated and undertreated. To evaluate the efficacy of esomeprazole on GERD-related nighttime heartburn and associated sleep disturbances. In this multicentre, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, patients with moderate-to-severe nighttime heartburn and GERD-related sleep disturbances (endoscopies not required) received esomeprazole 20 mg or placebo each morning for 4 weeks. Heartburn symptoms and GERD-related sleep disturbances were evaluated using the validated Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and validated Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire. The analysis included 262 patients (esomeprazole, n = 137; placebo, n = 125). Significantly more patients receiving esomeprazole achieved nighttime heartburn relief (primary end point) than those receiving placebo (34.3% vs. 10.4%; P heartburn and GERD-related sleep disturbances, improving heartburn symptoms, sleep quality, work productivity and functionality.

  7. Non-acid gastro-oesophageal reflux is associated with squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kgomo, Mpho; Mokoena, Taole R; Ker, James A

    2017-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus is a common cancer among South Africans. Due to the absence of effective screening and surveillance programme for early detection and late presentation, squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage or when metastasis has already occurred. The 5-year survival is often quoted at 5%-10%, which is poor. To determine the association between oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and non-acid gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Study design: A cross-sectional case-control analytical study of patients referred to the Gastroenterology Division of Steve Biko Academic Hospital in Pretoria, South Africa. All patients had combined multichannel impedance and pH studies done and interpreted after upper gastroscopy using the American College of Gastroenterology guidelines by two clinicians. Thirty-two patients with OSCC were recruited: non-acid reflux was found in 23 patients (73%), acid reflux in 2 patients (6%) and 7 patients (22%) had normal multichannel impedance and pH studies.Forty-nine patients matched by age, gender and race were recruited as a control group. Non-acid reflux was found in 11 patients (22%), acid reflux in 31 patients (63%) and 7 patients (14%) had normal multichannel impedance and pH monitoring study. The significance of the association between non-acid reflux and OSCC was tested using χ 2 , and simple logistic regression was used to adjust for the effects of potential confounders.The OR of developing OSCC in patients with non-acid gastro-oesophageal reflux was 8.8 (95% CI 3.2 to 24.5, P<0.0001) in this South African group.Alcohol and smoking had no effect on these results.

  8. Review article : intra-oesophageal impedance monitoring for the assessment of bolus transit and gastro-oesophageal reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conchillo, J. M.; Smout, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Intra-oesophageal impedance monitoring can be used to assess the clearance of a swallowed bolus (oesophageal transit) and to detect gastro-oesophageal reflux independent of its acidity. Aim To discuss the clinical application of the impedance technique for the assessment of bolus transit

  9. Additional considerations for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    assisting patients, physicians and regulatory authorities. The new definition ... tract symptoms, but patients mainly present with heartburn and regurgitation. Various .... PubMed [homepage on the Internet]. ... Relationship between symptom load.

  10. Gastro-oesophageal reflux monitoring: review and consensus report on detection and definitions of acid, non-acid, and gas reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifrim, D; Castell, D; Dent, J; Kahrilas, P J

    2004-01-01

    To date, most concepts on the frequency of gastro-oesophageal reflux episodes and the efficiency of the antireflux barrier have been based on inferences derived from measurement of oesophageal pH. The development of intraluminal impedance monitoring has highlighted the fact that pH monitoring does not detect all gastro-oesophageal reflux events when little or no acid is present in the refluxate, even if special pH tracing analysis criteria are used. In November 2002, a workshop took place at which 11 specialists in the field of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease discussed and criticised all currently available techniques for measurement of reflux. Here, a summary of their conclusions and recommendations of how to achieve the best results from the various techniques now available for reflux measurement is presented. PMID:15194656

  11. Cough associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD): Japanese experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Akio

    2017-12-01

    Differences in the aetiology as well as patient background of chronic cough have been recognised among US, UK, and Japan. One of the marked differences has been the prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), which has been one of the top three causes in Western countries. It was indeed uncommon or rare in Japan, but, with the increasing prevalence of GOR itself, chronic cough associated with GORD seems to have become more common. In this article, cough associated with GORD will be reviewed based on literature and our Japanese experience. Further, potentially broader relevance of GORD in chronic cough will also be mentioned, highlighting the potential importance of dysmotiliy/non-acid reflux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Refractory gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a major management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-05-12

    May 12, 2009 ... modulators, bile acid binders and sucralfate is yet to be elucidated. Surgery. Antireflux surgery should be considered in patients who require high doses of PPIs to control symptoms, particularly young patients who may require lifelong therapy.20. Antireflux surgery has also been suggested to be effective in ...

  13. Impact of concomitant laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and hiatal hernia repair on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in morbidly obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Harshit; Vigneshwaran, Balasubiramaniyan; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Ahuja, Vineet

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of hiatal hernia repair (HHR) on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in morbidly obese patients with hiatus hernia undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). It is a retrospective study involving ten morbidly obese patients with large hiatus hernia diagnosed on pre-operative endoscopy who underwent LSG and simultaneous HHR. The patients were assessed for symptoms of GERD using a Severity symptom score (SS) questionnaire and anti-reflux medications. Of the ten patients, five patients had GERD preoperatively. At the mean follow-up of 11.70 ± 6.07 months after surgery, four patients (80%) showed complete resolution while one patient complained of persistence of symptoms. Endoscopy in this patient revealed resolution of esophagitis indicating that the persistent symptoms were not attributable to reflux. The other five patients without GERD remained free of any symptom attributable to GERD. Thus, in all ten patients, repair of hiatal hernia (HH) during LSG led to either resolution of GERD or prevented any new onset symptom related to GER. In morbidly obese patients with HH with or without GERD undergoing LSG, repair of the hiatus hernia helps in amelioration of GERD and prevents any new onset GER. Thus, the presence of HH should not be considered as a contraindication for LSG.

  14. Impact of concomitant laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and hiatal hernia repair on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in morbidly obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshit Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of hiatal hernia repair (HHR on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD in morbidly obese patients with hiatus hernia undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG. Materials and Methods: It is a retrospective study involving ten morbidly obese patients with large hiatus hernia diagnosed on pre-operative endoscopy who underwent LSG and simultaneous HHR. The patients were assessed for symptoms of GERD using a Severity symptom score (SS questionnaire and anti-reflux medications. Results: Of the ten patients, five patients had GERD preoperatively. At the mean follow-up of 11.70 ± 6.07 months after surgery, four patients (80% showed complete resolution while one patient complained of persistence of symptoms. Endoscopy in this patient revealed resolution of esophagitis indicating that the persistent symptoms were not attributable to reflux. The other five patients without GERD remained free of any symptom attributable to GERD. Thus, in all ten patients, repair of hiatal hernia (HH during LSG led to either resolution of GERD or prevented any new onset symptom related to GER. Conclusion: In morbidly obese patients with HH with or without GERD undergoing LSG, repair of the hiatus hernia helps in amelioration of GERD and prevents any new onset GER. Thus, the presence of HH should not be considered as a contraindication for LSG.

  15. Impact of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease on work productivity despite therapy with proton pump inhibitors in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gross M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common disorder with consequences for the patient's health-related quality of life (HRQoL. In Germany, few data are available on the impact of GERD on work-related productivity. Aim To study the impact of GERD on work productivity despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI therapy and the association between productivity and symptom duration, severity, and HRQoL. Methods Retrospective data from randomly selected patients with chronic GERD symptoms, treated by office-based general practitioners or general internists with routine clinical care, were analyzed together with information from self-administered instruments assessing work productivity (WPAI-GERD, symptoms (RDQ, and HRQoL (QOLRAD. Results Reduced productivity was reported by 152 of 249 patients (61.0%, although 89.5% of them were treated with PPI. The reduction in work productivity was 18.5% in all patients and 30.3% in those with reduced productivity. Patients with impaired productivity showed a significantly lower HRQoL and more-severe symptoms of reflux disease. In all patients, the mean sick leave attributable to reflux symptoms was 0.6 hours in the previous seven days and 1.4 work days in the previous three months. Conclusion GERD has a substantial impact on work productivity in Germany, even in patients receiving routine clinical care and PPI therapy.

  16. The value of gastro-oesophageal scintigraphy in the detection of gastro-oesophageal reflux in the infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Luyer, B.; Texte, D.; Mallet, E.; Menibus, C.H. de; Segond, G.; Chauman, J.; Noel, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    50 children with a strong clinical suspicion of gastroesophageal reflux and 10 control patients were evaluated with gastroesophageal scintiscans. 500 μCi a 1 mCi of Tc sulfur colloid mixed the patients' routine milk or formula feeding was administred and serial images of the abdomen and thorax were obtained. A positive scintiscan was found in 35 patients (sensitivity 70%) and none of the controls (specificity 100%). A comparison of findings in 34 patients refered for both radiographic and radionucleide studies showed that barium studies were positive in 38% and radionucleide in 64.7%. We found this examination to be more sensitive that the standard barium radiography particularly in patients with respiratory symptoms. We concluded that the GE scintiscan is complementary to barium studies in the diagnosis of GE reflux. Pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents was detected in only a case of the 35 patients with documented GE reflux. A T1/2 emptying gastric longer than 90 minutes (linear calculation) or 105 minutes (exponential calculation) is an indirect GE reflux test. This procedure is simple, safe more physiologic than other available examinations [fr

  17. Value of gastro-oesophageal scintigraphy in the detection of gastro-oesophageal reflux in the infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Luyer, B.; Texte, D.; Mallet, E.; Menibus, C.H. de; Segond, G.; Chauman, J.; Noel, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    50 children with a strong clinical suspicion of gastroesophageal reflux and 10 control patients were evaluated with gastroesophageal scintiscans. 500 μCi a 1 mCi of Tc sulfur colloid mixed the patients' routine milk or formula feeding was administred and serial images of the abdomen and thorax were obtained. A positive scintiscan was found in 35 patients (sensitivity 70%) and none of the controls (specificity 100%). A comparison of findings in 34 patients refered for both radiographic and radionucleide studies showed that barium studies were positive in 38% and radionucleide in 64.7%. We found this examination to be more sensitive that the standard barium radiography particularly in patients with respiratory symptoms. We concluded that the GE scintiscan is complementary to barium studies in the diagnosis of GE reflux. Pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents was detected in only a case of the 35 patients with documented GE reflux. A T1/2 emptying gastric longer than 90 minutes (linear calculation) or 105 minutes (exponential calculation) is an indirect GE reflux test. This procedure is simple, safe more physiologic than other available examinations

  18. Value of gastro-oesophageal scintigraphy in the detection of gastro-oesophageal reflux in the infant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Luyer, B.; Texte, D.; Mallet, E.; Menibus, C.H. de (Departement de Pediatrie); Dewald, M. (Service de Radiologie Pediatrique, Hopital Charles Nicolle, 76 - Rouen (France)); Segond, G.; Chauman, J.; Noel, J.P. (Departement de Medecine Nucleaire, Centre Henri Becquerel, 76 - Rouen (France))

    1983-12-01

    50 children with a strong clinical suspicion of gastroesophageal reflux and 10 control patients were evaluated with gastroesophageal scintiscans. 500 ..mu..Ci a 1 mCi of Tc sulfur colloid mixed the patients' routine milk or formula feeding was administred and serial images of the abdomen and thorax were obtained. A positive scintiscan was found in 35 patients (sensitivity 70%) and none of the controls (specificity 100%). A comparison of findings in 34 patients refered for both radiographic and radionucleide studies showed that barium studies were positive in 38% and radionucleide in 64.7%. We found this examination to be more sensitive that the standard barium radiography particularly in patients with respiratory symptoms. We concluded that the GE scintiscan is complementary to barium studies in the diagnosis of GE reflux. Pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents was detected in only a case of the 35 patients with documented GE reflux. A T1/2 emptying gastric longer than 90 minutes (linear calculation) or 105 minutes (exponential calculation) is an indirect GE reflux test. This procedure is simple, safe more physiologic than other available examinations.

  19. Laparoscopic fundoplication surgery versus medical management for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sushil K; Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan

    2015-11-05

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is a common condition with 3% to 33% of people from different parts of the world suffering from GORD. There is considerable uncertainty about whether people with GORD should receive an operation or medical treatment for controlling the condition. To assess the benefits and harms of laparoscopic fundoplication versus medical treatment for people with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. We searched the Cochrane Upper Gastrointestinal and Pancreatic Diseases Group (UGPD) Trials Register (June 2015), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 6, 2015), Ovid MEDLINE (1966 to June 2015), and EMBASE (1980 to June 2015) to identify randomised controlled trials. We also searched the references of included trials to identify further trials. We considered only randomised controlled trials (RCT) comparing laparoscopic fundoplication with medical treatment in people with GORD irrespective of language, blinding, or publication status for inclusion in the review. Two review authors independently identified trials and independently extracted data. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using both fixed-effect and random-effects models with RevMan 5 based on available case analysis. Four studies met the inclusion criteria for the review, and provided information on one or more outcomes for the review. A total of 1160 participants in the four RCTs were either randomly assigned to laparoscopic fundoplication (589 participants) or medical treatment with proton pump inhibitors (571 participants). All the trials included participants who had had reflux symptoms for at least six months and had received long-term acid suppressive therapy. All the trials included only participants who could undergo surgery if randomised to the surgery arm. All of the trials were at high risk of bias. The overall quality of evidence was low or very low. None

  20. Research priority setting in Barrett's oesophagus and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, James; Gadeke, Lisa; Lovat, Laurence; Hamdy, Shaheen; Hawkey, Chris; McLaughlin, John; Ang, Yeng

    2017-11-01

    The incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus is increasing. Barrett's oesophagus is the main precursor to oesophageal adenocarcinoma, which has a poor prognosis. In view of the vast potential burden of these diseases on patients and health-care resources, there is a real need to define and focus research efforts. This priority setting exercise aimed to produce a list of the top ten uncertainties in the field that reflect the priorities of patients and health-care providers. We adopted the robust and transparent methodologies previously outlined by the James Lind Alliance. This qualitative approach firstly involves an ideas gathering survey that, once distilled, generates a longlist of research uncertainties. These uncertainties are then prioritised via an interim ranking survey and a final workshop to achieve consensus agreement. The initial 629 uncertainties, generated from a survey of 170 individual respondents (47% professional, 53% non-professional) and one workshop, were narrowed down to the final top ten uncertainties of priority for future research. These priorities covered a range of issues, including a need for improved patient risk stratification, alternative diagnostic and surveillance tests, efficacy of a dedicated service for Barrett's oesophagus, cost-effectiveness and appropriateness of current surveillance, advances in development of non-drug treatments for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, safety of long-term drug treatment, and questions regarding the durability and role of different endoscopic therapies for dysplastic Barrett's oesophagus. This is the first patient-centred assessment of priorities for researchers in this chronic disease setting. We hope that recognition and dissemination of these results will shape the future direction of research and translate into meaningful gains for patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pneumopatias e doença de refluxo gastroesofágico Lung diseases and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Cláudio Barroso Pereira

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A doença do refluxo gastro esofágico decorre do refluxo patológico do estômago para o esófago. Quando esse refluxo ocorre fora do esófago denomina-se doença de refluxo extraesofágico. O autor propõe uma revisão sobre as doenças pulmonares associadas ao refluxo. É avaliado, previamente, de forma resumida o conceito de cada doença e, em seguida, de modo sistemático, são discutidos a prevalência do refluxo sobre as pneumopatias, os mecanismo que explicam essas interações e o impacto do tratamento do refluxo gastroesofagiano sobre as doenças pulmonares. O autor conclui que é inegável a existência de uma conexão entre doença de refluxo gastro esofágico e várias doenças pulmonares, sendo mister estudos complementares para corroborar essa associação.Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Disease is a consequence of pathological reflux from stomach to oesophagus. Whenever the refluxed contents extended beyond the oesophagus itself, is called Extraoesophageal Reflux Disease. The author proposes a review about pulmonary disorders and gastroesophageal reflux. Previously, it is evaluated in an abridged way, the concepts of each diseases and after that, in a systematic form, it is discussed the prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux in lung diseases, all the mechanisms studies and the impact of gastro-oesophageal treatment on lung disorders. The author concludes that is undeniable the link between Gastro-oesophageal reflux and lung diseases and further reaserch is mandatory in order to corroborate this association.

  2. Radiologic diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux by means of graded abdominal compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fransson, S.G.; Soekjer, H.; Johansson, K.E.; Tibbling, L.

    The aim of the study was to ascertain whether abdominal compression by a standardized technique increases the reliability of the radiologic diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux. Eighty-eight patients were examined by means of a manometric reflux test, 24-hour measurements of pH and endoscopy. The radiologic examination was performed with and without graded abdominal compression, the patient at the same time turning from side to side. When abdominal compression was included the result of the radiologic examination was positive in 31 patients. In the absence of abdominal compression reflux was detected in 11 of these patients. In one patient reflux was detected only without compression. All these 31 patients had one more test positive and in 27 at least 2 more tests were positive. Another 21 patients had reflux disease as indicated by at least 2 of the 3 other tests. The compression technique seems to yield no false positive responses, and proved to be significantly more reliable than examinations without compression.

  3. Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux and Apnoea: Is There a Temporal Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossor, Thomas; Andradi, Gwendolyn; Ali, Kamal; Bhat, Ravindra; Greenough, Anne

    2018-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) and apnoea are common in infants; whether there is a causal relationship is controversial. To determine whether there was a temporal relationship between GOR and apnoea, in particular, the frequency of obstructive apnoeas and if the frequency of GOR episodes correlated with apnoea frequency when maturity at testing was taken into account. Polysomnography and pH/multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) studies were performed. Apnoeas were classified as central, obstructive, or mixed. MII events were classified as acidic (pH reflux event was compared to that in the 5-min period preceding the event and that in a 5-min reflux-free period (control period). Forty infants (median gestational age 29 [range 24-42] weeks) were assessed at a post-conceptional age of 37 (30-54) weeks. Obstructive (n = 580), central (n = 900), and mixed (n = 452) apnoeas were identified; 381 acid reflux events were detected by MII and 153 by the pH probe only. Apnoeas were not more frequent following GOR than during control periods. Both the frequency of apnoeas (p = 0.002) and GOR episodes (p = 0.01) were inversely related to post-conceptional age at testing, but were not significantly correlated with each other when controlled for post-conceptional age. These results suggest that GOR does not cause apnoea. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Influence of intrapulmonary percussive ventilation in upright position on gastro-oesophageal reflux in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ginderdeuren, F; Kerckhofs, E; Deneyer, M; Vanlaethem, S; Buyl, R; Vandenplas, Y

    2016-10-01

    To determine the influence of physiotherapy using intrapulmonary percussive ventilation on gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in infants reflux episodes (RE) over a 20-min period was registered for each infant and a mean per 20 min was calculated in order to obtain a baseline value. The number of RE during IPV R intervention was compared to baseline. Fifty infants with a median age of 133 days were recruited of whom 21 were diagnosed with pathological GOR. During IPV R , the incidence of RE in the entire group was significantly lower compared to baseline; median (inter-quartile range [IQR]) 0 (0-1) versus 0.71 (0-1.33) RE, respectively, P = 0.003. The subgroup with abnormal GOR showed also a significant decrease of RE during IPV R ; median (IQR) 0 (0-1) versus 1.17 (0.55-2.16) RE, respectively, P = 0.03. No difference was detected in the group with normal reflux; median (IQR) 0.6 (0-1) compared to 0 (0-1) RE, respectively, P = 0.34. IPV R does not induce, nor aggravate GOR in infants without and with pathological GOR, respectively, but on the contrary decreases the number of RE in patients with pathological reflux. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:1065-1071. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Analytical sensitivity of Tc99m radionuclide 'milk' scanning in the detection of gastro-oesophageal reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paton, J.Y.; Nanayakkara, C.S.; Cosgriff, P.S.

    1985-09-01

    The analytical sensitivity of radionuclide ''milk'' scans for detecting gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) has been assessed using an in vitro simulation test. Five factors were found to affect the ability to detect simulated reflux: isotope concentration, absolute gamma camera sensitivity, absorber thickness overlying the ''oesophagus'' and volume and duration of reflux. We found that a critical volume-duration product must be exceeded for reflux to be detected. Radionuclide milk scanning appears to be much less sensitive in detecting transient events like GOR than might be expected from previously reported static simulation studies.

  6. Association of gastro-oesophageal reflux and chronic rhinosinusitis: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leason, S R; Barham, H P; Oakley, G; Rimmer, J; DelGaudio, J M; Christensen, J M; Sacks, R; Harvey, R J

    2017-03-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) has been implicated in the development of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). The association of GORD with CRS is systematically assessed from the medical literature. Embase and MEDLINE were searched using a comprehensive strategy limited to English language and Human subjects. Any study with original data on the experimental, diagnostic, treatment or prognostic association of CRS with GORD was included. Studies without a control group, case reports and review articles were excluded. The search returned 958 records, with an additional 10 found from bibliographic lists; this produced 32 studies. The included studies (n=32) consisted of studies reporting pathogenic factors (n=20), epidemiological association (n=8), prognostic interactions (n=3), and a combination of these outcomes (n=1). Potential pathogenic roles for GORD in CRS were supported; CRS subjects had greater prevalence of intranasal Helicobacter pylori and acid reflux than subjects without CRS. CRS is more prevalent in GORD sufferers than those without GORD. Evidence is conflicting for GORD as a factor in CRS treatment failure. The results support a significant association of GORD with CRS. Physicians should be cognizant of the potential for acid and non-acid reflux as a driving factor in CRS.

  7. Influence of respiratory physiotherapy on gastro-oesophageal reflux in infants: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ginderdeuren, Filip; Kerckhofs, Eric; Deneyer, Michel; Vanlaethem, Sylvie; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2015-09-01

    To provide a survey on the literature concerning the influence of respiratory physiotherapy on gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in infants and young children. Electronic databases (Pubmed, Web of Science, PEDro) and reference lists of articles and narrative reviews were searched. Articles were included when infants and small children underwent oesophageal pH monitoring or pH-multichannel intraluminal impedance monitoring while respiratory physiotherapy was administered. Descriptive analysis was performed and two researchers scored the methodological quality of these studies. Out of 985 articles, seven (six English, one French) have been included, In total 277 patients were involved, 71 with cystic fibrosis. Depending on the technique used, four studies showed GOR to be aggravated during therapy, three studies reported no effect. The evidence is not conclusive on whether respiratory physiotherapy induces or aggravates GOR in infants and small children. Age, disease, and treatment options play an important role. More specific research, also focussing on the influence of respiratory physiotherapy on non-acid reflux and the impact of recently developed airway clearance techniques (ACT's) on GOR is necessary. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Influence of bouncing and assisted autogenic drainage on acid gastro-oesophageal reflux in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ginderdeuren, Filip; Vandenplas, Yvan; Deneyer, Michel; Vanlaethem, Sylvie; Buyl, Ronald; Kerckhofs, Eric

    2017-08-01

    To determine the influence of modern airway clearance techniques using assisted autogenic drainage (AAD), whether or not combined with bouncing, on acid gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in infants reflux episodes (RE) and the refluxindex (RI) were the outcome measures. The results obtained during (T15) and 15 min after the intervention (T30) were compared to a period of 15 min before treatment (T0). The results of 150 infants, evenly distributed over the three treatment groups, were analyzed. No significant differences were found in number of RE at T15 and T30 compared to T0 in the bouncing group (P = 0.42), the AAD group (P = 0.14), and the BAAD group (P = 0.91). RI was significantly lower in the AAD group at T15 compared to T0 (P < 0.01). No differences in RI were found in the bouncing group (P = 0.28), nor in the BAAD group (P = 0.81). Bouncing, AAD and BAAD do not induce, nor aggravate acid GOR in infants under the age of 1 year. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Continuous versus bolus intragastric tube feeding for preterm and low birth weight infants with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Robyn; Foster, Jann P; Psaila, Kim

    2014-07-17

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is a particularly common condition in preterm and low birth weight infants. These infants are also more likely to have excessive regurgitation, as they do not have a fully developed antireflux mechanism. Preterm and low birth weight infants who are unable to suck oral feeds are required to be fed via an intragastric tube for varying lengths of time. Intragastric tube feeding can be delivered by the intermittent bolus or continuous feeding method. Use of continuous or intermittent bolus intragastric feeding may have a positive or negative effect on the incidence or severity of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. To determine whether continuous or intermittent bolus intragastric tube feeding reduces the number of episodes and the duration of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in preterm and low birth weight infants.We intended to perform subgroup analyses for gestational age; birth weight; age in days from birth at full enteral feeding via intragastric tube (breast vs bottle); frequency of intermittent bolus feed; and type of medication for treatment of GORD (only if medication prescribed and given similarly to both intervention groups). We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Group as described in The Cochrane Library (www.thecochranelibrary.com) to search for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2013, Issue 9), MEDLINE (1966 to September 2013), EMBASE (1980 to September 2013) and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (1982 to September 2013). We also searched previous reviews, including cross-references, abstracts and conference and symposia proceedings of the Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand and the Pediatric Academic Societies (American Pediatric Society/Society for Pediatric Research and European Society for Paediatric Research) from 1990 to 2012. Published and unpublished RCTs and quasi

  10. Randomized clinical trial of 270° posterior versus 180° anterior partial laparoscopic fundoplication for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roks, D J; Koetje, J H; Oor, J E; Broeders, J A; Nieuwenhuijs, V B; Hazebroek, E J

    2017-06-01

    Partial fundoplications provide similar reflux control with fewer post-fundoplication symptoms compared with Nissen fundoplication for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). The best choice of procedure for partial fundoplication remains unclear. The aim of this study was to compare the outcome of two different types of partial fundoplication for GORD. A double-blind RCT was conducted between 2012 and 2015 in two hospitals specializing in antireflux surgery. Patients were randomized to undergo either a laparoscopic 270° posterior fundoplication (Toupet) or a laparoscopic 180° anterior fundoplication. The primary outcome was postoperative dysphagia at 12 months, measured by the Dakkak score. Subjective outcome was analysed at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. Objective reflux control was assessed before and 6 months after surgery. Ninety-four patients were randomized to laparoscopic Toupet or laparoscopic 180° anterior fundoplication (47 in each group). At 12 months, 85 patients (90 per cent) were available for follow-up. Objective scores were available for 76 (81 per cent). Postoperative Dakkak dysphagia score at 12 months was similar in the two groups (mean 5·9 for Toupet versus 6·4 for anterior fundoplication; P = 0·773). Subjective outcome at 12 months demonstrated no significant differences in control of reflux or post-fundoplication symptoms. Overall satisfaction and willingness to undergo surgery did not differ between the groups. Postoperative endoscopy and 24-h pH monitoring showed no significant differences in mean oesophageal acid exposure time or recurrent pathological oesophageal acid exposure. Both types of partial fundoplication provided similar control of GORD at 12 months, with no difference in post-fundoplication symptoms. Registration number: NTR5702 (www.trialregister.nl). © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Infant gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD): Australian GP attitudes and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Catherine N; Segal, Ahuva Y; Hinds, Rupert; Jones, Kay M; Piterman, Leon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the attitudes and practices of Australian general practitioners (GPs) regarding infant gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) diagnosis and management. A national cross-sectional survey, involving a random sample of currently practising Australian GPs (n = 2319) was undertaken between July and September 2011. GPs attitudes and management of infant GORD were surveyed via an online and paper-based 41-item questionnaire. In total, 400 responses were analysed (17.24% response rate). The majority of GPs employed empirical trials of acid-suppression medication and/or lifestyle modifications to diagnose infant GORD. GPs frequently recommended dietary modification despite the belief that they were only moderately effective at best. In addition, GPs frequently prescribed acid-suppression medication, despite concerns regarding their safety in the infant population. Other GP concerns included the lack of clinical guidelines and education for GPs about infant GORD, as well as the level of evidence available for the safety and efficacy of diagnostic tests and treatments. Despite the important role Australian GPs play in the diagnosis and management of infant GORD, high-level evidence-based guidelines for GPs are lacking. Consequently, GPs engage in diagnostic and management practices despite their concerns regarding the safety and effectiveness. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  12. The prevalence of dental erosion in Nigerian patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agbakwuru Elugwaraonu A

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In various people of the Western world, gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR has been reported to be a common problem. Various studies have also assessed the relationship between GOR and dental erosion. The authors are not aware of such studies in Nigerians. It is therefore the aims of the present study to estimate the prevalence of GOR; to estimate the prevalence of dental erosion in patients with GORD; to document the oral findings in patients diagnosed with GORD and to compare these findings with previous studies elsewhere. Methods A total of 225 subjects comprising of 100 volunteers and 125 patients diagnosed with GORD were involved in this study. History of gastric juice regurgitation and heartburn were recorded. Oral examination to quantify loss of tooth structure was done using the tooth wear index (TWI designed by Smith and Knight (1984. Results Twenty patients with GORD presented with dental erosion in the maxillary anterior teeth with TWI scores ranging from 1–3. The prevalence of erosion was found to be statistically significant between GORD patients (16% and control (5% (p 0.05. Conclusion The present study supports the consideration of dental erosion as the extra-oesophageal manifestation of GORD. However the association between GORD and burning mouth sensation needs more investigation.

  13. Diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is enhanced by adding oesophageal histology and excluding epigastric pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, N; Vieth, M; Wernersson, B; Wissmar, J; Dent, J

    2017-05-01

    The diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in clinical practice is limited by the sensitivity and specificity of symptoms and diagnostic testing. To determine if adding histology as a criterion and excluding patients with epigastric pain enhances the diagnosis for GERD. Patients with frequent upper gastrointestinal symptoms who had not taken a proton pump inhibitor in the previous 2 months and who had evaluable distal oesophageal biopsies were included (Diamond study: NCT00291746). Epithelial hyperplasia was identified when total epithelial thickness was at least 430 μm. Investigation-based GERD criteria were: presence of erosive oesophagitis, pathological oesophageal acid exposure and/or positive symptom-acid association probability. Symptoms were assessed using the Reflux Disease Questionnaire and a pre-specified checklist. Overall, 127 (55%) of the 231 included patients met investigation-based GERD criteria and 195 (84%) met symptom-based criteria. Epithelial hyperplasia was present in 89 individuals, of whom 61 (69%) met investigation-based criteria and 83 (93%) met symptom-based criteria. Adding epithelial hyperplasia as a criterion increased the number of patients diagnosed with GERD on investigation by 28 [12%; number needed to diagnose (NND): 8], to 155 (67%). The proportion of patients with a symptom-based GERD diagnosis who met investigation-based criteria including epithelial hyperplasia was significantly greater when concomitant epigastric pain was absent than when it was present (P < 0.05; NND: 8). Histology increases diagnosis of GERD and should be performed when clinical suspicion is high and endoscopy is negative. Excluding patients with epigastric pain enhances sensitivity for the diagnosis of GERD. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Effects of the frame acquisition rate on the sensitivity of gastro-oesophageal reflux scintigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codreanu, I; Chamroonrat, W; Edwards, K

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the sensitivity of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) scintigraphy at 5-s and 60-s frame acquisition rates. Methods: GOR scintigraphy of 50 subjects (1 month–20 years old, mean 42 months) were analysed concurrently using 5-s and 60-s acquisition frames. Reflux episodes were graded as low if activity was detected in the distal half of the oesophagus and high if activity was detected in its upper half or in the oral cavity. For comparison purposes, detected GOR in any number of 5-s frames corresponding to one 60-s frame was counted as one episode. Results: A total of 679 episodes of GOR to the upper oesophagus were counted using a 5-s acquisition technique. Only 183 of such episodes were detected on 60-s acquisition images. To the lower oesophagus, a total of 1749 GOR episodes were detected using a 5-s acquisition technique and only 1045 episodes using 60-s acquisition frames (these also included the high-level GOR on 5-s frames counted as low level on 60-s acquisition frames). 10 patients had high-level GOR episodes that were detected only using a 5-s acquisition technique, leading to a different diagnosis in these patients. No correlation between the number of reflux episodes and the gastric emptying rates was noted. Conclusion: The 5-s frame acquisition technique is more sensitive than the 60-s frame acquisition technique for detecting both high- and low-level GOR. Advances in knowledge: Brief GOR episodes with a relatively low number of radioactive counts are frequently indistinguishable from intense background activity on 60-s acquisition frames. PMID:23520226

  15. The gastro-oesophageal common cavity revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, M. C.; Bredenoord, A. J.; Samsom, M.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    The manometric common cavity phenomenon has been used as indicator of gastro-oesophageal reflux of liquid or gaseous substances. Using combined pH and impedance recording as reference standard the value of a common cavity as indicator of gastro-oesophageal reflux was tested. Ten healthy male

  16. Cough reflex sensitivity and airway inflammation in patients with chronic cough due to non-acid gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhihong; Yu, Li; Xu, Shuchang; Liu, Bo; Zhao, Ting; Lü, Hanjing; Qiu, Zhongmin

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the pathogenesis of chronic cough caused by non-acid reflux. Seven patients with chronic cough due to non-acid reflux, 12 patients with chronic cough due to acid reflux, 10 patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease without cough and 12 healthy volunteers were recruited for the study. All subjects underwent oesophageal multi-channel intraluminal impedance measurements combined with pH monitoring, and assessment of cough reflex sensitivity to capsaicin and induced sputum cytology. The concentrations of substance P, mast cell tryptase, prostaglandin D2 and histamine in induced sputum were measured by ELISA. Cough threshold C2 and C5 did not differ between patients with chronic cough due to non-acid or acid reflux, but the values were significantly lower than those for patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease without cough and healthy volunteers. Weakly acidic reflux episodes were obviously more frequent in patients with chronic cough due to non-acid reflux than in the other three groups. Sputum substance P and mast cell tryptase concentrations were remarkably increased in patients with chronic cough, but were similar for those with cough due to non-acid or acid reflux. There were significant inverse correlations between substance P levels and cough threshold C2 or C5 in patients with cough due to non-acid or acid reflux, and between mast cell tryptase levels and cough threshold C2 in patients with cough due to acid reflux. Chronic cough due to non-acid reflux may be related to cough reflex hypersensitivity caused by neurogenic airway inflammation and mast cell activation, in which weakly acidic reflux is possibly a major factor. © 2011 The Authors. Respirology © 2011 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  17. Comparison of the effects of esomeprazole and fundoplication on airway responsiveness in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiljander, Toni; Rantanen, Tuomo; Kellokumpu, Ilmo; Kööbi, Tiit; Lammi, Lauri; Nieminen, Markku; Poussa, Tuija; Ranta, Arto; Saarelainen, Seppo; Salminen, Paulina

    2013-07-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is suggested to cause or aggravate several respiratory conditions. Studies with proton pump inhibitors have resulted in only minor improvements in pulmonary outcomes in patients with GORD. It has been speculated that operative treatment of GORD might be more efficient as it also diminishes non-acidic reflux. To compare the effects of esomeprazole 40 mg bid and fundoplication on airway responsiveness, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), exhaled nitric oxide (NO) and respiratory symptoms in patients with moderate-to-severe GORD. Sixty-nine GORD patients had methacholine inhalation challenge performed on them, and FEV1, exhaled NO and respiratory symptoms were measured at baseline, after a 3-month treatment with esomeprazole and 3 months after fundoplication. Primary outcome variable was dose-response slope (DRS), i.e. decline in FEV1 during methacholine challenge divided with the amount of methacholine administered (%/μmol). Pre-defined subgroup analysis was performed among those with concomitant asthma (n = 12). There was no improvement in DRS, FEV1 or exhaled NO after esomeprazole treatment or fundoplication. Cough and dyspnoea measured with visual analog scale improved with esomeprazole treatment (P < 0.001), and further after fundoplication (P < 0.001). Among those with concomitant asthma, significant improvements in St George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) scores could be seen after fundoplication. Neither esomeprazole treatment nor fundoplication diminishes airway responsiveness or exhaled NO, or improves FEV1 in patients with GORD. Improvements in respiratory symptoms and SGRQ scores after GORD treatments could be detected. However, as this was not a placebo-controlled study, the findings in these secondary endpoints should not be emphasised. ClinicalTrials.cov: NCT00994708. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Control of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations and reflux by the GABAB agonist baclofen in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q; Lehmann, A; Rigda, R; Dent, J; Holloway, R H

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations (TLOSRs) are the major cause of gastro-oesophageal reflux in normal subjects and in most patients with reflux disease. The gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor type B agonist, baclofen, is a potent inhibitor of TLOSRs in normal subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of baclofen on TLOSRs and postprandial gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with reflux disease. Methods: In 20 patients with reflux disease, oesophageal motility and pH were measured, with patients in the sitting position, for three hours after a 3000 kJ mixed nutrient meal. On separate days at least one week apart, 40 mg oral baclofen or placebo was given 90 minutes before the meal. Results: Baclofen reduced the rate of TLOSRs by 40% from 15 (13.8–18.3) to 9 (5.8–13.3) per three hours (preflux episodes by 43% from 7.0 (4.0–12.0) to 4.0 (1.5–9) per three hours (median (interquartile range); preflux disease, the GABAB agonist baclofen significantly inhibits gastro-oesophageal reflux episodes by inhibition of TLOSRs. These findings suggest that GABAB agonists may be useful as therapeutic agents for the management of reflux disease. PMID:11772961

  19. Update on the epidemiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Serag, Hashem B; Sweet, Stephen; Winchester, Christopher C; Dent, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective To update the findings of the 2005 systematic review of population-based studies assessing the epidemiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Design PubMed and Embase were screened for new references using the original search strings. Studies were required to be population-based, to include ≥200 individuals, to have response rates ≥50% and recall periods <12 months. GERD was defined as heartburn and/or regurgitation on at least 1 day a week, or according to the Montreal definition, or diagnosed by a clinician. Temporal and geographic trends in disease prevalence were examined using a Poisson regression model. Results 16 studies of GERD epidemiology published since the original review were found to be suitable for inclusion (15 reporting prevalence and one reporting incidence), and were added to the 13 prevalence and two incidence studies found previously. The range of GERD prevalence estimates was 18.1%–27.8% in North America, 8.8%–25.9% in Europe, 2.5%–7.8% in East Asia, 8.7%–33.1% in the Middle East, 11.6% in Australia and 23.0% in South America. Incidence per 1000 person-years was approximately 5 in the overall UK and US populations, and 0.84 in paediatric patients aged 1– 17 years in the UK. Evidence suggests an increase in GERD prevalence since 1995 (p<0.0001), particularly in North America and East Asia. Conclusions GERD is prevalent worldwide, and disease burden may be increasing. Prevalence estimates show considerable geographic variation, but only East Asia shows estimates consistently lower than 10%. PMID:23853213

  20. Associations between gastro-oesophageal reflux, its management and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Victoria S; Müllerová, Hana; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Patel, Anant; Hurst, John R

    2015-09-01

    To determine factors, overall and by sex, associated with self-reported gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, and to evaluate relationships between GORD, its modification by acid suppression medications (Proton Pump Inhibitors [PPI]/histamine-2 receptor antagonists [H2RA]) and exacerbations of COPD and mortality. Logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with GORD; Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for GORD and risk of exacerbation and death. Among 2135 COPD patients from the ECLIPSE cohort, 547 patients self-reported GORD, with female preponderance; 237 were taking PPI/H2RA. Risk factors for GORD did not differ by sex. When compared to patients who did not report GORD or use of PPI/H2RA, patients with GORD and taking PPI/H2RA had a significantly increased risk of exacerbation (HR = 1.58, 95%CI = 1.35-1.86); risk was also increased for patients reporting GORD only or PPI/H2RA use only (HR = 1.21 [1.04-1.40] and 1.33 [1.08-1.65], respectively). Similar findings were observed for risk of hospitalised exacerbation. GORD was not associated with mortality. GORD in COPD patients is highly prevalent, and risk factors did not differ by sex. Use of PPI/H2RA and self-reported GORD were associated with increased risk of moderate-to-severe and hospitalised exacerbations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Distinguishing the impact of dexlansoprazole on heartburn vs. regurgitation in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peura, D A; Pilmer, B; Hunt, B; Mody, R; Perez, M C

    2013-11-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is characterised by symptomatic heartburn and regurgitation. Treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) effectively decreases heartburn symptoms, but their effects on symptomatic regurgitation are less clear. To determine the impact of PPI therapy on heartburn and regurgitation severity in patients with either non-erosive GERD (NERD) or erosive oesophagitis (EE). Endoscopically-confirmed NERD patients received dexlansoprazole 30 or 60 mg or placebo in a randomised, blinded, 4-week study. Endoscopically-confirmed EE patients received dexlansoprazole 60 mg or lansoprazole 30 mg in two 8-week, randomised, blinded healing studies. The Patient Assessment of Upper Gastrointestinal Symptom Severity questionnaire, which includes a heartburn/regurgitation subscale, was administered to assess symptom severity at baseline, and at weeks 2 and 4 of the NERD study and at weeks 4 and 8 during the EE trials. We defined separate subscales for heartburn and regurgitation for this post-hoc analysis. Among patients with both symptoms at baseline, improvements in individual heartburn and regurgitation subscales along with the original combined heartburn/regurgitation subscale were determined. In the NERD and EE studies, 661 and 1909 patients, respectively, had both heartburn and regurgitation at baseline. NERD patients receiving dexlansoprazole 30 and 60 mg experienced significantly greater improvements in symptom severity for both heartburn and regurgitation compared with placebo. EE patients receiving dexlansoprazole 60 mg had significantly greater improvements in heartburn/regurgitation and heartburn-only subscales at week 4 compared with those receiving lansoprazole. Dexlansoprazole appears to be effective in improving both heartburn and regurgitation, and this improvement is maintained for the duration of treatment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux in children. Comparison between oesophageal pH and barium examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Khawari, Hanaa A. [Department of Radiology, Al-Amiri Hospital, Kuwait University (Kuwait); Sinan, T.S. [Department of Radiology, Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital, Kuwait University (Kuwait); Seymour, Helen [Department of Radiology, St George' s Hospital, Blackshaw Road, London SW17 0QT (United Kingdom)

    2002-11-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is a common disorder encountered during childhood. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential to prevent serious complications. There are several methods for the diagnosis of GOR, with variable opinions regarding which one is the most sensitive and specific. Objective. This is a retrospective study comparing 24-h oesophageal pH monitoring and barium examinations in the diagnosis of GOR in children. Patients and methods. All children referred with signs and/or symptoms of GOR from January to December 1996 at Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, UK, were included in the study. The recorded results (presence or absence of reflux) of barium examinations and 24-h oesophageal pH monitoring studies performed on 169 children were retrospectively reviewed and compared. Results. One-third of patients were below 1 year of age. In all age groups, oesophageal pH probe studies showed a high detection rate (83%) and low incidence of false-negative results (7%) compared to barium examinations, which showed a lower detection rate (43%) and higher incidence of false-negative results (48%). Most GOR-related anatomical abnormalities diagnosed by barium examinations were identified in infants below 1 year of age. Conclusions. We believe that 24-h oesophageal pH monitoring should be used as the first line of investigation for the diagnosis of GOR in all children regardless of the age group. Barium examinations can be reserved for patients below 1 year of age, those going for surgery and those with negative oesophageal pH monitoring results but strong clinical suspicion of GOR. (orig.)

  3. The effect of Helicobacter pylori infection and eradication in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: A parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwizer, Werner; Menne, Dieter; Schütze, Kurt; Vieth, Michael; Goergens, Reiner; Malfertheiner, Peter; Leodolter, Andreas; Fried, Michael; Fox, Mark R

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to resolve controversy regarding the effects of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy and H. pylori infection in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. A randomized, double-blind, multicentre trial was performed in patients presenting with reflux symptoms. H. pylori-positive patients were randomized to receive either antibiotics or placebo for 7 days. H. pylori-negative patient controls received placebo. All received esomeprazole 20 mg b.d. for 7 days, followed by 40 mg o.d. to complete an 8-week course, and were followed up for 32 weeks by telephone. In this study, 198/589 (34%) patients were H. pylori-positive and 113 H. pylori-negative patients served as controls. Baseline endoscopy revealed 63% Los Angeles grade 0A and 37% Los Angeles grade BCD oesophagitis with no difference between patient groups. Symptom improvement on esomeprazole was seen in 89%. H. pylori eradication was successful in 82%. H. pylori eradication had no effect on symptomatic relapse (hazard ratio 1.15, 95% CI 0.74-1.8; p = 0.5). Overall, H. pylori-positive patients had a lower probability of relapse compared to H. pylori-negative controls (hazard ratio 0.6, 95% CI 0.43-0.85; p = 0.004). Relapse hazard was modulated also by oesophagitis grade (BCD vs. 0A, hazard ratio 2.1, 95% CI 1.5-3.0). Relapse of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms after a course of high dose acid suppression took longer for H. pylori-positive patients than H. pylori-negative controls; however eradication therapy had no effect on the risk of relapse; ClincialTrials.gov number, NCT00574925.

  4. Partial symptom-response to proton pump inhibitors in patients with non-erosive reflux disease or reflux oesophagitis - a post hoc analysis of 5796 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, P; van Zanten, S Veldhuyzen; Mattsson, H

    2012-01-01

    Although most patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) benefit from proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, some experience only partial symptom relief.......Although most patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) benefit from proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, some experience only partial symptom relief....

  5. Adam, Eve and the reflux enigma: age and sex differences across the gastro-oesophageal reflux spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royston, Christine; Bardhan, Karna D

    2017-06-01

    We present demographic differences across the gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) spectrum in a UK District General Hospital. Data were prospectively collected over 37 years. At endoscopy patients were categorized as: erosive oesophagitis (EO), Barrett's oesophagus (BO) or nonerosive reflux disease (NER). Analysis 1: comparison of EO, BO and NER 1977-2001 when the database for GORD without BO closed. Analysis 2: demographic differences in oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) in total BO population diagnosed 1977-2011. GORD 1977-2001 (n=11 944): sex, male predominance in EO and BO but not NER; male : female ratios, 1.81, 1.65, 0.87, respectively (P<0.0001); mean age at presentation, EO 54 years, BO 62 years, NER 50 years; women were older than men by 10, 7 and 6 years, respectively.BO 1977-2011: prevalent OAC, 87/1468 (6%); male : female ratio, 4.1 (P<0.0001); incident OAC, 54/1381 (3.9%); male : female ratio, 3.5 (P<0.0001). Among all BO, more men developed OAC (3 vs. 0.9%). Within each sex, proportion of OAC higher among men (4.9 vs. 2.3%); at OAC diagnosis women were slightly but not significantly older (69.9 vs. 72.3 years, P=0.322). Two views may explain our findings. First, women have either milder reflux, or reduced mucosal sensitivity hence reflux remains silent for longer. Alternatively, women genuinely develop reflux later, that is, are more protected and for longer from developing GORD and its complications. Early evidence is emerging that female sex hormones may indeed have a protective role in GORD during the reproductive period. We suggest reflux and its consequences may be an example of 'protection' conferred on Eve.

  6. Treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease with rabeprazole in primary and secondary care : does Helicobacter pylori infection affect proton pump inhibitor effectiveness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, NJ; de Boer, WA; Geldof, H; Hazelhoff, B; Bergmans, P; Tytgat, GNJ; Smout, AJPM

    2004-01-01

    Background: The presence of the gastric pathogen, Helicobacter pylori influences acid suppression by proton pump inhibitors and treatment outcome in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Aim: To determine the influence of H. pylori infection on effectiveness of rabeprazole in primary and

  7. Treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease with rabeprazole in primary and secondary care: does Helicobacter pylori infection affect proton pump inhibitor effectiveness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, N. J.; Boer, W. A.; Geldof, H.; Hazelhoff, B.; Bergmans, P.; Tytgat, G. N. J.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The presence of the gastric pathogen, Helicobacter pylori influences acid suppression by proton pump inhibitors and treatment outcome in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. AIM: To determine the influence of H. pylori infection on effectiveness of rabeprazole in primary and

  8. A prospective cross-sectional study of laparoscopic subtotal Lind fundoplication for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease--a durable and effective anti-reflux procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapey, I M; Agrawal, S; Peacock, A; Super, P

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic partial fundoplication for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is reported to have fewer side effects when compared to Nissen fundoplication, but doubts remain over its long term durability in controlling reflux. The aim of this study was to assess outcome of symptoms for all patients presenting with GORD undergoing routine laparoscopic subtotal Lind fundoplication. All patients undergoing laparoscopic fundoplication between August, 1999 and November, 2007 performed by a single surgeon were included in the study. The anti-reflux procedure studied was laparoscopic Lind (300°) fundoplication with crural repair in all cases. Patients completed pre and post-operative questionnaires containing validated scoring systems for heartburn, gas bloat, dysphagia and overall patient satisfaction. Over the 100-month period, 320 consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic subtotal Lind fundoplication. Of these, 256 (80%) replied to the questionnaire at a mean of 31 months (range 3-96 months) following surgery. 91.4% of respondents had an improvement in heartburn symptom score with a significant reduction in score from 7.74 preoperatively to 1.25 postoperatively (preflux control (heartburn and regurgitation) from 3.49 preoperatively to 1.48 after surgery (preflux symptoms with half of these reporting their recurrence within two years following surgery. Because of this all were tested with post-operative pH testing, yet only one had a 24-h pH time outside the normal range. Overall patient satisfaction was high with a visual analogue score of 9 and 88% of the patients claimed they would have the operation again. Laparoscopic Lind fundoplication demonstrates excellent reflux control when performed routinely for all patients presenting with GORD. This technique is both durable and efficacious in controlling reflux symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A study of the effect of nasal modes of ventilation on the incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux in preterm neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, Ss; Datta, Karuna; Adhikari, Km

    2012-01-01

    Nasal modes of respiratory support cause variable amounts of gastric dilatation which may increase gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER) in preterms. To compare the incidence of GER in nasally ventilated, preterm babies with controls (babies not on ventilation). A prospective, observational comparative study. Twenty-three preterm babies of gestational age 28-36 weeks and weight ranging between 1,000 g and Reflux index (RI) was calculated as the percentage of study time the lower oesophageal pH was reflux with symptoms if any. Numerical data were shown as mean with standard deviation and statistical comparisons were done using the χ(2)-test, Fischer test, and t-test wherever applicable. The RI was higher in ventilated babies as compared to the control group, particularly in the subgroup A, where test babies formed their own controls. Grade IV reflux (7 cases) was seen only in the ventilated babies. There was no difference in the incidence of GER in babies on nCPAP as compared with nIPPV. Grade IV reflux could not be reliably predicted by RI alone. No definite temporal relation between episodes of reflux and symptoms could be determined in this study. There is an increase in GER in preterms on nasal modes of ventilation. A combination of upper (pharyngeal) and lower oesophageal sensors are preferred to a single lower oesophageal sensor when assessing GER by oesophageal pHmetry in neonates.

