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Sample records for gas-phase decontamination demonstration

  1. Preconceptual design of the gas-phase decontamination demonstration cart

    Munday, E.B.

    1993-12-01

    Removal of uranium deposits from the interior surfaces of gaseous diffusion equipment will be a major portion of the overall multibillion dollar effort to decontaminate and decommission the gaseous diffusion plants. Long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas-phase decontamination is being developed at the K-25 Site as an in situ decontamination process that is expected to significantly lower the decontamination costs, reduce worker exposure to radioactive materials, and reduce safeguard concerns. This report documents the preconceptual design of the process equipment that is necessary to conduct a full-scale demonstration of the LTLT method in accordance with the process steps listed above. The process equipment and method proposed in this report are not intended to represent a full-scale production campaign design and operation, since the gas evacuation, gas charging, and off-gas handling systems that would be cost effective in a production campaign are not cost effective for a first-time demonstration. However, the design presented here is expected to be applicable to special decontamination projects beyond the demonstration, which could include the Deposit Recovery Program. The equipment will therefore be sized to a 200 ft size 1 converter (plus a substantial conservative design margin), which is the largest item of interest for gas phase decontamination in the Deposit Recovery Program. The decontamination equipment will allow recovery of the UF 6 , which is generated from the reaction of ClF 3 with the uranium deposits, by use of NaF traps

  2. Gas-phase decontamination demonstration on PORTS cell X-25-4-2. Final technology status report

    Riddle, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    The Long-Term, Low Temperature (LTLT) process is a gas-phase in situ decontamination technique which has been tested by LMES/K-25 personnel on the laboratory scale with promising results. The purpose of the Gas-Phase Decontamination Demonstration at PORTS was to evaluate the LTLT process on an actual diffusion cascade cell at conditions similar to those used in the laboratory testing. The demonstration was conducted on PORTS diffusion cell X-25-4-2 which was one of the X-326 Building cells which was permanently shutdown as part of the Suspension of HEU Production at PORTS. The demonstration full-scale test consisted of rendering the cell leak-tight through the installation of Dresser seals onto the process seals, exposing the cell to the oxidants ClF 3 and F 2 for a period of 105 days and evaluating the effect of the clean-up treatment on cell samples and coupons representing the major diffusion cascade materials of construction. The results were extrapolated to determine the effectiveness of LTLT decontamination over the range of historical uranium isotope assays present in the diffusion complex. It was determined that acceptable surface contamination levels could be obtained in all of the equipment in the lower assay cascades which represents the bulk of the equipment contained in the diffusion complex

  3. Gas phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion process equipment

    Bundy, R.D.; Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.; Neiswander, D.W.

    1994-01-01

    D ampersand D of the process facilities at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) will be an enormous task. The EBASCO estimate places the cost of D ampersand D of the GDP at the K-25 Site at approximately $7.5 billion. Of this sum, nearly $4 billion is associated with the construction and operation of decontamination facilities and the dismantlement and transport of contaminated process equipment to these facilities. In situ long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas phase decontamination is being developed and demonstrated at the K-25 site as a technology that has the potential to substantially lower these costs while reducing criticality and safeguards concerns and worker exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials. The objective of gas phase decontamination is to employ a gaseous reagent to fluorinate nonvolatile uranium deposits to form volatile LJF6, which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The LTLT process permits the decontamination of the inside of gas-tight GDP process equipment at room temperature by substituting a long exposure to subatmospheric C1F for higher reaction rates at higher temperatures. This paper outlines the concept for applying LTLT gas phase decontamination, reports encouraging laboratory experiments, and presents the status of the design of a prototype mobile system. Plans for demonstrating the LTLT process on full-size gaseous diffusion equipment are also outlined briefly

  4. Investigation of gas-phase decontamination of internally radioactively contaminated gaseous diffusion process equipment and piping

    Bundy, R.D.; Munday, E.B.

    1991-01-01

    Construction of the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) was begun during World War 2 to produce enriched uranium for defense purposes. These plants, which utilized UF 6 gas, were used primarily for this purpose through 1964. From 1959 through 1968, production shifted primarily to uranium enrichment to supply the nuclear power industry. Additional UF 6 -handling facilities were built in feed and fuel-processing plants associated with the uranium enrichment process. Two of the five process buildings at Oak ridge were shut down in 1964. Uranium enrichment activities at Oak Ridge were discontinued altogether in 1985. In 1987, the Department of Energy (DOE) decided to proceed with a permanent shutdown of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). DOE intends to begin decommissioning and decontamination (D ampersand D) of ORGDP early in the next century. The remaining two GDPs are expected to be shut down during the next 10 to 40 years and will also require D ampersand D, as will the other UF 6 -handling facilities. This paper presents an investigation of gas- phase decontamination of internally radioactively contaminated gaseous diffusion process equipment and piping using powerful fluorinating reagents that convert nonvolatile uranium compounds to volatile UF 6 . These reagents include ClF 3 , F 2 , and other compounds. The scope of D ampersand D at the GDPs, previous work of gas-phase decontamination, four concepts for using gas-phase decontamination, plans for further study of gas-phase decontamination, and the current status of this work are discussed. 13 refs., 15 figs

  5. The Stability of CI02 as a Product of Gas Phase Decontamination Treatments

    Simmons, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    The gas phase decontamination project is investigating the use of chlorine trifluoride (ClF 3 ) to fluorinate nonvolatile uranium deposits to produce uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) gas. The potential existence of chlorine dioxide (ClO 2 ) during gas phase decontamination with ClF 3 has been the subject of recent safety discussions. Some of the laboratory data collected during feasibility studies of the gas phase process has been evaluated for the presence of ClO 2 in the product gas stream. The preliminary evidence to date can be summarized as follows: (1) ClO 2 was not detected in the flow loop in the absence of ClF 3 ; (2) ClO 2 was not detected in the static reactors in the absence of both ClF 3 and ClF; and (3) ClO 2 was detected in a static reactor in the absence of all fluorinating gases. The experimental evidence suggests that ClO 2 will not exist in the presence of ClF 3 , ClF, or UF 6 . The data analyzed to date is insufficient to determine the stability of ClO 2 in the presence of ClO 2 F. Thermodynamic calculations of the ClF 3 + H 2 O system support the experimental evidence, and suggest that ClO 2 will not exist in the presence of ClO 2 F. Additional experimental efforts are needed to provide a better understanding of the gas phase ClF 3 treatments and the product gases. However, preliminary evidence to date suggests that ClO 2 should not be present as a product during the normal operations of the gas phase decontamination project

  6. The Stability of CI02 as a Product of Gas Phase Decontamination Treatments

    D. W. Simmons

    1994-09-01

    The gas phase decontamination project is investigating the use of chlorine trifluoride (ClF{sub 3}) to fluorinate nonvolatile uranium deposits to produce uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) gas. The potential existence of chlorine dioxide (ClO{sub 2}) during gas phase decontamination with ClF{sub 3} has been the subject of recent safety discussions. Some of the laboratory data collected during feasibility studies of the gas phase process has been evaluated for the presence of ClO{sub 2} in the product gas stream. The preliminary evidence to date can be summarized as follows: (1) ClO{sub 2} was not detected in the flow loop in the absence of ClF{sub 3}; (2) ClO{sub 2} was not detected in the static reactors in the absence of both ClF{sub 3} and ClF; and (3) ClO{sub 2} was detected in a static reactor in the absence of all fluorinating gases. The experimental evidence suggests that ClO{sub 2} will not exist in the presence of ClF{sub 3}, ClF, or UF{sub 6}. The data analyzed to date is insufficient to determine the stability of ClO{sub 2} in the presence of ClO{sub 2}F. Thermodynamic calculations of the ClF{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O system support the experimental evidence, and suggest that ClO{sub 2} will not exist in the presence of ClO{sub 2}F. Additional experimental efforts are needed to provide a better understanding of the gas phase ClF{sub 3} treatments and the product gases. However, preliminary evidence to date suggests that ClO{sub 2} should not be present as a product during the normal operations of the gas phase decontamination project.

  7. Salt decontamination demonstration test results

    Snell, E.B.; Heng, C.J.

    1983-06-01

    The Salt Decontamination Demonstration confirmed that the precipitation process could be used for large-scale decontamination of radioactive waste sale solution. Although a number of refinements are necessary to safely process the long-term requirement of 5 million gallons of waste salt solution per year, there were no observations to suggest that any fundamentals of the process require re-evaluation. Major accomplishments were: (1) 518,000 gallons of decontaminated filtrate were produced from 427,000 gallons of waste salt solution from tank 24H. The demonstration goal was to produce a minimum of 200,000 gallons of decontaminated salt solution; (2) cesium activity in the filtrate was reduced by a factor of 43,000 below the cesium activity in the tank 24 solution. This decontamination factor (DF) exceeded the demonstration goal of a DF greater than 10,000; (3) average strontium-90 activity in the filtrate was reduced by a factor of 26 to less than 10 3 d/m/ml versus a goal of less than 10 4 d/m/ml; and (4) the concentrated precipitate was washed to a final sodium ion concentration of 0.15 M, well below the 0.225 M upper limit for DWPF feed. These accomplishments were achieved on schedule and without incident. Total radiation exposure to personnel was less than 350 mrem and resulted primarily from sampling precipitate slurry inside tank 48. 3 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  8. Evaluation of gas-phase technetium decontamination and safety related experiments during FY 1994. A report of work in progress

    Simmons, D.W.; Munday, E.B.

