WorldWideScience

Sample records for gaseous species emitted

  1. Monitoring and removal of gaseous carbon-14 species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabat, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    A simple and efficient method was developed for the monitoring of low level carbon-14 in nuclear power station areas and gaseous effluent. Gaseous carbon compounds (hydrocarbons and CO) are catalytically oxidized to CO 2 , which is then absorbed on solid Ca(OH) 2 at elevated temperatures. The 14 C collected is quantitatively liberated by thermal decomposition of CaCO 3 as CO 2 , which is either measured directly by flow-through detectors or absorbed in alkali hydroxide followed by liquid scintillation counting. The method can also be used for the removal of gaseous 14 C. The Ca 14 CO 3 can be immobilized in concrete for long term disposal. Ca(OH) 2 is an inexpensive absorber. It is selective for CO 2 and has high capacity and efficiency for its absorption and retention. A theoretical evaluation of thee optium conditions for CO 2 absorption and liberation is discussed and experimental investigations are described. There is good agreement between theoretical predictions and experimental findings

  2. Examination of vegetation around a nuclear plant emitting gaseous fluorides in order to detect fluorine pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teulon, Francoise; Bonnaventure, J. P.

    1971-08-01

    Fluorine pollution (chronic or occasional) around a plant rejecting gaseous fluoride effluents can be detected from vegetation samples by chemical analysis. Systematic monitoring allows the effects and gravity of the pollution to be estimated. The analytical method used consists of a double distillation (in phosphoric acid and perchloric acid) followed by a spectro-colorimetric analysis (alizarine-complexon-lanthane). This method of control allows both the efficiency of the trapping installations and also the appearance of effluents at unexpected places to be checked, In the event of an accident it is possible to determine the advisability of prohibiting the consumption of locally grown produce by humans or fodder by cattle. Research conducted in order to determine the relation between visible, damage to certain vegetables (tomatoes, haricot beans and sorghum) and their fluorine contents demonstrated that such a relation appears above all at the level of the leaves; chemical analysis may thus be used to confirm or reject information obtained on the basis of visual evidence [fr

  3. Characterization of gaseous and semi-volatile organic compounds emitted from field burning of rice straw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim Oanh, Nguyen Thi; Tipayarom, Aungsiri; Bich, Thuy Ly; Tipayarom, Danutawat; Simpson, Christopher D.; Hardie, David; Sally Liu, L.-J.

    2015-10-01

    Rice straw (RS) field burning, commonly practiced in Asia, produces large amounts of toxic air pollutants but has not been comprehensively characterized. This study conducted field and laboratory measurements for gaseous pollutants and semi-VOCs (16 PAHs, 16 chlorinated pesticides and 14 PCBs) in RS burning smoke to determine emission factors (EFs) and emission concentration profiles. Paddy burning experiments were done following common practices used by farmers in Southeast Asia and EFs were estimated using the carbon balance method. Laboratory hood experiments simulated burning of dry RS (moisture content ∼ 5%) and normal RS (moisture ∼ 23-30%). Semi-VOCs were analyzed separately in the particulate (PM) and gas phases, and the levels measured in smoke were compared with those in the paddy background and in general ambient air to identify enrichment of the compounds. Lower EFs of all pollutants were obtained for hood burning dry RS as compared to hood burning normal RS. EFs of all detected pollutants in the field burning were higher than hood burning. The EFs of field burning in mg kg-1 RS were 760 for benzene, 230 for toluene, 510 for SO2, 490 for NO2, 260 for total PAHs (88% in gas phase), 0.11 for total PCBs (59% in gas phase) and 0.23 for OCPs (62% in gas phase). The EF of aldehydes determined in the hood experiment was 80-150 mg kg-1 RS. As compared to ambient air, RS smoke had significant enrichment of light PAHs, fluoranthene in PM and acenaphthylene in gas phase. Smoke had a higher proportion of benzene in BTEX than roadside air. Levels of PCBs, OCPs and aldehydes were higher in the burning smoke compared to ambient air, but there was no significant enrichment of particular compounds. This study provides appropriate ranges of EFs for developing emission inventory of RS spread field burning.

  4. A comparative study on the transdermal penetration effect of gaseous and aqueous plasma reactive species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Gan, Lu; Ma, Mingyu; Zhang, Song; Liu, Jingjing; Chen, Hongxiang; Liu, Dawei; Lu, Xinpei

    2018-02-01

    To improve the depth of plasma active species in the skin, it is very important to develop skin disease treatment using plasma. In this article, an air plasma source was used to work directly with the skin of a mouse. A tortuous pathway, hair follicles, electroporation and a microneedle do not aid the transdermal delivery of gaseous plasma active species, therefore these gaseous plasma active species cannot penetrate mouse skin with a thickness of ~0.75 mm. The plasma activated water (PAW) produced by the air plasma source was used to study the transdermal penetration of the aqueous plasma activated species. This aqueous plasma activated species can penetrate the skin through hair follicles, intercellular and transcellular routes. The pH of the PAW did not affect the penetration efficiency of the aqueous plasma active species.

  5. Emissions of gaseous nitrogen species from manure management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dämmgen, Ulrich; Hutchings, Nick

    2008-01-01

    A procedure for the assessment of emissions of nitrogen (N) species (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide, di-nitrogen) from the manure management system is developed, which treats N pools and flows including emissions strictly according to conservation of mass criteria. As all relevant flows...... in the husbandry of mammals are depicted, the methodology is considered a Tier 3 approach in IPCC terminology or a detailed methodology in UN ECE terminology. The importance of accounting for all N species is illustrated by comparing emission estimates obtained using this approach with those obtained from...

  6. Microwave spectrometer for the detection of transient gaseous species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolbe, W.F.; Zoellner, W.D.; Leskovar, B.

    1979-06-01

    A microwave spectrometer and associated apparatus for the detectin of unstable free radical species is described. The spectrometer, which operates over a frequency range from 66 to 73 GHz, consists of a tunable Fabry-Perot resonator followed by superhetrodyne detection for high sensitivity at low power levels. The resonator tuning is accomplished by means of a computer controlled stepping motor and by a piezoelectric transducer which also permits the use of source modulation and phase sensitive detection at 100 Hz. The sensitivity of the spectrometer is adequate to permit the detection of rotational transitions with absorption coefficients as small as 2 x 10/sup -9/ cm/sup -1/. The operation of the spectrometer is demonstrated by the detection of the two free radical species OH and SO. In the case of OH, a number of ..lambda..-doubling transitions, previously unobserved, are reported.

  7. Gaseous nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Gaseous nebulae are large, tenuous clouds of ionized gas that are associated with hot stars and that emit visible light because of the energy that they receive from the ultraviolet radiation of the stars. Examples include H II regions, planetary nebulae, and nova/supernova remnants. The emphasis is on the physical processes that occur in gaseous nebulae as opposed to a study of the objects themselves. The introduction discusses thermodynamic vs. steady-state equilibrium and excitation conditions in a dilute radiation field. Subsequent sections take up important atomic processes in gaseous nebulae (particle--particle collision rates, radiative interaction rates, cross sections), the ionization equilibrium (sizes of H II regions, ionization of the heavier elements), kinetic temperature and energy balance (heating of the electrons, cooling of the electrons), and the spectra of gaseous nebulae (line fluxes in nebulae). 7 figures, 5 tables

  8. C60 interactions with surfaces, gaseous species and photons: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    The behavior of C 60 in collisions with surfaces, with other gaseous species, and with photons is discussed. The focus is on the processes leading to fragmentation of the molecule, the identification of fragmentation products, and the mechanism of fragmentation. The nature of the fragmentation process of C 60 is of considerable interest in itself and needs to be understood in detail if C 60 cluster ion beams are to be fully exploited technologically. In addition, one may anticipate that an understanding of C 60 fragmentation will contribute mutatis mutandis to an elucidation of the elementary steps leading to the assembly of C 60 from smaller carbon clusters

  9. Differences in the dry deposition of gaseous elemental I-131 to several leafy vegetable species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinonaga, T.; Heuberger, H.; Tschiersch, J.

    2004-01-01

    The height of the dry deposition of gaseous elemental 131 I to leafy vegetable is quite uncertain because of the different habit, surface texture and leaf uptake of the different plant species. There is no comparative data on the deposition to various species, but leafy vegetables are taken as reference plants for the estimation of the height of contamination of vegetable foods after a nuclear accident. Therefore new chamber experiments were performed to determine under homogeneous and controlled conditions the dry deposition of gaseous elemental 131 I on mature leafy vegetable. The simultaneous exposition of endive, head lettuce, red oak leaf lettuce and spinach (spring leafy vegetable) rsp. curly kale, white cabbage and spinach (summer leafy vegetable) was arranged. The sample collective of each species was such large that for the expected variation of the results a statistically firm analysis was possible. Significant differences were observed for the 131 I deposition on spring vegetable: the deposition on spinach was roughly 3 times that on leaf lettuce, 4 times that on endive and 9 times that on head lettuce. All summer vegetables showed differences in deposition. For Iodine, the deposition on spinach was roughly 3 times (6 times) that on curly kale and 35 times (100 times) that on white cabbage in the 2 experiments. Washing by deionised water could reduce the contamination only by about 10% for 131 I. (author)

  10. Carbonaceous species emitted from handheld two-stroke engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volckens, John; Olson, David A.; Hays, Michael D.

    Small, handheld two-stroke engines used for lawn and garden work (e.g., string trimmers, leaf blowers, etc.) can emit a variety of potentially toxic carbonaceous air pollutants. Yet, the emissions effluents from these machines go largely uncharacterized, constraining the proper development of human exposure estimates, emissions inventories, and climate and air quality models. This study samples and evaluates chemical pollutant emissions from the dynamometer testing of six small, handheld spark-ignition engines—model years 1998-2002. Four oil-gas blends were tested in each engine in duplicate. Emissions of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and gas-phase hydrocarbons were predominant, and the PM emitted was organic matter primarily. An ANOVA model determined that engine type and control tier contributed significantly to emissions variations across all identified compound classes; whereas fuel blend was an insignificant variable accounting for engines were generally intermediate in magnitude compared with other gasoline-powered engines, numerous compounds traditionally viewed as motor vehicle markers are also present in small engine emissions in similar relative proportions. Given that small, handheld two-stroke engines used for lawn and garden work account for 5-10% of total US emissions of CO, CO 2, NO x, HC, and PM 2.5, source apportionment models and human exposure studies need to consider the effect of these small engines on ambient concentrations in air polluted environments.

  11. MESSENGER Searches for Less Abundant or Weakly Emitting Species in Mercury's Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; McClintock, William E.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sprague, Ann L.; Burger, Matthew H.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2011-01-01

    Mercury's exosphere is composed of material that originates at the planet's surface, whether that material is native or delivered by the solar wind and micrometeoroids. Many exospheric species have been detected by remote sensing, including H and He by Mariner 10, Na, K, and Ca by ground-based observations, and H, Na, Ca, Mg, and Ca+ by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. Other exospheric species, including Fe, AI, Si, 0, S, Mn, CI, Ti, OH, and their ions, are expected to be present on the basis of MESSENGER surface measurements and models of Mercury's surface chemistry. Here we report on searches for these species made with the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) channel of the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS). No obvious signatures of the listed species have yet been observed in Mercury's exosphere by the UVVS as of this writing. It is possible that detections are elusive because the optimum regions of the exosphere have not been sampled. The Sun-avoidance constraints on MESSENGER place tight limits on instrument boresight directions, and some regions are probed infrequently. If there are strong spatial gradients in the distribution of weakly emitting species, a high-resolution sampling of specific regions may be required to detect them. Summing spectra over time will also aid in the ability to detect weaker emission. Observations to date nonetheless permit strong upper limits to be placed on the abundances of many undetected species, in some cases as functions of time and space. As those limits are lowered with time, the absence of detections can provide insight into surface composition and the potential source mechanisms of exospheric material.

  12. Dry deposition of particulate Cs-134 to several leafy vegetable species and comparison to deposition of gaseous radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschiersch, J.; Shinonaga, T.; Heuberger, H.

    2004-01-01

    The height of the dry deposition of particulate radionuclides to leafy vegetable is quite uncertain because of the different habit, surface texture and leaf uptake of the different species. There is no comparative data on the deposition to various species, but leafy vegetables are taken as reference plants for the estimation of the height of contamination of vegetable foods after a nuclear accident. Therefore new chamber experiments were performed to determine under homogeneous and controlled conditions the dry deposition of particulate radio-caesium on mature leafy vegetable. The simultaneous exposition of endive, head lettuce, red oak leaf lettuce and spinach (spring leafy vegetable) rsp. curly kale, white cabbage and spinach (summer leafy vegetable) was arranged. The sample collective of each species was such large that for the expected variation of the results a statistically firm analysis was possible. For spring vegetable, there was no significant difference observed in deposition of 134 Cs between spinach and leaf lettuce, about twice the amount was deposited on both species as on endive and 3 times as on head lettuce. All summer vegetables showed differences in deposition for Caesium, the deposition to curly kale was highest, about twice that on spinach and 35 times (80 times) that on white cabbage. The normalized deposition velocity could be estimated, in average it was about 8 times lower for 134 Cs than for gaseous elemental 131 I. The influence of the particle size on the deposition velocity was small in the considered size range of 0.58-1.1μm (AMAD) of the monodisperse aerosol. Washing could reduce the contamination by about 45% for 134 Cs. (author)

  13. Contribution of gaseous and particulate species to droplet solute composition at the Puy de Dôme, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sellegri

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical reactions of dissolved gases in the liquid phase play a key role in atmospheric processes both in the formation of secondary atmospheric compounds and their wet removal rate but also in the regulation of the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere. The behavior of gaseous species and their chemical transformation in clouds are difficult to observe experimentally given the complex nature of clouds. During a winter field campaign at the summit of the Puy de Dôme (central France, 1465 m a.s.l, we have deployed an experimental set-up to provide a quantification of phase partitioning of both organic (CH3COOH, HCOOH, H2C2O4 and inorganic (NH3, HNO3, SO2, HCl species in clouds. We found that nitric and hydrochloric acids can be considered close to Henry's law equilibrium, within analytical uncertainty and instrumental errors. On another hand, for NH3 and carboxylic acids, dissolution of material from the gas phase is kinetically limited and never reaches the equilibrium predicted by thermodynamics, resulting in significant sub-saturation of the liquid phase. On the contrary, SIV is supersaturated in the liquid phase, in addition to the presence of significant aerosol-derived SVI transferred through nucleation scavenging. Upon droplet evaporation, a significant part of most species, including SIV, tends to efficiently return back into the gas phase. Overall, gas contribution to the droplet solute concentration ranges from at least 48.5 to 98% depending on the chemical species. This is particularly important considering that aerosol scavenging efficiencies are often calculated assuming a negligible gas-phase contribution to the solute concentration. Our study emphasizes the need to account for the in-cloud interaction between particles and gases to provide an adequate modeling of multiphase chemistry systems and its impact on the atmospheric aerosol and gas phases.

  14. Emissions of gaseous nitrogen species from manure management: A new approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daemmgen, Ulrich [Federal Agricultural Research Centre, Institute of Agroecology, Bundesallee 50, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)], E-mail: ulrich.daemmgen@fal.de; Hutchings, Nicholas J. [Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Agroecology, Tjele (Denmark)], E-mail: nick.hutchings@agrsci.dk

    2008-08-15

    A procedure for the assessment of emissions of nitrogen (N) species (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide, di-nitrogen) from the manure management system is developed, which treats N pools and flows including emissions strictly according to conservation of mass criteria. As all relevant flows in the husbandry of mammals are depicted, the methodology is considered a Tier 3 approach in IPCC terminology or a detailed methodology in UN ECE terminology. The importance of accounting for all N species is illustrated by comparing emission estimates obtained using this approach with those obtained from the application the present detailed/Tier 2 methodology. - A cow is a cow. There is no distinction between an IPCC and a UN ECE cow{exclamation_point}.

  15. Computation of laminar heat transfer from gaseous plasmas in electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, T. K.

    1972-01-01

    Heat transfer analysis procedure is presented for two-temperature gaseous plasma. Analysis is based on laminar flow of singly-ionized, quasineutral plasma with variable properties. Sheath analysis is described for species in accelerating field, decelerating field, emitted from wall, and recombining at wall.

  16. N Management of European Grasslands: Can the Exchange of Gaseous N Species Be Influenced at the Operational Level?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Calanca

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Grassland ecosystems can be regarded as biochemical reactors in which large amounts of organic nitrogen (N are converted into inorganic N, and vice versa. If managed in a sustainable manner, grasslands should operate in a quasi steady state, characterized by an almost perfect balance between total N input and output. As a consequence, the exchange of gaseous N species (NH3, NO, NO2, N2O, and N2 between grasslands and the atmosphere is very small compared to the total N turnover. In this study, the effects of two management options (mowing and fertilization on production and emission of nitrous oxide (N2O from a grass/clover crop were examined on the basis of observations and model results referring to an experiment carried out on the Swiss Plateau in late summer of 2000. It was found that production and emission of N2O induced by mowing were of the same order of magnitude as those brought about by fertilization, suggesting a possible transfer of N from clover to the soil after defoliation. Emissions were strongly modulated by precipitation on time scales ranging from 1 day to 1 week. This indicates that effective control of N2O emissions through management on a day-to-day basis requires reliable medium-range weather forecasts. Model calculations were not able to reproduce essential characteristics of the emissions. The model slightly overestimated the background emissions, but severely underestimated the emission peaks following fertilizer application, and largely failed to reproduce emission induced by mowing. Shortfalls in the model used for this study were found in relation to the description of soil-water fluxes, soil organic matter, and the physiology of clover.

  17. Ab-initio assessment of conventional standard-state thermodynamic properties of geochemically relevant gaseous and aqueous species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetuschi Zuccolini, M.; Ottonello, G.; Belmonte, D.

    2011-05-01

    After some introductory remarks on the essential basic concepts concerning isolated (gas state) atoms and molecules (adiabatic vs. vertical ionization potential and electron affinity; dissociation energy), we will show how their (absolute) internal energy and enthalpy (i.e. "thermal corrections" to the energy of the molecule) may be converted into the conventional counterparts of common use in thermochemistry through an appropriate thermochemical cycle. The first-principles acceptation of entropy, in terms of translational, rotational, vibrational, and electronic contributions to the bulk partition function, will then be briefly restated, emphasizing that, for practical calculations, the V-dependency of the translational terms can be converted into a P-dependency with the perfect gas law. The entropy of "aqueous" species will then be discussed after some preliminary remarks on the significance of the "solvation entropy" in terms of a Polarized Continuum Model (PCM) conceptual framework, and some comments on the energy of the "hydronium ion" H 3O +. Some comments on the nature of the electrostatic portion of the solvation entropy, in terms of the Born solvation theory, and the non-electrostatic portion (solvent collapse+cavity formation+dispersion+repulsion+liberation entropy terms), will then be made, showing how this last term may be computed practically by exploiting its analogy with the Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers electrostatic approach. After some elementary application of the various concepts to the gaseous state, we will present a potential application of major use in geochemistry, i.e. the possibility of computing ab-initio the interaction parameters (i.e. individual activity coefficients) of complex ions in solution through PCM procedures. We will then discuss the state of the art attained in determining ab-initio the p Ka scale of organic and inorganic acids, perhaps the most demanding task, due to the high level of internal precision required. Finally, we

  18. Growth promotion of Lactuca sativa in response to volatile organic compounds emitted from diverse bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincheira, Paola; Venthur, Herbert; Mutis, Ana; Parada, Maribel; Quiroz, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    Agrochemicals are currently used in horticulture to increase crop production. Nevertheless, their indiscriminate use is a relevant issue for environmental and legal aspects. Alternative tools for reducing fertilizers and synthetic phytohormones are being investigated, such as the use of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as growth inducers. Some soil bacteria, such as Pseudomonas and Bacillus, stimulate Arabidopsis and tobacco growth by releasing VOCs, but their effects on vegetables have not been investigated. Lactuca sativa was used as model vegetable to investigate bacterial VOCs as growth inducers. We selected 10 bacteria strains, belonging to Bacillus, Staphylococcus and Serratia genera that are able to produce 3-hydroxy-2-butanone (acetoin), a compound with proven growth promoting activity. Two-day old-seedlings of L. sativa were exposed to VOCs emitted by the selected bacteria grown in different media cultures for 7 days. The results showed that the VOCs released from the bacteria elicited an increase in the number of lateral roots, dry weight, root growth and shoot length, depending on the media used. Three Bacillus strains, BCT53, BCT9 and BCT4, were selected according to its their growth inducing capacity. The BCT9 strain elicited the greatest increases in dry weight and primary root length when L. sativa seedlings were subjected to a 10-day experiment. Finally, because acetoin only stimulated root growth, we suggest that other volatiles could be responsible for the growth promotion of L. sativa. In conclusion, our results strongly suggest that bacteria volatiles can be used as growth-inducers as alternative or complementary strategies for application in horticulture species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Gaseous Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    aseous Matter focuses on the many important discoveries that led to the scientific interpretation of matter in the gaseous state. This new, full-color resource describes the basic characteristics and properties of several important gases, including air, hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and nitrogen. The nature and scope of the science of fluids is discussed in great detail, highlighting the most important scientific principles upon which the field is based. Chapters include:. Gaseous Matter An Initial Perspective. Physical Characteristics of Gases. The Rise of the Science of Gases. Kinetic Theory of

  20. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from 40 Mediterranean plant species: VOC speciation and extrapolation to habitat scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, S.M.; Boissard, C.; Hewitt, C.N. [Institute of Environmental and Natural Sciences, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom). Department of Environmental Science

    2001-07-01

    Forty native Mediterranean plant species were screened for emissions of the C5 and C10 hydrocarbons, isoprene and monoterpenes, in five different habitats. A total of 32 compounds were observed in the emissions from these plants. The number of compounds emitted by different plant species varied from 19 (Quercus ilex) to a single compound emission, usually of isoprene. Emission rates were normalised to generate emission factors for each plant species for each sampling event at standard conditions of temperature and light intensity. Plant species were categorised according to their main emitted compound, the major groups being isoprene, {alpha}-pinene, linalool, and limonene emitters. Estimates of habitat fluxes for each emitted compound were derived from the contributing plant species' emission factors, biomass and ground cover. Emissions of individual compounds ranged from 0.002 to 505gha{sup -1}h{sup -1} (camphene from garrigue in Spain in autumn and isoprene from riverside habitats in Spain in late spring, respectively). Emissions of isoprene ranged from 0.3 to 505gha{sup -1}h{sup -1} (macchia in Italy in late spring and autumn, and riverside in Spain in late spring, respectively) and {alpha}-pinene emissions ranged from 0.51 to 52.92gha{sup -1}h{sup -1} (garrigue in Spain in late spring, and forest in France in autumn, respectively). Habitat fluxes of most compounds in autumn were greater than in late spring, dominated by emissions from Quercus ilex, Gemista scorpius and Quercus pubescens. This study contributes to regional emission inventories and will be of use to tropospheric chemical modellers. (author)

  1. Gaseous emissions from coal stockpiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-01-15

    Stockpiled coal undergoes atmospheric oxidation and desorption processes during open air storage. These processes release gases to the environment which may effect health and safety by their toxicity and flammability. In extreme cases, this could lead to a fire. This report discusses gaseous emissions from coal stockpiles. It covers gas emission mechanisms, and gas sampling and testing methods, before examining in more detail the principal gases that have been emitted. It concludes that there is limited research in this area and more data are needed to evaluate the risks of gaseous emissions. Some methods used to prevent coal self-heating and spontaneous combustion can be applied to reduce emissions from coal stockpiles.

  2. Particle concentrations, gas-particle partitioning, and species intercorrelations for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) emitted during biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Bryan M.; Daniel Jones, A.; Turn, Scott Q.; Williams, Robert B.

    Eight types of agricultural and forest fuels including 4 cereal crop residues and 4 wood fuels were burned in a combustion wind tunnel to simulate the open burning of biomass. Concentrations for 19 PAH species in particulate matter were found to range between 120 and 4000 mg kg -1, representing between 1 and 70% of total PAH emission. Weakly flaming spreading fires in the cereals were observed to produce higher levels of heavier PAH than more robust fires, with greater partitioning of PAH to the particle phase. Individual species concentrations appeared well correlated within groups based primarily on molecular weight, but no single species was observed to correlate with all others to serve as an indicator of PAH emission strength. Equilibrium gas-particle partitioning did not appear to be achieved within the 3-5 s residence time prior to sampling for sampling temperatures between 32 and 87°C, and in particular for the heavier species emitted from wood fuel pile fires with higher stack gas temperatures and shorter residence times. Total PAH emission, particle-phase concentrations, and fraction of PAH on particles were more strongly influenced by burning conditions than by fuel type.

  3. A denuder-impinger system with in situ derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of gaseous iodine-containing halogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ru-Jin; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2008-11-14

    Reactive iodine species have been suggested to play an important role in the atmosphere (e.g. tropospheric ozone depletion, coastal new particle formation). However, there still exist major uncertainties about their atmospheric chemistry, mostly due to the lack of analytical approaches for the accurate speciation of certain key compounds. In this study, 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene (1,3,5-TMB)-coated denuder proved to be suitable for the differentiation between gaseous interhalogens (iodine monochloride (ICl), iodine monobromide (IBr)) and molecular iodine (I2) based on a selective collection/derivatization method. The results of the denuder sampling were compared with the results of impinger sampling in water, methanol and carbon tetrachloride solutions of 1,3,5-TMB. ICl and IBr are converted into 1-iodo-2,4,6-trimethoxybenzene (1-iodo-2,4,6-TMB) and 1-bromo-2,4,6-trimethoxybenzene (1-bromo-2,4,6-TMB), respectively, in the denuder systems. The respective collection efficiency is 99.2% for ICl and 92.6% for IBr, at 500mLmin(-1) gas flow rate. The collection efficiency for I2 is lower than 1% in the same denuder system, but significantly increases to about 90% in the aqueous 1,3,5-TMB loaded impinger. The denuder-impinger coupled system was then used to differentiate and to collect the ICl, IBr and I2 gas mixtures, followed by gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry (GC-MS) determination. The precision of the method is in general better than 9.1%. The parameters affecting denuder operation including sampling flow rate, sampling duration, and relative humidity have been evaluated. The presented method provides an attractive protocol for iodine species analysis for atmospheric chemistry research.

  4. Application of head-space solid-phase microextraction for the analysis of volatile metabolites emitted by Penicillium species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Torben; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Montanarella, Luca

    1996-01-01

    Head-space solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) has been used to collect volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from fungi of the genus Penicillium. Gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was employed for the analysis of the profiles of volatile metabolites characteristic ......-SPME has a great potential use in the analysis of biogenic VOC emissions, including chemotaxonomical studies....

  5. Resveratrol Prevents High Fluence Red Light-Emitting Diode Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Photoinhibition of Human Skin Fibroblast Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mamalis

    Full Text Available Skin fibrosis is a significant medical problem that leads to a functional, aesthetic, and psychosocial impact on quality-of-life. Light-emitting diode-generated 633-nm red light (LED-RL is part of the visible light spectrum that is not known to cause DNA damage and is considered a safe, non-invasive, inexpensive, and portable potential alternative to ultraviolet phototherapy that may change the treatment paradigm of fibrotic skin disease.The goal of our study was to investigate the how reactive oxygen species (ROS free radicals generated by high fluence LED-RL inhibit the migration of skin fibroblasts, the main cell type involved in skin fibrosis. Fibroblast migration speed is increased in skin fibrosis, and we studied cellular migration speed of cultured human skin fibroblasts as a surrogate measure of high fluence LED-RL effect on fibroblast function. To ascertain the inhibitory role of LED-RL generated ROS on migration speed, we hypothesized that resveratrol, a potent antioxidant, could prevent the photoinhibitory effects of high fluence LED-RL on fibroblast migration speed.High fluence LED-RL generated ROS were measured by flow cytometry analysis using dihydrorhodamine (DHR. For purposes of comparison, we assessed the effects of ROS generated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 on fibroblast migration speed and the ability of resveratrol, a well known antioxidant, to prevent LED-RL and H2O2 generated ROS-associated changes in fibroblast migration speed. To determine whether resveratrol could prevent the high fluence LED-RL ROS-mediated photoinhibition of human skin fibroblast migration, treated cells were incubated with resveratrol at concentrations of 0.0001% and 0.001% for 24 hours, irradiated with high fluences LED-RL of 480, 640, and 800 J/cm2.High fluence LED-RL increases intracellular fibroblast ROS and decreases fibroblast migration speed. LED-RL at 480, 640 and 800 J/cm2 increased ROS levels to 132.8%, 151.0%, and 158.4% relative to matched

  6. Astrophysics of gaseous nebulae and active galactic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterbrock, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    A graduate-level text and reference book on gaseous nebulae and the emission regions in Seyfert galaxies, quasars, and other types of active galactic nuclei (AGN) is presented. The topics discussed include: photoionization equilibrium, thermal equilibrium, calculation of emitted spectrum, comparison of theory with observations, internal dynamics of gaseous nebulae, interstellar dust, regions in the galactic context, planetary nebulae, nova and supernova remnants, diagnostics and physics of AGN, observational results on AGN

  7. Development of gaseous photomultiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokanai, F.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Sugiyama, H.; Okada, T.

    2014-01-01

    We have been developing gaseous photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with alkali photocathode combined with micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs). The potential advantage of the gaseous PMT is that it can achieve a very large effective area with adequate position and timing resolutions. In addition, it will be easily operated under a very high magnetic field, compared with the conventional vacuum-based PMT. To evaluate the gaseous PMTs filled with Ne and Ar based gas mixture, we have developed gaseous PMTs with an alkali photocathode combined with MPGDs such as a glass capillary plate, GEM, and Micromegas detector. We describe the recent development of the gaseous PMTs, particularly the production of the photocathode, gas gain, ion and photon feedbacks, quantum efficiency, and the characteristics in the magnetic field environment. (author)

  8. Gaseous (DMS, MSA, SO2, H2SO4 and DMSO and particulate (sulfate and methanesulfonate sulfur species over the northeastern coast of Crete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bardouki

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed study of the levels, the temporal and diurnal variability of the main compounds involved in the biogenic sulfur cycle was carried out in Crete (Eastern Mediterranean during the Mediterranean Intensive Oxidant Study (MINOS field experiment in July-August 2001. Intensive measurements of gaseous dimethylsulfide (DMS, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO, sulfur dioxide (SO2, sulfuric (H2SO4 and methanesulfonic acids (MSA and particulate sulfate (SO42- and methanesulfonate (MS- have been performed during the campaign. Dimethylsulfide (DMS levels ranged from 2.9 to 136 pmol·mol-1 (mean value of 21.7 pmol·mol-1 and showed a clear diurnal variation with daytime maximum. During nighttime DMS levels fall close or below the detection limit of 2 pmol·mol-1. Concurrent measurements of OH and NO3 radicals during the campaign indicate that NO3 levels can explain most of the observed diurnal variation of DMS. Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO ranged between 0.02 and 10.1 pmol·mol-1 (mean value of 1.7 pmol·mol-1 and presents a diurnal variation similar to that of DMS. SO2 levels ranged from 220 to 2970 pmol·mol-1 (mean value of 1030 pmol·mol-1, while nss-SO42- and MS- ranged from 330 to 7100 pmol·mol-1, (mean value of 1440 pmol·mol-1 and 1.1 to 37.5 pmol·mol-1 (mean value of 11.5 pmol·mol-1 respectively. Of particular interest are the measurements of gaseous MSA and H2SO4. MSA ranged from below the detection limit (3x104 to 3.7x107 molecules cm-3, whereas H2SO4 ranged between 1x105 and 9.0x107 molecules cm-3. The measured H2SO4 maxima are among the highest reported in literature and can be attributed to high insolation, absence of precipitation and increased SO2 levels in the area. From the concurrent SO2, OH, and H2SO4 measurements a sticking coefficient of 0.52±0.28 was calculated for H2SO4. From the concurrent MSA, OH, and DMS measurements the yield of gaseous MSA from the OH-initiated oxidation of DMS was calculated to range between 0.1-0.4%. This low MSA

  9. Generation of gaseous tritium standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohorst, F.A.

    1994-09-01

    The determination of aqueous and non-aqueous tritium in gaseous samples is one type of determination often requested of radioanalytical laboratories. This determination can be made by introducing the sample as a gas into a sampling train containing two silica gel beds separated by.a catalytic oxidizer bed. The first bed traps tritiated water. The sample then passes into and through the oxidizer bed where non-aqueous tritium containing species are oxidized to water and other products of combustion. The second silica gel bed then traps the newly formed tritiated water. Subsequently, silica gel is removed to plastic bottles, deionized water is added, and the mixture is permitted to equilibrate. The tritium content of the equilibrium mixture is then determined by conventional liquid scintillation counting (LSC). For many years, the moisture content of inert, gaseous samples has been determined using monitors which quantitatively electrolyze the moisture present after that moisture has been absorbed by phosphorous pentoxide or other absorbents. The electrochemical reaction is quantitative and definitive, and the energy consumed during electrolysis forms the basis of the continuous display of the moisture present. This report discusses the experimental evaluation of such a monitor as the basis for a technique for conversion of small quantities of SRMs of tritiated water ( 3 HOH) into gaseous tritium standards ( 3 HH)

  10. Effect of photoactivated disinfection with a light-emitting diode on bacterial species and biofilms associated with periodontitis and peri-implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Sigrun; Markauskaite, Giedre; Nietzsche, Sandor; Laugisch, Oliver; Salvi, Giovanni E; Sculean, Anton

    2013-05-01

    To determine the effect of photoactivated disinfection (PAD) using toluidine blue and a light-emitting diode (LED) in the red spectrum (wave length at 625-635 nm) on species associated with periodontitis and peri-implantitis and bacteria within a periodontopathic biofilm. Sixteen single microbial species including 2 Porphyromonas gingivalis and 2 Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and a multispecies mixture consisting of 12 species suspended in saline without and with 25% human serum were exposed to PAD. Moreover, single-species biofilms consisting of 2 P. gingivalis and 2 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains and a multi-species biofilm on 24-well-plates, grown on titanium discs and in artificial periodontal pockets were exposed to PAD with and without pretreatment with 0.25% hydrogen peroxide. Changes in the viability were determined by counting the colony forming units (cfu). PAD reduced the cfu counts in saline by 1.42 log₁₀ after LED application for 30s and by 1.99 log₁₀ after LED application for 60s compared with negative controls (each p<0.001). Serum did not inhibit the efficacy of PAD. PAD reduced statistically significantly (p<0.05) the cfu counts of the P. gingivalis biofilms. The viability of the A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms and the multi-species biofilms was statistically significantly decreased when PAD was applied after a pretreatment with 0.25% hydrogen peroxide. The biofilm formed in artificial pockets was more sensitive to PAD with and without pretreatment with hydrogen peroxide compared with those formed on titanium discs. PAD using a LED was effective against periodontopathic bacterial species and reduced viability in biofilms but was not able to completely destroy complex biofilms. The use of PAD following pretreatment with hydrogen peroxide resulted in an additional increase in the antimicrobial activity which may represent a new alternative to treat periodontal and peri-implant infections thus warranting further testing in clinical

  11. Volatiles emitted from maize ears simultaneously infected with two Fusarium species mirror the most competitive fungal pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Sherif

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Along with barley and rice, maize provides staple food for more than half of the world population. Maize ears are regularly infected with fungal pathogens of the Fusarium genus, which, besides reducing yield, also taint grains with toxic metabolites. In an earlier work, we have shown that maize ears infection with single Fusarium strains was detectable through volatile sensing. In nature, infection most commonly occurs with more than a single fungal strain; hence we tested how the interactions of two strains would modulate volatile emission from infected ears. For this purpose, ears of a hybrid and a dwarf maize variety were simultaneously infected with different strains of F. graminearums and F. verticillioides and, the resulting volatile profiles were compared to the ones of ears infected with single strains. Disease severity, fungal biomass and the concentration of an oxylipin 9-hydroxy octadecadienoic acid, a signaling molecule involved in plant defense, were monitored and correlated to volatile profiles. Our results demonstrate that in simultaneous infections of hybrid and dwarf maize, the most competitive fungal strains had the largest influence on the volatile profile of infected ears. In both concurrent and single inoculations, volatile profiles reflected disease severity. Additionally, the data further indicate that dwarf maize and hybrid maize might emit common (i.e. sesquiterpenoids and specific markers upon fungal infection. Overall this suggests that volatile profiles might be a good proxy for disease severity regardless of the fungal competition taking place in maize ears. With the appropriate sensitivity and reliability, volatile sensing thus appears as a promising tool for detecting fungal infection of maize ears under field conditions.

  12. Position Sensitive Gaseous Photomultipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Martinengo, P; Peskov, V

    2010-01-01

    Advances in the technologies associated with position sensitive gaseous detectors especially featuring CsI as reflective photoconverters will be reviewed. These photodetectors represent the most effective solution for what concerns cost and performance in the case of large area Cherenkov imaging applications in relatively low rate (or low occupancy) high energy physics and astrophysics experiments. Moreover, they are the only choice when the Cherenkov detector is embedded in a magnetic field. Recently proposed single photon MPGDs (Micropattern Gaseous Detectors) will be also discussed in view of the successful efforts so far made to extend their sensitivity to visible light. With some modifications, photosensitive gaseous detectors can also be used in the imaging of X-rays and particles.

  13. Mercury from combustion sources: a review of the chemical species emitted and their transport in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpi, A.

    1997-01-01

    Different species of mercury have different physical/chemical properties and thus behave quite differentially in air pollution control equipment and in the atmosphere. In general, emission of mercury from coal combustion sources are approximately 20-50% elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) and 50-80% divalent mercury (Hg(II)), which may be predominantly HgCl 2 . Emissions of mercury from waste incinerators are approximately 10-20% Hg 0 and 75-85% Hg(II). The partitioning of mercury in flue gas between the elemental and divalent forms may be dependent on the concentration of particulate carbon, HCl and other pollutants in the stack emissions. The emission of mercury from combustion facilities depends on the species in the exhaust stream and the type of air pollution control equipment used at the source. Air pollution control equipment for mercury removal at combustion facilities includes activated carbon injection, sodium sulfide injection and wet lime/limestone flue gas desulfurization. White Hg(II) is water-soluble and may be removed form the atmosphere by wet and dry deposition close to the combustion sources, the combination of a high vapor pressure and low water-solubility facilitate the long-range transport of Hg 0 in the atmosphere. Background mercury in the atmosphere is predominantly Hg 0 . Elemental mercury is eventually removed from the atmosphere by dry deposition onto surfaces and by wet deposition after oxidation to water-soluble, divalent mercury. 62 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  14. Position sensitive gaseous photomultipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Biteman, V; Peskov, Vladimir; Sakuraï, H; Silin, E; Sokolova, T; Radionov, I

    2001-01-01

    In this paper a simple design of a gaseous photomultiplier, sensitive up to visible light, is described. It consists of a parallel plate chamber combined with a solid photocathode through a capillary plate, which works in a transmission mode and serves to suppress photon feedback. Ion feedback was minimized through the optimization of the gas mixture. A gain >10 sup 3 was achieved.

  15. Gaseous diffusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, G.A.; Shacter, J.

    1978-01-01

    A gaseous diffusion system is described comprising a plurality of diffusers connected in cascade to form a series of stages, each of the diffusers having a porous partition dividing it into a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber, and means for combining a portion of the enriched gas from a succeeding stage with a portion of the enriched gas from the low pressure chamber of each stage and feeding it into one extremity of the high pressure chamber thereof

  16. Transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with scintillation gaseous detection device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilatos, Gerasimos; Kollia, Mary; Dracopoulos, Vassileios

    2015-03-01

    A transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with use of a scintillation gaseous detection device has been implemented. This corresponds to a transmission scanning electron microscope but with addition of a gaseous environment acting both as environmental and detection medium. A commercial type of low vacuum machine has been employed together with appropriate modifications to the detection configuration. This involves controlled screening of various emitted signals in conjunction with a scintillation gaseous detection device already provided with the machine for regular surface imaging. Dark field and bright field imaging has been obtained along with other detection conditions. With a progressive series of modifications and tests, the theory and practice of a novel type of microscopy is briefly shown now ushering further significant improvements and developments in electron microscopy as a whole. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Gaseous detectors for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Silva, A. L. M.

    2018-01-01

    The energy resolution capability of gaseous detectors is being used in the last years to perform studies on the detection of characteristic X-ray lines emitted by elements when excited by external radiation sources. One of the most successful techniques is the Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) analysis. Recent developments in the new generation of micropatterned gaseous detectors (MPGDs), triggered the possibility not only of recording the photon energy, but also of providing position information, extending their application to EDXRF imaging. The relevant features and strategies to be applied in gaseous detectors in order to better fit the requirements for EDXRF imaging will be reviewed and discussed, and some application examples will be presented.

  18. GASEOUS DISCHARGE DEVICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, J.D.

    1961-01-10

    An extremely compact two-terminal gaseous discharge device is described that is capable of producing neutrons in copious quantities, relatively high energy ions, intense x rays, and the like. Principal novelty resides in the provision of a crossed electric-magnetic field region in the discharge envelope that traps electrons and accelerates them to very high energies to provide an intense ionizing medium adjacent the anode of the device for ionizing gas therein with extremely high efficiency. In addition, the crossed-field trapping region holds the electrons close to the anode whereby the acceleration of ions to the cathode is not materially effected by the electron sheath and the ions assume substantially the full energy of the anodecathode potential drop. (auth)

  19. Ethylene Oxide Gaseous Sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Robert R.; Shull, James J.

    1962-01-01

    The duration of the equilibration period between admission of water vapor and subsequent introduction of gaseous ethylene oxide to an evacuated sterilizer chamber was studied with respect to its effect on the inactivation of spores of Bacillus subtilis var. niger under simulated practical conditions. Introduction of a water-adsorbing cotton barrier between the spores and an incoming gas mixture of water vapor and ethylene oxide caused a marked increase in the observed thermochemical death time of the spore populations. This effect was negated by admission of water vapor one or more minutes prior to introduction of ethylene oxide gas. Increases in temperature and relative humidity of the system promoted passage of water vapor through the cotton barriers and diminished their effect. PMID:13890660

  20. Dosimeter for measuring gaseous contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kring, E.V.; Lautenberger, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    A personal dosimeter for measuring the time-average concentration of a gaseous contaminant in the atmosphere in a manner substantially independent of atmospheric motion relative to the dosimeter is provided. The dosimeter comprises a detector substance capable of chemically or physically combining with the gaseous contaminant disposed tightly between two substantially flat members, at least one of which has a plurality of throughand-through channels. The members have corresponding, meshing shapes such that the channels provide the only communication between the atmosphere and the detector substance, allowing the gaseous contaminant to diffuse through the channels

  1. Cool gaseous nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Shaver, P A; Pottasch, S R

    1979-01-01

    The electron temperatures of diffuse gaseous nebulae have long been thought to be close to 10/sup 4/K. Much lower temperatures were derived from some of the early radio continuum and recombination line work, but these were generally considered to be wrong for a variety of reasons. While there is little doubt that the bright nebulae do indeed have temperatures of approximately 8000-9000K, there are strong indications that some nebulae of lower densities have much lower temperatures,

  2. Gaseous radioactive waste processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onizawa, Hideo.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To prevent explosion of hydrogen gas within gaseous radioactive waste by removing the hydrogen gas by means of a hydrogen absorber. Structure: A coolant extracted from a reactor cooling system is sprayed by nozzle into a gaseous phase (hydrogen) portion within a tank, thus causing slipping of radioactive rare gas. The gaseous radioactive waste rich in hydrogen, which is purged in the tank, is forced by a waste gas compressor into a hydrogen occlusion device. The hydrogen occlusion device is filled with hydrogen occluding agents such as Mg, Mg-Ni alloy, V-Nb alloy, La-Ni alloy and so forth, and hydrogen in the waste gas is removed through reaction to produce hydrogen metal. The gaseous radioactive waste, which is deprived of hydrogen and reduced in volume, is stored in an attenuation tank. The hydrogen stored in the hydrogen absorber is released and used again as purge gas. (Horiuchi, T.)

  3. An introduction to technetium in the gaseous diffusion cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, D.W.

    1996-09-01

    The radioisotope technetium-99 ( 99 Tc) was introduced into the gaseous diffusion plants (GDP) as a contaminant in uranium that had been reprocessed from spent nuclear reactor fuel. 99 Tc is a product of the nuclear fission of uranium-235 ( 235 U). The significantly higher emitted radioactivity of 99 Tc generates concern in the enrichment complex and warrants increased attention (1) to the control of all site emissions, (2) to worker exposures and contamination control when process equipment requires disassembly and decontamination, and (3) to product purity when the enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) product is marketed to the private sector. A total of 101,268 metric tons of RU (∼96% of the total) was fed at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) between FY1953 and FY1976. An additional 5600 metric tons of RU from the government reactors were fed at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), plus an approximate 500 tons of foreign reactor returns. Only a small amount of RU was fed directly at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The slightly enriched PGDP product was then fed to either the ORGDP or PORTS cascades for final enrichment. Bailey estimated in 1988 that of the 606 kg of Tc received at PGDP from RU, 121 kg was subsequently re-fed to ORGDP and 85 kg re-fed to PORTS

  4. Simulating Isotope Enrichment by Gaseous Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Cameron

    2015-04-01

    A desktop-computer simulation of isotope enrichment by gaseous diffusion has been developed. The simulation incorporates two non-interacting point-mass species whose members pass through a cascade of cells containing porous membranes and retain constant speeds as they reflect off the walls of the cells and the spaces between holes in the membranes. A particular feature is periodic forward recycling of enriched material to cells further along the cascade along with simultaneous return of depleted material to preceding cells. The number of particles, the mass ratio, the initial fractional abundance of the lighter species, and the time between recycling operations can be chosen by the user. The simulation is simple enough to be understood on the basis of two-dimensional kinematics, and demonstrates that the fractional abundance of the lighter-isotope species increases along the cascade. The logic of the simulation will be described and results of some typical runs will be presented and discussed.

  5. Determination of non-gaseous and gaseous mercury fractions in unused fluorescent lamps: a study of different lamp types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figi, Renato; Nagel, Oliver; Schreiner, Claudia; Hagendorfer, Harald

    2015-03-01

    Since incandescent light bulbs have been phased out in the European Union from 2009, the use of fluorescent lamps has drastically increased as a reliable, more energy-efficient and cost-effective alternative. State-of-the-art fluorescent lamps are dependent on mercury/mercury alloys, posing a risk for the consumer and the environment, and appropriate waste management is challenging. Consequently analytical methods to determine possible mercury species (non-gaseous/gaseous) in these lamps are of need. Here, a straightforward and wet-chemistry-based analytical strategy for the determination of gaseous and non-gaseous mercury in commercially available fluorescent lamps is presented. It can be adapted in any analytical laboratory, without or with only minimum modifications of already installed equipment. The analytical figures of merit, as well as application of the method to a series of commercially available fluorescent lamps, are presented. Out of 14 analysed and commercially available lamp types, results from this study indicate that only one contains a slightly higher amount of mercury than set by the legislative force. In all new lamps the amount of gaseous mercury is negligible compared with the non-gaseous fraction (88%-99% of total mercury). © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Effects of Laser Printer–Emitted Engineered Nanoparticles on Cytotoxicity, Chemokine Expression, Reactive Oxygen Species, DNA Methylation, and DNA Damage: A Comprehensive in Vitro Analysis in Human Small Airway Epithelial Cells, Macrophages, and Lymphoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirela, Sandra V.; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Lu, Xiaoyan; Castranova, Vincent; Thomas, Treye; Qian, Yong; Bello, Dhimiter; Kobzik, Lester; Koturbash, Igor; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Background Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) incorporated into toner formulations of printing equipment become airborne during consumer use. Although information on the complex physicochemical and toxicological properties of both toner powders and printer-emitted particles (PEPs) continues to grow, most toxicological studies have not used the actual PEPs but rather have primarily used raw toner powders, which are not representative of current exposures experienced at the consumer level during printing. Objectives We assessed the biological responses of a panel of human cell lines to PEPs. Methods Three physiologically relevant cell lines—small airway epithelial cells (SAECs), macrophages (THP-1 cells), and lymphoblasts (TK6 cells)—were exposed to PEPs at a wide range of doses (0.5–100 μg/mL) corresponding to human inhalation exposure durations at the consumer level of 8 hr or more. Following treatment, toxicological parameters reflecting distinct mechanisms were evaluated. Results PEPs caused significant membrane integrity damage, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine release in different cell lines at doses equivalent to exposure durations from 7.8 to 1,500 hr. Furthermore, there were differences in methylation patterns that, although not statistically significant, demonstrate the potential effects of PEPs on the overall epigenome following exposure. Conclusions The in vitro findings obtained in this study suggest that laser printer–emitted engineered nanoparticles may be deleterious to lung cells and provide preliminary evidence of epigenetic modifications that might translate to pulmonary disorders. Citation Pirela SV, Miousse IR, Lu X, Castranova V, Thomas T, Qian Y, Bello D, Kobzik L, Koturbash I, Demokritou P. 2016. Effects of laser printer–emitted engineered nanoparticles on cytotoxicity, chemokine expression, reactive oxygen species, DNA methylation, and DNA damage: a comprehensive in

  7. Treatment of Radioactive Gaseous Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    Radioactive waste, with widely varying characteristics, is generated from the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, research laboratories and medical facilities. The waste needs to be treated and conditioned as necessary to provide waste forms acceptable for safe storage and disposal. Although radioactive gaseous radioactive waste does not constitute the main waste flow stream at nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste processing facilities, it represents a major source for potential direct environmental impact. Effective control and management of gaseous waste in both normal and accidental conditions is therefore one of the main issues of nuclear fuel cycle and waste processing facility design and operation. One of the duties of an operator is to take measures to avoid or to optimize the generation and management of radioactive waste to minimize the overall environmental impact. This includes ensuring that gaseous and liquid radioactive releases to the environment are within authorized limits, and that doses to the public and the effects on the environment are reduced to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. Responsibilities of the regulatory body include the removal of radioactive materials within authorized practices from any further regulatory control — known as clearance — and the control of discharges — releases of gaseous radioactive material that originate from regulated nuclear facilities during normal operation to the environment within authorized limits. These issues, and others, are addressed in IAEA Safety Standards Series Nos RS-G-1.7, WS-G-2.3 and NS-G-3.2. Special systems should be designed and constructed to ensure proper isolation of areas within nuclear facilities that contain gaseous radioactive substances. Such systems consist of two basic subsystems. The first subsystem is for the supply of clean air to the facility, and the second subsystem is for the collection, cleanup and

  8. Aerotrace. Measurement of trace species in the exhaust of aero engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottington, R.V. [DRA, Farnborough (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    There is growing evidence that trace species, both gaseous and particulate, play an important role in the chemistry of the atmosphere. Very little is currently known about the nature and concentration of these species emitted by aircraft engines. The purpose of AEROTRACE, therefore, is to make representative measurements of trace species emissions, such as particulates, hydrocarbon constituents and various nitrogen compounds, from engine combustors over the entire flight altitude range from ground level to cruise conditions. An overview of the programme and progress to date is presented. (author)

  9. Search for and identification of gaseous noble metal emissions from catalytic converters. Quantitative and statistic screening of platinum metal aerosols emitted by automotive catalytic converters; Suche und Identifizierung von gasfoermigen katalysatorbuertigen Edelmetallemissionen (VPT 06). Quantitative und statistische Reihenuntersuchungen ueber emittierte Platinmetallaerosole aus Automobilkatalysatoren (VPT 08)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artelt, S. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Toxikologie und Aerosolforschung, Hannover (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The aim of these two projects was to determine whether platinum is contained in catalysed automobile exhaust fumes and in what quantities it is emitted. A further task was to determine the particle size and particle size distribution of emitted particles. For this purpose an engine test stand was set up at the Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Aerosol Research and two different sampling techniques were developed. [Deutsch] Im Rahmen dieser beiden Vorhaben sollte untersucht werden, ob Platin im katalysierten Automobilabgas vorhanden ist und in welcher Menge es emittiert wird. Weiterhin sollte die Partikelgroesse der emittierten Partikel und ihre Verteilung bestimmt werden. Im Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Toxikologie und Aerosolforschung wurde dazu ein Motorstand aufgebaut und zwei unterschiedliche Probenahmetechniken entwickelt. (orig.)

  10. Effects of Laser Printer-Emitted Engineered Nanoparticles on Cytotoxicity, Chemokine Expression, Reactive Oxygen Species, DNA Methylation, and DNA Damage: A Comprehensive in Vitro Analysis in Human Small Airway Epithelial Cells, Macrophages, and Lymphoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirela, Sandra V; Miousse, Isabelle R; Lu, Xiaoyan; Castranova, Vincent; Thomas, Treye; Qian, Yong; Bello, Dhimiter; Kobzik, Lester; Koturbash, Igor; Demokritou, Philip

    2016-02-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) incorporated into toner formulations of printing equipment become airborne during consumer use. Although information on the complex physicochemical and toxicological properties of both toner powders and printer-emitted particles (PEPs) continues to grow, most toxicological studies have not used the actual PEPs but rather have primarily used raw toner powders, which are not representative of current exposures experienced at the consumer level during printing. We assessed the biological responses of a panel of human cell lines to PEPs. Three physiologically relevant cell lines--small airway epithelial cells (SAECs), macrophages (THP-1 cells), and lymphoblasts (TK6 cells)--were exposed to PEPs at a wide range of doses (0.5-100 μg/mL) corresponding to human inhalation exposure durations at the consumer level of 8 hr or more. Following treatment, toxicological parameters reflecting distinct mechanisms were evaluated. PEPs caused significant membrane integrity damage, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine release in different cell lines at doses equivalent to exposure durations from 7.8 to 1,500 hr. Furthermore, there were differences in methylation patterns that, although not statistically significant, demonstrate the potential effects of PEPs on the overall epigenome following exposure. The in vitro findings obtained in this study suggest that laser printer-emitted engineered nanoparticles may be deleterious to lung cells and provide preliminary evidence of epigenetic modifications that might translate to pulmonary disorders.

  11. Planar Reflection of Gaseous Detonations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damazo, Jason Scott

    Pipes containing flammable gaseous mixtures may be subjected to internal detonation. When the detonation normally impinges on a closed end, a reflected shock wave is created to bring the flow back to rest. This study built on the work of Karnesky (2010) and examined deformation of thin-walled stainless steel tubes subjected to internal reflected gaseous detonations. A ripple pattern was observed in the tube wall for certain fill pressures, and a criterion was developed that predicted when the ripple pattern would form. A two-dimensional finite element analysis was performed using Johnson-Cook material properties; the pressure loading created by reflected gaseous detonations was accounted for with a previously developed pressure model. The residual plastic strain between experiments and computations was in good agreement. During the examination of detonation-driven deformation, discrepancies were discovered in our understanding of reflected gaseous detonation behavior. Previous models did not accurately describe the nature of the reflected shock wave, which motivated further experiments in a detonation tube with optical access. Pressure sensors and schlieren images were used to examine reflected shock behavior, and it was determined that the discrepancies were related to the reaction zone thickness extant behind the detonation front. During these experiments reflected shock bifurcation did not appear to occur, but the unfocused visualization system made certainty impossible. This prompted construction of a focused schlieren system that investigated possible shock wave-boundary layer interaction, and heat-flux gauges analyzed the boundary layer behind the detonation front. Using these data with an analytical boundary layer solution, it was determined that the strong thermal boundary layer present behind the detonation front inhibits the development of reflected shock wave bifurcation.

  12. Radiation imaging with gaseous detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauli, Fabio

    2018-01-01

    Modern position-sensitive fast gaseous detectors, developed primarily to satisfy the needs of particle physics experiments, have been tailored by many research groups for the use in other applied fields, owing to their main performances: high rate capability, sub-mm position resolution, large covered areas at moderate costs. Implemented with electronic or optical detection systems, the devices are successfully used to image various radiation fields: X-rays, low energy electrons, neutrons.

