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Sample records for gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms

  1. Review article: acidity and volume of the refluxate in the genesis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sifrim, D.; Mittal, R.; Fass, R.; Smout, A.; Castell, D.; Tack, J.; Gregersen, H.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A number of mechanisms, other than acid reflux, may be responsible for the symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. AIM: To assess the importance of non-acid reflux mechanisms. METHODS: This review is based on presentations and discussion at a workshop, where specialists in the

  2. Heartburn, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and non-erosive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heartburn, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and non-erosive reflux disease. Haley Smith. Abstract. Reflux is a normal process that occurs in healthy infants, children and adults. Most episodes are short-lived and do not cause bothersome symptoms of complications. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) develops ...

  3. Psychometric evaluation of a daily gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptom measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Reimer, Christina; Smith, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the validity of the Heartburn Reflux Dyspepsia Questionnaire (HRDQ), a newly developed measure of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) symptoms. Specifically, the HRDQ was developed for patients, who still experience symptoms with proton...... was demonstrated by moderate to high correlations with ReQuest™ change scores and time with symptoms. An HRDQ cut-off value of 0.70 for definition of ‘bad day’ was also evaluated. Conclusions: Based on existing evidence, the HRDQ is a valid and reliable measure of GORD symptoms that can be used as a study outcome...

  4. Review article: the pathophysiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, G. E. E.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications. AIM: To review the current knowledge on the underlying factors contributing to GERD, with particular emphasis on the most

  5. The effects of obesity on oesophageal function, acid exposure and the symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggiansah, R; Sweis, R; Anggiansah, A; Wong, T; Cooper, D; Fox, M

    2013-03-01

    Obese patients have an increased risk of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease; however, the mechanism underlying this association is uncertain. To test the hypothesis that mechanical effects of obesity on oesophageal function increase acid exposure and symptoms. Height, weight and waist circumference (WC) were measured in patients with typical reflux symptoms referred for manometry and 24 h ambulatory pH studies. Symptom severity was assessed by questionnaire. The association between obesity [WC, body mass index (BMI)], oesophageal function, acid exposure and reflux symptoms was assessed. Physiological measurements were obtained from 582 patients (median age 48, 56% female) of whom 406 (70%) completed symptom questionnaires. The prevalence of general obesity was greater in women (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2) ; F 23%:M 16%; P = 0.056), however more men had abdominal obesity (WC ≥ 99 cm (M 41%:F 28%; P = 0.001)). Oesophageal acid exposure increased with obesity (WC: R = 0.284, P obese patients. Instead, independent effects of obesity and oesophageal dysfunction on acid exposure were present. Reflux symptoms increased with acid exposure (R = 0.300; P symptom severity in obese patients. Abdominal obesity (waist circumference) is associated with oesophageal dysfunction, increased acid exposure and reflux symptoms; however, this analysis does not support the mechanical hypothesis that the effects of obesity on oesophageal function are the cause of increased acid exposure in obese patients. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Oesophagitis, signs of reflux, and gastric acid secretion in patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, K.E.; Ask, P.; Boeryd, B.; Fransson, S.G.; Tibbling, L.

    1986-01-01

    In a study comprising 100 patients referred to a surgical clinic with symptons suggestive of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, the value of different diagnostic procedures was investigated. Positive acid perfusion and 24-h pH tests were the commonest findings. Forty-nine per cent showed normal oesophageal mucosa or diffuse oesophagitis at endoscopy. The severity of heartburn and regurgitation did not differ between patients with normal oesophageal mucosa and oesophagitis of various severities. The severity of macroscopic oesophagitis was significantly corelated to the total reflux time, the presence of reflux or a hiatal hernia at radiology, an open cardia or reflux at endoscopy, pressure transmission or reflux, and low lower oesophageal sphincter pressure at manometry. Gastric hypersecretion was found in 66% of the patients. Gastric acid secretion was not correlated to the severity of oesophagitis or to the findings at 24-h pH test. In patients with severe oesophagitis the sensivity for radiologic, manometric and endoscopic signs of incompetence of the gastro-oesophageal junction was 94%

  7. Don't eat tomatoes: patient's self-reported experiences of causes of symptoms in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibley, Lesley B; Norton, Christine; Jones, Roger

    2010-08-01

    About 30-50% of patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) experience refractory symptoms despite taking proton pump inhibitors regularly. Epidemiology studies suggest lifestyle risks, but these are under-represented in existing guidelines. The potential for changes to positively impact on symptoms may be underestimated. Lifestyle advice currently appears to be ineffective. To inform the future design of a behaviour change intervention aimed at improving symptoms for patients with GORD, by exploring patient understanding and experiences of lifestyle influences on GORD symptoms. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 23 patients (12 women and 11 men) aged 30-86 years, aiming to identify lifestyle influences perceived by patients to affect their symptoms. Patients reported a wide range of daily influences on their symptoms, including diet, drinking with a meal, body position, alcohol, gaining weight, stress and anxiety. Dietary influences included types of food eaten and eating pattern-including speed of eating and meal size. Many foods were identified as troublesome, but not all foods affected all patients. Eating late and daytime tiredness were not recognized as causes or consequences of night-time reflux. Patients stated that daily living patterns affected their reflux symptoms, but influences were highly variable between respondents. Lifestyle factors appear to combine in unique patterns for individuals, but GORD patients may not be able to identify potential triggers and make changes for themselves. A behaviour change intervention might prove beneficial to these patients.

  8. Effect of coffee on gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with reflux disease and healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, PJ; Samsom, M; Smout, AJP

    1999-01-01

    Background Many patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) report that coffee aggravates their symptoms and doctors tend to discourage its use in GORD. Objective To assess the effect of coffee ingestion on gastro-oesophageaI acid reflux. Design A randomized, controlled, crossover study.

  9. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in The Netherlands. Results of a multicentre pH study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, A. J.; Geus, W. P.; Mulder, P. G.; Stockbrügger, R. W.; Lamers, C. B.

    1996-01-01

    Information on the relationships between gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR), reflux symptoms, hiatal hernia (HH) and oesophagitis, and the response to antisecretory treatment is lacking. In a multicentre study endoscopy, ambulatory 24-h pH monitoring and symptom assessment were carried out in 142

  10. Role of gastroscopy in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This two-year study is a retrospective analysis of records of patients diagnosed with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) at a private medical aid society for the ... diagnosed GORD patients (n = 586) who were on drug therapy were included in the study. These patients were .... thritis and angina pectoris. NSAIDS, cal-.

  11. Additional considerations for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment may range from unscheduled self-medication to complicated laparoscopic surgery. This article describes some of the associated factors, revised definitions and the role of surgery in the management of GORD. Keywords: gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, glucocorticoid, GORD, Helicobacter pylori, obstructive ...

  12. New algorithm for the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.; Mccoll, K.; Tack, J.; Holtmann, G.; Hunt, R. H.; Malfertheiner, P.; Hungin, A. P. S.; Batchelor, H. K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is associated with a variety of typical and atypical symptoms. Patients often present in the first instance to a pharmacist or primary care physician and are subsequently referred to secondary care if initial management fails. Guidelines usually

  13. Randomised clinical trial: daily pantoprazole magnesium 40 mg vs. esomeprazole 40 mg for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, assessed by endoscopy and symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes-Filho, J P; Pedroso, M; Quigley, E M M

    2014-01-01

    Pantoprazole magnesium (pantoprazole-Mg) may display extended inhibition of the proton pump with the potential for improved clinical efficacy in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD). To compare the efficacy of pantoprazole-Mg and esomeprazole in GERD. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (Los Angeles grades A-D) patients were randomised to 4 weeks of treatment with pantoprazole-Mg (n = 290) or esomeprazole (n = 288), both 40 mg once daily, in this multicentre (14 Brazilian sites in 9 cities), double-blind study, with an additional 4 weeks' treatment in nonresponding patients. Severity of oesophagitis (at endoscopy) and GERD-related symptoms (ReQuest-GI) were assessed. The primary end point was the proportion of patients in complete remission (ReQuest-GI score esomeprazole groups at 8 weeks, with no significant differences. Mucosal healing rates were high and not significantly different. At 8 weeks, symptom relief with pantoprazole-Mg was significantly greater than that with esomeprazole (91.6% vs. 86.0%, P = 0.0370) because of continued improvement in symptoms with pantoprazole-Mg from week 4 to week 8 (P = 0.0206). Pantoprazole-Mg 40 mg was at least as effective as esomeprazole 40 mg for complete remission and the mucosal healing rate was high. Symptom relief with pantoprazole-Mg continued to improve from 4 to 8 weeks and was greater than that with esomeprazole at week 8, suggesting an extended period of treatment effect (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01132638). © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Postprandial gastro-oesophageal reflux demonstrated by radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, P.R.; Mohr Madsen, K.; Naeser, A.; Thommesen, P.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation to detect food-stimulated gastro-oesophageal (GE) reflux was carried out in 54 consecutive fasting patients, 35 of whom experienced reflux while 19 did not. All patients then received a standard meal (566 kcal), and the investigation was repeated 1 h afterward. Of the 35 with GE reflux in the fasting state, 33 also had GE reflux in the postprandial state, and 17 of the 19 patients with no GE reflux while fasting also had none in the postprandial state. It is concluded that the radiological method can identify most patients in whom food-stimulated GE reflux could be of clinical significance. (orig.) [de

  15. Postprandial gastro-oesophageal reflux demonstrated by radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, P.R.; Mohr Madsen, K.; Naeser, A.; Thommesen, P. (Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1991-05-01

    An investigation to detect food-stimulated gastro-oesophageal (GE) reflux was carried out in 54 consecutive fasting patients, 35 of whom experienced reflux while 19 did not. All patients then received a standard meal (566 kcal), and the investigation was repeated 1 h afterward. Of the 35 with GE reflux in the fasting state, 33 also had GE reflux in the postprandial state, and 17 of the 19 patients with no GE reflux while fasting also had none in the postprandial state. It is concluded that the radiological method can identify most patients in whom food-stimulated GE reflux could be of clinical significance. (orig.).

  16. Gastric dysrhythmias occur in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease complicated by food regurgitation but not in uncomplicated reflux

    OpenAIRE

    Leahy, A; Besherdas, K; Clayman, C; Mason, I; Epstein, O

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To investigate gastric pacemaker activity in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease using the electrogastrogram.
PATIENTS—Forty patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (20 with acid reflux, 20 with the additional symptom of food regurgitation) and 30 asymptomatic controls.
METHODS—Patients were studied using an electrogastrogram, oesophageal manometry, and 24 hour ambulatory oesophageal pH analysis.
RESULTS—An abnormal electrogastrogram was recorded in two (7%) controls, two (10%) pati...

  17. Scintimetric objectification of the pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobl, R.

    1981-01-01

    In this investigation, the author initially made animal experiments to find out: - if and how the gastro-oesophageal reflux in a cardiac insufficiency caused by cardiomyotomy could be proven quantitatively by scintiscanning as often as wanted and how the course of the arising oesophagitis correlated with the findings of the scintiscanning. For the clinical examinations, he referred to patients complaining the reflux difficulties or patients who had had a Balanced Operation because of a reflux disease. The main concern was to clarify the special characteristics and the reliability of reflux scintiscanning and to compare them to conventional methods of radiological and endoscopic reflux diagnostics. (orig./MG) [de

  18. The effectiveness of esomeprazole 40 mg in patients with persistent symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease following treatment with a full dose proton pump inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R; Patrikios, T

    2008-01-01

    Background: Some patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) remain symptomatic despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. There is a need to determine the most appropriate management of these patients. Aims: To assess the effectiveness of esomeprazole 40 mg in GORD symptoms persisting in patients receiving a full daily dose PPI. Methods: In this multi-centre open label study patients who had received full daily dose PPI for 8 weeks, but were still experiencing persistent GORD symptoms, were treated with esomeprazole 40 mg for 8 weeks (n = 99). The primary outcome variable was the change in the frequency of heartburn. Patient-reported outcomes were also assessed using the Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ) and the GORD Impact Scale (GIS). Results: The mean frequency of heartburn was reduced by 78% from 4.4 days a week to 1 day a week at the end of the 8-week treatment period (p esomeprazole (all p esomeprazole 40 mg significantly improved the frequency and severity of all GORD symptoms. PMID:19166433

  19. Acid suppressants for managing gastro-oesophageal reflux and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in infants: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jane C; Schneuer, Francisco J; Harrison, Christopher; Trevena, Lyndal; Hiscock, Harriet; Elshaug, Adam G; Nassar, Natasha

    2018-02-22

    To evaluate the diagnosis and management of reflux and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in infants aged Overprescribing of acid suppressants to infants may be occurring. In infants, acid-suppressant medicines are no better than placebo and may have significant negative side effects; however, guidelines are inconsistent. Clear, concise and consistent guidance is needed. GPs and parents need to understand what is normal and limitations of medical therapy. We need a greater understanding of the influences on GP prescribing practices, of parents' knowledge and attitudes and of the pressures on parents of infants with these conditions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Long-term treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, A.W.

    2008-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), characterized by heartburn and acid regurgitation, is one of the most common gastrointestinal diseases general practitioners encounter. GORD is effectively treated with acid suppressive medication (ASM), of which proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are most

  1. Gastro-oesophageal reflux, eosinophilic airway inflammation and chronic cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Adalberto; Faro, Vicenta; Cobeta, Ignacio; Royuela, Ana; Molyneux, Ian; Morice, Alyn H

    2011-08-01

    Patients with eosinophilic airway inflammation (EAI) often show a therapeutic response to corticosteroids. Non-invasive methods of diagnosing EAI are potentially useful in guiding therapy, particularly in conditions such as chronic cough, for which corticosteroids may not be the first-line treatment. The value of exhaled nitric oxide (ENO) in the diagnosis of EAI was prospectively investigated in a cohort of 116 patients with chronic cough of varying aetiology. An optimum cut-off value was derived for differentiating between EAI and non-EAI causes of chronic cough. As the diagnosis was gastro-oesophageal reflux in 70 patients (60.3% of the total), the possible relationship between ENO and EAI in the presence or absence of reflux was subsequently investigated. The optimum value of ENO for differentiating EAI (32% of patients) from non-EAI causes of cough was 33 parts per billion (sensitivity 60.5%, specificity 84.6%). In the subgroup of patients with reflux, ENO was highly specific for the diagnosis of EAI (sensitivity 66%, specificity 100%). Conversely, in the patients without reflux, ENO did not discriminate between cough due to EAI or other causes (sensitivity 100%, specificity 28.9%). These results suggest that the presence or absence of reflux should be taken into consideration when interpreting ENO measurements in the diagnosis of chronic cough associated with EAI. © 2011 The Authors. Respirology © 2011 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  2. Gastro-oesophageal reflux in obese subjects: Influence of overweight, weight loss and chronic gastric balloon distension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathus-Vliegen, E. M. H.; Tygat, G. N. J.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Gastro-oesophageal reflux is an obesity-related health risk assumed to improve after weight loss. Prolonged intragastric balloon distension might oppose this. The purpose of the study was to investigate the prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux in untreated obese subjects and to study

  3. Cardiac mucosa at the gastro-oesophageal junction: indicator of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease? Data from a prospective central European multicentre study on histological and endoscopic diagnosis of oesophagitis (histoGERD trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, Cord; Schneider, Nora I; Plieschnegger, Wolfgang; Schmack, Bertram; Bordel, Hartmut; Höfler, Bernd; Eherer, Andreas J; Wolf, Eva-Maria; Rehak, Peter; Vieth, Michael

    2014-07-01

    The origin and significance of cardiac mucosa at the gastro-oesophageal junction are controversial. In the prospective Central European multicentre histoGERD trial, we aimed to assess the prevalence of cardiac mucosa, characterized by the presence of glands composed of mucous cells without parietal cells, and to relate its presence to features related to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). One thousand and seventy-one individuals (576 females and 495 males; median age 53 years) were available for analysis. Overall, in biopsy specimens systematically taken from above and below the gastro-oesophageal junction, cardiac mucosa was observed in 713 (66.6%) individuals. Its presence was associated with patients' symptoms and/or complaints (P = 0.0025), histological changes of the squamous epithelium (P < 0.001) indicative of GORD, intestinal metaplasia (P < 0.001), and an endoscopic diagnosis of oesophagitis (P < 0.001). No association with an endoscopic diagnosis of Barrett's oesophagus or with gastric pathology, particularly Helicobacter infection, was observed. Cardiac mucosa is a common finding in biopsy specimens taken from the gastro-oesophageal junction. Its association with reflux symptoms, histological changes indicating GORD and the endoscopic diagnosis of oesophagitis suggests that injury and repair related to GORD contribute to its development and/or expansion. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Systematic review: the effects of carbonated beverages on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T; Gerson, L; Hershcovici, T; Stave, C; Fass, R

    2010-03-01

    Carbonated beverages have unique properties that may potentially exacerbate gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD), such as high acidity and carbonation. Cessation of carbonated beverage consumption is commonly recommended as part of lifestyle modifications for patients with GERD. To evaluate the relationship of carbonated beverages with oesophageal pH, oesophageal motility, oesophageal damage, GERD symptoms and GERD complications. A systematic review. Carbonated beverage consumption results in a very short decline in intra-oesophageal pH. In addition, carbonated beverages may lead to a transient reduction in lower oesophageal sphincter basal pressure. There is no evidence that carbonated beverages directly cause oesophageal damage. Carbonated beverages have not been consistently shown to cause GERD-related symptoms. Furthermore, there is no evidence that these popular drinks lead to GERD complications or oesophageal cancer. Based on the currently available literature, it appears that there is no direct evidence that carbonated beverages promote or exacerbate GERD.

  5. The role of hiatus hernia in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herwaarden, MA; Samsom, M; Smout, AJPM

    This article gives an overview of the role of sliding hiatus hernia in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). The crural diaphragm acts as an external sphincter of the antireflux barrier. Contractions of the crural diaphragm increase lower-oesophageal-sphincter (LOS) pressure during each

  6. Beneficial effect of omeprazole in a patient with severe bronchial asthma and gastro-oesophageal reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Depla, A. C.; Bartelsman, J. F.; Roos, C. M.; Tytgat, G. N.; Jansen, H. M.

    1988-01-01

    A 25-yr-old man suffered from severe nocturnal asthma, which was shown to be provoked by pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux. A dramatic, immediate improvement of his pulmonary condition was achieved by treatment with omeprazole after failure of other therapeutic measures, including high doses of

  7. Factors Affecting the Prevalence of Gastro-oesophageal Reflux in Childhood Corrosive Oesophageal Strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar H. İskit

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastro-oesophageal reflux may accompany the corrosive oesophageal damage caused by the ingestion of corrosive substances and affect its treatment. The factors that affect the development of reflux in these cases and their effects on treatment still remain unclear. Aims: Our aim is to investigate the prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux in children with corrosive oesophageal strictures, the risk factors affecting this prevalence and the effects of gastro-oesophageal reflux on treatment. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: We enrolled 52 patients with oesophageal stricture due to corrosive substance ingestion who were referred to our clinic between 2003 and 2010. Groups, which were determined according to the presence of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER, were compared with each other in terms of clinical findings, results of examination methods, characteristics of the stricture and success of the treatment. Results: The total number of patients in our study was 52; 30 of them were male and 22 of them were female. The mean age of our study population was 4.2±2.88 years. Thirty-three patients had gastro-oesophageal reflux (63.5%. Patients who had strictures caused by the ingestion of alkali substances were 1.6-times more likely to have reflux. There were no differences between patients with or without reflux in terms of number and localisation of strictures. Mean distance of stricture was longer in patients with reflux (3.7±1.8 cm than in patients without (2.2±1.0 cm (p0.05. Conclusion: Corrosive oesophageal stricture was usually accompanied by gastro-oesophageal reflux and the length of stricture is an important risk factor. Negative effects of reflux over dilatation treatment have not yet been demonstrated in the short-term. Nevertheless, this frequent rate of reflux may eventually increase the risk of oesophagitis and Barrett’s oesophagus; therefore, we suggest that these effects should be prospectively evaluated in a

  8. Systematic review: role of acid, weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, G. E.; Smout, A.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is gaining recognition. To quantify the proportions of reflux episodes that are acidic (pH <4), weakly acidic (pH 4-7) and weakly alkaline (pH >7) in adult patients with GERD, and to evaluate their

  9. Systematic review: frequency and reasons for consultation for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungin, A P S; Hill, C; Raghunath, A

    2009-08-15

    Upper gastrointestinal symptoms impose a substantial illness burden and management costs. Understanding perceptions and reasons for seeking healthcare is a prerequisite for meeting patients' needs effectively. To review systematically findings on consultation frequencies for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and dyspepsia and patients' reasons for consultation. Systematic literature searches. Reported consultation rates ranged from 5.4% to 56% for GERD and from 26% to 70% for dyspepsia. Consultation for GERD was associated with increased symptom severity and frequency, interference with social activities, sleep disturbance, lack of timetabled work, higher levels of comorbidity, depression, anxiety, phobia, somatization and obsessionality. Some consulted because of fears that their symptoms represented serious disease; others avoided consultation because of this. Inconsistent associations were seen with medication use. Patients were less likely to consult if they felt that their doctor would trivialize their symptoms. Few factors were consistently associated with dyspepsia consultation. However, lower socio-economic status and Helicobacter pylori infection were associated with increased consultation. Patients' perceptions of their condition, comorbid factors and external reasons such as work and social factors are related to consultation rates for GERD. Awareness of these factors can guide the clinician towards a more effective strategy than one based on drug therapy alone.

  10. The influence of the speed of food intake on multichannel impedance in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Serhat; Bayrakci, Berna; Erdogan, Askin; Yildirim, Esra; Vardar, Rukiye

    2013-10-01

    There is a general belief that gastro-oesophageal reflux increases after meals and especially following a rapid intake. To evaluate the impact of rapid vs. slow food intake on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) patients. Forty-six GORD patients with heartburn and / or acid regurgitation once a week or more often common were included in this study. Participants were asked to eat the same standard meal within either 5 or 30 minutes under observation in a random order on 2 consecutive days. A total of 28 hours of recording were obtained by intraoesophageal impedance pH and number of liquid and mixed reflux episodes within 3 hours of the slow- and fast-eating postprandial periods were calculated. While all patients defined GORD symptoms, 10 (21.7%) had pathological 24-h intraoesophageal impedance measurement, 15 (32.6%) had pathological DeMeester and 21.7% had erosive oesophagitis. No difference has been shown according to the eating speed when all reflux episodes were taken together (754 vs. 733). Speed of food intake also did not have an impact on patients with normal vs. pathological 24-h intraoesophageal impedance or erosive vs. non-erosive. During the first postprandial hour, approximately half of the reflux events were non-acid, compared to 34.2% during the second hour and 26.8% during the third hour (p eating speed on reflux episodes in GORD patients did not support the general belief that reflux increases following fast eating. Acid and non-acid reflux were similar at the first postprandial hour, then acid reflux episodes were predominantly higher, which implicate the importance of acid pockets.

  11. Gastro-oesophageal reflux demonstrated by radiography: a supplement to 24-h pH monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, E.; Aksglaede, K.; Jacobsen, N.O.; Funch-Jensen, P.; Thommesen, P.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is demonstrated by radiography as a supplement to 24-h pH monitoring. Material and Methods: Forty-two patients (mean age 44 years) with suspicion of GOR disease were assessed according to a standard questionnaire. GOR was investigated by 24-h pH-monitoring and by radiography. Oesophageal emptying and the presence of rings or strictures were registered as well. Mucosal biopsies, classified as normal, light oesophagitis, severe oesophagitis, or Barrett's oesophagus, were correlated to age, gender, symptomatology, pH monitoring, and oesophageal emptying. GOR and morphological changes demonstrated by radiography were correlated to pH monitoring and mucosa biopsies. Results: Based on pH monitoring, patients with severe oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus had a significantly higher acid exposure compared to patients with normal mucosa and light oesophagitis, with no difference concerning age, gender, and symptoms. Severe oesophagitis, including Barrett's oesophagus, was found only in patients with a positive test for radiologic GOR. Eleven patients had rings or strictures independent of oesophageal mucosal changes. Conclusion: GOR demonstrated by radiography identified patients where complications could be expected, which was not possible by pH monitoring alone

  12. Proximal and distal gastro-oesophageal reflux in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Annemarie L; Button, Brenda M; Denehy, Linda; Roberts, Stuart J; Bamford, Tiffany L; Ellis, Samantha J; Mu, Fi-Tjen; Heine, Ralf G; Stirling, Robert G; Wilson, John W

    2014-02-01

    The aims of this observational study were (i) to examine the prevalence of symptomatic and clinically silent proximal and distal gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or bronchiectasis, (ii) the presence of gastric aspiration, and (iii) to explore the possible clinical significance of this comorbidity in these conditions. Twenty-seven participants with COPD, 27 with bronchiectasis and 17 control subjects completed reflux symptom evaluation and dual-channel 24 h oesophageal pH monitoring. In those with lung disease, pepsin levels in sputum samples were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, with disease severity (lung function and high-resolution computed tomography) also measured. The prevalence of GOR in COPD was 37%, in bronchiectasis was 40% and in control subjects was 18% (P = 0.005). Of those diagnosed with GOR, clinically silent reflux was detected in 20% of participants with COPD and 42% with bronchiectasis. While pepsin was found in 33% of COPD and 26% of bronchiectasis participants, the presence of pepsin in sputum was not related to a diagnosis of GOR based on oesophageal pH monitoring in either condition. Neither a diagnosis of GOR nor the presence of pepsin was associated with increased severity of lung disease in COPD or bronchiectasis. The prevalence of GOR in COPD or bronchiectasis is twice that of the control population, and the diagnosis could not be based on symptoms alone. Pepsin was detected in sputum in COPD and bronchiectasis, suggesting a possible role of pulmonary aspiration, which requires further exploration. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  13. Impact of gastro-oesophageal reflux on microRNA expression, location and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Cameron M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ulceration of the oesophageal squamous mucosa (ulcerative oesophagitis is a pathological manifestation of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, and is a major risk factor for the development of Barrett’s oesophagus. Barrett’s oesophagus is characterised by replacement of reflux-damaged oesophageal squamous epithelium with a columnar intestinal-like epithelium. We previously reported discovery of microRNAs that are differentially expressed between oesophageal squamous mucosa and Barrett’s oesophagus mucosa. Now, to better understand early steps in the initiation of Barrett’s oesophagus, we assessed the expression, location and function of these microRNAs in oesophageal squamous mucosa from individuals with ulcerative oesophagitis. Methods Quantitative real-time PCR was used to compare miR-21, 143, 145, 194, 203, 205 and 215 expression levels in oesophageal mucosa from individuals without pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux to individuals with ulcerative oesophagitis. Correlations between microRNA expression and messenger RNA differentiation markers BMP-4, CK8 and CK14 were analyzed. The cellular localisation of microRNAs within the oesophageal mucosa was determined using in-situ hybridisation. microRNA involvement in proliferation and apoptosis was assessed following transfection of a human squamous oesophageal mucosal cell line (Het-1A. Results miR-143, miR-145 and miR-205 levels were significantly higher in gastro-oesophageal reflux compared with controls. Elevated miR-143 expression correlated with BMP-4 and CK8 expression, and elevated miR-205 expression correlated negatively with CK14 expression. Endogenous miR-143, miR-145 and miR-205 expression was localised to the basal layer of the oesophageal epithelium. Transfection of miR-143, 145 and 205 mimics into Het-1A cells resulted in increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation. Conclusions Elevated miR-143, miR-145 and miR-205 expression was observed in

  14. Heartburn, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and non-erosive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-31

    Jan 31, 2010 ... After eating, food is carried from the mouth to the stomach .... Eat smaller meals. Eating large meals may cause the stomach to become over- distended. This increases upward pressure against the oesophageal sphincter causing acid reflux. ... By elevating the head of the bed, the head and shoulders are.

  15. the pharmacological management of gastro-oesophageal reflux

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    medicine techniques, such as acupuncture, are controversial, but show some benefit, especially in NORD patients who have failed anti-reflux treatment.9 Allied healthcare professionals, including nurses and pharmacists, are encouraged to treat GORD in the absence of danger signs (weight loss, haematemesis, melaenia.

  16. Gastro-oesophageal reflux in infants and children | Nel | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the symptoms in infants and young children are often atypical. Patients with significant symptoms require more extensive diagnostic assessment, such as contrast radiography, oesophagoscopy and oesophageal pH-metry. In most cases, parental reassurance and advice on feeding are sufficient. Thickened feeds ...

  17. Gastro-oesophageal reflux in mechanically ventilated patients: effects of an oesophageal balloon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Levi, M; Félez, M; Martínez-Miralles, E; Solsona, J F; Blanco, M L; Broquetas, J M; Torres, A

    2003-08-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) and bronchoaspiration of gastric content are risk factors linked with ventilator-associated pneumonia. This study was aimed at evaluating the effect of a nasogastric tube (NGT) incorporating a low-pressure oesophageal balloon on GOR and bronchoaspiration in patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Fourteen patients were studied in a semi-recumbent position for 2 consecutive days. Inflation or deflation of the oesophageal balloon was randomised. Samples of blood, gastric content, and oropharyngeal and bronchial secretions were taken every 2 h over a period of 8 h. A radioactively labelled nutritional solution was continuously administered through the NGT. The magnitude of both the GOR and bronchoaspiration was measured by radioactivity counting of oropharyngeal and bronchial secretion samples, respectively. Inflation of the oesophageal balloon resulted in a significant decrease of both GOR and bronchoaspiration of gastric content. This protective effect was statistically significant from 4 h following inflation throughout the duration of the study. This study demonstrates that an inflated oesophageal balloon delays and decreases gastro-oesophageal and bronchial aspiration of gastric content in patients carrying a nasogastric tube and receiving enteral nutrition during mechanical ventilation. Although the method was found to be safe when applied for 8 h, longer times should be considered with caution.

  18. Influence of respiratory physiotherapy on gastro-oesophageal reflux in infants: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ginderdeuren, Filip; Kerckhofs, Eric; Deneyer, Michel; Vanlaethem, Sylvie; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2015-09-01

    To provide a survey on the literature concerning the influence of respiratory physiotherapy on gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in infants and young children. Electronic databases (Pubmed, Web of Science, PEDro) and reference lists of articles and narrative reviews were searched. Articles were included when infants and small children underwent oesophageal pH monitoring or pH-multichannel intraluminal impedance monitoring while respiratory physiotherapy was administered. Descriptive analysis was performed and two researchers scored the methodological quality of these studies. Out of 985 articles, seven (six English, one French) have been included, In total 277 patients were involved, 71 with cystic fibrosis. Depending on the technique used, four studies showed GOR to be aggravated during therapy, three studies reported no effect. The evidence is not conclusive on whether respiratory physiotherapy induces or aggravates GOR in infants and small children. Age, disease, and treatment options play an important role. More specific research, also focussing on the influence of respiratory physiotherapy on non-acid reflux and the impact of recently developed airway clearance techniques (ACT's) on GOR is necessary. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Comparison of the effects of esomeprazole and fundoplication on airway responsiveness in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiljander, Toni; Rantanen, Tuomo; Kellokumpu, Ilmo; Kööbi, Tiit; Lammi, Lauri; Nieminen, Markku; Poussa, Tuija; Ranta, Arto; Saarelainen, Seppo; Salminen, Paulina

    2013-07-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is suggested to cause or aggravate several respiratory conditions. Studies with proton pump inhibitors have resulted in only minor improvements in pulmonary outcomes in patients with GORD. It has been speculated that operative treatment of GORD might be more efficient as it also diminishes non-acidic reflux. To compare the effects of esomeprazole 40 mg bid and fundoplication on airway responsiveness, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), exhaled nitric oxide (NO) and respiratory symptoms in patients with moderate-to-severe GORD. Sixty-nine GORD patients had methacholine inhalation challenge performed on them, and FEV1, exhaled NO and respiratory symptoms were measured at baseline, after a 3-month treatment with esomeprazole and 3 months after fundoplication. Primary outcome variable was dose-response slope (DRS), i.e. decline in FEV1 during methacholine challenge divided with the amount of methacholine administered (%/μmol). Pre-defined subgroup analysis was performed among those with concomitant asthma (n = 12). There was no improvement in DRS, FEV1 or exhaled NO after esomeprazole treatment or fundoplication. Cough and dyspnoea measured with visual analog scale improved with esomeprazole treatment (P esomeprazole treatment nor fundoplication diminishes airway responsiveness or exhaled NO, or improves FEV1 in patients with GORD. Improvements in respiratory symptoms and SGRQ scores after GORD treatments could be detected. However, as this was not a placebo-controlled study, the findings in these secondary endpoints should not be emphasised. ClinicalTrials.cov: NCT00994708. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The gastro-oesophageal common cavity revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, M. C.; Bredenoord, A. J.; Samsom, M.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    The manometric common cavity phenomenon has been used as indicator of gastro-oesophageal reflux of liquid or gaseous substances. Using combined pH and impedance recording as reference standard the value of a common cavity as indicator of gastro-oesophageal reflux was tested. Ten healthy male

  1. Radiologic findings after fundoplication compared with a pH reflux test and symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fransson, S.G.; Soekjer, H.; Johansson, K.E.; Tibbling, L.; Linkoeping Univ.; Linkoeping Univ.

    1986-01-01

    In a follow-up after fundoplication, 61 patients underwent a double contrast examination of the stomach and a radiologic examination to detect any gastro-oesophageal reflux. The radiologic findings were compared with pH reflux test and symptoms. Gastro-oesophageal reflux was found in 7 patients at radiologic examination. None of these patients had an adequate fundoplication at a double contrast examination of the stomach and all had symptoms indicating reflux. Recurrence of gastro-oesophageal reflux may be shown at the radiologic examination and predicted by the morphologic appearances at the double contrast examination. (orig.)

  2. Sleep-related breathing disorders in small children with nocturnal acid gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewska, J; Kaczmarski, M

    2004-01-01

    Coincidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease with obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome has been discussed in recent years. Treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) reduces gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Moreover, treatment of gastroesophageal reflux with omeprazole can reduce the severity of obstructive sleep in selected individuals. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that gastroesophageal reflux does not influence sleep quality and breathing pattern during sleep in children. 24 children (14 boys, 10 girls, aged 2 months-3 years) with sleep disturbances indicating GER were studied. Standard polysomnography with parallel recording of 24-h oesophageal monitoring was performed. Apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) in active/REM sleep and quiet/NREM sleep was compared between nocturnal acid GER children (13 children; 7 boys, 6 girls; aged 1.28 +/- 0.95y; FRT-18.63 +/- 11.83%) and nocturnal acid GER-free controls (11 children; 7 boys, 4 girls; aged 1.64 +/- 0.97y; FRT-2.93 +/- 2.08%). Exclusion criteria were: 1. laboratory signs of infection (increasing OB, increasing CRP, increasing alpha2-globulin); 2. clinical symptoms of infection in the respiratory tract, the alimentary tract or in the urinary tract. In children with nocturnal GER higher incidence of obstructive apnea/hypopnea during REM sleep was found: AHI = 23.35/h +/- 19.1; (CI 95%11.81-34.89) vs AHI = 4.99/h +/- 3.12 in children without nocturnal GER. We found no differences between the groups in saturation < 90% time during sleep. The study confirms coincidence of nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux and sleep-related breathing disorders in children. Higher number of apnea/hypopnea during REM sleep was found in children with nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux.

  3. The effects of a weakly acidic meal on gastric buffering and postprandial gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, K; Francis, D L; See, J A; Geno, D M; Katzka, D A

    2011-09-01

    Exclusion of the meal during ambulatory pH monitoring presumes that a meal completely buffers gastric acid and reflux of acidic food content cannot be distinguished from gastric acid. However, the ability of a meal to completely buffer gastric acid remains unclear. To determine the effect of a weakly acid meal on gastric buffering and oesophageal acid exposure. Patients undergoing multichannel intraluminal impedance pH studies were given a standard weakly acidic meal (pH = 5.9). Gastric and oesophageal pH was measured during the meal and in 15 min intervals for 2 h postprandially. The study included 30 patients, with pathological acid reflux detected in 18 patients. Complete gastric buffering occurred in seven patients (23%) and was lost in all patients within 75 min of the meal. Oesophageal acid was detected in 33% of patients within 30 min of the meal and 81% of patients during the 2 h postprandial period. Postprandial oesophageal acid exposure was greater in patients with pathological acid reflux (9 ± 2.7% vs. 1.7 ± 0.8% P = 0.05) with a trend towards more incomplete gastric acid buffering and significant differences when measuring weak acid reflux (pH 4-5). Acid reflux rarely occurred in the absence of gastric acid, with gastric acid present in 74 of 79 (94%) fifteen minute postprandial intervals with acid reflux. The ability of a meal to buffer gastric acid is poor. Early postprandial oesophageal acid reflux occurs in a substantial proportion of patients. Addition of a weakly acidic or pH neutral meal to ambulatory pH monitoring may unmask early postprandial acid reflux and provide data on gastric acid buffering. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Relationships between air swallowing, intragastric air, belching and gastro-oesophageal reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, AJ; Weusten, BLAM; Timmer, R; Akkermans, LMA; Smout, AJPM

    Background: With each swallow a certain amount of air is transported to the stomach. The stomach protects itself against excessive distention by swallowed air through belching (gas reflux). The mechanism of belching (transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation) is also one of the mechanisms

  5. Relationships between air swallowing, intragastric air, belching and gastro-oesophageal reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, A. J.; Weusten, B. L. A. M.; Timmer, R.; Akkermans, L. M. A.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With each swallow a certain amount of air is transported to the stomach. The stomach protects itself against excessive distention by swallowed air through belching (gas reflux). The mechanism of belching (transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation) is also one of the mechanisms

  6. Comparison of upper gastrointestinal contrast studies and pH/impedance tests for the diagnosis of childhood gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macharia, Eva W

    2012-08-01

    The upper gastrointestinal (UGI) contrast study is used in the assessment of children with gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) and for detection of structural anomalies. The pH study is more sensitive than the UGI study for the diagnosis of GOR. The pH study has been replaced by the pH/impedance test, which detects both acid and nonacid reflux. To compare the UGI contrast study with the pH/impedance test for the diagnosis of GOR in children. We retrospectively reviewed consecutive records of children investigated for GOR from October 2008 to February 2010, and compared the findings of UGI studies with those of pH/impedance tests. The UGI studies revealed GOR in 116 of 579 children (20%). Of the children undergoing a UGI study, 66 also underwent a pH/impedance test. Using the pH/impedance tests as the reference for GOR, UGI had a sensitivity of 42.8% and a negative predictive value of 24%. There was no significant correlation (P > 0.05) between the reflux index and the number of reflux episodes in the pH/impedance tests and height of reflux in the UGI study. There were low incidences of malrotation (0.9%), hiatus hernia (1%) and delayed gastric emptying (0.4%). The UGI study had low sensitivity for the diagnosis of GOR and low yield for the diagnosis of structural anomalies.

  7. Scintigraphy in the detection of gastro-oesophageal reflux in children with caustic oesophageal burns: a comparative study with radiography and 24-h pH monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezcan, Z.; Erinc, R.; Dirlik, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Ege University Medical Faculty, Izmir (Turkey); Oezcan, C.; Mutaf, O. [Dept. of Paediatric Surgery, Ege University Medical Faculty, Izmir (Turkey)

    2001-10-01

    Background: Caustic injury of the oesophagus not only causes luminal narrowing but is also responsible for longitudinal contraction, resulting in gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR), which leads to failure of conventional therapy. Therefore, the development of GOR should be investigated periodically to direct appropriate management of these patients. Purpose: To determine the ability of scintigraphy to detect GOR in children with caustic oesophageal strictures in comparison with barium study and 24-h pH monitoring. Materials and methods: Seventeen children with caustic oesophageal injury underwent scintigraphy, an upper GI barium study and 24-h pH monitoring within the same week. Five patients were also investigated post-operatively for the assessment of surgical outcome after antireflux surgery. Results: On the whole, there was good correlation (r = 0.78, P < 0.00 l) between scintigraphy and 24-h oesophageal pH monitoring. Scintigraphy detected all but one (9/10) refluxing patients and also correctly identified all (7/7) non-refluxing patients. Barium studies demonstrated 6 out of 10 refluxing patients. There were no false-positive barium studies in non-refluxing patients. Post-operative studies demonstrated no evidence of GOR in surgically treated patients. Conclusions: Our results indicate that, by comparison with barium studies, scintigraphy is useful in the detection of GOR in cases with caustic oesophageal strictures and may be used as a screening modality for those under clinical follow-up. (orig.)

  8. Diagnosing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease or lactose intolerance in babies who cry a lot in the first few months overlooks feeding problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-04-01

    This paper explores two areas in which the translation of research into practice may be improved in the management of cry-fuss behaviours in the first few months of life. Firstly, babies who cry excessively are often prescribed proton pump inhibitors, despite evidence that gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is very rarely a cause. The inaccuracy of commonly used explanatory mechanisms, the side-effects of acid-suppressive medications, and the failure to identify treatable problems, including feeding difficulty when the diagnosis of 'reflux' is applied, are discussed. Secondly, crying breastfed babies are still prescribed lactase or lactose-free formula, despite evidence that the problem of functional lactose overload is one of breastfeeding management. The mechanisms and management of functional lactose overload are discussed. These two problems of research translation need to be addressed because failure to identify and manage other causes of cry-fuss problems, including feeding difficulty, may have adverse outcomes for a small but significant minority of families. © 2013 The Author. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  9. Comparing laparoscopic antireflux surgery with esomeprazole in the management of patients with chronic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a 3-year interim analysis of the LOTUS trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundell, L; Attwood, S; Ell, C; Fiocca, R; Galmiche, J-P; Hatlebakk, J; Lind, T; Junghard, O

    2008-01-01

    Background: With the introduction of laparoscopic antireflux surgery (LARS) for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) along with the increasing efficacy of modern medical treatment, a direct comparison is warranted. The 3-year interim results of a randomised study comparing both the efficacy and safety of LARS and esomeprazole (ESO) are reported. Methods: LOTUS is an open, parallel-group multicentre, randomised and controlled trial conducted in dedicated centres in 11 European countries. LARS was completed according to a standardised protocol, comprising a total fundoplication and a crural repair. Medical treatment comprised ESO 20 mg once daily, which could be increased stepwise to 40 mg once daily and then 20 mg twice daily in the case of incomplete GORD control. The primary outcome variable was time to treatment failure (Kaplan–Meier analysis). Treatment failure was defined on the basis of symptomatic relapse requiring treatment beyond that stated in the protocol. Results: 554 patients were randomised, of whom 288 were allocated to LARS and 266 to ESO. The two study arms were well matched. The proportions of patients who remained in remission after 3 years were similar for the two therapies: 90% of surgical patients compared with 93% medically treated for the intention to treat population, p = 0.25 (90% vs 95% per protocol). No major unexpected postoperative complications were experienced and ESO was well tolerated. However, postfundoplication complaints remain a problem after LARS. Conclusions: Over the first 3 years of this long-term study, both laparoscopic total fundoplication and continuous ESO treatment were similarly effective and well-tolerated therapeutic strategies for providing effective control of GORD. PMID:18469091

  10. Laryngopharyngeal reflux: a prospective analysis of a 34 item symptom questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakonstantinou, L; Leslie, P; Gray, J; Chadwick, T; Hudson, M; Wilson, J A

    2009-10-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux is increasingly diagnosed, but both its symptoms and relationship to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease remain confused. (i) To assess symptoms in potential laryngopharyngeal reflux patients according to a comprehensive symptom list based on both a gastro-oesophageal reflux questionnaire and a laryngopharyngeal reflux questionnaire. (ii) To assess whether there are statistically discrete symptom clusters which might map to specific syndromes e.g. globus pharynges. Prospective single cohort questionnaire survey. A 34-item questionnaire comprising all symptoms identifiable on (i) the original 25-item Gastroesophageal Symptom Assessment Scale (GSAS) and (ii) the nine Reflux Symptom Index (RSI) items, 'unbundled' as necessary, were administered to 62 ENT clinic attenders. Descriptive, correlation and cluster analysis was performed. All but two of the combined 34-symptom list were endorsed by at least 20% of 62 patients. Certain symptoms which the Reflux Symptom Index groups as a single item were only weakly correlated. No specific symptom clusters were identified. Neither the most popular 'lower' oesophageal (GSAS) nor the 'throat' reflux (RSI) questionnaire adequately captures the full range of potential reflux symptoms regularly encountered in otolaryngology patients: inadequate evaluation of patients' symptoms may have contributed to the ongoing uncertainty about the role of acid or pepsin suppression. A more comprehensive reflux questionnaire is needed to characterise the true reflux correlations of laryngopharyngeal symptoms, and offer a symptom-specific measure of response to placebo and anti-reflux therapy.

  11. Indirect comparison of randomised controlled trials: comparative efficacy of dexlansoprazole vs. esomeprazole in the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M S; Tan, S C; Xiong, T

    2013-07-01

    Dexlansoprazole is a new proton pump inhibitor (PPI) with a dual delayed-release system. Both dexlansoprazole and esomeprazole are an enantiomer of lansoprazole and omeprazole respectively. However, there is no head-to-head trial data or indirect comparison analyses between dexlansoprazole and esomeprazole. To compare the efficacy of dexlansoprazole with esomeprazole in healing erosive oesophagitis (EO), the maintenance of healed EO and the treatment of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) comparing dexlansoprazole or esomeprazole with either placebo or another PPI were systematically reviewed. Random-effect meta-analyses and adjusted indirect comparisons were conducted to compare the treatment effect of dexlansoprazole and esomeprazole using a common comparator. The relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. The indirect comparisons revealed significant differences in symptom control of heartburn in patients with NERD at 4 weeks. Dexlansoprazole 30 mg was more effective than esomeprazole 20 mg or 40 mg (RR: 2.01, 95% CI: 1.15-3.51; RR: 2.17, 95% CI: 1.39-3.38). However, there were no statistically significant differences between the two drugs in EO healing and maintenance of healed EO. Comparison of symptom control in healed EO was not able to be made due to different definitions used in the RCTs. Adjusted indirect comparisons based on currently available RCT data suggested significantly better treatment effect in symptom control of heartburn in patients with NERD for dexlansoprazole against esomeprazole. No statistically significant differences were found in other EO outcomes. However, these study findings need to be interpreted with caution due to small number of studies and other limitations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A PROPOSITION FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE IN CHILDREN - A REPORT FROM A WORKING GROUP ON GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENPLAS, Y; ASHKENAZI, A; BELLI, D; BOIGE, N; BOUQUET, J; CADRANEL, S; CEZARD, JP; CUCCHIARA, S; DUPONT, C; GEBOES, K; GOTTRAND, F; HEYMANS, HSA; JASINSKI, C; KNEEPKENS, CMF; KOLETZKO, S; MILLA, P; MOUGENOT, JF; NUSSLE, D; NAVARRO, J; NEWELL, SJ; OLAFSDOTTIR, E; PEETERS, S; RAVELLI, A; POLANCO, [No Value; SANDHU, BK; TOLBOOM, J

    In this paper, a Working Group on Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux discusses recommendations for the first line diagnostic and therapeutic approach of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in infants and children. All members of the Working Group agreed that infants with uncomplicated gastro-oesophageal reflux

  13. The role of an alginate suspension on pepsin and bile acids - key aggressors in the gastric refluxate. Does this have implications for the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugala, Vicki; Avis, Jeanine; Jolliffe, Ian G; Johnstone, Lesley M; Dettmar, Peter W

    2009-08-01

    During a reflux event the oesophagus is exposed to a heterogeneous mixture of gastric juice components. The role of non-acid components of the refluxate in causing damage to the oesophagus is now well established but no therapeutic option exists to address this. The role of Gaviscon Advance (GA), a raft-forming alginate suspension, in protecting the oesophagus from damage by pepsin and bile acids (aggressors) was investigated using a series of in-vitro models. GA was able to dose-dependently inhibit pepsin activity over and above the neutralisation effect of the formulation. This was evident against both protein and collagen substrates using two distinct colorimetric assays. GA was able to retard the diffusion of pepsin and multiple bile acids using a Franz cell model. Using the raft-forming mode of action GA was able to remove both pepsin and multiple bile acids from a simulated reflux event. There was capacity in the GA raft to accommodate aggressors from multiple reflux events. GA can specifically remove both pepsin and bile acids from the refluxate, limit their diffusion and affect enzymatic activity of pepsin. There is a role for GA to reduce the damaging potential of the refluxate and thus protect the oesophagus.

  14. Review article: reflux and its consequences--the laryngeal, pulmonary and oesophageal manifestations. Conference held in conjunction with the 9th International Symposium on Human Pepsin (ISHP) Kingston-upon-Hull, UK, 21-23 April 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearson, J. P.; Parikh, S.; Orlando, R. C.; Johnston, N.; Allen, J.; Tinling, S. P.; Belafsky, P.; Arevalo, L. F.; Sharma, N.; Castell, D. O.; Fox, M.; Harding, S. M.; Morice, A. H.; Watson, M. G.; Shields, M. D.; Bateman, N.; McCallion, W. A.; van Wijk, M. P.; Wenzl, T. G.; Karkos, P. D.; Belafsky, P. C.

    2011-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the commonest diseases of Western populations, affecting 20 to 30% of adults. GERD is multifaceted and the classical oesophageal symptoms such as heartburn and regurgitation often overlap with atypical symptoms that impact upon the respiratory

  15. Gastro-oesophageal intussusception in a young German Shepherd Dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werthern, C.J. von; Montavon, P.M.; Fluckiger, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    A gastro-oesophageal intussusception in a female, six-week-old German shepherd dog was treated surgically with success. The dog was presented with acute dyspnoea and signs of shock. After laparotomy, the herniated organs were reduced from the lumen of the oesophagus into the abdomen and an imbrication of the oesophageal hiatus, an appositional fundoplication and a left-sided incisional fundopexy were performed. The dog made an uneventful recovery. Eighteen months after surgery the dog is still alive, with no clinical signs despite the persistent presence of megaoesophagus

  16. How reflux causes symptoms: reflux perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijenborg, Pim W; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2013-06-01

    In gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms arise due to reflux of gastric content into the oesophagus. However, the relation between magnitude and onset of reflux and symptom generation in GERD patients is far from simple; gastroesophageal reflux occurs several times a day in everyone and the majority of reflux episodes remains asymptomatic. This review aims to address the question how reflux causes symptoms, focussing on factors leading to enhanced reflux perception. We will highlight esophageal sensitivity variance between subtypes of GERD, which is influenced by peripheral sensitization of primary afferents, central sensitization of spinal dorsal horn neurons, impaired mucosal barrier function and genetic factors. We will also discuss the contribution of specific refluxate characteristics to reflux perception, including acidity, and the role of bile, pepsin and gas and proximal extent. Further understanding of reflux perception might improve GERD treatment, especially in current partial responders to therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Refractory gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a major management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-05-12

    May 12, 2009 ... latitude with the sex ratio of births. Normally, slightly more boys than girls are born. Kristen Navara of the University of Georgia in Athens analysed birth data between 1997 and 2006 from 202 countries collected by the. US Central Intelligence Agency. Navara's analysis of CIA data suggests that, worldwide, ...

  18. if, when and how to treat gastro-oesophageal reflux

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tardive dyskinesia associated with use of metodopramide in a child. JPediatr 1992; 121, 983-985. 9. Wooding 5, Sendall C Contra-indication to Prepulsid use in prematurely born infants (born at a gestational age 01 less than 36 weeks) from °through 3 months after deli,'ery date. Prepulsid package insert change, 1997.

  19. Gastro-oesophageal reflux: an overview of the pharmacotherapeutic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    short-term use only. Meanwhile sodium bicarbonate should be used with caution in patients who require a restricted sodium intake.4,9. Dimethicone and simethicone may relieve a 'bloated feeling' by acting as antiflatulent or defoaming agents. They may also be of benefit in the management of intestinal colic in infants and.

  20. Gastro-oesophageal reflux: an overview of the pharmacotherapeutic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , including histamine 2-receptor antagonists, proton pump inhibitors, mucosal or cytoprotective agents and pro-motility agents. Deciding on appropriate therapy will depend on the diagnosis, side-effects and cost-effectiveness of the treatment.

  1. Additional considerations for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oesophageal inflammation is the result of the inadequately managed suppression of gastric acid caused by the retrograde flow from the stomach through the lower oesophageal sphincter, which may result in complications, including stricture formation, Barrett's oesophagus, erosive oesophagitis and adenocarcinoma.

  2. Determinants of reflux-induced chronic cough

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herregods, Thomas V. K.; Pauwels, Ans; Jafari, Jafar; Sifrim, Daniel; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Tack, Jan; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Gastro-oesophageal reflux is considered to be an important contributing factor in chronic unexplained cough. It remains unclear why some reflux episodes in the same patient causes cough while others do not. To understand more about the mechanism by which reflux induces cough, we aimed to

  3. Phase II study of biweekly cetuximab in combination with irinotecan as second-line treatment in patients with platinum-resistant gastro-oesophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønnemann, K R; Yilmaz, Mette Karen; Bjerregaard, J K

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phase II trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cetuximab and irinotecan as second-line treatment in patients with gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma.......The purpose of this phase II trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cetuximab and irinotecan as second-line treatment in patients with gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma....

  4. Inverse association between gastroesophageal reflux and blood pressure: Results of a large community based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane Athene J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a cross-sectional community based study, as part of a randomised controlled trial of eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection, the association between blood pressure and symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux was examined. Methods Linear regression was used to examine the association between systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the frequency of heartburn and acid regurgitation in 4,902 of 10,537 participants aged 20–59 years. Results In multivariable analyses, adjusted mean systolic blood pressure was 4.2 (95% confidence interval 1.5 to 7.0 mm Hg lower in participants with daily acid regurgitation compared to those with less frequent symptoms. Similarly, for diastolic blood pressure, a reduction of 2.1 (0.0 to 4.3 mm Hg wasobserved. Conclusion People who experience daily symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux have lower blood pressure than people with less frequent or no symptoms. It is possible that factors influencing nitric oxide concentrations both at the lower oesophageal sphincter and within the vasculature may be involved. This hypothesis requires confirmation. Trials registration number ISRCTN44816925

  5. Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) is a prognostic factor in ovarian, gastro-oesophageal and pancreatico-biliary cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Attar, A; Gossage, L; Fareed, K R; Shehata, M; Mohammed, M; Zaitoun, A M; Soomro, I; Lobo, D N; Abbotts, R; Chan, S; Madhusudan, S

    2010-01-01

    Background: Altered DNA repair may be associated with aggressive tumour biology and impact upon response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We investigated whether expression of human AP endonuclease (APE1), a key multifunctional protein involved in DNA BER, would impact on clinicopathological outcomes in ovarian, gastro-oesophageal, and pancreatico-biliary cancer. Methods: Formalin-fixed human ovarian, gastro-oesophageal, and pancreatico-biliary cancers were constructed into TMAs. Expression ...

  6. Gastro-oesophageal reflux: An overview of the cost-effectiveness of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    short-term use only. Meanwhile sodium bicarbonate should be used with caution in patients who require a restricted sodium intake.3,4. Dimethicone and simethicone may relieve a 'bloated feeling' by acting as antiflatulent or defoaming agents. They may also be of benefit in the management of intestinal colic in infants and.

  7. Cine-oeso-gastro-scintigraphy (COGS) and gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR): a 15-year experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet, J.; Role, C.; Joussein, M.

    1996-01-01

    Eight thousand COGS were performed, searching for, quantifying and visualizing GOR, and possibly associated oesophageal dismotility or gastric emptying disorders in neonates (15 %), infants (33 %), children 1-4 (20%), 4-8 (20%) and 8-16 years old (14%). Indications were medical or surgical, to diagnoses, assess or follow up GOR with or without treatment. GOR was discovered in 65 % of the cases. A respiratory contamination by GOR aspiration was visualized in 4 % of patients with recurrent respiratory diseases, or near miss from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Pathological patterns of gastric emptying in SIDS are emphasized. Oesophageal motility dysfunctions, primary or related to oesophagitis, are visualized and quantified by scintigraphic imaging. PH-metry and scintigraphy accuracies and their relative positions are discussed. (authors). 117 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Effect of azithromycin on acid reflux, hiatus hernia and proximal acid pocket in the postprandial period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, W. O.; Bennink, R. J.; de Ruigh, A. A.; Hirsch, D. P.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background The risk for acidic reflux is mainly determined by the position of the gastric acid pocket. It was hypothesised that compounds affecting proximal stomach tone might reduce gastro-oesophageal reflux by changing the acid pocket position. Objective To study the effect of azithromycin (Azi)

  9. Review article: reflux and its consequences--the laryngeal, pulmonary and oesophageal manifestations. Conference held in conjunction with the 9th International Symposium on Human Pepsin (ISHP) Kingston-upon-Hull, UK, 21-23 April 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, J P; Parikh, S; Orlando, R C; Johnston, N; Allen, J; Tinling, S P; Johnston, N; Belafsky, P; Arevalo, L F; Sharma, N; Castell, D O; Fox, M; Harding, S M; Morice, A H; Watson, M G; Shields, M D; Bateman, N; McCallion, W A; van Wijk, M P; Wenzl, T G; Karkos, P D; Belafsky, P C

    2011-04-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the commonest diseases of Western populations, affecting 20 to 30% of adults. GERD is multifaceted and the classical oesophageal symptoms such as heartburn and regurgitation often overlap with atypical symptoms that impact upon the respiratory system and airways. This is referred to as extra-oesophageal reflux disease (EERD), or laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), which manifests as chronic cough, laryngitis, hoarseness, voice disorders and asthma. The 'Reflux and its consequences' conference was held in Hull in 2010 and brought together a multidisciplinary group of experts all with a common interest in the many manifestations of reflux disease to present recent research and clinical progress in GERD and EERD. In particular new techniques for diagnosing reflux were showcased at the conference. Both clinical and non-clinical key opinion leaders were invited to write a review on key areas presented at the `Reflux and its consequences' conference for inclusion in this supplement. Eleven chapters contained in this supplement reflected the sessions of the conference and included discussion of the nature of the refluxate (acid, pepsin, bile acids and non-acid reflux); mechanisms of tissue damage and protection in the oesophagus, laryngopharynx and airways. Clinical conditions with a reflux aetiology including asthma, chronic cough, airway disease, LPR, and paediatric EERD were reviewed. In addition methods for diagnosis of reflux disease and treatment strategies, especially with reference to non-acid reflux, were considered. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) is a prognostic factor in ovarian, gastro-oesophageal and pancreatico-biliary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Attar, A; Gossage, L; Fareed, K R; Shehata, M; Mohammed, M; Zaitoun, A M; Soomro, I; Lobo, D N; Abbotts, R; Chan, S; Madhusudan, S

    2010-02-16

    Altered DNA repair may be associated with aggressive tumour biology and impact upon response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We investigated whether expression of human AP endonuclease (APE1), a key multifunctional protein involved in DNA BER, would impact on clinicopathological outcomes in ovarian, gastro-oesophageal, and pancreatico-biliary cancer. Formalin-fixed human ovarian, gastro-oesophageal, and pancreatico-biliary cancers were constructed into TMAs. Expression of APE1 was analysed by IHC and correlated to clinicopathological variables. In ovarian cancer, nuclear APE1 expression was seen in 71.9% (97 out of 135) of tumours and correlated with tumour type (P=0.006), optimal debulking (P=0.009), and overall survival (P=0.05). In gastro-oesophageal cancers previously exposed to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 34.8% (16 out of 46) of tumours were positive in the nucleus and this correlated with shorter overall survival (P=0.005), whereas cytoplasmic localisation correlated with tumour dedifferentiation (P=0.034). In pancreatico-biliary cancer, nuclear staining was seen in 44% (32 out of 72) of tumours. Absence of cytoplasmic staining was associated with perineural invasion (P=0.007), vascular invasion (P=0.05), and poorly differentiated tumours (P=0.068). A trend was noticed with advanced stage (P=0.077). Positive clinicopathological correlations of APE1 expression suggest that APE1 is a potential drug target in ovarian, gastro-oesophageal, and pancreatico-biliary cancers.

  11. Impact of helicobacter pylori eradication on dyspeptic symptoms in the community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, S.Z.; English, J.; Abbas, A.B.; Vivian, G.; Shaw, S.; McGovern, D.; Dalton, H.R.

    2003-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Eradication of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) will cure most Hp positive duodenal ulcers (DU). However, after such treatment, patients often continue to get dyspeptic symptoms. The effects of Hp eradication in patients with proven DU on gastro-oesophageal reflux dis (GORD) symptoms are controversial. Results: Eighty one percent patients had improvement in ulcer-type symptoms. 21% developed new GORD symptoms. 68% discontinued long-term acid-suppression treatment. 79% requiring continued acid suppression therapy had new or continued GORD symptoms. Conclusion: Patients in the community with Hp positive DU disease after eradication, 81% patients got symptomatic improvement, two third discontinued their acid suppressing therapy but 21% developed new GORD symptoms. Among those who required continued acid suppression, 79% had GORD symptoms. (author)

  12. Is scintigraphy of value in the diagnosis of gastrooesophageal reflux disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjellen, G.; Brudin, L.; Haakansson, H.O. (Centrallasarettet, Kalmar (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    110 patients with suspected oesophageal symptoms were investigated by means of oesophageal endoscopy (OE), 24-h pH- metry, and oesophageal scintigraphy (ES). When 24-h pH-metry formed the basis for diagnosis of gastrooesophageal reflux disease (GERD), the sensitivity for ES at abdominal compression was 64%, but no statistically significant differences were found among erect refluxers, supine refluxers, and comibined refluxers. Only 4% of the GERD patients had pathologic oesophageal clearing at ES. The more severe the macroscopic oesophagitis found by OE, the more pronounced were the abnormal findings at 24-h pH-metry and at ES with abdominal compression. Increased postprandial reflux was associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux and hiatal hernia at ES with abdominal compression and the most severe form of oesophagitis, respectively. It is concluded that ES has too low sensitivity to be recommended as a screening test for GERD. Nevertheless, the specificity of 76% can to some extent help us to rule out GERD in patients. 19 refs., 7 tabs.

  13. [The value of twenty-four hour intraoesophageal pH monitoring and manometry in the management of patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakner, Lilla; Döbrönte, Zoltán

    2009-10-25

    Functional gastroenterological examinations (intraoesophageal pH monitoring, oesophageal manometry, scintigraphy, impedance examination) play important role in the management of patients with upper gastrointestinal complaints. Four different cases are demonstrated where diagnose and therapy was developed by these examinations. Two patients had typical gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms and two others had dysphagia. Intraoesophageal pH monitoring was performed by Zinetics twenty-four hour one or two channel pH catheters and oesophageal manometry was carried out by Zinetics EMC four channel catheter with water perfusion method. In one of the patients with typical and extraoesophageal reflux symptoms, lower oesophageal sphincter incompetency by manometry and pathological acid reflux was observed by intraoesophageal pH monitoring, respectively. Furthermore, hiatal hernia was established, peristalsis of the oesophagus proved to be preserved. Because of incomplete efficacy of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, antireflux surgery was indicated. An other patient with reflux symptoms had physiological pH monitoring and manometric values. Hypersensitive oesophagus was diagnosed and PPI therapy in double dose was applied. Both patients are symptom free up to now. Other two patients complained difficult swallowing and weight loss. Absence of lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation and hypomotility of the oesophagus was observed. After oesophageal dilatation, both patients with achalasia could easy swallow and eat. Our cases confirm the importance of the twenty-four hour intraoesophageal pH monitoring and oesophageal manometry in the diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, non-cardiac chest pain, other extraoesophageal manifestations and dysphagia. These examinations support the decision for the adequate therapeutic strategy (conventional treatment, surgery or operation or endoscopic intervention) and are important in the follow-up of patients.

  14. Laparoscopy, computerised tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the management of gastric and gastro-oesophageal junction cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, A; Galloway, S

    2016-07-01

    The staging laparoscopy has been used in the management of gastrointestinal cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of staging laparoscopy, in comparison with computed tomography (CT) and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging in staging patients with gastro-oesophageal junction (GOJ) and gastric cancers. The data were collected for patients between 1996 and 2013 undergoing investigation and treatment for GOJ and gastric cancers at a single institute. The pre-operative data (staging data), intraoperative details, post-operative course and follow-up were analysed for individual cases. Staging laparoscopy altered management plan in 64 (17 %) of 387 patients with negative staging CT and FDG-PET scan. Twenty-seven (7 %) patients with GOJ cancer (types I, II and III) were identified with pathological intraperitoneal nodes, 15 (4 %) gastric cancer with metastatic intraperitoneal deposits and liver metastases and 3 % gastric cancers with positive ascitic fluid for cancer cells. Ten (3 %) of patients were downstaged and were offered curative resection. Patients with metastatic disease were referred for palliative chemotherapy. The overall sensitivity of staging laparoscopy in diagnosing intraabdominal pathology was 86 % in comparison with CT (81 %) and FDG-PET (78 %). The diagnostic laparoscopy is useful for detecting and confirming nodal involvement and distant metastatic disease not evident on the staging CT scan and FDG-PET. This could potentially alter treatment and prognosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal cancer. The diagnostic laparoscopy should be performed as part of investigation and treatment planning for patients suffering from GOJ and gastric cancers. This can help to avoid surgery in patients with advanced disease.

  15. Different risk factors between reflux symptoms and mucosal injury in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsien Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is diagnosed based on typical symptoms in clinical practice. It can be divided into two groups using endoscopy: erosive and nonerosive reflux disease (NERD. This study aims to determine the risk factors of reflux symptoms and mucosal injury. This was a two-step case-control study derived from a cohort of 998 individuals having the data of reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ and endoscopic findings. Those with minor reflux symptoms were excluded. The first step compared symptomatic GERD patients with healthy controls. The 2nd step compared patients with erosive esophagitis with healthy controls. In this study, the prevalence of symptomatic GERD and erosive esophagitis were 163 (16.3% and 166 (16.6%, respectively. A total of 507 asymptomatic individuals without mucosal injury of the esophagus on endoscopy were selected as healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, multivariate analyses showed that symptomatic GERD patients had a higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia [odds ratio (OR, 1.83; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.13–2.96] and obesity (OR, 1.85; 95% CI 1.08–3.02. By contrast, male sex (OR, 2.24; 95% CI 1.42–3.52, positive Campylo-like organism (CLO test (OR, 0.56; 95% CI 0.37–0.84, and hiatus hernia (OR, 14.36; 95% CI 3.05–67.6 were associated with erosive esophagitis. In conclusion, obesity and hypertriglyceridemia were associated with reflux symptoms. By contrast, male sex, negative infection of Helicobacter pylori, and hiatus hernia were associated with mucosal injury. Our results suggested that risk factors of reflux symptoms or mucosal injury might be different in GERD patients. The underlying mechanism awaits further studies to clarify.