  10. pH monitoring of gastro-oesophageal reflux before and after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thereaux, J; Barsamian, C; Bretault, M; Dusaussoy, H; Lamarque, D; Bouillot, J-L; Czernichow, S; Carette, C

    2016-03-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is a common obesity-related co-morbidity that is assessed objectively by 24-h pH monitoring. Some concerns have been raised regarding the risk of de novo GORD or exacerbation of pre-existing GORD after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Here, 24-h pH monitoring was used to assess the influence of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy on postoperative GORD in obese patients with or without preoperative GORD. From July 2012 to September 2014, all patients scheduled for laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy were invited to participate in a prospective follow-up. Patients who underwent preoperative 24-h pH monitoring were asked to repeat the examination 6 months after operation. GORD was defined as an oesophageal pH < 4 for at least 4·2 per cent of the total time recorded. Of 89 patients, 76 had preoperative pH monitoring for GORD evaluation and 50 had postoperative reassessment. Patients without (group 1, 29 patients) or with (group 2, 21 patients) preoperative GORD were similar regarding age, sex ratio and body mass index. In group 1, the median (i.q.r.) total time at pH < 4 was significantly higher after surgery than before: 5·6 (2·5-9·5) versus 1·6 (0·7-2·9) per cent (P < 0·001). Twenty of the 29 patients experienced de novo GORD as determined by 24-h pH monitoring (P < 0·001). In group 2, total time at pH < 4 after surgery was no different from the preoperative value: 5·9 (3·9-10·7) versus 7·7 (5·2-10·3) per cent (P = 0·296). Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy was associated with de novo GORD in over two-thirds of patients, but did not seem to exacerbate existing GORD. © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Radiologic findings after fundoplication compared with a pH reflux test and symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fransson, S.G.; Soekjer, H.; Johansson, K.E.; Tibbling, L.; Linkoeping Univ.; Linkoeping Univ.

    1986-01-01

    In a follow-up after fundoplication, 61 patients underwent a double contrast examination of the stomach and a radiologic examination to detect any gastro-oesophageal reflux. The radiologic findings were compared with pH reflux test and symptoms. Gastro-oesophageal reflux was found in 7 patients at radiologic examination. None of these patients had an adequate fundoplication at a double contrast examination of the stomach and all had symptoms indicating reflux. Recurrence of gastro-oesophageal reflux may be shown at the radiologic examination and predicted by the morphologic appearances at the double contrast examination. (orig.)

  12. Radiologic findings after fundoplication compared with a pH reflux test and symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fransson, S.G.; Soekjer, H.; Johansson, K.E.; Tibbling, L.

    In a follow-up after fundoplication, 61 patients underwent a double contrast examination of the stomach and a radiologic examination to detect any gastro-oesophageal reflux. The radiologic findings were compared with pH reflux test and symptoms. Gastro-oesophageal reflux was found in 7 patients at radiologic examination. None of these patients had an adequate fundoplication at a double contrast examination of the stomach and all had symptoms indicating reflux. Recurrence of gastro-oesophageal reflux may be shown at the radiologic examination and predicted by the morphologic appearances at the double contrast examination.

  13. Minimal access surgery compared with medical management for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: five year follow-up of a randomised controlled trial (REFLUX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, S C; Boachie, C; Ramsay, C R; Krukowski, Z H; Heading, R C; Campbell, M K

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the long term clinical effectiveness of laparoscopic fundoplication as an alternative to drug treatment for chronic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). Design Five year follow-up of multicentre, pragmatic randomised trial (with parallel non-randomised preference groups). Setting Initial recruitment in 21 UK hospitals. Participants Responders to annual questionnaires among 810 original participants. At entry, all had had GORD for >12 months. Intervention The surgeon chose the type of fundoplication. Medical therapy was reviewed and optimised by a specialist. Subsequent management was at the discretion of the clinician responsible for care, usually in primary care. Main outcome measures Primary outcome measure was self reported quality of life score on disease-specific REFLUX questionnaire. Other measures were health status (with SF-36 and EuroQol EQ-5D questionnaires), use of antireflux medication, and complications. Results By five years, 63% (112/178) of patients randomised to surgery and 13% (24/179) of those randomised to medical management had received a fundoplication (plus 85% (222/261) and 3% (6/192) of those who expressed a preference for surgery and for medical management). Among responders at 5 years, 44% (56/127) of those randomised to surgery were taking antireflux medication versus 82% (98/119) of those randomised to medical management. Differences in the REFLUX score significantly favoured the randomised surgery group (mean difference 8.5 (95% CI 3.9 to 13.1), Preflux-related operations—most often revision of the wrap. Long term rates of dysphagia, flatulence, and inability to vomit were similar in the two randomised groups. Conclusions After five years, laparoscopic fundoplication continued to provide better relief of GORD symptoms than medical management. Adverse effects of surgery were uncommon and generally observed soon after surgery. A small proportion had re-operations. There was no evidence of long term adverse

  14. Validation of the GerdQ questionnaire for the management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Juntaro; Okada, Sawako; Hirata, Kenro; Fukuhara, Seiichiro; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Background The GerdQ scoring system may be a useful tool for managing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. However, GerdQ has not been fully validated in Asian countries. Objective To validate the Japanese version of GerdQ and to compare this version to the Carlsson-Dent questionnaire (CDQ) in both general and hospital-based populations. Methods The questionnaires, including the Japanese versions of GerdQ and CDQ, and questions designed to collect demographic information, were sent to a general population via the web, and to a hospital-based population via conventional mail. The optimal cutoff GerdQ score and the differences in the characteristics between GerdQ and CDQ were assessed. Results The answers from 863 web-responders and 303 conventional-mail responders were analysed. When a GerdQ cutoff score was set at 8, GerdQ significantly predicted the presence of reflux oesophagitis. Although the GerdQ scores were correlated with the CDQ scores, the concordance rates were poor. Multivariate analysis results indicated that, the additional use of over-the-counter medications was associated with GerdQ score ≥ 8, but not with CDQ score ≥ 6. Conclusions The GerdQ cutoff score of 8 was appropriate for the Japanese population. Compared with CDQ, GerdQ was more useful for evaluating treatment efficacy and detecting patients’ unmet medical needs. PMID:24917957

  15. Gastro-oesophageal reflux: a mixed methods study of infants admitted to hospital in the first 12 months following birth in NSW (2000-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlen, Hannah Grace; Foster, Jann P; Psaila, Kim; Spence, Kaye; Badawi, Nadia; Fowler, Cathrine; Schmied, Virginia; Thornton, Charlene

    2018-02-12

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is common in infants. When the condition causes pathological symptoms and/or complications it is considered gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). It appears to be increasingly diagnosed and causes great distress in the first year of infancy. In New South Wales (NSW), residential parenting services support families with early parenting difficulties. These services report a large number of babies admitted with a label of GOR/GORD. The aim of this study was to explore the maternal and infant characteristics, obstetric interventions, and reasons for clinical reporting of GOR/GORD in NSW in the first 12 months following birth (2000-2011). A three phase, mixed method sequential design was used. Phase 1 included a linked data population based study (n = 869,188 admitted babies). Phase 2 included a random audit of 326 medical records from admissions to residential parenting centres in NSW (2013). Phase 3 included eight focus groups undertaken with 45 nurses and doctors working in residential parenting centres in NSW. There were a total of 1,156,020 admissions recorded of babies in the first year following birth, with 11,513 containing a diagnostic code for GOR/GORD (1% of infants admitted to hospitals in the first 12 months following birth). Babies with GOR/GORD were also more likely to be admitted with other disorders such as feeding difficulties, sleep problems, and excessive crying. The mothers of babies admitted with a diagnostic code of GOR/GORD were more likely to be primiparous, Australian born, give birth in a private hospital and have: a psychiatric condition; a preterm or early term infant (37-or-38 weeks); a caesarean section; an admission of the baby to SCN/NICU; and a male infant. Thirty six percent of infants admitted to residential parenting centres in NSW had been given a diagnosis of GOR/GORD. Focus group data revealed two themes: "It is over diagnosed" and "A medical label is a quick fix, but what else could be

  16. Dilated intercellular space diameter as marker of reflux-related mucosal injury in children with chronic cough and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrelli, O; Mancini, V; Thapar, N; Ribolsi, M; Emerenziani, S; de'Angelis, G; Bizzarri, B; Lindley, K J; Cicala, M

    2014-04-01

    The diagnostic corroboration of the relationship between gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and chronic cough remains challenging. To compare oesophageal mucosal intercellular space diameter (ISD) in children with GERD, children with gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER)-related cough (GrC) and a control group, and to explore the relationship between baseline impedance levels and dilated ISD in children with GER-related cough. Forty children with GERD, 15 children with GrC and 12 controls prospectively underwent oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with oesophageal biopsies taken 2-3 cm above squamocolumnar junction. ISD were quantified using transmission electron microscopy. Impedance-pH monitoring with evaluation of baseline impedance in the most distal impedance channel was performed in both patient groups. A significant difference in mean ISD values was found between GrC patients (0.9 ± 0.2 μm) and controls (0.5 ± 0.2 μm, P reflux parameter. Finally, there was no correlation between ISD and distal baseline impedance values (r:-0.35; NS). In children with reflux-related cough, dilated intercellular space diameter appears to be an objective and useful marker of oesophageal mucosal injury regardless of acid exposure, and its evaluation should be considered for those patients where the diagnosis is uncertain. In children with reflux-related cough, baseline impedance levels have no role in identifying reflux-induced oesophageal mucosal ultrastructural changes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Questionnaire-based survey in a developing country showing noncompliance with paediatric gastro-oesophageal reflux practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasfi, Hayat; Hanna-Wakim, Rima; Akel, Imad; Yazbeck, Nadine

    2017-02-01

    This 2015 study investigated whether Lebanese paediatricians diagnosed and managed gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in infants and children in accordance with the 2009 guidelines from the North American and European Societies for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. Paediatricians members of the Lebanese Order of Physicians with updated email addresses were invited to complete a web-based survey between September and November 2015, to assess their knowledge and management of GERD. Responses were received from 114 of the 543 paediatricians, and 96 were analysed. Only two respondents complied fully with the international guidelines. The majority diagnosed GERD in infants based solely on their medical history and examination. Moreover, nearly two-thirds of the respondents would start an empiric trial with acid suppression. Around half of the respondents considered proton pump inhibitors to be the mainstay of GERD treatment. This was the first Lebanese study that surveyed the management of paediatric GERD. Only 2.1% of the paediatricians followed the guidelines on the evidence-based management of GERD. This highlights the need for studies to assess barriers to guideline implementation and the development of new guidelines accounting for regional factors, mainly the cost of investigations and prevalence of medical insurance. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Investigation and management of gastro-oesophageal reflux in United Kingdom neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossor, Thomas; Andradi, Gwendolyn; Bhat, Ravindra; Greenough, Anne

    2018-01-01

    In 2004, wide variation in the investigation and management of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) of infants on UK major neonatal units was demonstrated. Our aim was to resurvey neonatal practitioners to determine current practice and whether it was now evidence based. A questionnaire was sent to all 207 UK neonatal units. Responses were obtained from 84% of units. The most frequent 'investigation' was a trial of therapy (83% of units); pH studies were used in 38%, upper GI contrast studies in 19% and multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII)/pH studies in 5%. Only six units suggested a threshold for an abnormal pH study and two units for an abnormal MII study. Infants were commenced on antireflux medication without investigation always in 32% of units, often in 29%, occasionally in 19% and only never in 1%. Gaviscon was used as first line treatment in 60% of units, and other medications included ranitidine in 53%, thickening agents in 27%, proton pump inhibitors in 23%, domperidone in 22% and erythromycin in 6%. There remains a wide variation in diagnostic and treatment strategies for infants with suspected GOR on neonatal intensive care units, emphasising the need for randomised trials to determine appropriate GOR management. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and dental erosions in adults: influence of acidified food intake and impact on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Daiane C; Venturini, Ana Paula C; Callegari-Jacques, Sidia M; Fornari, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and dental erosions (DE) have an established association. We assessed whether GORD is associated with DE controlling for acidified food intake and their relationships with quality of life (QOL). In this cross-sectional study, 419 adult patients who sought dentistry consultation were considered eligible. Patients responded to questionnaires for GORD symptoms, acidified food ingestion and World Health Organization quality of life (WHOQOL Bref), followed by an oral examination, in which DE were characterized according to the Smith & Knight criteria. A total of 417 patients were included (43.8±13.7 years; 68.8% women). There were 143 patients with GORD (34.3%) and 274 controls without GORD. The prevalence of DE was higher in GORD patients compared with the controls (25.9 vs. 17.2%; P=0.041). GORD was associated with DE after adjusting for acidified food intake (P=0.035), with a prevalence ratio of 1.52 (0.95 confidence interval 1.03-2.22). The WHOQOL Bref score was significantly lower in the presence of GORD [median 17.2 (GORD-DE-) vs. 15.4 (GORD+DE+); P<0.01], irrespective of DE. In adults examined in a referential dentistry centre in South America, DE were prevalent and significantly associated with GORD. This association was independent of the intake of acidified food in our study. Impairment in QOL was observed in GORD patients irrespective of the presence of DE.

  20. The semantic connectivity map: an adapting self-organising knowledge discovery method in data bases. Experience in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscema, Massimo; Grossi, Enzo

    2008-01-01

    We describe here a new mapping method able to find out connectivity traces among variables thanks to an artificial adaptive system, the Auto Contractive Map (AutoCM), able to define the strength of the associations of each variable with all the others in a dataset. After the training phase, the weights matrix of the AutoCM represents the map of the main connections between the variables. The example of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease data base is extremely useful to figure out how this new approach can help to re-design the overall structure of factors related to complex and specific diseases description.

  1. The detection of gastro-oesophageal reflux in varicose changes of the oesophagus using scintigraphy. Szintigraphischer Nachweis des gastro-oesophagealen Refluxes bei Patienten mit Oesophagusvarizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kielmann, U.

    1984-08-27

    Comparative studies carried out in 22 bearers of oesophageal varices and 13 asymptomatic healthy volunteers on the basis of gastric reflux scintigraphy revealed findings to prove the occurrence of physiological reflux for the control group and, by contrast with this observation, markedly prolonged reflux episodes in the patient group. The occurrence of reflux was seen to be linked to the size of the varices found in the terminal oesophagus (negative correlation). A positive and significant correlation could be established between the size of a patient's varices and the frequency of haemorrhages. Bleedings and reflux episodes, however, were observed to be quite unrelated events. The results obtained strongly suggested that gastro-oesophageal reflux cannot be regarded as having a key role in haemorrhages from oesophageal varices. Nor was it possible to find statistical support for the effects of sclerotherapy on the frequency of haemorrhages. This was evidence in confirmation of the fact that obliteration is the obvious method in the treatment of haemorrhaging varices of the oesophagus. (TRV).

  2. Laparoscopic vs. open Nissen's fundoplication for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in children: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Tian, Jing; Jing, Li; Wang, Quan; Tian, Jinhui; Lun, Li

    2016-10-01

    Available evidence showed inconsistent results between laparoscopic Nissen's fundoplication (LNF) and open Nissen's fundoplication (ONF) for children with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD), so this study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety between LNF and ONF. Systematic, comprehensive literature searches were conducted to include randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared LNF and ONF for GERD. Two reviewers independently selected studies, abstracted data and assessed the methodological quality and evidence level. Data was analyzed by Review Manager Version 5.0. Risk ratio (RR) was used for dichotomous outcomes, and mean difference (MD) was used for continuous scales. Heterogeneity was estimated with the I 2 statistic, fixed-effect model was used if I 2 <50%, and otherwise random-effects model was used. Three RCTs (171 children) were included. There was not a statistical difference in mortality (RR 1.12, 95%CI 0.50 2.48), or postoperative complications (RR 0.87, 95%CI 0.61 1.25), readmission (RR 1.53, 95%CI 0.67 3.51), or hospital stay (MD 0.85, 95%CI -0.06 1.75) between LNF and ONF. But LNF was associated with more incidence of recurrence (RR 3.32, 95%CI 1.40 7.84), longer surgery duration (MD 76.33, 95%CI 69.37 83.28), but fewer retching (RR 0.11, 95%CI 0.02 0.58) than ONF. LNF might be as effective and safe as ONF in the short and long term, but both were associated with high risk of recurrence and mortality, especially for those children with neurological impairment, before the age of 18 months and female gender. This required a comprehensive evaluation of children before surgery. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dietary carbohydrate intake, insulin resistance and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a pilot study in European- and African-American obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointer, S D; Rickstrew, J; Slaughter, J C; Vaezi, M F; Silver, H J

    2016-11-01

    Although obesity rates are higher in African-American than European-American women, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and its comorbidities are more prevalent in European-American women. A common denominator for increased adiposity, and consequent insulin resistance, is excess dietary macronutrient intake - which may promote greater prevalence and severity of GERD in women. To investigate whether GERD is more robustly associated with dietary carbohydrate intake, particularly dietary simple carbohydrate intake, and insulin resistance in European-American women. About 144 obese women were assessed at baseline and 16 weeks after consuming a high-fat/low-carbohydrate diet. GERD diagnosis and medication usage was confirmed in medical records with symptoms and medications assessed weekly. About 33.3% (N = 33) of European-American and 20.0% (N = 9) of African-American women had GERD at baseline. Total carbohydrate (r = 0.34, P < 0.001), sugars (r = 0.30, P = 0.005), glycaemic load (r = 0.34, P = 0.001) and HOMA IR (r = 0.30, P = 0.004) were associated with GERD, but only in European-American women. In response to high-fat/low-carbohydrate diet, reduced intake of sugars was associated with reduced insulin resistance. By the end of diet week 10, all GERD symptoms and medication usage had resolved in all women. GERD symptoms and medication usage was more prevalent in European-American women, for whom the relationships between dietary carbohydrate intake, insulin resistance and GERD were most significant. Nevertheless, high-fat/low-carbohydrate diet benefited all women with regard to reducing GERD symptoms and frequency of medication use. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Relationships between air swallowing, intragastric air, belching and gastro-oesophageal reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, AJ; Weusten, BLAM; Timmer, R; Akkermans, LMA; Smout, AJPM

    Background: With each swallow a certain amount of air is transported to the stomach. The stomach protects itself against excessive distention by swallowed air through belching (gas reflux). The mechanism of belching (transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation) is also one of the mechanisms

  5. Relationships between air swallowing, intragastric air, belching and gastro-oesophageal reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, A. J.; Weusten, B. L. A. M.; Timmer, R.; Akkermans, L. M. A.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With each swallow a certain amount of air is transported to the stomach. The stomach protects itself against excessive distention by swallowed air through belching (gas reflux). The mechanism of belching (transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation) is also one of the mechanisms

  6. The dynamics of the oesophageal squamous epithelium 'normalisation' process in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease treated with long-term acid suppression or anti-reflux surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastracci, L; Fiocca, R; Engström, C; Attwood, S; Ell, C; Galmiche, J P; Hatlebakk, J G; Långström, G; Eklund, S; Lind, T; Lundell, L

    2017-05-01

    Proton pump inhibitors and laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery (LARS) offer long-term symptom control to patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD). To evaluate the process of 'normalisation' of the squamous epithelium morphology of the distal oesophagus on these therapies. In the LOTUS trial, 554 patients with chronic GERD were randomised to receive either esomeprazole (20-40 mg daily) or LARS. After 5 years, 372 patients remained in the study (esomeprazole, 192; LARS, 180). Biopsies were taken at the Z-line and 2 cm above, at baseline, 1, 3 and 5 years. A severity score was calculated based on: papillae elongation, basal cell hyperplasia, intercellular space dilatations and eosinophilic infiltration. The epithelial proliferative activity was assessed by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. A gradual improvement in all variables over 5 years was noted in both groups, at both the Z-line and 2 cm above. The severity score decreased from baseline at each subsequent time point in both groups (P refluxate seems to play the predominant role in restoring tissue morphology. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Gastro-oesophageal reflux in large-sized, deep-chested versus small-sized, barrel-chested dogs undergoing spinal surgery in sternal recumbency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Tilemahos L; Kazakos, George M; Savvas, Ioannis; Kostakis, Charalampos; Papadopoulou, Paraskevi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether an increased frequency of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is more common in large-sized, deep-chested dogs undergoing spinal surgery in sternal recumbency than in small-sized, barrelchested dogs. Prospective, cohort study. Nineteen small-sized, barrel-chested dogs (group B) and 26 large-sized, deep-chested dogs (group D). All animals were premedicated with intramuscular (IM) acepromazine (0.05 mg kg -1 ) and pethidine (3 mg kg -1 ) IM. Anaesthesia was induced with intravenous sodium thiopental and maintained with halothane in oxygen. Lower oesophageal pH was monitored continuously after induction of anaesthesia. Gastro-oesophageal reflux was considered to have occurred whenever pH values > 7.5 or < 4 were recorded. If GOR was detected during anaesthesia, measures were taken to avoid aspiration of gastric contents into the lungs and to prevent the development of oesophagitis/oesophageal stricture. The frequency of GOR during anaesthesia was significantly higher in group D (6/26 dogs; 23.07%) than in group B (0/19 dogs; 0%) (p = 0.032). Signs indicative of aspiration pneumonia, oesophagitis or oesophageal stricture were not reported in any of the GOR cases. In large-sized, deep-chested dogs undergoing spinal surgery in sternal recumbency, it would seem prudent to consider measures aimed at preventing GOR and its potentially devastating consequences (oesophagitis/oesophageal stricture, aspiration pneumonia). Copyright © 2016 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Is this a reflux patient or is it a patient with functional dyspepsia with additional reflux symptoms?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Patients with pyrosis or regurgitation as the dominating symptoms have gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). However, patients with more atypical symptoms may also suffer from it. The disease is usually chronic and patients who have additional oesophagitis are at risk of developing complicati......Patients with pyrosis or regurgitation as the dominating symptoms have gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). However, patients with more atypical symptoms may also suffer from it. The disease is usually chronic and patients who have additional oesophagitis are at risk of developing...

  9. Scintigraphy in the detection of gastro-oesophageal reflux in children with caustic oesophageal burns: a comparative study with radiography and 24-h pH monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezcan, Z.; Erinc, R.; Dirlik, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Ege University Medical Faculty, Izmir (Turkey); Oezcan, C.; Mutaf, O. [Dept. of Paediatric Surgery, Ege University Medical Faculty, Izmir (Turkey)

    2001-10-01

    Background: Caustic injury of the oesophagus not only causes luminal narrowing but is also responsible for longitudinal contraction, resulting in gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR), which leads to failure of conventional therapy. Therefore, the development of GOR should be investigated periodically to direct appropriate management of these patients. Purpose: To determine the ability of scintigraphy to detect GOR in children with caustic oesophageal strictures in comparison with barium study and 24-h pH monitoring. Materials and methods: Seventeen children with caustic oesophageal injury underwent scintigraphy, an upper GI barium study and 24-h pH monitoring within the same week. Five patients were also investigated post-operatively for the assessment of surgical outcome after antireflux surgery. Results: On the whole, there was good correlation (r = 0.78, P < 0.00 l) between scintigraphy and 24-h oesophageal pH monitoring. Scintigraphy detected all but one (9/10) refluxing patients and also correctly identified all (7/7) non-refluxing patients. Barium studies demonstrated 6 out of 10 refluxing patients. There were no false-positive barium studies in non-refluxing patients. Post-operative studies demonstrated no evidence of GOR in surgically treated patients. Conclusions: Our results indicate that, by comparison with barium studies, scintigraphy is useful in the detection of GOR in cases with caustic oesophageal strictures and may be used as a screening modality for those under clinical follow-up. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in wheezy infants using 24-h oesophageal combined impedance and pH monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Ahmed; El-Desoky, Tarek; Fathi, Khalid; Fawzi Elkashef, Wagdi; Zaki, Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is incriminated as a cause of non-asthmatic infantile wheeze. To date, no diagnostic test is considered standard for GERD-related airway reflux diagnosis. Oesophageal combined multiple channel intraluminal impedance and pH (MII-pH) monitoring is proposed to be a sensitive tool for evaluation of all GERD including infantile wheeze. We aimed to determine the GERD prevalence amongst wheezy infants in the first year of life using combined MII-pH versus pH monitoring alone and evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of objective MII-pH monitoring parameters in GERD-associated infantile wheeze diagnosis compared to those of lipid-laden macrophage index (LLMI). Thirty-eight wheezy infants below 1year of age were evaluated for GERD using oesophageal combined MII-pH monitoring and LLMI. Totally, 60.5% of cases had abnormal MII-pH; only 7.9% of them had abnormal pH monitoring. LLMI was significantly higher in wheezy infants with abnormal MII-pH than infants with normal MII-pH monitoring (112±88 versus 70±48; P=0.036). The current definitions of abnormal MII-pH study, reflux index≥10% and distal reflux episodes≥100, had low sensitivity (23%) but high specificity (100% and 96%, respectively) in GERD-related aspiration diagnosis defined by LLMI≥100. Using ROC curves, bolus contact time≥2.4% and proximal reflux episodes≥46 had 61% and 54% sensitivity and 64% and 76% specificity, respectively, in GERD-related aspiration diagnosis. Combined MII-pH is superior to pH monitoring in reflux-associated infantile wheeze diagnosis. Objective data including proximal reflux episodes and bolus contact time should be combined with the current parameters used in reflux-associated infantile wheeze diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Pan-Arab Association of Gastroenterology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. MicroRNA-196a & microRNA-101 expression in Barrett's oesophagus in patients with medically and surgically treated gastro-oesophageal reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bright Tim

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proton pump inhibitor (PPI medication and surgical fundoplication are used for the control of gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with Barrett's oesophagus, but differ in their effectiveness for both acid and bile reflux. This might impact on the inflammatory processes that are associated with progression of Barrett's oesophagus to cancer, and this may be evident in the gene expression profile and microRNA expression pattern in Barrett's oesophagus mucosa. We hypothesised that two miRNAs with inflammatory and oncogenic roles, miR-101 and miR-196a, are differentially expressed in Barrett's oesophagus epithelium in patients with reflux treated medically vs. surgically. Findings Mucosal tissue was obtained at endoscopy from patients with Barrett's oesophagus whose reflux was controlled by proton pump inhibitor (PPI therapy (n = 20 or by fundoplication (n = 19. RNA was extracted and the expression of miR-101 and miR-196a was measured using real-time reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction. There were no significant differences in miR-101 and miR-196a expression in Barrett's oesophagus epithelium in patients treated by PPI vs. fundoplication (p = 0.768 and 0.211 respectively. Secondary analysis showed a correlation between miR-196a expression and Barrett's oesophagus segment length (p = 0.014. Conclusion The method of reflux treatment did not influence the expression of miR-101 and miR-196a in Barrett's oesophagus. This data does not provide support to the hypothesis that surgical treatment of reflux better prevents cancer development in Barrett's oesophagus. The association between miR-196a expression and Barrett's oesophagus length is consistent with a tumour promoting role for miR-196a in Barrett's oesophagus.

  12. MicroRNA-196a & microRNA-101 expression in Barrett's oesophagus in patients with medically and surgically treated gastro-oesophageal reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medication and surgical fundoplication are used for the control of gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with Barrett's oesophagus, but differ in their effectiveness for both acid and bile reflux. This might impact on the inflammatory processes that are associated with progression of Barrett's oesophagus to cancer, and this may be evident in the gene expression profile and microRNA expression pattern in Barrett's oesophagus mucosa. We hypothesised that two miRNAs with inflammatory and oncogenic roles, miR-101 and miR-196a, are differentially expressed in Barrett's oesophagus epithelium in patients with reflux treated medically vs. surgically. Findings Mucosal tissue was obtained at endoscopy from patients with Barrett's oesophagus whose reflux was controlled by proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy (n = 20) or by fundoplication (n = 19). RNA was extracted and the expression of miR-101 and miR-196a was measured using real-time reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction. There were no significant differences in miR-101 and miR-196a expression in Barrett's oesophagus epithelium in patients treated by PPI vs. fundoplication (p = 0.768 and 0.211 respectively). Secondary analysis showed a correlation between miR-196a expression and Barrett's oesophagus segment length (p = 0.014). Conclusion The method of reflux treatment did not influence the expression of miR-101 and miR-196a in Barrett's oesophagus. This data does not provide support to the hypothesis that surgical treatment of reflux better prevents cancer development in Barrett's oesophagus. The association between miR-196a expression and Barrett's oesophagus length is consistent with a tumour promoting role for miR-196a in Barrett's oesophagus. PMID:21352563

  13. Diagnosing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease or lactose intolerance in babies who cry a lot in the first few months overlooks feeding problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-04-01

    This paper explores two areas in which the translation of research into practice may be improved in the management of cry-fuss behaviours in the first few months of life. Firstly, babies who cry excessively are often prescribed proton pump inhibitors, despite evidence that gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is very rarely a cause. The inaccuracy of commonly used explanatory mechanisms, the side-effects of acid-suppressive medications, and the failure to identify treatable problems, including feeding difficulty when the diagnosis of 'reflux' is applied, are discussed. Secondly, crying breastfed babies are still prescribed lactase or lactose-free formula, despite evidence that the problem of functional lactose overload is one of breastfeeding management. The mechanisms and management of functional lactose overload are discussed. These two problems of research translation need to be addressed because failure to identify and manage other causes of cry-fuss problems, including feeding difficulty, may have adverse outcomes for a small but significant minority of families. © 2013 The Author. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  14. Impact of regurgitation on health-related quality of life in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease before and after short-term potent acid suppression therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrilas, Peter J; Jonsson, Andreas; Denison, Hans; Wernersson, Börje; Hughes, Nesta; Howden, Colin W

    2014-05-01

    Limited data exist on the impact of regurgitation on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). We assessed the relationship between regurgitation frequency and HRQOL before and after acid suppression therapy in GORD. We used data from two randomised trials of AZD0865 25-75 mg/day versus esomeprazole 20 or 40 mg/day in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) (n=1415) or reflux oesophagitis (RO) (n=1460). The Reflux Disease Questionnaire was used to select patients with frequent and intense heartburn for inclusion and to assess treatment response. The Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire was used to assess HRQOL. At baseline, 93% of patients in both the NERD and RO groups experienced regurgitation. Mean QOLRAD scores were similar for NERD and RO at baseline and at week 4 and disclosed decremental HRQOL with increasing frequency of regurgitation; a clinically relevant difference of >0.5 in mean QOLRAD scores was seen with regurgitation ≥4 days/week versus <4 days/week. The prevalence of frequent, persistent regurgitation (≥4 days/week) at week 4 among heartburn responders (≤1 day/week of mild heartburn) was 28% in NERD and 23% in RO. QOLRAD scores were higher among heartburn responders. There was a similar pattern of impact related to regurgitation frequency in heartburn responders compared with the group as a whole. Frequent regurgitation was associated with a clinically relevant, incremental decline in HRQOL beyond that associated with heartburn before and after potent acid suppression in both NERD and RO. NCT00206284 and NCT00206245.

  15. Relevance of mild ineffective oesophageal motility (IOM) and potential pharmacological reversibility of severe IOM in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornari, F; Blondeau, K; Durand, L; Rey, E; Diaz-Rubio, M; De Meyer, A; Tack, J; Sifrim, D

    2007-11-15

    Several studies showed high prevalence of ineffective oesophageal motility (IOM) in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and suggested an important role for ineffective oesophageal motility in increased acid exposure. However, impedance-manometric studies proposed that only severe ineffective oesophageal motility might affect oesophageal clearance. (i) To re-assess the relevance of mild IOM in GERD and (ii) to test the reversibility of IOM. Oesophageal motility, clearance and acid exposure were assessed in 191 GERD patients: 99 without IOM; 58 with mild IOM (30-80% ineffective contractions) and 34 with severe IOM (>80% ineffective contractions). In 30 patients with oesophagitis, the potential reversibility of IOM was evaluated with edrophonium intravenously. Patients with mild IOM had identical oesophageal clearance and acid exposure in comparison with those without IOM. Patients with severe IOM had a higher probability of prolonged supine clearance and acid exposure [odds ratio: 2.88 (1.16-7.17); 2.48 (0.99-6.17)]. This effect was independent of the presence of hiatal hernia and male sex. Severe IOM could be transiently reverted in 55% of patients. Mild IOM does not affect oesophageal clearance. Only severe IOM is associated with prolonged clearance and acid exposure, particularly in supine periods. The edrophonium test might be useful to predict severe IOM response to prokinetic medications.

  16. Effectiveness of add-on therapy with domperidone vs alginic acid in proton pump inhibitor partial response gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in systemic sclerosis: randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foocharoen, Chingching; Chunlertrith, Kitti; Mairiang, Pisaln; Mahakkanukrauh, Ajanee; Suwannaroj, Siraphop; Namvijit, Suwassa; Wantha, Orathai; Nanagara, Ratanavadee

    2017-02-01

    Twice-daily dosing of proton pump inhibitor (PPI), the standard therapy for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD), is an effective therapy for GERD in SSc. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of omeprazole in combination with domperidone vs in combination with algycon in reducing the severity and frequency of reflux symptoms of PPI partial response (PPI-PR) GERD in SSc. Adult SSc patients having PPI-PR GERD were randomly assigned to receive domperidone plus algycon placebo or algycon plus domperidone placebo in a 1:1 ratio plus omeprazole for 4 weeks. The assessment included severity of symptom grading by visual analogue scale, frequency of symptoms by frequency scale for symptoms of GERD and quality of life (QoL) by EuroQol five-dimensions questionnaire scoring. One hundred and forty-eight SSc-GERD patients were enrolled, of whom 88 had PPI-PR. Eighty cases were randomized for either domperidone (n = 38) or algycon (n = 37) therapy. The majority in both groups had the diffuse SSc subset. At the end of the study, no significant difference in symptom grading was found between groups. After treatment and compared with baseline, the severity of symptoms, frequency scale for symptoms of GERD and QoL significantly improved in both groups. Five (13.2%) and 8 (21.6%) respective cases in the domperidone and algycon groups did not respond. The prevalence of PPI-PR GERD is common. Domperidone and algycon are equally effective treatments in combination with omeprazole. However, ∼17% of patients were non-responsive, so the effectiveness of domperidone, algycon and PPI combination therapy should be further investigated. https://clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01878526). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The effect of the stage of the ovarian cycle (anoestrus or dioestrus) and of pregnancy on the incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Tilemahos L; Savvas, Ioannis; Kazakos, George M; Ververidis, Haralabos N; Psalla, Dimitra; Kostakis, Charalampos; Skepastianos, Petros; Raptopoulos, Dimitris

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the potential association of increased blood progesterone (P4 ) concentrations and/or late pregnancy with the incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR), in healthy bitches undergoing ovariohysterectomy under general anaesthesia during anoestrus or dioestrus or during the second half of pregnancy. Prospective observational study. Ninety-four healthy, female, dogs, aged 1-8 years presented for elective ovariohysterectomy. Non-pregnant animals were classified into group A (anoestrus) (n = 35) if blood P4 concentration was sufficiently low or group D (dioestrus) (n = 26) if blood P4 concentration was sufficiently high. All animals in the second half of pregnancy were classified into group P (n = 33). Acepromazine (0.05 mg kg(-1) ) was administered intramuscularly as preanaesthetic medication, and sodium thiopental (10 mg kg(-1) , with additional doses if needed) was administered intravenously (IV) for induction of anaesthesia. After endotracheal intubation, halothane (1.1-1.3% end-tidal concentration) in oxygen was used for maintenance of anaesthesia. Lower oesophageal pH was monitored continuously throughout surgery using a pH-measuring probe. Reflux was considered to have occurred whenever pH values of >7.5 (alkaline reflux) or reflux) were recorded. On completion of surgery, carprofen (4 mg kg(-1) ) was administered IV. Further administration of analgesics post-operatively was dictated by visual analogue scale pain scoring. Acid GOR was observed in five of 26 dogs in group D, six of 35 group A, and 12 of 33 group P (p = 0.152). The incidence of GOR in group P approached statistical significance and was higher than the incidence in the combined group A + D (one sided p = 0.044, two sided p = 0.077). In dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy, GOR during anaesthesia occurs with a high incidence in dogs in the second half of pregnancy compared to non-pregnant animals during anoestrus or dioestrus. Measures could be taken in such cases

  18. Autosomal dominant hereditary sensory neuropathy with chronic cough and gastro-oesophageal reflux: clinical features in two families linked to chromosome 3p22-p24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Penelope J; Kok, Cindy; Nicholson, Garth A; Ing, Alvin J; Spies, Judith M; Bassett, Mark L; Cameron, John; Kerlin, Paul; Bowler, Simon; Tuck, Roger; Pollard, John D

    2005-12-01

    Autosomal dominant hereditary sensory neuropathy (HSN I) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, and in some families it is due to mutations in the serine palmitoyltransferase (SPTLC1) gene. We have characterized two families with HSN I associated with cough and gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR). From a large Australian family, 27 individuals and from a smaller family, 11 individuals provided clinical information and blood for genetic analysis. Affected individuals had an adult onset of paroxysmal cough, GOR and distal sensory loss. Cough could be triggered by noxious odours or by pressure in the external auditory canal (Arnold's ear-cough reflex). Other features included throat clearing, hoarse voice, cough syncope and sensorineural hearing loss. Neurophysiological and pathological studies demonstrated a sensory axonal neuropathy. Gastric emptying studies were normal, and autonomic function and sweat tests were either normal or showed distal hypohidrosis. Cough was likely to be due to a combination of denervation hypersensitivity of the upper airways and oesophagus, and prominent GOR. Most affected individuals were shown on 24 h ambulatory oesophageal pH monitoring to have multiple episodes of GOR, closely temporally associated with coughing. Hoarse voice was probably attributable to acid-induced laryngeal damage, and there was no evidence of vocal cord palsy. No other cause for cough was found on most respiratory or otorhinological studies. Linkage to chromosome 3p22-p24 has been found in both families, with no evidence of linkage to loci for known HSN I, autosomal dominant hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, hereditary GOR or triple A syndrome. These families represent a genetically novel variant of HSN I, with a distinctive cough owing to involvement of the upper aerodigestive tract.

  19. The association between gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and subsequent rheumatoid arthritis occurrence: a nested case-control study from Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Herng-Ching; Xirasagar, Sudha; Lee, Cha-Ze; Huang, Chung-Chien; Chen, Chao-Hung

    2017-11-17

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is a common comorbidity among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). While GORD has been attributed to the antirheumatic medications, no studies of human cohorts have investigated a link between GORD and RA. This study investigates whether GORD is associated with a subsequent RA diagnosis over a 5-year follow-up using a population-based dataset. Taiwan PARTICIPANTS: We used data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database. The study group consisted of 13 645 patients with an ambulatory claim showing a GORD diagnosis. We used propensity score matching to select 13 645 comparison patients (one per study patient with GORD). We tracked each patient's claims over a 5-year period to identify those who subsequently received a diagnosis of RA. Cox proportional hazard (PH) regression modelling was used for analysis. Over 5-year follow-up, RA incidence rate per 1000 person-years was 2.81 among patients with GORD and 0.84 among the comparison group. Cox PH modelling showed that GORD was independently associated with a 2.84-fold increased risk of RA (95% CI 2.09 to 3.85) over 5-year follow-up, after adjusting for the number of ambulatory care visits within the year following the index date (to mitigate surveillance bias). We observed that GORD might associate with subsequent RA occurrence. Because current treatment guidelines for RA emphasise early diagnosis and prompt treatment, the observed association between GORD and RA may help acquaint clinicians to patients with GORD with higher RA risk and facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Determinants of oesophageal 'alkaline' pH environment in controls and patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, S; Bradley, L A; Richter, J E

    1993-01-01

    The determinants of the oesophageal alkaline pH environment are poorly understood. Saliva (pH 6.4-7.8) may be a major contributor, although some argue the importance of refluxed alkaline duodenal contents. Acid and alkaline reflux parameters were studied over 2 days in 30 subjects (control, oesophagitis and Barrett's patients; 10 each) using glass pH electrodes. In phase 1, one pH electrode was placed 1 cm below the upper oesophageal sphincter to assess the influence of saliva and the other 5...

  1. Clinical and economic evaluation of laparoscopic surgery compared with medical management for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: 5-year follow-up of multicentre randomised trial (the REFLUX trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, A M; Boachie, C; Cotton, S C; Faria, R; Bojke, L; Epstein, D M; Ramsay, C R; Corbacho, B; Sculpher, M; Krukowski, Z H; Heading, R C; Campbell, M K

    2013-06-01

    Despite promising evidence that laparoscopic fundoplication provides better short-term relief of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) than continued medical management, uncertainty remains about whether benefits are sustained and outweigh risks. To evaluate the long-term clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of laparoscopic surgery among people with GORD requiring long-term medication and suitable for both surgical and medical management. Five-year follow-up of a randomised trial (with parallel non-randomised preference groups) comparing a laparoscopic surgery-based policy with a continued medical management policy. Cost-effectiveness was assessed alongside the trial using a NHS perspective for costs and expressing health outcomes in terms of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Follow-up was by annual postal questionnaire and selective hospital case notes review; initial recruitment in 21 UK hospitals. Questionnaire responders among the 810 original participants. At entry, all had documented evidence of GORD and symptoms for > 12 months. Questionnaire response rates (years 1-5) were from 89.5% to 68.9%. Three hundred and fifty-seven participants were recruited to the randomised comparison (178 randomised to surgical management and 179 randomised to continued medical management) and 453 to the preference groups (261 surgical management and 192 medical management). The surgeon chose the type of fundoplication. Primary: disease-specific outcome measure (the REFLUX questionnaire); secondary: Short Form questionnaire-36 items (SF-36), European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), NHS resource use, reflux medication, complications. The randomised groups were well balanced. By 5 years, 63% in the randomised surgical group and 13% in the randomised medical management group had received a total or partial wrap fundoplication (85% and 3% in the preference groups), with few perioperative complications and no associated deaths. At 1 year (and 5 years

  2. A novel reflux inhibitor lesogaberan (AZD3355) as add-on treatment in patients with GORD with persistent reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy: a randomised placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Beaumont, Hanneke; Hatlebakk, Jan G.; Silberg, Debra G.; Björck, Karin; Karlsson, Maria; Denison, Hans

    2011-01-01

    o evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of add-on treatment with lesogaberan (AZD3355), a novel reflux inhibitor, in patients with persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised, parallel-group,

  3. Water syphon test and gastrooesophageal reflux during childhood (correlation with the clinical findings and oesophageal manometry)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotter, R.; Hoellwarth, M.

    1981-07-01

    The water syphon test is a simple and easily performed method for demonstrating gastro-oesophageal reflux with a high degree of reliability. It is carried out following a conventional barium swallow. Compared with clinical findings and oesophageal manometry, the water syphon test is very reliable for demonstrating gastro-oesophageal reflux during childhood. Prolonged irradiation in order to see spontaneous reflux becomes unnecessary. This results in a significant reduction in radiation dose. Barium swallow and the water syphon test are the most useful initial examinations in children with symptoms which suggest reflux.

  4. Dynamic scintigraphy of the oesophagus in the evaluation of reflux oesophagitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babic, Z.; Ugarkovic, B.; Ivancevic, D.; Babic, D. (Zagreb Univ. Hospital Center (Yugoslavia). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine General Hospital ' Dr. Josip Kajfes' , Zagreb (Yugoslavia). Dept. of Gastroenterology)

    1990-11-01

    A method is presented which combines gastro-oesophageal reflux quantification and oesophageal activity. A group of 33 subjects with gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms and endoscopically confirmed reflux oesophagitis and a group of 21 asymptomatic subjects with normal oesophageal, gastric and duodenal endoscopic findings were examined. The subjects were given 37 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-Sn-colloid in saline orally and then scintiscanned dynamically. The gastro-oesophageal quantification was done after transit measurement and after the oesophageal time activity (to detect residual oesophageal activity) reached its minimum. The difference in the reflux indices between the two groups was highly significant. In low-grade oesophagitis measured reflux was lower than in higher grades of disease. Only 4.7% false-positive results were observed with a specificity of 95%, indicating that this method may be superior to methods published earlier. (orig.).

  5. Conversion of Sleeve Gastrectomy to Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass is Effective for Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease but not for Further Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Chetan D; Mahawar, Kamal K; Boyle, Maureen; Schroeder, Norbert; Balupuri, Shlok; Small, Peter K

    2017-07-01

    Inadequate weight loss (IWL)/weight regain (WR) and gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), unresponsive to medical management, are two most common indications for conversion of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). This study reports detailed outcomes of conversion of SG to RYGB for these two indications separately. We interrogated our prospectively maintained database to identify patients who underwent a conversion of their SG to RYGB in our unit. Outcomes in patients converted for IWL/WR and those converted for GERD were evaluated separately. We carried out 22 SG to RYGB in our unit between Aug 2012 and April 2015 with a mean follow-up of 16 months. Indication for conversion was GERD in 10/22 (45.5%) patients and IWL/WR in 11/22 (50.0%) patients. Patients undergoing conversion for GERD were significantly lighter (BMI 30.5) than those converted for IWL/WR (BMI 43.3) at the time of conversion. The conversion was very effective for GERD with 100% patients reporting improvement in symptoms, and 80% patients were able to stop their antacid medications. IWL/WR group achieved a further BMI drop of 2.5 points 2 years after surgery (final BMI 40.8) in comparison with 2.0 points BMI drop achieved by the GERD group (final BMI 28.5). This study demonstrates that conversion of SG to RYGB is effective for GERD symptoms but not for further weight loss, which was modest in both groups. Future studies need to examine the best revisional procedure for IWL/WR after SG.

  6. Laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery : indications, techniques and physiological effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeders, J.A.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is a highly prevalent chronic disorder in which retrograde flow of gastric contents into the oesophagus causes troublesome symptoms or lesions. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy controls reflux disease in 95% of the patients and the remaining 5% have

  7. A PROPOSITION FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE IN CHILDREN - A REPORT FROM A WORKING GROUP ON GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENPLAS, Y; ASHKENAZI, A; BELLI, D; BOIGE, N; BOUQUET, J; CADRANEL, S; CEZARD, JP; CUCCHIARA, S; DUPONT, C; GEBOES, K; GOTTRAND, F; HEYMANS, HSA; JASINSKI, C; KNEEPKENS, CMF; KOLETZKO, S; MILLA, P; MOUGENOT, JF; NUSSLE, D; NAVARRO, J; NEWELL, SJ; OLAFSDOTTIR, E; PEETERS, S; RAVELLI, A; POLANCO, [No Value; SANDHU, BK; TOLBOOM, J

    In this paper, a Working Group on Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux discusses recommendations for the first line diagnostic and therapeutic approach of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in infants and children. All members of the Working Group agreed that infants with uncomplicated gastro-oesophageal reflux

  8. The role of an alginate suspension on pepsin and bile acids - key aggressors in the gastric refluxate. Does this have implications for the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugala, Vicki; Avis, Jeanine; Jolliffe, Ian G; Johnstone, Lesley M; Dettmar, Peter W

    2009-08-01

    During a reflux event the oesophagus is exposed to a heterogeneous mixture of gastric juice components. The role of non-acid components of the refluxate in causing damage to the oesophagus is now well established but no therapeutic option exists to address this. The role of Gaviscon Advance (GA), a raft-forming alginate suspension, in protecting the oesophagus from damage by pepsin and bile acids (aggressors) was investigated using a series of in-vitro models. GA was able to dose-dependently inhibit pepsin activity over and above the neutralisation effect of the formulation. This was evident against both protein and collagen substrates using two distinct colorimetric assays. GA was able to retard the diffusion of pepsin and multiple bile acids using a Franz cell model. Using the raft-forming mode of action GA was able to remove both pepsin and multiple bile acids from a simulated reflux event. There was capacity in the GA raft to accommodate aggressors from multiple reflux events. GA can specifically remove both pepsin and bile acids from the refluxate, limit their diffusion and affect enzymatic activity of pepsin. There is a role for GA to reduce the damaging potential of the refluxate and thus protect the oesophagus.