  13. Gaseous diffusion -- the enrichment workhorse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoemaker, J.E. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Construction of the first large-scale gaseous diffusion facility was started as part of the Manhattan Project in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, in 1943. This facility, code named ''K-25,'' began operation in January 1945 and was fully on stream by September 1945. Four additional process buildings were later added in Oak Ridge as the demand for enriched uranium escalated. New gaseous diffusion plants were constructed at Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, during this period. The three gaseous diffusion plants were the ''workhorses'' which provided the entire enriched uranium demand for the United States during the 1950s and 1960s. As the demand for enriched uranium for military purposes decreased during the early 1960s, power to the diffusion plants was curtailed to reduce production. During the 1960s, as plans for the nuclear power industry were formulated, the role of the diffusion plants gradually changed from providing highly-enriched uranium for the military to providing low-enriched uranium for power reactors

  14. Radioactive gaseous waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuhara, Yuka.

    1991-01-01

    Radioactive gaseous wastes are introduced to a cooling tower and cooled by cooling water discharged from a cooling water discharging nozzle. Cooled radioactive gaseous wastes are cleaned by cleaning water in the cleaning tower and introduced accompanied with water to a condenser. Water in the gases is condensed in a condenser and gathered in a condensated water receiving tank. Water-removed gases are removed with fine particles by way of filters and then released out of the system by using a blower. Further, water used for cleaning the radioactive gaseous wastes in the cleaning tower is gathered to the liquid wastes receiving tank and sent to a radioactive liquid wastes processing device. On the other hand, condensates collected to the condensates receiving tank are returned to a cooling water discharging nozzle by a pump and re-utilized as cooling water. This can reduce the amount of radioactive liquid wastes, to reduce the processing amount of the radioactive liquid waste processing devices. (I.N.)

  15. Radiation emitting devices act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    This Act, entitled the Radiation Emitting Devices Act, is concerned with the sale and importation of radiation emitting devices. Laws relating to the sale, lease or import, labelling, advertising, packaging, safety standards and inspection of these devices are listed as well as penalties for any person who is convicted of breaking these laws

  16. Removing Gaseous NH3 Using Biochar as an Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung S. Ro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia is a major fugitive gas emitted from livestock operations and fertilization production. This study tested the potential of various biochars in removing gaseous ammonia via adsorption processes. Gaseous ammonia adsorption capacities of various biochars made from wood shaving and chicken litter with different thermal conditions and activation techniques were determined using laboratory adsorption column tests. Ammonia adsorption capacities of non-activated biochars ranged from 0.15 to 5.09 mg·N/g, which were comparable to that of other commercial activated carbon and natural zeolite. There were no significant differences in ammonia adsorption capacities of steam activated and non-activated biochars even if the surface areas of the steam activated biochars were about two orders of magnitude greater than that of non-activated biochars. In contrast, phosphoric acid activation greatly increased the biochar ammonia adsorption capacity. This suggests that the surface area of biochar did not readily control gaseous NH3 adsorption. Ammonia adsorption capacities were more or less linearly increased with acidic oxygen surface groups of non-activated and steam-activated biochars. Phosphoric acid bound to the acid activated biochars is suspected to contribute to the exceptionally high ammonia adsorption capacity. The sorption capacities of virgin and water-washed biochar samples were not different, suggesting the potential to regenerate spent biochar simply with water instead of energy- and capital-intensive steam. The results of this study suggest that non-activated biochars can successfully replace commercial activated carbon in removing gaseous ammonia and the removal efficiency will greatly increase if the biochars are activated with phosphoric acid.

  17. One-step green synthetic approach for the preparation of multicolor emitting copper nanoclusters and their applications in chemical species sensing and bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamore, Jigna R; Jha, Sanjay; Mungara, Anil Kumar; Singhal, Rakesh Kumar; Sonkeshariya, Dhanshri; Kailasa, Suresh Kumar

    2016-06-15

    One-step green microwave synthetic approach was developed for the synthesis of copper nanoclusters (Cu NCs) and used as a fluorescent probe for the sensitive detection of thiram and paraquat in water and food samples. Unexpectedly, the prepared Cu NCs exhibited strong orange fluorescence and showed emission peak at 600 nm, respectively. Under optimized conditions, the quenching of Cu NCs emission peak at 600 nm was linearly proportional to thiram and paraquat concentrations in the ranges from 0.5 to 1000 µM, and from 0.2 to 1000 µM, with detection limits of 70 nM and 49 nM, respectively. In addition, bioimaging studies against Bacillus subtilis through confocal fluorescence microscopy indicated that Cu NCs showed strong blue and green fluorescence signals, good permeability and minimum toxicity against the various bacteria species, which demonstrates their potential feasibility for chemical species sensing and bioimaging applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Sampling technologies and air pollution control devices for gaseous and particulate arsenic: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helsen, Lieve

    2005-01-01

    Direct measurement of arsenic release requires a good sampling and analysis procedure in order to capture and detect the total amount of metals emitted. The literature is extensively reviewed in order to evaluate the efficiency of full field-scale and laboratory scale techniques for capturing particulate and gaseous emissions of arsenic from the thermo-chemical treatment of different sources of arsenic. Furthermore, trace arsenic concentrations in ambient air, national standard sampling methods and arsenic analysis methods are considered. Besides sampling techniques, the use of sorbents is also reviewed with respect to both approaches (1) to prevent the metals from exiting with the flue gas and (2) to react or combine with the metals in order to be collected in air pollution control systems. The most important conclusion is that submicron arsenic fumes are difficult to control in conventional air pollution control devices. Complete capture of the arsenic species requires a combination of particle control and vapour control devices. - Submicron arsenic fumes are difficult to control in conventional air pollution control devices

  19. Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

  20. Experiments for detection of gaseous Po-210 originated from microbial activity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimoto, A.; Momoshima, N.

    2006-01-01

    We attempted to detect gaseous Po-210 (half-life 138d) emitted from organisms in the environment. Gaseous Po-210 was tried to collect in 0.5 M nitric acid solution after passing the atmospheric air through filters and a distilled water bubbler, which would remove aerosols existing in the air. The activity of Po-210 was determined by alpha spectrometry after radiochemical separation and electrolytic deposition of Po-210 on a silver disk. Twenty seven point four mBq of Po-210 was observed when 800 m 3 atmospheric air was sampled. Blank of Po-210 in regents and the sampling system was 4.9-6.8 mBq. The concentration of Po-210 observed in the atmospheric air was, thus about 5 times higher than the background; the results strongly support existence of gaseous Po-210 in the environment. (author)

  1. Radiation emitting devices regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    The Radiation Emitting Devices Regulations are the regulations referred to in the Radiation Emitting Devices Act and relate to the operation of devices. They include standards of design and construction, standards of functioning, warning symbol specifications in addition to information relating to the seizure and detention of machines failing to comply with the regulations. The radiation emitting devices consist of the following: television receivers, extra-oral dental x-ray equipment, microwave ovens, baggage inspection x-ray devices, demonstration--type gas discharge devices, photofluorographic x-ray equipment, laser scanners, demonstration lasers, low energy electron microscopes, high intensity mercury vapour discharge lamps, sunlamps, diagnostic x-ray equipment, ultrasound therapy devices, x-ray diffraction equipment, cabinet x-ray equipment and therapeutic x-ray equipment

  2. Light-Emitting Pickles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M.; Mollmann, K-P.

    2015-01-01

    We present experiments giving new insights into the classical light-emitting pickle experiment. In particular, measurements of the spectra and temperatures, as well as high-speed recordings, reveal that light emission is connected to the polarity of the electrodes and the presence of hydrogen.

  3. Radioactive gaseous waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Kazuo.

    1997-01-01

    In a radioactive gaseous waste processing device, a dehumidifier in which a lot of hollow thread membranes are bundled and assembled is disposed instead of a dehumidifying cooling device and a dehumidifying tower. The dehumidifier comprises a main body, a great number of hollow thread membranes incorporated in the main body, a pair of fixing members for bundling and fixing both ends of the hollow thread membranes, a pair of caps for allowing the fixing members to pass through and fixing them on both ends of the main body, an off gas flowing pipe connected to one of the caps, a gas exhaustion pipe connected to the other end of the cap and a moisture removing pipeline connected to the main body. A flowrate control valve is connected to the moisture removing pipeline, and the other end of the moisture removing pipeline is connected between a main condensator and an air extraction device. Then, cooling and freezing devices using freon are no more necessary, and since the device uses the vacuum of the main condensator as a driving source and does not use dynamic equipments, labors for the maintenance is greatly reduced to improve economical property. The facilities are reduced in the size thereby enabling to use space effectively. (N.H.)

  4. 7th International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics

    CERN Document Server

    James, David

    1994-01-01

    The Seventh International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, U. S. A. , on April 24-28, 1994. The symposium continued the interdisciplinary character and comprehensive approach of the preceding six symposia. Gaseous DielecIries VII is a detailed record of the symposium proceedings. It covers recent advances and developments in a wide range of basic, applied and industrial areas of gaseous dielectrics. It is hoped that Gaseous DielecIries VII will aid future research and development in, and encourage wider industrial use of, gaseous dielectrics. The Organizing Committee of the Seventh International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics consisted of G. Addis (U. S. A. ), L. G. Christophorou (U. S. A. ), F. Y. Chu (Canada), A. H. Cookson (U. S. A. ), O. Farish (U. K. ), I. Gallimberti (Italy) , A. Garscadden (U. S. A. ), D. R. James (U. S. A. ), E. Marode (France), T. Nitta (Japan), W. Pfeiffer (Germany), Y. Qiu (China), I. Sauers (U. S. A. ), R. J. Van Brunt (U. S. A. ), and W. Zaengl...

  5. Preliminary study of PCBs in raccoons living on or near the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halbrook, Richard S. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Zoology. Cooperative Wildlife Research Lab. Kentucky Research Consortium for Energy and Environment

    2016-01-15

    The “Ecological Monitoring at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: Historical Evaluation and Guidelines for Future Monitoring” report (Halbrook, et al. 2007) recommended the raccoon as a species for study at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). This species was selected to fill data gaps in ecological resources and provide resource managers with knowledge that will be valuable in making decisions and implementing specific actions to safeguard ecological resources and reduce human exposure. The current paper reports results of a preliminary evaluation to establish protocols for collection of tissues and initial screening of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in raccoons collected near the PGDP. These data are useful in developing future more comprehensive studies.

  6. Gaseous pollutants from brick kiln industry decreased the growth, photosynthesis, and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrees, Muhammad; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Shah, Aamir Mehmood; Abbas, Farhat; Saleem, Farhan; Rizwan, Muhammad; Hina, Saadia; Jabeen, Fariha; Ali, Shafaqat

    2016-05-01

    Gaseous pollutant emissions from brick kiln industries deteriorate the current state of ambient air quality in Pakistan and worldwide. These gaseous pollutants affect the health of plants and may decrease plant growth and yield. A field experiment that was conducted to monitor the concentration of gaseous pollutants emitted mainly from brick kilns in the ambient air and associated impacts on the growth and physiological attributes of the two wheat (Triticum spp.) cultivars. Plants were grown at three sites, including control (Ayub Agriculture Research Institute, AARI), low pollution (LP) site (Small Estate Industry), and high pollution (HP) site (Sidar Bypass), of Faisalabad, Pakistan. Monitoring of ambient air pollution at experimental sites was carried out using the state-of-art ambient air analyzers. Plants were harvested after 120 days of germination and were analyzed for different growth attributes. Results showed that the hourly average concentration of gaseous air pollutants CO, NO2, SO2, and PM10 at HP site were significantly higher than the LP and control sites. Similarly, gaseous pollutants decreased plant height, straw and grain yield, photosynthesis and increased physical injury, and metal concentrations in the grains. However, wheat response toward gaseous pollutants did not differ between cultivars (Galaxy and 8173) studied. Overall, the results indicated that brick kiln emissions could reduce the performance of wheat grown in the soils around kilns and confirm the adverse impacts of pollutants on the growth, yield, and quality of the wheat.

  7. Characterisation of particulate matter and gaseous emissions from a large ship diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldanová, Jana; Fridell, Erik; Popovicheva, Olga; Demirdjian, Benjamin; Tishkova, Victoria; Faccinetto, Alessandro; Focsa, Cristian

    Composition of exhaust from a ship diesel engine using heavy fuel oil (HFO) was investigated onboard a large cargo vessel. The emitted particulate matter (PM) properties related to environmental and health impacts were investigated along with composition of the gas-phase emissions. Mass, size distribution, chemical composition and microphysical structure of the PM were investigated. The emission factor for PM was 5.3 g (kg fuel) -1. The mass size distribution showed a bimodal shape with two maxima: one in the accumulation mode with mean particle diameter DP around 0.5 μm and one in the coarse mode at DP around 7 μm. The PM composition was dominated by organic carbon (OC), ash and sulphate while the elemental carbon (EC) composed only a few percent of the total PM. Increase of the PM in exhaust upon cooling was associated with increase of OC and sulphate. Laser analysis of the adsorbed phase in the cooled exhaust showed presence of a rich mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) species with molecular mass 178-300 amu while PM collected in the hot exhaust showed only four PAH masses. Microstructure and elemental analysis of ship combustion residuals indicate three distinct morphological structures with different chemical composition: soot aggregates, significantly metal polluted; char particles, clean or containing minerals; mineral and/or ash particles. Additionally, organic carbon particles of unburned fuel or/and lubricating oil origin were observed. Hazardous constituents from the combustion of heavy fuel oil such as transitional and alkali earth metals (V, Ni, Ca, Fe) were observed in the PM samples. Measurements of gaseous composition in the exhaust of this particular ship showed emission factors that are on the low side of the interval of global emission factors published in literature for NO x, hydrocarbons (HC) and CO.

  8. Reactive Uptake of Gaseous Sesquiterpenes on Aqueous Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Kohei; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Hama, Tetsuya; Kajii, Yoshizumi; Enami, Shinichi

    2017-02-02

    Sesquiterpenes emitted from biogenic sources play important roles in atmospheric HOx cycles and new particle formation. Current atmospheric models, however, fail to account for their fates, possibly due to missing heterogeneous sinks. Here we apply interface-specific mass spectrometry to detect carbocation products of the reactive uptake of gaseous sesquiterpenes C 15 H 24 (β-caryophyllene (β-C), α-humulene (α-H), and alloaromadendrene (a-d)) on the surface of aqueous microjets as functions of water acidity and gas concentration. We find that these gases are effectively protonated to C 15 H 25 + upon colliding with the surface of pH < 5 water microjets. We determine inflection points from plots of product yields vs bulk pH: pH 1/2 = 4.17 ± 0.05, 4.28 ± 0.06, and 4.36 ± 0.19, and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) from H 2 O/D 2 O (1:1 = vol/vol) experiments: KIE = 2.31 ± 0.08, 1.95 ± 0.05, and 2.71 ± 0.11, for β-C, α-H, and a-d, respectively. These results are analyzed vis-a-vis previous reports on isoprene and monoterpenes experiments. We estimate 6.2 × 10 -5 ≤ γ ≤ 3.1 × 10 -4 for the reactive uptake of gaseous sesquiterpenes on acidic (1 < pH < 3) water surfaces. The atmospheric implications of present findings are discussed.

  9. Behaviour of gaseous alkali compounds in coal gasification; Kaasumaisten alkaliyhdisteiden kaeyttaeytyminen kivihiilien kaasutuksessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nykaenen, J. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    In this project the behaviour of alkali compounds emitting from CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2}- and airblown gasification are studied. This research project is closely connected to an EU-project coordinated by the Delft University of Technology (DUT). In that project alkali emissions from a 1.6 MW pilot plant will be measured. The results from those measurements will be compared with the calculations performed in this LIEKKI 2 project. The equilibrium calculations show that the major gaseous alkali compounds emitting from combustion and gasification are chlorides and hydroxides. This applies both to air- and CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2}-blown processes. In all the cases studied the concentration of gaseous alkali compounds is determined mainly by the amount of chlorides. The key parameters, with respect to alkali behaviour, are the temperature of the process and chlorine content of the coal. By cooling the gases down to 600 deg C prior to a ceramic filter the alkali concentration can be kept about at 100 ppbv. In combustion, the addition of calcium carbonate increases the amount of gaseous alkali compounds by decreasing the amount of alkali sulphates. In the case of gasification the importance of limestone is negligible. The difference between air- and CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2}-blown processes, in terms of gaseous alkali emissions, is small. This is because CO{sub 2} concentration of the gas does not have a strong impact on alkali chlorides. Furthermore, the effect of CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2}-ratio of the recirculation process is negligible. (orig.)

  10. Legal provisions governing gaseous effluents radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelmann, I.

    1985-01-01

    This contribution explains the main provisions governing radiological monitoring of gaseous effluents from LWR type nuclear power plants. KTA rule 1503.1 defines the measuring methods and tasks to be fulfilled by reactor operators in order to safeguard due monitoring and accounting of radioactive substances in the plants' gaseous effluents. The routine measurements are checked by a supervisory programme by an independent expert. The routine controls include analysis of filter samples, comparative measurement of radioactive noble gases, interlaboratory comparisons, and comparative evaluation of measured values. (DG) [de

  11. Dynamical instability of a charged gaseous cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, M.; Mumtaz, Saadia

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss dynamical instability of a charged dissipative cylinder under radial oscillations. For this purpose, we follow the Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches to evaluate linearized perturbed equation of motion. We formulate perturbed pressure in terms of adiabatic index by applying the conservation of baryon numbers. A variational principle is established to determine characteristic frequencies of oscillation which define stability criteria for a gaseous cylinder. We compute the ranges of radii as well as adiabatic index for both charged and uncharged cases in Newtonian and post-Newtonian limits. We conclude that dynamical instability occurs in the presence of charge if the gaseous cylinder contracts to the radius R*.

  12. Gaseous Electronics Tables, Atoms, and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Raju, Gorur Govinda

    2011-01-01

    With the constant emergence of new research and application possibilities, gaseous electronics is more important than ever in disciplines including engineering (electrical, power, mechanical, electronics, and environmental), physics, and electronics. The first resource of its kind, Gaseous Electronics: Tables, Atoms, and Molecules fulfills the author's vision of a stand-alone reference to condense 100 years of research on electron-neutral collision data into one easily searchable volume. It presents most--if not all--of the properly classified experimental results that scientists, researchers,

  13. Chapter 4 Gaseous Elemental Mercury in the Ambient Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariya, Parisa A.; Skov, Henrik; Grage, Mette M L

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the kinetics and mechanisms associated with the atmospheric chemistry of mercury is of great importance to protecting the environment. This review will focus on theoretical calculations to advance understanding of gas phase oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) by halogen...... species. Understanding the gas phase oxidation process between atmospheric mercury and halogen compounds is particularly important as all studies indicate that this interaction is the primary conversion mechanism in the troposphere leading to deposition of mercury. Theoretically predicting...... the thermochemistry of mercury containing species in the atmosphere is important because of the lack of experimental results. In this article a review of theoretical calculations of rate constants and reaction products is presented. Available laboratory data are listed and discussed as well in order to highlight...

  14. Chemical equilibrium of gaseous systems at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asahina, Tadashi; Kosaka, Mineo; Shiroyanagi, Itaru

    1979-01-01

    As an example for chemical equilibrium of gaseous systems at high temperature. N 2 O-C 2 H 2 system which was used for atomic absorption analysis of metallic elements was picked up and the equilibrium partial pressures of the generated chemical species were calculated under the assumption that the system should have the minimum free energy. It was indicated that the equilibrium compositions were affected markedly by the sprayed water consisting in the aqueous solutions. Then, the residual fractions of neutral metal were calculated by considering the reactions between these species and the metallic element assumed to be dilute infinitely and were compared with the experimentally measured intensities of absorption. The agreement was satisfactorily good. (author)

  15. Methods and systems for deacidizing gaseous mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liang

    2010-05-18

    An improved process for deacidizing a gaseous mixture using phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption is described. The process utilizes a multiphasic absorbent that absorbs an acid gas at increased rate and leads to reduced overall energy costs for the deacidizing operation.

  16. Sevoflurane improves gaseous exchange and exerts protective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Original Research Article. Sevoflurane improves gaseous exchange and exerts protective effects in lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury in mice models .... field microscope [20]. Statistical analysis. All data are expressed as mean ± standard error of the mean (SEM). One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test were used ...

  17. Attachment of gaseous fission products to aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skyrme, G.

    1985-01-01

    Accidents may occur in which the integrity of fuel cladding is breached and volatile fission products are released to the containment atmosphere. In order to assess the magnitude of the subsequent radiological hazard it is necessary to know the transport behaviour of such fission products. It is frequently assumed that the fission products remain in the gaseous phase. There is a possibility, however, that they may attach themselves to particles and hence substantially modify their transport properties. This paper provides a theoretical assessment of the conditions under which gaseous fission products may be attached to aerosol particles. Specific topics discussed are: the mass transfer of a gaseous fission product to an isolated aerosol particle in an infinite medium; the rate at which the concentration of fission products in the gas phase diminishes within a container as a result of deposition on a population of particles; and the distribution of deposited fission product between different particle sizes in a log-normal distribution. It is shown that, for a given mass, small particles are more efficient for fission product attachment, and that only small concentrations of such particles may be necessary to achieve rapid attachment. Conditions under which gaseous fission products are not attached to particles are also considered, viz, the competing processes of deposition onto the containment walls and onto aerosol particles, and the possibility of the removal of aerosols from the containment by various deposition processes, or agglomeration, before attachment takes place. (author)

  18. Effect of Hypergravity Stress on Gaseous Exchange and Survival of Young and Old Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradian, Kh. K.; Timchenko, A. N.

    Hypergravity tolerance decreases in aging Guinea pigs, the range being lower than in other studied species of laboratory mammals - mice, hamsters, and rats. Moreover, for the gaseous exchange rate and body temperature, the decline during the stress is not characteristic for Guinea pigs of both age groups, in contrast to other species. In general, hypergravity tolerance of Guinea pigs could be more appropriate experimental models.

  19. Radiation tests for a single-GEM-loaded gaseous detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyong Sei; Hong, Byung Sik; Park, Sung Keun [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yeol [NoticeKorea, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    We report on a systematic study of a single-gas-electron-multiplier (GEM)-loaded gaseous detector developed for precision measurements of high-energy particle beams and for dose verification in particle therapy. In the present study, a 256-channel prototype detector having an active area of 16 x 16 cm{sup 2} and operating using a continuous current-integration-mode signal-processing method was manufactured and tested with X-rays emitted from a 70-kV X-ray generator and 43-MeV protons provided by the MC50 proton cyclotron at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science(KIRAMS). The amplified detector response was measured for X-rays with an intensity of about 5 x 10{sup 6} Hz cm{sup -2}. The linearity of the detector response to the particle flux was examined and validated by using 43-MeV proton beams. The non-uniform development of the amplification for the gas electrons in space was corrected by applying a proper calibration to the channel responses of the measured beam-profile data. We conclude from the radiation tests that the detector developed in the present study will allow us to perform quality measurements of various high-energy particle beams and to apply the technology to dose-verification measurements in particle therapy.

  20. Polymer light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier-Thianche, Emmmanuelle

    1998-01-01

    We study sandwich type semiconducting polymer light emitting diodes; anode/polymer/cathode. ITO is selected as anode, this polymer is a blend of a commercially available polymer with a high hole transport ability: polyvinyl-carbazole and a laser dye: coumarin-515. Magnesium covered with silver is chosen for the anode. We study the influence of polymer thickness and coumarin doping ratio on electroluminescence spectrum, electric characteristics and quantum efficiency. An important drawback is that diodes lifetime remains low. In the second part of our study we determine degradations causes with X-Ray reflectivity experiments. It may be due to ITO very high roughness. We realize a new type of planar electroluminescent device: a channel type electroluminescent device in which polymer layer is inserted into an aluminium channel. Such a device is by far more stable than using classical sandwich structures with the same polymer composition: indeed, charges are generated by internal-field ionization and there is no injection from the electrode to the polymer. This avoids electrochemical reactions at electrodes, thus reducing degradations routes. (author) [fr

  1. Light Emitting Diode (LED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique called photodynamic therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source releasing long wavelengths of light) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can also be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED probe consists of 144 tiny pinhead-size diodes, is 9-inches long, and about one-half-inch in diameter. The small balloon aids in even distribution of the light source. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy by the Marshall Space Flight Center under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research program grant.

  2. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique, called Photodynamic Therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny, pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source that releases long wavelengths of light ) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. 'A young woman operated on in May 1999 has fully recovered with no complications and no evidence of the tumor coming back,' said Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Medical Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The LEDs, developed and managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, have been used on seven Space Shuttle flights inside the Microgravity Astroculture Facility. This technology has also been successfully used to further commercial research in crop growth.

  3. Acid-base thermochemistry of gaseous aliphatic α-aminoacids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchoux, Guy; Huang, Sihua; Inda, Bhawani Singh

    2011-01-14

    Acid-base thermochemistry of isolated aliphatic amino acids (denoted AAA): glycine, alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine and proline has been examined theoretically by quantum chemical computations at the G3MP2B3 level. Conformational analysis on neutral, protonated and deprotonated species has been used to identify the lowest energy conformers and to estimate the population of conformers expected to be present at thermal equilibrium at 298 K. Comparison of the G3MP2B3 theoretical proton affinities, PA, and ΔH(acid) with experimental results is shown to be correct if experimental thermochemistry is re-evaluated and adapted to the most recent acidity-basicity scales. From this point of view, a set of evaluated proton affinities of 887, 902, 915, 916, 919 and 941 kJ mol(-1), and a set of evaluated ΔH(acid) of 1433, 1430, 1423, 1423, 1422 and 1426 kJ mol(-1), is proposed for glycine, alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine and proline, respectively. Correlations with structural parameters (Taft's σ(α) polarizability parameter and molecular size) suggest that polarizability of the side chain is the major origin of the increase in PA and decrease in ΔH(acid) along the homologous series glycine, alanine, valine and leucine/isoleucine. Heats of formation of gaseous species AAA, AAAH(+) and [AAA-H](-) were computed at the G3MP2B3 level. The present study provides previously unavailable Δ(f)H°(298) for the ionized species AAAH(+) and [AAA-H](-). Comparison with Benson's estimate, and correlation with molecular size, show that several experimental Δ(f)H°(298) values of neutral or gaseous AAA might be erroneous.

  4. Software digitizer for high granular gaseous detector

    CERN Document Server

    Haddad, Y; Boudry, V

    2014-01-01

    A sampling calorimeter using gaseous sensor layers with digital readout [1] is near perfect for ``Particle Flow Algorithm'' [2,3] approach, since it is homogeneous over large surfaces, robust, cost efficient, easily segmentable to any readout pad dimension and size and almost insensitive to neutrons. Monte-Carlo (MC) programs such as GEANT4 [4] simulate with high precision the energy deposited by particles. The sensor and electronic response associated to a pad are calculated in a separate ``digitization'' process. We develop a general method for simulating the pad response using the spatial information from a simulation done at high granularity. The digitization method proposed here has been applied to gaseous detectors including Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPC) and MicroMegas, and validated on test beam data. Experimental observable such as pad multiplicity and mean number of hits at different thresholds have been reproduced with high precision.

  5. Basic processes and trends in gaseous detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    Almost a century after the invention of the proportional counter, a large research effort is still devoted to better understand the basic properties of gaseous detectors, and to improve their performances and reliability, particularly in view of use at the high radiation levels expected at LHC. In the first part of the lectures, after a brief introduction on underlying physical phenomena, I will review modern sophisticated computational tools, as well as some classic "back of the envelope" analytical methods, available today for estimating the general performances of gaseous detectors. In the second part, I will analyze in more detail problems specific to the use of detectors at high rates (space charge, discharges, aging), and describe the recent development of powerful and perhaps more reliable devices, particularly in the field of position-sensitive micro-pattern detectors.

  6. Photosensitive Gaseous Detectors for Cryogenic Temperature Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Iacobaeus, C; Lund-Jensen, B; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F

    2007-01-01

    There are several proposals and projects today for building LXe Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) for dark matter search. An important element of these TPCs are the photomultipliers operating either inside LXe or in vapors above the liquid. We have recently demonstrated that photosensitive gaseous detectors (wire type and hole-type) can operate perfectly well until temperatures of LN2. In this paper results of systematic studies of operation of the photosensitive version of these detectors (combined with reflective or semi-transparent CsI photocathodes) in the temperature interval of 300-150 K are presented. In particular, it was demonstrated that both sealed and flushed by a gas detectors could operate at a quite stable fashion in a year/time scale. Obtained results, in particular the long-term stability of photosensitive gaseous detectors, strongly indicate that they can be cheap and simple alternatives to photomultipliers or avalanche solid-state detectors in LXe TPC applications.

  7. Secondary incinerator for radioactive gaseous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tadashi; Masuda, Takashi.

    1997-01-01

    A vessel incorporated with packings, in which at least either of the packings and the vessel is put to induction-heating by high frequency induction coils, is disposed in a flow channel of radioactive gaseous wastes exhausted from a radioactive waste incinerator. The packings include metals such as stainless pipes and electroconductive ceramics such as C-SiC ceramics. Since only electricity is used as an energy source, in the secondary incinerator for the radioactive gaseous wastes, it can be installed in a cell safely. In addition, if ceramics are used, there is no worry of deterioration of the incinerator due to organic materials, and essential functions are not lowered. (T.M.)

  8. Trends and new developments in gaseous detectors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069485

    2004-01-01

    Almost one century ago the method of particle detection with gaseous detectors was invented. Since then they have been exploited successfully in many experiments using a wide variety of different applications. The development is still going on today. The underlying working principles are today well understood and with the help of modern simulation techniques, new configurations can be easily examined and optimized before a first experimental test. Traditional wire chamber ensembles demonstrate that they are still up to date and are well prepared to meet also the challenges of LHC. Applications will be discussed using TPCs in high multiplicity environments with standard Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) as readout as well as drift tubes in a muon spectrometer for a Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiment. Triggered by the evolving printed circuit technology, a new generation of gaseous detectors with very high position resolution and rate capability has emerged. Two representatives (MICROMEGAS, GEM) have p...

  9. Uranium enrichment export control guide: Gaseous diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-09-01

    This document was prepared to serve as a guide for export control officials in their interpretation, understanding, and implementation of export laws that relate to the Zangger International Trigger List for gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment process components, equipment, and materials. Particular emphasis is focused on items that are especially designed or prepared since export controls are required for these by States that are party to the International Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty.

  10. National Gas Survey. Synthesized gaseous hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    The supply-Technical Advisory Task Force-Synthesized Gaseous Hydrocarbon Fuels considered coal, hydrocarbon liquids, oil shales, tar sands, and bioconvertible materials as potential feedstocks for gaseous fuels. Current status of process technology for each feedstock was reviewed, economic evaluations including sensitivity analysis were made, and constraints for establishment of a synthesized gaseous hydrocarbon fuels industry considered. Process technology is presently available to manufacture gaseous hydrocarbon fuels from each of the feedstocks. In 1975 there were eleven liquid feedstock SNG plants in the United States having a capacity of 1.1 billion SCFD. There can be no contribution of SNG before 1982 from plants using feedstocks other than liquids because there are no plants in operation or under construction as of 1977. Costs for SNG are higher than current regulated prices for U.S. natural gas. Because of large reserves, coal is a prime feedstock candidate although there are major constraints in the area of coal leases, mining and water permits, and others. Commercial technology is available and several new gasification processes are under development. Oil shale is also a feedstock in large supply and commercial process technology is available. There are siting and permit constraints, and water availability may limit the ultimate size of an oil shale processing industry. Under projected conditions, bioconvertible materials are not expected to support the production of large quantities of pipeline quality gas during the next decade. Production of low or medium Btu gas from municipal solid wastes can be expected to be developed in urban areas in conjunction with savings in disposal costs. In the economic evaluations presented, the most significant factor for liquid feedstock plants is the anticipated cost of feedstock and fuel. The economic viability of plants using other feedstocks is primarily dependent upon capital requirements.

  11. EURODIF: the uranium enrichment by gaseous diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rougeau, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    During the seventies the nuclear power programme had an extremely rapid growth rate which entailed to increase the world uranium enrichment capacity. EURODIF is the largest undertaking in this field. This multinational joint venture built and now operates and enrichment plant using the gaseous diffusion process at Tricastin (France). This plant is delivering low enriched uranium since two years and has contracted about 110 million SWU's till 1990. Description, current activity and prospects are given in the paper. (Author) [pt

  12. 2 π gaseous flux proportional detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guevara, E.A.; Costello, E.D.; Di Carlo, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    A counting system has been developed in order to measure carbon-14 samples obtained in the course of a study of a plasmapheresis treatment for diabetic children. The system is based on the use of a 2π gaseous flux proportional detector especially designed for the stated purpose. The detector is described and experiment results are given, determining the characteristic parameters which set up the working conditions. (Author) [es

  13. Innovative Monitoring of Atmospheric Gaseous Hydrogen Fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Dugheri, Stefano; Bonari, Alessandro; Pompilio, Ilenia; Monti, Alessandro; Mucci, Nicola; Arcangeli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) is a basic raw material for a wide variety of industrial products, with a worldwide production capacity of more than three million metric tonnes. A novel method for determining particulate fluoride and gaseous hydrogen fluoride in air is presented herewith. Air was sampled using miniaturised 13?mm Swinnex two-stage filter holders in a medium-flow pumping system and through the absorption of particulate fluoride and HF vapours on cellulose ester filters uncoated or impre...

  14. A Population Study of Gaseous Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiaras, A.; Waldmann, I. P.; Zingales, T.; Rocchetto, M.; Morello, G.; Damiano, M.; Karpouzas, K.; Tinetti, G.; McKemmish, L. K.; Tennyson, J.; Yurchenko, S. N.

    2018-04-01

    We present here the analysis of 30 gaseous extrasolar planets, with temperatures between 600 and 2400 K and radii between 0.35 and 1.9 R Jup. The quality of the HST/WFC3 spatially scanned data combined with our specialized analysis tools allow us to study the largest and most self-consistent sample of exoplanetary transmission spectra to date and examine the collective behavior of warm and hot gaseous planets rather than isolated case studies. We define a new metric, the Atmospheric Detectability Index (ADI) to evaluate the statistical significance of an atmospheric detection and find statistically significant atmospheres in around 16 planets out of the 30 analyzed. For most of the Jupiters in our sample, we find the detectability of their atmospheres to be dependent on the planetary radius but not on the planetary mass. This indicates that planetary gravity plays a secondary role in the state of gaseous planetary atmospheres. We detect the presence of water vapour in all of the statistically detectable atmospheres, and we cannot rule out its presence in the atmospheres of the others. In addition, TiO and/or VO signatures are detected with 4σ confidence in WASP-76 b, and they are most likely present in WASP-121 b. We find no correlation between expected signal-to-noise and atmospheric detectability for most targets. This has important implications for future large-scale surveys.

  15. Quantitative Thermochemical Measurements in High-Pressure Gaseous Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Jun J.; Fischer, David G.

    2012-01-01

    We present our strategic experiment and thermochemical analyses on combustion flow using a subframe burst gating (SBG) Raman spectroscopy. This unconventional laser diagnostic technique has promising ability to enhance accuracy of the quantitative scalar measurements in a point-wise single-shot fashion. In the presentation, we briefly describe an experimental methodology that generates transferable calibration standard for the routine implementation of the diagnostics in hydrocarbon flames. The diagnostic technology was applied to simultaneous measurements of temperature and chemical species in a swirl-stabilized turbulent flame with gaseous methane fuel at elevated pressure (17 atm). Statistical analyses of the space-/time-resolved thermochemical data provide insights into the nature of the mixing process and it impact on the subsequent combustion process in the model combustor.

  16. A new gaseous and combustible form of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santilli, Ruggero Maria [Institute for Basic Research, P.O. Box 1577, Palm Harbor, FL 34682 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    In this paper we present, apparently for the first time, various measurements on a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen called HHO gas produced via a new electrolyzer (international patents pending by Hydrogen Technologies Applications, Inc. of Clearwater, Florida), which mixture is distinctly different than the Brown and other known gases. The measurements herein reported suggest the existence in the HHO gas of stable clusters composed of H and O atoms, their dimers H-O, and their molecules H{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O whose bond cannot entirely be of valence type. Numerous anomalous experimental measurements on the HHO gas are reported in this paper for the first time. To reach their preliminary, yet plausible interpretation, we introduce the working hypothesis that the clusters constituting the HHO gas constitute another realization of a recently discovered new chemical species called for certain technical reasons magnecules as well as to distinguish them from the conventional 'molecules' [Santilli RM. Foundations of hadronic chemistry with applications to new clean energies and fuels. Boston, Dordrecht, London: Kluwer Academic Publisher; 2001]. It is indicated that the creation of the gaseous and combustible HHO from distilled water at atmospheric temperature and pressure occurs via a process structurally different than evaporation or separation, thus suggesting the existence of a new form of water, apparently introduced in this paper for the first time, with the structure (HxH)-O where 'x' represents the new magnecular bond and '-' the conventional molecular bond. The transition from the conventional H-O-H species to the new (HxH)-O species is predicted by a change of the electric polarization of water caused by the electrolyzer. When H-O-H is liquid, the new species (HxH)-O can only be gaseous, thus explaining the transition of state without evaporation or separation energy. Finally, the new species (HxH)-O is predicted to be

  17. Particle and gaseous emissions from individual diesel and CNG buses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Å. M. Hallquist

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study size-resolved particle and gaseous emissions from 28 individual diesel-fuelled and 7 compressed natural gas (CNG-fuelled buses, selected from an in-use bus fleet, were characterised for real-world dilution scenarios. The method used was based on using CO2 as a tracer of exhaust gas dilution. The particles were sampled by using an extractive sampling method and analysed with high time resolution instrumentation EEPS (10 Hz and CO2 with a non-dispersive infrared gas analyser (LI-840, LI-COR Inc. 1 Hz. The gaseous constituents (CO, HC and NO were measured by using a remote sensing device (AccuScan RSD 3000, Environmental System Products Inc.. Nitrogen oxides, NOx, were estimated from NO by using default NO2/NOx ratios from the road vehicle emission model HBEFA3.1. The buses studied were diesel-fuelled Euro III–V and CNG-fuelled Enhanced Environmentally Friendly Vehicles (EEVs with different after-treatment, including selective catalytic reduction (SCR, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR and with and without diesel particulate filter (DPF. The primary driving mode applied in this study was accelerating mode. However, regarding the particle emissions also a constant speed mode was analysed. The investigated CNG buses emitted on average a higher number of particles but less mass compared to the diesel-fuelled buses. Emission factors for number of particles (EFPN were EFPN, DPF = 4.4 ± 3.5 × 1014, EFPN, no DPF = 2.1 ± 1.0 × 1015 and EFPN, CNG = 7.8 ± 5.7 ×1015 kg fuel−1. In the accelerating mode, size-resolved emission factors (EFs showed unimodal number size distributions with peak diameters of 70–90 nm and 10 nm for diesel and CNG buses, respectively. For the constant speed mode, bimodal average number size distributions were obtained for the diesel buses with peak modes of ~10 nm and ~60 nm. Emission factors for NOx expressed as NO2 equivalents for the diesel buses were on average 27 ± 7 g (kg fuel−1 and for the CNG buses 41

  18. Detection of Gaseous Methane on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Leslie; Tokunaga, Alan; Elliot, J.; deBergh, Catherine; Owen, Tobias; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We obtained Pluto's spectrum using the CSHELL echelle spectrograph at NASA's IRTF on Mauna Kea, on 25-26 May 1992, with a spectral resolution of 13,300. The spectral range (5998 - 6018 per centimeter, or 1661.8 - 1666.9 nm) includes the R(0) and the Q(1) - Q(9) lines of the 2v3 band of methane. The resulting spectrum shows the first detection of gaseous methane on Pluto, with a column height of 1.20 (sup +3.15) (sub -0.87) cm-A (3.22 (sup +8.46) (sub -2.34) x 10(exp 19) molecule per square centimeter)).

  19. Treatment of gaseous and airborne radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leichsenring, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    Gaseous and airborne radionuclides in the fuel cycle are retained in vessel off-gas filter systems and in the dissolver off-gas cleaning system. Those systems have to meet the regulatory requirements for both normal and accident conditions. From the solutions liquid aerosols are formed during liquid transfer (air lifts, steam jets) or by air sparging or by evaporation processes. During dissolution the volatile radionuclides i.e. 85 Kr, 129 I and 14 C are liberated and enter into the dissolver off-gas cleaning system. Flow sheets of different cleaning systems and their stage of development are described. (orig./RW)

  20. Dissolved gaseous Hg (DGM) in the Mediterranean surface and deep waters

    OpenAIRE

    Kotnik J.; Horvat M.

    2013-01-01

    Dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) was studied in surface and deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea for last 12 years during several oceanographic cruises on board the Italian research vessel Urania and covered both Western and Eastern Mediterranean Basins as well as Adriatic Sea. DGM was measured together with other mercury species (RHg - reactive Hg, THg - total Hg, MeHg - monomethyl Hg and DMeHg - dimethylmercury), and with some water quality parameters in coastal and open sea deep water profi...

  1. Position-sensitive gaseous photomultipliers research and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Francke, Tom; Peskov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Gaseous photomultipliers are defined as gas-filled devices capable of recording single ultraviolet (UV) and visible photons with high position resolution. Used in a variety of research areas, these detectors can be paired with computers to treat and store imaging information of UV-light. Position-Sensitive Gaseous Photomultipliers: Research and Applications explores the advancement of gaseous detectors as applied for single photon detection. Emphasizing emerging perspectives and new ways to apply gaseous detectors across research fields, this research-based publication is an essential reference source for engineers, physicists, graduate-level students, and researchers.

  2. Innovative Monitoring of Atmospheric Gaseous Hydrogen Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonari, Alessandro; Pompilio, Ilenia; Monti, Alessandro; Arcangeli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) is a basic raw material for a wide variety of industrial products, with a worldwide production capacity of more than three million metric tonnes. A novel method for determining particulate fluoride and gaseous hydrogen fluoride in air is presented herewith. Air was sampled using miniaturised 13 mm Swinnex two-stage filter holders in a medium-flow pumping system and through the absorption of particulate fluoride and HF vapours on cellulose ester filters uncoated or impregnated with sodium carbonate. Furthermore, filter desorption from the holders and the extraction of the pentafluorobenzyl ester derivative based on solid-phase microextraction were performed using an innovative robotic system installed on an xyz autosampler on-line with gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS). After generating atmospheres of a known concentration of gaseous HF, we evaluated the agreement between the results of our sampling method and those of the conventional preassembled 37 mm cassette (±8.10%; correlation coefficient: 0.90). In addition, precision (relative standard deviation for n = 10, 4.3%), sensitivity (0.2 μg/filter), and linearity (2.0–4000 μg/filter; correlation coefficient: 0.9913) were also evaluated. This procedure combines the efficiency of GC/MS systems with the high throughput (96 samples/day) and the quantitative accuracy of pentafluorobenzyl bromide on-sample derivatisation. PMID:27829835

  3. Gaseous radiocarbon measurements of small samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruff, M.; Szidat, S.; Gaeggeler, H.W.; Suter, M.; Synal, H.-A.; Wacker, L.

    2010-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a well-established method for samples containing carbon in the milligram range. However, the measurement of small samples containing less than 50 μg carbon often fails. It is difficult to graphitise these samples and the preparation is prone to contamination. To avoid graphitisation, a solution can be the direct measurement of carbon dioxide. The MICADAS, the smallest accelerator for radiocarbon dating in Zurich, is equipped with a hybrid Cs sputter ion source. It allows the measurement of both, graphite targets and gaseous CO 2 samples, without any rebuilding. This work presents experiences dealing with small samples containing 1-40 μg carbon. 500 unknown samples of different environmental research fields have been measured yet. Most of the samples were measured with the gas ion source. These data are compared with earlier measurements of small graphite samples. The performance of the two different techniques is discussed and main contributions to the blank determined. An analysis of blank and standard data measured within years allowed a quantification of the contamination, which was found to be of the order of 55 ng and 750 ng carbon (50 pMC) for the gaseous and the graphite samples, respectively. For quality control, a number of certified standards were measured using the gas ion source to demonstrate reliability of the data.

  4. Innovative Monitoring of Atmospheric Gaseous Hydrogen Fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugheri, Stefano; Bonari, Alessandro; Pompilio, Ilenia; Monti, Alessandro; Mucci, Nicola; Arcangeli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) is a basic raw material for a wide variety of industrial products, with a worldwide production capacity of more than three million metric tonnes. A novel method for determining particulate fluoride and gaseous hydrogen fluoride in air is presented herewith. Air was sampled using miniaturised 13 mm Swinnex two-stage filter holders in a medium-flow pumping system and through the absorption of particulate fluoride and HF vapours on cellulose ester filters uncoated or impregnated with sodium carbonate. Furthermore, filter desorption from the holders and the extraction of the pentafluorobenzyl ester derivative based on solid-phase microextraction were performed using an innovative robotic system installed on an xyz autosampler on-line with gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS). After generating atmospheres of a known concentration of gaseous HF, we evaluated the agreement between the results of our sampling method and those of the conventional preassembled 37 mm cassette (±8.10%; correlation coefficient: 0.90). In addition, precision (relative standard deviation for n = 10, 4.3%), sensitivity (0.2  μ g/filter), and linearity (2.0-4000  μ g/filter; correlation coefficient: 0.9913) were also evaluated. This procedure combines the efficiency of GC/MS systems with the high throughput (96 samples/day) and the quantitative accuracy of pentafluorobenzyl bromide on-sample derivatisation.

  5. Innovative Monitoring of Atmospheric Gaseous Hydrogen Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Dugheri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen fluoride (HF is a basic raw material for a wide variety of industrial products, with a worldwide production capacity of more than three million metric tonnes. A novel method for determining particulate fluoride and gaseous hydrogen fluoride in air is presented herewith. Air was sampled using miniaturised 13 mm Swinnex two-stage filter holders in a medium-flow pumping system and through the absorption of particulate fluoride and HF vapours on cellulose ester filters uncoated or impregnated with sodium carbonate. Furthermore, filter desorption from the holders and the extraction of the pentafluorobenzyl ester derivative based on solid-phase microextraction were performed using an innovative robotic system installed on an xyz autosampler on-line with gas chromatography (GC/mass spectrometry (MS. After generating atmospheres of a known concentration of gaseous HF, we evaluated the agreement between the results of our sampling method and those of the conventional preassembled 37 mm cassette (±8.10%; correlation coefficient: 0.90. In addition, precision (relative standard deviation for n=10, 4.3%, sensitivity (0.2 μg/filter, and linearity (2.0–4000 μg/filter; correlation coefficient: 0.9913 were also evaluated. This procedure combines the efficiency of GC/MS systems with the high throughput (96 samples/day and the quantitative accuracy of pentafluorobenzyl bromide on-sample derivatisation.

  6. Blue light emitting thiogallate phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Robert C.; Smith, David C.; King, Christopher N.; Tuenge, Richard T.

    1998-01-01

    A crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor of the formula RGa.sub.2 S.sub.4 :Ce.sub.x where R is selected from the group consisting of calcium, strontium, barium and zinc, and x is from about 1 to 10 atomic percent, the phosphor characterized as having a crystalline microstructure on the size order of from about 100 .ANG. to about 10,000 .ANG. is provided together with a process of preparing a crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor by depositing on a substrate by CVD and resultant thin film electroluminescent devices including a layer of such deposited phosphor on an ordinary glass substrate.

  7. Trace analysis of short-lived iodine-containing volatiles emitted by different types of algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorenz, U. R.; Kundel, M.; Huang, R.-J.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric iodine chemistry in the lower troposphere gained more attention in the last decade, because of its role in depleting tropospheric ozone and accelerating the ozone destroying capacity of other halogen species [1]. The iodine oxides formed during this reaction may also undergo further oxidation and form polyoxides which then can act as cloud condensation nuclei [2]. Precursors of both reactions are gaseous molecular iodine (I2) and volatile iodocarbons. Both I2 and iodocarbons are emitted by different kinds of macroalgae, whereby the emission of I2 dominates [3]. Iodocarbons are also released by different kinds of microalgaeand itis assumed that also I2 is released by these algae. Here we present the results of the measurement of iodine containing volatiles emitted by eight different macroalgae found in the intertidal zone and microalgae, two pure cultures and two net samples. To measure I2 emissionfrom macroalgae an on-line time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometric method was used[4] to determine the emission rates and to investigate temporally resolved emission profiles. The molecular iodine emissions from microalgae were measured using a recently developed denuder sampling technique and GC-MS method [5]. Iodocarbons were preconcentrated on solid adsorbent tubes and measured using thermodesorption-GC-MS. The results of the macroalgae experiments showed that Laminariales were found to be the strongest I2 emitters. Time series of the iodine release of L. digitata and L. hyperborea showed a strong I2 emission when first exposed to air followed by an exponential decline of the release rate. For both species I2 emission bursts were observed. For L. saccharina und F. serratus a more continuous I2 release profile was detected, however, F. serratus released much less I2. For A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus the I2 emission rates were slowly increasing with time (1h-2h) until a more or less stable I2 emission rate was reached. The lowest I2 emission rates were

  8. Solid–gaseous phase transformation of elemental contaminants during the gasification of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Ying; Ameh, Abiba [Centre for Bioenergy & Resource Management, School of Energy, Environment & Agrifood, Cranfield University, Cranfield MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Lei, Mei [Centre for Environmental Remediation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Duan, Lunbo [Key Laboratory of Energy Thermal Conversion and Control, Ministry of Education, School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Longhurst, Philip, E-mail: P.J.Longhurst@cranfield.ac.uk [Centre for Bioenergy & Resource Management, School of Energy, Environment & Agrifood, Cranfield University, Cranfield MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    Disposal of plant biomass removed from heavy metal contaminated land via gasification achieves significant volume reduction and can recover energy. However, these biomass often contain high concentrations of heavy metals leading to hot-corrosion of gasification facilities and toxic gaseous emissions. Therefore, it is of significant interest to gain a further understanding of the solid–gas phase transition of metal(loid)s during gasification. Detailed elemental analyses (C, H, O, N and key metal/metalloid elements) were performed on five plant species collected from a contaminated site. Using multi-phase equilibria modelling software (MTDATA), the analytical data allows modelling of the solid/gas transformation of metal(loid)s during gasification. Thermodynamic modelling based on chemical equilibrium calculations was carried out in this study to predict the fate of metal(loid) elements during typical gasification conditions and to show how these are influenced by metal(loid) composition in the biomass and operational conditions. As, Cd, Zn and Pb tend to transform to their gaseous forms at relatively low temperatures (< 1000 °C). Ni, Cu, Mn and Co converts to gaseous forms within the typical gasification temperature range of 1000–1200 °C. Whereas Cr, Al, Fe and Mg remain in solid phase at higher temperatures (> 1200 °C). Simulation of pressurised gasification conditions shows that higher pressures increase the temperature at which solid-to-gaseous phase transformations takes place. - Highlights: • Disposal of plants removed from metal contaminated land raises environmental concerns • Plant samples collected from a contaminated site are shown to contain heavy metals. • Gasification is suitable for plant disposal and its emission is modelled by MTDATA. • As, Cd, Zn and Pb are found in gaseous emissions at a low process temperature. • High pressure gasification can reduce heavy metal elements in process emission.

  9. Test Beam Measurements on Picosec Gaseous Detector.

    CERN Document Server

    Sohl, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    In the Picosec project micro pattern gaseous detectors with a time resolution of some ten picoseconds are developed. The detectors are based on Micromegas detectors. With a cherenkov window and a photocathode the time jitter from different position of the primary ionization clusters can be substituted. This reports describes the beam setup and measurements of different Picosec prototypes. A time resolution of under 30 ps has been measured during the test beam. This report gives an overview of my work as a Summer Student. I set up and operated a triple-GEM tracker and a trigger system for the beam. During the beam I measured different prototypes of Picosec detectors and analysed the data.

  10. Gaseous radiation detectors fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sauli, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Widely used in high-energy and particle physics, gaseous radiation detectors are undergoing continuous development. The first part of this book provides a solid background for understanding the basic processes leading to the detection and tracking of charged particles, photons, and neutrons. Continuing then with the development of the multi-wire proportional chamber, the book describes the design and operation of successive generations of gas-based radiation detectors, as well as their use in experimental physics and other fields. Examples are provided of applications for complex events tracking, particle identification, and neutral radiation imaging. Limitations of the devices are discussed in detail. Including an extensive collection of data and references, this book is ideal for researchers and experimentalists in nuclear and particle physics.

  11. Background reduction of a spherical gaseous detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fard, Ali Dastgheibi [Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane, France ali.dastgheibi-fard@lsm.in2p3.fr (France); Loaiza, Pia; Piquemal, Fabrice [Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (France); Giomataris, Ioannis; Gray, David; Gros, Michel; Magnier, Patrick; Navick, Xavier-François [CEA Saclay - IRFU/SEDI - 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Savvidis, Ilias [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2015-08-17

    The Spherical gaseous detector (or Spherical Proportional Counter, SPC) is a novel type of detector. It consists of a large spherical volume filled with gas, using a single detection readout channel. The detector allows 100 % detection efficiency. SEDINE is a low background version of SPC installed at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (LSM) underground laboratory (4800 m.w.e) looking for rare events at very low energy threshold, below 100 eV. This work presents the details on the chemical cleaning to reduce internal {sup 210}Pb surface contamination on the copper vessel and the external radon reduction achieved via circulation of pure air inside anti-radon tent. It will be also show the radon measurement of pure gases (Ar, N, Ne, etc) which are used in the underground laboratory for the low background experiments.

  12. 2011 GASEOUS IONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Anderson

    2011-03-04

    The Gaseous Ions: Structures, Energetics and Reactions Gordon Research Conference will focus on ions and their interactions with molecules, surfaces, electrons, and light. The conference will cover theory and experiments, and systems ranging from molecular to biological to clusters to materials. The meeting goal continues to be bringing together scientists interested in fundamentals, with those applying fundamental phenomena to a wide range of practical problems. Each of the ten conference sessions will focus on a topic within this spectrum, and there will also be poster sessions for contributed papers, with sufficient space and time to allow all participants to present their latest results. To encourage active participation by young investigators, about ten of the poster abstracts will be selected for 15 minute 'hot topic' talks during the conference sessions. Hot topic selection will be done about a month before the meeting. Funds should be available to offset the participation cost for young investigators.

  13. Gaseous fuel reactors for power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmick, H. H.; Schwenk, F. C.

    1978-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is participating in a NASA-sponsored program to demonstrate the feasibility of a gaseous uranium fueled reactor. The work is aimed at acquiring experimental and theoretical information for the design of a prototype plasma core reactor which will test heat removal by optical radiation. The basic goal of this work is for space applications, however, other NASA-sponsored work suggests several attractive applications to help meet earth-bound energy needs. Such potential benefits are: small critical mass, on-site fuel processing, high fuel burnup, low fission fragment inventory in reactor core, high temperature for process heat, optical radiation for photochemistry and space power transmission, and high temperature for advanced propulsion systems.

  14. Air pollution with gaseous emissions and methods for their removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassilev, Venceslav; Boycheva, Sylvia; Fidancevska, Emilija

    2009-01-01

    Information concerning gaseous pollutants generated in the atmosphere, as a result of fuel incineration processes in thermal power and industrial plants, was summarized. The main methods and technologies for flue gases purification from the most ecologically hazardous pollutants are comparatively discussed. Keywords: gaseous pollutants, aerosols, flue gas purification systems and technologies, air ecology control

  15. 49 CFR 538.8 - Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... VEHICLES § 538.8 Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels. The gallon equivalent of gaseous fuels, for purposes... Natural Gas 0.823 Liquefied Natural Gas 0.823 Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Grade HD-5)* 0.726 Hydrogen 0.259...

  16. Flux and polarization signals of spatially inhomogeneous gaseous exoplanets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karalidi, T.; Stam, D.M.; Guirado, D.

    2013-01-01

    Aims. We present numerically calculated, disk-integrated, spectropolarimetric signals of starlight that is reflected by vertically and horizontally inhomogeneous gaseous exoplanets. We include various spatial features that are present on Solar System’s gaseous planets: belts and zones, cyclonic

  17. On the physics and technology of gaseous particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Fonte, P; Peskov, V; 10.1088/0963-0252/19/3/034021

    2010-01-01

    Despite an already long and fruitful history, gaseous elementary-particle detectors remain today an important mainstay of high-energy and nuclear physics experiments and of radiation detection in general. In here we briefly describe some of the gaseous detector's main applications, along with some less known gas-discharge physics aspects of practical relevance.

  18. Development of Gaseous Iodine Generation and Sampling Systems Operated under High Pressure and Temperature Conditions for CFVS Performance Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Chul; Jung, Woo Young; Lee, Jong Chan; Kim, Gyu Tae; Lee, Doo Yong [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A Containment Filtered Venting System (hereafter CFVS) is one of the major features to prevent the damage of the containment integrity from the severe accident such as a station blackout. The main functions of CFVS are the filtration of particulate and gaseous form of fission products from the containment. In severe accidents, elemental iodine and organic iodides are main gaseous iodine species in the containment building of nuclear power plant. One of the important purposes of CFVS is to minimize the risk caused by the release of fission products such as radioactive materials. For these reason, the experiment of iodine scrubbing efficiency is very important performance parameter for the CFVS. Generally, Sublimation is an easy way to make gaseous elemental iodine in this system. In elemental iodine generation system, the system can control the pressure and temperature to make sublimation condition of iodine by argon gas and circulating thermostat. Moreover, the elemental iodine vapor pressure is estimated by data sheet shown in Reference 2. The organic iodine such as CH{sub 3}I is generated with two-fluid nozzle technique. The two-fluid nozzle can generate fine CH3I droplets which are easily evaporated from liquid to gas. Elemental iodine sampling system has online and off-line sampling scrubbing columns. In this study, the iodine generation and sampling systems is developed to be used in the iodine scrubbing test for the CFVS. The system can generate the gaseous elemental iodine and organic iodide to be injected into test section at high pressure and temperature conditions. The sampling system can sample the gaseous elemental In this study, the iodine generation and sampling systems is developed to be used in the iodine scrubbing test for the CFVS. The system can generate the gaseous elemental iodine and organic iodide to be injected into test section at high pressure and temperature conditions. The sampling system can sample the gaseous elemental.