  16. The oesophagus and cough: laryngo-pharyngeal reflux, microaspiration and vagal reflexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is generally considered to be one of the commonest causes of chronic cough, however randomised controlled trials of proton pump inhibitors have often failed to support this notion. This article reviews the most recent studies investigating the mechanisms thought to link reflux and cough, namely laryngo-pharyngeal reflux, micro-aspiration and neuronal cross-organ sensitisation. How recent evidence might shed light on the failure of acid suppressing therapies and suggest new approaches to treating reflux related cough are also discussed. PMID:23590893

  17. Gastroesophageal and extraesophageal reflux symptoms: similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinnan, Michael; Powell, Jason; Nikkar-Esfahani, Ali; Heading, Robert C; Doyle, Jill; Griffin, S Michael; Leslie, Paula; Bradley, Paula T; James, Peter; Wilson, Janet A

    2015-02-01

    The association between extraesophageal reflux (EER) and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is inadequately understood. We used the Comprehensive Reflux Symptom Scale (CReSS) to evaluate EER and reflux-symptom prevalence in gastroenterology and otolaryngology outpatients and symptom awareness among UK gastroenterologists. Cross-sectional cohort survey. Six hundred thirty-nine participants were surveyed: 103 controls, 359 patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), and 177 otolaryngology clinic patients with throat symptoms. Participants completed the CReSS questionnaire. The study was undertaken in the Endoscopy Unit and the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom. Registered members of the British Gastroenterology Society were asked to rate how frequently reflux patients might complain of each CReSS item. The median CReSS total in volunteers (4) was significantly lower (P 15% of ENT patients and 28% of EGD patients. Three major, robust CReSS factors: esophageal, pharyngeal, and upper airway emerged. Of 259 gastroenterologists, >20% scored 8 of the 34 symptoms as never being reported by reflux patients. Endorsement of each EER CReSS item by 28% to 58% of patients with endoscopic evidence of GERD supports the Montreal consensus on an EER-GERD continuum. Gastroenterologists vary considerably in their appreciation of EER symptom relevance. The advantages of CReSS include standardized, comprehensive capture of patient experience; discriminant validity of ENT and GERD patients from volunteers; and discrete esophageal, pharyngeal, and upper airway subscales. 4. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Inducing and Aggravating Factors of Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhiyatam Mardhiyah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (subsequently abbreviated as GERD is a disease commonly found in the community. Several factors have been recognized as inducing and aggravating factors of GERD symptoms such as older age, female gender, obesity, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, certain diet and poor eating habit like eating fatty, spicy, and acid food.

  19. Extraoesophageal symptoms and signs of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Tepeš

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is very common in developed world, with the prevalence of disease is between 6 and 20%. Pathologic reflux can provoke not only typical symptoms (heartburn and regurgitation but also atypical symptoms and diseases of extraoesophageal organs (pulmonary, ENT, mouth. High prevalence of GERD in patients with unexplained chest pain, asthma, chronic cough, chronic laryngitis, hoarsness and dental erosions is not a proof of causality. GERD can cause these diseases with reflux of acid and pepsin into pharynx, larynx, lungs and mouth (reflux theory or through vasovagal mechanisms (reflex theory. Conclusions Good therapeutic success with medical or operative treatment in early methodologically not well conducted studies has not been completely proven in double-blind placebo controlled studies. GERD is an ethyological reason for these extraoesophageal symptoms and diseases in an approximately one third of patients. With diagnostic modalities that we have now, we cannot clearly define in which patient is GERD is an ethyologic factor or a contributer, before we start the treatment. In patients suspected of having GERD, there is therapeutic option of a trial with high dose of proton pump inhibitor for 3 to 6 months. In other patients with low clinical suspicion of GERD, 24-hour pH testing should be done first.

  20. The effect of the speed of eating on acid reflux and symptoms of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valitova, Elen R; Bayrakçı, Berna; Bor, Serhat

    2013-01-01

    There is a general belief that gastroesophageal reflux attacks appear more frequently after quick meal, which is without powerful scientific basis, and the general advise to patients is to eat slowly. We aimed to determine whether the speed of eating has an impact on reflux attacks and symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients. 24-h intraesophageal pH monitoring was performed to 60 patients with frequent gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms (39 women) in a tertiary referral center. One hour after placing the pH probe, the patients were asked to have the same meal (744 kcal: 37,6% of carbohydrate, 21,2% of protein, and 41,2% of fat) within 5 or 30 minutes in random order for two consecutive days without extubating. The number of reflux episodes, acid exposure time, and the symptoms of 3-h postprandial period were analyzed. Thirty-eight patients had normal and 22 patients had pathologic pH monitoring for a total of 28 hours of measurement period. The number of reflux episodes increased in the 2 nd hour. The fast eating group had less reflux attacks and lower total reflux time in the 1 st hour and an insignificant increase in the 2 nd and 3 rd hours. The number of symptoms was higher following slow eating (113 vs. 100) without reaching significance. Speed of food intake has no significant impact on acidic reflux attacks in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. The classical advice "eat slowly" may not have any scientific basis. However, a similar study on patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease should be performed by combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH to evaluate the place of nonacid or weak acid reflux.

  1. Milk /sup 99/Tcsup(m)-EHIDA test for enterogastric bile reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackie, C.R.; Wisbey, M.L.; Cuschieri, A. (Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (UK))

    1982-02-01

    The study and clinical assessment of enterogastric bile reflux has been restricted for want of a simple non-invasive test for its detection and quantification. This paper describes such a test in which biliary excretion scintigraphy has been combined with a milk meal provocation. Two of 10 healthy volunteers studied showed probable reflux of approximately 5 per cent of total initial abdominal field activity. Among 73 patients studied, 37 patients showed definite reflux of up to 47 per cent. Reflux occurred in 19 of 22 post-gastric surgery patients and in 7 of 22 patients with peptic ulcer disease, gastritis or gastro-oesophageal reflux. None of 7 patients with 'non-specific' abdominal pain showed any reflux, but 11 of 22 patients with gallstone disease or previous cholecystectomy showed reflux of up to 35 per cent, including 9 of 11 patients with loss of gallbladder reservoir function.

  2. Markers of sarcopenia quantified by computed tomography predict adverse long-term outcome in patients with resected oesophageal or gastro-oesophageal junction cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamandl, Dietmar; Baltzer, Pascal A.; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center GET-Unit, Vienna (Austria); Paireder, Matthias; Asari, Reza; Schoppmann, Sebastian F. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Surgery, Upper-GI-Service, Comprehensive Cancer Center GET-Unit, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-05-15

    To assess the impact of sarcopenia and alterations in body composition parameters (BCPs) on survival after surgery for oesophageal and gastro-oesophageal junction cancer (OC). 200 consecutive patients who underwent resection for OC between 2006 and 2013 were selected. Preoperative CTs were used to assess markers of sarcopenia and body composition (total muscle area [TMA], fat-free mass index [FFMi], fat mass index [FMi], subcutaneous, visceral and retrorenal fat [RRF], muscle attenuation). Cox regression was used to assess the primary outcome parameter of overall survival (OS) after surgery. 130 patients (65 %) had sarcopenia based on preoperative CT examinations. Sarcopenic patients showed impaired survival compared to non-sarcopenic individuals (hazard ratio [HR] 1.87, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.15-3.03, p = 0.011). Furthermore, low skeletal muscle attenuation (HR 1.91, 95 % CI 1.12-3.28, p = 0.019) and increased FMi (HR 3.47, 95 % CI 1.27-9.50, p = 0.016) were associated with impaired outcome. In the multivariate analysis, including a composite score (CSS) of those three parameters and clinical variables, only CSS, T-stage and surgical resection margin remained significant predictors of OS. Patients who show signs of sarcopenia and alterations in BCPs on preoperative CT images have impaired long-term outcome after surgery for OC. (orig.)

  3. Air column in esophagus and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moosavi, Alijavad; Raji, Hanieh; Teimoori, Mojtaba; Ghourchian, Shadi

    2012-01-01

    During imaging of the normal esophagus, air is often detected. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between the appearance of air bubbles on imaging and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) symptoms. The cross-sectional imaging study was conducted at Rasole Akram Hospital, Tehran, Iran. A total of 44 patients underwent X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning; the presence of air in the esophagus and visible on CT imaging was scrutinized. The average age of the subjects was 59 and the male to female ratio was 0.83. We found a significant relationship between the presence of GERD symptoms, the size of air bubbles and esophageal dilation (ED) on the CT scan. Air bubbles in the esophagus may be seen frequently in CT scans, but their size and location can vary. The GERD symptoms can arise when a small diameter air column is present within the esophagus, especially in the middle and lower parts

  4. Obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda M Malaty, J Kennard Fraley

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hoda M Malaty1, J Kennard Fraley1,2, Suhaib Abudayyeh1, Kenneth W Fairly1, Ussama S Javed1, et al1Department of Medicine, 2Children’s Nutrition Research Center (CNRC, 4Department of Pediatrics, 5Texas Children’s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 3Department of Gastroenterology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USABackground: The association between body mass index (BMI and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has been extensively studied among adults but few studies have examined such association in children. Aims: 1 to determine the relationship between BMI in children and GERD, and 2 to use the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS values for BMI as a valid source for comparison. Methods: We identified two cohorts of children aged between two and 17 years who were seen at Texas Children’s Hospital (TCH. The first cohort consisted of children diagnosed with GERD based on upper gastrointestinal endoscopic and histologic evaluation, which was recorded in the Pediatric Endoscopic Database System-Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative (PEDS-CORI at TCH. A diagnosis of GERD was based on the presence of erosive esophagitis or esophageal ulcers. Endoscopic reports that were incomplete or did not include demographic features, indications for endoscopy, or endoscopic findings were excluded. The second cohort consisted of all children with symptoms due to gastroesophageal reflux (GER who received outpatient gastrointestinal (GI consultation at TCH for any 9th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD-9 code suggestive of GER. There was no overlap between the two cohorts as each child was indexed only once. Children with any comorbid illnesses were excluded.Measurements: The records for each child namely, age, gender, height, and weight were obtained on the same date as that of the diagnosis. Using the growth curves published by the NCHS, the gender/age specific weight

  5. Determinants of reflux-induced chronic cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herregods, Thomas V K; Pauwels, Ans; Jafari, Jafar; Sifrim, Daniel; Bredenoord, Albert J; Tack, Jan; Smout, André J P M

    2017-12-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux is considered to be an important contributing factor in chronic unexplained cough. It remains unclear why some reflux episodes in the same patient causes cough while others do not. To understand more about the mechanism by which reflux induces cough, we aimed to identify factors which are important in triggering cough. In this multicentre study, 49 patients with reflux-associated chronic cough were analysed using 24-hour pH-impedance-pressure monitoring. The characteristics of reflux episodes that were followed by cough were compared with reflux episodes not associated with cough. The majority (72.4%) of the reflux episodes were acidic (pHcough, reflux episodes that were followed by a cough burst were associated with a higher proximal extent (p=0.0001), a higher volume clearance time (p=0.002) and a higher acid burden in the preceding 15 min window (p=0.019) and higher reflux burden in the preceding 30 min window (p=0.044). No significant difference was found between the two groups when looking at the nadir pH, the pH drop, the acid clearance time or the percentage of reflux episodes which were acidic. The presence of a larger volume of refluxate and oesophageal exposure to reflux for a longer period of time seems to play an important role in inducing cough, while the acidity of the refluxate seems to be less relevant. This helps explain the observation that most patients with chronic cough tend not to benefit from acid inhibitory treatment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease and respiratory disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, G; Caffarena, P E; Battistini, E; Fregonese, B; Barabino, A; Jasonni, V

    1995-01-01

    The patients treated for oesophageal atresia present a correlation between the clinical sintomatology after recanalization characterized by disfagia, dispnea, recurrent cough, chronic pneumopaties and oesophageal anomalies. Where morphological alterations accounting for the presence of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) were not evident, possible functional alterations of the motility were considered. The incidence of GOR was considerably high and, expression of a congenital alteration of the lower oesophageal sphincter and of oesophageal peristalsis, becomes even more severe due to further stretching of the gastro-esophageal junction. The authors underline that the early demonstration of histological changes, even before recanalization, and the motility disorders of the oesophagus have to be well studied, while the LES is normalized, in order to prevent and treat the possible appearance of the well-known complications of GOR.

  7. Pattern of food intolerance in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselli, Michele; Lo Cascio, Natalina; Rabitti, Stefano; Eusebi, Leonardo H; Zeni, Elena; Soavi, Cecilia; Cassol, Francesca; Zuliani, Giovanni; Zagari, Rocco M

    2017-12-01

    Many food items have been involved in gastro-esophageal reflux disease pathogenesis and dietary modification has been proposed as first-line treatment. Test-based exclusion diets have shown to significantly reduce reflux symptoms. We aimed to assess the patterns of food intolerance in a series of patients with typical gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms (GERS). We retrospectively evaluated all patients with typical reflux symptoms, attending the Centre Study Association on Food Intolerance and Nutrition of Ferrara from January 2010 to October 2015, who resulted positive to at least one food item at the Leucocytotoxic Test. The presence and severity of typical GERS (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation) were assessed using the Gastro-esophageal Reflux Disease Impact Scale (GIS) questionnaire. Only individuals with a GIS Score of at least 5 points were included. Almost all patients (91.1%) were intolerant to at least 5 food items. The most frequent food intolerance (more than 33% of patients) were found for milk (55.4%), lettuce (46.4%), coffee (43.7%), brewer's yeast (42.9%), pork (42.9%), tuna (37.5%), rice (35.7%), sole (34.8%), asparagus (34.8%) and eggs (33.9%). Nine different clusters of food intolerance were detected. Patients with typical gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms seem to have intolerance to multiple food items, some of which (lettuce, brewer's yeast, tuna, rice, sole and asparagus) have not yet been associated to gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms not responding to proton pump inhibitor: GERD, NERD, NARD, esophageal hypersensitivity or dyspepsia?

    OpenAIRE

    Bashashati, Mohammad; Hejazi, Reza A; Andrews, Christopher N; Storr, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common gastrointestinal process that can generate symptoms of heartburn and chest pain. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the gold standard for the treatment of GER; however, a substantial group of GER patients fail to respond to PPIs. In the past, it was believed that acid reflux into the esophagus causes all, or at least the majority, of symptoms attributed to GER, with both erosive esophagitis and nonerosive outcomes. However, with modern testing techniqu...

  9. A population-based survey to assess troublesome symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Christina; Bytzer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A simple frequency and severity threshold for categorizing reflux symptoms as troublesome has been suggested, but there is a lack of confirmatory studies for this threshold. The objectives of this study were to examine the characteristics for troublesome symptoms and to compare different ways of categorizing reflux symptoms as troublesome. Members of a web panel responding to an e-mail invitation (1623/3506, median age interval 40-44 years, 51% female) who reported reflux symptoms during the preceding 4 weeks (n=1284) were linked to the full questionnaire. Associations between self-reported troublesome symptoms (10-graded VAS) and troublesome symptoms (mild symptoms >1 day/week or moderate/severe symptoms > or = 1 day/week) and clinical characteristics were analyzed. Out of 1284 subjects, 482 (38%) reported reflux symptoms. Agreement on the classification of troublesome symptoms based on frequency and severity and self-reported troublesome symptoms was poor to fair. Using 4 as the cut-off point on the VAS showed the best agreement (kappa = 0.35). Of the 482 symptomatic respondents, 266 (55%) had troublesome symptoms based on frequency and severity and 274 (57%) had self-reported troublesome symptoms. Subjects (n=80) who had self-reported troublesome symptoms, but were not categorized as having troublesome symptoms based on frequency and severity, reported health concerns, work productivity loss and medical treatment significantly more often (p< or =0.03) than subjects (n=194) with troublesome symptoms according to both categorizations. Classification of troublesome reflux symptoms based on frequency and severity is too simplistic. Health concerns, disrupted work productivity and night-time symptoms add to the perception of symptoms as troublesome.

  10. Reflux nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Personal or family history of vesicoureteral reflux Repeat urinary tract infections Symptoms Some people have no symptoms of reflux nephropathy. ... kidney tests are done for other reasons. If symptoms do occur, they might be similar to those of: Chronic kidney ... and Tests Reflux nephropathy is often found ...

  11. The Clinical Value of Deflation Cough in Chronic Coughers With Reflux Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorini, Federico; Chellini, Elisa; Bigazzi, Francesca; Surrenti, Elisabetta; Fontana, Giovanni A

    2016-06-01

    Patients with deflation cough (DC), the cough-like expulsive effort(s) evoked by maximal lung emptying during a slow vital capacity maneuver, also present symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. DC can be inhibited by prior intake of antacids. We wished to assess DC prevalence and association between DC and chemical characteristics of refluxate in patients with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. A total of 157 consecutive outpatients underwent DC assessment and 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance pH (MII-pH) monitoring; 93/157 also had chronic cough. Patients performed two to four slow vital capacity maneuvers and DC was detected aurally. Subsequently, they underwent 24-h MII-pH monitoring, the outcomes of which were defined as abnormal when acid or non-acid reflux events were > 73. DC occurred in 46/157 patients, 18 of whom had abnormal MII-pH outcomes; 28 of the remaining 111 patients without DC also had abnormal MII-pH findings. Thus, in the patients as a group, there was no association between DC and MII-pH outcomes. DC occurred in 40/93 of the chronic coughers; 15 of whom had acid reflux. All but 2 of the 53 patients without DC had normal MII-pH outcomes (P < .001), and the negative predictive value of DC for excluding acid reflux was 96.2%. At follow-up, 65% of coughers showed significant improvement after treatment. The overall prevalence of DC was 29%, increasing to 43% in chronic coughers in whom the absence of DC virtually excludes acid reflux. Therefore, DC assessment may represent a useful screening test for excluding acid reflux in chronic coughers with reflux symptoms. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [The binomial symptom index for the evaluation of temporal association between cardiorespiratory symptoms and gastroesophageal reflux in neonates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga-Rivera, Alejandro; Moya, María José; Lopez-Alonso, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    The evaluation of symptom association between gastroesophageal reflux and cardiorespiratory events in preterm infants remains unclear. This paper describes a conservative approach to decision-making of anti-reflux surgery through symptom association analysis. Forty-three neonates with potentially reflux-related cardiorespiratory symptoms underwent synchronized esophageal impedance-pH and cardiorespiratory monitoring. Three indices were considered to evaluate symptom association, the symptom index (SI), the symptom sensitivity index (SSI) and the symptom association probability (SAP). A conservative strategy was adopted regarding the decision of anti-reflux surgery, and therefore, patients were scheduled for laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication if the three indices showed a positive assessment of symptom association. Retrospectively, these indices and the binomial symptom index (BSI) were contrasted against the decision of anti-reflux surgery using different windows of association. Thirteen patients showed positive symptom association but only two underwent anti-reflux surgery. The SI and the SSI showed an increasing trend with the width of the window of association. The SAP was affected randomly by slightly altering the windowing parameters. The BSI showed the best performance with the two-minute window (κ =0.78) CONCLUSIONS: The pathology under study is known to improve with maturity. However, the severity of cardiorespiratory symptoms may threaten the neonate's life and therefore, in some occasions, invasive treatments must be considered to protect life. The BSI provides a good prediction of a combination of positive SI, SSI and SAP, which may improve clinical decisions. However, further clinical studies are required to prove the BSI as an optimal predictor of clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms not responding to proton pump inhibitor: GERD, NERD, NARD, esophageal hypersensitivity or dyspepsia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashashati, Mohammad; Hejazi, Reza A; Andrews, Christopher N; Storr, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common gastrointestinal process that can generate symptoms of heartburn and chest pain. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the gold standard for the treatment of GER; however, a substantial group of GER patients fail to respond to PPIs. In the past, it was believed that acid reflux into the esophagus causes all, or at least the majority, of symptoms attributed to GER, with both erosive esophagitis and nonerosive outcomes. However, with modern testing techniques it has been shown that, in addition to acid reflux, the reflux of nonacid gastric and duodenal contents into the esophagus may also induce GER symptoms. It remains unknown how weakly acidic or alkaline refluxate with a pH similar to a normal diet induces GER symptoms. Esophageal hypersensitivity or functional dyspepsia with superimposed heartburn may be other mechanisms of symptom generation, often completely unrelated to GER. Detailed studies investigating the pathophysiology of esophageal hypersensitivity are not conclusive, and definitions of the various disease states may overlap and are often confusing. The authors aim to clarify the pathophysiology, definition, diagnostic techniques and medical treatment of patients with heartburn symptoms who fail PPI therapy. PMID:24719900

  14. Increased proximal reflux in a hypersensitive esophagus might explain symptoms resistant to proton pump inhibitors in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, Wout O.; Bennink, Roelof J.; de Jonge, Hugo; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease have symptoms resistant to treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Several mechanisms such as esophageal hypersensitivity, increased mucosal permeability, and possibly the position of the gastric acid pocket might underlie a

  15. Post-prandial reflux suppression by a raft-forming alginate (Gaviscon Advance) compared to a simple antacid documented by magnetic resonance imaging and pH-impedance monitoring: mechanistic assessment in healthy volunteers and randomised, controlled, double-blind study in reflux patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweis, R; Kaufman, E; Anggiansah, A; Wong, T; Dettmar, P; Fried, M; Schwizer, W; Avvari, R K; Pal, A; Fox, M

    2013-06-01

    Alginates form a raft above the gastric contents, which may suppress gastro-oesophageal reflux; however, inconsistent effects have been reported in mechanistic and clinical studies. To visualise reflux suppression by an alginate-antacid [Gaviscon Advance (GA), Reckitt Benckiser, UK] compared with a nonraft-forming antacid using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to determine the feasibility of pH-impedance monitoring for assessment of reflux suppression by alginates. Two studies were performed: (i) GA and antacid (Alucol, Wander Ltd, Switzerland) were visualised in the stomach after ingestion in 12 healthy volunteers over 30 min after a meal by MRI, with reflux events documented by manometry. (ii) A randomised controlled, double-blind cross-over trial of post-prandial reflux suppression documented by pH-impedance in 20 patients randomised to GA or antacid (Milk of Magnesia; Boots, UK) after two meals taken 24 h apart. MRI visualized a "mass" of GA form at the oesophago-gastric junction (OGJ); simple antacid sank to the distal stomach. The number of post-prandial common cavity reflux events was less with GA than antacid [median 2 (0-5) vs. 5 (1-11); P < 0.035]. Distal reflux events and acid exposure measured by pH-impedance were similar after GA and antacid. There was a trend to reduced proximal reflux events with GA compared with antacid [10.5 (8.9) vs. 13.9 (8.3); P = 0.070]. Gaviscon Advance forms a 'mass' close to the OGJ and significantly suppresses reflux compared with a nonraft-forming antacid. Standard pH-impedance monitoring is suitable for clinical studies of GA in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease patients where proximal reflux is the primary outcome. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. A population-based survey to assess troublesome symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimer, Christina; Bytzer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    . Associations between self-reported troublesome symptoms (10-graded VAS) and troublesome symptoms (mild symptoms >1 day/week or moderate/severe symptoms > or = 1 day/week) and clinical characteristics were analyzed. RESULTS: Out of 1284 subjects, 482 (38%) reported reflux symptoms. Agreement...... on the classification of troublesome symptoms based on frequency and severity and self-reported troublesome symptoms was poor to fair. Using 4 as the cut-off point on the VAS showed the best agreement (kappa = 0.35). Of the 482 symptomatic respondents, 266 (55%) had troublesome symptoms based on frequency and severity...

  17. Accounting for the effect of GERD symptoms on patients' health-related quality of life: supporting optimal disease management by primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flook, N W; Wiklund, I

    2007-12-01

    To review, from a primary care physician (PCP) perspective, the use of patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments for assessment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms, their impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) and the effectiveness of therapy. While generic and disease-specific PRO instruments have been used in the assessment of GERD, the latter can be considered to be more appropriate as they focus only on problems relevant to the disease in question (and therefore tend to be more responsive to change). Such instruments include the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale and the Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ). Their use indicates that GERD symptoms are troublesome and significantly reduce patients' HRQL, and that effective treatment of GERD improves HRQL. The GERD Impact Scale (GIS) questionnaire, primarily developed for use within primary care, can also help to determine the impact of symptoms on patients' everyday lives and, in turn, the benefit of appropriately targeted therapy. Notably, these PRO instruments were developed from focus groups of GERD patients, and only aspects rated of highest importance are used in the final instruments. Consequently, PCPs can feel confident that these questionnaires encompass the most relevant points that they are likely to ask in terms of how symptoms affect patients' everyday lives. Primary care physicians are encouraged to make wider use of PRO instruments within routine practice to improve communication with their GERD patients that, in turn, could lead to improved clinical outcomes and greater patient satisfaction.

  18. Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and related factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Nampei, Akihide; Shi, Kenrin; Ebina, Kosuke; Tomita, Tetsuya; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Hirao, Makoto; Hashimoto, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is common in patients with many chronic diseases, but has not been well recognized in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated the prevalence of GERD symptoms in 278 outpatients with RA and their association with such clinical factors as age, sex, height, weight, body mass index, medications drugs, and functional status evaluated by the Modified Health Assessment Questionnaire (MHAQ). GERD symptoms were evaluated by Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of ...

  19. Comparative study of omeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole and esomeprazole for symptom relief in patients with reflux esophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ri-Nan

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To clarify whether there is any difference in the symptom relief in patients with reflux esophagitis following the administration of four Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). METHODS: Two hundred and seventy-four patients with erosive reflux esophagitis were randomized to receive 8 wk of 20 mg omeprazole (n = 68), 30 mg of lansoprazole (n = 69), 40 mg of pantoprazole (n = 69), 40 mg of esomeprazole (n = 68) once a day in the morning. Daily changes in heartburn and acid reflux symptoms in the first 7 d of administration were assessed using a six-point scale (0: none; 1: mild; 2: mild-moderate; 3: moderate; 4: moderate-severe; 5: severe). RESULTS: The mean heartburn score in patients treated with esomeprazole more rapidly decreased than those receiving other PPI. Complete resolution of heartburn was also more rapid in patients treated with esomeprazole for 5 d compared with omeprazole (P = 0.0018, P = 0.0098, P = 0.0027, P = 0.0137, P = 0.0069, respectively), lansoprazole (P = 0.0020, P = 0.0046, P = 0.0037, P = 0.0016, P = 0.0076, respectively), and pantoprazole (P = 0.0006, P = 0.0005, P = 0.0009, P = 0.0031, P = 0.0119, respectively). There were no significant differences between the four groups in the rate of endoscopic healing of reflux esophagitis at week 8. CONCLUSION: Esomeprazole may be more effective than omeprazole, lansoprazole, and pantoprazole for the rapid relief of heartburn symptoms and acid reflux symptoms in patients with reflux esophagitis. PMID:19248200

  20. Arm span?height difference is correlated with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in aged Japanese subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Eguchi, Hitoshi; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Fujiwara, Motoshi; Nishii, Midori; Tokushima, Yoshinori; Eguchi, Naoko; Tago, Masaki; Sakanishi, Yuta; Tomonaga, Motosuke; Yoshioka, Tsuneaki; Hyakutake, Masaki; Emura, Sei; Koizumi, Shunzo; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Edakuni, Genichiro

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated an association between the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and aging plus height. In this study we investigated whether the arm span?height difference was related to GERD symptoms with a focus on aged subjects in the general population, since the arm span reflects the height in young adulthood before decreasing due to vertebral deformities from aging. A total of 285 elderly individuals (105 females) who visited nursing homes for the elderly i...

  1. The relationship between lower limb symptoms and superficial and deep venous reflux on duplex ultrasonography: The Edinburgh Vein Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, A; Evans, C J; Allan, P; Lee, A J; Ruckley, C V; Fowkes, F G

    2000-11-01

    Previous work from this group has demonstrated the relationships between lower limb symptoms and the presence and severity of trunk varicose veins as seen on clinical examination to be generally weak, symptom specific, and gender dependent. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationships in the general population between lower limb symptoms and the presence of superficial or deep venous reflux. A cross-sectional study was made of an age-stratified random sample of 1566 subjects (699 men and 867 women) aged 18 to 64 selected from 12 general practices in Edinburgh, Scotland. Subjects completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding symptoms (heaviness/tension, a feeling of swelling, aching, restless legs, cramps, itching, tingling) and underwent duplex ultrasound examination of the superficial and deep venous systems of both legs. Reflux of 0.5 seconds or greater was considered pathologic. Deep venous reflux was defined as reflux in at least the popliteal vein. There was a significant positive relationship between isolated superficial reflux and the presence of heaviness/tension (P superficial reflux in men was not significantly positively associated with any symptom. Isolated deep venous reflux was not significantly related to any symptom in either leg in either sex. Combined reflux was related to a feeling of swelling (P =.018, right leg; P =.0022, left leg), cramps (P =.0049, left leg) and itching (P =.0043, left leg) in men, and aching (P =.03, right leg) and cramps (P =.026, left leg) in women. In the general population, only certain lower limb symptoms were related to the presence of reflux on duplex ultrasound scanning. The strongest relationships were observed in the left legs of men with combined superficial and deep reflux.

  2. Are alarm symptoms predictive of cancer survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dregan, Alex; Møller, Henrik; Charlton, Judith; Gulliford, Martin C

    2013-01-01

    Background Alarm symptom presentations are predictive of cancer diagnosis but may also be associated with cancer survival. Aim To evaluate diagnostic time intervals, and consultation patterns after presentation with alarm symptoms, and their association with cancer diagnosis and survival. Design and setting Cohort study using the Clinical Practice Research Database, with linked Cancer Registry data, in 158 general practices. Method Participants included those with haematuria, haemoptysis, dysphagia, and rectal bleeding or urinary tract cancer, lung cancer, gastro-oesophageal cancer, and colorectal cancer. Results The median (interquartile range) interval in days from first symptom presentation to the corresponding cancer diagnosis was: haematuria and urinary tract cancer, 59 (28–109); haemoptysis and lung cancer, 35 (18–89); dysphagia and gastro-oesophageal cancer, 25 (12–48); rectal bleeding and colorectal cancer, 49 (20–157). Three or more alarm symptom consultations were associated with increased odds of diagnosis of urinary tract cancer (odds ratio [OR] 1.84, 95% CI = 1.50 to 2.27), lung cancer (OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.07 to 2.90) and gastro-oesophageal cancer (OR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.48 to 3.19). Longer diagnostic intervals were associated with increased mortality only for urinary tract cancer (hazard ratio 2.23, 95% CI = 1.35 to 3.69). Patients with no preceding alarm symptom had shorter survival from diagnosis of urinary tract, lung or colorectal cancer than those presenting with a relevant alarm symptom. Conclusion After alarm symptom presentation, repeat consultations are associated with cancer diagnoses. Longer diagnostic intervals appeared to be associated with a worse prognosis for urinary tract cancer only. Mortality is higher when cancer is diagnosed in the absence of alarm symptoms. PMID:24351496

  3. Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatica Goseva

    2014-09-01

    CONCLUSION: GER symptoms are more prevalent in patients with severe airways obstruction when compared to less airways obstructed group and controls. We could suggest an association between the degree of airways obstruction in patients with COPD and the increased rate of GER symptoms.

  4. Risk Factors on the Development of New-Onset Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms. A Population-Based Prospective Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallan, Andreas; Bomme, M.; Hveem, K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a highly prevalent disorder. This study assessed the risk factors of new-onset gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS). METHODS: The study was based on the HUNT study, a prospective population-based cohort study conducted in 1995-1997 and 2006...

  5. Total and abdominal obesity are risk factors for gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitadamo, Paolo; Buonavolontà, Roberta; Miele, Erasmo; Masi, Paola; Coccorullo, Paola; Staiano, Annamaria

    2012-07-01

    The association between GERD and obesity has been frequently reported in adults. Data in children are scarce and inconclusive, evaluating only general obesity. Central adiposity has never been investigated in children as a possible risk factor for GERD. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms in overweight and obese children in comparison with a general normal-weight population and whether the GERD symptoms are associated with waist circumference (WC). The study population consisted of 153 healthy children. A detailed clinical history and a physical examination were obtained from each patient. A questionnaire on reflux symptoms was completed by caregivers. The reflux symptomatic score resulted significantly higher in obese than in normal-weight children and in children with WC >90th percentile compared with those with WC obesity are risk factors for the development of GERD symptoms in children. The risk of GERD symptoms rises progressively with the increase in both body mass index and waist circumference, even in normal-weight children.

  6. Correlation of Gastrophageal Reflux Disease symptoms with Body Mass Index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, S.; Haque, Israr U.; Tayyab, Ghias U.N.; Rehman, Ameed U.; Rehman, Adeel U.; Chaudhry, NusratU.

    2008-01-01

    Aim was to find a correlation between symptoms of gastrophageal refluxdisease (GERD) and body mass index (BMI). A total of 603 patients whopresented at Ghurki Trust Teaching Hospital and Surgimed Hospital Lahore withsymptoms of GERD, were included and interviewed according to a validated GERDquestionnaire. It included questions regarding GERD symptoms and theirseverity/frequency. Symptoms were defined: frequent if occurred daily;occasional if weekly and severe if they were sufficiently intense to changelife style. Height and weight were also recorded and their BMI calculated. Weused logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the associationbetween the presence of each specific GI symptom and BMI. The odds ratios(OR) for a given specific symptom and 95% confidence intervals (CI) werecomputed from the coefficients in logistic regression models. The prevalenceof obesity was 25.3%, while 38.1% were overweight. There was an increase inreporting of GI symptoms in obese individuals compared to those with normalBMI who were taken as reference group. Frequent nausea, vomiting, earlysatiety, epigastric pain, heart burn, regurgitation, postprandial fullnessand dysphagia were present in 10.4, 5.6, 8.9, 17.2, 10.2, 22.1, 23.5 and21.7%, respectively, of obese subjects compared to 7.9, 1.2, 6.5, 3.5, 4.4,17.1 and 16.6% of normal BMI subjects. BMI showed a positive relationshipwith frequent vomiting (P=0.02), epigastric pain (P=0.03), regurgitation offood (P=0.02) and postprandial fullness (0.01). The majority of GERD symptomshave a greater likelihood of occurring with increasing BMI. (author)

  7. Weight Loss Can Lead to Resolution of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms: A Prospective Intervention Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mandeep; Lee, Jaehoon; Gupta, Neil; Gaddam, Srinivas; Smith, Bryan K.; Wani, Sachin B.; Sullivan, Debra K.; Rastogi, Amit; Bansal, Ajay; Donnelly, Joseph E.; Sharma, Prateek

    2013-01-01

    Objective Weight gain is an important risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); however, whether weight loss can lead to resolution of GERD symptoms is not clear. Our aim was to measure the impact of weight loss on GERD symptoms. Design and Methods In a prospective cohort study at a tertiary referral center, overweight/obese subjects (BMI 25-39.9 kg/m2) were enrolled in a structured weight loss program. Weight loss strategies included dietary modifications, increased physical activity and behavioral changes. At baseline and at 6 months, BMI and waist circumference were measured and all participants completed a validated reflux disease questionnaire. Results A total of 332 adult subjects, mean age 46 years and 66% women were prospectively enrolled. At baseline, the mean body weight, BMI, and waist circumference were 101 (±18) kg, 35 (±5) kg/m2 and 103 (±13) cm. At 6 months, majority of the subjects (97%) lost weight (average weight loss: 13 ± 7.7 kg) and as compared with baseline, there was a significant decrease in the overall prevalence of GERD (15 vs. 37%; P GERD symptom score (1.8 vs. 5.5; P GERD symptom scores; 65% had complete resolution and 15% had partial resolution of reflux symptoms. There was a significant correlation between % body weight loss and reduction in GERD symptom scores (r = 0.17, P GERD symptoms is high (37%) in overweight and obese subjects. A structured weight loss program can lead to complete resolution of GERD symptoms in the majority of these subjects. PMID:23532991

  8. Esomeprazole regimens for reflux symptoms in Chinese patients with chronic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Yuan, Yao-Zong; Hou, Xiao-Hua; Zou, Duo-Wu; Lu, Bin; Chen, Min-Hu; Liu, Fei; Wu, Kai-Chun; Zou, Xiao-Ping; Li, Yan-Qing; Zhou, Li-Ya

    2015-06-14

    To compare symptom control with esomeprazole regimens for non-erosive reflux disease and chronic gastritis in patients with a negative endoscopy. This randomized, open-label study was designed in line with clinical practice in China. Patients with typical reflux symptoms for ≥ 3 mo and a negative endoscopy who had a Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire score ≥ 8 were randomized to initial treatment with esomeprazole 20 mg once daily either for 8 wk or for 2 wk. Patients with symptom relief could enter another 24 wk of maintenance/on-demand treatment, where further courses of esomeprazole 20 mg once daily were given if symptoms recurred. The primary endpoint was the symptom control rate at week 24 of the maintenance/on-demand treatment period. Secondary endpoints were symptom relief rate, success rate (defined as patients who had symptom relief after initial treatment and after 24 wk of maintenance treatment), time-to-first-relapse and satisfaction rate. Based on the data collected in the modified intention-to-treat population (MITT; patients in the ITT population with symptom relief after initial esomeprazole treatment, n = 262), the symptom control rate showed a small but statistically significant difference in favor of the 8-wk regimen (94.9% vs 87.3%, P = 0.0473). Among the secondary endpoints, based on the data collected in the ITT population (n = 305), the 8-wk group presented marginally better results in symptom relief after initial esomeprazole treatment (88.3% vs 83.4%, P = 0.2513) and success rate over the whole study (83.8% vs 72.8%, P = 0.0258). The 8-wk regimen was found to provide a 46% reduction in risk of relapse vs the 2-wk regimen (HR = 0.543; 95%CI: 0.388-0.761). In addition, fewer unscheduled visits and higher patient satisfaction supported the therapeutic benefits of the 8-wk regimen over the 2-wk regimen. Safety was comparable between the two groups, with both regimens being well tolerated. Chinese patients diagnosed with chronic

  9. Esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms before and after oral IQoroR training

    OpenAIRE

    Hägg, Mary; Tibbling, Lita; Franzén, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To examine whether muscle training with an oral IQoro(R) screen (IQS) improves esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms. METHODS: A total of 43 adult patients (21 women and 22 men) were consecutively referred to a swallowing center for the treatment and investigation of long-lasting nonstenotic esophageal dysphagia. Hiatal hernia was confirmed by radiologic examination in 21 patients before enrollment in the study (group A; median age 52 years, range: 19-85 years). No hiatal hernia was d...

  10. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and antitumour activity of trastuzumab deruxtecan (DS-8201), a HER2-targeting antibody-drug conjugate, in patients with advanced breast and gastric or gastro-oesophageal tumours: a phase 1 dose-escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Toshihiko; Shitara, Kohei; Naito, Yoichi; Shimomura, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Yonemori, Kan; Shimizu, Chikako; Shimoi, Tatsunori; Kuboki, Yasutoshi; Matsubara, Nobuaki; Kitano, Atsuko; Jikoh, Takahiro; Lee, Caleb; Fujisaki, Yoshihiko; Ogitani, Yusuke; Yver, Antoine; Tamura, Kenji

    2017-11-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates have emerged as a powerful strategy in cancer therapy and combine the ability of monoclonal antibodies to specifically target tumour cells with the highly potent killing activity of drugs with payloads too toxic for systemic administration. Trastuzumab deruxtecan (also known as DS-8201) is an antibody-drug conjugate comprised of a humanised antibody against HER2, a novel enzyme-cleavable linker, and a topoisomerase I inhibitor payload. We assessed its safety and tolerability in patients with advanced breast and gastric or gastro-oesophageal tumours. This was an open-label, dose-escalation phase 1 trial done at two study sites in Japan. Eligible patients were at least 20 years old with breast or gastric or gastro-oesophageal carcinomas refractory to standard therapy regardless of HER2 status. Participants received initial intravenous doses of trastuzumab deruxtecan from 0·8 to 8·0 mg/kg and dose-limiting toxicities were assessed over a 21-day cycle; thereafter, dose reductions were implemented as needed and patients were treated once every 3 weeks until they had unacceptable toxic effects or their disease progressed. Primary endpoints included identification of safety and the maximum tolerated dose or recommended phase 2 dosing and were analysed in all participants who received at least one dose of study drug. The dose-escalation study is the first part of a two-part study with the second dose-expansion part ongoing and enrolling patients as of July 8, 2017, in Japan and the USA. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02564900. Between Aug 28, 2015, and Aug 26, 2016, 24 patients were enrolled and received trastuzumab deruxtecan (n=3 for each of 0·8, 1·6, 3·2, and 8·0 mg/kg doses; n=6 for each of 5·4 and 6·4 mg/kg). Up to the study cutoff date of Feb 1, 2017, no dose-limiting toxic effects, substantial cardiovascular toxic effects, or deaths occurred. One patient was removed from the activity analysis because they

  11. Validation of the GSFQ, a Self-Administered Symptom Frequency Questionnaire for Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Paré

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is based primarily on symptoms experienced by a patient, relatively little attention has been paid to the development and validation of self-administered questionnaires specific to GERD symptoms. The present article presents the validation of the short, self-administered GERD Symptom Frequency Questionnaire (GSFQ.

  12. Benefits of massage therapy for infants with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Madalynn; Pan, Zhaoxing; Workman, Rachel; Marcheggiani-Howard, Cassandra; Furuta, Glenn; Laudenslager, Mark L

    2014-10-01

    This randomized controlled pilot trial was conducted to evaluate the clinical efficacy of massage therapy (MT) for relief of symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The hypothesis was that, when compared to infants who received nonmassage therapy, infants who received MT would display fewer GERD symptoms, greater weight gain, greater amount of sleep, lower cortisol levels before and after treatment, and lower daily (area under the curve [AUC]) cortisol secretion. Participants were 36 infants born at term, 4-10 weeks of age at enrollment, healthy except for a diagnosis of GERD by their pediatrician, and with a score of at least 16 on the Infant Gastroesophageal Reflux Questionnaire-Revised (I-GERQ-R). Infants were randomized to receive either MT or a nonmassage sham treatment in their homes for 30 min twice a week for 6 weeks. Data collectors and parents were blind to study condition. GERD symptoms decreased in both groups and weight increased. Pretreatment salivary cortisol levels decreased significantly over time in the massage group while increasing in the nonmassage group. Daily cortisol level also decreased in the massage group and increased in the nonmassage group, but the difference was not significant. MT administered by a professional therapist did not affect symptoms of GERD differently than a sham treatment but did decrease infant stress as measured by cortisol. Research focusing on stress reduction in infants with GERD and multimodal treatments addressing GERD symptoms may yield the most effective treatment. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. Italian survey on general pediatricians' approach to children with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitadamo, Paolo; Miele, Erasmo; Alongi, Angelo; Brunese, Francesco Paolo; Di Cosimo, Maria Elisabetta; Ferrara, Dante; Gambotto, Silvia; Lamborghini, Adima; Mercuri, Maddalena; Pasinato, Angela; Sansone, Renato; Vitale, Concetta; Villani, Alberto; Staiano, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the current approach of Italian general pediatricians to children with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms, evaluating the implementation of the 2009 North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (NASPGHAN)-European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) guidelines. One hundred randomly identified Italian general pediatricians were asked to complete a case report-structured questionnaire investigating their approach to infants, children, and adolescents with symptoms suggestive of GER. Only 2 % of them showed complete adherence to the guidelines. Thirty-nine percent of them diagnosed GER disease based on clinical symptoms, irrespective of the age of the child; 56 % prescribed proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in infants with unexplained crying and/or distressed behavior and 38 % in infants with uncomplicated recurrent regurgitation and vomiting; 57 % prescribed PPIs in children younger than 8-12 years of age with vomiting and heartburn, without specific testing; and 54 % discontinued PPI therapy abruptly. The overall rate of pediatricians over-prescribing PPIs was 79 %. According to our findings, most Italian general pediatricians do not seem to follow the recommendations of the 2009 NASPGHAN-ESPGHAN reflux guidelines and often prescribe PPIs despite a lack of efficacy for the symptoms being treated. We are well aware that the guidelines address the average situation and that the evaluation of individual patients may frequently reveal reasons for opening criteria for exceptions. Nevertheless, the over-diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) places undue burden on both families and national health system which has not been impacted by the publication of international guidelines.

  14. Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and effects of esomeprazole on the quality of life related to reflux and dyspepsia in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namikoshi, Tamehachi; Harada, Kazuhiro; Hatta, Hidekazu; Tokura, Takehiko; Oshiro, Yoshiyuki; Nishizaki, Tetsuichi; Obata, Takahiro; Mori, Masahiro; Fueki, Takaaki; Fujimoto, Sohachi; Haruna, Yoshisuke; Kuwabara, Atsunori; Yorimitsu, Daisuke; Ihoriya, Chieko; Kadoya, Hiroyuki; Itano, Seiji; Fujimoto, Yasuo; Komai, Norio; Sasaki, Tamaki; Kashihara, Naoki

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms has not been investigated in patients on maintenance hemodialysis in Japan, and few studies have reported the effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in hemodialysis patients with GERD symptoms. Here, we investigated the prevalence of GERD symptoms and the effects of the PPI esomeprazole on the quality of life related to reflux and dyspepsia in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. This was a cross-sectional/cohort study of hemodialysis outpatients implemented in 10 Japanese medical facilities from October 2012 to March 2014. The trial was registered in the UMIN Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN000009124). Forty-one of 385 patients (11%) reported GERD symptoms on the Global Overall Symptom (GOS) questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the independent prognostic factors for GERD symptoms as a history of gastric ulcer and use of sevelamer hydrochloride or calcium polystyrene sulfonate. Participants with GERD symptoms completed the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia, Japanese version (QOLRAD-J) questionnaire and were assigned to receive 4-week esomeprazole treatment (20 mg/day). This PPI therapy significantly improved all QOLRAD-J domains in the full analysis set (n = 28) and improved the GERD symptoms listed in the GOS questionnaire. Significantly impaired disease-specific quality of life (QOL) in the QOLRAD-J domains was observed in 44.4-74.1% of patients who had symptoms before treatment. The mean GOS and QOLRAD-J scores correlated significantly. Therapy with 20 mg/day esomeprazole appears to be efficacious for improving disease-specific QOL and GERD symptoms in Japanese patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

  15. Do gastrointestinal and respiratory signs and symptoms correlate with the severity of gastroesophageal reflux?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzun Hakan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastroesophageal reflux (GER is a disorder that is common by seen in childhood and may lead to severe complications. In this study, we ascertained the incidence of GER among the children who had typical and atypical complaints of GER and whether there was a difference between two groups comparing the findings of 24-hour pH-meter. Methods 39 out of 70 patients with typical and atypical GER symptoms were diagnosed as GER by 24-hour pH-meter monitoring. The patients were divided into three groups, those having gastrointestinal complaints, those having respiratory complaints and those having both gastrointestinal and respiratory symptoms. Results Evaluated the GER prevalence in these groups, it was found to be 60% in the gastrointestinal group, 48.6% in the respiratory group and 75% in the mixed group. When pH-meter measurements of GER positive patients were compared within the clinical groups, the fraction of time that pH was lower than 4 was found to be significantly higher in the mixed group (p = 0.004. Conclusions The coexistence of gastrointestinal and respiratory symptoms in the patients with GER may be related to the severe reflux.

  16. Esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms before and after oral IQoro(R) training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägg, Mary; Tibbling, Lita; Franzén, Thomas

    2015-06-28

    To examine whether muscle training with an oral IQoro(R) screen (IQS) improves esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms. A total of 43 adult patients (21 women and 22 men) were consecutively referred to a swallowing center for the treatment and investigation of long-lasting nonstenotic esophageal dysphagia. Hiatal hernia was confirmed by radiologic examination in 21 patients before enrollment in the study (group A; median age 52 years, range: 19-85 years). No hiatal hernia was detected by radiologic examination in the remaining 22 patients (group B; median age 57 years, range: 22-85 years). Before and after training with an oral IQS for 6-8 mo, the patients were evaluated using a symptom questionnaire (esophageal dysphagia and acid chest symptoms; score 0-3), visual analogue scale (ability to swallow food: score 0-100), lip force test (≥ 15 N), velopharyngeal closure test (≥ 10 s), orofacial motor tests, and an oral sensory test. Another twelve patients (median age 53 years, range: 22-68 years) with hiatal hernia were evaluated using oral IQS traction maneuvers with pressure recordings of the upper esophageal sphincter and hiatus canal as assessed by high-resolution manometry. Esophageal dysphagia was present in all 43 patients at entry, and 98% of patients showed improvement after IQS training [mean score (range): 2.5 (1-3) vs 0.9 (0-2), P < 0.001]. Symptoms of reflux were reported before training in 86% of the patients who showed improvement at follow-up [1.7 (0-3) vs 0.5 (0-2), P < 0.001). The visual analogue scale scores were classified as pathologic in all 43 patients, and 100% showed improvement after IQS training [71 (30-100) vs 22 (0-50), P < 0.001]. No significant difference in symptom frequency was found between groups A and B before or after IQS training. The lip force test [31 N (12-80 N) vs 54 N (27-116), P < 0.001] and velopharyngeal closure test values [28 s (5-74 s) vs 34 s (13-80 s), P < 0.001] were significantly higher after IQS training. The

  17. Vonoprazan treatment improves gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Shinozaki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of vonoprazan, a new potassium-competitive acid blocker, on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD symptom are not fully elucidated. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of vonoprazan on GERD and associated gastrointestinal symptoms. We retrospectively reviewed 88 Helicobacter pylori negative patients with GERD treated with vonoprazan 10 mg daily. Symptoms were evaluated using the Izumo scale, which reflects quality of life related to various abdominal symptoms. The rates of improvement and resolution of GERD symptoms were 86% (76/88 and 57% (50/88, respectively. Improvement and resolution in patients with erosive esophagitis was higher than in those with non-erosive reflux disease (91% vs 83%, p = 0.260 and 71% vs 47%, p = 0.025, respectively. We attempted to identify factors which predict the effects of vonoprazan. Multivariate analysis identified advanced age (≥60-year-old (odds ratio [OR] 7.281, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.056–25.776, p = 0.002, obesity (BMI ≥ 24 (OR 3.342, 95%CI 1.124–9.940, p = 0.030 and erosive esophagitis (OR 4.368, 95%CI 1.281–14.895, p = 0.018 as positive predictors of resolution of GERD symptoms. Alcohol use (OR 0.131, 95%CI 0.027–0.632, p = 0.011 and history of H. pylori eradication (OR 0.171, 95%CI 0.041–0.718, p = 0.015 were identified as negative predictors. Vonoprazan also improved epigastric pain (73%, postprandial distress (60%, constipation (58% and diarrhea (52% in patients with GERD. In conclusion, vonoprazan 10 mg daily is effective in improving GERD symptoms. Advanced age, obesity, erosive esophagitis, alcohol use and history of H. pylori eradication influence the resolution of GERD symptoms. Treatment with vonoprazan favorably affects gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with GERD.

  18. The Benefits of Combination Therapy with Esomeprazole and Rebamipide in Symptom Improvement in Reflux Esophagitis: An International Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Su Jin; Park, Soo-Heon; Moon, Jeong Seop; Shin, Woon Geon; Kim, Jae Gyu; Lee, Yong Chan; Lee, Dong Ho; Jang, Jae Young; Kim, Jae J; Lee, Hang-Lak; Lee, Sang Woo; Hwangbo, Young; Xu, Jianming; Wang, Bangmao; Xue, Zhanxiong; Liu, Fei; Yuan, Yaozong; Leelakusolvong, Somchai; Dy, Frederick

    2016-11-15

    To investigate the effects of esomeprazole and rebamipide combination therapy on symptomatic improvement in patients with reflux esophagitis. A total of 501 patients with reflux esophagitis were randomized into one of the following two treatment regimens: 40 mg esomeprazole plus 300 mg rebamipide daily (combination therapy group) or 40 mg esomeprazole daily (monotherapy group). We used a symptom questionnaire that evaluated heartburn, acid regurgitation, and four upper gastrointestinal symptoms. The primary efficacy end point was the mean decrease in the total symptom score. The mean decreases in the total symptom score at 4 weeks were estimated to be -18.1±13.8 in the combination therapy group and -15.1±11.9 in the monotherapy group (p=0.011). Changes in reflux symptoms from baseline after 4 weeks of treatment were -8.4±6.6 in the combination therapy group and -6.8±5.9 in the monotherapy group (p=0.009). Over a 4-week treatment course, esomeprazole and rebamipide combination therapy was more effective in decreasing the symptoms of reflux esophagitis than esomeprazole monotherapy.

  19. Are alarm symptoms predictive of cancer survival?: population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dregan, Alex; Møller, Henrik; Charlton, Judith; Gulliford, Martin C

    2013-12-01

    Alarm symptom presentations are predictive of cancer diagnosis but may also be associated with cancer survival. To evaluate diagnostic time intervals, and consultation patterns after presentation with alarm symptoms, and their association with cancer diagnosis and survival. Cohort study using the Clinical Practice Research Database, with linked Cancer Registry data, in 158 general practices. Participants included those with haematuria, haemoptysis, dysphagia, and rectal bleeding or urinary tract cancer, lung cancer, gastro-oesophageal cancer, and colorectal cancer. The median (interquartile range) interval in days from first symptom presentation to the corresponding cancer diagnosis was: haematuria and urinary tract cancer, 59 (28-109); haemoptysis and lung cancer, 35 (18-89); dysphagia and gastro-oesophageal cancer, 25 (12-48); rectal bleeding and colorectal cancer, 49 (20-157). Three or more alarm symptom consultations were associated with increased odds of diagnosis of urinary tract cancer (odds ratio [OR] 1.84, 95% CI = 1.50 to 2.27), lung cancer (OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.07 to 2.90) and gastro-oesophageal cancer (OR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.48 to 3.19). Longer diagnostic intervals were associated with increased mortality only for urinary tract cancer (hazard ratio 2.23, 95% CI = 1.35 to 3.69). Patients with no preceding alarm symptom had shorter survival from diagnosis of urinary tract, lung or colorectal cancer than those presenting with a relevant alarm symptom. After alarm symptom presentation, repeat consultations are associated with cancer diagnoses. Longer diagnostic intervals appeared to be associated with a worse prognosis for urinary tract cancer only. Mortality is higher when cancer is diagnosed in the absence of alarm symptoms.

  20. Association of problem behavior with sleep problems and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Katsuyoshi; Yagi, Takakazu; Maeda, Aya; Nagayama, Kunihiro; Uehara, Sawako; Saito-Sakoguchi, Yoko; Kanematsu, Kyoko; Miyawaki, Shouichi

    2014-02-01

    There are few large-scale epidemiologic studies examining the associations between sleep problems, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms, lifestyle and food habits and problem behaviors (PB) in adolescents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations among these factors in Japanese adolescents. A cross-sectional survey of 1840 junior high school students was carried out using questionnaires. The subjects were classified into PB or normal behavior (NB) groups using the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC). The scores of the sleep-related factors, sleep bruxism, lifestyle and food habits, and GERD symptoms were compared. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors related to PB. Mean subject age was 13.3 ± 1.8 years. The PB group had significantly longer sleep latency and higher GERD symptom score (P sleep bruxism, difficulty falling asleep within 30 min, nightmares, feeling of low sleep quality, daytime somnolence, and daytime lack of motivation. Feelings of low sleep quality had the strongest association with PB, with an adjusted odds ratio of 12.88 (95% confidence interval: 8.99-18.46). PB in adolescents are associated with sleep problems, including sleep bruxism, as well as lifestyle and food habits and GERD symptoms. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  1. Different gastoroesophageal reflux symptoms of middle-aged to elderly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Yasuo; Dobashi, Kunio; Kusano, Motoyasu; Mori, Masatomo

    2011-01-01

    Symptomatic differences and the impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have not been clarified in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The purpose of this study is to assess the differences of GERD symptoms among asthma, COPD, and disease control patients, and determine the impact of GERD symptoms on exacerbation of asthma or COPD by using a new questionnaire for GERD. A total of 120 subjects underwent assessment with the frequency scale for the sym...

  2. High prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in type 2 diabetics with hypoadiponectinemia and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirata Ayumu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has been increasing worldwide. Abdominal obesity or visceral fat accumulation rather than simple obesity is associated with GERD. Previous reports demonstrated the association between GERD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Signification of visceral fat accumulation and adiponectin in T2DM patients with GERD remains unclear. The present study investigated the relationships between GERD symptoms, visceral fat accumulation and adiponectin in subjects with T2DM. Findings The study (ADMIT study subjects were 66 Japanese T2DM outpatients, who answered the questionnaire regarding GERD symptoms in Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of GERD (FSSG, and were measured visceral fat area by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Patients with FSSG scores of more than 8 were considered as positive. The prevalence of FSSG score ≥ 8 and average FSSG score in T2DM subjects with the metabolic syndrome (Mets were significantly higher compared to those without Mets. The prevalence of FSSG score ≥ 8 and average FSSG score in T2DM subjects with low levels of serum adiponectin were significantly higher compared to those with high levels of serum adiponectin. Moreover, the combination of Mets and hypoadiponectinemia had a multiplicative effect on GERD symptom score (p = 0.047. Conclusions Our study showed that the coexistence of MetS and low levels of serum adiponectin was associated with the higher prevalence of FSSG score ≥ 8 and the higher scores of GERD symptom in subjects with T2DM. Trial Registration UMIN 000002271.

  3. Does treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux disease with omeprazole decrease allergic rhinitis symptoms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Shirkani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Allergic rhinitis is the most common type of allergic disease among population. Its accurate treatment is very important for cutting of allergic march. On the other hand, gasteroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is one of the most common gastrointestinal problems among allergic patients mainly asthmatic cases. It might conflict treatment. Despite of asthma, a few studies have been conducted on the impact of GERD treatment on allergic rhinitis symptoms. In this study, we assessed GERD treatment and its effects on improving of allergic rhinitis patients with GERD. Materials and Methods: In a prospective cross-sectional study, March - September 2012, 103 consecutive patients with persistent moderate to severe seasonal allergic rhinitis enrolled. For allergic rhinitis patients with GERD 20 mg omeperazole once daily for 6 weeks prescribed, empirically. Conventional allergy treatment continued and finally the allergic rhinitis symptoms were assessed clinically and recorded before, 5th, 10th and 30th days of omeprazole treatment period. Results: Our study included 103 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis who were divided into GERD (n=33, 38% and non-GERD (n=70, 68% groups with the mean age 28 and 25.7 years, respectively. The first group developed significant improvement for GERD symptoms on days 5, 10 and 30 after beginning of therapy (P=0.03. No association was found between GERD treatment and relief of allergic symptoms or TNSS improvement (P>0.05. Data analyzed by Epi info (ver 7 and SPSS software (ver 11.5, and by Chi squeare test and paired T test. P lower than 0.05 was considered as significant. Conclusion: This study showed no significant association between empirical treatment of GERD and improvement of allergic symptoms in patients with allergic rhinitis. However, further studies with a larger sample size might be needed.

  4. CASE STUDY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-02

    Jun 2, 2011 ... complained of progressive dysphagia for solids for 2 months and a weight loss of 5 kg during the same period. He denied loss of appetite, haematemesis or symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. He weighed 76 kg with a body mass index of 25.9. Clinical examination was unremarkable, with no.

  5. Should Helicobacter pylori be eradicated before starting long-term proton pump inhibitors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rauws, E. A.

    1997-01-01

    Symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is a common disorder characterized by pathological exposure of the distal oesophagus to acid. The management requires the control of symptoms, prevention of relapse and complications. Proton pump inhibitors are without doubt the most effective agents in

  6. Randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coyle, C; Crawford, G; Wilkinson, J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Symptomatic breakthrough in proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-treated gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients is a common problem with a range of underlying causes. The nonsystemic, raft-forming action of alginates may help resolve symptoms. AIM: To assess alginate-antacid (Gavisc...

  7. Effect of proton-pump inhibitor treatment on symptoms and quality of life in GERD patients depends on the symptom-reflux association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, Marissa C.; Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Numans, Mattijs E.; de Wit, Niek J.; Samsom, Melvin; Smout, Andre J. P. M.

    2008-01-01

    Backgound: Gastroesophageal reflux disease patients demonstrate various pathophysiologic backgrounds. Therefore, a heterogeneous response to proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment can be expected. We investigated the effect of short-term PPI treatment on symptoms and quality of life (QOL) in primary

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux disease as an etiology of sleep disturbance in subjects with insomnia and minimal reflux symptoms: a pilot study of prevalence and response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Nicholas J; Madanick, Ryan D; Alattar, Maha; Morgan, Douglas R; Davis, Paris H; Galanko, Joseph A; Spacek, Melissa B; Vaughn, Bradley V

    2008-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a well-recognized cause of impaired sleep in patients with frequent GERD symptoms, as well as those with sleep apnea. GERD's role in sleep disturbance of minimally symptomatic patients with poor sleep quality is less clear. We aimed to define the prevalence of GERD-related sleep disturbance in minimally-symptomatic subjects with demonstrated insomnia, and to assess the changes in sleep efficiency in these subjects after vigorous acid suppression. We recruited subjects aged 18-75 years reporting at least 6 months of insomnia, and sleep difficulty at least three nights per week. Subjects with a BMI > 30, a history of snoring or ongoing use of proton pump inhibitor or H2 receptor antagonist were excluded. Subjects underwent concurrent sleep study with dual channel 24-h pH study. Sleep efficiency, defined as the percentage of time after sleep initiation that the subject actually slept, and spontaneous arousal index, defined as the number of arousals per hour, were calculated. Those with a sleep study demonstrating poor sleep quality (sleep efficiency of 10 arousals/h for those aged 15 for those who were 45 or older) and no obstructive sleep apnea were treated with rabeprazole 20 mg PO BID x 14 days. After 14 days, the subjects underwent repeat sleep study with pH monitoring. The GERD Symptom Assessment Scale (GSAS), the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ) were administered to subjects at study inception and after 2 weeks of therapy. Twenty-four subjects reporting insomnia were enrolled, and 20 met criteria for disordered sleep and no OSA. Seventeen completed both the first and second studies, and 16 were adequate for analysis. Baseline GSAS demonstrated trivial or no reflux symptoms in the cohort (no subject scored > 8 out of 45 on GSAS, corresponding to a median rating of reflux symptoms of "not at all"). Four of 16 subjects (25%) demonstrated abnormal pH studies at baseline

  9. Is this a reflux patient or is it a patient with functional dyspepsia with additional reflux symptoms?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, P

    1995-01-01

    of functional dyspepsia is less documented and in most studies the symptomatic pattern could not predict the pharmacologic principle of clinical benefit. This may be because a separation between presence of symptoms and presence of symptoms as a major problem has not been taken into account. Cisapride...... complications. The therapeutic goals in GORD are symptom relief, healing of lesions, prevention of complications, and omittance of adverse effects at the lowest possible costs. Patients with functional dyspepsia usually have symptoms of less severe intensity and as, per definition, no organic substrate...

  10. Effects of omeprazole or anti-reflux surgery on lower oesophageal sphincter characteristics and oesophageal acid exposure over 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emken, Birgitte-Elise G; Lundell, Lars R; Wallin, Lene; Myrvold, Helge E; Engström, Cecilia; Montgomery, Madeleine; Malm, Anders R; Lind, Tore; Hatlebakk, Jan G

    2017-01-01

    To compare the effect of anti-reflux surgery (ARS) versus proton pump inhibitor therapy on lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) function and oesophageal acid exposure in patients with chronic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) over a decade of follow-up. In this randomised, prospective, multicentre study we compared LOS pressure profiles, as well as oesophageal exposure to acid, at baseline and at 1 and 10 years after randomisation to either open ARS (n = 137) or long-term treatment with omeprazole (OME) 20-60 mg daily (n = 108). Median LOS resting pressure and abdominal length increased significantly and remained elevated in patients operated on with ARS, as opposed to those on OME. The proportion of total time (%) with oesophageal pH <4.0 decreased significantly in both the surgical and medical groups, and was significantly lower after 1 year in patients treated with ARS versus OME. After 10 years, oesophageal acid exposure was normalised in both groups, with no significant differences, and bilirubin exposure was within normal limits. After 10 years, patients with or without Barrett's oesophagus did not differ in acid reflux control between the two treatment options. Open ARS and OME were both effective in normalising acid reflux into the oesophagus even when studied over a period of 10 years. Anatomically and functionally the LOS was repaired durably by surgery, with increased resting pressure and abdominal length.

  11. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in a Danish population: a prospective follow-up analysis of symptoms, quality of life, and health-care use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jane Møller; Wildner-Christensen, Mette; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2009-01-01

    in a population followed up for 5 years. METHODS: A total of 10,000 randomly selected inhabitants, 40-65 years old, received, as a part of a controlled trial of Helicobacter pylori screening and treatment (control group), a mailed questionnaire regarding demographic data, gastrointestinal symptoms (the......OBJECTIVES: The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS) in the population is high; however, data on long-term follow-up and incidence of GERS in the population are sparse. This study describes the long-term natural history of GERS, the related health-care use, and quality of life...

  12. Functional dyspepsia (FD) and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD): overlapping or discrete entities?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2012-02-03

    As the incidence of both gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease have declined, that of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and non-ulcer, or functional dyspepsia (FD) have reached virtually epidemic proportions. As we come to appreciate the expression of these disorders in the community, the real spectrum of each disease has become evident. FD and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), the most prevalent manifestation of GORD, frequently overlap. Where then does GORD end and FD begin? Is it realistic, or even clinically relevant, to attempt a clear separation between these entities? These are more than issues of mere semantics; therapeutic options may be dictated by the classification of the patient as one or the other. Recent work indicates clearly that NERD is a heterogeneous disorder incorporating some patients who may well harbour subtle manifestations of oesophagitis and others who have entirely normal 24-hour pH studies. These differences may be crucial to the concept of NERD\\/FD overlap. While evidence in support of this concept is far from complete, it would appear that this overlap is most relevant to those NERD patients who do not exhibit abnormal esophageal acid exposure. These patients truly belong in the spectrum of functional gastrointestinal disorders rather than in GORD; attempts to shoe-horn these individuals into the spectrum of GORD will result in therapeutic disappointment and surgical disaster.

  13. Reflux and aerodigestive tract diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coca-Pelaz, A.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Paccagnella, D.; Takes, R.P.; Rinaldo, A.; Silver, C.E.; Woolgar, J.A.; Hinni, M.L.; Ferlito, A.