    1995-05-01

    Laboratory activities for FY94 included: evaluation of decontamination of Tc by gas-phase techniques, evaluation of diluted ClF{sub 3} for removing U deposits, evaluation of potential hazard of wet air inlekage into a vessel containing ClF{sub 3}, planning and preparation for experiments to assess hazard of rapid reaction of ClF{sub 3} and hydrated UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} or powdered Al, and preliminary evaluation of compatibility of Tenic valve seat material.

  9. Broad-Spectrum Liquid- and Gas-Phase Decontamination of Chemical Warfare Agents by One-Dimensional Heteropolyniobates.

    Guo, Weiwei; Lv, Hongjin; Sullivan, Kevin P; Gordon, Wesley O; Balboa, Alex; Wagner, George W; Musaev, Djamaladdin G; Bacsa, John; Hill, Craig L

    2016-06-20

    A wide range of chemical warfare agents and their simulants are catalytically decontaminated by a new one-dimensional polymeric polyniobate (P-PONb), K12 [Ti2 O2 ][GeNb12 O40 ]⋅19 H2 O (KGeNb) under mild conditions and in the dark. Uniquely, KGeNb facilitates hydrolysis of nerve agents Sarin (GB) and Soman (GD) (and their less reactive simulants, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP)) as well as mustard (HD) in both liquid and gas phases at ambient temperature and in the absence of neutralizing bases or illumination. Three lines of evidence establish that KGeNb removes DMMP, and thus likely GB/GD, by general base catalysis: a) the k(H2 O)/k(D2 O) solvent isotope effect is 1.4; b) the rate law (hydrolysis at the same pH depends on the amount of P-PONb present); and c) hydroxide is far less active against the above simulants at the same pH than the P-PONbs themselves, a critical control experiment. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS, BAY CITY, MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    The SITE Program funded a field demonstration to evaluate the Eco Logic Gas-Phase Chemical Reduction Process developed by ELI Eco Logic International Inc. (ELI), Ontario, Canada. The Demonstration took place at the Middleground Landfill in Bay City, Michigan using landfill wa...

  11. W-12 valve pit decontamination demonstration

    Benson, C.E.; Parfitt, J.E.; Patton, B.D.

    1995-12-01

    Waste tank W-12 is a tank in the ORNL Low-Level Liquid Waste (LLLW) system that collected waste from Building 3525. Because of a leaking flange in the discharge line from W-12 to the evaporator service tank (W-22) and continual inleakage into the tank from an unknown source, W-12 was removed from service to comply with the Federal Facilities Agreement requirement. The initial response was to decontaminate the valve pit between tank W-12 and the evaporator service tank (W-22) to determine if personnel could enter the pit to attempt repair of the leaking flange. Preventing the spread of radioactive contamination from the pit to the environment and to other waste systems was of concern during the decontamination. The drain in the pit goes to the process waste system; therefore, if high-level liquid waste were generated during decontamination activities, it would have to be removed from the pit by means other than the available liquid waste connection. Remote decontamination of W-12 was conducted using the General Mills manipulator bridge and telescoping trolley and REMOTEC RM-10 manipulator. The initial objective of repairing the leaking flange was not conducted because of the repair uncertainty and the unknown tank inleakage. Rather, new piping was installed to empty the W-12 tank that would bypass the valve pit and eliminate the need to repair the flange. The radiological surveys indicated that a substantial decontamination factor was achieved

  12. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION - ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL, INC.

    The patented Eco Logic Process employs a gas-phase reduction reaction of hydrogen with organic and chlorinated organic compounds at elevated temperatures to convert aqueous and oily hazardous contaminants into a hydrocarbon-rich gas product. After passing through a scrubber, the ...

  13. Demonstration recommendations for accelerated testing of concrete decontamination methods

    Dickerson, K.S.; Ally, M.R.; Brown, C.H.; Morris, M.I.; Wilson-Nichols, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    A large number of aging US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facilities located throughout the US require deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning. Although several technologies are available commercially for concrete decontamination, emerging technologies with potential to reduce secondary waste and minimize the impact and risk to workers and the environment are needed. In response to these needs, the Accelerated Testing of Concrete Decontamination Methods project team described the nature and extent of contaminated concrete within the DOE complex and identified applicable emerging technologies. Existing information used to describe the nature and extent of contaminated concrete indicates that the most frequently occurring radiological contaminants are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}U (and its daughters), {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, and tritium. The total area of radionuclide-contaminated concrete within the DOE complex is estimated to be in the range of 7.9 {times} 10{sup 8} ft{sup 2}or approximately 18,000 acres. Concrete decontamination problems were matched with emerging technologies to recommend demonstrations considered to provide the most benefit to decontamination of concrete within the DOE complex. Emerging technologies with the most potential benefit were biological decontamination, electro-hydraulic scabbling, electrokinetics, and microwave scabbling.

  14. Demonstration recommendations for accelerated testing of concrete decontamination methods

    Dickerson, K.S.; Ally, M.R.; Brown, C.H.; Morris, M.I.; Wilson-Nichols, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    A large number of aging US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facilities located throughout the US require deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning. Although several technologies are available commercially for concrete decontamination, emerging technologies with potential to reduce secondary waste and minimize the impact and risk to workers and the environment are needed. In response to these needs, the Accelerated Testing of Concrete Decontamination Methods project team described the nature and extent of contaminated concrete within the DOE complex and identified applicable emerging technologies. Existing information used to describe the nature and extent of contaminated concrete indicates that the most frequently occurring radiological contaminants are 137 Cs, 238 U (and its daughters), 60 Co, 90 Sr, and tritium. The total area of radionuclide-contaminated concrete within the DOE complex is estimated to be in the range of 7.9 x 10 8 ft 2 or approximately 18,000 acres. Concrete decontamination problems were matched with emerging technologies to recommend demonstrations considered to provide the most benefit to decontamination of concrete within the DOE complex. Emerging technologies with the most potential benefit were biological decontamination, electro-hydraulic scabbling, electrokinetics, and microwave scabbling

  15. Criteria for the evaluation of a dilute decontamination demonstration

    FitzPatrick, V.F.; Divine, J.R.; Hoenes, G.R.; Munson, L.F.; Card, C.J.

    1981-12-01

    This document provides the prerequisite technical information required to evaluate and/or develop a project to demonstrate the dilute chemical decontamination of the primary coolant system of light water reactors. The document focuses on five key areas: the basis for establishing programmatic prerequisites and the key decision points that are required for proposal evaluation and/or RFP (Request for Proposal) issuance; a technical review of the state-of-the-art to identify the potential impacts of a reactor's primary-system decontamination on typical BWR and PWR plants; a discussion of the licensing, recertification, fuel warranty, and institutional considerations and processes; a preliminary identification and development of the selection criteria for the reactor and the decontamination process; and a preliminary identification of further research and development that might be required

  16. Technology demonstrations in the Decontamination and Decommissioning Focus Area

    Bossart, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes three large-scale demonstration projects sponsored jointly by the Decontamination and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA), and the three US Department of Energy (DOE) Operations Offices that successfully offered to deactivate or decommission (D ampersand D) one of its facilities using a combination of innovative and commercial D ampersand D technologies. The paper also includes discussions on recent technology demonstrations for an Advanced Worker Protection System, an Electrohydraulic Scabbling System, and a Pipe Explorer trademark. The references at the conclusion of this paper should be consulted for more detailed information about the large-scale demonstration projects and recent technology demonstrations sponsored by the DDFA

  17. DECONTAMINATION/DESTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR ORGANICS IN TRANSURANIC WASTE

    Chris Jones; Javier Del Campo; Patrick Nevins; Stuart Legg

    2002-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has approximately 5000 55-gallon drums of {sup 238}Pu contaminated waste in interim storage. These may not be shipped to WIPP in TRUPACT-II containers due to the high rate of hydrogen production resulting from the radiolysis of the organic content of the drums. In order to circumvent this problem, the {sup 238}Pu needs to be separated from the organics--either by mineralization of the latter or by decontamination by a chemical separation. We have conducted ''cold'' optimization trials and surrogate tests in which a combination of a mediated electrochemical oxidation process (SILVER II{trademark}) and ultrasonic mixing have been used to decontaminate the surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes were impregnated with copper oxalate for plutonium dioxide. Our process combines both mineralization of reactive components (such cellulose, rubber, and oil) and surface decontamination of less reactive materials such as polyethylene, polystyrene and polyvinylchloride. By using this combination of SILVER II and ultrasonic mixing, we have achieved 100% current efficiency for the destruction of the reactive components. We have demonstrated that: The degree of decontamination achieved would be adequate to meet both WIPP waste acceptance criteria and TRUPACT II packaging and shipping requirements; The system can maintain near absolute containment of the surrogate radionuclides; Only minimal pre-treatment (coarse shredding) and minimal waste sorting are required; The system requires minimal off gas control processes and monitoring instrumentation; The laboratory trials have developed information that can be used for scale-up purposes; The process does not produce dioxins and furans; Disposal routes for secondary process arisings have already been demonstrated in other programs. Based on the results from Phase 1, the recommendation is to proceed to Phase 2 and use the equipment at Savannah

  18. WIS decontamination factor demonstration test with radioactive nuclides

    Kanbe, Hiromi; Mayuzumi, Masami; Ono, Tetsuo; Nagae, Madoka; Sekiguchi, Ryosaku; Takaoku, Yoshinobu.