  19. Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The US Department of Energy's liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility is a research and demonstration facility available on a user-fee basis to private and public sector test and training sponsors concerned with safety aspects of hazardous chemicals. Though initially designed to accommodate large liquefied natural gas releases, the Spill Test Facility (STF) can also accommodate hazardous materials training and safety-related testing of most chemicals in commercial use. The STF is located at DOE's Nevada Test Site near Mercury, Nevada, USA. Utilization of the Spill Test Facility provides a unique opportunity for industry and other users to conduct hazardous materials testing and training. The Spill Test Facility is the only facility of its kind for either large- or small-scale testing of hazardous and toxic fluids including wind tunnel testing under controlled conditions. It is ideally suited for test sponsors to develop verified data on prevention, mitigation, clean-up, and environmental effects of toxic and hazardous gaseous liquids. The facility site also supports structured training for hazardous spills, mitigation, and clean-up. Since 1986, the Spill Test Facility has been utilized for releases to evaluate the patterns of dispersion, mitigation techniques, and combustion characteristics of select materials. Use of the facility can also aid users in developing emergency planning under US P.L 99-499, the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) and other regulations. The Spill Test Facility Program is managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy (FE) with the support and assistance of other divisions of US DOE and the US Government. DOE/FE serves as facilitator and business manager for the Spill Test Facility and site. This brief document is designed to acquaint a potential user of the Spill Test Facility with an outline of the procedures and policies associated with the use of the facility

  20. Methods for reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons using electrical discharge

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2017-02-16

    Methods for the reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons are provided. The methods can include forming a bubble containing the gaseous hydrocarbon in a liquid. The bubble can be generated to pass in a gap between a pair of electrodes, whereby an electrical discharge is generated in the bubble at the gap between the electrodes. The electrodes can be a metal or metal alloy with a high melting point so they can sustain high voltages of up to about 200 kilovolts. The gaseous hydrocarbon can be combined with an additive gas such as molecular oxygen or carbon dioxide. The reformation of the gaseous hydrocarbon can produce mixtures containing one or more of H2, CO, H2O, CO2, and a lower hydrocarbon such as ethane or ethylene. The reformation of the gaseous hydrocarbon can produce low amounts of CO2 and H2O, e.g. about 15 mol-% or less.

  1. Effect of gaseous ozone for control of stored product pests at low and high temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise Stengård; Hansen, Peer; Vagn Jensen, Karl-Martin

    2013-01-01

    Gaseous ozone (O3) has shown potential for control of insects in stored grain. A previous laboratory study determined doses of ozone necessary to control freely exposed and internal stages of eleven stored product pest species at 20 C. In this study the impact of temperature on the effect of ozone...... was tested on two species of stored product pests: Sitophilus granarius and Plodia interpunctella. Insects were exposed to continuous flows of ozone in doses of approximately 33 ppm for 6 d or approximately 131 ppm for 8 d at low temperatures between 7.3 and 7.9 C and high temperatures between 29.6 and 31...

  2. Conversion factors for estimating release rate of gaseous radioactivity by an aerial survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kimiaki; Moriuchi, Shigeru

    1988-02-01

    Conversion factors necessary for estimating release rate of gaseous radioactivity by an aerial survey are presented. The conversion factors were determined based on calculation assuming a Gaussian plume model as a function of atmospheric stability, down-wind distance and flight height. First, the conversion factors for plumes emitting mono-energy gamma rays were calculated, then, conversion factors were constructed through convolution for the radionuclides essential in an accident of a nuclear reactor, and for mixtures of these radionuclides considering elapsed time after shutdown. These conversion factors are shown in figures, and also polynomial expressions of the conversion factors as a function of height have been decided with the least-squares method. A user can easily obtain proper conversion factors from data shown here. (author)

  3. Assessment of Emission of Selected Gaseous Components from Coal Processing Waste Storage Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Howaniec

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Coal mine waste dumps are often thermally active objects with exhalation zones emitting exhaust gases, both inorganic and organic, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols and BTEX hydrocarbons. The genotoxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons make the monitoring of their emissions of particular importance. In this paper, the emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from exhalation zones of selected mine waste dumps located in Poland are presented. The experimental data set was analyzed with the application of the Hierarchical Clustering Analysis. The compounds of two- and three-cyclic hydrocarbons, such as naphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene and anthracene, were quantified in the gaseous samples tested. The compounds with a greater number of aromatic rings, such as fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo[a]anthracene and chrysene were characteristic only for some of the mine waste dumps tested.

  4. Diffusion-based process for carbon dioxide uptake and isoprene emission in gaseous/aqueous two-phase photobioreactors by photosynthetic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Fiona K; Melis, Anastasios

    2012-01-01

    Photosynthesis for the generation of fuels and chemicals from cyanobacteria and microalgae offers the promise of a single host organism acting both as photocatalyst and processor, performing sunlight absorption and utilization, as well as CO(2) assimilation and conversion into product. However, there is a need to develop methods for generating, sequestering, and trapping such bio-products in an efficient and cost-effective manner that is suitable for industrial scale-up and exploitation. A sealed gaseous/aqueous two-phase photobioreactor was designed and applied for the photosynthetic generation of volatile isoprene (C(5)H(8)) hydrocarbons, which operates on the principle of spontaneous diffusion of CO(2) from the gaseous headspace into the microalgal or cyanobacterial-containing aqueous phase, followed by photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation and isoprene production by the transgenic microorganisms. Volatile isoprene hydrocarbons were emitted from the aqueous phase and were sequestered into the gaseous headspace. Periodic replacement (flushing) of the isoprene (C(5)H(8)) and oxygen (O(2)) content of the gaseous headspace with CO(2) allowed for the simultaneous harvesting of the photoproducts and replenishment of the CO(2) supply in the gaseous headspace. Reduction in practice of the gaseous/aqueous two-phase photobioreactor is offered in this work with a fed-batch and a semi-continuous culturing system using Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 heterologously expressing the Pueraria montana (kudzu) isoprene synthase (IspS) gene. Constitutive isoprene production was observed over 192 h of experimentation, coupled with cyanobacterial biomass accumulation. The diffusion-based process in gaseous/aqueous two-phase photobioreactors has the potential to be applied to other high-value photosynthetically derived volatile molecules, emanating from a variety of photosynthetic microorganisms. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Production and Transport of Gaseous18F-Synthons:18F-Acyl Fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huailei; DiMagno, Stephen G; DeGrado, Timothy R

    2015-12-01

    Fluorine-18 ( 18 F, T 1/2 =109.7 min) is a positron-emitting isotope that has found extensive application as a radiolabel for positron emission tomography (PET). Although gaseous 11 C-CO 2 and 11 C-CH 4 are practically transported from cyclotron to radiochemistry processes, 18 F-fluoride is routinely transported in aqueous solution because it is commonly produced by proton irradiation of 18 O-enriched water. In most cases, subsequent dry-down steps are necessary to prepare reactive 18 F-fluoride for radiofluorination. In this work, a simple module was designed to generate gaseous 18 F-acyl fluorides from aqueous 18 F-fluoride solution by solid phase 18 F-radiofluorination of acyl anhydride. The gaseous 18 F-acyl fluorides were purified through a column containing Porapak Q/Na 2 SO 4 , resulting in high yields (>86%), purities (>99%) and specific activities (>1200 GBq/μmol). Prototypic 18 F-acetyl fluoride ( 18 F-AcF) was readily transported through 15 m of 0.8 mm ID polypropylene tubing with low (0.64 ± 0.12 %) adsorption to the tubing. Following dissolution of 18 F-AcF in solvent containing base, highly reactive 18 F-flouride was generated immediately and used directly for 18 F-labeling reactions. These data indicate that 18 F-acyl fluorides represent a new paradigm for preparation and transport of anhydrous, reactive 18 F-fluoride for radiofluorinations.

  6. Photoionization Models for the Inner Gaseous Disks of Herbig Be Stars: Evidence against Magnetospheric Accretion?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, P.; Sigut, T. A. A.; Landstreet, J. D., E-mail: ppatel54@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2017-02-20

    We investigate the physical properties of the inner gaseous disks of three hot Herbig B2e stars, HD 76534, HD 114981, and HD 216629, by modeling CFHT-ESPaDOns spectra using non-LTE radiative transfer codes. We assume that the emission lines are produced in a circumstellar disk heated solely by photospheric radiation from the central star in order to test whether the optical and near-infrared emission lines can be reproduced without invoking magnetospheric accretion. The inner gaseous disk density was assumed to follow a simple power-law in the equatorial plane, and we searched for models that could reproduce observed lines of H i (H α and H β ), He i, Ca ii, and Fe ii. For the three stars, good matches were found for all emission line profiles individually; however, no density model based on a single power-law was able to reproduce all of the observed emission lines. Among the single power-law models, the one with the gas density varying as ∼10{sup −10}( R {sub *}/ R ){sup 3} g cm{sup −3} in the equatorial plane of a 25 R {sub *} (0.78 au) disk did the best overall job of representing the optical emission lines of the three stars. This model implies a mass for the H α -emitting portion of the inner gaseous disk of ∼10{sup −9} M {sub *}. We conclude that the optical emission line spectra of these HBe stars can be qualitatively reproduced by a ≈1 au, geometrically thin, circumstellar disk of negligible mass compared to the central star in Keplerian rotation and radiative equilibrium.

  7. The Properties of the Galactic Hot Gaseous Halo from X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunyang; Bregman, Joel N.

    2018-01-01

    The extended hot X-ray emitting gaseous halo of the Milky Way has an optical depth ∼1 for the dominant emission lines of O VII and O VIII, which are used to infer the halo properties. To improve on halo gas properties, we treat optical depth effects with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model, which leads to slightly steeper density profiles (β ~ 0.5) than if optical depths effects were ignored. For the preferred model where the halo is rotating on cylinders at 180 km s-1, independent fits to both lines lead to identical results, where the core radius is 2.5 kpc and the turbulent component of the Doppler-b parameter is 100–120 km s-1 the turbulent pressure is 20% of the thermal pressure. The fit is improved when emission from a disk is included, with a radial scale length of 3 kpc (assumed) and a fitted vertical scale height of approximately 1.3 kpc. The disk component is a minor mass constituent and has low optical depth, except at low latitudes. The gaseous mass is 3–4×1010 M⊙ within 250 kpc, similar to our previous determinations and significantly lower than the mass of the missing baryons, which is 1.7× 10^11 M⊙.

  8. Degradation of gaseous formaldehyde via visible light photocatalysis using multi-element doped titania nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laciste, Maricris T; de Luna, Mark Daniel G; Tolosa, Nolan C; Lu, Ming-Chun

    2017-09-01

    This study developed a modified titanium dioxide photocatalyst doped with multi-element synthesized via sol-gel process to productize a novel photocatalyst. The study includes degradation of gaseous formaldehyde under visible light using the synthesized novel titanium dioxide photocatalyst. Varying molar ratios from 0 to 2 percent (% mole in titanium dioxide) of ammonium fluoride, silver nitrate and sodium tungstate as dopant precursors for nitrogen, fluorine, silver and tungsten were used. Photodegradation of gaseous formaldehyde was examined on glass tubular reactors illuminated with blue light emitting diodes (LEDs) using immobilized photocatalyst. The photocatalytic yield is analyzed based on the photocatalyst surface chemical properties via X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectrophotometry, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) characterization results. The applied modifications enhanced the visible light capability of the catalyst in comparison to the undoped catalyst and commercially available Degussa P-25, such that it photocatalytically degrades 88.1% of formaldehyde in 120 min. Synthesized titanium dioxide photocatalyst exhibits a unique spin orbital at 532.07 eV and 533.27 eV that came from the hybridization of unoccupied Ti d(t 2g ) levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Examples of Radiation-Emitting Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Examples of Radiation-Emitting Electronic Products Radiation Use Medical: Diagnostic Medical: Therapeutic Medical: Surgical Medical: Other Scientific, ... FDA Enforcement Authorities for Radiation-Emitting Products (with examples of products) RCHSA Television Receivers, Microwave Ovens, Cabinet ...

  10. Modelling gaseous dry deposition in AURAMS: a unified regional air-quality modelling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Moran, M.D.; Makar, P.A.; Brook, J.R.; Gong, S.

    2002-01-01

    An upgraded parameterization scheme for gaseous dry-deposition velocities has been developed for a new regional air-quality model with a 91-species gas-phase chemistry mechanism, of which 48 species are ''transported'' species. The well-known resistance analogy to dry deposition is adopted in the present scheme, with both O 3 and SO 2 taken as base species. Stomatal resistances are calculated for all dry-depositing species using a ''sunlit/shaded big-leaf'' canopy stomatal resistance submodel. Dry-ground, wet-ground, dry-cuticle, and wet-cuticle resistances for O 3 and SO 2 , and parameters for calculating canopy stomatal resistance and aerodynamic resistance for these two base species are given as input parameters for each of the 15 land-use categories and/or five seasonal categories considered by the scheme. Dry-ground, wet-ground, dry-cuticle, and wet-cuticle resistances for the other 29 model species for which dry deposition is considered to be a significant process are scaled to the resistances of O 3 and SO 2 based on published measurements of their dry deposition and/or their aqueous solubility and oxidizing capacity. Mesophyll resistances are treated as dependent only on chemical species. Field experimental data have then been used to evaluate the scheme's performance for O 3 and SO 2 . Example sets of modelled dry-deposition velocities have also been calculated for all 31 dry-deposited species and 15 land-use categories for different environmental conditions. This new scheme incorporates updated information on dry-deposition measurements and is able to predict deposition velocities for 31 gaseous species for different land-use types, seasons, and meteorological conditions. (author)

  11. Carbon transport phenomena and gaseous impurities behavior in HENDEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Kunito; Yokota, Syuuichi

    1988-01-01

    In a high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR), high gaseous impurity levels could lead to carbon transport problem. The carbon transport process is based on two chemical reactions occurring in turn. One is the reaction of the impurity species water and/or CO 2 with praphite in the core, and the other is that of produced CO and H 2 to form C deposit at metal surface. Carbon deposition occurred on the inner surface of the pressure vessel of the T 2 test section in Helium Engineering Demonstration Loop (HENDEL), where the 50 t graphite is installed. From the analysis of the deposition, the C was not graphite but amorphous carbon. Chemical reaction should take place. The levels of H 2 and CO in He gas remarkably increased just after increasing the temperature of He gas flowing into the graphite from 700degC to 930degC. The increase of the impurities can be regarded as the result of the reaction of graphite with water absorbed in the atmosphere and outgassing of the products. It has been shown that the effective method to reduce the C deposition is the He gas purification taking account of the impurity concentration ratios, H 2 /H 2 O and/or CO/CO 2 based on the thermodynamical equilibrium state. (author)

  12. Growth of graphene films from non-gaseous carbon sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James; Sun, Zhengzong; Yan, Zheng; Ruan, Gedeng; Peng, Zhiwei

    2015-08-04

    In various embodiments, the present disclosure provides methods of forming graphene films by: (1) depositing a non-gaseous carbon source onto a catalyst surface; (2) exposing the non-gaseous carbon source to at least one gas with a flow rate; and (3) initiating the conversion of the non-gaseous carbon source to the graphene film, where the thickness of the graphene film is controllable by the gas flow rate. Additional embodiments of the present disclosure pertain to graphene films made in accordance with the methods of the present disclosure.

  13. Low temperature gaseous nitriding and carburising of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The response of various austenitic and duplex stainless steel grades to low temperature gaseous nitriding and carburising was investigated. Gaseous nitriding was performed in ammonia/hydrogen mixtures at temperatures ,723 K; gaseous carburising was carried out in carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixtures...... for temperatures (783 K. The case developed by thermochemical treatment was examined using reflected light microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and microhardness testing. Both nitriding and carburising led to the development of expanded austenite in the surface adjacent zone, irrespective of the phase...... constitution of the substrate. A two step process, consisting of carburising followed by nitriding, provides great flexibility with regard to adjusting the hardness–depth profile....

  14. Quantitative study of a gaseous atmosphere by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR); Etude quantitative d atmosphere gazeuse par spectroscopie infrarouge a transformee de Fourier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, G.; Faivret, O.; Doncourt, A.; Dubard, V. [CEA, Is sur Tille, (France)

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this work is to implement an in situ quantitative analysis of gases present in a gaseous atmosphere by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy in order to determine the processes occurring during the uranium corrosion reactions. Indeed, during these reactions, the gaseous atmosphere initially present evolves during the reaction and leads to the formation of new gaseous species. The aim is then to in situ quantify the proportion of species present during all the reactional process. A preliminary study on pure gases has been carried out. The studied gases are: CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2} and CO. The aim is to identify their spectral symbol in the infrared and to determine their behaviour (absorbance) in terms of their concentration. The study of different binary gases mixtures, as for instance CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, CO/H{sub 2} or CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} has been carried out too. This study presents the results concerning the CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} mixture and more particularly the evolution of the spectral sign of gases in terms of the partial concentrations of H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. The study of the spectra of this mixtures show that the presence of a gaseous specie has an influence on the characteristics of the peaks (intensity and area) of the spectra relative to other gaseous species present in the mixture according to a transfer function which has then been determined. The feasibility of the implementation of an in situ quantitative gaseous analysis by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy is then discussed from FTIR tables (intensity and area of peaks) obtained on gaseous mixtures. (O.M.)

  15. Release of gaseous tritium during reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruecher, H.; Hartmann, K.

    1983-01-01

    About 50% of the tritium put through an LWR reprocessing plant is obtained as tritium-bearing water, HTO. Gaseous tritium, HT has a radiotoxicity which is by 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of HTO. A possibility for the removal of HTO could therefore be its conversion into the gas phase with subsequent emission of the HT into the atmosphere. However, model computations which are, in part, supported by experimental data reveal that the radiation exposure caused by HT release is only by about one order of magnitude below that caused by HTO. This is being attributed to the relatively quick reoxidation of HT by soil bacteria. Two alternatives for producing HT from HTO (electrolysis; voloxidation with subsequent electrolysis) are presented and compared with the reference process of deep-well injection of HTO. The authors come to the conclusion that tritium removal by HT release into the atmosphere cannot be recommended at present under either radiological or economic aspects. (orig.) [de

  16. Gaseous Nitrogen Orifice Mass Flow Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritrivi, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The Gaseous Nitrogen (GN2) Orifice Mass Flow Calculator was used to determine Space Shuttle Orbiter Water Spray Boiler (WSB) GN2 high-pressure tank source depletion rates for various leak scenarios, and the ability of the GN2 consumables to support cooling of Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) lubrication during entry. The data was used to support flight rationale concerning loss of an orbiter APU/hydraulic system and mission work-arounds. The GN2 mass flow-rate calculator standardizes a method for rapid assessment of GN2 mass flow through various orifice sizes for various discharge coefficients, delta pressures, and temperatures. The calculator utilizes a 0.9-lb (0.4 kg) GN2 source regulated to 40 psia (.276 kPa). These parameters correspond to the Space Shuttle WSB GN2 Source and Water Tank Bellows, but can be changed in the spreadsheet to accommodate any system parameters. The calculator can be used to analyze a leak source, leak rate, gas consumables depletion time, and puncture diameter that simulates the measured GN2 system pressure drop.

  17. The behavior of gaseous iodine in sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kanji

    1974-01-01

    Radioactive iodine gas was passed through 10 different sands collected at rivers and hills. The relation between the amount of the loaded gas and the amount of adsorbed gas was determined at room temperature, 50 -- 60 0 C, and 90 -- 100 0 C under humidity of 2 sand. This amount was about 1 -- 3 times as much as that of monomolecular membrane adsorption, 0.2 -- 0.3 μg/cm 2 . The decrease of adsorption amount that accompanies the increase of humidity is attributable to the decrease of effective surface area of sand due to the presence of water. The transport of iodine in sand was studied by passing gaseous iodine through a glass tubing packed with sand. The distribution in the flow direction of iodine indicated that the ease of desorption depends upon the situation of adsorption. Easily desorbed case was named Henry type adsorption. Hardly desorbed case was named absorption type. Discussion is made on experimental results. (Fukutomi, T.)

  18. Automated sampling and control of gaseous simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Ruoguan

    2013-05-04

    In this work, we describe a method that automates the sampling and control of gaseous fluid simulations. Several recent approaches have provided techniques for artists to generate high-resolution simulations based on a low-resolution simulation. However, often in applications the overall flow in the low-resolution simulation that an animator observes and intends to preserve is composed of even lower frequencies than the low resolution itself. In such cases, attempting to match the low-resolution simulation precisely is unnecessarily restrictive. We propose a new sampling technique to efficiently capture the overall flow of a fluid simulation, at the scale of user\\'s choice, in such a way that the sampled information is sufficient to represent what is virtually perceived and no more. Thus, by applying control based on the sampled data, we ensure that in the resulting high-resolution simulation, the overall flow is matched to the low-resolution simulation and the fine details on the high resolution are preserved. The samples we obtain have both spatial and temporal continuity that allows smooth keyframe matching and direct manipulation of visible elements such as smoke density through temporal blending of samples. We demonstrate that a user can easily configure a simulation with our system to achieve desired results. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  19. GEM - A novel gaseous particle detector

    CERN Document Server

    Meinschad, T

    2005-01-01

    The work carried out within the framework of this Ph.D. deals with the construction of gaseous prototype detectors using Gas Electron Multiplier electrodes for the amplification of charges released by ionizing particles. The Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) is a thin metal-clad polymer foil, etched with a high density of narrow holes, typically 50-100mm-2. On the application of a potential difference between the conductive top and bottom sides each hole acts as independent proportional counter. This new fast device permits to reach large amplification factors at high rates with a strong photon and ion-mediated feedback suppression due to the avalanche confinement in the GEM-holes. Here, in particular studies have been performed, which should prove, that the GEM-technology is applicable for an efficient measurement of single Cherenkov photons. These UV-photons can be detected in different ways. An elegant solution to develop large area RICH-detectors is to evaporate a pad-segmented readout-cathode of a multi-wire...

  20. The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) apparatus for nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (invited)a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, D. A.; Velsko, C. A.; Jedlovec, D. R.; Yeamans, C. B.; Moody, K. J.; Tereshatov, E.; Stoeffl, W.; Riddle, A.

    2012-10-01

    The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) diagnostic apparatus was recently installed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Following a NIF shot, RAGS is used to pump the gas load from the NIF chamber for purification and isolation of the noble gases. After collection, the activated gaseous species are counted via gamma spectroscopy for measurement of the capsule areal density and fuel-ablator mix. Collection efficiency was determined by injecting a known amount of 135Xe into the NIF chamber, which was then collected with RAGS. Commissioning was performed with an exploding pusher capsule filled with isotopically enriched 124Xe and 126Xe added to the DT gas fill. Activated xenon species were recovered post-shot and counted via gamma spectroscopy. Results from the collection and commissioning tests are presented. The performance of RAGS allows us to establish a noble gas collection method for measurement of noble gas species produced via neutron and charged particle reactions in a NIF capsule.

  1. Solid-gaseous phase transformation of elemental contaminants during the gasification of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ying; Ameh, Abiba; Lei, Mei; Duan, Lunbo; Longhurst, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Disposal of plant biomass removed from heavy metal contaminated land via gasification achieves significant volume reduction and can recover energy. However, these biomass often contain high concentrations of heavy metals leading to hot-corrosion of gasification facilities and toxic gaseous emissions. Therefore, it is of significant interest to gain a further understanding of the solid-gas phase transition of metal(loid)s during gasification. Detailed elemental analyses (C, H, O, N and key metal/metalloid elements) were performed on five plant species collected from a contaminated site. Using multi-phase equilibria modelling software (MTDATA), the analytical data allows modelling of the solid/gas transformation of metal(loid)s during gasification. Thermodynamic modelling based on chemical equilibrium calculations was carried out in this study to predict the fate of metal(loid) elements during typical gasification conditions and to show how these are influenced by metal(loid) composition in the biomass and operational conditions. As, Cd, Zn and Pb tend to transform to their gaseous forms at relatively low temperatures (gasification temperature range of 1000-1200°C. Whereas Cr, Al, Fe and Mg remain in solid phase at higher temperatures (>1200°C). Simulation of pressurised gasification conditions shows that higher pressures increase the temperature at which solid-to-gaseous phase transformations takes place. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Emissions of Nanoparticles and Gaseous Material from 3D Printer Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yuna; Yoon, Chungsik; Ham, Seunghon; Park, Jihoon; Kim, Songha; Kwon, Ohhun; Tsai, Perng-Jy

    2015-10-20

    This study evaluated the emissions characteristics of hazardous material during fused deposition modeling type 3D printing. Particulate and gaseous materials were measured before, during, and after 3D printing in an exposure chamber. One ABS and two PLA (PLA1 and PLA2) cartridges were tested three times. For online monitoring, a scanning mobility particle sizer, light scattering instrument, and total volatile organic compound (TVOC) monitor were employed and a polycarbonate filter and various adsorbent tubes were used for offline sampling. The particle concentration of 3D printing using ABS material was 33-38 times higher than when PLA materials were used. Most particles were nanosize (<100 nm) during ABS (96%) and PLA1 (98%) use, but only 12% were nanosize for PLA2. The emissions rates were 1.61 × 10(10) ea/min and 1.67 × 10(11) ea/g cartridge with the ABS cartridge and 4.27-4.89 × 10(8) ea/min and 3.77-3.91 × 10(9) ea/g cartridge with the PLA cartridge. TVOCs were also emitted when the ABS was used (GM; 155 ppb, GSD; 3.4), but not when the PLA cartridges were used. Our results suggest that more research and sophisticated control methods, including the use of less harmful materials, blocking emitted containments, and using filters or adsorbents, should be implemented.

  3. Gaseous emissions during the solid state fermentation of different wastes for enzyme production at pilot scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulini-Duran, Caterina; Abraham, Juliana; Rodríguez-Pérez, Sheila; Cerda, Alejandra; Jiménez-Peñalver, Pedro; Gea, Teresa; Barrena, Raquel; Artola, Adriana; Font, Xavier; Sánchez, Antoni

    2015-03-01

    The emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC), CH4, N2O and NH3 during the solid state fermentation process of some selected wastes to obtain different enzymes have been determined at pilot scale. Orange peel+compost (OP), hair wastes+raw sludge (HW) and winterization residue+raw sludge (WR) have been processed in duplicate in 50 L reactors to provide emission factors and to identify the different VOC families present in exhaust gaseous emissions. Ammonia emission from HW fermentation (3.2±0.5 kg Mg(-1) dry matter) and VOC emission during OP processes (18±6 kg Mg(-1) dry matter) should be considered in an industrial application of these processes. Terpenes have been the most emitted VOC family during all the processes although the emission of sulphide molecules during HW SSF is notable. The most emitted compound was dimethyl disulfide in HW and WR processes, and limonene in the SSF of OP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A PEMS study of the emissions of gaseous pollutants and ultrafine particles from gasoline- and diesel-fueled vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng; Lou, Diming; Hu, Zhiyuan; Feng, Qian; Chen, Yiran; Chen, Changhong; Tan, Piqiang; Yao, Di

    2013-10-01

    On-road emission measurements of gasoline- and diesel-fueled vehicles were conducted by a portable emission measurement system (PEMS) in Shanghai, China. Horiba OBS 2200 and TSI EEPS 3090 were employed to detect gaseous and ultrafine particle emissions during the tests. The driving-based emission factors of gaseous pollutants and particle mass and number were obtained on various road types. The average NOx emission factors of the diesel bus, diesel car, and gasoline car were 8.86, 0.68, and 0.17 g km-1, all of which were in excess of their emission limits. The particle number emission factors were 7.06 × 1014, 6.08 × 1014, and 1.57 × 1014 km-1, generally higher than the results for similar vehicle types reported in the previous studies. The size distributions of the particles emitted from the diesel vehicles were mainly concentrated in the accumulation mode, while those emitted from the gasoline car were mainly distributed in the nucleation mode. Both gaseous and particle emission rates exhibit significant correlations with the change in vehicle speed and power demand. The lowest emission rates for each vehicle type were produced during idling. The highest emission rates for each vehicle type were generally found in high-VSP bins. The particle number emission rates of the gasoline car show the strongest growth trend with increasing VSP and speed. The particle number emission for the gasoline car increased by 3 orders of magnitude from idling to the highest VSP and driving speed conditions. High engine power caused by aggressive driving or heavy loads is the main contributor to high emissions for these vehicles in real-world situations.

  5. Sampling and identification of gaseous and particle bounded air pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettrup, A.

    1993-01-01

    Air pollutants are gaseous, components of aerosols or particle bounded. Sampling, sample preparation, identification and quantification of compounds depend from kind and chemical composition of the air pollutants. Quality assurance of analytical data must be guaranted. (orig.) [de

  6. Favorite Demonstrations: Gaseous Diffusion: A Demonstration of Graham's Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, George B.; Ebner, Ronald D.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which gaseous ammonia and hydrochloric acid are used to illustrate rates of diffusion (Graham's Law). Simple equipment needed for the demonstration include a long tube, rubber stoppes, and cotton. Two related demonstrations are also explained. (DH)

  7. The nonlinear stage of gravitational instability in flat gaseous systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyachenko, V.L.; Churilov, S.M.; Shukhman, I.G.

    1980-05-01

    The evolution of finite-amplitude waves in a flat, gaseous, gravitating system is considered. Constraints are placed on the physical state of the gas such that density perturbations can undergo strong growth.

  8. Gaseous Helium Reclamation at Rocket Test Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ability to restore large amounts of vented gaseous helium (GHe) at rocket test sites preserves the GHe and reduces operating cost. The used GHe is vented into...

  9. The effect of selected gaseous air pollutants on woody plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baciak Michał

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses gaseous air pollutants that have the greatest impact on forest ecosystems. This group of pollutants ncludes sulfur dioxide (SO2, nitric oxides (NO and NO2 and ozone (O3.

  10. Heterogeneous Reaction gaseous chlorine nitrate and solid sodium chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, Raimo S.; Chu, Liang T.; Leu, Ming-Taun

    1994-01-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of gaseous chlorine nitrate and solid sodium chloride was investigated over a temperature range of 220 - 300 K in a flow-tube reactor interfaced with a differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer.

  11. Why only some plants emit isoprene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Russell K; Jones, Ryan T; Rosenstiel, Todd N; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2013-03-01

    Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is emitted from many plants and it appears to have an adaptive role in protecting leaves from abiotic stress. However, only some species emit isoprene. Isoprene emission has appeared and been lost many times independently during the evolution of plants. As an example, our phylogenetic analysis shows that isoprene emission is likely ancestral within the family Fabaceae (= Leguminosae), but that it has been lost at least 16 times and secondarily gained at least 10 times through independent evolutionary events. Within the division Pteridophyta (ferns), we conservatively estimate that isoprene emissions have been gained five times and lost two times through independent evolutionary events. Within the genus Quercus (oaks), isoprene emissions have been lost from one clade, but replaced by a novel type of light-dependent monoterpene emissions that uses the same metabolic pathways and substrates as isoprene emissions. This novel type of monoterpene emissions has appeared at least twice independently within Quercus, and has been lost from 9% of the individuals within a single population of Quercus suber. Gain and loss of gene function for isoprene synthase is possible through relatively few mutations. Thus, this trait appears frequently in lineages; but, once it appears, the time available for evolutionary radiation into environments that select for the trait is short relative to the time required for mutations capable of producing a non-functional isoprene synthase gene. The high frequency of gains and losses of the trait and its heterogeneous taxonomic distribution in plants may be explained by the relatively few mutations necessary to produce or lose the isoprene synthase gene combined with the assumption that isoprene emission is advantageous in a narrow range of environments and phenotypes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Euthanasia using gaseous agents in laboratory rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentim, A M; Guedes, S R; Pereira, A M; Antunes, L M

    2016-08-01

    Several questions have been raised in recent years about the euthanasia of laboratory rodents. Euthanasia using inhaled agents is considered to be a suitable aesthetic method for use with a large number of animals simultaneously. Nevertheless, its aversive potential has been criticized in terms of animal welfare. The data available regarding the use of carbon dioxide (CO2), inhaled anaesthetics (such as isoflurane, sevoflurane, halothane and enflurane), as well as carbon monoxide and inert gases are discussed throughout this review. Euthanasia of fetuses and neonates is also addressed. A table listing currently available information to ease access to data regarding euthanasia techniques using gaseous agents in laboratory rodents was compiled. Regarding better animal welfare, there is currently insufficient evidence to advocate banning or replacing CO2 in the euthanasia of rodents; however, there are hints that alternative gases are more humane. The exposure to a volatile anaesthetic gas before loss of consciousness has been proposed by some scientific studies to minimize distress; however, the impact of such a measure is not clear. Areas of inconsistency within the euthanasia literature have been highlighted recently and stem from insufficient knowledge, especially regarding the advantages of the administration of isoflurane or sevoflurane over CO2, or other methods, before loss of consciousness. Alternative methods to minimize distress may include the development of techniques aimed at inducing death in the home cage of animals. Scientific outcomes have to be considered before choosing the most suitable euthanasia method to obtain the best results and accomplish the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Freezer-sublimer for gaseous diffusion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reti, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for freezing and subliming uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) as part of a gaseous diffusion plant from which a quantity of the UF 6 inventory is intermittently withdrawn and frozen to solidify it. A plurality of upright heat pipes holds a coolant and is arranged in a two compartment vessel, the lower compartment is exposed to UF 6 , the higher one serves for condensing the evaporated coolant by means of cooling water. In one embodiment, each pipe has a quantity of coolant such as freon, hermetically sealded therein. In the other embodiment, each pipe is sealed only at the lower end while the upper end communicates with a common vapor or cooling chamber which contains a water cooled condenser. The cooling water has a sufficiently low temperature to condense the evaporated coolant. The liquid coolant flows gravitationally downward to the lower end portion of the pipe. UF 6 gas is flowed into the tank where it contacts the finned outside surface of the heat pipes. Heat from the gas evaporates the coolant and the gas in turn is solidified on the exterior of the heat pipe sections in the tank. To recover UF 6 gas from the tank, the solidified UF 6 is sublimed by passing compressed UF 6 gas over the frozen UF 6 gas on the pipes or by externally heating the lower ends of the pipes sufficiently to evaporate the coolant therein above the subliming temperature of the UF 6 . The subliming UF 6 gas then condenses the coolant in the vertical heat pipes, so that it can gravitationally flow back to the lower end portions

  14. Odorous gaseous emissions as influence by process condition for the forced aeration composting of pig slaughterhouse sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazy, V., E-mail: vincent.blazy@irstea.fr [Irstea, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucillé, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Guardia, A. de, E-mail: amaury.de-guardia@irstea.fr [Irstea, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucillé, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Benoist, J.C; Daumoin, M. [Irstea, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucillé, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Lemasle, M.; Wolbert, D. [Laboratoire Sciences Chimiques de Rennes - équipe Chimie et Ingénierie des Procédés, UMR 6226 CNRS, ENSCR, Avenue du Général Leclerc, 35700 Rennes (France); Barrington, S., E-mail: suzellebarrington@sympatico.ca [Irstea, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucillé, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Concordia University, Department of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1455 de Maisonneuve, Montréal, QC H3G 1M8 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • The gaseous emissions produced by various composting process conditions were characterized and quantified. • Nine compounds were potentially odorous: TMA, NH{sub 3}, 2-pentanone, 1-propanol-2-methyl, acetophenone and sulphur forms. • The tested composting process conditions reduced odour emissions by a factor of 5–10. • A reduction of 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 6} is required to reach an odour threshold limit at peak event emissions. • Both aeration rate and bulking agent had the most impact on reducing odour emissions. - Abstract: Compost sustainability requires a better control of its gaseous emissions responsible for several impacts including odours. Indeed, composting odours have stopped the operation of many platforms and prevented the installation of others. Accordingly, present technologies collecting and treating gases emitted from composting are not satisfactory and alternative solutions must be found. Thus, the aim of this paper was to study the influence of composting process conditions on gaseous emissions. Pig slaughterhouse sludge mixed with wood chips was composted under forced aeration in 300 L laboratory reactors. The process conditions studied were: aeration rate of 1.68, 4.03, 6.22, 9.80 and 13.44 L/h/kg of wet sludge; incorporation ratio of 0.55, 0.83 and 1.1 (kg of wet wood chips/kg of wet sludge), and; bulking agent particles size of <10, 10 < 20 and 20 < 30 mm. Out-going gases were sampled every 2 days and their composition was analysed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC–MS). Fifty-nine compounds were identified and quantified. Dividing the cumulated mass production over 30 days of composting, by odour threshold, 9 compounds were identified as main potential odour contributors: hydrogen sulphide, trimethylamine, ammonia, 2-pentanone, 1-propanol-2-methyl, dimethyl sulphide, dimethyl disulphide, dimethyl trisulphide and acetophenone. Five gaseous compounds were correlated with both aeration rate and

  15. Blue-emitting laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, K.; Ishibashi, A.

    This paper reviews the recent results of blue-emitting laser diodes. These devices are based on ZnMgSSe alloy II-VI semiconductors. Recently we have achieved room temperature continuous-wave operation of ZnMgSSe blue lasers for the first time. ZnMgSSe alloys offer a wide range of band-gap energy from 2.8 to 4.5 eV, while maintaining lattice matching to GaAs substrates. These characteristics make ZnMgSSe suitable for cladding layers of blue lasers. In this article, the feasibilities of ZnMgSSe will be reviewed. The laser structures and characteristics will be also mentioned.

  16. Phototherapy with Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Within the field of dermatology, advances in the use of light emitting diodes (LEDs) have led to their clinical application for a variety of medical and cosmetic uses. Of note, one phototherapy device has demonstrated beneficial effects over a range of clinical applications (Omnilux™; GlobalMed Technologies, Glen Ellen, California). The study included a literature review of published studies. Using LEDs with frequencies of 415nm (blue), 633nm (red), and 830nm (infrared), this device has demonstrated significant results for the treatment of medical conditions, including mild-to-moderate acne vulgaris, wound healing, psoriasis, squamous cell carcinoma in situ (Bowen’s disease), basal cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis, and cosmetic applications. Although photodynamic therapy with the photosensitizer 5-aminolevulinic acid might cause stinging and burning, phototherapy is free of adverse events. We determined that phototherapy using LEDs is beneficial for a range of medical and aesthetic conditions encountered in the dermatology practice. This treatment displays an excellent safety profile.

  17. Cytochrome bd and Gaseous Ligands in Bacterial Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Elena; Borisov, Vitaliy B; Vicente, João B; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Cytochrome bd is a unique prokaryotic respiratory terminal oxidase that does not belong to the extensively investigated family of haem-copper oxidases (HCOs). The enzyme catalyses the four-electron reduction of O 2 to 2H 2 O, using quinols as physiological reducing substrates. The reaction is electrogenic and cytochrome bd therefore sustains bacterial energy metabolism by contributing to maintain the transmembrane proton motive force required for ATP synthesis. As compared to HCOs, cytochrome bd displays several distinctive features in terms of (i) metal composition (it lacks Cu and harbours a d-type haem in addition to two haems b), (ii) overall three-dimensional structure, that only recently has been solved, and arrangement of the redox cofactors, (iii) lesser energetic efficiency (it is not a proton pump), (iv) higher O 2 affinity, (v) higher resistance to inhibitors such as cyanide, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S) and (vi) ability to efficiently metabolize potentially toxic reactive oxygen and nitrogen species like hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and peroxynitrite (ONOO - ). Compelling evidence suggests that, beyond its bioenergetic role, cytochrome bd plays multiple functions in bacterial physiology and affords protection against oxidative and nitrosative stress. Relevant to human pathophysiology, thanks to its peculiar properties, the enzyme has been shown to promote virulence in several bacterial pathogens, being currently recognized as a target for the development of new antibiotics. This review aims to give an update on our current understanding of bd-type oxidases with a focus on their reactivity with gaseous ligands and its potential impact on bacterial physiology and human pathophysiology. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Air fountains in the erosion of gaseous stratifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deri, E.; Cariteau, B.; Abdo, D.

    2010-01-01

    In 1979, the Three Mile Island accident demonstrated that, in a nuclear reactor undergoing to a severe accident, a loss of core cooling may enhance the oxidation of the clads, and this may turn in the production of a safety-relevant hydrogen amount. Since then, major efforts have been devoting to hydrogen safety R and D in the nuclear field. Owing to buoyancy forces, hydrogen may accumulate in the higher regions of the containment. Therefore, we are now experiencing a renewed interest on stratified enclosures. In this frame, relevant experimental data are required to validate and improve the computer codes that are aimed to predict the post-accident thermal-hydraulic conditions of the containment. The goal of this work is to investigate, on a small scale, the break-up of a gaseous stratification by the injection of vertical fountains. A helium layer is created on the top of an air-filled containment of a total volume of 1 m 3 . A vertical round air fountain is then injected upward from the containment bottom plate. The Particle Image Velocimetry technique and a series of thermal conductivity gauges are used to measure the flow velocity and the species evolution. To describe the stratification break-up phenomenon, a review of a nondimensional approach is presented and applied successfully to the test cases. In order to point out some leading features in the mixing, the influence of molecular diffusion is also taken into account. Finally, during the experimental campaign, a diffusion-, a gravity-, and an inertia-dominated regime are observed.

  19. Emission factors of gaseous pollutants from recent kerosene space heaters and fuels available in France in 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carteret, M.; Pauwels, J.-F.; Hanoune, B. (Univ. Lille 1. PhysicoChimie des Processus de Combustion, Lille (France))

    2012-08-15

    Laboratory measurements of the gaseous emission factors (EF) from two recent kerosene space heaters (wick and injector) with five different fuels have been conducted in an 8-m3 environmental chamber. The two heaters tested were found to emit mainly CO{sub 2}, CO, NO, NO{sub 2}, and some volatile organic compounds (VOCs). NO{sub 2} is continuously emitted during use, with an EF of 100-450 mu per g of consumed fuel. CO is normally emitted mainly during the first minutes of use (up to 3 mg/g). Formaldehyde and benzene EFs were quantified at 15 and 16 mu/g, respectively, for the wick heater. Some other VOCs, such as 1,3-butadiene, were detected with lower EFs. We demonstrated the unsuitability of a 'biofuel' containing fatty acid methyl esters for use with the wick heater, and that the accumulation of soot on the same heater, whatever the fuel, leads to a dramatic increase in the CO EF, up to 16 mg/g, which could be responsible for chronic and acute CO intoxications. (Author)

  20. Two new sources of reactive gaseous mercury in the free troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, H.; Ambrose, J. L.; Jaffe, D. A.

    2012-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a neurotoxin that bioaccumulates in the food chain. Mercury is emitted to the atmosphere primarily in its elemental form, which has a long lifetime allowing global transport. It is known that atmospheric oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) generates reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) which plays an important role in the atmospheric mercury cycle by enhancing the rate of mercury deposition to ecosystems. However, the primary GEM oxidants, and the sources and chemical composition of RGM are poorly known. Using speciated mercury measurements conducted at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory since 2005 we present two previously unidentified sources of RGM to the free troposphere (FT). Firstly, we observed elevated RGM concentrations, large RGM/GEM-ratios, and anti-correlation between RGM and GEM during Asian long-rang transport events, demonstrating that RGM is formed from GEM by in-situ oxidation in some anthropogenic pollution plumes in the FT. During the Asian pollution events the measured RGM/GEM-ratios reached peak values, up to ~0.20, which are significantly larger than ratios typically measured (RGM/GEM < 0.05) in the Asian source region. Secondly, we observed very high RGM levels - the highest reported in the FT - in clean air masses that were processed upwind of Mt. Bachelor Observatory over the Pacific Ocean. The high RGM concentrations (up to 700 pg m-3), high RGM/GEM-ratios (up to 1), and very low ozone levels during these events provide the first observational evidence indicating significant GEM oxidation in the lower FT. The identification of these processes changes our conceptual understanding of the formation and distribution of oxidized Hg in the global atmosphere.

  1. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene for Applications in Gaseous Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Franchino, S.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Jackman, R.B.; Muller, H.; Nguyen, T.T.; de Oliveira, R.; Oliveri, E.; Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Ropelewski, L.; Smith, J.; van Stenis, M.; Streli, C.; Thuiner, P.; Veenhof, R.

    2016-07-11

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical and electrical properties. Regarded as the thinnest and narrowest conductive mesh, it has drastically different transmission behaviours when bombarded with electrons and ions in vacuum. This property, if confirmed in gas, may be a definitive solution for the ion back-flow problem in gaseous detectors. In order to ascertain this aspect, graphene layers of dimensions of about 2x2cm$^2$, grown on a copper substrate, are transferred onto a flat metal surface with holes, so that the graphene layer is freely suspended. The graphene and the support are installed into a gaseous detector equipped with a triple Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM), and the transparency properties to electrons and ions are studied in gas as a function of the electric fields. The techniques to produce the graphene samples are described, and we report on preliminary tests of graphene-coated GEMs.

  2. Extruder system and method for treatment of a gaseous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvi, Norberto; Perry, Robert James; Singh, Surinder Prabhjot; Balch, Gary Stephen; Westendorf, Tiffany Elizabeth Pinard

    2016-04-05

    A system for treatment of a gaseous medium, comprises an extruder having a barrel. The extruder further comprises a first inlet port, a second inlet port, and a plurality of outlet ports coupled to the barrel. The first inlet port is configured for feeding a lean sorbent, the second inlet port is configured for feeding a gaseous medium, and the plurality of outlet ports are configured for releasing a plurality of components removed from the gaseous medium. Further, the extruder comprises a plurality of helical elements coupled to a plurality of kneading elements, mounted on a shaft, and disposed within the barrel. The barrel and the plurality of helical and kneading elements together form an absorption unit and a desorption unit. The first and second inlet ports are formed in the absorption unit and the plurality of outlet ports are formed in the absorption and desorption units.

  3. Distribution of Gaseous and Particulate Mercury in the Coastal Rregion of Taiwan Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, J.

    2017-12-01

    This investigation provides information in the distribution patterns and sources of the atmospheric mercury species in the coastal region across Taiwan Strait. Total gaseous mercury (TGM) and total particulate mercury (TPM) were monitored from 2013 to 2017 in Xiamen, Fujian; and Kaosiung, Taiwan respectively. Results indicated that the average concentrations of TGM were 4.07±1.75 ng/m3, and 4.63±0.39 ng/m3, and the average concentrations of TPM were 195.72±132.37 pg/m3 and 194.72±42.19 pg/m3, respectively in Xiamen and Kaosiung. It is also found that seasonal variation of gaseous Hg was similar for those two cities, with higher concentration occurred in cold months and lower in warm months. The monsoon weather played a critical role in the seasonal variation of atmospheric mercury concentrations. Correlation analysis showed the concentrations of two atmospheric species mercury correlated negatively with wind speed, ambient temperature, and positively with NO2, CO and O3 in both cities. TPM had a more significant relationship with criteria air pollutants than that of TGM in Xiamen. Backward trajectory simulation (HYSPLIT) showed that the air masses originated commonly from North China and the Yellow Sea. They can transport through the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) and arrived in Xiamen when the events of high TGM concentration occurred. However, the clean air masses from open sea could dilute the concentration of atmospheric mercury.

  4. Light emitting device having peripheral emissive region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-05-28

    Light emitting devices are provided that include one or more OLEDs disposed only on a peripheral region of the substrate. An OLED may be disposed only on a peripheral region of a substantially transparent substrate and configured to emit light into the substrate. Another surface of the substrate may be roughened or include other features to outcouple light from the substrate. The edges of the substrate may be beveled and/or reflective. The area of the OLED(s) may be relatively small compared to the substrate surface area through which light is emitted from the device. One or more OLEDs also or alternatively may be disposed on an edge of the substrate about perpendicular to the surface of the substrate through which light is emitted, such that they emit light into the substrate. A mode expanding region may be included between each such OLED and the substrate.

  5. Interconversion of pollutants from the gaseous to the condensed phase. Technical progress report - brief summary of recent findings, March 1, 1983-August 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Purpose of the studies were to provide new information on the interconversion of pollutants from the gaseous to the condensed phase. More information were obtained on mechanisms of cluster formation, leading to the production of prenucleation embryos, rates of phase transformation, and the thermochemical properties and photochemical stability of the species involved. Systems studied included nitric acid, ammonia, sulfuric acid, carbonic acid, etc

  6. The effect of gaseous ammonia on cobalt perrhenate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, L.P.; Men'shikov, O.D.; Borisov, V.V.; Sorokin, S.I.; Krutovertsev, S.A.; Kharkevich, S.I.; Ivanova, O.M.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of humid air ammonia mixture on crystal pentahydrate of cobalt(2) perrhenate has been studied by the methods of PES, IR spectroscopy thermal analysis and electrophysical measurements. It is shown that with an increase in ammonia content in gaseous phase cobalt perrhenate successively transforms into diaquodiammine-, tetrammine- and μ-dioxo-bis-(tetrammine) derivatives of cobalt. Reversibility of dioxocomplex formation and a correlation between the change in electrophysical properties of crystal sample and change in ammonia content in gaseous phase are pointed out. 16 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  7. Electron impact phenomena and the properties of gaseous ions

    CERN Document Server

    Field, F H; Massey, H S W; Brueckner, Keith A

    1970-01-01

    Electron Impact Phenomena and the Properties of Gaseous Ions, Revised Edition deals with data pertaining to electron impact and to molecular gaseous ionic phenomena. This book discusses electron impact phenomena in gases at low pressure that involve low-energy electrons, which result in ion formation. The text also describes the use of mass spectrometers in electron impact studies and the degree of accuracy obtained when measuring electron impact energies. This book also reviews relatively low speed electrons and the transitions that result in the ionization of the atomic system. This text the

  8. Rare earths in iron and steelmaking and gaseous desulphurisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, D.A.R.; Subramanian, S.V.; Meng, V.; Kumar, R.V.

    1985-01-01

    Rare earth (RE) additions, either as mischmetal or rare earth silicide, are used in many ladle treatment processes in modern ferrous metallurgy. In ironmaking they provide the basis for the control of graphite morphology in cast irons and in steelmaking additions are made to aluminum-killed steels for desulphurisation and the control of inclusion composition and morphology. Rare earth oxides may also be used in the desulphurisation of medium calorific value gaseous fuels and stack gases. In this paper, Ce-S-O and La-S-O phase stability diagrams are used to determine the role of the rare earths in the external processing of iron and steel, and gaseous desulphurisation

  9. Modelling of atmospheric transport of heavy metals emitted from Polish power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zysk, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Modelling of atmospheric transport of heavy metals emitted from Polish power sector. Many studies have been conducted to investigate the atmospheric heavy metals contamination and its deposition to ecosystems. The increasing attention to mercury pollution has been mainly driven by the growing evidence of its negative impacts on wildlife, ecosystems and particularly human health. Lead and cadmium are also toxics which are being emitted into the atmosphere by anthropogenic as well as natural sources. The harmful influence of these three heavy metals was underlined in the Aarhus Protocol on Heavy Metals of 1998. The Parties of this protocol (including Poland) are obligated to reduce emissions, observe the transport and the amounts of lead, mercury and cadmium in the environment. Poland is one of the biggest emitter of mercury, lead and cadmium in Europe mainly due to emission from coal combustion processes. Therefore in Poland, research efforts to study the heavy metals emission, atmospheric transport, concentration and deposition are extremely important. The objectives of this work were twofold: - The practical objective was to develop and run a model to represent the atmospheric dispersion of mercury and to implement it in the air quality modelling platform Polyphemus.- The scientific objective was to perform heavy metals dispersion studies over Europe and detailed studies of the impact of the polish power sector on the air quality regarding mercury, cadmium and lead. To meet the declared aim, a new mercury chemical model was implemented into the Polyphemus air quality system. The scientific literature was reviewed regarding mercury chemistry and mercury chemical models. It can be concluded that the chemistry of mercury is still not well known. The models also differ in the way of calculating the dry and wet deposition of mercury. The elemental gaseous mercury ambient concentrations are evenly distributed, on the contrary, high variations in the spatial gradients of

  10. Dry deposition of gaseous radioiodine and particulate radiocaesium onto leafy vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschiersch, Jochen; Shinonaga, Taeko; Heuberger, Heidi

    2009-10-15

    Radionuclides released to the atmosphere during dry weather (e.g. after a nuclear accident) may contaminate vegetable foods and cause exposure to humans via the food chain. To obtain experimental data for an appropriate assessment of this exposure path, dry deposition of radionuclides to leafy vegetables was studied under homogeneous and controlled greenhouse conditions. Gaseous (131)I-tracer in predominant elemental form and particulate (134)Cs-tracer at about 1 mum diameter were used to identify susceptible vegetable species with regard to contamination by these radionuclides. The persistence was examined by washing the harvested product with water. The vegetables tested were spinach (Spinacia oleracea), butterhead lettuce (Lactuca sativa var. capitata), endive (Cichorium endivia), leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa var. crispa), curly kale (Brassica oleracea convar. acephala) and white cabbage (Brassica oleracea convar. capitata). The variation of radionuclides deposited onto each vegetable was evaluated statistically using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis Test and the U-test of Mann-Whitney. Significant differences in deposited (131)I and (134)Cs activity concentration were found among the vegetable species. For (131)I, the deposition velocity to spinach normalized to the biomass of the vegetation was 0.5-0.9 cm(3) g(-1) s(-1) which was the highest among all species. The particulate (134)Cs deposition velocity of 0.09 cm(3) g(-1) s(-1) was the highest for curly kale, which has rough and structured leaves. The lowest deposition velocity was onto white cabbage: 0.02 cm(3) g(-1) s(-1) (iodine) and 0.003 cm(3) g(-1) s(-1) (caesium). For all species, the gaseous iodine deposition was significantly higher compared to the particulate caesium deposition. The deposition depends on the sensitive parameters leaf area, stomatal aperture, and plant morphology. Decontamination by washing with water was very limited for iodine but up to a factor of two for caesium.

  11. TC-99 Decontaminant from heat treated gaseous diffusion membrane -Phase I, Part B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Restivo, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Duignan, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-01

    Uranium gaseous diffusion cascades represent a significant environmental challenge to dismantle, containerize and dispose as low-level radioactive waste. Baseline technologies rely on manual manipulations involving direct access to technetium-contaminated piping and materials. There is a potential to utilize novel decontamination technologies to remove the technetium and allow for on-site disposal of the very large uranium converters. Technetium entered these gaseous diffusion cascades as a hexafluoride complex in the same fashion as uranium. Technetium, as the isotope Tc-99, is an impurity that follows uranium in the first cycle of the Plutonium and Uranium Extraction (PUREX) process. The technetium speciation or exact form in the gaseous diffusion cascades is not well defined. Several forms of Tc-99 compounds, mostly the fluorinated technetium compounds with varying degrees of volatility have been speculated by the scientific community to be present in these cascades. Therefore, there may be a possibility of using thermal or leaching desorption, which is independent of the technetium oxidation states, to perform an insitu removal of the technetium as a volatile species and trap the radionuclide on sorbent traps which could be disposed as low-level waste. Based on the positive results of the first part of this work1 the use of steam as a thermal decontamination agent was further explored with a second piece of used barrier material from a different location. This new series of tests included exposing more of the material surface to the flow of high temperature steam through the change in the reactor design, subjecting it to alternating periods of stream and vacuum, as well as determining if a lower temperature steam, i.e., 121°C (250°F) would be effective, too. Along with these methods, one other simpler method involving the leaching of the Tc-99 contaminated barrier material with a 1.0 M aqueous solution of ammonium carbonate, with and without sonication, was

  12. Nuclear waste disposal utilizing a gaseous core reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternoster, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of a gaseous core nuclear reactor designed to produce power to also reduce the national inventories of long-lived reactor waste products through nuclear transmutation was examined. Neutron-induced transmutation of radioactive wastes is shown to be an effective means of shortening the apparent half life.

  13. Oxidation of gaseous hydrocarbons by alkene-utilizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Gaseous alkenes are widespread in the environment due to the emission of these hydrocarbons by industry and due to their production from natural sources as for instance ethene by plants, fungi and bacteria. Micro-organisms have developed the potential to oxidize these hydrocarbons. Alkenes

  14. Direct readout of gaseous detectors with tiled CMOS circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visschers, J.L.; Blanco Carballo, V.; Chefdeville, M.; Colas, P.; Graaf, H. van der; Schmitz, J.; Smits, S.; Timmermans, J.