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease can present with a wide variety of extraesophageal symptoms. In particular, the type of disease characterized predominately by laryngopharyngeal reflux may be difficult to diagnose because of the absence of regurgitation or heartburn. The available battery of

  14. Endoscopic and symptoms analysis in Mexican patients with irritable Bowel syndrome, dyspepsia, and gastroesophageal reflux disease

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    Santiago Camacho

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the data of endoscopy and symptoms in 118 Mexican patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, dyspepsia, non-erosive reflux disease (NERD and erosive esophagitis (EE. IBS criteria were fulfilling for dyspepsia patients in 47%, for NERD in 48%, and for EE patients in 48% of cases. Esophagitis was present in 42% of patients with IBS and in 45% of patients with dyspepsia. A higher prevalence of hiatus hernia was found in EE vs. NERD. Heartburn and acid eructation were associated with the presence of esophagitis; acid eructation, regurgitation and nocturnal pain with duodenitis; and heartburn and regurgitation with hiatus hernia. Males more frequently reported: ucus in feces, abdoinal distension, nausea and gastritis; and oen ore frequently reported esophagitis and duodenitis. Patients with NERD (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.08 to 5.99, p=0.04, tenesmus and early satiety, and men had an increase risk for reporting hard or lumpy stools. In conclusion, nearly half of the Mexican patients with NERD, EE and dyspepsia fulfill criteria for IBS. A large number of symptoms were correlated with endoscopy, which can be used to improve the indication of the endoscopy and its implementation in clinical studies.O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar os dados de endoscopia e sintomas de 118 pacientes mexicanos com síndrome do intestino irritável (IBS, dispepsia, doença do refluxo não-erosiva (NERD e esofagite erosiva (EE. Os pacientes com IBS preencheram os critérios para dispepsia em 47%, para NERD em 48%, e para pacientes EE em 48% dos casos. Esofagite estava presente em 42% dos pacientes com IBS e em 45% dos pacientes com dispepsia. A maior prevalência de hérnia de hiato foi encontrada na EE em comparação com NERD. Azia e eructação ácida foram associadas à presença de esofagite; eructação ácida, regurgitação e dor noturna, com duodenite; e azia e regurgitação com hérnia de hiato. Os homens relataram mais

  15. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Refractory to Proton Pump Inhibitors and the Effects of Switching to 20 mg Esomeprazole on Reflux Symptoms and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Fuminao; Hashiguchi, Keiichi; Onitsuka, Yasunori; Tanigawa, Ken; Minami, Hitomi; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Shiozawa, Ken; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Taura, Naota; Ohnita, Ken; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Isomoto, Hajime; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-12-31

    BACKGROUND Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may deteriorate patient quality of life (QOL) despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS Nineteen Japanese institutions were surveyed to determine the clinical characteristics and QOL of patients with refractory GERD. Those patients treated with a conventional PPI were switched to 20 mg esomeprazole for 4 weeks. Symptoms and QOL were assessed using Global Overall Symptom and Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) questionnaires at baseline and at 2 and/or 4 weeks of esomeprazole treatment. RESULTS Of 120 patients who completed the survey, 58 (48.3%) had refractory GERD. Of these, 69.0% were aged ≥ 65 years, 79.3% were prescribed a PPI at a standard or high dose, and 22.4% were prescribed a PPI together with another drug. After switching to esomeprazole, patients reported significant improvements in heartburn, acid regurgitation, and excessive belching at 2 weeks using a symptom diary, as well as the total score, reflux, abdominal pain, and indigestion, which were assessed using the GSRS at 4 weeks. CONCLUSIONS About half of Japanese patients with GERD may be refractory to conventional PPIs. Their reflux-related symptoms are often severe and may impair QOL. Switching to esomeprazole could be used to improve their symptoms and QOL.

  16. Effect of Aloe Vera and Pantoprazole on Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms in Mustard Gas Victims: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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    Yunes Panahi, Jafar Aslani, Ali Hajihashemi, Mahdieh Kalkhorani, Mostafa Ghanei, Amirhossein Sahebkar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common complaint of sulphur mustard (SM-exposed subjects. Routine treatments such as proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs, H2-blockers and anti-acids cannot control GERD symptoms completely. Aloe vera is a medicinal plant that has been shown to reduce gastric acid secretion. The efficacy of pantoprazole with or without A. Vera juice in alleviating GERD symptoms was investigated in SM-exposed subjects. Methods: Male patients with a history of SM exposure and diagnosed GERD were enrolled and assigned to treatment with pantoprazole (40 mg before breakfast plus A. vera syrup (5 mL bid before breakfast and at bedtime (n=44, or pantoprazole alone (40 mg before breakfast (n=41 for a period of 6 weeks. GERD symptoms were assessed at baseline and weeks 3 and 6 of study using the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI questionnaire. Results: Seventy-five patients (n=38 and 37 in the A. vera + pantoprazloe and pantoprazole group, respectively completed the study. No significant difference was found between the groups regarding demographic characteristics and baseline RSI score (p>0.05. A decreasing trend in RSI score was observed in both groups by the 3rd and 6th week of study (p<0.001. There was a greater reduction of RSI score in the A. vera + pantoprazloe versus pantoprazole group (p<0.001. There was no report of any side effects from A. vera during the course of trial. Conclusion: Findings of the present study suggested a significant improvement in the severity of GERD symptoms in SM-exposed subjects following addition of A. Vera to pantoprazole.

  17. [Observational study in primary health care: symptoms control of gastroesophageal reflux disease and influence on the quality of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstić, Miodrag; Damjanov, Dragomir; Ngorni, Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disease in primary care. The most effective medicamentous treatment is proton pump inhibitors (PPI). Observational study conducted in 13 primary health care centers from the whole Serbia with the aim to collect local epidemiology data on GERD and to investigate the intensity and frequency of disease symptoms and the quality of life of patients treated with proton pump inhibitors by using a Patient's Questionnaire. Adult GERD patients treated with PPI were under follow-up for two months. The investigators evaluated typical symptoms and gave global assessment of disease severity. The patients filled-in the Patient's Questionnaire on disease symptoms and quality of life. At the study end, the investigators evaluated the importance of the Patient's Questionnaire in the management of these patients. The study included 828 patients (66.3% female) of mean age 54.8 years. The most common life habits were coffee consumption (86.1%), exposure to stress (81.7%), smoking (45.7%) and alcohol consumption (25%). With PPI therapy a statistically significant reduction of typical GERD symptoms of any intensity was detected as evaluated by the investigators (p quality of life, as estimated by the patients (p Primary health care physicians evaluated the Patient's Questionnaire as an important tool in the investigation of the disease symptoms and the quality of life of patients with GERD. The intensity and frequency of symptoms were reduced, and the quality of life of patients with GERD was improved by therapy with PPI.

  18. Eight weeks of omeprazole 20 mg significantly reduces both laryngopharyngeal reflux and comorbid chronic rhinosinusitis signs and symptoms: Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

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    Anzić, S A; Turkalj, M; Župan, A; Labor, M; Plavec, D; Baudoin, T

    2018-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux recommended treatment (dose and duration) with proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) compared to placebo significantly reduces the signs and symptoms of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and comorbid chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Double-blind randomised placebo-controlled trial. Eight weeks of treatment with omeprazole 20 mg once daily (OD). Sixty patients (28 women, aged 19-87 years) with diagnosed LPR and comorbid CRS. Significant reduction in signs and symptoms (reflux symptom index (RSI) score as subjective, and reflux finding score (RFS) as objective measure) of LPR after 8 weeks of treatment with omeprazole 20 mg OD when compared to placebo. Secondary objectives were significant reduction in signs and symptoms of comorbid CRS after 8 weeks of treatment with omeprazole 20 mg OD when compared to placebo and the association of the severity of signs and symptoms of LPR with the ones of CRS. RSI and RFS decreased significantly more in the active treatment group after 8 weeks compared to placebo (P < .001 for both). CRS and endoscopy scoring decreased both significantly more in the active group after 8 weeks compared to placebo (P < .001 for both). CRS scoring significantly correlated with RSI (R = 0.312, P = .015) but not with RFS (R = 0.199, P = .127). The results of our trial suggest that omeprazole 20 mg OD for 8 weeks was effective in reducing signs and symptoms of both LPR and CRS, although in most patients still present at the end of the trial. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Lifestyle factors affecting gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms: a cross-sectional study of healthy 19864 adults using FSSG scores

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    Yamamichi Nobutake

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a very common disorder worldwide, comprised of reflux esophagitis (RE and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD. As more than half of GERD patients are classified into the NERD group, precise evaluation of bothersome epigastric symptoms is essential. Nevertheless, compared with many reports targeting endoscopic reflux esophagitis, large-scale studies focusing on GERD symptoms have been very scarce. Methods To elucidate lifestyle factors affecting GERD symptoms, 19,864 healthy adults in Japan were analyzed. Sub-analyses of 371 proton pump inhibitor (PPI users and 539 histamine H2-receptor antagonist (H2RA users were also performed. Using the FSSG (Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of GERD score as a response variable, 25 lifestyle-related factors were univariately evaluated by Student's t-test or Pearson's correlation coefficient, and were further analyzed with multiple linear regression modelling. Results Average FSSG scores were 4.8 ± 5.2 for total subjects, 9.0 ± 7.3 for PPI users, and 8.2 ± 6.6 for H2RA users. Among the total population, positively correlated factors and standardized coefficients (β for FSSG scores are inadequate sleep (β = 0.158, digestive drug users (β = 0.0972 for PPI, β = 0.0903 for H2RA, and β = 0.104 for others, increased body weight in adulthood (β = 0.081, dinner just before bedtime (β = 0.061, the habit of midnight snack (β = 0.055, lower body mass index (β = 0.054, NSAID users (β = 0.051, female gender (β = 0.048, lack of breakfast (β = 0.045, lack of physical exercise (β = 0.035, younger age (β = 0.033, antihyperglycemic agents non-users (β = 0.026, the habit of quick eating (β = 0.025, alcohol drinking (β = 0.025, history of gastrectomy (β = 0.024, history of cardiovascular disease (β = 0.020, and smoking (β = 0.018. Positively correlated factors for PPI users are female gender (β = 0.198, inadequate sleep (β = 0.150, lack of breakfast

  20. Laryngopharyngeal reflux

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    Maja Šereg-Bahar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 4–10 % of patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER some atypical symptoms are found (cough, hoarseness, globus pharyngeus, dyspnea which are characteristic for laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR. The signs of LPR can be detected in more than 50 % of dysphonic patients. In the diagnostics of LPR, a meticulous history and a videoendoscopy of the larynx and pharynx are the most important procedures. The diagnosis of LPR can be confirmed by the 24-hour double probe pH monitoring and the treatment test with proton pump inhibitors. The best diagnostic results can be obtained with a combination of several diagnostic procedures.Conclusions: An otorhinolaryngologist can start a treatment test with proton pump inhibitors in a patient in whom a laryngopharyngeal reflux is suspected on the basis of history and laryngopharyngeal endoscopy. A successful treatment requires at least 12 weeks regimen with high doses 20 mg twice a day. In the case of alarm signs and unsuccessful treatment a gastroenterologic intervention is necessary.

  1. The differences in esophageal motility and its clinical significance between the patients with typical and atypical symptoms of non-erosive reflux disease

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    Ling LIN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To study the characteristics of esophageal motility in the patients with different symptoms of nonerosive reflux disease (non-erosive reflux disease, NERD. Methods  Eighty-six patients with NERD who visited the Department of Gastroenterology in our hospital from August 2012 to December 2014 were selected. They were all evaluated with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and high resolution esophageal manometry. Those who had neither definite esophageal mucosal erosion nor Barrett's esophagus at endoscopy were diagnosed as NERD. According to the presence or absence of typical acid reflux and/or heartburn symptoms, patients with NERD were divided into two groups: the typical symptom group (47 cases, and the atypical symptom group (39 cases. High resolution measurement of esophageal pressure was used to evaluate the differences in esophageal dynamic characteristics between patients with different symptoms of NERD. The final results were analyzed with t test and chi-square test. Results  Compared with atypical symptom group, both the resting pressure (20.68±1.64mmHg vs 15.79±1.21mmHg respectively, P0.05. Conclusion  There is a difference in esophageal motility characteristics between the patients with typical and atypical symptoms of NERD, and the main differences are changes in the resting pressure and residual pressure of LES. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.12.12

  2. Diagnostic yield of oesophageal pH monitoring in patients with chronic unexplained cough

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogte, Auke; Bredenoord, Arjan J.; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: One of the main causes of persistent cough is gastro-oesophageal reflux. In these patients, excessive oesophageal acid exposure and/or a temporal association between gastro-oesophageal reflux and cough can be demonstrated during 24-h pH monitoring. Impedance pH monitoring may have a

  3. Diagnostic yield of oesophageal pH monitoring in patients with chronic unexplained cough

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogte, Auke; Bredenoord, Arjan J.; Smout, Andre J. P. M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. One of the main causes of persistent cough is gastro-oesophageal reflux. In these patients, excessive oesophageal acid exposure and/or a temporal association between gastro-oesophageal reflux and cough can be demonstrated during 24-h pH monitoring. Impedance pH monitoring may have a

  4. PRISM, a Patient-Reported Outcome Instrument, Accurately Measures Symptom Change in Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Garth; Bolus, Roger; Whitman, Cynthia; Talley, Jennifer; Erder, M Haim; Joseph, Alain; Silberg, Debra G; Spiegel, Brennan

    2017-03-01

    Most patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) experience relief following treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) (Vakil et al. in Am J Gastroenterol 101:1900-1920, 2006; Everhart and Ruhl in Gastroenterology 136:376-386, 2009). As many as 17-44% of patients, however, exhibit only partial response to therapy. Most extant GERD patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments fail to meet development best practices as described by the FDA (Talley and Wiklund in Qual Life Res 14:21-33, 2005; Van Pinxteren et al. in Cochrane Database Syst Rev 18:CD002095, 2004; El-Serag et al. in Aliment Pharmacol Ther 32:720-737, 2010). To develop and validate a PRO instrument for clinical trials involving patients with GERD who are PPI partial responders. We prepared a systematic literature review, held patient focus groups, convened an expert panel, and conducted cognitive interviews to establish content validity. Eligible participants took PPI therapy for at least 8 weeks, had undergone an upper endoscopy, and scored at least 8 points on the GerdQ [6]. Qualitative data guided development of 26 draft items. Items were reviewed by expert panels and debriefed with patients. The resulting 21-item instrument underwent psychometric evaluation during a Phase IIB trial. During the trial, confirmatory factor analysis (n = 220) resulted in a four-factor model displaying the highest goodness of fit. All domains had a high inter-item correlation (Cronbach's α > 0.8). Test-retest reliability and convergent validity were strong, with highly significant (p GERD with a partial response to PPI therapy.

  5. Comparison of Omeprazole with Ranitidine for Treatment of Symptoms Associated with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Uncomplicated Duodenal Ulcer

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    Andre P Archambault

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This randomized, single-blind, parallel group study was conducted to compare omeprazole with ranitidine for the treatment of symptoms associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, uncomplicated duodenal ulcer (DU or both. After baseline assessments, patients were randomized to receive daily treatment with either 20 mg omeprazole or 300 mg ranitidine for four weeks. In total, 1481 patients (1001 omeprazole, 480 ranitidine with a diagnosis of GERD (n=904 and/or DU (n=577, confirmed by endoscopy or barium meal and reporting moderate to severe symptoms, were included in the analyses. The seventy of overall daytime symptoms reported by the omeprazole group at clinic visits was lower than that reported by the ranitidine group at week 2 for the entire patient group (P=0.0002 and at both weeks 2 and 4 for the subgroup of patients with GERD (P=0.0001 and P=0.001, respectively. The severity of overall night-time symptoms reported by the omeprazole group was lower than that reported by the ranitidine group at week 4 for all patients as a whole (P=0.042 and at both weeks 2 and 4 for the subgroup of patients with GERD (P=0.035 and P=0.010, respectively. There were no significant differences in reports of adverse events. In the omeprazole group, 19% of patients at week 2 and 15% of patients at week 4 reported adverse events, while the corresponding results from the ranitidine group were 21% and 11%. In conclusion, patients with GERD, DU or both treated with omeprazole 20 mg daily for four weeks showed statistically significant reductions in symptoms compared with patients treated with ranitidine 300 mg daily for the same period of time. The percentage of patients with any remaining daytime symptoms was 12% lower in the omeprazole group compared with the ranitidine group at week 2, and 7% lower at week 4. Five per cent fewer patients in the omeprazole group experienced night-time symptoms at either week 2 or week 4.

  6. What is Obesity Doing to Your Gut?

    OpenAIRE

    LEE, Yeong Yeh

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a fast-emerging epidemic in the Asia-Pacific region, with numbers paralleling the rising global prevalence within the past 30 years. The landscape of gut diseases in Asia has been drastically changed by obesity. In addition to more non-specific abdominal symptoms, obesity is the cause of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, various gastrointestinal cancers (colorectal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, oesophageal adenocarcinoma, gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, pancreatic cancer and ga...

  7. Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication controls reflux symptoms and improves disease-specific quality of life in patients with class I and II obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin Del Campo, Sara E; Chaudhry, Umer I; Kanji, Aliyah; Suzo, Andrew J; Perry, Kyle A

    2017-11-01

    Patients with class I obesity and refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease may not qualify for bariatric surgery, and the effectiveness of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication remains controversial. This study evaluates the early efficacy of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication in patients with class I and II obesity. Data for patients who underwent laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication between 2009 and 2014 were collected prospectively. Cohorts were stratified based on body mass index at the time of surgery: Nonobese (body mass index obese (body mass index 30-34.9 kg/m 2 ), and class II obese (body mass index 35-39.9 kg/m 2 ). Primary outcome measures were symptoms assessed using the gastroesophageal reflux symptom scale and the gastroesophageal reflux disease health-related quality of life questionnaires. One hundred seventy-six patients underwent laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication during the study period: 76 nonobese (body mass index 26.2 ± 2.9 kg/m 2 ), 53 class I obese (body mass index 32.4 ± 1.5 kg/m 2 ), and 47 class II obese (body mass index 37.7 ± 2.5 kg/m 2 ). Baseline gastroesophageal reflux symptom scale scores were 35.5 (6-72), 37.0 (5-72), and 45.0 (5-72) in nonobese, class I obese, and class II obese groups, respectively. Six weeks postoperatively, scores decreased to 6.5 (0-72), 4.0 (0-27), and 9.0 (0-64), respectively (P symptom control and quality of life 18-months postoperatively in nonobese and class I and II obese patients. Thus, laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication represents a viable surgical option for patients with class I and II obesity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sweetened carbonated drinks do not alter upper digestive tract physiology in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, R; Savarese, M F; Sarnelli, G; Vollono, G; Rocco, A; Coccoli, P; Cirillo, C; Asciore, L; Nardone, G; Buyckx, M

    2008-07-01

    Sweetened carbonated beverages are widely consumed, which has fuelled several conflicting opinions about their effects on upper digestive tract functions. We aimed to evaluate the effect of sweetened carbonated drinks, consumed with a standard meal, on gastro-oesophageal reflux, gastric emptying and gallbladder contraction and postmeal sensations in healthy subjects. Thirteen healthy volunteers (seven women, six males; median age 22 years) were tested following the intake of 300 mL sweetened water containing increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide (seven subjects), and of 300 mL sweetened commercial flavoured drink with and without carbon dioxide (six subjects). Gastro-oesophageal reflux, gastric emptying and gallbladder contraction were studied by pH-impedance, octanoic acid breath test and ultrasound respectively. Gastro-oesophageal refluxes were significantly increased 1 h after meal with both water and commercial beverages; only sweetened water without carbon dioxide determined a persistently increasing number of refluxes 2 h postmeal. No differences were found for gastric emptying, gallbladder contraction or postmeal symptoms with any of the beverages tested. This study shows that 300 mL of sweetened carbonated beverage with different levels of carbonation or a commercial soft drink do not modify the physiology of the upper digestive tract.

  9. The role of combined 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring in the evaluation of children with gastrointestinal symptoms suggesting gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojsak, I; Ivković, L; Trbojević, T; Pavić, I; Jadrešin, O; Mišak, Z; Kolaček, S

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (pH-MII) monitoring in the diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children who presented with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in comparison with the results of pH-metry alone and endoscopy. All children who underwent pH-MII monitoring due to GI symptoms, suggestive of GERD, from October 2013 to October 2015 in Children's Hospital Zagreb, were retrospectively enrolled in the study. The cohort was divided into three groups according to age - group 1: children pH-MII and only in 21 of 133 patients (15.8%) by pH-metry alone. Endoscopy was performed in 77 (57.9%) children and esophagitis was found in 32/77 (41.6%). The finding of esophagitis significantly correlated with the number of total reflux episodes (coef. 0.42, p pH-MII; but, no correlation was found to reflux episodes detected by pH-metry alone (coef. 0.21, p = 0.07). Compared with pH-metry alone, pH-MII performed significantly better in the detection of GERD in all age groups. On the basis of our data, pH-MII had a strong correlation with endoscopically confirmed esophagitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Therapeutic Response to Twice-daily Rabeprazole on Health-related Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients with Refractory Reflux Esophagitis: A Multicenter Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Hongo, Michio; Kusano, Motoyasu; Furuhata, Yoshinori; Miyagishi, Hideaki; Ikeuchi, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of twice-daily rabeprazole doses on health-related quality of life in refractory patients. Methods and Patients Reflux esophagitis patients with an insufficient response to once-daily proton pump inhibitor therapy (Los Angeles Classification grade A-D) received rabeprazole 10 mg or 20 mg twice daily for 8 weeks. The health-related quality of life (SF-8™) and symptoms, using the Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of Gastroesophageal reflux disease, were evaluated before treatment and at weeks 4 and 8. Endoscopy was performed at baseline and at weeks 8 and 32 where possible. The rabeprazole dose was determined by the attending physician. Results There were 1,796 patients analyzed for the efficacy of the twice-daily treatment. Of these cases, 1,462 were treated with rabeprazole 10 mg twice daily, and 334 were treated with rabeprazole 20 mg twice daily. The factors that affected the selection of the twice-daily rabeprazole dose by physicians were evaluated, and as expected, “endoscopic findings when treatment was started” had a strong effect on the selection of the rabeprazole dose. With both regimens, health-related quality of life and subjective symptoms were significantly improved at weeks 4 and 8 compared to baseline (p<0.001). The recurrence rate of erosive esophagitis at week 32 was 9.7% in rabeprazole twice daily-treated patients and 28.4% in proton pump inhibitor (PPI) once daily-treated patients. Both regimens were well tolerated. Conclusion Twice-daily treatment with rabeprazole improved the subjective symptoms and health-related quality of life in patients with refractory reflux esophagitis more effectively than the standard once-daily dose. PMID:28502925

  11. [Reflux nephropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabra, R

    1990-08-01

    A corticopapillary scar is a frequent finding on urography in patients with vesicoureteral reflux. It is considered a typical sign of so-called reflux nepropathy. It develops most frequently in children aged 5-7 years and has a negative impact on the growth of the kidney. In its development three factors participate: ureterovesical reflux, intrarenal reflux associated with so-called refluxing papillas and urinary infection. The inflammatory cicatrical process may affect the whole kidney--small shrivelled kidney--or only a portion of the kidney. The development of scars is explained by the so-called bing-bang theory according to which all refluxing papillae are affected at the same time by the first urinary infection. This position develops in particular in case of inadequate treatment of acute pyelonephritis, Deformity of normal papillae caused by various factors explains, however, the development of renal scars in children aged 8-12 years or even in adults. The growing kidney tolerates poorly not only urinary infections and scar formation but also hydrodynamic disorders associated with vesicoureteral reflux. Therefore it is important to diagnose and treat vesicoureteral reflux already at an early age. For the time being it is important o consider asymptomatic bacteriuria and any urinary infection in children a clinical marker calling for examination for the possible presence of vesicoureteral reflux.

  12. Comparison of the Carlsson-Dent and GERD-Q questionnaires for gastroesophageal reflux disease symptom detection in a general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Omaña, R; Sánchez-Reyes, O; Ángeles-Granados, E

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is an extremely common pathology in the general population and one of the main reasons for consultation in gastroenterology. There are different instruments for detecting its symptoms, but few studies comparing one tool with another have been conducted in Mexico. To compare the effectiveness of the Carlsson-Dent questionnaire (CDQ) and the GERD-Q questionnaire (GQQ) in detecting GERD symptoms in a general population. A prospective, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted on 220 individuals in an open population within the time frame of May-June 2015. The subjects were evaluated through the self-assessment CDQ and GQQ. The positive scores from the CDQ (≥ 4) were compared with those of the GQQ (≥ 8), to determine which of the two instruments more easily detected patients with GERD symptoms. Fifty-seven percent of the patients were men and the mean patient age was 38.1 years. Fifty percent of the subjects presented with GERD symptoms with a positive score in at least one questionnaire; 45% had positive CDQ results and 23% had positive GQQ results. Fifty-seven percent of the patients with a positive CDQ score presented with overweight/obesity, as did 72% of the patients with a positive GQQ result. Finally, 20% of the individuals had positive results for reflux symptoms in both questionnaires. There was a prevalence of GERD symptoms in 50% of the individuals studied from a general population. The GQQ detected a greater number of GERD symptoms in patients that presented with overweight/obesity and the CDQ was considered easier for patients to understand and answer. It is striking that there was only 20% agreement between the two questionnaires, suggesting that they may be useful for identifying GERD symptoms in different populations. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. Therapieresistentie van gastro-oesofageale refluxklachten: zure reflux, niet-zure reflux of geen reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, A. J.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) was a huge step forward in the treatment of gastric acid-related disorders such as reflux disease and gastric ulcers. Despite the strong effectiveness of PPIs, in a small number of patients reflux symptoms are not adequately relieved by these drugs.

  14. Lipid-Laden Alveolar Macrophages and pH Monitoring in Gastroesophageal Reflux-Related Respiratory Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid-laden alveolar macrophages and pH monitoring have been used in the diagnosis of chronic aspiration in children with gastroesophageal reflux (GER. This study was conducted to prove a correlation between the detection of alimentary pulmonary fat phagocytosis and an increasing amount of proximal gastroesophageal reflux. It was assumed that proximal gastroesophageal reflux better correlates with aspiration than distal GER. Patients from 6 months to 16 years with unexplained recurrent wheezy bronchitis and bronchial hyperreactivity, or recurrent pneumonia with chronic cough underwent 24-hour double-channel pH monitoring and bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL. Aspiration of gastric content was determined by counting lipid laden alveolar macrophages from BAL specimens. There were no correlations between any pH-monitoring parameters and counts of lipid-laden macrophages in the whole study population, even when restricting analysis to those with abnormal reflux index expressing clinically significant GER. Quantifying lipid-laden alveolar macrophages from BAL in children with gastroesophageal-related respiratory disorders does not have an acceptable specificity to prove chronic aspiration as an underlying etiology. Therefore, research for other markers of pulmonary aspiration is needed.

  15. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms and Dietary Behaviors are Significant Correlates of Short Sleep Duration in the General Population: The Nagahama Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kimihiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Muro, Shigeo; Yamada, Ryo; Setoh, Kazuya; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Kosugi, Shinji; Sekine, Akihiro; Nakayama, Takeo; Mishima, Michiaki; Chiba, Tsutomu; Chin, Kazuo; Matsuda, Fumihiko

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine relationships among gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms, dietary behaviors, and sleep duration in the general population. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Community-based. Participants: There were 9,643 participants selected from the general population (54 ± 13 y). Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Sleep duration, sleep habits, and unfavorable dietary behaviors of each participant were assessed with a structured questionnaire. Participants were categorized into five groups according to their sleep duration: less than 5 h, 5 to less than 6 h, 6 to less than 7 h, 7 to less than 8 h, and 8 or more h per day. GERD was evaluated using the Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of GERD (FSSG) and participants having an FSSG score of 8 or more or those under treatment of GERD were defined as having GERD. Trend analysis showed that both the FSSG score and the number of unfavorable dietary habits increased with decreasing sleep duration. Further, multiple logistic regression analysis showed that both the presence of GERD (odds ratio = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.07–1.32) and the number of unfavorable dietary behaviors (odds ratio = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.13–1.26) were independent and potent factors to identify participants with short sleep duration even after controlling for other confounding factors. Conclusion: The current study showed that both GERD symptoms and unfavorable dietary behaviors were significant correlates of short sleep duration independently of each other in a large sample from the general population. Citation: Murase K, Tabara Y, Takahashi Y, Muro S, Yamada R, Setoh K, Kawaguchi T, Kadotani H, Kosugi S, Sekine A, Nakayama T, Mishima M, Chiba T, Chin K, Matsuda F. Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and dietary behaviors are significant correlates of short sleep duration in the general population: the Nagahama Study. SLEEP 2014;37(11):1809-1815. PMID:25364076

  16. It is possible to classify non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients into endoscopically normal groups and minimal change groups by subjective symptoms and responsiveness to rabeprazole -- a report from a study with Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Motoyasu; Shirai, Naohito; Yamaguchi, Kanako; Hongo, Michio; Chiba, Tsutomu; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2008-12-01

    The hypothesis that non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients comprise various subgroups is gaining popularity. This study was conducted to investigate the possibility of categorizing NERD patients according to symptom types and response to acid-suppressive drug rabeprazole (RPZ) 10 mg/day. NERD patients were classified as grade N (endoscopically normal), M (minimal change), or erosive GERD, and answered a 51-item, yes-or-no questionnaire pre and post-treatment. Compared to erosive GERD, clear differences existed in pretreatment prevalence of symptoms and responsiveness to RPZ in grades N and M; the results suggested stomachaches (especially at night) were significant symptoms in grade N and dysmotility-like symptoms like bloated stomach were significant in grade M while gastroesophageal reflux symptoms were significant in erosive GERD. Clinical significance of classifying NERD was indicated from different symptoms and responsiveness to PPI.

  17. A population-based survey of the epidemiology of symptom-defined gastroesophageal reflux disease: the Systematic Investigation of Gastrointestinal Diseases in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Jia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidemiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has yet to be investigated using the symptomatic threshold criteria recommended by the Montreal Definition. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of symptom-defined GERD across five regions of China, and to investigate variables associated with GERD. Methods A representative sample of 18 000 adults (aged 18-80 years were selected equally from rural and urban areas in each region (n = 1800. According to the Montreal Definition, GERD is present when mild symptoms of heartburn and/or regurgitation occur on ≥2 days a week, or moderate-to-severe symptoms of heartburn and/or regurgitation occur on ≥1 day a week. Results In total, 16 091 participants completed the survey (response rate: 89.4% and 16 078 responses were suitable for analysis. Applying the Montreal criteria, the prevalence of symptom-defined GERD was 3.1% and varied significantly (p Conclusions This population-based survey found that the prevalence of symptom-defined GERD in China was 3.1%, which is lower than that found in Western countries.

  18. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Sleep Quality in a Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Jyh Chen

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study highlights the adverse effect of gastroesophageal reflux on sleep, even in the absence of reflux symptoms. This finding has therapeutic implications in patients with silent erosive disease, and future trials are warranted.

  19. Weight loss and waist reduction is associated with improvement in gastroesophageal disease reflux symptoms: A longitudinal study of 15 295 subjects undergoing health checkups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S-K; Lee, T; Yang, H-J; Park, J H; Sohn, C I; Ryu, S; Park, D I

    2017-05-01

    General obesity and abdominal obesity is an established risk factor of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, the influence of weight or waist change on improvement of GERD is unclear. Our aim was to investigate if weight loss or waist reduction improves GERD symptoms and esophagitis. A retrospective longitudinal study of 15 295 subjects who underwent gastroscopy for a health checkup and reported GERD symptoms between 2011 and 2013, and repeated a checkup until 2014 was conducted. The improvement of GERD symptoms and esophagitis according to weight loss (≥-2, -0.5 to -2 kg/m 2 in body mass index [BMI]), waist reduction (≥-5, -0.1 to -0.5 cm) and baseline BMI/waist circumference (WC) categories was assessed using logistic regression. Weight loss or waist reduction was associated with improvement in GERD symptoms only in subjects with general or abdominal obesity. Among subjects with general obesity (BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 ) and decreased ≥2 kg/m 2 in BMI, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of improvement in GERD symptoms was 2.34 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.70-2.83). Among subjects with abdominal obesity (WC ≥90 cm) and decreased ≥5 cm in WC, the corresponding OR was 2.16 (95% CI 1.56-2.90). There was no association between weight loss or waist reduction and improvement in esophagitis. Weight loss or waist reduction was associated with improvement in GERD symptoms only in subjects with general or abdominal obesity. Weight loss or waist reduction will be an important treatment option in obese patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and dietary behaviors are significant correlates of short sleep duration in the general population: the Nagahama Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kimihiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Muro, Shigeo; Yamada, Ryo; Setoh, Kazuya; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Kosugi, Shinji; Sekine, Akihiro; Nakayama, Takeo; Mishima, Michiaki; Chiba, Tsutomu; Chin, Kazuo; Matsuda, Fumihiko

    2014-11-01

    To examine relationships among gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms, dietary behaviors, and sleep duration in the general population. Cross-sectional. Community-based. There were 9,643 participants selected from the general population (54 ± 13 y). None. Sleep duration, sleep habits, and unfavorable dietary behaviors of each participant were assessed with a structured questionnaire. Participants were categorized into five groups according to their sleep duration: less than 5 h, 5 to less than 6 h, 6 to less than 7 h, 7 to less than 8 h, and 8 or more h per day. GERD was evaluated using the Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of GERD (FSSG) and participants having an FSSG score of 8 or more or those under treatment of GERD were defined as having GERD. Trend analysis showed that both the FSSG score and the number of unfavorable dietary habits increased with decreasing sleep duration. Further, multiple logistic regression analysis showed that both the presence of GERD (odds ratio = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.07-1.32) and the number of unfavorable dietary behaviors (odds ratio = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.13-1.26) were independent and potent factors to identify participants with short sleep duration even after controlling for other confounding factors. The current study showed that both GERD symptoms and unfavorable dietary behaviors were significant correlates of short sleep duration independently of each other in a large sample from the general population.

  1. Healing of Erosive Esophagitis and Improvement of Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease After Esomeprazole Treatment in Children 12 to 36 Months Old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolia, Vasundkara; Gilger, Mark A; Barker, Peter N; Illueca, Marta

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate erosive esophagitis healing and symptom improvement with once-daily esomeprazole in children ages 12 to 36 months with endoscopically or histologically proven gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Data from children ages 12 to 36 months were included in a post-hoc analysis of an 8-week, multicenter, randomized, and double-blind by dose strata study of patients ages 1 to 11 years with endoscopically or histologically confirmed GERD. Children were randomized to receive esomeprazole 5 or 10 mg once daily. Patients underwent endoscopy and, if required, mucosal biopsy at baseline. Patients who had erosive esophagitis (graded using the Los Angeles classification system) at baseline underwent a follow-up endoscopy at final study visit to assess healing of erosive esophagitis. Investigators scored severity of GERD symptoms at baseline and every 2 weeks using the Physician Global Assessment. Thirty-one of 109 primary study patients ages 12 to 36 months were included in the post hoc analysis. At baseline, 15 patients (48.4%) had erosive esophagitis, underwent follow-up endoscopy, and were healed after 8 weeks of esomeprazole treatment. Of the 19 patients with moderate-to-severe baseline Physician Global Assessment symptom scores, 84.2% had lower scores by the final visit. Following esomeprazole treatment, GERD symptoms were significantly improved from baseline to final visit (P ≤ 0.0018). Esomeprazole 5 or 10 mg may be used to successfully treat erosive esophagitis and symptoms of GERD in children as young as 1 year. Moreover, although not yet validated in pediatric patients, the Los Angeles classification system was useful in grading erosive esophagitis in children ages 12 to 36 months.

  2. Greater loss of productivity among Japanese workers with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms that persist vs resolve on medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H; Matsuzaki, J; Masaoka, T; Inadomi, J M

    2014-06-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) impairs quality of life; however, the association between GERD and work productivity has not been well investigated in Japan. This study was designed to compare the impact of GERD on productivity between Japanese workers with GERD symptoms that persisted vs resolved on medical therapy. A cross-sectional Web-based survey was conducted in workers. The impact of GERD on work and daily productivity was evaluated using a Web-reported Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire for patients with GERD and a GERD symptom severity Questionnaire. Demographic information, clinical history, and satisfaction with GERD medication were also ascertained. A total of 20 000 subjects were invited to the survey. After the exclusion of patients with a history of gastrointestinal (GI) malignancy, peptic ulcer, upper GI surgery, and unemployment, 650 participants were included in the analysis. Participants with persistent GERD symptoms reported a significantly greater losses of work productivity (11.4 ± 13.4 h/week), absenteeism (0.7 ± 3.1 h/week), presenteeism (10.7 ± 12.6 h/week), costs (20 100 ± 26 800 JPY/week), and lower daily productivity (71.3% [95% confidence interval, 69.0-73.7]) than those whose symptoms were alleviated with medications. The level of dissatisfaction with GERD medications among participants with persistent GERD symptoms was significantly correlated with loss of work and daily productivity (p productivity despite medical therapy. Ineffective GERD therapy is associated with greater productivity loss. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Questionário de sintomas na doença do refluxo gastroesofágico Symptom's questionnaire for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Fornari

    2004-12-01

    's quality of life through a score and they are available such abroad as in Brazil. Nevertheless, questionnaires based on gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms are not available in Portuguese. AIM: To develop and validate in Portuguese a specific questionnaire for gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Velanovich's original questionnaire was translated, one question about "regurgitation" symptom was included and the vocabulary was adjusted to be understood to the scholarity level of the analyzed population. The "face validity" to each question was evaluated by the members of a multidisciplinary panel and a symptom's questionnaire for gastroesophageal reflux disease was developed. The questionnaire was applied to patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms confirmed by prolonged pH esophageal monitoring. The reproducibility, the comprehension, the time spent to fill out the questionnaire and the correlation coefficient to Johnson-DeMeester's score were measured. RESULTS: The "face validity" was considered satisfactory by the panel and the questionnaire was applied to 124 patients, consecutively. The comprehension of the questionnaire and the time less than 5 minutes to fill out them were observed in all patients (100%. Reproducibility for 10 patients in two different occasions showed a high intra-class correlation coefficient of 0,833. The correlation to the Johnson-DeMeester's score was null. CONCLUSION: This study showed that the symptom's questionnaire for gastroesophageal reflux disease has "face validity", excellent reproducibility, easy comprehension and was quickly answered by patients. The correlation with Johnson-DeMeester's score was null.

  4. A Population-Based Study on Comorbidity in Children with Severe Motor and Intellectual Disabilities: Focus on Feasibility and Prevalence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.G. Veugelers (Rebekka)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractComorbidity is common in children with severe motor and intellectual disabilities (SMID). We performed a population-based study in 196 children with SMID, focusing on respiratory infections, respiratory function, constipation, dysphagia, gastro-oesophageal reflux and nutritional

  5. Effect of Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol, a cannabinoid receptor agonist, on the triggering of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations in dogs and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumont, H.; Jensen, J.; Carlsson, A.; Ruth, M.; Lehmann, A.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are the main mechanism underlying gastro-oesophageal reflux and are a potential pharmacological treatment target. We evaluated the effect of the CB(1)/CB(2) receptor agonist Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol

  6. A population-based nested case control study on recurrent pneumonias in children with severe generalized cerebral palsy: ethical considerations of the design and representativeness of the study sample.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.G. Veugelers (Rebekka); E.A. Calis (Elsbeth); C. Penning (Corine); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); R.M.D. Bernsen (Roos); J. Bouquet (Jan); M.A. Benninga (Marc); P.J.F.M. Merkus (Peter); H.G. Arets (Hubertus); D. Tibboel (Dick); H.M. Evenhuis (Heleen)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: In children with severe generalized cerebral palsy, pneumonias are a major health issue. Malnutrition, dysphagia, gastro-oesophageal reflux, impaired respiratory function and constipation are hypothesized risk factors. Still, no data are available on the relative contribution

  7. A population-based nested case control study on recurrent pneumonias in children with severe generalized cerebral palsy: ethical considerations of the design and representativeness of the study sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veugelers, Rebekka; Calis, Elsbeth A. C.; Penning, Corine; Verhagen, Arianne; Bernsen, Roos; Bouquet, Jan; Benninga, Marc A.; Merkus, Peter J. F. M.; Arets, Hubertus G. M.; Tibboel, Dick; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In children with severe generalized cerebral palsy, pneumonias are a major health issue. Malnutrition, dysphagia, gastro-oesophageal reflux, impaired respiratory function and constipation are hypothesized risk factors. Still, no data are available on the relative contribution of these

  8. Gastric-Esophageal Stenting for Malignant Dysphagia: Results of Prospective Clinical Trial Evaluation of Long-Term Gastroesophageal Reflux and Quality of Life-Related Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Prejesh; North, D Alan; Scoggins, Charles; Schlegel, Melissa; Martin, Robert C G

    2015-07-01

    Stenting across the gastroesophageal (GE) junction for adenocarcinoma has historically been contraindicated secondary to the concerns for severe GE reflux (GER) symptoms. The aim of this study was to assess reflux symptoms and quality of life (QOL) effects in patients undergoing esophageal stenting across the GE junction. We performed a prospective single arm QOL clinical trial evaluating patients with stage 2/3 GE junction adenocarcinoma, undergoing neoadjuvant therapy (from baseline to 10 weeks post-stenting) after stenting across the GE junction, for GER symptoms and QOL-GER assessments (EORTC-QLQ-O25 and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Esophageal [FACT-E]). Forty consecutive patients were enrolled in this clinical trial. The median age was 62 years (range 47 to 83 years); 84% were male and 19% were female patients. Median dysphagia score of 3 (only liquids tolerated) pre-stent was significantly improved to a score of 0 (ability to eat all foods) post-stent (p = 0.01). There was a significantly improved and sustained swallowing QOL from 2 weeks up to 10 weeks post-stent. The GER-QOL scores were similar 2 weeks post-stent, but were significantly improved throughout the rest of the study. Proton pump inhibitors were being used in 58% of patients pre-stent and in 85% of patients at 2- to 10-week follow-up. Planned chemotherapy and/or chemo-radiation therapy was completed in 95% of all patients. Stent migration (radiologic and/or complete) was seen in 63% of patients at some time during their therapy and corresponded to pathologic response in 85% of those patients. Esophageal stenting across the GE junction remains the optimal therapy for dysphagia relief in esophageal malignancies and does not adversely affect a patient's GER-QOL. Esophageal stenting across the GE junction is not contraindicated and should be the initial therapy in patient management. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gastroesophageal reflux disease-related symptom recurrence in patients discontinuing proton pump inhibitors for Bravo wireless esophageal pH monitoring study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Schey

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD are treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs. Those that do not achieve symptom relief, or non-responders, usually undergo esophageal pH monitoring off PPIs in order to confirm the presence of GERD. Aims: To assess the efficacy of the reverse-PPI trial in evaluating the presence of GERD or its recurrence rates, as well as to identify a correlation between the symptom recurrence rates and GERD severity determined by 48-hour Bravo esophageal pH-monitor testing. Methods: A final total of 205 patients that underwent the 48-hour Bravo esophageal pH-monitoring study were retrospectively included. Patients discontinued PPI usage for at least 7 days prior to testing, and completed symptom questionnaires during the 2-day test. The Bravo test was considered positive if the percentage of time with esophageal pH 4.4%. Results: A total of 363 patients underwent 48-hour Bravo testing and of those patients, 205 were eligible for the study. Ninety-two patients reported symptoms as being «same/better» and 113 as being «worse» after stopping PPIs. Of the 92 patients with improved symptoms, 44 (48% had documented acid reflux during the Bravo study, compared with 65 of 113 (58% patients with worsening symptoms that also complained of acid reflux. Of the 109 patients found to have confirmed GERD upon pH monitoring, 65 (59.6% reported a worsening of symptoms, compared with 48 of 96 (50.0% patients without GERD (p = 0.043. Main symptoms stated to be worse included heartburn, chest pain, regurgitation, nausea, and belching (p  7 days (p = 0.042 Conclusion: Symptom exacerbation following PPI cessation for at least 7 days correlated with acid reflux severity assessed by Bravo testing. Patients off PPIs for 7 days had a higher likelihood of experiencing worsening symptoms, compared with those off PPIs for more than 7 days. These findings suggest that when PPIs are held for 7 days or less prior to

  10. Vesicoureteral reflux and reflux nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, H.S.

    1985-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is mainly a primary phenomenon due to incompetence of the ureterovesical junction, mostly affecting a pediatric population. During micturition cystourethrography (MCU) reflux into the kidney - intrarenal reflux (IRR) - is occasionally seen. In areas with IRR the kidney surface may subsequently be depressed and the papillae retracted (reflux nephropathy (RN)). VUR may lead to hypertension and/or end-stage renal failure. Most commonly, VUR is discovered during evaluation for urinary tract infection, but it may also be present in patients with hypertension, toxemia of pregnancy, chronic renal failure and proteinuria, and it may be found in siblings of patients with VUR. For the time being VUR is demonstrated at radiographic MCU, whereas RN is diagnosed by demonstration of focal scars and of abnormal parenchymal thickness at urography. In children with VUR and no abnormalities of calyces or parenchymal defects standardized measurement of the parenchymal thickness at three sites may identify kidneys which are likely to develop focal scars. Quantitation of focal scarring should be performed in connection with a measure of the overall kidney size. The occurrence of IRR is dependent of the papillary morphology, intrapelvic pressure and urine flow. There may be an important relationship between renal ischemia and IRR in producing a 'vicious circle of deleterious effects' which, combined with parenchymal extravasation, may lead to RN. Treatment of VUR includes medical and surgical management. Since renal scarring may occur in infancy, prevention should focus on infants and young children. Infants and young children with severe VUR may have normal urograms. Therefore a MCU should also be performed, preferably with the recommended standardized technique. (orig.)

  11. Asthma symptoms improvement in moderate persistent asthma patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD: the role of proton-pump inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus D. Susanto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate effect of proton pump inhibitor (esomeprazole on asthma symptoms, use of inhaled bronchodilator and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR in moderate persistent asthma with gastroesofageal refluks disease (GERD. This randomized single blind, controlled clinical trial study was conducted at Persahabatan Hospital, Jakarta from July 2004 until October 2005. Samples were moderate persistent asthma patients with GERD. GERD is diagnosed GERD symptoms and proof of oesophagitis from endoscopy and or histapatologic examination from oesophagus biopsy. Phase 1:2 week run-in period patient received inhaled budesonide 2x200 ug/day. Phase 2: patient randomised to receive inhaled budesonide 2 x 400 ug/day with esomeprazole 40 mg/day or without esomeprazole (control group for 8 weeks. Phase 3: 4 week wash out period, patient receive inhaled budesonide 2 x 200 ug/day. Diary cards were assessed at run-in periode, after treatment 4 weeks, 8 weeks and wash out. There were 32 patients (23 female and 9 male completed the study. Mean total asthma symptoms score daily were significantly decreased on esomeprazole vs without esomeprazole after 8 weeks (-2.29 vs -0.90; p < 0.05. Mean use of inhaled bronchodilator was significantly decreased on esomeprazole vs without esomeprazole after 8 weeks (-1.09 vs -0.42; p < 0.05. Morning and evening PEFR improved higher on esomeprazole than without esomeprazol but were not significantly difference. In conclusion, administration esomeprazole 40 mg daily improved asthma symptoms and lower the use of inhaled bronchodilator in moderate persistent asthma patients with GERD. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 169-74Keywords: Asthma symptoms, inhaled bronchodilator, moderate persistent asthma, GERD, esomeprazole

  12. Effect of asthma and PTSD on persistence and onset of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms among adults exposed to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiehui; Brackbill, Robert M; Jordan, Hannah T; Cone, James E; Farfel, Mark R; Stellman, Steven D

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the direction of causality among asthma, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and onset of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS) after exposure to the 9/11/2001 World Trade Center (WTC) disaster. Using data from the WTC Health Registry, we investigated the effects of early diagnosed post-9/11 asthma and PTSD on the late onset and persistence of GERS using log-binomial regression, and examined whether PTSD mediated the asthma-GERS association using structural equation modeling. Of 29,406 enrollees, 23% reported GERS at follow-up in 2011-2012. Early post-9/11 asthma and PTSD were each independently associated with both the persistence of GERS that was present at baseline and the development of GERS in persons without a prior history. PTSD mediated the association between early post-9/11 asthma and late-onset GERS. Clinicians should assess patients with post-9/11 GERS for comorbid asthma and PTSD, and plan medical care for these conditions in an integrated fashion. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:805-814, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms and comorbid asthma and posttraumatic stress disorder following the 9/11 terrorist attacks on World Trade Center in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiehui; Brackbill, Robert M; Stellman, Steven D; Farfel, Mark R; Miller-Archie, Sara A; Friedman, Stephen; Walker, Deborah J; Thorpe, Lorna E; Cone, James

    2011-11-01

    Excess gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was reported in several populations exposed to the September 11 2001 (9/11) terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC). We examined new onset gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS) since 9/11 and persisting up to 5-6 years in relation to 9/11-related exposures among the WTC Health Registry enrollees, and potential associations with comorbid asthma and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This is a retrospective analysis of 37,118 adult enrollees (i.e., rescue/recovery workers, local residents, area workers, and passersby in lower Manhattan on 9/11) who reported no pre-9/11 GERS and who participated in two Registry surveys 2-3 and 5-6 years after 9/11. Post-9/11 GERS (new onset since 9/11) reported at first survey, and persistent GERS (post-9/11 GERS reported at both surveys) were analyzed using log-binomial regression. Cumulative incidence was 20% for post-9/11 GERS and 13% for persistent GERS. Persistent GERS occurred more often among those with comorbid PTSD (24%), asthma (13%), or both (36%) compared with neither of the comorbid conditions (8%). Among enrollees with neither asthma nor PTSD, the adjusted risk ratio (aRR) for persistent GERS was elevated among: workers arriving at the WTC pile on 9/11 (aRR=1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-2.1) or working at the WTC site > 90 days (aRR=1.6; 1.4-2.0); residents exposed to the intense dust cloud on 9/11 (aRR=1.5; 1.0-2.3), or who did not evacuate their homes (aRR=1.7; 1.2-2.3); and area workers exposed to the intense dust cloud (aRR=1.5; 1.2-1.8). Disaster-related environmental exposures may contribute to the development of GERS. GERS may be accentuated in the presence of asthma or PTSD.

  14. Traditional reflux parameters and not impedance monitoring predict outcome after fundoplication in extraesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, David O; Goutte, Marion; Slaughter, James C; Garrett, C Gaelyn; Hagaman, David; Holzman, Michael D; Vaezi, Michael F

    2011-09-01

    Fundoplication is considered in patients with refractory extraesophageal reflux symptoms. However, postoperative symptom resolution is inconsistent. This analysis investigates which presenting symptoms and preoperative objective parameters predict postoperative symptom improvement. Retrospective cohort study. A total of 237 patients referred for extraesophageal reflux symptoms refractory to medical therapy underwent esophageal function testing. Fundoplication was performed in 27 patients with objective evidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Symptomatic improvement was assessed at postoperative intervals. Logistic regression determined which symptoms and objective parameters predicted improvement of the presenting extraesophageal reflux symptom. Overall, 59% of patients reported at least partial improvement of their presenting extraesophageal symptom after fundoplication. Predictors of symptomatic improvement were the presence of heartburn with or without regurgitation concomitant to their primary presenting symptom (odds ratio [OR], 6.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97-44.9; P = .05) and pH < 4 more than 12% of a 24-hour period (OR, 10.5; 95% CI, 1.36-81.1; P = .02). Probability of postoperative extraesophageal reflux symptom improvement was 90% if both conditions were present. Both heartburn with or without regurgitation and esophageal pH < 4 more than 12% of a 24-hour period predicted postfundoplication resolution of the presenting extraesophageal reflux symptom. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  15. Pharmacokinetics and Acid-suppressive Effects of Esomeprazole in Infants 1-24 Months Old With Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omari, Taher; Davidson, Geoffrey; Bondarov, Patrik; Nauclér, Emma; Nilsson, Catarina; Lundborg, Per

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the pharmacokinetics and acid-suppressive effects of esomeprazole in infants with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In this single-blind, randomized, parallel-group study, 50 infants 1 to 24 months old with symptoms of GERD, and ≥ 5% of time with intraesophageal pH esomeprazole 0.25 mg/kg (n = 26) or 1 mg/kg (n = 24) once daily for 1 week. Intraesophageal and intragastric pH were recorded at 1 week, and blood samples were taken for pharmacokinetic analysis. At baseline, mean percentages of time with intragastric pH >4 and intraesophageal pH esomeprazole 0.25 mg/kg group and 28.6% and 12.5% in the esomeprazole 1 mg/kg group. After 1 week of treatment, times with intragastric pH >4 were 47.9% and 69.3% in the esomeprazole 0.25 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg groups, respectively (P 5 minutes duration decreased from 6 at baseline to 3 and 2 with esomeprazole 0.25 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg, respectively. The geometric mean AUC0-t of esomeprazole were 0.24 and 1.79 μmol · h/L for the 0.25 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg dosages of esomeprazole, respectively. Both esomeprazole dosages were well tolerated. Oral treatment with esomeprazole 0.25 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg was well tolerated and provided dose-related acid suppression, dose-related exposure to esomeprazole, and decreased esophageal acid exposure in infants 1-24 months old with GERD.

  16. Evaluation of the effectiveness of esomeprazole treatment strategies in the management of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Jingtian; Yu, Yang; Ma, Jianxia; Yu, Xiaofeng

    2016-05-01

    Here we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of esomeprazole treatment strategies comparing with other proton pump inhibitors (PPI) in clinical practice for six months in the management of patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). An extensive search of the literature focusing on PPI therapeutic evaluation was performed up to December 2014. Risk ratio (RR) with its corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in each study was chosen as the effect size. Cochrane's Q statistic and I2 test were both conducted to evaluate heterogeneity across individual studies. Meta-regression was conducted to explore the source of heterogeneity and sensitive analysis was performed to assess the risk bias for the meta-analysis. Totally, eleven trials with high quality enrolled in the meta-analysis. Esomeprazole therapy (20 mg daily) had lower relapse rates than other drugs during six months maintenance treatment (RR = 0.67; 95% CI: 0.55-0.83). Heartburn (RR = 0.72; 95% CI: 0.57-0.92) and epigastric pain (RR = 0.82, 95% Cl: 0.70-0.96) were less likely to happen after esomeprazole treatment, and no significant advantage was found on acid regurgitation and dysphagia. Moreover, lower risk for serious adverse events was observed after esomeprazole therapy (RR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.04-1.88). Blind method or difference controlled drugs did not influence heterogeneity across studies. Moreover, the conclusion on acid regurgitation, abdominal pain and dysphagia might be unstable. In GERD patients, esomeprazole 20 mg daily is more effective than other PPIs regarding relapse rates, symptoms of epigastric pain and heartburn, and serious adverse events.

  17. Is impedance pH monitoring superior to the conventional 24-h pH meter in the evaluation of patients with laryngorespiratory symptoms suspected to be due to gastroesophageal reflux disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Daphne; Ang, Tiing Leong; Teo, Eng Kiong; Hsu, Pon Poh; Tee, Augustine; Poh, Choo Hean; Tan, Jessica; Ong, Jeannie; Fock, Kwong Ming

    2011-10-01

    Cough and laryngo-pharyngeal symptoms (LPS) are associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The role of acid reflux (AR) and non-acid reflux (NAR) in atypical GERD pathogenesis is controversial. The aims of the study were to determine the prevalence of high esophageal acid exposure time (AET) in patients presenting with cough or LPS and determine the incremental yield of multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (MII-pH) monitoring. We undertook a prospective study of patients with cough or LPS referred for GERD evaluation between January 2009 and May 2011. All patients underwent esophageal manometry, gastroscopy and MII-pH. Patients' characteristics, gastroscopy findings, distal esophageal AET, bolus exposure (BE) time and numbers of AR and NAR episodes in the proximal and distal esophagus were studied. Overall 50 patients (22 male, mean age 47.5 ± 14.2 years) were evaluated for unexplained chronic cough (n = 23, 46.0%), and LPS symptoms including globus (n = 10, 20.0%), sore throat (n = 12, 24.0%) and hoarse voice (n = 5, 10.0%). A normal gastroscopy, Los Angeles grade A and B esophagitis occurred in 44 (88.0%), 5 (10.0%) and 1 (2.0%) patient, respectively. Seven (14.0%) recorded elevated AET (chronic cough, 4; sore throat, 2; and hoarse voice, 1). Nine patients recorded abnormal impedance characteristics (raised BE time and/or increased reflux numbers) despite a normal AET leading to an incremental diagnostic yield of 18%. An isolated high AET is uncommon in patients with cough or LPS. Combined MII-pH improves the diagnostic yield in patients with atypical GERD manifestations. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Digestive Diseases © 2011 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Exercise and the Prevention of Oesophageal Cancer (EPOC) study protocol: a randomized controlled trial of exercise versus stretching in males with Barrett's oesophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzer, Brooke M; Paratz, Jennifer D; Reeves, Marina M; Whiteman, David C

    2010-06-16

    Chronic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and excessive body fat are considered principal causes of Barrett's oesophagus (a metaplastic change in the cells lining the oesophagus) and its neoplastic progression, oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Metabolic disturbances including altered levels of obesity-related cytokines, chronic inflammation and insulin resistance have also been associated with oesophageal cancer development, especially in males. Physical activity may have the potential to abrogate metabolic disturbances in males with Barrett's oesophagus and elicit beneficial reductions in body fat and gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms. Thus, exercise may be an effective intervention in reducing oesophageal adenocarcinoma risk. However, to date this hypothesis remains untested.The 'Exercise and the Prevention of Oesophageal Cancer Study' will determine whether 24 weeks of exercise training will lead to alterations in risk factors or biomarkers for oesophageal adenocarcinoma in males with Barrett's oesophagus. Our primary outcomes are serum concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 as well as insulin resistance. Body composition, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms, cardiovascular fitness and muscular strength will also be assessed as secondary outcomes. A randomized controlled trial of 80 overweight or obese, inactive males with Barrett's oesophagus will be conducted in Brisbane, Australia. Participants will be randomized to an intervention arm (60 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic and resistance training, five days per week) or a control arm (45 minutes of stretching, five days per week) for 24 weeks. Primary and secondary endpoints will be measured at baseline (week 0), midpoint (week 12) and at the end of the intervention (week 24). Due to the increasing incidence and very high mortality associated with oesophageal adenocarcinoma, interventions effective in preventing the progression of

  19. Thoracoscopic repair of congenital tracheo-oesophageal fistula manifesting in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrishikesh P Salgaonkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital trcheo-oesophageal fistula (TOF without oesophageal atresia is usually diagnosed and managed in the neonatal period. Its presentation in adulthood is a rarity. Traditional treatment of a TOF in adults involves its repair via a thoracotomy. We report the case of a 23-year-old man diagnosed with an H-type TOF during workup undertaken for his symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux. This fistula located at the level of third thoracic vertebra was repaired successfully using a thoracoscopic approach.

  20. Laparoscopic surgery for gastro-esophageal acid reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijven, Marlies P.; Gisbertz, Suzanne S.; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.

    2014-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a troublesome disease for many patients, severely affecting their quality of life. Choice of treatment depends on a combination of patient characteristics and preferences, esophageal motility and damage of reflux, symptom severity and symptom correlation to acid

  1. [Surgical treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Akio

    2007-05-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is major treatment for acid reflux. It reduces major symptom of GERD and effective. However, the cause of GERD is the insufficiency of anti-reflux mechanism of cardia. Only surgical treatment can care for hiatal hernia as the main cause of the disruption. Redundant reflux against conservative treatment or obvious hiatal hernia is indication for laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. Late diagnosis might request radical operation, so we need to know the indication for laparoscopic treatment. For the safer laparoscopic procedure, we perform curtain retraction technique and Floppy Nissen -short cuff method. The former contribute to prevent hemorrhage or pneumothorax, and the latter can reduce the post-operative disphagia.

  2. Laparoscopic Sphincter Augmentation Device Eliminates Reflux Symptoms and Normalizes Esophageal Acid Exposure One- and 2-Year Results of a Feasibility Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonavina, Luigi; Demeester, Tom; Fockens, Paul; Dunn, Daniel; Saino, Greta; Bona, Davide; Lipham, John; Bemelman, Willem; Ganz, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: One- and 2-year evaluation of a feasibility trial (clinicaltrials.gov registration numbers NCT01057992, NCT01058070, and 01058564) to assess the safety and efficacy of a laparoscopically implanted sphincter augmentation device for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

  3. High-definition endoscopy with i-Scan and Lugol's solution for more precise detection of mucosal breaks in patients with reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, A; Basting, N; Goetz, M; Tresch, A; Mudter, J; Biesterfeld, S; Galle, P R; Neurath, M F; Kiesslich, R

    2009-02-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease are subdivided into non-erosive (NERD) and erosive reflux disease (ERD). The newly available EPKi processor enables high-definition resolution above HDTV standard (HD+). The aim of the study was to test the efficacy of HD+ esophagogastroduodenoscopy alone and in conjunction with i-Scan (newly developed postprocessing digital filter) and chromoendoscopy (Lugol's solution) for differentiation of reflux patients. The distal esophagus of patients with heartburn was inspected with three imaging modalities. HD+ was followed by i-Scan and 15-mL Lugol's solution (1.5 %). The esophagus was evaluated for mucosal breaks (Los Angeles Classification [LA]). Small visible changes were also characterized, and targeted biopsies were performed. End points of the study were the presence and grade of esophagitis and the number of circumscribed changes. A total of 50 patients were included (female 29; mean age 54.7 years). HD+ identified nine patients with mucosal breaks (LA 7A; 2C), i-Scan was able to detect 12 patients (LA 8A; 2B; 2C; 0D) ( P = n. s.) and chromoendoscopy identified 25 patients (LA 16A; 7B; 1C, 1D) ( P Lugol's solution in 19 patients. The number of circumscribed lesions could be increased from 21 (HD+) to 58 (i-Scan) ( P Lugol spraying ( P Lugol's solution in conjunction with HD+ endoscopy significantly improves the identification of patients with esophagitis and reduces misclassification. The i-Scan filter and chromoendoscopy help to identify reflux-associated lesions.

  4. Lower pH values of weakly acidic refluxes as determinants of heartburn perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with normal esophageal acid exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bortoli, N; Martinucci, I; Savarino, E; Franchi, R; Bertani, L; Russo, S; Ceccarelli, L; Costa, F; Bellini, M; Blandizzi, C; Savarino, V; Marchi, S

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel impedance pH monitoring has shown that weakly acidic refluxes are able to generate heartburn. However, data on the role of different pH values, ranging between 4 and 7, in the generation of them are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether different pH values of weakly acidic refluxes play a differential role in provoking reflux symptoms in endoscopy-negative patients with physiological esophageal acid exposure time and positive symptom index and symptom association probability for weakly acidic refluxes. One hundred and forty-three consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, nonresponders to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), were allowed a washout from PPIs before undergoing: upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry, and multichannel impedance pH monitoring. In patients with both symptom index and symptom association probability positive for weakly acidic reflux, each weakly acidic reflux was evaluated considering exact pH value, extension, physical characteristics, and correlation with heartburn. Forty-five patients with normal acid exposure time and positive symptom association probability for weakly acidic reflux were identified. The number of refluxes not heartburn related was higher than those heartburn related. In all distal and proximal liquid refluxes, as well as in distal mixed refluxes, the mean pH value of reflux events associated with heartburn was significantly lower than that not associated. This condition was not confirmed for proximal mixed refluxes. Overall, a low pH of weakly acidic reflux represents a determinant factor in provoking heartburn. This observation contributes to better understand the pathophysiology of symptoms generated by weakly acidic refluxes, paving the way toward the search for different therapeutic approaches to this peculiar condition of esophageal hypersensitivity. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  5. Impedance-pH monitoring and conventional pH monitoring are complementary methods to detect association between gastroesophageal reflux and apnea-related symptoms in preterm infants and neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Myung Seok; Shim, Jeong Ok; Moon, Jin Soo; Kim, Han Suk; Ko, Jae Sung; Choi, Jung-Hwan; Seo, Jeong Kee

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the usefulness of Multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (MII-pH) monitoring as compared with conventional pH monitoring for detecting Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) episodes and apnea-related symptom association in preterm infants and neonates. Twenty-three infants (16 preterm and 7 term infants) in hospital, who underwent 24-h MII-pH monitoring, were studied retrospectively. GER indices and apnea-related symptom association were measured by both MII-pH and conventional pH based analysis. Of the total 998 GER episodes assessed by MII-pH monitoring, 407 (40.8%) were acidic and 590 (59.1%) were weakly acidic. A total of 1689 GER episodes were detected by conventional pH based analysis and 270 (16%) were related to retrograde bolus movement. A total of 313 apnea-related symptoms were reported. Five patients had a positive symptom association: 3 by MII-pH, 1 by both MII-pH and conventional pH, 1 only by conventional pH. Addition of MII-pH monitoring to conventional pH monitoring improves the diagnostic yield of symptom association analysis in preterm infants and neonates with apnea-related symptoms. Conventional pH monitoring is still important in the era of impedance measurement.

  6. [Reflux nephropathy in absence of obvious vesicoureteral reflux].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vino, L; Pedrolli, A; Portuese, A; Dal Cerè, M; Pizzini, C; Sinaguglia, G; Fanos, V

    2000-01-01

    Although the majority of patients with vesicoureteric reflux presents DMSA scan alterations, parenchimal renal scars are found also in children without vesicoureteric reflux. Two clinical cases of reflux nephropathy without evidence of reflux are presented. Several explanations could be advocated to justify this picture, including haematogenous source of infection, inadequate timing and/or procedure of cystouretrography, intermittency of reflux, ascending bacteria, previous presence of reflux, and appearance of controlateral reflux during the natural history of a monolateral documented reflux. Tailored diagnostic and therapeutic strategy should discussed for each patient.

  7. Gastroesophageal Reflux and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Fahim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The histological counterpart of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is usual interstitial pneumonia, in which areas of fibrosis of various ages are interspersed with normal lung. This pattern could be explained by repeated episodes of lung injury followed by abnormal wound healing responses. The cause of the initiating alveolar epithelial injury is unknown, but postulated mechanisms include immunological, microbial, or chemical injury, including aspirated gastric refluxate. Reflux is promoted by low basal pressure in the lower oesophageal sphincter and frequent relaxations, potentiated by hiatus hernia or oesophageal dysmotility. In susceptible individuals, repeated microaspiration of gastric refluxate may contribute to the pathogenesis of IPF. Microaspiration of nonacid or gaseous refluxate is poorly detected by current tests for gastroesophageal reflux which were developed for investigating oesophageal symptoms. Further studies using pharyngeal pH probes, high-resolution impedance manometry, and measurement of pepsin in the lung should clarify the impact of reflux and microaspiration in the pathogenesis of IPF.

  8. Characteristics of gastroesophageal reflux in symptomatic patients with and without excessive esophageal acid exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, Albert J.; Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Timmer, Robin; Smout, Andŕe J. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In some patients with a physiological esophageal acid exposure, an association between reflux episodes and symptoms can be demonstrated. Besides acidity, other factors such as proximal extent may determine whether a reflux episode is perceived or not. We aimed to investigate the reflux

  9. Very Short Gastroesophageal Acid Reflux during the Upright Position Could Be Associated with Asthma in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukinori Yoshida

    2009-01-01

    Conclusions: Reflux during the upright position was associated with asthmatic symptoms. The mean number of acid refluxes/h during the upright position in addition to the reflux index could be useful in the diagnosis of GERD when associated with asthma.