    1987-01-01

    A radioactive Waste Incineration System (WIS) with suspension combustion is noticed as effective volume reduction technology of low level radiactive wastes that are increasing every year. In order to demonstrate the decontamination efficiency of ceramic filter used on WIS, this test has been carried out with the test facilities as joint research of Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. Miscellaneous combustible waste and power resin, to which 5 nuclides (Mn-54, Fe-59, Co-60, Zn-65, Cs-137) were added, were used as samples for incineration. As the result of the test, it was verified that Decontamination Factor (DF) of the single stage ceramic filter was usually kept over 10 5 for every nuclide, and from the results of above DF, over 10 8 is expected for real commercial plant as a total system. Therefore, it is realized that the off-gas clean up system of the WIS composed of only single stage of ceramic filter is capable of sufficiently efficient decontamination of exhaust gas to be released to stack. (author)

  19. Technology development and demonstration for TRIGA research reactor decontamination, decommissioning and site restoration

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Ki Jung; Lee, Byung Jik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the introduction to research reactor decommissioning plan at KAERI, the background of technology development and demonstration, and the current status of the system decontamination technology for TRIGA reactors, concrete decontamination and dust treatment technologies, wall ranging robot and graphic simulation of dismantling processes, soil decontamination and restoration technology, recycling or reuse technologies for radioactive metallic wastes, and incineration technology demonstration for combustible wastes. 9 figs

  20. Decontamination

    Montford, B.

    1975-01-01

    Development of special techniques has permitted the use of mild decontamination processes for the CANDU type reactor primary coolant circuit, overcoming many of the problems associated with conventional decontamination processes, which use strong, acidic reagents. (Author)

  1. Decontamination demonstration facility (D.D.F) modularization/mobility study

    FitzPatrick, V.F.; Butts, H.L.; Moles, R.G.; Lundgren, R.A.

    1980-11-01

    The component decontamination technology, developed under the DOE sponsored TRU Waste Decontamination Program, has potential benefits to nuclear utility owners in four strategic areas: (1) Meeting ALARA Criteria for Maintenance/Operations; (2) Management of wastes and waste forms; (3) Accident Response; (4) Decommissioning. The most significant step in transferring this technology directly to the nuclear industry is embodied in the TMI Decontamination Demonstration Facility

  2. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS - PHASE I. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN, PRELIMINARY COST, AND EVALUATION STUDY

    The report discusses Phase I (a conceptual design, preliminary cost, and evaluation study) of a program to demonstrate the recovery of energy from waste methane produced by anaerobic digestion of waste water treatment sludge. The fuel cell is being used for this application becau...

  3. Gas phase ion chemistry

    Bowers, Michael T

    1979-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 2 covers the advances in gas phase ion chemistry. The book discusses the stabilities of positive ions from equilibrium gas-phase basicity measurements; the experimental methods used to determine molecular electron affinities, specifically photoelectron spectroscopy, photodetachment spectroscopy, charge transfer, and collisional ionization; and the gas-phase acidity scale. The text also describes the basis of the technique of chemical ionization mass spectrometry; the energetics and mechanisms of unimolecular reactions of positive ions; and the photodissociation

  4. Gas Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    Granqvist, Claes; Kish, Laszlo; Marlow, William

    This book deals with gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis and is intended for researchers and research students in nanomaterials science and engineering, condensed matter physics and chemistry, and aerosol science. Gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis is instrumental to nanotechnology - a field in current focus that raises hopes for environmentally benign, resource-lean manufacturing. Nanoparticles can be produced by many physical, chemical, and even biological routes. Gas-phase synthesis is particularly interesting since one can achieve accurate manufacturing control and hence industrial viability.

  5. Initial decontamination of the equipment decontamination room at the West Valley Demonstration Project. Topical report, September 1983-May 1985

    Meigs, R.A.

    1985-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the initial decontamination of the Equipment Decontamination Room (EDR). The effort spanned a two-year period and included packaging and removal of waste; grinding away contaminated concrete floors; pump-out and spraydown of an equipment soaking pit; washing and painting of walls, equipment, and floors; refurbishment of utilities and various pieces of equipment; and load tests of EDR and Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cranes. After decontamination, the EDR was converted into a waste handling area for the decommissioning of the CPC

  6. Demonstration experience with an abrasive blasting technique for decontaminating concrete pads

    Devgun, J.S.; Land, R.R.; Doane, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    A demonstration was performed for decontaminating a radioactivity contaminated concrete pad with a portable abrasive blasting system. The system utilizes a rotating blast wheel that scours the concrete surface with metal abrasive. The metal abrasive, pulverized concrete dust, and contaminants rebound into a separator chamber. The reusable metal abrasive is recycled, and the pulverized media are removed to an integral dust collection system. The exhaust is HEPA filtered to minimize release of airborne contaminants. However, the technique had limited success in reducing contamination around the cracks and seams in the concrete where the higher activity levels of contamination were detected during the radiological survey before the cleanup. The technique can be successful and cost-effective in decontaminating large areas of low contamination; however, careful characterization and planning are necessary. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tabs

  7. Demonstration test on decontamination of contaminated pool water using liquid-solid settling technology with flocculants

    Aritomi, Masanori; Adachi, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Tagawa, Akihiro; Hosobuchi, Shigeki; Takanashi, Junko

    2013-01-01

    For the purpose of supplying agricultural water, a stationary purification system for contaminated water had been developed on the basis of the liquid-solid settling technology using flocculants. Two kinds of flocculants had been developed on the basis of preliminary tests: one that compounds iron ferrocyanide and the other that does not. With the use of this system and flocculants, a demonstration test was conducted to apply the decontamination technology on contaminated water in two swimming pools in an elementary school located at Motomiya City, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. It is proved from the results that both the developed purification system and the flocculants can be established as a practicable decontamination technology for contaminated water: the treatment rate was 10 m 3 /hour and the elimination factor of radioactive materials was higher than 99%. (author)

  8. National demonstration of full reactor coolant system (RCS) chemical decontamination at Indian Point 2

    Trovato, S.A.; Parry, J.O. [Consolidated Edison Co., New York, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Key to the safe and efficient operation of the nation`s civilian nuclear power plants is the performance of maintenance activities within regulations and guidelines for personnel radiation exposure. However, maintenance activities, often performed in areas of relatively high radiation fields, will increase as the nation`s plant age. With the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) lowering the allowable radiation exposure to plant workers in 1994 and considering further reductions and regulations in the future, it is imperative that new techniques be developed and applied to reduce personnel exposure. Full primary system chemical decontamination technology offers the potential to be single most effective method of maintaining workers exposure {open_quotes}as low as reasonably achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) while greatly reducing plant operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. A three-phase program underway since 1987, has as its goal to demonstrate that full RCS decontamination is a visible technology to reduce general plant radiation levels without threatening the long term reliability and operability of a plant. This paper discusses research leading to and plans for a National Demonstration of Full RCS Chemical Decontamination at Indian Point 2 nuclear generating station in 1995.

  9. Gas phase ion chemistry

    Bowers, Michael T

    1979-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 1 covers papers on the advances of gas phase ion chemistry. The book discusses the advances in flow tubes and the measurement of ion-molecule rate coefficients and product distributions; the ion chemistry of the earth's atmosphere; and the classical ion-molecule collision theory. The text also describes statistical methods in reaction dynamics; the state selection by photoion-photoelectron coincidence; and the effects of temperature and pressure in the kinetics of ion-molecule reactions. The energy distribution in the unimolecular decomposition of ions, as well

  10. Gas phase pulse radiolysis

    Jonah, C.D.; Andong Liu; Mulac, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    Gas phase pulse radiolysis, a technique which can be used to study many different phenomena in chemistry and physics, is discussed. As a source of small radicals, pulse radiolysis is important to the field of chemistry, particularly to combustion and atmospheric kinetics. The reactions of 1,3-butadiene, allene, ethylene and acetylene with OH are presented. 52 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. Gas-Phase Thermolyses

    Carlsen, Lars; Egsgaard, Helge

    1982-01-01

    The unimolecular gas-phase thermolyses of 1,2,3-oxadithiolan 2-oxide and thiiran 1-oxide have been studied by the flash vacuum thermolysis–field ionization mass spectrometry (f.v.t.–f.i.m.s.) technique in the temperature range from 1 043 to 1 404 K. The reactions are rationalized in terms of sulp...