  9. How reflux causes symptoms: reflux perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenborg, Pim W.; Bredenoord, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    In gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms arise due to reflux of gastric content into the oesophagus. However, the relation between magnitude and onset of reflux and symptom generation in GERD patients is far from simple; gastroesophageal reflux occurs several times a day in everyone and

  10. Gastro-oesophageal intussusception in a young German Shepherd Dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werthern, C.J. von; Montavon, P.M.; Fluckiger, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    A gastro-oesophageal intussusception in a female, six-week-old German shepherd dog was treated surgically with success. The dog was presented with acute dyspnoea and signs of shock. After laparotomy, the herniated organs were reduced from the lumen of the oesophagus into the abdomen and an imbrication of the oesophageal hiatus, an appositional fundoplication and a left-sided incisional fundopexy were performed. The dog made an uneventful recovery. Eighteen months after surgery the dog is still alive, with no clinical signs despite the persistent presence of megaoesophagus

  11. Results of left thoracoscopic Collis gastroplasty with laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for the surgical treatment of true short oesophagus in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and Type III-IV hiatal hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugaresi, Marialuisa; Mattioli, Benedetta; Perrone, Ottorino; Daddi, Niccolò; Di Simone, Massimo Pierluigi; Mattioli, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding surgery for true short oesophagus (TSOE). We compared the results of thoracoscopic Collis gastroplasty-laparoscopic Nissen procedure for the treatment of TSOE with the results of standard laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. Between 1995 and 2013, the Collis-Nissen procedure was performed in 65 patients who underwent minimally invasive surgery when the length of the abdominal oesophagus, measured intraoperatively after maximal oesophageal mediastinal mobilization, was ≤1.5 cm. The results of the Collis-Nissen procedure were frequency-matched according to age, sex and period of surgical treatment with those of 65 standard Nissen fundoplication procedures in patients with a length of the abdominal oesophagus >1.5 cm. Postoperative mortality and morbidity were evaluated according to the Accordion classification. The patients underwent a timed clinical-instrumental follow-up that included symptoms assessment, barium swallow and endoscopy. Symptoms, oesophagitis and global results were graded according to semi-quantitative scales. The results were considered to be excellent in the absence of symptoms and oesophagitis, good if symptoms occurred two to four times a month in the absence of oesophagitis, fair if symptoms occurred two to four times a week in the presence of hyperaemia, oedema and/or microscopic oesophagitis and poor if symptoms occurred on a daily basis in the presence of any grade of endoscopic oesophagitis, hiatal hernia of any size or type, or the need for antireflux medical therapy. The follow-up time was calculated from the time of surgery to the last complete follow-up. The postoperative mortality rate was 1.5% for the Collis-Nissen and 0 for the Nissen procedure. The postoperative complication rate was 24% for the Collis-Nissen and 7% for Nissen (P = 0.001) procedure. The complication rate for the Collis-Nissen procedure was 43% in the first 32 cases and 6% in the last 33 cases (P < 0.0001). The median follow-up period

  12. Functional heartburn has more in common with functional dyspepsia than with non-erosive reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savarino, E; Pohl, D; Zentilin, P; Dulbecco, P; Sammito, G; Sconfienza, L; Vigneri, S; Camerini, G; Tutuian, R; Savarino, V

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Functional dyspepsia and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) are prevalent gastrointestinal conditions with accumulating evidence regarding an overlap between the two. Still, patients with NERD represent a very heterogeneous group and limited data on dyspeptic symptoms in various subgroups of NERD are available. Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of dyspeptic symptoms in patients with NERD subclassified by using 24 h impedance-pH monitoring (MII-pH). Methods: Patients with typical reflux symptoms and normal endoscopy underwent impedance-pH monitoring off proton pump inhibitor treatment. Oesophageal acid exposure time (AET), type of acid and non-acid reflux episodes, and symptom association probability (SAP) were calculated. A validated dyspepsia questionnaire was used to quantify dyspeptic symptoms prior to reflux monitoring. Results: Of 200 patients with NERD (105 female; median age, 48 years), 81 (41%) had an abnormal oesophageal AET (NERD pH-POS), 65 (32%) had normal oesophageal AET and positive SAP for acid and/or non-acid reflux (hypersensitive oesophagus), and 54 (27%) had normal oesophageal AET and negative SAP (functional heartburn). Patients with functional heartburn had more frequent (pheartburn reinforces the concept that functional gastrointestinal disorders extend beyond the boundaries suggested by the anatomical location of symptoms. This should be regarded as a further argument to test patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in order to separate patients with functional heartburn from patients with NERD in whom symptoms are associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux. PMID:19460766

  13. the pharmacological management of gastro-oesophageal reflux

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The advantage of self-treatment with OTC drugs is the provision of effective and .... may be an inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and asthma or allergy.19 ... important being pneumonia, osteoporosis and bone fractures, bacterial ...

  14. Additional considerations for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oesophageal inflammation is the result of the inadequately managed suppression of gastric acid caused by the retrograde flow from the stomach through the lower oesophageal sphincter, which may result in complications, including stricture formation, Barrett's oesophagus, erosive oesophagitis and adenocarcinoma.

  15. if, when and how to treat gastro-oesophageal reflux

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tardive dyskinesia associated with use of metodopramide in a child. JPediatr 1992; 121, 983-985. 9. Wooding 5, Sendall C Contra-indication to Prepulsid use in prematurely born infants (born at a gestational age 01 less than 36 weeks) from °through 3 months after deli,'ery date. Prepulsid package insert change, 1997.

  16. Gastro-oesophageal reflux: an overview of the pharmacotherapeutic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... stomach empties into the duodenum, and relieving the discomfort caused by heartburn. ... Family history. • Obesity ... occurring two or more times a week in patients under the age of. 50 with no other ... Stress-related mucosal injury. The acid ...

  17. Low morbidity after palliation of obstructing gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma to restore swallowing function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Steen Christian; Lundsgaard, Martin; Ellemann, Ann-Camilla

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the procedure-related complications and survival after deployment of self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) or use of argon plasma coagulation (APC) in patients with obstructing gastro-oesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma.......This study describes the procedure-related complications and survival after deployment of self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) or use of argon plasma coagulation (APC) in patients with obstructing gastro-oesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma....

  18. Idiopathic megaoesophagus and intermittent gastro-oesophageal intussusception in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geffen, C; Saunders, J H; Vandevelde, B; Van Ham, L; Hoybergs, Y; Daminet, S

    2006-08-01

    An eight-month-old domestic shorthair cat was presented with chronic vomiting for three months, with an acute increase in frequency during the past two days. A diagnosis of megaoesophagus was made by chest radiography. Diagnostic work-up for megaoesophagus was performed. A gastro-oesophageal intussusception was identified during endoscopy. Medical and nutritional therapy was instituted with a good response to the treatment.

  19. Thioredoxin interacting protein and its association with clinical outcome in gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline M. Woolston

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall prognosis for operable gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma remains poor and therefore neoadjuvant chemotherapy has become the standard of care, in addition to radical surgery. Certain anticancer agents (e.g. anthracyclines and cisplatin generate damaging reactive oxygen species as by-products of their mechanism of action. Drug effectiveness can therefore depend upon the presence of cellular redox buffering systems that are often deregulated in cancer. The expression of the redox protein, thioredoxin interacting protein, was assessed in gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinomas. Thioredoxin interacting protein expression was assessed using conventional immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray of 140 adenocarcinoma patients treated by primary surgery alone and 88 operable cases treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In the primary surgery cases, high thioredoxin interacting protein expression associated with a lack of lymph node involvement (p=0.005, no perineural invasion (p=0.030 and well/moderate tumour differentiation (p=0.033. In the neoadjuvant tumours, high thioredoxin interacting protein expression was an independent marker for improved disease specific survival (p=0.002 especially in cases with anthracycline-based regimes (p=0.008. This study highlights the potential of thioredoxin interacting protein as a biomarker for response in neoadjuvant treated gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma and may represent a useful therapeutic target due to its association with tumour progression.

  20. Inverse association between gastroesophageal reflux and blood pressure: Results of a large community based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane Athene J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a cross-sectional community based study, as part of a randomised controlled trial of eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection, the association between blood pressure and symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux was examined. Methods Linear regression was used to examine the association between systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the frequency of heartburn and acid regurgitation in 4,902 of 10,537 participants aged 20–59 years. Results In multivariable analyses, adjusted mean systolic blood pressure was 4.2 (95% confidence interval 1.5 to 7.0 mm Hg lower in participants with daily acid regurgitation compared to those with less frequent symptoms. Similarly, for diastolic blood pressure, a reduction of 2.1 (0.0 to 4.3 mm Hg wasobserved. Conclusion People who experience daily symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux have lower blood pressure than people with less frequent or no symptoms. It is possible that factors influencing nitric oxide concentrations both at the lower oesophageal sphincter and within the vasculature may be involved. This hypothesis requires confirmation. Trials registration number ISRCTN44816925

  1. Phase II study of biweekly cetuximab in combination with irinotecan as second-line treatment in patients with platinum-resistant gastro-oesophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønnemann, K R; Yilmaz, Mette Karen; Bjerregaard, J K

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phase II trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cetuximab and irinotecan as second-line treatment in patients with gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma.......The purpose of this phase II trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cetuximab and irinotecan as second-line treatment in patients with gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma....

  2. Chemoradiotherapy in tumours of the oesophagus and gastro-oesophageal junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, M C C M; van Laarhoven, H W M

    2016-08-01

    Oesophageal cancer remains a malignancy with a poor prognosis. However, in the recent 10-15 years relevant progress has been made by the introduction of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for tumours of the oesophagus or gastro-oesophageal junction. The addition of neo-adjuvant CRT to surgery has significantly improved survival and locoregional control, for both adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. For irresectable or medically inoperable patients, definitive CRT has changed the treatment intent from palliative to curative. Definitive CRT is a good alternative for radical surgery in responding patients with squamous cell carcinoma and those running a high risk of surgical morbidity and mortality. For patients with an out-of-field solitary locoregional recurrence after primary curative treatment, definitive CRT can lead to long term survival. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Effect of azithromycin on acid reflux, hiatus hernia and proximal acid pocket in the postprandial period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, W. O.; Bennink, R. J.; de Ruigh, A. A.; Hirsch, D. P.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background The risk for acidic reflux is mainly determined by the position of the gastric acid pocket. It was hypothesised that compounds affecting proximal stomach tone might reduce gastro-oesophageal reflux by changing the acid pocket position. Objective To study the effect of azithromycin (Azi)

  4. Symptom perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease is dependent on spatiotemporal reflux characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusten, B. L.; Akkermans, L. M.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Smout, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: The mechanisms responsible for the development of symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are poorly understood. The aims of this study were to identify differences in spatiotemporal reflux characteristics (proximal extent and duration of reflux episodes, ascending

  5. Absence of correlation between serum CRP levels and mitochondrial D-loop DNA mutations in gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin H. L. Tan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Both inflammation and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutation are thought to play a role in the many human cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between inflammation and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations in the D-loop region in carcinogenesis of gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinomas. Materials and Methods: Blood samples of 20 patients with gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma were taken for measurement of serum C-reactive protein (CRP concentration. Direct sequencing of mtDNA in the D-loop region was done in the 20 adenocarcinoma samples and their corresponding surrounding non-cancerous tissue. Sequences were compared with existing mtDNA databases to identify mutations. Results: mtDNA mutations in the D-loop region occur commonly with almost identical frequency in both non-cancerous tissue (3.0 ΁ 1.6 and adenocarcinoma (3.1 ΁ 1.9 (P = 0.916, paired t-test. CRP levels are not predictive of the number of D-loop mutations in both adenocarcinoma (β: -0.131; 95% CI: -2.354-1.364; P = 0.583 and non-cancerous tissue samples (β: 0.130; 95% CI: -1.125-1.933; P = 0.586. Five new mutations were identified that were not recorded previously in mtDNA databases. Conclusion: D-loop mtDNA mutations are common in both gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma and surrounding non-cancerous tissue. However, the accumulation of such mutations appears to occur independent of systemic inflammation. The frequency of D-loop mutations is likely not useful as a marker for carcinogenesis in gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

  6. [Influence of chest physiotherapy on gastro-œsophageal reflux in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reychler, G; Jacques, L; Arnold, D; Scheers, I; Smets, F; Sokal, E; Stephenne, X

    2015-05-01

    Chest physiotherapy is regularly prescribed for children, particularly in cystic fibrosis. Gastro-oesophageal reflux is common in this disease and is associated with certain chest physiotherapy manoeuvres. To evaluate the influence of two chest physiotherapy techniques on gastro-oesophageal reflux in children. Twenty-nine children were investigated by routine pHmetry. During the examination, they performed two chest physiotherapy manoeuvres in a seated position for 10 minutes each with a 5 minutes rest between them. The two manoeuvres used were a slow expiration technique (ELPr) and positive expiratory pressure (PEP). It was a prospective study and the order of manoeuvres was randomised. The pH traces were analysed blindly when all the studies had been completed. In the sample, 21% of children had gastro-oesophageal reflux during the physiotherapy session. No relationship was found between reflux during physiotherapy and pathological reflux (P=0.411) nor the physiotherapy technique used (P=0.219). The use of these two chest physiotherapy techniques in children in a seated position can produce gastro-oesophageal reflux. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Perioperative epidural analgesia reduces cancer recurrence after gastro-oesophageal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, J G; Hacking, M B; Link, E K; Wessels, K L; Riedel, B J

    2014-03-01

    Recent interest has focused on the role of perioperative epidural analgesia in improving cancer outcomes. The heterogeneity of studies (tumour type, stage and outcome endpoints) has produced inconsistent results. Clinical practice also highlights the variability in epidural effectiveness. We considered the novel hypothesis that effective epidural analgesia improves cancer outcomes following gastro-oesophageal cancer surgery in patients with grouped pathological staging. Following institutional approval, a database analysis identified 140 patients, with 2-year minimum follow-up after gastro-oesophageal cancer surgery. All patients were operated on by a single surgeon (2005-2010). Information pertaining to cancer and survival outcomes was extracted. Univariate analysis demonstrated a 1-year 14% vs. 33% (P = 0.01) and 2-year 27% vs. 40% [hazard ratio (HR)=0.59; 95% CI, 0.32-1.09, P = 0.087] incidence of cancer recurrence in patients with (vs. without) effective (> 36 h duration) epidural analgesia, respectively. Multivariate analysis demonstrated increased time to cancer recurrence (HR = 0.33; 95% CI: 0.17-0.63, P benefit (HR = 0.42; 95% CI: 0.21-0.83, P benefit in patients with oesophageal cancer (HR = 0.34; 95% CI: 0.16-0.75, P = 0.005) and in patients with tumour lymphovascular space infiltration (LVSI), (HR = 0.49; 95% CI: 0.26-0.94, P = 0.03). Effective epidural analgesia improved estimated median time to death (2.9 vs. 1.8 years, P = 0.029) in patients with tumour LVSI. This study found an association between effective post-operative epidural analgesia and medium-term benefit on cancer recurrence and survival following oesophageal surgery. A prospective study that controls for disease type, stage and epidural effectiveness is warranted. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Gastro-oesophageal reflux: An overview of the cost-effectiveness of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with normal acid-base balance and cause metabolic alkalosis, or ... be dependent on the diagnosis, side-effects and cost-effectiveness of the .... care, e.g. time lost from work due to illness.5 When different ... negative impact on a patient's psychological well-being, than ... as well as the effects on the patient's quality of life.

  9. Histomorphological differentiation of non-erosive reflux disease and functional heartburn in patients with PPI-refractory heartburn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandulski, A; Jechorek, D; Caro, C; Weigt, J; Wex, T; Mönkemüller, K; Malfertheiner, P

    2013-09-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-refractory heartburn may be due to persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux, oesophageal hypersensitivity or functional heartburn (FH). The differentiation between non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and FH may be very difficult. However, this differentiation is important for appropriate therapeutic management. Dilated intercellular spaces (DIS), papillary elongation (PE) and basal cell hyperplasia (BCH) can be all assessed by light microscopy. Whether these mucosal abnormalities allow the differentiation of NERD from FH in PPI-refractory patients is uncertain. To assess histopathological findings by light microscopy in patients with refractory heartburn to differentiate NERD from FH. Sixty-two patients with PPI-refractory symptoms underwent EGD and MII-pH after pausing PPI medication for 2 weeks before investigation. Twenty-five subjects without upper gastrointestinal symptoms were included as controls. Symptom assessment was based on the reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ). Biopsies were taken 3-5 cm above the gastro-oesophageal junction. DIS, PE, BCH and infiltration of immune cells were evaluated and a sum score was calculated. Based on endoscopy and MII-pH, GERD was diagnosed in 43 patients (NERD: 20; ERD: 23) and FH in 19 patients. There was no difference in symptoms between the groups. Each individual histopathological item was different between the groups (P < 0.0001). Between NERD and FH, the most significant difference was found for DIS and the histopathological sum score (P < 0.001). These findings suggest that oesophageal biopsies are useful to differentiate NERD from FH. Increased DIS and a histological sum score are the most significant histopathological abnormalities in NERD as compared with FH. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Patients with physiological acid exposure and positive symptom association scores: a distinct group within the GORD spectrum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, D. R.; van Herwaarden, M. A.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Samsom, M.

    2009-01-01

    Studies comparing pH-metrically well-characterized gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) patients with physiological reflux to GORD patients with pathological reflux, with regard to clinical and epidemiological data, are lacking. We included 273 GORD patients with pathological 24-h pH-monitoring

  11. Impact of helicobacter pylori eradication on dyspeptic symptoms in the community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, S Z; English, J; Abbas, A B [Royal Cornwall Hospital, Truro (United Kingdom). Gastrointestinal Unit; Crawshaw, A [The Cornwall General Practice Training Group, Truro (United Kingdom); Vivian, G [Royal Cornwall Hospital, Truro (United Kingdom). Nuclear Medicine Dept.; Shaw, S [University of Plymouth, Plymouth (United Kingdom). School of Mathematics and Statistics; McGovern, D; Dalton, H R [Royal Cornwall Hospital, Truro (United Kingdom). Gastrointestinal Unit

    2003-06-01

    Abstract: Background: Eradication of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) will cure most Hp positive duodenal ulcers (DU). However, after such treatment, patients often continue to get dyspeptic symptoms. The effects of Hp eradication in patients with proven DU on gastro-oesophageal reflux dis (GORD) symptoms are controversial. Results: Eighty one percent patients had improvement in ulcer-type symptoms. 21% developed new GORD symptoms. 68% discontinued long-term acid-suppression treatment. 79% requiring continued acid suppression therapy had new or continued GORD symptoms. Conclusion: Patients in the community with Hp positive DU disease after eradication, 81% patients got symptomatic improvement, two third discontinued their acid suppressing therapy but 21% developed new GORD symptoms. Among those who required continued acid suppression, 79% had GORD symptoms. (author)

  12. Impact of helicobacter pylori eradication on dyspeptic symptoms in the community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, S.Z.; English, J.; Abbas, A.B.; Vivian, G.; Shaw, S.; McGovern, D.; Dalton, H.R.

    2003-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Eradication of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) will cure most Hp positive duodenal ulcers (DU). However, after such treatment, patients often continue to get dyspeptic symptoms. The effects of Hp eradication in patients with proven DU on gastro-oesophageal reflux dis (GORD) symptoms are controversial. Results: Eighty one percent patients had improvement in ulcer-type symptoms. 21% developed new GORD symptoms. 68% discontinued long-term acid-suppression treatment. 79% requiring continued acid suppression therapy had new or continued GORD symptoms. Conclusion: Patients in the community with Hp positive DU disease after eradication, 81% patients got symptomatic improvement, two third discontinued their acid suppressing therapy but 21% developed new GORD symptoms. Among those who required continued acid suppression, 79% had GORD symptoms. (author)

  13. Is scintigraphy of value in the diagnosis of gastrooesophageal reflux disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjellen, G.; Brudin, L.; Haakansson, H.O. (Centrallasarettet, Kalmar (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    110 patients with suspected oesophageal symptoms were investigated by means of oesophageal endoscopy (OE), 24-h pH- metry, and oesophageal scintigraphy (ES). When 24-h pH-metry formed the basis for diagnosis of gastrooesophageal reflux disease (GERD), the sensitivity for ES at abdominal compression was 64%, but no statistically significant differences were found among erect refluxers, supine refluxers, and comibined refluxers. Only 4% of the GERD patients had pathologic oesophageal clearing at ES. The more severe the macroscopic oesophagitis found by OE, the more pronounced were the abnormal findings at 24-h pH-metry and at ES with abdominal compression. Increased postprandial reflux was associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux and hiatal hernia at ES with abdominal compression and the most severe form of oesophagitis, respectively. It is concluded that ES has too low sensitivity to be recommended as a screening test for GERD. Nevertheless, the specificity of 76% can to some extent help us to rule out GERD in patients. 19 refs., 7 tabs.

  14. Pharyngeal pH alone is not reliable for the detection of pharyngeal reflux events: A study with oesophageal and pharyngeal pH-impedance monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardin, Marie; Roman, Sabine; des Varannes, Stanislas Bruley; Gourcerol, Guillaume; Coffin, Benoit; Ropert, Alain; Mion, François

    2013-01-01

    Background Pharyngeal pH probes and pH-impedance catheters have been developed for the diagnosis of laryngo-pharyngeal reflux. Objective To determine the reliability of pharyngeal pH alone for the detection of pharyngeal reflux events. Methods 24-h pH-impedance recordings performed in 45 healthy subjects with a bifurcated probe for detection of pharyngeal and oesophageal reflux events were reviewed. Pharyngeal pH drops to below 4 and 5 were analysed for the simultaneous occurrence of pharyngeal reflux, gastro-oesophageal reflux, and swallows, according to impedance patterns. Results Only 7.0% of pharyngeal pH drops to below 5 identified with impedance corresponded to pharyngeal reflux, while 92.6% were related to swallows and 10.2 and 13.3% were associated with proximal and distal gastro-oesophageal reflux events, respectively. Of pharyngeal pH drops to below 4, 13.2% were related to pharyngeal reflux, 87.5% were related to swallows, and 18.1 and 21.5% were associated with proximal and distal gastro-oesophageal reflux events, respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrates that pharyngeal pH alone is not reliable for the detection of pharyngeal reflux and that adding distal oesophageal pH analysis is not helpful. The only reliable analysis should take into account impedance patterns demonstrating the presence of pharyngeal reflux event preceded by a distal and proximal reflux event within the oesophagus. PMID:24917995

  15. Determinants of perception of heartburn and regurgitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, A. J.; Weusten, B. L. A. M.; Curvers, W. L.; Timmer, R.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: It is not known why some reflux episodes evoke symptoms and others do not. We investigated the determinants of perception of gastro-oesophageal reflux. METHODS: In 32 patients with symptoms suggestive of gastro-oesophageal reflux, 24 hour ambulatory pH and impedance monitoring

  16. Patterns of gas and liquid reflux during transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation: a study using intraluminal electrical impedance

    OpenAIRE

    Sifrim, D; Silny, J; Holloway, R; Janssens, J

    1999-01-01

    Background—Belching has been proposed as a major mechanism underlying acid gastro-oesophageal reflux in normal subjects. However, the presence of oesophageal gas has not been measured directly but only inferred from manometry. 
Aims—To investigate, using intraluminal electrical impedance, the patterns of gas and liquid reflux during transient lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) relaxations, the main mechanism of acid reflux in normal subjects. 
Methods—Impedance changes ass...

  17. Value of esophagus cinescintigraphy in adult patients (study of esophageal transit and detection of gastroesophageal reflux. Investigation of 52 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquier, J.; Sauvan, R.; Dupin, B.; Guidicelli, R.; Fuentes, P.; Reboud, E.

    1985-01-01

    Using scintigraphic techniques oesophageal transit was studied in 47 patients and gastro-oesophageal reflux was evaluated in 41 patients. The comparison of these investigations with oesophageal manometry, acid reflux test and endoscopy emphasized the value of the simple and noninvasive scintigraphic methods. Radionuclide oesophageal transit detected a higher incidence of esophageal motor abnormality than the other methods. Gastroesophageal (GE) scintiscanning detected GE reflux accurately, rapidly and with greater sensitivity than the other diagnostic techniques.

  18. Value of esophagus cinescintigraphy in adult patients (study of esophageal transit and detection of gastroesophageal reflux). Investigation of 52 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquier, J.; Sauvan, R.; Dupin, B.; Guidicelli, R.; Fuentes, P.; Reboud, E.

    1985-01-01

    Using scintigraphic techniques oesophageal transit was studied in 47 patients and gastro-oesophageal reflux was evaluated in 41 patients. The comparison of these investigations with oesophageal manometry, acid reflux test and endoscopy emphasized the value of the simple and noninvasive scintigraphic methods. Radionuclide oesophageal transit detected a higher incidence of esophageal motor abnormality than the other methods. Gastroesophageal (GE) scintiscanning detected GE reflux accurately, rapidly and with greater sensitivity than the other diagnostic techniques [fr

  19. Risk of Barrett's oesophagus, oesophageal adenocarcinoma and reflux oesophagitis and the use of nitrates and asthma medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladanchuk, Todd C; Johnston, Brian T; Murray, Liam J; Anderson, Lesley A

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between use of asthma medication and nitrates and risk of reflux oesophagitis, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Data were collected on use of asthma medication and nitrates at least 1 year before interview from patients with reflux oesophagitis, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Associations between use of asthma medications and nitrates and the risk of reflux oesophagitis, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma were estimated using multiple logistic regression. Nine hundred and forty-one subjects were recruited: 230 reflux oesophagitis, 224 Barrett's oesophagus, 227 oesophageal adenocarcinoma patients and 260 population controls. Barrett's oesophagus patients were more likely than controls to have had a diagnosis of asthma (odds ratio 2.15, 95% confidence interval 1.15-4.03) and to have used asthma medications (odds ratio 2.13, 95% confidence interval 1.09-4.16). No significant associations were observed between use of asthma medication or nitrates and reflux oesophagitis or oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms appear to confound the association between asthma medication use and Barrett's oesophagus. However, it is possible that asthma medications may increase the risk of Barrett's oesophagus by other mechanisms.

  20. Prevalence and Spectrum of Gastro Esophageal Reflux Disease in Bronchial Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameschandra, Sahoo; Acharya, Vishak; Kunal; Vishwanath, Tantry; Ramkrishna, Anand; Acharya, Preetam

    2015-10-01

    There exists a complex interplay between asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Both these diseases are known to aggravate each other and amelioration of one is necessary for the control of the other. There is a paucity of studies in Indian population on this subject. To evaluate the clinical features and the endoscopic findings of the upper gastrointestinal tract in patients with bronchial asthma. Study was conducted at KMC group of hospitals, Mangalore in the Department of chest medicine in association with Department of gastroenterology. Subjects included 50 cases of bronchial asthma and controls were 58 non asthmatic patients with allergic rhinitis and chronic urticaria. All patients were queried about presence or absence of symptoms of upper gastro intestinal tract disorders by gastro oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) questionnaire and all the included patients underwent upper gastro intestinal endoscopy. The study showed that symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux were significantly more in asthmatics (52%) as compared to the controls (28%). The common presenting features of gastroesophageal reflux in asthmatics were heartburn (40%) retrosternal pain (24%), nocturnal cough (18%), dyspepsia (16%) and regurgitation (14%) and the above symptoms were significantly more common in asthmatics as compared to controls. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was found to be significantly more common in the asthmatics (58%) as compared to the control group where it was present in 32.75% of the subjects. Clinical or endoscopic evidence of any upper gastrointestinal disorder was found in 68% of the asthmatics as compared to 37.93% of the controls. This difference was found to be statistically significant. The study showed that gastroesophageal reflux disease was significantly more in asthmatics as compared to the controls. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms were more common in asthmatics as against controls. Clinical or endoscopic evidence of upper gastrointestinal disorder and

  1. Oral regurgitation after reflux provoking meals: a possible cause of dental erosion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, D W; Evans, D F; Smith, B G

    1997-02-01

    Certain foods and drinks such as alcohol, heavily spiced or fatty meals are known to provoke gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR). This may give rise to symptoms of heartburn, epigastric pain and occasionally oral regurgitation of the gastric contents. Oral regurgitation of gastric juice is important in dentistry because of its association with dental erosion. This study measured oesophageal and oral reflux in 12 healthy subjects after a curry meal taken with alcohol 2 h before sleep. Each subject repeated the test with a bland non-reflux provoking control meal. GOR was measured by recording distal and proximal oesophageal pH on a dual channel, portable pH monitor. Oral pH was measured with a pH sensitive radio-telemetry capsule (RTC) held on the palate in a vacuum formed splint. Signals from the RTC were received by an aerial worn around the head. The pH change produced by GOR was estimated as the percentage time that pH (PTpH) was less than 4 in the distal oesophagus. Similarly, the PTpH was estimated reflux in only two subjects. In one of these subjects the bland meal provoked oral regurgitation with a PTpH < 5.5 of 13.5%. In the remaining subjects little oral regurgitation occurred.

  2. Novel therapeutics for gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbib, Frank; Simon, Mireille

    2012-09-01

    Approximately 20-30% of patients with gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms report inadequate symptom relief while on proton-pump inhibitor therapy. The mechanisms involved are failure of the antireflux barrier (transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations), high proximal extent of the refluxate, esophageal hypersensitivity and impaired mucosal integrity. Persisting acid or nonacid reflux can be demonstrated in 40-50% of cases, suggesting that there is room for antireflux therapy in these patients. New antireflux compounds have been shown to decrease the occurrence of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations. The most promising classes of compounds are GABA type B agonists and metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonists, which can reduce both reflux episodes and symptoms, but the development of these compounds has been abandoned for either safety issues or lack of efficacy. Esophageal hypersensitivity and impaired mucosal integrity may prove to be relevant therapeutic targets in the future.

  3. The oesophagus and cough: laryngo-pharyngeal reflux, microaspiration and vagal reflexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is generally considered to be one of the commonest causes of chronic cough, however randomised controlled trials of proton pump inhibitors have often failed to support this notion. This article reviews the most recent studies investigating the mechanisms thought to link reflux and cough, namely laryngo-pharyngeal reflux, micro-aspiration and neuronal cross-organ sensitisation. How recent evidence might shed light on the failure of acid suppressing therapies and suggest new approaches to treating reflux related cough are also discussed. PMID:23590893

  4. Different risk factors between reflux symptoms and mucosal injury in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chung-Hsien; Hsieh, Tsung-Cheng; Hsiao, Tsung-Hsien; Wang, Pin-Chao; Tseng, Tai-Chung; Lin, Hans Hsienhong; Wang, Chia-Chi

    2015-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is diagnosed based on typical symptoms in clinical practice. It can be divided into two groups using endoscopy: erosive and nonerosive reflux disease (NERD). This study aims to determine the risk factors of reflux symptoms and mucosal injury. This was a two-step case-control study derived from a cohort of 998 individuals having the data of reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ) and endoscopic findings. Those with minor reflux symptoms were excluded. The first step compared symptomatic GERD patients with healthy controls. The 2(nd) step compared patients with erosive esophagitis with healthy controls. In this study, the prevalence of symptomatic GERD and erosive esophagitis were 163 (16.3%) and 166 (16.6%), respectively. A total of 507 asymptomatic individuals without mucosal injury of the esophagus on endoscopy were selected as healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, multivariate analyses showed that symptomatic GERD patients had a higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia [odds ratio (OR), 1.83; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-2.96] and obesity (OR, 1.85; 95% CI 1.08-3.02). By contrast, male sex (OR, 2.24; 95% CI 1.42-3.52), positive Campylo-like organism (CLO) test (OR, 0.56; 95% CI 0.37-0.84), and hiatus hernia (OR, 14.36; 95% CI 3.05-67.6) were associated with erosive esophagitis. In conclusion, obesity and hypertriglyceridemia were associated with reflux symptoms. By contrast, male sex, negative infection of Helicobacter pylori, and hiatus hernia were associated with mucosal injury. Our results suggested that risk factors of reflux symptoms or mucosal injury might be different in GERD patients. The underlying mechanism awaits further studies to clarify. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  5. Different risk factors between reflux symptoms and mucosal injury in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsien Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is diagnosed based on typical symptoms in clinical practice. It can be divided into two groups using endoscopy: erosive and nonerosive reflux disease (NERD. This study aims to determine the risk factors of reflux symptoms and mucosal injury. This was a two-step case-control study derived from a cohort of 998 individuals having the data of reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ and endoscopic findings. Those with minor reflux symptoms were excluded. The first step compared symptomatic GERD patients with healthy controls. The 2nd step compared patients with erosive esophagitis with healthy controls. In this study, the prevalence of symptomatic GERD and erosive esophagitis were 163 (16.3% and 166 (16.6%, respectively. A total of 507 asymptomatic individuals without mucosal injury of the esophagus on endoscopy were selected as healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, multivariate analyses showed that symptomatic GERD patients had a higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia [odds ratio (OR, 1.83; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.13–2.96] and obesity (OR, 1.85; 95% CI 1.08–3.02. By contrast, male sex (OR, 2.24; 95% CI 1.42–3.52, positive Campylo-like organism (CLO test (OR, 0.56; 95% CI 0.37–0.84, and hiatus hernia (OR, 14.36; 95% CI 3.05–67.6 were associated with erosive esophagitis. In conclusion, obesity and hypertriglyceridemia were associated with reflux symptoms. By contrast, male sex, negative infection of Helicobacter pylori, and hiatus hernia were associated with mucosal injury. Our results suggested that risk factors of reflux symptoms or mucosal injury might be different in GERD patients. The underlying mechanism awaits further studies to clarify.

  6. The relation between gastro-oesophageal reflux, sleeping-position and sudden infant death and its impact on positional therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenplas, Y.; Belli, D. C.; Dupont, C.; Kneepkens, C. M.; Heymans, H. S.

    1997-01-01

    Many infants do regurgitate. The recommended therapeutic approach starts with postural and dietary measures, followed by antacids and prokinetics. However, the recent findings regarding the increased risk for sudden infant death (SID) in the prone sleeping position challenge the current

  7. Correlation of Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire to impedance-pH measurements in children

    OpenAIRE

    Prachuapthunyachart, Sittichoke; Jarasvaraparn, Chaowapong; Gremse, David A

    2017-01-01

    Background: Esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring has become one of the preferred tests to correlate observed reflux-like behaviors with esophageal reflux events. The Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire is a validated tool used to distinguish infants with gastroesophageal reflux disease from healthy children. The aim of this study was to determine whether the Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire composite symptom ...

  8. HER2 testing of gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma: a commentary and guidance document from the Association of Clinical Pathologists Molecular Pathology and Diagnostics Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Newton A C S; Amary, Fernanda; Butler, Rachel; Byers, Richard; Gonzalez, David; Haynes, Harry R; Ilyas, Mohammad; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Taniere, Philippe

    2018-05-01

    The use of biologics targeted to the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein is the latest addition to the armamentarium used to fight advanced gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. The decision to treat with the biologic trastuzumab is completely dependent on HER2 testing of tumour tissue. In 2017, the College of American Pathologists, American Society for Clinical Pathology and the American Society of Clinical Oncology jointly published guidelines for HER2 testing and clinical decision making in gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The Association of Clinical Pathologists Molecular Pathology and Diagnostics Committee has issued the following document as a commentary of these guidelines and, in parallel, to provide guidance on HER2 testing in National Health Service pathology departments within the UK. This guidance covers issues related to case selection, preanalytical aspects, analysis and interpretation of such HER2 testing. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Foods Inducing Typical Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Choe, Jung Wan; Joo, Moon Kyung; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lee, Beom Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Byun, Kwan Soo; Bak, Young-Tae

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Several specific foods are known to precipitate gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms and GERD patients are usually advised to avoid such foods. However, foods consumed daily are quite variable according to regions, cultures, etc. This study was done to elucidate the food items which induce typical GERD symptoms in Korean patients. Methods One hundred and twenty-six Korean patients with weekly typical GERD symptoms were asked to mark all food items that induced typic...

  10. Comparison between the Reflux Finding Score and the Reflux Symptom Index in the Practice of Otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Heloisa Sobreira; Pinto, José Antonio; Zavanela, Adma Roberta; Cavallini, André Freitas; Freitas, Gabriel Santos; Garcia, Fabiola Esteves

    2016-07-01

    The Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease has a prevalence of ∼12% of the urban population in Brazil. Koufman proposed the term to designate Laryngeal Pharyngeal Reflux (LPR) symptoms, signs or tissue damage resulting from aggression of the gastrointestinal contents in the upper aerodigestive tract. Belafsky et al proposed a score that points to inflammatory laryngeal signs through videolaryngoscopic findings, the Reflux Finding Score (RFS). Moreover, in 2002, they published the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI). The objective of this study is to provide a comparison between the Reflux Finding Score and the Reflux Symptom Index in the practice of Otorhinolaryngology. Our study involved a total of 135 patients who visited the Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT) clinic Núcleo de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço de São Paulo between April 2014 and May 2015 with suspected LPR. We excluded nine patients and the study group was 126 patients. All patients were ranked by their RSI and RFS scores. The study group consisted of 126 patients (88 women and 38 men). Their main complaints were cough (40.4%), globus (21.4%), dysphonia (19.8%), throat clearing (15.8%), postnasal drip (3.17%), snoring (1.5%), dysphagia (1.5%), cacosmia (0.7%), and regurgitation (1.5%). The RSI ranges from 13 to 42 with a mean of 20.7 (SD = 6.67). The RFS ranged from 3 to 19 with a mean of 9.53 (SD = 2.64). The RSI and RFS can easily be included in ENT routines as objective parameters, with low cost and high practicality. Based on the clinical index, the specialist can evaluate the need for further tests.

  11. Esophageal Mucosal Impedance Pattern is Distinct in Patients With Extraesophageal Reflux Symptoms and Pathologic Acid Reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitt, Robert T; Lal, Pooja; Yuksel, Elif Saritas; Ates, Fehmi; Slaughter, James C; Garrett, C Gaelyn; Higginbotham, Tina; Vaezi, Michael F

    2017-05-01

    Current diagnostic tests for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) do not consistently measure chronicity of reflux. Mucosal impedance (MI) is a minimally invasive measurement to assess esophageal conductivity changes due to GERD. We aimed to investigate MI pattern in patients with symptoms of extraesophageal reflux (EER) in a prospective longitudinal cohort study. Patients with potential symptoms of EER undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with wireless pH monitoring were studied. Participants included those with erosive esophagitis (E+), normal EGD/abnormal pH (E-/pH+), and normal EGD/normal pH (E-/pH-). MI was measured from the site of injury in patients with E+, as well as at 2, 5, and 10 cm above the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ) in all participants. Forty-one patients with symptoms of EER were studied. MI measurements at 2 cm above the SCJ were significantly (P = 0.04) different among the three groups, with MI lowest for E+ and greatest for E-/pH- patients. Although not statistically significant, there is a graded increase in median (interquartile range) MI axially along the esophagus at 5 cm (P = 0.20) and at 10 cm (P = 0.27) above the SCJ, with those with reflux (E+ and E-/pH+) having a lower MI than those without. Patients with symptoms of EER and evidence of acid reflux have an MI lower than those without at 2 cm above the SCJ, with a trend at 5 cm and 10 cm as well. MI may be a tool to assess presence of GERD in patients presenting with EER symptoms. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: Update on inflammation and symptom perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altomare, Annamaria; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Cocca, Silvia; Emerenziani, Sara; Cicala, Michele

    2013-10-21

    Although gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder in Western countries, with a significant impact on quality of life and healthcare costs, the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of symptoms remain to be fully elucidated. GERD symptoms and complications may result from a multifactorial mechanism, in which acid and acid-pepsin are the important noxious factors involved. Prolonged contact of the esophageal mucosa with the refluxed content, probably caused by a defective anti-reflux barrier and luminal clearance mechanisms, would appear to be responsible for macroscopically detectable injury to the esophageal squamous epithelium. Receptors on acid-sensitive nerve endings may play a role in nociception and esophageal sensitivity, as suggested in animal models of chronic acid exposure. Meanwhile, specific cytokine and chemokine profiles would appear to underlie the various esophageal phenotypes of GERD, explaining, in part, the genesis of esophagitis in a subset of patients. Despite these findings, which show a significant production of inflammatory mediators and neurotransmitters in the pathogenesis of GERD, the relationship between the hypersensitivity and esophageal inflammation is not clear. Moreover, the large majority of GERD patients (up to 70%) do not develop esophageal erosions, a variant of the condition called non-erosive reflux disease. This summary aims to explore the inflammatory pathway involved in GERD pathogenesis, to better understand the possible distinction between erosive and non-erosive reflux disease patients and to provide new therapeutic approaches.

  13. Assessment of the Safety and Efficacy of a Raft-Forming Alginate Reflux Suppressant (Liquid Gaviscon) for the Treatment of Heartburn during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugala, Vicki; Bassin, Julian; Swales, Valerie S.; Lindow, Stephen W.; Dettmar, Peter W.; Thomas, Edward C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER) and the symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation are common in pregnancy. These symptoms are transient and mostly resolve postpartum but have a negative impact on quality of life. Here, we present a prospective clinical evaluation of the safety and efficacy of an alginate raft-forming oral suspension that is licensed for use in pregnancy. The study was a multicentre, prospective, open-label, and baseline-controlled study of Liquid Gaviscon (LG) in the treatment of heartburn in pregnant women with current symptoms of heartburn and/or reflux requiring treatment (recruited 144). The efficacy of the study medication was rated by the investigator (primary endpoint) and patient. Treatment was deemed to be a success in 91% of patients as judged by the investigator (95% CI 85.0–95.3) and 90% (95% CI 84.1–94.8) when assessed by the patient themselves. Very few adverse events or serious adverse events were reported that were considered to be related to the study medication, and these were consistent with the normal population incidences. Serum sodium levels remained unchanged. This prospective open-label study in a large number of pregnant women has shown that LG is both safe and highly efficacious in the treatment of heartburn and GER symptoms in pregnancy. PMID:23209926

  14. Inducing and Aggravating Factors of Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhiyatam Mardhiyah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (subsequently abbreviated as GERD is a disease commonly found in the community. Several factors have been recognized as inducing and aggravating factors of GERD symptoms such as older age, female gender, obesity, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, certain diet and poor eating habit like eating fatty, spicy, and acid food.

  15. The efficacy of the upright position on gastro-esophageal reflux and reflux-related respiratory symptoms in infants with chronic respiratory symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woo Jin; Yang, Hyeon Jong; Min, Taek Ki; Jeon, You Hoon; Lee, Hae Won; Lee, Jun Sung; Pyun, Bok Yang

    2012-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux (GER), particularly non-acid reflux, is common in infants and is a known cause of chronic respiratory symptoms in infancy. Recent guidelines recommended empirical acid suppression therapy and the head-up position in patients with suspected GER. However, the efficacy of the upright position in relieving GER and reflux-related respiratory symptoms in infants is unclear. We conducted this study to investigate the efficacy of the upright position on GER and reflux-related respiratory symptoms in infants with chronic respiratory symptoms. Thirty-two infants (21 male; median age, 5 months; range, 0 to 19 months) with unexplained chronic respiratory symptoms underwent multi-channel intraluminal esophageal impedance and pH monitoring. We retrospectively compared the frequencies of GER and reflux-related symptoms according to body position. A mean of 3.30 episodes of reflux per hour was detected. Overall, refluxes were more frequent during the postprandial period than the emptying period (3.77 vs. 2.79 episodes/hour, respectively; P=0.01). Although there was no significant difference in the total refluxes per hour between the upright and recumbent positions (6.12 vs. 3.77 episodes, P=0.10), reflux-related respiratory symptoms per reflux were significantly fewer in infants kept in an upright position than in a recumbent position during the postprandial period (3.07% vs. 14.75%, P=0.016). Non-acid reflux was the predominant type of reflux in infants, regardless of body position or meal time. The upright position may reduce reflux-related respiratory symptoms, rather than reflux frequency. Thus, it may be a useful non-pharmacological treatment for infantile GER disease resistant to acid suppressants.

  16. Extraoesophageal symptoms and signs of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Tepeš

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is very common in developed world, with the prevalence of disease is between 6 and 20%. Pathologic reflux can provoke not only typical symptoms (heartburn and regurgitation but also atypical symptoms and diseases of extraoesophageal organs (pulmonary, ENT, mouth. High prevalence of GERD in patients with unexplained chest pain, asthma, chronic cough, chronic laryngitis, hoarsness and dental erosions is not a proof of causality. GERD can cause these diseases with reflux of acid and pepsin into pharynx, larynx, lungs and mouth (reflux theory or through vasovagal mechanisms (reflex theory. Conclusions Good therapeutic success with medical or operative treatment in early methodologically not well conducted studies has not been completely proven in double-blind placebo controlled studies. GERD is an ethyological reason for these extraoesophageal symptoms and diseases in an approximately one third of patients. With diagnostic modalities that we have now, we cannot clearly define in which patient is GERD is an ethyologic factor or a contributer, before we start the treatment. In patients suspected of having GERD, there is therapeutic option of a trial with high dose of proton pump inhibitor for 3 to 6 months. In other patients with low clinical suspicion of GERD, 24-hour pH testing should be done first.

  17. Relationship between gastroesophageal reflux symptoms and dietary factors in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji Hyun; Chung, Su Jin; Lee, Jun Haeng; Kim, Young-Ho; Chang, Dong Kyung; Son, Hee Jung; Kim, Jae J; Rhee, Jong Chul; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is increasing in Korea. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between GERD symptoms and dietary factors in Korea. From January 2007 to April 2008, 162 subjects were enrolled (81 in GERD group and 81 in control group). They were asked to complete the questionnaires about GERD symptoms and dietary habits. The symptom severity score was recorded by visual analogue scale. Subjects with overweight or obesity had an increased risk for GERD (OR, 2.52; 95% CI, 1.18-5.39). Irregular dietary intake was one of the risk factors for GERD (OR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.11-4.89). Acid regurgitation was the most suffering (2.85 ± 2.95 by visual analogue scale) and frequent reflux-related symptom (57.5%) in GERD. Noodles (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.12-1.34), spicy foods (OR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.02-1.16), fatty meals (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.09-1.33), sweets (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.00-2.02), alcohol (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.03-1.31), breads (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.01-1.34), carbonated drinks (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.04-2.74) and caffeinated drinks (OR,1.41; 95% CI, 1.15-1.73) were associated with symptom aggravation in GERD. Among the investigated noodles, ramen (instant noodle) caused reflux-related symptoms most frequently (52.4%). We found that noodles, spicy foods, fatty meals, sweets, alcohol, breads, carbonated drinks and caffeinated drinks were associated with reflux-related symptoms.

  18. Acid Secretion and Its Relationship to Esophageal Reflux Symptom in Patients with Subtotal Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Jin; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Park, Jae Myung; Song, Kyo Young; Yoo, Han Mo

    2018-03-01

    Esophageal reflux symptom has been reported as common in patients with subtotal gastrectomy. Management of postoperative esophageal reflux symptom is not satisfactory. The aim of this study is to investigate prevalence of esophageal reflux symptom after subtotal gastrectomy and assess factors affecting esophageal reflux symptom in subtotal gastrectomy patients. We prospectively enrolled 100 consecutive patients with subtotal gastrectomy who were regularly followed up by endoscopic examination. Acid secretory capacity was assessed by measuring messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of H + /K + -adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) via real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in biopsy specimens. In total, 47 % of patients had typical esophageal reflux symptom, where heartburn or regurgitation was experienced at least weekly. Age, sex, body mass index, and type of reconstruction did not differ between esophageal reflux and non-esophageal-reflux groups. The esophageal reflux group had longer duration from time of operation until study (median 5.0 versus 3.6 years; P = 0.017). Hill grade for gastroesophageal (GE) flap valve was higher in the esophageal reflux group than in the non-esophageal-reflux group (P = 0.027). H + /K + -ATPase mRNA expression was higher in the esophageal reflux group than in the non-esophageal-reflux group [3967.6 (± 7583.7) versus 896.2 (± 1456.0); P = 0.006]. Multivariate analysis revealed that postoperative duration, H + /K + -ATPase mRNA expression level, and GE flap valve disruption were significantly associated with esophageal reflux symptom development. Esophageal reflux symptom is common in patients after subtotal gastrectomy, possibly because of anti-reflux-barrier impairment and preservation of acid secretory capacity following surgery. Optimal acid suppression may be helpful in managing postoperative esophageal reflux symptom.

  19. The Role of Sleep in the Modulation of Gastroesophageal Reflux and Symptoms in NICU Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Aslam; Malkar, Manish; Splaingard, Mark; Khuhro, Abdul; Jadcherla, Sudarshan

    2015-09-01

    Newborns sleep about 80% of the time. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is prevalent in about 10% of neonatal intensive care unit infants. Concurrent polysomnography and pH-impedance studies clarify the relationship of gastroesophageal reflux with sleep. To characterize spatiotemporal and chemical characteristics of impedance-positive gastroesophageal reflux and define symptom associations in sleep and wake states in symptomatic neonates. We hypothesized that frequency of impedance-positive gastroesophageal reflux events and their association with cardiorespiratory symptoms is greater during sleep. Eighteen neonates underwent concurrent polysomnography with a pH-impedance study. Impedance-positive gastroesophageal reflux events (weakly acidic or acidic) were categorized between sleep versus wake states: Symptom Index = number of symptoms with gastroesophageal reflux/total symptoms*100; Symptom Sensitivity Index = number of gastroesophageal reflux with symptoms/total gastroesophageal reflux*100; Symptom Association Probability = [(1 - probability of observed association between reflux and symptoms)*100]). We analyzed 317 gastroesophageal reflux events during 116 hours of polysomnography. During wake versus sleep, respectively, the median (interquartile range) frequency of impedance-positive gastroesophageal reflux was 4.9 (3.1-5.8) versus 1.4 (0.7-1.7) events/hour (P sleep is lower; however, spatiotemporal and chemical characteristics of gastroesophageal reflux and symptom-generation mechanisms are distinct. For cardiorespiratory symptoms during sleep, a lower Symptom Index entails evaluation for etiologies other than gastroesophageal reflux disease, a higher Symptom Sensitivity Index implies heightened esophageal sensitivity, and similar Symptom Association Probability indicates other mechanistic possibilities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Airway Reflux, Cough and Respiratory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneux, Ian D.; Morice, Alyn H.