    2007-01-01

    A coordinated design effort is underway, exploring the three-dimensional direct readout of gaseous detectors by an anode plate equipped with a tiled array of many CMOS pixel readout ASICs, having amplification grids integrated on their topsides and being contacted on their backside

  15. Gaseous tracking at linear hadron collider: Pushing the limits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    arrays of several thousand m2 of active detector surface to cover a large rapidity interval. The challenge is the construction of ... performance on aging of gaseous detectors. 2. ATLAS muon system. The ATLAS muon system ... drift gas is used to avoid high occupancy and aging respectively. The MDTs have been thoroughly ...

  16. Gaseous fuel production by anaerobic fungal degradation of banana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaerobic biodegradation of banana leaves by cellulolytic fungus (yeast) was carried out at optimum operational conditions of temperature (330C), PH (7.3) and slurry concentration (4g/25cm3). The organic component of the gaseous fuel generated was analysed using flame ionization detector (FID). The analysis revealed ...

  17. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion: final environmental statement. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    Volume 1 is comprised of chapters on: background and description; environmental impacts of add-on gaseous diffusion plant; unavoidable adverse environmental effects; alternatives; relationship between short-term uses and long-term productivity; relationship of program to land-use plans, policies, and controls; irreversible and irretrievable commitments of resources; cost-benefit analysis; and response to comment letters

  18. Transference system of gaseous fluoride compounds for infrared spectrofotometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, L.

    1988-07-01

    A vacuum line design for transference of gaseous fluoride compounds involved in the uranium hexafluoride infrared analysis is presented. The text include specific comments about the characteristics of each component and about the possibilities of its acquisition in the national market. (author) [pt

  19. gaseous fuel production by anaerobic fungal degradation of banana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JANICO

    wood, peat, lignite, anthracite, coke, e.t.c; liquid fuels include: petrol, diesel oil, kerosene e.t.c; and gaseous fuels include: natural gas, coal gas, water gas, producer gas ..... publishing company Ltd., New Delhi – India. Pp 2 - 50. Murray, P.R.S. (1977). Principles of organic chemistry: A modern comprehensive text for schools.

  20. Removal, storage and disposal of gaseous radionuclides from airborne effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Radioisotopes in the gaseous effluents arising from fuel reprocessing plants are examined and the state of the art to remove, store and dispose of them are discussed. The generation and discharge of krypton-85, iodine-129, tritium and carbon-14 are treated in details. A comparison of the various separation processes is made. Economic aspects of removal of the radionuclides are analysed

  1. Microstructural and compositional Evolution of Compound Layers during Gaseous Nitrocarburizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Hong; Somers, Marcel A.J.; Ågren, John

    2000-01-01

    Compound layers developed at 848 K during gaseous nitrocarburizing of iron and iron-carbon specimens were investigated for several combinations of N and C activities imposed at the specimen surface by gas mixtures of NH3, N2, CO2 and CO. The microstructural evolution of the compound layer was stu...

  2. Gaseous tracking at linear hadron collider: Pushing the limits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Gaseous detectors have been pushed to the limits when required to operate in the ferocious and aggressive rate environment of the new generation of HEP experiments. A great effort has resulted in the optimization and construction of large systems of gas detectors, some operational and some due for installation.

  3. Low temperature gaseous surface hardening of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The present contribution gives an overview of some of the technological aspects of low temperature thermochemical treatment of stainless steel. Examples of low temperature gaseous nitriding, carburising and nitrocarburising of stainless steel are presented and discussed. In particular......, the morphology, microstructure and characteristics of so-called expanite “layers” on stainless steel are addressed....

  4. Low temperature gaseous surface hardening of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present contribtion gives an overview of some of the technological aspects of low temperature thermochemical treatment of stainless steel. Examples of low temperature gaseous nitriding, carburising and nitrocarburising of stainless steel are presented and discussed. In particular......, the morphology, microstructure and characteristics of so-called expanded austenite "layers" on stainless steel are addressed....

  5. Charge amplitude distribution of the Gossip gaseous pixel detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanco Carballo, V.M.; Chefdeville, M.A.; Colas, P.; Giomataris, Y.; van der Graaf, H.; Gromov, V.; Hartjes, F.; Kluit, R.; Koffeman, E.; Salm, Cora; Schmitz, Jurriaan; Smits, Sander M.; Timmermans, J.; Timmermans, J.; Visschers, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    The Gossip gaseous pixel detector is being developed for the detection of charged particles in extreme high radiation environments as foreseen close to the interaction point of the proposed super LHC. The detecting medium is a thin layer of gas. Because of the low density of this medium, only a few

  6. Separation of gaseous air pollutants using membrane contactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverak, T.; Bulejko, P.; Ostrezi, J.; Kristof, O.; Kalivoda, J.; Kejik, P.; Mayerova, K.; Adamcik, M.

    2017-10-01

    This work deals with the separation of CO2 gaseous pollutant from gas mixtures to a water solution using the laboratory contactor. The laboratory set process parameters showed the rate of carbon dioxide transition through the interface in a so promising level the contactor separators can be considered as a very promising pathway to reduce the content of this greenhouse gas from the air.

  7. Separation of tritium from gaseous and aqueous effluent systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobisk, E.H.

    1977-01-01

    Three processes are discussed for separating tritium from gaseous and aqueous effluent systems: separation in the gas phase using Pd-25 wt percent Ag alloy diffusion membranes; electrolytic separation in the aqueous phase using ''bipolar'' electrodes; and the countercurrent exchange of tritium-containing hydrogen gas with water on catalytic surfaces combined with separation by direct electrolysis

  8. Radioactive effluents, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, calendar year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acox, T.A.; Hary, L.F.; Klein, L.S.

    1983-03-01

    Radioactive discharges from the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are discussed and tabulated. Tables indicate both the location of the discharge and the nuclides discharged. All discharges for 1982 are well below the Radioactive Concentration Guide limits specified in DOE Order 5480.1, Chapter XI. 1 figure

  9. Engineering design of the Aries-IV gaseous divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, M.Z.; Najmabadi, F.; Sharafat, S.

    1994-01-01

    ARIES-IV is a conceptual, D-T burning, steady-state tokamak fusion reactor producing 1000 MWe net. It operates in the second plasma stability regime. The structural material is SiC composite and the primary coolant is helium at 10MPa base pressure. ARIES-IV uses double-null divertors for particle control. Total thermal power recovered from the divertors is 425MW, which is 16% of the total reactor thermal power. Among the desirable goals of divertor design were to avoid the use of tungsten and to use the same structural material and primary coolant as in the blanket design. In order to reduce peak heat flux, the innovative gaseous divertor has been used in ARIES-IV. A gaseous divertor reduces peak heat flux by increasing the surface area and by distributing particle and radiation energy more uniformly. Another benefit of gaseous divertor is the reduction of plasma temperature in the divertor chamber, so that material erosion due to sputtering, can be diminished. This makes the use of low-Z material possible in a gaseous divertor

  10. 29 CFR 1910.162 - Fixed extinguishing systems, gaseous agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... employee alarm capable of being perceived above ambient light or noise levels when agent design... application. Carbon dioxide obtained by dry ice conversion to liquid is not acceptable unless it is processed... designed concentration of gaseous agents is maintained until the fire has been extinguished or is under...

  11. Inhalation gases or gaseous mediators as neuroprotectants for cerebral ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Brad A; Harrison, Joanne C; Nair, Shiva M; Sammut, Ivan A

    2013-01-01

    Ischaemic stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While recombinant tissue plasminogen activator can be administered to produce thrombolysis and restore blood flow to the ischaemic brain, therapeutic benefit is only achieved in a fraction of the subset of patients eligible for fibrinolytic intervention. Neuroprotective therapies attempting to restrict the extent of brain injury following cerebral ischaemia have not been successfully translated into the clinic despite overwhelming pre-clinical evidence of neuroprotection. Therefore, an adequate treatment for the majority of acute ischaemic stroke patients remains elusive. In the stroke literature, the use of therapeutic gases has received relatively little attention. Gases such as hyperbaric and normobaric oxygen, xenon, hydrogen, helium and argon all possess biological effects that have shown to be neuroprotective in pre-clinical models of ischaemic stroke. There are significant advantages to using gases including their relative abundance, low cost and feasibility for administration, all of which make them ideal candidates for a translational therapy for stroke. In addition, modulating cellular gaseous mediators including nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulphide may be an attractive option for ischaemic stroke therapy. Inhalation of these gaseous mediators can also produce neuroprotection, but this strategy remains to be confirmed as a viable therapy for ischaemic stroke. This review highlights the neuroprotective potential of therapeutic gas therapy and modulation of gaseous mediators for ischaemic stroke. The therapeutic advantages of gaseous therapy offer new promising directions in breaking the translational barrier for ischaemic stroke.

  12. On the Jeans Criterion of a Stratified Heat Conducting Gaseous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 33; Issue 4. On the Jeans Criterion of a Stratified Heat Conducting Gaseous Medium in the Presence of Non-Uniform Rotation and Magnetic Field. Joginder S. Dhiman Rekha Dadwal. Volume 33 Issue 4 December 2012 pp 363-373 ...

  13. On the Jeans Criterion of a Stratified Heat Conducting Gaseous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    homogeneous stratified gaseous medium with finite thermal conductiv- ity and infinite electrical conductivity, in the presence of non-uniform rotation and magnetic field in the Chandrasekhar's frame of reference, is studied. It is found that the magnetic field, whether uniform or non- uniform, has no effect on the Jeans' criterion ...

  14. Thermodynamic and transport properties of gaseous tetrafluoromethane in chemical equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J. L.; Boney, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    Equations and in computer code are presented for the thermodynamic and transport properties of gaseous, undissociated tetrafluoromethane (CF4) in chemical equilibrium. The computer code calculates the thermodynamic and transport properties of CF4 when given any two of five thermodynamic variables (entropy, temperature, volume, pressure, and enthalpy). Equilibrium thermodynamic and transport property data are tabulated and pressure-enthalpy diagrams are presented.

  15. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion: final environmental statement. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    Volume 1 is comprised of chapters on: background and description; environmental impacts of add-on gaseous diffusion plant; unavoidable adverse environmental effects; alternatives; relationship between short-term uses and long-term productivity; relationship of program to land-use plans, policies, and controls; irreversible and irretrievable commitments of resources; cost-benefit analysis; and response to comment letters. (LK)

  16. Absorption of continuum radiation in a resonant expanding gaseous sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaparev, N Y

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with absorption of external continuum radiation in a self-similarly expanding gaseous sphere. Frequency probability and integral probability of radiation absorption in the resonance frequency range are determined depending on the expansion velocity gradient and thickness of the optical medium. It is shown that expansion results in a reduced optical thickness of the medium and enhanced integral absorption. (paper)

  17. Plant air systems safety study: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Air System facilities and operations are reviewed for potential safety problems not covered by standard industrial safety procedures. Information is presented under the following section headings: facility and process description (general); air plant equipment; air distribution system; safety systems; accident analysis; plant air system safety overview; and conclusion

  18. Relationship between epiphytic lichens, trace elements and gaseous atmospheric pollutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobben, van H.F.; Wamelink, G.W.W.; Braak, ter C.J.F.

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the joint effect of gaseous atmospheric pollutants and trace elements on epiphytic lichens. We used our data to test the hypothesis that lichens are generally insensitive to toxic effects of trace elements, and can therefore be used as accumulator organisms to

  19. Organic light emitting devices for illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Michael; Lu, Min-Hao Michael; Weaver, Michael S.

    2010-02-16

    An organic light emitting device is provided. The device has a plurality of regions, each region having an organic emissive layer adapted to emit a different spectrum of light. The regions in combination emit light suitable for illumination purposes. The area of each region may be selected such that the device is more efficient that an otherwise equivalent device having regions of equal size. The regions may have an aspect ratio of at least about four. All parts of any given region may be driven at the same current.

  20. Wheat Under LED's (Light Emitting Diodes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Astroculture is a suite of technologies used to produce and maintain a closed controlled environment for plant growth. The two most recent missions supported growth of potato, dwarf wheat, and mustard plants, and provided scientists with the first opportunity to conduct true plant research in space. Light emitting diodes have particular usefulness for plant growth lighting because they emit a much smaller amount of radiant heat than do conventional lighting sources and because they have potential of directing a higher percentage of the emitted light onto plants surfaces. Furthermore, the high output LED's have emissions in the 600-700 nm waveband, which is of highest efficiency for photosynthesis by plants.

  1. Characteristics and applications of small, portable gaseous air pollution monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKercher, Grant R; Salmond, Jennifer A; Vanos, Jennifer K

    2017-04-01

    Traditional approaches for measuring air quality based on fixed measurements are inadequate for personal exposure monitoring. To combat this issue, the use of small, portable gas-sensing air pollution monitoring technologies is increasing, with researchers and individuals employing portable and mobile methods to obtain more spatially and temporally representative air pollution data. However, many commercially available options are built for various applications and based on different technologies, assumptions, and limitations. A review of the monitor characteristics of small, gaseous monitors is missing from current scientific literature. A state-of-the-art review of small, portable monitors that measure ambient gaseous outdoor pollutants was developed to address broad trends during the last 5-10 years, and to help future experimenters interested in studying gaseous air pollutants choose monitors appropriate for their application and sampling needs. Trends in small, portable gaseous air pollution monitor uses and technologies were first identified and discussed in a review of literature. Next, searches of online databases were performed for articles containing specific information related to performance, characteristics, and use of such monitors that measure one or more of three criteria gaseous air pollutants: ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and carbon monoxide. All data were summarized into reference tables for comparison between applications, physical features, sensing capabilities, and costs of the devices. Recent portable monitoring trends are strongly related to associated applications and audiences. Fundamental research requires monitors with the best individual performance, and thus the highest cost technology. Monitor networking favors real-time capabilities and moderate cost for greater reproduction. Citizen science and crowdsourcing applications allow for lower-cost components; however important strengths and limitations for each application must be addressed

  2. Advanced Characterization of Semivolatile Organic Compounds Emitted from Biomass Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, L. E.; Liu, Y.; Rivas-Ubach, A.; Shaw, J. B.; Lipton, M. S.; Barsanti, K. C.

    2017-12-01

    Biomass burning (BB) emits large amounts of non-methane organic gases (NMOGs) and primary (directly emitted) particulate matter (PM). NMOGs also react in plume to form secondary PM (i.e., SOA) and ozone. BB-PM has been difficult to represent accurately in models used for chemistry and climate predictions, including for air quality and fire management purposes. Much recent research supports that many previously unconsidered SOA precursors exist, including oxidation of semivolatile compounds (SVOCs). Although many recent studies have characterized relatively volatile BB-derived NMOGs and relatively non-volatile particle-phase organic species, comparatively few studies have performed detailed characterization of SVOCs emitted from BB. Here we present efforts to expand the volatility and compositional ranges of compounds measured in BB smoke. In this work, samples of SVOCs in gas and particle phases were collected from 18 fires representing a range of fuel types during the 2016 FIREX fire laboratory campaign; samples were analyzed by two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TOFMS) and Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Hundreds of compounds were detectable in both gas and particle phases by GCxGC-TOFMS whereas thousands of peaks were present in the FTICR mass spectra. Data from both approaches highlight that chemical fingerprints of smoke are fuel/burn-dependent. These efforts support our continued research in building the understanding and model representation of BB emissions and BB-derived SOA.

  3. Toxicity of inhaled alpha-emitting radionuclides - Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggenburg, B.A.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Guilmette, R.A.; Gillett, N.A.; Diel, J.H.; Lundgren, D.L.; Hahn, F.F.; Boecker, B.B.; McClellan, R.O.

    1988-01-01

    The toxicity of inhaled alpha-emitting radionuclides is being investigated in a series of interrelated dose-response studies. Dogs, rodents, and nonhuman primates have been exposed to monodisperse or polydisperse aerosols of the oxides of 239 Pu, 238 Pu, 241 Am, or 244 Cm to measure the relative importance of average organ dose, local dose around particles, specific activity, chemical form, particle size, and number of particles inhaled to the development of biological effects. The influence of animal species, age at exposure, and pre-existing lung disease, as well as the effects of repeated exposure, are also being studied, because they may influence the toxicity of these radionuclides. (author)

  4. Organic emitters: Light-emitting fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortí, Enrique; Bolink, Henk J.

    2015-04-01

    Light-emitting fibres that suit integration with textiles are prepared by dip-coating a steel wire with an electroluminescent material and then cleverly wrapping the structure with a carbon nanotube sheet that functions as a transparent electrode.

  5. Radiation-emitting Electronic Product Codes

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database contains product names and associated information developed by the Center for all products, both medical and non-medical, which emit radiation. It...

  6. Emissive Ion Thruster -EMIT, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A propulsion system is proposed that is based on acceleration of ions emitted from a thin, solid-state electrochemical ceramic membrane. This technology would...

  7. Radiation Emitting Product Corrective Actions and Recalls

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database provides descriptions of radiation-emitting products that have been recalled under an approved corrective action plan to remove defective and...

  8. A method to unfold the efficiency of gaseous detectors exposed to broad X-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Souza, Maria Ines S. de; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2000-01-01

    A method to obtain the efficiency of a gaseous detector exposed to broad energy X-ray spectra was developed. It consists in the de-convolution of the integrated detector response using the shapes of those spectra as a tool to unfold the aimed detector efficiency curve. For this purpose, the spectra emitted by a X-ray tube under several anode voltages, were properly characterized through measurements with a NaI(Tl) spectrometer. A Lorentz function was then fitted to each of the spectra, and their parameters expressed as a function of the anode voltage, by using polynomial and gaussian fittings. The integral of the product of each Lorentz function, by another unknown Lorentz function, expressing the detector efficiency curve, represents the response of the detector for each anode tension, e.g., each X-ray spectrum. The symbolical integration of that product, produces a general function containing the unknown parameters of the unknown efficiency curve. A non-linear fitting of this general function, to the detector response points, as experimentally obtained, generates the aimed parameters for the efficiency curve. The final detector efficiency curve is obtained after normalization procedures. (author)

  9. Purification/deodorization of indoor air and gaseous effluents by TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichat, P.; Disdier, J.; Hoang-Van, C.; Mas, D.; Goutailler, G.; Gaysse, C. [Laboratoire ' Photocatalyse, Catalyse et Environnement' , CNRS UMR ' IFoS' , Ecole Centrale de Lyon, BP 163, 69131 Ecully Cedex (France)

    2000-12-25

    Our objective was to further assess the capabilities of TiO{sub 2} to purify/deodorize indoor air and industrial gaseous effluents. Using a laboratory photoreactor including a lamp emitting around 365nm and a TiO{sub 2}-coated fiber glass mesh, we first determined that the removal rate of three very different pollutants (CO, n-octane, pyridine) was 5-10{mu}mol per Wh consumed by the lamp for 50-2000ppmv concentrations and 25-50lh{sup -1} flow rates (dry air or O{sub 2}). We inferred that this order of magnitude allows, by use of a reasonable-size apparatus, the abatement of pollutants in constantly renewed indoor air, except CO and CH{sub 4} that are too concentrated. Using a TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis-based individual air purifier prototype, we showed, through distinctive analytical measurements, that the average concentrations of benzene, toluene and xylenes were indeed reduced by a factor of 2-3 in an ordinary non-airtight room. We also showed that O{sub 3} addition in O{sub 2} very markedly increases the mineralization percentage of n-octane, under otherwise identical conditions, in the laboratory photoreactor without photoexcitation of O{sub 3}; this property of O{sub 3} can expand the application field of photocatalytic air purification in industry, at least in some cases.

  10. Tracing Sources of Total Gaseous Mercury to Yongheung Island off the Coast of Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang S. Lee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, total gaseous mercury (TGM concentrations were measured on Yongheung Island off the coast of Korea between mainland Korea and Eastern China in 2013. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively evaluate the impact of local mainland Korean sources and regional Chinese sources on local TGM concentrations using multiple tools including the relationship with other pollutants, meteorological data, conditional probability function, backward trajectories, and potential source contribution function (PSCF receptor modeling. Among the five sampling campaigns, two sampling periods were affected by both mainland Korean and regional sources, one was caused by mainland vehicle emissions, another one was significantly impacted by regional sources, and, in the remaining period, Hg volatilization from oceans was determined to be a significant source and responsible for the increase in TGM concentration. PSCF identified potential source areas located in metropolitan areas, western coal-fired power plant locations, and the southeastern industrial area of Korea as well as the Liaoning province, the largest Hg emitting province in China. In general, TGM concentrations generally showed morning peaks (07:00~12:00 and was significantly correlated with solar radiation during all sampling periods.

  11. Blue emitting organic semiconductors under high pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knaapila, Matti; Guha, Suchismita

    2016-01-01

    This review describes essential optical and emerging structural experiments that use high GPa range hydrostatic pressure to probe physical phenomena in blue-emitting organic semiconductors including π-conjugated polyfluorene and related compounds. The work emphasizes molecular structure and inter......This review describes essential optical and emerging structural experiments that use high GPa range hydrostatic pressure to probe physical phenomena in blue-emitting organic semiconductors including π-conjugated polyfluorene and related compounds. The work emphasizes molecular structure...

  12. Phosphorescent Nanocluster Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttipillai, Padmanaban S; Zhao, Yimu; Traverse, Christopher J; Staples, Richard J; Levine, Benjamin G; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-01-13

    Devices utilizing an entirely new class of earth abundant, inexpensive phosphorescent emitters based on metal-halide nanoclusters are reported. Light-emitting diodes with tunable performance are demonstrated by varying cation substitution to these nanoclusters. Theoretical calculations provide insight about the nature of the phosphorescent emitting states, which involves a strong pseudo-Jahn-Teller distortion. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Stable blue phosphorescent organic light emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Thompson, Mark; Giebink, Noel

    2014-08-26

    Novel combination of materials and device architectures for organic light emitting devices is provided. An organic light emitting device, is provided, having an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer includes a host and a phosphorescent emissive dopant having a peak emissive wavelength less than 500 nm, and a radiative phosphorescent lifetime less than 1 microsecond. Preferably, the phosphorescent emissive dopant includes a ligand having a carbazole group.

  14. Tc-99 Decontamination From Heat Treated Gaseous Diffusion Membrane -Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Restivo, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Duignan, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-03-13

    Uranium gaseous diffusion cascades represent a significant environmental challenge to dismantle, containerize and dispose as low-level radioactive waste. Baseline technologies rely on manual manipulations involving direct access to technetium-contaminated piping and materials. There is a potential to utilize novel thermal decontamination technologies to remove the technetium and allow for on-site disposal of the very large uranium converters. Technetium entered these gaseous diffusion cascades as a hexafluoride complex in the same fashion as uranium. Technetium, as the isotope Tc-99, is an impurity that follows uranium in the first cycle of the Plutonium and Uranium Extraction (PUREX) process. The technetium speciation or exact form in the gas diffusion cascades is not well defined. Several forms of Tc-99 compounds, mostly the fluorinated technetium compounds with varying degrees of volatility have been speculated by the scientific community to be present in these cascades. Therefore, there may be a possibility of using thermal desorption, which is independent of the technetium oxidation states, to perform an in situ removal of the technetium as a volatile species and trap the radionuclide on sorbent traps which could be disposed as low-level waste.

  15. Radioactivity in gaseous waste discharged from the separations facilities during fourth quarter of 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sliger, G. J.

    1980-02-22

    This document is issued quarterly for the purpose of summarizing the radioactive gaseous wastes that are discharged from the facilities of the Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell). Data on alpha and beta emissions during 1979 are presented where relevant to the gaseous effluent. Emission data are not included on gaseous wastes produced within the 200 areas by other Hanford contractors.

  16. Radioactivity in gaseous waste discharged from the separations facilities during 1978. [Rockwell Hanford Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J. D.; Poremba, B. E.

    1979-03-30

    This document is issued quarterly for the purpose of summarizing the radioactive gaseous wastes that are discharged from the facilities of the Rockwell Hanford Operations. Data on alpha and beta emissions during 1978 are presented where relevant to the gaseous effluent. Emission data are not included on gaseous wastes produced within the 200 Areas by other Hanford contractors.

  17. 46 CFR 131.815 - Alarm for fixed gaseous fire-extinguishing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alarm for fixed gaseous fire-extinguishing system. 131... VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.815 Alarm for fixed gaseous fire-extinguishing system. Each alarm for a fixed gaseous fire-extinguishing system must be...

  18. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion: final environmental statement. Volume 2. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    Volume 2 is comprised of appendices: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Existing Facilities; Ecology; Civic Involvement; Social Analysis; Population Projections; Toxicity of Air Pollutants to Biota at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; and Assessment of Noise Effects of an Add-On to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

  19. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion: final environmental statement. Volume 2. Appendices. [Appendices only

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liverman, James L.

    1977-09-01

    Volume 2 is comprised of appendices: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Existing Facilities; Ecology; Civic Involvement; Social Analysis; Population Projections; Toxicity of Air Pollutants to Biota at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; and Assessment of Noise Effects of an Add-On to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. (LK)

  20. 77 FR 3255 - Notice of 229 Boundary Revision at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    ... No: 2012-1214] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of 229 Boundary Revision at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion... entry into or upon areas, buildings, and other facilities of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant... provided in 10 CFR 860.4, into or upon this facility, installation, or real property of the Paducah Gaseous...

  1. 78 FR 65389 - United States Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... COMMISSION United States Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The current CoC for PGDP is set to expire on December... operation of a uranium enrichment facility in Paducah, Kentucky, using the gaseous ] diffusion process. PGDP...

  2. NOVEL TECHNOLOGIES FOR GASEOUS CONTAMINANTS CONTROL; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B.S. Turk; T. Merkel; A. Lopez-Ortiz; R.P. Gupta; J.W. Portzer; G.N. Krishnan; B.D. Freeman; G.K. Fleming

    2001-01-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop technologies for cleaning/conditioning the syngas from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system to meet the tolerance limits for contaminants such as H(sub 2)S, COS, NH(sub 3), HCN, HCl, and alkali for fuel cell and chemical production applications. RTI's approach is to develop a modular system that (1) removes reduced sulfur species to sub-ppm levels using a hybrid process consisting of a polymer membrane and a regenerable ZnO-coated monolith or a mixed metal oxide sorbent; (2) removes hydrogen chloride vapors to sub-ppm levels using an inexpensive, high-surface area material; and (3) removes NH(sub 3) with acidic adsorbents. RTI is working with MEDAL, Inc., and North Carolina State University (NCSU) to develop polymer membrane technology for bulk removal of H(sub 2)S from syngas. These membranes are being engineered to remove the acid gas components (H(sub 2)S, CO(sub 2), NH(sub 3), and H(sub 2)O) from syngas by focusing on the ''solubility selectivity'' of the novel polymer compositions. The desirable components of the syngas (H(sub 2) and CO) are maintained at high-pressure conditions as a non-permeate stream while the impurities are transported across the membrane to the low pressure side. RTI tested commercially available and novel materials from MEDAL using a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) permeation apparatus. H(sub 2)S/H(sub 2) selectivities and gt;30 were achieved, although there was a strong negative dependence with temperature. MEDAL believes that all the polymer compositions tested so far can be prepared as hollow fiber membrane modules using the existing manufacturing technology. For fuel cell and chemical applications, additional sulfur removal (beyond that achievable with the membranes) is required. To overcome limitations of conventional ZnO pellets, RTI is testing a monolith with a thin coating of high surface area zinc-oxide based materials. Alternatively, a regenerable

  3. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to summarize effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results and compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and orders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Environmental monitoring at PGDP consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of liquid and gaseous discharges to the environment. Environmental surveillance is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuff, biota, and other media. Environmental monitoring is performed to characterize and quantify contaminants, assess radiation exposures of members of the public, demonstrate compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, and detect and assess the effects (if any) on the local environment. Multiple samples are collected throughout the year and are analyzed for radioactivity, chemical content, and various physical attributes

  4. Shuttle Gaseous Hydrogen Venting Risk from Flow Control Valve Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, J. Philip; Baurle, Robert A.; Gafney, Richard L.; Norris, Andrew T.; Pellett, Gerald L.; Rock, Kenneth E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a series of studies to assess the potential risk associated with the failure of one of three gaseous hydrogen flow control valves in the orbiter's main propulsion system during the launch of Shuttle Endeavour (STS-126) in November 2008. The studies focused on critical issues associated with the possibility of combustion resulting from release of gaseous hydrogen from the external tank into the atmosphere during assent. The Shuttle Program currently assumes hydrogen venting from the external tank will result in a critical failure. The current effort was conducted to increase understanding of the risk associated with venting hydrogen given the flow control valve failure scenarios being considered in the Integrated In-Flight Anomaly Investigation being conducted by NASA.

  5. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental report for 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Counce-Brown, D. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    This two-part report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site Environmental Report for 1990, is published annually. It reflects the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) on the area's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation, and wildlife. In addition, an assessment of the effect of PGDP effluents on the resident human population is made. PGDP's overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP's neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, to reduce the formation of waste, and to minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials.

  6. Method of producing gaseous products using a downflow reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortright, Randy D; Rozmiarek, Robert T; Hornemann, Charles C

    2014-09-16

    Reactor systems and methods are provided for the catalytic conversion of liquid feedstocks to synthesis gases and other noncondensable gaseous products. The reactor systems include a heat exchange reactor configured to allow the liquid feedstock and gas product to flow concurrently in a downflow direction. The reactor systems and methods are particularly useful for producing hydrogen and light hydrocarbons from biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons using aqueous phase reforming. The generated gases may find used as a fuel source for energy generation via PEM fuel cells, solid-oxide fuel cells, internal combustion engines, or gas turbine gensets, or used in other chemical processes to produce additional products. The gaseous products may also be collected for later use or distribution.

  7. Aging phenomena in gaseous detectors - perspectives from the 2001 workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlmann, M.; Padilla, C.; Tesch, N.; Titov, M.

    2002-01-01

    High-Energy Physics experiments are currently entering a new era which requires the operation of gaseous particle detectors at unprecedented high rates and integrated particle fluxes. Full functionality of such detectors over the lifetime of an experiment in a harsh radiation environment is of prime concern. New classes of gaseous detectors such as large-scale straw-type detectors, Micro-pattern Gas Detectors, and resistive plate chambers--each with their own specific aging characteristics--have evolved since the first workshop on wire chamber aging was held at LBL, Berkeley in 1986. The 2001 workshop provided a forum to review the progress since 1986 in understanding aging effects and to exchange recent experiences. A summary of the main results reported at the 2001 workshop is presented providing a systematic review of aging effects in state-of-the-art detectors

  8. Gaseous Micropattern Detectors High Energy Physics and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, A

    2000-01-01

    Multiwire gaseous detectors have matured in the last few decades with major implications in particle physics experiments. They have also been successfully refined for use in other fields: X-rays for medical imaging, UV and single photon detection, neutron and crystal diffraction studies etc. Their major limitation has been a modest rate capability (103/mm2). In the last decade several micropattern position sensitive gas devices have been introduced with an inherently improved rate capability (few MHz/mm2) and a localization accuracy of 40-50 µm. They are being extensively pursued for their application in several fields. The state of the art of this new generation of gaseous detectors will be reviewed.

  9. Gaseous Micropattern Detectors In Astrophysics, Radiology and Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, A

    2000-01-01

    Multiwire gaseous detectors have matured in the last few decades with major implications in particle physics experiments, they have also been successfully refined for use in other fields: X-rays for medical imaging, UV and single photon detection, neutron and crystal diffraction studies etc. Their major limitation has been a modest rate capability (flux ~ 103/mm2). In the last decade several micropattern position sensitive gas devices have been introduced with an inherently improved rate capability (few MHz/mm2) and a localization accuracy of 40-50 m. They are being extensively pursued for their application in several fields. A state-of-the-art of this new generation of gaseous detectors will be reviewed.

  10. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, C.M.

    1993-09-01

    This two-part report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental Report for 1992, is published annually. It reflects the results of an environmental monitoring program designed to quantify potential increases in the concentration of contaminants and potential doses to the resident human population. The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP's neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, reduce the generation of waste, and minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials

  11. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horak, C.M. [ed.] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-09-01

    This two-part report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental Report for 1992, is published annually. It reflects the results of an environmental monitoring program designed to quantify potential increases in the concentration of contaminants and potential doses to the resident human population. The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP`s neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, reduce the generation of waste, and minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials.

  12. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to summarize effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results and compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and orders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Environmental monitoring at PGDP consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of liquid and gaseous discharges to the environment. Environmental surveillance is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuff, biota, and other media. Environmental monitoring is performed to characterize and quantify contaminants, assess radiation exposures of members of the public, demonstrate compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, and detect and assess the effects (if any) on the local environment. Multiple samples are collected throughout the year and are analyzed for radioactivity, chemical content, and various physical attributes.

  13. Leaf absorption of atmospheric ammonia emitted from pig slurry applied beneath the canopy of winter wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjedde Sommer, S.; Jensen, E.S.; Kofoed Schjoerring, J.

    1993-01-01

    Absorption of volatilized ammonia after application of slurry onto the soil surface (sand) between rows of a wheat crop was studied in two experiments. The slurry was labelled with 15 N-NH 4 . During seven days the accumulated gaseous N loss from the slurry varied from 6.9 to 11.1 g N m -2 . In April ammonia losses from slurry applied beneath a 5 cm high wheat crop were equal to losses from slurry applied to a fallow, but 2.2% of the lost atmospheric ammonia was taken up by the leaves. In May ammonia loss from slurry applied between the rows of a 43 cm high crop was reduced by 6% compared to the loss from fallow, because of a reduced transfer of ammonia from the slurry to the air. Of the emitted ammonia 3.3% was absorbed by the canopy. (au)

  14. Process and composition for drying of gaseous hydrogen halides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom, Glenn M.; Brown, Duncan W.

    1989-08-01

    A process for drying a gaseous hydrogen halide of the formula HX, wherein X is selected from the group consisting of bromine, chlorine, fluorine, and iodine, to remove water impurity therefrom, comprising: contacting the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide with a scavenger including a support having associated therewith one or more members of the group consisting of: (a) an active scavenging moiety selected from one or more members of the group consisting of: (i) metal halide compounds dispersed in the support, of the formula MX.sub.y ; and (ii) metal halide pendant functional groups of the formula -MX.sub.y-1 covalently bonded to the support, wherein M is a y-valent metal, and y is an integer whose value is from 1 to 3; (b) corresponding partially or fully alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, of the metal halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); wherein the alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, when present, are reactive with the gaseous hydrogen halide to form the corresponding halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); and M being selected such that the heat of formation, .DELTA.H.sub.f of its hydrated halide, MX.sub.y.(H.sub.2 O).sub.n, is governed by the relationship: .DELTA.H.sub.f .gtoreq.n.times.10.1 kilocalories/mole of such hydrated halide compound wherein n is the number of water molecules bound to the metal halide in the metal halide hydrate. Also disclosed is an appertaining scavenger composition and a contacting apparatus wherein the scavenger is deployed in a bed for contacting with the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide.

  15. Method of removing iodine and compounds thereof from gaseous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keener, R.L.; Kittle, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    Anion exchange resins including an acrylic backbone formed by the suspension polymerization of a mixture of an acrylic and a crosslinking monomer are useful in the removal of iodine and iodine compounds from gaseous effluents. Removal of radioactive iodine contaminants, particularly alkyl iodine compounds or hydrogen iodine, under extreme conditions, namely temperatures up to 180 0 C and humidities up to 100 percent, from effluents resulting from a major nuclear accident could probably be adsorbed by these resins described herein

  16. Interpretation of the [ClIII] Lines in Gaseous Nebulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, L H; Czyzak, S J; Walker, M F; Krueger, T K

    1970-05-01

    The intensity ratio of the green lambdalambda5517 and 5537 lines of [ClIII] serves as an indicatrix of the electron density in many gaseous nebulae whose spectra can be observed with an image converter. Quantitative interpretation of the line ratio requires accurate values of the collisional strengths and transition probabilities. With improved values of these parameters we have revised electron densities for a number of nebulae; the results seem to be in good accord with those derived from other criteria.

  17. NOVEL TECHNOLOGIES FOR GASEOUS CONTAMINANTS CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.S. Turk; T. Merkel; A. Lopez-Ortiz; R.P. Gupta; J.W. Portzer; G.N. Krishnan; B.D. Freeman; G.K. Fleming

    2001-09-30

    The overall objective of this project is to develop technologies for cleaning/conditioning the syngas from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system to meet the tolerance limits for contaminants such as H{sub 2}S, COS, NH{sub 3}, HCN, HCl, and alkali for fuel cell and chemical production applications. RTI's approach is to develop a modular system that (1) removes reduced sulfur species to sub-ppm levels using a hybrid process consisting of a polymer membrane and a regenerable ZnO-coated monolith or a mixed metal oxide sorbent; (2) removes hydrogen chloride vapors to sub-ppm levels using an inexpensive, high-surface area material; and (3) removes NH{sub 3} with acidic adsorbents. RTI is working with MEDAL, Inc., and North Carolina State University (NCSU) to develop polymer membrane technology for bulk removal of H{sub 2}S from syngas. These membranes are being engineered to remove the acid gas components (H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O) from syngas by focusing on the ''solubility selectivity'' of the novel polymer compositions. The desirable components of the syngas (H{sub 2} and CO) are maintained at high-pressure conditions as a non-permeate stream while the impurities are transported across the membrane to the low pressure side. RTI tested commercially available and novel materials from MEDAL using a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) permeation apparatus. H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} selectivities >30 were achieved, although there was a strong negative dependence with temperature. MEDAL believes that all the polymer compositions tested so far can be prepared as hollow fiber membrane modules using the existing manufacturing technology. For fuel cell and chemical applications, additional sulfur removal (beyond that achievable with the membranes) is required. To overcome limitations of conventional ZnO pellets, RTI is testing a monolith with a thin coating of high surface area zinc-oxide based materials

  18. The Gaseous Explosive Reaction : The Effect of Inert Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, F W

    1928-01-01

    Attention is called in this report to previous investigations of gaseous explosive reactions carried out under constant volume conditions, where the effect of inert gases on the thermodynamic equilibrium was determined. The advantage of constant pressure methods over those of constant volume as applied to studies of the gaseous explosive reaction is pointed out and the possibility of realizing for this purpose a constant pressure bomb mentioned. The application of constant pressure methods to the study of gaseous explosive reactions, made possible by the use of a constant pressure bomb, led to the discovery of an important kinetic relation connecting the rate of propagation of the zone of explosive reaction within the active gases, with the initial concentrations of those gases: s = K(sub 1)(A)(sup n1)(B)(sup n2)(C)(sup n3)------. By a method analogous to that followed in determining the effect of inert gases on the equilibrium constant K, the present paper records an attempt to determine their kinetic effect upon the expression given above.

  19. Measurements of gaseous multiplication coefficient in pure isobutane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Iara Batista de

    2010-01-01

    In this work it is presented measurements of gaseous multiplication coefficient (α) in pure isobutane obtained with a parallel plate chamber, protected against discharges by one electrode (anode) of high resistivity glass (ρ = 2 x 10 12 Ω.cm). The method applied was the Pulsed Townsend, where the primary ionization is produced through the incidence of a nitrogen laser beam onto a metallic electrode (cathode). The electric currents measured with the chamber operating in both ionization and avalanche regimes were used to calculate the gaseous multiplication coefficient by the solution of the Townsend equation for uniform electric fields. The validation of the technique was provided by the measurements of gaseous multiplication coefficient in pure nitrogen, a widely studied gas, which has well-established data in literature. The α coefficients in isobutane were measured as a function of the reduced electric field in the range of 139Td up to 208Td. The obtained values were compared with those simulated by Imonte software (version 4.5) and the only experimental results available in the literature, recently obtained in our group. This comparison showed that the results are concordant within the experimental errors. (author)

  20. Separation of tritium from gaseous and aqueous effluent systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobisk, E.H.

    1977-01-01

    Removal or reduction of tritium content in a wide variety of effluent streams has been extensively studied in the United States. This paper specifically reviews three processes involving tritium separation in the gaseous phase and the aqueous phase. Diffusion through a selective Pd-25Ag alloy membrane at temperatures up to 600 0 C and at pressures up to 700 kg/cm 2 has resulted in successful separation of hydrogen-deuterium mixtures with an associated separation factor of 1.65 (and gives a calculated separation factor for hydrogen-tritium mixtures of 2.0). Use of a single palladium bipolar membrane in an electrolysis system has been found to yield a hydrogen-deuterium separation factor of 4 and a hydrogen-tritium factor of 6 to 11 without the production of gaseous hydrogen. Finally, countercurrent catalytic exchange between tritium-containing hydrogen gas and water has yielded a separation factor of 6.3. The specific advantages of each of these systems will be discussed in terms of their potential applications. In all cases, further investigations are necessary to scale the systems to handle large quantities of feed material in a continuous mode and to minimize energy requirements. Such separative systems must necessarily be cascaded to yield gaseous or aqueous product streams suitable for recycling to the tritium producing systems, for storage or for discharge to the environment. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-02-12

    A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

  2. Electron beam treatment of organic pollutants contained in gaseous streams. 1. RCM report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) and Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) are emitted in different processes, mostly combustion-based ones applied in power, chemical and metallurgical industries, municipal wastes incineration, etc. Many of them are persistent in environment, so called Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs). They are responsible for ozone layer depletion, ground level and photochemical smog formation, contribute to the greenhouse effect, most of them being carcinogenic or/and mutagenic. Some tests performed in different countries have shown that electron beam technology can be a promising technique in these applications. Good removing efficiency for chlorohydrocarbons, dioxins and PAH was demonstrated in the laboratory scale. Different hybrid techniques like eb/absorption or eb/catalysis were studied as well. However, due to the different product formation, this technique should be studied carefully further concerning process mechanism, analyses of products and possible technical solution applications. The present CRP aiming at development of laboratory and pilot plant methodologies for comparative evaluation of degradation effects of organic pollutants in gaseous phase. Theoretical and experimental investigations of the mechanisms of the processes are part of the research work. Limitation of formation of toxic byproducts, modification of physical and chemical properties, application of hybrid processes (eb/catalytist) are important topics for further development under the CRP. The CRP has been launched with the objectives of developing analytical techniques for better understanding of degradation effects of organic pollutants in gaseous phase and technologies (processing conditions) to control these emissions. It is anticipated that through collaborative and cooperative research efforts of the participants, new analytical methods to study the process and strategies to apply electron beam to address these emissions will be developed. The executive summary

  3. Gaseous emissions from sewage sludge combustion in a moving bed combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistella, Luciane; Silva, Valdemar; Suzin, Renato C; Virmond, Elaine; Althoff, Chrtistine A; Moreira, Regina F P M; José, Humberto J

    2015-12-01

    Substantial increase in sewage sludge generation in recent years requires suitable destination for this residue. This study evaluated the gaseous emissions generated during combustion of an aerobic sewage sludge in a pilot scale moving bed reactor. To utilize the heat generated during combustion, the exhaust gas was applied to the raw sludge drying process. The gaseous emissions were analyzed both after the combustion and drying steps. The results of the sewage sludge characterization showed the energy potential of this residue (LHV equal to 14.5 MJ kg(-1), db) and low concentration of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF). The concentration of CO, NOx, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes) emitted from the sludge combustion process were lower than the legal limits. The overall sludge combustion and drying process showed low emissions of PCDD/PCDF (0.42 ng I-TEQ N m(-3)). BTEX and PAH emissions were not detected. Even with the high nitrogen concentration in the raw feed (5.88% db), the sludge combustion process presented NOx emissions below the legal limit, which results from the combination of appropriate feed rate (A/F ratio), excess air, and mainly the low temperature kept inside the combustion chamber. It was found that the level of CO emissions from the overall sludge process depends on the dryer operating conditions, such as the oxygen content and the drying temperature, which have to be controlled throughout the process in order to achieve low CO levels. The aerobic sewage sludge combustion process generated high SO2 concentration due to the high sulfur content (0.67 wt%, db) and low calcium concentration (22.99 g kg(-1)) found in the sludge. The high concentration of SO2 in the flue gas (4776.77 mg N m(-3)) is the main factor inhibiting PCDD/PCDF formation. Further changes are needed in the pilot plant scheme to reduce SO2 and particulate matter emissions

  4. Unstable Roche-Lobe Overflow of Gaseous Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Brian

    The discoveries of more than 100 roughly Earth-sized bodies with orbital periods less than 1 day, ultra-short-period planets or candidates (USPs), have challenged planet formation theories, and evidence suggests USPs may be the remnants of gaseous planets that shed their atmospheres. Indeed, many hot Jupiters are near Roche-Lobe overflow (RLO), and tidal decay can push them the rest of the way in. Recent work has shown stable RLO (atmospheres lost via a steady outflow and thin accretion disk) probably cannot produce USPs on its own but suggested unstable RLO (atmospheres quickly shed on dynamical timescales) may. In fact, stable RLO may drive overflowing hot Jupiters into unstable RLO, and by analogy with the common-envelope binaries, the core that remains can drive off the gaseous envelope at the cost of its orbital energy. Wellestablished mass-radius relations for gaseous planets, coupled to simple energy and angular momentum considerations, provide a connection between the observed masses and periods for USPs and their putative progenitor gaseous planets, with few free parameters. We propose to investigate the hypothesis that USPs originate through tidal decay and a combination of stable and unstable Roche-lobe overflow of short-period gaseous planets through the following studies: -We will explore the planetary masses, orbital periods, etc. that produce unstable RLO using the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) suite. -We will relate the observed periods and masses of USPs to their putative progenitor masses and periods to see whether they are consistent with the unstable RLO hypothesis. This proposal is directly relevant to the Exoplanets Research Program since it seeks to "understand the ... physical processes of exoplanets" and "improve understanding of [their] origins" through "theoretical studies ... and modeling'". We also expect that it will have broad impacts on a variety of astrophysical topics: -Ultra-short period planets could

  5. Emission factors of gaseous pollutants from recent kerosene space heaters and fuels available in France in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carteret, M; Pauwels, J-F; Hanoune, B

    2012-08-01

    Laboratory measurements of the gaseous emission factors (EF) from two recent kerosene space heaters (wick and injector) with five different fuels have been conducted in an 8-m(3) environmental chamber. The two heaters tested were found to emit mainly CO(2), CO, NO, NO(2), and some volatile organic compounds (VOCs). NO(2) is continuously emitted during use, with an EF of 100-450 μg per g of consumed fuel. CO is normally emitted mainly during the first minutes of use (up to 3 mg/g). Formaldehyde and benzene EFs were quantified at 15 and 16 μg/g, respectively, for the wick heater. Some other VOCs, such as 1,3-butadiene, were detected with lower EFs. We demonstrated the unsuitability of a 'biofuel' containing fatty acid methyl esters for use with the wick heater, and that the accumulation of soot on the same heater, whatever the fuel, leads to a dramatic increase in the CO EF, up to 16 mg/g, which could be responsible for chronic and acute CO intoxications. Our results show that in spite of new technologies and emission standards for unvented kerosene space heaters, as well as for the fuels, the use of these heaters in indoor environments still leads to NO(x) levels in excess of current health recommendations. Whereas injection heaters generate more nitrogen oxides than wick heaters, prolonged use of the latter leads to a soot buildup, concomitant with high CO emissions, which could be responsible for acute and chronic intoxications. The use of a biofuel in a wick heater is also of concern. Maintenance of the heaters and adequate ventilation of the room during use of kerosene space heaters are therefore of prime importance to reduce personal exposure. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Evaluation of light-emitting diodes as attractant for sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) in northeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Francinaldo Soares; Brito, Jefferson Mesquita; Costa, Benedita Maria; Lobo, Shelre Emile Pereira Duarte

    2015-01-01

    Hoover Pugedo light traps were modified for use with green and blue-light-emitting diodes to trap phlebotomine sandflies in northeastern Brazil. A total of 2,267 specimens belonging to eight genera and 15 species were sampled. The predominant species were Nyssomyia whitmani(34.41%) and Micropygomyia echinatopharynx(17.25%).The green LED trap prevailed over the blue and control lights; however, no statistically significant difference could be detected among the three light sources. Even withou...

  7. The exchange reaction between hydrogen and deuterium. II - Proposal for an heterogeneous initiation mechanism of gaseous phase reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marteau, Chantal; Gaillard-Cusin, Francoise; James, Henri

    1978-01-01

    Investigation of experimental data related to evolution period exhibited by H 2 -D 2 exchange process requires to take into account the variation against time of every atomic species -adsorbed or not- implied in the reaction mechanism. The formation of first chain carriers involves: - chemisorption of either gaseous reactant on the surface active centres (Σ), e.g.: Σ + 1/2 H 2 reversible ΣH; - consecutive generation of atomic species through hetero-homogeneous transfer between chemisorbed species (ΣH) and gaseous molecules: ΣH+H 2 →Σ+H 2 +H 0 , ΣH+D 2 →Σ+HD+D 0 . Therefore, it can be shown that the heterogeneous initiation process of a gas phase reaction identifies to a chain linear mechanism. Such an heterogeneous sequence conditions the further proceeding of the homogeneous chain reaction; both evolutions being kinematically connected. Rate constant of hydrogen adsorption on silica glass: ksub(a1) approximately 10 14 exp(-47/RT)Isup(0,5).molesup(-0,5).S -1 has been evaluated [fr

  8. Light-Emitting Diodes: A Hidden Treasure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planinšic, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    LEDs, or light-emitting diodes, are cheap, easy to purchase, and thus commonly used in physics instruction as indicators of electric current or as sources of light (Fig. 1). In our opinion LEDs represent a unique piece of equipment that can be used to collect experimental evidence, and construct and test new ideas in almost every unit of a general…

  9. Light-Emitting Diodes: Learning New Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planinšic, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    This is the third paper in our Light-Emitting Diodes series. The series aims to create a systematic library of LED-based materials and to provide the readers with the description of experiments and pedagogical treatment that would help their students construct, test, and apply physics concepts and mathematical relations. The first paper, published…

  10. Fluorescence lifetime imaging using light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Gordon T; Munro, Ian; Poher, Vincent; French, Paul M W; Neil, Mark A A; Elson, Daniel S; Hares, Jonathan D

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate flexible use of low cost, high-power light emitting diodes as illumination sources for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Both time-domain and frequency-domain techniques have been implemented at wavelengths spanning the range 450-640 nm. Additionally, we demonstrate optically sectioned fluorescence lifetime imaging by combining structured illumination with frequency-domain FLIM

  11. Single side Emitting Transparent OLED lamp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lifka, H.; Verschuren, C.A.; Bruls, D.M.; Tanase, C.

    2011-01-01

    Transparent OLEDs offer great potential for novel applications. Preferably, the light should be emitted from one side only. This can bedone to some extent by modifying electrode thicknesses, but at the cost of reduced transparency. Here, we demonstrate a new approach tomake single side emissive

  12. Fragranced consumer products: Chemicals emitted, ingredients unlisted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinemann, Anne C.; MacGregor, Ian C.; Gordon, Sydney M.; Gallagher, Lisa G.; Davis, Amy L.; Ribeiro, Daniel S.; Wallace, Lance A.

    2011-01-01

    Fragranced consumer products are pervasive in society. Relatively little is known about the composition of these products, due to lack of prior study, complexity of formulations, and limitations and protections on ingredient disclosure in the U.S. We investigated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from 25 common fragranced consumer products-laundry products, personal care products, cleaning supplies, and air fresheners-using headspace analysis with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Our analysis found 133 different VOCs emitted from the 25 products, with an average of 17 VOCs per product. Of these 133 VOCs, 24 are classified as toxic or hazardous under U.S. federal laws, and each product emitted at least one of these compounds. For 'green' products, emissions of these compounds were not significantly different from the other products. Of all VOCs identified across the products, only 1 was listed on any product label, and only 2 were listed on any material safety data sheet (MSDS). While virtually none of the chemicals identified were listed, this nonetheless accords with U.S. regulations, which do not require disclosure of all ingredients in a consumer product, or of any ingredients in a mixture called 'fragrance.' Because the analysis focused on compounds emitted and listed, rather than exposures and effects, it makes no claims regarding possible risks from product use. Results of this study contribute to understanding emissions from common products, and their links with labeling and legislation.

  13. Floral scent emitted by white and coloured morphs in orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormont, L; Delle-Vedove, R; Bessière, J-M; Schatz, B

    2014-04-01

    Polymorphism of floral signals, such as colour and odour, is widespread in flowering plants and often considered to be adaptive, reflecting various pollinator preferences for particular floral traits. Several authors have recently hypothesized that particular associations exist between floral colour and scent, which would result from shared biochemistry between these two floral traits. In this study, we compared the chemical composition of floral volatiles emitted by white- and purple-flowered morphs of three different orchid species, including two food-deceptive species (Orchis mascula and Orchis simia) and a food-rewarding species (Anacamptis coriophora fragrans). We found clear interspecific differences in floral odours. As expected from their pollination strategy, the two deceptive orchids showed high inter-individual variation of floral volatiles, whereas the food-rewarding A. c. fragrans showed low variation of floral scent. Floral volatiles did not differ overall between white- and coloured-flowered morphs in O. mascula and A. c. fragrans, while O. simia exhibited different volatile profiles between the two colour morphs. However, a detailed analysis restricted to benzenoid compounds (which are associated with the production of floral anthocyanin pigments) showed that white inflorescences emitted more volatiles of the shikimic pathway than coloured ones, both for O. mascula and O. simia. These results are consistent with the current hypothesis that shared biochemistry creates pleiotropic links between floral colour and scent. Whether intraspecific variation of floral signals actually affects pollinator attraction and influences the reproductive success of these orchids remains to be determined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of low-dose gaseous ozone on pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontes Belchor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of chronically infected wounds is a challenge, and bacterial environmental contamination is a growing issue in infection control. Ozone may have a role in these situations. The objective of this study was to determine whether a low dose of gaseous ozone/oxygen mixture eliminates pathogenic bacteria cultivated in Petri dishes. Methods A pilot study with 6 bacterial strains was made using different concentrations of ozone in an ozone-oxygen mixture to determine a minimally effective dose that completely eliminated bacterial growth. The small and apparently bactericidal gaseous dose of 20 μg/mL ozone/oxygen (1:99 mixture, applied for 5min under atmospheric pressure was selected. In the 2nd phase, eight bacterial strains with well characterized resistance patterns were evaluated in vitro using agar-blood in adapted Petri dishes (105 bacteria/dish. The cultures were divided into 3 groups: 1- ozone-oxygen gaseous mixture containing 20 μg of O3/mL for 5 min; 2- 100% oxygen for 5 min; 3- baseline: no gas was used. Results The selected ozone dose was applied to the following eight strains: Escherichia coli, oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, oxacillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter baumannii susceptible only to carbapenems, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa susceptible to imipenem and meropenem. All isolates were completely inhibited by the ozone-oxygen mixture while growth occurred in the other 2 groups. Conclusion A single topical application by nebulization of a low ozone dose completely inhibited the growth of all potentially pathogenic bacterial strains with known resistance to antimicrobial agents.

  15. CO2 laser photoacoustic detection of ammonia emitted by ceramic industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sthel, M S; Schramm, D U; Lima, G R; Carneiro, L; Faria, R T; Castro, M P P; Alexandre, J; Toledo, R; Silva, M G; Vargas, H

    2011-01-01

    A homemade photoacoustic spectrometer has been constructed for monitoring gas emission from several sources. Numerous air pollutant gases are emitted exhaust of industries, vehicles and power plants. The photoacoustic technique is extremely sensitive and selective in detecting various gases. This work focuses on the gas emitted by the ceramic industry in northern Rio de Janeiro State in Brazil, the ceramic industry plays a remarkable role in the economy activity of this region, in recent years, this region developed into a significant red ceramic complex. The potential impact on the atmospheric environment of the region due to gaseous pollutant emissions from these anthropogenic sources needs to be evaluated. In this work we identified NH3 present in the samples collected in the kiln of a ceramic plant, in the concentration range of 33-52 ppmV. The ammonia gas present in our collected samples might come from the excess nitrogen in the manure soil from where the ceramic material was extracted. This soil was used for the sugarcane culture which is another important economic activity of this region. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. CO 2 laser photoacoustic detection of ammonia emitted by ceramic industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sthel, M. S.; Schramm, D. U.; Lima, G. R.; Carneiro, L.; Faria, R. T., Jr.; Castro, M. P. P.; Alexandre, J.; Toledo, R.; Silva, M. G.; Vargas, H.