  12. Gas-Phase Thermolyses

    Carlsen, Lars; Egsgaard, Helge

    1982-01-01

    The unimolecular gas-phase thermolyses of the four methyl and ethyl monothioacetates (5)–(8) have been studied by the flash vacuum thermolysis–field ionization mass spectrometry technique in the temperature range 883–1 404 K. The types of reactions verified were keten formation, thiono–thiolo rea...

  13. Large-scale demonstration of disposal of decontaminated salt as saltstone. Part I. Construction, loading, and capping of lysimeters

    Wolf, H.C.

    1984-06-01

    The installation phase of a large-scale demonstration of the disposal concept for decontaminated, low-level radioactive salt waste at the Savannah River Plant was completed in December 1983 and January 1984. The installation entailed immobilizing 7500 gallons of decontaminated salt solution with a blended cement formulation and pouring the resulting grout, saltstone, into three specially designed lysimeters for extended in-field leaching tests under natural conditions. 4 references, 35 figures, 4 tables

  14. Decontamination and radioactivity measurement on building surfaces related to dismantling of Japan power demonstration reactor (JPDR)

    Hatakeyama, Mutsuo; Tachibana, Mitsuo; Yanagihara, Satoshi

    1997-12-01

    In the final stage of dismantling activities for decommissioning a nuclear power plant, building structures have to be demolished to release the site for unrestricted use. Since building structures are generally made from massive reinforced concrete materials, it is not a rational way to treat all concrete materials arising from its demolition as radioactive waste. Segregation of radioactive parts from building structures is therefore indispensable. The rational procedures were studied for demolition of building structures by treating arising waste as non-radioactive materials, based on the concept established by Nuclear Safety Commission, then these were implemented in the following way by the JPDR dismantling demonstration project. Areas of the JPDR facilities are categorized into two groups : possibly contaminated areas, and possibly non-contaminated areas, based on the document of the reactor operation. Radioactivity on the building surfaces was then measured to confirm that the qualitative categorization is reasonable. After that, building surfaces were decontaminated in such a way that the contaminated layers were removed with enough margin to separate radioactive parts from non-radioactive building structures. Thought it might be possible to demolish the building structures by treating arising waste as non-radioactive materials, confirmation survey for radioactivity was conducted to show that there is no artificial radioactive nuclides produced by operation in the facility. This report describes the procedures studied on measurement of radioactivity and decontamination, and the results of its implementation in the JPDR dismantling demonstration project. (author)

  15. Large-scale decontamination and decommissioning technology demonstration project at a former uranium metal production facility

    Martineit, R.A.; Borgman, T.D.; Peters, M.S.; Stebbins, L.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Focus Area, led by the Federal Energy Technology Center, has been charged with improving upon baseline D ampersand D technologies with the goal of demonstrating and validating more cost-effective and safer technologies to characterize, deactivate, survey, decontaminate, dismantle, and dispose of surplus structures, buildings, and their contents at DOE sites. The D ampersand D Focus Area's approach to verifying the benefits of the improved D ampersand D technologies is to use them in large-scale technology demonstration (LSTD) projects at several DOE sites. The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) was selected to host one of the first three LSTD's awarded by the D ampersand D Focus Area. The FEMP is a DOE facility near Cincinnati, Ohio, that was formerly engaged in the production of high quality uranium metal. The FEMP is a Superfund site which has completed its RUFS process and is currently undergoing environmental restoration. With the FEMP's selection to host an LSTD, the FEMP was immediately faced with some challenges. The primary challenge was that this LSTD was to be integrated into the FEMP's Plant 1 D ampersand D Project which was an ongoing D ampersand D Project for which a firm fixed price contract had been issued to the D ampersand D Contractor. Thus, interferences with the baseline D ampersand D project could have significant financial implications. Other challenges include defining and selecting meaningful technology demonstrations, finding/selecting technology providers, and integrating the technology into the baseline D ampersand D project. To date, twelve technologies have been selected, and six have been demonstrated. The technology demonstrations have yielded a high proportion of open-quotes winners.close quotes All demonstrated, technologies will be evaluated for incorporation into the FEMP's baseline D ampersand D

  16. Gas-Phase Thermolysis

    Carlsen, Lars; Egsgaard, Helge; Schaumann, Ernst

    1980-01-01

    The unimolecular gas-phase thermolytic decomposition of three silylated thionocarboxylic acid derivatives (2b), (3), and (8) have been studied by the flash vacuum thermolysis–field ionization mass spectrometry technique in the temperature range from 783 to 1 404 K in order to elucidate its possible...... applicability as a route to thioketens. Only very minor amounts of the expected thioketens were found, whereas the corresponding ketens were obtained as the major products. A possible mechanism for keten formation is discussed....

  17. Decontamination of the Scrap Removal Room at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    Bridenbaker, W.A.; Clemons, L.

    1987-02-01

    This report describes the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Scrap Removal Room (SRR) at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The SRR is an area in the former reprocessing plant that is required for use in support of D and D for other plant areas. The SRR contained a 6.8 Mg (7.5-ton) crane for loading waste material into a shielded truck cask. It became radioactively contaminated during fuel reprocessing from 1966 to 1972. This report describes the work performed to accomplish the D and D objectives of removing existing piping and equipment and of reducing radiation and contamination levels, to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) levels for the installation of new equipment. Also reported are pre- and post-radiological conditions, personnel exposure, radioactive waste volume collected, cost and schedule data, and lessons learned

  18. Decontamination of the extraction sample aisle at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    Vance, R.F.

    1986-09-01

    This report describes the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Extraction Sample Aisle (XSA) at the West Valley Demonstration Project. The XSA is one of several areas in the former reprocessing plant required for use in support of the solidification of high-level waste. The XSA contained three glove boxes which housed sample stations. It became radioactively contaminated during fuel reprocessing from 1966 to 1972. This report describes the work performed to accomplish the D and D objectives of removing existing piping and equipment and of reducing radiation and contamination levels, to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) levels for the installation of new equipment. Also reported are pre- and post-radiological conditions, personnel exposure, radioactive waste volume collected, cost and schedule data, and lessons learned

  19. Demonstration and evaluation of the CORPEX trademark Nuclear Decontamination Process, Technical task plan No. SR152005. Final Report

    May, C.G.

    1997-01-01

    In June, 1995, the Decontamination and Decommissioning Focus Area funded a demonstration of the CORPEX Nuclear Decontamination Process in an Old Metallography Laboratory glovebox at the Savannah River Site. The objective of the demonstration was to prove the effectiveness of a new and innovative technology that would reduce the risks associated with future cleanups of plutonium-238 contaminated equipment in the DOE complex. After facility and vendor preparations in support of the demonstration, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) was informed by the vendor that the chemistry proposed for use in the decontamination process was not effective on sintered plutonium, which was the form of plutonium in the selected glovebox. After further technical evaluation, the demonstration was canceled. This report describes the work performed in support of the demonstration and the present status of the project. The CORPEX chemical process is a nondestructive cleaning method that removes only the contaminant and the matrix that fixed the contaminant to the surface. It does not damage the substrate. The cleaning agent is destroyed by the addition of proprietary oxidizers, leaving water, carbon dioxide and nitrogen gases, and a sludge as waste

  20. DEMONSTRATION AND EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL HIGH LEVEL WASTE MELTER DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Weger, Hans; Kodanda, Raja Tilek Meruva; Mazumdar, Anindra; Srivastava, Rajiv Ph.D.; Ebadian, M.A. Ph.D.

    2003-01-01

    Four hand-held tools were tested for failed high-level waste melter decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The forces felt by the tools during operation were measured using a tri-axial accelerometer since they will be operated by a remote manipulator. The efficiency of the tools was also recorded. Melter D and D consists of three parts: (1) glass fracturing: removing from the furnace the melted glass that can not be poured out through normal means, (2) glass cleaning: removing the thin layer of glass that has formed over the surface of the refractory material, and (3) K-3 refractory breakup: removing the K-3 refractory material. Surrogate glass, from a formula provided by the Savannah River Site, was melted in a furnace and poured into steel containers. K-3 refractory material, the same material used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility, was utilized for the demonstrations. Four K-3 blocks were heated at 1150 C for two weeks with a glass layer on top to simulate the hardened glass layer on the refractory surface in the melter. Tools chosen for the demonstrations were commonly used D and D tools, which have not been tested specifically for the different aspects of melter D and D. A jackhammer and a needle gun were tested for glass fracturing; a needle gun and a rotary grinder with a diamond face wheel (diamond grinder) were tested for glass cleaning; and a jackhammer, diamond grinder, and a circular saw with a diamond blade were tested for refractory breakup. The needle gun was not capable of removing or fracturing the surrogate glass. The diamond grinder only had a removal rate of 3.0 x 10-4 kg/s for K-3 refractory breakup and needed to be held firmly against the material. However, the diamond grinder was effective for glass cleaning, with a removal rate of 3.9 cm2/s. The jackhammer was successful in fracturing glass and breaking up the K-3 refractory block. The jackhammer had a glass-fracturing rate of 0.40 kg/s. The jackhammer split the K-3 refractory

  1. Decontamination of the Warm Aisles at the West Valley Demonstration Project. Final topical report, January 1985-February 1986

    Allen, J.C.