  10. [Digestive localizations of scleroderma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modigliani, R

    1984-01-01

    Systemic scleroderma involves the gastro-intestinal tract in over 50 p. 100 of cases, the commonest target organs being the oesophagus, the small intestine, the colon and the stomach in that order. The G-I symptoms of this collagenosis are all related to disorder of motility secondary to disturbances of innervation and then to atrophy of the smooth muscle and fibrous infiltration. Oesophageal involvement results in gastro-oesophageal reflux and/or dysphagia due to the lack of tonicity of the lower oesophageal sphincter and a reduction of peristalsis. Disease of the small intestine may cause pseudo-intestinal obstruction or a secondary malabsorption syndrome due to abnormal intraluminal bacterial flora. Colonic involvement causes severe constipation with formation of faecoliths. Finally, scleroderma may be complicated by an acute abdominal syndrome: occlusion due to diffuse reduction in small intestinal motility, peritonitis due to perforation of the small intestine, ileo-colonic infarction, gastro-intestinal haemorrhage complicating telangiectasia. Treatment is purely symptomatic: classical remedies for gastro-oesophageal reflux and its complications, and antibiotics for malabsorption syndromes.

  11. Emerging drugs for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are very effective and safe drugs for the treatment of erosive and non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Nevertheless, a significant proportion of GERD patients (30 - 40%) continue to suffer from symptoms during PPI treatment, which has stimulated the

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux disease - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peptic esophagitis - children; Reflux esophagitis - children; GERD - children; Heartburn - chronic - children; Dyspepsia - GERD - children ... GERD. Certain factors can lead to GERD in children, including: Birth defects, such as hiatal hernia , a ...

  13. [Analysis of anti-reflux surgery failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano Novillo, I; Benavent Gordo, M I; Portela Casalod, E; Delgado Muñoz, M D; Aguado Roncero, P; Vilariño Mosquera, A; Berchi García, F J

    2000-01-01

    Recurrent gastroesophageal reflux following fundoplication is a challenging problem, because it is usually refractory to medical treatment and a second, technically difficult, antireflux operation is required. Different factors that may contribute to surgery failure have been identified in children. We present 8 cases who underwent redofundoplication after failed procedures, from a total number of 96 patients operated on due to gastroesophageal reflux. Four patient's had their initial fundoplication performed at our institution. Six patients were neurologically impaired, six had chronic pulmonary disease, and two had esophageal atresia. The main presenting symptoms were recurrent vomiting (n = 8) and aspiration (n = 4). Gastroesophageal reflux was confirmed by barium swallow and endoscopy. Operative findings showed wrap breakdown in two cases, warp breakdown associated with hiatal hernia in five, wrap breakdown associated with paraesophageal hernia in two cases, and paraesophageal hernia with normal wrap in one. A second Nissen procedure were performed in five cases, whereas a Collis-Nissen gastroplasty was realized in three with a short esophagus. Six patients had a successful outcome remaining symptom free, one has severe disphagia, and one has recurrent vomiting. In our experience, patients with recurrent gastroesophageal reflux disease should undergo an antireflux procedure tailored to specific anatomic or functional abnormalities.

  14. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marinda

    ... environmental irritants, and smoking. Asthma (reflux as a cofactor leading to poorly controlled disease). Erosion of dental enamel. Proposed association with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease but neither association nor causation established. Pharyngitis. Sinusitis. Recurrent otitis media. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis ...

  15. [Intraesophageal pH in children with suspected reflux].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calva-Rodríguez, R; García-Aranda, J A; Bendimez-Cano, A; Estrada-Saavedra, R

    1989-05-01

    We study 22 children with clinical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. The main manifestations were: frequent vomiting, failure to thrive and repetitive pneumonia. In all of them we perform barium esophagogram (SEGD) with fluoroscopy, esophageal manometry (EM) and a four hours intraesophageal pH measurement. Thirteen of the twenty two children present a pathologic reflux (ERGE); in 16 we found SEGD that show reflux; three of them had an abnormal EM, the other 13 were normal. Seven patients showed alteration of the intraesophageal pH measurement. In conclusion the intraesophageal pH measurement in short period of time (4 hours) is a good method in the diagnosis of patients with ERGE.

  16. Vesicoureteric reflux and pyelonephritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikstad, I.; Aperia, A.; Broberger, O.; Ekendren, K.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of gross vesicoureteric reflux in combination with urinary tract infection on the area of the renal parenchyma was analysed in 8, non-selected, girls during 3 to 6 years. A progressive significant decrease of the relative size of the kidneys with vesicoureteric reflux occurred as compared with that of kidneys with normal ureters. The decrease was mainly due to scars in the upper and lower poles. A positive correlation was found between the reduction of parenchyma and the number of episodes of pyelonephritis. (Auth.)

  17. Reflux.pm6

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    reflux related aspects of life, such as problems with food and drink (3.5), emotional distress (3.6), impaired vitality (3.7), sleep disturbance (3.8) and impaired ... sions: emotional distress, sleep disturbance, vitality, food/ drink problems and .... acute coronary events.40 These aspects of patients' lives are impaired whether or ...

  18. Refractory gastrooesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, Albert J.; Smout, André J.

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) has facilitated the treatment of gastrooesophageal reflux disease (GORD) enormously; however, treatment of GORD still fails in a small proportion of patients. This small proportion of therapy-resistant patients encompasses a substantial part of the

  19. Refractory gastrooesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, Albert J.; Smout, Andre J.

    The introduction of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) has facilitated the treatment of gastrooesophageal reflux disease (GORD) enormously; however, treatment of GORD still fails in a small proportion of patients. This small proportion of therapy-resistant patients encompasses a substantial part of the

  20. Sex and Gender Differences in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Gwang Ha

    2016-01-01

    It is important to understand sex and gender-related differences in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) because gender-related biologic factors might lead to better prevention and therapy. Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) affects more women than men. GERD symptoms are more frequent in patients with NERD than in those with reflux esophagitis. However, men suffer pathologic diseases such as reflux esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) more frequently than women. The prevalence of reflux esophagitis is significantly increased with age in women, especially after their 50s. The mean age of EAC incidence in women is higher than in men, suggesting a role of estrogen in delaying the onset of BE and EAC. In a chronic rat reflux esophagitis model, nitric oxide was found to be an aggravating factor of esophageal injury in a male-predominant way. In addition, the expression of esophageal occludin, a tight junction protein that plays an important role in the esophageal defense mechanism, was up-regulated in women. This explains the male predominance of reflux esophagitis and delayed incidence of BE or EAC in women. Moreover, the symptoms such as heartburn, regurgitation, and extra-esophageal symptoms have been more frequently reported by women than by men, suggesting that sex and gender play a role in symptom perception. Differential sensitivity with augmented symptoms in women might have diagnostic and therapeutic influence. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that hormone replacement therapy has a protective effect against esophageal cancer. However, an anti-inflammatory role of estrogen remains compelling, which means further study is necessary in this area. PMID:27703114

  1. Scintigraphic evaluation of duodenogastric reflux. Problems, pitfalls, and technical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drane, W E; Karvelis, K; Johnson, D A; Silverman, E D

    1987-05-01

    Bile reflux has been implicated in the pathogenesis of gastritis, gastric ulcer, and esophagitis. Radionuclide techniques provide the only non-invasive method to detect duodenogastric reflux. To analyze the problems that occur with attempts at quantitation, 55 patients were prospectively evaluated (45 patients with reflux esophagitis or Barrett's esophagus and ten patients with clinical symptoms of bile reflux, four of whom had Bilroth II surgery) with Tc-99m DISIDA, using a fasting technique with gallbladder stimulation by sincalide. Visual duodenogastric reflux occurred in 16 of 55 patients. Overlap of small bowel with the stomach is the major problem for accurate quantitation and occurred in 20 of 55 patients (36%). Overlap of left lobe of the liver occurred in 40 of 55 patients (73%), but its contribution to gastric activity was slight and could be easily subtracted. Reflux was intermittent in six of the 16 positive studies (38%), and continuous computer acquisition is needed to detect its maximum value. Primarily because of the problem of small bowel overlap, scintigraphic evaluation of duodenogastric reflux is only, at best, semi-quantitative. A review of the technical variables used in this examination, as well as potential problems that can occur, is provided.

  2. [Update on gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra Pueyo, Jordi

    2014-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a highly frequent disorder classically characterized by the presence of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation that improves with drug therapy that reduces acid content in the stomach. However, especially in patients with non-erosive disease, response to proton pump inhibitors is unsatisfactory in approximately 1 out of 3 patients, and consequently, in these patients, it is important to establish a definitive diagnosis and an alternative therapeutic strategy. In the last few years, advances have been made in knowledge of the physiopathology of reflux, such as identification of the role of the acid pocket in producing reflux, technological advances that allow differentiation among acid reflux, non-acid reflux and slightly acid reflux, and advances in the treatment of reflux with drugs that attempt to act on the barrier function of the esophagogastric junction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  3. Presença de refluxo em pacientes com sintomas típicos de doença do refluxo gastroesofágico Factors related to the presence of reflux in patients with typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Corsi

    2007-04-01

    GERD symptoms. Clinical data, Body Mass Index, abdominal ultrasound aspects and upper digestive endoscopic data are reported. Manometry and esophageal pH-monitoring were performed. RESULTS: One-hundred-and-seventy-two patients were female (68.5%. Mean age of the total was 51.8 years. Ultrasound examination revealed colelithiasis in 23 patients and PC in 21 patients. Hiatal hernia was diagnosed in 177 patients (71%, with an average size of 3.0cm. Erosive esophagitis was found in 168 patients (66.9% and Barrett's esophagus in 23 patients (9.2%. A combination of hiatal hernia and esophagitis was diagnosed in 131 patients (52.3% while only 37 patients (14.7% did not present either. The mean extension of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES was 2.6 cm, whereas in 132 patients (52.6% the LES was shorter. The mean pressure of the LES was 18.9 mmHg; 46 patients (18.3% had pressures below 14 mmHg. The mean number of reflux episodes on prolonged esophageal monitoring was 42.9; the mean number of prolonged episodes of reflux was 4.6, and the mean percentage of total acid time was 8.4%. DeMeester scores were high in 175 patients (69.7%. CONCLUSION: In patients with typical GERD symptoms, factors influencing the presence of pathological reflux as confirmed by prolonged esophageal pH-monitoring were: age, hiatal hernia associated to erosive esophagitis, a smaller extension, low baseline pressure and smaller volume vector of the LES.

  4. Relationship between the number of outpatient visits for hypotension in the springtime in Japan, extracted from clinical electronic records, and global solar radiation levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, T; Hoshino, A; Matsubara, N; Matsuoka, T; Kikuchi, Y; Shimbo, T; Shimizu, T

    2011-01-01

    Hypotension is commonly reported in springtime when health changes, such as autonomic imbalance, are common and its symptoms may cause difficulties in daily activities. In this study, medical data from 101 outpatient clinic attendees (mean age 43.9 years; 16 males) making their first visit for hypotension symptoms, were compared with meteorological data from the clinic's location. The main symptom of hypotension was giddiness on standing. The most common coexisting conditions were gastrointestinal; e.g. gastro-oesophageal reflux disorder and irritable bowel syndrome. The 7-day moving average of total global solar radiation correlated significantly with the 7-day moving average of the number of patients with hypotension. Discriminant analysis revealed an increase in hypotension consultations in the total global solar radiation moving average range 11-19 MJ/m(2), consistent with the local spring season. Guidance--such as wearing compression stockings during springtime--may help to reduce the occurrence of clinical hypotension in susceptible patients.

  5. Exercise and the Prevention of Oesophageal Cancer (EPOC study protocol: a randomized controlled trial of exercise versus stretching in males with Barrett's oesophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeves Marina M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and excessive body fat are considered principal causes of Barrett's oesophagus (a metaplastic change in the cells lining the oesophagus and its neoplastic progression, oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Metabolic disturbances including altered levels of obesity-related cytokines, chronic inflammation and insulin resistance have also been associated with oesophageal cancer development, especially in males. Physical activity may have the potential to abrogate metabolic disturbances in males with Barrett's oesophagus and elicit beneficial reductions in body fat and gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms. Thus, exercise may be an effective intervention in reducing oesophageal adenocarcinoma risk. However, to date this hypothesis remains untested. The 'Exercise and the Prevention of Oesophageal Cancer Study' will determine whether 24 weeks of exercise training will lead to alterations in risk factors or biomarkers for oesophageal adenocarcinoma in males with Barrett's oesophagus. Our primary outcomes are serum concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 as well as insulin resistance. Body composition, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms, cardiovascular fitness and muscular strength will also be assessed as secondary outcomes. Methods/Design A randomized controlled trial of 80 overweight or obese, inactive males with Barrett's oesophagus will be conducted in Brisbane, Australia. Participants will be randomized to an intervention arm (60 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic and resistance training, five days per week or a control arm (45 minutes of stretching, five days per week for 24 weeks. Primary and secondary endpoints will be measured at baseline (week 0, midpoint (week 12 and at the end of the intervention (week 24. Discussion Due to the increasing incidence and very high mortality associated with oesophageal adenocarcinoma

  6. Exercise and the Prevention of Oesophageal Cancer (EPOC) study protocol: a randomized controlled trial of exercise versus stretching in males with Barrett's oesophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winzer, Brooke M; Paratz, Jennifer D; Reeves, Marina M; Whiteman, David C

    2010-01-01

    Chronic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and excessive body fat are considered principal causes of Barrett's oesophagus (a metaplastic change in the cells lining the oesophagus) and its neoplastic progression, oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Metabolic disturbances including altered levels of obesity-related cytokines, chronic inflammation and insulin resistance have also been associated with oesophageal cancer development, especially in males. Physical activity may have the potential to abrogate metabolic disturbances in males with Barrett's oesophagus and elicit beneficial reductions in body fat and gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms. Thus, exercise may be an effective intervention in reducing oesophageal adenocarcinoma risk. However, to date this hypothesis remains untested. The 'Exercise and the Prevention of Oesophageal Cancer Study' will determine whether 24 weeks of exercise training will lead to alterations in risk factors or biomarkers for oesophageal adenocarcinoma in males with Barrett's oesophagus. Our primary outcomes are serum concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 as well as insulin resistance. Body composition, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms, cardiovascular fitness and muscular strength will also be assessed as secondary outcomes. A randomized controlled trial of 80 overweight or obese, inactive males with Barrett's oesophagus will be conducted in Brisbane, Australia. Participants will be randomized to an intervention arm (60 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic and resistance training, five days per week) or a control arm (45 minutes of stretching, five days per week) for 24 weeks. Primary and secondary endpoints will be measured at baseline (week 0), midpoint (week 12) and at the end of the intervention (week 24). Due to the increasing incidence and very high mortality associated with oesophageal adenocarcinoma, interventions effective in

  7. The diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease cannot be made with barium esophagograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, C M G; Smout, A J P M; Bredenoord, A J

    2015-02-01

    For over 50 years, barium studies have been used to diagnose gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), but the value of this test is controversial. Our study aimed to determine if barium esophagograms can be used to diagnose GERD. Barium esophagograms and pH-impedance measurement were performed in 20 subjects with reflux symptoms. pH-impedance measurements were used as gold standard for the diagnosis of GERD. Gastro-esophageal reflux measured with the barium study was defined as a positive outcome. 50% of patients presented gastro-esophageal reflux on the barium esophagogram. No significant differences were observed in acid exposure time between subjects with (median: 7.4%; interquartile range, IQR: 8.4%) or without reflux at barium esophagography (median: 5.95%; IQR: 13.05%; p > 0.05). Nor did we find differences in median proximal extent of reflux measured with impedance monitoring between patients with a positive (median: 6.7%; IQR: 1.95%) and negative barium study (median: 7.1%; IQR: 0.68%; p > 0.05). Patients with reflux on barium esophagogram did not have a positive symptom association probability more often than those who did not have reflux at barium esophagography. Lastly, there were no differences in numbers of acid, weakly acidic or total reflux episodes between those with positive or negative barium esophagogram (p > 0.05). No correlations were found between the maximum proximal extent of gastro-esophageal reflux during esophagography and pH-impedance parameters. Presence or absence of gastro-esophageal reflux during barium esophagography does not correlate with incidence or extent of reflux observed during 24-h pH-impedance monitoring and is not of value for the diagnosis of GERD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Studying the Psychological Profile of Patients with Laryngopharyngeal Reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesallam, Tamer A; Shoeib, Rasha M; Farahat, Mohamed; Kaddah, Fatma-Elzahraa A; Malki, Khalid H

    2015-01-01

    Psychological factors have been claimed to play a role in the predisposition for laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) symptoms. The aims of this work were to study the relationship between psychological disorders and LPR and to investigate the effect of potential psychological disorders on patients' self-perception of reflux-related problems. Forty-two patients with symptoms suggestive of LPR were psychologically evaluated using the Social Readjustment Rating Scale, the Symptom Checklist-90 Revised, the Manifest Anxiety Scale of Taylor, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, and the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale. Oropharyngeal 24-hour pH monitoring was used to diagnose LPR. LPR-related symptoms were assessed using the reflux symptom index (RSI) and the voice handicap index-10 (VHI-10). Patients were divided into groups based on psychiatric evaluation and pH results. Correlations between psychological profile characteristics and LPR-related parameters were also investigated. No significant difference was found between the positive and negative LPR group for any of the assessed psychological disorders. Also, no significant difference was detected between the positive and negative psychological disorder groups regarding RSI, VHI-10, and pH results. Correlations between psychological profile parameters and LPR-related measures were also nonsignificant. It appears that there is no association between psychological disorders and LPR. The psychological background of the LPR patients had no influence on patients' self-perception of their reflux-related problems. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Clinical characteristics and effectiveness of lansoprazole in Japanese patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Miwa, Hiroto; Sanada, Katsuyuki; Miyata, Koji; Haruma, Ken

    2014-04-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) frequently have symptoms of dyspepsia in addition to reflux symptoms. Treatment options for dyspepsia are not standardized. The aim of this study was to clarify the therapeutic effect of lansoprazole on dyspepsia in Japanese patients with GERD. GERD patients with dyspepsia were enrolled and treated with lansoprazole 15 or 30 mg once daily for 4 weeks. Reflux and dyspeptic symptoms were assessed by questionnaires before treatment, and 2 and 4 weeks after the start of lansoprazole treatment. In the effectiveness analysis set (n = 12,653), heartburn was reported by 91.6 % of patients at study enrollment. Postprandial fullness was the most frequently reported dyspepsia symptom at the start of the study, reported by 79.0 % of enrolled patients. After 4 weeks of lansoprazole treatment, heartburn symptoms were improved in 75.7 % of patients and symptoms of postprandial fullness were improved in 68.7 % of patients. The therapeutic effect of low and high doses of lansoprazole on dyspepsia, as well as on reflux symptoms, was approximately 10 % higher in patients with endoscopy-confirmed erosive esophagitis (60.1-82.2 %), than in patients with non-erosive reflux diseases (53.0-73.3 %). Lansoprazole was well tolerated. In this large-scale clinical study, lansoprazole effectively relieved dyspepsia in addition to reflux symptoms in patients with GERD.

  10. Vesicoureteric reflux in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameela A Kari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to identify the differences between primary and secondary vesicoureteric reflux (VUR and the effect of associated bladder abnormalities on kidney function. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of children with VUR who were followed up at King Abdulaziz University Hospital from January 2005 to December 2010. The review included results of radiological investigations and kidney function tests. We used Chi-square test for statistical analysis and paired t-test to compare group means for initial and last creatinine levels. Results: Ninety-nine children were included in this study. Twenty (20.2% had primary VUR, 11 had high-grade VUR, while 9 had low-grade reflux. All children with low-grade VUR had normal dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA. Renal scars were present in 72% of the children with high-grade VUR. The mean creatinine levels (initial and last for both groups were normal. Seventy-nine (79.8% children had secondary VUR, which was due to posterior urethral valves (PUV (46.8%, neurogenic bladder caused by meningomyelocele (25.3%, non-neurogenic neurogenic bladder (NNB (21.5%, or neurogenic bladder associated with prune belly syndrome (6.3%. Children with NNB, meningomyelocele and PUV had high creatinine at presentation with no considerable worsening of their kidney functions during the last visit. Renal scars were present in 49.4% of the children with secondary VUR. Conclusion: Children with primary VUR and normal bladder had good-functioning kidneys, while those with secondary VUR associated with abnormal bladder caused by NNB, spina bifida or PUV had abnormal kidney functions. DMSA scans were useful in predicting higher grades of VUR in children with primary reflux.

  11. Reflux and GERD (in Children)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Distinctions and Management Video Teen GERD Video Medical Animation Video Pediatric GERD PBS Episode AUDIO Infant Reflux and GERD: Distinctions and Management Supporters Support for the NASPGHAN Foundation's Pediatric Reflux and GERD Education Campaign was provided by AstraZeneca LP and Takeda ...

  12. Laryngopharyngeal Reflux: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Latest Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campagnolo, Andrea Maria

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR is a highly prevalent disease and commonly encountered in the otolaryngologist's office. Objective To review the literature on the diagnosis and treatment of LPR. Data Synthesis LPR is associated with symptoms of laryngeal irritation such as throat clearing, coughing, and hoarseness. The main diagnostic methods currently used are laryngoscopy and pH monitoring. The most common laryngoscopic signs are redness and swelling of the throat. However, these findings are not specific of LPR and may be related to other causes or can even be found in healthy individuals. Furthermore, the role of pH monitoring in the diagnosis of LPR is controversial. A therapeutic trial with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs has been suggested to be cost-effective and useful for the diagnosis of LPR. However, the recommendations of PPI therapy for patients with a suspicion of LPR are based on the results of uncontrolled studies, and high placebo response rates suggest a much more complex and multifactorial pathophysiology of LPR than simple acid reflux. Molecular studies have tried to identify biomarkers of reflux such as interleukins, carbonic anhydrase, E-cadherin, and mucin. Conclusion Laryngoscopy and pH monitoring have failed as reliable tests for the diagnosis of LPR. Empirical therapy with PPIs is widely accepted as a diagnostic test and for the treatment of LPR. However, further research is needed to develop a definitive diagnostic test for LPR.

  13. The follow-up and results of laparoscopic antireflux surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetje, Jan Harm

    2016-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is a common disease in the Western world. In addition to lifestyle advice, treatment consists of the use of antacids. Some of the patients do not benefit from antacids, do not want to swallow lifelong antacids or suffer from a diaphragmatic hernia. For this group,

  14. Review article: long-term use of proton pump inhibitors in GORD--help or hindrance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.

    2001-01-01

    Many patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) experience chronic relapses and require maintenance therapy for symptomatic relief. This article reviews possible mechanisms for chronic relapse in GORD, and discusses the risks and benefits of proton pump inhibitors as maintenance therapy

  15. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux: An overview of the cost-effectiveness of pharmacotherapeutic treatment options. Abstract PDF · Vol 58, No 2 (2016) - Articles Sublingual immunotherapy for the treatment of allergies. Abstract PDF · Vol 58, No 4 (2016) - Articles Neuropathic pain: targeting the melatonin MT2 receptor. Abstract PDF ...

  16. Current concepts and issues in the management of regurgitation of infants : A reappraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenplas, Y; Belli, D; Benhamou, PH; Cadranel, S; Cezard, JP; Cucchiara, S; Dupont, C; Faure, C; Gottrand, F; Hassall, E; Heymans, HSA; Kneepkens, CMF; Sandhu, BK

    Regurgitation in infants is a common problem. Recent issues, such as the increased risk of sudden infant death in the prone sleeping position, the finding of persisting occult gastro-oesophageal reflux with feed thickeners, and the increasing awareness of the cost-benefit ratio of medications may

  17. Shortcomings of the first-generation proton pump inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.

    2001-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely prescribed for the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) as well as gastric and duodenal ulcers, and these agents are now considered the drugs of choice for managing such acid-related disorders. Despite their well-documented efficacy and

  18. Transoral incision free fundoplication (TIF – A new paradigm in the surgical treatment of GERD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliot Goodman

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available An estimated 10 billion dollars is spent treating gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD in the USA every year. The present article reports a case of the safe and successful use of transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF using the EsophyX™ device in the surgical treatment of GERD.

  19. An audit of povincial Gastroenterology services in the Western Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An audit of povincial Gastroenterology services in the Western Cape. G Watermeyer, MEC van Wyk, PA Goldberg. Abstract. Background. While disorders such as gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, gastrointestinal (GI) cancers and inflammatory bowel disease are prevalent among all racial groups in the Western Cape, ...

  20. Proton-pump inhibitors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    definition of what constitutes an adequate trial of PPIs. Six weeks of a daily PPI at a standard dose ... treatment of choice for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and peptic ulcer disease. PPIs are considered safe and .... chronic PPI use and vitamin B12 deficiency.33 Thus, it is prudent to check vitamin B12 levels, especially ...

  1. Giant lower oesophageal ulcer Bushman baby

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-02-26

    Feb 26, 1983 ... ment, and on this occasion gastro-oesophageal reflux was observed in addition to the features mentioned previously. There was also a contracted prepyloric segment ('pseudohypertrophic pyloric stenosis'). Surgical intervention was clearly indicated. Surgical treatment. A high midline incision was made, ...

  2. Postoperative Feeding Difficulties after Repair of Congenital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of these, 24 (37.5%) developed feeding difficulties in the immediate post operative period. The causes of the feeding difficulties were Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) 9, Recurrent diaphragmatic hernia 8, Adhesive intestinal obstruction 4, Poor intestinal motility 2, Campylobacter enteritis, 1, Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, 1.

  3. Endoscopic regression of Barrett's oesophagus during omeprazole treatment; a randomised double blind study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, FTM; Ganesh, S; Kuipers, EJ; Sluiter, WJ; Klinkenberg-Knol, EC; Lamers, CBHW; Kleibeuker, JH

    1999-01-01

    Background-Barrett's oesophagus, columnar metaplasia of the epithelium, is a premalignant condition with a 50-100-fold increased risk of cancer. The condition is caused by chronic gastro-oesophageal reflux. Regression of metaplasia may decrease the cancer risk. Aims-To determine whether elimination

  4. Twenty-four-hour pH measurements in morbid obesity: effects of massive overweight, weight loss and gastric distension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathus-Vliegen, L. M.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the influence of untreated (super)morbid obesity and the effects of massive weight loss and chronic gastric distension on gastro-oesophageal reflux. Seventeen young morbidly obese patients (32 years old; body weight 166.5 kg; body mass index 55 kg/m2) underwent 24-h ambulatory

  5. LOS function and obesity: The impact of untreated obesity, weight loss, and chronic gastric balloon distension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathus-Vliegen, E. M. H.; van Weeren, M.; van Eerten, P. V.

    2003-01-01

    Background/Aims: In obesity, many gastro-oesophageal reflux promoting factors are present. Weight reduction is advised to symptomatic overweight subjects. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influences of untreated obesity, weight loss, and chronic gastric balloon distension on the

  6. Cohort profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maret-Ouda, John; Wahlin, Karl; Artama, Miia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a newly created all-Nordic cohort of patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), entitled the Nordic Antireflux Surgery Cohort (NordASCo), which will be used to compare participants having undergone antireflux surgery with those who have not regarding risk of canc...

  7. Verlenging van de QTc-tijd bij een pasgeborene tijdens gebruik van cisapride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeringa, M; Pulles-Heintzberger, C F; van Puijenbroek, E P; Verduijn, M M

    1999-01-01

    In a 7-week-old female infant a prolonged QTc interval, up to 485 ms, was measured and attributed to the use of the prokinetic agent cisapride. The girl was born at 32 1/7 weeks of gestational age, started to use cisapride (0.8 mg/kg/day) at the age of 7 weeks because of gastro-oesophageal reflux.

  8. Comorbidities of asthma during childhood : possibly important, yet poorly studied

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, E. P.; Duiverman, E. J.; Brand, P. L. P.

    Asthma in adults is associated with comorbidities such as obesity, gastro-oesophageal reflux, dysfunctional breathing and mental disorders. Herein, we provide an overview of the current state of evidence on these comorbidities in childhood asthma. The prevalence, known mechanisms and possible

  9. Oesophageal transit of marshmallow after the Angelchik procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, C S; Smart, H; Amar, S S; Morris, D L

    1989-03-01

    The oesophageal transit time of half a marshmallow was measured radiologically in 17 controls, 28 patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux pre-operatively, 36 patients soon after implantation of the Angelchik prosthesis (2-9 weeks) and in 23 patients later postoperatively (9-48 months). Sixteen postoperative patients also underwent oesophageal manometry. All control and pre-operative patients had a marshmallow transit time of less than 1 min; 67 per cent of the early postoperative patients had prolonged transit and 70 per cent of the late tests were similarly abnormal. Prolonged oesophageal transit as measured by marshmallow swallow correlated well with symptoms of solid food dysphagia. Most, but not all, patients with an abnormal marshmallow swallow had abnormal manometric findings. The oesophageal transit of solid food is significantly slowed after the Angelchik procedure and this is not a transient postoperative phenomenon.

  10. Evaluation of Current Operations for the Prevention of Gastroesophageal Reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeester, Tom R.; Johnson, Lawrence F.; Kent, Alfred H.

    1974-01-01

    A prospective randomized study was done on 45 patients to evaluate the effectiveness of the Hill, Nissen or Belsey anti-reflux procedure. All patients had symptoms of GE reflux unresponsive to medical therapy, a + standard acid reflux test (SART), and esophagitis (38/45) or + Burnstein test (7/45). Esophageal symptomatic, radiographic, manometric and pH (SART and 24-hr monitoring) evaluation was done pre- and 154 days (ave.) postsurgery. All procedures improved the symptoms of pyrosis. The best improvement was seen after the Nissen repair. All procedures increased the distal esophageal sphincter (DES) pressures over preoperative levels. The Nissen and Belsey increased it more than the Hill. Sphincter length and dynamics remained unchanged. The Nissen procedure placed more of the manometric sphincter below the respiratory inversion point in the positive pressure environment of the abdomen. The esophageal length was increased by the Nissen and Hill repairs. This was thought to account for the high incidence of temporary postsurgery dysphagia following the Nissen and Hill repairs and the lower incidence following the Belsey repair. Reflux was most effectively prevented by the Nissen repair, as shown by the SART and the 24-hr esophageal pH monitoring, a sensitive measurement of frequency and duration of reflux. The average length of hospital stay was 20 days for Belsey and 12 days for both Nissen and Hill procedure. Postsurgery complications were more common following the thoracic than the abdominal approach. Ability to vomit postrepair was greatest with the Hill and least with the Belsey and Nissen repair. All procedures temporarily increased amount of flatus. It is concluded that the Nissen repair best controls reflux and its symptoms by providing the greatest increase in DES pressure and placing more of the sphincter in the positive abdominal environment. This is accomplished with the lowest morbidity but at the expense of temporary postoperative dysphagia and a 50

  11. Relevance between GerdQ score and the severity of reflux esophagitis in Uygur and Han Chinese

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Man; Zhang, Jing-Zhan; Kang, Xiao-Jing; Li, Li; Huang, Xiao-Ling; Aihemaijiang, Kuerbanjiang; Ayinuer, Aheman; Li, Yue-Xian; He, Xiao-Lei; Gao, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire (GerdQ) was used to investigate the inpatients with typical reflux related symptoms in Gastroenterology. According to heartburn, regurgitation, abdominal pain, nausea, sleep disorders, whether taking over the counter (OTC) drugs 6 points to score. Using endoscopy as the gold standard for the diagnosis of reflux esophagitis (RE), and the results were compared with GerdQ score to determine the threshold value for RE, to analyze the distribution of G...

  12. Closed loop reflux system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Witt, R.; Jepson, B.E.; Schwind, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO 3 ). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO 3 , and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO 4 ) and SO 2 gas, which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO 2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO 4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na 2 SO 4 ), which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H 2 SO 4 components, which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials. (U.S.)

  13. [Impact of reflux on the kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollard, P; Louis, D; Basset, T

    1984-03-01

    Description of the reflux nephropathy. Pyelonephritis lesions are undoubtedly linked to the vesico-ureteric reflux. The role of the intra-renal reflux ( Hodson ) and the Big Bang Theory ( Ransley ) are discussed as the data from animal experiments. The role of the sterile reflux and of the segmental hypoplasia is relatively less important. The actual management of vesico-ureteric reflux treatment is questioned.

  14. Gastroesophageal Reflux (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... address other conditions that can contribute to GER symptoms, including obesity and certain medicines — and in teens, smoking and alcohol use. If these measures don't help relieve the symptoms, the doctor may also prescribe medicine, such as ...

  15. Debut of Gastroesophageal Reflux Concomitant with Administration of Sublingual Immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is an often debilitating condition characterised by retrograde flow of content from stomach into the oesophagus, where the low pH of the stomach acid irritates the mucosa of the oesophagus. The most dominant symptoms in GORD are pyrosis, regurgitation, and d...... to administration of sublingual immunotherapy for house dust mite in allergic rhinitis. The patient had to stop the SLIT after two weeks of administration due to GORD. The cessation resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms....

  16. [Laparoscopic treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux by fundoplication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidraoui, Khalid; Chehab, Farid; Khaiz, Driss; Lakhloufi, Ali; Bouzidi, Abdelmjid

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the results of the laparoscopic fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease. From January 1997 to February 2001, we performed 8 laparoscopic fundoplication. They are 5 men and 3 women with mean age of 45 [30-67 years]. The delay of apparition the symptoms varied from 6 months to 14 years. Seven patients had a heart burn. The preoperative evaluation included endoscopy, gastrointestinal contrast radiography, 24 hour pH monitoring and esophageal manometry. The surgical procedures were partial fundoplication (Toupet) in 7 cases and complete fundoplication (Nissen) in 1 case. There was no postoperative mortality. Two patients had a postoperative dysphagia. Two patients had persistent epigastric pain without gastroesophageal reflux in endoscopy and esophageal manometry. Laparoscopic fundoplication for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease is a safe and effective procedure with satisfying results.

  17. What is LPR (Laryngopharyngeal Reflux)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... press registration and more below. Please direct any interview requests or policy questions to our media and public relations staff at newsroom@entnet.org . Insight into the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) What ...

  18. Parenchymal reflux in renal dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinckney, L.E.; Currarino, G.; Weinberg, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Primitive ducts, tubules, and cysts often communicate with the pelvocalyceal systems of dysplastic kidneys, and may sometimes be filled in retrograde fashion with radiographic contrast material. Their size, shape, and distribution provide a variable radiographic appearance that must be distinguished from other causes of intrarenal reflux. When reflux filling of dysplastic structures is incomplete, the radiographic findings do not fully represent the severity of anatomic abnormality

  19. Gastroesophageal reflux after esophageal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Osamu; Yokoi, Hideki; Maebeya, Shinji

    1989-01-01

    By means of esophageal transit scintigram using 99m Tc-DTPA, 15 patients (13 esophageal carcinomas and 2 cardia carcinomas) were studied, in whom esophagogastric anastomosis was done according to the posterior invagination anastomosis technique we had devised. In all 8 patients with anastomosis at cervical region, gastroesophageal reflux was not seen on both scintigrams before and after meals, and the average pressure gradient of high pressure zone at anastomosis was 39.8 cmH 2 O. In 2 of 7 patients with intrathoracic anastomosis, the scintigram before meals showed severe reflux. and the endoscopic findings showed diffuse and moderate erosion in the esophageal mucosa. The average pressure gradient across the anastomosis was 6.5 cmH 2 O. In these 2 patients, the new fornix with a sharp angle of His was not formed. In the remaining 5 patients with intrathoracic anastomosis, reflux was not seen on the scintigram before meals. However, in 2 of them, the scintigram after meal and endoscopic examination revealed mild reflux and mild esophagitis respectively. Furthermore in one patient very mild reflux was observed only on the scintigram after meals but the endoscopic findings showed the normal esophageal mucosa. In these 5 patients, the average pressure gradient across the anastomosis was 17.0 cmH 2 O, which was significantly higher (p<0.01) than that in 2 patients with severe reflux and was significantly lower (p<0.01) than the mean value of high pressure zone in 8 patients with cervical anastomosis. In conclusion, it is presumed that the formation of a large fornix enough to store food and a sharp angle of His are important factors in maintaining an anti-reflux mechanism. The esophageal transit scintigram was proved to be an excellent technique in detecting and evaluating quantitatively gastroesophageal reflux. (author)

  20. Concomitant functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome decrease health-related quality of life in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Durk R.; van Herwaarden, Margot A.; Baron, Astrid; Smout, André J. P. M.; Samsom, Melvin

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have reported an overlap between gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of FD and IBS in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and the effect on

  1. Canadian Digestive Health Foundation Public Impact Series: Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Canada: Incidence, Prevalence, and Direct and Indirect Economic Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N Fedorak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Digestive Health Foundation initiated a scientific program to assess the incidence, prevalence, mortality and economic impact of digestive disorders across Canada. The current article presents the updated findings from the study concerning gastroesophageal reflux disease – a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications (Montreal definition.

  2. Canadian Digestive Health Foundation Public Impact Series: gastroesophageal reflux disease in Canada: incidence, prevalence, and direct and indirect economic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorak, Richard N; Veldhuyzen van Zanten, Sander; Bridges, Ron

    2010-07-01

    The Canadian Digestive Health Foundation initiated a scientific program to assess the incidence, prevalence, mortality and economic impact of digestive disorders across Canada. The current article presents the updated findings from the study concerning gastroesophageal reflux disease - a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications (Montreal definition).

  3. Correcting Reflux Laparoscopically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Poulin

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Most operations in the abdominal cavity and chest can be performed using minimally invasive techniques. As yet it has not been determined which laparoscopic procedures are preferable to the same operations done through conventional laparotomy. However, most surgeons who have completed the learning curves of these procedures believe that most minimally invasive techniques will be scientifically recognized soon. The evolution, validation and justification of advanced laparoscopic surgical methods seem inevitable. Most believe that the trend towards procedures that minimize or eliminate the trauma of surgery while adhering to accepted surgical principles is irreversible. The functional results of laparoscopic antireflux surgery in the seven years since its inception have been virtually identical to the success curves generated with open fundoplication in past years. Furthermore, overall patient outcomes with laparoscopic procedures have been superior to outcomes with the traditional approach. Success is determined by patient selection and operative technique. Patient evaluation should include esophagogastroduodenoscopy, barium swallow, 24 h pH study and esophageal motility study. Gastric emptying also should be evaluated. Patients who have abnormal propulsion in the esophagus should not receive a complete fundoplication (Nissen because it adds a factor of obstruction. Dor or Toupet procedures are adequate alternatives. Prokinetic agents, dilation or pyloroplasty are used for pyloric obstruction ranging from little to more severe. Correcting reflux laparoscopically is more difficult in patients with obesity, peptic strictures, paraesophageal hernias, short esophagus, or a history of previous upper abdominal or antireflux surgery.

  4. Prevalence of broncopulmonary and otorhinolaryngologic symptoms in children under investigation for gastroesophageal reflux disease: retrospective analysis Prevalência de achados broncopulmonares e otorrinolaringológicos em crianças sob investigação de doença do refluxo gastroesofágico: análise retrospectiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor José Barbosa Santos

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common ailment in children, adding up to the evidence that gastroesophageal reflux is an important cofactor in upper airway disorders, especially in the pediatric population. It is very common for it to impact the upper and lower airways. Our goal was to assess the presence of otorhinolaryngological symptoms in children aged between one and twelve years in whom gastroesophageal reflux is suspected. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We assessed data from the charts of patients up to 12 years of age submitted to 24 hour pH measuring of one of two channels, placed at 2 and 5 cm from the LEE in order to confirm the diagnosis of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. RESULTS: We studied 143 charts from children who underwent 24 hour pH measuring to investigate GERD; however, only 65 were included. The most prevalent symptoms in the children were bronchopulmonary, found in 89.2%, of sinonasal symptoms (72.3%, otologic (46.1% and repetition UAW infections (44.6%. When we compared the presence of each group of symptoms of the results from the pH measuring, no significant differences were found between the symptoms and the pH measuring results. CONCLUSION: GERD can manifest in different ways and otorhinolaryngological symptoms are frequent in children.A Doença do Refluxo Gastroesofágico (DRGE é uma afecção comum na infância, aumentando as evidências de que o refluxo gastroesofágico seja um cofator importante que contribui para as desordens de vias aéreas, principalmente na população pediátrica. É muito comum serem observadas manifestações em vias aéreas superiores e inferiores. Nosso objetivo é avaliar a presença de sintomas otorrinolaringológicos em crianças com idade de um a 12 anos e suspeita de doença do refluxo gastroesofágico. MATERIAIS E MÉTODO: Foram avaliados dados de prontuários de pacientes de até 12 anos submetidos à pHmetria de 24 horas de um ou dois canais, locados a 2 e 5 cm do EEI para

  5. Prospective study on effect of Helicobacter pylori on gastroesophageal reflux disease

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    Sabah Jalal Shareef

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The Helicobacter pylori infections role in etiology of peptic ulcer is well known, but its role in gastroesophageal reflux disease is one of the important issues which has to be confirmed. We tried to find out the effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on gastroesophageal reflux disease. Methods: The current study was done on 100 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease from January 1st to June 30th, 2014 in Rizgary Teaching Hospital, Erbil city. The diagnosis was made by history, clinical examination, and endoscopy. Helicobacter pylori infection was confirmed by gastric biopsy and histopathological examination. We tried to find out the effects of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients and its eradication on their symptoms. The data was analyzed with the statistical package for the social sciences (version 18. Results: The mean age ± SD of participants was 37.13 ± 12.5 (17-75 years. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection was 75%. The endoscopy showed that 50 out of 75 patients had erosive esophagitis and 25 out of 75 patients had normal appearance known as non-erosive esophagitis. The study showed no significance of its eradication on symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Conclusion: The effect of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients was significant regarding endoscopic finding while inversely related to symptoms severity. The eradication of infection did not cause improvement in symptom severity i.e. triple therapy not advised in the course of treatment.

  6. The Role of Helicobacter pylori in Laryngopharyngeal Reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ross; Kilty, Shaun J; Hutton, Brian; Bonaparte, James P

    2017-02-01

    Objective The primary objective was to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori among patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux. The secondary objective was determining if H pylori eradication leads to greater symptom improvement in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux as compared with standard proton pump inhibitor therapy alone. Data Sources EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, European Union Clinical Trials Register, Cochrane Library databases of clinical trials, and ClinicalTrials.gov. Review Methods A systematic review was performed of studies assessing the diagnosis or treatment of H pylori among patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux. Randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, case-control studies, and case series were included. A meta-analysis of prevalence data and assessment of heterogeneity was performed on relevant studies. Results Fourteen studies were analyzed in the review, with 13 eligible for the meta-analysis. We determined that the prevalence of H pylori among patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux was 43.9% (95% confidence interval, 32.1-56.5). The heterogeneity of studies was high, with an overall I 2 value of 92.3%. We were unable to quantitatively assess findings for our secondary outcome, since H pylori identification and treatment were not the primary focus of the majority of studies. Conclusion There is a high rate of H pylori infection among patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux. The infection rate in North America and Western Europe has not been adequately studied. There is insufficient evidence to make a recommendation regarding the testing and treatment of H pylori infection among patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux.

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tips that may make your symptoms better are: Eat smaller meals, and eat more often. Lose weight, if you ... going to sleep: DO NOT skip meals or eat a large meal for dinner to make up for missed meals. ...

  8. Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Doctor Near You Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease) Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease) Patient Health ... pH probe: A small wire with an acid sensor is placed through the nose down to the ...

  9. Is pepsin detected in the saliva of patients who experience pharyngeal reflux?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Printza, A; Speletas, M; Triaridis, S; Wilson, J

    2007-07-01

    To investigate if pepsin is detected, with an activity assay, in the saliva of patients with a clinical diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and can therefore be used as a diagnostic marker of laryngopharyngeal reflux. Pilot, prospective study. Adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of LPR collected whole saliva samples on regular intervals for a day, and upon experiencing symptoms attributed to LPR. Patients were selected on the basis of presence of severe symptoms and laryngoscopic findings of laryngopharyngeal reflux and symptoms of gastroesopharyngeal reflux. They reported voice disorders, dysphagia, throat clearing, excessive secretions, breathing difficulties, cough, globus sensation and throat pain. Control participants reported the absence of pharyngeal and laryngeal symptoms and of symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. Saliva samples were assayed with fibrinogen on an agarose gel plate. The detection of pepsin was based on the presence of peptic activity which was qualitatively evaluated. The control participants had negative assays. No saliva samples from the LPR patients, collected at regular sampling, tested positive for pepsin. All the samples collected at the presence of symptoms and following regurgitation episodes tested negative for pepsin. Saliva samples pH ranged from 7 to 8. Pepsin was not detected, with an activity assay, in the saliva of patients with a clinical diagnosis of LPR. A concentration method might be more sensitive although saliva and swallowing physiology renders the detection of pepsin in the saliva difficult.

  10. Qualitative evaluation of the enterogastric reflux

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    Jimenez Garcia, A.; Ortega Bevia, J.M.; Garcia Fernandez, S.; Bonet Padilla, R.; Jimenez Garcia, E.; Rodrigues de Quesada, B. (Hospital Universitario da Faculdade de Medicina, Sevilla (Spain)); Szego, T. (Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina)

    Using Tc/sup 99/ - labeled HIDA, enterogastric reflux was studied in 24 subjects - six asymptomatic individuals and 18 previously submitted to gastric surgery for ulcers, through truncular vagotomy + pyloroplasty, gastrectomy with either BI or BII reconstruction. In the control group there was no evidence of reflux. In the subject group, seven of the 18 patients showed clearly enterogastric reflux. It is concluded that method is readily performed, without morbidity in these series, with a clear picture of the enterogastric reflux.

  11. Does the Use of Pacifier Affect Gastro-Esophageal Reflux in Preterm Infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvaglia, Luigi; Martini, Silvia; Corrado, Maria Francesca; Mariani, Elisa; Legnani, Elena; Bosi, Isabella; Faldella, Giacomo; Aceti, Arianna

    2016-05-01

    This crossover study showed that non-nutritive sucking, provided with a pacifier in 30 preterm infants, had no effect on acid and nonacid gastro-esophageal reflux evaluated by esophageal pH-impedance, and thus may be reasonably used in preterm neonates with symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02023216. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Morphine-augmented cholescintigraphy enhances duodenogastric reflux

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    Shih, Wei-Jen; Magoun, S.; Wierzbinski, B.; Ryo, U-Yun [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Medical Center; Lee, Jong-Kang

    1995-11-01

    Morphine intervention in cholescintigraphy decreases imaging time to diagnose acute cholecystitis. Not infrequently we observe duodenogastric reflux during scintigraphy with and without morphine intervention. To evaluate occurrence of duodenogastric reflux related to morphine, we reviewed 55 patients who underwent cholescintigraphy with (32) and without (23) morphine intervention. Morphine was injected when there was bowel activity with non-visualization of the gallbladder at 60 min. Duodenogastric reflux was identified by the appearance of activity in the area just below or immediately adjacent to the tip of the left hepatic lobe laterally. Among 32 patients with morphine intervention, 19 had acute cholecystitis and 13 chronic cholecystitis. Eleven of 19 (58%) with acute cholecystitis had duodenogastric reflux and 6 of 13 (46%) had duodenogastric reflux in chronic cholecystitis. The total of duodenogastric reflux in the group with morphine injection was 53%. Two patients` duodenogastric reflux occurred before morphine injection and was more apparent after morphine was given. In the without morphine group, 3 had acute cholecystitis and 20 had chronic cholecystitis; 2 (one acute and one chronic cholecystitis) of these 23 (9%) had duodenogastric reflux. Our results indicate: occurrence of duodenogastric reflux in morphine augmented cholescintigraphy is not significantly different in cholecystitis from that in chronic cholecystitis; duodenogastric reflux in morphine augmentation occurs significantly more often than without morphine intervention (p<0.001). We conclude that cholescintigraphy with morphine enhances duodenogastric reflux. The degree of duodenogastric reflux in the acute cholecystitis patients has been more severe than in the chronic cholecystitis patients. (author).

  13. Effect of fasting on laryngopharyngeal reflux disease in male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Abdul-latif; Nassar, Jihad; Dowli, Alexander; Al Zaghal, Zeid; Sabri, Alain

    2012-11-01

    To address the effect of fasting on laryngopharyngeal reflux disease (LPRD). A total of 22 male subjects have been recruited for this study. Subjects with vocal fold pathologies, recent history of upper respiratory tract infection or laryngeal manipulation were excluded. Demographic data included age and history of smoking. All subjects were evaluated while fasting for at least 12 h and non-fasting. By non-fasting we mean that they ate and drank during the day at their discretion with no reservation. The abstention from water and or food intake during the non-fasting period extended from few minutes to 3 h. All subjects were evaluated at the same time during the day. The evaluation consisted of a laryngeal examination and the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI). The Reflux Finding Score (RFS) was used to report on the reflux laryngeal findings. Subjects were considered to have LPRD if either the RSI or the RFS were positive (>9 RSI, >7 RFS). There was a non-significant increase in the total prevalence of LPRD while fasting compared to non-fasting (32 vs. 50 % while fasting, p value 0.361). In the RSI, the most common symptoms while non-fasting and fasting were throat clearing (64 vs. 68 %), postnasal drip (45 vs. 59 %) and globus sensation (36 vs. 50 %). The average score of all the three increased significantly while fasting. For the RFS the most common laryngeal findings in the non-fasting group versus the fasting group were erythema (77 vs. 68 %), thick endolaryngeal mucus (77 vs. 77 %) and posterior commissure hypertrophy (55 vs. 64 %). Fasting results in a nonsignificant increase in laryngopharyngeal reflux disease. The increase can be hypothetically explained on the change in eating habits and the known alterations in gastric secretions during Ramadan. Fasting subjects must be alert to the effect of LPRD on their throat and voice in particular.

  14. ANTISECRETORY TREATMENT FOR PEDIATRIC GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE - A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

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    Ângelo Zambam de MATTOS

    2017-09-01

    different combinations of omeprazole, bethanechol and placebo for the treatment of children with cough, and there is no clear definition on the best strategy. Another study demonstrated that omeprazole performed better than ranitidine for the treatment of extraesophageal reflux manifestations. Ten studies failed to demonstrate significant benefits of proton pump inhibitors or histamine H2 receptor antagonists for the treatment of unspecific manifestations attributed to gastroesophageal reflux in infants. CONCLUSION: Proton pump inhibitors or histamine H2 receptor antagonists may be used to treat children with gastroesophageal reflux disease, but not to treat asthma or unspecific symptoms.

  15. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and gastroesophageal reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenard, Fabien; Iannelli, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the only effective procedure that provides long-term sustained weight loss. Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) has emerged over the last few years to be an ideal bariatric procedure because it has several advantages compared to more complex bariatric procedures, including avoiding an intestinal bypass. However, several published follow-up studies report an increased rate of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) after a SG. GERD is described as either de novo or as being caused by aggravation of preexisting symptoms. However, the literature on this topic is ambivalent despite the potentially increased rate of GERDs that may occur after this common bariatric procedure. This article reviews the mechanisms responsible for GERD in obese subjects as well as the results after a SG with respect to GERD. Future directions for clinical research are discussed along with the current surgical options for morbidly obese patients with GERD and undergoing bariatric surgery. PMID:26420961

  16. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenard, Fabien; Iannelli, Antonio

    2015-09-28

    Bariatric surgery is the only effective procedure that provides long-term sustained weight loss. Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) has emerged over the last few years to be an ideal bariatric procedure because it has several advantages compared to more complex bariatric procedures, including avoiding an intestinal bypass. However, several published follow-up studies report an increased rate of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) after a SG. GERD is described as either de novo or as being caused by aggravation of preexisting symptoms. However, the literature on this topic is ambivalent despite the potentially increased rate of GERDs that may occur after this common bariatric procedure. This article reviews the mechanisms responsible for GERD in obese subjects as well as the results after a SG with respect to GERD. Future directions for clinical research are discussed along with the current surgical options for morbidly obese patients with GERD and undergoing bariatric surgery.

  17. Vesicoureteral Reflux (VUR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often first detected when a child has a urinary tract infection (UTI) with a fever. Symptoms of a UTI include: lower tract infection (in ... kidneys are functioning and check for signs of infection or damage to the ... to create images of the urinary tract and may reveal a defect or blockage ...

  18. Incidence of Biliary Reflux Esophagitis After Laparoscopic Omega Loop Gastric Bypass in Morbidly Obese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Tamer M Said; Hassan, Mohamed Ibrahim

    2017-06-01

    Omega loop gastric bypass is a successful bariatric surgery with numerous favorable circumstances as being basic, effective on weight reduction and treatment of obesity associated metabolic disorder, the short expectation to learn and adapt, and the simplicity of correction and inversion. However, there are arguments about the possibility of biliary reflux and/or the potential danger of gastroesophageal malignancy after the procedure. Fifty patients experiencing morbid obesity with body mass index >40 or >35 kg/m 2 with two related comorbidities, for example, diabetes type II, hypertension, or dyslipidemia, underwent omega loop gastric bypass with a follow-up period up to 18 months, investigating for any symptom of reflux infection by upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy and pH metry. Reflux esophagitis (a gastroesophageal reflux disease) was detected in 3 patients (6%); 2 cases (4%) showed (Grade A) acidic reflux esophagitis at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Just 1 case (2%) had experienced gastroesophageal biliary reflux esophagitis (Grade A) at 12 months. No metaplasia or dysplasia was detected in the endoscopic biopsies. Omega loop gastric bypass is a safe and effective bariatric procedure with low incidence of postoperative biliary reflux, metaplasia, or dysplasia at the esophagogastric junction, confirmed 18 months after the operation.

  19. Pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease: new understanding in a new era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herregods, T V K; Bredenoord, A J; Smout, A J P M

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has increased in the last decades and it is now one of the most common chronic diseases. Throughout time our insight in the pathophysiology of GERD has been characterized by remarkable back and forth swings, often prompted by new investigational techniques. Even today, the pathophysiology of GERD is not fully understood but it is now recognized to be a multifactorial disease. Among the factors that have been shown to be involved in the provocation or increase of reflux, are sliding hiatus hernia, low lower esophageal sphincter pressure, transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation, the acid pocket, obesity, increased distensibility of the esophagogastric junction, prolonged esophageal clearance, and delayed gastric emptying. Moreover, multiple mechanisms influence the perception of GERD symptoms, such as the acidity of the refluxate, its proximal extent, the presence of gas in the refluxate, duodenogastroesophageal reflux, longitudinal muscle contraction, mucosal integrity, and peripheral and central sensitization. Understanding the pathophysiology of GERD is important for future targets for therapy as proton pump inhibitor-refractory GERD symptoms remain a common problem. In this review we provide an overview of the mechanisms leading to reflux and the factors influencing perception, in the light of historical developments. It is clear that further research remains necessary despite the recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of GERD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Medical or Surgical Treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Liakakos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common condition with increasing prevalence worldwide. The disease encompasses a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms and disorders from simple heartburn without esophagitis to erosive esophagitis with severe complications, such as esophageal strictures and intestinal metaplasia. Diagnosis is based mainly on ambulatory esophageal pH testing and endoscopy. There has been a long-standing debate about the best treatment approach for this troublesome disease. Methods and Results. Medical treatment with PPIs has an excellent efficacy in reversing the symptoms of GERD, but they should be taken for life, and long-term side effects do exist. However, patients who desire a permanent cure and have severe complications or cannot tolerate long-term treatment with PPIs are candidates for surgical treatment. Laparoscopic antireflux surgery achieves a significant symptom control, increased patient satisfaction, and complete withdrawal of antireflux medications, in the majority of patients. Conclusion. Surgical treatment should be reserved mainly for young patients seeking permanent results. However, the choice of the treatment schedule should be individualized for every patient. It is up to the patient, the physician and the surgeon to decide the best treatment option for individual cases.

  1. Clinical and radiological characteristic of the gastroesophageal reflux disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brankov, O.; Racheva, G.; Totev, M.; Antonova, D.

    2007-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in children is a normal physiologic process that can progress to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) when pathologic symptoms and complications appear. The pathogenesis of GER is related to a decrease pressure and transient relaxations of the lower esophageal sphincter, which is the most important factors contributing to reflux. If the history and physical examination reveal concerns of GERD further evaluation is necessary: esophageal pH monitoring, endoscopy, barium swallowing. The gold standard for the diagnosis of GERD is the 24-hour pH probe. Barium contrast radiography is useful to detect anatomic abnormalities, such as gaped cardia, reflux of contrast material, hiatal hernia, esophageal stricture and shortened esophagus. When compared to esophageal pH monitoring, the upper Gl series is less sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of GER, but is helpful as widely used first-step diagnosis in cases with symptomatic GERD. (authors)

  2. Operative Treatments for Reflux After Bariatric Surgery: Current and Emerging Management Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treitl, Daniela; Nieber, Derek; Ben-David, Kfir

    2017-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder that has a well-established connection with obesity. To ameliorate the morbidity associated with obesity, bariatric procedures have become an established pathway to accomplish sustained weight loss. In some procedures, such as with the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, weight loss is also accompanied by the resolution of GERD symptoms. However, other popular bariatric surgeries, such as the sleeve gastrectomy, have a controversial impact on their effect on reflux. Consequently, increased attention has been given to the development of strategies for the management of de novo or recurrent reflux after bariatric surgery. This article aims to discuss medical and surgical strategies for reflux after bariatric surgery, and their outcomes.

  3. Findings in cystourethrography that suggest lower urinary tract dysfunction in children with vesicoureteral reflux

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    Ubirajara Barroso Jr

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Children with lower urinary tract dysfunction and vesicoureteral reflux, at cystography assessment, frequently present alterations in the lower urinary tract anatomy such as dilated posterior urethra, irregularity of the bladder wall and diverticula. However, the significance of these findings is unknown. The objective of this study is to evaluate the incidence of these findings, their time of disappearance and their correlation with the severity of the reflux. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 193 children with vesicoureteral reflux, considered simple, in the age group above 5 years at the moment of diagnosis, were analyzed. The recommendation for follow-up of these patients was one voiding cystoureterography (VCUG each year. Only patients with a minimum of 2 VCUGs performed in a period of at least 6 months were considered. The VCUGs were classified as positive and negative in relation to findings that were characteristic of lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD. RESULTS: From the 193 children analyzed, 50 (26% presented positive VCUG and 143 negative VCUG. From the patients without symptoms of lower urinary tract dysfunction (n = 135, 12 (9% presented positive VCUG and 123 (91% a negative VCUG. From the patients with negative VCUG, 68 (48% presented unilateral reflux and 75 (52% presented bilateral reflux. From those with positive VCUG, 26 (52% had unilateral reflux and 24 bilateral reflux (48%. This difference was not statistically significant. A higher incidence of grade II reflux was more evident in patients with negative VCUG and degree III in patients with positive VCUG (p < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrated that 64% of the patients with LUTD and reflux presented findings in the VCUG that suggest dysfunction.

  4. The comparative analyses of different diagnostic approaches in detection of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children.

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    Nina Ristic

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the different diagnostic approaches in detection of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children presented with symptoms suggesting gastroesophageal reflux disease.The study design was cross sectional. The study retrospectively included all children who underwent combined multiple intraluminal impedance and pH (pH-MII monitoring due to gastrointestinal and/or extraesophageal symptoms suggesting gastroesophageal reflux disease at University Children's Hospital in Belgrade, from July 2012 to July 2016.A total of 218 (117 boys/101 girls, mean age 6.7 years (range 0.06-18.0 years, met the inclusion criteria. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was found in 128 of 218 children (57.4% by pH-MII and in 76 (34.1% children by pH metry alone. Using pH-MII monitoring as gold standard, sensitivity of pH-metry was lowest in infants (22.9%, with tendency to increase in older age groups (reaching 76.4% in children ≥ 9 years. The sensitivity of pH-metry alone in children with extraesophageal symptoms was 38.1%, while the sensitivity of pH-metry in children with gastrointestinal symptoms was 63.8%. Reflux esophagitis was identified in 31 (26.1% of 119 children who underwent endoscopy. Logistic regression analysis showed that best predictors of endoscopic reflux esophagitis are the longest acid episode (OR = 1.52, p<0.05 and DeMeester reflux composite score (OR = 3.31, p<0.05. The significant cutoff values included DeMeester reflux composite score ≥ 29 (AUC 0.786, CI 0.695-0.877, p<0.01 and duration of longest acid reflux ≥ 18 minutes (AUC 0.784, CI 0.692-0.875, p<0.01.The results of our study suggested that compared with pH-metry alone, pH-MII had significantly higher detection rate of gastroesophageal reflux disease, especially in infants. Our findings also showed that pH-MII parameters correlated significantly with the endoscopically confirmed erosive esophagitis.

  5. Integrative Treatment of Reflux and Functional Dyspepsia in Children

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    Ann Ming Yeh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD and functional dyspepsia (FD are common problems in the pediatric population, with up to 7% of school-age children and up to 8% of adolescents suffering from epigastric pain, heartburn, and regurgitation. Reflux is defined as the passage of stomach contents into the esophagus, while GERD refers to reflux symptoms that are associated with symptoms or complications—such as pain, asthma, aspiration pneumonia, or chronic cough. FD, as defined by the Rome III classification, is a persistent upper abdominal pain or discomfort, not related to bowel movements, and without any organic cause, that is present for at least two months prior to diagnosis. Endoscopic examination is typically negative in FD, whereas patients with GERD may have evidence of esophagitis or gastritis either grossly or microscopically. Up to 70% of children with dyspepsia exhibit delayed gastric emptying. Treatment of GERD and FD requires an integrative approach that may include pharmacologic therapy, treating concurrent constipation, botanicals, mind body techniques, improving sleep hygiene, increasing physical activity, and traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture.

  6. Learning from the learning curve: factors associated with successful endoscopic correction of vesicoureteral reflux using dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Sumit; Lorenzo, Armando J; Khoury, Antoine E; Braga, Luis H P; Skeldon, Sean J; Suoub, Mohammed; Farhat, Walid; Pippi Salle, João L; Bägli, Darius J

    2008-10-01

    Conflicting reports exist regarding the parameters guiding successful correction of vesicoureteral reflux using dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer. We performed logistic regression analysis to evaluate the effect of injected volume while adjusting for other factors potentially associated with success following dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer injection. Between July 2003 and June 2006, 126 consecutive patients (34 boys and 92 girls) with a mean +/- SD age of 6.5 +/- 3.7 years with primary vesicoureteral reflux (196 refluxing ureters) underwent injection for febrile urinary tract infections. Success was defined as complete reflux resolution. Age, gender, laterality, preoperative vesicoureteral reflux grade, surgeon experience, dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer volume, time to surgery from initial presentation and preoperative treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms were analyzed. Vesicoureteral reflux grade was I to V in 7 (3.5%), 53 (27%), 91 (46.4%), 30 (15.3%) and 15 renal units (7.6%), respectively. The success rate after 1 injection was 50% by patient and 59.2% by ureter. Mean injected volume was 0.9 +/- 0.27 ml in those who had a successful injection vs 0.67 +/- 0.24 ml in those in whom injection failed (p hyaluronic acid copolymer compared to 31.7% with less than 0.8 ml. Multivariate analysis confirmed that higher dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer volume (p = 0.001), lower preoperative grade (p = 0.013), surgeon experience (p = 0.025) and treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms (p = 0.009) were associated with successful correction of vesicoureteral reflux. Our analysis strengthens the previously reported association of surgeon experience and vesicoureteral reflux grade with successful endoscopic vesicoureteral reflux correction. The data also revealed an association between injected volume and vesicoureteral reflux correction even while controlling for other variables, highlighting its importance as a true success modifier.

  7. Contemporary Management of Vesicoureteral Reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiyev, Perviz; Burgu, Berk

    2017-04-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) remains the most interesting topic of pediatric urology due to the dynamic nature of recent controversial publications. Starting from the need for a diagnosis to the necessity and effectiveness of treatment in preventing scars, VUR remains in the mist. Although recent strong evidence helped as fog lights in this blurriness, more data are required for achieving crystal clearance. This article aims to summarize and discuss the current state of the evidence regarding VUR management. To provide a comprehensive synthesis of the main evidence in the literature on the current and contemporary management of VUR in children; to discuss conservative management with continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP), especially its effectiveness and safety; and to review the current evidence regarding contemporary surgical techniques. We conducted a nonsystematic review of the literature using the recent guidelines and PubMed database regarding surveillance, CAP, endoscopic, open, laparoscopic, and robot-assisted ureteral surgical treatment. Despite the striking results of previous studies revealing the ineffectiveness of CAP, more recent studies and their two fresh meta-analyses revealed a positive role for CAP in the contemporary management of VUR. One of the most interesting findings is the redundant rising of endoscopic correction and its final settlement to real indicated cases. Patient individualization in the contemporary management of VUR seems to be the keyword. The evidence in the literature showed a safe and effective use of laparoscopic and robot-assisted laparoscopic reimplantations. The goal of VUR treatment is to prevent the occurrence of febrile urinary tract infections and formation of scars in the renal parenchyma. The approach should be risk adapted and individualized according to current knowledge. Individual risk is influenced by the presentation age, sex, history of pyelonephritis and renal damage, grade of reflux, bladder bowel

  8. [Vesico-renal reflux and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbe, Y P; Ratajczak, A; Coadou, Y; Guille, F; Lobel, B

    1985-01-01

    By modifying the anatomical location of the bladder and ureter, and by favoring urinary stasis and pyuria, pregnancy may reveal or aggravate an existing vesico-renal reflux. In reporting six cases of vesico-renal reflux in pregnant women, revealed by attacks of feverish lombalgia, or mictional disorders associated with pyuria, and confirmed postpartum by intravenous urography, retrograde cystography and cystoscopy, the authors recall the factors associated with pregnancy which favor the appearance of a reflux, mechanical, hormonal and metabolic action. Surgical correction of refluxes associated with pyuria and detected during pregnancy would seem indicated.