    2011-01-01

    It is increasingly accepted that the effects of gastro-oesophageal reflux are not limited to the gastrointestinal tract. The adjacent respiratory structures are also at risk from material ejected from the proximal oesophagus as a result of the failure of anatomical and physiological barriers. There is evidence of the influence of reflux on several respiratory and otorhinological conditions and although in many cases the precise mechanism has yet to be elucidated, the association alone opens potential novel avenues of therapy to clinicians struggling to treat patients with apparently intractable respiratory complaints. This review provides a description of the airway reflux syndrome, its effects on the lung and current and future therapeutic options. PMID:23251752

  1. Scintigraphic demonstration of bile reflux after gastro-intestinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gratz, K.F.; Creutzig, H.; Lieth, U. von der; Hundeshagen, H.

    1983-04-01

    Bile reflux may occur after a variety of reconstructive procedures in the gastro-intestinal tract and biliary system. The present paper deals with reflux into the duodenum, jejunum, stomach, oesophagus and into blind loops. The demonstration of reflux by sup(99m)Tc labelled IDA acid derivatives, and a possible quantitative approach, are discussed. The advantages of isotope methods are: 1. Direct demonstration of bile reflux without any intervention in the physiological process and with little trouble to the patient. 2. The ability to use the method for various reconstructive procedures and 3. the additional information obtained which may help in the differential diagnosis of blind loops, biliary obstruction, cholecystitis or liver metastases if there has been a gastrectomy for a malignant tumour. In combination with a second administration of a radio-isotope tracer, one may be able to demonstrate abnormalities in the motility of the stomach or gut, or pyloric stenosis or gastro-oesophageal reflux.

  2. Reflux episodes and esophageal impedance levels in patients with typical and atypical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bi Xing; Jiang, Liu Qin; Lin, Lin; Wang, Ying; Wang, Meifeng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To determine the relationship between baseline impedance levels and gastroesophageal reflux, we retrospectively enrolled 110 patients (54 men and 56 female; mean age, 51 ± 14 years) with suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who underwent 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring. Patients were stratified according to symptom (typical or atypical) and reflux types (acid reflux, nonacid reflux [NAR], or no abnormal reflux). Mean nocturnal baseline impedance (MNBI) were measured 3 cm (distal esophagus) and 17 cm (proximal esophagus) above the lower esophageal sphincter. Median distal esophageal MNBI was lower in the acid reflux group (1244 Ω; 647–1969 Ω) than in the NAR (2586 Ω; 1368–3666 Ω) or no abnormal reflux groups (3082 Ω; 2495–4472 Ω; all P < .05). Distal MNBI were negatively correlated with DeMeester score and acid exposure time. Atypical symptoms were more frequently associated with NAR than typical symptoms (P < .01). Among patients with positive symptom-association probability (SAP) for NAR, median proximal MNBI tended to be lower in patients with typical symptoms (median, 3013 Ω; IQR, 2535–3410 Ω) than in those with atypical symptoms (median, 3386 Ω; IQR, 3044–3730 Ω, P = .05). Thus, atypical GERD symptoms were more likely to be associated with NAR. The mucosal integrity of the proximal esophagus might be relatively impaired in GERD patients with typical symptoms for NAR. PMID:28906377

  3. Milk /sup 99/Tcsup(m)-EHIDA test for enterogastric bile reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackie, C.R.; Wisbey, M.L.; Cuschieri, A. (Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (UK))

    1982-02-01

    The study and clinical assessment of enterogastric bile reflux has been restricted for want of a simple non-invasive test for its detection and quantification. This paper describes such a test in which biliary excretion scintigraphy has been combined with a milk meal provocation. Two of 10 healthy volunteers studied showed probable reflux of approximately 5 per cent of total initial abdominal field activity. Among 73 patients studied, 37 patients showed definite reflux of up to 47 per cent. Reflux occurred in 19 of 22 post-gastric surgery patients and in 7 of 22 patients with peptic ulcer disease, gastritis or gastro-oesophageal reflux. None of 7 patients with 'non-specific' abdominal pain showed any reflux, but 11 of 22 patients with gallstone disease or previous cholecystectomy showed reflux of up to 35 per cent, including 9 of 11 patients with loss of gallbladder reservoir function.

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peptic esophagitis; Reflux esophagitis; GERD; Heartburn - chronic; Dyspepsia - GERD ... into the esophagus. This is called reflux or gastroesophageal reflux. Reflux may cause symptoms. Harsh stomach acids can ...

  5. Persistent reflux symptoms cause anxiety, depression, and mental health and sleep disorders in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yoshihide; Kamiya, Takeshi; Senoo, Kyouji; Tsuchida, Kenji; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Kojima, Hisayo; Yamashita, Hiroaki; Yamakawa, Yoshihiro; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; Ozeki, Tomonori; Endo, Masatsugu; Nakanishi, Kazuhisa; Sando, Motoki; Inagaki, Yusuke; Shikano, Michiko; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Kubota, Eiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Katsumi, Kohei; Joh, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Some patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease experience persistent reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy. These symptoms reduce their health-related quality of life. Our aims were to evaluate the relationship between proton pump inhibitor efficacy and health-related quality of life and to evaluate predictive factors affecting treatment response in Japanese patients. Using the gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire, 145 gastroesophageal reflux disease patients undergoing proton pump inhibitor therapy were evaluated and classified as responders or partial-responders. Their health-related quality of life was then evaluated using the 8-item Short Form Health Survey, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaires. Sixty-nine patients (47.6%) were partial responders. These patients had significantly lower scores than responders in 5/8 subscales and in the mental health component summary of the 8-item Short Form Health Survey. Partial responders had significantly higher Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, including anxiety and depression scores, than those of responders. Non-erosive reflux disease and double proton pump inhibitor doses were predictive factors of partial responders. Persistent reflux symptoms, despite proton pump inhibitor therapy, caused mental health disorders, sleep disorders, and psychological distress in Japanese gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

  6. Air column in esophagus and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moosavi, Alijavad; Raji, Hanieh; Teimoori, Mojtaba; Ghourchian, Shadi

    2012-01-01

    During imaging of the normal esophagus, air is often detected. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between the appearance of air bubbles on imaging and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) symptoms. The cross-sectional imaging study was conducted at Rasole Akram Hospital, Tehran, Iran. A total of 44 patients underwent X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning; the presence of air in the esophagus and visible on CT imaging was scrutinized. The average age of the subjects was 59 and the male to female ratio was 0.83. We found a significant relationship between the presence of GERD symptoms, the size of air bubbles and esophageal dilation (ED) on the CT scan. Air bubbles in the esophagus may be seen frequently in CT scans, but their size and location can vary. The GERD symptoms can arise when a small diameter air column is present within the esophagus, especially in the middle and lower parts

  7. EGFR gene amplification is relatively common and associates with outcome in intestinal adenocarcinoma of the stomach, gastro-oesophageal junction and distal oesophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkman, Eva-Maria; Ålgars, Annika; Lintunen, Minnamaija; Ristamäki, Raija; Sundström, Jari; Carpén, Olli

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 50 % of gastric adenocarcinomas belong to a molecular subgroup characterised by chromosomal instability and a strong association with the intestinal histological subtype. This subgroup typically contains alterations in the receptor tyrosine kinase–RAS pathway, for example EGFR or HER2 gene amplifications leading to protein overexpression. In clinical practice, HER2 overexpressing metastatic gastric cancer is known to respond to treatment with anti-HER2 antibodies. By contrast, anti-EGFR antibodies have not been able to provide survival benefit in clinical trials, which, however, have not included patient selection based on the histological subtype or EGFR gene copy number analysis of the tumours. To examine the role of EGFR as a potential biomarker, we studied the prevalence, clinicopathological associations as well as prognostic role of EGFR and HER2 expression and gene amplification in intestinal adenocarcinomas of the stomach, gastro-oesophageal junction and distal oesophagus. Tissue samples from 220 patients were analysed with EGFR and HER2 immunohistochemistry. Those samples with moderate/strong staining intensity were further analysed with silver in situ hybridization to quantify gene copy numbers. The results were associated with clinical patient characteristics and survival. Moderate/strong EGFR protein expression was found in 72/220 (32.7 %) and EGFR gene amplification in 31/220 (14.1 %) of the tumours, while moderate/strong HER2 protein expression was detected in 31/220 (14.1 %) and HER2 gene amplification in 29/220 (13.2 %) of the tumours. EGFR and HER2 genes were co-amplified in eight tumours (3.6 %). EGFR gene amplification was more common in tumours of distal oesophagus/gastro-oesophageal junction/cardia than in those of gastric corpus (p = 0.013). It was associated with shortened time to cancer recurrence (p = 0.026) and cancer specific survival (p = 0.033). EGFR gene amplification is relatively common in intestinal adenocarcinomas

  8. Correlation between duodenogastric reflux and symptoms of digestive system diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leja, M.; Reinholds, E.; Brezinskis, G.; Aboltins, A.; Lejnieks, A.

    2004-01-01

    The symptoms of digestive origin potentially indicative for duodenogastric reflux (DGR) have been compared to the results obtained by scintigraphic method, elaborated by the group of authors. The symptoms were registred bu using a specially elaborated questionnaire according to preliminary determined intervals of time with respect to the scintigraphic investigation. No correlation was found between DGR and the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, regurgitation with sour and bitter content, belching, heartburn, burning sensation in the epigastric area, early satiety, flatulence, constipation, dyspepsia and abdominal pain. Diarrhoea in the morning of the investigation and month prior to the investigation was statistically significantly correlating to DGR, while no correlation was confirmed to the symptom a day and a week prior to the investigation. Bittertaste in the mouth had the best correlation to DGR in all the analysed intervals. The conclusion is made that bitter taste in the mouth is the best correlating symptom for DGR, still the low sensitivity and low positive and negative predictive values of the symptom does not make it a useful guide for symptom-based diagnosis of DGR

  9. The association between gastroesophageal flap valve function and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, O; Kalkan, Ç; Yaman, A; Tüzün, A; Soykan, I

    2017-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examination is usually the first step in the evaluation of patients with suspected gastroesopageal reflux disease. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the association between gastroesophageal flap valve function (GEFV) and gastroesophapgeal reflux symptoms in patients undergoing routine upper endoscopy. Patients and methods: 1507 patients were included into the study and the GEFV graded I to IV as follows: Hill I-II: normal GEFV, and Hill III-IV: abnormal GEFV. Patients in abnormal GEFV group had a higher incidence of reflux symptoms compared to normal GEFV group (53.4% vs 47.4% for heartburn p=0.03 and 53.2% vs 42.4% for regurgitation, preflux symptoms were in abnormal GEFV group. In patients undergoing endoscopy because of reflux symptoms, Grade III-IV valve was detected more commonly in patients with reflux symptoms compared to patients without reflux symptoms (p = 0.01). Patients with abnormal valves (Hill grades III and IV) but without reflux symptoms, esophagitis and hiatal hernia should be evaluated individually by means of the presence of gastroesophageal reflux disease which means that GEFV is not a good indicator of reflux disease. © Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica.

  10. Use of acid-suppressive therapy before anti-reflux surgery in 2922 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lødrup, A; Pottegård, A; Hallas, J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend that patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease are adequately treated with acid-suppressive therapy before undergoing anti-reflux surgery. Little is known of the use of acid-suppressive drugs before anti-reflux surgery. AIM: To determine the use of proton pump...... inhibitors and H2 -receptor antagonists in the year before anti-reflux surgery. METHODS: A nationwide retrospective study of all patients aged ≥18 undergoing first-time anti-reflux surgery in Denmark during 2000-2012 using data from three different sources: the Danish National Register of Patients......, the Danish National Prescription Register, and the Danish Person Register. RESULTS: The study population thus included 2922 patients (median age: 48 years, 55.7% male). The annual proportion of patients redeeming ≥180 DDD of acid-suppressive therapy increased from 17.0% 5 years before anti-reflux surgery...

  11. Correlation of Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire to impedance-pH measurements in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prachuapthunyachart, Sittichoke; Jarasvaraparn, Chaowapong; Gremse, David A

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring has become one of the preferred tests to correlate observed reflux-like behaviors with esophageal reflux events. The Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire is a validated tool used to distinguish infants with gastroesophageal reflux disease from healthy children. The aim of this study was to determine whether the Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire composite symptom scores and individual symptom scores correlate with outcomes in esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring. A total of 26 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease-associated symptoms, aged 0-2 years, for whom both esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring and Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire survey results were available were included in the study. Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire score data were collected from a 7-day recall of parent's responses about the frequency and severity of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms, which determined the individual symptom scores. The composite symptom scores is the sum of all individual symptom scores. Multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH study results were compared to Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire data using Pearson correlation. Among 26 patients, a total number of 2817 (1700 acid and 1117 non-acid) reflux episodes and 845 clinical reflux behaviors were recorded. There were significant correlations between the reflux index and the individual symptom scores for coughing/gagging/choking (r 2 = 0.2842, p = 0.005), the impedance score and individual symptom scores for coughing/gagging/choking (r 2 = 0.2482, p = 0.009), the reflux symptom index for acid reflux-related coughing/gagging/choking and the individual symptom scores for coughing/gagging/choking (r 2 = 0.1900, p = 0.026), the impedance score and

  12. A population-based survey to assess troublesome symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimer, Christina; Bytzer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A simple frequency and severity threshold for categorizing reflux symptoms as troublesome has been suggested, but there is a lack of confirmatory studies for this threshold. The objectives of this study were to examine the characteristics for troublesome symptoms and to compare different...... ways of categorizing reflux symptoms as troublesome. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Members of a web panel responding to an e-mail invitation (1623/3506, median age interval 40-44 years, 51% female) who reported reflux symptoms during the preceding 4 weeks (n=1284) were linked to the full questionnaire....... Associations between self-reported troublesome symptoms (10-graded VAS) and troublesome symptoms (mild symptoms >1 day/week or moderate/severe symptoms > or = 1 day/week) and clinical characteristics were analyzed. RESULTS: Out of 1284 subjects, 482 (38%) reported reflux symptoms. Agreement...

  13. Markers of sarcopenia quantified by computed tomography predict adverse long-term outcome in patients with resected oesophageal or gastro-oesophageal junction cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamandl, Dietmar; Baltzer, Pascal A.; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Paireder, Matthias; Asari, Reza; Schoppmann, Sebastian F.

    2016-01-01

    To assess the impact of sarcopenia and alterations in body composition parameters (BCPs) on survival after surgery for oesophageal and gastro-oesophageal junction cancer (OC). 200 consecutive patients who underwent resection for OC between 2006 and 2013 were selected. Preoperative CTs were used to assess markers of sarcopenia and body composition (total muscle area [TMA], fat-free mass index [FFMi], fat mass index [FMi], subcutaneous, visceral and retrorenal fat [RRF], muscle attenuation). Cox regression was used to assess the primary outcome parameter of overall survival (OS) after surgery. 130 patients (65 %) had sarcopenia based on preoperative CT examinations. Sarcopenic patients showed impaired survival compared to non-sarcopenic individuals (hazard ratio [HR] 1.87, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.15-3.03, p = 0.011). Furthermore, low skeletal muscle attenuation (HR 1.91, 95 % CI 1.12-3.28, p = 0.019) and increased FMi (HR 3.47, 95 % CI 1.27-9.50, p = 0.016) were associated with impaired outcome. In the multivariate analysis, including a composite score (CSS) of those three parameters and clinical variables, only CSS, T-stage and surgical resection margin remained significant predictors of OS. Patients who show signs of sarcopenia and alterations in BCPs on preoperative CT images have impaired long-term outcome after surgery for OC. (orig.)

  14. Chemotherapy versus self-expanding metal stent as primary treatment of severe dysphagia from unresectable oesophageal or gastro-oesophageal junction cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchefeu, Yann; Archambeaud, Isabelle; Landi, Bruno; Lièvre, Astrid; Lepère, Céline; Rougier, Philippe; Mitry, Emmanuel

    2014-03-01

    To compare chemotherapy first (group 1) versus self-expanding metal stent first (group 2) for the management of malignant dysphagia in unresectable oesophageal or gastro-oesophageal junction cancer. Patients from two university hospitals with severe malignant dysphagia (dysphagia score ≥ 2) uneligible for surgery or radiochemotherapy were evaluated retrospectively. Forty-two patients were included in group 1, and 29 in group 2. After 4 weeks, dysphagia scores improved by at least 1 point in 67% of patients in group 1 versus 93% in group 2 (p=0.01); 48% of patients in group 1 were able to eat solid food versus 68% in group 2 (p=0.054). In group 1, a self-expanding metal stent was secondarily placed in 18 patients (42.9%), whereas in group 2 dysphagia required a second self-expanding metal stent placement in 33.3% of patients. Chemotherapy as the first treatment may be a valid option, avoiding self-expanding metal stent insertion in half of the patients. Copyright © 2013 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Markers of sarcopenia quantified by computed tomography predict adverse long-term outcome in patients with resected oesophageal or gastro-oesophageal junction cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamandl, Dietmar; Baltzer, Pascal A.; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center GET-Unit, Vienna (Austria); Paireder, Matthias; Asari, Reza; Schoppmann, Sebastian F. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Surgery, Upper-GI-Service, Comprehensive Cancer Center GET-Unit, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-05-15

    To assess the impact of sarcopenia and alterations in body composition parameters (BCPs) on survival after surgery for oesophageal and gastro-oesophageal junction cancer (OC). 200 consecutive patients who underwent resection for OC between 2006 and 2013 were selected. Preoperative CTs were used to assess markers of sarcopenia and body composition (total muscle area [TMA], fat-free mass index [FFMi], fat mass index [FMi], subcutaneous, visceral and retrorenal fat [RRF], muscle attenuation). Cox regression was used to assess the primary outcome parameter of overall survival (OS) after surgery. 130 patients (65 %) had sarcopenia based on preoperative CT examinations. Sarcopenic patients showed impaired survival compared to non-sarcopenic individuals (hazard ratio [HR] 1.87, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.15-3.03, p = 0.011). Furthermore, low skeletal muscle attenuation (HR 1.91, 95 % CI 1.12-3.28, p = 0.019) and increased FMi (HR 3.47, 95 % CI 1.27-9.50, p = 0.016) were associated with impaired outcome. In the multivariate analysis, including a composite score (CSS) of those three parameters and clinical variables, only CSS, T-stage and surgical resection margin remained significant predictors of OS. Patients who show signs of sarcopenia and alterations in BCPs on preoperative CT images have impaired long-term outcome after surgery for OC. (orig.)

  16. Quality of life, patient satisfaction, and disease burden in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease with or without laryngopharyngeal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Eun Jeong; Choi, Kee Don; Jung, Hye-Kyung; Youn, Young Hoon; Min, Byung-Hoon; Song, Kyung Ho; Huh, Kyu Chan

    2017-07-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have decreased health-related quality of life (HRQL). The quality of life in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) symptoms is also significantly impaired. However, the impact of LPR symptoms on HRQL in GERD patients has not been studied. A nationwide, random-sample, and face-to-face survey of 300 Korean patients with GERD was conducted from January to March 2013. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms were assessed using the Rome III questionnaire, LPR symptoms using the reflux symptom index, and HRQL using the EuroQol five dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire. A structured questionnaire on patient satisfaction, sickness-related absences, and health-related work productivity was also used. Among the 300 patients with GERD, 150 had LPR symptoms. The mean EQ-5D index was lower in patients with GERD and LPR symptoms than in those without LPR (0.88 vs 0.91, P = 0.002). A linear regression model showed that the severity of LPR symptoms was related to decreased HRQL and was independent of age, marital status, body mass index, or household income. The overall satisfaction rate regarding treatment was lower in patients with GERD and LPR (40.0% vs 69.1%, P = 0.040). GERD patients with LPR symptoms reported greater sickness-related absent hours per week (0.36 vs 0.02 h, P = 0.016) and greater percentages of overall work impairment than those without LPR (31.1% vs 20.8%, P Gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with LPR symptoms have a poorer HRQL, a lower satisfaction rate, and a greater disease burden than those without LPR. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Efficacy of Vonoprazan for Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms in Patients with Proton Pump Inhibitor-resistant Non-erosive Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikura, Ryota; Yamada, Atsuo; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Hayakawa, Yoku; Takahashi, Akihiro; Shinozaki, Tomohiro; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2018-03-30

    Objective Clinically, patients with proton pomp inhibitor (PPI)-resistant gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) are very challenging to treat. The aim of this study was to determine the rates of symptom relief and adverse events among PPI-resistant GERD patients that changed their therapy from a PPI to vonoprazan. Methods Patients with severe gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (total GERD-Q score ≥8) without endoscopic findings of mucosal breaks who changed their medication from a PPI to vonoprazan during a 12-week period from 2015 to 2016 at 2 hospitals were selected. The primary outcome was the self-reported relief of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. The odds ratio (OR) for the improvement of symptoms was calculated based on an exact binomial distribution using a matched-pair analysis. The secondary outcome was the GERD-Q score and adverse events. Results Twenty-six patients (6 men) with a mean age of 67.5 years were analyzed. After the therapy was changed from a PPI to vonoprazan, 18 patients (69.2%) reported an improvement, 6 (23.1%) reported no change, and 2 (7.7%) reported an exacerbation of symptoms. A change in therapy was significantly associated with improved self-reported symptoms (OR 9.0, pgastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Vonoprazan is one of the most promising treatment options for patients with PPI-resistant GERD.

  18. [The Additional Role of Symptom-Reflux Association Analysis of Diagnosis of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Using Bravo Capsule pH Test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyoungwon; Park, Moo In; Park, Seun Ja; Moon, Won; Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2017-10-25

    Since the development of ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring test to diagnose gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), several parameters have been introduced. The aim of this study was to assess whether using the symptom index (SI), symptom sensitivity index (SSI), and symptom association probability (SAP), in addition to the DeMeester score (DS), would be useful for interpreting the Bravo pH monitoring test. A retrospective study, which included 68 patients with reflux symptoms refractory to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy who underwent a Bravo capsule pH test between October 2006 and May 2015, was carried out. Acid reflux parameters and symptom reflux association parameters were analyzed. The median percent time of total pHvariation in percent time of total pHpH test, diagnosis of GERD, including reflux hypersensitivity, can be improved by performing an analysis of the symptom-reflux association and of the day-to-day variation.

  19. COMBINED 24-HOURS ESOPHAGEAL PH MONITORING AND MULTICHANNEL INTRALUMINAL IMPEDANCE FOR COMPARISON OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX IN CHILDREN WITH TYPICAL VERSUS ATYPICAL SYMPTOMS OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Taghavi, Seyed Alireza; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir; Nasri, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    - Gastroesophageal reflux disease is the most common esophageal disorder in pediatrics. - The aim of this study was to compare reflux parameters of typical and atypical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease using 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring and multichannel intraluminal impedance in pediatric population. - In this prospective study, 43 patients aged less than 18 year with suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease were enrolled. The patients were divided into two groups based on the main presenting symptoms (typical versus atypical). Twenty four-hour pH monitoring and multichannel intraluminal impedance were performed in all the patients for comparing these two group regarding association of symptoms and reflux. Number of refluxes, pH related reflux, total reflux time, reflux more than 5 minutes, longest time of the reflux, lowest pH at reflux, reflux index were recorded and compared. Data comparison was done using SPSS. - The mean age of the patients was 5.7±3.4 years and 65.1% were male. Out of 43 patients 24 cases had typical symptoms and 19 had atypical symptoms. The mean reflux events detected by multichannel intraluminal impedance was more than mean reflux events detected by pH monitoring (308.4±115.8 vs 69.7±66.6) with P value of 0.037, which is statistically significant. The mean symptom index and symptom association probability were 35.01% ± 20.78% and 86.42% ± 25.79%, respectively in multichannel intraluminal impedance versus 12.73% ± 12.48% and 45.16% ± 42.29% in pH monitoring (P value reflux was 46.26±47.16 and 30.9±22.09 for atypical and typical symptoms respectively. The mean symptom index was 18.12% ± 13.101% and 8.30% ± 10.301% in atypical and typical symptoms respectively (P=0.034). Bolus clearance was longer in atypical symptoms compared typical symptoms(Preflux was found in children with atypical symptoms of reflux. Longer duration of bolus clearance was found in group with atypical symptoms of reflux.

  20. Obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda M Malaty, J Kennard Fraley

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hoda M Malaty1, J Kennard Fraley1,2, Suhaib Abudayyeh1, Kenneth W Fairly1, Ussama S Javed1, et al1Department of Medicine, 2Children’s Nutrition Research Center (CNRC, 4Department of Pediatrics, 5Texas Children’s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 3Department of Gastroenterology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USABackground: The association between body mass index (BMI and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has been extensively studied among adults but few studies have examined such association in children. Aims: 1 to determine the relationship between BMI in children and GERD, and 2 to use the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS values for BMI as a valid source for comparison. Methods: We identified two cohorts of children aged between two and 17 years who were seen at Texas Children’s Hospital (TCH. The first cohort consisted of children diagnosed with GERD based on upper gastrointestinal endoscopic and histologic evaluation, which was recorded in the Pediatric Endoscopic Database System-Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative (PEDS-CORI at TCH. A diagnosis of GERD was based on the presence of erosive esophagitis or esophageal ulcers. Endoscopic reports that were incomplete or did not include demographic features, indications for endoscopy, or endoscopic findings were excluded. The second cohort consisted of all children with symptoms due to gastroesophageal reflux (GER who received outpatient gastrointestinal (GI consultation at TCH for any 9th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD-9 code suggestive of GER. There was no overlap between the two cohorts as each child was indexed only once. Children with any comorbid illnesses were excluded.Measurements: The records for each child namely, age, gender, height, and weight were obtained on the same date as that of the diagnosis. Using the growth curves published by the NCHS, the gender/age specific weight

  1. Epirubicin, oxaliplatin, and capectabine is just as "MAGIC"al as epirubicin, cisplatin, and fluorouracil perioperative chemotherapy for resectable locally advanced gastro-oesophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawna Sirohi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The perioperative use of epirubicin, cisplatin, and fluorouracil (ECF significantly improves outcomes in patients with gastric and gastro-oesophageal (GO cancers but is cumbersome to administer. Given the equivalence of epirubicin, oxaliplatin, and capectabine (EOX with ECF in advanced setting, we analyzed the compliance, efficacy, and toxicity of perioperative EOX in resectable but locally advanced cancers. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively maintained database of patients treated between January 2012 and September 2013 at Tata Memorial Centre. Patients were planned to receive 3# of neoadjuvant (NA and 3# of adjuvant EOX (intravenous epirubicin 50 mg/m 2 D1, oxaliplatin 130 mg/m 2 , on D1, capecitabiine 1250 mg/m 2 D1-21 every 21 days. On completion of NA therapy, patients were planned to undergo gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy. Results: A total of 99 patients (76% males, median age 51 years were treated with perioperative EOX. Preoperatively, 93% patients completed EOX. Post-NA chemotherapy, 4 patients progressed, 1 patient died and 94 were taken up for surgery. Of these, 9 were inoperable and 85 patients underwent radical surgery. Of these, 71% (60/85 were able to complete three cycles of adjuvant EOX. The compliance to complete all 6 cycles of perioperative chemotherapy was 64%. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were comparable to the MAGIC dataset apart from higher number of diarrhea in our patients. Conclusions: In patients with resectable GO adenocarcinoma, it is possible to deliver the MAGIC-type perioperative chemotherapy with EOX with better compliance, toxicity, and efficacy rates.

  2. Role of non-acid gastro-esophageal reflux in children with respiratory symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenzeri, Letizia; Quitadamo, Paolo; Tambucci, Renato; Ummarino, Dario; Poziello, Antonio; Miele, Erasmo; Staiano, Annamaria

    2017-05-01

    Respiratory symptoms are a possible atypical clinical picture of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, a significant number of patients with GERD-related respiratory symptoms do not report improvement despite aggressive acid-suppressive therapy. Some of these refractory cases may be due to the recently appreciated entity of non-acid or weakly acidic reflux. The aim of our study is to assess the pH-impedance features of GER inducing airway symptoms, compared with GER inducing typical gastro-intestinal (GI) symptoms. We prospectively enrolled infants and children with GERD-related respiratory symptoms from January 2015 to December 2015. Age- and sex-matched patients with GERD-related GI symptoms were enrolled as comparison group. The overall number, the acidity pattern, and the height of reflux episodes were compared between the two groups. Forty patients (M/F: 20/20; mean age: 58.3 months) were enrolled in the study group and 40 in the comparison group. The mean acid exposure index was 7.9% within the study group and 15.9% within the comparison group (p:0.026). Children with respiratory symptoms versus children with GI symptoms had a mean of 40.8 acid reflux episodes versus 62.4 (p:0.001), a mean of 2.2 weakly acid reflux episodes versus 20.1 (p:0.002), and a mean of 22.1 weakly alkaline reflux episodes versus 10.2 (P 1 year with GERD-related respiratory symptoms showed a significantly higher number of weakly alkaline refluxes than children with GERD-related GI symptoms. This supports the hypothesis that respiratory symptoms are less related to acidity than GI symptoms. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2017;52:669-674. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease and respiratory disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, G; Caffarena, P E; Battistini, E; Fregonese, B; Barabino, A; Jasonni, V

    1995-01-01

    The patients treated for oesophageal atresia present a correlation between the clinical sintomatology after recanalization characterized by disfagia, dispnea, recurrent cough, chronic pneumopaties and oesophageal anomalies. Where morphological alterations accounting for the presence of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) were not evident, possible functional alterations of the motility were considered. The incidence of GOR was considerably high and, expression of a congenital alteration of the lower oesophageal sphincter and of oesophageal peristalsis, becomes even more severe due to further stretching of the gastro-esophageal junction. The authors underline that the early demonstration of histological changes, even before recanalization, and the motility disorders of the oesophagus have to be well studied, while the LES is normalized, in order to prevent and treat the possible appearance of the well-known complications of GOR.

  4. Pattern of food intolerance in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselli, Michele; Lo Cascio, Natalina; Rabitti, Stefano; Eusebi, Leonardo H; Zeni, Elena; Soavi, Cecilia; Cassol, Francesca; Zuliani, Giovanni; Zagari, Rocco M

    2017-12-01

    Many food items have been involved in gastro-esophageal reflux disease pathogenesis and dietary modification has been proposed as first-line treatment. Test-based exclusion diets have shown to significantly reduce reflux symptoms. We aimed to assess the patterns of food intolerance in a series of patients with typical gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms (GERS). We retrospectively evaluated all patients with typical reflux symptoms, attending the Centre Study Association on Food Intolerance and Nutrition of Ferrara from January 2010 to October 2015, who resulted positive to at least one food item at the Leucocytotoxic Test. The presence and severity of typical GERS (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation) were assessed using the Gastro-esophageal Reflux Disease Impact Scale (GIS) questionnaire. Only individuals with a GIS Score of at least 5 points were included. Almost all patients (91.1%) were intolerant to at least 5 food items. The most frequent food intolerance (more than 33% of patients) were found for milk (55.4%), lettuce (46.4%), coffee (43.7%), brewer's yeast (42.9%), pork (42.9%), tuna (37.5%), rice (35.7%), sole (34.8%), asparagus (34.8%) and eggs (33.9%). Nine different clusters of food intolerance were detected. Patients with typical gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms seem to have intolerance to multiple food items, some of which (lettuce, brewer's yeast, tuna, rice, sole and asparagus) have not yet been associated to gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

  5. Scintigraphic Evaluation of Esophageal Motility and Gastroesophageal Reflux in Patients Presenting with Upper Respiratory Tract Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalachandran, Jaykanth; Simon, Shelley; Elangoven, Indirani; Jain, Avani; Sivathapandi, Thangalakshmi

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of Study: The purpose is to evaluate the findings and utility of esophageal transit scintigraphy (ETS) and gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy (GES) in patients presenting with upper respiratory tract (URT) symptoms suspected to be due to gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients aged between 19 and 60 years underwent nasopharyngolaryngoscopy (NPL), ETS, and GES. Correlation between GER, esophageal motility, and NPL was evaluated. Inclusion criteria include patients with recurrent URT symptoms such as chronic dry cough/hoarseness of voice and itching/foreign body sensation in throat. Those with typical gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of GER, URT symptoms relieved by antibiotics, surgical intervention in abdomen, cardiac/hepatobiliary diseases, etc. were excluded from the study. Results: Significant correlation was found between GER and NPL in 28/30 patients. More the grade of reflux, more severe was the NPL findings. Two patients with Grade II reflux had normal NPL suggesting structural inflammatory changes due to acidic pH of refluxate which have not yet manifested or symptoms could be due to nonacid refluxate. Incidence of esophageal motility disorder was statistically significant in patients with GER disease (GERD). Patients who had symptoms, but no demonstrable GER showed delayed ET in supine position suggesting the presence of esophageal motility disorder even before GERD. Conclusion: GES demonstrated GER in patients presenting with URT symptoms without typical GI symptoms. ETS showed coexistence of esophageal motility disorder in most patients presenting with URT symptoms even without an associated reflux disease. We hypothesize that primary abnormal esophageal motility leads to delayed esophageal clearance and consequently to URT symptoms. Addition of ETS to GES is easily feasible with no significant additional cost, time, or radiation burden. PMID:29430111

  6. [The binomial symptom index for the evaluation of temporal association between cardiorespiratory symptoms and gastroesophageal reflux in neonates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga-Rivera, Alejandro; Moya, María José; Lopez-Alonso, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    The evaluation of symptom association between gastroesophageal reflux and cardiorespiratory events in preterm infants remains unclear. This paper describes a conservative approach to decision-making of anti-reflux surgery through symptom association analysis. Forty-three neonates with potentially reflux-related cardiorespiratory symptoms underwent synchronized esophageal impedance-pH and cardiorespiratory monitoring. Three indices were considered to evaluate symptom association, the symptom index (SI), the symptom sensitivity index (SSI) and the symptom association probability (SAP). A conservative strategy was adopted regarding the decision of anti-reflux surgery, and therefore, patients were scheduled for laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication if the three indices showed a positive assessment of symptom association. Retrospectively, these indices and the binomial symptom index (BSI) were contrasted against the decision of anti-reflux surgery using different windows of association. Thirteen patients showed positive symptom association but only two underwent anti-reflux surgery. The SI and the SSI showed an increasing trend with the width of the window of association. The SAP was affected randomly by slightly altering the windowing parameters. The BSI showed the best performance with the two-minute window (κ =0.78) CONCLUSIONS: The pathology under study is known to improve with maturity. However, the severity of cardiorespiratory symptoms may threaten the neonate's life and therefore, in some occasions, invasive treatments must be considered to protect life. The BSI provides a good prediction of a combination of positive SI, SSI and SAP, which may improve clinical decisions. However, further clinical studies are required to prove the BSI as an optimal predictor of clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. The Clinical Value of Deflation Cough in Chronic Coughers With Reflux Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorini, Federico; Chellini, Elisa; Bigazzi, Francesca; Surrenti, Elisabetta; Fontana, Giovanni A

    2016-06-01

    Patients with deflation cough (DC), the cough-like expulsive effort(s) evoked by maximal lung emptying during a slow vital capacity maneuver, also present symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. DC can be inhibited by prior intake of antacids. We wished to assess DC prevalence and association between DC and chemical characteristics of refluxate in patients with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. A total of 157 consecutive outpatients underwent DC assessment and 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance pH (MII-pH) monitoring; 93/157 also had chronic cough. Patients performed two to four slow vital capacity maneuvers and DC was detected aurally. Subsequently, they underwent 24-h MII-pH monitoring, the outcomes of which were defined as abnormal when acid or non-acid reflux events were > 73. DC occurred in 46/157 patients, 18 of whom had abnormal MII-pH outcomes; 28 of the remaining 111 patients without DC also had abnormal MII-pH findings. Thus, in the patients as a group, there was no association between DC and MII-pH outcomes. DC occurred in 40/93 of the chronic coughers; 15 of whom had acid reflux. All but 2 of the 53 patients without DC had normal MII-pH outcomes (P < .001), and the negative predictive value of DC for excluding acid reflux was 96.2%. At follow-up, 65% of coughers showed significant improvement after treatment. The overall prevalence of DC was 29%, increasing to 43% in chronic coughers in whom the absence of DC virtually excludes acid reflux. Therefore, DC assessment may represent a useful screening test for excluding acid reflux in chronic coughers with reflux symptoms. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms not responding to proton pump inhibitor: GERD, NERD, NARD, esophageal hypersensitivity or dyspepsia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashashati, Mohammad; Hejazi, Reza A; Andrews, Christopher N; Storr, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common gastrointestinal process that can generate symptoms of heartburn and chest pain. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the gold standard for the treatment of GER; however, a substantial group of GER patients fail to respond to PPIs. In the past, it was believed that acid reflux into the esophagus causes all, or at least the majority, of symptoms attributed to GER, with both erosive esophagitis and nonerosive outcomes. However, with modern testing techniques it has been shown that, in addition to acid reflux, the reflux of nonacid gastric and duodenal contents into the esophagus may also induce GER symptoms. It remains unknown how weakly acidic or alkaline refluxate with a pH similar to a normal diet induces GER symptoms. Esophageal hypersensitivity or functional dyspepsia with superimposed heartburn may be other mechanisms of symptom generation, often completely unrelated to GER. Detailed studies investigating the pathophysiology of esophageal hypersensitivity are not conclusive, and definitions of the various disease states may overlap and are often confusing. The authors aim to clarify the pathophysiology, definition, diagnostic techniques and medical treatment of patients with heartburn symptoms who fail PPI therapy. PMID:24719900

  9. Accounting for the effect of GERD symptoms on patients' health-related quality of life: supporting optimal disease management by primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flook, N W; Wiklund, I

    2007-12-01

    To review, from a primary care physician (PCP) perspective, the use of patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments for assessment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms, their impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) and the effectiveness of therapy. While generic and disease-specific PRO instruments have been used in the assessment of GERD, the latter can be considered to be more appropriate as they focus only on problems relevant to the disease in question (and therefore tend to be more responsive to change). Such instruments include the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale and the Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ). Their use indicates that GERD symptoms are troublesome and significantly reduce patients' HRQL, and that effective treatment of GERD improves HRQL. The GERD Impact Scale (GIS) questionnaire, primarily developed for use within primary care, can also help to determine the impact of symptoms on patients' everyday lives and, in turn, the benefit of appropriately targeted therapy. Notably, these PRO instruments were developed from focus groups of GERD patients, and only aspects rated of highest importance are used in the final instruments. Consequently, PCPs can feel confident that these questionnaires encompass the most relevant points that they are likely to ask in terms of how symptoms affect patients' everyday lives. Primary care physicians are encouraged to make wider use of PRO instruments within routine practice to improve communication with their GERD patients that, in turn, could lead to improved clinical outcomes and greater patient satisfaction.

  10. Post-prandial reflux suppression by a raft-forming alginate (Gaviscon Advance) compared to a simple antacid documented by magnetic resonance imaging and pH-impedance monitoring: mechanistic assessment in healthy volunteers and randomised, controlled, double-blind study in reflux patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweis, R; Kaufman, E; Anggiansah, A; Wong, T; Dettmar, P; Fried, M; Schwizer, W; Avvari, R K; Pal, A; Fox, M

    2013-06-01

    Alginates form a raft above the gastric contents, which may suppress gastro-oesophageal reflux; however, inconsistent effects have been reported in mechanistic and clinical studies. To visualise reflux suppression by an alginate-antacid [Gaviscon Advance (GA), Reckitt Benckiser, UK] compared with a nonraft-forming antacid using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to determine the feasibility of pH-impedance monitoring for assessment of reflux suppression by alginates. Two studies were performed: (i) GA and antacid (Alucol, Wander Ltd, Switzerland) were visualised in the stomach after ingestion in 12 healthy volunteers over 30 min after a meal by MRI, with reflux events documented by manometry. (ii) A randomised controlled, double-blind cross-over trial of post-prandial reflux suppression documented by pH-impedance in 20 patients randomised to GA or antacid (Milk of Magnesia; Boots, UK) after two meals taken 24 h apart. MRI visualized a "mass" of GA form at the oesophago-gastric junction (OGJ); simple antacid sank to the distal stomach. The number of post-prandial common cavity reflux events was less with GA than antacid [median 2 (0-5) vs. 5 (1-11); P < 0.035]. Distal reflux events and acid exposure measured by pH-impedance were similar after GA and antacid. There was a trend to reduced proximal reflux events with GA compared with antacid [10.5 (8.9) vs. 13.9 (8.3); P = 0.070]. Gaviscon Advance forms a 'mass' close to the OGJ and significantly suppresses reflux compared with a nonraft-forming antacid. Standard pH-impedance monitoring is suitable for clinical studies of GA in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease patients where proximal reflux is the primary outcome. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Ramucirumab for Treating Advanced Gastric Cancer or Gastro-Oesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Previously Treated with Chemotherapy: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükkaramikli, Nasuh C; Blommestein, Hedwig M; Riemsma, Rob; Armstrong, Nigel; Clay, Fiona J; Ross, Janine; Worthy, Gill; Severens, Johan; Kleijnen, Jos; Al, Maiwenn J

    2017-12-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the company that manufactures ramucirumab (Cyramza ® , Eli Lilly and Company) to submit evidence of the clinical and cost effectiveness of the drug administered alone (monotherapy) or with paclitaxel (combination therapy) for treating adults with advanced gastric cancer or gastro-oesophageal junction (GC/GOJ) adenocarcinoma that were previously treated with chemotherapy, as part of the Institute's single technology appraisal (STA) process. Kleijnen Systematic Reviews Ltd (KSR), in collaboration with Erasmus University Rotterdam, was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). This paper describes the company's submission, the ERG review, and NICE's subsequent decisions. Clinical effectiveness evidence for ramucirumab monotherapy (RAM), compared with best supportive care (BSC), was based on data from the REGARD trial. Clinical effectiveness evidence for ramucirumab combination therapy (RAM + PAC), compared with paclitaxel monotherapy (PAC), was based on data from the RAINBOW trial. In addition, the company undertook a network meta-analysis (NMA) to compare RAM + PAC with BSC and docetaxel. Cost-effectiveness evidence of monotherapy and combination therapy relied on partitioned survival, cost-utility models. The base-case incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of the company was £188,640 (vs BSC) per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained for monotherapy and £118,209 (vs BSC) per QALY gained for combination therapy. The ERG assessment indicated that the modelling structure represented the course of the disease; however, a few errors were identified and some of the input parameters were challenged. The ERG provided a new base case, with ICERs (vs BSC) of £188,100 (monotherapy) per QALY gained and £129,400 (combination therapy) per QALY gained and conducted additional exploratory analyses. The NICE Appraisal Committee (AC), considered the company's decision problem was in

  12. Factors associated with residual gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in patients receiving proton pump inhibitor maintenance therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawara, Fumiaki; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Morita, Yoshinori; Uda, Atsushi; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Saito, Masaya; Ooi, Makoto; Ishida, Tsukasa; Kondo, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Shiei; Okuno, Tatsuya; Yano, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Masaru; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Hayakumo, Takanobu; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Hirano, Takeshi; Hirai, Midori; Azuma, Takeshi

    2017-03-21

    To elucidate the factors associated with residual gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms in patients receiving proton pump inhibitor (PPI) maintenance therapy in clinical practice. The study included 39 GERD patients receiving maintenance PPI therapy. Residual symptoms were assessed using the Frequency Scale for Symptoms of GERD (FSSG) questionnaire and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). The relationships between the FSSG score and patient background factors, including the CYP2C19 genotype, were analyzed. The FSSG scores ranged from 1 to 28 points (median score: 7.5 points), and 19 patients (48.7%) had a score of 8 points or more. The patients' GSRS scores were significantly correlated with their FSSG scores (correlation coefficient = 0.47, P reflux-related symptom scores: 12 ± 1.9 vs 2.5 ± 0.8, P reflux disease patients were significantly lower than those of the other patients (total scores: 5.5 ± 1.0 vs 11.8 ± 6.3, P < 0.05; dysmotility symptom-related scores: 1.0 ± 0.4 vs 6.0 ± 0.8, P < 0.01). Approximately half of the GERD patients receiving maintenance PPI therapy had residual symptoms associated with a lower quality of life, and the CYP2C19 genotype appeared to be associated with these residual symptoms.

  13. A study of dysphagia symptoms and esophageal body function in children undergoing anti-reflux surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Omari, T.; Connor, F.; McCall, L.; Ferris, L.; Ellison, S.; Hanson, B.; Abu-Assi, R.; Khurana, S.; Moore, D.

    2018-01-01

    Background: The role of high-resolution esophageal impedance manometry (HRIM) for establishing risk for dysphagia after anti-reflux surgery is unclear. We conducted a prospective study of children with primary gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease, for whom symptoms of dysphagia were determined pre-operatively and then post-operatively and we examined for features that may predict post-operative dysphagia. Methods: Thirteen children (aged 6.8–15.5 years) undergoing work-up prior to 360 o Niss...

  14. The role of gastroesophageal reflux in relation to symptom onset in patients with proton pump inhibitor-refractory nonerosive reflux disease accompanied by an underlying esophageal motor disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, Shinya; Funaki, Yasushi; Iida, Akihito; Tokudome, Kentaro; Tamura, Yasuhiro; Ogasawara, Naotaka; Sasaki, Makoto; Kasugai, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    The symptom improvement rate is low with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in nonerosive reflux disease (NERD). The underlying pathogenic mechanism is complex. Esophageal motility disorders (EMDs) are thought to be a factor, but their prevalence, type, symptoms and the role played by gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in symptom onset have not been fully investigated. To investigate the role of GER in symptom onset in PPI-refractory NERD patients with EMDs. This study comprised 76 patients with PPI-refractory NERD. Manometry was performed during PPI treatment and patients were divided into an EMD group and normal motility (non-EMD) group. Then, multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring was performed and medical interviews were conducted. Nineteen patients (25%) had an EMD. Data were compared between 17 patients, excluding 2 with achalasia and 57 non-EMD patients. No significant differences were observed between groups in 24-hour intraesophageal pH <4 holding time (HT), mean number of GER episodes or mean number of proximal reflux episodes. The reflux-related symptom index (≥50%) showed a relationship between reflux and symptoms in 70.5% of EMD patients and 75% of non-EMD patients. In the EMD group, the score for FSSG (Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of GERD) question (Q)10 was significantly correlated with the number of GER episodes (r = 0.58, p = 0.02) and the number of proximal reflux episodes (r = 0.63, p = 0.02). In addition, the score for Q9 tended to be correlated with the number of GER episodes (r = 0.44, p = 0.06). Our results suggest that some PPI-refractory NERD patients have EMDs, and that GER plays a role in symptom onset.

  15. Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication offers high patient satisfaction with relief of extraesophageal symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakita, Steven; Villadolid, Desiree; Thomas, Ashley; Bloomston, Mark; Albrink, Michael; Goldin, Steven; Rosemurgy, Alexander

    2006-03-01

    Nissen fundoplication is applied for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), usually because of symptoms of esophageal injury. When presenting symptoms are extraesophageal, there is less enthusiasm for operative control of reflux because of concerns of etiology and efficacy. This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication in palliating extraesophageal symptoms of GERD. Patients were asked to score their symptoms before and after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication on a Likert scale (0 = never/none to 5 = always/every time I eat). A total of 322 patients with extraesophageal symptoms (asthma, cough, gas/bloat, chest pain, and odynophagia) of 4 to 5 were identified and analyzed. After fundoplication, all extraesophageal symptom scores improved (P < 0.0001 for all, Wilcoxon matched-pairs test). Likewise, postoperative symptoms were noted to be greatly improved or resolved in 67 per cent to 82 per cent of patients for each symptom. Furthermore, after fundoplication, patients were less likely to modify their dietary (82% vs 49%) or sleeping habits (70% vs 28%) to avoid initiating/ exacerbating symptoms. Although extraesophageal symptoms are conventionally thought to be inadequately palliated by surgery, this study documents excellent relief of extraesophageal symptoms after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication, denotes high patient satisfaction, and encourages application of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication.

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms are not sufficient to guide esophageal function testing in lung transplant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, S; Zheng, J; Wood, R K; Shimpi, R A; Hartwig, M G; Chow, S-C; Leiman, D A

    2018-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease and esophageal dysmotility are prevalent in patients with advanced lung disease and are associated with graft dysfunction following lung transplantation. As a result, many transplant centers perform esophageal function testing as part of the wait-listing process but guidelines for testing in this population are lacking. The aim of this study is to describe whether symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux correlate with abnormal results on pH-metry and high-resolution manometry and can be used to identify those who require testing. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 226 lung transplant candidates referred for high-resolution manometry and pH-metry over a 12-month period in 2015. Demographic data, results of a standard symptom questionnaire and details of esophageal function testing were obtained. Associations between the presence of symptoms and test results were analyzed using Fisher's exact tests and multivariable logistic regression. The most common lung disease diagnosis was interstitial lung disease (N = 131, 58%). Abnormal pH-metry was seen in 116 (51%) patients and the presence of symptoms was significantly associated with an abnormal study (p advanced lung disease, symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux increase the likelihood of elevated acid exposure on pH-metry but were not associated with dysmotility. Given the proportion of asymptomatic patients with abnormal studies and associated post-transplant risks, a practice of universal high-resolution manometry and pH-metry testing in this population is justifiable.