    1986-06-01

    The West Valley Demonstration Project is a DOE project to solidify in a glass form the 2,120 m 3 (560,000 gallons) of liquid high-level waste stored in two underground steel tanks at the site of the world's first commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing plant, West Valley, New York. One project objective is to utilize as much of the existing plant areas as practical for the installation of solidification support systems. Previously, Extraction Cell Three (XC3) and the Product Purification Cell (PPC) had been chosen as the location of the Liquid Waste Treatment System (LWTS). Subsequently, it was decided that areas of the Upper Warm Aisle (UWA) and the Lower Warm Aisle (LWA) which are located adjacent to the south wall of XC3 and PPC would also be needed for the installation of LWTS equipment. Shielded concrete niches which contained pumps and valve manifolds are located in the warm aisles. One pump niche and one valve manifold niche in the UWA and one pump niche in the LWA were identified as needed for the LWTS. Also, it was necessary to remove some equipment which was located outside the niches. Subsequently, decontamination plans were made and carried out to prepare these areas for modification and installation activities. Predecontamination survey activities began in January 1985, and decontamination operations were completed in February 1986. Decontamination efforts, results, and lessons learned are reported

  2. Cement waste form qualification report: WVDP [West Valley Demonstration Project] PUREX decontaminated supernatant

    McVay, C.W.; Stimmel, J.R.; Marchetti, S.

    1988-08-01

    This report provides a summary of work performed to develop a cement-based, low-level waste formulation suitable for the solidification of decontaminated high-level waste liquid produced as a by-product of PUREX spent fuel reprocessing. The resultant waste form is suitable for interim storage and is intended for ultimate disposal as low-level Class C waste; it also meets the stability requirements of the NRC Branch Technical Position on Waste Form Qualification, May 1983 and the requirements of 10 CFR 61. A recipe was developed utilizing only Portland Type I cement based on an inorganic salts simulant of the PUREX supernatant. The qualified recipe was tested full scale in the production facility and was observed to produce a product with entrained air, low density, and lower-than-expected compressive strength. Further laboratory scale testing with actual decontaminated supernatant revealed that set retarders were present in the supernatant, precluding setting of the product and allowing the production of ''bleed water.'' Calcium nitrate and sodium silicate were added to overcome the set retarding effect and produced a final product with improved performance when compared to the original formulation. This report describes the qualification process and qualification test results for the final product formulation. 7 refs., 38 figs., 21 tabs

  3. Reticulated Vitreous Carbon Electrodes for Gas Phase Pulsed Corona Reactors

    Locke, B

    1998-01-01

    A new design for gas phase pulsed corona reactors incorporating reticulated vitreous carbon electrodes is demonstrated to be effective for the removal of nitrogen oxides from synthetic air mixtures...

  4. Reticulated Vitreous Carbon Electrodes for Gas Phase Pulsed Corona Reactors

    LOCKE, B

    1999-01-01

    A new design for gas phase pulsed corona reactors incorporating reticulated vitreous carbon electrodes is demonstrated to be effective for the removal of nitrogen oxides from synthetic air mixtures...

  5. Treatment plan for aqueous/organic/decontamination wastes under the Oak Ridge Reservation FFCA Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation Program

    Backus, P.M.; Benson, C.E.; Gilbert, V.P.

    1994-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV have entered into a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) which seeks to facilitate the treatment of low-level mixed wastes currently stored at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in violation of the Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The FFCA establishes schedules for DOE to identify treatment for wastes, referred to as Appendix B wastes, that current have no identified or existing capacity for treatment. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DDT ampersand E) program was established to provide the support necessary to identify treatment methods for mixed was meeting the Appendix B criteria. The Program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs for major categories of the Appendix B wastes based on the waste characteristics and possible treatment technologies. The Aqueous, Organic, and Decontamination (A OE D) project team was established to identify pretreatment options for aqueous and organic wastes which will render the waste acceptable for treatment in existing waste treatment facilities and to identify the processes to decontaminate heterogeneous debris waste. In addition, the project must also address the treatment of secondary waste generated by other DDT ampersand E projects. This report details the activities to be performed under the A OE D Project in support of the identification, selection, and evaluation of treatment processes. The goals of this plan are (1) to determine the major aqueous and organic waste streams requiring treatment, (2) to determine the treatment steps necessary to make the aqueous and organic waste acceptable for treatment in existing treatment facilities on the ORR or off-site, and (3) to determine the processes necessary to decontaminate heterogeneous wastes that are considered debris

  6. Decontamination of the product handling area at the West Valley Demonstration Project: Final topical report for period July 1985 to February 1986

    Phillips, E.C.

    1986-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) preparations of an existing facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), the Product Handling Area (PHA), to be part of a Liquid Waste Treatment System (LWTS) in conjunction with the Cement Solidification System (CSS). Two interconnected facilities, the Uranium Product Cell (UPC) and the Uranium Loadout Area (ULO), form the PHA. Both of these facilities contain large tanks. Both of the tanks in the UPC are suitable for use as components of the LWTS. In addition, the UPC is the only existing means of access to the bottom of the Product Purification Cell (PPC) in which some of the equipment for the LWTS will be installed. Consequently, this report describes the decontamination of the PHA from a radioactively contaminated environment to one which may be entered in street clothes. Of the two facilities of the PHA, the UPC was the more highly contaminated prior to decontamination. Decontamination of the UPC has been completed leaving most of the surfaces in the facility smearably clean. Decontamination of the UPC consisted of washing all surfaces, draining the floor sump, removing unneeded piping, installing a back flow filter system, painting all surfaces, installing rubber matting on the floor and placing new stainless steel covering on the UPC ledge. Decontamination operations in the ULO have been completed and were similar to those in the UPC consisting of decontaminating by hand wipedown, removing contamination fixed in paint, and applying new paint. In addition, two pumps and a concrete pump niche were removed. Prior to decontamination, surface contamination was present in the ULO. After decontamination, most of the surfaces in the ULO were clean of smearable contamination. D and D Operations were initiated in the PHA in July 1985 and completed in February 1986. 13 figs., 9 tabs

  7. Decontamination and decommissioning of Extraction Cell 3 at the West Valley Demonstration Project. Topical report, January 1982-April 1985

    Jones, E.D.

    1985-12-01

    This report describes the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of Extraction Cell 3 (XC-3) at the West Valley Demonstration Project. XC-3 is one of several cells in the former reprocessing plant required for use in support of the solidification of high-level waste. It became radioactively contaminated during nuclear fuel reprocessing from 1966 to 1972. XC-3 contained systems used in the final uranium extraction cycle. Several pump niche and sample box drains were routed into the cell. The report describes the work performed to accomplish the D and D objectives of removing existing piping and equipment from XC-3 and to reducing radiation and contamination levels, to allow installation of equipment for the Liquid-Waste Treatment System (LWTS). Contaminated debris and equipment inside the cell were removed, packaged and stored for future disposition. Interior surfaces (walls, floor, and ceiling) of the cell were then decontaminated to a radiation level that allowed entry without the use of protective clothing or respiratory protection

  8. Decontamination of the chemical crane room and decontamination and decommissioning of the extraction chemical room at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    Phillips, E.C.; Golden, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the decontamination of the Chemical Crane Room (CCR) of the West Valley Plant and the Extraction Chemical Room (XCR) from radioactively contaminated conditions to essentially shirt sleeve environments. In both cases, subsequent use re-contaminated the rooms. Prior to decontamination, general exposure rates in the CCR were 50 to 100 mR/hr with hot spots as high as 2000 mR/hr. Smearable levels on the floor were in the range of 10 5 to 10 6 dpm per 100/cm 2 . Respiratory protection was mandatory for entry. In the Extraction Chemical Room (XCR) prior to decontamination and decommissioning (D/D), radiological surveys indicated a maximum radiation field of 5 mR/hr, due to sources internal to the room, and 20,000 dpm beta/100 cm 2 surface contamination. A radiation source external to the XCR caused a hot spot with a 9 mR/hr exposure rate inside the XCR. The CCR, located at the north end of the Chemical Process Cell (CPC) is for the storage and servicing of two bridge cranes used in the CPC. Decontamination and exposure reduction in the CCR has been completed using vacuum cleaning, damp wipe down, and surface grinding followed by shielding and painting. The decontamination and decommissioning of the Extraction Chemical Room (XCR), located on the fifth floor elevation (160') of the reprocessing plant at the WVDP, has been completed. D/D operations included removal of piping, tanks, supports, and equipment to provide a clean work area of about 3000 square feet and 17 feet high

  9. Pilot-scale treatability testing -- Recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from decontamination and decommissioning activities: Soda blasting demonstration