  9. Impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease on daily life: the Systematic Investigation of Gastrointestinal Diseases in China (SILC epidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Xiaoping

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease imposes a significant burden of illness in Western populations. However, data on the impact of reflux symptoms on daily life in Asian populations are scarce. The current study aimed to evaluate the impact of GERD (defined on the basis of symptoms on health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL in individuals from five regions in China, as part of the Systematic Investigation of Gastrointestinal Diseases in China (SILC study. Methods In total, 18 000 residents were randomly selected from across five regions of China and asked to complete a general information questionnaire and a Chinese version of the Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ. A randomly selected subsample of one-fifth of subjects (20% from each region completed Chinese versions of the 36-item self-administered (SF-36 questionnaire and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS questionnaire. Reflux symptoms were defined as the presence of heartburn and/or regurgitation. Symptom-defined GERD was diagnosed as mild heartburn and/or regurgitation ≥2 days per week, or moderate/severe heartburn and/or regurgitation ≥1 day a week, based on the Montreal Definition of GERD for population-based studies. Results The response rate was 89.4% for the total sample (16 091/18 000, and for the 20% subsample (3219/3600. Meaningful impairment was observed in all 8 SF-36 dimensions in participants with symptom-defined GERD, in 7 of the 8 SF-36 dimensions in participants with troublesome reflux symptoms, and in 6 of the 8 SF-36 dimensions in participants with reflux symptoms below the threshold for symptom-defined GERD. Meaningful daytime sleepiness was also observed in each of these groups. The proportion of individuals reporting troublesome symptoms increased as reflux symptom frequency and severity approached the threshold for symptom-defined GERD, and this was associated with concomitant decreases in all HRQoL measures. Troublesome symptoms were reported by 68.2% (75

  10. Oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing prevent gastrooesophageal reflux disease in dogs after oesophageal anastomosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ji-Gang; Liu, Quan-Xing; Den, Xu-Feng; Min, Jia-Xin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To examine the efficiency of oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing technique in decreasing the rate of postoperative gastrooesophageal reflux disease in a dog model. METHODS: We operated on 10 dogs in this study. First, we resected a 5-cm portion of the distal oesophagus and then restored the continuity of the oesophageal and gastric walls by end-to-end anastomosis. A group of five dogs was subjected to the oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing technique, whereas another group (control) of five dogs was subjected to the stapling technique after oesophagectomy. The symptom of gastrooesophageal reflux was recorded by 24-h pH oesophageal monitoring. Endoscopy and barium swallow examination were performed on all dogs. Anastomotic leakage was observed by X-ray imaging, whereas benign anastomotic stricture and mucosal damage were observed by endoscopy. RESULTS: None of the 10 dogs experienced anastomotic leakage after oesophagectomy. Four dogs in the new technology group resumed regular feeding, whereas only two of the dogs in the control group tolerated solid food intake. pH monitoring demonstrated that 25% of the dogs in the experimental group exhibited reflux and that none had mucosal damage consistent with reflux. Conversely, both reflux and mucosal damage were observed in all dogs in the control group. CONCLUSION: The oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing technique can improve the postoperative quality of life through the long-term elimination of reflux oesophagitis and decreased stricture formation after primary oesophageal anastomosis. PMID:25516655

  11. Scintigraphy, pH measurement and radiography in the evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, B.; Petersen, H.; Grette, K.; Erichsen, H.; Myrvold, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    Scintigraphy as a diagnostic tool has been explored in 69 patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms and endoscopic esophagitis. In all subjects the presence of reflux was also evaluated by radiography and intraesophageal pH measurements (standard acid reflux test). The overall sensitivity of scintigraphy (85.5%) was significantly higher than those of radiography (27.5%) and pH measurements (69.5%). Scintigraphy was performed with normal saline and with acidified orange juice as the transport medium for the isotope 99mTc. The yield of positive scintigrams was higher (22.3 to 61.1%, depending on the grade of endoscopic esophagitis) with the latter variant. Moreover, demonstration of spontaneous reflux was greatly facilitated by the acid scintigraphy. This was particularly obvious in the grade I esophagitis, in which the freqency of spontaneous reflux with saline method was 3.4% and with acid medium 34/3%. Reflux (induced or spontaneous) was seen in 22 normal control subjects with the saline method, and in 1 subject only with the acid method. On the basis of these findings it is concluded that scintigraphy, especially the acid variant of the technique, is a valuable diagnostic procedure in GER disease

  12. Oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing prevent gastrooesophageal reflux disease in dogs after oesophageal anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ji-Gang; Liu, Quan-Xing; Den, Xu-Feng; Min, Jia-Xin

    2014-12-14

    To examine the efficiency of oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing technique in decreasing the rate of postoperative gastrooesophageal reflux disease in a dog model. We operated on 10 dogs in this study. First, we resected a 5-cm portion of the distal oesophagus and then restored the continuity of the oesophageal and gastric walls by end-to-end anastomosis. A group of five dogs was subjected to the oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing technique, whereas another group (control) of five dogs was subjected to the stapling technique after oesophagectomy. The symptom of gastrooesophageal reflux was recorded by 24-h pH oesophageal monitoring. Endoscopy and barium swallow examination were performed on all dogs. Anastomotic leakage was observed by X-ray imaging, whereas benign anastomotic stricture and mucosal damage were observed by endoscopy. None of the 10 dogs experienced anastomotic leakage after oesophagectomy. Four dogs in the new technology group resumed regular feeding, whereas only two of the dogs in the control group tolerated solid food intake. pH monitoring demonstrated that 25% of the dogs in the experimental group exhibited reflux and that none had mucosal damage consistent with reflux. Conversely, both reflux and mucosal damage were observed in all dogs in the control group. The oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing technique can improve the postoperative quality of life through the long-term elimination of reflux oesophagitis and decreased stricture formation after primary oesophageal anastomosis.

  13. Prevalence of Barrett's esophagus in individuals without typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease Prevalência do esôfago de Barrett em indivíduos sem sintomas típicos da doença por refluxo gastroesofágico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Carneiro de Freitas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Barrett’s esophagus, the major risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma, is detected in approximately 10%-14% of individuals submitted to upper endoscopy for the assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease related symptoms. Prevalence studies of Barrett’s esophagus in individuals without typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease have reported rates ranging from 0.6% to 25%. AIM: To determine the prevalence of Barrett’s in a Brazilian population older than 50 years without typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. METHODS: A total of 104 patients (51 men, mean age of 65 years, with an indication for upper endoscopy but without symptoms of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation (determined with a validated questionnaire were recruited. Subjects submitted to upper endoscopic examination in the last 10 years or using antisecretory medication (proton pump inhibitors during the last 6 months were not included. Methylene blue chromoscopy was performed during the endoscopic exam to facilitate identification of the metaplastic epithelium. RESULTS: Barrett’s esophagus was diagnosed endoscopically and confirmed by histology in four patients, all of them males. The metaplastic segment was short (less than 3 cm and free of dysplasia in all patients. The prevalence of Barrett’s esophagus was 7.75% in the male population and 3.8% in the general population studied. CONCLUSION: Due to the low prevalence of Barrett’s esophagus found in the present study, associated with the finding of short-segment Barrett’s esophagus in all cases diagnosed and the absence of dysplasia in the material analyzed, endoscopic screening for Barrett’s esophagus in patients above the age of 50 without the classical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease is not indicated for the Brazilian population.RACIONAL: O esôfago de Barrett, principal fator de risco para o adenocarcinoma do esôfago, é uma complicação da doença por refluxo

  14. Haematemesis: a new syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axon, A T; Clarke, A

    1975-01-01

    Three patients presented with symptoms suggesting a Mallory-Weiss tear. Endoscopy showed a localized, clearly demarcated area of bright red mucosa near the gastro-oesophageal junction; this was thought to have arisen by retrograde intussusception of the stomach during vomiting or retching and may have caused the haemorrhage. PMID:1079153

  15. The transjugular intrahepatic porto- systemic shunt (TIPSS) procedure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Management of acute variceal bleeding. Patients with portal hypertension may either be asymptomatic or pre- sent with symptoms due to variceal bleeding, ascites, encephalopathy or hypersplenism. Variceal haemorrhage occurs in up to 85% of cases at the gastro-oesophageal junction. The management of variceal ...

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux and gastric emptying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, P.; Treves, S.T.

    1985-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) may be defined as a dysfunction of the distal esophagus causing return of gastric contents into the esophagus. GER is a rather common problem during infancy, with an incidence estimated as 1 in 500 infants. Several methods are available to diagnose and quantitate GER. These include fluoroscopy after barium feedings, in conjunction with an upper gastrointestinal series; esophageal manometry; endoscopy; pH probe monitoring, in conjunction with a Tuttle Test; and extended pH probe evaluation for a 24-h period. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy has been advocated as an alternative noninvasive study requiring no sedation. Scintigraphy offers the advantages of prolonged observation, high sensitivity, and low radiation exposure

  17. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health ... English Español Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) KidsHealth / For Teens / Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) What's in this article? ...

  18. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease in preschool children with asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yukinori; Kameda, Makoto; Nishikido, Tomoki; Takamatu, Isamu; Doi, Satoru

    2008-05-01

    In pediatric intractable asthma, there is occasionally an association with GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). It is not clear in which cases GERD should be suspected or how effective the GERD therapy is in treating the asthma. Twenty-seven preschool children (asthma attack in spite of asthma therapy underwent 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring. We examined retrospectively the incidence of GERD and the effectiveness of famotidine in GERD positive patients. 18 of the 27 patients (66.7%) had positive results (GERD positive group). In 12 of the 15 patients (80%) who underwent GERD therapy (famotidine), respiratory symptoms were decreased. In the GERD positive group, the incidence of acid reflux during waking hours was more frequent than during sleeping hours. In 8 of 12 patients (66.7%) in whom famotidine was effective, cough and wheeze often occurred during the daytime and corresponded with the time when acid reflux must commonly occurred. We conclude that children suffering from recurrent asthma attack in spite of asthma therapy must be examined for the presence of GERD.

  19. Evaluating the autonomic nervous system in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wan-Ju; Shu, Chih-Hung; Chou, Kun-Ta; Wang, Yi-Fen; Hsu, Yen-Bin; Ho, Ching-Yin; Lan, Ming-Ying

    2013-06-01

    The pathogenesis of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) remains unclear. It is linked to but distinct from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which has been shown to be related to disturbed autonomic regulation. The aim of this study is to investigate whether autonomic dysfunction also plays a role in the pathogenesis of LPR. Case-control study. Tertiary care center. Seventeen patients with LPR and 19 healthy controls, aged between 19 and 50 years, were enrolled in the study. The patients were diagnosed with LPR if they had a reflux symptom index (RSI) ≥ 13 and a reflux finding score (RFS) ≥ 7. Spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis was used to assess autonomic function. Anxiety and depression levels measured by the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) were also conducted. In HRV analysis, high frequency (HF) represents the parasympathetic activity of the autonomic nervous system, whereas low frequency (LF) represents the total autonomic activity. There were no significant differences in the LF power and HF power between the 2 groups. However, significantly lower HF% (P = .003) and a higher LF/HF ratio (P = .012) were found in patients with LPR, who demonstrated poor autonomic modulation and higher sympathetic activity. Anxiety was also frequently observed in the patient group. The study suggests that autonomic dysfunction seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of LPR. The potential beneficial effect of autonomic nervous system modulation as a therapeutic modality for LPR merits further investigation.

  20. Reflux Revisited: Advancing the Role of Pepsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karna Dev Bardhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease is mediated principally by acid. Today, we recognise reflux reaches beyond the esophagus, where pepsin, not acid, causes damage. Extraesophageal reflux occurs both as liquid and probably aerosol, the latter with a further reach. Pepsin is stable up to pH 7 and regains activity after reacidification. The enzyme adheres to laryngeal cells, depletes its defences, and causes further damage internally after its endocytosis. Extraesophageal reflux can today be detected by recognising pharyngeal acidification using a miniaturised pH probe and by the identification of pepsin in saliva and in exhaled breath condensate by a rapid, sensitive, and specific immunoassay. Proton pump inhibitors do not help the majority with extraesophageal reflux but specifically formulated alginates, which sieve pepsin, give benefit. These new insights may lead to the development of novel drugs that dramatically reduce pepsinogen secretion, block the effects of adherent pepsin, and give corresponding clinical benefit.

  1. A study on the diagnosis of minimal endoscopic lesions in nonerosive reflux esophagitis using computed virtual chromoendoscopy (FICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Antonio Rufino Gomes Jr.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastroesophageal reflux disease is very prevalent in the world. Endoscopically it can be classified as nonerosive when there is no mucosal erosive lesion on endoscopy. The presence of endoscopic minimal lesions is included in the Los Angeles classification for reflux disease. Virtual chromoendoscopy Fuji Intelligent Color Enhancement (FICE is an endoscopic technique that enhances detection of small lesions of the digestive tract. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the use of FICE improves the diagnosis of minimal lesions on endoscopy, and to assess the association of symptoms with minimal lesions in patients with nonerosive reflux disease. METHODS: One hundred fifty-five patients were enrolled, 62 with typical reflux symptoms and 93 without esophageal symptoms. The patients had normal esophageal endoscopy or minimal lesions. Each patient was examined initially by conventional video endoscopy and then using FICE. RESULTS: Among 155 patients, 113 had a normal conventional endoscopy and 42 had minimal lesions. Sixty-two patients had typical reflux symptoms, and 93 other symptoms unrelated to reflux. In 104 patients, the esophageal mucosa was normal for both conventional endoscopy and FICE, in 42 patients both techniques showed minimal lesions, in 9 patients conventional endoscopy was normal and minimal lesions were shown by FICE. The height and circumference of minimal lesions were greater using FICE than that measured by conventional endoscopy. There was a significant association of the presence of minimal lesions with male gender, but not with alcoholism, smoking, anti-inflammatory drugs and age. The diagnosis of minimal lesions was observer-dependent, both in conventional endoscopy as using FICE. CONCLUSIONS: The use of FICE improves the diagnosis of minimal lesions as compared to conventional videoendoscopy, although this diagnosis remains observer-dependent. There was no association between the presences of minimal lesions with reflux

  2. Myotomy for achalasia: to wrap or not to wrap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, Richard J

    2008-10-01

    One of the potential consequences of carrying out a Heller's myotomy for achalasia is gastro-oesophageal reflux. Whether it is frequent or severe enough to warrant the routine addition of a fundoplication to the operation is debated. In this prospective series of all patients undergoing a myotomy using a minimally invasive method the incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is examined. It was found that in 124 patients who had been followed for at least 6 months, whereas mild heartburn was common (51 patients; 41%), in only 10 patients (8.2%) was a proton pump inhibitor required and there were no patients whose reflux was not controlled using standard medical treatment. Peptic oesophagitis was an infrequent endoscopic finding with only 3 of 40 patients with no or mild heartburn having mild oesophagitis and no patient on a proton pump inhibitor having active peptic oesophagitis. These findings suggest that the addition of a fundoplication to a Heller's myotomy to prevent gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is not essential.

  3. Twenty-four-hour esophageal impedance-pH monitoring in healthy preterm neonates: rate and characteristics of acid, weakly acidic, and weakly alkaline gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Alonso, Manuel; Moya, Maria Jose; Cabo, Jose Antonio; Ribas, Juan; del Carmen Macías, Maria; Silny, Jiry; Sifrim, Daniel

    2006-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is a physiologic process and is considered pathologic (gastroesophageal reflux disease) when it causes symptoms or results in complications. It is common in preterm infants and occurs in healthy neonates. Twenty-four-hour pH monitoring commonly is used in children for diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease, and abnormal reflux is considered with detection of increased esophageal acid exposure. However, in neonates, relatively few gastroesophageal reflux episodes cause esophageal acidification to pH feeds, which can induce a weaker acid secretory response than that observed in older infants and adults. As a consequence, gastric pH may be > 4 for prolonged periods, and reflux of gastric contents might be less acidic or even alkaline. Esophageal impedance monitoring can detect weakly acidic and even alkaline gastroesophageal reflux. The role of weakly acidic reflux in the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease in preterm infants is not clear. To date, studies that have used impedance-pH in neonates assessed the association between nonacid reflux and cardiorespiratory symptoms, but no impedance data from healthy preterm neonates have been available to determine whether those symptomatic neonates had an increased number of weakly acidic reflux episodes or increased reactivity to a physiologic number of reflux events. Our aim with this study was to provide impedance-pH values for acid, weakly acidic, and weakly alkaline reflux from healthy preterm neonates. Esophageal impedance was recorded for 24 hours in 21 asymptomatic preterm neonates by replacing the conventional feeding tube with a specially designed feeding tube that included 9 impedance electrodes (8 French). All neonates were asymptomatic, with spontaneous breathing. Reflux monitoring was performed after comprehensive explanation and on receipt of written parental consent. Esophageal and gastric pH were monitored using a separate parallel pediatric catheter (6 French

  4. Documenting the prevalence of hiatal hernia and oesophageal abnormalities in brachycephalic dogs using fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, E J; Sutton, D; Friend, E J; Warren-Smith, C M R

    2017-12-01

    To report the prevalence of abnormal fluoroscopic findings in brachycephalic dogs that were presented to a referral hospital for obstructive airway syndrome. Hospital records between May 2013 and November 2015 identified 36 brachycephalic dogs investigated for obstructive airway disease: 21 French bulldogs, six bulldogs, four Boston terriers, two pugs, two boxers and one shih-tzu. The presence or absence of hiatal hernia, delayed oesophageal transit, gastro-oesophageal reflux and redundant oesophagus were recorded. Of the 36 dogs, 16 had hiatal hernia, all of which were French bulldogs; 31 dogs had delayed oesophageal transit time, 27 had gastro-oesophageal reflux, and four had redundant oesophagus. Clinical Significance: The prevalence of hiatal hernia is higher than expected in the French bulldog, and there was a high prevalence of oesophageal disease in this group in general. These results suggest a need to investigate similar cases for evidence of gastrointestinal disease that may also require attention. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  5. Limited ability of the proton-pump inhibitor test to identify patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Jones, Roger; Vakil, Nimish

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy often is assessed to determine whether patients' symptoms are acid-related and if patients have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), although the accuracy of this approach is questionable. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of the PPI te...

  6. Endoscopic pH Monitoring for Patients with Suspected or Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian G Turner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wireless pH studies can offer prolonged pH monitoring, which may potentially facilitate the diagnosis and management of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the detection rate of abnormal esophageal acid exposure using prolonged pH monitoring in patients with suspected or refractory GERD symptoms.

  7. Factors that influence therapeutic outcomes in symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2012-02-03

    The term "symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease" (GERD) refers to those patients who present with the typical GERD symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation, yet do not have endoscopic evidence of esophagitis. The primary goals of managing symptomatic GERD are to control symptoms and improve quality of life. A clinical assessment of the GERD patient can identify important clinical features, such as atypical and extraesophageal symptoms for which acid-suppressive agents tend to be less effective. Performing an endoscopy can further identify the patient as having nonerosive reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, or Barrett\\'s esophagus-diagnoses which can help determine treatment but may not prove predictive of therapeutic response. Determining acid exposure through pH testing can predict therapeutic response, with those revealing an abnormal acid exposure time being more responsive to acid-suppressive therapy. However, the performance of an endoscopy and pH testing on each patient is clearly not practical. Whereas the natural history of symptomatic GERD is still largely undefined, acid-suppressive therapy appears to be the best approach available for both the short-term and long-term management of this disease.

  8. High concentrations of pepsin in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from children with cystic fibrosis are associated with high interleukin-8 concentrations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNally, P

    2011-02-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux is common in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and is thought to be associated with pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. The measurement of pepsin in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid has recently been suggested to be a reliable indicator of aspiration. The prevalence of pulmonary aspiration in a group of children with CF was assessed and its association with lung inflammation investigated.

  9. MICTURATION DISORDERS IN CHILDREN WITH VESICOURETERAL REFLUX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasa Zivic

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Micturation disorders associated with VUR disable reflux resolution and treatment in-creasing renal damage and reflux nephropathy. Recent data consider recurrent infection in addition to bladder dysfunction and genetic succesibility in develop reflux nephropaty. According to their potential damage to upper tract they are classified into mild, moderate and severe.Typ staccato or lazy bladder is often associated with renal damage.Most severe dysfunction/non-neurogenic neurogenic bladder can be associated with renal insufficiency. Monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis has no rise for development nephropathy.

  10. Reflux disease as an etiological factor of dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojšin Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Gastroesophageal reflux is a frequent disease which has a significant influence on the development of dental erosions. Objective The aim of this research was to determine the frequency of dental erosions among the patients with gastroesophageal reflux, as well as to verify the most common symptoms of gastroesophageal disease. Methods The research comprised of two groups, each consisting of 30 patients aged 18-80 years. The experimental group comprised of patients diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, while the control group was composed of patients who were not diagnosed with GERD. Based on the illness history data, all patients of the experimental group were registered to have gastroesophageal and extraesophageal symptoms. Dental erosions were diagnosed during a stomatological inspection by using index system according to Eccles and Jenkins. Data processing was accomplished by the Statgraphics Centurion software package. Results Dental erosions were found in 76.7% of experimental group patients, and in 53.3% of control group patients. Fortynine percent of teeth of the experimental group patients and 31.1% of the control group patients showed erosive changes. On average, the number of teeth with erosions in the experimental group was 15.7 per person and in the control group 10 per person. The teeth of the front region of the upper jaw, as well as the lower first molars had the highest average value of dental erosion index. In the experimental group 12.8% of teeth and 24% of teeth in the control group were diagnosed to have dental erosion index value 1. Furthermore, 23.4% of teeth in the experimental group and 7.1% of teeth in the control group were registered to have dental erosion index value 2. Finally, the dental erosion index value 3 was found in 13.0% of teeth in the experimental group only. The highest average value of regional erosion index in the experimental group was found in the region 13-23 equalling 1

  11. [Gastroesophageal reflux: clinical, endoscopic characteristics and associated risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelo Vega, Jean Marcel; Olivera Hermoza, Rogers; Páucar Sotomayor, Héctor; Flores Aldea, Juan Carlos

    2003-01-01

    We performed a case control study to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics, and identify the risk factors associated to gastroesophageal reflux among patients of the gastroenterology unit at the HNSE EsSalud - Cusco. There were included 645 patients with endoscopic diagnosis of esophagitis between january 1, 1999 and december 31, 2000. Afterwards, we selected a sample of 125 cases and 124 non related matched controls. The statistical profiles about gastroesophageal reflux, the digestive endoscopy service digests and the clinic histories of patients were reviewed; and the case and control samples were interviewed namelessly with their previous consent. Gastroesophageal reflux esophagitis was the diagnosis in 13% of endoscopies at the study period, with a little predominance in males (65%) and a middle age of 51,64. A 39,8% of cases concern of university proffesional patients. The main symptom was dyspepsia (84,18%) followed by the clasic clinical markers pirosis (44%) and regurgitation (30%), and nondigestive symptoms were unfrecuent (9%). Esophagitis was diagnosted mainly at mild stages of the disease (94% of cases) and we demonstrated an statistical association between esophagitis and hiatal hernia in the 32% of cases (pAINES (OR:19,36 and IC: 2,65-396,73) and coffee (OR:4,39 and IC: 1,72-11,65), and overweight (OR: 2,60 and IC: 2,60-6,78); the math associated factors were consumption of cigarretes, alcohol, mint and fatty food, postprandial liying position and taking of drugs such as benzodiacepines, calcium channel blockers and nitrates. The remaining factors have had not any kind of relation.

  12. The effect of itopride combined with lansoprazole in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Byung-Joon; Lee, Dong-Soo

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the efficacy of adding a prokinetic agent to proton pump inhibitors (PPI) for the treatment of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) disease. A prospective, randomized open trial comparing lansoprazole plus itopride to lansoprazole single therapy was performed for 12 weeks. Sixty-four patients with a reflux finding score (RFS) >7 and a reflux symptom index (RSI) >13 were enrolled and received either lansoprazole 30 mg once daily with itopride 50 mg three times daily or lansoprazole 30 mg once daily for 12 weeks. RSI and RFS were completed at baseline, after 6 weeks, and after 12 weeks. During the treatment period, RSI and RFS were significantly improved compared with the pretreatment scores in both study groups. Reductions of total RSI and globus symptom were significantly higher in the lansoprazole plus itopride group compared to the lansoprazole group. In the RFS, however, there were no significant differences between the two groups. In conclusion, itopride in addition to PPI did not show any superior RFS improvement compared to PPI single therapy, but was helpful in speeding up relief of reflux symptoms in LPR patients. Thus, itopride may be considered as the secondary additive agent in the PPI treatment of LPR patients.

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux - correlation between diagnostic methods; Refluxo gastroesofagico - correlacao entre metodos diagnosticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Maria das Gracas de Almeida; Penas, Maria Exposito; Fonseca, Lea Mirian Barbosa [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia-Medicina Nuclear; Lemme, Eponina Maria O. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Clinia Medica-Gastroenterologia; Martinho, Maria Jose Ribeiro [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear

    1999-02-01

    A group of 97 individuals with typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was submitted to gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy (GES) and compared to the results obtained from endoscopy, histopathology and 24 hours pHmetry. Twenty-four healthy individuals were used as a control group and they have done only the GERS. The results obtained showed that: (a) the difference in the reflux index (RI) for the control group and the sick individuals was statistically significant (p < 0.0001); (b) the correlation between GERS and the other methods showed the following results: sensitivity, 84%; specificity, 95%; positive predictive value, 98%; negative predictive value, 67%; accuracy, 87%. We have concluded that the scintigraphic method should be used to confirm the diagnosis of GERD and also recommended as initial investiative procedure. (author)

  14. Grading of vesicoureteral reflux by radionuclide cystography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fretzayas, A.; Karpathios, T.; Dimitriou, P.; Nicolaidou, P.; Matsaniotis, N.

    1984-03-01

    Thirty-six children with urinary tract infection aged 6 months to 14 years (mean age 4 1/2 years) were studied sequentially using direct radionuclide (RNC) and conventional voiding cystourethrography (VCU). Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) was detected equally well by both methods. Twenty-seven refluxing ureters were foand by RNC, 23 by VCU and 22 by both methods. Radiologic grade of reflux may be determined approximately with the isotope technique from the volume of regurgitating urine und duration of reflux, at a much decreased radiation exposure. Residual urine was also measured by RNC and found to be higher in children with VUR. RNC is a reliable method for detecting and grading VUR and should effectively replace VCU as the follow-up examination of choice.

  15. Gaviscon and domperidon responsive apnea episodes associated with gastro-esophageal reflux disease in twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Huseyin; Eren, Abdulkadir; Kara, Semra

    2015-01-01

    The possible pathophysiology of the relationship between gastro-esophageal reflux disease and apnea of prematurity has been widely investigated. Various physiological protective reflex responses provide a plausible biological link between gastro-esophageal reflux and apnea of prematurity. It is uncertain whether or not there is a causal relationship between the two diseases. PATIENT'S FINDINGS: Twins were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit due to feeding problems. Physical examination was normal except for reticulated, blueviolet skin changes. Short apneic attacks occurred on the first day in twin 1 and on the second day in twin 2, and these were initially treated by stimulation and increased ambient O2 concentration. Then, we conducted methylxanthine and continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Laboratory and radiological analysis were normal. As gastro-esophageal reflux disease was thought to be the causes of the treatment-refractory apnea, therapy with gaviscon and domperidon was begun for both cases. Apneic attacks did not recur after gaviscon and domperidon therapy. Pharmacological therapy for gastro-esophageal reflux disease has not definitively been shown to be effective in improving symptoms and hence, should be reserved especially for infants with treatment refractory apnea episodes suspected as being gastro-esophageal reflux in premature infants.

  16. Proton pump inhibitor-refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease: challenges and solutions

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    Mermelstein J

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Mermelstein,1 Alanna Chait Mermelstein,2 Maxwell M Chait3 1Gasteroenterology and Nutrition Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA; 3Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA Abstract: A significant percentage of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD will not respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI therapy. The causes of PPI-refractory GERD are numerous and diverse, and include adherence, persistent acid, functional disorders, nonacid reflux, and PPI bioavailability. The evaluation should start with a symptom assessment and may progress to imaging, endoscopy, and monitoring of esophageal pH, impedance, and bilirubin. There are a variety of pharmacologic and procedural interventions that should be selected based on the underlying mechanism of PPI failure. Pharmacologic treatments can include antacids, prokinetics, alginates, bile acid binders, reflux inhibitors, and antidepressants. Procedural options include laparoscopic fundoplication and LINX as well as endoscopic procedures, such as transoral incisionless fundoplication and Stretta. Several alternative and complementary treatments of possible benefit also exist. Keywords: PPI failure, resistant GERD, acid-related diseases, gastroesophageal reflux disease, acid reflux, proton pump inhibitors

  17. Reduced quality of life in patients with non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease

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    Márcia Vargas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a highly prevalent condition in the Western world. It is a frequent cause of medical appointments and has a high impact on quality of life (QOL. This study aimed to assess health-related quality of life (HQ-QOL of patients with non-erosive gastroesophageal disease (NERD and compare their scores with the scores of patients with GERD symptoms and non-pathological acid reflux (non-NERD. Methods: We studied 42 patients with GERD symptoms—21 with positive pHmetry for acid reflux (NERD group and 21 with negative pHmetry for acid reflux (non-NERD group. We enrolled patients matched by age and gender. Patient inclusion criteria were based on clinical and endoscopic findings and pHmetry. All other major diseases having an impact on QOL were excluded as well as patients in regular use of proton pump inhibitors, prokinetics, histamine-2 receptor antagonists and anti-depressants. All subjects were asked to fill in a validated translation of the SF-36 questionnaire. We described scores trough median and interquartile range (IQR and assessed the significance of the comparisons through Mann-Whitney test and chi-square test or Student’s t-test when appropriate. Results: We found no significant differences in the eight domains of SF-36 between the two groups. Conclusion: QOL of patients with GERD symptoms was equivalent, regardless of acid reflux at pHmetry. Keywords: SF-36; quality of life; gastroesophageal reflux; pHmetry

  18. Cystic Fibrosis and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Asim; Pauwels, Ans

    2017-11-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is common in children and adults with cystic fibrosis (CF). Pathological gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is also frequent in patients of all ages with CF. This article reviews the pathophysiology, diagnostic work-up, management options, complications, and future directions in the evaluation and management of GERD - unique to and pertinent for - patients with CF in particular. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative study of two modes of gastroesophageal reflux measuring: conventional esophageal pH monitoring and wireless pH monitoring

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    Rimon Sobhi Azzam

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Esophageal pH monitoring is considered to be the gold standard for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal acid reflux. However, this method is very troublesome and considerably limits the patient's routine activities. Wireless pH monitoring was developed to avoid these restrictions. OBJECTIVE: To compare the first 24 hours of the conventional and wireless pH monitoring, positioned 3 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter, in relation to: the occurrence of relevant technical failures, the ability to detect reflux and the ability to correlate the clinical symptoms to reflux. METHODS: Twenty-five patients referred for esophageal pH monitoring and with typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease were studied prospectively, underwent clinical interview, endoscopy, esophageal manometry and were submitted, with a simultaneous initial period, to 24-hour catheter pH monitoring and 48-hour wireless pH monitoring. RESULTS: Early capsule detachment occurred in one (4% case and there were no technical failures with the catheter pH monitoring (P = 0.463. Percentages of reflux time (total, upright and supine were higher with the wireless pH monitoring (P < 0.05. Pathological gastroesophageal reflux occurred in 16 (64% patients submitted to catheter and in 19 (76% to the capsule (P = 0.355. The symptom index was positive in 12 (48% patients with catheter pH monitoring and in 13 (52% with wireless pH monitoring (P = 0.777. CONCLUSIONS: 1 No significant differences were reported between the two methods of pH monitoring (capsule vs catheter, in regard to relevant technical failures; 2 Wireless pH monitoring detected higher percentages of reflux time than the conventional pH-metry; 3 The two methods of pH monitoring were comparable in diagnosis of pathological gastroesophageal reflux and comparable in correlating the clinical symptoms with the gastroesophageal reflux.

  20. Impact of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms on health resource usage and work absenteeism in Spain Impacto de los síntomas de reflujo gastroesofágico sobre el uso de servicios sanitarios y el absentismo laboral en España

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    E. Rey

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to estimate the impact of gastroesophageal reflux (GER symptoms on the utilization of healthcare services and work absenteeism in Spain. Methods: a cross-sectional study on 2,500 subjects representative of the Spanish population from 40 to 79 years of age. Data were collected via a telephone interview in January 2002 using Locke's questionnaire after its cross-cultural adaptation and validation for telephone use in Spain. Results: GER is responsible for 296.8 doctor consultations (95% CI: 245.3-348.7 per 1,000 inhabitants per year, for 24 esophagogastrointestinal radiographic studies per 1,000 inhabitants per year (95% CI: 18-30, for 32.4 (95% CI: 25.5-39.3 high digestive endoscopies per 1,000 inhabitants per year, and for the loss of 201 (95% CI: 0-411.1 working days per 1,000 employed inhabitants with GER per year. In relation to medication intake, GER resulted in 4,092 (95% CI: 3,300-5,133 treatment days with H2 antagonists per 1,000 inhabitants per year, 9,030 (95% CI: 7,846-10,332 treatment days with proton pump inhibitors per 1,000 inhabitants per year, and 1,082 (95% CI: 519-1,549 treatment days with prokinetics per 1,000 inhabitants per year. Conclusions: GER has a large impact on the utilization of healthcare resources and work absenteeism in Spain, in contrast to the widespread belief that it is an illness of little importance.

  1. Reflux-cough syndrome: Assessment of temporal association between reflux episodes and cough bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herregods, T. V. K.; Pauwels, A.; Tack, J.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundGastro-esophageal reflux can be the cause of chronic cough. In the assessment of the temporal association between reflux and cough, previous studies have used a two-minute time window, based on studies in patients with heartburn. However, it remains unclear whether the optimal time window

  2. High incidence of vesicoureteric reflux in asymptomatic siblings of children with known reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treves, S.T.; Van den Abbeele, A.D.; Davis, R.T.; Rosen, P.; Bauer, S.; Retik, A.; Colodny, A.

    1985-01-01

    A significant occurrence of vesicoureteric reflux in siblings of children with reflux has been previously suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of vesicoureteric reflux in asymptomatic siblings of children with vesicoureteric reflux using radionuclide voiding cystography (RNC). A random group of 52 siblings was studied. Their ages were from 2 mos. to 13 yrs. (mean 4 yrs.). Seventy-one percent were female and 29% male, RNC was performed with the patients supine, and Tc-99m pertechnetate (2mCi/1) was infused into the bladder by catheter. A computerized gamma camera recorded the filling and voiding phase of the study at 1 frame/5 sec. Reflux was detected in 40% of the patients. It was bilateral in 17% and unilateral in 23% of the patients. Reflux was identified to the renal pelves in half of the patients. In two of these patients Tc-99m DMSA scans were obtained which revealed significant renal scarring. This study demonstrates the high incidence of reflux of various degrees in these asymptomatic siblings on high risk of developing significant renal disease. Identification and proper treatment of asymptomatic children with vesicoureteric reflux may help prevent the development of renal damage

  3. Primary vesicoureteral reflux in Sudanese children

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    El-Tigani M. A. Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR is a common congenital renal tract anomaly in children. Reports from Sudan are scanty. We report the characteristics, presentation and outcome of primary VUR in a tertiary care hospital. The records of 30 patients (16 males; 53% followed-up between January 2004 and December 2010 were reviewed. The mean age at the time of diagnosis was 4 ± 3.9 years and 47% were <2 years of age. Renal ultrasound scan (USS failed to predict VUR in 17% of the patients. On voiding cysturethrogram (VCUG, VUR was bilateral in 57% and severe grade in 64%. Grades were not significantly associated with age, gender or site of VUR. Initial dimercaptosuccinic acid radionuclide scan showed renal damage in 61.5% of the patients. Renal damage was significantly associated with female gender and severe VUR, but not with age of onset or history of urinary tract infection (UTI. Thirteen patients (43.3% presented with acute UTI, eight (26.6% with non-specific urinary tract symptoms and nine (30% with persistently elevated serum creatinine. Urine cultures were positive in 73% of patients, and E. coli was the most common pathogen. Renal impairment at presentation was significantly associated with bilateral severe VUR and history of UTI but not age or gender. After a mean follow-up period of 1.78 years (6 months to 5 years, 70% of patients remained with normal renal function and 30% progressed to chronic kidney disease; two of them died. In conclusion, our data is different from many studies. Features of primary VUR in Sudanese children are late age of onset, equal gender affection and predominance of severe grade. Presentation is associated with a high rate of UTI, renal damage and advanced renal impairment. Measures to improve early detection and treatment of VUR may reduce the risk of kidney damage.

  4. [Recommended diet for reflux spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Valter Nilton; Viebig, Ricardo Guilherme

    2003-01-01

    The spectrophotometric probe, which uses bilirubin as a marker for the detection of duodenoesophagic reflux is subject to interference from strongly colored foods, which can cause erroneously high bilirubin absorbance readings. To overcome this problem it is necessary to ingest a diet that is free from such substances. To test the absorbance of 48 different food substances in an in vitro environment. Dry foods were blended with water or milk and non-dry solid foods were blended undiluted. It was utilized the proper calibration recipient to test them. The absorbance of weakly colored foods was usually lesser than the commonly accepted threshold of 0.14, and the absorbance of strongly colored foods was usually above this. Thirty-two from the 48 substances tested are suitable when the absorbance threshold is set at 0.14, but scrambled eggs, lacteous flour mush, green beans, beetroot, carrot, chayote, squash, "baroa" potato, boiled corn, orange, cashew, purple grape, avocado, mango, papaya and peach can alter the results and must be avoided. From the foods evaluated, enough are suitable at the 0.14 threshold to enable a suitable diet to be constructed for most patients during Bilitec studies.

  5. Bladder Dysfunction and Vesicoureteral Reflux

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    Ulla Sillén

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this overview the influence of functional bladder disturbances and of its treatment on the resolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR in children is discussed. Historically both bladder dysfunction entities, the overactive bladder (OAB and the dysfunctional voiding (DV, have been described in conjunction with VUR. Treatment of the dysfunction was also considered to influence spontaneous resolution in a positive way. During the last decades, however, papers have been published which could not support these results. Regarding the OAB, a prospective study with treatment of the bladder overactivity with anticholinergics, did not influence spontaneous resolution rate in children with a dysfunction including also the voiding phase, DV and DES (dysfunctional elimination syndrome, most studies indicate a negative influence on the resolution rate of VUR in children, both before and after the age for bladder control, both with and without treatment. However, a couple of uncontrolled studies indicate that there is a high short-term resolution rate after treatment with flow biofeedback. It should be emphasized that the voiding phase dysfunctions (DV and DES are more severe than the genuine filling phase dysfunction (OAB, with an increased frequency of UTI and renal damage in the former groups. To be able to answer the question if treatment of bladder dysfunction influence the resolution rate of VUR in children, randomized controlled studies must be performed.

  6. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease and connective tissue dysplasia in aspect of premorbid and comorbid disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhulaĭ, G S; Sekareva, E V; Dzhulaĭ, T E

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the phenotypic and visceral signs of connective tissue dysplasia (CTD) and comorbid diseases of the digestive system in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients with different types of esophageal reflux as the predictors of its variants. In 124 patients with GERD the clinical features, phenotypic and visceral signs of undifferentiated CTD were studied in details. In 82.0% of patients with GERD associated with gastroesophageal type of reflux (GER) phenotypic and especially visceral signs of STD were detected, mainly in the form of cardiochalasia and hiatal hernia. In patients with duodenogastroesophageal reflux symptoms (DGER) the signs of STD were marked in 42.0% of cases, mostly in the form of biliary tract structure abnormalities. The risk of GERD associated with prevalence of GER, was 11.9 times higher in the presence of diagnostically meaningful combination of 6 or more signs of STD than in patients with DGER. Realization of predictor options in GER occurs in the preference of sharp, acidic foods, spices, taking medications that reduce lower esophageal sphincter tone. GERD, associated with DGER, is formed in patients with family history of diseases of the biliary tract and in the preference of food rich of calories. Study of STD symptoms as predictors of structural development of GERD and its variants is prospective to predict disease, choice of profession and eating behavior, primarily in young adults.

  7. Therapeutic efficacy of digital music gastric electrical pacing for refractory functional dyspepsia concomitant with non-erosive reflux disease

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    Ya-mei RAN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the clinical efficacy of digital music gastric electrical pacing for refractory functional dyspepsia concomitant with non-erosive reflux disease, and its effects on mental health and life-quality of the patients. Methods According to the Rome Ⅲ criteria and Montreal consensus in diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease, 50 patients with concomitant refractory functional dyspepsia and non-erosive reflux disease were recruited. The clinical efficacy of digital music gastric electrical pacing were evaluated using the score of clinical symptoms before treatment and 15 days after treatment, and the mental health and life-quality of patients were assessed using symptom checklist 90. Results Main symptoms, including upper abdominal pain, abdominal fullness, early satiety, belching, hiccup, nausea, heartburn, acid reflux (daytime, nocturnal acid reflux, loss of appetite and sleep, were significantly improved 15 days after treatment compared with those of pre-treatment, and there were statistically significant differences (all P<0.005. The significant response rate/response rate (efficacy rate were 59.0%/100.0%, 59.3%/96.3%, 47.0%/94.1%, 61.3%/96.8 %, 86.7%/100.0%, 80.0%/100.0%, 64.3%/92.9%, 73.7%/89.5%, 64.3%/85.7%, 90.0%/90.0%, 36.7%/93.3% respectively. After treatment for 15 days, the overall response rate of symptom relief was 94.4% in patients and the overall significant response rate was 65.7%. The symptom scores of somatization, obsessive-compulsiveness, depression, and anxiety were significantly improved, and the differences were statistically significant (all P<0.01. Conclusion The clinical efficacy of digital music gastric electrical pacing is significant for refractory functional dyspepsia concomitant with nonerosive reflux disease, and it is expected to be a new option for the treatment of this disease complex. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.03.08

  8. Phonetic Approaches of Laryngopharyngeal Reflux Disease: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechien, Jérôme R; Delvaux, Véronique; Huet, Kathy; Khalife, Mohamad; Fourneau, Anne-Françoise; Piccaluga, Myriam; Harmegnies, Bernard; Saussez, Sven

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to explore the impact of the selection of the analyzed time interval on the significance of acoustic measurements used to investigate laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) treatment efficacy, and based on these results to develop an alternative statistical approach in data analysis focusing on individual patient vocal behavior. This is a prospective case series. From September 2013 to July 2015, 41 patients with a reflux finding score (RFS) > 7 and a reflux symptom index (RSI) > 13 were enrolled and treated with pantoprazole 20 mg twice daily and diet behavioral changes for 3 months. Voice recordings were performed at baseline and after 3 months of treatment. Most stable time intervals of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 seconds, and a 1-second time interval positioned at mid-production, were subjected to acoustic analysis. Based on the latter, we developed an "informativeness coefficient" for each acoustic parameter that aimed at assessing its sensitivity to clinical resolution in the case of LPR disease. Significant clinical improvement (RSI and RFS) was observed after treatment (P < 0.05). The acoustic analysis revealed that acoustic parameters significantly improving from pre- to posttreatment varied across time intervals. The duration and the position of the analyzed time interval in the production yielded considerable differences in the results. Analysis of the informativeness coefficient indicated that jitter, jitter percent, relative average perturbation (RAP), pitch perturbation quotient (PPQ), shimmer (ShdB), shimmer percent (Shim), amplitude perturbation quotient (APQ), and smoothed amplitude perturbation quotient (sAPQ) were the indices most sensitive to medical treatment efficacy, with a coefficient ranging from 75.86% to 86.21%. Depending on the selection of the time interval over which the acoustic parameters are measured, the potential effect of the treatment may or may not be statistically demonstrated. Future studies are needed to

  9. Effect of liquid meals with different volumes on gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Keng-Liang; Rayner, Christopher K; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chiu, King-Wah; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Chiu, Cheng-Tang

    2014-03-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are often advised to avoid large meals, based on their complaints of increased symptoms after eating too much, and epidemiological evidence of a link between high volume intake and the presence of GERD. However, the precise effects of meal volume on gastroesophageal reflux have not been well studied. We aimed to clarify the effect of meal volume on acid regurgitation and symptoms in patients with GERD. Fifteen patients (10 female, 5 male; mean 54 ± 10 years old) with GERD were studied twice each in random order, during 24 h ambulatory pH monitoring. On one day, they consumed a 600 mL liquid test meal three times (breakfast, lunch, and dinner), and on the other, they consumed a 300 mL test meal six times (breakfast, snack, lunch, snack, dinner, and snack). Gastric fundus and antral areas and antral contractions were measured by transabdominal ultrasound. Symptoms were recorded using questionnaires. During the 600 mL regimen, there were more reflux episodes (17 ± 4 vs 10 ± 2, P = 0.03) and a greater total acid reflux time (12.5 ± 5.9% vs 5.5 ± 3.6%; P = 0.045) than the 300 mL regimen. Both the cross-sectional area of the gastric fundus (P = 0.024) and the number of antral contractions (P = 0.014) were greater for the 600 mL regimen. Larger meals are associated with distension of the gastric fundus and an increase in gastroesophageal reflux when compared with smaller, more frequent meals.

  10. Management of vesicoureteral reflux in neurogenic bladder

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    Charlotte Q. Wu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR is a significant risk factor for pyelonephritis and renal scarring. VUR can occur through a defective ureterovesical junction (UVJ or an overwhelmed normal UVJ mechanism such as in bladder dysfunction of congenital, acquired, or behavioral etiology. There are numerous causes for the development of a neurogenic bladder from spinal dysraphisms to spinal cord trauma and even centrally based abnormalities in children with apparently normal motor function (inappropriately termed nonneurogenic neurogenic bladder. The foundation of managing reflux in these neurogenic bladders is to maintain low bladder pressures which will commonly mean that compliance will be normal as well. There have been several publications that have shown that if bladder pressures are lowered simply with clean intermittent catheterization and medications that the reflux can resolve spontaneously. Alternatively, the patients that are in need of bladder augmentation can have spontaneous resolution of their reflux with the resulting increase in capacity. Surgical intervention is called for when bladder capacity is adequate and the reflux persists or if it is part of a larger operation to increase capacity and to manage outlet resistance. In some instances, reimplantation is necessary because the ureters interfere with the bladder neck procedure. Aside from open and robotic surgical intervention the use of endoscopic injectable agents is beginning to become more popular especially when combined with intravesical botulinum toxin A injections. Great strides are being made in the management of patients with neurogenic bladders and we are seeing more choices for the urologist to be able to manage these patients.

  11. A cross-syndrome cohort comparison of sleep disturbance in children with Smith-Magenis syndrome, Angelman syndrome, autism spectrum disorder and tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickett, J; Heald, M; Oliver, C; Richards, C

    2018-03-01

    Sleep disturbance is common in children with neurodevelopmental disorders, with high rates identified in children with Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), Angelman syndrome (AS), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Phenotypic sleep profiles for these groups may implicate different pathways to sleep disturbance. At present, cross-group comparisons that might elucidate putative phenotypic sleep characteristics are limited by measurement differences between studies. In this study, a standardised questionnaire was administered across groups affording comparison of the prevalence and profile of sleep disturbance between groups and contrast to chronologically age-matched typically developing (TD) peers. The modified version of Simonds and Parraga's sleep questionnaire, adapted for use in children with intellectual disabilities, was employed to assess sleep disturbance profiles in children aged 2-15 years with SMS (n = 26), AS (n = 70), ASD (n = 30), TSC (n = 20) and a TD contrast group (n = 47). Associations between sleep disturbance and age, obesity, health conditions and overactivity/impulsivity were explored for each neurodevelopmental disorder group. Children with SMS displayed severe night waking (81%) and early morning waking (73%). In contrast, children with ASD experienced difficulties with sleep onset (30%) and sleep maintenance (43%). Fewer children with ASD (43%) and AS (46%) experienced severe night waking compared to children with SMS (both p sleep-disordered breathing scores were identified for children with SMS (p Sleep disturbance in children with AS and TSC was associated with poorer health. Children experiencing symptoms indicative of gastro-oesophageal reflux had significantly higher sleep-disordered breathing scores in the AS, SMS and ASD groups (all p sleep disturbance were found for certain groups. These data reveal syndrome-specific profiles of sleep disturbance. The divergent associations

  12. Radionuclide scintigraphy in the evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux in symptomatic and asymptomatic pre-term infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morigeri, C.; Mukhopadhyay, K.; Narang, A. [Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Division of Neonatology, Department of Paediatrics, Chandigarh (India); Bhattacharya, A.; Mittal, B.R. [Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chandigarh (India)

    2008-09-15

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is very common in pre-term infants. The diagnosis based on symptoms is always questionable. The incidence of GER in symptomatic babies varies from 22% to 85%, but literature regarding the incidence of reflux in asymptomatic pre-term infants is lacking. We used radionuclide scintigraphy to evaluate the incidence of GER in symptomatic as well as asymptomatic pre-term neonates and to assess whether symptoms have any relation with positive scintigraphy. We studied 106 pre-term infants (52 symptomatic, 54 asymptomatic) of less than 34 weeks of gestation, who fulfilled the eligibility criteria. Babies were considered symptomatic in the presence of vomiting, regurgitation, apnea, de-saturations, unexplained bradycardia and recurrent lung collapses. Radionuclide scintigraphy was conducted at post-conceptional age of 32-34 weeks when they were clinically stable for 72 h. Feeding was avoided for 2 h preceding the study. {sup 99m}Tc sulphur colloid was administered in a dose of 1.85 MBq (0.05 mCi) in 1 ml, followed by milk (full feed) through an orogastric tube, prior to imaging under a gamma camera. Reflux was graded as low or high, and reflux episodes during the study were counted. The incidence of GER in the symptomatic group was 71.2% and in asymptomatic babies 61.1% (p=0.275). High-grade reflux was more common (71.4%) than low-grade (28.6%) in both groups (p=0.449). Mean number of reflux episodes in 20 min was 4.4{+-}2.4 in symptomatic babies and 4.9 {+-}2.2 in asymptomatic babies (p=0.321). Babies with positive scintigraphy were similar in birth weight, gestation, time to achieve full feeds, weight and age at discharge to those with negative scintigraphy. GER is common in pre-term infants of less than 34 weeks gestation. The incidence of positive scintigraphy and grade of reflux is not significantly different in symptomatic vs. asymptomatic babies. Though radionuclide scintigraphy is a simple, quick and non-invasive investigation in

  13. Reflux and GERD in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... when the infant begins to show symptoms including refusal to feed, poor weight gain, breathing problems and ... medical advice. It is not a substitute for care by a trained medical provider. GIKids is not ...

  14. Infant Gastroesophageal Reflux Information on the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgowan, Regina; Greer, Leah C; D'Auria, Jennifer P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the type and quality of health information about infant gastroesophageal reflux (GER) that a parent may find on the World Wide Web. The data collection tool included evaluation of Web site quality and infant GER-specific content on the 30 sites that met the inclusion criteria. The most commonly found content categories in order of frequency were management strategies, when to call a primary care provider, definition, and clinical features. The most frequently mentioned strategies included feeding changes, infant positioning, and medications. Thirteen of the 30 Web sites included information on both GER and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Mention of the use of medication to lessen infant symptoms was found on 15 of the 30 sites. Only 10 of the 30 sites included information about parent support and coping strategies. Pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) should utilize well-child visits to address the normalcy of physiologic infant GER and clarify any misperceptions parents may have about diagnosis and the role of medication from information they may have found on the Internet. It is critical for PNPs to assist in the development of Web sites with accurate content, advise parents on how to identify safe and reliable information, and provide examples of high-quality Web sites about child health topics such as infant GER. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Type II Diabetes Mellitus

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    Huihui Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM were known to have higher prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in the Western countries, but data on the impact of GERD on DM patients in our country are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients in Shanghai, China, and to explore its possible risk factors. Methods. 775 type II DM cases were randomly collected. Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ was used to check the presence of GERD. Patients’ characteristics, laboratory data, face-to-face interview, nerve conduction study, and needle electromyogram (EMG test were analyzed. Results. 16% patients were found with typical GERD symptoms. Pathophysiological factors such as peripheral neuropathy, metabolism syndrome, and obesity were found to have no significant differences between GERD and non-GERD type II DM patients in the present study. Conclusion. The prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients is higher than that in adult inhabitants in Shanghai, China. No difference in pathophysiological factors, such as peripheral neuropathy, and metabolism syndrome was found in DM-GERD patients, suggesting that further study and efforts are needed to explore deeper the potential risk factors for the high prevalence rate of GERD in DM patients.

  16. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Alkaline Reflux: the Mechanisms of the Development and Therapeutic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.D. Zviahintseva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD — a pathology, which occupies a leading place among all acid-related diseases. The main mechanism of GERD is a violation of the motor-evacuation function of the stomach — slowing gastric emptying and duodenogastric reflux. Slow gastric emptying contributes to more frequent reflux, and the presence of duodenal contents in refluxate — alkaline reflux — is aggressive for the esophageal mucosa (EM. This is due to the presence of bile acids, lysolecithin and pancreatic enzymes in the esophageal refluxate. A long existing contact of aggressive factors in the stomach and the esophagus leads to the development of inflammatory and destructive lesions of the mucous membrane of these organs. According to many researchers, bile acids play a key role in the pathogenesis of the damaging effects on the EM. Drug correction of GERD with alkaline reflux includes, along with the administration of proton pump inhibitors, prokinetics (itopride hydrochloride and ursodeoxycholic acid preparations.

  17. Comorbidities in severe asthma: frequency of rhinitis, nasal polyposis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, vocal cord dysfunction and bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Bisaccioni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Severe asthma is found in approximately 10% of patients with asthma. Some factors associated with worse asthma control include rhinitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, vocal cord dysfunction (VCD, nasal polyposis and bronchiectasis. Therefore, we evaluated the prevalence of these illnesses in patients with severe asthma. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of data obtained from electronic medical records of patients with severe asthma between January 2006 and June 2008. Symptoms of rhinitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease were evaluated as well as intolerance to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. We evaluated the results of esophagogastroduodenoscopy, videolaryngoscopy and CT scans of the chest in order to confirm gastroesophageal reflux disease, nasal polyposis, vocal cord dysfunction and bronchiectasis. RESULTS: We evaluated 245 patients. Rhinitis symptoms were present in 224 patients (91.4%; 18 (7.3% had intolerance to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and 8 (3.3% had nasal polyposis. Symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease were reported for 173 (70.6% patients, although the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease was confirmed based on esophagogastroduodenoscopy or laryngoscopy findings in just 58 (33.6% patients. Vocal cord dysfunction was suspected in 16 (6.5% and confirmed through laryngoscopy in 4 (1.6%. The patient records provided CT scans of the chest for 105 patients, and 26 (24.8% showed bronchiectasis. DISCUSSION: Rhinitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease were the most common comorbidities observed, in addition to bronchiectasis. Therefore, in patients with severe asthma, associated diseases should be investigated as the cause of respiratory symptoms and uncontrolled asthma.

  18. A Modern Magnetic Implant for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Robert A

    2017-09-01

    A magnetic implant for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was Food and Drug Administration-approved in 2012 and has been extensively evaluated. The device is a ring of magnets that are placed around the gastroesophageal junction, augmenting the native lower esophageal sphincter and preventing reflux yet preserving lower esophageal sphincter physiologic function and allowing belching and vomiting. Magnetic force is advantageous, being permanent and precise, and forces between magnets decrease with esophageal displacement. Multiple patient cohorts have been studied using the magnetic device, and trials establish consistent, long-term improvement in pH data, GERD symptom scores, and proton-pump inhibitor use. A 5-year Food and Drug Administration trial demonstrated that most patients achieved normal pH scores, 85% stopped proton-pump inhibitors, and GERD health-related quality of life symptom scores improved from 27 to 4 at 5 years. Seven studies have compared magnetic augmentation with laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication and demonstrated that the magnetic device achieved comparable efficacy with regard to proton-pump inhibitor cessation, GERD symptom score improvement, and heartburn and regurgitation scores. However, to date there have been no randomized, controlled trials comparing the 2 techniques, and the study cohorts are not necessarily comparable regarding hiatal hernia size, severity of reflux, body mass index scores, or esophagitis scores. Dysphagia incidence was similar in both groups. Reoperation rates and safety profiles were also comparable, but the magnetic device demonstrated significant beneficial differences in allowing belching and vomiting. The magnetic device is safe, with the main adverse event being dysphagia with an approximate 3%-5% chronic incidence. Device removals in clinical trials have been between 0% and 7% and were uneventful. There have been no erosions, perforations, or infections in FDA clinical trials

  19. Vesicoureteral reflux and continuous prophylactic antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR management must be tailored based on the risk for further infections and renal scarring, gender, likelihood of spontaneous resolution, and parental preferences. Because we now understand that sterile VUR is benign and most reflux spontaneously resolves over time, the initial approach in majority of children is non-surgical with continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP and correction of bladder and bowel dysfunction. Despite increasing utilization of CAP over the past four decades, the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis has been questioned due to conflicting results of studies plagued with design flaws and inadequate subject sample size. The Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux (RIVUR trial, which was designed to address many of the limitations from previous studies, provided much needed answers. In this review, we sought to describe the controversy surrounding VUR management, highlight the results of RIVUR trial, and discuss how the RIVUR findings impact our understanding of CAP in the management of VUR.

  20. Vesical-ureteral reflux in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desvignes, V.; Palcoux, J.B.; Cochat, P.

    1995-01-01

    The vesical-ureteral reflux is the most frequent uropathy in children. The diagnosis is made by uretero-cystography, often after pyelonephritis, sometimes after ante-natal diagnosis from echographic abnormalities. Spontaneous recovery is possible in 50 to 80% of cases. This is especially true in grade 1, 2 and 3, however complications may occur. They are more frequent in the case of reflux nephropathy with a resulting risk of hypertension and chronic renal failure. The therapeutic choice is between the conservative management with urinary antiseptics ad the surgical treatment with ureters re-implantation or endoscopic treatment. The therapeutic indications take into account vesical-ureteral reflux grades, the child's age, the associated diseases and the child's and parents' compliance. (authors). 22 refs., 2 figs

  1. Intra-renal reflux: A new cause of medullary hyperechogenicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diard, F.; Nicolau, A.; Bernard, S.

    1987-02-01

    A 5-month-old infant with untreated severe urinary tract infection and bilateral vesico-ureteral reflux, had diffuse intrarenal reflux and hyperechogenicity of the medulla of two normal sized kidneys. We discuss the hyperechogenicity of the medulla in relationship to the intrarenal reflux.

  2. The association between reflux esophagitis and airway hyper-reactivity in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Karbasi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The association of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER with a wide variety of pulmonary disorders was recognized. We aimed to evaluate the effect of GER-induced esophagitis on airway hyper-reactivity (AHR in patients and the response to treatment. Materials and Methods: In this cohort study, 30 patients attending the gastrointestinal clinic of a university hospital with acid reflux symptoms were included. All patients were evaluated endoscopically and divided into case group with esophagitis and control group without any evidence of esophagitis. Spirometry and methacholine test were done in all patients before and after treatment of GER with pantoprazole 40 mg daily for six months. Results: There was a significant difference in the rate of positive methacholine test between the cases (40% and the controls (6.7% prior to anti-acid therapy (P < 0.0001. After six months of treatment, the frequency of positive methacholine test diminished from 40 to 13.3% in the case group (P < 0.05 but did not change in the controls (P = 0.15. Conclusion: The presence of esophagitis due to GER would increase the AHR and treatment with pantoperazole would decrease AHR in patients with proved esophagitis and no previous history of asthma after six months.

  3. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy for diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Michiomi; Aoki, Nobuhiko; Imura, Souichi; Eguchi, Hiroyuki; Tamamoto, Humihiko

    1995-01-01

    99m Tc-DTPA is a sensitive technique for the detection of gastro-esophageal reflux in children. Forty-eight children with gastro-esophageal reflux are scored by the results of the time activity curve of gastro-esophageal scintiscanning and the 24 hr esophageal pH tests. The score of gastro-esophageal scintiscanning is compared with the 24 hr esophageal pH score. There is a correlation in the score between the gastro-esophageal scintiscanning and the 24 hr esophageal pH test. (author)

  4. PRIMARY PREVENTION OF POSTOPERATIVE REFLUX DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Martynov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Creation of anastomoses between hollow organs of the abdominal cavity, retroperitoneal space and the small intestine always raises the question of the prevention of reflux from the small intestine into the cavity drained the esophagus, stomach, gallbladder, liver outer duct cysts of the liver and pancreas. After surgery, any reflux becomes pathological. Reflux – is an obligate precancer. So, throw the bile and pancreatic juices in the stomach, the stump of the stomach, esophagus contributes to reflux esophagitis, reflux gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer, or a stump. After an internal drainage of cavity formation in the small intestine develops postoperative reflux disease, which is caused by the actions of the surgeon who tried sincerely to help the patient. It is possible to give the definition of such states “Iatrogenic Postoperative Reflux Disease”.The aim of this work was to develop and put into practice a “cap” on the afferent loop of the small intestine, do not migrate into the gut lumen, with an internal cavity drainage structures of the abdominal cavity and retroperitoneal space and to evaluate clinical outcomes. As a result, the authors have developed a way to create a “cap” on a loop of the small intestine, which is used for the drainage of cavity formation, conducted research on its safety, proper functioning, accessibility, analyzed the clinical situation offers. For drainage of cavernous fistula formation impose between him and a loop of small intestine 40–50 cm from the Treitz ligament. Form a intestine anastomosis by Brown.Above this junction length leads to the formation of the drained portion of the small intestine is about 10 cm, in the middle of which impose a “stub”. Length of discharge from the drainage area of education of the small intestine to interintestinal Brownian anastomosis is about 30 cm. To form a “plug” free land use of the greater omentum, through which by puncture-poke perform

  5. A Comparison of Alkaline Water and Mediterranean Diet vs Proton Pump Inhibition for Treatment of Laryngopharyngeal Reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalvan, Craig H; Hu, Shirley; Greenberg, Barbara; Geliebter, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is a common disorder with protean manifestations in the head and neck. In this retrospective study, we report the efficacy of a wholly dietary approach using alkaline water, a plant-based, Mediterranean-style diet, and standard reflux precautions compared with that of the traditional treatment approach of proton pump inhibition (PPI) and standard reflux precautions. To determine whether treatment with a diet-based approach with standard reflux precautions alone can improve symptoms of LPR compared with treatment with PPI and standard reflux precautions. This was a retrospective medical chart review of 2 treatment cohorts. From 2010 to 2012, 85 patients with LPR that were treated with PPI and standard reflux precautions (PS) were identified. From 2013 to 2015, 99 patients treated with alkaline water (pH >8.0), 90% plant-based, Mediterranean-style diet, and standard reflux precautions (AMS) were identified. The outcome was based on change in Reflux Symptom Index (RSI). Recorded change in the RSI after 6 weeks of treatment. Of the 184 patients identified in the PS and AMS cohorts, the median age of participants in each cohort was 60 years (95% CI, 18-82) and 57 years (95% CI, 18-93), respectively (47 [56.3%] and 61 [61.7%] were women, respectively). The percentage of patients achieving a clinically meaningful (≥6 points) reduction in RSI was 54.1% in PS-treated patients and 62.6% in AMS-treated patients (difference between the groups, 8.05; 95% CI, -5.74 to 22.76). The mean reduction in RSI was 27.2% for the PS group and 39.8% in the AMS group (difference, 12.10; 95% CI, 1.53 to 22.68). Our data suggest that the effect of PPI on the RSI based on proportion reaching a 6-point reduction in RSI is not significantly better than that of alkaline water, a plant-based, Mediterranean-style diet, and standard reflux precautions, although the difference in the 2 treatments could be clinically meaningful in favor of the dietary approach. The

  6. Open access capture of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease using an online patient-reported outcomes instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielemans, Merel M.; Jansen, Jan Bmj; van Oijen, Martijn Gh

    2012-01-01

    Persons with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) frequently search online for information about causes and treatment options. The GerdQ self-assessment questionnaire can be used for diagnosis of GERD and follow-up of symptoms. To assess whether it is feasible (1) to study the prevalence and

  7. Reflux und Essstörungen - "Ein Fall für Zwei"

    OpenAIRE

    Imfeld, C; Imfeld, T

    2008-01-01

    The term erosion describes tooth wear caused by acids. Erosions can be a consequence of medical problems like gastroesophageal reflux disease or eating disorders which lead to a regular contact of gastric acid with teeth. These, so called intrinsic erosions occur in such typical locations within the dental arches that even in the absence of other symptoms gastric acid can be assumed to be the cause. Dental professionals may thus be the first to discover and diagnose the underlying medical pro...

  8. [Reflux disease and eating disorders--a case for teamwork].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imfeld, Carola; Imfeld, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    The term erosion describes tooth wear caused by acids. Erosions can be a consequence of medical problems like gastroesophageal reflux disease or eating disorders which lead to a regular contact of gastric acid with teeth. These, so called intrinsic erosions occur in such typical locations within the dental arches that even in the absence of other symptoms gastric acid can be assumed to be the cause. Dental professionals may thus be the first to discover and diagnose the underlying medical problem. A good cooperation between the physician and the dentist is consequently necessary for a causal treatment of the patient. Parallel to the therapy of the underlying disease practical dental prophylactic measures like chewing gum und fluoride rinses are recommended.

  9. [Usefulness of assessment of voice capabilities in female patients with reflux-related dysphonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siupsinskiene, Nora; Adamonis, Kestutis; Toohill, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    To analyze vocal capabilities in patients diagnosed with reflux related dysphonia versus controls with healthy voice with selection of the most informative discriminating quantitative parameters and to assess voice changes following treatment. Six parameters of voice range profile (VRP) and five parameters of speech range profile were taken and analyzed from 60 dysphonic outpatient females with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) diagnosed by reflux-related atypical and typical symptoms, videolaryngoscopic findings, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and positive response to empiric 3-month omeprazole treatment. Seventy-six females with healthy voice served as controls. All six parameters of voice range profile and three of 5 parameters of speech range profile showed significant differences comparing LPR patients with controls before omeprazole treatment (Prange to be the most informative parameter for discrimination between reflux-related dysphonic and healthy voices (overall prediction accuracy, 86.8%). A threshold value of significant parameter was stated using the receiver operating characteristic curve. Treatment with omeprazole significantly improved voice quality showing the greatest changes in the mean scores of majority of voice range profile parameters. Vocal capabilities, especially evaluated by voice range profile, are restricted in LPR female patients in comparison to subjects with healthy voice. Quantitative voice assessment with voice range profile may add more objective aspect for screening dysphonia and could be used as a criterion of evaluation of treatment efficacy in such patients.

  10. Prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux during First Year of Life in Infants Admitted in Pediatric Department of Imam Reza Hospital-Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Amirian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gastroesophageal reflux (GER is the most common of esophageal disorder in all ages.  GER defined as passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, and GER disease (GERD, (symptoms or complications of GER, are common pediatric problems. Clinical manifestations of GERD in infants include regurgitation, irritability, choking, gagging vomiting, poor weight gain and respiratory disorder. The purpose of this study is evaluation prevalence of Gastroesophageal reflux and its symptoms in infants during first year of life.   Materials and Method: This study was performed on 75 infants younger than one year old, who were admitted in pediatric department of Imam Reza Hospital in Mashhad during 3 months.   Results: In this study in a three- month period, GER was assessed in 75 infants younger than one year who were admitted in pediatric department of Imam Reza Hospital. Their parents reported GER in 66% of these infants. The most common symptom of reflux was regurgitation. Regurgitation was reported at least once a day to seven times a day. The other reported symptoms were respectively: irritability (16%, choking (10%, and failure to thrive (0.3%. Peak reported regurgitation was 60% at 3.5 months.   Conclusion: Gastroesophageal reflux is a common problem in infancy. Complaints of regurgitation are common during the first year of life. So understanding the symptoms of GER and recognition of GERD should be considred.   Keyword: Infant,Gastroesophageal Reflux, Prevalence. 