  17. Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatica Goseva

    2014-09-01

    CONCLUSION: GER symptoms are more prevalent in patients with severe airways obstruction when compared to less airways obstructed group and controls. We could suggest an association between the degree of airways obstruction in patients with COPD and the increased rate of GER symptoms.

  18. Increased proximal reflux in a hypersensitive esophagus might explain symptoms resistant to proton pump inhibitors in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohof, Wout O; Bennink, Roelof J; de Jonge, Hugo; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2014-10-01

    Approximately 30% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease have symptoms resistant to treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Several mechanisms such as esophageal hypersensitivity, increased mucosal permeability, and possibly the position of the gastric acid pocket might underlie a partial response to PPIs. To what extent these mechanisms interact and contribute to PPI-resistant symptoms, however, has not been investigated previously. In 18 gastroesophageal reflux disease patients (9 PPI responders and 9 PPI partial responders), esophageal sensitivity, mucosal permeability, and postprandial reflux parameters were determined during PPI use. Esophageal sensitivity for distension was measured by gradual balloon inflation at 5 and 15 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. The mucosal permeability of 4 esophageal biopsy specimens per patient was determined in Ussing chambers by measuring the transepithelial electrical resistance and transmucosal flux of fluorescein. Postprandial reflux parameters were determined using concurrent high-resolution manometry/pH impedance after a standardized meal. In addition, the acid pocket was visualized using scintigraphy. No difference in the rate of postprandial acid reflux, in the pH of the acid pocket (PPI responders 3.7 ± 0.7 vs PPI partial responders 4.2 ± 0.4; P = .54), or in the position of the acid pocket was observed in PPI partial responders compared with PPI responders. In addition, the permeability of the esophageal mucosa was similar in both groups, as shown by a similar transepithelial electrical resistance and flux of fluorescein. PPI partial responders had more reflux episodes with a higher mean proximal extent, compared with PPI responders, and were more sensitive to balloon distension, both in the upper and lower esophagus. PPI-resistant symptoms most likely are explained by increased proximal reflux in a hypersensitive esophagus and less likely by increased mucosal permeability or the position of

  19. Japanese apricot improves symptoms of gastrointestinal dysmotility associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekita, Takao; Kato, Jun; Enomoto, Shotaro; Yoshida, Takeichi; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Hanamitsu, Toshiko; Inoue, Izumi; Maeda, Yoshimasa; Moribata, Kosaku; Muraki, Yosuke; Shingaki, Naoki; Deguchi, Hisanobu; Ueda, Kazuki; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Tamai, Hideyuki; Ichinose, Masao

    2015-07-14

    To investigate the effects of Japanese apricot (JA) consumption on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-related symptoms. Participants included individuals living in Minabe-cho, a well-known JA-growing region, who received specific medical check-ups by the local community health service in 2010. GERD-related symptoms were examined in 1303 Japanese individuals using a validated questionnaire, the Frequency Scale for Symptoms of GERD (FSSG), which consists of 7 questions associated with acid reflux symptoms and 5 questions asking about gastrointestinal dysmotility symptoms. Each question was answered using a 4-point scale, with higher scores indicating more severe GERD-related symptoms. Subjects were divided into two groups according to their intake of dried and pickled JA: daily intake (≥ 1 JA daily) (392 subjects) and none or occasional intake (reflux score did not differ between subjects with and without daily intake of JA (1.08 ± 1.90 vs 1.24 ± 2.11, P = 0.177). Subanalysis indicated that improvement in dysmotility by JA intake was specifically observed in non-elderly (1.24 ± 1.68 vs 1.62 ± 2.22, P = 0.005) and H. pylori-negative subjects (0.99 ± 1.58 vs 1.57 ± 2.06, P < 0.001). GERD patients (total FSSG score ≥ 8) were less frequently observed among subjects with daily intake of JA as compared to those without daily intake of JA (6.1% vs 9.7%, P = 0.040). Daily JA intake may improve digestive dysmotility symptoms, resulting in relief of GERD symptoms. The effect is more obvious in non-elderly and H. pylori-negative subjects.

  20. Effect of CPAP Therapy on Symptoms of Nocturnal Gastroesophageal Reflux among Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamanna, Sadeka; Campbell, Douglas; Warren, Richard; Ullah, Mohammad I

    2016-09-15

    Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (nGER) is common among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Previous studies demonstrated that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) reduces symptoms of nGER. However, improvement in nGER symptoms based on objective CPAP compliance has not been documented. We have examined the polysomnographic characteristics of patients with nGER and OSA and looked for association of OSA severity and CPAP compliance with improvement in nGER symptoms. We interviewed 85 veterans with OSA to assess their daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness scale [ESS]) and nGER symptom frequency after their polysomnography and polysomnographic data were reviewed. At 6 months' follow-up, ESS score, nGER score, and CPAP machine compliance data were reassessed. Data from 6 subjects were dropped from final analysis due to their initiation of new medication for nGER symptom since the initial evaluation. Sixty-two of 79 (78%) patients complained of nGER symptoms during initial visit. At baseline, nGER score was correlated with sleep efficiency (r = 0.43), and BMI correlated with the severity of OSA (r = 0.41). ESS and nGER improved (p CPAP compliant patients. A minimum CPAP compliance of 25% was needed to achieve any benefit in nGER improvement. Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux is common among patients with OSA which increases sleep disruption and worsens the symptoms of daytime sleepiness. CPAP therapy may help improve the symptoms of both nocturnal acid reflux and daytime sleepiness, but adherence to CPAP is crucial to achieve this benefit. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  1. Correlation of Gastrophageal Reflux Disease symptoms with Body Mass Index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, S.; Haque, Israr U.; Tayyab, Ghias U.N.; Rehman, Ameed U.; Rehman, Adeel U.; Chaudhry, NusratU.

    2008-01-01

    Aim was to find a correlation between symptoms of gastrophageal refluxdisease (GERD) and body mass index (BMI). A total of 603 patients whopresented at Ghurki Trust Teaching Hospital and Surgimed Hospital Lahore withsymptoms of GERD, were included and interviewed according to a validated GERDquestionnaire. It included questions regarding GERD symptoms and theirseverity/frequency. Symptoms were defined: frequent if occurred daily;occasional if weekly and severe if they were sufficiently intense to changelife style. Height and weight were also recorded and their BMI calculated. Weused logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the associationbetween the presence of each specific GI symptom and BMI. The odds ratios(OR) for a given specific symptom and 95% confidence intervals (CI) werecomputed from the coefficients in logistic regression models. The prevalenceof obesity was 25.3%, while 38.1% were overweight. There was an increase inreporting of GI symptoms in obese individuals compared to those with normalBMI who were taken as reference group. Frequent nausea, vomiting, earlysatiety, epigastric pain, heart burn, regurgitation, postprandial fullnessand dysphagia were present in 10.4, 5.6, 8.9, 17.2, 10.2, 22.1, 23.5 and21.7%, respectively, of obese subjects compared to 7.9, 1.2, 6.5, 3.5, 4.4,17.1 and 16.6% of normal BMI subjects. BMI showed a positive relationshipwith frequent vomiting (P=0.02), epigastric pain (P=0.03), regurgitation offood (P=0.02) and postprandial fullness (0.01). The majority of GERD symptomshave a greater likelihood of occurring with increasing BMI. (author)

  2. Introduction into the NHS of magnetic sphincter augmentation: an innovative surgical therapy for reflux - results and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, D; Campbell, B; Wajed, S

    2018-04-01

    Introduction Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is a common, chronic debilitating condition. Surgical management traditionally involves fundoplication. Magnetic sphincter augmentation (MSA) is a new definitive treatment. We describe our experience of introducing this innovative therapy into NHS practice and report the early clinical outcomes. Methods MSA was introduced into NHS practice following successful acceptance of a cost-effective business plan and close observation of National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommendations for new procedures, including a carefully planned prospective data collection over a two-year follow-up period. Results Forty-seven patients underwent MSA over the 40-month period. Reflux health-related quality of life (GERD-HRQL) was significantly improved after the procedure and maintained at one- and two-year (P business plan and compliance with NICE recommendations.

  3. Mechanisms underlying reflux symptoms and dysphagia in patients with joint hypermobility syndrome, with and without postural tachycardia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikree, A; Aziz, Q; Sifrim, D

    2017-06-01

    The joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) is a common non-inflammatory connective tissue disorder which frequently co-exists with postural tachycardia syndrome (PoTS), a form of orthostatic intolerance. Gastrointestinal symptoms and dysmotility have been reported in PoTS. Dysphagia and reflux are common symptoms in JHS, yet no studies have examined the physiological mechanism for these, subdivided by PoTS status. Thirty patients (28 female, ages: 18-62) with JHS and symptoms of reflux (n=28) ± dysphagia (n=25), underwent high-resolution manometry and 24 hour pH-impedance monitoring after questionnaire-based symptom assessment. Esophageal physiology parameters were examined in JHS, subdivided by PoTS status. Fifty-three percent of JHS patients with reflux symptoms had pathological acid reflux, 21% had reflux hypersensitivity, and 25% had functional heartburn. Acid exposure was more likely to be increased in the recumbent than upright position (64% vs 43%). The prevalence of hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter (33%) and hiatus hernia (33%) was low. Forty percent of patients with dysphagia had minor disorders of motility, 60% had functional dysphagia. Eighteen (60%) patients had coexistent PoTS-they had significantly higher dysphagia (21 vs 11.5, P=.04) and reflux scores (24.5 vs 16.5, P=.05), and double the prevalence of pathological acid reflux (64% vs 36%, P=.1) and esophageal dysmotility (50% vs 25%, P=.2) though this was not significant. A large proportion of JHS patients with esophageal symptoms have true reflux-related symptoms or mild esophageal hypomotility, and this is more likely if they have PoTS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms before and after oral IQoro(R) training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägg, Mary; Tibbling, Lita; Franzén, Thomas

    2015-06-28

    To examine whether muscle training with an oral IQoro(R) screen (IQS) improves esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms. A total of 43 adult patients (21 women and 22 men) were consecutively referred to a swallowing center for the treatment and investigation of long-lasting nonstenotic esophageal dysphagia. Hiatal hernia was confirmed by radiologic examination in 21 patients before enrollment in the study (group A; median age 52 years, range: 19-85 years). No hiatal hernia was detected by radiologic examination in the remaining 22 patients (group B; median age 57 years, range: 22-85 years). Before and after training with an oral IQS for 6-8 mo, the patients were evaluated using a symptom questionnaire (esophageal dysphagia and acid chest symptoms; score 0-3), visual analogue scale (ability to swallow food: score 0-100), lip force test (≥ 15 N), velopharyngeal closure test (≥ 10 s), orofacial motor tests, and an oral sensory test. Another twelve patients (median age 53 years, range: 22-68 years) with hiatal hernia were evaluated using oral IQS traction maneuvers with pressure recordings of the upper esophageal sphincter and hiatus canal as assessed by high-resolution manometry. Esophageal dysphagia was present in all 43 patients at entry, and 98% of patients showed improvement after IQS training [mean score (range): 2.5 (1-3) vs 0.9 (0-2), P dysphagia and reflux symptoms in adults, likely due to improved hiatal competence.

  5. Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and effects of esomeprazole on the quality of life related to reflux and dyspepsia in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namikoshi, Tamehachi; Harada, Kazuhiro; Hatta, Hidekazu; Tokura, Takehiko; Oshiro, Yoshiyuki; Nishizaki, Tetsuichi; Obata, Takahiro; Mori, Masahiro; Fueki, Takaaki; Fujimoto, Sohachi; Haruna, Yoshisuke; Kuwabara, Atsunori; Yorimitsu, Daisuke; Ihoriya, Chieko; Kadoya, Hiroyuki; Itano, Seiji; Fujimoto, Yasuo; Komai, Norio; Sasaki, Tamaki; Kashihara, Naoki

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms has not been investigated in patients on maintenance hemodialysis in Japan, and few studies have reported the effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in hemodialysis patients with GERD symptoms. Here, we investigated the prevalence of GERD symptoms and the effects of the PPI esomeprazole on the quality of life related to reflux and dyspepsia in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. This was a cross-sectional/cohort study of hemodialysis outpatients implemented in 10 Japanese medical facilities from October 2012 to March 2014. The trial was registered in the UMIN Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN000009124). Forty-one of 385 patients (11%) reported GERD symptoms on the Global Overall Symptom (GOS) questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the independent prognostic factors for GERD symptoms as a history of gastric ulcer and use of sevelamer hydrochloride or calcium polystyrene sulfonate. Participants with GERD symptoms completed the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia, Japanese version (QOLRAD-J) questionnaire and were assigned to receive 4-week esomeprazole treatment (20 mg/day). This PPI therapy significantly improved all QOLRAD-J domains in the full analysis set (n = 28) and improved the GERD symptoms listed in the GOS questionnaire. Significantly impaired disease-specific quality of life (QOL) in the QOLRAD-J domains was observed in 44.4-74.1% of patients who had symptoms before treatment. The mean GOS and QOLRAD-J scores correlated significantly. Therapy with 20 mg/day esomeprazole appears to be efficacious for improving disease-specific QOL and GERD symptoms in Japanese patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

  6. Effect of azithromycin on acid reflux, hiatus hernia and proximal acid pocket in the postprandial period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohof, W O; Bennink, R J; de Ruigh, A A; Hirsch, D P; Zwinderman, A H; Boeckxstaens, G E

    2012-12-01

    The risk for acidic reflux is mainly determined by the position of the gastric acid pocket. It was hypothesised that compounds affecting proximal stomach tone might reduce gastro-oesophageal reflux by changing the acid pocket position. To study the effect of azithromycin (Azi) on acid pocket position and acid exposure in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). Nineteen patients with GORD were included, of whom seven had a large hiatal hernia (≥3 cm) (L-HH) and 12 had a small or no hiatal hernia (S-HH). Patients were randomised to Azi 250 mg/day or placebo during 3 days in a crossover manner. On each study day, reflux episodes were detected using concurrent high-resolution manometry and pH-impedance monitoring after a standardised meal. The acid pocket was visualised using scintigraphy, and its position was determined relative to the diaphragm. Azi reduced the number of acid reflux events (placebo 8.0±2.2 vs Azi 5.6±1.8, pacid exposure (placebo 10.5±3.8% vs Azi 5.9±2.5%, preflux episodes. Acid reflux occurred mainly when the acid pocket was located above, or at the level of, the diaphragm, rather than below the diaphragm. Treatment with Azi reduced hiatal hernia size and resulted in a more distal position of the acid pocket compared with placebo (below the diaphragm 39% vs 29%, p=0.03). Azi reduced the rate of acid reflux episodes in patients with S-HH (38% to 17%) to a greater extent than in patients with L-HH (69% to 62%, p=0.04). Azi reduces acid reflux episodes and oesophageal acid exposure. This effect was associated with a smaller hiatal hernia size and a more distal position of the acid pocket, further indicating the importance of the acid pocket in the pathogenesis of GORD. http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=1970 NTR1970.

  7. Cine-oeso-gastro-scintigraphy (COGS) and gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR): a 15-year experience; Cine-oesogastroscintigraphie et reflux gastro-oesophagien de l`enfant: 15 ans d`experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillet, J.; Role, C.; Joussein, M.

    1996-12-31

    Eight thousand COGS were performed, searching for, quantifying and visualizing GOR, and possibly associated oesophageal dismotility or gastric emptying disorders in neonates (15 %), infants (33 %), children 1-4 (20%), 4-8 (20%) and 8-16 years old (14%). Indications were medical or surgical, to diagnoses, assess or follow up GOR with or without treatment. GOR was discovered in 65 % of the cases. A respiratory contamination by GOR aspiration was visualized in 4 % of patients with recurrent respiratory diseases, or near miss from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Pathological patterns of gastric emptying in SIDS are emphasized. Oesophageal motility dysfunctions, primary or related to oesophagitis, are visualized and quantified by scintigraphic imaging. PH-metry and scintigraphy accuracies and their relative positions are discussed. (authors). 117 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Evaluation of 18F-fluorothymidine positron emission tomography ([18F]FLT-PET/CT) methodology in assessing early response to chemotherapy in patients with gastro-oesophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R; Mapelli, P; Hanna, G B; Goldin, R; Power, D; Al-Nahhas, A; Merchant, S; Ramaswami, R; Challapalli, A; Barwick, T; Aboagye, E O

    2016-12-01

    3'-Deoxy-3'-[ 18 F]fluorothymidine ([ 18 F]FLT) PET has limited utility in abdominal imaging due to high physiological hepatic uptake of a tracer. We evaluated [ 18 F]FLT-PET/CT combined with a temporal-intensity information-based voxel-clustering approach termed kinetic spatial filtering (KSF) to improve tumour visualisation in patients with locally advanced and metastatic gastro-oesophageal cancer and as a marker of early response to chemotherapy. Dynamic [ 18 F]FLT-PET/CT data were collected before and 3 weeks post first cycle of chemotherapy. Changes in tumour [ 18 F]FLT-PET/CT variables were determined. Response was determined on contrast-enhanced CT after three cycles of therapy using RECIST 1.1. Ten patients were included. Following application of the KSF, visual distinction of all oesophageal and/or gastric tumours was observed in [ 18 F]FLT-PET images. Among the nine patients available for response evaluation (RECIST 1.1), three patients had responded (partial response) and six patients were non-responders (stable disease). There was a significant association between Ki-67 and all baseline [ 18 F]FLT-PET parameters. Area under the curve (AUC) from 0 to 1 min was associated with treatment response. The results of this study indicate that application of the KSF allowed accurate visualisation of both primary and metastatic lesions following imaging with the proliferation marker, [ 18 F]FLT-PET/CT. However, [ 18 F]FLT-PET uptake parameters did not correlate with response. Instead, we observe significant changes in tracer delivery following chemotherapy suggesting that further [ 18 F]FLT-PET/CT studies in this tumour type should be undertaken with caution.

  9. The Relationship of the Post-reflux Swallow-induced Peristaltic Wave Index and Esophageal Baseline Impedance with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Kyu; Lee, Joon Seong; Lee, Tae Hee; Hong, Su Jin; Park, Sang Joon; Jeon, Seong Ran; Kim, Hyun Gun; Kim, Jin-Oh

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims The post-reflux swallow-induced peristaltic wave (PSPW) index and esophageal baseline impedance (BI) are novel impedance parameters used to evaluate esophageal chemical clearance and mucosal integrity. However, their relationship with reflux symptoms is not known. We aim to evaluate the correlations of PSPW index and esophageal BI with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms. Methods We performed a retrospective review of multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH (MII-pH) tracings in patients with suspected GERD. Reflux symptoms were also analyzed from checklists using ordinal scales. The PSPW index and esophageal BIs in 6 spots (z1–z6) were measured. Bivariate (Spearman) correlation was used to analyze the relationship between the PSPW index or esophageal BI, and the degree of GERD symptoms measured. Results The MII-pH records of 143 patients were analyzed. The PSPW index was significantly lower in patients who had heartburn and negatively correlated with the degree of heartburn (r = −0.186, P < 0.05). On the contrary, the PSPW index was not significantly correlated with the degree of dysphagia (r = −0.013, P = 0.874). Distal esophageal BI was not significantly correlated with heartburn, but negatively correlated with the degree of dysphagia (z3: r = −0.328, z4: r = −0.361, z5: r = −0.316, z6: r = −0.273; P < 0.05). Conclusions These findings suggest that delayed chemical clearance of the esophagus may induce heartburn, but that it is not related to dysphagia. However, a lack of esophageal mucosal integrity may be related to dysphagia. PMID:28044052

  10. Incidence of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in patients with refractory chronic sinusitis upon clinical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira, Marcela Schmidt B. de

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS is a pathology that has structural and histological alterations. The association between CRS and the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has been widely discussed in the last years. For this relationship to be confirmed, it is necessary to find evidences that the patients with CRS present a major incidence of GERD, that the physiopathology of both diseases explains the association between them and that the GERD treatment cures or improves the CRS' symptoms. Objectives: To evaluate the incidence of GERD in patients with CRS and a level of improvement of the nasosinusal disease symptoms after treatment with protons pump inhibitors. Methods: Retrospective study with 30 patients with CRS refractory to the clinical treatment and/or nasal cavity polypoid pathology with indication of the paranasal sinuses functional endoscopic surgery. We applied a questionnaire for evaluation of the symptomatology and previous treatment for gastroesophageal reflux. The data were submitted to statistical analysis by the Chi-Square test or Fisher's exact test with a significance of 5%. Results: Out of the patients with GERD, 33% had an improvement of the CRS' symptomatology with medications for treatment of the gastric pathology. Conclusion: It is not possible yet to state that the GER is a factor responsible for the CRS and it must be researched as a cofactor or eliciting factor when there is not other evident etiology. However, there are plausible biological mechanisms for such association.

  11. Gastroesophageal reflux and upper gastrointestinal tract disorders in children with persistent or recurrent respiratory symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urioste, A.; Orellana, P.; Harris, P.; Sanchez, I.; Holgren, N.

    2002-01-01

    Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER) and gastrointestinal (GI) dismotility disorders, can coexist in children with persistent and/or recurrent bronchopulmonary symptoms(RBPS) condition that eventually improve or disappear after the treatment of these GI disorders The goal of this study was to evaluated the presence of GER, abnormal esophageal transit, swallowing disorders and lung aspiration in children with RBPS. We performed standard scintigraphic gastrointestinal procedures in 67 children.; 36 boys, with a mean age of 1.75 yrs. (10 days-15 yrs),all of them presented with RBPS, 21 of them associated with GI symptoms and 20 with neurological symptoms. Thirty four out of 67 children (50.74%) had an abnormal scintigraphic finding; single or combined. Swallowing abnormalities was observed in 11 (16.4%), esophageal transit abnormalities was observed in 16 (23.9%), GER in 9 (13.4%) and lung aspiration in 6 (8.95%). 10 children had more than one abnormalities (14.9%). Among the 20 children with neurological symptoms, 75% had an abnormal scintigraphic study versus the 40.4% of children without neurological symptoms. In children with RBPS, abnormalities of gastrointestinal tract is not uncommon; 50.74% in our group, specially in children with neurological symptoms (75%). Scintigraphic procedure is a safe, sensible and non invasive technique that allows the simultaneous evaluation of different parameters of the gastrointestinal motility, in order to detect abnormalities that could explain the clinical features in children with RBPS

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmud, L.S.; Vitti, R.A.; Fisher, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with detection and quantification of gastroesophageal reflux. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) generally refers to a symptom complex consisting of heartburn, regurgitation, and chest pain, the latter of which is often confused with pain of cardiac origin. Gastroesophageal reflux occurs when gastric or duodenal contents enter the esophagus. This phenomenon of symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux has been attributed to a variety of anatomic abnormalities, including loss of the acute cardioesophageal Angle of Hiss, widening of the diaphragmatic hiatus, loss of a normal gastric rosette formed by apposition of the gastric mucosal folds, disruption of the phrenoesophageal ligament, and conversion of the distal paraesophageal pressure from an intra-abdominal to an intrathoracic level. Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) dysfunction has been suggested as a major determinant of gastroesophageal competence. Quantitative scintigraphic studies of gastroesophageal reflux suggest that the LES pressure is the important determinant of gastroesophageal reflux, although some investigators have failed to confirm this role of the LES in gastroesophageal competence

  13. Abnormal Gastroesophageal Flap Valve Is Associated With High Gastresophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire Score and the Severity of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Vietnamese Patients With Upper Gastrointestinal Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Duc T; Nguyen, Trang T; Hiyama, Toru

    2018-04-30

    There have been no studies investigating the distribution of abnormal gastroesophageal flap valve (GEFV) among patients with dyspepsia, non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), and reflux esophagitis (RE) in the same set of patients. The aims of this study are to investigate (1) the association between GEFV and gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire (GERDQ) score, and (2) the distribution of abnormal GEFV in Vietnamese patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Three hundred and thirty-one patients recruited in this prospective cross-sectional study were classified into 3 groups: reflux esophagitis (RE), non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) (GERDQ score ≥ 8, no endoscopic mucosal injury), and dyspepsia (GERDQ score < 8, no endoscopic mucosal injury). The GEFV was graded endoscopically according to the Hill classification. GEFV grades I and II were regarded as normal, while grades III and IV were regarded as abnormal GEFV. There were 215 (65.0%) patients with dyspepsia, 55 (16.6%) patients with NERD, and 61 (18.4%) patients with RE. Abnormal GEFV was an independent risk factor for GERD (OR, 2.93; CI 95%, 1.76-4.88) and RE (OR, 3.41; CI 95%, 1.78-6.53). The mean GERDQ score of patients with abnormal GEFV was significantly higher than that of patients with normal GEFV (5.7 ± 2.4 vs 4.9 ± 2.7, P = 0.011). The prevalence of abnormal GEFV gradually increased in patients with dyspepsia (27.4%), NERD (43.6%), grade A RE (56.8%), and grades B/C RE (80.0%) ( P < 0.001). Abnormal GEFV was significantly associated with high GERDQ score. Its prevalence gradually increased in patients with dyspepsia, NERD, and RE, respectively.

  14. Association of problem behavior with sleep problems and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Katsuyoshi; Yagi, Takakazu; Maeda, Aya; Nagayama, Kunihiro; Uehara, Sawako; Saito-Sakoguchi, Yoko; Kanematsu, Kyoko; Miyawaki, Shouichi

    2014-02-01

    There are few large-scale epidemiologic studies examining the associations between sleep problems, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms, lifestyle and food habits and problem behaviors (PB) in adolescents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations among these factors in Japanese adolescents. A cross-sectional survey of 1840 junior high school students was carried out using questionnaires. The subjects were classified into PB or normal behavior (NB) groups using the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC). The scores of the sleep-related factors, sleep bruxism, lifestyle and food habits, and GERD symptoms were compared. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors related to PB. Mean subject age was 13.3 ± 1.8 years. The PB group had significantly longer sleep latency and higher GERD symptom score (P sleep bruxism, difficulty falling asleep within 30 min, nightmares, feeling of low sleep quality, daytime somnolence, and daytime lack of motivation. Feelings of low sleep quality had the strongest association with PB, with an adjusted odds ratio of 12.88 (95% confidence interval: 8.99-18.46). PB in adolescents are associated with sleep problems, including sleep bruxism, as well as lifestyle and food habits and GERD symptoms. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  15. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in a Danish population: a prospective follow-up analysis of symptoms, quality of life, and health-care use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jane Møller; Wildner-Christensen, Mette; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS) in the population is high; however, data on long-term follow-up and incidence of GERS in the population are sparse. This study describes the long-term natural history of GERS, the related health-care use, and quality of life...... Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS)), and quality of life (the Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36)) at inclusion and after 5 years. GERS was defined as a mean score > or =2 in the reflux dimension in the GSRS. Information on use of health-care resources was drawn from the questionnaires and registers...

  16. A New Algorithm to Reduce the Incidence of Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms after Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ece, Ilhan; Yilmaz, Huseyin; Acar, Fahrettin; Colak, Bayram; Yormaz, Serdar; Sahin, Mustafa

    2017-06-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is one of the most prefered treatment option for morbid obesity. However, the effects of LSG on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are controversial. Asymptomatic GERD and hiatal hernia (HH) is common in obese patients. Therefore, it is important to identify the high risk patients prior to surgery. This study aims to evaluate efficacy of cruroplasty for HH during LSG in morbidly obese patients using ambulatory pH monitoring (APM) results, and to investigate the patients' selection criteria for this procedure. This retrospective study includes outcomes of 59 patients who underwent LSG and HH repair according to our patient selection algorithm. Outcomes included preoperative GERD Health-Related Quality of Life (GERD-HRQL) questionnaire, APM results, percentage of postoperative excess weight loss, and total weight loss. For a total of 402 patients, APM was applied in 70 patients who had a positive score of GERD-HRQL, and 59 patients underwent LSG and concomitant HH repair who had a DeMeester score of 14.7% or above. There was no statistically significant difference in weight loss at 6 and 12-month follow-up. Two patients (3.3%) had symptoms of GERD at 12 months postoperatively, and only one (1.6%) patient required treatment of proton pump inhibitor for reflux. In the total cohort, 11 (2.7%) patients also evolved de novo GERD symptoms. This study confirm that careful attention to patient selection and surgical technique can reduce the symptoms of GERD at short-term. Routine bilateral crus exploration could be a major risk factor of postoperative GERD.

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in patients with celiac disease and the effects of a gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachman, Fabio; Vázquez, Horacio; González, Andrea; Andrenacci, Paola; Compagni, Liliana; Reyes, Hugo; Sugai, Emilia; Moreno, María Laura; Smecuol, Edgardo; Hwang, Hui Jer; Sánchez, Inés Pinto; Mauriño, Eduardo; Bai, Julio César

    2011-03-01

    Celiac disease (CD) patients often complain of symptoms consistent with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We aimed to assess the prevalence of GERD symptoms at diagnosis and to determine the impact of the gluten-free diet (GFD). We evaluated 133 adult CD patients at diagnosis and 70 healthy controls. Fifty-three patients completed questionnaires every 3 months during the first year and more than 4 years after diagnosis. GERD symptoms were evaluated using a subdimension of the Gastrointestinal Symptoms Rating Scale for heartburn and regurgitation domains. At diagnosis, celiac patients had a significantly higher reflux symptom mean score than healthy controls (P 3) compared with 5.7% of controls (P symptoms were significantly associated with the classical clinical presentation of CD (35.0%) compared with atypical/silent cases (15.2%; P symptoms are common in classically symptomatic untreated CD patients. The GFD is associated with a rapid and persistent improvement in reflux symptoms that resembles the healthy population. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanisms of Reflux Perception in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, Albert J.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with reflux symptoms often do not have excessive esophageal acid exposure, and patients with severe gastroesophageal reflux often do not have reflux symptoms. Understanding why different types of reflux induce symptoms in different patients is vital for addressing therapeutic gaps in the

  19. Incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and positive maxillary antral cultures in children with symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nation, Javan; Kaufman, Michael; Allen, Meredith; Sheyn, Anthony; Coticchia, James

    2014-02-01

    Studies have shown that gastroesophageal reflux disease occurs more frequently than expected in children with chronic rhinosinusitis. The objective of this study is to further understand the relationship of pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with symptoms of rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, and chronic cough. A retrospective chart review of 63 children, ages 6 months to 10 years old with rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, and chronic cough. The patients underwent maxillary cultures, adenoidectomy, and distal third esophageal biopsies. Children with esophageal biopsies showing esophagitis were classified as positive for gastroesophageal reflux disease, and maxillary antral swabs growing a high density of bacteria were classified as positive for chronic rhinosinusitis. Six months to 5 years old children (n=43), 6 (14%) had simultaneous positive maxillary antral cultures and positive esophageal biopsies, 11 (26%) had positive esophageal biopsies alone, 23 (53%) had positive maxillary antral cultures alone, and 3 (7%) had neither. Six to 10 years old children (n=20), 9 (45%) had simultaneous positive maxillary antral cultures and positive esophageal biopsies, 1 (5%) patient had positive esophageal biopsies alone, 3 (15%) patients had positive maxillary antral cultures alone, and 7 (35%) patients had neither. Twenty-seven (42%) of the patients from the whole study had gastroesophageal reflux positive biopsies. The younger children were statistically likely to have chronic rhinosinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease independently of each other (p=0.0002). A direct group comparison found the younger group to have independent chronic rhinosinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease and the older group to have simultaneous chronic rhinosinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (p=0.0006). In children with the presenting symptoms of rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, and chronic cough, younger children tend to have either chronic

  20. Alginate antacid (Gaviscon DA) chewable tablets reduce esophageal acid exposure in Chinese patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and heartburn symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yao Zong; Fang, Jing Yuan; Zou, Duo Wu; Levinson, Nigel; Jenner, Bartosz; Wilkinson, Joanne

    2016-11-01

    To assess the efficacy of Gaviscon Double Action (DA) alginate antacid chewable tablets for reducing esophageal acid exposure in Chinese patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Altogether 44 patients reporting moderate to severe heartburn symptoms underwent two pH monitoring visits. The treatment sequence was randomized to patients received DA alginate antacid or placebo at one visit and the alternate treatment 7 days later. After a standardized reflux-provoking meal, patients took four tablets of DA alginate antacid or placebo. Esophageal pH was measured for 4 h post-dosing using an electrode positioned 5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. The primary end-point was the percentage of 4-h post-dosing period with pH acid reflux episodes (pH reflux time and DeMeester scores. All 44 patients completed the study and provided data for analysis. With DA alginate antacid, the mean percentage time with pH acid exposure without serious clinically relevant health risks. These findings suggest DA alginate antacid tablets are appropriate for treating acid reflux in Chinese GERD patients with heartburn symptoms. © 2016 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms on the quality of life in pregnant women: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fill Malfertheiner, Sara; Seelbach-Göbel, Birgit; Costa, Serban-Dan; Ernst, Wolfgang; Reuschel, Edith; Zeman, Florian; Malfertheiner, Peter; Malfertheiner, Maximilian V

    2017-08-01

    Pregnant women often suffer from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). GERD symptoms are known to influence the quality of life; however, there is a lack of data in pregnant women. The aim of this study was to establish the impact of GERD symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) during pregnancy. A prospective longitudinal cohort study to investigate the impact of GERD symptoms on the HRQOL was carried out in 510 pregnant women and 330 nonpregnant women as controls. Two validated questionnaires, the Reflux Disease Questionnaire and the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia Questionnaire, were used. The study showed a significant negative impact on HRQOL in pregnant women with GERD symptoms. All five areas, emotional distress, sleep disturbance, vitality, food/drink problems, and physical/social functioning, were significantly reduced, but the most significant impact was on sleep (Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia Questionnaire score -35%). Overall, quality of life in women with GERD worsened throughout pregnancy. GERD is frequently seen in pregnant women and has a negative impact on HRQOL, especially in late pregnancy. Therefore, there is a need for adequate therapy of GERD in pregnant women and HRQOL could be an adequate monitoring tool in this population.

  2. Pathophysiology and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, W. O. A.; Hirsch, D. P.; Boeckxstaens, G. E. E.

    2009-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is a physiological phenomenon but becomes pathological if troublesome symptoms and/or complications occur. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has different phenotypes ranging from non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), through reflux esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus, and

  3. Should Helicobacter pylori be eradicated before starting long-term proton pump inhibitors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rauws, E. A.

    1997-01-01

    Symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is a common disorder characterized by pathological exposure of the distal oesophagus to acid. The management requires the control of symptoms, prevention of relapse and complications. Proton pump inhibitors are without doubt the most effective agents in

  4. Prevalence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease in patients with difficult to control asthma and effect of proton pump inhibitor therapy on asthma symptoms, reflux symptoms, pulmonary function and requirement for asthma medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandur, V; Murugesh, M; Banait, V; Rathi, P M; Bhatia, S J; Joshi, J M; Kate, A

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis that GER can trigger or exacerbate asthma is supported by several clinical trials that have shown amelioration in asthma symptoms and/or an improvement in pulmonary function after antireflux therapy. To investigate the prevalence of GER in patients with difficult to control asthma and to determine the effect of omeprazole on asthma symptoms, reflux symptoms, pulmonary function and on the requirement of asthma medications. Patients with difficult to control asthma were recruited into the study. All patients underwent esophageal manometry and 24 hour esophageal pH monitoring. Pulmonary function tests were done before and after treatment. The severity of asthma and reflux was assessed by a 1 week pulmonary symptom score(PSS) and reflux symptom score(RSS) respectively before and after treatment. Those who had an abnormal pH study (pH 5% of the time) underwent anti-GER treatment with lifestyle changes, and a proton pump inhibitor (omeprazole 40 mg, bid) for 3 months. Asthma medications were added or deleted based on severity of asthma. Out of 250 asthmatic patients screened, forty patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Twenty eight of 40 patients(70%) were diagnosed to have GERD. Of the patients 28 with GER, 8 patients(28.5%) had no reflux symptoms. On 24 hr pH metry, the percentage time pH reflux symptom score(RSS) improved from 22.39 ± 14.99 to 1.04 ± 1.07, pulmonary symptom score(PSS) improved from 27.14 ± 7.49 to 13.82 ± 4.21 and night time asthma symptom score(NASS) improved from 6.71 ± 1.80 to 3.04 ± 1.23 (p-value <0.0001). After treatment, FEV1 and PEFR increased from 1.38 ± 0.57 and 4.14 ± 1.97 to 1.47 ± 0.54 and 5.56 ± 1.72, respectively (p-value 0.00114). PPI therapy improves nocturnal asthma symptoms, daytime asthma symptoms, pulmonary function and decreases requirement of asthma medications in these patients.

  5. A study of pathophysiological factors associated with gastro-esophageal reflux disease in twins discordant for gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovino, P; Mohammed, I; Anggiansah, A; Anggiansah, R; Cherkas, L F; Spector, T D; Trudgill, N J

    2013-08-01

    Differences in lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and peristaltic function and in transient LES relaxations (TLESR) have been described in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, some of these differences may be the result of chronic GERD rather than being an underlying contributory factor. Twins discordant for GERD symptoms, i.e., only one twin had GERD symptoms, underwent standard LES and esophageal body manometry, and then using a sleeve sensor prolonged LES and pH monitoring, 30 min before and 60 min after a 250 mL 1200 kcal lipid meal. Eight monozygotic and 24 dizygotic female twins were studied. Although there was no difference in preprandial LES pressure (symptomatic 13.2 ± 7.1 mmHg vs asymptomatic 15.1 ± 6.2 mmHg, P = 0.4), LES pressure fell further postprandially in symptomatic twins (LES pressure area under the curve 465 ± 126 vs 331 ± 141 mmHg h, P reflux episodes in symptomatic twins occurred due to low LES pressure or deep inspiration/strain and 0/17 in asymptomatic twins (P = 0.01). There was no difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic twins in: peristaltic amplitude, ineffective esophageal body motility, hiatus hernia prevalence, or LES length. There was also no difference in TLESR frequency preprandially (symptomatic median 1(range 0-2) vs asymptomatic 0(0-2), P = 0.08) or postprandially (2.5(1-8) vs 3(1-6), P = 0.81). Twins with GERD symptoms had lower postprandial LES pressure and given the close genetic link between the twins, it is possible that such differences are caused by GERD. Acid reflux episodes associated with a hypotensive LES were seen in symptomatic, but not in asymptomatic twins. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Effect of proton-pump inhibitor treatment on symptoms and quality of life in GERD patients depends on the symptom-reflux association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, Marissa C.; Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Numans, Mattijs E.; de Wit, Niek J.; Samsom, Melvin; Smout, Andre J. P. M.

    2008-01-01

    Backgound: Gastroesophageal reflux disease patients demonstrate various pathophysiologic backgrounds. Therefore, a heterogeneous response to proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment can be expected. We investigated the effect of short-term PPI treatment on symptoms and quality of life (QOL) in primary

  7. Use of acid-suppressive therapy before anti-reflux surgery in 2922 patients: a nationwide register-based study in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lødrup, A; Pottegård, A; Hallas, J; Bytzer, P

    2015-07-01

    Guidelines recommend that patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease are adequately treated with acid-suppressive therapy before undergoing anti-reflux surgery. Little is known of the use of acid-suppressive drugs before anti-reflux surgery. To determine the use of proton pump inhibitors and H2 -receptor antagonists in the year before anti-reflux surgery. A nationwide retrospective study of all patients aged ≥18 undergoing first-time anti-reflux surgery in Denmark during 2000-2012 using data from three different sources: the Danish National Register of Patients, the Danish National Prescription Register, and the Danish Person Register. The study population thus included 2922 patients (median age: 48 years, 55.7% male). The annual proportion of patients redeeming ≥180 DDD of acid-suppressive therapy increased from 17.0% 5 years before anti-reflux surgery to 64.9% 1 year before. The probability for inadequate dosing 1 year before surgery (reflux surgery, as a high proportion of patients receive inadequate dosing of acid-suppressive therapy prior to the operation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Does treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux disease with omeprazole decrease allergic rhinitis symptoms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Shirkani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Allergic rhinitis is the most common type of allergic disease among population. Its accurate treatment is very important for cutting of allergic march. On the other hand, gasteroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is one of the most common gastrointestinal problems among allergic patients mainly asthmatic cases. It might conflict treatment. Despite of asthma, a few studies have been conducted on the impact of GERD treatment on allergic rhinitis symptoms. In this study, we assessed GERD treatment and its effects on improving of allergic rhinitis patients with GERD. Materials and Methods: In a prospective cross-sectional study, March - September 2012, 103 consecutive patients with persistent moderate to severe seasonal allergic rhinitis enrolled. For allergic rhinitis patients with GERD 20 mg omeperazole once daily for 6 weeks prescribed, empirically. Conventional allergy treatment continued and finally the allergic rhinitis symptoms were assessed clinically and recorded before, 5th, 10th and 30th days of omeprazole treatment period. Results: Our study included 103 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis who were divided into GERD (n=33, 38% and non-GERD (n=70, 68% groups with the mean age 28 and 25.7 years, respectively. The first group developed significant improvement for GERD symptoms on days 5, 10 and 30 after beginning of therapy (P=0.03. No association was found between GERD treatment and relief of allergic symptoms or TNSS improvement (P>0.05. Data analyzed by Epi info (ver 7 and SPSS software (ver 11.5, and by Chi squeare test and paired T test. P lower than 0.05 was considered as significant. Conclusion: This study showed no significant association between empirical treatment of GERD and improvement of allergic symptoms in patients with allergic rhinitis. However, further studies with a larger sample size might be needed.

  9. Fiber-enriched diet helps to control symptoms and improves esophageal motility in patients with non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Sergey; Isakov, Vasily; Konovalova, Mariya

    2018-06-07

    To investigate the effect of dietary fiber on symptoms and esophageal function testing parameters in non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (NERD) patients. Thirty-six NERD patients with low (gastroesophageal refluxes (GER) decreased from 67.9 ± 17.7 to 42.4 ± 13.5 ( P reflux time decreased from 10.6 ± 12.0 min to 5.3 ± 3.7 min ( P gastroesophageal refluxes, and a decrease of heartburn frequency per week in NERD.

  10. Exacerbations of COPD and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Mamoru Sakae

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between gastroesophageal reflux (GER and COPD exacerbations. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of various electronic databases for articles published up through December of 2012. Studies considered eligible for inclusion were those dealing with COPD, COPD exacerbations, and GER; comparing at least two groups (COPD vs. controls or GER vs. controls; and describing relative risks (RRs and prevalence ratios-or ORs and their respective 95% CIs (or presenting enough data to allow further calculations for the association between GER and COPD-as well as exacerbation rates. Using a standardized form, we extracted data related to the study design; criteria for GER diagnosis; age, gender, and number of participants; randomization method; severity scores; methods of evaluating GER symptoms; criteria for defining exacerbations; exacerbation rates (hospitalizations, ER visits, unscheduled clinic visits, prednisone use, and antibiotic use; GER symptoms in COPD group vs. controls; mean number of COPD exacerbations (with symptoms vs. without symptoms; annual frequency of exacerbations; GER treatment; and severity of airflow obstruction. RESULTS: Overall, GER was clearly identified as a risk factor for COPD exacerbations (RR = 7.57; 95% CI: 3.84-14.94, with an increased mean number of exacerbations per year (mean difference: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.22-1.36. The prevalence of GER was significantly higher in patients with COPD than in those without (RR = 13.06; 95% CI: 3.64-46.87; p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: GER is a risk factor for COPD exacerbations. The role of GER in COPD management should be studied in greater detail.

  11. Decline in perception of acid regurgitation symptoms from gastroesophageal reflux disease in diabetes mellitus patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Sakitani

    Full Text Available To determine if a discrepancy exists between subjective symptoms and the grade of endoscopic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in diabetes mellitus (DM patients.All 2,884 patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy completed the modified Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS, an interview-based rating scale consisting of 16 items including a question on acid regurgitation. Patients were divided into DM and non-DM groups (1,135 and 1,749 patients, respectively. GERD was diagnosed endoscopically and graded according to the Los Angeles classification. Grade B or more severe GERD was defined as severe endoscopic GERD. The intergroup GSRS score was compared statistically.In severe endoscopic GERD patients, the prevalence of patients with a positive GSRS score in the acid regurgitation question was statistically lower in DM patients than non-DM patients. Of the 60 non-DM patients with severe endoscopic GERD, 40 patients (67% had a positive GSRS score for acid regurgitation; however, of the 51 DM patients with severe endoscopic GERD, 23 patients (45% had a positive GSRS score. Multivariate analysis showed that severe endoscopic GERD (OR: 2.01; 95% CI: 1.21-3.33; p = 0.0066, non-DM (OR: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.54-0.94; p = 0.0157, younger age (OR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.97-0.99; p = 0.0125, and hiatal hernia (OR: 1.46; 95% CI: 1.12-1.90; p = 0.0042 were associated with acid regurgitation symptoms.There is a discrepancy between subjective symptoms and endoscopic GERD grade in DM patients. The ability of DM patients to feel acid regurgitation may be decreased.

  12. Nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease and mild degree of esophagitis: Comparison of symptoms endoscopic, manometric and pH-metric patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grande Michele

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our aim in the present study was to compare patients presenting with gastroesophageal reflux disease in the presence or absence of mild-grade esophagitis (grade I or II according to the Savary-Miller classification. Methods Between 2005 and 2007, 215 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (67 with reflux associated with grade I or II esophagitis and 148 without esophagitis were evaluated at the Department of Surgery, University Hospital Tor Vergata, Rome, and were included in the present study. The evaluations consisted of clinical interviews, endoscopy of the high digestive tract, esophageal manometry and pH monitoring. Results There was no significant difference between the two groups with regard to age, sex or symptoms. The incidence of heartburn associated with noncardiac chest pain was greater in the esophagitis group than in the dysphagia group. The incidence of hiatal hernia was similar in both groups. Although the motor pattern was similar in both groups, the length of the abdominal esophagus was greater in patients without esophagitis (1.6 cm vs 1.1 cm; P  Conclusions Gastroesophageal reflux without esophagitis must be regarded not as a milder form of the disease but as part of a single disease. Furthermore, these patients often demonstrate lower rates of symptom improvement after antireflux treatment in comparison with patients with erosive esophagitis. Therefore, further trials to assess the treatment algorithm for these patients are warranted.