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the nature and magnitude of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) obligations at its sites. With disposal costs rising and available storage facilities decreasing, DOE is exploring and implementing new waste minimizing D and D techniques. Technology demonstrations are being conducted by LMES at a DOE gaseous diffusion processing plant, the K-25 Site, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The gaseous diffusion process employed at Oak Ridge separated uranium-235 from uranium ore for use in atomic weapons and commercial reactors. These activities contaminated concrete and other surfaces within the plant with uranium, technetium, and other constituents. The objective of current K-25 D and D research is to make available cost-effective and energy-efficient techniques to advance remediation and waste management methods at the K-25 Site and other DOE sites. To support this objective, O'Brien and Gere tested a decontamination system on K-25 Site concrete and steel surfaces contaminated with radioactive and hazardous waste. A scouring system has been developed that removes fixed hazardous and radioactive surface contamination and minimizes residual waste. This system utilizes an abrasive sodium bicarbonate medium that is projected at contaminated surfaces. It mechanically removes surface contamination while leaving the surface intact. Blasting residuals are captured and dissolved in water and treated using physical/chemical processes. Pilot-scale testing of this soda blasting system and bench and pilot-scale treatment of the generated residuals were conducted from December 1993 to September 1994

  10. Corrosion Characteristics of Inconel-600 at the NP(Cu)-HYBRID Decontamination Demonstration Test with HANARO FTL Specimen

    Jung, Jun Young; Park, Sang Yoon; Won, Hui Jun; Kim, Seon Byeong; Choi, Wang Kyu; Moon, Jei Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    An alkaline permanganate (AP) or nitric permanganate (NP) oxidative phase has been generally used to dissolve the chromium-rich oxide. AP is advantageous for the corrosion resistance, but increases the volume of secondary waste during the decontamination procedure. On the other hand, NP has a high corrosion rate but reduces secondary waste. For the safe use of an oxidative decontamination solution with high corrosive resistance and less amount of secondary waste are required. In this study, we modified NP oxidative decontamination solution by adding Cu{sup 2+} to reduce the corrosion rate. To evaluate the general corrosion characteristics, we measured the weight losses of selected specimens in an NP(Cu) and other solutions. The localized corrosion was observed using an optical microscope (OM). To compare the decontamination performance, we measured the contact dose rate of specimens treated in NP-HYBRID and NP(Cu)-HYBRID systems. The reduced corrosion characteristics of the Inconel-600 specimen in a NP(Cu) oxidative solution was observed in terms of generalized corrosion as well as localized corrosion. Less corrosion characteristics do not affect the performance of the overall decontamination compared to the NP-HYBRID process. Therefore, our results support that the NP(Cu)-HYBRID decontamination process is appropriate for the decontamination of the primary coolant system in a nuclear reactor.

  11. Radioactive decontamination

    1983-07-01

    This Code of Practice covers: (a) the decontamination of plant items, buildings and associated equipment; (b) decontamination of protective clothing; (c) simple personal decontamination; and (d) the basic mechanisms of contamination and their influence on decontaminability. (author)

  12. Decommissioning and decontamination of licensed reactor facilities and demonstration nuclear power plants

    Lear, G.; Erickson, P.B.

    1975-01-01

    Decommissioning of licensed reactors and demonstration nuclear power plants has been accomplished by mothballing (protective storage), entombment, and dismantling or a combination of these three. The alternative selected by a licensee seems to be primarily based on cost. A licensee must, however, show that the decommissioning process provides adequate protection of the health and safety of the public and no adverse impact on the environment. To date the NRC has approved each of the alternatives in the decommissioning of different facilities. The decommissioning of small research reactors has been accomplished primarily by dismantling. Licensed nuclear power plants, however, have been decommissioned primarily by being placed in a mothballed state in which they continue to retain a reactor license and the associated licensee responsibilities

  13. Gas-phase photocatalysis in μ-reactors

    Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Henriksen, Toke Riishøj

    2010-01-01

    Gas-phase photocatalysis experiments may benefit from the high sensitivity and good time response in product detection offered by μ-reactors. We demonstrate this by carrying out CO oxidation and methanol oxidation over commercial TiO2 photocatalysts in our recently developed high-sensitivity reac......Gas-phase photocatalysis experiments may benefit from the high sensitivity and good time response in product detection offered by μ-reactors. We demonstrate this by carrying out CO oxidation and methanol oxidation over commercial TiO2 photocatalysts in our recently developed high...

  14. Iodine removal from a gas phase

    Vikis, A. Ch.

    1982-01-01

    Iodine, e.g. radioactive iodine, present as one or more organic iodides, optionally with elemental iodine, in a gas phase (e.g. air) are removed by photochemically decomposing the organic iodides to elemental iodine, reacting the iodine produced, and any initially present with excess ozone, preferably photochemically produced in situ in the gas phase to produce solid iodine oxides, and removing the solid oxides from the gas phase. (author)

  15. Iodine removal from a gas phase

    Vikis, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    Iodine, e.g. radioactive iodine, present as one or more organic iodides, optionally with elemental iodine, in a gas phase (e.g. air) are removed by photochemically decomposing the organic iodides to elemental iodine, reacting the iodine produced, and any initially present with excess ozone, preferably photochemically produced in situ in the gas phase to produce solid iodine oxides, and removing the solid oxides from the gas phase

  16. SVOC partitioning between the gas phase and settled dust indoors

    Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2010-09-01

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are a major class of indoor pollutants. Understanding SVOC partitioning between the gas phase and settled dust is important for characterizing the fate of these species indoors and the pathways by which humans are exposed to them. Such knowledge also helps in crafting measurement programs for epidemiological studies designed to probe potential associations between exposure to these compounds and adverse health effects. In this paper, we analyze published data from nineteen studies that cumulatively report measurements of dustborne and airborne SVOCs in more than a thousand buildings, mostly residences, in seven countries. In aggregate, measured median data are reported in these studies for 66 different SVOCs whose octanol-air partition coefficients ( Koa) span more than five orders of magnitude. We use these data to test a simple equilibrium model for estimating the partitioning of an SVOC between the gas phase and settled dust indoors. The results demonstrate, in central tendency, that a compound's octanol-air partition coefficient is a strong predictor of its abundance in settled dust relative to its gas phase concentration. Using median measured results for each SVOC in each study, dustborne mass fractions predicted using Koa and gas-phase concentrations correlate reasonably well with measured dustborne mass fractions ( R2 = 0.76). Combined with theoretical understanding of SVOC partitioning kinetics, the empirical evidence also suggests that for SVOCs with high Koa values, the mass fraction in settled dust may not have sufficient time to equilibrate with the gas phase concentration.

  17. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION OF A THERMAL DESORPTION/UV PHOTOLYSIS PROCESS FOR DECONTAMINATING SOILS CONTAINING HERBICIDE ORANGE

    This treatability study report presents the results of laboratory and field tests on the effectiveness of a new decontamination process for soils containing 2,4-D/2,4,5-T and traces of dioxin. The process employs three operations, thermal desorption, condensation and absorp...

  18. Environmental decontamination

    Cristy, G.A.; Jernigan, H.C. (eds.)

    1981-02-01

    The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination. (DLS)

  19. Environmental decontamination

    Cristy, G.A.; Jernigan, H.C.

    1981-02-01

    The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination

  20. An Introduction to the Gas Phase

    Vallance, Claire

    2017-11-01

    'An Introduction to the Gas Phase' is adapted from a set of lecture notes for a core first year lecture course in physical chemistry taught at the University of Oxford. The book is intended to give a relatively concise introduction to the gas phase at a level suitable for any undergraduate scientist. After defining the gas phase, properties of gases such as temperature, pressure, and volume are discussed. The relationships between these properties are explained at a molecular level, and simple models are introduced that allow the various gas laws to be derived from first principles. Finally, the collisional behaviour of gases is used to explain a number of gas-phase phenomena, such as effusion, diffusion, and thermal conductivity.

  1. Techniques in Gas Phase Thermolyses

    Egsgaard, Helge; Larsen, Elfinn; Carlsen, Lars

    1982-01-01

    Basic principles, capabilities and limitations of collision activation mass spectrometry are reported, with special reference to real-time analysis of flash vacuum thermolytically generated products. The analytical utility is demonstrated in terms of structure elucidation and isomerization studies...

  2. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-12-18

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations.

  3. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations

  4. Influence of Decontamination

    Knaack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the influence of several decontamination techniques on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. There are different kinds of decontamination methods like mechanical and chemical processes. The techniques specified, and their potential to change measured characteristics like the isotope vector of the contamination is demonstrated. It is common for all these processes, that the contamination is removed from the surface. Slightly adhered nuclides can be removed more effectively than strongly sticking nuclides. Usually a mixture of these nuclides forms the contamination. Problematically any kind of decontamination will influence the nuclide distribution and the isotope vector. On the one hand it is helpful to know the nuclide distribution and the isotope vector for the radiological characterization of the nuclear facility and on the other hand this information will be changed in the decontamination process. This is important especially for free release procedures, radiation protection and waste management. Some questions on the need of decontamination have been discussed. (authors)

  5. Rapid and effective decontamination of chlorophenol-contaminated soil by sorption into commercial polymers: concept demonstration and process modeling.