  11. Saliva transit in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiani, R A; Mota, G A; Aprile, L R O; Dantas, R O

    2015-10-01

    Saliva is an important factor in the neutralization of the acidity of the refluxed material that comes from the stomach to the esophagus. The impairment of saliva transit from oral cavity to distal esophagus may be one of the causes of esophagitis and symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). With the scintigraphic method, the transit of 2 mL of artificial saliva was measured in 30 patients with GERD and 26 controls. The patients with GERD had symptoms of heartburn and acid regurgitation, a 24-hour pH monitoring with more than 4.2% of the time with pH below four, 26 with erosive esophagitis, and four with non-erosive reflux disease. Fourteen had mild dysphagia for solid foods. Twenty-one patients had normal esophageal manometry, and nine had ineffective esophageal motility. They were 15 men and 15 women, aged 21-61 years, mean 39 years. The control group had 14 men and 12 women, aged 19-61 years, mean 35 years. The subjects swallowed in the sitting and supine position 2 mL of artificial saliva labeled with 18 MBq of (99m) Technetium phytate. The time of saliva transit was measured from oral cavity to esophageal-gastric transition, from proximal esophagus to esophageal-gastric transition, and the transit through proximal, middle, and distal esophageal body. There was no difference between patients and controls in the time for saliva to go from oral cavity to esophageal-gastric transition, and from proximal esophagus to esophageal-gastric transition, in the sitting and supine positions. In distal esophagus in the sitting position, the saliva transit duration was shorter in patients with GERD (3.0 ± 0.8 seconds) than in controls (7.6 ± 1.7 seconds, P = 0.03). In conclusion, the saliva transit from oral cavity to the esophageal-gastric transition in patients with GERD has the same duration than in controls. Saliva transit through the distal esophageal body is faster in patients with GERD than controls. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the

  12. Frequency distribution of gastro esophageal reflux disease in inhalation injury: A historical cohort study

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    Ashraf Karbasi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is no data on the prevalence and the association of gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD with toxic fume inhalation. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the frequency distribution of GERD symptoms among the individuals with mild respiratory disorder due to the past history of toxic fume exposure to sulfur mustard (SM. Materials and Methods: In a historical cohort study, subjects were randomly selected from 7000 patients in a database of all those who had a history of previous exposure to a single high dose of SM gas during war. The control group was randomly selected from adjacent neighbors of the patients, and two healthy male subjects were chosen per patient. In this study, we used the validated Persian translation of Mayo Gastroesophageal Reflux Questionnaire to assess the frequency distribution of reflux disease. Results: Relative frequency of GERD symptoms, was found to be significantly higher in the inhalation injury patients with an odds ratio of 8.30 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.73-14.55, and after adjustment for cigarette smoking, tea consumption, age, and body mass index, aspirin and chronic cough the odds ratio was found to be 4.41 (95% CI: 1.61-12.07. Conclusion: The most important finding of our study was the major GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation once or more per week among the individuals with the past history of exposure to SM toxic gas is substantially higher (4.4-fold than normal populations.

  13. Have we Overtreated Children with Vesicoureteric Reflux?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mn

    ABSTRACT. Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common serious bacterial infections in young children. These UTIs have a high association with vesicoureteric reflux (VUR). The pathophysiology of. VUR's renal sequelae, its investigation and management is presently undergoing a reassessment. This review ...

  14. Gastric Reflux on Routine Tc-99m DISIDA hepatobiliary Scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Wook; Lee, Heon Young [Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    Reflux of bile and digestive enzymes from the small bowel and duodenum into stomach has been observed in patients with various gastroduodenal diseases. Tc-99m iminodiacetic acid derivatives hepatobiliary scan has been used as a noninvasive method to detect duodenogastric reflux. Sometimes, gastric reflux can be observed incidentally on routine Tc-99m DISA hepatobiliary scintigraphy. To evaluate the clinical meaning of gastric reflux on routine Tc-99m DISIDA hepatobiliary scan, we analyzed 36 patients showed gastric reflux incidentally on the routine Tc-99m-DISIDA hepatobiliary scintigraphy from December 1991 to June 1995 in Chungnam National University Hospital. The results were as follows: 1) The gastric reflux was observed in 2.3% of 1,553 cases of routine Tc-99m DISIDA Hepatobiliary scintigraphy for 43 months. 2) Nineteen percent of patients with gastric reflux had the past medical history of operations on stomach or biliary system. And that history was more prevalent in patients with reflux than those without reflux, significantly (p<0.01). 3) On fiberoptic gastroduodenpscopic examination, 87% of the patients with gastric reflux had the gastroduodenal diseases such as gastritis, gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, duodenal cancer and ampullary diverticulosis. We thought that the gastric reflux can be observed considerably in patients without any operation history on stomach or duodenum, although the operation history is more prevalent in patients with gastric reflux than those without reflux, significantly and most of patients with gastric reflux on routine Tc-99m DISIDA scan has various gastroduodenal diseases.

  15. Gastric Reflux on Routine Tc-99m DISIDA hepatobiliary Scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Wook; Lee, Heon Young

    1995-01-01

    Reflux of bile and digestive enzymes from the small bowel and duodenum into stomach has been observed in patients with various gastroduodenal diseases. Tc-99m iminodiacetic acid derivatives hepatobiliary scan has been used as a noninvasive method to detect duodenogastric reflux. Sometimes, gastric reflux can be observed incidentally on routine Tc-99m DISA hepatobiliary scintigraphy. To evaluate the clinical meaning of gastric reflux on routine Tc-99m DISIDA hepatobiliary scan, we analyzed 36 patients showed gastric reflux incidentally on the routine Tc-99m-DISIDA hepatobiliary scintigraphy from December 1991 to June 1995 in Chungnam National University Hospital. The results were as follows: 1) The gastric reflux was observed in 2.3% of 1,553 cases of routine Tc-99m DISIDA Hepatobiliary scintigraphy for 43 months. 2) Nineteen percent of patients with gastric reflux had the past medical history of operations on stomach or biliary system. And that history was more prevalent in patients with reflux than those without reflux, significantly (p<0.01). 3) On fiberoptic gastroduodenpscopic examination, 87% of the patients with gastric reflux had the gastroduodenal diseases such as gastritis, gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, duodenal cancer and ampullary diverticulosis. We thought that the gastric reflux can be observed considerably in patients without any operation history on stomach or duodenum, although the operation history is more prevalent in patients with gastric reflux than those without reflux, significantly and most of patients with gastric reflux on routine Tc-99m DISIDA scan has various gastroduodenal diseases.

  16. COMPARISON OF SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF LEVOSULPIRIDE AND ITOPRIDE IN TREATMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Ibrahim Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD is a common condition caused by reflux of the liquid acidic contents of the stomach into the oesophagus. Prokinetic medications can be used to treat or control the disease. Such medications can have mild-toserious adverse effects. Levosulpiride and itopride are two such medications, which are used for treating GERD. The aim of the study is to assess the safety and efficacy of levosulpiride and itopride in the management of GERD and to study the side effects and treatment outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total 210 patients aged 18 to 90 years, 99 males and 111 females (male:female ratio of 1:1.1 with reflux oesophagitis were divided into three groups and an endoscopy test was done before starting treatment. The control group received rabeprazole and the two test groups received levosulpiride and itopride. Clinical adverse events were recorded at the end of week 1 and week 2. Following treatment, relief of symptoms was assessed at the end of 2 weeks. RESULTS There were total 210 patients (99 males and 111 females. The male-to-female ratio was 1:1.1. GERD was more common in the 31-50 year age group. Most common symptoms were of dyspepsia, regurgitation, vomiting and heartburn. Improvement of symptoms during the treatment was seen in 53% levosulpiride and 41% itopride patients, respectively. The main adverse effects were abdominal pain and nausea. The percentage of nausea was high with itopride than levosulpiride. CONCLUSION Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common problem frequently seen in both genders and in younger people. Symptomatic relief and endoscopic recovery is early with levosulpiride than itopride. Levosulpiride gives better quality of life earlier in the treatment than itopride and has lesser side effects and better healing outcome.

  17. Cornelia de Lange syndrome – characteristics and laparoscopic treatment modalities of reflux based on own material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Szyca

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cornelia de Lange syndrome (typus degenerativus amstelodamensis, CdLS, Brachmann syndrome is a complex, congenital,multi-gene anomaly characterized by mental retardation. Its features include growth inhibition, hirsutism,structural anomalies of the limbs and abnormal development of osseous structures of the face. Independent of thephenotype of the disease, 85% of patients are assumed to have symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease(GERD. Aspiration pneumonia is one of the complications of GERD and a main cause of death in these patients.Patients not responding to medical treatment qualify for surgery. Until recently, anti-reflux procedures for GERD inCdLS patients were performed solely via laparotomy. The contemporary gold standard is a procedure performedlaparoscopically. There are a few case reports of patients with CdLS operated on for GERD with laparoscopy availablein the literature. The goal of this paper is to present two cases of Cornelia de Lange syndrome treated with laparoscopicantireflux procedures. We have performed two such procedures in 14 and 16 year-old girls with typical symptomsof the syndrome, i.e. developmental and mental retardation, hirsutism, structural limb anomalies and abnormalface development. The main indications for surgery in both cases were ineffective medical treatment and persistentaspiration pneumonia and its complications as a result of the gastroesophageal reflux. Oesophageal hiatus herniaand reflux were confirmed with accessory tests in both cases. During 36 months of follow-up, according to Barents,no episode of oesophageal reflux with acidic gastric content was noted. The treated children slept well during thenight and did not need hospitalization for aspiration pneumonia. Neither of them required proton pump inhibitors. Itshould be concluded that laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is a safe and effective method of GERD treatment in childrenwith CdLS.

  18. [Preoperative workup to assess indication for laparoscopic treatment in gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Holanda, S; Urdiales, G L; Fernández, J A; España, L; Rodríguez-Rubio, J; Martínez, M D; Fernández, F; Tojo, S; Fernández-Muñiz, P; Calleja, M; Valverde, D

    2008-07-01

    antireflux surgery performed by an experienced surgeon is a maintenance option for patients with well-documented gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Well-documented GERD is difficult to find, as GERD is a multifactorial disease in which the gastroesophageal junction, with its special anatomical and functional components, is important. In order to examine patient preoperative workups, and their indication for surgical treatment in GERD, we retrospectively studied patients who underwent a laparoscopic antireflux procedure. preoperative workups in patients from our health care area who underwent a laparoscopic antireflux procedure from December 1997 to February 2007 were retrospectively analyzed. Data related to epidemiological findings, symptoms, morphologic and functional evaluation, medical therapy, and indication for surgical treatment were recorded and statistically analyzed by means of a bivariate test. Differences were significant when the p value was equal to or less than 0.05. 100 patients (50 % female, 51.31 +/- 13.53 years of age) underwent a laparoscopic antireflux surgery after 56.47 +/- 61.33 months with symptoms. Ninety-five percent of patients had an anatomical abnormality. The pH monitoring test diagnosed three quarters of cases. The most frequent indication for GERD treatment was persistent or recurrent esophagitis despite adequate medical treatment (52 cases). based on our preoperative workup, as described, 100 percent of subjects were well documented and diagnosed with GERD (both non-erosive reflux disease and erosive reflux disease), and their indication for laparoscopic treatment was retrospectively assessed in 94% of cases.

  19. Managing gastroesophageal reflux disease – comparative efficacy and outcomes of dexlansoprazole MR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frye JW

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jeanetta W Frye, David A Peura Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA, USA Abstract: The management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has been revolutionized with the development of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs. Unfortunately, due to the inherent pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of conventional PPIs, many patients continue to suffer from symptoms related to GERD despite appropriate use of PPIs. Dexlansoprazole MR is a PPI with a unique dual delayed-release delivery system that has been designed to address the unmet needs in GERD management. Specifically, dexlansoprazole MR addresses limitations with short plasma half-life and need for meal-associated dosing, characteristic of conventional PPIs. In addition, dexlansoprazole MR has been shown to be effective in several specific clinical situations. These include coadministration with clopidogrel, healing of all grades of erosive esophagitis, improvement in reflux-related quality of life, step down to once-per-day dosing, and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections. Furthermore, dexlansoprazole MR has been found to induce symptom improvement in patients with nonerosive esophageal reflux disease, nocturnal heartburn and GERD-related sleep disturbance, and regurgitation. Overall, dexlansoprazole MR is a unique and useful tool in the management of GERD. Keywords: GERD, PPI, NERD

  20. Results of biofeedback treatment on reflux resolution rates in children with dysfunctional voiding and vesicoureteral reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibar, Yusuf; Ors, Onder; Demir, Erkan; Kalman, Suleyman; Sakallioglu, Onur; Dayanc, Murat

    2007-09-01

    It is well known that a relationship exists between vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and dysfunctional voiding, and the spontaneous resolution rate in older children is lower than the rate in younger children. In this study, we analyzed our experience with biofeedback treatment in older children with confirmed voiding dysfunction and VUR and investigated the effect of this treatment on the reflux resolution rates in these children. A total of 78 children, 5 to 14 years old (mean age 9), with voiding dysfunction and VUR detected by voiding cystourethrography were treated with biofeedback therapy. Voiding cystourethrography was performed 6 months after completion of the biofeedback program to determine the reflux status. The treatment results were also documented as subjective and objective improvements. The reflux in 98 units (20 bilateral) was grade 1 in 26, grade 2 in 32, grade 3 in 28, and grade 4 in 12. At 6 months of follow-up, VUR had resolved on voiding cystourethrography in 62 units (63%), the grade had improved in 28 units (29%), and the reflux had remained unchanged in 8 units (8%). Among the older children treated with biofeedback, we also observed improvements in nocturnal enuresis (82%), daytime wetting (70%), constipation (78%), frequency (76%), infrequency (64%), urgency (71%), staccato voiding (81%), flattened voiding (81%), bladder overactivity (82%), detrusor sphincter dyssynergia (77%), spinning top urethra (67%), and urinary tract infection (80%). Biofeedback therapy is applicable in older children with dysfunctional voiding and VUR and yields greater resolution rates than the historical resolution rates.

  1. Enterogastric reflux in normal subjects and patients with Bilroth II gastroenterostomy. Measurement of enterogastric reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolin, R D; Malmud, L S; Stelzer, F; Menin, R; Makler, P T; Applegate, G; Fisher, R S

    1979-11-01

    Initially, scintigraphy was established as a valid method for detecting and quantitating enterogastric reflux. A new, tubeless technique for the measurement of enterogastric reflux was developed. 99mTc bound to [(2,6 dimethylphenylcarbamoylmethyl) iminodiacetic acid] (5 mCi) was administered intravenously to visualize the liver and biliary tract. One hour later, a standard liquid meal labeled with 111In bound to diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (250 microCi) was given. The 99mTc and 111In activities were recorded simultaneously for 1-min periods at 15-min intervals for 2 hr over liver, gallbladder, and gastric areas of interest. Enterogastric reflux indices were determined. Ten normal subjects and 13 patients with vagotomy, hemigastrectomy, and Bilroth II gastrojejunostomy were evaluated. The enterogastric reflux index in asymptomatic postsurgical patients was increased significantly to 24.6 +/- 4.7 compared with 8.2 +/- 6.0 (P less than 0.01) in normal subjects. In postsurgical patients with the syndrome of alkaline gastritis, the enterogastric reflux index was increased significantly to 86.3 +/- 7.1 (P less than 0.01) compared with asymptomatic postsurgical patients.

  2. Phase I study of docetaxel, oxaliplatin and capecitabine (TEX) as first line therapy to patients with advanced gastro-oesophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maria; Schønnemann, Katrine R; Yilmaz, Mette

    2010-01-01

    mg/m(2) iv as a 30 minutes infusion) and oral capecitabine (1 000 to 1 250 mg/m(2)/day). TEX was repeated every third week for a maximum of eight cycles. Toxicity was evaluated according to CTCAE v3.0 and dose limiting toxicity (DLT) was evaluated after the first course of TEX. Results. From June...... 2007 to April 2009, 23 consecutive patients received TEX. At dose level V, two of four patients experienced DLT and therefore we included additional seven patients at dose level IV. Only one of seven experienced DLT but dose-intensity was reduced to 75% in four of seven patients after three courses...

  3. Stenting as a palliative method in the management of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus and gastro-oesophageal junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Wlodarczyk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus and gastroesophageal junction usually requires palliative treatment, and the method of choice is stenting. There are several types of stents currently available, including: self-expandable metallic stents (fully or partially covered; self-expandable plastic stents; biodegradable stents. Each of the mentioned stents has its advantages and limitations, and requires a proper, patient-tailored selection. Due to the close anatomical relationship between the oesophagus and bronchial tree, some patients may require bilateral stenting. Oesophageal stenting may not only be considered as a palliative procedure, but can also be implemented to alleviate dysphagia during preoperative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy.

  4. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for intractable biliary reflux in an individual with incomplete tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Deborah; Tower, Donald; Goetz, Lance

    2015-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common complication in the spinal cord injury (SCI) population. Surgical treatment of GERD has a unique risk/benefit profile in this population. This 68-year-old male with chronic incomplete tetraplegia, dyslipidemia, and well-controlled diabetes mellitus underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGBP) for intractable biliary reflux. Postoperatively, the patient had resolution of his symptoms but he also presented with significant weight loss and dumping syndrome. While he did have improvement in his dyslipidemia there was no change in his functional status. RYGBP is an option for refractory GERD treatment in the SCI population but preoperative risk assessment and close monitoring postoperatively is essential.

  5. Snus and risk of gastroesophageal reflux. A population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lie, Tina Malene; Bomme, Maria; Hveem, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Tobacco smoking is a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux, but whether other tobacco products increase the risk is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate if snus increases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was based...... users, daily snus users had a reduced risk of GERS (OR 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64-0.93), while previous snus users and those using risk (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.00-1.46 and OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.02-1.96, respectively). There was no association between age when...... starting using snus and GERS. Snus users who started using snus to quit or cut down on cigarette smoking, who started using both snus and cigarettes or cigarettes alone had an increased risk of GERS. Snus users risk of GERS (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.02-2.16), while those aged...

  6. Endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux: Current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Lackgren

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR affects around 1% of all children. It carries an increased risk of febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs and is associated with impaired renal function. Endoscopic treatment with NASHA/Dx gel (dextranomer microspheres in a stabilized hyaluronic acid-based gel of nonanimal origin is minimally invasive, well tolerated and provides cure rates approaching those of open surgery: ~90% in several studies. It has also been shown to be effective in a variety of ′complicated′ cases. Endoscopic treatment is therefore considered preferable to open surgery and long-term antibiotic prophylaxis. Nontreatment of VUR is being discussed as an alternative option, whereby children are treated with antibiotics only when UTIs occur. Considering all the available evidence, however, active intervention with endoscopic treatment remains preferable. A new approach to managing VUR may nevertheless be considered, with treatment decisions based not only on the grade of reflux, but also factors such as age, sex, renal scarring, and bladder dysfunction. Open surgery would be reserved for use only in the ~10% of children not responding to endoscopic treatment, and patients with refluxing primary megaureter.

  7. [Clinical characteristics of gastroesophageal reflux disease with esophageal injury in korean: focusing on risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Jung, Min Kyu; Kim, Sung Kook; Jang, Byung Ik; Lee, Si Hyung; Kim, Kyeong Ok; Kim, Eun Soo; Cho, Kwang Bum; Park, Kyung Sik; Kim, Eun Young; Jung, Jin Tae; Kwon, Joong Goo; Lee, Joong Hyun; Yang, Chang Hun; Park, Chang Keun; Seo, Hyang Eun; Jeon, Seong Woo

    2011-05-25

    Recent studies suggest that the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is increasing in Korea. However, studies on risk factors for GERD have yielded inconsistent results. The aims of this study were to compare clinical features between symptomatic syndromes without esophageal injury (=non-erosive disease [NED]) and syndromes with esophageal injury (=erosive disease [ED]), and to determine risk factors associated ED. A total of 450 subjects who visited gastroenterology clinics of six training hospitals in Daegu from March 2008 to April 2010 were consecutively enrolled. The subjects were asked to complete a questionnaire which inquired about gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. The questionnaire also included questions about smoking, alcohol drinking, consumption of coffee, use of drugs, exercise, and other medical history. The subjects were subdivided into NED and ED groups. The proportion of subjects in each NED and ED group was 172 (38.2%) and 278 (61.8%). Male gender, smoking, alcohol drinking, consumption of coffee, large waist circumference, infrequent medication of antacids, aspirin and NSAIDs, infrequent and mild GERD symptoms were all significantly associated with ED on univariate analysis. Age, hiatal hernia, diabetes mellitus, body mass index, change in weight during 1 year, and number of typical GERD symptoms were not independent risk factors for ED. However, the association between ED and alcohol drinking, infrequent medication of antacids, mild typical GERD symptoms remained as strong risk factors after adjustments on multivariate logistic analysis. Independent risk factors associated with ED were alcohol drinking, infrequent medication of antacids and mild typical GERD symptoms.

  8. Debut of Gastroesophageal Reflux Concomitant with Administration of Sublingual Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Juel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD is an often debilitating condition characterised by retrograde flow of content from stomach into the oesophagus, where the low pH of the stomach acid irritates the mucosa of the oesophagus. The most dominant symptoms in GORD are pyrosis, regurgitation, and dysphagia. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT was first described in 1986. Following this description, the use has greatly increased in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, as an alternative to subcutaneously administered immunotherapy. Side effects are commonly of oropharyngeal and gastrointestinal nature, for example, swelling, itching, irritation, ulceration of the oropharynx and nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhoea. More serious side effects are dominated by respiratory tract and systemic manifestations. A 30-year-old male experienced refractory, relentless, and debilitation GORD subsequent to administration of sublingual immunotherapy for house dust mite in allergic rhinitis. The patient had to stop the SLIT after two weeks of administration due to GORD. The cessation resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms.

  9. Gastroesophageal Reflux is Not Associated with Dental Erosion in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Yvette K.; Heyman, Melvin B.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Dalal, Deepal H.; Wojcicki, Janet M.; Clark, Ann L.; Rechmann, Beate; Rechmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Dental erosion is a complication of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in adults; in children, it is not clear if GER has a role in dental pathologic conditions. Dietary intake, oral hygiene, high bacterial load, and decreased salivary flow might contribute independently to GER development or dental erosion, but their potential involvement in dental erosion from GER is not understood. We investigated the prevalence of dental erosion among children with and without GER symptoms, and whether salivary flow rate or bacterial load contribute to location-specific dental erosion. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 59 children (ages 9–17 y) with symptoms of GER and 20 asymptomatic children (controls); all completed a questionnaire on dietary exposure. Permanent teeth were examined for erosion into dentin, erosion locations, and affected surfaces. The dentist was not aware of GER status, nor was the gastroenterologist aware of dental status. Stimulated salivary flow was measured and salivary bacterial load was calculated for total bacteria, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli. Results Controlling for age, dietary intake, and oral hygiene, there was no association between GER symptoms and dental erosion, by tooth location or affected surface. Salivary flow did not correlate with GER symptoms or erosion. Erosion location and surface were independent of total bacteria and levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli. Conclusions Location-specific dental erosion is not associated with GER, salivary flow, or bacterial load. Prospective studies are required to determine the pathogenesis of GER-associated dental erosion and the relationship between dental caries to GER and dental erosion. PMID:21820389

  10. Management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease beyond the lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanfleteren, Lowie E G W; Spruit, Martijn A; Wouters, Emiel F M; Franssen, Frits M E

    2016-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an umbrella term that covers many clinical subtypes with clearly different pulmonary and extra-pulmonary characteristics, but with persistent airflow limitation in common. This insight has led to the development of a more personalised approach in bronchodilator therapy, prevention of exacerbations, and advanced treatments (such as non-invasive ventilation and lung volume reduction techniques). However, systemic manifestations and comorbidities of COPD also contribute to different clinical phenotypes and warrant an individualised approach as part of integrated disease management. Alterations in bodyweight and composition, from cachexia to obesity, demand specific management. Psychological symptoms are highly prevalent, and thorough diagnosis and treatment are necessary. Moreover, prevention of exacerbations requires interventions beyond the lungs, including treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, reduction of cardiovascular risks, and management of dyspnoea and anxiety. In this Review, we discuss the management of COPD beyond the respiratory system and propose treatment strategies on the basis of the latest research and best practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dysphagia: epidemiology, risk factors and impact on quality of life--a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslick, G D; Talley, N J

    2008-05-01

    Data on the population epidemiology of dysphagia are scarce. Little is known about the prevalence, risk factors and impact on quality of life of dysphagia in the general community. To determine the magnitude and impact of dysphagia in the general community. A random sample of 1000 individuals of Sydney, Australia, were mailed a validated self-report questionnaire to assess dysphagia. Measured were dysphagia symptoms, potential mechanisms, risk factors, psychological disorders, quality of life and demographics. The response rate of included subjects (n = 926) was 73% (n = 672). Dysphagia ever was reported by 16% (n = 110). Multiple logistic regression analysis found that odynophagia was independently associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (OR = 3.41, 95% CI: 1.16-10.04). Intermittent dysphagia was independently associated with GERD (OR = 2.96, 95% CI: 1.76-4.98) and anxiety (OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.01-1.19). The presence of progressive dysphagia was independently associated with depression (OR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.07-1.67). Progressive dysphagia was independently associated with reduced 'general health' (OR = 0.95, 95% CI: 0.90-0.99), while intermittent dysphagia was associated with a reduction in the 'role physical' subscale (OR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.97-0.99). Dysphagia is remarkably common in the general population. GERD is a risk factor for dysphagia as well as odynophagia. Intermittent dysphagia was associated with anxiety, while progressive dysphagia was associated with depression.

  12. State of Motor-Evacuation Function of the Stomach According to 13C-Octanoate Breath Test in Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Mishchuk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We examined 58 patients with erosive form of gastroesophageal reflux disease and 10 healthy volunteers. All patients underwent fibrogastroduodenoscopy, 24 hour pH monitoring in the lower third of esophagus, 13C-octanoate breath test, identified concentration of cholecystokinin-pankreozymin in blood serum. It is found that 44.83 % of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease have delayed, 36.21 % — rapid and 18.97 % — normal motor-e­vacuation function of the stomach. In patients with delayed gastric motility we observed prevalence of bile reflux with pH over 6 in the lower third of the esophagus, amounting to 42 % (p = 0.044, and increased concentration in the blood of cholecystokinin-pankreozymin up to (7.12 ± 0.21 ng/ml (p < 0.05, in healthy subjects — (5.91 ± 0.34 ng/ml. In patients with accelerated motility number of refluxes under 4 was 45 %, and cholecystokinin-pankreozymin le­vel — (4.4 ± 1.2 ng/ml. These data support the view of other authors that causes of heartburn as a leading symptom of gastroesophageal reflux disease can be duodenogastric reflux and visceral hyperalgesia.

  13. Can Surgical Technique Affect the Success of Endoscopic Treatment in Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux and Overactive Bladder Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Şahan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective “Traditional subureteral transurethral injection” (STING and “Double hydrodistention-implantation” (Double-HIT injection techniques for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR treatment are a less invasive, yet very effective options. The influence of injection techniques in treatment success is not adequately searched in children with overactive bladder syndrome (OAB. The objective of this study to compare the short-term success rates of STING and Double-HIT techniques in children with OAB-VUR complex. Materials and Methods Children who underwent endoscopic injection for VUR between 2010 and 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were grouped into two groups according to the surgical techniques (STING or Double-HIT. Success of the treatment was defined with a negative voiding cystourethrogram at the 6th postoperative week. Patients were evaluated according to sex, age, pre- and postoperative reflux grades, laterality, type and volume of bulking agent and presence of OAB. Results Both groups were similar in terms of sex, age, lower urinary tract dysfunction, reflux grade and success rates. Surgical technique, score of pediatric lower urinary tract symptom questionnaire, age, sex, laterality of reflux and type of the bulking agent found to have no effect on the overall success rates (p>0.05. Presence of OAB and/or a high grade reflux were identified as statistically significant predictive factors that could affect the treatment results. Conclusion The short-term surgical success of the double-HIT and STING techniques showed no difference in children with OAB. The presence of a high grade reflux and/or OAB seemed to be the main factors for overall success in endoscopic VUR surgery.

  14. Once-daily omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate heals severe refractory reflux esophagitis with morning or nighttime dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbelo, Diana M; Enders, Felicity T; Romero, Yvonne; Francis, Dawn L; Achem, Sami R; Dabade, Tushar S; Crowell, Michael D; Geno, Debra M; DeJesus, Ramona S; Namasivayam, Vikneswaran; Adamson, Steven C; Arora, Amindra S; Majka, Andrew J; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Murray, Joseph A; Lohse, Matthew; Diehl, Nancy N; Fredericksen, Mary; Jung, Kee Wook; Houston, Margaret S; O'Neil, Angela E; Katzka, David A

    2015-01-01

    Morning dose or twice-daily proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use is often prescribed to heal severe reflux esophagitis. Compare the effect of single dose morning (control arm) versus nighttime (experimental arm) omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate (Zegerid(®)) (IR-OME) on esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Adult outpatients with Los Angeles grade C or D esophagitis were allocated to open-label 40 mg IR-OME once a day for 8 weeks in a prospective, randomized, parallel design, single center study. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and validated self-report symptom questionnaires were completed at baseline and follow-up. Intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses were performed. Ninety-two of 128 (72 %) eligible subjects participated [64 (70 %) male, mean age 58 (range 19-86), median BMI 29 (range 21-51), 58 C:34 D]. Overall, 81 (88 %) subjects healed [n = 70 (76 %)] or improved [n = 11 (12 %)] erosions. There was no significant difference (morning vs. night) in mucosal healing [81 vs. 71 %, (p = 0.44)] or symptom resolution [heartburn (77 vs. 65 %, p = 0.12), acid regurgitation (82 vs. 73 %, p = 0.28)]. Prevalence of newly identified Barrett's esophagus was 14 % with half diagnosed only after treatment. Once-daily IR-OME (taken morning or night) effectively heals severe reflux esophagitis and improves GERD symptoms. Results support the clinical practice recommendation to repeat EGD after 8 weeks PPI therapy in severe esophagitis patients to assure healing and exclude Barrett's esophagus.

  15. Vesicoureteral refluxed volume and renal function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, V.; Capkun, V.; Eterovic, D.; Stanicic, A.; Saraga, M.

    1994-01-01

    The therapeutical approach to vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) depends on assessment of the renal involvement. The effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and parenchymal mean transit time of radiotracer (pMTT) of the affected kidney are sensitive functional parameters. We investigated the association of these functional indices with the volume of refluxed urine. In 64 children (mean age 6.4 yrs) the presence of VUR was confirmed with direct radionuclide cystography in 80 ureters (48 unilateral and 32 bilateral) and the maximal volume of refluxed urine (MVRU) was determined for each uretero-renal unit. All patients also underwent dynamic renal scintigraphy with I-131-hippuran, providing the values of pMTT and relative renal hippuran clearances of the respective kidneys by deconvolution analysis. In 37 of the affected kidneys ERPF was also determined by combining the latter results with total ERPF, determined by plasma clearance of hippuran. Using the borderline value of MVRU of 4 ml, the group with higher MVRU exhibited significantly lower ERPF of the affected kidney (194±93 vs. 270±77 ml/min/1.73 m2, p=.002) and significantly higher proportion of pMTT's over 3.5 min (31/33 vs. 17/47, p=.003). The negative linear correlation between MVRU and ERPF was found (r=-.45, p=.006). We conclude that quantitative radionuclide cystography, aside from diagnosis and follow-up of VUR, may also provide insight in the function of the affected kidney and thus contribute in designing the therapeutical approach. (author)

  16. Dental approach to erosive tooth wear in gastroesophageal reflux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-02

    Jun 2, 2014 ... Abstract. Background: The duration of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), the frequency of reflux, the pH and type of acid, and the quality and quantity of saliva affect the severity of dental erosion due to GERD. Objective: To ... Some medications cause salivary hypofunction and dental erosion; drugs ...

  17. Respiratory repercussions of gastroesophageal reflux and cine-esophagogastroscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillemeteau, C.; Saudubray, F.; Guillet, J.

    1985-01-01

    Asthma and recurrent bronchopneumopathies in children are often associated with gastroesophageal reflux. Cine-esogastroscintigraphy is proposed for demonstrating reflux and establishing its direct or indirect responsibility in respiratory disease. 133 patients aged 5 months to 16 years were studied. Reflux was found in 65.5% of cases, either severe (44.4% of cases) or minor (21.1%). Episodes of reflux produced respiratory manifestations in 7% of patients. Inhalation of refluxed material was proved in 3% by demonstration of pulmonary contamination. Sensitivity of cine-esophagogastroscintigraphy is comparable to that of esophageal pH measurement for detection of reflux. It does not require positioning of a probe in the esophageal lumen. It provides quantitative parameters on esophageal transit, reflux and gastric voiding, and demonstrates pulmonary contamination. It is easy to perform and can be readily included in an outpatient clinic workup. Its sensitivity and reliability make it a useful tool for evaluation of therapeutic efficiency. The interlocking of various physiopathologic factors contributes to the polymorphism of respiratory manifestations of reflux [fr

  18. Respiratory repercussions of gastroesophageal reflux and cine-esophagogastroscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillemeteau, C.; Saudubray, F.; Guillet, J.

    1984-01-01

    Asthma and recurrent bronchopneumopathies in children are often associated with gastroesophageal reflux. Cine-esogastroscintigraphy is proposed for demonstrating reflux and establishing its direct or indirect responsibility in respiratory disease. 133 patients aged 5 months to 16 years were studied. Reflux was found in 65.5% of cases, either severe (44.4% of cases) or minor (21.1%). Episodes of reflux produced respiratory manifestations in 7% of patients. Inhalation of refluxed material was proved in 3% by demonstration of pulmonary contamination. Sensitivity of cine-esophagogastroscintigraphy is comparable to that of esophageal pH measurement for detection of reflux. It does not require positioning of a probe in the esophageal lumen. It provides quantitative parameters on esophageal transit, reflux and gastric voiding, and demonstrates pulmonary contamination. It is easy to perform and can be readily included in an outpatient clinic workup. Its sensitivity and reliability make it a useful tool for evaluation of therapeutic efficiency. The interlocking of various physiopathologic factors contributes to the polymorphism of respiratory manifestations of reflux [fr

  19. Dental approach to erosive tooth wear in gastroesophageal reflux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The duration of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), the frequency of reflux, the pH and type of acid, and the quality and quantity of saliva affect the severity of dental erosion due to GERD. Objective: To summarize the diagnostic protocol and treatment of dental erosion due to GERD. Methods: A Medline ...

  20. Risk factors of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Shiraz, southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi-Firoozi, Mehdi; Khademolhosseini, Farnaz; Yousefi, Maryam; Mehrabani, Davood; Zare, Najaf; Heydari, Seyed Taghi

    2007-11-07

    To determine the prevalence and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in a healthy general population in relation to demographic, lifestyle and health-seeking behaviors in Shiraz, southern Iran. A total of 1978 subjects aged > 35 years who referred to Gastroenterohepatology Research Center and who completed a questionnaire consisting of 27 questions for GERD in relation to demographic, lifestyle and health-seeking behaviors were included in this study for a period of five months. The validity and reliability of the questionnaire were determined. The prevalence of GERD was 15.4%, which was higher in females (17.3%), in rural areas (19.8%), and in illiterate subjects (21.5%) and those with a mean age of 50.25 years. The prevalence was significantly lower in subjects having fried food (14.8%), and fruit and vegetables (14.6%). More symptoms were noticed in subjects consuming pickles (22.1%), taking aspirin (21%) and in subjects with psychological distresses (27.2%) and headaches (22%). The correlation was statistically significant between GERD and halitosis (18.3%), dyspepsia (30.6%), anxiety (19.5%), nightmares (23.9%) and restlessness (18.5%). Their health seeking behavior showed that there was a significant restriction of diet (20%), consumption of herbal medicine (19%), using over-the-counter drugs (29.9%) and consulting with physicians (24.8%). Presence of GERD symptoms was also significantly related to a previous family history of the disease (22.3%). GERD is more common in females, rural and illiterate subjects and correlated with consumption of pickles, occurrence of headache, psychological distress, dyspepsia, halitosis, anxiety, nightmare and restlessness, and a family history of GERD and aspirin intake, but the correlation was negative with consumption of fat and fiber intake.

  1. Proton Pump Inhibitors in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Friend or Foe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, C Prakash

    2017-09-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been redefined, in light of recent advances highlighting GERD phenotypes that respond to PPIs, and fresh revelations of potential risks of long-term PPI therapy. Erosive esophagitis predicts excellent response to PPI therapy, but non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) with abnormal reflux parameters on ambulatory reflux monitoring also demonstrates a similar response. In contrast, response is suboptimal in the absence of abnormal reflux parameters. In this setting, if an alternate appropriate indication for PPI therapy does not coexist, risks may outweigh benefits of PPI therapy. Adverse events from long-term PPI therapy continue to be reported, most based on association rather than cause-and-effect. Appropriate indications need to be established before embarking on long-term PPI therapy. Future research will define true risks of long-term PPI therapy, and develop alternate management options for acid peptic diseases.

  2. Motility characteristics in the transition zone in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GORD) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Wen; Xie, Chen-Xi; Wu, Kai-Ming; Chen, Min-Hu; Xiao, Ying-Lian

    2016-08-30

    Defects in distal oesophageal peristalsis was thought to be an indication of incomplete bolus transit (BT). However, the role of transition zone (TZ) defects in the BT in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) patients needs clarification. The aim of this study was to assess the TZ defects in GORD patients and to explore the relationship between TZ defects and BT. One hundred and two patients with reflux symptoms and 20 healthy adults were included in the study. All subjects underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, high resolution impedance manometry (HRiM) and 24-h ambulatory multichannel impedance-pH (MII-pH) monitoring. Patients were subgrouped into reflux oesophagitis (RE), non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), hypersensitive oesophagus (HO) and functional heartburn (FH) classified following MII-pH monitoring. Oesophageal pressure topography was analysed to define TZ defects by spatial or temporal TZ measurements exceeding 2 cm or 1 s, weak and fragmented swallows were excluded, and the association between TZ and BT was investigated. Following liquid swallows, there were no significant differences in TZ delay time and TZ length between groups (RE: 1.75 s (1.32-2.17) and 2.50 cm (2.40-3.20); NERD: 1.60 s (1.10-2.00) and 2.20 cm (2.10-2.65); HO: 1.60 s (1.30-1.80) and 2.70 cm (2.30-3.00); FH: 1.55 s (1.20-2.17) and 3.10 cm (2.25-5.00); Healthy volunteers: 1.50 s (1.20-1.90) and 2.30 cm (2.10-3.00). However, individuals with TZ defects had lower complete BT rates compared with those without TZ defects (p peristalsis.

  3. Multicenter assessment of venous reflux by duplex ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Fedor; Comerota, Anthony; Eklof, Bo; Kistner, Robert L; Labropoulos, Nicos; Lohr, Joann; Marston, William; Meissner, Mark; Moneta, Gregory; Neglén, Peter; Neuhardt, Diana; Padberg, Frank; Welsh, Harold J

    2012-02-01

    This prospective multicenter investigation was conducted to define the repeatability of duplex-based identification of venous reflux and the relative effect of key parameters on the reproducibility of the test. Repeatability was studied by having the same technologist perform duplicate tests, at the same time of the day, using the same reflux-provoking maneuver and with the patient in the same position. Reproducibility was examined by having two different technologists perform the test at the same time of the day, using the same reflux-provoking maneuver and with the patient in the same position. Facilitated reproducibility was studied by having two different technologists examine the same patients immediately after an educational intervention. Limits of agreement between two duplex scans were studied by changing three elements of the test: time of the day (morning vs afternoon), patient's position (standing vs supine), and reflux initiation (manual vs automatic compression-decompression). The study enrolled 17 healthy volunteers and 57 patients with primary chronic venous disease. Repeatability of reflux time measurements in deep veins did not significantly differ with the time of day, the patient's position, or the reflux-provoking maneuver. Reflux measurements in the superficial veins were more repeatable (P ultrasound detection of venous reflux. Reports should include information on the time of the test, the patient's position, and the provoking maneuver used. Adopting a uniform cut point of 0.5 second for pathologic reflux can significantly improve the reliability of reflux detection. Implementation of a standard protocol should elevate the minimal standard for agreement between repeated tests from the current 70% to at least 80% and with more rigid standardization, to 90%. Copyright © 2012 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Scientific foundations for medical treatment based on modifying diet, lifestyle habits, and patient attitudes in chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csendes, Attila; Burdiles, Patricio

    2007-02-01

    In most patients with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease, treatment is medical. Among the main elements involved in treatment are general dietary measures, lifestyle habits, and patients' attitudes to symptom control. The present article summarizes the scientific foundations that support these measures: head elevation during nighttime sleep, smoking cessation, losing weight, avoiding rigorous exercise, and reducing or eliminating alcohol consumption. Dietary therapy is mainly based on avoiding fatty foods, chocolate, coffee, mint, and irritating fizzy drinks. Although each patient's response to these measures is highly individual, the mechanisms through which symptoms are reproduced is gradually becoming clearer: a large percentage of patients with uncomplicated gastroesophageal reflux disease will gain considerable relief simply by eliminating some of these habits.

  5. Pilot plant trial of the reflux classifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvin, K.P.; Doroodchi, E.; Callen, A.M.; Lambert, N.; Pratten, S.J. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineers

    2002-01-01

    The Ludowici LMPE Reflux Classifier is a new device designed for classifying and separating particles on the basis of size or density. This work presents a series of experimental results obtained from the first pilot scale study of the reflux classifier (RC). The main focus of the investigation was to assess the particle gravity separation and throughput performance of the device. In this study, the classifier was used to separate coal and mineral matter less than 2 mm in size. The experimental results were then compared with the performance data on a teetered bed separator (TBS). It was concluded that the classifier could offer an excellent gravity separation at a remarkably high solids throughput of 47 t/m{sup 2}h more than 3 times higher than for a TBS. The separation performance of the RC was also better, with significantly less variation in the D-50 with particle size. A simple theoretical model providing an explanation of the separation performance is also presented.

  6. The Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Treatment of Excessive Belching Symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessing, Boudewijn F.; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Excessive belching is a commonly observed complaint in clinical practice that can occur not only as an isolated symptom but also as a concomitant symptom in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or functional dyspepsia. Impedance monitoring has revealed that there are two mechanisms

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and eosinophilic esophagitis in infants and children. A study of esophageal pH, multiple intraluminal impedance and endoscopic ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalby, Kasper; Nielsen, Rasmus; Kruse-Andersen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in childhood share aspects of symptomatology. In order to characterize EE and GERD in infants and children with symptoms of GERD we performed a prospective investigation including prolonged esophageal pH measurement, multipl...

  8. Diagnosis and management of urinary tract infection and vesicoureteral reflux in the neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baracco, Rossana; Mattoo, Tej K

    2014-09-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common bacterial infection in febrile newborns, particularly those born prematurely and with a low birth weight. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) predisposes to UTI and renal scarring. Half of neonates with UTI may have only low-grade fever or no fever. Jaundice in the absence of any other symptoms or signs may be the only clinical manifestation of UTI in neonates. The urinalysis may be negative in a significant number of neonates with UTI. Newborns with UTI have a high incidence of congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract anomalies, and hence should undergo renal imaging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficacy of On-Demand Therapy Using 20-mg Vonoprazan for Mild Reflux Esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezawa, Mariko; Kawami, Noriyuki; Hoshino, Shintaro; Hoshikawa, Yoshimasa; Koizumi, Eriko; Takenouchi, Nana; Hanada, Yuriko; Kaise, Mitsuru; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko

    2018-03-07

    The study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of on-demand therapy using 20-mg vonoprazan for mild reflux esophagitis (RE). On-demand therapy by taking one 20-mg tablet of vonoprazan only when reflux symptoms occurred was performed for 24 weeks using 30 patients with mild RE who were receiving maintenance therapy with proton pomp inhibitors (PPIs). The presence or absence of RE, degree of overall satisfaction with the treatment, score of symptoms, and fasting gastrin level before breakfast were examined before and after on-demand therapy. The number of tablets taken during the 24-week period was also noted. One of the 30 patients dropped out of on-demand therapy 1 week after its initiation. Remission was maintained in 25 (86.2%) of the 29 patients (all 10 [100%] Los Angeles classification grade A patients and 15 (78.9%) of the 19 grade B patients). However, 4 grade B patients exhibited grade B relapse. There were no differences in the degree of overall satisfaction, score of symptoms or the gastrin level between PPI and on-demand therapies. The number of vonoprazan tablets taken during the observation period was 33 tablets (median)/24 weeks. On-demand therapy using 20-mg vonoprazan tablets is an effective alternative maintenance therapy for mild RE. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Respiratory complications of gastroesophageal reflux associated with paraesophageal hiatal hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greub, Gilbert; Liaudet, Lucas; Wiesel, Paul; Bettschart, Vincent; Schaller, Marie-Denise

    2003-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may be associated with episodes of bronchoaspiration, sometimes leading to life-threatening respiratory complications. GERD is frequently observed in the setting of type 1 (sliding type) hiatal hernia, but only infrequently complicates the course of type 2 (paraesophageal) hernia. We performed a retrospective analysis of 50 patients operated for type 2 hiatal hernia in our hospital, to determine the prevalence of respiratory complaints related to GERD in this setting. We found 7 cases (14%) of type 2 hiatal hernia complicated by pulmonary manifestations as the only symptoms of GERD. These ranged from dyspnea to severe bronchoconstriction and acute respiratory failure. The series is illustrated by the report of 1 patient who experienced acute bronchospasm and cardiopulmonary arrest as a complication of GERD. In all patients, surgical repair of the hiatal hernia, together with an antireflux procedure, resulted in complete resolution of the respiratory complaints for follow-up periods up to 160 months. Our data emphasize the particular prevalence of respiratory involvement in the case of GERD complicating type 2 hiatal hernia, and also the excellent symptomatic results obtained by surgical therapy for this condition.

  11. Psychological modulation in patients surgically intervened for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, F J Pérez; Carranque, G; Oehling, H; Hernández, J M; Oliva, H

    2014-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been related with certain psychological dimensions. The influence of mood, emotional intelligence, and perceived quality of life on clinical symptoms and outcome of antireflux surgery was evaluated in GERD patients with and without hiatal hernia. The study included 61 patients who were diagnosed with GERD between 2003 and 2008: 16 of them without hiatal hernia (group A) and 45 of them with hiatal hernia (group B). All of these patients had undergone laparoscopic antireflux surgery. Patients were clinically examined and evaluated with the following instruments: Short Form (SF)-36 Health Survey, Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale, and Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS)-24. Proportions were compared by using the chi-squared test; averages were compared by using the Student's t-test (with Bonferroni's correction). In general, our patients intervened for GERD showed results lower than normal or close to the lower limit of normal in the administered tests. Patients in the group without hernia were younger (P tolerance to stress and higher frustration, fear, and worry. On the basis of such unfavorable phychoemotional results observed with GERD patients (especially those without hernia) in the different tests, we propose that improving our knowledge of the psychological profile of GERD patients - particularly those without hiatal hernia - could help in designing individualized medical and psychological therapies and increase success rates. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  12. Quality of life scales for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Li Guan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common chronic disease of the gastrointestinal tract that occurs in 3.1% of the Chinese population [1]. Heartburn, acid regurgitation and epigastric pain are typical clinical symptoms of GERD. These symptoms can affect patients' work productivity, sleep, diet and daily activities, thus resulting in a reduced quality of life (QOL [2]. Although patient QOL is increasingly being considered as a medical outcome index in the evaluation of the impact of GERD symptoms on patients' health status, measuring patient QOL in clinical trials can be challenging due to the lack of a standard assessment tool. Therefore, we aim to review the commonly used generic, disease-specific and hybrid QOL questionnaires to evaluate patients with GERD to provide a reference for clinical nursing work.

  13. The Second Canadian Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Consensus: Moving Forward to New Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a disease with serious consequences that may result in significant impairment in quality of life and disease morbidity. Across all grades of severity of symptoms and severity of underlying esophageal disease, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs provide therapeutic gains over prokinetics (PKs or H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs. The potential cost effectiveness of using medications with higher acquisition costs that may lower health care costs overall is often disregarded when conducting cost comparisons with medications having lower 'up-front' costs. Limiting therapy to less effective agents condemns many patients to protracted suffering, repeated physician visits and needless reinvestigation of symptoms that could have been resolved by appropriate initial therapy. Based on current data, use of any classification of symptom severity as a basis for selecting one class of therapeutic agents over another for first line therapy (ie PKs, H2RAs for 'mild' GERD, versus a PPI for 'severe' disease is unwarranted.

  14. Efficacy and safety of once-daily esomeprazole for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in neonatal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Geoffrey; Wenzl, Tobias G; Thomson, Michael; Omari, Taher; Barker, Peter; Lundborg, Per; Illueca, Marta

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of proton pump inhibitors in infants aged esomeprazole 0.5 mg/kg or placebo once daily for up to 14 days. Change from baseline in the total number of GERD symptoms (from video monitoring) and GERD-related signs (from cardiorespiratory monitoring) was assessed with simultaneous esophageal pH, impedance, cardiorespiratory, and 8-hour video monitoring. There were no significant differences between the esomeprazole and placebo groups in the percentage change from baseline in the total number of GERD-related signs and symptoms (-14.7% vs -14.1%, respectively). Mean change from baseline in total number of reflux episodes was not significantly different between esomeprazole and placebo (-7.43 vs -0.2, respectively); however, the percentage of time pH was 5 minutes in duration was significantly decreased with esomeprazole vs placebo (-10.7 vs 2.2 and -5.5 vs 1.0, respectively; P ≤ .0017). The number of patients with adverse events was similar between treatment groups. Signs and symptoms of GERD traditionally attributed to acidic reflux in neonates were not significantly altered by esomeprazole treatment. Esomeprazole was well tolerated and reduced esophageal acid exposure and the number of acidic reflux events in neonates. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Two years of experience with robot-assisted anti-reflux surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanberg Jensen, Jonas; Kold Antonsen, Henning; Durup, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Robot-assisted anti-reflux surgery (RAAS) is an alternative to conventional laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery (CLAS). The purpose of this study was to evaluate initial Danish experiences with robot-assisted anti-reflux surgery compared to conventional laparoscopic anti-reflux s...

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in COPD: links and risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee AL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Annemarie L Lee,1–3 Roger S Goldstein1,2,4 1West Park Healthcare Centre, 2Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 4Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: COPD is a long-term condition associated with considerable disability with a clinical course characterized by episodes of worsening respiratory signs and symptoms associated with exacerbations. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is one of the most common gastrointestinal conditions in the general population and has emerged as a comorbidity of COPD. GERD may be diagnosed by both symptomatic approaches (including both typical and atypical symptoms and objective measurements. Based on a mix of diagnostic approaches, the prevalence of GERD in COPD ranges from 17% to 78%. Although GERD is usually confined to the lower esophagus in some individuals, it may be associated with pulmonary microaspiration of gastric contents. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to GERD in COPD originate from gastroesophageal dysfunction, including altered pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (which normally protect against GERD and changes in esophageal motility. Proposed respiratory contributions to the development of GERD include respiratory medications that may alter esophageal sphincter tone and changes in respiratory mechanics, with increased lung hyperinflation compromising the antireflux barrier. Although the specific cause and effect relationship between GERD and COPD has not been fully elucidated, GERD may influence lung disease severity and has been identified as a significant predictor of acute exacerbations of COPD. Further clinical effects could include a poorer health-related quality of life and an increased cost in health care, although these factors require further clarification. There are both medical and surgical options available for the

  17. Diagnosis of intrarenal reflux and its role in pathogenesis of reflux nephropathy in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimatsu, Akiko [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-06-01

    We compared newly developed radionuclide cystography with conventional contrast voiding cystography (VCG) with regard to their diagnostic usefulness of intrarenal reflux (IRR) in children. Based on the imaging findings, we assessed the role of IRR in the pathogenesis of reflux nephropathy (RN). Among the ureters which revealed IRR diagnosed by radionuclide cystography, 38.9% (7 out of 18 ureters) of the cases examined by VCG had IRR. In the case of VCG, the sensitivity and specificity of IRR detection were 33.3% and 100%, respectively. There was a statistical correlation between the presence/absence of IRR and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). RN was significantly correlated with advanced grade of VUR associated with IRR. Among 9 kidneys of the subjects who had suffered from urinary tract infection (UTI) only once, IRR was detected in 33.3% (3/9) and RN in 66.7% (2/3). From these findings, conventional contrast VCG is considered not effective for the diagnosis of IRR. Moreover, it is suggested that VUR complicated with IRR is deeply associated with the development of RN. In addition, it is suggested that UTI might be related to the onset of IRR. (author)

  18. HISTORICAL ASPECTS OF THE VESICOURETERAL REFLUX STUDY AMONG CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Ryabtseva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux is one of the most widely spread lower urinary tract diseases among children, which is the primary reason for the disturbed urodynamics and development of the chronic pyelonephritis. As a consequence, the contamination of the urinary tracts may be the reason for further development of the chronic kidney disease, renal hypertonia and may inevitably lead to disability. The modern diagnostics of the vesi coureteral reflux is very important for the adequate conservative and operative treatment. In the given article, the authors highlight the diagnostics development stages of this disease and provide comparative characteristics of different diagnostic methods.Key words: vesicoureteral reflux, urodynamics, diagnostics, children.

  19. Sleeve Gastrectomy and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Laffin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery, when combined with lifestyle and medical interventions, is a common and successful treatment modality in the obese patient. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is one such procedure that has increased in popularity as a definitive bariatric operation. Although laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy has been shown to be effective in producing weight loss and improving type 2 diabetes mellitus, its effect on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has been inconsistent. This paper aims to summarize the available literature regarding GERD prevalence following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, 8 studies demonstrate increased GERD prevalence, and 5 demonstrate decreased GERD prevalence following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. The relationship between GERD and SG is complex and no clear relationship exists. The anatomic and physiologic changes caused by laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy are discussed in the context of these inconsistent results.

  20. Reflux, Allergic Rhinitis, and Sleep Disorders with Asthma Control and Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esat Hayat

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study we aimed to investigate the effect of comorbid diseases such as gastroesophageal reflux, allergic rhinitis, sleep disorders with asthma control test and asthma quality of life in Turkish asthma patients. Material and Method: Total of 50 patients who were followed with a diagnosis of asthma were enrolled in this study. During application, spirometric parameters, Reflux Symptom Index (RSI, Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis Symptom Index (ARSI, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Asthma Control Test (ACT, and Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaires (AQLQ were filled under the supervision of a physician, also smoking habits, body mass index of cases were recorded. The relation of spirometric parameters, RSI, ARSI and PSQI with AQLQ and ACT tests were investigated by using SPSS 15.0 statistical software. Results: Negative correlation was found between the ACT and RSI (r = - 0.314, p = 0.026, ACT and PSQI (r= -0,620; p<0.001. Positive correlation was found between ACT and AQLQ (r=0.667, p <0.001, there was no relationship between ACT and ARSI (p=0,25. Negative correlation was found between AQLQ and RSI (r= -0,551; p<0.001, AQLQ and ARSI (r= -0,390; p<0.005. There was no relationship between AQLQ and PSQI (p=0.082, also there was no relationship between FEV1 value and ACT, AQLQ, RSI, ARSI, PSQI. Discussion: In conclusion, gastroesophageal reflux and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis negatively effect the quality of life and asthma control in asthmatic patients, also poor sleep quality is associated with poor asthma control.

  1. A 5-year prospective review of posterior partial fundoplication in the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, L M; Wadley, M S

    2010-01-01

    Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is the most common surgical procedure performed for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD). It is however associated with a number of mechanical complications with as many as one in three patients experiencing troublesome dysphagia or gas bloat. Partial fundoplication, either posterior or anterior, has been advocated in an attempt to reduce these problems. Our aim was to prospectively evaluate laparoscopic posterior partial (Toupet) fundoplication as the primary surgical treatment for GORD. Outcomes following Toupet fundoplication performed between October 2002 and October 2007 were recorded prospectively. All patients underwent a 270 degrees posterior partial fundoplication with routine crural repair. All procedures were performed by a single surgeon. Pre-operative investigations included endoscopy, pH studies/manometry and contrast studies. DeMeester acidity scores, percentage reflux time and oesophageal motility were recorded. Pre- and post-operative DeMeester symptom scores (0-9, DSS) and Visick grading were used to assess the outcomes of surgery. 101 Patients were studied. Ages ranged from 17 to 69 years. The median pre-operative DSS of 5 fell to a median of 0 post-operatively. Scores decreased following surgery in all cases. 91 (91%) patients were discharged on the 2nd post-operative day or sooner. 5 (4.9%) patients had prolonged dysphagia (>3 months), and 8 (7.9%) had mild prolonged gas bloat. A single patient had a recurrence of reflux at 2 years and required re-do laparoscopic surgery. There were no conversions to open surgery. Laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication provides excellent relief of GORD symptoms with a low incidence of post-operative mechanical complications. We would recommend it as the operation of choice for GORD. Copyright 2010 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Feeding disorders, ALTE syndrome, Sandifer syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease in the course of food hypersensitivity in 8-month old infant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwańczak, Barbara; Mowszet, Krystyna; Iwańczak, Franciszek

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes the occurrence of feeding disorders, atopic dermatitis, life-threatening symptoms, Sandifer syndrome, and gastroesophageal reflux disease in 8-month old infant in the course of food hypersensitivity. Used in the treatment of cow's milk protein hydrolysates with a considerable degree of hydrolysis, omeprazole, Cisapride. It was not until the introduction of elemental diet based on free amino acids resulted in the withdrawal of life-threatening child's symptoms.

  3. High-definition endoscopy with iScan and Lugol's solution for the detection of inflammation in patients with nonerosive reflux disease: histologic evaluation in comparison with a control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, J W; Deris, N; Marquardt, J U; Thomaidis, T; Moehler, M; Kittner, J M; Nguyen-Tat, M; Dümcke, S; Tresch, A; Biesterfeld, S; Goetz, M; Mudter, J; Neurath, M F; Galle, P R; Kiesslich, R; Hoffman, A

    2016-01-01

    Nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) is commonly diagnosed in patients with symptoms of reflux. The aim of the present study was to determine whether high-definition endoscopy (HD) plus equipped with the iScan function or chromoendoscopy with Lugol's solution might permit the differentiation of NERD patients from those without reflux symptoms, proven by targeted biopsies of endoscopic lesions. A total of 100 patients without regular intake of proton pump inhibitors and with a normal conventional upper endoscopy were prospectively divided into NERD patients and controls. A second upper endoscopy was performed using HD+ with additional iScan function and then Lugol's solution was applied. Biopsy specimens were taken from the gastroesophageal junction in all patients. A total of 65 patients with reflux symptoms and 27 controls were included. HD(+) endoscopy with iScan revealed subtle mucosal breaks in 52 patients; the subsequent biopsies confirmed esophagitis in all cases. After Lugol's solution, 58 patients showed mucosal breaks. Sensitivity for the iScan procedure was 82.5%, whereas that for Lugol's solution was 92.06%. Excellent positive predictive values of 100% and 98.3%, respectively, were noted. The present study suggests that the majority of patients with NERD and typical symptoms of reflux disease can be identified by iScan or Lugol's chromoendoscopy as minimal erosive reflux disease (ERD) patients. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  4. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and overall and Cause-specific Mortality: A Prospective Study of 50000 Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islami, Farhad; Pourshams, Akram; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Khademi, Hooman; Poutschi, Hossein; Khoshnia, Masoud; Norouzi, Alireza; Amiriani, Taghi; Sohrabpour, Amir Ali; Aliasgari, Ali; Jafari, Elham; Semnani, Shahryar; Abnet, Christian C.; Pharaoh, Paul D.; Brennan, Paul; Kamangar, Farin; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Only a few studies in Western countries have investigated the association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and mortality at the general population level and they have shown mixed results. This study investigated the association between GERD symptoms and overall and cause-specific mortality in a large prospective population-based study in Golestan Province, Iran. METHODS Baseline data on frequency, onset time, and patient-perceived severity of GERD symptoms were available for 50001 participants in the Golestan Cohort Study (GCS). We identified 3107 deaths (including 1146 circulatory and 470 cancer-related) with an average follow-up of 6.4 years and calculated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for multiple potential confounders. RESULTS Severe daily symptoms (defined as symptoms interfering with daily work or causing nighttime awakenings on a daily bases, reported by 4.3% of participants) were associated with cancer mortality (HR 1.48, 95% CI: 1.04-2.05). This increase was too small to noticeably affect overall mortality. Mortality was not associated with onset time or frequency of GERD and was not increased with mild to moderate symptoms. CONCLUSION We have observed an association with GERD and increased cancer mortality in a small group of individuals that had severe symptoms. Most patients with mild to moderate GERD can be re-assured that their symptoms are not associated with increased mortality. PMID:24872865

  5. Secretin-stimulating MRCP. The diagnosis of pancreaticobiliary reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motosugi, Utaroh; Ichikawa, Tomoaki; Araki, Tsutomu

    2003-01-01

    Pancreaticobiliary maljunction is a clinically important condition that may cause the occurrence of biliary malignancies. It is widely accepted that continuous reflux of the pancreatic juice into the common bile duct (CBD) and/or gallbladder is essential as an etiology of biliary malignancies. It has been also mentioned that reflux of the pancreatic juice into the CBD/gallbladder is observed regardless of the presence of pancreaticobiliary maljunction. Secretin-stimulating MRCP may demonstrate not only outflow of the pancreatic juice to the duodenum but also the phenomenon of reflux of the pancreatic juice into the CBD/gallbladder as enlargement of the CBD/gallbladder. We investigated whether secretin-stimulating MRCP can diagnose pancreaticobiliary reflux. (author)

  6. Randomized study of lafutidine vs lansoprazole in patients with mild gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Ryuta; Okada, Hiroyuki; Kawano, Seiji; Komazawa, Yoshinori; Yoshinaga, Fumiya; Nagata, Shinji; Inoue, Masafumi; Komatsu, Hirohisa; Onogawa, Seiji; Kushiyama, Yoshinori; Mukai, Shinichi; Todo, Hiroko; Okanobu, Hideharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Tanaka, Shinji; Haruma, Ken; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-06-21

    To compare the clinical efficacy of the second-generation H2RA lafutidine with that of lansoprazole in Japanese patients with mild gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Patients with symptoms of GERD and a diagnosis of grade A reflux esophagitis (according to the Los Angeles classification) were randomized to receive lafutidine (10 mg, twice daily) or lansoprazole (30 mg, once daily) for an initial 8 wk, followed by maintenance treatment comprising half-doses of the assigned drug for 24 wk. The primary endpoint was the frequency and severity of heartburn during initial and maintenance treatment. The secondary endpoints were the sum score of questions 2 and 3 in the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS), and the satisfaction score. Between April 2012 and March 2013, a total of 53 patients were enrolled, of whom 24 and 29 received lafutidine and lansoprazole, respectively. After 8 wk, the frequency and severity of heartburn was significantly reduced in both groups. However, lafutidine was significantly inferior to lansoprazole with regard to the severity of heartburn during initial and maintenance treatment (P = 0.016). The sum score of questions 2 and 3 in the GSRS, and satisfaction scores were also significantly worse in the lafutidine group than the lansoprazole group (P = 0.0068 and P = 0.0048, respectively). The clinical efficacy of lafutidine was inferior to that of lansoprazole, even in Japanese patients with mild GERD.

  7. [Psycho-autonomic aspects in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, and functional esophageal disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogromov, A P; Diukova, G M; Rykova, S M; Bein, A M

    2005-01-01

    The subjects of the study were 79 patients (35 with functional esophageal disorders (FED), 24 with nonerosive reflux disease (NERD), and 20 with erosive reflux disease (ERD), who were selected on the basis of clinical complaints, 24-hour ph-study, and esophagogastroduodenoscopy. All the subjects were evaluated by means of clinical questionnaires and psychological tests: Beck depression test, Spielberg State-Trait Anxiety inventory (STAI), and Toronto alexithymia test (TAS). In FED and NERD patients vs. ERD patients the following abnormalities were observed more frequently: autonomic and functional somatic symptoms (apart from gastrointestinal tract (GIT) complaints) (p eating behavior disorders (DEBQ) (p < 0.05), maternal overprotection in childhood (p < 0.05), psychophysioligical GIT reaction in childhood (p < 0.05), higher levels of state and trait anxiety (p < 0.05), and hypochondria (p < 0.05). The clinical symptom index (CSI) (the sum of stomach and bowel complaints to the sum of esophageal complaints ratio) was calculated. CSI in FED and NERD patients was 1.8, while CSI in ERD patients--0.1 (p < 0). Thus, compared to ERD patients, patients with FED and NERD were characterized by more pronounced emotional, motivational, and autonomic disorders. Besides, CSI demonstrated that the character of gastrointestinal dysfunction was more diffuse in NERD and FED and more local--in ERD patients.

  8. Intestinal and gastric permeability in children with eosinophilic esophagitis and reflux esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Aldrich J T; Persad, Sujata; Slae, Mordechai; Abdelradi, Amr; Kluthe, Cheryl; Shirton, Leanne; Danchuk, Ronda; Persad, Rabin; Meddings, Jon; Huynh, Hien Q

    2015-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic and immune-mediated entity that leads to a characteristic inflammation of esophageal mucosa. Patients complain of dysphagia and reflux-like symptoms. As many as 80% of patients with EoE may also have a history of atopy, and patients with asthma and eczema have previously been shown to have increased intestinal permeability. This study was designed to assess small intestinal and gastric permeability in patients with EoE and to see whether it differed from healthy individuals and patients with reflux esophagitis (RE). Gastric and small intestinal permeability was measured using sugar probe tests containing lactulose, mannitol, and sucrose. Lactulose-to-mannitol (L/M) ratios in the patient's urine were a measure for intestinal permeability, and total sucrose was a measure for gastric permeability. We analyzed samples from 23 patients with EoE, 20 RE, 14 normal upper endoscopy with gastrointestinal symptoms, and 26 healthy controls. All of the 4 groups had L/M ratios less than the upper limit of normal (<0.025). There was no statistically significant difference in gastric permeability between the 4 groups (L/M P = 0.26, sucrose P = 0.46). Our data suggest that an alteration in gastric and intestinal permeability does not play a role in EoE or RE pathogenesis.