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux disease as an etiology of sleep disturbance in subjects with insomnia and minimal reflux symptoms: a pilot study of prevalence and response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Nicholas J; Madanick, Ryan D; Alattar, Maha; Morgan, Douglas R; Davis, Paris H; Galanko, Joseph A; Spacek, Melissa B; Vaughn, Bradley V

    2008-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a well-recognized cause of impaired sleep in patients with frequent GERD symptoms, as well as those with sleep apnea. GERD's role in sleep disturbance of minimally symptomatic patients with poor sleep quality is less clear. We aimed to define the prevalence of GERD-related sleep disturbance in minimally-symptomatic subjects with demonstrated insomnia, and to assess the changes in sleep efficiency in these subjects after vigorous acid suppression. We recruited subjects aged 18-75 years reporting at least 6 months of insomnia, and sleep difficulty at least three nights per week. Subjects with a BMI > 30, a history of snoring or ongoing use of proton pump inhibitor or H2 receptor antagonist were excluded. Subjects underwent concurrent sleep study with dual channel 24-h pH study. Sleep efficiency, defined as the percentage of time after sleep initiation that the subject actually slept, and spontaneous arousal index, defined as the number of arousals per hour, were calculated. Those with a sleep study demonstrating poor sleep quality (sleep efficiency of 10 arousals/h for those aged 15 for those who were 45 or older) and no obstructive sleep apnea were treated with rabeprazole 20 mg PO BID x 14 days. After 14 days, the subjects underwent repeat sleep study with pH monitoring. The GERD Symptom Assessment Scale (GSAS), the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ) were administered to subjects at study inception and after 2 weeks of therapy. Twenty-four subjects reporting insomnia were enrolled, and 20 met criteria for disordered sleep and no OSA. Seventeen completed both the first and second studies, and 16 were adequate for analysis. Baseline GSAS demonstrated trivial or no reflux symptoms in the cohort (no subject scored > 8 out of 45 on GSAS, corresponding to a median rating of reflux symptoms of "not at all"). Four of 16 subjects (25%) demonstrated abnormal pH studies at baseline

  14. Efficacy of a potassium-competitive acid blocker for improving symptoms in patients with reflux esophagitis, non-erosive reflux disease, and functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaoka, Daisuke; Nagahara, Akihito; Hojo, Mariko; Matsumoto, Kenshi; Ueyama, Hiroya; Matsumoto, Kohei; Izumi, Kentaro; Takeda, Tsutomu; Komori, Hiroyuki; Akazawa, Yoichi; Shimada, Yuji; Osada, Taro; Watanabe, Sumio

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of a potassium-competitive acid blocker (PCAB) named vonoprazan (VPZ) for improving symptoms in patients with reflux esophagitis (RE), non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), and functional dyspepsia (FD). A hospital-based, retrospective study of outpatients in our department (Department of Gastroenterology, University of Juntendo, Tokyo, Japan) between March 2015 and August 2016 was performed. The patients who were experiencing heartburn, acid regurgitation, gastric pain, and/or a heavy feeling in the stomach of at least moderate severity at baseline were treated with 20 mg VPZ once daily for 4 weeks. The patients completed the global overall symptom (GOS) scale to determine their symptom severity at baseline and after the 4 week treatment period. The proportions of patients with RE, NERD, and FD achieving improvement of their symptoms, defined as a GOS scale score of 1 ('no problem') or 2 ('minimal problem'), were evaluated. During 4 weeks of VPZ therapy, changes in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) score, which was defined as the total points for heartburn and acid regurgitation on the GOS scale in patients with RE and NERD, and in the FD score, which was defined as the total points for gastric pain and a heavy feeling in the stomach on the GOS scale in patients with FD, were also evaluated. A total of 88 eligible cases were included in the present study, comprising 20 patients with RE, 25 patients with NERD, and 43 patients with FD. The rates of symptomatic improvement in patients with RE, NERD, and FD were 75.0, 60.0, and 48.8%, respectively. For the patients who were first administered VPZ, the rates of symptomatic improvement were 90.9, 66.7, and 58.8% in patients with RE, NERD, and FD, respectively. For those patients who were resistant to 8 weeks of proton pump inhibitor therapy, the rates of symptomatic improvement were 55.6, 53.8, and 42.3% in patients with RE, NERD, and FD, respectively

  15. Symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux in severely mentally retarded people: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Bos, J.; Niezen-de Boer, M.C.; Böhmer, C.J.M.; Francke, A.L.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs when stomach acid frequently backs up (or refluxes) into the gullet (or esophagus), and it has serious consequences for the quality of life. Usually this is felt as heartburn. Because severely mentally retarded people usually do not utter

  16. Typical and atypical symptoms of gastro esophageal reflux disease: Does Helicobacter pylori infection matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, Laurino; Ciccaglione, Antonio Francesco; Marzio, Leonardo

    2015-11-06

    To analyze whether the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could affect the quality of symptoms in gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients. one hundred and forty-four consecutive patients referred to our Unit for suspected GERD were recruited for the study. All patients underwent esophageal pH-metric recording. For those with a positive test, C13 urea breath test was then performed to assess the H. pylori status. GERD patients were stratified according to the quality of their symptoms and classified as typical, if affected by heartburn and regurgitation, and atypical if complaining of chest pain, respiratory and ears, nose, and throat features. H. pylori-negative patients were also asked whether they had a previous diagnosis of H. pylori infection. If a positive response was given, on the basis of the time period after successful eradication, patients were considered as "eradicated" (E) if H. pylori eradication occurred more than six months earlier or "recently eradicated" if the therapy had been administered within the last six months. Patients without history of infection were identified as "negative" (N). χ (2) test was performed by combining the clinical aspects with the H. pylori status. one hundred and twenty-nine of the 144 patients, including 44 H. pylori-positive and 85 H. pylori-negative (41 negative, 21 recently eradicated, 23 eradicated more than 6 mo before), were eligible for the analysis. No difference has been found between H. pylori status and either the number of reflux episodes (138 ± 23 vs 146 ± 36, respectively, P = 0.2, not significant) or the percentage of time with pH values < 4 (6.8 ± 1.2 vs 7.4 ± 2.1, respectively, P = 0.3, not significant). The distribution of symptoms was as follows: 13 typical (30%) and 31 atypical (70%) among the 44 H. pylori-positive cases; 44 typical (52%) and 41 atypical (48%) among the 85 H. pylori-negative cases, (P = 0.017 vs H. pylori+; OR = 2.55, 95%CI: 1.17-5.55). Furthermore

  17. Ramucirumab plus paclitaxel versus placebo plus paclitaxel in patients with previously treated advanced gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma (RAINBOW): a double-blind, randomised phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Hansjochen; Muro, Kei; Van Cutsem, Eric; Oh, Sang-Cheul; Bodoky, György; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Hironaka, Shuichi; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Lipatov, Oleg; Kim, Tae-You; Cunningham, David; Rougier, Philippe; Komatsu, Yoshito; Ajani, Jaffer; Emig, Michael; Carlesi, Roberto; Ferry, David; Chandrawansa, Kumari; Schwartz, Jonathan D; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2014-10-01

    VEGFR-2 has a role in gastric cancer pathogenesis and progression. We assessed whether ramucirumab, a monoclonal antibody VEGFR-2 antagonist, in combination with paclitaxel would increase overall survival in patients previously treated for advanced gastric cancer compared with placebo plus paclitaxel. This randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, phase 3 trial was done at 170 centres in 27 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. Patients aged 18 years or older with advanced gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma and disease progression on or within 4 months after first-line chemotherapy (platinum plus fluoropyrimidine with or without an anthracycline) were randomly assigned with a centralised interactive voice or web-response system in a 1:1 ratio to receive ramucirumab 8 mg/kg or placebo intravenously on days 1 and 15, plus paclitaxel 80 mg/m(2) intravenously on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle. A permuted block randomisation, stratified by geographic region, time to progression on first-line therapy, and disease measurability, was used. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Efficacy analysis was by intention to treat, and safety analysis included all patients who received at least one treatment with study drug. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01170663, and has been completed; patients who are still receiving treatment are in the extension phase. Between Dec 23, 2010, and Sept 23, 2012, 665 patients were randomly assigned to treatment-330 to ramucirumab plus paclitaxel and 335 to placebo plus paclitaxel. Overall survival was significantly longer in the ramucirumab plus paclitaxel group than in the placebo plus paclitaxel group (median 9·6 months [95% CI 8·5-10·8] vs 7·4 months [95% CI 6·3-8·4], hazard ratio 0·807 [95% CI 0·678-0·962]; p=0·017). Grade 3 or higher adverse events that occurred in more than 5% of patients in the ramucirumab plus paclitaxel group versus placebo

  18. Role of non-acid reflux in patients with non-erosive reflux disease

    OpenAIRE

    Karamanolis, Georgios P.; Tutuian, Radu

    2013-01-01

    Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) is the most common presentation of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Although acid reflux is the most important cause of symptom generation in NERD patients, non-acid reflux is also associated with reflux symptoms. The temporal relation between symptoms and reflux episodes is of importance in evaluating the results of combined pH-impedance monitoring in NERD patients. Mucosal hypersensitivity and mechanical stimulation due to great volume of non-acid reflux ar...

  19. Symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Gastroesophageal Reflux and the Risk of Barrett's Esophagus in a Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lindam

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux is overrepresented in people with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and it has been suggested that OSA worsens gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Aggravated reflux might lead to an increased risk of Barrett's esophagus.To assess the association between sleep apnea symptoms and Barrett's esophagus.Included in a case-control study in Brisbane, Australia were 237 patients with histologically confirmed Barrett's esophagus and 247 population controls. The controls were randomly selected from the electoral roll and frequency-matched to the cases by age and sex. Information on OSA symptoms (excessive daytime sleepiness and sleep related apnea symptoms, gastroesophageal reflux symptoms and anthropometric measures were collected through interviews and written questionnaires. Multivariable logistic regression provided odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI, adjusted for potential confounding by BMI and gastroesophageal reflux.The prevalence of Barrett's esophagus was higher among people with excessive daytime sleepiness than those without (24% vs. 18%; p-value 0.1142 and in participants with sleep-related apnea symptoms (20% vs. 13%; p-value 0.1730. However, there were non-significantly increased ORs of Barrett's esophagus among people with excessive daytime sleepiness (OR 1.42, 95% CI 0.90-2.34 and sleep related apnea symptoms (OR 1.32, 95% CI 0.74-2.36 when adjusting for age, sex and BMI. After further adjustment for gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, the point ORs were no longer increased (OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.61-1.70 for daytime sleepiness and OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.38-1.38 for sleep related apnea symptoms.Symptoms of OSA are possibly associated with an increased risk of Barrett's esophagus, an association that appears to be mediated entirely by gastroesophageal reflux.

  20. Diagnosis and Anti-Reflux Therapy for GERD with Respiratory Symptoms: A Study Using Multichannel Intraluminal Impedance-pH Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Wu, Jimin; Hu, Zhiwei; Yan, Chao; Gao, Xiang; Liang, Weitao; Liu, Diangang; Li, Fei; Wang, Zhonggao

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Respiratory symptoms are often associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Although the role of multichannel intraluminal impedance–pH (MII-pH) monitoring in GERD is clear, little is known regarding the characteristics of patients with respiratory symptoms based on MII-pH monitoring and anti-reflux therapy. We evaluated a cohort of GERD patients to identify the MII-pH parameters of GERD-related respiratory symptoms and to assess the anti-reflux therapy outcomes. Methods We undertook a prospective study of patients who were referred for GERD evaluation from January 2011 to January 2012. One hundred ninety-five patients underwent MII-pH monitoring and esophageal manometry, and one hundred sixty-five patients underwent invasive anti-reflux therapy that included laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication (LTF) and the Stretta procedure. The patient characteristics and MII-pH parameters were analyzed, and the symptom scores were assessed at baseline and at 1- and 3-year follow-up evaluations. Results Of the 195 patients, 96 (49.2%) exhibited respiratory symptoms and significantly more reflux episodes (70.7±29.3) than patients without respiratory symptoms (64.7±24.4, p = 0.044) based on the MII-pH monitoring results. Moreover, the group of patients with respiratory symptoms exhibited more proximal reflux episodes (35.2±21.3) than the non-respiratory symptomatic group (28.3±17.9, p = 0.013). One hundred twenty-five patients following the Stretta procedure (n = 60, 31 with respiratory symptoms) or LTF (n = 65, 35 with respiratory symptoms) completed the designated 3-year follow-up period and were included in the final analysis. The symptom scores after anti-reflux therapy all decreased relative to the corresponding baseline values (p0.05). However, LTF significantly reduced the recurrence (re-operation) rate compared with the Stretta procedure (0 vs. 19.4%, p = 0.006). Conclusions MII-pH monitoring effectively detected respiratory

  1. Diagnosis and Anti-Reflux Therapy for GERD with Respiratory Symptoms: A Study Using Multichannel Intraluminal Impedance-pH Monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    Full Text Available Respiratory symptoms are often associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Although the role of multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (MII-pH monitoring in GERD is clear, little is known regarding the characteristics of patients with respiratory symptoms based on MII-pH monitoring and anti-reflux therapy. We evaluated a cohort of GERD patients to identify the MII-pH parameters of GERD-related respiratory symptoms and to assess the anti-reflux therapy outcomes.We undertook a prospective study of patients who were referred for GERD evaluation from January 2011 to January 2012. One hundred ninety-five patients underwent MII-pH monitoring and esophageal manometry, and one hundred sixty-five patients underwent invasive anti-reflux therapy that included laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication (LTF and the Stretta procedure. The patient characteristics and MII-pH parameters were analyzed, and the symptom scores were assessed at baseline and at 1- and 3-year follow-up evaluations.Of the 195 patients, 96 (49.2% exhibited respiratory symptoms and significantly more reflux episodes (70.7±29.3 than patients without respiratory symptoms (64.7±24.4, p = 0.044 based on the MII-pH monitoring results. Moreover, the group of patients with respiratory symptoms exhibited more proximal reflux episodes (35.2±21.3 than the non-respiratory symptomatic group (28.3±17.9, p = 0.013. One hundred twenty-five patients following the Stretta procedure (n = 60, 31 with respiratory symptoms or LTF (n = 65, 35 with respiratory symptoms completed the designated 3-year follow-up period and were included in the final analysis. The symptom scores after anti-reflux therapy all decreased relative to the corresponding baseline values (p0.05. However, LTF significantly reduced the recurrence (re-operation rate compared with the Stretta procedure (0 vs. 19.4%, p = 0.006.MII-pH monitoring effectively detected respiratory-related predictive parameters, including total

  2. Effects of omeprazole or anti-reflux surgery on lower oesophageal sphincter characteristics and oesophageal acid exposure over 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emken, Birgitte-Elise G; Lundell, Lars R; Wallin, Lene; Myrvold, Helge E; Engström, Cecilia; Montgomery, Madeleine; Malm, Anders R; Lind, Tore; Hatlebakk, Jan G

    2017-01-01

    To compare the effect of anti-reflux surgery (ARS) versus proton pump inhibitor therapy on lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) function and oesophageal acid exposure in patients with chronic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) over a decade of follow-up. In this randomised, prospective, multicentre study we compared LOS pressure profiles, as well as oesophageal exposure to acid, at baseline and at 1 and 10 years after randomisation to either open ARS (n = 137) or long-term treatment with omeprazole (OME) 20-60 mg daily (n = 108). Median LOS resting pressure and abdominal length increased significantly and remained elevated in patients operated on with ARS, as opposed to those on OME. The proportion of total time (%) with oesophageal pH acid exposure was normalised in both groups, with no significant differences, and bilirubin exposure was within normal limits. After 10 years, patients with or without Barrett's oesophagus did not differ in acid reflux control between the two treatment options. Open ARS and OME were both effective in normalising acid reflux into the oesophagus even when studied over a period of 10 years. Anatomically and functionally the LOS was repaired durably by surgery, with increased resting pressure and abdominal length.

  3. Overlap of symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sanne; Jensen, Trine Holm; Henriksen, Susanne Lund

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are common functional gastrointestinal conditions with significant impact on the daily lives of individuals. The objective was to investigate the prevalence and overlap...

  4. Prevalence, risk factors and impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms: a population-based study in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minhu; Xiong, Lishou; Chen, Huixin; Xu, Angao; He, Longjun; Hu, Pinjin

    2005-07-01

    There are few data on the epidemiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in South China. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of GERD symptoms in South China and to evaluate the impact on health-related quality of life. A face-to-face interview was carried out in South China using a validated Chinese version of the Reflux Disease Questionnaire to assess the prevalence of GERD symptoms. A randomly clustered sampling of permanent inhabitants aged 18 to 90 years was carried out under stratification of urban and suburban areas. The impact of GERD symptoms on health-related quality of life was evaluated using the Chinese version of SF-36. A total of 3338 residents (1468 M, 1870 F) were investigated. Mean age of the responders was 42.6 +/- 16.4 years; response rate was 95%. The prevalence of heartburn and/or acid eructation occurring at least weekly was 6.2%. The age- and gender-adjusted point prevalence of GERD symptoms in South China is 2.3% (95% CI, 1.8%, 2.8%) according to the definition in this study. There was no difference in prevalence between male (2.6%) and female (2.4%) subjects and there was no significant association between age and prevalence of GERD symptoms. Divorced/widowed/separated subjects (OR 4.61; 95% CI, 2.15%, 9.89%) and subjects with a heavy burden of work (OR 3.43, 95% CI, 1.72%, 6.84%) were significantly more likely to report GERD symptoms. As compared with the general population, subjects with GERD symptoms experienced considerable impairment in quality of life. The prevalence of GERD symptoms in South China was much lower than that reported in Western countries. GERD had a negative impact on quality of life.

  5. Evaluation of an Innovative Over-the-Counter Treatment for Symptoms of Reflux Disease: Quick-Dissolving Alginate Granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugala, Vicki; Dettmar, Peter W.; Thomas, Edward C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Traditional antacids and alginate-based reflux suppressants are OTC products commonly used to treat reflux symptoms. There has been a lack of innovation of new formulations in this therapy area despite consumers finding established products unpalatable. Here we evaluate a novel product formulation which takes the form of quick-dissolving alginate granules in single-dose sachets (Gaviscon Direct Powder (GDP)). Market research and taste evaluation confirmed that reflux sufferers considered GDP to have good flavour and taste, no chalky aftertaste and dissolved rapidly in the mouth with 68% noting so within 10 seconds. GDP was considered convenient and easy to use. The consumer-driven product development was also shown to form a strong alginate raft in standardised in vitro conditions that met the specifications of the BP monograph (raft strength > 7.5 g). Gastric retention of GDP and a test meal was investigated in healthy volunteers using gamma scintigraphy in comparison to Liquid Gaviscon. Both products formed an alginate raft in the stomach above the test meal and emptied after the meal. The gastric retention of the GDP product was found to be noninferior to Liquid Gaviscon. In conclusion, the innovative GDP product formed an effective raft and was well liked by consumers. PMID:23320198

  6. Frequency, types and complications of barrett's esophagus in patients with symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, A.L.; Sadiq, S.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study was carried out to evaluate the frequency, types and complications of Barrett's esophagus in symptomatic gastro-esophageal reflux patients. Subjects: A total of 100 patients of gastro-esophageal reflux were studied to evaluate the frequency, types and complications of Barrett's esophagus. Endoscopic biopsies were taken and examined with H and E and various special stains like PAS, Alcian blue/PAS, high iron diamine/ Alcian blue and Giemsa stains. Results: Of 100 cases studied, 32 were found to have Barrett's esophagus on microscopy. The remaining 68 cases showed low and high grade changes of gastro-esophageal reflux. Conclusion: In comparison with studies from western countries, Barrett's esophagus was found to be relatively more common in our population. However, the frequency of complications like ulcer, stricture, dysplasia and adenocarcinoma was lesser. (author)

  7. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease symptoms and demographic factors as a pre-screening tool for Barrett's esophagus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxue Liu

    Full Text Available Barrett's esophagus (BE occurs as consequence of reflux and is a risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma. The current "gold-standard" for diagnosing BE is endoscopy which remains prohibitively expensive and impractical as a population screening tool. We aimed to develop a pre-screening tool to aid decision making for diagnostic referrals.A prospective (training cohort of 1603 patients attending for endoscopy was used for identification of risk factors to develop a risk prediction model. Factors associated with BE in the univariate analysis were selected to develop prediction models that were validated in an independent, external cohort of 477 non-BE patients referred for endoscopy with symptoms of reflux or dyspepsia. Two prediction models were developed separately for columnar lined epithelium (CLE of any length and using a stricter definition of intestinal metaplasia (IM with segments ≥ 2 cm with areas under the ROC curves (AUC of 0.72 (95%CI: 0.67-0.77 and 0.81 (95%CI: 0.76-0.86, respectively. The two prediction models included demographics (age, sex, symptoms (heartburn, acid reflux, chest pain, abdominal pain and medication for "stomach" symptoms. These two models were validated in the independent cohort with AUCs of 0.61 (95%CI: 0.54-0.68 and 0.64 (95%CI: 0.52-0.77 for CLE and IM ≥ 2 cm, respectively.We have identified and validated two prediction models for CLE and IM ≥ 2 cm. Both models have fair prediction accuracies and can select out around 20% of individuals unlikely to benefit from investigation for Barrett's esophagus. Such prediction models have the potential to generate useful cost-savings for BE screening among the symptomatic population.

  8. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease symptoms and demographic factors as a pre-screening tool for Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinxue; Wong, Angela; Kadri, Sudarshan R; Corovic, Andrej; O'Donovan, Maria; Lao-Sirieix, Pierre; Lovat, Laurence B; Burnham, Rodney W; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2014-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) occurs as consequence of reflux and is a risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma. The current "gold-standard" for diagnosing BE is endoscopy which remains prohibitively expensive and impractical as a population screening tool. We aimed to develop a pre-screening tool to aid decision making for diagnostic referrals. A prospective (training) cohort of 1603 patients attending for endoscopy was used for identification of risk factors to develop a risk prediction model. Factors associated with BE in the univariate analysis were selected to develop prediction models that were validated in an independent, external cohort of 477 non-BE patients referred for endoscopy with symptoms of reflux or dyspepsia. Two prediction models were developed separately for columnar lined epithelium (CLE) of any length and using a stricter definition of intestinal metaplasia (IM) with segments ≥ 2 cm with areas under the ROC curves (AUC) of 0.72 (95%CI: 0.67-0.77) and 0.81 (95%CI: 0.76-0.86), respectively. The two prediction models included demographics (age, sex), symptoms (heartburn, acid reflux, chest pain, abdominal pain) and medication for "stomach" symptoms. These two models were validated in the independent cohort with AUCs of 0.61 (95%CI: 0.54-0.68) and 0.64 (95%CI: 0.52-0.77) for CLE and IM ≥ 2 cm, respectively. We have identified and validated two prediction models for CLE and IM ≥ 2 cm. Both models have fair prediction accuracies and can select out around 20% of individuals unlikely to benefit from investigation for Barrett's esophagus. Such prediction models have the potential to generate useful cost-savings for BE screening among the symptomatic population.

  9. Acid sensitization of esophageal mucosal afferents: implication for symptom perception in patients across the gastroesophageal reflux disease spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczesniak, Michal Marcin; Fuentealba, Sergio Enrique; Cook, Ian J

    2013-01-01

    Sensitization of esophageal chemoreceptors, either directly by intermittent acid exposure or indirectly through esophagitis-associated inflammatory mediators, is likely to be the mechanism underlying the perception of heartburn. To compare basal esophageal sensitivity with electrical stimulation and acid, and to compare the degree of acid-induced sensitization in controls and in patient groups across the entire spectrum of gastroesophageal reflux disease: erosive oesophagitis (EO), nonerosive reflux disease (NERD), and functional heartburn (FH). Esophageal sensory and pain thresholds to electrical stimulation were measured before, 30, and 60 minutes after an intraesophageal infusion of saline or HCl. Patients received a 30-minute infusion of 0.15 M HCl and controls were randomized to receive either HCl (n = 11) or saline (n = 10). After electrical sensory threshold testing, participants received another 30-minute infusion of HCl to determine whether sensitivity to acid is increased by prior acid exposure All patient groups had higher basal sensory thresholds than healthy controls (controls, 13 ± 1.4 mA; FH, 20 ± 5.1 mA; NERD, 21 ± 5.1 mA; EO, 23 ± 5.4 mA; P acid exposure reduced sensory thresholds to electrical stimulation in FH and NERD patients (P acid sensitivity during the first HCl infusion was comparable between all patient groups and controls. The secondary infusion caused increased discomfort in all participants (P acid-induced sensitization to HCl was significantly elevated in the patient groups ( P acid infusion sensitizes it to subsequent electrical and chemical stimulation. (2) The acid-related sensitization is greater in gastroesophageal reflux disease than in controls and may influence in part symptom perception in this population. (3) Acid-related sensitization within the gastroesophageal reflux disease population is not dependant on mucosal inflammation.

  10. Functional dyspepsia (FD) and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD): overlapping or discrete entities?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2012-02-03

    As the incidence of both gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease have declined, that of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and non-ulcer, or functional dyspepsia (FD) have reached virtually epidemic proportions. As we come to appreciate the expression of these disorders in the community, the real spectrum of each disease has become evident. FD and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), the most prevalent manifestation of GORD, frequently overlap. Where then does GORD end and FD begin? Is it realistic, or even clinically relevant, to attempt a clear separation between these entities? These are more than issues of mere semantics; therapeutic options may be dictated by the classification of the patient as one or the other. Recent work indicates clearly that NERD is a heterogeneous disorder incorporating some patients who may well harbour subtle manifestations of oesophagitis and others who have entirely normal 24-hour pH studies. These differences may be crucial to the concept of NERD\\/FD overlap. While evidence in support of this concept is far from complete, it would appear that this overlap is most relevant to those NERD patients who do not exhibit abnormal esophageal acid exposure. These patients truly belong in the spectrum of functional gastrointestinal disorders rather than in GORD; attempts to shoe-horn these individuals into the spectrum of GORD will result in therapeutic disappointment and surgical disaster.

  11. Evaluation of new gastro-intestinal prokinetic (ENGIP-I) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwaikar, Pradeep P; Kulkarni, Sujay S; Bargaje, Rahul S

    2005-10-01

    The ENGIP-I study was conducted to investigate the efficacy, and safety of itopride in patients of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. There were significant reductions in heartburn frequency, heartburn severity, gastro-oesophageal regurgitation frequency at day 3 only. ENGIP-I study concluded that itopride was well tolerated by patients and appears to be the drug of choice in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

  12. Pathogenesis of Double-Dose Proton Pump Inhibitor-Resistant Non-Erosive Reflux Disease, and Mechanism of Reflux Symptoms and Gastric Acid Secretion-Suppressive Effect in the Presence or Absence of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawami, Noriyuki; Takenouchi, Nana; Umezawa, Mariko; Hoshino, Shintaro; Hanada, Yuriko; Hoshikawa, Yoshimasa; Sano, Hirohito; Hoshihara, Yoshio; Nomura, Tsutomu; Uchida, Eiji; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Various mechanisms have been suggested to be responsible for contributing to the occurrence of proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-resistant non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). The aims of this study were to clarify the pathogenesis of PPI-resistant NERD. Fifty-three patients with NERD, who had persistent reflux symptoms despite taking double-dose PPI, were included in this study. After excluding eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and primary esophageal motility disorder, esophageal impedance-pH monitoring was carried out. In symptom index (SI)-positive patients, the mechanism of SI positivity and the percent time with intragastric pH >4 were investigated according to the presence or absence of Helicobacter pylori infection. One of the 53 patients had EoE, and 4 had primary esophageal motility disorder. Twenty-three and 2 patients were SI-positive for liquid and gas-only reflux respectively. Of 17 SI-positive, H. pylori-negative patients, 5 were SI-positive for acid reflux, whereas all of the H. pylori-positive patients were SI-positive for non-acid reflux. The percent time with intragastric pH >4 was significantly lower in the H. pylori-negative patients than in the H. pylori-positive patients. The pathogenesis of double-dose PPI-resistant NERD was identified in 57%. In some of H. pylori-negative patients, acid-related symptoms were observed. However, in H. pylori-positive patients, these symptoms were excluded by taking double-dose PPI. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. The Effect of Ramelteon on Heartburn Symptoms of Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Chronic Insomnia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Lokesh K; Fass, Ronnie; Gadam, Rakshith; Maradey-Romero, Carla; Nasrollah, Laya; Hershcovici, Tiberiu; Quan, Stuart F; Dickman, Ram

    2016-02-01

    There is a bidirectional relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and sleep. It has been demonstrated that antireflux treatment can improve sleep quality in GERD patients with nighttime reflux. Patients with heartburn and/or regurgitation ≥3 times/week and insomnia for ≥3 months were included. Patients were assessed at baseline with the demographic, GERD symptom assessment scale, Epworth sleepiness scale, Berlin sleep apnea, Pittsburgh sleep quality index, and the Insomnia severity index questionnaires. Subjects underwent an upper endoscopy followed by pH testing. Subsequently, subjects were randomized, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, to receive either ramelteon 8 mg or placebo before bedtime for 4 weeks. During the last week of treatment, subjects completed a daily GERD symptom and sleep diary and underwent actigraphy. Sixteen patients completed the study, 8 in each arm (mean age and M/F were 48.5 vs. 57.8 y, and 8/0 vs. 6/2, respectively). Patients who received ramelteon demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in symptom score as compared with those who received placebo for daytime heartburn (-42% vs. -29%), nighttime heartburn (-42% vs. 78%), 24-hour heartburn (-42% vs. -3%), and 24-hour acid regurgitation (-26% vs. 19%) (all P<0.05). Insomnia severity index score was significantly reduced in patients receiving ramelteon as compared with placebo (-46% vs. -5%, P<0.05). Ramelteon group also demonstrated a significant improvement in sleep efficiency and sleep latency, as compared with placebo, P<0.05). No significant adverse events were observed with ramelteon. Ramelteon significantly improved symptoms in patients with GERD. In addition, ramelteon significantly improved patients' sleep experience. Further studies are needed in the future (NCT01128582).

  14. Radiologic studies on gastroesophageal reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seung Gi; Kim, Kun Sang; Park, Soo Soung [College of Medicine, Chung Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-12-15

    Gastroesophageal reflux is generally recognized as the preponderant factor in the causation of the most cases of esophagitis and the accompanying symptom of pyrosis. In has been known that free gastroesophageal reflux is infrequent phenomenon but we observed gastroesophageal reflux during U. G. I. examination in 111 cases among 152 patients (73.3%) who had various gastrointestinal symptoms. Gastroesophageal reflux was most frequently induced in supine LAO position. The next frequent positions are erect position, RAO and supine position.

  15. Lifestyle factors affecting gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms: a cross-sectional study of healthy 19864 adults using FSSG scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamichi Nobutake

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a very common disorder worldwide, comprised of reflux esophagitis (RE and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD. As more than half of GERD patients are classified into the NERD group, precise evaluation of bothersome epigastric symptoms is essential. Nevertheless, compared with many reports targeting endoscopic reflux esophagitis, large-scale studies focusing on GERD symptoms have been very scarce. Methods To elucidate lifestyle factors affecting GERD symptoms, 19,864 healthy adults in Japan were analyzed. Sub-analyses of 371 proton pump inhibitor (PPI users and 539 histamine H2-receptor antagonist (H2RA users were also performed. Using the FSSG (Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of GERD score as a response variable, 25 lifestyle-related factors were univariately evaluated by Student's t-test or Pearson's correlation coefficient, and were further analyzed with multiple linear regression modelling. Results Average FSSG scores were 4.8 ± 5.2 for total subjects, 9.0 ± 7.3 for PPI users, and 8.2 ± 6.6 for H2RA users. Among the total population, positively correlated factors and standardized coefficients (β for FSSG scores are inadequate sleep (β = 0.158, digestive drug users (β = 0.0972 for PPI, β = 0.0903 for H2RA, and β = 0.104 for others, increased body weight in adulthood (β = 0.081, dinner just before bedtime (β = 0.061, the habit of midnight snack (β = 0.055, lower body mass index (β = 0.054, NSAID users (β = 0.051, female gender (β = 0.048, lack of breakfast (β = 0.045, lack of physical exercise (β = 0.035, younger age (β = 0.033, antihyperglycemic agents non-users (β = 0.026, the habit of quick eating (β = 0.025, alcohol drinking (β = 0.025, history of gastrectomy (β = 0.024, history of cardiovascular disease (β = 0.020, and smoking (β = 0.018. Positively correlated factors for PPI users are female gender (β = 0.198, inadequate sleep (β = 0.150, lack of breakfast

  16. Zero-Inflated Models for Identifying Relationships Between Body Mass Index and Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms: A Nationwide Population-Based Study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qin; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Tianyi; Zhang, Ruijie; Zhao, Yanfang; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Yibin; Wang, Rui; Ma, Xiuqiang; He, Jia

    2016-07-01

    That obesity leads to gastroesophageal reflux is a widespread notion. However, scientific evidence for this association is limited, with no rigorous epidemiological approach conducted to address this question. This study examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in a large population-representative sample from China. We performed a cross-sectional study in an age- and gender-stratified random sample of the population of five central regions in China. Participants aged 18-80 years completed a general information questionnaire and a Chinese version of the Reflux Disease Questionnaire. The zero-inflated Poisson regression model estimated the relationship between body mass index and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Overall, 16,091 (89.4 %) of the 18,000 eligible participants responded. 638 (3.97 %) and 1738 (10.81 %) experienced at least weekly heartburn and weekly acid regurgitation, respectively. After adjusting for potential risk factors in the zero-inflated part, the frequency [odds ratio (OR) 0.66, 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) 0.50-0.86, p = 0.002] and severity (OR 0.66, 95 % CI 0.50-088, p = 0.004) of heartburn in obese participants were statistically significant compared to those in normal participants. In the Poisson part, the frequency of acid regurgitation, overweight (OR 1.10, 95 % CI 1.01-1.21, p = 0.038) and obesity (OR 1.19, 95 % CI 1.04-1.37, p = 0.013) were statistically significant. BMI was strongly and positively related to the frequency and severity of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Additionally, gender exerted strong specific effects on the relationship between BMI and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. The severity and frequency of heartburn were positively correlated with obesity. This relationship was presented distinct in male participants only.

  17. The role of combined 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring in the evaluation of children with gastrointestinal symptoms suggesting gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojsak, I; Ivković, L; Trbojević, T; Pavić, I; Jadrešin, O; Mišak, Z; Kolaček, S

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (pH-MII) monitoring in the diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children who presented with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in comparison with the results of pH-metry alone and endoscopy. All children who underwent pH-MII monitoring due to GI symptoms, suggestive of GERD, from October 2013 to October 2015 in Children's Hospital Zagreb, were retrospectively enrolled in the study. The cohort was divided into three groups according to age - group 1: children Gastro-esophageal reflux disease was determined in 44 of 133 patients (33.1%) by pH-MII and only in 21 of 133 patients (15.8%) by pH-metry alone. Endoscopy was performed in 77 (57.9%) children and esophagitis was found in 32/77 (41.6%). The finding of esophagitis significantly correlated with the number of total reflux episodes (coef. 0.42, p reflux episodes detected by pH-MII; but, no correlation was found to reflux episodes detected by pH-metry alone (coef. 0.21, p = 0.07). Compared with pH-metry alone, pH-MII performed significantly better in the detection of GERD in all age groups. On the basis of our data, pH-MII had a strong correlation with endoscopically confirmed esophagitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Use of radioisotopic esophageal transit in the assessment of patients with symptoms of reflux and non-specific esophageal motor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iascone, C; Di Giulio, E; Maffi, C; Ruperto, M

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess the esophageal clearance of a radioisotopic bolus in patients with symptoms of reflux and evaluate the impact of manometric abnormalities on scintigraphic esophageal transit. Esophageal clearance was assessed in a supine position and indicated by the retained radioactivity in the esophagus at 10, 20, 30 and 40 s after the ingestion of a liquid bolus labeled with 2 mCi 99 mTc-SC. The study included 214 consecutive patients with symptoms of reflux and 11 normal controls. The results were compared to the motility findings detected on manometry performed on a separate occasion. Esophageal manometry was normal in 93 patients. Nonspecific esophageal motor disorders were identified in 121 patients and were classified into: 'predominantly nonpropagated activity', 'predominantly low-amplitude peristaltic contractions' and 'miscellaneous disorders' diagnosed in 27, 47 and 47 patients, respectively. The radionuclide clearance was significantly delayed in the overall group of patients compared with that of normal controls (P motor disorders compared with patients with reflux symptoms and 'normal manometry' (P disorders'. Radioisotopic esophageal clearance abnormalities are frequently observed in patients with reflux symptoms and are more likely to be associated to hypomotility disorders, i.e. nonpropagated motor activity or low-amplitude contractions.

  19. Patient-Provider Interactions Affect Symptoms in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Pilot Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Dossett

    Full Text Available It is unclear whether the benefits that some patients derive from complementary and integrative medicine (CIM are related to the therapies recommended or to the consultation process as some CIM provider visits are more involved than conventional medical visits. Many patients with gastrointestinal conditions seek out CIM therapies, and prior work has demonstrated that the quality of the patient-provider interaction can improve health outcomes in irritable bowel syndrome, however, the impact of this interaction on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is unknown. We aimed to assess the safety and feasibility of conducting a 2 x 2 factorial design study preliminarily exploring the impact of the patient-provider interaction, and the effect of an over-the-counter homeopathic product, Acidil, on symptoms and health-related quality of life in subjects with GERD.24 subjects with GERD-related symptoms were randomized in a 2 x 2 factorial design to receive 1 either a standard visit based on an empathic conventional primary care evaluation or an expanded visit with questions modeled after a CIM consultation and 2 either Acidil or placebo for two weeks. Subjects completed a daily GERD symptom diary and additional measures of symptom severity and health-related quality of life.There was no significant difference in GERD symptom severity between the Acidil and placebo groups from baseline to follow-up (p = 0.41, however, subjects who received the expanded visit were significantly more likely to report a 50% or greater improvement in symptom severity compared to subjects who received the standard visit (p = 0.01. Total consultation length, perceived empathy, and baseline beliefs in CIM were not associated with treatment outcomes.An expanded patient-provider visit resulted in greater GERD symptom improvement than a standard empathic medical visit. CIM consultations may have enhanced placebo effects, and further studies to assess the active components of this

  20. The differences in esophageal motility and its clinical significance between the patients with typical and atypical symptoms of non-erosive reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling LIN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To study the characteristics of esophageal motility in the patients with different symptoms of nonerosive reflux disease (non-erosive reflux disease, NERD. Methods  Eighty-six patients with NERD who visited the Department of Gastroenterology in our hospital from August 2012 to December 2014 were selected. They were all evaluated with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and high resolution esophageal manometry. Those who had neither definite esophageal mucosal erosion nor Barrett's esophagus at endoscopy were diagnosed as NERD. According to the presence or absence of typical acid reflux and/or heartburn symptoms, patients with NERD were divided into two groups: the typical symptom group (47 cases, and the atypical symptom group (39 cases. High resolution measurement of esophageal pressure was used to evaluate the differences in esophageal dynamic characteristics between patients with different symptoms of NERD. The final results were analyzed with t test and chi-square test. Results  Compared with atypical symptom group, both the resting pressure (20.68±1.64mmHg vs 15.79±1.21mmHg respectively, P0.05. Conclusion  There is a difference in esophageal motility characteristics between the patients with typical and atypical symptoms of NERD, and the main differences are changes in the resting pressure and residual pressure of LES. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.12.12

  1. Food and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdea-Blaga, Teodora; Negrutiu, Dana E; Palage, Mariana; Dumitrascu, Dan L

    2017-05-15

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a chronic condition with a high prevalence in western countries. Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation episodes and a decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure are the main mechanisms involved. Currently used drugs are efficient on reflux symptoms, but only as long as they are administered, because they do not modify the reflux barrier. Certain nutrients or foods are generally considered to increase the frequency of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, therefore physicians recommend changes in diet and some patients avoid bothering foods. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding food and gastroesophageal reflux. For example, fat intake increases the perception of reflux symptoms. Regular coffee and chocolate induce gastroesophageal reflux and increase the lower esophageal exposure to acid. Spicy foods might induce heartburn, but the exact mechanism is not known. Beer and wine induce gastroesophageal reflux, mainly in the first hour after intake. For other foods, like fried food or carbonated beverages data on gastroesophageal reflux is scarce. Similarly, there is few data about the type of diet and gastroesophageal reflux. Mediterranean diet and a very low carbohydrate diet protect against reflux. Regarding diet-related practices, consistent data showed that a "short-meal-to-sleep interval" favors reflux episodes, therefore some authors recommend that dinner should be at least four hours before bedtime. All these recommendations should consider patient's weight, because several meta-analysis showed a positive association between increased body mass index and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Children & Teens Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants Definition & ...

  3. Comparison of Stretta procedure and toupet fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease-related extra-esophageal symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao; Liang, Wei-Tao; Wang, Zhong-Gao; Hu, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Ji-Min; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Mei-Ping

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the outcomes between the Stretta procedure and laparoscopic toupet fundoplication (LTF) in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-related extra-esophageal symptoms. METHODS: From January 2011 to February 2012, a total of 98 patients diagnosed with GERD-related extra-esophageal symptoms who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled in this study. All patients who either underwent the Stretta procedure or LTF treatment have now completed the 3-year follow-up. Primary outcome measures, including frequency and severity of extra-esophageal symptoms, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use, satisfaction, and postoperative complications, were assessed. The results of the Stretta procedure and LTF therapy were analyzed and compared. RESULTS: There were 47 patients in the Stretta group and 51 patients in the LTF group. Ninety patients were available at the 3-year follow-up. The total of the frequency and severity scores for every symptom improved in both groups (P 0.05). However, the score for globus hysterics was different between the Stretta group and the LTF group (4.9 ± 2.24 vs 3.2 ± 2.63, P < 0.05). After the Stretta procedure and LTF treatment, 29 and 33 patients in each group achieved PPI therapy independence (61.7% vs 64.7%, P = 0.835). The patients in the LTF group were more satisfied with their quality of life than those in the Stretta procedure group (P < 0.05). Most complications resolved without intervention within two weeks; however, two patients in the LTF group still suffered from severe dysphagia 2 wk after the operation, and it improved after bougie dilation treatment in both patients. CONCLUSION: The Stretta procedure and LTF were both safe and effective for the control of GERD-related extra-esophageal symptoms and the reduction of PPI use. PMID:26668513

  4. Comparison of Stretta procedure and toupet fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease-related extra-esophageal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao; Liang, Wei-Tao; Wang, Zhong-Gao; Hu, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Ji-Min; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Mei-Ping

    2015-12-07

    To compare the outcomes between the Stretta procedure and laparoscopic toupet fundoplication (LTF) in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-related extra-esophageal symptoms. From January 2011 to February 2012, a total of 98 patients diagnosed with GERD-related extra-esophageal symptoms who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled in this study. All patients who either underwent the Stretta procedure or LTF treatment have now completed the 3-year follow-up. Primary outcome measures, including frequency and severity of extra-esophageal symptoms, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use, satisfaction, and postoperative complications, were assessed. The results of the Stretta procedure and LTF therapy were analyzed and compared. There were 47 patients in the Stretta group and 51 patients in the LTF group. Ninety patients were available at the 3-year follow-up. The total of the frequency and severity scores for every symptom improved in both groups (P 0.05). However, the score for globus hysterics was different between the Stretta group and the LTF group (4.9 ± 2.24 vs 3.2 ± 2.63, P < 0.05). After the Stretta procedure and LTF treatment, 29 and 33 patients in each group achieved PPI therapy independence (61.7% vs 64.7%, P = 0.835). The patients in the LTF group were more satisfied with their quality of life than those in the Stretta procedure group (P < 0.05). Most complications resolved without intervention within two weeks; however, two patients in the LTF group still suffered from severe dysphagia 2 wk after the operation, and it improved after bougie dilation treatment in both patients. The Stretta procedure and LTF were both safe and effective for the control of GERD-related extra-esophageal symptoms and the reduction of PPI use.

  5. Oesophageal baseline impedance values are decreased in patients with eosinophilic oesophagitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rhijn, Bram D.; Kessing, Boudewijn F.; Smout, Andreas J. P. M.; Bredenoord, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Gastro-oesophageal reflux has been suggested to play a role in eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoO). Oesophageal acid exposure decreases baseline intraluminal impedance, a marker of mucosal integrity, in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). Objectives: The aim of this study

  6. Anti-reflux surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery. You may need another surgery in the future if you develop new reflux symptoms or swallowing ... Diseases of the esophagus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  7. Comparison of Omeprazole with Ranitidine for Treatment of Symptoms Associated with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Uncomplicated Duodenal Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre P Archambault

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This randomized, single-blind, parallel group study was conducted to compare omeprazole with ranitidine for the treatment of symptoms associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, uncomplicated duodenal ulcer (DU or both. After baseline assessments, patients were randomized to receive daily treatment with either 20 mg omeprazole or 300 mg ranitidine for four weeks. In total, 1481 patients (1001 omeprazole, 480 ranitidine with a diagnosis of GERD (n=904 and/or DU (n=577, confirmed by endoscopy or barium meal and reporting moderate to severe symptoms, were included in the analyses. The seventy of overall daytime symptoms reported by the omeprazole group at clinic visits was lower than that reported by the ranitidine group at week 2 for the entire patient group (P=0.0002 and at both weeks 2 and 4 for the subgroup of patients with GERD (P=0.0001 and P=0.001, respectively. The severity of overall night-time symptoms reported by the omeprazole group was lower than that reported by the ranitidine group at week 4 for all patients as a whole (P=0.042 and at both weeks 2 and 4 for the subgroup of patients with GERD (P=0.035 and P=0.010, respectively. There were no significant differences in reports of adverse events. In the omeprazole group, 19% of patients at week 2 and 15% of patients at week 4 reported adverse events, while the corresponding results from the ranitidine group were 21% and 11%. In conclusion, patients with GERD, DU or both treated with omeprazole 20 mg daily for four weeks showed statistically significant reductions in symptoms compared with patients treated with ranitidine 300 mg daily for the same period of time. The percentage of patients with any remaining daytime symptoms was 12% lower in the omeprazole group compared with the ranitidine group at week 2, and 7% lower at week 4. Five per cent fewer patients in the omeprazole group experienced night-time symptoms at either week 2 or week 4.

  8. Characteristics of symptomatic reflux episodes in Japanese proton pump inhibitor-refractory non-erosive reflux disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kenichiro; Koike, Tomoyuki; Iijima, Katsunori; Saito, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Hiroki; Hatta, Waku; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients. METHODS: Thirty-five NERD patients with persistent symptoms, despite taking rabeprazole 10 mg twice daily for at least 8 wk, were included in this study. All patients underwent 24 h combined impedance - pH on rabeprazole. The symptom index (SI) was considered to be positive if ≥ 50%, and proximal reflux episodes were determined when reflux reached 15 cm above the proximal margin of the lower esophageal sphincter. RESULTS: In 14 (40%) SI-positive patients, with liquid weakly acid reflux, the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms was significantly more frequent in proximal reflux episodes (46.7%) than in distal ones (5.7%) (P acid reflux, there were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms between proximal reflux episodes (38.5%) and distal ones (20.5%) (NS). With mixed liquid-gas weakly acid reflux, the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms in proximal reflux episodes was significantly more frequent (31.0%) than in distal reflux ones (3.3%) (P acid reflux, there were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms between proximal reflux episodes (29.4%) and distal ones (14.3%) (NS). CONCLUSION: The proximal extent of weakly acidic liquid and mixed liquid-gas reflux is a major factor associated with reflux perception in SI-positive patients on proton pump inhibitor therapy. PMID:26715820

  9. Laryngopharyngeal reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Šereg-Bahar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 4–10 % of patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER some atypical symptoms are found (cough, hoarseness, globus pharyngeus, dyspnea which are characteristic for laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR. The signs of LPR can be detected in more than 50 % of dysphonic patients. In the diagnostics of LPR, a meticulous history and a videoendoscopy of the larynx and pharynx are the most important procedures. The diagnosis of LPR can be confirmed by the 24-hour double probe pH monitoring and the treatment test with proton pump inhibitors. The best diagnostic results can be obtained with a combination of several diagnostic procedures.Conclusions: An otorhinolaryngologist can start a treatment test with proton pump inhibitors in a patient in whom a laryngopharyngeal reflux is suspected on the basis of history and laryngopharyngeal endoscopy. A successful treatment requires at least 12 weeks regimen with high doses 20 mg twice a day. In the case of alarm signs and unsuccessful treatment a gastroenterologic intervention is necessary.

  10. What is Obesity Doing to Your Gut?

    OpenAIRE

    LEE, Yeong Yeh

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a fast-emerging epidemic in the Asia-Pacific region, with numbers paralleling the rising global prevalence within the past 30 years. The landscape of gut diseases in Asia has been drastically changed by obesity. In addition to more non-specific abdominal symptoms, obesity is the cause of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, various gastrointestinal cancers (colorectal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, oesophageal adenocarcinoma, gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, pancreatic cancer and ga...

  11. PRISM, a Patient-Reported Outcome Instrument, Accurately Measures Symptom Change in Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Garth; Bolus, Roger; Whitman, Cynthia; Talley, Jennifer; Erder, M Haim; Joseph, Alain; Silberg, Debra G; Spiegel, Brennan

    2017-03-01

    Most patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) experience relief following treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) (Vakil et al. in Am J Gastroenterol 101:1900-1920, 2006; Everhart and Ruhl in Gastroenterology 136:376-386, 2009). As many as 17-44% of patients, however, exhibit only partial response to therapy. Most extant GERD patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments fail to meet development best practices as described by the FDA (Talley and Wiklund in Qual Life Res 14:21-33, 2005; Van Pinxteren et al. in Cochrane Database Syst Rev 18:CD002095, 2004; El-Serag et al. in Aliment Pharmacol Ther 32:720-737, 2010). To develop and validate a PRO instrument for clinical trials involving patients with GERD who are PPI partial responders. We prepared a systematic literature review, held patient focus groups, convened an expert panel, and conducted cognitive interviews to establish content validity. Eligible participants took PPI therapy for at least 8 weeks, had undergone an upper endoscopy, and scored at least 8 points on the GerdQ [6]. Qualitative data guided development of 26 draft items. Items were reviewed by expert panels and debriefed with patients. The resulting 21-item instrument underwent psychometric evaluation during a Phase IIB trial. During the trial, confirmatory factor analysis (n = 220) resulted in a four-factor model displaying the highest goodness of fit. All domains had a high inter-item correlation (Cronbach's α > 0.8). Test-retest reliability and convergent validity were strong, with highly significant (p < 0.01) correlations between average weekly PRISM scores and severity anchors and significant (p < 0.05) correlations with anchor subscales. Cumulative distribution functions revealed significant differences between responders and non-responders. Analysis in a clinical trial setting demonstrated strong psychometric properties suggesting validity of PRISM. Developed in line with FDA guidance on PROs, PRISM represents an

  12. Randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coyle, C; Crawford, G; Wilkinson, J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Symptomatic breakthrough in proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-treated gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients is a common problem with a range of underlying causes. The nonsystemic, raft-forming action of alginates may help resolve symptoms. AIM: To assess alginate-antacid (Gaviscon...... Double Action, RB, Slough, UK) as add-on therapy to once-daily PPI for suppression of breakthrough reflux symptoms. METHODS: In two randomised, double-blind studies (exploratory, n=52; confirmatory, n=262), patients taking standard-dose PPI who had breakthrough symptoms, assessed by Heartburn Reflux...