    2011-01-01

    A homemade photoacoustic spectrometer has been constructed for monitoring gas emission from several sources. Numerous air pollutant gases are emitted exhaust of industries, vehicles and power plants. The photoacoustic technique is extremely sensitive and selective in detecting various gases. This work focuses on the gas emitted by the ceramic industry in northern Rio de Janeiro State in Brazil, the ceramic industry plays a remarkable role in the economy activity of this region, in recent years, this region developed into a significant red ceramic complex. The potential impact on the atmospheric environment of the region due to gaseous pollutant emissions from these anthropogenic sources needs to be evaluated. In this work we identified NH 3 present in the samples collected in the kiln of a ceramic plant, in the concentration range of 33-52 ppmV. The ammonia gas present in our collected samples might come from the excess nitrogen in the manure soil from where the ceramic material was extracted. This soil was used for the sugarcane culture which is another important economic activity of this region.

  17. Characterization of laser-tissue interaction processes by low-boiling emitted substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigmann, Hans-Juergen; Lademann, Juergen; Serfling, Ulrike; Lehnert, W.; Sterry, Wolfram; Meffert, H.

    1996-01-01

    Main point in this study was the investigation of the gaseous and low-boiling substances produced in the laser plume during cw CO2 laser and XeCl laser irradiation of tissue by gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry. The characteristic emitted amounts of chemicals were determined quantitatively using porcine muscular tissue. The produced components were used to determine the character of the chemical reaction conditions inside the interaction zone. It was found that the temperature, and the water content of the tissue are the main parameter determining kind and amount of the emitted substances. The relative intensity of the GC peak of benzene corresponds to a high temperature inside the interaction area while a relative strong methylbutanal peak is connected with a lower temperature which favors Maillard type reaction products. The water content of the tissue determines the extent of oxidation processes during laser tissue interaction. For that reason the moisture in the tissue is the most important parameter to reduce the emission of harmful chemicals in the laser plume. The same methods of investigation are applicable to characterize the interaction of a controlled and an uncontrolled rf electrosurgery device with tissue. The results obtained with model tissue are in agreement with the situation characteristic in laser surgery.

  18. Dry deposition of gaseous radioiodine and particulate radiocaesium onto leafy vegetables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschiersch, Jochen, E-mail: tschiersch@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstaedter Landstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Shinonaga, Taeko [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstaedter Landstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Heuberger, Heidi [TU Muenchen, Center of Life and Food Sciences Weihenstephan, Duernast 2, 85350 Freising (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    Radionuclides released to the atmosphere during dry weather (e.g. after a nuclear accident) may contaminate vegetable foods and cause exposure to humans via the food chain. To obtain experimental data for an appropriate assessment of this exposure path, dry deposition of radionuclides to leafy vegetables was studied under homogeneous and controlled greenhouse conditions. Gaseous {sup 131}I-tracer in predominant elemental form and particulate {sup 134}Cs-tracer at about 1 {mu}m diameter were used to identify susceptible vegetable species with regard to contamination by these radionuclides. The persistence was examined by washing the harvested product with water. The vegetables tested were spinach (Spinacia oleracea), butterhead lettuce (Lactuca sativa var. capitata), endive (Cichorium endivia), leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa var. crispa), curly kale (Brassica oleracea convar. acephala) and white cabbage (Brassica oleracea convar. capitata). The variation of radionuclides deposited onto each vegetable was evaluated statistically using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis Test and the U-test of Mann-Whitney. Significant differences in deposited {sup 131}I and {sup 134}Cs activity concentration were found among the vegetable species. For {sup 131}I, the deposition velocity to spinach normalized to the biomass of the vegetation was 0.5-0.9 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1} s{sup -1} which was the highest among all species. The particulate {sup 134}Cs deposition velocity of 0.09 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1} s{sup -1} was the highest for curly kale, which has rough and structured leaves. The lowest deposition velocity was onto white cabbage: 0.02 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1} s{sup -1} (iodine) and 0.003 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1} s{sup -1} (caesium). For all species, the gaseous iodine deposition was significantly higher compared to the particulate caesium deposition. The deposition depends on the sensitive parameters leaf area, stomatal aperture, and plant morphology. Decontamination by washing with water was very

  19. Study on Surface Modification of Indium Tin Oxide and Resist Surfaces Using CF4/O2 Plasma for Manufacturing Organic Light-Emitting Diodes by Inkjet Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikagawa, Masakuni; Tohno, Ichiro; Shinmura, Tadashi; Takagi, Shigeyuki; Kataoka, Yoshinori; Fujihira, Masamichi

    2008-12-01

    We studied a surface modification technique for indium tin oxide (ITO) anodes without precleaning and resist banks for manufacturing organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by inkjet printing. The ITO surface modified by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with an optimized CF4/O2 (7:3) gas mixture improved both its hydrophilicity and its work function, while the resist surface treated by the plasma became hydrophobic. The resist and ITO surfaces treated by plasmas of various gas mixtures (i.e., CF4, CF4/Ar (1:2), CF4/O2 (x:1; x=1, 7/3, 4, and 9) were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the C 1s, F 1s, O 1s, and In 3d5/2 core levels. On the uncleaned ITO surfaces modified by CF4/O2 plasmas, organic contaminants were removed more efficiently and the deposition of CFx on the remaining contaminants decreased with increasing oxygen. The amount of F in the form of InFx increased using the CF4/O2 (7:3) plasma in comparison with that using the CF4/Ar and CF4 plasmas. We investigated the effect of adding oxygen to CF4 on the change in gaseous species produced in the plasma chamber by mass spectrometry. In the CF4/O2 (7:3) plasma, the peak intensities of F+, HF+, F2+, O+, and O2+ were higher than those in the CF4 plasma. The results suggest that In2O3 was generated by the oxidation of indium with O, and InFx was generated by the fluoridation of indium with HF. By introducing InFx onto ITO surfaces using the CF4/O2 plasma, the hole-injection energy barrier could be reduced.

  20. Spectrophotometric determination of volautile inorganic hydrides in binary gaseous mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezchikov, V.G.; Skachkova, I.N.; Kuznetsova, T.S.; Khrushcheva, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made on possibility of single and continuons analysis of binary mixtures (hydride-gas) for the content of volatile inorganic hydrides (VIH) from absorption spectra in the 185-280 nm band. Dependences of the percentage of VIH transmission on the wavelength are presented. It is shown that the maximum of their absorption depends on the element-hydrogen the bond length and binding energy. Detection limit for boron hydride was established to be n x 10 -3 % vol at 185-190 nm wavelength. Technique for spectrophotometric hydride determination in binary mixtures with hydrogen, argon, helium was developed. The technique provides the continuous control of gaseous mixture composition

  1. Buildup of 236U in the gaseous diffusion plant product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, J.S.

    1975-01-01

    A generalized projection of the average annual 236 U concentration that can be expected in future enriched uranium product from the US-ERDA gaseous diffusion plants when reprocessed fuels become available for cascade feeding is given. It is concluded that the buildup of 236 U is not an ever-increasing function, but approaches a limiting value. Projected concentrations result in only slight separative work losses and present no operational problem to ERDA in supplying light water reactor requirements. The use of recycle uranium from power reactor spent fuels will result in significant savings in natural uranium feed

  2. Ionization and scintillation of nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renner, J., E-mail: jrenner@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gehman, V.M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H.S.; Miller, T.; Nakajima, Y.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C.A.B.; Shuman, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Álvarez, V. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC & Universitat de València, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Borges, F.I.G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, Rua Larga, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Cárcel, S. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC & Universitat de València, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Castel, J.; Cebrián, S. [Laboratorio de Física Nuclear y Astropartículas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Calle Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Cervera, A. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC & Universitat de València, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Conde, C.A.N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, Rua Larga, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); and others

    2015-09-01

    Ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon at approximately 14 bar have been simultaneously observed in an electroluminescent time projection chamber. Neutrons from radioisotope α-Be neutron sources were used to induce xenon nuclear recoils, and the observed recoil spectra were compared to a detailed Monte Carlo employing estimated ionization and scintillation yields for nuclear recoils. The ability to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils using the ratio of ionization to primary scintillation is demonstrated. These results encourage further investigation on the use of xenon in the gas phase as a detector medium in dark matter direct detection experiments.

  3. Reliability study: maintenance facilities Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, B.E.; Sikorski, P.A.; Fankell, R.; Johnson, O.; Ferryman, D.S.; Miller, R.L.; Gearhart, E.C.; Rafferty, M.J.

    1981-08-01

    A reliability study of the maintenance facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant has been completed. The reliability study team analyzed test data and made visual inspections of each component contributing to the overall operation of the facilities. The impacts of facilities and equipment failures were given consideration with regard to personnel safety, protection of government property, health physics, and environmental control. This study revealed that the maintenance facilities are generally in good condition. After evaluating the physical condition and technology status of the major components, the study team made several basic recommendations. Implementation of the recommendations proposed in this report will help assure reliable maintenance of the plant through the year 2000

  4. Evaluation of seismic hazard at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toro, G.R.; McGuire, R.K.

    1991-01-01

    Seismic hazard at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant is evaluated using a formulation that considers the rupture dimensions of potential large earthquakes in the New Madrid region. The New Madrid source zone is modeled as a system of parallel faults. A characteristic-magnitude model, based on historical seismic city and paleoseismic studies, describes seismicity in the New madrid source zone. The attenuation functions reflect distance saturation caused by the rupture size of large earthquakes. Preliminary results from this seismic hazard analysis are presented and compared to results obtained using the EPRI and LLNL methodologies

  5. Fundamental laws of separation by the gaseous diffusion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouligand, G.M.

    1964-01-01

    Using the Knudsen's law for the flow of each component of a gaseous mixture through a porous membrane, we derive the overall separation laws and the separation power for one stage of diffusion: Various types of stages differing by the geometrical configuration and the flow nature are considered. For the sake of simplicity physical phenomena causing a loss of separation efficiency are neglected. Computation show the advantages of counter-current type stage with one entering and two leaving flows. A more refined theory of separation can be derived with the same basis of this work. (author) [fr

  6. Isotropic collision-induced light scattering by gaseous CF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliasmine, A.; Godet, J.L.; Le Duff, Y.; Bancewicz, T.

    1997-01-01

    The binary isotropic collision-induced scattering spectra of the gaseous tetrafluoromethane has been measured in absolute units in the 50 - 150cm -1 frequency range. Corresponding theoretical intensities taking into account multipolar polarizabilities have been calculated in a semiclassical way. From a comparison with experiment, the independent components of dipole-quadrupole and dipole-octupole polarizability tensors have been estimated. They have been compared with those previously deduced from depolarized spectrum and with recent theoretical ab initio calculations. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  7. Anomalous Abundances in Gaseous Nebulae From Recombination and Collisional Lines: Improved Photoionization and Recombination Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Anil Kumar; Nahar, S. N.; Eissner, W. B.; Montenegro, M.

    2011-01-01

    A perplexing anomaly arises in the determination of abundances of common elements in gaseous nebulae, as derived from collisionally excited lines (CEL) as opposed to those from Recombination Lines (RCL). The "abundance discrepancy factors" can range from a factor of 2 to an order of magnitude or more. That has led to quite different interpretation of the physical structure and processes in gaseous nebulae, such as temperature fluctuations across the object, or metal-rich concentrations leading to a dual-abundnace scenario. We show that the problem may lie in inaccuracies in photoionization and recombination models neglecting low-energy resonance phenomena due to fine structure. Whereas the atomic physics of electron impact excitation of forbidden lines is well understood, and accurate collision strengths have long been available, that is not generally the case for electron-ion recombination cross sections. A major problem is the inclusion of relativisitic effects as it pertains to the existence of very low-energy fine structure resonances in photoionization cross sections. We carry out new relativistic calculations for photoionization and recombination cross sections using a recently extended version of the Breit-Pauli R-matrix codes, and the unified electron-ion recombination method that subsumes both the radiative and the dielectronic recombination (RR and DR) processes in an ab initio and self-consistent manner. We find that near-thresold resonances manifest themselves within fine structure levels of the ground state of ions, enhancing low-temperature recombination rate coefficients at 1000-10,000 K. The resulting enahncement in level-specific and total recombination rate coefficients should therefore lead to reduced abundances derived from RCL, and in accordance with those from CEL. We present results for photoionization of O II into, and recombination from, O III. Theoretical cross sections are benchmarked against high-resolution measurements from synchrotron

  8. Stomatal Frequency and Atmospheric CO2: a Model Based on Photosynthesis and Gaseous Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth-Nebelsick, A.; Konrad, W.

    2004-12-01

    Gaseous exchange in land plants occurs via micropores on the plant surface, the stomata. The stomatal frequency (SF) of leaves has attracted considerable interest with respect to increasing atmospheric CO2 since Woodward (1987) demonstrated that this parameter changes inversely with CO2 in various species. The response is due to 1) individual phenotypic plasticity and 2) evolutionary change, depending on the considered time scale. The SF-CO2 response is regarded to represent a valuable device for determining past atmospheric CO2 concentration and SF data from fossil plant material are therefore often used as CO2 proxies. There are, however, numerous difficulties which have to be considered, such as: 1) high variance of the data, especially for fossil material, 2) interspecific differences of the response, 3) the CO2 ceiling (= weak or no response under CO2 concentration higher than ambient) and 4) differences between short-term and long-term responses. Although processes related to plant gaseous exchange are assumed to represent the causal basis for the response, no clear explanatory model has yet been proposed and even doubts have emerged about the real existence of this phenomenon. In this contribution it is shown that results obtained with a model based on diffusion and assimilation suggest that the SF-CO2 response is a structural adjustment of maximum stomatal conductance. The results 1) offer a clear explanation for the often observed weak response of stomatal frequency to CO2 levels higher than ambient, 2) provide a simple equation for calculating ancient CO2 levels from stomatal data, and 3) can contribute to predictions concerning plant reactions to elevated CO2 levels in the future.

  9. Lung Cancer Mortality among Uranium Gaseous Diffusion Plant Workers: A Cohort Study 1952–2004

    OpenAIRE

    LW Figgs

    2013-01-01

    Background: 9%–15% of all lung cancers are attributable to occupational exposures. Reports are disparate regarding elevated lung cancer mortality risk among workers employed at uranium gaseous diffusion plants. Objective: To investigate whether external radiation exposure is associated with lung cancer mortality risk among uranium gaseous diffusion workers. Methods: A cohort of 6820 nuclear industry workers employed from 1952 to 2003 at the Paducah uranium gaseous diffusion plant (PGD...

  10. Low energy consumption method for separating gaseous mixtures and in particular for medium purity oxygen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jujasz, Albert J.; Burkhart, James A.; Greenberg, Ralph

    1988-01-01

    A method for the separation of gaseous mixtures such as air and for producing medium purity oxygen, comprising compressing the gaseous mixture in a first compressor to about 3.9-4.1 atmospheres pressure, passing said compressed gaseous mixture in heat exchange relationship with sub-ambient temperature gaseous nitrogen, dividing the cooled, pressurized gaseous mixture into first and second streams, introducing the first stream into the high pressure chamber of a double rectification column, separating the gaseous mixture in the rectification column into a liquid oxygen-enriched stream and a gaseous nitrogen stream and supplying the gaseous nitrogen stream for cooling the compressed gaseous mixture, removing the liquid oxygen-enriched stream from the low pressure chamber of the rectification column and pumping the liquid, oxygen-enriched steam to a predetermined pressure, cooling the second stream, condensing the cooled second stream and evaporating the oxygen-enriched stream in an evaporator-condenser, delivering the condensed second stream to the high pressure chamber of the rectification column, and heating the oxygen-enriched stream and blending the oxygen-enriched stream with a compressed blend-air stream to the desired oxygen concentration.

  11. Review of microfluidic cell culture devices for the control of gaseous microenvironments in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H.-M.; Lee, T.-A.; Ko, P.-L.; Chiang, H.-J.; Peng, C.-C.; Tung, Y.-C.

    2018-04-01

    Gaseous microenvironments play important roles in various biological activities in vivo. However, it is challenging to precisely control gaseous microenvironments in vitro for cell culture due to the high diffusivity nature of gases. In recent years, microfluidics has paved the way for the development of new types of cell culture devices capable of manipulating cellular microenvironments, and provides a powerful tool for in vitro cell studies. This paper reviews recent developments of microfluidic cell culture devices for the control of gaseous microenvironments, and discusses the advantages and limitations of current devices. We conclude with suggestions for the future development of microfluidic cell culture devices for the control of gaseous microenvironments.

  12. The use of gaseous fuels mixtures for SI engines propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flekiewicz, M.; Kubica, G.

    2016-09-01

    Paper presents results of SI engine tests, carried on for different gaseous fuels. Carried out analysis made it possible to define correlation between fuel composition and engine operating parameters. Tests covered various gaseous mixtures: of methane and hydrogen and LPG with DME featuring different shares. The first group, considered as low carbon content fuels can be characterized by low CO2 emissions. Flammability of hydrogen added in those mixtures realizes the function of combustion process activator. That is why hydrogen addition improves the energy conversion by about 3%. The second group of fuels is constituted by LPG and DME mixtures. DME mixes perfectly with LPG, and differently than in case of other hydrocarbon fuels consists also of oxygen makes the stoichiometric mixture less oxygen demanding. In case of this fuel an improvement in engine volumetric and overall engine efficiency has been noticed, when compared to LPG. For the 11% DME share in the mixture an improvement of 2% in the efficiency has been noticed. During the tests standard CNG/LPG feeding systems have been used, what underlines utility value of the research. The stand tests results have been followed by combustion process simulation including exhaust forming and charge exchange.

  13. Gaskinetic Modeling on Dilute Gaseous Plume Impingement Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunpei Cai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper briefly reviews recent work on gaseous plume impingement flows. As the major part of this paper, also included are new comprehensive studies on high-speed, collisionless, gaseous, circular jet impinging on a three-dimensional, inclined, diffuse or specular flat plate. Gaskinetic theories are adopted to study the problems, and several crucial geometry-location and velocity-direction relations are used. The final complete results include impingement surface properties such as pressure, shear stress, and heat flux. From these surface properties, averaged coefficients of pressure, friction, heat flux, moment over the entire flat plate, and the distance from the moment center to the flat plate center are obtained. The final results include accurate integrations involving the geometry and specific speed ratios, inclination angle, and the temperature ratio. Several numerical simulations with the direct simulation Monte Carlo method validate these analytical results, and the results are essentially identical. The gaskinetic method and processes are heuristic and can be used to investigate other external high Knudsen (Kn number impingement flow problems, including the flow field and surface properties for a high Knudsen number jet from an exit and flat plate of arbitrary shapes. The results are expected to find many engineering applications, especially in aerospace and space engineering.

  14. Trapping technology for gaseous fission products from voloxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jin Myeong; Park, J. J.; Park, G. I.; Jung, I. H.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, G. H.; Yang, M. S.

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this report is to review the different technologies for trapping the gaseous wastes containing Cs, Ru, Tc, 14 C, Kr, Xe, I and 3 H from a voloxidation process. Based on literature reviews and KAERI's experimental results on the gaseous fission products trapping, appropriate trapping method for each fission product has been selected considering process reliability, simplicity, decontamination factor, availability, and disposal. Specifically, the most promising trapping method for each fission product has been proposed for the development of the INL off-gas trapping system. A fly ash filter is proposed as a trapping media for a cesium trapping unit. In addition, a calcium filter is proposed as a trapping media for ruthenium, technetium, and 14 C trapping unit. In case of I trapping unit, AgX is proposed. For Kr and Xe, adsorption on solid is proposed. SDBC (Styrene Divinyl Benzene Copolymer) is also proposed as a conversion media to HTO for 3 H. This report will be used as a useful means for analyzing the known trapping technologies and help selecting the appropriate trapping methods for trapping volatile and semi-volatile fission products, long-lived fission products, and major heat sources generated from a voloxidation process. It can also be used to design an off-gas treatment system

  15. Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility: Overview of STF capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility (STF) constructed at the Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site is a basic research tool for studying the dynamics of accidental releases of various hazardous liquids. This Facility is designed to (1) discharge, at a controlled rate, a measured volume of hazardous test liquid on a prepared surface of a dry lake bed (Frenchman Lake); (2) monitor and record process operating data, close-in and downwind meteorological data, and downwind gaseous concentration levels; and (3) provide a means to control and monitor these functions from a remote location. The STF will accommodate large and small-scale testing of hazardous test fluid release rates up to 28,000 gallons per minute. Spill volumes up to 52,800 gallons are achievable. Generic categories of fluids that can be tested are cryogenics, isothermals, aerosol-forming materials, and chemically reactive. The phenomena that can be studied include source definition, dispersion, and pool fire/vapor burning. Other capabilities available at the STF include large-scale wind tunnel testing, a small test cell for exposing personnel protective clothing, and an area for developing mitigation techniques

  16. Research on solubility characteristics of gaseous methyl iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yanmin; Sun Zhongning; Gu Haifeng; Wang Junlong

    2014-01-01

    With the deionized water as the absorbent, the solubility characteristics of the gaseous methyl iodide were studied under different temperature and pressure conditions, using a dynamic measuring method. The results show that within the range of experiment parameters, namely temperature is below 80℃ and pressure is lower than 0.3 MPa, the physical dissolution process of gaseous methyl iodide in water obeys Henry's law. The solubility coefficient under different temperature and pressure conditions was calculated based on the measurement results. Further research indicates that at atmospheric pressure, the solubility coefficient of methyl iodide in water decreases exponentially with the increase of temperature. While the pressure changes from 0.1 MPa to 0.3 MPa with equal interval, the solubility coefficient also increases linearly. The variation of the solubility coefficient with temperature under different pressure conditions all decreases exponentially. An equation is given to calculate the solubility coefficient of methyl iodide under different pressure and temperature conditions. (authors)

  17. Starlight excitation of permitted lines in gaseous nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandi, S.A.

    1975-01-01

    The weak heavy element permitted lines observed in the spectra of gaseous nebula have, with only a few exceptions, been thought to be excited only by recombination. The accuracy of this assumption for individual lines in nebula spectra is investigated in detail via model nebula calculations. First, approximations and techniques of calculation are considered for the three possible excitation mechanisms: recombination, resonance fluorescence by the starlight continuum, and resonance fluorescence by other nebular emission lines. Next, the permitted lines of O I as observed in gaseous nebulae are discussed. Thirdly, it is shown that varying combinations of recombination, resonance fluorescence by starlight, and resonance fluorescence by other nebula lines can successfully account for the observed strengths in the Orion Nebula of lines of the following ions: C II, N I, N II, N III, O II, Ne II, Si II, Si III, and S III. A similar analysis is performed for the lines in the spectra of the planetary nebulae NGC7662 and NGC7027, and, with some exceptions, satisfactory agreement between the observed and predicted line strengths is found. Finally, observations of the far red spectra of the Orion Nebula, the planetary nebulae NGC3242, NGC6210, NGC2392, IC3568, IC4997, NGC7027, and MGC7662, and the reflection nebulae IC431 and NGC2068 are reported

  18. Solid-state photoelectrochemical H2 generation with gaseous reactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwu, Kingsley O.; Galeckas, Augustinas; Kuznetsov, Andrej Yu.; Norby, Truls

    2013-01-01

    Photocurrent and H 2 production were demonstrated in an all solid-state photoelectrochemical cell employing gaseous methanol and water vapour at the photoanode. Open circuit photovoltage of around −0.4 V and short circuit photocurrent of up to 250 μA/cm 2 were obtained. At positive bias, photocurrent generation was limited by the irradiance, i.e., the amount of photogenerated charge carriers at the anode. Time constants and impedance spectra showed an electrochemical capacitance of the cell of about 15 μF/cm 2 in the dark, which increased with increasing irradiance. With only water vapour at the anode, the short circuit photocurrent was about 6% of the value with gaseous methanol and water vapour. The photoanode and electrocatalyst on carbon paper support were affixed to the proton conducting membrane using Nafion ® as adhesive, an approach that yielded photocurrents up to 15 times better than that of a cell assembled by hot-pressing, in spite of the overall cell resistance of the latter being up to five times less than that of the former. This is attributed, at least partially, to reactants being more readily available at the photoanode of the better performing cell

  19. Theoretical investigation of chemical and physical properties of gaseous fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, Fredrik

    1999-12-01

    This thesis is discussing the chemical and physical properties of different gaseous fuels. A mapping of about seventy gaseous fuels resulted in eleven type gases, these gases have mainly five components (inerts, H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4} and higher order of hydrocarbons) of different quantities. Calculations of heating value and Wobbe number have been done. Dew point temperatures have been estimated by using three different programs. Flammability limits, laminar flame speed and auto ignition temperatures have been calculated by using a kinetic and chemical program developed by Mauss. Flammability limits have been compared with Le Chatelier's law and measurements. Problems related to combustion such as flash back, lift off and instability are closely connected with flame speed and flow patterns. These problems are discussed in terms of laminar flame speed and Reynolds' number. The main results of this study were: Auto ignition temperature for gas mixtures behavior is very complex and unpredictable. In general small quantities of hydrogen decrease the temperature of auto ignition. The calculations of flammability limits by the kinetic and chemical software showed good agreement to measurements. Low Btu gases requires large flow area in order to avoid large pressure drop.

  20. Gridless, very low energy, high-current, gaseous ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizir, A V; Shandrikov, M V; Yushkov, G Yu; Oks, E M

    2010-02-01

    We have made and tested a very low energy gaseous ion source in which the plasma is established by a gaseous discharge with electron injection in an axially diverging magnetic field. A constricted arc with hidden cathode spot is used as the electron emitter (first stage of the discharge). The electron flux so formed is filtered by a judiciously shaped electrode to remove macroparticles (cathode debris from the cathode spot) from the cathode material as well as atoms and ions. The anode of the emitter discharge is a mesh, which also serves as cathode of the second stage of the discharge, providing a high electron current that is injected into the magnetic field region where the operating gas is efficiently ionized. In this discharge configuration, an electric field is formed in the ion generation region, accelerating gas ions to energy of several eV in a direction away from the source, without the use of a gridded acceleration system. Our measurements indicate that an argon ion beam is formed with an energy of several eV and current up to 2.5 A. The discharge voltage is kept at less than 20 V, to keep below ion sputtering threshold for cathode material, a feature which along with filtering of the injected electron flow, results in extremely low contamination of the generated ion flow.

  1. Control of technetium at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraceno, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    Technetium-99 entered the gaseous diffusion complex as a volatile impurity in recycled uranium that was fed to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Subsequently, it entered the Oak Ridge and Portsmouth cascades as an impurity in Paducah product feed. Most of the technetium was adsorbed on cascade equipment in increasingly high concentrations as it moved up the cascade. Since the low energy beta radiation produced by technetium cannot penetrate cascade equipment, it presents no significant hazard to workers as long as it remains inside of equipment. However, when equipment that contains high concentrations of technetium is opened for maintenance or change-out, precautions are taken to ensure worker safety. Traps containing activated alumina are used at the plant vent streams to limit radioactive emissions as far as possible. Annual vent stream emissions have been well below DOE limits. To allow continued compliance, other potential trapping agents have been tested. Several that limit emissions more effectively than activated alumina have been found. Other traps containing magnesium fluoride are used in the upper cascade to reduce the technetium concentration. Waste solutions from decontamination can also contain technetium. These solutions must either be stored for controlled discharge or treated to remove the technetium. To allow the latter, an ion exchange facility is being installed for operation by the end of FY-1982. Liquid discharges at Portsmouth have usually been less than 5% of the DOE imposed limits

  2. DISCOVERY OF AN H{alpha} EMITTING DISK AROUND THE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE OF M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.; Ricci, T. V., E-mail: robertobm@astro.iag.usp.br [Instituto de Astronomia Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo, SP CEP 05508-090 (Brazil)

    2013-01-10

    Due to its proximity, the mass of the supermassive black hole in the nucleus of the Andromeda galaxy (M31), the most massive black hole in the Local Group of galaxies, has been measured by several methods involving the kinematics of a stellar disk which surrounds it. We report here the discovery of an eccentric H{alpha} emitting disk around the black hole at the center of M31 and show how modeling this disk can provide an independent determination of the mass of the black hole. Our model implies a mass of 5.0{sup +0.8}{sub -1.0} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} for the central black hole, consistent with the average of determinations by methods involving stellar dynamics, and compatible (at 1{sigma} level) with measurements obtained from the most detailed models of the stellar disk around the central black hole. This value is also consistent with the M-{sigma} relation. In order to make a comparison, we applied our simulation on the stellar kinematics in the nucleus of M31 and concluded that the parameters obtained for the stellar disk are not formally compatible with the parameters obtained for the H{alpha} emitting disk. This result suggests that the stellar and the H{alpha} emitting disks are intrinsically different from each other. A plausible explanation is that the H{alpha} emission is associated with a gaseous disk. This hypothesis is supported by the detection of traces of weaker nebular lines in the nuclear region of M31. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that the H{alpha} emission is, at least partially, generated by stars.

  3. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs. Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of  ∼  10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ, we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity  =  0 %, an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05  ×  10−4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4  ×  10−5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition at the atmosphere–soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  4. Portable and Disposable Paper-Based Fluorescent Sensor for In Situ Gaseous Hydrogen Sulfide Determination in Near Real-Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruci, João Flávio da Silveira; Cardoso, Arnaldo Alves

    2016-12-06

    Hydrogen sulfide is found in many environments including sewage systems, petroleum extraction platforms, kraft paper mills, and exhaled breath, but its determination at ppb levels remains a challenge within the analytical chemistry field. Off-line methods for analysis of gaseous reduced sulfur compounds can suffer from a variety of biases associated with high reactivity, sorptive losses, and atmospheric oxidative reactions. Here, we present a portable, online, and disposable gas sensor platform for the in situ determination of gaseous hydrogen sulfide, employing a 470 nm light emitting diode (LED) and a microfiber optic USB spectrometer. A sensing layer was created by impregnating 2.5 μL (0.285 nmol) of fluorescein mercury acetate (FMA) onto the surface of a micropaper analytical device with dimensions of 5 × 5 mm, which was then positioned in the optical detection system. The quantitative determination of H 2 S was based on the quenching of fluorescence intensity after direct selective reaction between the gas and FMA. This approach enabled linear calibration within the range 17-67 ppb of H 2 S, with a limit of detection of 3 ppb. The response time of the sensor was within 60 s, and the repeatability was 6.5% (RSD). The sensor was employed to monitor H 2 S released from a mini-scale wastewater treatment tank in a research laboratory. The appropriate integration of optoelectronic and mechanical devices, including LED, photodiode, pumps, and electronic boards, can be used to produce simple, fully automated portable sensors for the in situ determination of H 2 S in a variety of environments.

  5. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo; Su, Hang; Li, Xin; Kuhn, Uwe; Meusel, Hannah; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shao, Min; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-08-01

    Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO) is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of ˜ 10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ), we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity = 0 %), an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05) × 10-4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4) × 10-5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition) at the atmosphere-soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  6. Principles of phosphorescent organic light emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaev, Boris; Baryshnikov, Gleb; Agren, Hans

    2014-02-07

    Organic light-emitting device (OLED) technology has found numerous applications in the development of solid state lighting, flat panel displays and flexible screens. These applications are already commercialized in mobile phones and TV sets. White OLEDs are of especial importance for lighting; they now use multilayer combinations of organic and elementoorganic dyes which emit various colors in the red, green and blue parts of the visible spectrum. At the same time the stability of phosphorescent blue emitters is still a major challenge for OLED applications. In this review we highlight the basic principles and the main mechanisms behind phosphorescent light emission of various classes of photofunctional OLED materials, like organic polymers and oligomers, electron and hole transport molecules, elementoorganic complexes with heavy metal central ions, and clarify connections between the main features of electronic structure and the photo-physical properties of the phosphorescent OLED materials.

  7. Depletion of atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury by plant uptake at Mt. Changbai, Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Fu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There exists observational evidence that gaseous elemental mercury (GEM can be readily removed from the atmosphere via chemical oxidation followed by deposition in the polar and sub-polar regions, free troposphere, lower stratosphere, and marine boundary layer under specific environmental conditions. Here we report GEM depletions in a temperate mixed forest at Mt. Changbai, Northeast China. The strong depletions occurred predominantly at night during the leaf-growing season and in the absence of gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM enrichment (GOM  <  3 pg m−3. Vertical gradients of decreasing GEM concentrations from layers above to under forest canopy suggest in situ loss of GEM to forest canopy at Mt. Changbai. Foliar GEM flux measurements showed that the foliage of two predominant tree species is a net sink of GEM at night, with a mean flux of −1.8 ± 0.3 ng m2 h−1 over Fraxinus mandshurica (deciduous tree species and −0.1 ± 0.2 ng m2 h−1 over Pinus Koraiensis (evergreen tree species. Daily integrated GEM δ202Hg, Δ199Hg, and Δ200Hg at Mt. Changbai during 8–18 July 2013 ranged from −0.34 to 0.91 ‰, from −0.11 to −0.04 ‰ and from −0.06 to 0.01 ‰, respectively. A large positive shift in GEM δ202Hg occurred during the strong GEM depletion events, whereas Δ199Hg and Δ200Hg remained essentially unchanged. The observational findings and box model results show that uptake of GEM by forest canopy plays a predominant role in the GEM depletion at Mt. Changbai forest. Such depletion events of GEM are likely to be a widespread phenomenon, suggesting that the forest ecosystem represents one of the largest sinks ( ∼ 1930 Mg of atmospheric Hg on a global scale.

  8. Approaches to blue light emitting polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    Blue-light emitting polymers are important for full colour displays. Blue- light emitting polymers, such as poly(fluorene)s have been reported, but tend to be soluble in the conjugated form. The aim of the project was to produce insoluble polymers, prepared via processible soluble precursor polymers, so that multilayer devices could be easily fabricated. Multilayer devices are often required for more efficient light emission. The target materials were derivatives of poly(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV), a green-yellow emitting polymer. To blue shift the emission of PPV, bulky substituents, namely chloro, phenyl and alkyl, were attached to the vinylic linkage. These bulky substituents were incorporated to introduce steric interactions between the side group and the backbone phenyl protons, to shorten the effective conjugation length and increase the HOMO-LUMO energy gap. Chloro substituents quenched the fluorescence. Phenyl substituents resulted in highly conjugated precursor polymers with low molecular weights, showing blue- green to green emission in the conjugated form. Alkyl substituted PPV derivatives, prepared via chloro or xanthate precursors, were blue-light emitting conjugated polymers, which were electroluminescent in ITO/polymer/AI devices. The PL quantum yields were found to be up to 38%. The incorporation of electron withdrawing groups into the polymers was attempted, to lower the barrier to electron injection. Chloro groups quenched fluorescence and methylsulfone substituents resulted in insoluble polymers, probably due to cross-linking. However a copolymer containing methylsulfone electron withdrawing groups could be prepared. Phenylsulfone substituents were found to give fluorescent polymers which were soluble in the precursor form. (author)

  9. Light-emitting device test systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Mark; Brodie, Alan; George, James; Guan, Yu; Nyffenegger, Ralph

    2018-01-23

    Light-emitting devices, such as LEDs, are tested using a photometric unit. The photometric unit, which may be an integrating sphere, can measure flux, color, or other properties of the devices. The photometric unit may have a single port or both an inlet and outlet. Light loss through the port, inlet, or outlet can be reduced or calibrated for. These testing systems can provide increased reliability, improved throughput, and/or improved measurement accuracy.

  10. Near-infrared light emitting device using semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supran, Geoffrey J.S.; Song, Katherine W.; Hwang, Gyuweon; Correa, Raoul Emile; Shirasaki, Yasuhiro; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Bulovic, Vladimir; Scherer, Jennifer

    2018-04-03

    A near-infrared light emitting device can include semiconductor nanocrystals that emit at wavelengths beyond 1 .mu.m. The semiconductor nanocrystals can include a core and an overcoating on a surface of the core.

  11. White Top-Emitting OLEDs on Metal Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Freitag, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    This work focusses on the development of top-emitting white organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), which can be fabricated on metal substrates. Bottom-emitting OLEDs have been studied intensively over the years and show promising perspectives for future commercial applications in general lighting. The development of top-emitting devices has fallen behind despite the opportunities to produce these devices also on low-cost opaque substrates. This is due to the challenges of top-light-emission c...

  12. The formation of ultra-fine particles during ozone-initiated oxidations with terpenes emitted from natural paint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamorena, Rheo B; Jung, Sang-Guen; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Lee, Woojin

    2007-03-06

    The formation of secondary products during the ozone-initiated oxidations with biogenic VOCs emitted from natural paint was investigated in this study. Mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy measurements have shown that the major components of gas-phase chemicals emitted from natural paint are monoterpenes including alpha- and beta-pinenes, camphene, p-cymene, and limonene. A significant formation of gaseous carbonyl products and nano-sized particles (4.4-168nm) was observed in the presence of ozone. Carboxylic acids were also observed to form during the reactions (i.e. formic acid at 0.170ppm and acetic acid at 0.260ppm). The formation of particles increased as the volume of paint introduced into a reaction chamber increased. A secondary increase in the particle number concentration was observed after 440min, which suggests further partitioning of oxidation products (i.e. carboxylic acids) into the particles previously existing in the reaction chamber. The growth of particles increased as the mean particle diameter and particle mass concentrations increased during the reaction. The experimental results obtained in this study may provide insight into the potential exposure of occupants to irritating chemical compounds formed during the oxidations of biogenic VOCs emitted from natural paint in indoor environments.

  13. Light Emitting Transistors of Organic Single Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2009-03-01

    Organic light emitting transistors (OLETs) are attracting considerable interest as a novel function of organic field effect transistors (OFETs). Besides a smallest integration of light source and current switching devices, OLETs offer a new opportunity in the fundamental research on organic light emitting devices. The OLET device structure allows us to use organic single crystals, in contrast to the organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), the research of which have been conducted predominantly on polycrystalline or amorphous thin films. In the case of OFETs, use of single crystals have produced a significant amount of benefits in the studies of pursuit for the highest performance limit of FETs, intrinsic transport mechanism in organic semiconductors, and application of the single crystal transistors. The study on OLETs have been made predominantly on polycrystalline films or multicomponent heterojunctions, and single crystal study is still limited to tetracene [1] and rubrene [2], which are materials with relatively high mobility, but with low photoluminescence efficiency. In this paper, we report fabrication of single crystal OLETs of several kinds of highly luminescent molecules, emitting colorful light, ranging from blue to red. Our strategy is single crystallization of monomeric or oligomeric molecules, which are known to have a very high photoluminescence efficiency. Here we report the result on single crystal LETs of rubrene (red), 4,4'-bis(diphenylvinylenyl)-anthracene (green), 1,4-bis(5-phenylthiophene-2-yl)benzene (AC5) (green), and 1,3,6,8-tetraphenylpyrene (TPPy) (blue), all of which displayed ambipolar transport as well as peculiar movement of voltage controlled movement of recombination zone, not only from the surface of the crystal but also from the edges of the crystals, indicting light confinement inside the crystal. Realization of ambipolar OLET with variety of single crystals indicates that the fabrication method is quite versatile to various light

  14. Modifying woody plants for efficient conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinus, R.J.; Dimmel, D.R.; Feirer, R.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Malcolm, E.W. (Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1990-07-01

    The Short Rotation Woody Crop Program (SRWCP), Department of Energy, is developing woody plant species as sources of renewable energy. Much progress has been made in identifying useful species, and testing site adaptability, stand densities, coppicing abilities, rotation lengths, and harvesting systems. Conventional plant breeding and intensive cultural practices have been used to increase above-ground biomass yields. Given these and foreseeable accomplishments, program leaders are now shifting attention to prospects for altering biomass physical and chemical characteristics, and to ways for improving the efficiency with which biomass can be converted to gaseous and liquid fuels. This report provides a review and synthesis of literature concerning the quantity and quality of such characteristics and constituents, and opportunities for manipulating them via conventional selection and breeding and/or molecular biology. Species now used by SRWCP are emphasized, with supporting information drawn from others as needed. Little information was found on silver maple (Acer saccharinum), but general comparisons (Isenberg 1981) suggest composition and behavior similar to those of the other species. Where possible, conclusions concerning means for and feasibility of manipulation are given, along with expected impacts on conversion efficiency. Information is also provided on relationships to other traits, genotype X environment interactions, and potential trade-offs or limitations. Biomass productivity per se is not addressed, except in terms of effects that may by caused by changes in constituent quality and/or quantity. Such effects are noted to the extent they are known or can be estimated. Likely impacts of changes, however effected, on suitability or other uses, e.g., pulp and paper manufacture, are notes. 311 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. The antifungal effect of light emitting diode on Malassezia yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, Hyun Seung; Na, Eui Young; Yun, Sook Jung; Lee, Jee-Bum

    2012-07-01

    Malassezia (M.) species are members of the normal part of the skin flora, but they might induce or be involved with various cutaneous diseases. Although the role of Malassezia in the pathogenesis of cutaneous diseases is not fully understood, recent studies have shown that decreased density of Malassezia led to improvement of these diseases. To identify the antifungal effect of light emitting diode (LED) against Malassezia, its antifungal mechanisms and the impact on the keratinocytes. LED with various wavelengths (370-630nm) on Malassezia furfur, Malassezia sympodialis and Malassezia globosa was irradiated according to dose and then the antifungal effects were thereafter assessed. After irradiating LED with 392.5±1nm of wavelength according to dose on Malassezia species, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid hydroperoxide production assay were measured. In addition, cell viability and inflammatory cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α, TGF-β, TLR-2 and COX-2) expressions in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) by LED irradiation were evaluated. The growth of Malassezia species was dose-dependently suppressed by both LED with 380±2 and 392.5±1nm wavelengths. The increases of intracellular and extracellular ROS by LED irradiation with 392.5±1nm wavelengths were significantly observed compared to control group. The cell viability and cytokines in NHEKs were not significantly affected by LED irradiation under 5J/cm(2)in vitro. LED irradiation with 380±2 and 392.5±1nm wavelengths proved to have antifungal effect against Malassezia species and no impact on NHEKs under 5J/cm(2). The findings suggest that LED might be an adjunctive therapeutic light tool against Malassezia yeasts related cutaneous diseases. Copyright © 2012 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fission fragments transport by gaseous flow with aerosols

    CERN Document Server

    Gangrskij, Y P; Zhemenik, V I; Myshinskij, G V; Penionzhkevich, Yu E; Selesh, O

    2002-01-01

    Paper describes a pilot facility for fission fragment transport by gaseous flow with aerosols. This facility designed for fragment transport consists of a reaction chamber with irradiated target, receipt chamber to collect fragments, aerosol generator, roughing pump to pump put gas and a capillary connecting these units of facility. Paper presents the results of facility testing with fragments of sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U photofission by microtron Bremsstrahlung. The obtained parameters of facility (up to 70% efficiency of transport, up to 0.1 s time of transport at 1 m distance) enable to use it efficiently in experiments dealing with heavy nuclei fission and with investigation in properties of fission fragments

  17. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant annual site environmental report for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horak, C.M. [ed.

    1994-11-01

    This calendar year (CY) 1993 annual report on environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth) and its environs consists of three separate documents: a summary pamphlet for the general public; a more detail discussion and of compliance status, data, and environmental impacts (this document); and a volume of detailed data that is available on request. The objectives of this report are to report compliance status during 1993; provide information about the plant site and plant operations; report 1993 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site; document information on input and assumptions used in calculations; provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on quality assurance for the environmental monitoring program.

  18. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, C.M.

    1993-09-01

    This calendar year (CY) 1992 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: narrative, summaries, and conclusions (Part 1) and data presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are to: (1) report 1992 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, (2) provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, (3) provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, (4) provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and (5) provide general information on plant quality assurance

  19. Breakdown Limit Studies in High Rate Gaseous Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Ivaniouchenkov, Yu; Peskov, Vladimir; Ramsey, B D

    1998-01-01

    We report results from a systematic study of breakdown limits for novel high rate gaseous detectors: MICROMEGAS, CAT and GEM, together with more conventional devices such as thin-gap parallel-mesh chambers and high-rate wire chambers. It was found that for all these detectors, the maximum achievable gain, before breakdown appears, drops dramatically with incident flux, and is sometimes inversely proportional to it. Further, in the presence of alpha particles, typical of the backgrounds in high-energy experiments, additional gain drops of 1-2 orders of magnitude were observed for many detectors. It was found that breakdowns at high rates occur through what we have termed an "accumulative" mechanism, which does not seem to have been previously reported in the literature. Results of these studies may help in choosing the optimum detector for given experimental conditions.

  20. Thermodynamic cycle calculations for a pumped gaseous core fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J.C.; Van Dam, H.

    1991-01-01

    Finite and 'infinitesimal' thermodynamic cycle calculations have been performed for a 'solid piston' model of a pumped Gaseous Core Fission Reactor with dissociating reactor gas, consisting of Uranium, Carbon and Fluorine ('UCF'). In the finite cycle calculations the influence has been investigated of several parameters on the thermodynamics of the system, especially on the attainable direct (nuclear to electrical) energy conversion efficiency. In order to facilitate the investigation of the influence of dissociation, a model gas, 'Modelium', was developed, which approximates, in a simplified, analytical way, the dissociation behaviour of the 'real' reactor gas. Comparison of the finite cycle calculation results with those of a so-called infinitesimal Otto cycle calculation leads to the conclusion that the conversion efficiency of a finite cycle can be predicted, without actually performing the finite cycle calculation, with reasonable accuracy, from the so-called 'infinitesimal efficiency factor', which is determined only by the thermodynamic properties of the reactor gas used. (author)

  1. The infrared spectrum of gaseous malonaldehyde (3-hydroxy-2-propenal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zuzana; Wilson, E. Bright; Duerst, Richard W.

    The infrared spectra of gaseous malonaldehyde and four of its deutero isotopes were recorded in the regions 4000-75 and 4000-400 cm -1, respectively. The vibrational fundamental frequencies were assigned in terms of C s molecular symmetry, primarily on the basis of transferring frequencies for similar modes and force constants from acrolein and other related molecules, plus the Redlich—Teller and reduced Redlich—Teller product rules. This assignment I does not agree well with a priori calculations of the frequencies received from two groups. Assignment II involved some changes in the intermediate frequency range which led to much better agreement with a priori values, but a conclusive choice has not been made.

  2. Economic evaluation of the gaseous diffusion on uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Yuji; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Fujine, Sachio; Aochi, Tetsuo; Higashi, Kunio.

    1977-11-01

    A gaseous diffusion plant is a large multi-stage system, which is composed of about a thousand stages in cascade and other support facilities even to obtain the slightly enriched uranium for LWR. To design and construct such a reliable, versatile, economical plant, it is necessary to know the process characteristics and to make a techno-economic evaluation of the enrichment plant. A cascade optimization and a conceptual design of the diffusion plant are described, and the cost evaluation formulae based the 1970-1972 cost level in Japan are given. In parametric case studies with the economic evaluation program developed, technological and economic factors in the plant economy are presented. (auth.)

  3. Analysis of radiation fields in tomography on diffusion gaseous sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekman, I.N.

    1999-01-01

    Perspectives of application of equilibrium and stationary variants of diffusion tomography with radioactive gaseous sounds for spatial reconstruction of heterogeneous media in materials technology were considered. The basic attention were allocated to creation of simple algorithms of detection of sound accumulation on the background of monotonically varying concentration field. Algorithms of transformation of two-dimensional radiation field in three-dimensional distribution of radiation sources were suggested. The methods of analytical elongation of concentration field permitting separation of regional anomalies on the background of local ones and vice verse were discussed. It was shown that both equilibrium and stationary variants of diffusion tomography detect the heterogeneity of testing material, provide reduction of spatial distribution of elements of its structure and give an estimation of relative degree of defectiveness

  4. The gaseous diffusion process in France from Pierrelatte to Eurodif

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plurien, P.; Coates, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the historical aspects of the development of the gaseous diffusion process for uranium enrichment in France. This development started in 1952 at a very small scale in the Saclay's CEA center and led to the building of the Pierrelatte factory during the 1958-1967 period, devoted to military applications. During the 1965-1970 transition period, a first attempt was done to transfer these separation methods to civil nuclear applications. The 1971-1976 period was marked by the start up of the Eurodif company as a consequence of the EdF choice for low-enriched uranium reactors. The French Tricastin site was chosen for the lay-out of a huge European enrichment plant: the Georges Besse factory. The paper summarizes the successive international agreements, contracts and participations with the Eurodif company and its financial structure and subsidiary companies. (J.S.). 3 tabs., 4 photos

  5. Purge Monitoring Technology for Gaseous Helium (GHe) Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Jonathan; Lansaw, John

    2010-01-01

    John C. Stennis Space Center provides rocket engine propulsion testing for the NASA space programs. Since the development of the Space Shuttle, every Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has gone through acceptance testing before going to Kennedy Space Center for integration into the Space Shuttle. The SSME is a large cryogenic rocket engine that used Liquid Oxygen (LO2) and Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) as propellants. Due to the extremely cold cryogenic conditions of this environment, an inert gas, helium, is used as a purge for the engine and propellant lines since it can be used without freezing in the cryogenic environment. As NASA moves forward with the development of the new ARES V launch system, the main engines as well as the upper stage engine will use cryogenic propellants and will require gaseous helium during the development testing of each of these engines. The main engine for the ARES V will be similar in size to the SSME.

  6. Emulation workbench for position sensitive gaseous scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, L.; Margato, L.M.S.; Morozov, A.; Solovov, V.; Fraga, F. A. F.

    2015-01-01

    Position sensitive detectors based on gaseous scintillation proportional counters with Anger-type readout are being used in several research areas such as neutron detection, search for dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Design and optimization of such detectors are complex and time consuming tasks. Simulations, while being a powerful tool, strongly depend on the light transfer models and demand accurate knowledge of many parameters, which are often not available. Here we describe an alternative approach based on the experimental evaluation of a detector using an isotropic point-like light source with precisely controllable light emission properties, installed on a 3D positioning system. The results obtained with the developed setup at validation conditions, when the scattered light is strongly suppressed show good agreement with simulations

  7. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant annual site environmental report for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    This calendar year (CY) 1993 annual report on environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth) and its environs consists of three separate documents: a summary pamphlet for the general public; a more detail discussion and of compliance status, data, and environmental impacts (this document); and a volume of detailed data that is available on request. The objectives of this report are to report compliance status during 1993; provide information about the plant site and plant operations; report 1993 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site; document information on input and assumptions used in calculations; provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on quality assurance for the environmental monitoring program

  8. Production of gaseous fuel by pyrolysis of municipal solid waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, T. H.; Ringer, H. N.; Bridges, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Pilot plant tests were conducted on a simulated solid waste which was a mixture of shredded newspaper, wood waste, polyethylene plastics, crushed glass, steel turnings, and water. Tests were conducted at 1400 F in a lead-bath pyrolyser. Cold feed was deaerated by compression and was dropped onto a moving hearth of molten lead before being transported to a sealed storage container. About 80 percent of the feed's organic content was converted to gaseous products which contain over 90 percent of the potential waste energy; 12 percent was converted to water; and 8 percent remained as partially pyrolyzed char and tars. Nearly half of the carbon in the feed is converted to benzene, toluene and medium-quality fuel gas, a potential credit of over $25 per ton of solid waste. The system was shown to require minimal preprocessing and less sorting then other methods.

  9. Quality Testing of Gaseous Helium Pressure Vessels by Acoustic Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Barranco-Luque, M; Hervé, C; Margaroli, C; Sergo, V

    1998-01-01

    The resistance of pressure equipment is currently tested, before commissioning or at periodic maintenance, by means of normal pressure tests. Defects occurring inside materials during the execution of these tests or not seen by usual non-destructive techniques can remain as undetected potential sources of failure . The acoustic emission (AE) technique can detect and monitor the evolution of such failures. Industrial-size helium cryogenic systems employ cryogens often stored in gaseous form under pressure at ambient temperature. Standard initial and periodic pressure testing imposes operational constraints which other complementary testing methods, such as AE, could significantly alleviate. Recent reception testing of 250 m3 GHe storage vessels with a design pressure of 2.2 MPa for the LEP and LHC cryogenic systems has implemented AE with the above-mentioned aims.

  10. A novel fast timing micropattern gaseous detector: FTM

    CERN Document Server

    De Oliveira, Rui; Maggi, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    In recent years important progress in micropattern gaseous detectors has been achieved in the use of resistive material to build compact spark-protected devices. The novel idea presented here consists of the polarisation of WELL structures using only resistive electrodes. This allows a new device to be built with an architecture based on a stack of several coupled layers where drift and WELL multiplication stages alternate in the structure. The signals from each multiplication stage can be read out from any external readout boards through the capacitive couplings. Each layer provides a signal with a gain of 10^4 - 10^5. The main advantage of this new device is the dramatic improvement of the timing provided by the competition of the ionisation processes in the different drift regions, which can be exploited for fast timing at the high luminosity accelerators (e.g. HL-LHC upgrade) as well as applications outside particle physics.

  11. A novel fast timing micropattern gaseous detector: FTM

    CERN Document Server

    De Oliveira, Rui; Sharma, Archana

    2015-01-01

    In recent years important progress in micropattern gaseous detectors has been achieved in the use of resistive material to build compact spark-protected devices. The novel idea presented here consists of the polarisation of WELL structures using only resistive coating. This allows a new device to be built with an architecture based on a stack of several coupled layers where drift and WELL multiplication stages alternate in the structure. The signals from each multiplication stage can be read out from any external readout boards through the capacitive couplings. Each layer provides a signal with a gain of 10^4-10^5. The main advantage of this new device is the dramatic improvement of the timing provided by the competition of the ionisation processes in the different drift regions, which can be exploited for fast timing at the high luminosity accelerators (e.g. HL-LHC upgrade) as well as far applications like medical imaging.

  12. Mortality patterns among Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Caroline; Hughes, Therese S; Muldoon, Susan; Aldrich, Tim; Rice, Carol; Hornung, Richard; Brion, Gail; Tollerud, David J

    2010-07-01

    To determine whether Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant workers had mortality patterns that differed from the general US population and to investigate whether mortality patterns were associated with job title or workplace exposures. A retrospective occupational cohort mortality study was conducted on 6759 workers. Standardized mortality ratio analyses compared the cohort with the referent US population. Internal comparisons producing standardized rate ratios were conducted by job title, metal exposure, and cumulative internal and external radiation exposures. Overall mortality and cancer rates were lower than the referent population, reflecting a strong healthy worker effect. Individual not significant standardized mortality ratios and standardized rate ratios were noted for cancers of the lymphatic and hematopoietic tissue. Although relatively low exposures to radiation and metals did not produce statistically significant health effects, no significant elevations for lymphatic and hematopoietic cancers were consistent with previous studies of nuclear workers.

  13. Measurement of carbon 14 radioactivity in its gaseous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Michel

    1967-01-01

    This report presents an apparatus aimed at following in a destructive way the distribution of the specific activity of a C 14 -marked graphite sample by measuring the gaseous C 14 activity. This apparatus is based on the following principle: the sample is oxidised in dry air at 900 C in a thermo-balance which allows the graphite wear to be monitored. The variation of the formed active gas activity is measured by means of a scintillation counter. The knowledge of these both parameters (wear and activity variation in function of time) allows the distribution of the specific activity in the graphite sample to be known. The development and adjustment of the scintillation detector are notably addressed [fr

  14. Crystallization of MoO2 from gaseous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinkova, L.A.; Skrebkova, E.D.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of the conditions of growing MoO 2 crystals from a gaseous phase in the presence of iodine on morphology and quality of the crystals has been studied. MoO 2 and Mo+MoO 3 have been used as an initial charge; iodine concentration has been changed from 0.5 to 10 mg/cm 3 . The quality of the crystals has been evaluated by the ratio between the resistance at room and helium temperatures. Optimum temperature of the crystallization zone on growing MoO 2 crystals is 850 deg since at that temperature the value of the residual resistance of the crystals is maximum. Iodine concentration must not exceed 0.5-2 mg/cm 3 . The obtained MoO 2 crystals possess good surface area; dislocation density does not exceed 10 -3 cm -2

  15. 78 FR 30342 - United States Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... COMMISSION United States Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... Renewal of its Certificate of Compliance (CoC) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The existing CoC (No. GDP-1) authorizes operation of a uranium enrichment facility in Paducah, Kentucky. The...

  16. [Unsegmented continuous-flow sample processing and electrochemical detection of gaseous species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mottola, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    Goals were a continuous-flow, unsegmented, all-gas carrier and/or a segmented liquid/gas interface system for sample introduction and transport to detection/determination point; a regenerable electrode probe base on redox reactions of Fe(II) and Fe(III) complexes with 1, 10-phenanthroline and related ligands; and amperometric/coulometric current measurements providing analyte signals. Gases to be detected included NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2]. This report is divided into 3 parts: preparation of new ligands of 1,10-phenanthroline family; glassy carbon surfaces coated with polymeric films prepared from monomeric units of tris[5-amino-1,10-phenanthroline]iron(II); and sulfite oxidase/hexacyanoferrate modified C paste electrode.