    Tomei, M Concetta; Mosca Angelucci, Domenica; Ademollo, Nicoletta; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2015-03-01

    Solid phase extraction performed with commercial polymer beads to treat soil contaminated by chlorophenols (4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol) as single compounds and in a mixture has been investigated in this study. Soil-water-polymer partition tests were conducted to determine the relative affinities of single compounds in soil-water and polymer-water pairs. Subsequent soil extraction tests were performed with Hytrel 8206, the polymer showing the highest affinity for the tested chlorophenols. Factors that were examined were polymer type, moisture content, and contamination level. Increased moisture content (up to 100%) improved the extraction efficiency for all three compounds. Extraction tests at this upper level of moisture content showed removal efficiencies ≥70% for all the compounds and their ternary mixture, for 24 h of contact time, which is in contrast to the weeks and months, normally required for conventional ex situ remediation processes. A dynamic model characterizing the rate and extent of decontamination was also formulated, calibrated and validated with the experimental data. The proposed model, based on the simplified approach of "lumped parameters" for the mass transfer coefficients, provided very good predictions of the experimental data for the absorptive removal of contaminants from soil at different individual solute levels. Parameters evaluated from calibration by fitting of single compound data, have been successfully applied to predict mixture data, with differences between experimental and predicted data in all cases being ≤3%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Importance of the gas phase role to the prediction of energetic material behavior: An experimental study

    Ali, A.N.; Son, S.F.; Asay, B.W.; Sander, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    Various thermal (radiative, conductive, and convective) initiation experiments are performed to demonstrate the importance of the gas phase role in combustion modeling of energetic materials (EM). A previously published condensed phase model that includes a predicted critical irradiance above which ignition is not possible is compared to experimental laser ignition results for octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Experimental results conflict with the predicted critical irradiance concept. The failure of the model is believed to result from a misconception about the role of the gas phase in the ignition process of energetic materials. The model assumes that ignition occurs at the surface and that evolution of gases inhibits ignition. High speed video of laser ignition, oven cook-off and hot wire ignition experiments captures the ignition of HMX and TNT in the gas phase. A laser ignition gap test is performed to further evaluate the effect of gas phase laser absorption and gas phase disruption on the ignition process. Results indicate that gas phase absorption of the laser energy is probably not the primary factor governing the gas phase ignition observations. It is discovered that a critical gap between an HMX pellet and a salt window of 6 mm±0.4 mm exists below which ignition by CO 2 laser is not possible at the tested irradiances of 29 W/cm 2 and 38 W/cm 2 for HMX ignition. These observations demonstrate that a significant disruption of the gas phase, in certain scenarios, will inhibit ignition, independent of any condensed phase processes. These results underscore the importance of gas phase processes and illustrate that conditions can exist where simple condensed phase models are inadequate to accurately predict the behavior of energetic materials

  7. Importance of the gas phase role to the prediction of energetic material behavior: An experimental study

    Ali, A. N.; Son, S. F.; Asay, B. W.; Sander, R. K.

    2005-03-01

    Various thermal (radiative, conductive, and convective) initiation experiments are performed to demonstrate the importance of the gas phase role in combustion modeling of energetic materials (EM). A previously published condensed phase model that includes a predicted critical irradiance above which ignition is not possible is compared to experimental laser ignition results for octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Experimental results conflict with the predicted critical irradiance concept. The failure of the model is believed to result from a misconception about the role of the gas phase in the ignition process of energetic materials. The model assumes that ignition occurs at the surface and that evolution of gases inhibits ignition. High speed video of laser ignition, oven cook-off and hot wire ignition experiments captures the ignition of HMX and TNT in the gas phase. A laser ignition gap test is performed to further evaluate the effect of gas phase laser absorption and gas phase disruption on the ignition process. Results indicate that gas phase absorption of the laser energy is probably not the primary factor governing the gas phase ignition observations. It is discovered that a critical gap between an HMX pellet and a salt window of 6mm±0.4mm exists below which ignition by CO2 laser is not possible at the tested irradiances of 29W /cm2 and 38W/cm2 for HMX ignition. These observations demonstrate that a significant disruption of the gas phase, in certain scenarios, will inhibit ignition, independent of any condensed phase processes. These results underscore the importance of gas phase processes and illustrate that conditions can exist where simple condensed phase models are inadequate to accurately predict the behavior of energetic materials.

  8. Gas-Phase Reactivity of Microsolvated Anions

    Thomsen, Ditte Linde

    the gas-phase α-effect. The experimental studies are performed by means of the flowing after glow selected ion flow tube technique, and these are supplemented by electronic structure calculations. The α-nucleophile employed is the microsolvated hydrogen peroxide anion whose reactivity is compared......Gas-phase studies of ion-molecule reactions shed light on the intrinsic factors that govern reactivity; and even solvent effects can be examined in the gasphase environment by employing microsolvated ions. An area that has received considerable attention with regard to the interplay between...... to that of a series of microsolvated oxygen centered anions. The association of the nucleophiles with a single water or methanol molecule allows the α-effect to be observed in the SN2 reaction with methyl chloride; this effect was not apparent in the reactions of the unsolvated anions. The results suggest...

  9. Studies of matrix diffusion in gas phase

    Hartikainen, K.; Timonen, J.; Vaeaetaeinen, K.; Pietarila, H.

    1994-03-01

    The diffusion of solutes from fractures into rock matrix is an important factor in the safety analysis of disposal of radioactive waste. Laboratory measurements are needed to complement field investigations for a reliable determination of the necessary transport parameters. Measurements of diffusion coefficients in tight rock samples are usually time consuming because the diffusion processes are slow. On the other hand it is well known that diffusion coefficients in the gas phase are roughly four orders of magnitude larger than those in the liquid phase. Therefore, for samples whose structures do not change much upon drying, it is possible to estimate the diffusion properties of the liquid phase when the properties of the gas phase are known. Advantages of the gas method are quick and easy measurements. In the measurements nitrogen was used as the carrier gas and helium as the tracer gas, and standard techniques have been used for helium detection. Techniques have been developed for both channel flow and through-diffusion measurements. The breakthrough curves have been measured in every experiment and all measurements have been modelled by using appropriate analytical models. As a result matrix porosities and effective diffusion coefficients in the gas phase have been determined. (12 refs., 21 figs., 6 tabs.)

  10. Surface decontamination

    Silva, S. da; Teixeira, M.V.

    1986-06-01

    The general methods of surface decontamination used in laboratory and others nuclear installations areas, as well as the procedures for handling radioactive materials and surfaces of work are presented. Some methods for decontamination of body external parts are mentioned. The medical supervision and assistance are required for internal or external contamination involving or not lesion in persons. From this medical radiation protection decontamination procedures are determined. (M.C.K.) [pt

  11. Decontamination and decommissioning of the extraction chemical room at the West Valley Demonstration Project. Final topical report, December 1982-April 1984

    Phillips, E.C.

    1985-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the preparation of a facility for use in decontaminating and decommissioning (D and D) extraction cells at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). In order to prepare such a facility, it was necessary to decontaminate, decommission and equip the Extraction Chemical Room (XCR) at the WVDP. This report describes the D and D of the XCR from a radioactively contaminated condition to an essentially shirt sleeve environment. Also included is a description of the changes made to the XCR for use in the D and D of the extraction cells which are located beneath the floor of the XCR. In the XCR prior to D and D, radiological surveys indicated a maximum radiation field of 5 mrad/hr, due to sources internal to the room, and 20,000 dpm beta/100 cm 2 surface contamination. A radiation source external to the XCR caused a hot spot with a 9 mrad/hr exposure rate inside the XCR. The D and D of the XCR, located on the fifth floor elevation 48.8 m of the reprocessing plant at the WVDP, has been completed. D and D operations included removal of piping, tanks, supports, and equipment to provide a clean work area of about 278.7 m 2 and 5.2 m high. Subsequent to the removal of piping and equipment, a new floor was installed in part of the room and equipment for use in the D and D of the extraction cells was added. The equipment included a large containment tent over the extraction cell hatches, a jib crane, two gantries, a monorail crane, an air transporter, and a temporary ventilation system. D and D operations in the XCR were initiated in December 1982 and the completed facility was available for use in February 1984

  12. Advance in radioactive decontamination

    Basteris M, J. A.; Farrera V, R.

    2010-09-01

    The objective of the present work was to determine if the application of the Na hypochlorite has some utility in the radioactive decontamination, in comparison with the water, detergent and alcohol. Several methods were compared for decontaminate the iodine 131 and technetium 99, the work table and the skin it was carried out an initial count with the Geiger Muller. Later on, in a single occasion, the areas were washed with abundant water, alcohol, clothes detergent and sodium hypochlorite (used commercially as domestic bleacher) without diluting. Observing that the percentage in the decrease of the counted radioactivity by the Geiger Muller, decreased in the following way: It was demonstrated that the Na hypochlorite presents the highest index of radioactive decontamination with 100% of effectiveness. The Na hypochlorite is an excellent substance that can be used with effectiveness and efficiency like decontamination element in the accident cases of radioactive contamination in the clinical laboratories of nuclear medicine. (Author)

  13. Gas phase reactive collisions, experimental approach

    Canosa A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1937 when the first molecule in space has been identified, more than 150 molecules have been detected. Understanding the fate of these molecules requires having a perfect view of their photochemistry and reactivity with other partners. It is then crucial to identify the main processes that will produce and destroy them. In this chapter, a general view of experimental techniques able to deliver gas phase chemical kinetics data at low and very low temperatures will be presented. These techniques apply to the study of reactions between neutral reactants on the one hand and reactions involving charge species on the other hand.