  13. Recurrent symptoms after fundoplication with a negative pH study--recurrent reflux or functional heartburn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sarah K; Cai, Wang; Jamieson, Glyn G; Zhang, Alison Y; Myers, Jennifer C; Parr, Zoe E; Watson, David I; Persson, Jenny; Holtmann, Gerald; Devitt, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    A small cohort of patients present after antireflux surgery complaining of recurrent heartburn. Over two thirds of these patients will have a negative 24-h pH study. The aim of our study is to determine whether these patients have an associated functional disorder or abnormal cytokine activity and to examine the reproducibility of pH testing. A prospective analysis was carried out on a cohort of patients who had undergone a fundoplication and postoperative pH testing for recurrent heartburn: group A--patients with recurrent heartburn and a negative 24-h pH study and group B (control group)--patients with recurrent heartburn and a positive pH study. Questionnaires, a blood sample, and repeat pH testing were completed. Sixty-nine patients were identified. Group A's depression score (8.6 +/- 4.1) was significantly higher than group B's (5.9 +/- 4.2; P = 0.03). Cytokine levels were similar in both groups. Forty-seven of 49 (96%) patients who underwent repeat pH testing had a negative study. Symptom-reflux correlation was highly significant (P heartburn and a negative pH study have associated functional or psychiatric comorbidities such as depression. Reproducibility of 24-h pH testing in these patients is excellent.

  14. Clinical and laboratory studies of the antacid and raft-forming properties of Rennie alginate suspension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.; Simoneau, G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acid pockets at the gastro-oesophageal junction escape buffering from meals in the stomach. Combining high-dose antacid with alginate may therefore be of benefit in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. AIM: To characterize the antacid and raft-forming properties of Rennie alginate

  15. Role of Acid and Weakly Acidic Reflux in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Off Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hea Jung; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Lim, Chul Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gye

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Available data about reflux patterns and symptom determinants in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) subtypes off proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy are lacking. We aimed to evaluate reflux patterns and determinants of symptom perception in patients with GERD off PPI therapy by impedance-pH monitoring. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the impedance-pH data in patients diagnosed as GERD based on results of impedance-pH monitoring, endoscopy and/or typical symptoms. The characteristics of acid and weakly acidic reflux were evaluated. Symptomatic and asymptomatic reflux were compared according to GERD subtypes and individual symptoms. Results Forty-two patients (22 males, mean age 46 years) were diagnosed as GERD (17 erosive reflux disease, 9 pH(+) non-erosive reflux disease [NERD], 9 hypersensitive esophagus and 7 symptomatic NERD). A total of 1,725 reflux episodes were detected (855 acid [50%], 857 weakly acidic [50%] and 13 weakly alkaline reflux [reflux was more frequently symptomatic and bolus clearance was longer compared with weakly acidic reflux. In terms of globus, weakly acidic reflux was more symptomatic. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed reflux; these associations were more pronounced in erosive reflux disease and symptomatic NERD. The perception of regurgitation was related to acid reflux, while that of globus was more related to weakly acidic reflux. Conclusions In patients not taking PPI, acid reflux was more frequently symptomatic and had longer bolus clearance. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed type; however, weakly acidic reflux was associated more with globus. These data suggest a role for impedance-pH data in the evaluation of globus. PMID:22837877

  16. Role of Acid and weakly acidic reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease off proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hea Jung; Cho, Yu Kyung; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Lim, Chul Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gye

    2012-07-01

    Available data about reflux patterns and symptom determinants in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) subtypes off proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy are lacking. We aimed to evaluate reflux patterns and determinants of symptom perception in patients with GERD off PPI therapy by impedance-pH monitoring. We retrospectively reviewed the impedance-pH data in patients diagnosed as GERD based on results of impedance-pH monitoring, endoscopy and/or typical symptoms. The characteristics of acid and weakly acidic reflux were evaluated. Symptomatic and asymptomatic reflux were compared according to GERD subtypes and individual symptoms. Forty-two patients (22 males, mean age 46 years) were diagnosed as GERD (17 erosive reflux disease, 9 pH(+) non-erosive reflux disease [NERD], 9 hypersensitive esophagus and 7 symptomatic NERD). A total of 1,725 reflux episodes were detected (855 acid [50%], 857 weakly acidic [50%] and 13 weakly alkaline reflux [Acid reflux was more frequently symptomatic and bolus clearance was longer compared with weakly acidic reflux. In terms of globus, weakly acidic reflux was more symptomatic. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed reflux; these associations were more pronounced in erosive reflux disease and symptomatic NERD. The perception of regurgitation was related to acid reflux, while that of globus was more related to weakly acidic reflux. In patients not taking PPI, acid reflux was more frequently symptomatic and had longer bolus clearance. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed type; however, weakly acidic reflux was associated more with globus. These data suggest a role for impedance-pH data in the evaluation of globus.

  17. Comparison of the Carlsson-Dent and GERD-Q questionnaires for gastroesophageal reflux disease symptom detection in a general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Omaña, R; Sánchez-Reyes, O; Ángeles-Granados, E

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is an extremely common pathology in the general population and one of the main reasons for consultation in gastroenterology. There are different instruments for detecting its symptoms, but few studies comparing one tool with another have been conducted in Mexico. To compare the effectiveness of the Carlsson-Dent questionnaire (CDQ) and the GERD-Q questionnaire (GQQ) in detecting GERD symptoms in a general population. A prospective, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted on 220 individuals in an open population within the time frame of May-June 2015. The subjects were evaluated through the self-assessment CDQ and GQQ. The positive scores from the CDQ (≥ 4) were compared with those of the GQQ (≥ 8), to determine which of the two instruments more easily detected patients with GERD symptoms. Fifty-seven percent of the patients were men and the mean patient age was 38.1 years. Fifty percent of the subjects presented with GERD symptoms with a positive score in at least one questionnaire; 45% had positive CDQ results and 23% had positive GQQ results. Fifty-seven percent of the patients with a positive CDQ score presented with overweight/obesity, as did 72% of the patients with a positive GQQ result. Finally, 20% of the individuals had positive results for reflux symptoms in both questionnaires. There was a prevalence of GERD symptoms in 50% of the individuals studied from a general population. The GQQ detected a greater number of GERD symptoms in patients that presented with overweight/obesity and the CDQ was considered easier for patients to understand and answer. It is striking that there was only 20% agreement between the two questionnaires, suggesting that they may be useful for identifying GERD symptoms in different populations. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Characteristics of refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms -is switching proton pump inhibitors based on the patient's CYP2C19 genotype an effective management strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Oota, Kazuhiro; Harada, Satoshi; Edogawa, Shoko; Kojima, Yuichi; Sanomura, Makoto; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Hayashi, Katsuyoshi; Hongoh, Yasushi; Itabashi, Tsukasa; Kitae, Hidehiro; Hoshimoto, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Nozomi; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    We investigated factors related to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) -refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms, particularly with respect to acid, the CYP2C19 genotype and psychological aspects. Patients with an Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of GERD (FSSG) score of ≥8 after the initial treatment were switched to therapy with rabeprazole at a dose of 20 mg once daily for eight weeks. We investigated the rate of improvement in PPI-refractory GERD symptoms, background factors, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) score and the CYP2C19 genotype. Patients Sixty patients endoscopically diagnosed with reflux esophagitis within the past six months who had received omeprazole at a dose of 20 mg once daily for eight weeks or longer were enrolled. In 71.6% of the patients, the FSSG score decreased to GERD symptoms. Significant factors related to omeprazole-refractory GERD symptoms included a longer disease duration (p=0.0004) and higher HADS score (p=0.01). Among the omeprazole-refractory cases, only 23.5% of the patients showed symptom improvement after switching to rabeprazole. There were no significant differences in the average scores for FSSG (p=0.089) or HADS (p=0.182), before or after the drug change. A total of 92% of the rabeprazole poor responders were homo/hetero extensive metabolizers for the CYP2C19 genotype. Our findings suggest that switching the PPI from omeprazole (20 mg once daily) to rabeprazole (20 mg once daily) is not a significant effective therapeutic strategy for improving PPI-refractory GERD symptoms, taking into consideration possible psychometric factors and patients who require stronger acid suppression than that achieved with a double dose of PPIs for PPI-refractory GERD symptoms.

  19. Bile Reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the upper part of your small intestine (duodenum). Bile reflux into the stomach Bile and food mix ... properly, and bile washes back into the stomach. Bile reflux into the esophagus Bile and stomach acid ...

  20. Risks and benefits of antireflux operations in neurologically impaired children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgstein, E. S.; Heij, H. A.; Beugelaar, J. D.; Ekkelkamp, S.; Vos, A.

    1994-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER) in neurologically impaired children often causes feeding problems and complications of oesophagitis and is frequently resistant to medical treatment. Fifty neurologically impaired children underwent anterior gastropexy as anti-reflux operation, combined with

  1. Reflux perception and the esophageal mucosal barrier in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenborg, P.W.

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Heartburn, regurgitation and chest pain are the key symptoms. Patients with reflux symptoms often have more than average reflux of acidic contents in the esophagus. However, frequently there is

  2. Clinical characteristics and psychosocial impact of different reflux time in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiann-Hwa; Wen, Shu-Hui; Hsu, Ching-Sheng; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Chen, Chien-Lin; Wang, Chia-Chi

    2017-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is an emerging disease, and can impair quality of life and sleep. This study aimed to investigate whether GERD patients with different timings of reflux symptoms have different clinical characteristics. This study prospectively enrolled individuals who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy during a health checkup. Each participant completed all questionnaires including Reflux Disease Questionnaire, Nighttime GERD questionnaire, Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Combined reflux was defined as the timing of reflux symptoms occurring at both daytime and nighttime. A total of 2604 participants were enrolled. Of them, 651 symptomatic GERD patients, according to the Reflux Disease Questionnaire score, were recruited for final analysis. Of them, 224 (34.4%) had erosive esophagitis on endoscopy. According to the timing of reflux symptoms, 184 (28.3%) were assigned to the daytime reflux group, 71 (10.9%) to the nighttime reflux group, and 396 (60.8%) to the combined reflux group. In post hoc analysis, the combined reflux group had a significantly higher Reflux Disease Questionnaire score than the daytime reflux group (p reflux groups had higher body mass index and longer duration (> 12 years) of education than the daytime reflux group (p reflux of have more troublesome symptoms than those with daytime reflux. GERD patients with different timings of reflux symptoms have different clinical characteristics in terms of body mass index and duration of education, but not in terms of esophageal inflammation, quality of sleep, and psychosocial status. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Charumathi Raghu; Triadafilopoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents into the esophagus causes troublesome symptoms, esophageal injury, and/or complications. Use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) remains the standard therapy for GERD and is effective in most patients. Those whose symptoms are refractory to PPIs should be evaluated further and other treatment options should be considered, according to individual patient characteristics. Response to PPIs could be total (no symptoms), partial (residual breakthrough symptoms), or absent (no change in symptoms). Patients experiencing complete response do not usually need further management. Patients with partial response can be treated surgically or by using emerging endoscopic therapies. Patients who exhibit no response to PPI need further evaluation to rule out other causes. PMID:25274499

  4. Radiological findings after gastrectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedl, P.; Polterauer, P.; Funovics, J.

    1980-06-01

    In 63 patients after total gastrectomy and reconstruction of the small bowel described by Beal-Longmire, Roux and Tomoda radiological findings were correlated with clinical symptoms. No correlation could be found between clinical symptoms of dumping and oesophagitis caused by reflux on one side and increased length of intestinal transit time, increased diameter of intestinal loops and gastro-oesophageal reflux on the other side. Enlarged blind loops after termino-lateral oesophago-jejunostomy and insufficient ligations (operation technique by Tomoda) were correlated with higher incidence of pains. Patients operated by the method of Beal-Longmire and Roux showed better results than those operated with the method of Tomoda.

  5. Prevalence of eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms: A cross-sectional study from a tertiary care hospital in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruah, Bhaskarjyoti; Kumar, Tarun; Das, Prasenjit; Thakur, Bhaskar; Sreenivas, Vishnubatla; Ahuja, Vineet; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Makharia, Govind K

    2017-09-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is being recognized increasingly all over the globe; Indian data is however sparse. We screened patients with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) for presence of EoE in them. Consecutive patients with symptoms suggestive of GERD underwent gastroduodenoscopy and esophageal biopsies, obtained from both the upper esophagus (5 cm below the upper esophageal sphincter) and lower esophagus (5 cm above gastroesophageal junction), as well as from any other endoscopically visible abnormal mucosa. Demographic and clinical characteristics, endoscopic findings, peripheral blood eosinophilic count, and history of use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) were analyzed. Stool examination was done to rule out parasitoids. EoE was diagnosed if number of mucosal eosinophil infiltrate was >20 per high-power field. In the latter, Warthin-Starry stain was performed to rule out presence of H elicobacter pylori. Of 190 consecutive patients with symptoms of GERD screened, esophageal biopsies were available in 185 cases. Of them, 6 had EoE, suggesting a prevalence of 3.2% among patients with GERD. On univariate analysis, history of allergy, non-response to PPI, and absolute eosinophil counts and on multivariable analysis, history of allergy and no response to PPIs were significant predictors of EoE. Presence of EOE did not correlate with severity of reflux symptoms. In this hospital-based study from northern part of India, prevalence of EoE in patients with GERD was 3.2%. EoE should be considered as a diagnostic possibility, especially in those with history of allergy, no-response to PPI, and absolute eosinophil count of ≥250/cumm.

  6. A population-based survey of the epidemiology of symptom-defined gastroesophageal reflux disease: the Systematic Investigation of Gastrointestinal Diseases in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Jia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidemiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has yet to be investigated using the symptomatic threshold criteria recommended by the Montreal Definition. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of symptom-defined GERD across five regions of China, and to investigate variables associated with GERD. Methods A representative sample of 18 000 adults (aged 18-80 years were selected equally from rural and urban areas in each region (n = 1800. According to the Montreal Definition, GERD is present when mild symptoms of heartburn and/or regurgitation occur on ≥2 days a week, or moderate-to-severe symptoms of heartburn and/or regurgitation occur on ≥1 day a week. Results In total, 16 091 participants completed the survey (response rate: 89.4% and 16 078 responses were suitable for analysis. Applying the Montreal criteria, the prevalence of symptom-defined GERD was 3.1% and varied significantly (p Conclusions This population-based survey found that the prevalence of symptom-defined GERD in China was 3.1%, which is lower than that found in Western countries.

  7. Role of Acid and Weakly Acidic Reflux in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Off Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Hea Jung; Cho, Yu Kyung; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Lim, Chul Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gye

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Available data about reflux patterns and symptom determinants in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) subtypes off proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy are lacking. We aimed to evaluate reflux patterns and determinants of symptom perception in patients with GERD off PPI therapy by impedance-pH monitoring. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the impedance-pH data in patients diagnosed as GERD based on results of impedance-pH monitoring, endoscopy and/or typical symptoms. T...

  8. Multicenter, randomized, double-blind study comparing 20 and 40 mg of pantoprazole for symptom relief in adolescents (12 to 16 years of age) with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    An age-appropriate questionnaire (GASP-Q) was used to assess the frequency and severity of the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms: abdominal/belly pain, chest pain/heartburn, pain after eating, nausea, burping/belching, vomiting/regurgitation, choking when eating, and difficulty swallow...

  9. Weight loss and waist reduction is associated with improvement in gastroesophageal disease reflux symptoms: A longitudinal study of 15 295 subjects undergoing health checkups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S-K; Lee, T; Yang, H-J; Park, J H; Sohn, C I; Ryu, S; Park, D I

    2017-05-01

    General obesity and abdominal obesity is an established risk factor of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, the influence of weight or waist change on improvement of GERD is unclear. Our aim was to investigate if weight loss or waist reduction improves GERD symptoms and esophagitis. A retrospective longitudinal study of 15 295 subjects who underwent gastroscopy for a health checkup and reported GERD symptoms between 2011 and 2013, and repeated a checkup until 2014 was conducted. The improvement of GERD symptoms and esophagitis according to weight loss (≥-2, -0.5 to -2 kg/m 2 in body mass index [BMI]), waist reduction (≥-5, -0.1 to -0.5 cm) and baseline BMI/waist circumference (WC) categories was assessed using logistic regression. Weight loss or waist reduction was associated with improvement in GERD symptoms only in subjects with general or abdominal obesity. Among subjects with general obesity (BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 ) and decreased ≥2 kg/m 2 in BMI, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of improvement in GERD symptoms was 2.34 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.70-2.83). Among subjects with abdominal obesity (WC ≥90 cm) and decreased ≥5 cm in WC, the corresponding OR was 2.16 (95% CI 1.56-2.90). There was no association between weight loss or waist reduction and improvement in esophagitis. Weight loss or waist reduction was associated with improvement in GERD symptoms only in subjects with general or abdominal obesity. Weight loss or waist reduction will be an important treatment option in obese patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The effect of dietary carbohydrate on gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Keng-Liang; Kuo, Chung-Mou; Yao, Chih-Chien; Tai, Wei-Chen; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Lim, Chee-Sang; Chiu, Yi-Chun

    2018-01-12

    Acid changes in gastroesophageal reflux with vary component in the food have less been studied, especially carbohydrate. We plan to clarify the effect of different carbohydrate density on low esophageal acid and reflux symptoms of patients with gastroesophgeal reflux disease. Twelve patients (52 ± 12 years old; five female) with gastroesophageal reflux disease were recruited for the prospective crossover study. Each patient was invited for panendoscope, manometry and 24 h pH monitor. The two formulated liquid meal, test meal A: 500 ml liquid meal (containing 84.8 g carbohydrate) and B: same volume liquid meal (but 178.8 g carbohydrate) were randomized supplied as lunch or dinner. Reflux symptoms were recorded. There are significant statistic differences in more Johnson-DeMeester score (p = 0.019), total reflux time (%) (p = 0.028), number of reflux periods (p = 0.026) and longest reflux (p = 0.015) after high carbohydrate diet than low carbohydrate. Total reflux time and number of long reflux periods more than 5 min are significant more after high carbohydrate diet. More acid reflux symptoms are found after high carbohydrate diet. High carbohydrate diet could induce more acid reflux in low esophagus and more reflux symptoms in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and dietary behaviors are significant correlates of short sleep duration in the general population: the Nagahama Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kimihiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Muro, Shigeo; Yamada, Ryo; Setoh, Kazuya; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Kosugi, Shinji; Sekine, Akihiro; Nakayama, Takeo; Mishima, Michiaki; Chiba, Tsutomu; Chin, Kazuo; Matsuda, Fumihiko

    2014-11-01

    To examine relationships among gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms, dietary behaviors, and sleep duration in the general population. Cross-sectional. Community-based. There were 9,643 participants selected from the general population (54 ± 13 y). None. Sleep duration, sleep habits, and unfavorable dietary behaviors of each participant were assessed with a structured questionnaire. Participants were categorized into five groups according to their sleep duration: less than 5 h, 5 to less than 6 h, 6 to less than 7 h, 7 to less than 8 h, and 8 or more h per day. GERD was evaluated using the Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of GERD (FSSG) and participants having an FSSG score of 8 or more or those under treatment of GERD were defined as having GERD. Trend analysis showed that both the FSSG score and the number of unfavorable dietary habits increased with decreasing sleep duration. Further, multiple logistic regression analysis showed that both the presence of GERD (odds ratio = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.07-1.32) and the number of unfavorable dietary behaviors (odds ratio = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.13-1.26) were independent and potent factors to identify participants with short sleep duration even after controlling for other confounding factors. The current study showed that both GERD symptoms and unfavorable dietary behaviors were significant correlates of short sleep duration independently of each other in a large sample from the general population.

  12. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Sleep Quality in a Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Jyh Chen

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study highlights the adverse effect of gastroesophageal reflux on sleep, even in the absence of reflux symptoms. This finding has therapeutic implications in patients with silent erosive disease, and future trials are warranted.

  13. Scintigraphic evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    When patients have symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease, their symptoms usually respond to conventional therapeutic measures. In some patients, however, the symptoms may persist despite the application of standard treatment regimens. It is in these instances that the clinician may employ extensive diagnostic tests to determine the cause of the patient's complaints. Because the introduction of gastroesophageal scintigraphy, a number of other techniques were employed to evaluate gastroesophageal reflux. These include barium esophagography, barium cineesophagography; endoscopy; esophageal mucosal biopsy; esophageal manometry; the acid-clearance test; and acid-reflux testing. Each of the nonscintigraphic techniques has a limitation either in its sensitivity or in the requirement for endogastric intubation. In addition, with the exception of the scintigraphic method, none of the tests permits quantitation of reflux

  14. Greater loss of productivity among Japanese workers with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms that persist vs resolve on medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H; Matsuzaki, J; Masaoka, T; Inadomi, J M

    2014-06-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) impairs quality of life; however, the association between GERD and work productivity has not been well investigated in Japan. This study was designed to compare the impact of GERD on productivity between Japanese workers with GERD symptoms that persisted vs resolved on medical therapy. A cross-sectional Web-based survey was conducted in workers. The impact of GERD on work and daily productivity was evaluated using a Web-reported Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire for patients with GERD and a GERD symptom severity Questionnaire. Demographic information, clinical history, and satisfaction with GERD medication were also ascertained. A total of 20 000 subjects were invited to the survey. After the exclusion of patients with a history of gastrointestinal (GI) malignancy, peptic ulcer, upper GI surgery, and unemployment, 650 participants were included in the analysis. Participants with persistent GERD symptoms reported a significantly greater losses of work productivity (11.4 ± 13.4 h/week), absenteeism (0.7 ± 3.1 h/week), presenteeism (10.7 ± 12.6 h/week), costs (20 100 ± 26 800 JPY/week), and lower daily productivity (71.3% [95% confidence interval, 69.0-73.7]) than those whose symptoms were alleviated with medications. The level of dissatisfaction with GERD medications among participants with persistent GERD symptoms was significantly correlated with loss of work and daily productivity (p < 0.001). GERD places a significant burden on work and daily productivity despite medical therapy. Ineffective GERD therapy is associated with greater productivity loss. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Sleep disorders — a doctor's nightmare

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    chronic pain and gastro- oesophageal reflux which are ... Extrinsic sleep disorders (includes medication/drug-related causes, poor sleep hygiene .... avoid functional impairment and the possible ... flow and chest and abdominal movement.

  16. Effect of Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol, a cannabinoid receptor agonist, on the triggering of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations in dogs and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumont, H.; Jensen, J.; Carlsson, A.; Ruth, M.; Lehmann, A.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are the main mechanism underlying gastro-oesophageal reflux and are a potential pharmacological treatment target. We evaluated the effect of the CB(1)/CB(2) receptor agonist Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux disease-related symptom recurrence in patients discontinuing proton pump inhibitors for Bravo wireless esophageal pH monitoring study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Schey

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD are treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs. Those that do not achieve symptom relief, or non-responders, usually undergo esophageal pH monitoring off PPIs in order to confirm the presence of GERD. Aims: To assess the efficacy of the reverse-PPI trial in evaluating the presence of GERD or its recurrence rates, as well as to identify a correlation between the symptom recurrence rates and GERD severity determined by 48-hour Bravo esophageal pH-monitor testing. Methods: A final total of 205 patients that underwent the 48-hour Bravo esophageal pH-monitoring study were retrospectively included. Patients discontinued PPI usage for at least 7 days prior to testing, and completed symptom questionnaires during the 2-day test. The Bravo test was considered positive if the percentage of time with esophageal pH 4.4%. Results: A total of 363 patients underwent 48-hour Bravo testing and of those patients, 205 were eligible for the study. Ninety-two patients reported symptoms as being «same/better» and 113 as being «worse» after stopping PPIs. Of the 92 patients with improved symptoms, 44 (48% had documented acid reflux during the Bravo study, compared with 65 of 113 (58% patients with worsening symptoms that also complained of acid reflux. Of the 109 patients found to have confirmed GERD upon pH monitoring, 65 (59.6% reported a worsening of symptoms, compared with 48 of 96 (50.0% patients without GERD (p = 0.043. Main symptoms stated to be worse included heartburn, chest pain, regurgitation, nausea, and belching (p  7 days (p = 0.042 Conclusion: Symptom exacerbation following PPI cessation for at least 7 days correlated with acid reflux severity assessed by Bravo testing. Patients off PPIs for 7 days had a higher likelihood of experiencing worsening symptoms, compared with those off PPIs for more than 7 days. These findings suggest that when PPIs are held for 7 days or less prior to

  18. [Prevalence of symptoms and risk factors of the gastro esophageal reflux disease at school students of the Republic of Tyva].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsinskaya, V L

    2014-01-01

    For the purpose of the analysis of risk factors of formation of a gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children's population of the Republic of Tyva examination of school students of Kyzyl is conducted. 2185 pupils (1746 schoolchildren of radical and 439 schoolchildren of the alien population) took part in research. Inspection included an interview by means of the questionnaire developed on the basis of a questionnaire of Mayo Clinic; clinical examination, somatometry and somatometry typing. 203 schoolchildren with complaints to heartburn the fibroesophagogastroduodenoscopy is carried out. Complaints to heartburn showed 11,8% of schoolchildren of radical and 16,6% of pupils of the alien population (p = 0,01). Weekly heartburn was noted by 1,4% of Tuvinians and 2,3% of pupils of the alien population. School students with complaints to heartburn in most cases have no endoscopic signs of damage of a gullet: esophagitis is revealed only at 1% surveyed. The risk of emergence of GERD is higher at the high school age, at the burdened heredity, early artificial feeding, existence of food allergy; the insufficient use of products with the high maintenance of a protein. Risk factors are also disharmonious physical development (high growth and excess body weight), the brahimorphious type of a constitution and accessory to macrosomatotype.

  19. Potentiated clinoptilolite: artificially enhanced aluminosilicate reduces symptoms associated with endoscopically negative gastroesophageal reflux disease and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potgieter W

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Wilna Potgieter, Caroline Selma Samuels, Jacques Renè SnymanDepartment of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, Gauteng, South AfricaPurpose: The cation exchanger, a potentiated clinoptilolite (Absorbatox™ 2.4D, is a synthetically enhanced aluminosilicate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible benefits of a potentiated clinoptilolite as a gastroprotective agent in reducing the severity of clinical symptoms and signs associated with 1 endoscopically negative gastroesophageal reflux disease (ENGORD and 2 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID medication.Methods and patients: Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot studies, the ENGORD and NSAID studies, were conducted. After initial negative gastroscopy, a total of 25 patients suffering from ENGORD were randomized to receive either placebo capsules or 750 mg Absorbatox twice daily for 14 days. The NSAID study recruited 23 healthy patients who received orally either 1,500 mg Absorbatox or placebo three times daily, plus 500 mg naproxen twice daily. Patients underwent gastroscopic evaluation of their stomach linings prior to and on day 14 of the study. Gastric biopsies were obtained and evaluated via the upgraded Sydney system, whereas visible gastric events and status of the gastric mucosa were evaluated via a 0–3 rating scale. During both studies, patients recorded gastric symptoms in a daily symptom diary.Results: In the ENGORD study, patients who received the potentiated clinoptilolite reported a significant reduction (P≤0.05 in severity of symptoms including reduction in heartburn (44%, discomfort (54%, and pain (56%. Symptom-free days improved by 41% compared to the group who received placebo (not significant. This was over and above the benefits seen with the proton pump inhibitor. In the NSAID study, the reduction in gastric symptom severity was echoed in the group who received the potentiated

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kault, B.; Halvorsen, T.; Petersen, H.; Grette, K.; Myrvold, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Radionucleotide scintigraphy and esophagoscopy with biopsy were carried out in 101 patients with symptoms strongly suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease. GER was visualized by scintigraphy in 86.1% of the patients. Endoscopic and histologic esophagitis were found in 68.1% and 58.4% of the patients, respectively, whereas both examinations taken together showed evidence of esophagitis in 82%. Histologic evidence of esophagitis was found in nearly all patients with severe endoscopic changes, and in 43.7% of the patients with no endoscopic abnormality. Scintigraphic reflux was demonstrated more frequently (p<0.05) in the patients with severe endoscopic esophagitis (97.5%) than in those with no or only mild endoscopic changes (78.6%). Scintigraphic reflux was found in 91.5% and 78.5% of the patients with and without histologic evidence of esophagitis (p=0.07). 15 of the 18 patients (83.3%) without endoscopic and histologic abnormalities in the esophagus had scintigraphic evidence of reflux. The present study strongly supports the clinical significance of scintigraphy in GER disease and confirms that esophageal biopsy specimens increase the sensitivity of endoscopic evaluation

  1. Vesicoureteral Reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the ureter if a child’s valve doesn’t work properly. The doctor provides the treatment using general anesthesia and a child can usually go home the same day. Secondary vesicoureteral reflux Doctors treat secondary VUR after finding the exact cause of the condition . Treatment may include surgery to ...

  2. Effect of asthma and PTSD on persistence and onset of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms among adults exposed to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiehui; Brackbill, Robert M; Jordan, Hannah T; Cone, James E; Farfel, Mark R; Stellman, Steven D

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the direction of causality among asthma, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and onset of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS) after exposure to the 9/11/2001 World Trade Center (WTC) disaster. Using data from the WTC Health Registry, we investigated the effects of early diagnosed post-9/11 asthma and PTSD on the late onset and persistence of GERS using log-binomial regression, and examined whether PTSD mediated the asthma-GERS association using structural equation modeling. Of 29,406 enrollees, 23% reported GERS at follow-up in 2011-2012. Early post-9/11 asthma and PTSD were each independently associated with both the persistence of GERS that was present at baseline and the development of GERS in persons without a prior history. PTSD mediated the association between early post-9/11 asthma and late-onset GERS. Clinicians should assess patients with post-9/11 GERS for comorbid asthma and PTSD, and plan medical care for these conditions in an integrated fashion. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:805-814, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Randomised clinical trial: the clinical efficacy and safety of an alginate-antacid (Gaviscon Double Action) versus placebo, for decreasing upper gastrointestinal symptoms in symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J; Yang, C; Zhao, H; Zheng, P; Wilkinson, J; Ng, B; Yuan, Y

    2015-10-01

    There is a paucity of large-scale studies evaluating the clinical benefit of the Gaviscon Double Action (DA) alginate-antacid formulation for treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms. Randomised double-blind placebo-controlled parallel-group study to evaluate efficacy and safety of Gaviscon DA in reducing heartburn, regurgitation and dyspepsia symptoms in individuals with mild-to-moderate GERD in China. Participants with symptomatic GERD (n = 1107) were randomised to receive Gaviscon DA or placebo (two tablets four times daily) for seven consecutive days. The primary endpoint compared the change in Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ) score for the GERD (heartburn + regurgitation) dimension between Gaviscon DA and placebo. Secondary endpoints compared the change in RDQ scores for individual heartburn, regurgitation and dyspepsia dimensions, overall treatment evaluation (OTE) scores and incidence of adverse events (AEs). Mean RDQ GERD scores: 2.51 for Gaviscon DA and 2.50 for placebo at baseline; 1.25 for Gaviscon DA and 1.46 for placebo post treatment. Gaviscon DA was statistically superior to placebo in reducing GERD and dyspepsia RDQ scores [least-squares mean (LSM) difference: GERD -0.21, P GERD symptoms was observed both in those with non-erosive and those with erosive reflux disease (LSM difference -0.14 [P = 0.038] and -0.29 [P GERD. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01869491. © 2015 The Authors. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Asthma symptoms improvement in moderate persistent asthma patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD: the role of proton-pump inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus D. Susanto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate effect of proton pump inhibitor (esomeprazole on asthma symptoms, use of inhaled bronchodilator and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR in moderate persistent asthma with gastroesofageal refluks disease (GERD. This randomized single blind, controlled clinical trial study was conducted at Persahabatan Hospital, Jakarta from July 2004 until October 2005. Samples were moderate persistent asthma patients with GERD. GERD is diagnosed GERD symptoms and proof of oesophagitis from endoscopy and or histapatologic examination from oesophagus biopsy. Phase 1:2 week run-in period patient received inhaled budesonide 2x200 ug/day. Phase 2: patient randomised to receive inhaled budesonide 2 x 400 ug/day with esomeprazole 40 mg/day or without esomeprazole (control group for 8 weeks. Phase 3: 4 week wash out period, patient receive inhaled budesonide 2 x 200 ug/day. Diary cards were assessed at run-in periode, after treatment 4 weeks, 8 weeks and wash out. There were 32 patients (23 female and 9 male completed the study. Mean total asthma symptoms score daily were significantly decreased on esomeprazole vs without esomeprazole after 8 weeks (-2.29 vs -0.90; p < 0.05. Mean use of inhaled bronchodilator was significantly decreased on esomeprazole vs without esomeprazole after 8 weeks (-1.09 vs -0.42; p < 0.05. Morning and evening PEFR improved higher on esomeprazole than without esomeprazol but were not significantly difference. In conclusion, administration esomeprazole 40 mg daily improved asthma symptoms and lower the use of inhaled bronchodilator in moderate persistent asthma patients with GERD. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 169-74Keywords: Asthma symptoms, inhaled bronchodilator, moderate persistent asthma, GERD, esomeprazole

  5. Development and validation of a simple and multifaceted instrument, GERD-TEST, for the clinical evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux and dyspeptic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Koji; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko; Oshio, Atsushi; Joh, Takashi; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Haruma, Ken

    2017-07-28

    To evaluate the psychometric properties of a newly developed questionnaire, known as the gastroesophageal reflux and dyspepsia therapeutic efficacy and satisfaction test (GERD-TEST), in patients with GERD. Japanese patients with predominant GERD symptoms recruited according to the Montreal definition were treated for 4 wk using a standard dose of proton pump inhibitor (PPI). The GERD-TEST and the Medical Outcome Study Short Form-8 Health Survey (SF-8) were administered at baseline and after 4 wk of treatment. The GERD-TEST contains three domains: the severity of GERD and functional dyspepsia (FD) symptoms (5 items), the level of dissatisfaction with daily life (DS) (4 items), and the therapeutic efficacy as assessed by the patients and medication compliance (4 items). A total of 290 patients were eligible at baseline; 198 of these patients completed 4 wk of PPI therapy. The internal consistency reliability as evaluated using the Cronbach's α values for the GERD, FD and DS subscales ranged from 0.75 to 0.82. The scores for the GERD, FD and DS items/subscales were significantly correlated with the physical and mental component summary scores of the SF-8. After 4 wk of PPI treatment, the scores for the GERD items/subscales were greatly reduced, ranging in value from 1.51 to 1.87 and with a large effect size ( P GERD items/subscales were observed between treatment responders and non-responders ( P GERD-TEST has a good reliability, a good convergent and concurrent validity, and is responsive to the effects of treatment. The GERD-TEST is a simple, easy to understand, and multifaceted PRO instrument applicable to both clinical trials and the primary care of GERD patients.

  6. Reflux in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    What are reflux (GER) and GERD? The esophagus is the tube that carries food from your mouth to your stomach. If your child has reflux, his or ... into the esophagus. Another name for reflux is gastroesophageal reflux (GER). GERD stands for gastroesophageal reflux disease. It ...

  7. Reflux in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    What are reflux (GER) and GERD? The esophagus is the tube that carries food from your mouth to your stomach. If your baby has reflux, his or ... into the esophagus. Another name for reflux is gastroesophageal reflux (GER). GERD stands for gastroesophageal reflux disease. It ...

  8. [Association between acid reflux and esophageal dysmotility in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhi-hui; Feng, Li; Wen, Mao-yao; Liu, Jian-rong; Yang, Li

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the association between esophageal motility and acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A total of 94 patients with typical reflux symptoms such as heartburn, regurgitation and chest pain, whose score (Sc) of reflux diagnostic questionnaire (RDQ) was greater than or equal to 12 were enrolled in the study. Each participant was evaluated by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, high resolution manometry (HRM) of esophagus and 24 h esophageal pH monitoring. The participants were divided into groups of reflux esophagitis (RE) and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) on the basis of endoscopy findings. The 24 h esophageal pH monitoring categorized participants into physiologic reflux (pH) and pathologic reflux (pH+). The characteristics of esophageal motility and acid reflux were compared between the two groups of participants. Lower but non-significant differences (P > 0.05) were found in pressure of lower esophageal sphincter (LESP), length of lower esophageal sphincter (LESL), esophageal contraction amplitude (CA), distal contractile integral (DCI) and effective peristalsis proportion (EPP) in the participants in the RE group compared with those in the NERD group. Participants in the RE group had significantly higher prevalence of reduced LESP (63.0% vs. 31.7%, P 0.05). RE is closely associated with acid reflux and hiatus hernia. Esophageal dysmotility is more likely to appear in patients with pH+. The interaction of acid reflux and esophageal dysmotility may play a role in GERD.

  9. Causes of, and Therapeutic Approaches for, Proton Pump Inhibitor-Resistant Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Ishihara, Shunji

    2008-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the most widely used drugs for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, approximately 20% of patients with reflux esophagitis and 40% of those with nonerosive reflux diseases complain of troublesome symptoms, even during treatment with PPIs. In patients with reflux esophagitis, dose escalation and co-administration with a histamine ...

  10. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Douglas C

    2016-08-01

    Despite the frequency with which antireflux procedures are performed, decisions about gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment remain challenging. Several factors contribute to the difficulties in managing gastroesophageal reflux. First, the distinction between physiologic and pathologic gastroesophageal reflux (gastroesophageal reflux disease-GERD) is not always clear. Second, measures of the extent of gastroesophageal reflux often poorly correlate to symptoms or other complications attributed to reflux in infants and children. A third challenge is that the outcome of antireflux procedures, predominately fundoplications, are relatively poorly characterized. All of these factors contribute to difficulty in knowing when to recommend antireflux surgery. One of the manifestations of the uncertainties surrounding GERD is the high degree of variability in the utilization of pediatric antireflux procedures throughout the United States. Pediatric surgeons are frequently consulted for GERD and fundoplication, uncertainties notwithstanding. Although retrospective series and anecdotal observations support fundoplication in some patients, there are many important questions for which sufficient high-quality data to provide a clear answer is lacking. In spite of this, surgeons need to provide guidance to patients and families while awaiting the development of improved evidence to aid in these recommendations. The purpose of this article is to define what is known and what is uncertain, with an emphasis on the most recent evidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Regional oesophageal sensitivity to acid and weakly acidic reflux in patients with non-erosive reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerenziani, S; Ribolsi, M; Sifrim, D; Blondeau, K; Cicala, M

    2009-03-01

    The mechanisms underlying symptoms in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) remain to be elucidated. Non-erosive reflux disease patients appear to be more sensitive to intraluminal stimula than erosive patients, the proximal oesophagus being the most sensitive. In order to assess regional oesophageal changes in reflux acidity and sensitivity to reflux, according either to the acidity or the composition of the refluxate, combined multiple pH and multiple pH-impedance (pH-MII) was performed in 16 NERD patients. According to multiple pH-metry, 29% and 12% of reflux events reached the middle and proximal oesophagus respectively, and 35% and 19% according to conventional pH-MII (P acid reflux became weakly acidic at the proximal oesophagus. In all patients, the frequency of symptomatic refluxes, both acid and weakly acidic, was significantly higher at the proximal, compared with distal oesophagus (25 +/- 8%vs 11 +/- 2% for acid reflux and 27 +/- 8%vs 8 +/- 2% for weakly acidic reflux; P reflux. As approximately 30% of acid reflux becomes weakly acidic along the oesophageal body, to better characterize proximal reflux, in clinical practice, combined proximal pH-impedance monitoring should be used. In NERD patients, the proximal oesophagus seems to be more sensitive to both acid and weakly acidic reflux.

  12. Patterns of reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease in pediatric population of New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sarath Kumar; Cohen, Ralph Clinton; Karpelowsky, Jonathan Saul

    2017-02-01

    This study is to determine the association of ambulatory pH monitoring (24hr pH) with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and its other investigations. The clinical and epidemiological profiles of subjects referred for reflux disorders are also studied. Symptoms or group of symptoms, profiles and prior investigations of 1259 consecutive pediatric subjects (with 1332 24hr pH studies performed) referred for evaluation of reflux disorders between 1988 and 2012 were retrospectively studied. Chi-square or fisher exact test was used for hypothesis testing, student t-test for the comparison of means and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test for comparing medians of continuous variables. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), defined as reflux causing major symptoms and complications, was diagnosed in 57.5% subjects of the total sample. Forty-three percent were girls and 56.7% were boys. The most common age group was between 4 months and 2 years (51.2%). Vomiting (64.4%) and irritability (74%) were the most common symptoms with the neurological conditions (23.2%) being the most frequent underlying condition. The parameters used in 24hr pH were significantly higher in those diagnosed with GERD (P reflux disorders. 24hr pH is reliable and should be considered routine in reflux disorders, as it identifies patients with pathologic reflux and avoids a needless surgery. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  13. Thoracoscopic repair of congenital tracheo-oesophageal fistula manifesting in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrishikesh P Salgaonkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital trcheo-oesophageal fistula (TOF without oesophageal atresia is usually diagnosed and managed in the neonatal period. Its presentation in adulthood is a rarity. Traditional treatment of a TOF in adults involves its repair via a thoracotomy. We report the case of a 23-year-old man diagnosed with an H-type TOF during workup undertaken for his symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux. This fistula located at the level of third thoracic vertebra was repaired successfully using a thoracoscopic approach.

  14. Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease) Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal ... What symptoms are displayed by a child with GERD? While GER and EER in children often cause ...

  15. Acid reflux episodes sensitize the esophagus to perception of weakly acidic and mixed reflux in non-erosive reflux disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerenziani, S; Ribolsi, M; Guarino, M P L; Balestrieri, P; Altomare, A; Rescio, M P; Cicala, M

    2014-01-01

    Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients are more sensitive than erosive esophagitis patients to weakly acidic reflux and to the presence of gas in the refluxate. Intra-esophageal acid perfusion sensitizes esophageal receptors to mechanical and chemical stimuli. To establish whether acid sensitization plays a role in the perception of weakly acidic and mixed reflux episodes, 29 NERD patients, responders and 14 non-responders to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), underwent pH-impedance monitoring. Non-responders repeated the study while on PPIs. To assess the effect of acid exposure on symptom perception, the time period with pH below 4 was measured in 15- and 30-minute time-windows preceding the onset of each reflux episode. Considering weakly acidic and mixed refluxes, both in responder and non-responder patients (off PPIs), the symptomatic refluxes were preceded by a significantly higher cumulative acid exposure than the asymptomatic refluxes. In all patients, following acid reflux, the percentage of symptomatic weakly acidic reflux episodes was significantly higher than that of asymptomatic refluxes. Non-responder patients, off-treatment, were characterized by a lower proportion of weakly acidic reflux and mixed reflux episodes. In the non-responder patients on PPI, only mixed and weakly symptomatic reflux episodes were preceded by a higher cumulative acid exposure. In NERD patients, spontaneous acid reflux enhances subsequent reflux perception, regardless of acidity or liquid/mixed composition of episodes; in non-responder patients on PPIs, only the perception of mixed and weakly acidic reflux episodes seems to be mediated by a preceding acid exposure. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Rohof, Wout O.

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common digestive diseases in the Western world, with typical symptoms, such as heartburn, regurgitation, or retrosternal pain, reported by 15% to 20% of the general population. The pathophysiology of GERD is multifactorial. Our understanding

  17. Nuclear imaging in reflux diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bares, R.

    1988-12-01

    Duodenogastric and gastroesophageal refluxes can be accurately detected by hepatobiliary and gastroesophageal scintigraphy. These procedures are non-invasive and easy to perform. Practical details and evaluation are described. Subsequent to a review of diagnostic results, indications are discussed. Both techniques should be applied in cases where morphological examinations did not yield any pathologic result and clinical symptoms are suggestive for functional disturbances.

  18. Vesicoureteral reflux and reflux nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, H.S.

    1985-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is mainly a primary phenomenon due to incompetence of the ureterovesical junction, mostly affecting a pediatric population. During micturition cystourethrography (MCU) reflux into the kidney - intrarenal reflux (IRR) - is occasionally seen. In areas with IRR the kidney surface may subsequently be depressed and the papillae retracted (reflux nephropathy (RN)). VUR may lead to hypertension and/or end-stage renal failure. Most commonly, VUR is discovered during evaluation for urinary tract infection, but it may also be present in patients with hypertension, toxemia of pregnancy, chronic renal failure and proteinuria, and it may be found in siblings of patients with VUR. For the time being VUR is demonstrated at radiographic MCU, whereas RN is diagnosed by demonstration of focal scars and of abnormal parenchymal thickness at urography. In children with VUR and no abnormalities of calyces or parenchymal defects standardized measurement of the parenchymal thickness at three sites may identify kidneys which are likely to develop focal scars. Quantitation of focal scarring should be performed in connection with a measure of the overall kidney size. The occurrence of IRR is dependent of the papillary morphology, intrapelvic pressure and urine flow. There may be an important relationship between renal ischemia and IRR in producing a 'vicious circle of deleterious effects' which, combined with parenchymal extravasation, may lead to RN. Treatment of VUR includes medical and surgical management. Since renal scarring may occur in infancy, prevention should focus on infants and young children. Infants and young children with severe VUR may have normal urograms. Therefore a MCU should also be performed, preferably with the recommended standardized technique. (orig.)

  19. Gastroesophageal reflux and lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Keith C

    2015-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) can cause respiratory symptoms and may trigger, drive and/or worsen airway disorders, interstitial lung diseases and lung allograft dysfunction. Whether lifestyle changes and acid suppression alone can counter and prevent the adverse effects of GER on the respiratory tract remains unclear. Recent data suggest that antireflux surgery may be more effective in preventing lung disease progression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or lung transplant recipients who have evidence of allograft dysfunction associated with the presence of excessive GER. Additional research and clinical trials are needed to determine the role of GER in various lung disorders and identify which interventions are most efficacious in preventing the respiratory consequences of gastroesophageal reflux disease. In addition, measuring biomarkers that indicate that gastric refluxate has been aspirated into the lower respiratory tract (e.g., pepsin and bile acid concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) may prove helpful in both diagnosis and therapeutic decision making.

  20. Laparoscopic surgery for gastro-esophageal acid reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijven, Marlies P.; Gisbertz, Suzanne S.; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.

    2014-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a troublesome disease for many patients, severely affecting their quality of life. Choice of treatment depends on a combination of patient characteristics and preferences, esophageal motility and damage of reflux, symptom severity and symptom correlation to acid

  1. Reflux and GERD (in Children)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses Print Share Reflux GERD Reflux occurs during or after a meal when ... tube connecting the mouth to the stomach). Reflux & GERD The Difference Between Reflux and GERD in Kids ...