  17. Emissions of major gaseous and particulate species during experimental burns of southern African biomass

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Keene, WC

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available insignificant. Grass fires with the highest EF(el)s for NH3 corresponded to MCEs in the range of 0.93; grass fires with higher and low MCEs exhibited lower EF(el)s. NH3 emissions for most fuels were poorly correlated with fuel N. Most Cl and Br in fuel...

  18. Integrated bioprocess for conversion of gaseous substrates to liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peng; Chakraborty, Sagar; Kumar, Amit; Woolston, Benjamin; Liu, Hongjuan; Emerson, David; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-04-05

    In the quest for inexpensive feedstocks for the cost-effective production of liquid fuels, we have examined gaseous substrates that could be made available at low cost and sufficiently large scale for industrial fuel production. Here we introduce a new bioconversion scheme that effectively converts syngas, generated from gasification of coal, natural gas, or biomass, into lipids that can be used for biodiesel production. We present an integrated conversion method comprising a two-stage system. In the first stage, an anaerobic bioreactor converts mixtures of gases of CO2 and CO or H2 to acetic acid, using the anaerobic acetogen Moorella thermoacetica The acetic acid product is fed as a substrate to a second bioreactor, where it is converted aerobically into lipids by an engineered oleaginous yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica We first describe the process carried out in each reactor and then present an integrated system that produces microbial oil, using synthesis gas as input. The integrated continuous bench-scale reactor system produced 18 g/L of C16-C18 triacylglycerides directly from synthesis gas, with an overall productivity of 0.19 g⋅L(-1)⋅h(-1) and a lipid content of 36%. Although suboptimal relative to the performance of the individual reactor components, the presented integrated system demonstrates the feasibility of substantial net fixation of carbon dioxide and conversion of gaseous feedstocks to lipids for biodiesel production. The system can be further optimized to approach the performance of its individual units so that it can be used for the economical conversion of waste gases from steel mills to valuable liquid fuels for transportation.

  19. Integrated bioprocess for conversion of gaseous substrates to liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peng; Chakraborty, Sagar; Kumar, Amit; Woolston, Benjamin; Liu, Hongjuan; Emerson, David; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    In the quest for inexpensive feedstocks for the cost-effective production of liquid fuels, we have examined gaseous substrates that could be made available at low cost and sufficiently large scale for industrial fuel production. Here we introduce a new bioconversion scheme that effectively converts syngas, generated from gasification of coal, natural gas, or biomass, into lipids that can be used for biodiesel production. We present an integrated conversion method comprising a two-stage system. In the first stage, an anaerobic bioreactor converts mixtures of gases of CO2 and CO or H2 to acetic acid, using the anaerobic acetogen Moorella thermoacetica. The acetic acid product is fed as a substrate to a second bioreactor, where it is converted aerobically into lipids by an engineered oleaginous yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica. We first describe the process carried out in each reactor and then present an integrated system that produces microbial oil, using synthesis gas as input. The integrated continuous bench-scale reactor system produced 18 g/L of C16-C18 triacylglycerides directly from synthesis gas, with an overall productivity of 0.19 g⋅L−1⋅h−1 and a lipid content of 36%. Although suboptimal relative to the performance of the individual reactor components, the presented integrated system demonstrates the feasibility of substantial net fixation of carbon dioxide and conversion of gaseous feedstocks to lipids for biodiesel production. The system can be further optimized to approach the performance of its individual units so that it can be used for the economical conversion of waste gases from steel mills to valuable liquid fuels for transportation. PMID:26951649

  20. Enhanced quantum efficiency in blue-emitting polymer/dielectric nanolayer nanocomposite light-emitting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Hyeok; Lim, Yong Taik; Park, O Ok; Yu, Jae-Woong; Kim, Jai Kyeong; Kim, Young Chul

    2004-01-01

    Light-emitting devices based on environmentally stable, blue-emitting polymer/dielectric nanolayer nanocomposites were fabricated by blending poly(di-octylfluorene) (PDOF) with organo-clay. By reducing the excimer formation that leads to long wavelength tails, the photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL) color purity of the device was enhanced. When a conjugated polymer/dielectric nanolayer nanocomposite is applied to an EL device, we expect an electronic structure similar to the well-known quantum well in small nanodomains. The ratio of PDOF/organo-clay was regulated from 2:1 to 0.5:1 (w/w). The light-emitting device of 0.5:1 (w/w) blend demonstrated the highest quantum efficiency (QE), 0.72% (ph/el), which is ∼500 times higher value compared with that of the pure PDOF layer device. However, the driving voltage of the nanocomposite devices tended to increase with increasing organo-clay content

  1. Alpha Emitting Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals for Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chérel, Michel; Barbet, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Today, cancer treatments mainly rely on surgery or external beam radiation to remove or destroy bulky tumors. Chemotherapy is given when tumours cannot be removed or when dissemination is suspected. However, these approaches cannot permanently treat all cancers and relapse occurs in up to 50% of the patients’ population. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) are effective against some disseminated and metastatic diseases, although they are rarely curative. Most preclinical and clinical developments in this field have involved electron-emitting radionuclides, particularly iodine-131, yttrium-90 and lutetium-177. The large range of the electrons emitted by these radionuclides reduces their efficacy against very small tumour cell clusters or isolated tumour cells present in residual disease and in many haematological tumours (leukaemia, myeloma). The range of alpha particles in biological tissues is very short, less than 0.1 mm, which makes alpha emitters theoretically ideal for treatment of such isolated tumour cells or micro-clusters of malignant cells. Thus, over the last decade, a growing interest for the use of alpha-emitting radionuclides has emerged. Research on targeted alpha therapy (TAT) began years ago in Nantes through cooperation between Subatech, a nuclear physics laboratory, CRCNA, a cancer research centre with a nuclear oncology team and ITU (Karlsruhe, Germany). CD138 was demonstrated as a potential target antigen for Multiple Myeloma, which is a target of huge clinical interest particularly suited for TAT because of the disseminated nature of the disease consisting primarily of isolated cells and small clusters of tumour cells mainly localized in the bone marrow. Thus anti-CD138 antibodies were labelled with bismuth-213 from actinium-225/bismuth-213 generators provided by ITU and used to target multiple myeloma cells. In vitro studies showed cell cycle arrest, synergism with chemotherapy and very little induction

  2. Efficient organic light emitting-diodes (OLEDs)

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Yi-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Following two decades of intense research globally, the organic light-emitting diode (OLED) has steadily emerged as the ultimate display technology of choice for the coming decades. Portable active matrix OLED displays have already become prevalent, and even large-sized ultra-high definition 4K TVs are being mass-produced. More exotic applications such as wearable displays have been commercialized recently. With the burgeoning success in displays, researchers are actively bringing the technology forward into the exciting solid-state lighting market. This book presents the knowledge needed for

  3. Aero particles characterization emitted by mobile sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas V, A.; Romero G, E. T.; Lopez G, H.

    2009-01-01

    In our country, the mobile sources that conform most of the emissions at the atmosphere, are concentrated on the urban areas. For the present work, samples coming from the escapes of terrestrial transport were obtained, such as: passenger buses, load transport and particular vehicles of the Metropolitan area of the Toluca valley. The material was analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy of low vacuum and X-ray diffraction. The objective was to characterize the emitted particles by mobile sources, morphological and chemically to know the structure, size and elements that compose them. (Author)

  4. Hybrid fluorescent layer emitting polarized light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammadimasoudi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanorods have anisotropic absorption and emission properties. In this work a hybrid luminescent layer is produced based on a mixture of CdSe/CdS nanorods dispersed in a liquid crystal that is aligned by an electric field and polymerized by UV illumination. The film emits light with polarization ratio 0.6 (polarization contrast 4:1. Clusters of nanorods in liquid crystal can be avoided by applying an AC electric field with sufficient amplitude. This method can be made compatible with large-scale processing on flexible transparent substrates. Thin polarized light emitters can be used in LCD backlights or solar concentrators to increase the efficiency.

  5. Removal of 2-butoxyethanol gaseous emissions by biotrickling filtration packed with polyurethane foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, M C; Álvarez-Hornos, F J; Engesser, K H; Dobslaw, D; Gabaldón, C

    2016-03-25

    The removal of 2-butoxyethanol from gaseous emissions was studied using two biotrickling filters (BTF1 and BTF2) packed with polyurethane foam. Two different inoculum sources were used: a pure culture of Pseudomonas sp. BOE200 (BTF1) and activated sludge from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (BTF2). The bioreactors were operated at inlet loads (ILs) of 130 and 195 g m(-3) hour(-1) and at an empty bed residence time (EBRT) of 12.5s. Under an IL of ∼130 g m(-3) hour(-1), BTF1 presented higher elimination capacities (ECs) than BTF2, with average values of 106±7 and 68±8 g m(-3) hour(-1), respectively. However, differences in ECs between BTFs were decreased by reducing the irrigation intervals from 1 min every 12 min to 1 min every 2 hours in BTF2. Average values of EC were 111±25 and 90±7 g m(-3) hour(-1) for BTF1 and BTF2, respectively, when working at an IL of ∼195 g m(-3) hour(-1). Microbial analysis revealed a significant shift in the microbial community of BTF1 inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. BOE200. At the end of the experiment, the species Microbacterium sp., Chryseobacterium sp., Acinetobacter sp., Pseudomonas sp. and Mycobacterium sp. were detected. In BTF2 inoculated with activated sludge, the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) technique showed a diverse microbial community including species that was able to use 2-butoxyethanol as its carbon source, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida as representative species. Although BTF1 inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. BOE200 and higher gas velocity (probably greater gas/liquid mass transfer rate) showed a slight improvement in performance, the use of activated sludge as inoculum seems to be a more feasible option for the industrial application of this technology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Impacts from PCB accumulation on amphibians inhabiting streams flowing from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGarady, C J; Halbrook, R S

    2003-11-01

    Contamination at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Paducah, Kentucky, has been under evaluation for many years. We studied amphibians in selected outfalls (drainage ditches) flowing from the PGDP to determine if PCBs were accumulating in their tissues and how this might affect local populations. We determined relative amphibian species richness and abundance among seven outfalls and three reference streams by listening to their calls during audio surveys. We also captured amphibians from each study site during the summers of 2000 and 2001 and analyzed their carcasses for PCBs (Aroclor 1260 and 34 congeners) and livers for ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity, a biomarker of PCBs and other organic contamination. Ten species were heard across study sites, and abundance and richness at outfalls were similar to those observed at reference sites. However, there were significant differences in abundance (p = 0.001) and richness (p = 0.048) of amphibians between continuously flowing and intermittent outfalls. There were no significant differences in PCB concentrations (p = 0.113) in amphibians captured from study sites, although Aroclor 1260 concentrations tended to be higher in amphibians collected from one outfall (outfall 12) on the east side of the plant (x = 1260 microg/kg) compared with all other study sites (x = 489 microg/kg). EROD activity measured in the liver was not indicative of Aroclor 1260 concentrations in amphibians at the PGDP, and EROD did not differ by study site, species, age class, or gender. PCB concentrations measured in amphibians at the PGDP were similar to concentrations measured at reference sites and did not appear to negatively affect individual amphibians or abundance and richness.

  7. Organic bistable light-emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liping; Liu, Jie; Pyo, Seungmoon; Yang, Yang

    2002-01-01

    An organic bistable device, with a unique trilayer structure consisting of organic/metal/organic sandwiched between two outmost metal electrodes, has been invented. [Y. Yang, L. P. Ma, and J. Liu, U.S. Patent Pending, U.S. 01/17206 (2001)]. When the device is biased with voltages beyond a critical value (for example 3 V), the device suddenly switches from a high-impedance state to a low-impedance state, with a difference in injection current of more than 6 orders of magnitude. When the device is switched to the low-impedance state, it remains in that state even when the power is off. (This is called "nonvolatile" phenomenon in memory devices.) The high-impedance state can be recovered by applying a reverse bias; therefore, this bistable device is ideal for memory applications. In order to increase the data read-out rate of this type of memory device, a regular polymer light-emitting diode has been integrated with the organic bistable device, such that it can be read out optically. These features make the organic bistable light-emitting device a promising candidate for several applications, such as digital memories, opto-electronic books, and recordable papers.

  8. Electrically and Optically Readable Light Emitting Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Che-Wei; Tan, Wei-Chun; Lu, Meng-Lin; Pan, Tai-Chun; Yang, Ying-Jay; Chen, Yang-Fang

    2014-06-01

    Electrochemical metallization memories based on redox-induced resistance switching have been considered as the next-generation electronic storage devices. However, the electronic signals suffer from the interconnect delay and the limited reading speed, which are the major obstacles for memory performance. To solve this problem, here we demonstrate the first attempt of light-emitting memory (LEM) that uses SiO2 as the resistive switching material in tandem with graphene-insulator-semiconductor (GIS) light-emitting diode (LED). By utilizing the excellent properties of graphene, such as high conductivity, high robustness and high transparency, our proposed LEM enables data communication via electronic and optical signals simultaneously. Both the bistable light-emission state and the resistance switching properties can be attributed to the conducting filament mechanism. Moreover, on the analysis of current-voltage characteristics, we further confirm that the electroluminescence signal originates from the carrier tunneling, which is quite different from the standard p-n junction model. We stress here that the newly developed LEM device possesses a simple structure with mature fabrication processes, which integrates advantages of all composed materials and can be extended to many other material systems. It should be able to attract academic interest as well as stimulate industrial application.

  9. UVC emitting phosphors obtained by spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caiut, J.M.A., E-mail: jmacaiut@iq.unesp.b [Centre d' Elaboration de Materiaux et d' Etudes Structurales, CEMES/CNRS-BP 94347, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Institute of Chemistry, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, CP 355, Araraquara-SP 14801-970 (Brazil); Lechevallier, S.; Dexpert-Ghys, J. [Centre d' Elaboration de Materiaux et d' Etudes Structurales, CEMES/CNRS-BP 94347, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Caillier, B.; Guillot, Ph. [Diagnostic des Plasmas Hors Equilibre, Universite Jean Francois Champollion, place de Verdun, 81012 Albi Cedex 9 (France)

    2011-04-15

    The broadband inter-configurational (4f{sup 1}5d{sup 1{yields}}4f{sup 2}) emission of Pr{sup 3+} doped in lanthanum orthophosphate (LaPO{sub 4}) and in calcium pyrophosphate (Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}) has been investigated under plasma excitation. The synthesis by spray pyrolysis at moderate temperature followed by a controlled annealing proves to be a very efficient way to produce good quality UVC emitting phosphor Ca{sub 1.92}Pr{sub 0.04}Na{sub 0.04}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} ({alpha} phase). The emission of this phosphor in the wavelength range 200-350 nm has been measured with a prototype device, which can be employed for anti-microbial testing. - Research Highlights: {yields} The Pr{sup 3+} doped orthophosphate and pyrophosphate were synthesized by spray pyrolysis. {yields} The dense particles present good quality UVC emitting (200-350 nm). {yields} The prototype device can be employed for anti-microbial testing.

  10. Solid-phase microcolumn extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identification of volatile organic compounds emitted by paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrivnák, Ján; Tölgyessy, Peter; Figedyová, Sona; Katuscák, Svetozár

    2009-11-15

    A rapid non-destructive sampling technique for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by paper sheets is described. A capillary, which is connected to a microcolumn packed with Tenax TA, is inserted between two sheets at the centre of a paper stack encapsulated inside a PET/Al/PE composite foil. The other end of the microcolumn is connected to a gas-tight syringe and an appropriate volume of gaseous phase is aspirated. The microcolumn is then thermally desorbed in a modified GC inlet (modification is presented) and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In the chromatogram from the analysis of artificially aged paper sample 21 compounds were identified. Advantages of the method including the short sampling time (1 min), simplicity and economic aspect are discussed.

  11. Cost of controlling directly emitted acidic emissions from major industrial sources. Final report, February 1985-August 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmel, T.E.; Waddell, J.T.; Adams, R.C.

    1988-07-01

    This report gives results of estimates, using a model-plant approach, of costs for retrofitting selected acidic-emission-control systems to utility and industrial boilers, Claus sulfur-recovery plants, catalytic-cracking units, primary copper smelters, coke-oven plants, primary aluminum smelters, and municipal solid-waste incinerators. Cost-effectiveness (defined as the unit annual cost for removing acidic materials) of each control system was calculated based on the anticipated performance of the system. If SO/sub 2/ is simultaneously emitted with the acidic materials, controls were selected that removed both SO/sub 2/ and the acidic materials. Cost-effectiveness was considerably better for the combined (SO/sub 2/ plus acidic material) removal systems. Because of a need for performance data on acidic-emissions-control systems, it would be desirable if research could be conducted on removing acid sulfates and nitrates by existing gaseous and particulate control systems.

  12. Rigorous simulations of emitting and non-emitting nano-optical structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, O.T.A.

    2010-01-01

    In the next decade, several applications of nanotechnology will change our lives. LED lighting is about to replace the common light bulb. The main advantages are its energy efficiency and long lifetime. LEDs can be much more efficient, when part of the emitted light that is currently trapped in the

  13. Novel mass spectrometric instrument for gaseous and particulate characterization and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggiola, M.J.

    1993-04-01

    Under contract DE-AC21-92MC29116, SRI International will develop a unique new instrument that will be capable of providing real-time (< l minute), quantitative, chemical characterization of gaseous and particulate pollutants generated from DOE waste cleanup activities. The instrument will be capable of detecting and identifying volatile organic compounds, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and transuranic species released during waste cleanup activities. The instrument will be unique in its ability to detect and quantify in real-time these diverse pollutants in both vapor and particulate form. The instrument to be developed under this program will consist of several major components: (1) an isokinetic sampler capable of operating over a wide range of temperatures (up to 500 K) and flow rates; (2) a high pressure to low pressure transition and sampling region that efficiently separates particles from vapor-phase components for separate, parallel analyses; (3) two small mass spectrometers, one optimized for organic analysis using a unique field ionization source and one optimized for particulate characterization using thermal pyrolysis and electron-impact ionization (EI); and (4) a powerful personal computer for control and data acquisition

  14. Identification and detection of gaseous effluents from hyperspectral imagery using invariant algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Erin M.; Messinger, David W.; Salvaggio, Carl; Schott, John R.

    2004-08-01

    The ability to detect and identify effluent gases is, and will continue to be, of great importance. This would not only aid in the regulation of pollutants but also in treaty enforcement and monitoring the production of weapons. Considering these applications, finding a way to remotely investigate a gaseous emission is highly desirable. This research utilizes hyperspectral imagery in the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum to evaluate an invariant method of detecting and identifying gases within a scene. The image is evaluated on a pixel-by-pixel basis and is studied at the subpixel level. A library of target gas spectra is generated using a simple slab radiance model. This results in a more robust description of gas spectra which are representative of real-world observations. This library is the subspace utilized by the detection and identification algorithms. The subspace will be evaluated for the set of basis vectors that best span the subspace. The Lee algorithm will be used to determine the set of basis vectors, which implements the Maximum Distance Method (MaxD). A Generalized Likelihood Ratio Test (GLRT) determines whether or not the pixel contains the target. The target can be either a single species or a combination of gases. Synthetically generated scenes will be used for this research. This work evaluates whether the Lee invariant algorithm will be effective in the gas detection and identification problem.

  15. The investigation of reducing PAHs emission from coal pyrolysis by gaseous catalytic cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yulong; Zhao, Ruifang; Zhang, Chun; Li, Guanlong; Zhang, Jing; Li, Fan

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic cracking method of PAHs for the pyrolysis gaseous products is proposed to control their pollution to the environment. In this study, the Py-GC-MS is used to investigate in situ the catalytic effect of CaO and Fe2O3 on the 16 PAHs from Pingshuo coal pyrolysis under different catalytic temperatures and catalyst particle sizes. The results demonstrate that Fe2O3 is effective than that of CaO for catalytic cracking of 16 PAHs and that their catalytic temperature corresponding to the maximum PAHs cracking rates is different. The PAHs cracking rate is up to 60.59% for Fe2O3 at 600°C and is 52.88% at 700°C for CaO. The catalytic temperature and particle size of the catalysts have a significant effect on PAHs cracking rate and CaO will lose the capability of decreasing 16 PAHs when the temperature is higher than 900°C. The possible cracking process of 16 PAHs is deduced by elaborately analyzing the cracking effect of the two catalysts on 16 different species of PAHs.

  16. Scavenging of gaseous mercury by acidic snow at Kuujjuarapik, Northern Quebec

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahoutifard, Nazafarin; Poissant, Laurier; Scott, Susannah L.

    2006-01-01

    One fate of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) in the Arctic has been identified as gas phase oxidation by halogen-containing radicals, leading to abrupt atmospheric mercury depletion concurrent with ozone depletion. Rapid deposition of oxidized mercury leads to snow enrichment in mercury. In this report, we describe experiments that demonstrate the ability of snow to directly scavenge atmospheric mercury. The study was conducted at Kuujjuarapik, Quebec, Canada (latitude 55 o 17'N). A mercury depletion event (MDE) caused the mercury concentration in the surface snow of the coastal snowpack to double, from (9.4 ± 2.0) to (19.2 ± 1.7) ng/L. Independent of the MDE, mercury concentrations increased five-fold, from (10.0 ± 0.1) to (51.4 ± 6.0) ng/L, upon spiking the snow with 500 μM hydrogen peroxide under solar irradiation. Total organic carbon in the spiked irradiated snow samples also decreased, consistent with the formation of strongly oxidizing species. The role of the snowpack in releasing GEM to the atmosphere has been reported; these findings suggest that snow may also play a role in enhancing deposition of mercury

  17. The Investigation of Reducing PAHs Emission from Coal Pyrolysis by Gaseous Catalytic Cracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic cracking method of PAHs for the pyrolysis gaseous products is proposed to control their pollution to the environment. In this study, the Py-GC-MS is used to investigate in situ the catalytic effect of CaO and Fe2O3 on the 16 PAHs from Pingshuo coal pyrolysis under different catalytic temperatures and catalyst particle sizes. The results demonstrate that Fe2O3 is effective than that of CaO for catalytic cracking of 16 PAHs and that their catalytic temperature corresponding to the maximum PAHs cracking rates is different. The PAHs cracking rate is up to 60.59% for Fe2O3 at 600°C and is 52.88% at 700°C for CaO. The catalytic temperature and particle size of the catalysts have a significant effect on PAHs cracking rate and CaO will lose the capability of decreasing 16 PAHs when the temperature is higher than 900°C. The possible cracking process of 16 PAHs is deduced by elaborately analyzing the cracking effect of the two catalysts on 16 different species of PAHs.

  18. SOLGASMIX-PV, Chemical System Equilibrium of Gaseous and Condensed Phase Mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besmann, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: SOLGASMIX-PV, which is based on the earlier SOLGAS and SOLGASMIX codes, calculates equilibrium relationships in complex chemical systems. Chemical equilibrium calculations involve finding the system composition, within certain constraints, which contains the minimum free energy. The constraints are the preservation of the masses of each element present and either constant pressure or volume. SOLGASMIX-PV can calculate equilibria in systems containing a gaseous phase, condensed phase solutions, and condensed phases of invariant and variable stoichiometry. Either a constant total gas volume or a constant total pressure can be assumed. Unit activities for condensed phases and ideality for solutions are assumed, although nonideal systems can be handled provided activity coefficient relationships are available. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The program is designed to handle a maximum of 20 elements, 99 substances, and 10 mixtures, where the gas phase is considered a mixture. Each substance is either a gas or condensed phase species, or a member of a condensed phase mixture

  19. UV spectra and OH-oxidation kinetics of gaseous phase morpholinic compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Rachidi, Mariam El

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the UV spectra as well as the kinetics of gaseous phase OH-oxidation of morpholine, N-formylmorpholine (NFM) and N-acetlymorpholine (NAM). The spectra recorded using a UV spectrometer in the spectral range 200-280nm show that the analytes mainly absorb at wavelengths less than 280nm. This indicates that their photolysis potential in the troposphere is insignificant. Meanwhile, the OH-reactivity of these analytes was studied using a triple-jacket 2m long reactor equipped with a multi-reflection system and coupled to an FTIR spectrometer. The experiments were carried out at 295 and 313K for the amine and amides, respectively. The study was conducted in the relative mode using isoprene and benzaldehyde as reference compounds. The rate constants obtained are 14.0±1.9, 4.0±1.1 and 3.8±1.0 (in units of 10-11cm3molecule-1s-1) for morpholine, NFM and NAM respectively. These results are discussed in terms of reactivity and compared to those obtained for other oxy-nitrogenated species. In addition, the determined rate constants are used to estimate effective atmospheric lifetimes of the investigated morpholinic compounds with respect to reaction with OH radicals. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy characterization of gaseous atmospheric pressure plasmas with 2 mm spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laroche, G. [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie de Surface, Centre de Recherche sur les Materiaux Avances, Departement de genie des mines, de la metallurgie et des materiaux, Universite Laval, 1065, avenue de la Medecine, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Centre de recherche du CHUQ, Hopital St Francois d' Assise, 10, rue de l' Espinay, local E0-165, Quebec G1L 3L5 (Canada); Vallade, J. [Laboratoire Procedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, PROMES, CNRS, Technosud, Rambla de la Thermodynamique, F-66100 Perpignan (France); Agence de l' environnement et de la Ma Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -carettrise de l' Energie, 20, avenue du Gresille, BP 90406, F-49004 Angers Cedex 01 (France); Bazinette, R.; Hernandez, E.; Hernandez, G.; Massines, F. [Laboratoire Procedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, PROMES, CNRS, Technosud, Rambla de la Thermodynamique, F-66100 Perpignan (France); Nijnatten, P. van [OMT Solutions bv, High Tech Campus 9, 5656AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2012-10-15

    This paper describes an optical setup built to record Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectra in an atmospheric pressure plasma with a spatial resolution of 2 mm. The overall system consisted of three basic parts: (1) optical components located within the FTIR sample compartment, making it possible to define the size of the infrared beam (2 mm Multiplication-Sign 2 mm over a path length of 50 mm) imaged at the site of the plasma by (2) an optical interface positioned between the spectrometer and the plasma reactor. Once through the plasma region, (3) a retro-reflector module, located behind the plasma reactor, redirected the infrared beam coincident to the incident path up to a 45 Degree-Sign beamsplitter to reflect the beam toward a narrow-band mercury-cadmium-telluride detector. The antireflective plasma-coating experiments performed with ammonia and silane demonstrated that it was possible to quantify 42 and 2 ppm of these species in argon, respectively. In the case of ammonia, this was approximately three times less than this gas concentration typically used in plasma coating experiments while the silane limit of quantification was 35 times lower. Moreover, 70% of the incoming infrared radiation was focused within a 2 mm width at the site of the plasma, in reasonable agreement with the expected spatial resolution. The possibility of reaching this spatial resolution thus enabled us to measure the gaseous precursor consumption as a function of their residence time in the plasma.

  1. Reactions of iodine-125 with gaseous ethene induced via EC-decay of xenon-125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franken, K.; Coenen, H.H.

    1990-01-01

    Decay-induced reactions of nucleogenic iodine species in situ via the 125 Xe(EC) 125 I decay were examined in gaseous ethene. Vinyl iodide is the only monomeric compound found in pure ethene with 0.7% radiochemical yield besides 10% radioiodinated oligomers, which were analyzed by gel permeation chromatography. Addition of rare gases increases the yield of C 2 H 3 I up to 3.3% and of oligomers to about 25%. The effect of different rare gasese indicates substitution reactions of thermal iodine cations in 1 D 2 and 1 S 2 excited states with a 25% and in the 2 P 1 and 2 P 0 states with 75% contribution. Endothermic and homolytic reactions could be excluded for vinyl iodide generation. Radical besides ionic induced oligomerization, however, seem to occur since traces of oxygen increase the organic product yields. The chain length of oligomers formed is strongly reduced in the presence of rare gases, oxygen and especially of H-acidic compounds (HX, X = OH, OCH 3 , OC 2 H 5 ). Latter additives were also effective in trapping the intermediately formed ethene-iodonium complex giving rise to 1-iodo-2-X-ethanes. In presence of 1% HCl the production of 125 ICH 2 CH 2 Cl proceeded with preparative radiochemical yields of up to 70%. This occurs by primary formation of 125 ICl and subsequent addition to ethene. (orig.)

  2. Understanding the primary emissions and secondary formation of gaseous organic acids in the oil sands region of Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liggio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic acids are known to be emitted from combustion processes and are key photochemical products of biogenic and anthropogenic precursors. Despite their multiple environmental impacts, such as on acid deposition and human–ecosystem health, little is known regarding their emission magnitudes or detailed chemical formation mechanisms. In the current work, airborne measurements of 18 gas-phase low-molecular-weight organic acids were made in the summer of 2013 over the oil sands region of Alberta, Canada, an area of intense unconventional oil extraction. The data from these measurements were used in conjunction with emission retrieval algorithms to derive the total and speciated primary organic acid emission rates, as well as secondary formation rates downwind of oil sands operations. The results of the analysis indicate that approximately 12 t day−1 of low-molecular-weight organic acids, dominated by C1–C5 acids, were emitted directly from off-road diesel vehicles within open pit mines. Although there are no specific reporting requirements for primary organic acids, the measured emissions were similar in magnitude to primary oxygenated hydrocarbon emissions, for which there are reporting thresholds, measured previously ( ≈  20 t day−1. Conversely, photochemical production of gaseous organic acids significantly exceeded the primary sources, with formation rates of up to  ≈  184 t day−1 downwind of the oil sands facilities. The formation and evolution of organic acids from a Lagrangian flight were modelled with a box model, incorporating a detailed hydrocarbon reaction mechanism extracted from the Master Chemical Mechanism (v3.3. Despite evidence of significant secondary organic acid formation, the explicit chemical box model largely underestimated their formation in the oil sands plumes, accounting for 39, 46, 26, and 23 % of the measured formic, acetic, acrylic, and propionic acids respectively and with

  3. Understanding the primary emissions and secondary formation of gaseous organic acids in the oil sands region of Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggio, John; Moussa, Samar G.; Wentzell, Jeremy; Darlington, Andrea; Liu, Peter; Leithead, Amy; Hayden, Katherine; O'Brien, Jason; Mittermeier, Richard L.; Staebler, Ralf; Wolde, Mengistu; Li, Shao-Meng

    2017-07-01

    Organic acids are known to be emitted from combustion processes and are key photochemical products of biogenic and anthropogenic precursors. Despite their multiple environmental impacts, such as on acid deposition and human-ecosystem health, little is known regarding their emission magnitudes or detailed chemical formation mechanisms. In the current work, airborne measurements of 18 gas-phase low-molecular-weight organic acids were made in the summer of 2013 over the oil sands region of Alberta, Canada, an area of intense unconventional oil extraction. The data from these measurements were used in conjunction with emission retrieval algorithms to derive the total and speciated primary organic acid emission rates, as well as secondary formation rates downwind of oil sands operations. The results of the analysis indicate that approximately 12 t day-1 of low-molecular-weight organic acids, dominated by C1-C5 acids, were emitted directly from off-road diesel vehicles within open pit mines. Although there are no specific reporting requirements for primary organic acids, the measured emissions were similar in magnitude to primary oxygenated hydrocarbon emissions, for which there are reporting thresholds, measured previously ( ≈ 20 t day-1). Conversely, photochemical production of gaseous organic acids significantly exceeded the primary sources, with formation rates of up to ≈ 184 t day-1 downwind of the oil sands facilities. The formation and evolution of organic acids from a Lagrangian flight were modelled with a box model, incorporating a detailed hydrocarbon reaction mechanism extracted from the Master Chemical Mechanism (v3.3). Despite evidence of significant secondary organic acid formation, the explicit chemical box model largely underestimated their formation in the oil sands plumes, accounting for 39, 46, 26, and 23 % of the measured formic, acetic, acrylic, and propionic acids respectively and with little contributions from biogenic VOC precursors. The model

  4. In Situ Gaseous Reduction Pilot Demonstration - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, E.C.; Phelan, J.M.; Giblin, J.T.; Olsen, K.B.; Miller, R.D.; Gilmore, T.J.

    1999-01-01

    The demonstration of the IGRS approach conducted at SWMU 143 on the White Sands Missile Range has provided information needed to complete a technical performance assessment and cost analysis of the technology. At least 70% of the Cr(VI) present in contaminated sediment at the site was reduced, thus verifying the effectiveness of the approach. Most of the treatment occurred in a zone located from approximately4 to 10 ft below ground surface, which appears to be a higher permeability interval. A deeper zone from approximately10 to 16 ft that contains lower levels of contamination was essentially unaffected. The deeper zone is somewhat finer grained and has a higher clay content and is, thus, less permeable. It appears that most of the treatment gas was channeled through the higher, more-permeable zone and the lower zone was bypassed. Treatment of the lower zone could probably be accomplished, however, if a second injection well were installed and screened across the zone so that treatment gas could be forced into this interval. The amount of H 2 S consumed during the test exceeded the amount predicted by the laboratory treatability study. In addition, the levels of H 2 S observed at the extraction wells were relatively low, even though a significant level of treatment was observed at the site. It is inferred that interfering reactions or slower reaction kinetics are the likely source of consumption of extra H 2 S observed in the field. Future laboratory work will be undertaken to investigate the nature of these chemical reactions and the reaction rates associated with the gaseous reduction of Cr(VI) in soils. Elucidation of these effects may reveal methods for improving the effectiveness of the technology and reducing unit costs. A life-cycle cost model was developed for the technology based on demonstration information (Hogan 1998). This model suggests that the technology should compare favorably with excavation from a cost basis for larger sites, especially when

  5. In Situ Gaseous Reduction Pilot Demonstration - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, E.C.; Phelan, J.M.; Giblin, J.T.; Olsen, K.B.; Miller, R.D.; Gilmore, T.J.

    1999-02-23

    The demonstration of the IGRS approach conducted at SWMU 143 on the White Sands Missile Range has provided information needed to complete a technical performance assessment and cost analysis of the technology. At least 70% of the Cr(VI) present in contaminated sediment at the site was reduced, thus verifying the effectiveness of the approach. Most of the treatment occurred in a zone located from {approximately}4 to 10 ft below ground surface, which appears to be a higher permeability interval. A deeper zone from {approximately}10 to 16 ft that contains lower levels of contamination was essentially unaffected. The deeper zone is somewhat finer grained and has a higher clay content and is, thus, less permeable. It appears that most of the treatment gas was channeled through the higher, more-permeable zone and the lower zone was bypassed. Treatment of the lower zone could probably be accomplished, however, if a second injection well were installed and screened across the zone so that treatment gas could be forced into this interval. The amount of H{sub 2}S consumed during the test exceeded the amount predicted by the laboratory treatability study. In addition, the levels of H{sub 2}S observed at the extraction wells were relatively low, even though a significant level of treatment was observed at the site. It is inferred that interfering reactions or slower reaction kinetics are the likely source of consumption of extra H{sub 2}S observed in the field. Future laboratory work will be undertaken to investigate the nature of these chemical reactions and the reaction rates associated with the gaseous reduction of Cr(VI) in soils. Elucidation of these effects may reveal methods for improving the effectiveness of the technology and reducing unit costs. A life-cycle cost model was developed for the technology based on demonstration information (Hogan 1998). This model suggests that the technology should compare favorably with excavation from a cost basis for larger sites

  6. Sanitizing radish seeds by simultaneous treatments with gaseous chlorine dioxide, high relative humidity, and mild heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Jihyun; Choi, Moonhak; Son, Hyeri; Beuchat, Larry R; Kim, Yoonsook; Kim, Hoikyung; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2016-11-21

    Sanitizing radish seeds intended for edible sprout production was achieved by applying simultaneous treatments with gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO 2 ), high relative humidity (RH, 100%), and mild heat (55°C). Gaseous ClO 2 was produced from aqueous ClO 2 (0.66ml) by mixing sulfuric acid (5% w/v) with sodium chlorite (10 mg/mL) in a sealed container (1.8L). Greater amounts of gaseous ClO 2 were measured at 23% RH (144ppm after 6h) than at 100% RH (66ppm after 6h); however, the lethal activity of gaseous ClO 2 against naturally occurring mesophilic aerobic bacteria (MAB) on radish seeds was significantly enhanced at 100% RH. For example, when exposed to gaseous ClO 2 at 23% RH, the number of MAB on radish seeds decreased from 3.7logCFU/g to 2.6logCFU/g after 6h. However, when exposed to gaseous ClO 2 at 100% RH for 6h, the MAB population decreased to 0.7logCFU/g after 6h. Gaseous ClO 2 was produced in higher amounts at 55°C than at 25°C, but decreased more rapidly over time at 55°C than at 25°C. The lethal activity of gaseous ClO 2 against MAB on radish seeds was greater at 55°C than at 25°C. When radish seeds were treated with gaseous ClO 2 (peak concentration: 195ppm) at 100% RH and 55°C, MAB were reduced to populations below the detectable level (0.05) decreased after treatment for 6h. The information reported here will be useful when developing decontamination strategies for producing microbiologically safe radish seed sprouts. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Microwave remediation of electronic circuitry waste and the resulting gaseous emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Rebecca L.

    The global community has become increasingly dependent on computer and electronic technology. As a result, society is faced with an increasing amount of obsolete equipment and electronic circuitry waste. Electronic waste is generally disposed of in landfills. While convenient, this action causes a substantial loss of finite resources and poses an environmental threat as the circuit board components breakdown and are exposed to the elements. Hazardous compounds such as lead, mercury and cadmium may leach from the circuitry and find their way into the groundwater supply. For this dissertation, a microwave waste remediation system was developed. The system was designed to remove the organic components from a wide variety of electronic circuitry. Upon additional heating of the resulting ash material in an industrial microwave, a glass and metal product can be recovered. Analysis of the metal reveals the presence of precious metals (gold, silver) that can be sold to provide a return on investment. a glass and metal product can be recovered. Analysis of the metal reveals the presence of precious metals (gold, silver) that can be sold to provide a return on investment. Gaseous organic compounds that were generated as a result of organic removal were treated in a microwave off gas system that effectively reduced the concentration of the products emitted by several orders of magnitude, and in some cases completely destroying the waste gas. Upon further heating in an industrial microwave, a glass and metal product were recovered. In order to better understand the effects of processing parameters on the efficiency of the off-gas system, a parametric study was developed. The study tested the microwave system at 3 flow rates (10, 30, and 50 ft 3/min) and three temperatures (400, 700 and 1000°C. In order to test the effects of microwave energy, the experiments were repeated using a conventional furnace. While microwave energy is widely used, the mechanisms of interaction with

  8. Positron emitting radionuclides for South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynchbank, S.; Van der Walt, T.N.; Sharpey-Shafer, J.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In South Africa there are currently two projects underway to supply and utilise positron emitting radionuclides for imaging in clinical nuclear medicine facilities. The advantages and applications of such radio nuclides are numerous and well known. However the premier initial application will be to employ 1BF, at first in the compound fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F)-FDG, for patients with cancers and neoplasms. The two projects are sited at iThemba LABS, where production of a generator supplying 66 Ga and the provision of ( 18 F]-FDG, are in an advanced state of planning; the former already fully financed by the Innovation Fund of the National Research Foundation. The two positron emitting radionuclides, 18 F and 68 Ge, will be produced using a cyclotron induced reaction on 1802 and Ga, respectively, at iThemba LABS. The 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generator consists of an anion exchanger loaded with 68 Ge, which decays to 68 Ga. The resulting radiopharmaceuticals, ( 18 F]-FDG and 68 Ga citrate, will be produced by the Radionuclide Production Group of iThemba LABS, using well described methods. However the structures and processes to be used in the generator to provide 68 Ga are novel and will be explained. Initially provision of the CBF]-FDG will be to selected clinical medicine facilities in the Western Cape and Gauteng. It should be noted that the logistical problems of providing this radiopharmaceutical (which are much complicated by its short half life of 109.7 min) to Gauteng, were shown to be surmountable in the 1970s, by a regular delivery of 18 F between Gauteng and Cape Town, after the advent of a commercial service using jet aircraft. The obvious requirement that there should be appropriate nuclear medicine facilities to image patients, at the sites to which the positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals will be supplied, has been addressed. Proposed solutions will be outlined, in terms of a dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) camera and a gamma

  9. Nuclear criticality safety aspects of gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in the diffusion cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffer, J.E. [Parallax, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This paper determines the nuclear safety of gaseous UF{sub 6} in the current Gaseous Diffusion Cascade and auxiliary systems. The actual plant safety system settings for pressure trip points are used to determine the maximum amount of HF moderation in the process gas, as well as the corresponding atomic number densities. These inputs are used in KENO V.a criticality safety models which are sized to the actual plant equipment. The ENO V.a calculation results confirm nuclear safety of gaseous UF{sub 6} in plant operations..

  10. Biofuels and Bioproducts from Wet and Gaseous Waste Streams: Challenges and Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-01-09

    This report draws together activities related to wet and gaseous waste feedstocks into a single document. It enables an amplified focus on feedstocks in the relevant technology and potential markets category. Also, this report helps to inform and support ongoing wet and gaseous resource recovery activities in the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and in the broader federal space. Historically, the office has identified wet and gaseous waste feedstocks as potentially advantageous, but has not pursued them with a sustained focus. This document seeks to position these waste streams appropriately alongside more traditional feedstocks in BETO efforts.

  11. The development of gaseous detectors with solid photocathodes for low temperature applications

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L.; Iacobaeus, C.; Francke, T.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Pavlopoulos, N.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.

    2004-01-01

    There are several applications and fundamental research areas which require the detection of VUV light at cryogenic temperatures. For these applications we have developed and successfully tested special designs of gaseous detectors with solid photocathodes able to operate at low temperatures: sealed gaseous detectors with MgF2 windows and windowless detectors. We have experimentally demonstrated, that both primary and secondary (due to the avalanche multiplication inside liquids) scintillation lights could be recorded by photosensitive gaseous detectors. The results of this work may allow one to significantly improve the operation of some noble liquid gas TPCs.

  12. Nuclear criticality safety aspects of gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF6) in the diffusion cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, J.E.

    1997-04-01

    This paper determines the nuclear safety of gaseous UF 6 in the current Gaseous Diffusion Cascade and auxiliary systems. The actual plant safety system settings for pressure trip points are used to determine the maximum amount of HF moderation in the process gas, as well as the corresponding atomic number densities. These inputs are used in KENO V.a criticality safety models which are sized to the actual plant equipment. The ENO V.a calculation results confirm nuclear safety of gaseous UF 6 in plant operations

  13. IAEA verification experiment at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, D.M.; Subudhi, M.; Calvert, O.L.; Bonner, T.N.; Cherry, R.C.; Whiting, N.E.

    1998-01-01

    In April 1996, the United States (US) added the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to the list of facilities eligible for the application of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. At that time, the US proposed that the IAEA carry out a Verification Experiment at the plant with respect to the downblending of about 13 metric tons of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the form of UF 6 . This material is part of the 226 metric tons of fissile material that President Clinton has declared to be excess to US national-security needs and which will be permanently withdrawn from the US nuclear stockpile. In September 1997, the IAEA agreed to carry out this experiment, and during the first three weeks of December 1997, the IAEA verified the design information concerning the downblending process. The plant has been subject to short-notice random inspections since December 17, 1997. This paper provides an overview of the Verification Experiment, the monitoring technologies used in the verification approach, and some of the experience gained to date

  14. Preview-based sampling for controlling gaseous simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Ruoguan

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we describe an automated method for directing the control of a high resolution gaseous fluid simulation based on the results of a lower resolution preview simulation. Small variations in accuracy between low and high resolution grids can lead to divergent simulations, which is problematic for those wanting to achieve a desired behavior. Our goal is to provide a simple method for ensuring that the high resolution simulation matches key properties from the lower resolution simulation. We first let a user specify a fast, coarse simulation that will be used for guidance. Our automated method samples the data to be matched at various positions and scales in the simulation, or allows the user to identify key portions of the simulation to maintain. During the high resolution simulation, a matching process ensures that the properties sampled from the low resolution simulation are maintained. This matching process keeps the different resolution simulations aligned even for complex systems, and can ensure consistency of not only the velocity field, but also advected scalar values. Because the final simulation is naturally similar to the preview simulation, only minor controlling adjustments are needed, allowing a simpler control method than that used in prior keyframing approaches. Copyright © 2011 by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.

  15. Frequency-domain analysis for pulsating combustion of gaseous fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, I. A.; Porshnev, S. V.; Oshchepkova, V. Y.; Medvedev, A. N.

    2017-06-01

    Pulsating combustion is among combustion control methods used to suppress formation of NOx. Past experiments showed that the dependency of NOx content from pulsation rate has a minimum. A measuring unit was set up to study torch behavior in infrared band. To study pulsating combustion of gaseous fuel a thermographic camera was used. Thermographic sequences were recorded using the instrument FLIR 7700M with the resolution of 320×240 pixels at the frame rate of 412 Hz. The experiments resulted in obtaining thermographic sequences radiation intensity fields in the longitudinal section of the torch at different pulsation rates. The obtained raw data was preprocessed to obtain distributions of quantities of pixels corresponding to temperatures in each frame, as well as time-domain series for changes of the torch core longitudinal section area. Frequency-domain analysis was run for each time-domain series using Fast Fourier transform (FFT). The results demonstrate that the first maximum of spectral density coincides with the control action rate. The spectrum also contains pronounced second and third harmonics. For each spectrum of the time-domain series signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was calculated. Comparison of different SNR shows that maximum impact of pulsation control on torch radiation intensity takes place at the on/off valve opening rate of 4 Hz. This method of torch diagnostics can be helpful for future studies and development of pulsating combustion control systems.

  16. Measurement of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant criticality accident alarm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayloe, R.W. Jr.; D'Aquila, D.M.; McGinnis, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear criticality accident radiation alarm system installed at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant was tested extensively at critical facilities located at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The ability of the neutron scintillator radiation detection units to respond to a minimum accident of concern as defined in Standard ANSI/ANS-83.-1986 was demonstrated. Detector placement and the established trip point are based on shielding calculations performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and criticality specialists at the Portsmouth plant. Based on these experiments and calculations, a detector trip point of 5 mrad/h in air is used. Any credible criticality accident is expected to produce neutron radiation fields >5 mrad/h in air at one or more radiation alarm locations. Each radiation alarm location has a cluster of three detectors that employs a two-out-of-three alarm logic. Earlier work focused on testing the alarm logic latching circuitry. This work was directed toward measurements involving the actual audible alarm signal delivered

  17. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, J.W. (ed.) (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

    1990-10-01

    This calendar year 1989 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the Summary, Discussion, and Conclusions (Part 1) and the Data Presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are the following: report 1989 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance. Routine monitoring and sampling for radiation, radioactive materials, and chemical substances on and off the DOE site are used to document compliance with appropriate standards, to identify trends, to provide information for the public, and to contribute to general environmental knowledge. The surveillance program assists in fulfilling the DOE policy of protecting the public, employees, and environment from harm that could be caused by its activities and reducing negative environmental impacts to the greatest degree practicable. Environmental-monitoring information complements data on specific releases, trends, and summaries. 26 refs.

  18. Tensile properties of ADI material in water and gaseous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajnovic, Dragan, E-mail: draganr@uns.ac.rs [Faculty of Technical Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg D. Obradovića 6, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Balos, Sebastian; Sidjanin, Leposava [Faculty of Technical Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg D. Obradovića 6, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Eric Cekic, Olivera [Innovation Centre, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Grbovic Novakovic, Jasmina [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-03-15

    Austempered ductile iron (ADI) is an advanced type of heat treated ductile iron, having comparable mechanical properties as forged steels. However, it was found that in contact with water the mechanical properties of austempered ductile irons decrease, especially their ductility. Despite considerable scientific attention, the cause of this phenomenon remains unclear. Some authors suggested that hydrogen or small atom chemisorption causes the weakening of the surface atomic bonds. To get additional reliable data of that phenomenon, in this paper, two different types of austempered ductile irons were tensile tested in various environments, such as: argon, helium, hydrogen gas and water. It was found that only the hydrogen gas and water gave a statistically significant decrease in mechanical properties, i.e. cause embrittlement. Furthermore, the fracture surface analysis revealed that the morphology of the embrittled zone near the specimen surface shares similarities to the fatigue micro-containing striation-like lines, which indicates that the morphology of the brittle zone may be caused by cyclic local-chemisorption, micro-embrittlement and local-fracture. - Highlights: • In contact with water and other liquids the ADI suddenly exhibits embrittlement. • The embrittlement is more pronounced in water than in the gaseous hydrogen. • The hydrogen chemisorption into ADI surface causes the formation of a brittle zone. • The ADI austempered at lower temperatures (300 °C) is more resistant to embrittlement.

  19. Ultraviolet Channeling Dynamics in Gaseous Media for X -- Ray Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorkindale, John Charters

    The development of a coherent high brightness / short duration X -- ray source has been of considerable interest to the scientific community as well as various industries since the invention of the technology. Possible applications include X -- ray lithography, biological micro-imaging and the probing of molecular and atomic dynamics. One such source under investigation involves the interaction of a high pulsed power KrF UV laser with a noble gas target (krypton or xenon), producing a photon energy from 1 -- 5 keV. Amplification in this regime requires materials with very special properties found in spatially organized hollow atom clusters. One of the driving forces behind X -- ray production is the UV laser. Theoretical analysis shows that above a critical laser power, the formation of a stable plasma channel in the gaseous medium will occur which can act as a guide for the X-ray pulse and co-propagating UV beam. These plasma channels are visualized with a triple pinhole camera, axial and transverse von Hamos spectrometers and a Thomson scattering setup. In order to understand observed channel morphologies, full characterization of the drive laser was achieved using a Transient Grating -- Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (TG-FROG) technique which gives a full temporal representation of the electric field and associated phase of the ultrashort pulse. Insights gleaned from the TG -- FROG data as well as analysis of photodiode diagnostics placed along the UV laser amplification chain provide explanations for the plasma channel morphology and X -- ray output.

  20. Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and uranium hydride powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shugard, Andrew D.; Buffleben, George M.; Johnson, Terry A.; Robinson, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and uranium hydride powder can be rapid and reversible. • Gas–solid exchange rate is controlled by transport within ∼0.7 μm hydride particles. • Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using uranium hydride is feasible. - Abstract: Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and solid uranium hydride has been studied by flowing hydrogen (deuterium) gas through packed powder beds of uranium deuteride (hydride). We used a residual gas analyzer system to perform real-time analysis of the effluent gas composition. We also developed an exchange and transport model and, by fitting it to the experimental data, extracted kinetic parameters for the isotope exchange reaction. Our results suggest that, from approximately 70 to 700 kPa and 25 to 400 °C, the gas-to-solid exchange rate is controlled by hydrogen and deuterium transport within the ∼0.7 μm diameter uranium hydride particles. We use our kinetic parameters to show that gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen and deuterium using uranium hydride could be feasible

  1. Nitrogen-system safety study: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    The Department of Energy has primary responsibility for the safety of operations at DOE-owned nuclear facilities. The guidelines for the analysis of credible accidents are outlined in DOE Order 5481.1. DOE has requested that existing plant facilities and operations be reviewed for potential safety problems not covered by standard industrial safety procedures. This review is being conducted by investigating individual facilities and documenting the results in Safety Study Reports which will be compiled to form the Existing Plant Final Safety Analysis Report which is scheduled for completion in September, 1984. This Safety Study documents the review of the Plant Nitrogen System facilities and operations and consists of Section 4.0, Facility and Process Description, and Section 5.0, Accident Analysis, of the Final Safety Analysis Report format. The existing nitrogen system consists of a Superior Air Products Company Type D Nitrogen Plant, nitrogen storage facilities, vaporization facilities and a distribution system. The system is designed to generate and distribute nitrogen gas used in the cascade for seal feed, buffer systems, and for servicing equipment when exceptionally low dew points are required. Gaseous nitrogen is also distributed to various process auxiliary buildings. The average usage is approximately 130,000 standard cubic feet per day

  2. Development of a gaseous photon detector for Cherenkov imaging applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rocco, Elena; Dalla Torre, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the R&D activity aiming at a novel micro pattern gaseous photon detector based on the THick Gas Electron Multiplier (THGEM). The goal application of the novel photon detector is the detection of single photon in Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) counters. The THGEM principle is derived from the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) one, even if the material, the production technology and the size scale are different: a THGEM is a Circuit Printed Board (PCB) coated with thin copper layers on both faces, with holes obtained by drilling. Part of the THGEM features are similar to those of the GEMs, but a number of characteristics aspects result substantially different: in fact, if the geometrical parameters can be scaled from the GEM ones, the parameters related to the electrons multiplication, which is a microscopic physical phenomenon, do not. This is why, before starting the photon detector development, we have performed a systematic study of the THGEM multiplier. A photon detector is forme...

  3. Bioavailability study for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phipps, T.L.; Kszos, L.A.

    1996-08-01

    The overall purpose of this plan is to assess the bioavailability of metals in the continuous and intermittent outfalls. The results may be used to determine alternative metal limits that more appropriately measure the portion of metal present necessary for toxicity to aquatic life. These limits must remain protective of in-stream aquatic life; thus, the highest concentration of metal in the water will be determined concurrently with an assessment of acute or chronic toxicity on laboratory tests. Using the method developed by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW), biomonitoring results and chemical data will be used to recommend alternative metal limits for the outfalls of concern. The data will be used to meet the objectives of the study: (1) evaluate the toxicity of continuous outfalls and intermittent outfalls at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant; (2) determine the mean ratio of dissolved to Total Recoverable metal for Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn in the continuous and intermittent outfalls; (3) determine whether the concentration of total recoverable metal discharged causes toxicity to fathead minnows and /or Ceriodaphnia; and (4) determine alternative metal limits for each metal of concern (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn).

  4. Nuclear piston engine and pulsed gaseous core reactor power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, E.T.

    1976-01-01

    The investigated nuclear piston engines consist of a pulsed, gaseous core reactor enclosed by a moderating-reflecting cylinder and piston assembly and operate on a thermodynamic cycle similar to the internal combustion engine. The primary working fluid is a mixture of uranium hexafluoride, UF 6 , and helium, He, gases. Highly enriched UF 6 gas is the reactor fuel. The helium is added to enhance the thermodynamic and heat transfer characteristics of the primary working fluid and also to provide a neutron flux flattening effect in the cylindrical core. Two and four-stroke engines have been studied in which a neutron source is the counterpart of the sparkplug in the internal combustion engine. The piston motions which have been investigated include pure simple harmonic, simple harmonic with dwell periods, and simple harmonic in combination with non-simple harmonic motion. The results of the conducted investigations indicate good performance potential for the nuclear piston engine with overall efficiencies of as high as 50 percent for nuclear piston engine power generating units of from 10 to 50 Mw(e) capacity. Larger plants can be conceptually designed by increasing the number of pistons, with the mechanical complexity and physical size as the probable limiting factors. The primary uses for such power systems would be for small mobile and fixed ground-based power generation (especially for peaking units for electrical utilities) and also for nautical propulsion and ship power

  5. Distinguishing between microscale gaseous bubbles and liquid drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Beng Hau; An, Hongjie; Chan, Chon U.; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, there has been strong research interest in decorating surfaces with tiny bubbles and drops due to their potential applications in reducing slippage in micro and nanofluidic devices. Both nanobubbles and nanodrops are typically nucleated by exchanging fluids over a suitable substrate. However, the nucleation experiments present many challenges, such as reproducibility and the possibility of contamination. The use of one-use plastic syringes and needle cannulas in nucleation experiments can introduce polymeric contamination. A contaminated experiment may nucleate bubbles, drops or both. Moreover, it is surprisingly difficult to distinguish between bubbles and drops under the usual atomic force microscopy or optical techniques. Here we present an experimental study comparing bubbles and oil (PDMS) drops on an atomically smooth surface (HOPG). Instead of nucleating the objects via solvent exchange, we directly introduced bubbles via electrolysis, and oil drops by injecting a dilute solution. Contrary to previous reports, we find that under careful AFM characterisation, liquid drops and gaseous bubbles respond differently to a change in imaging force, and moreover present different characteristic force curves.