  9. Effects of pectin liquid on gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimizu Nobuzo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of thickeners is a standard therapy for decreasing episodes of regurgitation or vomiting in infants. However, it remains to be investigated whether thickener is effective for vomiting and/or chronic respiratory symptoms in children with cerebral palsy. Methods We enrolled 18 neurologically impaired children caused by cerebral palsy, with gastroesophageal reflux disease. In the first part of this study (pH monitoring, subjects were randomly allocated to two groups: fed with a high-pectin diet [enteral formula: pectin liquid = 2:1 (v/v], or a low-pectin diet [enteral formula: pectin liquid = 3:1 (v/v]. Two-channel esophageal pH monitoring was performed over 48 h. In the second part (clinical trial, subjects were fed a high- or low-pectin diet and non-pectin diet for 4 weeks in a crossover manner. Nurses recorded the feeding volume, number of episodes of vomiting, volume of gastric residue, episodes of cough and wheeze, frequency of using oxygen for dyspnea, and the day when the child could return to school. Cough and wheeze were recorded as a cough-score. Results The median value for the % time pH Conclusion Pectin liquid partially decreased gastroesophageal reflux as measured by eshophageal pH monitoring, and might improve vomiting and respiratory symptoms in children with cerebral palsy. Trial registration ISRCTN19787793

  10. Early Relief of Upper Gastrointestinal Dyspeptic Symptoms: A Survey of Empirical Therapy with Pantoprazole in Canadian Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Armstrong

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Upper gastrointestinal symptoms attributable to gastroesophageal reflux disease or peptic ulcer are common, but the outcome of proton pump inhibitor therapy in clinical practice is not well documented.

  11. Serum Gastrin Levels in Patients with Reflux Gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.M. Stepanov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of investigation of basal gastrin serum level and its relationships at chronic reflux gastritis. It has been established that gastrin level was increased in 100 % of patients. It was directly dependent on the biliary acid concentration in gastric acid, H.pylori-infection, stomach alkalization. Thus, duodenogastrical reflux causes hypergastrinemia that can result in chronic gastritis development.

  12. 2014 SSAT State-of-the-Art Conference: advances in diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Kyle A; Pham, Thai H; Spechler, Stuart J; Hunter, John G; Melvin, W Scott; Velanovich, Vic

    2015-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease affects at least 10 % of people in Western societies and produces troublesome symptoms and impairs patients' quality of life. The effective management of GERD is imperative as the diagnosis places a significant cost burden on the United States healthcare system with annual direct cost estimates exceeding 9 billion dollars annually. While effective for many patients, 30-40 % of patients receiving medical therapy with proton pump inhibitors experience troublesome breakthrough symptoms, and recent evidence suggests that this therapy subjects patients to increased risk of complications. Given the high cost of PPI therapy, patients are showing a decrease in willingness to continue with a therapy that provides incomplete relief; however, due to inconsistent outcomes and concern for procedure-related side effects following surgery, only 1 % of the GERD population undergoes anti-reflux surgery annually. The discrepancy between the number of patients who experience suboptimal medical treatment and the number considered for anti-reflux surgery indicates a large therapeutic gap in the management of GERD. The objective of the SSAT State-of-the-Art Conference was to examine technologic advances in the diagnosis and treatment of GERD and to evaluate the ways in which we assess the outcomes of these therapies to provide optimal patient care.

  13. Changes to the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This article explores changes in the ageing gastrointestinal tract, including: » Diminished sense of taste and smell. » Shrinking of the maxillary and mandibular bones in the jaw. » Slowing of oesophageal peristalsis giving a feeling that something is 'stuck in the throat'. » Relaxation of the lower sphincter leading to gastro-oesophageal reflux. » Reduction in gastric bicarbonate and prostaglandin in mucus increasing susceptibility to stomach ulcers. » Changes in villi in the small intestine reducing the area for absorption. » Overpopulation of bacteria in the small intestine leading to decreased absorption of folic acid and minerals.

  14. Prospective analysis of convalescence and early pain after uncomplicated laparoscopic fundoplication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, T; Støckel, M; Klarskov, B

    2004-01-01

    fundoplication for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Patients were recommended to convalesce for 2 days after operation. Duration of convalescence, dysphagia, fatigue, nausea, vomiting and different pain components were registered daily during the first week and on days 10 and 30 after fundoplication. RESULTS...... or severe dysphagia during the study period. Fatigue scores were significantly increased for 6 days after surgery (P ... and dysphagia are significant problems after uncomplicated total laparoscopic fundoplication. The time taken off work and away from recreational activity exceeded the recommended 2 days of convalescence, justifying further efforts to optimize early clinical outcome after total laparoscopic fundoplication....

  15. A population-based nested case control study on recurrent pneumonias in children with severe generalized cerebral palsy: ethical considerations of the design and representativeness of the study sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benninga Marc A

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In children with severe generalized cerebral palsy, pneumonias are a major health issue. Malnutrition, dysphagia, gastro-oesophageal reflux, impaired respiratory function and constipation are hypothesized risk factors. Still, no data are available on the relative contribution of these possible risk factors in the described population. This paper describes the initiation of a study in 194 children with severe generalized cerebral palsy, on the prevalence and on the impact of these hypothesized risk factors of recurrent pneumonias. Methods/Design A nested case-control design with 18 months follow-up was chosen. Dysphagia, respiratory function and constipation will be assessed at baseline, malnutrition and gastro-oesophageal reflux at the end of the follow-up. The study population consists of a representative population sample of children with severe generalized cerebral palsy. Inclusion was done through care-centres in a predefined geographical area and not through hospitals. All measurements will be done on-site which sets high demands on all measurements. If these demands were not met in "gold standard" methods, other methods were chosen. Although the inclusion period was prolonged, the desired sample size of 300 children was not met. With a consent rate of 33%, nearly 10% of all eligible children in the Netherlands are included (n = 194. The study population is subtly different from the non-participants with regard to severity of dysphagia and prevalence rates of pneumonias and gastro-oesophageal reflux. Discussion Ethical issues complicated the study design. Assessment of malnutrition and gastro-oesophageal reflux at baseline was considered unethical, since these conditions can be easily treated. Therefore, we postponed these diagnostics until the end of the follow-up. In order to include a representative sample, all eligible children in a predefined geographical area had to be contacted. To increase the consent rate, on

  16. Usefulness of gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy using the knee-chest position for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, Yasushi; Imai, Yukinori; Ota, Shinichi; Fujiwara, Kenji; Miyamae, Tatsuya

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) scintigraphy using the knee-chest (KC) position for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The study subjects were 37 patients with GERD and 8 healthy volunteers (control group). Endoscopically observed esophageal mucosal breaks were evaluated with the Los Angeles classification. For GER scintigraphy, the subjects ingested liquid yogurt labeled with 99m Tc-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid ( 99m Tc-DTPA) and water. Imaging was performed in the supine and KC position, and GER was graded as 1-4 according to the extent of GER assessed by scintigraphy. GER scintigraphy revealed no reflux in the control group (specificity: 100%). In the supine position, gastroesophageal reflux was observed in 49% of the patients with GERD, compared to 76% in the KC position. 21 of 23 (91%) patients with erosive esophagitis were shown to have GER with scintigraphy. GER scintigraphy revealed severe reflux (grade 3 or 4) (83%, 10/12) in the patients who had severe mucosal breaks (the Los Angels classification grade C or D). GER scintigraphy detected grade 1 or 2 reflux in 7 of the 14 patients who were endoscopically negative. There was a correlation between the endoscopically determined severity of mucosa and the reflux grade which was determined with GER scintigraphy. GER scintigraphy can detect gastroesophageal reflux with a high sensitivity in the KC position and might be a useful method in the screening and assessment of the severity of this disease. This method would be useful for the diagnosis of GERD in endoscopically negative patients. (author)

  17. Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Children & Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Diverticular Disease Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Dumping Syndrome ...

  18. Acid Reflux (GER and GERD) in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Diverticular Disease Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Dumping Syndrome ...

  19. Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Diverticular Disease Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Dumping Syndrome ...

  20. Reflux condensation behavior in SBLOCA tests of ATLAS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeon-Sik; Park, Hyun-Sik; Cho, Seok; Choi, Ki-Yong; Kang, Kyoung-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Behavior of a reflux condensation heat transfer was investigated for SBLOCA tests. • Behavior of the reflux condensate in HL, SG inlet plenum, and U-tubes were evaluated. • Concept of a steam moisturizing phenomenon was introduced and discussed. • Test data and MARS calculations were compared and discussed on the reflux condensate. - Abstract: The behavior of the reflux condensation heat transfer in a hot side steam generator (SG) U-tubes during a cold leg (CL) pipe and a direct vessel injection (DVI) line break in small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) tests of the ATLAS facility was investigated including MARS code calculations. Among the SBLOCA tests, a 6″-CL pipe and 50%-DVI line break SBLOCA test were selected to investigate the behavior of the reflux condensation. A reflux condensation heat transfer seemed to occur from the time the SG U-tubes were half-empty to near the loop seal clearing (LSC). It was found that a transition regime existed between the reflux condensation heat transfer and reverse heat transfer. The remaining reflux condensate in SG U-tubes owing to the counter-current flow limit (CCFL) phenomenon and a separating effect of liquid carry-over and/or entrainment with steam moisturizing seemed to affect the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the transition regime. It was also found that the steam flowrate of the loop pipings and SG U-tubes seemed to have a strong effect on the duration time of the transition regime, e.g., a larger steam flowrate results in a longer duration. From a comparison of the reflux condensation behavior between the ATLAS tests and MARS code calculations, overall qualitative agreements were found between the two cases. The largest discrepancies were found in the SG inlet plenum water level between the two cases, and the authors suggest that the combination effects of the remaining reflux condensate in SG U-tubes and a separating effect of liquid carry-over and/or entrainment with steam

  1. What is the place of empirical proton pump inhibitor testing in the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease? (Description, duration, and dosage).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardar, Rukiye; Keskin, Muharrem

    2017-12-01

    Empirical acid suppression tests that are performed with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are used to detect both the presence of acid-related gastrointestinal symptoms and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In comparison to other diagnostic methods, it is non-invasive, easily applicable, and cost-effective in the diagnosis of GERD. In addition to typical reflux symptoms, it can also be used for diagnostic purposes in patients with non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). If the symptom response is 50% and above when obtained using the PPI test in patients with NCCP, it can be considered as positive and the treatment should be continued sensitivity of the PPI test in patients with typical symptoms of GERD is 27%-89%, while its specificity is 35%-83%. Although there are differences related to the duration and dosage of the PPI test, a significant difference has not been found according to the type of PPI. When PPI test sensitivity and specificity were calculated by cumulatively evaluating the data regarding the PPI test in the literature, a sensitivity of 82.3% and specificity of 51.5% was obtained. It has been found that high doses of PPI were mostly used in studies, and the duration of the median test was 14 days. As a result, the sensitivity of PPI trial test is good, but the specificity is low in the diagnosis of GERD in patients with typical reflux symptoms.

  2. Gastric emptying in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lin; Yang Xiaochuan; Kuang Anren; Li Lixia; Ouyang Qin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and gastric emptying rate was investigated. Results of endoscopy, 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring were also evaluated. Methods: 15 patients were evaluated with endoscopy, pH monitoring and radionuclide gastric emptying. The results were compared with that of 17 control subjects. Correlations of gastric emptying rate and esophagitis, 24-hour pH monitoring between GERD patients and control subjects were also analyzed. Results: Liquid gastric emptying rate of GERD patients was significantly lower than that of control subjects at 15 and 30 min (P 0.05), but there exhibited a linear correlation between 50% solid emptying time and esophagus pH total score (r=0.643, P<0.05). Conclusions: The results indicate a delayed liquid and solid gastric emptying in GERD patients. There is a linear correlation between 50% solid emptying time and esophagus pH total score. Delayed gastric emptying may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of GERD

  3. Indications of 24-h esophageal pH monitoring, capsule pH monitoring, combined pH monitoring with multichannel impedance, esophageal manometry, radiology and scintigraphy in gastroesophageal reflux disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardar, Rukiye; Keskin, Muharrem

    2017-12-01

    Ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring is an essential method in patients exhibiting signs of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) to make an objective diagnosis. Intra-esophageal pH monitoring is important in patients who are non-responsive to medications and in those with extraesophageal symptoms, particularly in NERD, before surgical interventions. With the help of the wireless capsule pH monitoring, measurements can be made under more physiological conditions as well as longer recordings can be performed because the investigation can be better tolerated by patients. Ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring can be detected within normal limits in 17%-31.4% of the patients with endoscopic esophagitis; therefore, normal pH monitoring cannot exclude the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Multi-channel intraluminal impedance pH (MII-pH) technology have been developed and currently the most sensitive tool to evaluate patients with both typical and atypical reflux symptoms. The sensitivity of a pH catheter test is 58% for the detection of acid reflux compared with MII-pH monitoring; further, its sensitivity is 28% for the detection of weak acid reflux compared with MII-pH monitoring. By adding impedance to pH catheter in patients with reflux symptoms, particularly in those receiving PPIs, it has been demonstrated that higher rates of diagnoses and symptom analyses can be obtained than those using only pH catheter. Esophageal manometry is used in the evaluation of patients with functional dysphagia and unexplained noncardiac chest pain and prior to antireflux surgery. The use of esophageal manometry is suitable for the detection of esophageal motor patterns and extreme motor abnormalities (e.g., achalasia and extreme hypomotility). Esophageal manometry and ambulatory pH monitoring are often used in assessments prior to laparoscopic antireflux surgery and in patients with reflux symptoms refractory to medical treatment. Although the esophageal motility is

  4. Airway Hypersensitivity, Reflux, and Phonation Contribute to Chronic Cough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, David O.; Slaughter, James C.; Ates, Fehmi; Higginbotham, Tina; Stevens, Kristin L.; Garrett, C. Gaelyn; Vaezi, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Although chronic cough is a common, its etiology is often elusive, making patient management a challenge. Gastroesophageal reflux and airway hypersensitivity can cause chronic cough. We explored the relationship between reflux, phonation, and cough in patients with idiopathic chronic cough. Methods We performed a blinded, cross-sectional study of non-smoking patients with chronic cough (duration > 8 weeks) refractory to reflux treatment referred to the Digestive Disease Center at Vanderbilt University. All underwent 24-hour acoustic recording concurrently and temporally synchronized with ambulatory pH-impedance monitoring. Cough, phonation, and pH-impedance events were recorded. We evaluated the temporal relationship between cough and phonation or reflux events using Poisson and logistic regression. Results Seventeen patients met the inclusion criteria (88% female; 100% Caucasian; median age, 63 years and interquartile age range, 52–66 years; mean body mass index, 30.6 and interquartile range 27.9–34.0); there were 2048 analyzable coughing events. The probability of subsequent coughing increased with higher burdens of preceding cough, reflux, or phonation. Within the first 15 min after a cough event, the cough event itself was the main trigger of subsequent cough events. After this period, de novo coughing occurred with increases of 1.46-fold in association with reflux alone (95% confidence interval, 1.17–1.82; Pcough events in patients with idiopathic chronic cough. Reflux events were more strongly associated with increased rate of coughing. Our findings support the concept that airway hypersensitivity is a cause of chronic cough, and that the vocal folds may be an effector in chronic cough. ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01263626. PMID:26492842

  5. Control of acid and duodenogastroesophageal reflux (DGER) in patients with Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yachimski, Patrick; Maqbool, Sabba; Bhat, Yasser M; Richter, Joel E; Falk, Gary W; Vaezi, Michael F

    2015-08-01

    Symptom eradication in patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) does not guarantee control of acid or duodenogastroesophageal reflux (DGER). Continued reflux of acid and/or DGER may increase risk of neoplastic progression and may decrease the likelihood of columnar mucosa eradication after ablative therapy. To date, no study has addressed whether both complete acid and DGER control is possible in patients with BE. This prospective study was designed to assess the effect of escalating-dose proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy on esophageal acid and DGER. Patients with BE (≥3 cm in length) underwent simultaneous ambulatory prolonged pH and DGER monitoring after at least 1 week off PPI therapy followed by testing on therapy after 1 month of twice-daily rabeprazole (20 mg). In those with continued acid and/or DGER, the tests were repeated after 1 month of double-dose (40 mg twice daily) rabeprazole. The primary study outcome was normalization of both acid and DGER. Symptom severity was assessed on and off PPI therapy employing a four-point ordinal scale. A total of 29 patients with BE consented for pH monitoring, of whom 23 also consented for both pH and DGER monitoring off and on therapy (83% male; mean age 58 years; mean body mass index 29; mean Barrett's length 6.0 cm). Median (interquartile range) total % time pH 0.14 off PPI therapy were 18.4 (11.7-20.0) and 9.7 (5.0-22.2), respectively. In addition, 26/29 (90%) had normalized acid and 18/23 (78%) had normalized DGER on rabeprazole 20 mg. Among those not achieving normalization on 20 mg twice daily, 3/3 (100%) had normalized acid and 4/5 (80%) had normalized DGER on rabeprazole 40 mg twice daily. All subjects had symptoms controlled on rabeprazole 20 mg twice daily. Univariate analysis found no predictor for normalization of physiologic parameters based on demographics. Symptom control does not guarantee normalization of acid and DGER at standard dose of twice-daily PPI therapy. Normalization of

  6. Enterogastric reflux and gastric clearance of refluxate in normal subjects and in patients with and without bile vomiting following peptic ulcer surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, C.; Hulks, G.; Cuschieri, A.

    1986-01-01

    A noninvasive scintigraphic technique was used to estimate enterogastric reflux and subsequent gastric evacuation of refluxate in 35 normal, healthy subjects and 55 patients previously treated by vagotomy or partial gastrectomy. Reflux was provoked by a milk drink and quantitated by counting 99Tcm-EHIDA activity within the gastric area during gamma camera imaging. Seven normal subjects (20%) showed reflux of 5-18% of initial activity (mean: 10%), with peak values occurring at 5-30 minutes (mean: 14 minutes) following the milk. Gastric evacuation of activity in these subjects was monoexponential (r = 0.993, T1/2 = 24.1 minutes). Reflux occurred more frequently than normal in patients with truncal vagotomy and drainage (22/28 patients) and partial gastrectomy (20/21 patients). All of 16 patients with Billroth II anastomoses exhibited reflux, which was excessive compared with refluxing normal subjects (mean: 25%; p less than 0.01) and occurred later into the study (mean: 34 minutes; p less than 0.01). Ten of 11 asymptomatic patients showed reflux of similar amounts of activity (mean: 21%) compared with 16 patients who complained of bile vomiting (mean: 22%). However, asymptomatic patients exhibited gastric evacuation of refluxate at a rate similar to that of refluxing normal subjects, while bile vomiters showed significant gastric retention of refluxate at 25-30 minutes following peak gastric activity (p less than 0.05). This result confirms that post-operative bile vomiting is essentially a problem of gastric emptying

  7. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: review of 500 cases in single surgeon Australian practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Simon C; Le Page, Philip A; Taylor, Craig J

    2015-09-01

    Reported results and techniques of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) are variable. Our objective was to assess results of weight loss, complications and reflux in a large consecutive series of LSG, describing technical detail which contributed to outcomes. Retrospective review of prospectively collected data of 500 consecutive patients undergoing LSG. Patient demographics, weight loss, complications and functional outcomes were analysed and operative technique described. Five hundred patients underwent LSG over 3 years (37 revisional). Mean (range) preoperative body mass index was 45 kg/m(2) (35-76 kg/m(2) ). Mean follow-up and length of hospital stay were 14 months (1-34) and 3.8 days (3-12), respectively. All-cause 30-day readmission rate 1.2%. Mean excess weight loss (interquartile range, available patient data) was 43% (22-65%, 423 patients), 58% (45-70%, 352 patients), 76% (52-84%, 258 patients), 71% (51-87%, 102 patients) and 73% (55-86%, 13 patients) at 3, 6, 12, 24, 36 months, respectively. There was no mortality. Intraoperative complications occurred in two (0.4%) - splenic bleeding; bougie related oesophageal injury. Early surgical complications in four (1.2%) patients (one staple line leak and three post-operative bleeds). Other early complications occurred in three (0.6%) patients (one pseudomembranous colitis; one central line sepsis; one portal venous thrombosis) and late in four (0.8%) patients (three port-site incisional hernias; mid-sleeve stricture requiring endoscopic dilatation). Gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms decreased from 45 to 6%. With attention to detail, LSG can lead to good excess weight loss with minimal complications. Tenants to success include repair of hiatal laxity, generous width at angula incisura and complete resection of posterior fundus. © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  8. The diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Mouzan, Mohammad I.; Abdullah, Asaad M.

    2002-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common disorder affecting children worldwide. The objective of this study is to report our experience on the accuracy of tests used for the diagnosis ofgastroesophageal reflux disease with emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages of each of them. This study took place in the Pediatric Gastroenterology Division, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, during the period of 1994 through to 1999. Results of barium meal, 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring, endoscopy, and gastrointestinal scintigraphy are analyzed and compared in children with and without gastroesophageal reflux disease. One hundred and forty-four children were investigated. The diagnosis was confirmed in 85 and excluded in 59 children, who will be considered as patients without gastroesophageal reflux disease. The results of barium meal, 24 hour pH monitoring, endoscopy, and gastrointestinal scintigraphy were positive in 80%, 78%, 92%, and 70% of the patients with gastroesophageal disease. The same studies were falsely positive in 29%, 9%, 19%, and 0% of those without gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal pH was the most specific diagnostic study (91%), whereas endoscopy was the most sensitive (92%) and had the best positive predictive value (95%). The results of this study are similar to reports from other parts of the world. It is stressed that all procedures have important advantages and disadvantages indicating that the selection of procedures should be individualized and based on the clinical situation. (author)

  9. Gastric emptying of solid food in patients with gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shay, S.; Eggli, D.; Van Nostrand, D.; Johnson, L.

    1985-01-01

    While delayed solid gastric emptying (GE) has been reported in patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER), the relationship of GE to daytime and/or nighttime reflux patterns, and the severity of endoscopic esophagitis are unknown. The authors measured GE in a study population of symptomatic patients (n=33) with abnormal 24 hour pH monitoring (24 hr pH). The study population was divided into two groups by esophagoscopy; those with (E+=22); and 2) those without (E-=11) erosive esophagitis and/or Barrett's esophagus. GE was measured in all patients and in 15 normal volunteers (NL) by the in vivo labelling of chicken liver with Tc-99m-SC, which was in turn diced into 1 cm. cubes and given in 7 1/2 oz. of beef stew. Upright one minute anterior and posterior digital images were obtained every 15 min. for 2.5 hours. 24 hour pH was divided into daytime (upright) and nighttime (supine) segments, and acid exposure was defined as % time pH < 4 for that posture. There was no correlation between GE T 1/2 and acid exposure, daytime or nighttime, for the patient population as a whole. However, patients with the longest GE T1/2 tended to have severe daytime reflux. The authors rarely found delayed solid food gastric emptying in patients with reflux; moreover, they found no association between GE and either diurnal reflux patterns on 24 hr pH or the severity of endoscopic esophagitis

  10. Gastroplasty and fundoplication in the management of complex reflux problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, F G; Cooer, J D; Nelems, J M

    1978-11-01

    Between 1963 and 1976, 220 patients with complex reflux problems were managed by combining a modified Collis gastroplasty with a Belsey type of partial fundoplication. All patients had one or more of the following complicating conditions considered indications for the combined operation: peptic stricture (104), esophagitis and shortening without stricture (25), one or more prior hiatal repairs (65), massive herniation (33), and motor disorders associated with reflux (26). Ninety-six percent of the patients were evaluated by personal interview from 1 to 15 years after repair. The operative mortality rate was 0.5 percent. The incidence of significant symptomatic reflux requiring medical therapy was 3 percent and the incidence of troublesome dysphagia was 11 percent. No patient has required further operation for the relief of recurrent symptomatic reflux. Two patients required additional operation for severe residual dysphagia. Twenty patients managed by this repair were evaluated by preoperative, intraoperative, and sequential postoperative esophageal pressure studies. The mean postoperative pressure of 21.4 mm. Hg was more than double the preoperative value. Two publications from other centers reported on similar groups of patients managed by gastroplasty and partial fundoplication, evaluated by preoperative and postoperative esophageal pressures. In these latter publications, the percentage increase in postoperative lower esophageal pressure was significantly less than in our study, and a much higher incidence of symptomatic reflux was recorded. We suggest that the differences in postoperative pressures observed in account for the pronounced differences in the quality of results obtained.

  11. Clinical pathology of primary bile reflux gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping YAO

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the clinical and pathological features of primary bile reflux gastritis(BRG.Methods Endoscopy,Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori detection,and histopathologic examination were performed in 218 patients with primary BRG(observed group and 236 patients with simple chronic gastritis(SCG,control group as identified by gastroscope in order to analyze the endoscopic abnormalities,the frequency of H.pylori infection,pathological features and scores of inflammation.Results The frequency of H.pylori infection was 39.0%(85/218 in the observed group,which was significantly lower than that in the control group [52.1%(123/236].The topographic abnormalities of the antral mucosa as detected by gastroscopy,i.e.,congestion,hemorrhagic spots,erosion were not significantly different between BRG and SCG patients(P > 0.05.The scores of chronic and active inflammation were higher in patients when H.pylori infection was present than in patients without H.pylori infection in both groups(P < 0.05.The scores of inflammation,the detection rates of the antral intestinal metaplasia,antral atrophy and atypical hyperplasia were all higher in observed group than in control group(P < 0.05.The incidence of lengthening of gastric pits,telangiectasis or interstitial edema in BRG patients was also significantly higher than those in SCG patients(P < 0.05.Conclusions Primary BRG shows features of chemical gastritis with a higher tendency toward mucosal atrophy,intestinal metaplasia and atypical hyperplasia.Gastropic examination and biopsy should be emphasized.

  12. Effects of esomeprazole on sleep in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease as assessed on actigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramoto, Keiko; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Ochi, Masahiro; Okuyama, Masatsugu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Kenji; Watanabe, Toshio; Tominaga, Kazunari; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is strongly associated with sleep disturbances. Although treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) helps to improve GERD symptoms and subjective sleep parameters, the effects of PPI therapy on objective sleep parameters are conflicting. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of esomeprazole treatment on GERD symptoms and sleep parameters assessed using actigraphs and questionnaires. Thirteen patients with GERD received 20 mg of esomeprazole once daily for two weeks. The patients wore actigraphs from three days before the initiation of PPI treatment to the end of therapy. They were also asked to answer the following self-reported questionnaires: Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of GERD (FSSG), Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Objective sleep parameters were evaluated using actigraphy. Treatment with esomeprazole significantly decreased the total FSSG score, including the scores for reflux and dysmotility, as well as the ESS score, although it had no effect on the PSQI score. After the second week of treatment, esomeprazole significantly decreased the wake time (from 47.5±39.6 min to 36.0±27.1 min) and sleep latency period (from 19.5±19.8 min to 9.9±10.2 min) and increased the percentage of sleep time (from 89.1±8.8% to 91.9±6.3%); however, improvements were not noted in all objective parameters. Esomeprazole treatment significantly improves various objective sleep parameters in Japanese patients with GERD. Further placebo-controlled randomized trials are needed to obtain detailed results.

  13. An update on the use of pantoprazole as a treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sony Mathews

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sony Mathews, Ashley Reid, Chenlu Tian, Qiang CaiDivision of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University, School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USAAbstract: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a chronic, recurrent disease that affects nearly 19 million people in the US. The mainstay of therapy for GERD is acid suppression. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs are the most effective medication for both initial treatment and maintenance therapy of GERD. Pantoprazole, a first-generation PPI, was approved by the FDA in 2000 for the treatment of erosive esophagitis associated with GERD. It has been used in more than 100 different countries worldwide. It is one of the few PPIs available in multiple forms: a delayed-release oral capsule, oral suspension, and intravenous. Pantoprazole been shown to improve acid reflux-related symptoms, heal esophagitis, and improve health-related quality of life more effectively than histamine-2 receptor antagonists. Evaluated in over 100 clinical trials, pantoprazole has an excellent safety profile, is as efficacious as other PPIs, and has a low incidence of drug interactions. It has also been shown to be safe and effective in special patient populations, such as the elderly and those with renal or moderate liver disease.Keywords: pantoprazole, GERD, esophagitis

  14. Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for severe gastroesophageal reflux disease: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMaria, E J; Siuta, M; Widmeyer, J; Zfass, A M

    1997-03-01

    The advent of the laparoscopic approach to Nissen fundoplication has led to a resurgence in enthusiasm for the surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, controversy exists as to which subgroups of GERD patients are best treated surgically. The relative success of treatment with medical and surgical intervention in terms of both symptom control and objective resolution of esophageal injury must be weighed against the relative costs of each therapeutic strategy in both the short and long term, given that GERD tends to be a lifelong disorder. The following is the transcribed text of a debate held at the Medical College of Virginia as part of a continuing medical education program in which the statement "Laparoscopic antireflux surgery is superior to medical treatment for severe gastroesophageal reflux disease" was contested. Representatives from the departments of surgery and gastroenterology provided arguments supporting their respective sides of this issue. The purpose was not to promote polarization in treatment selection, but to review the available data in a forum that could promote development of a rational algorithm for clinical decision-making in patients with GERD who might benefit from antireflux surgery. Final comments from the authors are provided in an attempt to synthesize the arguments into a reasonable strategy for individual case management.

  15. Zonulin is not increased in the cardiac and esophageal mucosa of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wex, Thomas; Mönkemüller, Klaus; Kuester, Doerthe; Fry, Lucia; Kandulski, Arne; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Human Zonulin, related to the Zonula occludens toxin of Vibrio cholerae, regulates intestinal permeability and is induced in inflammatory disorders of the lower GI tract. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is associated with an impairment of epithelial barrier function. Here, we studied expression of zonulin in the gastroesophageal mucosa of 58 patients with typical reflux symptoms and 27 asymptomatic controls. During endoscopy, multiple biopsies from gastroesophageal mucosa were obtained for routine histopathology (Helicobacter pylori-status, inflammation) and gene expression analysis (immunohistochemistry, ELISA). Patients with GERD presented with typical histopathological alterations like elongation of papillae (P=0.015), basal cell hyperplasia (PZonulin was found to be expressed ubiquitously in gastroesophageal mucosa. Mucosal levels in controls ranged between 2.2 and 3.7 ng/microg total protein. Mean values were significantly higher in antrum (3.3+/-1.7 ng/microg) than cardia (2.7+/-1.2n g/microg) and esophagus (2.2+/-1.3 ng/microg) (Pzonulin expression in gastroesophageal mucosa. In conclusion, despite its established role for intestinal permeability, Zonulin seems not to be involved in the regulation of epithelial barrier function in relation to GERD.

  16. [Supraventricular tachycardia in newborns and its association with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes, Ángeles; Alshweki, Ayham; Pérez-Muñuzuri, Alejandro; Couce, María-Luz

    2017-10-01

    Supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) is the most common arrhythmia in the neonatal period, but its association with other triggering processes is not well established. The aim of the study was to analyse the possible relationship between neonatal SVT and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a condition which was recently linked to atrial arrhythmias. A retrospective longitudinal descriptive study was conducted over a period of 5years on newborns who were diagnosed with SVT in a level III neonatal unit, assessing morphological aspects, associated symptoms, and treatments received. Its association with GERD and the impact of this on SVT was studied. Eighteen patients (1.2 per 1000 newborns) were diagnosed with SVT. Fifty percent of them were combined with clinically significant GERD (P=.01), and all of them received drug treatment. The average time of control of SVT without GERD since diagnosis was 6 days (95% CI: 2.16-9.84, with a median of 3) and 7.6 days when both pathologies were present (95% CI: 4.14-10.9, with a median of 7) (P=.024). Patients with SVT in the neonatal period frequently have GERD, and this combination leads to more difficulty in controlling the tachycardia. The reflux could act as a trigger or perpetuator of arrhythmia, therefore it is important to find and treat GERD in infants with SVT. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Emerging dilemmas in the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrilas, Peter; Yadlapati, Rena; Roman, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is common, but less so than widely reported because of inconsistencies in definition. In clinical practice, the diagnosis is usually based on a symptom assessment without testing, and the extent of diagnostic testing pursued should be limited to that which guides management or which protects the patient from the risks of a potentially morbid treatment or an undetected early (or imminent) esophageal adenocarcinoma or which does both. When testing is pursued, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most useful initial diagnostic test because it evaluates for the major potential morbidities (Barrett’s, stricture, and cancer) associated with GERD and facilitates the identification of some alternative diagnostic possibilities such as eosinophilic esophagitis. However, endoscopy is insensitive for diagnosing GERD because most patients with GERD have non-erosive reflux disease, a persistent diagnostic dilemma. Although many studies have tried to objectify the diagnosis of GERD with improved technology, this is ultimately a pragmatic diagnosis based on response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, and, in the end, response to PPI therapy becomes the major indication for continued PPI therapy. Conversely, in the absence of objective criteria for GERD and the absence of apparent clinical benefit, PPI therapy is not indicated and should be discontinued. PPIs are well tolerated and safe, but nothing is perfectly safe, and in the absence of measurable benefit, even a miniscule risk dominates the risk-benefit assessment. PMID:29034088

  18. Emerging dilemmas in the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kahrilas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is common, but less so than widely reported because of inconsistencies in definition. In clinical practice, the diagnosis is usually based on a symptom assessment without testing, and the extent of diagnostic testing pursued should be limited to that which guides management or which protects the patient from the risks of a potentially morbid treatment or an undetected early (or imminent esophageal adenocarcinoma or which does both. When testing is pursued, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most useful initial diagnostic test because it evaluates for the major potential morbidities (Barrett’s, stricture, and cancer associated with GERD and facilitates the identification of some alternative diagnostic possibilities such as eosinophilic esophagitis. However, endoscopy is insensitive for diagnosing GERD because most patients with GERD have non-erosive reflux disease, a persistent diagnostic dilemma. Although many studies have tried to objectify the diagnosis of GERD with improved technology, this is ultimately a pragmatic diagnosis based on response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI therapy, and, in the end, response to PPI therapy becomes the major indication for continued PPI therapy. Conversely, in the absence of objective criteria for GERD and the absence of apparent clinical benefit, PPI therapy is not indicated and should be discontinued. PPIs are well tolerated and safe, but nothing is perfectly safe, and in the absence of measurable benefit, even a miniscule risk dominates the risk-benefit assessment.

  19. Omeprazole for Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease during Pregnancy and Lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Marshall

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux is a common complication of pregnancy and lactation. However, the safety of many effective medical therapies, including oral proton pump inhibitors, has not been well defined. The administration of oral omeprazole to a 41-year-old female during the third trimester of pregnancy, after ranitidine and cisapride failed to control her refractory gastroesophageal reflux, is reported. No adverse fetal effects were apparent, and the patient elected to continue omeprazole therapy (20 mg/day while breastfeeding. Peak omeprazole concentrations in breast milk (58 nM, 3 h after ingestion were less than 7% of the peak serum concentration (950 nM at 4 h, indicating minimal secretion. Although omeprazole is a potentially useful therapy for refractory gastroesophageal reflux during pregnancy and lactation, further data are needed to define better its safety and efficacy.

  20. Applying the ALARA concept to the evaluation of vesicoureteric reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Richard S.; Diamond, David A. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Urology, Boston, MA (United States); Chow, Jeanne S. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2006-09-15

    The voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) is a widely used study to define lower urinary tract anatomy and to diagnose vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) in children. We examine the technical advances in the VCUG and other examinations for reflux that have reduced radiation exposure of children, and we give recommendations for the use of imaging studies in four groups of children: (1) children with urinary tract infection, (2) siblings of patients with VUR, (3) infants with antenatal hydronephrosis (ANH), and (4) children with a solitary functioning kidney. By performing examinations with little to no radiation, carefully selecting only the children who need imaging studies and judiciously timing follow-up examinations, we can reduce the radiation exposure of children being studied for reflux. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of reflux nephropathy, pyelonephritis and renal dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grattan-Smith, J.D.; Little, Stephen B.; Jones, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    MR urography has the potential to significantly improve our understanding of the relationship between reflux nephropathy, pyelonephritis, vesicoureteric reflux and renal dysplasia. MR urography utilizes multiple parameters to assess both renal anatomy and function and provides a more complete characterization of acquired and congenital disease. Pyelonephritis and renal scarring can be distinguished by assessing the parenchymal contours and signal intensity. Characteristic imaging features of renal dysplasia include small size, subcortical cysts, disorganized architecture, decreased and patchy contrast enhancement as well as a dysmorphic pelvicalyceal system. Because of its ability to subdivide and categorize this heterogeneous group of disorders, it seems inevitable that MR urography will replace DMSA renal scintigraphy as the gold standard for assessment of pyelonephritis and renal scarring. MR urography will contribute to our understanding of renal dysplasia and its relationship to reflux nephropathy. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of reflux nephropathy, pyelonephritis and renal dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grattan-Smith, J.D. [Emory University School of Medicine, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Little, Stephen B. [Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jones, Richard A. [Emory University School of Medicine, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2008-01-15

    MR urography has the potential to significantly improve our understanding of the relationship between reflux nephropathy, pyelonephritis, vesicoureteric reflux and renal dysplasia. MR urography utilizes multiple parameters to assess both renal anatomy and function and provides a more complete characterization of acquired and congenital disease. Pyelonephritis and renal scarring can be distinguished by assessing the parenchymal contours and signal intensity. Characteristic imaging features of renal dysplasia include small size, subcortical cysts, disorganized architecture, decreased and patchy contrast enhancement as well as a dysmorphic pelvicalyceal system. Because of its ability to subdivide and categorize this heterogeneous group of disorders, it seems inevitable that MR urography will replace DMSA renal scintigraphy as the gold standard for assessment of pyelonephritis and renal scarring. MR urography will contribute to our understanding of renal dysplasia and its relationship to reflux nephropathy. (orig.)

  3. Efficacy of low-dose lansoprazole in the treatment of non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease: Influence of infection by Helicobacter pylori Eficacia de lansoprazol a dosis bajas en el tratamiento de la enfermedad por reflujo gastroesofágico no erosiva: Influencia de la infección por Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    M. Castro Fernández; E. García Díaz; J. L. Larraona; M. C. Rodríguez Hornillo; E. Lamas Rojas; D. Núñez Hospital; M. Pallarés Querol

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the most effective drugs to cure peptic esophagitis and control the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In most patients with GERD esophagitis is not detected by endoscopy, which represents GERD with a negative endoscopy or non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). The influence of infection by H. pylori in the evolution of GERD is controversial since a protective action is identified by some studies, but not all. We conducted a clinica...

  4. Surgical treatment of the non-complicated gastroesophageal reflux: fundoplication without division of the short gastric vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FELIX Valter Nilton

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background - There is today a significant greater number of laparoscopic antireflux procedures for the surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease and there are yet controversies about the necessity of division of the short gastric vessels and full mobilization of the gastric fundus to perform an adequate fundoplication. Aim - To verify the results of the surgical treatment of non-complicated gastroesophageal reflux disease performing Rossetti modification of the Nissen fundoplication. Patients and Methods - Fourteen patients were operated consecutively and prospectively (mean age 44.07 years; all had erosive esophagitis without Barrett's endoscopic signals (grade 3, Savary-Miller and they were submitted to the Rossetti modification of the Nissen fundoplication. Endoscopy, esophageal manometry and pHmetry were performed before the procedure and around 18 months postoperatively. Results - There was no morbidity, transient dysphagia average was 18.42 days; there was no register of dehiscence or displacement of the fundoplication and only one patient revealed a light esophagitis at postoperative endoscopy; the others presented a normal endoscopic view of the distal esophagus. All noticed a marked improvement of preoperative symptoms. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure changed from 5.82 mm Hg (preoperative mean to 12 mm Hg (postoperative mean; lower esophageal sphincter relaxing pressure, from 0.38 mm Hg to 5.24 mm Hg and DeMeester score, from 16.75 to 0.8. Conclusion - Rossetti procedure (fundoplication without division of the short gastric vessels is an effective surgical method to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  5. Clinical nursing of pelvic neoplasm treated with infusion chemotherapy by using an anti-reflux arterial port-catheter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Li; Yuan Chanjuan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical nursing care for patients with pelvic neoplasm who were treated with infusion chemotherapy by using an anti-reflux arterial port-catheter system. Methods: After the implantation of an anti-reflux arterial port-catheter system was successfully completed, intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy was carried out in 17 patients with pelvic neoplasm and the infusion chemotherapy was repeated for several times. The pre-procedural clinical nursing care was well done and the technique of proper placement was well grasped. The side effects of chemotherapy drugs and complications were dealt with in time. Medical orientation at discharge time included the protection methods for port-catheter system. Results: Seventeen patients received infusion chemotherapy successfully several times (ranged from 3 to 8 times) with a scheduled regular interval time. No severe complications occurred. No catheter leakage nor obvious irritation and compression symptoms of local skin developed during infusion period. Of the 17 patients, 6 had a complete response, 9 achieved a partial response, while the remaining 2 failed to respond. Conclusion: In accordance with characteristics of infusion chemotherapy by using an anti-reflux arterial port-catheter system, the reasonable and effective nursing care is important to guarantee the achievement of a successful performance and a satisfactory therapeutic result. (authors)

  6. Simulated Reflux Decreases Vocal Fold Epithelial Barrier Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Elizabeth; Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi

    2010-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis The vocal fold epithelium provides a barrier to the entry of inhaled and systemic challenges. However, the location of the epithelium makes it vulnerable to damage. Past research suggests, but does not directly demonstrate, that exposure to gastric reflux adversely affects the function of the epithelial barrier. Understanding the nature of reflux-induced epithelial barrier dysfunction is necessary to better recognize the mechanisms for vocal fold susceptibility to this disease. Therefore, we examined the effects of physiologically relevant reflux challenges on vocal fold transepithelial resistance and gross epithelial and subepithelial appearance. Study Design Ex vivo, mixed design with between-group and repeated-measures analyses. Methods Healthy, native porcine vocal folds (N = 52) were exposed to physiologically relevant acidic pepsin, acid-only, or pepsin-only challenges and examined with electrophysiology and light microscopy. For all challenges, vocal folds exposed to a neutral pH served as control. Results Acidic pepsin and acid-only challenges, but not pepsin-only or control challenges significantly reduced transepithelial resistance within 30 minutes. Reductions in transepithelial resistance were irreversible. Challenge exposure produced minimal gross changes in vocal fold epithelial or subepithelial appearance as evidenced by light microscopy. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that acidic environments characteristic of gastric reflux compromise epithelial barrier function without gross structural changes. In healthy, native vocal folds, reductions in transepithelial resistance could reflect reflux-related epithelial disruption. These results might guide the development of pharmacologic and therapeutic recommendations for patients with reflux, such as continued acid-suppression therapy and patient antireflux behavioral education. PMID:20564752

  7. Retrospective evaluation of patients of gastroesophageal reflux disease treated with laparoscopic Nissen′s fundoplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagpal Anish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate retrospectively the outcome of laparoscopic fundoplication in a cohort of patients with typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients with typical symptoms of GERD, who were operated for laparoscopic Nissen′s fundoplication from March 2001 to August 2008, were studied. The study was limited to patients with positive findings on upper gastrointestinal (GI endoscopy done by us and "typical" symptoms (heartburn, regurgitation, and dysphagia of GERD. Laparoscopic Nissen′s fundoplication was performed when clinical assessment suggested adequate oesophageal motility and length. Only one patient who had negative endoscopic findings underwent a 24-h pH monitoring before surgery. Outcome measures included assessment of the relief of the primary symptom responsible for surgery in the early postoperative period; the patient′s evaluation of outcome, and quality of life after surgery. Results: Relief of the primary symptom responsible for surgery was achieved in 95.24% of patients at a mean follow-up of 28 months. Thirty-five patients were asymptomatic, two had minor gastrointestinal symptoms not requiring medical therapy, three patients had gastrointestinal symptoms requiring medical therapy/Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPI and in two patients the symptoms worsened after surgery. There were no deaths. Clinically significant complications occurred in six patients. Median hospital stay was 3 days, decreasing from 6 days in the first 10 patients to 3 days in the last 10 patients. Conclusions: Laparoscopic Nissen′s fundoplication is the choice of operation for clinically symptomatic GERD patients.

  8. Pressure and X-ray recording of reflux into the thoracic stomach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemelman, W. A.; Brummelkamp, W. H.; van der Hulst, V. P.; Reeders, J. W.; Roos, C. M.; Klopper, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage, pulmonary aspiration and reflux-esophagitis might be induced or aggravated by the increased duodenogastric reflux observed in the thoracic stomach. In this study, the effect of respiration on the reflux-promoting pressure gradient in the intrathoracally located stomach was

  9. Urodynamics in boys after prenatally diagnosed vesicoureteric reflux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Jørgen Mogens

    1996-01-01

    Over the years, several theories have been presented regarding the pathogenesis of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children without neurological disease or posterior urethral valves. Primary VUR is one of many fetal uropathies detectable by prenatal sonography. Thirteen boys with a prenatal...... of patients with VUR and impaired renal function compared to: (1) reflux patients with bilateral normal renal function; and (2) "normal" controls. Patients with normal bilateral renal and bladder function had a low risk of urinary tract infection during the period of follow-up (1 to 6 years). Early urodynamic...

  10. Exhaled breath condensate pH does not discriminate asymptomatic gastroesophageal reflux or the response to lansoprazole treatment in children with poorly controlled asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Holbrook, Janet T; Wei, Christine Y; Brown, Meredith S; Wise, Robert A; Teague, W Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Although exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH has been identified as an "emerging" biomarker of interest for asthma clinical trials, the clinical determinants of EBC pH remain poorly understood. Other studies have associated acid reflux-induced respiratory symptoms, for example, cough, with transient acidification of EBC. We sought to determine the clinical and physiologic correlates of EBC acidification in a highly characterized sample of children with poorly controlled asthma. We hypothesized that (1) children with asymptomatic gastroesophageal reflux determined by 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring would have a lower EBC pH than children without gastroesophageal reflux, (2) treatment with lansoprazole would alter EBC pH in those children, and (3) EBC acidification would be associated with increased asthma symptoms, poorer asthma control and quality of life, and increased formation of breath nitrogen oxides (NOx). A total of 110 children, age range 6 to 17 years, with poor asthma control and esophageal pH data enrolled in the Study of Acid Reflux in Children with Asthma (NCT00442013) were included. Children submitted EBC samples for pH and NOx measurement at randomization and at study weeks 8, 16, and 24. Serial EBC pH measurements failed to distinguish asymptomatic gastroesophageal reflux and was not associated with breath NOx formation. EBC pH also did not discriminate asthma characteristics such as medication and health care utilization, pulmonary function, and asthma control and quality of life both at baseline and across the study period. Despite the relative ease of EBC collection, EBC pH as a biomarker does not provide useful information of children with asthma who were enrolled in asthma clinical trials. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Gastroesophageal reflux disease after per-oral endoscopic myotomy as compared with Heller's myotomy with fundoplication: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repici, Alessandro; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Maselli, Roberta; Mazza, Fabrizio; Correale, Loredana; Mandolesi, Daniele; Bellisario, Cristina; Sethi, Amrita; Kashab, Mouen; Rösch, Thomas; Hassan, Cesare

    2017-11-01

    Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) represents a less invasive alternative, as compared with conventional laparoscopic Heller's myotomy (LHM), for achalasia patients. It cannot be excluded, however, that the lack of fundoplication after POEM may result in a higher incidence of reflux disease, as compared with LHM. The aim was to conduct a systematic review of prospective studies reporting the incidence of reflux disease developed after POEM and LHM. Literature search with electronic databases was performed (up to February 2017) to identify full articles on the incidence of gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms, endoscopic- and pH-monitoring-findings after POEM and LHM (with fundoplication). Proportions and rates were pooled by means of a random or fixed effects models, according to the level of heterogeneity between studies. After applying the selection criteria, 17 and 28 studies, including 1,542 and 2,581 subjects who underwent POEM and LHM, respectively, were included. Pooled rate of postprocedure symptoms was 19.0% (95% CI, 15.7%-22.8%) after POEM, and 8.8% (95% CI, 5.3%-14.1%) after LHM, respectively. Pooled rate estimate of abnormal acid exposure at pH-monitoring was 39.0% (95% CI, 24.5%-55.8%) after POEM, and 16.8% (95% CI, 10.2%-26.4%) after LHM, respectively. Rate of post-POEM esophagitis was 29.4% (95% CI, 18.5%-43.3%) after POEM, and 7.6% (95% CI, 4.1%-13.7%) after LHM. At meta-regression, heterogeneity was partly explained by POEM approach and study population. Incidence of reflux-disease appears to be significantly more frequent after POEM than after LHM with fundoplication. pH-monitoring and appropriate treatment after POEM should be considered in order to prevent long-term reflux-related adverse events. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Association of Gum Bleeding with Respiratory Health in a Population Based Study from Northern Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Gómez Real

    Full Text Available There is little knowledge about how oral and respiratory health is interrelated even though the mucosa of the oral cavity and airways constitutes a continuum and the exposures to these are partly similar.To investigate whether gum bleeding is related to asthma, respiratory symptoms and self-reported COPD.A postal questionnaire including questions about respiratory and oral health was sent to general population samples in seven Northern European centres. In 13,409 responders, gum bleeding when brushing teeth was reported always/often by 4% and sometimes by 20%. Logistic regressions accounted for age, smoking, educational level, centre and gender. Effects of BMI, cardio-metabolic diseases, early life factors, gastro-oesophageal reflux, dental hygiene, nasal congestion, and asthma medication were addressed.Gum bleeding always/often was significantly associated with ≥ 3 asthma symptoms (OR 2.58, 95% CI 2.10-3.18, asthma (1.62 [1.23-2.14] and self-reported COPD (2.02 [1.28-3.18]. There was a dose-response relationship between respiratory outcomes and gum bleeding frequency (≥ 3 symptoms: gum bleeding sometimes 1.42 [1.25-1.60], often/always 2.58 [2.10-3.18], and there was no heterogeneity between centres (p(heterogeneity = 0.49. None of the investigated risk factors explained the associations. The observed associations were significantly stronger among current smokers (p(interaction = 0.004.A consistent link between gum bleeding and obstructive airways disease was observed, not explained by common risk factors or metabolic factors. We speculate that oral pathogens might have unfavourable impact on the airways, and that the direct continuity of the mucosa of the oral cavity and the airways reflects a pathway that might provide novel opportunities for interventions.

  13. Specific count model for investing the related factors of cost of GERD and functional dyspepsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Alireza; Chaibakhsh, Samira; Safaee, Azadeh; Moghimi-Dehkordi, Bijan

    2013-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study is to analyze the cost of GERD and functional dyspepsia for investing its related factors. Background Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease GERD and dyspepsia are the most common symptoms of gastrointestinal disorders. Recent studies showed high prevalence and variety of clinical presentation of these two symptoms imposed enormous economic burden to the society. Cost data that related to economics burden have specific characteristics. So this kind of data needs to specific models. Poisson regression (PR) and negative binomial regression (NB) are the models that were used for analyzing cost data in this paper. Patients and methods This study designed as a cross-sectional household survey from May 2006 to December 2007 on a random sample of individual in the Tehran province, Iran to find the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms and disorders and its related factors. The Cost in each item was counted. PR and NB were carried out to the data respectively. Likelihood ratio test was performed for comparison between models. Also Log likelihood, Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) were used to compare performance of the models. Results According to Likelihood ratio test and all three criterions that we used to compare performance of the models, NB was the best model for analyzing this cost data. Sex, age and insurance statues were being significant. Conclusion PR and NB models were carried out for this data and according the results improved fit of the NB model over PR, it clearly indicates that over-dispersion is involved due to unobserved heterogeneity and/or clustering. NB model in cost data more appropriate fit than PR. PMID:24834282

  14. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and airway disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stein, Mark R

    1999-01-01

    ...: An Important but Little Known Cause of Pulmonary Complications,'' appeared (1). Of course, one could say that this 1962 work is a bit dated. Indeed, since then we have become much more aware of the importance and prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux. This is evidenced by the following statement taken from John Murray and Jay Nadel (2): ''Over one third of the US population have symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and it is estimated that 10% of these individuals have respiratory symptoms that may be related...

  15. Rikkunshito improves globus sensation in patients with proton-pump inhibitor-refractory laryngopharyngeal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokashiki, Ryoji; Okamoto, Isaku; Funato, Nobutoshi; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2013-08-21

    To investigate the effect of rikkunshito on laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) symptoms and gastric emptying in patients with proton-pump inhibitor (PPI)-refractory LPR. In total, 22 patients with LPR were enrolled. Following a 2-wk treatment with PPI monotherapy, PPI-refractory LPR patients were randomly divided into two treatment groups (rikkunshito alone or rikkunshito plus the PPI, lansoprazole). LPR symptoms were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) score, gastrointestinal symptoms were assessed using the gastrointestinal symptom rating scale (GSRS), and gastric emptying was assessed using the radio-opaque marker method prior to and 4 wk following treatments. The 4-wk treatment with rikkunshito alone and with rikkunshito plus the PPI significantly decreased the globus sensation VAS scores. The VAS score for sore throat was significantly decreased following treatment with rikkunshito plus PPI but not by rikkunshito alone. Neither treatment significantly changed the GSRS scores. Rikkunshito improved delayed gastric emptying. We found a significant positive correlation between improvements in globus sensation and in gastric emptying (r² = 0.4582, P sensation in patients with PPI-refractory LPR, in part, because of stimulation of gastric emptying. Thus, rikkunshito is an effective treatment for PPI-refractory LPR.

  16. Taste and Smell Disturbances in Patients with Gastroparesis and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadi, Alisha; Saadi, Mohammed; Schey, Ron; Parkman, Henry P

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Patients with gastroparesis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) often report decreased enjoyment when eating. Some patients remark that food does not smell or taste the same. To determine if taste and/or smell disturbances are present in patients with gastroparesis and/or GERD and relate these to gastrointestinal symptom severity. Methods Patients with gastroparesis and/or GERD completed questionnaires evaluating taste and smell (Taste and Smell Survey [TSS]), Patient Assessment of Upper Gastrointestinal Symptom Severity Index (PAGI-SYM), and Demographics. TSS questioned the nature of taste/smell changes and the impact on quality of life. PAGI-SYM was used to calculate Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptom Index (GCSI) and Heartburn and Regurgitation Score (HB/RG). Results Seventy-six subjects were enrolled: healthy controls (n = 13), gastroparesis alone (n = 30), GERD alone (n = 10), and both gastroparesis and GERD (n = 23). Taste and smell disturbances were higher in patients with gastroparesis, GERD, and both gastroparesis and GERD compared to healthy controls. Taste and smell abnormalities were significantly correlated (r = 0.530, P Smell score was also strongly correlated to HB/RG (r = 0.513, P smell abnormalities are prominent in gastroparesis and GERD patients. Abnormalities in taste and smell are significantly correlated with both gastroparesis and GERD symptom severity. Awareness of this high prevalence of taste and smell dysfunction among patients with gastroparesis and GERD may help to better understand the food intolerances these patients often have. PMID:28147345

  17. Does the Compliance of the Bladder Affect the Grade of Vesicoureteral Reflux?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Kilinc

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We retrospectively reviewed videourodynamic outcomes in children with primary vesicoureteral reflux. The aim of this study to evaluate the relationship between vesicoureteral reflux grade and bladder compliance. Material and Method: Videourodynamic traces of 53 children with primary vesicoureteral reflux investigated between January 2004 and January 2012 were reviewed. The detrusor pressures of the point when the reflux started were recorded. The detrusor pressures 10 cmH2O or less at that point was accepted as normal compliance (Group 1, the detrusor pressures more than10 cm H2O was accepted as hipocompliance (Group 2. The reflux grades were divided into two grades, low-grade reflux (grades 1 and 2, high-grade reflux (grades 3, 4 and 5. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test. Results: Patients’ ages ranged between 5 and 11 years (mean 7.09±1.81 years. Of the 53 patients, 29 (54.7% had normal compliance (Group 1, 24 (45.3% had hipocompliance (Group 2. Twenty-four (82.8% patients in-group 1 had a low-grade reflux, 5 (17.2% patients had a high-grade reflux. In group 2, 8 (33.3% patients had a low-grade reflux, 16 (66.7% patients had a high-grade reflux. The detected high-grade reflux in-group 2 was significantly higher than in-group 1 (p<0.001. Discussion: The physicians should be considering the bladder compliance at the point when the reflux started in primary vesicoureteral reflux cases. The bladder hipocompliance may play a secondary role in reflux grade.

  18. Predicting the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors in patients with non-erosive reflux disease before therapy using dual-channel 24-h esophageal pH monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimatani, Tomohiko; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Nishino, Masafumi; Adachi, Kyoichi; Furuta, Kenji; Ito, Masanori; Kurosawa, Susumu; Manabe, Noriaki; Mannen, Kotaro; Hongo, Michio; Chiba, Tsutomu; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2012-05-01

    We aimed to determine whether reflux- and symptom-related parameters can predict the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). Twenty-seven NERD patients who had experienced heartburn more than once a week within the previous month were enrolled. Intraesophageal pH before therapy was measured simultaneously at 5 and 15 cm above the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) for 24 h. The PPI rabeprazole was administered at a dose of 10 mg once daily for 4 weeks. In the event that heartburn was not relieved, the dose was increased to 10 mg twice daily for an additional 2 weeks, and again to 20 mg twice daily for another 2 weeks. Univariate analysis demonstrated no significant associations between any reflux- or symptom-related parameters at either site and complete heartburn relief after 4 weeks, or cumulative complete heartburn relief after 8 weeks. However, post-hoc analysis demonstrated more satisfactory heartburn relief after 4 weeks in patients with a high symptom index compared with those with a low symptom index, at 5 cm above the EGJ (P = 0.009). Cumulative satisfactory heartburn relief after 8 weeks was also greater in patients with a high total number of acid reflux episodes compared with those with a low total number of episodes, at 15 cm above the EGJ (P = 0.037). Pre-therapeutic pH monitoring in the lower and mid-esophagus is useful for predicting the efficacy of PPI in NERD patients. © 2011 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Efficacy and Safety of a Natural Remedy for the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux: A Double-Blinded Randomized-Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Alecci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux (GER is a common, chronic, relapsing symptom. Often people self-diagnose and self-treat it even though health-related quality of life is significantly impaired. In the lack of a valid alternative approach, current treatments focus on suppression of gastric acid secretion by the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, but people with GER have a significantly lower response rate to therapy. We designed a randomized double-blinded controlled clinical study to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of a formulation based on sodium alginate/bicarbonate in combination with extracts obtained from Opuntia ficus-indica and Olea europaea associated with polyphenols (Mucosave®; verum, on GER-related symptoms. Male/female 118 (intention to treat subjects with moderate GER and having at least 2 to 6 days of GER episodes/week were treated with verum (6 g/day or placebo for two months. The questionnaires Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease-Health-Related Quality of Life (GERD-HRQoL and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptom Assessment Scale (GSAS were self-administered by participants before the treatment and at the end of the treatment. Verum produced statistically significant reduction of GERD-HRQoL and GSAS scores, −56.5% and −59.1%, respectively, in comparison to placebo. Heartburn and acid regurgitation episodes for week were significantly reduced by verum (p<0.01. Results indicate that Mucosave formulation provides an effective and well-tolerated treatment for reducing the frequency and intensity of symptoms associated with gastroesophageal reflux.

  20. Efficacy and Safety of a Natural Remedy for the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux: A Double-Blinded Randomized-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alecci, Umberto; Bonina, Francesco; Bonina, Andrea; Rizza, Luisa; Inferrera, Santi; Mannucci, Carmen; Calapai, Gioacchino

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common, chronic, relapsing symptom. Often people self-diagnose and self-treat it even though health-related quality of life is significantly impaired. In the lack of a valid alternative approach, current treatments focus on suppression of gastric acid secretion by the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), but people with GER have a significantly lower response rate to therapy. We designed a randomized double-blinded controlled clinical study to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of a formulation based on sodium alginate/bicarbonate in combination with extracts obtained from Opuntia ficus-indica and Olea europaea associated with polyphenols (Mucosave®; verum ), on GER-related symptoms. Male/female 118 (intention to treat) subjects with moderate GER and having at least 2 to 6 days of GER episodes/week were treated with verum (6 g/day) or placebo for two months. The questionnaires Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease-Health-Related Quality of Life (GERD-HRQoL) and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptom Assessment Scale (GSAS) were self-administered by participants before the treatment and at the end of the treatment. Verum produced statistically significant reduction of GERD-HRQoL and GSAS scores, -56.5% and -59.1%, respectively, in comparison to placebo. Heartburn and acid regurgitation episodes for week were significantly reduced by verum ( p < 0.01). Results indicate that Mucosave formulation provides an effective and well-tolerated treatment for reducing the frequency and intensity of symptoms associated with gastroesophageal reflux.

  1. The Prevalence and Clinical Features of Non-responsive Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease to Practical Proton Pump Inhibitor Dose in Korea: A Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hong Jun; Park, Soo Heon; Shim, Ki Nam; Kim, Yong Sung; Kim, Hyun Jin; Han, Jae Pil; Kim, Yong Sik; Bang, Byoung Wook; Kim, Gwang Ha; Baik, Gwang Ho; Kim, Hyung Hun; Park, Seon Young; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-07-25

    In Korea, there are no available multicenter data concerning the prevalence of or diagnostic approaches for non-responsive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) which does not respond to practical dose of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in Korea. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence and the symptom pattern of non-responsive GERD. A total of 12 hospitals who were members of a Korean GERD research group joined this study. We used the composite score (CS) as a reflux symptom scale which is a standardized questionnaire based on the frequency and severity of typical symptoms of GERD. We defined "non-responsive GERD" as follows: a subject with the erosive reflux disease (ERD) whose CS was not decreased by at least 50% after standard-dose PPIs for 8 weeks or a subject with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) whose CS was not decreased by at least 50% after half-dose PPIs for 4 weeks. A total of 234 subjects were analyzed. Among them, 87 and 147 were confirmed to have ERD and NERD, respectively. The prevalence of non-responsive GERD was 26.9% (63/234). The rates of non-responsive GERD were not different between the ERD and NERD groups (25.3% vs. 27.9%, respectively, p=0.664). There were no differences between the non-responsive GERD and responsive GERD groups for sex (p=0.659), age (p=0.134), or BMI (p=0.209). However, the initial CS for epigastric pain and fullness were higher in the non-responsive GERD group (p=0.044, p=0.014, respectively). In conclusion, this multicenter Korean study showed that the rate of non-responsive GERD was substantially high up to 26%. In addition, the patients with the non-responsive GERD frequently showed dyspeptic symptoms such as epigastric pain and fullness.

  2. Efficacy of vonoprazan for 24-week maintenance therapy of patients with healed reflux esophagitis refractory to proton pump inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Hideki; Yamada, Kazutoshi; Minouchi, Keiji; Kamiyamamoto, Shinji; Hinoue, Yoshinobu

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a potassium-competitive acid blocker (P-CAB), vonoprazan, for the maintenance therapy of healed reflux esophagitis (RE). A total of 60 patients were enrolled in this open-label, single-center, prospective study. All patients were diagnosed with RE with a frequency scale for the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (FSSG) total score ≥8 following treatment with standard proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for a minimum of 8 weeks. Standard PPI treatment was switched to vonoprazan 20 mg once daily for 4 weeks. A total of 52 patients, who had no endoscopic evidence of erosive esophagitis following vonoprazan treatment, received maintenance therapy with vonoprazan 10 mg once daily for 24 weeks. Symptoms were evaluated using the FSSG and Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). Upper gastrointestinal endoscopies were performed following 24 weeks of maintenance therapy. The primary endpoint was to determine the proportion of patients who exhibited maintenance of healed RE refractory to PPIs following 24 weeks of maintenance therapy with vonoprazan 10 mg once daily. Secondary endpoints included evaluation of the proportion of patients with symptomatic non-relapse at 24 weeks. Maintenance therapy with vonoprazan 10 mg once daily prevented relapse of esophageal mucosal breaks in 37/43 (86.0%) patients at 24 weeks. However, the number of patients with symptomatic relapse was 1 (1.9%) and 4 (7.7%) at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively. A total of 4 patients were withdrawn due to loss to follow-up. At the end of the 24-week maintenance period, the symptomatic non-relapse rate for acid reflux-associated and dysmotility symptom FSSG scores were 86.5 and 80.8%, respectively. Furthermore, the symptomatic non-relapse rate for reflux, abdominal pain, indigestion, diarrhea, and constipation GSRS scores at 24 weeks were 86.5, 80.8, 75.0, 71.2 and 76.9%, respectively. No serious adverse events were reported during the study

  3. The assessment of children with suspected laryngopharyngeal reflux: An Otorhinolaringological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzi, Francesca; Schindler, Antonio; Gaini, Renato Maria; Garavello, Werner

    2015-10-01

    The assessment of pediatric laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is controversial. Otorhinolaryngologists may play a role in the evaluation of children with suspected LPR detecting typical airway endoscopic findings and/or associated diseases and may help in the selection of children to be subjected to further instrumental tests. In this perspective the present review aims at examining the available evidence in the literature regarding the assessment of LPR in children. After careful literature search there are no current validated symptoms assessment questionnaires for LPR evaluation in children; flexible fiberoptic nasopharyngolaryngoscopy remains controversial as a diagnostic tool in suspect LPR cases; even though the multichannel intraluminal impedance with pH monitoring has been proposed as the instrumental gold standard, further evidence need to be found for validation in children with typical features of LPR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Management of Vesicoureteral Reflux by Endoscopic Injection of Dextranomer/Hyaluronic Acid in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Timothy W; Lacy, John M; Preston, David M

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old man presented for evaluation after discovery of a left bladder-wall tumor. He underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) operation for treatment of low-grade, Ta urothelial cancer of the bladder. The patient developed recurrent disease and returned to the operating room for repeat TURBT, circumcision, and administration of intravesical mitomycin C. The patient developed balanitis xerotica obliterans 4 years post-circumcision, requiring self-dilation with a catheter. He subsequently developed 3 consecutive episodes of left-sided pyelonephritis. Further investigation with voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) revealed Grade 3, left-sided vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Due to existing comorbidities, the patient elected treatment with endoscopic dextranomer/hyaluronic acid injection. A post-operative VCUG demonstrated complete resolution of left-sided VUR. This patient has remained symptom free for 8 months post-injection, with no episodes of pyelonephritis.

  5. Comparison of outcomes twelve years after antireflux surgery or omeprazole maintenance therapy for reflux esophagitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Lars; Miettinen, Pekka; Myrvold, Helge E

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: It is important to evaluate the long-term effects of therapies for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In a 12-year study, we compared the effects of therapy with omeprazole with those of antireflux surgery. METHODS: This open, parallel group study included 310 patients...... with esophagitis enrolled from outpatient clinics in Nordic countries. Of the 155 patients randomly assigned to each arm of the study, 154 received omeprazole (1 withdrew before therapy began), and 144 received surgery (11 withdrew before surgery). In patients who remained in remission after treatment, post......-fundoplication complaints, other symptoms, and safety variables were assessed. RESULTS: Of the patients enrolled in the study, 71 who were given omeprazole (46%) and 53 treated with surgery (37%) were followed for a 12-year follow-up period. At this time point, 53% of patients who underwent surgery remained in continuous...

  6. Diaphragmatic-intercostal breathing and the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in singers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverley du Plessis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article was inspired by our awareness of an increasing number of voice students and professional singers who specialize in Western art music and who present with symptoms relating to gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD. In our attempts to understand this phenomenon, we began questioning the relationship between diaphragmatic-intercostal breathing (DIB and the occurrence of GERD. This study uses two of the methods by which qualitative research can be done, namely literature reviews and case studies. The results of the literature review show that the way in which the lower esophageal sphincter (LES functions during DIB has direct bearing on the possible movement of gastric acids via the esophagus into the pharynx and the larynx. Acknowledging the fact that we are not medical experts, we then used the data from the case studies to suggest how singers might adjust their life styles in order to restrict or prevent occurrences of GERD.