  2. Influence of exercise testing in gastroesophageal reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Filho, Antonio Moreira; Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado Pinto; Nasi, Ary; Eisig, Jaime Natan; Rodrigues, Tomas Navarro; Barbutti, Ricardo Correa; Campos, Josemberg Marins; Chinzon, Decio

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a worldwide prevalent condition that exhibits a large variety of signs and symptoms of esophageal or extra-esophageal nature and can be related to the esophagic adenocarcinoma. In the last few years, greater importance has been given to the influence of physical exercises on it. Some recent investigations, though showing conflicting results, point to an exacerbation of gastroesophageal reflux during physical exercises. To evaluate the influence of physical activities in patients presenting with erosive and non erosive disease by ergometric stress testing and influence of the lower esophageal sphincter tonus and body mass index during this situation. Twenty-nine patients with erosive disease (group I) and 10 patients with non-erosive disease (group II) were prospectively evaluated. All the patients were submitted to clinical evaluation, followed by upper digestive endoscopy, manometry and 24 h esophageal pH monitoring. An ergometric testing was performed 1 h before removing the esophageal pH probe. During the ergometric stress testing, the following variables were analyzed: test efficacy, maximum oxygen uptake, acid reflux duration, gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, influence of the lower esophageal sphincter tonus and influence of body mass index in the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux during these physical stress. Maximum oxigen consumption or VO 2 max, showed significant correlation when it was 70% or higher only in the erosive disease group, evaluating the patients with or without acid reflux during the ergometric testing (p=0,032). The other considered variables didn't show significant correlations between gastroesophageal reflux and physical activity (p>0,05). 1) Highly intensive physical activity can predispose the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux episodes in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with erosive disease; 2) light or short sessions of physical activity have no influence on reflux, regardless of body

  3. Lower pH values of weakly acidic refluxes as determinants of heartburn perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with normal esophageal acid exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bortoli, N; Martinucci, I; Savarino, E; Franchi, R; Bertani, L; Russo, S; Ceccarelli, L; Costa, F; Bellini, M; Blandizzi, C; Savarino, V; Marchi, S

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel impedance pH monitoring has shown that weakly acidic refluxes are able to generate heartburn. However, data on the role of different pH values, ranging between 4 and 7, in the generation of them are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether different pH values of weakly acidic refluxes play a differential role in provoking reflux symptoms in endoscopy-negative patients with physiological esophageal acid exposure time and positive symptom index and symptom association probability for weakly acidic refluxes. One hundred and forty-three consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, nonresponders to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), were allowed a washout from PPIs before undergoing: upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry, and multichannel impedance pH monitoring. In patients with both symptom index and symptom association probability positive for weakly acidic reflux, each weakly acidic reflux was evaluated considering exact pH value, extension, physical characteristics, and correlation with heartburn. Forty-five patients with normal acid exposure time and positive symptom association probability for weakly acidic reflux were identified. The number of refluxes not heartburn related was higher than those heartburn related. In all distal and proximal liquid refluxes, as well as in distal mixed refluxes, the mean pH value of reflux events associated with heartburn was significantly lower than that not associated. This condition was not confirmed for proximal mixed refluxes. Overall, a low pH of weakly acidic reflux represents a determinant factor in provoking heartburn. This observation contributes to better understand the pathophysiology of symptoms generated by weakly acidic refluxes, paving the way toward the search for different therapeutic approaches to this peculiar condition of esophageal hypersensitivity. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  4. Acid reflux management: ENT perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ijaz; Batch, A J G

    2004-01-01

    Otolaryngological manifestations of acid reflux include a wide range of pharyngeal and laryngeal symptoms; and the constellation of symptoms has been called laryngopharyngeal reflux. This is a prospective study in a cohort of patients with various throat symptoms suggestive of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) who underwent flexible oesophago-gastroscopy, as a principal investigation. The aims were to look at the most reliable symptom(s) and sign(s), the diagnostic role of flexible oesophago-gastroscopy and the treatment response in these patients. The endoscopy score of 0 to 3 was based on endoscopic findings and the treatment response was measured from 0 to 100 per cent improvement of symptoms, as described by the patients. There were a total of 303 patients, 174 females and 129 males with ages ranging from 19 to 88 years. Seventy-five per cent had had symptoms for more than a year. Fifteen per cent were smokers. Globus, voice change, sore throat, dysphagia and cough were the predominant symptoms. Most patients, however, presented with a complex of various other secondary symptoms. The endoscopic findings were abnormal in 98 per cent of patients. Apart from the finding of non-specific hyperaemia, usually of the posterior larynx (13 per cent), lesions of the larynx and vocal folds were surprisingly uncommon. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) were prescribed in 90 per cent of patients. A total of 233 (76.8 per cent) responded to treatment. The improvement of symptoms ranged from 25 per cent in 36 (23 per cent), 50 per cent in 60 (20 per cent), 75 per cent in 59 (19 per cent) and 100 per cent in 78 (26 per cent) patients. Accumulative analysis of variance showed a significant difference between treatment responders and non-responders (p <0.04). In a logistic regression model patients with globus, voice change and gastric prolapse were more likely to respond to treatment (p <0.04). It can be concluded that voice change, sore throat, globus and cough choking are the most

  5. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy to assess the severity of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menin, R.A.; Malmud, L.S.; Petersen, R.P.; Maier, W.P.; Fisher, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-six (36) patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux were studied. Symptoms of heartburn, regurgitation, and dysphagia were scored as to their severity and compared to quantitative tests of gastroesophageal reflux. Patients were studied with the acid reflux test, fiberoptic endoscopy, exophageal mucosal biopsy with a pinch forceps, esophageal manometry, and radioisotopic gastroesophgeal scintigraphy. Symptoms were scored according to an arbitrary grading system as mild, moderate, or severe. There were significant correlations between symptoms scores and both the degree of endoscopic esophagitis and the gastroesophageal reflux indices as measured by the radioisotopic scintiscan, but not with the degree of histologic esophagitis or lower esophageal sphincter pressure. Review of the findings suggest the following profile for patients who might require antireflux surgery: severe symptoms; presence of endoscopic esophagitis; resting lower esophageal sphincter pressure below 10 mmHg; and gastroesophageal reflux index above 10%

  6. Reproducibility of gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy and the standard acid reflux test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, B.; Petersen, H.; Grette, K.; Myrvold, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Patients with symptoms compatible with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease and asymptomatic controls were evaluated three times for GER by gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy (GES) at intervals ranging from 6 h to 15 days and after various periods of fasting. Similarly, in patients and controls, pH monitoring at the distal esophagus was conducted three times by applying the standard reflux test (SART) at intervals ranging from 4 h to 3 days after different fasting periods. In 18 of 19 patients and 14 of 15 controls the results of SART were indentical on all three occations. A similar agreement was found for GES in 23 of 25 patients and 20 of 21 controls. The reproducibility of the induced type of reflux after ingestion of acidified organic juce was significantly better than that of the spontaneous types or the induced type of reflux after ingestion of saline. It is concluded that the reproducibility of GES and SART is similatly good

  7. Reproducibility of gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy and the standard acid reflux test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaul, B.; Petersen, H.; Grette, K.; Myrvold, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Patients with symptoms compatible with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease and asymptomatic controls were evaluated three times for GER by gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy (GES) at intervals ranging from 6 h to 15 days and after various periods of fasting. Similarly, in patients and controls, pH monitoring at the distal esophagus was conducted three times by applying the standard reflux test (SART) at intervals ranging from 4 h to 3 days after different fasting periods. In 18 of 19 patients and 14 of 15 controls the results of SART were indentical on all three occations. A similar agreement was found for GES in 23 of 25 patients and 20 of 21 controls. The reproducibility of the induced type of reflux after ingestion of acidified organic juce was significantly better than that of the spontaneous types or the induced type of reflux after ingestion of saline. It is concluded that the reproducibility of GES and SART is similatly good.

  8. Do laryngoscopic findings reflect the characteristics of reflux in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y C; Kwon, O E; Park, J M; Eun, Y G

    2018-02-01

    To analyse the association between 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (24-h MII-pH) parameters and each item of the reflux finding score (RFS) to determine whether the laryngoscopic findings of the RFS could reflect the characteristics of reflux in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). Prospective cohort study. Tertiary care referral medical centre. Patients complaining of LPR symptoms were evaluated via a 24-hour MII-pH. Among them, 99 patients whose LPR was confirmed via 24-hour MII-pH were enrolled in this study. Correlations between RFS ratings and 24-hour MII-pH parameters were evaluated and compared between patients with or without each laryngoscopic finding used in the RFS. Subglottic oedema had a statistically significant positive correlation with number of non-acid LPR and non-acid full column reflux events. Ventricular obliteration and posterior commissure hypertrophy showed a significant correlation with non-acid exposure time and total reflux exposure time. We also found a significant correlation between granuloma/granulation score and number of acid LPR events. The numbers of non-acid LPR and full column reflux events in patients with subglottic oedema were significantly higher than those without subglottic oedema. Among the laryngoscopic findings used in the RFS, subglottic oedema is specific for non-acid reflux episodes, and granuloma/granulation is specific for acid reflux episodes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Gastroesophageal Reflux Management with the LINX® System for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Following Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desart, Kenneth; Rossidis, Georgios; Michel, Michael; Lux, Tamara; Ben-David, Kfir

    2015-10-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has gained significant popularity in the USA, and consequently resulted in patients experiencing new-onset gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) following this bariatric procedure. Patients with GERD refractory to medical therapy present a more challenging situation limiting the surgical options to further treat the de novo GERD symptoms since the gastric fundus to perform a fundoplication is no longer an option. The aim of this study is to determine if the LINX® magnetic sphincter augmentation system is a safe and effective option for patients with new gastroesophageal reflux disease following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. This study was conducted at the University Medical Center. This is a retrospective review of seven consecutive patients who had a laparoscopic LINX® magnetic sphincter device placement for patients with refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy between July 2014 and April 2015. All patients were noted to have self-reported greatly improved gastroesophageal reflux symptoms 2-4 weeks after their procedure. They were all noted to have statistically significant improved severity and frequency of their reflux, regurgitation, epigastric pain, sensation of fullness, dysphagia, and cough symptoms in their postoperative GERD symptoms compared with their preoperative evaluation. This is the first reported pilot case series, illustrating that the LINX® device is a safe and effective option in patients with de novo refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease after a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy despite appropriate weight loss.

  10. Treatment of Post-Stent Gastroesophageal Reflux by Anti-Reflux Z-Stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, Roger Philip; Kew, Jacqueline; Byrne, Peter D.

    2000-01-01

    Severe symptoms of heartburn and retrosternal pain consistent with gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) developed in a patient following placement of a conventional self-expanding 16-24-mm-diameter x 12-cm-long esophageal stent across the gastroesophageal junction to treat an obstructing esophageal carcinoma. A second 18-mm-diameter x 10-cm-long esophageal stent with anti-reflux valve was deployed coaxially and reduced symptomatic GER immediately. Improvement was sustained at 4-month follow-up. An anti-reflux stent can be successfully used to treat significant symptomatic GER after conventional stenting

  11. Reflux nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can run in families. Blood pressure may be high, and there may be signs and symptoms of long-term (chronic) kidney disease. Blood and urine tests will be done, and may include: BUN -- blood Creatinine -- blood Creatinine clearance -- urine and blood Urinalysis or ...

  12. Pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease: Current diagnosis and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a disorder difficult to diagnose and to treat. Due to the current definition of GERD, i.e. gastroesophageal reflux (GER) causing bothersome symptoms and/or complications, diagnosis is subject to broad interpretation. This thesis consists of studies

  13. Characteristics of gastroesophageal reflux in symptomatic patients with and without excessive esophageal acid exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, Albert J.; Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Timmer, Robin; Smout, Andŕe J. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In some patients with a physiological esophageal acid exposure, an association between reflux episodes and symptoms can be demonstrated. Besides acidity, other factors such as proximal extent may determine whether a reflux episode is perceived or not. We aimed to investigate the reflux

  14. The effects of itopride on oesophageal motility and lower oesophageal sphincter function in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpellini, E; Vos, R; Blondeau, K; Boecxstaens, V; Farré, R; Gasbarrini, A; Tack, J

    2011-01-01

    Itopride is a new prokinetic agent that combines antidopaminergic and cholinesterase inhibitory actions. Previous studies suggested that itopride improves heartburn in functional dyspepsia, and decreases oesophageal acid exposure in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. It remains unclear whether this effect is due to effects of itopride on the lower oesophageal sphincter (LES). To study the effects of itopride on fasting and postprandial LES function in healthy subjects. Twelve healthy volunteers (five men; 32.6 ± 2.0 years) underwent three oesophageal sleeve manometry studies after 3 days premedication with itopride 50 mg, itopride 100 mg or placebo t.d.s. Drug was administered after 30 min and a standardized meal was administered after 90 min, with measurements continuing to 120 min postprandially. Throughout the study, 10 wet swallows were administered at 30-min intervals, and gastrointestinal symptoms were scored on 100 mm visual analogue scales at 15-min intervals. Lower oesophageal sphincter resting pressures, swallow-induced relaxations and the amplitude or duration of peristaltic contractions were not altered by both doses of itopride, at all time points. Itopride pre-treatment inhibited the meal-induced rise of transient LES relaxations (TLESRs). Itopride inhibits TLESRs without significantly affecting oesophageal peristaltic function or LES pressure. These observations support further studies with itopride in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. MRI patterns of Nissen fundoplication: normal appearance and mechanisms of failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulinna-Cosentini, Christiane; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Schima, Wolfgang [Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern Wien und Sankt Josef Krankenhaus, Department of Radiology, Krankenhaus Goettlicher Heiland, Vienna (Austria); Cosentini, Enrico P. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    The purpose of the study was to assess the role of MR fluoroscopy in the evaluation of post-surgical conditions of Nissen fundoplication due to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A total of 29 patients (21 patients with recurrent/persistent symptoms and eight asymptomatic patients as the control group) underwent MRI of the oesophagus and gastro-oesophageal junction (GEJ) at 1.5 T. Bolus transit of a buttermilk-spiked gadolinium mixture was evaluated with T2-weighted half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) and dynamic gradient echo sequences (B-FFE) in three planes. The results of MRI were compared with intraoperative findings, or, if the patients were treated conservatively, with endoscopy, manometry, pH-metry and barium swallow. MRI was able to determine the position of fundoplication wrap in 27/29 cases (93 % overall accuracy) and to correctly identify 4/6 malpositions (67 %), as well as all four wrap disruptions. All five stenoses in the GEJ were identified and could be confirmed intraoperatively or during dilatation. MRI correctly visualized three cases with motility disorders, which were manometrically confirmed as secondary achalasia. Three patients showed signs of recurrent reflux without anatomical failure. MRI is a promising diagnostic method to evaluate morphologic integrity of Nissen fundoplication and functional disorders after surgery. (orig.)

  16. Gastroesophageal Reflux and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Fahim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The histological counterpart of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is usual interstitial pneumonia, in which areas of fibrosis of various ages are interspersed with normal lung. This pattern could be explained by repeated episodes of lung injury followed by abnormal wound healing responses. The cause of the initiating alveolar epithelial injury is unknown, but postulated mechanisms include immunological, microbial, or chemical injury, including aspirated gastric refluxate. Reflux is promoted by low basal pressure in the lower oesophageal sphincter and frequent relaxations, potentiated by hiatus hernia or oesophageal dysmotility. In susceptible individuals, repeated microaspiration of gastric refluxate may contribute to the pathogenesis of IPF. Microaspiration of nonacid or gaseous refluxate is poorly detected by current tests for gastroesophageal reflux which were developed for investigating oesophageal symptoms. Further studies using pharyngeal pH probes, high-resolution impedance manometry, and measurement of pepsin in the lung should clarify the impact of reflux and microaspiration in the pathogenesis of IPF.

  17. Duodenal diverticula demonstrated by barium examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, T.; Thommesen, P.

    An investigation for biliary tract calculi and food-stimulated gastro-oesophageal reflux was carried out in 37 patients with duodenal diverticula demonstrated by barium examination. Sixty per cent of the diverticula were located in the descending part of the duodenum. Biliary tract calculi were demonstrated in 38 per cent and food-stimulated gastro-oesophageal reflux in 81 per cent of the patients. The detection of a duodenal diverticulum should result in a supplementary investigation for gallstones and gastrooesophageal reflux and its sequelae.

  18. Assessment of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Children(2-12 Month Based on Clinical Findings and Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Jassemi Zergani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gastroesophageal reflux is a common gastrointestinal disorder among infants, which can cause complications, such as esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus if its diagnosis and treatment are delayed. On the other hand, similarity of Gastro esophageal Reflux symptoms with symptoms of other childhood diseases makes its diagnosis and treatment difficult. So a proper tool for early screening and diagnostic test is essential. Methods: This study was conducted on 221 infants(2 to 12 months with initial symptoms of gastro esophageal reflux(frequent vomiting, restlessness after feeding, no weight gain, coughing repeatedly and refusing to eat that referred to pediatric Clinic of Rajai Hospital in Tonekabon. Data was collected with demographic and infant gastro esophageal reflux questionnaire by use of the information in records and interview with parents. Then the samples were examined via sonography for gastroesophagial reflux. Results: After initial screening based on infants gastro esophageal reflux tool, gastro esophageal reflux by ultrasound was positive in 63/3% of infants. The mean esophageal diameter was (20/73±2/54mm in infants with gastro esophageal reflux and (23/71±2/35mm in infants without gastro esophageal reflux. Conclusion: Due to the similarity of gastro esophageal Reflux symptoms with clinical symptoms of other childhood diseases, use of an initial screening measurement for early assessment of gastro esophageal reflux in infants is necessary. Moreover, appropriate, available and low costs diagnostic method with little complication seems essential such as ultrasonography for confirm diagnosis and early treatment.

  19. [Underlying Mechanisms and Management of Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in South Korea has increased over the past 10 years. Patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD) shows better response to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) than those with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). NERD is a heterogeneous condition, showing pathological gastroesophageal reflux or esophageal hypersensitivity to reflux contents. NERD patients with pathological gastroesophageal reflux or hypersensitivity to acid may respond to PPIs. However, many patients with esophageal hypersensitivity to nonacid or functional heartburn do not respond to PPIs. Therefore, careful history and investigations are required when managing patients with refractory GERD who show poor response to conventional dose PPIs. Combined pH-impedance studies and a PPI diagnostic trial are recommended to reveal underlying mechanisms of refractory symptoms. For those with ongoing reflux-related symptoms, split dose administration, change to long-acting PPIs or PPIs less influenced by CYP2C19 genotypes, increasing dose of PPIs, and the addition of alginate preparations, prokinetics, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or tricyclic antidepressants can be considered. Pain modulators, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or tricyclic antidepressants are more likely to be effective for those with reflux-unrelated symptoms. Surgery or endoscopic per oral fundoplication may be effective in selected patients.

  20. Hiatial hernia in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaul, B.; Petersen, H.; Myrvold, H.E.; Grette, K.; Roeysland, P.; Halvorsen, T.

    1986-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and radiologic examination were performed in 101 patients with symptoms strongly suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease. Hiatus hernia (HH) was found in 50 patients diagnosed by radiography or endoscopy, or both, in 22, 19, and 9 patients respectively. Severe endoscopic esophagitis (grades III and IV) was found more often in the patients with HH than in those without. The same was true for the early positive timed acid perfusion tests. Furthermore, the patients with HH more often had reflux by the standard acid reflux test (42 og 50 versus 28 of 51, gastroesophageal scintigraphy (47 of 50 versus 40 of 51; and radiography (20 of 50 versus 2 of 51; than the patients without HH. The results show that severe GER disease can occur without an associated HH and indicate that patients with symptoms of GER disease and associated HH are likely to have a more severe GER disease than those without HH.

  1. The diagnostic value of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms and detection of pepsin and bile acids in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and exhaled breath condensate for identifying lung transplantation patients with GERD-induced aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reder, Nicholas P; Davis, Christopher S; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Fisichella, P Marco

    2014-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is thought to lead to aspiration and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome after lung transplantation. Unfortunately, the identification of patients with GERD who aspirate still lacks clear diagnostic indicators. The authors hypothesized that symptoms of GERD and detection of pepsin and bile acids in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) are effective for identifying lung transplantation patients with GERD-induced aspiration. From November 2009 to November 2010, 85 lung transplantation patients undergoing surveillance bronchoscopy were prospectively enrolled. For these patients, self-reported symptoms of GERD were correlated with levels of pepsin and bile acids in BAL and EBC and with GERD status assessed by 24-h pH monitoring. The sensitivity and specificity of pepsin and bile acids in BAL and EBC also were compared with the presence of GERD in 24-h pH monitoring. The typical symptoms of GERD (heartburn and regurgitation) had modest sensitivity and specificity for detecting GERD and aspiration. The atypical symptoms of GERD (aspiration and bronchitis) showed better identification of aspiration as measured by detection of pepsin and bile acids in BAL. The sensitivity and specificity of pepsin in BAL compared with GERD by 24-h pH monitoring were respectively 60 and 45 %, whereas the sensitivity and specificity of bile acids in BAL were 67 and 80 %. These data indicate that the measurement of pepsin and bile acids in BAL can provide additional data for identifying lung transplantation patients at risk for GERD-induced aspiration compared with symptoms or 24-h pH monitoring alone. These results support a diagnostic role for detecting markers of aspiration in BAL, but this must be validated in larger studies.

  2. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and vocal disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Coelho de Arruda Henry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a chronic disease in which gastroduodenal contents reflux into the esophagus. The clinical picture of gastroesophageal reflux disease is usually composed by heartburn and regurgitation (typical manifestations. Atypical manifestations (vocal disturbances and asthma may also be complaint. OBJECTIVE: To analyse the clinical, endoscopic, manometric and pHmetric aspects of patients suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease associated with vocal disturbances. METHODS: Fifty patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease were studied, including 25 with vocal disturbances (group 1 - G1 and 25 without these symptoms (group 2 - G2. All patients were submitted to endoscopy, manometry and esophageal pHmetry (2 probes. The group 1 patients were submitted to videolaryngoscopy. RESULTS: Endoscopic findings: non-erosive reflux disease was observed in 95% of G1 patients and 88% of G2. Videolaryngoscopy: vocal fold congestion, asymmetry, nodules and polyps were observed in G1 patients. Manometric findings: pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (mm Hg: 11.6 ± 5.2 in G1 and 14.0 ± 6.2 in G2 (P = 0.14; pressure in the upper esophageal sphincter (mm Hg: 58.4 ± 15.9 in G1 and 69.5 ± 30.7 in the controls. pHmetric findings: De Meester index: 34.0 ± 20.9 in G1 and 15.4 ± 9.4 in G2 (P<0.001; number of reflux episodes in distal probe: 43.0 ± 20.4 in G1 and 26.4 ± 17.2 in G2 (P = 0.003; percentage of time with esophageal pH value lower than 4 units (distal sensor: 9.0% ± 6.4% in G1 and 3.4% ± 2.1% in G2 (P<0.001; number of reflux episodes in proximal probe: 7.5 ± 10.9 in G1 and 5.3 ± 5.7 in G2 (P = 0.38; percentage of time with esophageal pH values lower than 4 units (Proximal probe: 1.2 ± 2.7 in G1 and 0.5 ± 0.7 in G2 (P = 0.21. CONCLUSIONS: 1 The clinical, endoscopic, and manometric findings observed in patients with vocal disturbance do not differ from those without these symptoms; 2 gastroesophageal

  3. Emerging drugs for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are very effective and safe drugs for the treatment of erosive and non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Nevertheless, a significant proportion of GERD patients (30 - 40%) continue to suffer from symptoms during PPI treatment, which has stimulated the

  4. Association Between Nocturnal Acid Reflux and Sleep Disturbance in Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jui-Sheng; Lei, Wei-Yi; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Chen, Chien-Lin

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate whether there is a direct association between subjective sleep quality and esophageal acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. We enrolled patients with classic reflux symptoms for endoscopy and ambulatory pH monitoring. The severity of esophageal mucosal injury was assessed by upper endoscopy. Distal esophageal acid exposure was determined by ambulatory 24-hour pH monitoring. Sleep disturbance was assessed by using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. In total, 103 patients (53 patients without sleep dysfunction and 50 patients with sleep dysfunction) were studied. Erosive esophagitis was found more in patients with sleep disturbance than in those without sleep disturbance (45% versus 31%, P = 0.04). Abnormal esophageal pH was found more in patients with dysfunction (22%) than in patients without sleep dysfunction (5.7%, P = 0.03). Recumbent acid contact time (%) was greater in patients with sleep disturbance than in those without sleep disturbance (3.7 ± 2.4 versus 1.9 ± 0.9, P = 0.04). Sleep quality score positively correlated with acid contact time (r = 0.32, P = 0.02), prolonged reflux events (r = 0.45, P = 0.008) and longer reflux event (r = 0.28, P = 0.03) during recumbent period. Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease along with sleep dysfunction are characterized with greater nocturnal acid reflux and more erosive esophagitis. Our study suggests that increased nocturnal acid reflux may play a role in inducing sleep disturbance in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with chronic otitis media with effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, Fatih; Doğan, Mansur; Karataş, Duran; Yüce, Salim; Şentürk, Mehmet; Külahli, Ismail

    2013-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate a possible relation between gastroesophageal reflux disease and middle ear effusion in children. Children who came to ear, nose, and throat (ENT) department with the symptoms of hearing loss or aural fullness and diagnosed as OME by examination and tympanometry were included into the study. Children were reviewed gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms including the following: (a) airway symptoms: stridor, frequent cough, recurrent croup, wheezing, nasal congestion, obstructive apnea, hoarseness, and throat clearing; (b) feeding symptoms: frequent emesis, dysphagia, choking: gagging, sore throat, halitosis, food refusal, regurgitation, pyrosis, irritability, failure to thrive, and anemia. Diagnosis is made with at least one positive test of radionuclide gastroesophageal scintigraphy or 24 h pH probe in the patients with reflux. ENT findings were also examined between gastroesophageal reflux disease positive and gastroesophageal reflux disease negative groups. Approximately 39 (54.9%) of 71 children had at least 1 positive test for gastroesophageal reflux disease. Between the gastroesophageal reflux disease-positive and gastroesophageal reflux disease-negative groups, symptoms of reflux were not significantly different. Two pooled variables were created: airway complex (stridor, frequent cough, throat clearing), and feeding complex (irritability, pyrosis, failure to thrive). Percentage of positive symptom complexes were no statistically different between gastroesophageal reflux disease-positive and gastroesophageal reflux disease-negative groups (>0.05). Ear, nose, and throat disorders (including rhinitis/sinusitis, adenoid hypertrophy, tonsillitis/pharyngitis, and laryngitis) were more frequent in gastroesophageal reflux disease-positive group. Tonsillitis/pharyngitis was significantly different between the gastroesophageal reflux disease positive and gastroesophageal reflux disease-negative groups. Upper respiratory tract infections were seen

  6. Sexual activity does not predispose to reflux episodes in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Serhat; Valytova, Elen; Yildirim, Esra; Vardar, Rukiye

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of sexual activity on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is an under-recognized concern of patients, and one rarely assessed by physicians. Objective The objective of this article is to determine the influence of sexual activity on the intraesophageal acid exposure and acid reflux events in GERD patients. Methods Twenty-one patients with the diagnosis of GERD were prospectively enrolled. Intraesophageal pH monitoring was recorded for 48 hours with a Bravo capsule. All patients were instructed to have sexual intercourse or abstain in a random order two hours after the same refluxogenic dinner within two consecutive nights. Patients were requested to have sex in the standard “missionary position” and women were warned to avoid abdominal compression. The patients completed a diary reporting the time of the sexual intercourse and GERD symptoms. The percentage of reflux time and acid reflux events were compared in two ways: within 30 and 60 minutes prior to and after sexual intercourse on the day of sexual intercourse and in the same time frame of the day without sexual intercourse. Results Fifteen of 21 GERD patients were analyzed. The percentage of reflux time and number of acid reflux events did not show a significant difference within the 30- and 60-minute periods prior to and after sexual intercourse on the day of sexual intercourse and on the day without sexual intercourse, as well. Conclusion Sexual activity does not predispose to increased intraesophageal acid exposure and acid reflux events. Larger studies are needed to confirm our findings in patients who define reflux symptoms during sexual intercourse. PMID:25452843

  7. Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, C Prakash; Fass, Ronnie

    2018-01-01

    Management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) commonly starts with an empiric trial of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and complementary lifestyle measures, for patients without alarm symptoms. Optimization of therapy (improving compliance and timing of PPI doses), or increasing PPI dosage to twice daily in select circumstances, can reduce persistent symptoms. Patients with continued symptoms can be evaluated with endoscopy and tests of esophageal physiology, to better determine their disease phenotype and optimize treatment. Laparoscopic fundoplication, magnetic sphincter augmentation, and endoscopic therapies can benefit patients with well-characterized GERD. Patients with functional diseases that overlap with or mimic GERD can also be treated with neuromodulators (primarily antidepressants), or psychological interventions (psychotherapy, hypnotherapy, cognitive and behavioral therapy). Future approaches to treatment of GERD include potassium-competitive acid blockers, reflux-reducing agents, bile acid binders, injection of inert substances into the esophagogastric junction, and electrical stimulation of the lower esophageal sphincter. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100181.htm Gastroesophageal reflux - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... junction of the esophagus and the stomach prevents reflux of food and acid from the stomach into the esophagus. Review Date ...

  9. The usefulness of esophagography as a screening test for laryngopharyngeal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Chung, Phil Sang

    2006-01-01

    There are many articles about the role of barium esophagography for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, there are only rare articles reporting on laryngopharyngeal reflux disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of performing esophagography with the water-siphon test as an initial screening test for patients with suspected laryngopharyngeal reflux. From October 2002 to December 2004, barium esophagography with the water-siphon test was performed for 707 patients who had the typical symptoms and telescopic findings of laryngopharyngeal reflux. The results of the 707 esophagograms (the group with laryngopharyngeal reflux) were compared with those of 122 patients who were confirmed as having gastroesophageal reflux upon performing pH-metry (the group with gastroesophageal reflux) and the 324 patients without laryngopharyngeal reflux symptoms (the control group). The results of the water-siphon test were classified into normal, mild, moderate and severe degrees of gastroesophageal reflux. On the water-siphon test for the laryngopharyneal reflux group patients, 71 patients had normal (10.0%), 207 had mild (29.2%), 201 had moderate (28.4%) and 228 had severe (32.2%) degrees of reflux. The positive rates of the water-siphon test were 90.0%, 89.3% and 54.6% for the groups with laryngopharyngeal reflux, gastroesophageal reflux and the control group, respectively. A statistically significant difference was observed between the group with laryngopharyngeal reflux and the control group, and between the group with gastroesophageal reflux and the control group, respectively (ρ < 0.05). Esophagography with the water-siphon test is useful as an initial screening test for laryngopharyngeal reflux disease

  10. The usefulness of esophagography as a screening test for laryngopharyngeal reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Chung, Phil Sang [Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    There are many articles about the role of barium esophagography for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, there are only rare articles reporting on laryngopharyngeal reflux disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of performing esophagography with the water-siphon test as an initial screening test for patients with suspected laryngopharyngeal reflux. From October 2002 to December 2004, barium esophagography with the water-siphon test was performed for 707 patients who had the typical symptoms and telescopic findings of laryngopharyngeal reflux. The results of the 707 esophagograms (the group with laryngopharyngeal reflux) were compared with those of 122 patients who were confirmed as having gastroesophageal reflux upon performing pH-metry (the group with gastroesophageal reflux) and the 324 patients without laryngopharyngeal reflux symptoms (the control group). The results of the water-siphon test were classified into normal, mild, moderate and severe degrees of gastroesophageal reflux. On the water-siphon test for the laryngopharyneal reflux group patients, 71 patients had normal (10.0%), 207 had mild (29.2%), 201 had moderate (28.4%) and 228 had severe (32.2%) degrees of reflux. The positive rates of the water-siphon test were 90.0%, 89.3% and 54.6% for the groups with laryngopharyngeal reflux, gastroesophageal reflux and the control group, respectively. A statistically significant difference was observed between the group with laryngopharyngeal reflux and the control group, and between the group with gastroesophageal reflux and the control group, respectively ({rho} < 0.05). Esophagography with the water-siphon test is useful as an initial screening test for laryngopharyngeal reflux disease.

  11. Gastroesophageal Reflux: Regurgitation in the Infant Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Teresa D

    2018-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is common in infancy and mainly treated through nonpharmacological interventions. Knowing the early warning signs of GER is important for nursing assessment. Untreated GER can become acute when an infant fails to gain weight and has recurrent, forceful vomiting. Further investigation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is indicated when failure to gain weight, irritability, swallowing difficulties, regurgitation, and respiratory complications occur and should trigger referral to pediatric specialists. This article will share information about uncomplicated GER, GERD, and symptoms of these diagnoses, common screening tests, and treatment options. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Reflux and GERD in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses Print Share Reflux and GERD : Reflux and GERD in Infants Reflux and GERD in Infants It’s not uncommon for a baby ... happy, healthy childhood. Quick Facts about Reflux and GERD in Infants The majority of infants do not ...

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badillo, Raul; Francis, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disease with a prevalence as high as 10%-20% in the western world. The disease can manifest in various symptoms which can be grouped into typical, atypical and extra-esophageal symptoms. Those with the highest specificity for GERD are acid regurgitation and heartburn. In the absence of alarm symptoms, these symptoms can allow one to make a presumptive diagnosis and initiate empiric therapy. In certain situations, further diagnostic testing is needed to confirm the diagnosis as well as to assess for complications or alternate causes for the symptoms. GERD complications include erosive esophagitis, peptic stricture, Barrett’s esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma and pulmonary disease. Management of GERD may involve lifestyle modification, medical therapy and surgical therapy. Lifestyle modifications including weight loss and/or head of bed elevation have been shown to improve esophageal pH and/or GERD symptoms. Medical therapy involves acid suppression which can be achieved with antacids, histamine-receptor antagonists or proton-pump inhibitors. Whereas most patients can be effectively managed with medical therapy, others may go on to require anti-reflux surgery after undergoing a proper pre-operative evaluation. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current approach to the diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:25133039

  14. Gastroesophageal reflux - correlation between diagnostic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Maria das Gracas de Almeida; Penas, Maria Exposito; Fonseca, Lea Mirian Barbosa; Lemme, Eponina Maria O.; Martinho, Maria Jose Ribeiro

    1999-01-01

    A group of 97 individuals with typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was submitted to gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy (GES) and compared to the results obtained from endoscopy, histopathology and 24 hours pHmetry. Twenty-four healthy individuals were used as a control group and they have done only the GERS. The results obtained showed that: a) the difference int he reflux index (RI) for the control group and the sick individuals was statistically significant (p < 0.0001); b) the correlation between GERS and the other methods showed the following results: sensitivity, 84%; specificity, 95%; positive predictive value, 98%; negative predictive value, 67%; accuracy, 87%. We have concluded that the scintigraphic method should be used to confirm the diagnosis of GERD and also recommended as initial investiative procedure. (author)

  15. Correlation of obstructive sleep apnoea and laryngopharyngeal reflux: phmetry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhennawi, D M; Ahmed, M R; Abou-Halawa, A S

    2016-12-01

    To study the correlation of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). A descriptive study. Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt. 62 patients with polysomnography confirmed OSA. Patients were evaluated with ambulatory 24-h double channel pH monitoring. Mean reflux symptom index in the study group was 9 ± 5.5, and it was > 13 in all patients with severe OSA. Signs of LPR reflux were present in 34 (55%) patients. Abnormal reflux was detected in the distal oesophagus in 41 patients (66%) and in the proximal oesophagus in 21 patients (34%). Patients with severe OSA had significantly higher nocturnal LPR reflux episodes compared to patients with mild disease (P .05). LPR is common in patients with OSA. Patients with severe OSA have significantly higher nocturnal LPR. This should be considered when treating this group of patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Challenges of correlating pH change with relief of clinical symptoms in gastro esophageal reflux disease: a phase III, randomized study of Zegerid versus Losec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Dave; Ng Kwet Shing, Richard; Jones, Deborah; Gruss, Hans-Jurgen; Reguła, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    Zegerid (on demand immediate-release omeprazole and sodium bicarbonate combination therapy) has demonstrated earlier absorption and more rapid pH change compared with Losec (standard enteric coated omeprazole), suggesting more rapid clinical relief of heartburn. This Phase III, multicenter, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized study assessed the clinical superiority of Zegerid versus Losec for rapid relief of heartburn associated with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Patients with a history of frequent (2 3 days/week) uncomplicated GERD, were randomized to receive Zegerid (20 mg) or Losec (20 mg) with corresponding placebo. Study medication was self-administered on the first episode of heartburn, and could be taken for up to 3 days within a 14 day study period. Heartburn severity was self assessed up to 180 minutes post dose (9 point Likert scale). Primary endpoint was median time to sustained response (≥3 point reduction in heartburn severity for ≥45 minutes). Of patients randomized to Zegerid (N=122) or Losec (N=117), 228/239 had recorded ≥1 evaluable heartburn episodes and were included in the modified intent-to-treat population. No significant between-group differences were observed for median time to sustained response (60.0 vs. 52.2 minutes, Zegerid [N=117] and Losec [N=111], respectively), sustained partial response (both, 37.5 minutes) and sustained total relief (both, 105 minutes). Significantly more patients treated with Zegerid reached sustained total relief within 0-30 minutes post dose in all analysis sets (p<0.05). Both treatments were well tolerated and did not raise any safety concerns. Superiority of Zegerid over Losec for rapid heartburn relief was not demonstrated; both treatments were equally effective however the rapid onset of action of Losec was unexpected. Factors, including aspects of study design may have contributed to this. This study supports previously reported difficulty in correlating intra-gastric pH change with

  17. Challenges of correlating pH change with relief of clinical symptoms in gastro esophageal reflux disease: a phase III, randomized study of Zegerid versus Losec.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Walker

    Full Text Available Zegerid (on demand immediate-release omeprazole and sodium bicarbonate combination therapy has demonstrated earlier absorption and more rapid pH change compared with Losec (standard enteric coated omeprazole, suggesting more rapid clinical relief of heartburn. This Phase III, multicenter, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized study assessed the clinical superiority of Zegerid versus Losec for rapid relief of heartburn associated with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD.Patients with a history of frequent (2 3 days/week uncomplicated GERD, were randomized to receive Zegerid (20 mg or Losec (20 mg with corresponding placebo. Study medication was self-administered on the first episode of heartburn, and could be taken for up to 3 days within a 14 day study period. Heartburn severity was self assessed up to 180 minutes post dose (9 point Likert scale. Primary endpoint was median time to sustained response (≥3 point reduction in heartburn severity for ≥45 minutes.Of patients randomized to Zegerid (N=122 or Losec (N=117, 228/239 had recorded ≥1 evaluable heartburn episodes and were included in the modified intent-to-treat population. No significant between-group differences were observed for median time to sustained response (60.0 vs. 52.2 minutes, Zegerid [N=117] and Losec [N=111], respectively, sustained partial response (both, 37.5 minutes and sustained total relief (both, 105 minutes. Significantly more patients treated with Zegerid reached sustained total relief within 0-30 minutes post dose in all analysis sets (p<0.05. Both treatments were well tolerated and did not raise any safety concerns.Superiority of Zegerid over Losec for rapid heartburn relief was not demonstrated; both treatments were equally effective however the rapid onset of action of Losec was unexpected. Factors, including aspects of study design may have contributed to this. This study supports previously reported difficulty in correlating intra-gastric pH change with

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux disease - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peptic esophagitis - children; Reflux esophagitis - children; GERD - children; Heartburn - chronic - children; Dyspepsia - GERD - children ... GERD. Certain factors can lead to GERD in children, including: Birth defects, such as hiatal hernia , a ...

  19. Clinical and polysomnographic predictors of laryngopharyngeal reflux in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caparroz, Fábio Azevedo; Campanholo, Milena de Almeida Torres; Regina, Caroline Gomez; Park, Sung Woo; Haddad, Leonardo; Gregório, Luís Carlos; Haddad, Fernanda Louise Martinho

    2018-04-14

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and laryngopharyngeal reflux are diseases with a high prevalence in the overall population; however, it remains unclear whether they are diseases with the same risk factors present in the same populations or if there is any association between them. To evaluate and determine the prevalence of laryngopharyngeal reflux in patients with moderate and severe obstructive apnea syndrome and also to determine its predictive factors. Historical cohort, cross-sectional study of patients aged 18-70 years, referred to a tertiary service Otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinic with a polysomnographic diagnosis of moderate or severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The reflux symptom index questionnaire and the reflux finding score at indirect videolaryngoscopy were applied to the assessed population, considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Fifty-six patients were evaluated, of which 64.3% had a positive laryngopharyngeal reflux (positive reflux symptom index and/or positive endolaryngeal reflux finding score). Body mass index was a predictor of reflux presence in this group of patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. In patients with positive score for endoscopic findings and reflux symptom index (12.3%), there was a trend toward significance for a higher mean apnea-hypopnea index and a higher percentage of sleep time with oxyhemoglobin saturation below 90% (p=0.05). The prevalence of laryngopharyngeal reflux was higher in this group of patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, and the body mass index was a predictor of laryngopharyngeal reflux in these patients. There was a trend toward greater oxyhemoglobin desaturation in patients with a positive score for reflux symptoms index (RSI) and reflux finding score (RFS). Copyright © 2018 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux and respiratory diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatima, S.; Saeed, M.A.; Jafri, S.R.A.; Raza, M.; Kundi, Z.U.; Hyder, S.W.

    2002-01-01

    The association of gastroesophageal reflux disease and its pulmonary manifestation is well known however the exact underlying mechanism is unclear. The medical literature is deluged with studies on relationship between Gear and its pulmonary manifestations. The aim of this study was to 1) determine prevalence of GER in children with rLRTI, wheezing and asthma. 2) determine prevalence of asymptomatic respiratory anomalies in children with clinical reflux 3) determine effectiveness of anti-reflux therapy in clinical control of asthma, wheezing and rLRTI. Children were included in the study if they presented either with rLRTI, wheezing, Bronchial asthma or Clinical suspicion of GER without any respiratory symptoms. The GER study comprised esophageal transit, gastroesophageal reflux and lung aspiration studies. Acquisition and processing were according to predetermined protocol. Segmental and global esophageal transit times, GER according to duration of episode and volume of refluxed liquid, Reflux severity, Gastric retention at 30 minutes, Gastric emptying time, Presence of lung aspiration were calculated for each study. All children underwent Barium studies on a separate day. Clinical follow-up was done every 3 months and GER study was repeated every 6 months up to one year. The patient's therapy was determined by local protocols at discretion of clinicians. GER scintigraphy was performed in 43 patients (age range 5 months -12 years). Gastroesophageal reflux of varying degrees was observed in 10 children (23.25%) in all groups. The severity of clinical symptoms was directly related to severity of GER. The direct correlation was found between GER and reflux index. The results of GER scintigraphy were compared with Barium studies and results were found to be superior in terms of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in detecting disease. It was possible to objectively evaluate and monitor response to therapy after medical treatment in few cases with help of follow

  1. [Intraesophageal pH in children with suspected reflux].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calva-Rodríguez, R; García-Aranda, J A; Bendimez-Cano, A; Estrada-Saavedra, R

    1989-05-01

    We study 22 children with clinical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. The main manifestations were: frequent vomiting, failure to thrive and repetitive pneumonia. In all of them we perform barium esophagogram (SEGD) with fluoroscopy, esophageal manometry (EM) and a four hours intraesophageal pH measurement. Thirteen of the twenty two children present a pathologic reflux (ERGE); in 16 we found SEGD that show reflux; three of them had an abnormal EM, the other 13 were normal. Seven patients showed alteration of the intraesophageal pH measurement. In conclusion the intraesophageal pH measurement in short period of time (4 hours) is a good method in the diagnosis of patients with ERGE.

  2. Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease on Asthma Control in Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Anne E.; Clerisme-Beaty, Emmanuelle M.; Sugar, Elizabeth A.; Cohen, Rubin I.; Lang, Jason E.; Brown, Ellen D.; Richter, Joel E.; Irvin, Charles G.; Mastronarde, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity is a risk factor for asthma. Obese asthmatics often have poor asthma control and respond poorly to therapy. It has been suggested that co-morbidities associated with obesity, such as reflux and obstructive sleep apnea, could be important factors contributing to poor asthma control in obese patients. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine if (i) reflux and/or (ii) symptoms of sleep apnea contribute to poor asthma control in obesity. Methods We studied asthmatic subjects participating in a trial of reflux treatment. Participants underwent baseline evaluation of asthma symptoms and lung function. 304 participants underwent esophageal pH probe testing. 246 participants were evaluated for obstructive sleep apnea symptoms. Results Of 402 participants in this trial, 51% were obese. Role of reflux in asthma control Those with higher body mass index reported a higher prevalence of reflux symptoms, but the prevalence of pH probe acid reflux was similar in all groups. Reflux was not associated with measures of asthma control in obese patients. Role of obstructive sleep apnea in asthma control Symptoms and self-report of obstructive sleep apnea were more common with increasing body mass index and associated with worse asthma control as measured by the Juniper Asthma Control Questionnaire and Asthma Symptom Utility Index. Conclusions Our data suggest that obstructive sleep apnea, but not gastroesophageal reflux disease may contribute significantly to poor asthma control in obese patients. PMID:21819338

  3. Which drugs are risk factors for the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungan, Zeynel; Pınarbaşı Şimşek, Binnur

    2017-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which is common in many communities, is associated with structural factors, eating habits, and the use of certain drugs. The use of such drugs can lead to the emergence of GERD and can also exacerbate existing reflux symptoms. These drugs can contribute to GERD by directly causing mucosal damage, by reducing lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP), or by affecting esophagogastric motility. In this article, we report our investigation of the relationships between GERD and medications within the scope of the "Turkish GERD Consensus Group." For the medication groups for which sufficient data were obtained (Figure 1), a systematic literature review in English was conducted using the keywords "gastroesophageal reflux" [MeSH Terms] and "anti-inflammatory agents, non-steroidal" [MeSH Terms], "gastroesophageal reflux" [MeSH Terms] and "acetylsalicylic acid" [MeSH Terms], "gastroesophageal reflux" [All Fields] and "estrogenic agents" [All Fields], "gastroesophageal reflux" [All Fields] and "progesterones" [All Fields], "gastroesophageal reflux" [All Fields] and "hormone replacement therapy" [All Fields], "gastroesophageal reflux" [MeSH Terms] and "diphosphonates" [MeSH Terms] OR "diphosphonates" [All Fields], "calcium channel blockers" [MeSH Terms] and "gastroesophageal reflux" [MeSH Terms], "gastroesophageal reflux" [MeSH Terms] and "nitrates" [MeSH Terms], "gastroesophageal reflux" [MeSH Terms] and "antidepressive agents" [MeSH Terms], "gastroesophageal reflux" [MeSH Terms] and "benzodiazepines" [MeSH Terms] and "hypnotic drugs" [MeSH Terms], "gastroesophageal reflux" [MeSH Terms] and "cholinergic antagonists" [MeSH Terms], "gastroesophageal reflux" [MeSH Terms] and "theophylline" [MeSH Terms], and "gastroesophageal reflux [MeSH Terms] AND "anti-asthmatic agents" [MeSH Terms]. The studies were analyzed and the results are presented here.

  4. Presença de refluxo em pacientes com sintomas típicos de doença do refluxo gastroesofágico Factors related to the presence of reflux in patients with typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Corsi

    2007-04-01

    GERD symptoms. Clinical data, Body Mass Index, abdominal ultrasound aspects and upper digestive endoscopic data are reported. Manometry and esophageal pH-monitoring were performed. RESULTS: One-hundred-and-seventy-two patients were female (68.5%. Mean age of the total was 51.8 years. Ultrasound examination revealed colelithiasis in 23 patients and PC in 21 patients. Hiatal hernia was diagnosed in 177 patients (71%, with an average size of 3.0cm. Erosive esophagitis was found in 168 patients (66.9% and Barrett's esophagus in 23 patients (9.2%. A combination of hiatal hernia and esophagitis was diagnosed in 131 patients (52.3% while only 37 patients (14.7% did not present either. The mean extension of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES was 2.6 cm, whereas in 132 patients (52.6% the LES was shorter. The mean pressure of the LES was 18.9 mmHg; 46 patients (18.3% had pressures below 14 mmHg. The mean number of reflux episodes on prolonged esophageal monitoring was 42.9; the mean number of prolonged episodes of reflux was 4.6, and the mean percentage of total acid time was 8.4%. DeMeester scores were high in 175 patients (69.7%. CONCLUSION: In patients with typical GERD symptoms, factors influencing the presence of pathological reflux as confirmed by prolonged esophageal pH-monitoring were: age, hiatal hernia associated to erosive esophagitis, a smaller extension, low baseline pressure and smaller volume vector of the LES.

  5. Anti-reflux surgery - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stomach). Problems with these muscles can lead to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This surgery can also be done during a ... Anti-reflux surgery is usually done to treat GERD in children only after medicines have not worked ...

  6. Infant Reflux: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and children, endoscopy is usually done under general anesthesia. Treatment Infant reflux usually clears up by itself. ... Has evidence of an inflamed esophagus Has chronic asthma and reflux Surgery Rarely, the lower esophageal sphincter ...

  7. Vesicoureteral reflux: A historical perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    K.N. DeCotiis

    2016-12-28

    Dec 28, 2016 ... Abstract. The management of vesicoureteral reflux is a mainstay of pediatric urology. ... exponential relationship between number of urinary tract infections, .... dysfunction as an independent predictor of low reflux resolution.

  8. Influence of gastric emptying on gastro-esophageal reflux: a combined pH-impedance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourcerol, G; Benanni, Y; Boueyre, E; Leroi, A M; Ducrotte, P

    2013-10-01

    The involvement of delayed gastric emptying (GE) in the pathophysiology of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) remains debated and has been to date only assessed using esophageal pH-metry that only detects acidic reflux. We therefore investigated whether delay in GE could impact on liquid, mixed, and gas reflux detected using combined esophageal pH-impedance recording. Thirty consecutive patients were explored with GE and esophageal pH-impedance measurement in the workup of typical symptoms of GERD. Gastric emptying was assessed using the (13) C-octanoic acid breath test and an ambulatory esophageal pH-impedance recording was performed off proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for 24 h. Gastric emptying was normal in 17 patients and delayed in 13 patients. Delay in GE increased the daily number of liquid/mixed reflux events detected by combined esophageal pH-impedance monitoring, but had no effect of esophageal acid exposure or gas reflux. This translated in increased number of postprandial reflux events, with a longer bolus clearance time and increased esophageal proximal extension. In patient with delayed GE, symptomatic reflux had a higher proximal extension and a longer bolus clearance time compared to symptomatic reflux events from patients with normal GE. Delay in GE increases daily and postprandial liquid/mixed reflux events. Reflux characteristics differently trigger symptoms in patients with normal and delayed GE, and may impact on the therapeutic strategy. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Association between nocturnal bruxism and gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Shouichi; Tanimoto, Yuko; Araki, Yoshiko; Katayama, Akira; Fujii, Akihito; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2003-11-01

    To examine the relationship between nocturnal bruxism and gastroesophageal reflux. Controlled descriptive study and double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical study. Portable pH monitoring, electromyography, and audio-video recordings were conducted during the night in the subjects' home. Ten patients with bruxism and 10 normal subjects were matched for height, weight, age, and sex. They did not have symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Medication with a proton pump inhibitor (ie, a gastric-acid-inhibiting drug). The bruxism group showed a significantly higher frequency of nocturnal rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) episodes (mean +/- SD: 6.7 +/- 2.2 times per hour) and a higher frequency and percentage of time of gastroesophageal reflux episodes with a pH less than 4.0 and 5.0 (0.5 +/- 0.9 and 3.6 +/- 1.6 times per hour and 1.3% +/- 2.5% and 7.4% +/- 12.6%, respectively) than the control group (RMMA episodes: 2.4 +/- 0.9 times per hour; gastroesophageal reflux episodes: 0.0 +/- 0.0 and 0.1 +/- 0.3 times per hour and 0.0% +/- 0.0% and 0.0% +/- 0.0%, respectively). In the bruxism group, 100% of the gastroesophageal reflux episodes with a pH less than 3.0 and 4.0 included both an RMMA episode and an electromyographic burst, the duration of which was approximately 0.5 to 1.0 seconds, probably representing swallowing of saliva. The majority of gastroesophageal reflux episodes with a pH of 4.0 to 5.0 also included both an RMMA episode and an electromyographic burst in the control and bruxism groups