  6. Partnering efforts at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, C.B.

    1995-01-01

    Before individuals or agencies can effectively work together to solve common problems, they must first agree on exactly what those problems are and establish common goals and methods that will lead to mutually acceptable solutions. Then, they must make a conscientious effort to form a cohesive team that focuses on the established goals and deemphasize traditional roles, which may in some instances be considered adversarial. This kind of teamwork/partnering process can be more difficult, though not impossible, to achieve in cases where there are traditional (real or imagined) adversarial relationships between the parties, i.e. regulator vs. regulated. The US Department of Energy Site Office (DOE) at Paducah, Kentucky, the Kentucky Department of Environmental Protection (KDEP) and the US Environmental Protection Agency, Region IV (EPA) have made t strides toward teamwork and partnering at DOE's Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. They have accomplished this in a number of ways, which will be discussed in greater detail but first and foremost, the agencies agreed up front that they had mutual goals and interests. These goals are to protect public health and the environment in a cost-effective and timely manner, taking care to make the wisest use of public resources (tax dollars); to evaluate and minimize risks, and to achieve ''Win-Win'' for all parties concerned

  7. Determination of gaseous compounds using online mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praun, S.

    1999-08-01

    The work is divided in three major parts and describes various measurements of gaseous compounds. The first part tasks the problem of transit traffic along the motorway from Kufstein, Northern Tyrol/Austria until Ala, Trentino/Italy. During three periods measurements of the immissions of many compounds were carried out simultaneously in Northern Tyrol, Southern Tyrol and Trentino. The influence of the ban of heavy lorry traffic during the weekend and during the night on the reduction of NO 2 could be demonstrated. Furthermore certain compounds (e.g. Benzene) were monitored online for the first time along the motorway at lowest concentrations using the mass spectrometer 'Airsense 500'. In the second part online measurements of exhaled human breath after the oral application of a medicine against bronchitis was performed. In that way beside clinical and pharmacological studies the effectiveness of this pharmacon could be proved. The last part of the present work shows adsorption- and desorption measurements on four different adsorbents. During this procedure seven different gases with an increasing number of carbon atoms were monitored online by the hyphenation of these adsorbents with the mass spectrometer 'Airsense 500'. Thereby, the various properties of the adsorbents in the interaction with the gases could be demonstrated. (author)

  8. Innovative Decontamination Technology for Use in Gaseous Diffusion Plant Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, M.J.; Norton, C.J.; Fraikor, G.B.; Potter, G.L.; Chang, K.C.

    2006-01-01

    The results of bench scale tests demonstrated that TechXtract R RadPro TM technology (hereinafter referred to as RadPro R ) can provide 100% coverage of complex mockup gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) equipment and can decontaminate uranium (U) deposits with 98% to 99.99% efficiency. Deployment tests demonstrated RadPro R can be applied as foam, mist/fog, or steam, and fully cover the internal surfaces of complex mockup equipment, including large piping. Decontamination tests demonstrated that two formulations of RadPro R , one with neutron attenuators and one without neutron attenuators, could remove up to 99.99% of uranyl fluoride deposits, one of the most difficult to remove deposits in GDP equipment. These results were supplemented by results from previous tests conducted in 1994 that showed RadPro R could remove >97% of U and Tc-99 contamination from actual GDP components. Operational use of RadPro R at other DOE and commercial facilities also support these data. (authors)

  9. Combustion characteristics of hydrogen. Carbon monoxide based gaseous fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notardonato, J. J.; White, D. J.; Kubasco, A. J.; Lecren, R. T.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental rig program was conducted with the objective of evaluating the combuston performance of a family of fuel gases based on a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. These gases, in addition to being members of a family, were also representative of those secondary fuels that could be produced from coal by various gasification schemes. In particular, simulated Winkler, Lurgi, and Blue-water low and medium energy content gases were used as fuels in the experimental combustor rig. The combustor used was originally designed as a low NOx rich-lean system for burning liquid fuels with high bound nitrogen levels. When used with the above gaseous fuels this combustor was operated in a lean-lean mode with ultra long residence times. The Blue-water gas was also operated in a rich-lean mode. The results of these tests indicate the possibility of the existence of an 'optimum' gas turbine hydrogen - carbon monoxide based secondary fuel. Such a fuel would exhibit NOx and high efficiency over the entire engine operating range. It would also have sufficient stability range to allow normal light-off and engine acceleration. Solar Turbines Incorporated would like to emphasize that the results presented here have been obtained with experimental rig combustors. The technologies generated could, however, be utilized in future commercial gas turbines.

  10. Evaluation of light-emitting diodes as attractant for sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) in northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Francinaldo Soares; Brito, Jefferson Mesquita; Costa Neta, Benedita Maria; Lobo, Shelre Emile Pereira Duarte

    2015-09-01

    Hoover Pugedo light traps were modified for use with green and blue-light-emitting diodes to trap phlebotomine sandflies in northeastern Brazil. A total of 2,267 specimens belonging to eight genera and 15 species were sampled. The predominant species were Nyssomyia whitmani(34.41%) and Micropygomyia echinatopharynx(17.25%).The green LED trap prevailed over the blue and control lights; however, no statistically significant difference could be detected among the three light sources. Even without statistical significance, we suggest using LEDs as an attractant for the capture of sandflies because of several advantages over the conventional method with incandescent lamps.

  11. Evaluation of light-emitting diodes as attractant for sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae in northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francinaldo Soares Silva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hoover Pugedo light traps were modified for use with green and blue-light-emitting diodes to trap phlebotomine sandflies in northeastern Brazil. A total of 2,267 specimens belonging to eight genera and 15 species were sampled. The predominant species were Nyssomyia whitmani(34.41% and Micropygomyia echinatopharynx(17.25%.The green LED trap prevailed over the blue and control lights; however, no statistically significant difference could be detected among the three light sources. Even without statistical significance, we suggest using LEDs as an attractant for the capture of sandflies because of several advantages over the conventional method with incandescent lamps.

  12. SUMER: Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, K.; Axford, W. I.; Curdt, W.; Gabriel, A. H.; Grewing, M.; Huber, M. C. E.; Jordan, M. C. E.; Lemaire, P.; Marsch, E.; Poland, A. I.

    1988-01-01

    The SUMER (solar ultraviolet measurements of emitted radiation) experiment is described. It will study flows, turbulent motions, waves, temperatures and densities of the plasma in the upper atmosphere of the Sun. Structures and events associated with solar magnetic activity will be observed on various spatial and temporal scales. This will contribute to the understanding of coronal heating processes and the solar wind expansion. The instrument will take images of the Sun in EUV (extreme ultra violet) light with high resolution in space, wavelength and time. The spatial resolution and spectral resolving power of the instrument are described. Spectral shifts can be determined with subpixel accuracy. The wavelength range extends from 500 to 1600 angstroms. The integration time can be as short as one second. Line profiles, shifts and broadenings are studied. Ratios of temperature and density sensitive EUV emission lines are established.

  13. Light-emitting diodes for analytical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macka, Mirek; Piasecki, Tomasz; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2014-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are playing increasingly important roles in analytical chemistry, from the final analysis stage to photoreactors for analyte conversion to actual fabrication of and incorporation in microdevices for analytical use. The extremely fast turn-on/off rates of LEDs have made possible simple approaches to fluorescence lifetime measurement. Although they are increasingly being used as detectors, their wavelength selectivity as detectors has rarely been exploited. From their first proposed use for absorbance measurement in 1970, LEDs have been used in analytical chemistry in too many ways to make a comprehensive review possible. Hence, we critically review here the more recent literature on their use in optical detection and measurement systems. Cloudy as our crystal ball may be, we express our views on the future applications of LEDs in analytical chemistry: The horizon will certainly become wider as LEDs in the deep UV with sufficient intensity become available.

  14. Types of organic light-emitting diode (OLED)

    OpenAIRE

    Askari Mohammad Bagher

    2016-01-01

    An organic light-emitting diode (OLED) consists of several semiconducting organic layers sandwiched between two electrodes, at least one of them being transparent. OLEDs can provide brighter, crisper displays on electronic devices and use less power than conventional light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or liquid crystal displays (LCDs) used today. OLEDs are made by placing thin films of organic materials between two conductors. When electrical current is applied, a bright light is emitted. The OLED ...

  15. Unregulated gaseous exhaust emission from modern ethanol fuelled light duty vehicles in cold ambient condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clairotte, M.; Adam, T. W.; Zardini, A. A.; Astorga, C.

    2011-12-01

    According to Directive 2003/30/EC and 2009/28/EC of the European Parliament and the Council, Member States should promote the use of biofuel. Consequently, all petrol and diesel used for transport purpose available on the market since the 1st of January 2011 must contain a reference value of 5.75% of renewable energy. Ethanol in gasoline could be a promising alternative to comply with this objective, and is actually available in higher proportion in Sweden and Brazil. In addition to a lower dependence on fossil fuel, it is well established that ethanol contributes to reduce air pollutant emissions during combustion (CO, THC), and presents a beneficial effect on the greenhouse gas emissions. However, these statements rely on numerous chassis dynamometer emission studies performed in warm condition (22°C), and very few emission data are available at cold ambient condition encountered in winter, particularly in the north of Europe. In this present study, the effects of ethanol (E75-E85) versus gasoline (E5) have been investigated at cold ambient temperature (-7°C). Experiments have been carried out in a chassis dynamometer at the Vehicle Emission Laboratory (VELA) of the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC - Ispra, Italy). Emissions of modern passenger cars complying with the latest European standard (Euro4 and Euro5a) were tracked over the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). Unregulated gaseous compounds like greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide), and air quality related compounds (ammonia, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde) were monitored by an online Fourier Transformed Infra-Red spectrometer with 1 Hz acquisition frequency. In addition, a number of ozone precursors (carbonyls and volatile organic hydrocarbons) were collected in order to assess the ozone formation potential (OFP) of the exhaust. Results showed higher unregulated emissions at -7°C, regardless of the ethanol content in the fuel blend. Most of the emissions occurred during

  16. CAMEX-3 ATMOSPHERIC EMITTED RADIANCE INTERFEROMETER (AERI) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) was used to make atmospheric temperature and moisture retrievals. AERI provides absolutely calibrated...

  17. An assessment of the real-world driving gaseous emissions from a Euro 6 light-duty diesel vehicle using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luján, José M.; Bermúdez, Vicente; Dolz, Vicente; Monsalve-Serrano, Javier

    2018-02-01

    Recent investigations demonstrated that real-world emissions usually exceed the levels achieved in the laboratory based type approval processes. By means of on-board emissions measurements, it has been shown that nitrogen oxides emitted by diesel engines substantially exceed the limit imposed by the Euro 6 regulation. Thus, with the aim of complementing the worldwide harmonized light vehicles test cycle, the real driving emissions cycle will be introduced after 1 September 2017 to regulate the vehicle emissions in real-world driving situations. This paper presents on-board gaseous emissions measurements from a Euro 6 light-duty diesel vehicle in a real-world driving route using a portable emissions measurement system. The test route characteristics follow the requirements imposed by the RDE regulation. The analysis of the raw emissions results suggests that the greatest amount of nitrogen oxides and nitrogen dioxide are emitted during the urban section of the test route, confirming that lower speeds with more accelerations and decelerations lead to higher nitrogen oxides emissions levels than constant high speeds. Moreover, the comparison of the two calculation methods proposed by the real driving emissions regulation has revealed emissions rates differences ranging from 10% to 45% depending on the pollutant emission and the trip section considered (urban or total). Thus, the nitrogen oxides emissions conformity factor slightly varies from one method to the other.

  18. Numerical Investigation on Micro-Cavity Effect of Top-Emitting Organic Light Emitting Diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeongi; Hwang, Youngwook; Won, Taeyoung

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we report our numerical investigation on the top-emitting OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diodes) with micro-cavity. Our numerical model includes an ensemble of radiating dipole antennas for light emission as well as Poisson Equation for carrier injection and transportation. We formulated a set of differential equations by the Finite Element Method. Our simulation revealed that the recombination rate is affected by the thickness of each layer comprising the OLED structure and the amount of emission is determined by the total thickness of the OLED structure due to micro-cavity effect which is observed in between the total reflection layer and the half reflection layer. Our numerical solver enables us to optimize the OLED structure and thereby improve the external quantum efficiency.

  19. Nanosecond field emitted and photo-field emitted current pulses from ZrC tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganter, R.; Bakker, R.J.; Gough, C.; Paraliev, M.; Pedrozzi, M.; Le Pimpec, F.; Rivkin, L.; Wrulich, A.

    2006-01-01

    In order to find electron sources with low thermal emittance, cathodes based on single tip field emitter are investigated. Maximum peak current, measured from single tip in ZrC with a typical apex radius around 1 μm, are presented. Voltage pulses of 2 ns duration and up to 50 kV amplitude lead to field emission current up to 470 mA from one ZrC tip. Combination of high applied electric field with laser illumination gives the possibility to modulate the emission with laser pulses. Nanoseconds current pulses have been emitted with laser pulses at 1064 nm illuminating a ZrC tip under high-DC electric field. The dependence of photo-field emitted current with the applied voltage can be explained by the Schottky effect

  20. The quest for a third generation of gaseous photon detectors for Cherenkov imaging counters

    CERN Document Server

    Alexeev, M

    2009-01-01

    RICH (Ring Imaging CHerenkov) counters for PID in the high momentum domain and in large acceptance experiments require photon detectors covering extended surface (several square meters) and able to accept Cherenkov photons in a wide angular range. An ideal approach is represented by gaseous photon detectors, which allow covering wide surfaces at affordable costs. The first generation of these detectors was based on the use of organic vapors. The second generation consists of CsI photocathodes and open geometry gaseous detectors (MWPC). In spite of the success of this approach, some limits of the technique arise from the bombardment of the photocathodes by the ions generated in the amplification process and by the photon feedback. A third generation of gaseous photon detectors using closed geometry, as those possible with multistage arrangements of micropattern gaseous detectors, can overcome the observed limitations. We have started an R&D programme to develop a Thick-GEM-based photon detector and we repo...

  1. Performance evaluation of high-strength steel pipelines for high-pressure gaseous hydrogen transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Pipeline steels suffer significant degradation of their mechanical properties in high-pressure : gaseous hydrogen, including their fatigue cracking resistances to cyclic loading. The current : project work was conducted to produce fatigue crack growt...

  2. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report, CY 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1996-03-01

    This report describes the operating activities, upgrade activities, maintenance, and other activities regarding liquid and gaseous low level radioactive waste management at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Miscellaneous activities include training, audits, tours, and environmental restoration support

  3. Solution processed, white emitting tandem organic light-emitting diodes with inverted device architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfle, Stefan; Schienle, Alexander; Bernhard, Christoph; Bruns, Michael; Lemmer, Uli; Colsmann, Alexander

    2014-08-13

    Fully solution processed monochromatic and white-light emitting tandem or multi-photon polymer OLEDs with an inverted device architecture have been realized by employing WO3 /PEDOT:PSS/ZnO/PEI charge carrier generation layers. The luminance of the sub-OLEDs adds up in the stacked device indicating multi-photon emission. The white OLEDs exhibit a CRI of 75. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Light-Emitting Diodes: Phosphorescent Nanocluster Light-Emitting Diodes (Adv. Mater. 2/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttipillai, Padmanaban S; Zhao, Yimu; Traverse, Christopher J; Staples, Richard J; Levine, Benjamin G; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-01-13

    On page 320, R. R. Lunt and co-workers demonstrate electroluminescence from earth-abundant phosphorescent metal halide nanoclusters. These inorganic emitters, which exhibit rich photophysics combined with a high phosphorescence quantum yield, are employed in red and near-infrared light-emitting diodes, providing a new platform of phosphorescent emitters for low-cost and high-performance light-emission applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department Annual Operating Report, CY 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1994-02-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the waste management operations section of the liquid and gaseous waste operations department at ORNL for 1993. The process waste, liquid low-level waste, gaseous waste systems activities are reported, as well as the low-level waste solidification project. Upgrade activities is the various waste processing and treatment systems are summarized. A maintenance activity overview is provided, and program management, training, and other miscellaneous activities are covered

  6. Method for selectively removing fluorine and fluorine-containing contaminants from gaseous UF.sub.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Robert L. (Paducah, KY); Otey, Milton G. (Melber, KY); Perkins, Roy W. (Mayfield, KY)

    1982-01-01

    This invention is a method for effecting preferential removal and immobilization of certain gaseous contaminants from gaseous UF.sub.6. The contaminants include fluorine and fluorides which are more reactive with CaCO.sub.3 than is UF.sub.6. The method comprises contacting the contaminant-carrying UF.sub.6 with particulate CaCO.sub.3 at a temperature effecting reaction of the contaminant and the CaCO.sub.3.

  7. Gaseous hydrogen sulfide protects against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice partially independent from hypometabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Snijder, Pauline M.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Bos, Eelke M.; van den Born, Joost C.; Ruifrok, Willem-Peter T.; Vreeswijk-Baudoin, Inge; van Dijk, Marcory C. R. F.; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; van Goor, Harry

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major cause of cardiac damage following various pathological processes. Gaseous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is protective during IRI by inducing a hypometabolic state in mice which is associated with anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. We investigated whether gaseous H2S administration is protective in cardiac IRI and whether non-hypometabolic concentrations of H2S have similar protective properties. METHODS: Male C57BL/6...

  8. Development of new sealed UV sensitive gaseous detectors and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Di Mauro, Antonio; Martinengo, P; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F; Sipilä, H; Peskov, A

    2007-01-01

    We have developed prototypes of sealed gaseous detectors combined with CsI photocathodes or filled with photosensitive vapors for commercial applications. The first results with these devices for the detection of flames in daylight conditions and of scintillation lights from noble liquids are presented. They show that sealed UV sensitive gaseous detectors can have better performance (higher practical quantum efficiency and a better signal to noise ratio) than existing commercial UV sensitive detectors at lower production cost.

  9. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department Annual Operating Report, CY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1994-02-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the waste management operations section of the liquid and gaseous waste operations department at ORNL for 1993. The process waste, liquid low-level waste, gaseous waste systems activities are reported, as well as the low-level waste solidification project. Upgrade activities is the various waste processing and treatment systems are summarized. A maintenance activity overview is provided, and program management, training, and other miscellaneous activities are covered.

  10. Design of a Premixed Gaseous Rocket Engine Injector for Ethylene and Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    from a Bunsen Burner flame2.........................................................8 Figure 7. The Premixed Gaseous Velocity and the Flame Velocity...a heat and combustion radical sink to stabilize the flame . Figure 6. Streamlines from a Bunsen Burner flame2 It is important to pay...The Premixed Gaseous Velocity and the Flame Velocity above the Bunsen Burner rim3 An indication of when flashback is about to occur is when the

  11. Salient features in the preparation of gaseous tritium filled luminous light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, K.M.; Ravi, S.; Subramanian, T.K.; Ananthakrishnan, M.

    2003-01-01

    Beta radiation emanating from gaseous tritium in close proximity with copper activated zinc sulphide phosphor provides self sustained light sources and these sources are used for nocturnal illumination of liquid crystal display in digital watches and clocks, product advertisements, exit signs etc. We report herein the preparation of low specific radioactivity gaseous tritium (29.5 Ci/m mole; 1.09 TBq/m mole) filled light sources and its effect on light output. (author)

  12. Modelling the gas kinematics of an atypical Ly α emitting compact dwarf galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero-Romero, Jaime E.; Gronke, Max; Remolina-Gutiérrez, Maria Camila; Garavito-Camargo, Nicolás; Dijkstra, Mark

    2018-02-01

    Star-forming compact dwarf galaxies (CDGs) resemble the expected pristine conditions of the first galaxies in the Universe and are the best systems to test models on primordial galaxy formation and evolution. Here, we report on one of such CDGs, Tololo 1214-277, which presents a broad, single peaked, highly symmetric Ly α emission line that had evaded theoretical interpretation so far. In this paper, we reproduce for the first time these line features with two different physically motivated kinematic models: an interstellar medium composed by outflowing clumps with random motions and an homogeneous gaseous sphere undergoing solid body rotation. The multiphase model requires a clump velocity dispersion of 54.3 ± 0.6 km s-1 with outflows of 54.3 ± 5.1 km s-1 , while the bulk rotation velocity is constrained to be 348^{+75}_{-48} km s-1. We argue that the results from the multiphase model provide a correct interpretation of the data. In that case, the clump velocity dispersion implies a dynamical mass of 2 × 109 M⊙, 10 times its baryonic mass. If future kinematic maps of Tololo 1214-277 confirm the velocities suggested by the multiphase model, it would provide additional support to expect such kinematic state in primordial galaxies, opening the opportunity to use the models and methods presented in this paper to constrain the physics of star formation and feedback in the early generation of Ly α -emitting galaxies.

  13. Fine and ultrafine particles emitted from laser printers as indoor air contaminants in German offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tao; Hurraß, Julia; Gminski, Richard; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2012-11-01

    Various publications indicate that the operation of laser printers and photocopiers may be associated with health effects due to the release of gaseous components and fine and ultrafine particles (UFP). However, only sparse studies are available that evaluate the possible exposure of office workers to printer emissions under real conditions. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess the exposure of office workers to particulate matter released from laser printers and photocopiers. Concentrations of fine particles and UFP were measured before, during, and after the operation of laser printing devices in 63 office rooms throughout Germany. Additionally, the particles were characterized by electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A significant increase of fine particles and UFP was identified in ambient workplace air during and after the printing processes. Particle fractions between 0.23 and 20 μm emitted by the office machines significantly affect particle mass concentrations while printing 500 pages, i.e., during the printing process, PM(0.23-20), PM(2.5), and PM(10) concentrations increased in 43 out of the evaluated 62 office rooms investigated. Additionally, a significant increase was observed in submicrometer particles, with median particle number concentrations of 6,503 particles/cm(3) before and 18,060 particles/cm(3) during the printing process. Our data indicate that laser printers and photocopiers could be a relevant source of fine particles and particularly UFP in office rooms.

  14. Efficient double-emitting layer inverted organic light-emitting devices with different spacer layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Qu-yang; Zhang, Fang-hui

    2017-09-01

    Double-emitting layer inverted organic light-emitting devices (IOLEDs) with different spacer layers were investigated, where 2,20,7,70-tetrakis(carbazol-9-yl)-9,9-spirobifluorene (CBP), 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP), 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen) and 4,40,400-tris(N-carbazolyl)-triphenylamine (TCTA) were used as spacer layers, respectively, and GIr1 and R-4b were used as green and red guest phosphorescent materials, respectively. The results show that the device with BCP spacer layer has the best performance. The maximum current efficiency of the BCP spacer layer device reaches up to 24.15 cd·A-1 when the current density is 3.99 mA·cm-2, which is 1.23 times bigger than that of the CBP spacer layer device. The performance is better than that of corresponding conventional device observably. The color coordinate of the device with BCP spacer layer only changes from (0.625 1, 0.368 0) to (0.599 5, 0.392 8) when the driving voltage increases from 6 V to 10 V, so it shows good stability in color coordinate, which is due to the adoption of the co-doping evaporation method for cladding luminous layer and the effective restriction of spacer layer to carriers in emitting layer.

  15. Recent Advances in Conjugated Polymers for Light Emitting Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Alam, Javed; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy; Raja, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A recent advance in the field of light emitting polymers has been the discovery of electroluminescent conjugated polymers, that is, kind of fluorescent polymers that emit light when excited by the flow of an electric current. These new generation fluorescent materials may now challenge the domination by inorganic semiconductor materials of the commercial market in light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and polymer laser devices. This review provides information on unique properties of conjugated polymers and how they have been optimized to generate these properties. The review is organized in three sections focusing on the major advances in light emitting materials, recent literature survey and understanding the desirable properties as well as modern solid state lighting and displays. Recently, developed conjugated polymers are also functioning as roll-up displays for computers and mobile phones, flexible solar panels for power portable equipment as well as organic light emitting diodes in displays, in which television screens, luminous traffic, information signs, and light-emitting wallpaper in homes are also expected to broaden the use of conjugated polymers as light emitting polymers. The purpose of this review paper is to examine conjugated polymers in light emitting diodes (LEDs) in addition to organic solid state laser. Furthermore, since conjugated polymers have been approved as light-emitting organic materials similar to inorganic semiconductors, it is clear to motivate these organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and organic lasers for modern lighting in terms of energy saving ability. In addition, future aspects of conjugated polymers in LEDs were also highlighted in this review. PMID:21673938

  16. Interaction of a ballistic probe with gaseous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucerovsky, Zden; Greason, William D

    2008-01-01

    Free-flying metal probes are used to determine charge densities in gaseous media containing free charge or low density plasma. The trajectory of the probe is ensured either by gravity or by propelling the probe to a certain velocity at the launch site. While travelling, the probe charge changes from its launch-site magnitude to that related to the space charge density existing along the trajectory. The degree to which the probe's arrival-site charge magnitude matches the space charge density in the area of interest depends on the probe shape and on the charge exchange processes between the probe body and the medium. The paper studies a probe acting as a free-flying charge carrier in air, and discusses the problems that may lead to an imbalance between the charge collected by the probe in the area of interest and the charge measured at the arrival site. The analysis and the described experiments are of the ballistic type: a small, triboelectrically pre-charged metal probe was propelled on a horizontal path, and the charge carried by the probe was measured at several points along the trajectory by means of contact-free induction rings; the initial and final charges were determined by static Faraday cups. A charge disparity was found under certain conditions, and its degree explained by the effects of the charge carrier potential. The studied probe charges ranged from 10 to 50 nF, and the fly-times needed to cross a one-meter path ranged from 20 to 40 ms. The probe to gas charge exchange experiments and their analysis yielded conditions under which the probe lost approximately 10 % of its charge. The results of our study may be of interest to those who intend to use the free-flying probe technique for the determination of space charge density.

  17. Prioritizing and scheduling Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant safeguards upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmunds, T.; Saleh, R.; Zevanove, S.

    1992-02-01

    As part of the Site Safeguards and Security Plan (SSSP), facilities are required to develop a Resource Plan (RP). The Resource Plan provides documentation and justification for the facility's planned upgrades, including the schedule, priority, and cost estimates for the safeguards and security upgrades. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) management has identified and obtained funding approval for a number of safeguards and security upgrades, including line-item construction projects. These upgrade projects were selected to address a variety of concerns identified in the PORTS vulnerability assessments and other reviews performed in support of the SSSP process. However, budgeting and scheduling constraints do not make it possible to simultaneously begin implementation of all of the upgrade projects. A formal methodology and analysis are needed to explicitly address the trade-offs between competing safeguards objectives, and to prioritize and schedule the upgrade projects to ensure that the maximum benefit can be realized in the shortest possible time frame. The purpose of this report is to describe the methodology developed to support these upgrade project scheduling decisions. The report also presents the results obtained from applying the methodology to a set of the upgrade projects selected by PORTS S ampersand S management. Data for the analysis are based on discussions with personnel familiar with the PORTS safeguards and security needs, the requirements for implementing these upgrades, and upgrade funding limitations. The analysis results presented here assume continued highly enriched uranium (HEU) operations at PORTS. However, the methodology developed is readily adaptable for the evaluation of other operational scenarios and other resource allocation issues relevant to PORTS

  18. HI in Early Type Galaxies as Gaseous Merger History Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J. R.; Hibbard, J. E.; O'Connell, R. W.

    2003-12-01

    The presence of gaseous merger histories in early type galaxies was tested through a detection survey of 21cm hydrogen emission in the environments of two samples of early type galaxies. The test sample consisted of early type galaxies with central spikes in their surface brightness profiles which may indicate a former dense star formation region. The control sample consisted of early type galaxies without central spikes (and presumably without as recent or as densely located star formation events) and covered a similar range of distances and sizes. Both samples were chosen to be free of dust and active galactic nuclei. The two samples (17 test galaxies and 19 controls) were observed with the Green Bank Telescope with the spectrometer. The spectra were reduced by removing the radio frequency inteference, calibrating via the noise diode and position switching, averaging the multi-integrated spectra, baselining, and calibrating the flux via the observation of a standard source (3C295). The spectra of three galaxies were contaminated by continuum sources in the beam. The spectra of nine more galaxies displayed one or more 21cm lines. Three of these galaxies are members of the test sample and 6 are controls. After comparing the positions and velocities of neighboring galaxies which may have contaminated the beam to the observed spectral features, the probability that environmental gas can be associated with early type galaxies with central spikes is slightly higher. However, the numbers are too low for an adequate statistical analysis and mapping may be required to determine better positions for the detected gas. This work has been funded by NSF REU for NRAO's Summer Student Research Assistantship Program.

  19. Collection Method for Isotopic Analysis of Gaseous Nitrous Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Jiajue; Hastings, Meredith G

    2018-01-02

    The sources and chemistry of gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) in the environment are of great interest. HONO is a major source of atmospheric hydroxyl radical (OH), which impacts air quality and climate. HONO is also a major indoor pollutant that threatens human health. However, the large uncertainty of HONO sources and chemistry hinders an accurate prediction of the OH budget. Isotopic analysis of HONO may provide a tool for tracking the sources and chemistry of HONO. In this study, a modified annular denuder system (ADS) was developed to quantitatively capture HONO for offline nitrogen and oxygen isotopic analysis (δ 15 N and δ 18 O) using the denitrifier method. The ADS method was tested using laboratory generated HONO (400 ppbv to 1 ppmv) and validated by parallel HONO collection with a standard, basic impinger (BI) method. The ADS system shows complete capture of HONO without isotopic fractionation. The uncertainty (1σ) based on repeated measurements across the entire analytical procedure is 0.6‰ for δ 15 N and 0.5‰ for δ 18 O. The ADS method was also tested in roadside collections of ambient HONO (0.4-1.3 ppbv) for isotopic analysis and was found to be robust for low concentration collections over 3 and 12 h collection times. In order to ensure ability to use this method in the laboratory and in the field, storage conditions for the collected HONO samples were tested and samples can be stored with consistent δ 15 N and δ 18 O for 60 days. This method enables future work to utilize the isotopic composition of HONO for studying HONO chemical formation pathways, as well as atmospheric sources and chemistry.

  20. Recombination of positive helium ions in gaseous helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyu, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Wigner-Keck Monte Carlo trajectory method and the resonance complex theory are employed to calculate the rate coefficient k for H e + ions recombining in gaseous helium in the temperature range 80 2 + is obtained from a Morse potential and a long range ion-induced dipole interaction term. The three body He 3 + interaction is represented by an approximate expression which, for practical purpose, depends on the same parameters that determine the two body interaction. Russell had employed the Wigner-Keck Monte Carlo trajectory method to the same reaction. Unlike his calculation, in which the final quasibound states are treated as continuous, we apply the JWKB approximation to quantize those quasibound states. Both the values of k, calculated from two different quasibound state treatments, are found to be very close and give good agreement with experimental results obtained by Biondi, although they are still 10% to 20% lower than the experimental results. The resonance complex theory, developed by Roberts et al, is then employed to investigated de-excitation from the highest quasibound state, which can be populated by inward tunneling through the rotational (centrifugal) barrier. It is found that this strongly supports a suggestion proposed by Russell. He had suggested that the remaining difference between the Wigner-Keck method and experiment might be largely due to the formation of highly excited quasibound states. The statistical errors of the rate constants, which is the sun of results obtained from both methods, are kept less then 5% by running 2500 trajectories in the first method and 500 in the second

  1. Computed tomography with thermal neutrons and gaseous position sensitive detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Maria Ines Silvani

    2001-12-01

    A third generation tomographic system using a parallel thermal neutron beam and gaseous position sensitive detector has been developed along three discrete phases. At the first one, X-ray tomographic images of several objects, using a position sensitive detector designed and constructed for this purpose have been obtained. The second phase involved the conversion of that detector for thermal neutron detection, by using materials capable to convert neutrons into detectable charged particles, testing afterwards its performance in a tomographic system by evaluation the quality of the image arising from several test-objects containing materials applicable in the engineering field. High enriched 3 He, replacing the argon-methane otherwise used as filling gas for the X-ray detection, as well as, a gadolinium foil, have been utilized as converters. Besides the pure enriched 3 He, its mixture with argon-methane and later on with propane, have been also tested, in order to evaluate the detector efficiency and resolution. After each gas change, the overall performance of the tomographic system using the modified detector, has been analyzed through measurements of the related parameters. This was done by analyzing the images produced by test-objects containing several materials having well known attenuation coefficients for both thermal neutrons and X-rays. In order to compare the performance of the position sensitive detector as modified to detect thermal neutrons, with that of a conventional BF 3 detector, additional tomographs have been conducted using the last one. The results have been compared in terms of advantages, handicaps and complementary aspects for different kinds of radiation and materials. (author)

  2. Can the Oxygenator Screen Filter Reduce Gaseous Microemboli?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johagen, Daniel; Appelblad, Micael; Svenmarker, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Gaseous microemboli (GME) define small bubbles as housing. The present experimental study aimed to evaluate the GME removal properties of an integrated arterial screen filter in a standard microporous oxygenator. The GME properties of Terumo Capiox® FX25 with an integrated arterial screen filter was assessed in an experimental setup and compared with Capiox® RX25, in which no arterial screen filter is present. A blood analog prime solution was recirculated using a roller pump at 4 and 6 L per minute flow rate, respectively, through a customized CPB circuit comprising oxygenator, reservoir, and connecting tubing. A controlled volume of air was introduced into the circuit. The GME activity was measured and computed using a Gampt BCC200® ultrasonic device placing one probe at the venous inlet and one other at the arterial outlet of the oxygenator. Transmembrane delta values of GME activity were used to calculate the removal efficacy based on counts and volume of GME. Use of screen filtration reduced the GME volume by 99.1% ± .1% compared with 98.0% ± .1% for controls at 4 L/min flow rate (p < .001). At 6 L/min, the reduction was 97.9% ± .1% compared with 97.0% ± .1% (p < .001). In contrast, the reduction of GME counts was less effective after screen filtration compared with controls: 89.6 ± .6% versus 91.4 ± .4% at 4 L/min and 55.6% ± 1.6% versus 76.0% ± 1.4% at 6 L/min, respectively (p < .001). The tested oxygenator with incorporated arterial screen filter reduced GME activity based on the calculated volume at the same time as counts of GME increased. PMID:24779120

  3. Denuder for measuring emissions of gaseous organic exhaust gas constituents; Denuder zur Emissionsmessung von gasfoermigen organischen Abgasinhaltsstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerchel, B.; Jockel, W.; Kallinger, G.; Niessner, R.

    1997-05-01

    Industrial plants which emit carcinogenic or other noxious substances should be given top priority in any policy to ward off harmful environmental effects. This also applies to many volatile and semi-volatile air constituents such as volatile aliphatic carbonyls or amines. To date there are no satisfactory methods for determining trace organic components of exhaust gases. It is true that aldehydes are considered in the VDI Guideline 3862, but the measuring methods given there are based on absorption in liquids and are accordingly difficult to use and show a high cross-sensitivity for other substances. No VDI Guideline exists to date on amine emissions. In view of the complexity of exhaust gases a selective enrichment of certain families of substances would appear indicated. Sampling trouble could be reduced if it was possible only to accumulate the gaseous phase, or even just one family of gaseous constituents. A particularly suitable air sampling method is that of diffusion separation. These diffusion separators (denuders) are well known as a powerful measuring system which is able to accumulate trace pollutants in the outside air. The purpose of the present study was to find out whether the concept of diffusion separation is also applicable to emission monitoring, and in particular whether it is suitable for detecting volatile aliphatic aldehydes and amines (primary and secondary) at extremely low concentrations (<10 ppb). (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Fuer Anlagen mit Emissionen von krebserzeugenden und gesundheitsgefaehrdenden Stoffen ergibt sich ein besonderer Handlungsbedarf zum Schutz vor schaedlichen Umwelteinwirkungen. Zu diesen Stoffen gehoeren auch viele leicht- und mittelfluechtigen Luftinhaltsstoffe, wie z.B. die leichtfluechtigen aliphatischen Carbonyle oder Amine. Fuer organische Komponenten, die nur in geringen Konzentrationen im Abgas vorkommen, existieren bisher keine zufriedenstellenden Messverfahren. Fuer die Aldehyde liegt zwar die VDI-Richtlinie 3862

  4. HUBBLE FINDS THOUSANDS OF GASEOUS FRAGMENTS SURROUNDING DYING STAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Resembling a bizarre setting from a science fiction movie, dramatic images sent back by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have surprised astronomers by uncovering thousands of gigantic tadpole-shaped objects surrounding a dying star. Dubbed 'cometary knots' because their glowing heads and gossamer tails superficially resemble comets, they are probably the result of a dying star's final outbursts. Though ground-based telescopic observations have hinted at such objects, they have not previously been seen in such abundance, say researchers. The knots were detected by Hubble astronomer C. Robert O'Dell and graduate student Kerry P. Handron of Rice University in Houston, Texas, while exploring the Helix nebula, a ring of glowing gases blown off the surface of a sunlike star late in its life. O'Dell expects the gaseous knots, which are each several billion miles across, will eventually dissipate and vanish into the cold emptiness of interstellar space. However, he speculates that if the objects contract to form permanent solid bodies, they may contribute to a fraction (less than ten percent) of the missing mass of our galaxy, simply because of their sheer abundance around a typical dying star. (This so-called dark matter is a known source of gravity that affects the motions of stars in the galaxy). The mysterious 'space pods' came into view as O'Dell used Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 to survey the Helix nebula, located 450 light-years away in the constellation Aquarius and the closest planetary nebula to Earth -- so close that its angular size is almost half that of the full Moon. The most visible cometary knots all lie along the inner edge of the ring, at a distance of trillions of miles from the central star. Their comet-like tails, each stretching a hundred billion miles, form a radial pattern around the star like the spokes on a wagon wheel. Though previous ground-based observations show a spoke pattern in the Helix, and some structure, O'Dell emphasizes that

  5. Lifetime health risks from internally deposited beta-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boecker, B.B.; Griffith, W.C.; Hahn, F.F.; Nikula, K.J.; Lundgren, D.L.; Muggenburg, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Much of our knowledge on the lifetime health risks resulting from internal depositions of beta- and gamma-emitting radionuclides has come from studies in laboratory animals conducted to provide information not available from human epidemiological studies. This paper is focused primarily on results of experiments in which laboratory animals (dogs and rodents) were exposed once, briefly, by inhalation or intravenous injection to an individual fission-product radionuclide and were studied for radionuclide metabolism, dosimetry, and lifetime health effects. The relative importance of many dose- and effect-modifying factors was studied. The main long-term biological effects were cancers in the organs and tissues receiving the highest doses. Results for three different patterns of irradiation (skeleton, lung, and whole-body) are presented. The risks of bone cancers produced by 90 Sr are compared with those from 238 Pu in dogs. Lung cancer risks for several beta emitters inhaled in a relatively insoluble form by dogs are compared with results for 144 CeO 2 inhaled by rats. Late-occurring biological effects from the relatively uniform whole-body irradiation from intravenously injected 137 Cs are also presented. In addition to radionuclide-specific results, cross-cutting analyses of these studies provide valuable information on broader issues such as dose protraction, relative biological effectiveness, threshold considerations, and inter-species comparisons including extrapolation to human exposure situations. (authors)

  6. Degradation in organic light emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Vincent Vinh

    This thesis is about the fundamental causes of degradation in tris(8-Hydroxyquinoline) Aluminum (Alq3)-based organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Degradation typically occurs when a current is forced through an insulating material. Since the insulator does not support conduction waves (in its ground state), chemical restructuring must occur to accommodate the current. OLEDs have many technical advantages over the well known semiconductor-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). OLEDs have quantum efficiencies ˜1% (˜10 times higher than the LEDs), and operational power thresholds ˜.05mW (˜100 lower than the LEDs). OLEDs are preferred in power limited and portable devices; devices such as laptops and displays consume ˜1/4 of the supplied power---any power saving is significant. Other advantages, like better compliance to curved surfaces and ease of fabrication, give the OLEDs an even greater edge over the LEDs. OLEDs must have at least comparable or better lifetimes to remain attractive. Typical OLEDs last several 100hrs compared to the several 1000hrs for the LEDs. For reliable OLED application, it is necessary to understand the above breakdown mechanism. In this thesis, we attempt to understand the breakdown by looking at how OLEDs are made, how they work, and when they don't. In the opening sections, we give an overview of OLEDs and LEDs, especially how sustained luminescence is achieved through current circulation. Then in Chapter 2, we look at the basic components in the OLEDs. In Chapter 3 we look at how a hole material (like poly-vinyl carbazole or PVK) establishes an excitonic environment for the sustained luminescence in Alq3. We then approximate how potential is distributed when a simple luminescence system is in operation. In Chapter 4, we look at ways of measuring this distribution via the OLED impedance. Finally in Chapter 5, we look at the OLED stability under light emission conditions via PVK and Alq3 photoemission and photoabsorption spectra

  7. Improved performance of organic light-emitting diode with vanadium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 88; Issue 6. Improved performance of organic light-emitting ... Vanadium pentoxide layer deposited on the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) anode by vacuum deposition has been investigated in organic light-emitting diode (OLED).With 12nm optimal thickness of V 2 O 5 ...

  8. Device Physics of White Polymer Light-Emitting Diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, Herman T.; Hof, Andre; Blom, Paul W. M.

    2012-01-01

    The charge transport and recombination in white-emitting polymer light- emitting diodes (PLEDs) are studied. The PLED investigated has a single emissive layer consisting of a copolymer in which a green and red dye are incorporated in a blue backbone. From single-carrier devices the effect of the

  9. Monitoring biogenic volatile compounds emitted by Eucalyptus citriodora using SPME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zini, C A; Augusto, F; Christensen, T E; Smith, B P; Caramão, E B; Pawliszy, J

    2001-10-01

    A procedure to monitor BVOC emitted by living plants using SPME technique is presented. For this purpose, a glass sampling chamber was designed. This device was employed for the characterization of biogenic volatile compounds emitted by leaves of Eucalyptus citriodora. After extraction with SPME fibers coated with PDMS/ DVB, it was possible to identify or detect 33 compounds emitted by this plant. A semiquantitative approach was applied to monitor the behavior of the emitted BVOC during 9 days. Circadian profiles of the variation in the concentration of isoprene were plotted. Using diffusion-based SPME quantitation, a recently introduced analytical approach, with extraction times as short as 15 s, it was possible to quantify subparts-per-billion amounts of isoprene emitted by this plant.

  10. Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Wood

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices (QD-LEDs have generated considerable interest for applications such as thin film displays with improved color saturation and white lighting with a high color rendering index (CRI. We review the key advantages of using quantum dots (QDs in display and lighting applications, including their color purity, solution processability, and stability. After highlighting the main developments in QD-LED technology in the past 15 years, we describe the three mechanisms for exciting QDs – optical excitation, Förster energy transfer, and direct charge injection – that have been leveraged to create QD-LEDs. We outline the challenges facing QD-LED development, such as QD charging and QD luminescence quenching in QD thin films. We describe how optical downconversion schemes have enabled researchers to overcome these challenges and develop commercial lighting products that incorporate QDs to achieve desirable color temperature and a high CRI while maintaining efficiencies comparable to inorganic white LEDs (>65 lumens per Watt. We conclude by discussing some current directions in QD research that focus on achieving higher efficiency and air-stable QD-LEDs using electrical excitation of the luminescent QDs.

  11. Power saving regulated light emitting diode circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haville, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    A power saving regulated light source circuit, comprising a light emitting diode (LED), a direct current source and a switching transistor connected in series with the LED, a control voltage producing resistor connected in series with the LED to produce a control voltage corresponding to the current through the LED, a storage capacitor connected in parallel with the series combination of the LED and the resistor, a comparator having its output connected to the input of the transistor, the comparator having a reference input and a control input, a stabilized biasing source for supplying a stabilized reference voltage to the reference input, the control input of the comparator being connected to the control voltage producing resistor, the comparator having a high output state when the reference voltage exceeds the control voltage while having a low output state when the control voltage exceeds the reference voltage, the transistor being conductive in response to the high state while being nonconductive in response to the low state, the transistor when conductive being effective to charge the capacitor and to increase the control voltage, whereby the comparator is cycled between the high and low output states while the transistor is cycled between conductive and nonconductive states

  12. Bell inequalities for continuously emitting sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knill, Emanuel; Glancy, Scott; Nam, Sae Woo; Coakley, Kevin; Zhang, Yanbao

    2015-03-01

    A common experimental strategy for demonstrating nonclassical correlations is to show violation of a Bell inequality by measuring a continuously emitted stream of entangled photon pairs. The measurements involve the detection of photons by two spatially separated parties. The detection times are recorded and compared to quantify the violation. The violation critically depends on determining which detections are coincident. Because the recorded detection times have "jitter," coincidences cannot be inferred perfectly. In the presence of settings-dependent timing errors, this can allow a local-realistic system to show apparent violation, the so-called "coincidence loophole." Here, we introduce a family of Bell inequalities based on signed, directed distances between the parties' sequences of recorded time tags. Given that the time tags are recorded for synchronized, fixed observation periods and that the settings choices are random and independent of the source, violation of these inequalities unambiguously shows nonclassical correlations violating local realism. Distance-based Bell inequalities are generally useful for two-party configurations where the effective size of the measurement outcome space is large or infinite. We show how to systematically modify the underlying Bell functions to improve the signal-to-noise ratio and to quantify the significance of the violation.

  13. Light-Emitting Diodes: Solving Complex Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planinšič, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2015-05-01

    This is the fourth paper in our Light-Emitting Diodes series. The series aims to create a systematic library of LED-based materials and to provide readers with the description of experiments and the pedagogical treatment that would help their students construct, test, and apply physics concepts and mathematical relations. The first paper1 provided an overview of possible uses of LEDs in physics courses. The second paper2 discussed how one could help students learn the foundational aspects of LED physics through a scaf-folded inquiry approach, specifically the ISLE cycle. The third paper3 showed how the physics inherent in the functioning of LEDs could help students deepen their understanding of sources of electric power and the temperature dependence of resistivity, and explore the phenomenon of fluorescence also using the ISLE cycle.4 The goal of this fourth paper is to use LEDs as black boxes that allow students to study certain properties of a system of interest, specifically mechanical, electric, electromagnetic, and light properties. The term "black box" means that we use a device without knowing the mechanism behind its operation.

  14. The gaseous debris disk of the white dwarf SDSS J1228+1040. HST/COS search for far-ultraviolet signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, S.; Nagel, T.; Rauch, T.; Werner, K.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Gaseous and dust debris disks around white dwarfs (WDs) are formed from tidally disrupted planetary bodies. This offers an opportunity to determine the composition of exoplanetary material by measuring element abundances in the accreting WD's atmosphere. A more direct way to do this is through spectral analysis of the disks themselves. Aims: Currently, the number of chemical elements detected through disk emission-lines is smaller than that of species detected through lines in the WD atmospheres. We assess the far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectrum of one well-studied object (SDSS J122859.93+104032.9) to search for disk signatures at wavelengths contract NAS5-26666.

  15. High-Efficiency and High-Operational-Stability Top-Emitting Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Antioxidant Buffer Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hajime; Shimizu, Masao; Aratani, Sukekazu; Tanaka, Masahiro

    2009-08-01

    We have succeeded in developing top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with high efficiency and high operational stability using an antioxidant buffer layer. V2O5 was selected as the antioxidant buffer layer to suppress the degradation of the organic materials of OLEDs caused by active oxygen during buffer layer deposition and the damage caused by the bombardment of high-energy particles during transparent electrode sputtering. The top-emitting device with a V2O5 buffer layer had the same current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics as the bottom-emitting device with the same material system. The quantum efficiency of the top-emitting device was about 5%, the same as that of the bottom-emitting device. The time required for luminance to drop to 90% of the initial value of the top-emitting device was over 700 h, which is longer than that of the bottom-emitting device (300 h). From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of the interface between organic materials and V2O5, it was determined that there was no degradation of organic materials under V2O5.

  16. Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Endangered Species Protection Program helps promote recovery of listed species. The ESPP determines if pesticide use in a geographic area may affect any listed species. Find needed limits on pesticide use in Endangered Species Protection Bulletins.

  17. Carburization of austenitic alloys by gaseous impurities in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, G.Y.; Johnson, W.R.

    1980-03-01

    The carburization behavior of Alloy 800H, Inconel Alloy 617 and Hastelloy Alloy X in helium containing various amounts of H 2 , CO, CH 4 , H 2 O and CO 2 was studied. Corrosion tests were conducted in a temperature range from 649 to 1000 0 C (1200 to 1832 0 F) for exposure time up to 10,000 h. Four different helium environments, identified as A, B, C, and D, were investigated. Concentrations of gaseous impurities were 1500 μatm H 2 , 450 μatm CO, 50 μatm CH 4 and 50 μatm H 2 O for Environment A; 200 μatm H 2 , 100 μatm CO, 20 μatm CH 4 , 50 μatm H 2 O and 5 μatm CO 2 for Environment B; 500 μatm H 2 , 50 μatm CO, 50 μatm CH 4 and 2 O for Environment C; and 500 μatm H 2 , 50 μatm CO, 50 μatm CH 4 and 1.5 μatm H 2 O for Environment D. Environments A and B were characteristic of high-oxygen potential, while C and D were characteristic of low-oxygen potential. The results showed that the carburization kinetics in low-oxygen potential environments (C and D) were significantly higher, approximately an order of magnitude higher at high temperatures, than those in high-oxygen potential environments (A and B) for all three alloys. Thermodynamic analyses indicated no significant differences in the thermodynamic carburization potential between low- and high-oxygen potential environments. It is thus believed that the enhanced carburization kinetics observed in the low-oxygen potential environments were related to kinetic effects. A qualitatively mechanistic model was proposed to explain the enhanced kinetics. The present results further suggest that controlling the oxygen potential of the service environment can be an effective means of reducing carburization of alloys

  18. Humidity effects on surface dielectric barrier discharge for gaseous naphthalene decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Ayman A.; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Seto, Takafumi

    2018-04-01

    Experiments are performed using dry and humid air to clarify the effects of water vapour on the characteristics of surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) and investigate its impact on the performance of the SDBD for decomposition of gaseous naphthalene in air stream. The current characteristics, including the discharge and the capacitive currents, are deeply analyzed and the discharge mechanism is explored. The results confirmed that the humidity affected the microdischarge distribution without affecting the discharge mode. Interestingly, it is found that the water vapour had a significant influence on the capacitance of the reactor due to its deposition on the discharge electrode and the dielectric, which, in turn, affects the power loss in the dielectric and the total power consumed in the reactor. Thus, the factor of the humidity effect on the power loss in the dielectric should be considered in addition to its effect on the attachment coefficient. Additionally, there was an optimum level of the humidity for the decomposition of naphthalene in the SDBD, and its value depended on the gas composition, where the maximum naphthalene decomposition efficiency in O2/H2O is achieved at the humidity level ˜10%, which was lower than that obtained in air/H2O (˜28%). The results also revealed that the role of the humidity in the decomposition efficiency was not significant in the humidified O2 at high power level. This was attributed to the significant increase in oxygen-derived species (such as O atoms and O3) at high power, which was enough to overcome the negative effects of the humidity.

  19. Novel mass spectrometric instrument for gaseous and particulate characterization and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggiola, M.J.

    1994-02-01

    SRI International will develop a unique new instrument that will be capable of providing real-time (<1 minute), quantitative, chemical characterization of gaseous and particulate pollutants generated from DOE waste cleanup activities. The instrument will be capable of detecting and identifying volatile organic compounds, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and transuranic species released during waste cleanup activities. The instrument will be unique in its ability to detect and quantify in real-time these diverse pollutants in both vapor and particulate form. The instrument to be developed under this program will consist of several major components: (1) an isokinetic sampler capable of operating over a wide range of temperatures (up to 500 K) and flow rates; (2) a high pressure to low pressure transition and sampling region that efficiently separates particles from vapor-phase components for separate, parallel analyses; (3) two small mass spectrometers, one optimized for organic analysis using a unique field ionization source and one optimized for particulate characterization using thermal pyrolysis and electron-impact ionization (EI); and (4) a powerful personal computer for control and data acquisition. Initially, the instrument will be developed for targeted use in conjunction with the K-1435 Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) incinerator at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory K-25 site. Ultimately, the instrument will be designed to operate in the field at any cleanup site, located close to the stack or process vent, providing the plant operations personnel with real-time information and alarm capabilities. In addition, this instrument will be very broadly applicable for cleanup or sampling, for example, any time contaminated soil is moved or disturbed

  20. Dissolved gaseous Hg (DGM in the Mediterranean surface and deep waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotnik J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM was studied in surface and deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea for last 12 years during several oceanographic cruises on board the Italian research vessel Urania and covered both Western and Eastern Mediterranean Basins as well as Adriatic Sea. DGM was measured together with other mercury species (RHg - reactive Hg, THg - total Hg, MeHg - monomethyl Hg and DMeHg - dimethylmercury, and with some water quality parameters in coastal and open sea deep water profiles, however only DGM will be discussed here. DGM represents a considerable portion of THg (average of about 20 % in Mediterranean waters. Spatial and seasonal variations of measured DGM concentrations were observed in different indentified water masses as well as iwere observed. DGM was the highest in the northern Adriatic, most polluted part of the Mediterranean Sea as the consequence of Hg mining in Idrija and heavy industry of northern Italy.Generally, average DGM concentration was higher in W and E Mediteranean Deep Waters (WMDW and EMDW and Leavantine Intermediate Water (LIW than overlaying Modified Atlantic Water (MAW, however it was the highest in N Adriatic Surface waters and consequently in out flowing Adriatic Deep Waters (ADW. In deep water profiles the portion of DGM typically increased at depths with oxygen minimum and then towards the bottom, especially in areas with strong tectonic activity (Alboran Sea, Strait of Sicily, Tyrrhenian Sea, indicating its bacterial and/or geotectonic origin. A comparison of the results obtained in this study to others performed in the Mediterranean shows no significant differences. Results were also compared to the results obtained in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. During last oceanographic cruise in 2011 covering area between Livorno and Lipari Islands a novel method for continuous DGM determination in surface waters (Wangberg and Gardfeldt, 2011 was applied and compared to standard method.

  1. Gaseous Criteria Pollutants in Bangkok Metropolitan Region, Thailand: Analysis, Issues and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttamang, P.; Aneja, V. P.; Hanna, A. F.

    2017-12-01

    Analysis of gaseous criteria pollutants in Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR), Thailand, during 2010 to 2014 reveals that the hourly concentrations of CO, SO2 and NO2 were mostly below the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQs) of Thailand. However, the hourly concentrations of Ozone (O3) exceeded the Thailand NAAQs. The maximum concentrations of O3 were from 120 to 190 ppb. On average, the number of hourly O3 exceedances were from 1 to 60 hours a year depending on monitoring station locations. The exceedances were found during the dry season in both summer and winter. Inter-conversion between O3, NO and NO2 indicates the crossover point between species occur when the concentration of NOx ([NOx = NO + NO2]) is about 60 ppb. When [NOx] 60 ppb. The calculated photochemical reaction rate during photostationary state ranges from 0.12 to 1.22 min-1. Linear regression analysis between the concentrations of Ox ([Ox = O3 + NO2]) and NOx provides the role of local and regional contributions to Ox. Both the local and regional Ox contributions play an important role in the increase of [Ox] and those values were about double during O3 episodes ([O3] > 100 ppb). Ratio analysis suggests that the major contributors of primary pollutants over BMR are mobile sources (CO/NOx = 19.8). However, this region may also be influenced by point sources, but they are not dominant. An analysis of the air quality showed that the air quality index (AQI) for BMR was predominantly between good to moderate; however, during episode conditions in the region, unhealthy O3 categories were also observed. Note the manuscript is under review by a publication

  2. Seasonal and diel patterns of total gaseous mercury concentration in the atmosphere of the Central Valley of Costa Rica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Aylin; Valdes, Juan; Sibaja, Jose; Vega, Ilena; Alfaro, Rosa; Morales, Jose; Esquivel, Germain; Barrantes, Elisa [Laboratory for Atmospheric Chemistry, LAQAT-UNA, Universidad Nacional, P.O. Box 86-3000, Heredia (Costa Rica); Black, Paleah [Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, P.O. Box 450 Station A, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Lean, David, E-mail: drslean@gmail.com [P.O. Box 309, Apsley, Ontario, K0L 1A0 (Canada)

    2011-02-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Elevated seasonal and daily patterns of total gaseous mercury (TGM) were observed in the Central Valley of Costa Rica 27 km south-east of the Poas volcano. {yields} With the onset of the wet season TGM in late April, values increased from typical values near 10 to 905 ng m{sup -3}. {yields} During the day, TGM values increased until midday along with temperature and radiation but relative humidity showed a reciprocal pattern. {yields} We conclude that elemental mercury from the volcano may react with atmospheric oxidants especially during the dry season and the mercury would be deposited to the ground. {yields} With the onset of heavy rains, mercury in the soil is reduced and re-volatilized resulting in the high levels in atmospheric air at the end of April. - Abstract: Monitoring of Hg in the atmosphere near volcanoes is limited with no previous data for Costa Rica. Seasonal and daily patterns of total gaseous mercury (TGM) were observed at the main sampling location at the Universidad Nacional, Heredia, Costa Rica. The area (lat. 10.000230 long. -84.109499) is located in the Central Valley of Costa Rica and is 27 km SE of the Poas volcano (lat. 10.199486 long. -84.231388). Measurements were made from May 2008 to May 2009 at this location with some additional values obtained at other sites near the Poas volcano including San Luis and Grecia as well as near, Turrialba and Irazu volcanoes. Total gaseous Hg was determined in samples collected at a height of 2 m using the Tekran 2537A (Tekran Inc.) gas-phase Hg vapor analyzer. Meteorological data (temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction, radiation and precipitation) were obtained from the airport weather station located at Alajuela. Monthly precipitation is typically 85 mm during the dry season (December to April) with winds from the west. The wet season begins in late April and continues to December with monthly rainfall of 328 mm and winds from the NE. The annual mean

  3. Lighting emitting microstructures in porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squire, E.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical techniques are used to examine microstructuring effects on the optical properties of single layer, multilayer, single and multiple microcavity structures fabricated from porous silicon. Two important issues regarding the effects of the periodic structuring of this material are discussed. Firstly, the precise role played by this microstructuring, given that the luminescence is distributed throughout the entire structure and the low porosity layers are highly absorbing at short wavelengths. The second issue examined concerns the observed effects on the optical spectra of the samples owing to the emission bandwidth of the material being greater than the optical stopband of the structure. Measurements of the reflectivity and photoluminescence spectra of different porous silicon microstructures are presented and discussed. The results are modelled using a transfer matrix technique. The matrix method has been modified to calculate the optical spectra of porous silicon specifically by accounting for the effects of dispersion, absorption and emission within the material. Layer thickness and porosity gradients have also been included in the model. The dielectric function of the two component layers (i.e. silicon and air) is calculated using the Looyenga formula. This approach can be adapted to suit other porous semiconductors if required. Examination of the experimental results have shown that the emitted light is strongly controlled by the optical modes of the structures. Furthermore, the data display an interplay of a wide variety of effects dependent upon the structural composition. Comparisons made between the experimental and calculated reflectivity and photoluminescence spectra of many different porous silicon microstructures show very good agreement. (author)

  4. Kinematics of Hα Emitting Stars in Andromeda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilango, Megha; Ilango, Anita; Damon, Gabriel; Prichard, Laura; Guhathakurta, Puragra; PHAT Collaboration; SPLASH Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Studying emission line stars helps improve our understanding of stellar evolution, types of stars, and their environments. In this study, we analyzed stars exhibiting Hα emission (Hα stars) in the Andromeda Galaxy. We used a combination of spectroscopic and photometric diagnostic methods to remove a population of foreground Milky Way (MW) star contaminants from our data set. The Hα stars were selected from a sample of 5295 spectra from the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda’s Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey and accompanying photometric data from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey. Velocities of two classes of Hα stars, main sequence (MS) stars and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, were analyzed through a novel Age-Velocity Difference Correlation (AVDC) method, which utilizes line-of-sight velocity differences (LOSVDs) in order to estimate the age of a rare stellar population. Histograms, weighted means, and weighted standard deviations of the LOSVDs were used to conclude that MS stars are more kinematically coherent than AGB stars, and that Hα stars are kinematically comparable and thus close in age to their non-Hα counterparts. With these results, it can definitively be inferred that mass loss is important in two stages of stellar evolution: massive MS and intermediate mass AGB. We hypothesized that this mass loss could either occur as a normal part of MS and AGB evolution, or that it could be emitted by only a subpopulation of MS and AGB stars throughout their life cycle. Our use of the novel AVDC method sets a precedent for the use of similar methods in predicting the ages of rare stellar subgroups.This research was supported by NASA and the National Science Foundation. Most of this work was carried out by high school students working under the auspices of the Science Internship Program at UC Santa Cruz.