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux and respiratory tract infection in tube-fed elderly patients. A comparison between scintigraphy and 24-h pH monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Shigehiko; Koichi, Katsuyuki; Tofuku, Yohei [Ishikawa-Ken Saiseikai Kanazawa Hospital (Japan)

    1994-11-01

    Aspiration pneumonia in patients who received enteral feeding via a nasogastric tube may result from retrograde colonization from the stomach, and this may be more likely when the gastroesophageal reflux is severe and the gastric pH is relative high. We investigated 11 elderly patients fed via nasogastric tube with suspected recurrent aspiration pneumonia by means of esophageal scintigraphy, 24-h pH monitoring, gastric pH and concentrations of gram-negative bacilli in gastric aspirates. The grade of respiratory tract infection (RTI) was evaluated by the frequency of episodes of fever with respiratory symptoms. The correlation between the grade of RTI and reflux index by scintigraphy was statistically significant (p<0.05), but the correlation between the grade of RTI and reflux rate by 24-h pH monitoring was not statistically significant. Although the correlation between gastric pH and log (base 10) concentration of gram-negative bacilli/ml of gastric aspirates was statistically significant (p<0.001), the correlation between the grade of RTI and gastric pH was not statistically significant. Scintigraphy was superior for evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux resulting in aspiration pneumonia in the tube-fed elderly patients. (author).

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux and respiratory tract infection in tube-fed elderly patients. A comparison between scintigraphy and 24-h pH monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Shigehiko; Koichi, Katsuyuki; Tofuku, Yohei

    1994-01-01

    Aspiration pneumonia in patients who received enteral feeding via a nasogastric tube may result from retrograde colonization from the stomach, and this may be more likely when the gastroesophageal reflux is severe and the gastric pH is relative high. We investigated 11 elderly patients fed via nasogastric tube with suspected recurrent aspiration pneumonia by means of esophageal scintigraphy, 24-h pH monitoring, gastric pH and concentrations of gram-negative bacilli in gastric aspirates. The grade of respiratory tract infection (RTI) was evaluated by the frequency of episodes of fever with respiratory symptoms. The correlation between the grade of RTI and reflux index by scintigraphy was statistically significant (p<0.05), but the correlation between the grade of RTI and reflux rate by 24-h pH monitoring was not statistically significant. Although the correlation between gastric pH and log (base 10) concentration of gram-negative bacilli/ml of gastric aspirates was statistically significant (p<0.001), the correlation between the grade of RTI and gastric pH was not statistically significant. Scintigraphy was superior for evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux resulting in aspiration pneumonia in the tube-fed elderly patients. (author)

  9. Metabolic changes in the lower esophageal sphincter influencing the result of anti-reflux surgical interventions in chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease

    OpenAIRE

    Altorjay, Aron; Juhasz, Arpad; Kellner, Viola; Sohar, Gellert; Fekete, Matyas; Sohar, Istvan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: With the availability of a minimally invasive approach, anti-reflux surgery has recently experienced a renaissance as a cost-effective alternative to life-long medical treatment in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We are not aware of the fact whether reflux episodes causing complaints for a long time i.e., at least for one year are associated with metabolic changes in the lower esophageal sphincter, and if so, whether these may influence functional results achieved a...

  10. Correlation of endoscopic severity of gastroesophageal reflux disease (gerd) with body mass index (bmi)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, S.; Haq, I.U.; Butt, A.R.; Shafiq, F.; Huda, G.; Mirza, G.; Rehman, A.U.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the correlation of endoscopic severity of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) with Body Mass Index (BMI). This study was conducted on 203 patients, who presented with upper GI symptoms. Patients who fulfilled the symptom criteria were referred for endoscopy. Classification of GERD was done according to LA Grading classification system. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated as Body Weight (BW) in kilograms (kg) divided by the square of the body height (BH) in meter (m2). Patient data was analyzed using SPSS 12 software. Statistical evaluation was done using non-parametric Wilcoxon's-sign Rank test. P-value <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Distribution of GERD was as follows: GERD-A subjects 65 (32%), GERD B subjects 72 (35.4%), GERD-C subjects 23 (11.3%), GERD-D subjects 10 (4.92%), while Non-Erosive Reflux Disease (NERD) was present in 33 subjects (16.2%). Mean BMI was 27+5.02SD (range of 18.2-38.3). BMI of patients having NERD was in normal range but patients who were having advanced disease i.e. Grade C-D were in obese range of BMI, while those who were having LA grade A-B were in overweight BMI range. When regrouped as mild GERD (grade A-B) and NERD versus severe GERD (grade C-D), there was a strong significant correlation between severity of GERD and BMI, as detected by Wilcoxon's signed Rank test (p=0.001). Higher BMI seems to be associated with higher degree of endoscopic GERD severity. (author)

  11. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Sleep Quality in a Chinese Population

    OpenAIRE

    Mei-Jyh Chen; Ming-Shiang Wu; Jaw-Town Lin; Kuang-Yi Chang; Han-Mo Chiu; Wei-Chih Liao; Chien-Chuan Chen; Yo-Ping Lai; Hsiu-Po Wang; Yi-Chia Lee

    2009-01-01

    Although evidence suggests that gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may interrupt sleep, the effects of symptomatic and endoscopically diagnosed GERD remain elusive because the patient population is heterogeneous. Accordingly, we designed a cross-sectional study to assess their association. Methods: Consecutive participants in a routine health examination were enrolled. Definition and severity of erosive esophagitis were assessed using the Los Angeles classification system. Demographic ...

  12. Review article: extra-oesophageal reflux disease in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shields, M. D.; Bateman, N.; McCallion, W. A.; van Wijk, M. P.; Wenzl, T. G.

    2011-01-01

    In children, respiratory and ENT disorders are associated with extra-oesophageal reflux. These include asthma, recurrent pneumonia, cough, apnoea, sinusitis, otitis media, laryngomalacia, recurrent croup and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. The traditional tests of barium swallow, 24 h pH

  13. Use of proton pump inhibitors after anti-reflux surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodrup, A.; Pottegård, Anton; Hallas, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Antireflux surgery (ARS) has been suggested as an alternative to lifelong use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) in reflux disease. Data from clinical trials on PPI use after ARS have been conflicting. We investigated PPI use after ARS in the general Danish population using nationwide...

  14. Comparison of closed-pressurized and open-refluxed vessel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samples of residual fuel oil reference material (SRM 1634c) were mineralized in closed digestion vessels from Milestone Laboratory Systems (MLS) or from PAAR (HPA) or in open-refluxed microwave digestion flasks from Prolabo. The three digestion systems were evaluated in terms of accuracy and precision, reagents ...

  15. Nasogastric intubation causes gastroesophageal reflux in patients undergoing elective laparotomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Manning, B J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The routine use of nasogastric tubes in patients undergoing elective abdominal operation is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative fever, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Previous studies have shown that nasogastric tubes have no significant effect on the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux or on lower esophageal sphincter pressure in healthy volunteers. We hypothesized that nasogastric intubation in patients undergoing laparotomy reduces lower esophageal sphincter pressure and promotes gastroesophageal reflux in the perioperative period. METHODS: A prospective randomized case-control study was undertaken in which 15 consenting patients, admitted electively for bowel surgery, were randomized into 2 groups. Group 1 underwent nasogastric intubation after induction of anesthesia, and Group 2 did not. All patients had manometry and pH probes placed with the aid of endoscopic vision at the lower esophageal sphincter and distal esophagus, respectively. Nasogastric tubes, where present, were left on free drainage, and sphincter pressures and pH were recorded continuously during a 24-hour period. Data were analyzed with 1-way analysis of variance. RESULTS: The mean number of reflux episodes (defined as pH < 4) in the nasogastric tube group was 137 compared with a median of 8 episodes in the group managed without nasogastric tubes (P =.006). The median duration of the longest episode of reflux was 132 minutes in Group 1 and 1 minute in Group 2 (P =.001). A mean of 13.3 episodes of reflux lasted longer than 5 minutes in Group 1, with pH less than 4 for 37.4% of the 24 hours. This was in contrast to Group 2 where a mean of 0.13 episodes lasted longer than 5 minutes (P =.001) and pH less than 4 for 0.2% of total time (P =.001). The mean lower esophageal sphincter pressures were lower in Group 1. CONCLUSIONS. These findings demonstrate that patients undergoing elective laparotomy with routine nasogastric tube placement have significant gastroesophageal

  16. Western blotting in the diagnosis of duodenal-biliary and pancreaticobiliary refluxes in biliary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Guo-Zhe; Wu, Shuo-Dong; Chen, Chun-Chih; Su, Yang

    2009-12-01

    Currently adopted diagnostic methods for duodenal-biliary and pancreaticobiliary refluxes carry many flaws, so the incidence of the two refluxes demands further larger sample size studies. This study aimed to evaluate Western blotting for the diagnosis of refluxes in biliary diseases. An oral radionuclide 99mTc-DTPA test (radionuclide, RN) was conducted for the observation of duodenal-biliary reflux prior to measuring bile radioactivity and Western blotting for detecting bile enterokinase (EK). Pancreaticobiliary reflux was assessed by biochemical and Western blotting tests for biliary amylase activity and trypsin-1, respectively. In accordance with bile sample origin, our samples were classified into ductal bile and gall bile groups; based on each individual biliary disease, we further classified the ductal bile group into five sub-groups, and the gall bile group into four sub-groups. Western blotting was conducted to assess the two refluxes in biliary diseases. Consistencies were noted between EK and RN tests when diagnosing duodenal-biliary reflux (P0.05); in the common bile duct cyst group, the EK positive rate was significantly lower than the trypsin-1 positive rate (PWestern blotting can accurately reflect duodenal-biliary and pancreaticobiliary refluxes. EK has greater sensitivity than RN for duodenal-biliary reflux. The majority of biliary amylase and lipase comes from the pancreas in all biliary diseases; pancreaticobiliary reflux is the predominant source in the common bile duct cyst group and duodenal-biliary reflux is responsible for the ductal pigment stone group.

  17. Outcomes in patients with nonerosive reflux disease treated with a proton pump inhibitor and alginic acid ± glycyrrhetinic acid and anthocyanosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Pierro F

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Di Pierro,1 Mario Gatti,2 Giuliana Rapacioli,3 Leandro Ivaldi4 1Velleja Research, Milan, 2Gastroenterology Department, Giussano Hospital, Monza-Brianza, 3AIOR, Piacenza, 4Digestive Endoscopic Department, Ceva Hospital, Ceva, Cuneo, Italy Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of alginic acid alone versus alginic acid combined with low doses of pure glycyrrhetinic acid and bilberry anthocyanosides as an addon to conventional proton pump inhibitor therapy in relieving symptoms associated with nonerosive reflux disease. Methods: This prospective, randomized, 8-week, open-label trial was conducted at two centers. Sixty-three patients with persistent symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease and normal upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were eligible for the study. Patients in group A (n = 31 were treated with pantoprazole and a formula (Mirgeal® containing alginic acid and low doses of pure glycyrrhetinic acid + standardized Vaccinium myrtillus extract for 4 weeks, then crossed over to the multi-ingredient formula for a further 4 weeks. Patients in group B (n = 32 were treated pantoprazole and alginic acid alone twice daily, then crossed over to alginic acid twice daily for a further 4 weeks. Efficacy was assessed by medical evaluation of a symptom relief score, estimated using a visual analog scale (0–10. Side effects, tolerability, and compliance were also assessed. Results: Of the 63 patients enrolled in the study, 58 (29 in group A and 29 in group B completed the 8-week trial. The baseline characteristics were comparable between the two groups. During the study, significant differences were recorded in symptom scores for both groups. In group A, symptoms of chest pain, heartburn, and abdominal swelling were less serious than in group B. Treatment A was better tolerated, did not induce hypertension, and had fewer side effects than treatment B. No significant differences in compliance were found between the

  18. Features of obesity treatment in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E I Andreeva

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the past few decades, the worldwide prevalence of such nosological forms as gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity has been increasing. The combination of these pathologies is more often observed in patients who have nutrition and lifestyle issues, as well as genetic predisposition to these nosologies. Patients with obesity are noted to have predisposition to diaphragmatic hernias and mechanical damage of gastroesophageal junction, which occurs against the background of increased intragastric pressure and increased pressure gradient between the stomach and esophagus, as well as due to extension of the proximal part of the stomach. One of the basic pathogenetic moments of gastroesophageal reflux disease is spontaneous relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. According to recent studies, in obesity the frequency of postprandial spontaneous relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter increases even in the absence of diaphragmatic hernia, non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease and reflux esophagitis. The variety of metabolic disorders observed in these patients requires a comprehensive approach to treatment, aimed both at effective reduction of the acid-peptic factor and at correction of excessive body weight. Both non-pharmacological and pharmacological methods are distinguished among the main treatment directions for both components of this combined pathology. An important role in therapy is given to activities that contribute to the maintenance of healthy lifestyle: smoking cessation, weight loss, dietary nutrition, health-improving physical culture. Among medications for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity, which allow achieving an optimal acid-reducing effect, specific attention is assigned to a group of proton pump inhibitors (H+/K+-ATPase inhibitors, which have a lower affinity for hepatic cytochrome P450 enzyme system, do not affect its activity and do not clinically significantly cross-react with

  19. Recognizing Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for IBS Signs and Symptoms Overview Recognizing Symptoms Diagnosis of IBS Pain in IBS IBS with Constipation Constipated Diarrhea IBS ... for IBS Signs and Symptoms Overview Recognizing Symptoms Diagnosis of IBS Pain in IBS IBS with Constipation Constipated Diarrhea IBS ...

  20. Laparoscopic diverticulectomy with the aid of intraoperative gastrointestinal endoscopy to treat epiphrenic diverticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Most researchers believe that the presence of large epiphrenic diverticulum (ED with severe symptoms should lead to the consideration of surgical options. The choice of minimally invasive techniques and whether Heller myotomy with antireflux fundoplication should be employed after diverticulectomy became points of debate. The aim of this study was to describe how to perform laparoscopic transhiatal diverticulectomy (LTD and oesophagomyotomy with the aid of intraoperative gastrointestinal (GI endoscopy and how to investigate whether the oesophagomyotomy should be performed routinely after LTD. Patients and Methods: From 2008 to 2013, 11 patients with ED underwent LTD with the aid of intraoperative GI endoscopy at our department. Before surgery, 4 patients successfully underwent oesophageal manometry: Oesophageal dysfunction and an increase of the lower oesophageal sphincter pressure (LESP were found in 2 patients. Results: There were 2 cases of conversion to an open transthoracic procedure. Six patients underwent LTD, Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication; and 3 patients underwent only LTD. The dysphagia and regurgitation 11 patients experienced before surgery improved significantly. Motor function studies showed that there was no oesophageal peristalsis in 5 patients during follow-up, while 6 patients showed seemingly normal oesophageal motility. The LESP of 6 patients undergoing LTD, myotomy and Dor fundoplication was 16.7 ± 10.2 mmHg, while the LESPs of 3 patients undergoing only LTD were 26 mmHg, 18 mmHg and 21 mmHg, respectively. In 4 cases experiencing LTD, myotomy and Dor fundoplication, the gastro-oesophageal reflux occurred during the sleep stage. Conclusions: LTD constitutes a safe and valid approach for ED patients with severe symptoms. As not all patients with large ED have oesophageal disorders, according to manometric and endoscopic results, surgeons can categorise and decide whether or not myotomy and antireflux surgery

  1. [Critical assessment of a new endoscopic anatomic concept for the so-called cardia in the sense of the notions of Parmenides and Martin Heidegger].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegler, M; Asari, R; Cosentini, E P; Wrba, F; Schoppmann, S F

    2014-04-01

    of Parmenides by Heidegger. Our data recommend to omit the term "cardia" and allocate morphology either to the oesophagus (CLO, DDO) or to the proximal stomach or indicate that allocation is impossible (i. e.. tumour-induced). Future studies will have to test the value of this novel concept for diagnosis, treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and cancer prevention. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. An alginate-antacid formulation localizes to the acid pocket to reduce acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, Wout O.; Bennink, Roel J.; Smout, Andre J. P. M.; Thomas, Edward; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2013-01-01

    Alginate rafts (polysaccharide polymers that precipitate into a low-density viscous gel when they contact gastric acid) have been reported to form at the acid pocket, an unbuffered pool of acid that floats on top of ingested food and causes postprandial acid reflux. We studied the location of an

  3. Is there a proper way to treat shortened oesophagus? About a series of 67 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirard, L; Weerts, J M; Buldgen, B; Deben, L; Dewandre, J M; Francart, D; Monami, B; Markiewicz, S; Wahlen, Chr; Jehaes, C

    2010-01-01

    During the work-up of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) patients, barium swallow may show a shortened oesophagus with a non-reducible gastro-oesophageal junction. In our department, in such cases, a Collis-Nissen operation is usually planned. But, the proper reducibility of the gastro-oesophageal junction (GOJ) in the abdomen is difficult to assess peroperatively. The aim of this study is to compare retrospectively the follow-up of an oesophageal lengthening procedure (Collis-Nissen gastroplasty) versus a standard Nissen in the management of patients with primary short oesophagus or secondary to previous Nissen fundoplication. Between 01/2000 and 12/2009, 67 patients with a short oesophagus on X-Ray were operated on for proven GORD: 27 (Group A) underwent a Collis-Nissen fundoplication. In 40 patients (Group B), the GOJ was reduced easily and a standard Nissen fundoplication was judged sufficient by the experimented surgeon. Follow up included Quality of Life evaluation using the Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (GIQLI) and a barium swallow. 64 patients agreed to participate. Mean follow up was 46 months (4-122). Mean postoperative GIQLI score was 108 in group A, 97 in group B. Barium swallow was performed in 61 patients. In group A, seven patients out of 25 (28%) presented a intrathoracic migration on X-Ray while in group B, it was noted in 20 patients (55%). According literature, Collis gastroplasty allows a tension-free fundoplication to be performed to correct a shortened oesophagus. Though our series of brachy-oesophagus is small, it confirms a better outcome after a Collis-Nissen gastroplasty, compared to the classical Nissen fundoplication.

  4. Ureteroneocystostomy in primary vesicoureteral reflux: critical retrospective analysis of factors affecting the postoperative urinary tract infection rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Serkan Dogan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction To determine the parameters affecting the outcome of ureteroneocystostomy (UNC procedure for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. Materials and Methods Data of 398 patients who underwent UNC procedure from 2001 to 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. Different UNC techniques were used according to laterality of reflux and ureteral orifice configuration. Effects of several parameters on outcome were examined. Disappearance of reflux on control VCUG or absence of any kind of UTI/symptoms in patients without control VCUG was considered as clinical improvement. Results Mean age at operation was 59.2 ± 39.8 months and follow-up was 25.6 ± 23.3 months. Grade of VUR was 1-2, 3 and 4-5 in 17, 79, 302 patients, respectively. Male to female ratio was 163/235. UNC was performed bilaterally in 235 patients and intravesical approach was used in 373 patients. The frequency of voiding dysfunction, scar on preoperative DMSA, breakthrough infection and previous surgery was 28.4%, 70.7%, 49.3% and 22.4%, respectively. Twelve patients (8.9% with postoperative contralateral reflux were excluded from the analysis. Overall clinical improvement rate for UNC was 92%. Gender, age at diagnosis and operation, laterality and grade of reflux, mode of presentation, breakthrough infections (BTI under antibiotic prophylaxis, presence of voiding dysfunction and renal scar, and operation technique did not affect the surgical outcome. However, the clinical improvement rate was lower in patients with a history of previous endoscopic intervention (83.9% vs. 94%. Postoperative UTI rate was 27.2% and factors affecting the occurrence of postoperative UTI were previous failed endoscopic injection on univariate analysis and gender, preoperative BTI, postoperative VUR state, voiding dysfunction on multivariate analysis. Surgery related complication rate was 2% (8/398. These were all low grade complications (blood transfusion in 1, hematoma under incision in 3 and prolonged

  5. Symptoms and Warning Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reflux disorder intestinal distress from laxative abuse kidney problems from diuretic abuse severe dehydration from purging Binge Eating Disorder frequently eating large amounts of food (binge-eating) ...

  6. Refluxo gastroesofágico em pacientes portadores de papilomatose recorrente de laringe Gastroesophageal reflux in patients with recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Shizue Nagata Pignatari

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A cada ano aumentam as evidências de que o refluxo gastroesofágico seja um fator que contribui para as desordens de vias aéreas, principalmente na população pediátrica, podendo gerar sintomas respiratórios como estridor, tosse crônica, pneumonias de repetição e bronquite crônica. Estudos recentes têm sugerido que a associação entre papilomatose laríngea recorrente e refluxo gastroesofágico possa ser um fator determinante na recorrência e crescimento dos papilomas. OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a freqüência e a intensidade do refluxo gastroesofágico em crianças portadoras de Papilomatose Laríngea Recorrente (PLR. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Foram selecionadas 10 crianças portadoras de papilomatose laríngea recorrente, de ambos os sexos, com idade entre 3 e 12 anos. Todas foram submetidas a pH-metria de 24 horas com duplo canal para avaliação da presença e intensidade de refluxo gastroesofágico. RESULTADOS: Cinqüenta por cento dos pacientes apresentaram evidências de refluxo gastroesofágico patológico em nível do esfíncter distal, e 90% apresentou refluxo proximal patológico. CONCLUSÃO: A freqüência da associação entre refluxo gastroesofágico proximal em pacientes portadores de papilomatose recorrente de laringe é extremamente alta.Evidence of a relation between gastroesophaeal reflux and pediatric respiratory disorders increases every year. Many respiratory symptoms and clinical conditions such as stridor, chronic cough, and recurrent pneumonia and bronchitis appear to be related to gastroesophageal reflux. Some studies have also suggested that gastroesophageal reflux may be associated with recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis, contributing to its recurrence and severity. AIM: the aim of this study was to verify the frequency and intensity of gastroesophageal reflux in children with recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: ten children of both genders, aged between 3 and 12 years

  7. Haemorrhoids are associated with internal iliac vein reflux in up to one-third of women presenting with varicose veins associated with pelvic vein reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdstock, J M; Dos Santos, S J; Harrison, C C; Price, B A; Whiteley, M S

    2015-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of haemorrhoids in women with pelvic vein reflux, identify which pelvic veins are associated with haemorrhoids and assess if extent of pelvic vein reflux influences the prevalence of haemorrhoids. Females presenting with leg varicose veins undergo duplex ultrasonography to assess all sources of venous reflux. Those with significant reflux arising from the pelvis are offered transvaginal duplex ultrasound (TVS) to evaluate reflux in the ovarian veins and internal Iliac veins and associated pelvic varices in the adnexa, vulvar/labial veins and haemorrhoids. Patterns and severity of reflux were evaluated. Between January 2010 and December 2012, 419 female patients with leg or vulvar varicose vein patterns arising from the pelvis underwent TVS. Haemorrhoids were identified on TVS via direct tributaries from the internal Iliac veins in 152/419 patients (36.3%) and absent in 267/419 (63.7%). The prevalence of the condition increased with the number of pelvic trunks involved. There is a strong association between haemorrhoids and internal Iliac vein reflux. Untreated reflux may be a cause of subsequent symptomatic haemorrhoids. Treatment with methods proven to work in conditions caused by pelvic vein incompetence, such as pelvic vein embolisation and foam sclerotherapy, could be considered. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Is there a role for dynamic swallowing MRI in the assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease and oesophageal motility disorders?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulinna-Cosentini, Christiane; Koelblinger, C.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Weber, M.; Kleinhansl, P.; Schima, W.; Lenglinger, J.; Riegler, M.; Cosentini, E.P.; Bischof, G.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of dynamic MRI swallowing in patients with symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). Thirty-seven patients (17 m/20f) with typical signs of GERD underwent MR swallowing in the supine position at 1.5 T with a phased-array body coil. Using dynamic, gradient echo sequences (B-FFE) in the coronal, sagittal and axial planes, the bolus passages of buttermilk spiked with gadolinium chelate were tracked. MRI, pH-metry and manometry were performed within 31 days and results were compared. MRI results were concordant with pH-metry in 82% (23/28) of patients diagnosed with abnormal oesophageal acid exposure by pH-metry. Five patients demonstrated typical symptoms of GERD and had positive findings with pH monitoring, but false negative results with MRI. In four of six patients (67%), there was a correct diagnosis of oesophageal motility disorder, according to manometric criteria, on dynamic MRI. The overall accuracy of MRI diagnoses was 79% (27/34). A statistically significant difference was found between the size of hiatal hernia, grade of reflux in MRI, and abnormal acid exposure on pH-monitoring. MR fluoroscopy may be a promising radiation-free tool in assessing the functionality and morphology of the GE junction. (orig.)

  9. [Therapeutic effects of the integrated acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine on reflux esophagitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wan; Li, Bolin; Sun, Jianhui; Wang, Zhikun; Zhang, Nana; Shi, Fang; Pei, Lin

    2017-07-12

    definite therapeutic effects on reflux esophagitis, relieve the symptoms, protect gastric mucosa and reduce the.

  10. Omeprazole-Domperidone Fixed Dose Combination vs Omeprazole Monotherapy: A Phase 4, Open-Label, Comparative, Parallel Randomized Controlled Study in Mild to Moderate Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KY Marakhouski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the efficacy and safety of omeprazole-domperidone combination vs omeprazole monotherapy in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Methods: In a comparative, randomized controlled, phase 4 study, outpatients with GERD were randomly allocated to either group 1 (omeprazole 20 mg + domperidone 30 mg or group 2 (omeprazole 20 mg in an equal ratio; 2 capsules daily in the morning were administered for 8 weeks. Results: Sixty patients were enrolled. Esophagitis reversal was observed in 92% patients in group 1 vs 65.2% in group 2. Approximately, 83.3% patients in group 1 vs 43.3% patients in group 2 demonstrated full cupping of reflux symptoms at 8 weeks. Combined therapy resulted in significantly longer period of heartburn-free days (23 vs 12 days on omeprazole. There were no safety concerns. Conclusions: Omeprazole-domperidone combination was more effective than omeprazole alone in providing complete cupping of reflux symptoms and healing of esophagitis in patients with GERD. Both the treatments were well tolerated with few reports of adverse events. Trial registration: This trial is registered with http://clinicaltrials.gov , number NCT02140073.

  11. Omeprazole-Domperidone Fixed Dose Combination vs Omeprazole Monotherapy: A Phase 4, Open-Label, Comparative, Parallel Randomized Controlled Study in Mild to Moderate Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marakhouski, K Y; Karaseva, G A; Ulasivich, D N; Marakhouski, Y Kh

    2017-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of omeprazole-domperidone combination vs omeprazole monotherapy in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In a comparative, randomized controlled, phase 4 study, outpatients with GERD were randomly allocated to either group 1 (omeprazole 20 mg + domperidone 30 mg) or group 2 (omeprazole 20 mg) in an equal ratio; 2 capsules daily in the morning were administered for 8 weeks. Sixty patients were enrolled. Esophagitis reversal was observed in 92% patients in group 1 vs 65.2% in group 2. Approximately, 83.3% patients in group 1 vs 43.3% patients in group 2 demonstrated full cupping of reflux symptoms at 8 weeks. Combined therapy resulted in significantly longer period of heartburn-free days (23 vs 12 days on omeprazole). There were no safety concerns. Omeprazole-domperidone combination was more effective than omeprazole alone in providing complete cupping of reflux symptoms and healing of esophagitis in patients with GERD. Both the treatments were well tolerated with few reports of adverse events. This trial is registered with http://clinicaltrials.gov, number NCT02140073.

  12. Delayed-release oral suspension of omeprazole for the treatment of erosive esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease in pediatric patients: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Monzani

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Alice Monzani, Giuseppina Oderda1Department of Pediatrics, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, ItalyAbstract: Omeprazole is a proton-pump inhibitor indicated for gastroesophageal reflux disease and erosive esophagitis treatment in children. The aim of this review was to evaluate the efficacy of delayed-release oral suspension of omeprazole in childhood esophagitis, in terms of symptom relief, reduction in reflux index and/or intragastric acidity, and endoscopic and/or histological healing. We systematically searched PubMed, Cochrane and EMBASE (1990 to 2009 and identified 59 potentially relevant articles, but only 12 articles were suitable to be included in our analysis. All the studies evaluated symptom relief and reported a median relief rate of 80.4% (range 35%–100%. Five studies reported a significant reduction of the esophageal reflux index within normal limits (<7% in all children, and 4 studies a significant reduction of intra-gastric acidity. The endoscopic healing rate, reported by 9 studies, was 84% after 8-week treatment and 95% after 12-week treatment, the latter being significantly higher than the histological healing rate (49%. In conclusion, omeprazole given at a dose ranging from 0.3 to 3.5 mg/kg once daily (median 1 mg/kg once daily for at least 12 weeks is highly effective in childhood esophagitis.Keywords: proton pump inhibitors, children, ranitidine, H2-blockers

  13. [Modern esophageal surgery and late functional results as equations with several unknowns--Hungarian Academy of Sciences Doctoral Thesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altorjay, Aron

    2008-10-01

    Using the same surgical method and anatomically ideal primary healing, the functional results could even be different later. Trying to identify various factors being responsible for the above differences, 637 patient's data, who underwent previous oesophago-gastric surgery between 1985-2005, were analyzed. Biochemical, histological and electrophysiological examinations had been evaluated. Developing hypertrophy-like metabolic changes and enteric ganglionitis as morphological alternations of LES muscles induced by GERD may be reasons for complaints after antireflux surgery. The marking of Z-line with endoscopic clips followed by an immediately upright contrast study and substractional evaluation is appropriate for detecting true short esophagus. Open surgical procedures are justified even in the new millennium in cases when the patient already underwent previous upper abdominal operations - due to an increased risk of injury because of adhesions - in cases of primarily recurrent paraesophageal hernias after an unsuccessful open and/or laparoscopic reconstruction, as well as in cases of reflux with complications. When adenocarcinomas of the gastro-oesophageal junction are examined preoperatively, the ratio of the performed catabolic - AMAN, CB, and DPP I - enzymatic activity of the tissue sample from the tumour and adjacent intact mucosa within 2 cm of the tumour may have a prognostic value even in the preoperative examination period, and neo-adjuvant treatment should be considered in these group of patients. The patients' post-operative complaints and symptoms change during the post-operative period and correlate with the parameters of the myoelectric and contractile activities of the "Akiyama stomach". Tachygastria seems to be the major pathogenetic factor involved in the contractile dysfunction. Gastro-jejuno-duodenal interposition represents an adequate 'second-best' method of choice if technical difficulties emerge with jejunal or colon interposition following

  14. Cough: an unmet clinical need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V

    2011-01-01

    Cough is among the most common complaints for which patients worldwide seek medical attention. Thus, the evaluation and treatment of cough result in tremendous financial expenditure and consumption of health care resources. Yet, despite the clinical significance of cough, research efforts aimed at improving diagnostic capabilities and developing more effective therapeutic agents have been, to date, disappointing in their limited scope and outcomes. Acute cough due to the common cold represents the most common type of cough. Currently, available medications for the symptomatic management of acute cough are inadequate due to lack of proven efficacy and/or their association with undesirable or intolerable side effects at anti-tussive doses. Subacute cough, often representing a prolonged post-viral response, is typically refractory to standard anti-tussive therapy. Few clinical trials have evaluated therapeutic options for subacute cough. Diagnostic challenges facing the clinician in the management of chronic cough include the determination of whether symptoms of upper airway cough syndrome (formerly, postnasal drip syndrome) or gastro-oesophageal reflux disease are indeed the underlying cause of cough. Chronic, refractory unexplained (formerly, idiopathic) cough must be distinguished from cough that has not been fully evaluated and treated according to current guideline recommendations. Eagerly awaited are new safe and effective anti-tussive agents for use when cough suppression is desired, regardless of underlying aetiology of cough, as well as practical, validated ambulatory cough counters to aid clinical assessment and future research in the field of cough. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Respiratory Pharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-1 PMID:21198555

  15. Proton Pump Inhibitor-Responsive Oesophageal Eosinophilia: An Entity Challenging Current Diagnostic Criteria for Eosinophilic Oesophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Infante, Javier; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Cheng, Edaire; Dellon, Evan S.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Gupta, Sandeep K.; Hirano, Ikuo; Katzka, David A.; Moawad, Fouad J.; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Schoepfer, Alain; Spechler, Stuart; Wen, Ting; Straumann, Alex; Lucendo, Alfredo J.

    2016-01-01

    Consensus diagnostic recommendations to distinguish gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) from eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) by response to a trial of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) unexpectedly uncovered an entity called “PPI-responsive oesophageal eosinophilia” (PPI-REE). PPI-REE refers to patients with clinical and histologic features of EoE that remit with PPI treatment. Recent and evolving evidence, mostly from adults, shows that PPI-REE and EoE patients at baseline are clinically, endoscopically and histologically indistinguishable, and have significant overlap in terms of features of Th2 immune-mediated inflammation and gene expression. Furthermore, PPI therapy restores oesophageal mucosal integrity, reduces Th2 inflammation and reverses the abnormal gene expression signature in PPI-REE patients, similar to the effects of topical steroids in EoE patients. Additionally, recent series have reported that EoE patients responsive to diet/topical steroids may also achieve remission on PPI therapy. This mounting evidence supports the concept that PPI-REE represents a continuum of the same immunologic mechanisms that underlie EoE. Accordingly, it seems counterintuitive to differentiate PPI-REE from EoE based on a differential response to PPI therapy when their phenotypic, molecular, mechanistic, and therapeutic features cannot be reliably distinguished. For patients with symptoms and histologic features of EoE, it is reasonable to consider PPI therapy not as a diagnostic test, but as a therapeutic agent. Due to its safety profile, ease of administration and high response rates (up to 50%), PPI can be considered a first-line treatment, before diet and topical steroids. The reasons why some EoE patients respond to PPI, while others do not, remain to be elucidated. PMID:26685124

  16. Knowledge of pediatrician on gastroesophageal reflux/gastroesophageal reflux disease in children: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Surjono

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Gastroesophageal reflux (OER is involuntary movement of gastric content into esophagus due to transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. This condition usually ignored by physician. Many GER cases have severe complication before properly managed. Ten years after incorporating GER into Indonesia pediatric training curriculum, the knowledge of GER among pediatrician need to be measured. Objectives To measure pediatrician's knowledge of GER/GERD in children. Methods This was a cross sectional study using questionnaire and interview. Result There were 387 respondents who filled the questionnaire and being interviewed. The majority of respondents were between 25-45 years old (33.6%. Respondents who graduated before the year 2000 were 48.3%, and after 2000 were 51.7%. Majority of respondents were general pediatrician (90.2% and 41.3% working in teaching hospitals Among pediatricians graduated after year 2000,6 6%,5 0.5% and 57.5% could gave more than 80% correct answer to questions about general knowledge, diagnosis and management of GERD as compared to 49.2%, 42.2% and 47% subjects graduated before year 2000. More pediatricians graduated before year 2000 answered the questions on general knowledge, diagnosis and management < 60% correctly compared to those graduated after year 2000 (42.2%, 25.2% and 28.3% vs. 14%,11.5% and 12%, respectively. Fifty five of 160 (34.4% respondents who working in teaching hospital gave more than 80% correct answer to questions about GERD. Compared to those working in non-teaching hospitals, only 17.6% were able to correctly answer more than 80% of questions. Conclusions Better knowledge about GER/GERD are found among pediatricians graduated after the topics has been introduced to the curriculum and among those practicing in teaching hospitals.

  17. Extra-Esophageal Pepsin from Stomach Refluxate Promoted Tonsil Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Jeong, Han-Sin; Kim, Kyung Mi; Lee, Ye Jin; Jung, Myeong Hee; Park, Jung Je; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Woo, Seung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is associated with numerous pathologic conditions of the upper aerodigestive tract. Gastric pepsin within reflux contributes to immunologic reactions in the tonsil. In this study, we aimed to find the relationships between pepsin and tonsillar hypertrophy. We explored the notion whether tonsillar hypertrophy was due to pepsin-mediated gastric reflux in tonsil hypertrophy. Fifty-four children with tonsil hypertrophy and 30 adults with tonsillitis were recruited before surgical treatment. Blood and tonsil tissues from each patient were harvested for analysis of changes in lymphocyte and macrophage numbers coupled with histological and biochemical analysis. Pepsin was expressed at different levels in tonsil tissues from each tonsillar hypertrophy. Pepsin-positive cells were found in the crypt epithelium, surrounding the lymphoid follicle with developing fibrosis, and also surrounding the lymphoid follicle that faced the crypt. And also, pepsin staining was well correlated with damaged tonsillar squamous epithelium and TGF-β1 and iNOS expression in the tonsil section. In addition, pepsin and TGF-β1-positive cells were co-localized with CD68-positive cells in the crypt and surrounding germinal centers. In comparison of macrophage responsiveness to pepsin, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were noticeably larger in the presence of activated pepsin in the child group. Furthermore, CD11c and CD163-positive cells were significantly increased by activated pepsin. However, this was not seen for the culture of PBMNCs from the adult group. The lymphocytes and monocytes are in a highly proliferative state in the tonsillar hypertrophy and associated with increased expression of pro-inflammatory factors as a result of exposure to stomach reflux pepsin.

  18. A simple air-cooled reflux condenser for laboratory use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boult, K.A.

    1979-10-01

    This Memorandum describes the design of a simple compact air-cooled reflux condenser suitable for gloveboxes, cells or other locations where the provision of cooling water presents a problem. In a typical application the condenser functioned satisfactorily when used to condense water from a flask heated by a 100 watt mantle. There was no measurable loss of water from the boiling flask in 100 hours. (author)

  19. Association between esophageal dysmotility and gastroesophaeal reflux on barium studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, Craig; Levine, Marc S.; Rubesin, Stephen E.; Laufer, Igor; Redfern, Gina; Katzka, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is an association between abnormal primary peristalsis in the esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) on barium studies. Methods: A computerized search of radiologic reports revealed 151 patients with esophageal dysmotility (characterized by intermittently decreased or absent peristalsis in the esophagus on upper gastrointestinal tract examinations) who fulfilled our study's entry criteria. These 151 patients were stratified into two groups depending on whether this dysmotility was associated with nonperistaltic contractions (NPCs): 92 patients had no NPCs (Dysmotility and No NPCs Group) and 59 had NPCs (Dysmotility and NPCs Group). An age-matched control group of 92 patients with normal motility was also generated from the radiologic reports. The reports were also reviewed for the presence and degree of GER and other complications of GER. The frequency and degree of GER were tabulated for each group, and the data were analyzed using a Pearson chi square test to determine if significant differences were present in the frequency and degree of GER or other findings among the groups. Results: The frequency of GER was significantly higher in patients with abnormal peristalsis and no NPCs than in controls (p = 0.02). When GER was stratified based on the degree of reflux, the frequency of moderate-to-marked GER was significantly higher in patients with abnormal peristalsis and no NPCs than in patients with abnormal peristalsis and NPCs (p = 0.01) or in controls (p = 0.0031). The frequency of reflux esophagitis also was significantly higher in patients with abnormal peristalsis and no NPCs than in controls (p = 0.04). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that patients with esophageal dysmotility characterized by intermittently decreased or absent peristalsis without NPCs have a significantly higher frequency and degree of GER than patients with normal motility. The presence of this specific form of esophageal dysmotility on barium

  20. Association between esophageal dysmotility and gastroesophaeal reflux on barium studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Craig [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Levine, Marc S. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)]. E-mail: marc.levine@uphs.upenn.edu; Rubesin, Stephen E. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Laufer, Igor [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Redfern, Gina [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Katzka, David A. [Department of Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2006-07-15

    Objective: To determine whether there is an association between abnormal primary peristalsis in the esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) on barium studies. Methods: A computerized search of radiologic reports revealed 151 patients with esophageal dysmotility (characterized by intermittently decreased or absent peristalsis in the esophagus on upper gastrointestinal tract examinations) who fulfilled our study's entry criteria. These 151 patients were stratified into two groups depending on whether this dysmotility was associated with nonperistaltic contractions (NPCs): 92 patients had no NPCs (Dysmotility and No NPCs Group) and 59 had NPCs (Dysmotility and NPCs Group). An age-matched control group of 92 patients with normal motility was also generated from the radiologic reports. The reports were also reviewed for the presence and degree of GER and other complications of GER. The frequency and degree of GER were tabulated for each group, and the data were analyzed using a Pearson chi square test to determine if significant differences were present in the frequency and degree of GER or other findings among the groups. Results: The frequency of GER was significantly higher in patients with abnormal peristalsis and no NPCs than in controls (p = 0.02). When GER was stratified based on the degree of reflux, the frequency of moderate-to-marked GER was significantly higher in patients with abnormal peristalsis and no NPCs than in patients with abnormal peristalsis and NPCs (p = 0.01) or in controls (p = 0.0031). The frequency of reflux esophagitis also was significantly higher in patients with abnormal peristalsis and no NPCs than in controls (p = 0.04). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that patients with esophageal dysmotility characterized by intermittently decreased or absent peristalsis without NPCs have a significantly higher frequency and degree of GER than patients with normal motility. The presence of this specific form of esophageal dysmotility on

  1. Gastroesophageal Acid Reflux Control 5 Years After Antireflux Surgery, Compared With Long-term Esomeprazole Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatlebakk, Jan G; Zerbib, Frank; Bruley des Varannes, Stanislas; Attwood, Stephen E; Ell, Christian; Fiocca, Roberto; Galmiche, Jean-Paul; Eklund, Stefan; Långström, Göran; Lind, Tore; Lundell, Lars R

    2016-05-01

    We compared the ability of laparoscopic antireflux surgery (LARS) and esomeprazole to control esophageal acid exposure, over a 5-year period, in patients with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We also studied whether intraesophageal and intragastric pH parameters off and on therapy were associated with long-term outcomes. We analyzed data from a prospective, randomized, open-label trial comparing the efficacy and safety of LARS vs esomeprazole (20 or 40 mg/d) over 5 years in patients with chronic GERD. Ambulatory intraesophageal and intragastric 24-hour pH monitoring data were compared between groups before LARS or the start of esomeprazole treatment, and 6 months and 5 years afterward. A secondary aim was to evaluate the association between baseline and 6-month pH parameters and esomeprazole dose escalation, reappearance of GERD symptoms, and treatment failure over 5 years in patients receiving LARS or esomeprazole. In the LARS group (n = 116), the median 24-hour esophageal acid exposure was 8.6% at baseline and 0.7% after 6 months and 5 years (P esomeprazole group (n = 151), the median 24-hour esophageal acid exposure was 8.8% at baseline, 2.1% after 6 months, and 1.9% after 5 years (P esomeprazole). Gastric acidity was stable in both groups. Patients who required a dose increase to 40 mg/d had more severe supine reflux at baseline, and decreased esophageal acid exposure (P esomeprazole therapy. However, patients receiving LARS had significantly greater reductions in 24-hour esophageal acid exposure after 6 months and 5 years. Esophageal and gastric pH, off and on therapy, did not predict long-term outcomes of patients. Abnormal supine acid exposure predicted esomeprazole dose escalation. ClinicalTrials.Gov identifier: NCT00251927 (available: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00251927). Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease: the importance of obesity and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basoglu, Ozen K; Vardar, Rukiye; Tasbakan, Mehmet Sezai; Ucar, Zeynep Zeren; Ayik, Sibel; Kose, Timur; Bor, Serhat

    2015-05-01

    It is claimed that gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) increases in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of GERD in patients with OSAS and primary snoring and identify OSAS-related risk factors associated with GERD. In this prospective, cross-sectional, multicenter study, in total 1,104 patients were recruited for polysomnography: 147 subjects were in non-OSAS (primary snoring) and 957 patients were in OSAS group. All patients completed a validated GERD questionnaire. Demographic, anthropometric characteristics, and medical history were recorded. The prevalence of GERD was similar in OSAS (38.9%) and non-OSAS (32.0%) groups (p = 0.064). There was no difference in terms of major gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms (heartburn/acid regurgitation) between non-OSAS and mild, moderate, and severe OSAS groups. The prevalence of GERD was increased in female OSAS patients (46.6%) compared to males (35.7%) (p = 0.002). In OSAS patients with GERD, body mass index was greater (34.0 ± 7.0 vs. 33.1 ± 6.8, p = 0.049), waist (115.5 ± 13.9 vs. 113.1 ± 13.4, p = 0.007) and hip (117.9 ± 13.7 vs. 114.2 ± 12.8, p gender, hip circumference, and daytime sleepiness. In this large cohort, the prevalence of GERD was significantly increased in those with primary snoring and OSAS compared to the general population, but severity of OSAS did not influence GERD prevalence. The present results suggest that OSAS was not likely a causative factor but female gender, obesity, and sleepiness were related with prevalence of GERD in OSAS patients.

  3. [Effect of microcrystalline cellulose on alkaline gastritis due to bile reflux].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua, M; Piñol, F; Cendan, A

    1997-01-01

    Biliary acids present in gastric content due to a duodena-gastric reflux have been blamed for attacking the gastric mucosa through detergent action on the defensive barrier. This harmful action produces an inflammatory lesion on this mucosa, resulting in a chronic gastritis which is clinically expressed by epigastric pain, heartburn and vomits of biliar aspect among other symptoms, and it has constituted a clinical entity named Alcaline Gastritis by Duodenal-gastric Reflux, more recently, Reactive Gastritis according to the Sydney System. Among dietetic fibers, cellulose has been reported in recent investigations as most active in capturing and inactivating biliary acids: this constitutes a cytoprotective action on the stomach mucosa of patients who suffer this pathology. Concerning these aspects, we studied 50 patients with alcaline gastritis, excluding those who have H. pylori. The patients were diagnosed by endoscopy studies, dosage of total biliary acids in gastric content and biopsy and were divided into two groups of 25 subjects each. The first group (A) received powdered corn starch and the second group (B) powdered microcrystalline cellulose dosed 5 g/day during three months. The results showed that total biliary acids in gastric content decreased at the end of treatment mostly in patients treated with microcellulose, even though there was no statistical significance. From the clinical view point of vue, there was a highly satisfactory response in pain, vomits and heartburn after microcellulose treatment. The endoscopic inflammatory located in the antral region and diffusely, in the whole gastric mucosa, quantitatively improved and there was a significant difference in the antral location. The histological findings at the end of the treatment in either group showed no evolutive variation in the comparative study of the lesions found at the beginning of the treatment. Results are shown in tables.

  4. Dose-Finding Study of Omeprazole on Gastric pH in Neonates with Gastro-Esophageal Acid Reflux Using a Bayesian Sequential Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaguelidou, Florentia; Alberti, Corinne; Biran, Valerie; Bourdon, Olivier; Farnoux, Caroline; Zohar, Sarah; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne

    2016-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors are frequently administered on clinical symptoms in neonates but benefit remains controversial. Clinical trials validating omeprazole dosage in neonates are limited. The objective of this trial was to determine the minimum effective dose (MED) of omeprazole to treat pathological acid reflux in neonates using reflux index as surrogate marker. Double blind dose-finding trial with continual reassessment method of individual dose administration using a Bayesian approach, aiming to select drug dose as close as possible to the predefined target level of efficacy (with a credibility interval of 95%). Neonatal Intensive Care unit of the Robert Debré University Hospital in Paris, France. Neonates with a postmenstrual age ≥ 35 weeks and a pathologic 24-hour intra-esophageal pH monitoring defined by a reflux index ≥ 5% over 24 hours were considered for participation. Recruitment was stratified to 3 groups according to gestational age at birth. Five preselected doses of oral omeprazole from 1 to 3 mg/kg/day. Primary outcome, measured at 35 weeks postmenstrual age or more, was a reflux index <5% during the 24-h pH monitoring registered 72±24 hours after omeprazole initiation. Fifty-four neonates with a reflux index ranging from 5.06 to 27.7% were included. Median age was 37.5 days and median postmenstrual age was 36 weeks. In neonates born at less than 32 weeks of GA (n = 30), the MED was 2.5mg/kg/day with an estimated mean posterior probability of success of 97.7% (95% credibility interval: 90.3-99.7%). The MED was 1mg/kg/day for neonates born at more than 32 GA (n = 24). Omeprazole is extensively prescribed on clinical symptoms but efficacy is not demonstrated while safety concerns do exist. When treatment is required, the daily dose needs to be validated in preterm and term neonates. Optimal doses of omeprazole to increase gastric pH and decrease reflux index below 5% over 24 hours, determined using an adaptive Bayesian design differ among

  5. Dose-Finding Study of Omeprazole on Gastric pH in Neonates with Gastro-Esophageal Acid Reflux Using a Bayesian Sequential Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentia Kaguelidou

    Full Text Available Proton pump inhibitors are frequently administered on clinical symptoms in neonates but benefit remains controversial. Clinical trials validating omeprazole dosage in neonates are limited. The objective of this trial was to determine the minimum effective dose (MED of omeprazole to treat pathological acid reflux in neonates using reflux index as surrogate marker.Double blind dose-finding trial with continual reassessment method of individual dose administration using a Bayesian approach, aiming to select drug dose as close as possible to the predefined target level of efficacy (with a credibility interval of 95%.Neonatal Intensive Care unit of the Robert Debré University Hospital in Paris, France.Neonates with a postmenstrual age ≥ 35 weeks and a pathologic 24-hour intra-esophageal pH monitoring defined by a reflux index ≥ 5% over 24 hours were considered for participation. Recruitment was stratified to 3 groups according to gestational age at birth.Five preselected doses of oral omeprazole from 1 to 3 mg/kg/day.Primary outcome, measured at 35 weeks postmenstrual age or more, was a reflux index <5% during the 24-h pH monitoring registered 72±24 hours after omeprazole initiation.Fifty-four neonates with a reflux index ranging from 5.06 to 27.7% were included. Median age was 37.5 days and median postmenstrual age was 36 weeks. In neonates born at less than 32 weeks of GA (n = 30, the MED was 2.5mg/kg/day with an estimated mean posterior probability of success of 97.7% (95% credibility interval: 90.3-99.7%. The MED was 1mg/kg/day for neonates born at more than 32 GA (n = 24.Omeprazole is extensively prescribed on clinical symptoms but efficacy is not demonstrated while safety concerns do exist. When treatment is required, the daily dose needs to be validated in preterm and term neonates. Optimal doses of omeprazole to increase gastric pH and decrease reflux index below 5% over 24 hours, determined using an adaptive Bayesian design differ

  6. Childhood vesicoureteral reflux studies: registries and repositories sources and nosology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesney, Russell W; Patters, Andrea B

    2013-12-01

    Despite several recent studies, the advisability of antimicrobial prophylaxis and certain imaging studies for urinary tract infections (UTIs) remains controversial. The role of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) on the severity and re-infection rates for UTIs is also difficult to assess. Registries and repositories of data and biomaterials from clinical studies in children with VUR are valuable. Disease registries are collections of secondary data related to patients with a specific diagnosis, condition or procedure. Registries differ from indices in that they contain more extensive data. A research repository is an entity that receives, stores, processes and/or disseminates specimens (or other materials) as needed. It encompasses the physical location as well as the full range of activities associated with its operation. It may also be referred to as a biorepository. This report provides information about some current registries and repositories that include data and samples from children with VUR. It also describes the heterogeneous nature of the subjects, as some registries and repositories include only data or samples from patients with primary reflux while others also include those from patients with syndromic or secondary reflux. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. All rights reserved.

  7. Fabrication of hydroxyapatite from fish bones waste using reflux method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyanto, A.; Kosasih, E.; Aripin, D.; Hasratiningsih, Z.

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this present study was to investigate the fabrication of hydroxyapatites, which were synthesized from fish bone wastes using reflux method. The fish bone wastes collected from the restaurant were brushed and boiled at 100°C for 10 minutes to remove debris and fat. After drying, the fish bones were crushed, and ball milled into a fine powder. The fish bone wastes were then processed by refluxing using KOH and H3PO4 solutions. The samples were calcined at 900°C and characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FT-IR). The XRD pattern of samples after treatment revealed that the peak of hydroxyapatite was observed and the bands of OH- and PO4 3- were observed by FT-IR. The scanning electron microscope evaluation of sample showed the entangled crystal and porous structure of hydroxyapatite. In conclusion, the hydroxyapatite was successfully synthesized from fish bone wastes using reflux method.

  8. Belching during gastroscopy and its association with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B S; Lee, S H; Jang, D K; Chung, K H; Hwang, J H; Jang, S E; Cha, B H; Ryu, J K; Kim, Y-T

    2016-05-01

    Belching may result from transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation; therefore, it has been proposed that belching may be a manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This study was conducted to investigate the frequency of belching during esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and its association with GERD. A retrospective review was performed on prospectively collected clinical and endoscopic data from 404 subjects who underwent EGD without sedation from December 2012 to May 2013 in a training hospital in Korea. All detectable belching events during endoscopy were counted. Frequency and severity of belching events were compared between the group with and without GERD using an ordinal logistic regression model. There were 145 GERD patients (26 erosive reflux disease and 119 nonerosive reflux disease [NERD]). In the multivariable analysis, GERD was significantly associated with a higher frequency of belching events (odds ratio = 6.59, P GERD severity according to the Los Angeles classification (P GERD, including NERD. Future research should focus on its adjuvant role in the diagnosis of GERD/NERD and the necessity for applying differentiated endoscopy strategies for GERD patients, leading to less discomfort during EGD in patients at risk for intolerability. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  9. Recent advances in diagnostic testing for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rishi D; Vaezi, Michael F

    2017-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has a large economic burden with important complications that include esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, and adenocarcinoma. Despite endoscopy, validated patient questionnaires, and traditional ambulatory pH monitoring, the diagnosis of GERD continues to be challenging. Areas covered: This review will explore the difficulties in diagnosing GERD with a focus on new developments, ranging from basic fundamental changes (histology and immunohistochemistry) to direct patient care (narrow-band imaging, impedance, and response to anti-reflux surgery). We searched PubMed using the noted keywords. We included data from full-text articles published in English. Further relevant articles were identified from the reference lists of review articles. Expert commentary: Important advances in novel parameters in intraluminal impedance monitoring such as baseline impedance monitoring has created some insight into alternative diagnostic strategies in GERD. Recent advances in endoscopic assessment of esophageal epithelial integrity via mucosal impedance measurement is questioning the paradigm of prolonged ambulatory testing for GERD. The future of reflux diagnosis may very well be without the need for currently employed technologies and could be as simple as assessing changes in epithelia integrity as a surrogate marker for GERD. However, future studies must validate such an approach.

  10. Thermal-hydraulic phenomena during reflux condensation cooling in steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hae, Yong Jeong; Bum, Nyun Kim; Kwangho, Lee

    1998-01-01

    The transitions of cooling mechanism in steam generator tubes during reflux condensation are studied. It is found that the transitions are closely related to the occurrence of flooding or counter-current flow limitation phenomena in steam generator tubes. As shown in the previous studies of other researchers, the transition from filmwise reflux condensation into total reflux condensation occurs when the flooding criterion suggested by Wallis is met. In this study, it is suggested that the transition from total reflux condensation to complete carry-over occurs depending on the tube height and cooling conditions. It is also shown that the flooding at SG tubes occurs before the flooding at hot leg when a reflux condensation mode is existing in steam generator. Though the thermal-hydraulic conditions during reflux condensation after a small-break loss-of-coolant accident have enough margin to the transition into carry-over, considerations for the prevention of primary coolant relocation should be provided

  11. Quantitative radioisotope measurement of duodenogastric reflux in patients with ulcer or gastrectomized for ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyoedynmaa, S.; Paeaekkoenen, A.; Laensimies, E.; Korhonen, K.; Paeaekkoenen, M.; Aukee, S.

    1985-01-01

    In this work the duodenogastric reflux was quantified as the amount of radioactivity entering the stomach after an i.v. administration of sup(99m)Tc-HIDA in ulcer patients and in patients who had undergone BI gastrectomy. The results were compared with visual evidence of gastric activity in the gamma camera images and biochemical determination of gastric bile reflux. The method is useful in quantifying the reflux if the activity is above the background activity. It allows the determination of an upper limit for the reflux when the reflux is evident visually. Only two or three images are needed for the quantitation. No correlation was found between biochemical measurements of fasting bile reflux in the stomach and radioisotopic quantification. (orig.) [de

  12. Miturition cystourethrography using X-ray or scintigraphy in children with reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendstrup, L.; Carlsen, N.; Nielsen, S.L.; Dyrbye, M.; Eiken, M.; Krasilnikoff, P.A.; Gertz, T.C. (Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen (Denmark))

    1983-01-01

    Thirty children with first time urinary tract infection were investigated for vesicoureteral reflux after bladder catheterization. Micturition cystourethrography with X-ray was compared to scintigraphy because scintigraphy gives less than 10% radiation dose by fluoroscopy. Reflux to the renal pelvis was observed more frequently with scintigraphy, otherwise the nosographic sensitivity and the preditive value of a negative test were about the same (0.90). Scintigraphy is therefore recommended for routine control of reflux children.

  13. Usefulness of assessment of voice capabilities in female patients with reflux-related dysphonia

    OpenAIRE

    Šiupšinskienė, Nora; Adamonis, Kęstutis; Toohill, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. To analyze vocal capabilities in patients diagnosed with reflux related dysphonia versus controls with healthy voice with selection of the most informative discriminating quantitative parameters and to assess voice changes following treatment. Material and methods. Six parameters of voice range profile (VRP) and five parameters of speech range profile were taken and analyzed from 60 dysphonic outpatient females with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) diagnosed by reflux-related atypic...

  14. Acid suppression increases rates of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal injury in the presence of duodenal reflux.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: The contribution of gastric acid to the toxicity of alkaline duodenal refluxate on the esophageal mucosa is unclear. This study compared the effect of duodenal refluxate when acid was present, decreased by proton pump inhibitors (PPI), or absent. METHODS: We randomized 136 Sprague-Dawley rats into 4 groups: group 1 (n = 33) were controls; group 2 (n = 34) underwent esophagoduodenostomy promoting "combined reflux"; group 3 (n = 34) underwent esophagoduodenostomy and PPI treatment to decrease acid reflux; and group 4, the \\'gastrectomy\\' group (n = 35) underwent esophagoduodenostomy and total gastrectomy to eliminate acid in the refluxate. Esophaguses were examined for inflammatory, Barrett\\'s, and other histologic changes, and expression of proliferative markers Ki-67, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). RESULTS: In all reflux groups, the incidence of Barrett\\'s mucosa was greater when acid was suppressed (group C, 62%; group D, 71%) than when not suppressed (group B, 27%; P = 0.004 and P < .001). Erosions were more frequent in the PPI and gastrectomy groups than in the combined reflux group. Edema (wet weight) and ulceration was more frequent in the gastrectomy than in the combined reflux group. Acute inflammatory changes were infrequent in the PPI group (8%) compared with the combined reflux (94%) or gastrectomy (100%) groups, but chronic inflammation persisted in 100% of the PPI group. EGFR levels were greater in the PPI compared with the combined reflux group (P = .04). Ki-67, PCNA, and combined marker scores were greater in the gastrectomy compared with the combined reflux group (P = .006, P = .14, and P < .001). CONCLUSION: Gastric acid suppression in the presence of duodenal refluxate caused increased rates of inflammatory changes, intestinal metaplasia, and molecular proliferative activity. PPIs suppressed acute inflammatory changes only, whereas chronic inflammatory changes persisted.

  15. Associations of Circulating Gut Hormone and Adipocytokine Levels with the Spectrum of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Huei Tseng

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is complex and poorly understood. We aim to investigate the association of various circulating peptide hormones with heterogenous manifestations of GERD.One hundred and four patients that had experienced typical GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation for at least 3 episodes per week in the past 3 months were enrolled. All patients received a baseline assessment of symptom severity and frequency with the Reflux Disease Questionnaire and an upper endoscopy to classify GERD into erosive esophagitis (EE, n = 67, non-erosive esophagitis (NE, n = 37, and Barrett's esophagus (BE, n = 8. Fifty asymptomatic subjects with an endoscopically normal esophagus were recruited as the control group. Complete anthropometric measures and blood biochemistry were obtained and fasting serum levels of adipocytokines (adiponectin and leptin and gut hormones (ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in all subjects.All circulating peptide hormone levels were not statistically different between the GERD and control groups. However, GERD patients appeared to have lower PYY levels [median (25th-75th percentile, 80.1 (49.8-108.3 vs. 99.4 (65.8-131.9 pg/ml, p = 0.057] compared with control subjects. Among the GERD patients, ghrelin levels were inversely associated with the frequency and severity of acid regurgitation. In male GERD patients, EE was associated with significantly higher PYY levels [107.0 (55.0-120.8 vs. 32.8 (28.7-84.5 pg/ml, p = 0.026] but lower adiponectin levels [6.7 (5.6-9.3 vs. 9.9 (9.6-10.6 μg/ml, p = 0.034] than NE. Patients with BE had significantly lower adiponectin levels [6.0 (5.1-9.2 vs. 9.2 (7.1-11.2 μg/ml, p = 0.026] than those without BE.Humoral derangement of circulating peptide hormones might participate in inflammation and symptom perception in patients suffering from GERD. Further studies to clarify the exact role of these hormones

  16. Plague Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthcare Professionals Clinicians Public Health Officials Veterinarians Prevention History of Plague Resources FAQ Symptoms Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Plague symptoms depend on how ...

  17. Diagnostic value of the reflux sign in cholescintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Hisao

    1990-01-01

    This study reviewed 27 patients with the reflux sign in cholescintigraphy to assess its diagnostic value in detecting incomplete obstruction of the common bile duct (CBD). After at least 5 hours of fasting 5 mCi of Tc-99m PMT or Tc-99m (p-butyl) IDA was injected intravenously and serial images were recorded before and after administration of 10 μg of ceruletide diethylamine (caerulein). The reflux sign was determined to be positive when increased radioactivities in the right or left hepatic duct (minor reflux: MIR) or more peripheral intrahepatic ducts (major reflux; MAR) were recognized after gallbladder stimulation. The reflux sign was found in 30 of 266 consecutive studies. Direct and/or indirect X-ray cholangiograms were available in 27 (MIR; 13, MAR; 14), including juxtapapillary duodenal diverticulum (8), biliary dyskinesia (6), CBD stone (5), chronic pancreatitis (4), gallbladder stone (4), duodenal ulcer (2), chronic cholecystitis (2), CBD adenoma, duodenal papillitis, pancreatic pseudocyst, acute cholangitis, chronic hepatitis, and postgastrectomy (1 each). The caliber of the CBD on X-ray cholangiogram ranged from 4 to 16 mm. CBD dilatation of more than or equal to 10 mm was found in 23% of the MIR and in 79% of the MAR. Apparent stenosis of the CBD was found in 8% of the MIR and in 36% of the MAR. There was no significant difference in the ejection fraction of the gallbladder between MIR and MAR. MAR sign seemed to correspond to an increase in the caliber of the common hepatic duct more than 2 mm after caerulein injection on DIC. Persistent stasis of RI in the biliary system was found in 36% of the MAR. Duodenum appearance time of RI was prolonged by more than 60 min in 54% of the MIR and in 79% of the MAR. When the MAR sign was interpreted as positive for incomplete obstruction of the CBD including apparent stenosis of the CBD and/or CBD stone, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 89%, 67%, and 74%, respectively. (J.P.N.)

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux: comparison of barium studies with 24-h pH monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, John J.; Levine, Marc S.; Redfern, Regina O.; Rubesin, Stephen E.; Laufer, Igor; Katzka, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the correlation between massive gastroesophageal reflux (GER) on barium studies and pathologic acid reflux on 24-h pH monitoring. Methods: A search of hospital records from January 1997 to January 2001 revealed 28 patients who underwent both barium studies and 24-h pH monitoring. The radiologic reports were reviewed to determine the presence and degree of GER. Patients with reflux to or above the thoracic inlet either spontaneously or with provocative maneuvers in the recumbent position were classified as having massive reflux, whereas the remaining patients with reflux below the thoracic inlet or no reflux comprised the control group. The pH monitoring reports were also reviewed to determine if pathologic acid reflux was present in the recumbent position. The findings on these studies were then compared to determine the frequency of pathologic acid reflux in the recumbent position on pH monitoring in patients with massive reflux on barium studies compared with the control group. Results: Massive GER was observed on barium studies in 11 (39%) of the 28 patients and reflux below the thoracic inlet or no reflux in the remaining 17 patients (61%) who comprised the control group. All 11 patients (100%) with massive reflux on barium studies had pathologic acid reflux on pH monitoring in the recumbent position compared with six (35%) of 17 patients in the control group (P=0.0009). The pH in the distal esophagus on pH monitoring was less than 4.0 for 13.1% of the recumbent period for patients with massive GER on barium studies compared with 6.2% of the recumbent period for the control group (P=0.0076). Conclusion: Although 24-h pH monitoring remains the gold standard for the detection of GER, our experience suggests that patients with massive reflux on barium studies are so likely to have pathologic acid reflux in the recumbent position that these individuals can be further evaluated and treated for their gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD

  19. Intravoxel incoherent motion magnetic resonance imaging to predict vesicoureteral reflux in children with urinary tract infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Woo; Lee, Chang Hee; Park, Yang Shin; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Park, Cheol Min [Korea University College of Medicine, Departments of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, 80 Guro-dong, Guro-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Kee Hwan [Korea University College of Medicine, Departments of Pediatrics, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Je, Bo-Kyung [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kiefer, Berthold [Oncology Application Development, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    To compare the diffusion parameters of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) between the ''reflux'' and the ''non-reflux'' kidneys, and to evaluate the feasibility of using IVIM DWI to predict vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children with a urinary tract infection (UTI). Eighty-three kidneys from 57 pediatric patients with a UTI were classified into ''reflux'' and ''non-reflux'' groups according to voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) results. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), true diffusion coefficient (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*), and perfusion fraction (PF) were measured and compared in the renal pelvis of both groups. Four indices (D*/ADC, PF/ADC, D*/D, and PF/D) were calculated and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed. VURs were detected on VCUG in 21 kidneys. PF and D* were significantly higher in the ''reflux'' group than in the ''non-reflux'' group. The indices were all significantly higher. The PF/D index showed the best diagnostic performance in predicting VUR in children with UTI (A{sub z} = 0.864). PF and D* were significantly higher in the ''reflux'' kidney than in the ''non-reflux'' kidney. Our new index (PF/D) could prove useful for predicting VUR. (orig.)

  20. Evaluating outcomes of endoscopic full-thickness plication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with impedance monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Renteln, Daniel; Schmidt, Arthur; Riecken, Bettina; Caca, Karel

    2010-05-01

    Endoscopic full-thickness plication allows transmural suturing at the gastroesophageal junction to recreate the antireflux barrier. Multichannel intraluminal impedance monitoring (MII) can be used to detect nonacid or weakly acidic reflux, acidic swallows, and esophageal clearance time. This study used MII to evaluate the outcome of endoscopic full-thickness plication. In this study, 12 subsequent patients requi