  5. Power output and efficiency of beta-emitting microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheneler, David; Ward, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Current standard methods to calculate the dose of radiation emitted during medical applications by beta-minus emitting microspheres rely on an over-simplistic formalism. This formalism is a function of the average activity of the radioisotope used and the physiological dimensions of the patient only. It neglects the variation in energy of the emitted beta particle due to self-attenuation, or self-absorption, effects related to the finite size of the sphere. Here it is assumed the sphere is comprised of a pure radioisotope with beta particles being emitted isotropically throughout the material. The full initial possible kinetic energy distribution of a beta particle is taken into account as well as the energy losses due to scattering by other atoms in the microsphere and bremsstrahlung radiation. By combining Longmire's theory of the mean forward range of charged particles and the Rayleigh distribution to take into account the statistical nature of scattering and energy straggling, the linear attenuation, or self-absorption, coefficient for beta-emitting radioisotopes has been deduced. By analogy with gamma radiation transport in spheres, this result was used to calculate the rate of energy emitted by a beta-emitting microsphere and its efficiency. Comparisons to standard point dose kernel formulations generated using Monte Carlo data show the efficacy of the proposed method. Yttrium-90 is used as a specific example throughout, as a medically significant radioisotope, frequently used in radiation therapy for treating cancer.

  6. Semiconductor Nanomembrane-Based Light-Emitting and Photodetecting Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous integration between silicon (Si, III-V group material and Germanium (Ge is highly desirable to achieve monolithic photonic circuits. Transfer-printing and stacking between different semiconductor nanomembranes (NMs enables more versatile combinations to realize high-performance light-emitting and photodetecting devices. In this paper, lasers, including vertical and edge-emitting structures, flexible light-emitting diode, photodetectors at visible and infrared wavelengths, as well as flexible photodetectors, are reviewed to demonstrate that the transfer-printed semiconductor nanomembrane stacked layers have a large variety of applications in integrated optoelectronic systems.

  7. Power output and efficiency of beta-emitting microspheres

    OpenAIRE

    Cheneler, David; Ward, Michael C L

    2015-01-01

    Current standard methods to calculate the dose of radiation emitted during medical applications by beta-minus emitting microspheres rely on an over-simplistic formalism. This formalism is a function of the average activity of the radioisotope used and the physiological dimensions of the patient only. It neglects the variation in energy of the emitted beta particle due to self-attenuation, or self-absorption, effects related to the finite size of the sphere. Here it is assumed the sphere is co...

  8. Characterizing the Dissolution Rate of CO2-Brine in Porous Media under Gaseous and Supercritical Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohao Wu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The CO2-brine dissolution homogenizes the distribution of residual CO2 and reduces the leakage risk in the saline aquifer. As a key parameter to immobilize the free CO2, the dissolution rate of CO2-brine could be accelerated through mechanisms like diffusion and dispersion, which are affected by the subsurface condition, pore structure, and background hydrological flow. This study contributed the calculated dissolution rates of both gaseous and supercritical CO2 during brine imbibition at a pore-scale. The flow development and distribution in porous media during dynamic dissolution were imaged in two-dimensional visualization using X-ray microtomography. The fingerings branching and expansion resulted in greater dissolution rates of supercritical CO2 with high contact between phases, while the brine bypassed the clusters of gaseous CO2 with a slower dissolution and longer duration due to the isolated bubbles. The dissolution rate of supercritical CO2 was about two or three orders of magnitude greater than that of gaseous CO2, while the value distributions both spanned about four orders of magnitude. The dissolution rates of gaseous CO2 increased with porosity, but the relationship was the opposite for supercritical CO2. CO2 saturation and the Reynolds number were analyzed to characterize the different impacts on gaseous and supercritical CO2 at different dissolution periods.

  9. Sensitivity of dual fuel engine combustion and knocking limits to gaseous fuel composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selim, Mohamed Y.E.

    2004-01-01

    Combustion noise, knock and ignition limits data are measured and presented for a dual fuel engine running on dual fuels of Diesel and three gaseous fuels separately. The gaseous fuels used are liquefied petroleum gas, pure methane and compressed natural gas mixture. The maximum pressure rise rate during combustion is presented as a measure of combustion noise, and the knocking and ignition limits are presented as torque output at the onset of knocking and ignition failure. Experimental investigation on the dual fuel engine revealed the noise generated from combustion, knocking and ignition limits for all gases at different design and operating conditions. A Ricardo E6 Diesel version engine is converted to run on dual fuel of Diesel and the tested gaseous fuel and is used throughout the work. The engine is fully computerized, and the cylinder pressure data, crank angle data and engine operating variables are stored in a PC for off line analysis. The effects of engine speeds, loads, pilot injection angle, pilot fuel quantity and compression ratio on combustion noise, knocking torque, thermal efficiency and maximum pressure are examined for the dual engine running on the three gaseous fuels separately. The combustion noise, knocking and ignition limits are found to relate to the type of gaseous fuels and to the engine design and operating parameters

  10. An investigation on the physical, chemical and ecotoxicological characteristics of particulate matter emitted from light-duty vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vouitsis, Elias; Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Pistikopoulos, Panayiotis; Samaras, Zissis; Chrysikou, Loukia; Samara, Constantini; Papadimitriou, Chrysi; Samaras, Petros; Sakellaropoulos, George

    2009-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emitted from three light-duty vehicles was studied in terms of its physicochemical and ecotoxicological character using Microtox bioassay tests. A diesel vehicle equipped with an oxidation catalyst emitted PM which consisted of carbon species at over 97%. PM from a diesel vehicle with a particle filter (DPF) consisted of almost equal amounts of carbon species and ions, while a gasoline vehicle emitted PM consisting of ∼90% carbon and ∼10% ions. Both the DPF and the gasoline vehicles produced a distinct nucleation mode at 120 km/h. The PM emitted from the DPF and the gasoline vehicles was less ecotoxic than that of conventional diesel, but not in direct proportion to the emission levels of the different vehicles. These results indicate that PM emission reductions are not equally translated into ecotoxicity reductions, implying some deficiencies on the actual environmental impact of emission control technologies and regulations. - PM emission reductions brought by more stringent emission standards and associated technologies may not lead to equivalent (eco-)toxicity reductions.

  11. Star-Formation in Free-Floating Evaporating Gaseous Globules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Raghvendra

    How the evolutionary details of the star formation process (e.g., IMF, binary fraction, star formation efficiency, total extent and mass of star clusters) depend on the local environment is a major question in astrophysics. Massive stars have a strong feedback effect on their environment, via their winds, UV radiation, and ultimately, supernova blast waves, all of which can alter the likelihood for the formation of stars in nearby clouds and limit the accretion process of nearby protostars. But the complex structural make-up (revealed in exquisite detail by many modern studies using HST, Spitzer, WISE, & Herschel) of star-forming clouds in massive star-forming regions (MSFRs) has made it difficult, in spite of decades of study, to reach definitive, quantitative conclusions about the various physical processes at play in producing ``triggered" star formation. All of these issues can now be addressed using a newly recognized class of stellar nurseries embedded within giant HII regions: free-floating Evaporating Gaseous Globules having cometary shapes (frEGGs). We serendipitously discovered two frEGGs in the Cygnus massive star-forming region with HST. Our preliminary exmaination of the Spitzer archive has revealed a potentially much larger number. We used molecular-line observations showing the presence of dense clouds with total masses of cold molecular gas exceeding 0.5 to a few Msun associated with these objects, thereby disproving the initial hypothesis based on their morphology that these were similar to the proplyds (cometary-shaped photoevaporating protoplanetary disks) found in Orion (Sahai et al. 2012a,b). By virtue of their distinct, isolated morphologies, frEGGS offer us an exciting, new "clean-cut" probe of the star formation process in the vicinity of massive star clusters. And finally, frEGGs offer us an opportunity to study the earliest analogs of the physical environment where our Sun was born, since, like frEGGs, the protosolar nebula is believed to

  12. Volatile compounds emitted by diverse phytopathogenic microorganisms promote plant growth and flowering through cytokinin action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-López, Ángela María; Baslam, Marouane; De Diego, Nuria; Muñoz, Francisco José; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Almagro, Goizeder; Ricarte-Bermejo, Adriana; García-Gómez, Pablo; Li, Jun; Humplík, Jan F; Novák, Ondřej; Spíchal, Lukáš; Doležal, Karel; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2016-12-01

    It is known that volatile emissions from some beneficial rhizosphere microorganisms promote plant growth. Here we show that volatile compounds (VCs) emitted by phylogenetically diverse rhizosphere and non-rhizhosphere bacteria and fungi (including plant pathogens and microbes that do not normally interact mutualistically with plants) promote growth and flowering of various plant species, including crops. In Arabidopsis plants exposed to VCs emitted by the phytopathogen Alternaria alternata, changes included enhancement of photosynthesis and accumulation of high levels of cytokinins (CKs) and sugars. Evidence obtained using transgenic Arabidopsis plants with altered CK status show that CKs play essential roles in this phenomenon, because growth and flowering responses to the VCs were reduced in mutants with CK-deficiency (35S:AtCKX1) or low receptor sensitivity (ahk2/3). Further, we demonstrate that the plant responses to fungal VCs are light-dependent. Transcriptomic analyses of Arabidopsis leaves exposed to A. alternata VCs revealed changes in the expression of light- and CK-responsive genes involved in photosynthesis, growth and flowering. Notably, many genes differentially expressed in plants treated with fungal VCs were also differentially expressed in plants exposed to VCs emitted by the plant growth promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus subtilis GB03, suggesting that plants react to microbial VCs through highly conserved regulatory mechanisms. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Multicriteria approach to interpret the variability of the levels of particulate matter and gaseous pollutants in the Madrid metropolitan area, during the 1999-2012 period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, P.; Artíñano, B.; Viana, M. M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.

    2015-05-01

    The evolution of the mean levels of particulate matter (PM) and gaseous pollutants recorded in the Madrid metropolitan area from 1999 to 2012, were investigated focussing on the impact of mitigation strategies and economic scenarios. Temporal trends have shown that SO2, CO, NO, PM10 and NO2 levels at Madrid kerbside and urban-background sites have been decreasing over the 1999-2012 period, with statistical significance. A small contribution to the annual decreasing rates of SO2, NO and NO2 obtained at these sites could be attributed to the reduction in the regional background levels. The reduction in the emissions of atmospheric pollutants from specific sources of the urban agglomeration, explained most of the annual decreasing rates obtained at the kerbside and urban-background sites. From 1999 to 2007 a reduction of the emissions from road traffic and residential heating was produced, as a consequence of the implementation of a number of management strategies promoted and adopted by European and national public administrations. In contrast, from 2008 to 2012 a deep decrease in fuel consumption and a reduction of construction-demolition and roadwork activities took place in the Madrid metropolitan area, as a consequence of the economic recession. The expected overcoming of the economic crisis within the next few years, will presumably give rise to similar levels of PM and gaseous pollutants as those existing previously to the crisis period. The introduction of new Euro 6/VI vehicles which emit considerably less NOx than previous generation diesel vehicles, as well as the implementation of strategies aimed at reducing resuspended mineral dust from road traffic and construction-demolition activities are thus encouraged.

  14. Vacuum Deposited Organic Light Emitting Devices on Flexible Substrates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Forrest, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this eight year program was to demonstrate both passive and active matrix, flexible, small scale displays based on small molecular weight organic light emitting device (OLED) technology...

  15. Variability of volatile organic compounds emitted by seedlings of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variability of volatile organic compounds emitted by seedlings of seven African maize varieties when infested by adult Cicadulina storeyi China leafhopper vectors of maize streak virus. S Oluwafemi, MA Birkett, J Caulfield, JA Pickett ...

  16. Organic synthesis with short-lived positron-emitting radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, V.W.

    1988-01-01

    Chemistry with short-lived positron-emitting radioisotopes of the non-metals, principally 11 C, 13 N and 18 F, has burgeoned over the last decade. This has been almost entirely because of the emergence of positron emission tomography (PET) as a powerful non-invasive technique for investigating pathophysiology in living man. PET is essentially an external technique for the rapid serial reconstruction of the spatial distribution of any positron-emitting radioisotope that has been administered in vivo. Such a distribution is primarily governed by the chemical form in which the positron-emitting radioisotope is incorporated, and importantly for clinical research, is often perturbed by physical, biological or clinical factors. Judicious choice of the chemical form enables specific biological information to be obtained. For example, the labelling of glucose with a positron-emitting radioisotope could be expected to provide a radiopharmaceutical for the study of glucose utilisation in both health and disease. (author)

  17. Innovation in biological production and upgrading of methane and hydrogen for use as gaseous transport biofuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ao; Cheng, Jun; Murphy, Jerry D

    2016-01-01

    Biofuels derived from biomass will play a major role in future renewable energy supplies in transport. Gaseous biofuels have superior energy balances, offer greater greenhouse gas emission reductions and produce lower pollutant emissions than liquid biofuels. Biogas derived through fermentation of wet organic substrates will play a major role in future transport systems. Biogas (which is composed of approximately 60% methane/hydrogen and 40% carbon dioxide) requires an upgrading process to reduce the carbon dioxide content to less than 3% before it is used as compressed gas in transport. This paper reviews recent developments in fermentative biogas production and upgrading as a transport fuel. Third generation gaseous biofuels may be generated using marine-based algae via two-stage fermentation, cogenerating hydrogen and methane. Alternative biological upgrading techniques, such as biological methanation and microalgal biogas upgrading, have the potential to simultaneously upgrade biogas, increase gaseous biofuel yield and reduce carbon dioxide emission. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Measurements of diurnal concentration variations of gaseous HCl in air in the subnanogram range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusca, P.; Schwarz, B.; Baechmann, K.

    1984-01-01

    A method of measuring gaseous HCl based on diffusion samplers has been developed. This sampling method allows a filterless dynamic gas-aerosol separation. After thermal desorption, HCl is converted into 2-chlorocyclohexanol by gas-phase reaction with 7-oxabicyclo(4.1.0)heptane. The derivatization product is analyzed by GC-separation using an electrolytic conductivity detector (HECD). The minimum concentration detectable is: 40 pptv HCl. Several results of measurements of gaseous HCl in air are reported. Gaseous HCl is present in concentrations between about 0.1 and 1.4 ng l/sup -1/ at STP in rural areas and 0.2 and 3.0 ng l/sup -1/ at STP in urban areas. Diurnal and spatial variations and the influence of climate were measured and are discussed.

  19. Measurements of diurnal concentration variations of gaseous HCl in air in the sub-nanogram range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusca, P.; Schwarz, B.; Bächmann, K.

    A method of measuring gaseous HCl based on diffusion samplers has been developed. This sampling method allows a filterless dynamic gas-aerosol separation. After thermal desorption, HCl is converted into 2-chlorocyclohexanol by gas-phase reaction with 7-oxabicyclo(4.1.0)heptane. The derivatization product is analysed by GC-separation using an electrolytic conductivity detector (HECD). The minimum concentration detectable is: 40 pptv HCl. Several results of measurements of gaseous HCl in air are reported. Gaseous HCl is present in concentrations between about 0.1 and 1.4 ngℓ -1 at STP in rural areas and 0.2 and 3.0 ng ℓ -1 at STP in urban areas. Diurnal and spatial variations and the influence of climate were measured and are discussed.

  20. ASSESSMENT OF THE MOISTURE EFFECT ON GASEOUS PRODUCTS OF SELF-HEATING OF WOOD CHIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana VĚŽNÍKOVÁ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Biofuels are stored in large quantities and may be susceptible to self-ignition. The possible methods of indication of temperature increase include the analysis of the gaseous products of heating where concentrations of certain gases may increase with increasing temperature. Gas release is also affected by the moisture of the material given that the moisture level changes surface accessibility for oxygen on the one side and serves as a catalyst of the oxidation reactions on the other. The present project analysed the effect of temperature and moisture on gaseous products of heating of wood chips, one of frequently used biofuels, with the aim to determine a suitable gaseous indicator of beginning self-ignition.

  1. SOR/72-43 Radiation Emitting Devices Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    These Regulations of 10 February 1972, supplemented by SOR/77-895, lay down the classes of radiation emitting devices for the purposes of the Radiation Emitting Devices Act. They lay down their standards of design and construction and warning sign specifications and provide for the procedure to be followed by inspectors of such devices. The devices include inter alia extra-oral dental x-ray equipment, baggage inspection x-ray devices, laser scanners, television receivers. (NEA)

  2. Organic light emitting diode with surface modification layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basil, John D.; Bhandari, Abhinav; Buhay, Harry; Arbab, Mehran; Marietti, Gary J.

    2017-09-12

    An organic light emitting diode (10) includes a substrate (12) having a first surface (14) and a second surface (16), a first electrode (32), and a second electrode (38). An emissive layer (36) is located between the first electrode (32) and the second electrode (38). The organic light emitting diode (10) further includes a surface modification layer (18). The surface modification layer (18) includes a non-planar surface (30, 52).

  3. Organic light emitting diode with light extracting electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Abhinav; Buhay, Harry

    2017-04-18

    An organic light emitting diode (10) includes a substrate (20), a first electrode (12), an emissive active stack (14), and a second electrode (18). At least one of the first and second electrodes (12, 18) is a light extracting electrode (26) having a metallic layer (28). The metallic layer (28) includes light scattering features (29) on and/or in the metallic layer (28). The light extracting features (29) increase light extraction from the organic light emitting diode (10).

  4. Direct Printing of Light-Emitting Devices on Textile Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Deferme, Wim; Verboven, Inge

    2018-01-01

    Smart textiles are a rapidly expanding field in the world of textiles, announcing a new and intriguing era. Different functionalities can be added to the textile to make the textile smart and intelligent. One of these functionalities is the addition of light-emitting layers or devices that can be incorporated into the textiles. These light-emitting textiles find a broad application in the field of interior and exterior design and wearable applications. Depending on the application, two ...

  5. Organic light emitting device structures for obtaining chromaticity stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Yeh-Jiun; Lu, Michael; Kwong, Raymond C.

    2005-04-26

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). The devices of the present invention are efficient white or multicolored phosphorescent OLEDs which have a high color stability over a wide range of luminances. The devices of the present invention comprise an emissive region having at least two emissive layers, with each emissive layer comprising a different host and emissive dopant, wherein at least one of the emissive dopants emits by phosphorescence.

  6. Organic light emitting device structure for obtaining chromaticity stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Yeh-Jiun [Princeton, NJ; Ngo, Tan [Levittown, PA

    2007-05-01

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). The devices of the present invention are efficient white or multicolored phosphorescent OLEDs which have a high color stability over a wide range of luminances. The devices of the present invention comprise an emissive region having at least two emissive layers, with each emissive layer comprising a different host and emissive dopant, wherein at least one of the emissive dopants emits by phosphorescence.

  7. Null bactericidal effect of ultraviolet radiation emitted by LEDs.

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Alcántara Muñoz; Rafael Moreno-Rojas; Alicia Moreno Ortega; José Emilio Muñoz Cañete; Rafael Gómez Díaz

    2016-01-01

    This research has aimed to assess the bactericidal effect of ultraviolet light emitted by LEDS on the growth on Petri dishes of microorganisms whose legal limits in foods have been established. An electrically fed apparatus has been designed with precise timing and a camera to prevent light spillage, in which two ultraviolet radiation emission devices were connected by LED technology at different wavelengths: through an array of LEDS emitting at around 350nm, and a single specific...

  8. Power output and efficiency of beta-emitting microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheneler, David; Ward, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Current standard methods to calculate the dose of radiation emitted during medical applications by beta-minus emitting microspheres rely on an over-simplistic formalism. This formalism is a function of the average activity of the radioisotope used and the physiological dimensions of the patient only. It neglects the variation in energy of the emitted beta particle due to self-attenuation, or self-absorption, effects related to the finite size of the sphere. Here it is assumed the sphere is comprised of a pure radioisotope with beta particles being emitted isotropically throughout the material. The full initial possible kinetic energy distribution of a beta particle is taken into account as well as the energy losses due to scattering by other atoms in the microsphere and bremsstrahlung radiation. By combining Longmire’s theory of the mean forward range of charged particles and the Rayleigh distribution to take into account the statistical nature of scattering and energy straggling, the linear attenuation, or self-absorption, coefficient for beta-emitting radioisotopes has been deduced. By analogy with gamma radiation transport in spheres, this result was used to calculate the rate of energy emitted by a beta-emitting microsphere and its efficiency. Comparisons to standard point dose kernel formulations generated using Monte Carlo data show the efficacy of the proposed method. Yttrium-90 is used as a specific example throughout, as a medically significant radioisotope, frequently used in radiation therapy for treating cancer. - Highlights: • Range-energy relationship for the beta particles in yttrium-90 is calculated. • Formalism for the semi-analytical calculation of self-absorption coefficients. • Energy-dependent self-absorption coefficient calculated for yttrium-90. • Flux rate of beta particles from a self-attenuating radioactive sphere is shown. • The efficiency of beta particle emitting radioactive microspheres is calculated

  9. IR spectroscopy of gaseous fluorocarbon ions: The perfluoroethyl anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crestoni, Maria Elisa; Chiavarino, Barbara [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie del Farmaco, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , P. le A. Moro 5, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Lemaire, Joel; Maitre, Philippe [Universite Paris Sud, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique - UMR8000 CNRS, Faculte des Sciences - Batiment 350, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Fornarini, Simonetta, E-mail: simonetta.fornarini@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie del Farmaco, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , P. le A. Moro 5, I-00185 Roma (Italy)

    2012-04-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C{sub 2}F{sub 5}{sup -} ions are formed by dissociative electron capture in perfluoropropane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both their reactivity towards neutrals and IRMPD spectroscopy are investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sampled C{sub 2}F{sub 5}{sup -} ions are best described as covalently bound pentafluoroethyl anions. - Abstract: The first IR spectrum of a perfluorinated carbanion has been obtained in the gas phase by IRMPD spectroscopy. Quantum chemical calculations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level were performed yielding the optimized geometries and IR spectra for a covalently bound C{sub 2}F{sub 5}{sup -} species and for conceivable loosely bound F{sup -}(C{sub 2}F{sub 4}) complexes. Both the computational results and the IR characterization point to a covalent structure for the assayed species in agreement with the reactivity pattern displayed with selected neutrals.

  10. Light-emitting carbazole derivatives: potential electroluminescent materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, K R; Lin, J T; Tao, Y T; Ko, C W

    2001-09-26

    Stable carbazole derivatives that contain peripheral diarylamines at the 3- and 6-positions and an ethyl or aryl substituent at the 9-position of the carbazole moiety have been synthesized via palladium-catalyzed C-N bond formation. These new carbazole compounds (carbs) are amorphous with high glass transition temperatures (T(g), 120-194 degrees C) and high thermal decomposition temperatures (T(d) > 450 degrees C). The compounds are weakly to moderately luminescent in nature. The emission wavelength ranges from green to blue and is dependent on the substituent at the peripheral nitrogen atoms. Two types of light-emitting diodes were constructed from carb: (I) ITO/carb/TPBI/Mg:Ag and (II) ITO/carb/Alq(3)/Mg:Ag, where TPBI and Alq(3) are 1,3,5-tris(N-phenylbenzimidazol-2-yl)benzene and tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum, respectively. In type I devices, the carb functions as the hole-transporting as well as emitting material. In type II devices, either carb, or Alq(3) is the light-emitting material. Several green light-emitting devices exhibit exceptional maximum brightness, and the physical performance appears to be better than those of typical green light-emitting devices of the structure ITO/diamine/Alq(3)/Mg:Ag. The relation between the LUMO of the carb and the performance of the light-emitting diode is discussed.

  11. Light-emitting carbazole derivatives for electroluminescent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiann T.; Thomas, K. R. J.; Tao, Yu-Tai; Ko, Chung-Wen

    2002-02-01

    Amorphous carbazole derivatives containing peripheral diarylamines at the 3- and 6-positions and an ethyl or aryl substituent at the 9-position of the carbazole moiety have been synthesized. These new carbazole compounds (carbs) possess high glass transition temperatures (Tg: 120- 194 degree(s)C) and high thermal decomposition temperatures (Td>450 degree(s)C). The compounds are weakly to moderately luminescent with the emission wavelength ranging from green to blue. Two types of light-emitting diodes (LED) were constructed from carb:(I)ITO/carb/TPBI/Mg:Ag and (II)ITO/carb/Alq3/Mg:Ag, where TPBI and Alq3 are 1,3,5-tris(N-phenylbenzimidazol-2-yl)benzene and tris(8- hydroxyquinoline) aluminum, respectively. In type I devices the carb functions as the hole-transporting as well as emitting material. In type II devices either carb and/or Alq3 is the light emitting material. Several green light-emitting devices exhibit exceptional maximum brightness and the physical performance is superior to those of typical green-light-emitting devices of the structure ITO/diamine/Alq3/Mg:Ag. Relation between the LUMO of the carb and the performance of the light-emitting diode is discussed.

  12. Chemical thermodynamics of iodine species in the HTGR fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemer, T.B.

    1982-09-01

    The iodine-containing species in an intact fuel particle in the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) have been calculated. Assumptions include: (1) attainment of chemical thermodynamic equilibrium among all species in the open porosity of the particle, primarily in the buffer layer; and (2) fission-product concentrations in proportion to their yields. The primary gaseous species is calculated to be cesium iodide; in carbide-containing fuels, gaseous barium iodide may exhibit equivalent pressures. The condensed iodine-containing phase is usually cesium iodide, but in carbide-containing fuels, barium iodide may be stable instead. Absorption of elemental iodine on the carbon in the particle appears to be less than or equal to 10 -4 μg I/g C. The fission-product-spectra excess of cesium over iodine would generally be adsorbed on the carbon, but may form Cs 2 MoO 4 under some circumstances

  13. Influence of Plastic Deformation on Low Temperature Surface Hardening of Austenitic Stainless Steel by Gaseous Nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses an investigation of the influence of plastic deformation on low temperature surface hardening by gaseous nitriding of two commercial austenitic stainless steels: AISI 304 and EN 1.4369. The materials were plastically deformed to different equivalent strains by uniaxial...... tension. Gaseous nitriding of the strained material was performed in ammonia gas at atmospheric pressure at 703 K. Microstructural characterization of the as-deformed states and the nitrided case produced included X-ray diffraction analysis, reflected light microscopy, microhardness testing. The results...

  14. Handling of UF6 in U.S. gaseous diffusion plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legeay, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive systems analysis of UF 6 handling has been made in the three U.S. gaseous diffusion plants and has resulted in a significant impact on the equipment design and the operating procedures of these facilities. The equipment, facilities, and industrial practices in UF 6 handling operations as they existed in the early 1970's are reviewed with particular emphasis placed on the changes which have been implemented. The changes were applied to the systems and operating methods which evolved from the design, startup, and operation of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant in 1945

  15. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion, Piketon, Ohio. Volume 2. Draft environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    The need for additional uranium enrichment facilities and the environmental impacts of the add-on gaseous diffusion plant proposed for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are discussed. A detailed description of the proposed facilities is included and unavoidable adverse environmental effects, possible alternatives, and anticipated benefits from the proposed facilities are considered. The flora and fauna of the area are tabulated and possible effects of air and water pollution on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are postulated. The extent of anticipated noise impact on the vicinity and the anticipated extent of civic envolvement are discussed

  16. Hydrochloric acid aerosol and gaseous hydrogen chloride partitioning in a cloud contaminated by solid rocket exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Bendura, R. J.; Wornom, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    Partitioning of hydrogen chloride between hydrochloric acid aerosol and gaseous HCl in the lower atmosphere was experimentally investigated in a solid rocket exhaust cloud diluted with humid ambient air. Airborne measurements were obtained of gaseous HCl, total HCl, relative humidity and temperature to evaluate the conditions under which aerosol formation occurs in the troposphere in the presence of hygroscopic HCl vapor. Equilibrium predictions of HCl aerosol formation accurately predict the measured HCl partitioning over a range of total HCl concentrations from 0.6 to 16 ppm.

  17. Development on the production of 41Ar and 79Kr gaseous radiotracers for industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yelgaonkar, V.N.; Jagdeesan, K.C.; Shivarudrappa, V.; Sharma, V.K.; Chitra, S.

    2006-01-01

    Owing to the increase in demand from Indian industries for gas phase studies using radiotracers, efforts have been made to produce 41 Ar and 79 Kr indigenously by irradiation of 40 Ar and enriched 78 Kr gaseous targets in the research reactors. 41 Ar due to its short T 1/2 is useful in industries in nearby locations, whereas 79 Kr due to long T 1/2 will be used for studies in distant locations. The results on the studies of trial irradiation of these targets and standardisation of radioactivity assay protocols for regular production and supply of gaseous radiotracers are presented in this paper

  18. Turbulence coefficients and stability studies for the coaxial flow or dissimiliar fluids. [gaseous core nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, H.; Lavan, Z.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical investigations of fluid dynamics problems of relevance to the gaseous core nuclear reactor program are presented. The vortex type flow which appears in the nuclear light bulb concept is analyzed along with the fluid flow in the fuel inlet region for the coaxial flow gaseous core nuclear reactor concept. The development of numerical methods for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for appropriate geometries is extended to the case of rotating flows and almost completes the gas core program requirements in this area. The investigations demonstrate that the conceptual design of the coaxial flow reactor needs further development.

  19. Evaluation of aluminum capsules according to ISO 9978 to irradiation of gaseous samples in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Osvaldo L. da.; Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Souza, Daiane C.B.; Feher, Anselmo; Moura, Joao A.; Souza, Carla D.; Moura, Eduardo S.; Oliveira, Henrique B.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Gas irradiation in research nuclear reactors is an important way to produce radionuclides. Although some nuclear reactors centers offer this type of service, there are few publications about capsules to irradiation of gaseous samples. This paper describes a method to fabricate and evaluate aluminum capsules to irradiate gaseous samples in nuclear reactor. A semi-circular slotted die from a hydraulic press head was modified to seal aluminum tubes. The aluminum capsules were subjected to leak detection tests, which demonstrated the accordance with standard ISO 9978. (author)

  20. Quantum chemical approach for condensed-phase thermochemistry (IV): Solubility of gaseous molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Kamata, Masahiro; Nakai, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    The harmonic solvation model (HSM) was applied to the solvation of gaseous molecules and compared to a procedure based on the ideal gas model (IGM). Examination of 25 molecules showed that (i) the accuracy of ΔGsolv was similar for both methods, but the HSM shows advantages for calculating ΔHsolv and TΔSsolv; (ii) TΔSsolv contributes more than ΔHsolv to ΔGsolv in the HSM, i.e. the solvation of gaseous molecules is entropy-driven, which agrees well with experimental understanding (the IGM does not show this); (iii) the temperature dependence of Henry's law coefficient was correctly reproduced with the HSM.

  1. Building and commissioning of a setup to study ageing phenomena in gaseous detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abuhoza, A., E-mail: aabuhoza@kacst.edu.sa [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt (Germany); Schmidt, H.R. [Eberhard-Karls-Universität, Tübingen (Germany); Biswas, S. [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Jatni 752050 (India); Frankenfeld, U.; Hehner, J.; Schmidt, C.J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)

    2016-07-11

    In high-rate heavy-ion experiments, gaseous detectors encounter big challenges in terms of degradation of their performance due to a phenomenon called ageing. A setup for high precision ageing studies has been constructed and commissioned at the GSI detector laboratory. The setup as well as the gas system have been carefully optimized to reach a high sensitivity for ageing effects. Two different materials have been examined for their influence on gaseous detectors: RTV-3145 and Gerband 705. The details of the construction of the ageing test setup and the test results will be presented.

  2. A Study of the Operation of Especially Designed Photosensitive Gaseous Detectors at Cryogenic Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Lund-Jensen, B; Pavlopoulos, P; Peskov, Vladimir; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F

    2006-01-01

    In some experiments and applications there is need for large-area photosensitive detectors to operate at cryogenic temperatures. Nowadays, vacuum PMs are usually used for this purpose. We have developed special designs of planar photosensitive gaseous detectors able to operate at cryogenic temperatures. Such detectors are much cheaper PMs and are almost insensitive to magnetic fields. Results of systematic measurements of their quantum efficiencies, the maximum achievable gains and long-term stabilities will be presented. The successful operation of these detectors open realistic possibilities in replacing PMs by photosensitive gaseous detectors in some applications dealing with cryogenic liquids; for example in experiments using noble liquid TPCs or noble liquid scintillating calorimeters.

  3. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report CY 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1997-03-01

    This annual report summarizes operating activities dealing with the process waste system, the liquid low-level waste system, and the gaseous waste system. It also describes upgrade activities dealing with the process and liquid low-level waste systems, the cathodic protection system, a stack ventilation system, and configuration control. Maintenance activities are described dealing with nonradiological wastewater treatment plant, process waste treatment plant and collection system, liquid low-level waste system, and gaseous waste system. Miscellaneous activities include training, audits/reviews/tours, and environmental restoration support

  4. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion, Piketon, Ohio. Volume 2. Draft environmental statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, W. H.

    1976-06-01

    The need for additional uranium enrichment facilities and the environmental impacts of the add-on gaseous diffusion plant proposed for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are discussed. A detailed description of the proposed facilities is included and unavoidable adverse environmental effects, possible alternatives, and anticipated benefits from the proposed facilities are considered. The flora and fauna of the area are tabulated and possible effects of air and water pollution on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are postulated. The extent of anticipated noise impact on the vicinity and the anticipated extent of civic envolvement are discussed. (CH)

  5. Techniques involved in the preparation of radioluminescent sources with promethium-147 and gaseous tritium radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seshadri, N.K.; Subramanian, T.K.; Ravi, S.; Mathew, K.M.; Chinnayan, C.

    2001-01-01

    Beta radiation emanating from promethium-147 and gaseous tritium in close proximity with zinc sulphide phosphor will provide self sustained light sources and are used for, nocturnal illumination of liquid crystal display digital watches and clocks, product advertisements, telephone numbers, exit signs etc. In this paper a procedure for activation of zinc sulphide phosphor with promethium-147 and development of gaseous tritium light sources with respect to thickness of phosphor coating and its effect on light output is described. A typical light source was constructed with promethium-147 activated zinc sulphide to find the overall efficiency of conversion of beta energy to visible light. (author)

  6. Improving the light-emitting properties of single-layered polyfluorene light-emitting devices by simple ionic liquid blending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horike, Shohei; Nagaki, Hiroto; Misaki, Masahiro; Koshiba, Yasuko; Morimoto, Masahiro; Fukushima, Tatsuya; Ishida, Kenji

    2018-03-01

    This paper describes an evaluation of ionic liquids (ILs) as potential electrolytes for single-layered light-emitting devices with good emission performance. As optoelectronic devices continue to grow in abundance, high-performance light-emitting devices with a single emission layer are becoming increasingly important for low-cost production. We show that a simple technique of osmosing IL into the polymer layer can result in high luminous efficiency and good response times of single-layered light-emitting polymers, even without the additional stacking of charge carrier injection and transport layers. The IL contributions to the light-emission of the polymer are discussed from the perspectives of energy diagrams and of the electric double layers on the electrodes. Our findings enable a faster, cheaper, and lower-in-waste production of light-emitting devices.

  7. Highly efficient white phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes using a mixed host structure in deep blue emitting layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Chang Woo; Lee, Jun Yeob, E-mail: leej17@dankook.ac.kr

    2012-05-31

    Highly efficient phosphorescent white organic light-emitting diodes (PHWOLEDs) were developed using a deep blue phosphorescent emitter doped into a mixed host of high triplet energy host materials. The deep blue emitting layer was combined with a red:green emitting layer to fabricate PHWOLEDs. A high quantum efficiency of 19.5% with a color coordinate of (0.29,0.38) and 19.8% with a color coordinate of (0.39,0.46) were achieved in the PHWOLEDs using the mixed host emitting layer doped with a deep blue phosphorescent dopant. In addition, a low optimum doping concentration below 5% in red, green and blue dopants was realized in the PHWOLEDs. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High quantum efficiency in phosphorescent white device. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mixed host structure for high power efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low doping concentration below 5% in phosphorescent white device.

  8. Elementary electron-molecule interactions and negative ion resonances at subexcitation energies and their significance in gaseous dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.

    1977-01-01

    Recent knowledge on low-energy (mostly approximately less than 10 eV) electron-molecule interaction processes in dilute and in dense gases is synthesized, discussed, and related to the breakdown strength of gaseous dielectrics. Optimal design of multicomponent gaseous insulators can be made on the basis of such knowledge

  9. The impact of the fuel chemical composition on volatile organic compounds emitted by an in-service aircraft gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyan, A.; Kuo, Y. Y.; Brem, B.; Durdina, L.; Gerecke, A. C.; Heeb, N. V.; Haag, R.; Wang, J.

    2017-12-01

    Aircraft emissions received increased attention recently because of the steady growth of aviation transport in the last decades. Aircraft engines substantially contribute to emissions of particulate matter and gaseous pollutants in the upper and lower troposphere. Among all the pollutants emitted by aircrafts, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are particularly important because they are mainly emitted at ground level, posing a serious health risk for people living or working near airports. A series of measurements was performed at the aircraft engine testing facility of SR Technics (Zürich airport, Switzerland). Exhausts from an in-service turbofan engine were sampled at the engine exit plane by a multi-point sampling probe. A wide range of instruments was connected to the common sampling line to determine physico-chemical characteristics of non-volatile particulate matter and gaseous pollutants. Conventional Jet A-1 fuel was used as the base fuel, and measurements were performed with the base fuel doped with two different mixtures of aromatic compounds (Solvesso 150 and naphthalene-depleted Solvesso 150) and an alternative fuel (hydro-processed esters and fatty acids [HEFA] jet fuel). During this presentation, we will show results obtained for VOCs. These compounds were sampled with 3 different adsorbing cartridges, and analyzed by thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS, for Tenax TA and Carboxen 569) and by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/ mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS, for DNPH). The total VOC concentration was also measured with a flame ionization detector (FID). In addition, fuel samples were also analyzed by GC/MS, and their chemical compositions were compared to the VOCs emitted via engine exhaust. Total VOCs concentrations were highest at ground idle (>200 ppm C at 4-7% thrust), and substantially lower at high thrust (engine were mainly constituted of alkanes, oxygenated compounds, and aromatics. More than 50 % of the

  10. Electron emission induced by atomic collisions in gaseous targets and solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meckbach, W.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, it is considered only the process of single collision with gaseous targets. The possible inelastic processes are: excitation and ionization of both, target and incident beam. The attention was concentrated to the processes of direct ionization which may give rise to electron emission. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  11. Real Time Demonstration Project XRF Performance Evaluation Report for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant AOC 492

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Robert L [Argonne National Laboratory

    2008-04-03

    This activity was undertaken to demonstrate the applicability of market-available XRF instruments to quantify metal concentrations relative to background and risk-based action and no action levels in Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) soils. As such, the analysis below demonstrates the capabilities of the instruments relative to soil characterization applications at the PGDP.

  12. Hydrogen Liberation from Gaseous 2-Bora-1,3-diazacycloalkanium Cations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bendo, J.-A.; Martens, J.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Morton, T.H.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence is presented for cyclization to yield 2-bora-1,3-diazacycloalkanium cations in the gas phase. While the neutral compounds in solution and solid phase are known to possess an acyclic structure (as revealed by X-ray diffraction), the gaseous cations (from which borohydride BH4– ion has been

  13. Hydrogen Liberation from Gaseous 2-Bora-1,3-diazacycloalkanium Cations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bendo, J.A.; Martens, J.K.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Morton, T.H.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence is presented for cyclization to yield 2-bora-1,3-diazacycloalkanium cations in the gas phase. While the neutral compounds in solution and solid phase are known to possess an acyclic structure (as revealed by X-ray diffraction), the gaseous cations (from which borohydride BH4(-) ion has been

  14. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report CY 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents details about the operation of the liquid and gaseous waste department of Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the calendar year 1994. Topics discussed include; process waste system, upgrade activities, low-level liquid radioactive waste solidification project, maintenance activities, and other activities such as training, audits, and tours

  15. Active carbons for the storage of gaseous fuels; Charbons actifs pour le stockage de combustibles gazeux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celzard, A.; Mareche, J.F. [Nancy-1 Univ. Henri Poincare, CNRS, Lab. de Chimie du Solide Mineral, 33 - Pessac (France); David, P. [CEA Centre d' Etudes du Ripault, Lab. Carbone et Composites, 37 - Tours (France); Goetz, V. [Universite de Perpignan, Lab. Procedes Materiaux et Energie Solaire, CNRS-PROMES (UPR 8521), 66 - Perpignan (France)

    2006-03-15

    Requirements for storing efficiently alternative gaseous fuels like methane and hydrogen are detailed, and the target to be reached is recalled in each case. The preparation of a suitable material for methane storage by adsorption is described, while systems for densifying hydrogen are reviewed. Engineering problems for filling and emptying adsorptive storage vessels are finally discussed. (authors)

  16. Exergoeconomic optimization of coaxial tube evaporators for cooling of high pressure gaseous hydrogen during vehicle fuelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas Kjær; Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Markussen, Wiebke Brix

    2014-01-01

    Gaseous hydrogen as an automotive fuel is reaching the point of commercial introduction. Development of hydrogen fuelling stations considering an acceptable fuelling time by cooling the hydrogen to -40 C has started. This paper presents a design study of coaxial tube ammonia evaporators for three...

  17. Liquefied gaseous fuels safety and environmental control assessment program: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-05-01

    Progress is reported in research on the safety and environmental aspects of four principal liquefied gaseous material systems: liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), hydrogen, and ammonia. Each section of the report has been abstracted and indexed individually. (JGB)

  18. Contribution to the study of gaseous molecular iodine washout by natural rains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier-Bidoz, V.

    1991-01-01

    This study is part of researches about nuclear accident prediction consequences on the environment. It concerns transfering of molecular gaseous iodine into liquids and especially precipitation scavenging below the cloud (washout). Bibliographic data directly concerned with this study (iodine's aqueous chemistry, aqueous to gaseous phases transfer) and also with its global frame-work (atmospheric release from a nuclear reactor in accidental situation and the behaviour of atmospheric iodine) are presented. Several experimental approaches have been performed in laboratory and on field. An aqueous to gaseous phase transfer simulator allowed us to isolate parameters involved in absorption and desorption of the halogen. Field experiments permit to quantify dry deposition on different solutions and to get a better insight of the phenomenon. Extrapolation of the whole results to precipitation scavenging of gaseous iodine I 2 by natural rains suggests that the process is an irreversible one. Washout rate values acquired during rainy experiments with molecular iodine emission or in a laboratory rainfall simulator agree with literatures data relative to irreversibility. However and even if reversibility was efficient it was not possible to clearly exhibit it according to experimental conditions. Moreover, the analytical iodine method which leads to a good experimental study has been presented

  19. Adsorption of halogenated hydrocarbons from gaseous streams by amberlite XAD-4 resin and activated carbon: equilibria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rexwinkel, Glenn; Rexwinkel, G.; Heesink, Albertus B.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1999-01-01

    Single-solute adsorption equilibria have been measured for the adsorption of the gaseous solutes chloroform, chlorobenzene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane onto Amberlite XAD-4 resin. For 1,1,1-trichloroethane the adsorption equilibrium has also been measured with activated carbon Norit ROW 0.8 SUPRA as a

  20. The two faces of Eve: gaseous anaesthesia and inert gas narcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cameron R; Spiess, Bruce D

    2010-06-01

    Gaseous anaesthesia has been a great boon for medicine. These drugs form a foundation from which modern surgery has sprung, yet their mechanism(s) of actions remains poorly understood. Inert gas narcosis is a limitation of deep sea diving, and its mechanisms also remain poorly understood. In this review article we summarise what is known about the mechanisms of both gaseous anaesthesia and inert gas narcosis, including both lipid-based biophysical models and protein-based biochemical models, as well as explore some striking similarities between the two. These two phenomena may, in reality, be gradations of the same underlying mechanism. Recent findings include biochemical evidence suggesting that both gaseous anaesthesia and inert gas narcosis may be mediated by the occupation of minute spaces within the structure of many biologically important proteins, impairing their ability to undergo conformational changes and biological actions. This is exemplified by exploring the effects of the noble gas xenon, which can behave as either a narcotic gas or gaseous anaesthetic, depending on the partial pressure in which it is present.

  1. Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe past, present, and future activities undertaken to implement Environmental Restoration and Waste Management goals at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Environmental Restoration description of activities, resources, and milestones

  2. Counter-rotating gaseous disks in the 'Evil Eye' galaxy NGC4826

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Robert; Walterbos, Rene A. M.; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.

    1992-12-01

    The discovery of two counterrotating gaseous disks in the otherwise normal early-type spiral NGC4826 is reported. This is the most disklike galaxy in which any kinematic substructure has yet been found. This discovery raises the possibility that even spiral galaxies may have undergone a significant degree of structural evolution due to mergers.

  3. Determination of yields of gaseous products of carbohydrates radiolysis by mass spectrometry method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivko, A.A.; Gol'din, S.I.; Bondarenko, N.T.; Markevich, S.V.; Sharpatyj, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Possible complications are treated involved in the mass spectral study of the radiolytic products of deuterated carbohydrates. A method is proposed suitable for the evaluation of hydrogen isotopes relations and the content of deuterium in water. It has been possible to identify the major gaseous radiolytic products of glucose, polyglucan and dextran, and also to assess their radiation-chemical yields [ru

  4. Evaluation of gaseous chlorine dioxide for the inactivation of tulane virus on blueberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine the effectiveness of gaseous chlorine dioxide against a human norovirus surrogate on produce, chlorine dioxide was generated and applied to Tulane virus coated blueberries in a 240 ml treatment chamber. Chlorine dioxide was produced by acidifying sodium chlorite solution. Initial asse...

  5. Characterization of additives typically employed in EPDM formulations by using FT-IR of gaseous pyrolyzates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Beck Sanches

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR was employed to investigate the gaseous pyrolysis products of ethylene - propylene - diene rubber (EPDM. The objective was to evaluate the potential of FT-IR analysis of gaseous pyrolyzates (PY-G/FT-IR for characterization of EPDM additives. Two EPDM formulations, containing additives typically employed in EPDM rubbers, were analyzed. Initially, gaseous pyrolysis products from paraffin oil, stearic acid, 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline, tetramethylthiuram monosulfide (TMTM, tetramethylthiuram disulfide (TMTD, and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT were characterized separately, and their main absorptions were identified. Subsequently, the gaseous pyrolysis products of raw, unvulcanized, and vulcanized EPDM formulations were analyzed. The similarities observed in the FT-IR spectra of unvulcanized and vulcanized EPDM show that the vulcanization process does not interfere with the pyrolysis products. The identification of the functional groups of the studied additives was possible in both unvulcanized and vulcanized EPDM samples, without solvent extraction. Results also demonstrate that the PY-G/FT-IR technique can identify additives containing sulfur in concentrations as low as 1.4 phr (1.26% in both unvulcanized and vulcanized EPDM. However, the method showed some limitation due to overlapping and to similarities of TMTM and TMTD PY-G/FT-IR spectra, which could not be distinguished from each other. The PY-G/FT-IR technique is a faster and cheaper alternative to the sophisticated techniques usually applied to detection of additives in rubbers.

  6. Gaseous photomultipliers for the readout of scintillators and detection Cherenkov radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peskov, V.; Borovik-Romanov, A.

    1993-11-01

    The latest achievements in the development of gaseous detectors for registering UV and visible photons are described. Possible modifications of their design for some particular applications such as the readout of crystal scintillators. noble liquids, fibers and for large area Cherenkov detectors are discussed

  7. Modeling of carbon and nitrogen gaseous emissions from cattle manure compost windrows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windrow composting of cattle manure is a significant source of gaseous emissions, which include ammonia (NH3) and the greenhouse gases (GHGs) of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). A manure compost model was developed to simulate carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) processes includ...

  8. 40 CFR 89.304 - Equipment required for gaseous emissions; overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment required for gaseous emissions; overview. 89.304 Section 89.304 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... monoxide and carbon dioxide analysis; a heated flame ionization (HFID) type for hydrocarbon analysis; and a...

  9. New packaging design for fresh produce with effective distribution of antimicrobial gaseous chlorine dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the last decade, the potential use of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as an antimicrobial agent for vapor-phase decontamination to extend the shelf-life of fresh produce has been widely studied. Most of the works focused on the dose of gaseous ClO2 for particular food product and/or specific microorganis...

  10. Influences of packaging design on antimicrobial effects of gaseous chlorine dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas is an effective surface disinfectant, for it has the ability to reach and inactivate bacterial cells in biofilms which are attached to inaccessible sites on produce surfaces. One of the most promising applications of gaseous ClO2 is to be included in the headspace of foo...

  11. Use of gaseous tritium light sources (Beta lights) with respect to nocturnal illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    A number/letter plate for use in, for example darkened buildings has spaced apart gaseous tritium light sources (beta lights) arranged centrally along the indicia on a reflective background sealed in clear translucent plastics. Uses include house numbers, name plates, telephone numbers, notices, product advertisements, vehicle registration plates and names or trade marks on products. (author)

  12. Adsorption of gaseous RuO4 by various sorbents. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vujisic, L.; Nikolic, R.

    1983-01-01

    Sorption of gaseous RuO 4 on impregnated Alcoa Alumina H-151, impregnated charcoal, silica gel and HEPA filter was investigated. The results obtained on various sorbents are compared and discussed in connection with possibilities to use the chosen material in air cleaning systems

  13. Gaseous hydrogen sulfide protects against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice partially independent from hypometabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, Pauline M.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Bos, Eelke M.; van den Born, Joost C.; Ruifrok, Willem-Peter T.; Vreeswijk-Baudoin, Inge; van Dijk, Marcory C. R. F.; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; van Goor, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major cause of cardiac damage following various pathological processes. Gaseous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is protective during IRI by inducing a hypometabolic state in mice which is associated with anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant

  14. Gaseous material capacity of open plasma jet in plasma spray-physical vapor deposition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei-Jun; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2018-01-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) process, emerging as a highly efficient hybrid approach, is based on two powerful technologies of both plasma spray and physical vapor deposition. The maximum production rate is affected by the material feed rate apparently, but it is determined by the material vapor capacity of transporting plasma actually and essentially. In order to realize high production rate, the gaseous material capacity of plasma jet must be fundamentally understood. In this study, the thermal characteristics of plasma were measured by optical emission spectrometry. The results show that the open plasma jet is in the local thermal equilibrium due to a typical electron number density from 2.1 × 1015 to 3.1 × 1015 cm-3. In this condition, the temperature of gaseous zirconia can be equal to the plasma temperature. A model was developed to obtain the vapor pressure of gaseous ZrO2 molecules as a two dimensional map of jet axis and radial position corresponding to different average plasma temperatures. The overall gaseous material capacity of open plasma jet, take zirconia for example, was further established. This approach on evaluating material capacity in plasma jet would shed light on the process optimization towards both depositing columnar coating and a high production rate of PS-PVD.

  15. Treatment of timber products with gaseous borate esters, Part 2: process improvement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Turner, P

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper forms a continuation of the work on treatment of timber products with gaseous borate esters. Turner and Murphy (1995) in an earlier paper indicated that gas flow rate into the wood substrate was the principle factor limiting the rate...

  16. 40 CFR 89.412 - Raw gaseous exhaust sampling and analytical system description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.412 Raw gaseous exhaust sampling and analytical... chemically cleaned stainless steel or inert material, for example, polytetrafluoroethylene resin. The use of...

  17. Gaseous radioiodine transport in the air-forage-cow-milk system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, S.C.; Douglas, R.L.; Barth, D.S.

    1976-04-01

    To study the transport of 131 I in the air-forage-cow milk system, a gaseous form of 131 I was released over a field of growing alfalfa which also contained some baled hay and dairy cows in pens. Some of the alfalfa was converted to hay and fed to cows, and some was used as green chop for other cows and goats. The results of this experiment suggest that the deposition velocity of gaseous iodine is much less than that for iodine bound to particulates; that cows ingesting hay secrete a higher percentage of 131 I in milk than cows ingesting green chop; that gaseous forms do not penetrate hay bales to any great extent; that the gaseous form is transferred to milk in a manner similar to particulate forms; that ingestion of contaminated forage results in 80 times as much 131 I transfer to milk as does inhalation exposure to the same cloud; and that goats transfer 131 I from forage to milk more efficiently than do dairy cows

  18. Detectors and Concepts for sub-100 ps timing with gaseous detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Diaz, D.

    2017-01-01

    We give a short compendium of the main ongoing detectors and concepts capable of performing accurate sub-100 ps timing at high particle fluxes and on large areas, through technologies based on gaseous media. We briefly discuss the state-of-the-art, technological limitations and prospects, and a new bizarre idea.

  19. Gaseous mercury fluxes from forest soils in response to forest harvesting intensity: A field manipulation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Mazur; C.P.J. Mitchell; C.S. Eckley; S.L. Eggert; R.K. Kolka; S.D. Sebestyen; E.B. Swain

    2014-01-01

    Forest harvesting leads to changes in soil moisture, temperature and incident solar radiation, all strong environmental drivers of soil-air mercury (Hg) fluxes. Whether different forest harvesting practices significantly alter Hg fluxes from forest soils is unknown.We conducted a field-scale experiment in a northern Minnesota deciduous forest wherein gaseous Hg...

  20. On the effect of pre-oxidation on the kinetics of gaseous nitriding of iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friehling, Peter B.; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Preheating in an oxidising atmosphere is frequently used prior to gaseous nitriding. The effects of this preoxidation have been investigated and it is found that a preoxidation decrease the incubation time for the nucleation of iron nitrides. This results in a more homogeneous nucleation of iron...