  14. Experimental station for gas phase fluorescence spectroscopy

    Stankiewicz, M.; Garcia, E. Melero; Ruiz, J. Alvarez; Erman, P.; Hatherly, P.A.; Kivimaeki, A.; Rachlew, E.; Rius i Riu, J.

    2004-01-01

    The details of an experimental setup for gas phase atomic and molecular fluorescence measurements using synchrotron radiation are described in this article. The most significant part of the apparatus is an optical arrangement, which allows for simultaneous measurements of dispersed as well as total fluorescence intensity using an effusive gas jet and an inbuilt gas cell assembled in a convenient plug and measure configuration. The first measurements concerning fluorescence of the N 2 molecule around the N 1s edge obtained with this setup are presented

  15. Decontamination sheet

    Hirose, Emiko; Kanesaki, Ken.

    1995-01-01

    The decontamination sheet of the present invention is formed by applying an adhesive on one surface of a polymer sheet and releasably appending a plurality of curing sheets. In addition, perforated lines are formed on the sheet, and a decontaminating agent is incorporated in the adhesive. This can reduce the number of curing operation steps when a plurality steps of operations for radiation decontamination equipments are performed, and further, the amount of wastes of the cured sheets, and operator's exposure are reduced, as well as an efficiency of the curing operation can be improved, and propagation of contamination can be prevented. (T.M.)

  16. Decontamination method

    Tsujimura, Hiroshi; Ono, Shigeki; Tada, Nobuo; Tamai, Yasumasa; Okada, Masaya; Kurihara, Masayuki; Onuki, Toyomitsu; Toyota, Seiichi

    1998-01-01

    Before contamination of materials to be decontaminated, a surface of a region where a strippable paint is to be coated is smoothed by an epoxy resin previously. Then, a waterproof sheet is extended to the material to be decontaminated, and the strippable paint is applied to the periphery or the entire surface of the sheet. In order to facilitate peeling, the strippable paint is not applied to a portion of the outer circumference of the sheet. Even if the contaminating circumstance is an air atmosphere or a liquid such as reactor water, since the sheet itself has waterproofness and the strippable paint excellent in gas and water tightness is applied to the periphery, contamination is eliminated. When decontaminating the material to be decontaminated having contaminated surfaces, if the sheet for the start of peeling is picked up and the sheet is peeled, the strippable paint at the periphery thereof can be peeled off together with the sheet. (N.H.)

  17. Decontamination method

    Tsujimura, Hiroshi; Ono, Shigeki; Tada, Nobuo; Tamai, Yasumasa; Okada, Masaya; Kurihara, Masayuki [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Onuki, Toyomitsu; Toyota, Seiichi

    1998-10-27

    Before contamination of materials to be decontaminated, a surface of a region where a strippable paint is to be coated is smoothed by an epoxy resin previously. Then, a waterproof sheet is extended to the material to be decontaminated, and the strippable paint is applied to the periphery or the entire surface of the sheet. In order to facilitate peeling, the strippable paint is not applied to a portion of the outer circumference of the sheet. Even if the contaminating circumstance is an air atmosphere or a liquid such as reactor water, since the sheet itself has waterproofness and the strippable paint excellent in gas and water tightness is applied to the periphery, contamination is eliminated. When decontaminating the material to be decontaminated having contaminated surfaces, if the sheet for the start of peeling is picked up and the sheet is peeled, the strippable paint at the periphery thereof can be peeled off together with the sheet. (N.H.)

  18. Skin decontamination

    Moehrle, G.

    1975-01-01

    A general survey of skin decontamination is given. The success of every decontamination treatments depends mainly on the speed, but also on the care, with which the action is taken. The best way to remove the skin contaminants is thorough washing under lukewarm running water with mild soap and a soft brush. This washing is to be repeated several times for a period of several minutes. If results are not satisfactory, light duty detergents and wetting agents available commercially may also be used. Some solutions which have proved useful are mentioned. The decontamination solutions are best used in the order given. When one has no satisfactory decontamination effect, the next one is to be used. If necessary, these agents must be used several times in the stated order as long as this does not involve too much strain for the skin. All the decontamination measures mentioned refer, of course, to intact healthy skin. After decontamination has been completed, the skin should be treated with a protective cream

  19. Decontamination of nuclear facilities

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-seven papers were presented at this conference in five sessions. Topics covered include regulation, control and consequences of decontamination; decontamination of components and facilities; chemical and non-chemical methods of decontamination; and TMI decontamination experience

  20. Gas-phase synthesis of magnetic metal/polymer nanocomposites

    Starsich, Fabian H. L.; Hirt, Ann M.; Stark, Wendelin J.; Grass, Robert N.

    2014-12-01

    Highly magnetic metal Co nanoparticles were produced via reducing flame spray pyrolysis, and directly coated with an epoxy polymer in flight. The polymer content in the samples varied between 14 and 56 wt% of nominal content. A homogenous dispersion of Co nanoparticles in the resulting nanocomposites was visualized by electron microscopy. The size and crystallinity of the metallic fillers was not affected by the polymer, as shown by XRD and magnetic hysteresis measurements. The good control of the polymer content in the product nanocomposite was shown by elemental analysis. Further, the successful polymerization in the gas phase was demonstrated by electron microscopy and size measurements. The presented effective, dry and scalable one-step synthesis method for highly magnetic metal nanoparticle/polymer composites presented here may drastically decrease production costs and increase industrial yields.

  1. Transferring pharmaceuticals into the gas phase

    Christen, Wolfgang; Krause, Tim; Rademann, Klaus

    2008-11-01

    The dissolution of molecules of biological interest in supercritical carbon dioxide is investigated using pulsed molecular beam mass spectrometry. Due to the mild processing temperatures of most supercritical fluids, their adiabatic expansion into vacuum permits to transfer even thermally very sensitive substances into the gas phase, which is particularly attractive for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. In addition, supercritical CO2constitutes a chemically inert solvent that is compatible with hydrocarbon-free ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Here, we report on the dissolution and pulsed supersonic jet expansion of caffeine (C8H10N4O2), the provitamin menadione (C11H8O2), and the amino acid derivative l-phenylalanine tert-butyl ester hydrochloride (C6H5CH2CH(NH2)COOC(CH3)3[dot operator]HCl), into vacuum. An on-axis residual gas analyzer is used to monitor the relative amounts of solute and solvent in the molecular beam as a function of solvent densityE The excellent selectivity and sensitivity provided by mass spectrometry permits to probe even trace amounts of solutes. The strong density variation of CO2 close to the critical point results in a pronounced pressure dependence of the relative ion currents of solute and solvent molecules, reflecting a substantial change in solubility.

  2. Resolving Gas-Phase Metallicity In Galaxies

    Carton, David

    2017-06-01

    Chapter 2: As part of the Bluedisk survey we analyse the radial gas-phase metallicity profiles of 50 late-type galaxies. We compare the metallicity profiles of a sample of HI-rich galaxies against a control sample of HI-'normal' galaxies. We find the metallicity gradient of a galaxy to be strongly correlated with its HI mass fraction {M}{HI}) / {M}_{\\ast}). We note that some galaxies exhibit a steeper metallicity profile in the outer disc than in the inner disc. These galaxies are found in both the HI-rich and control samples. This contradicts a previous indication that these outer drops are exclusive to HI-rich galaxies. These effects are not driven by bars, although we do find some indication that barred galaxies have flatter metallicity profiles. By applying a simple analytical model we are able to account for the variety of metallicity profiles that the two samples present. The success of this model implies that the metallicity in these isolated galaxies may be in a local equilibrium, regulated by star formation. This insight could provide an explanation of the observed local mass-metallicity relation. Chapter 3 We present a method to recover the gas-phase metallicity gradients from integral field spectroscopic (IFS) observations of barely resolved galaxies. We take a forward modelling approach and compare our models to the observed spatial distribution of emission line fluxes, accounting for the degrading effects of seeing and spatial binning. The method is flexible and is not limited to particular emission lines or instruments. We test the model through comparison to synthetic observations and use downgraded observations of nearby galaxies to validate this work. As a proof of concept we also apply the model to real IFS observations of high-redshift galaxies. From our testing we show that the inferred metallicity gradients and central metallicities are fairly insensitive to the assumptions made in the model and that they are reliably recovered for galaxies

  3. Radical Reactions in the Gas Phase: Recent Development and Application in Biomolecules

    Yang Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes recent literature describing the use of gas phase radical reactions for structural characterization of complex biomolecules other than peptides. Specifically, chemical derivatization, in-source chemical reaction, and gas phase ion/ion reactions have been demonstrated as effective ways to generate radical precursor ions that yield structural informative fragments complementary to those from conventional collision-induced dissociation (CID. Radical driven dissociation has been applied to a variety of biomolecules including peptides, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and phospholipids. The majority of the molecules discussed in this review see limited fragmentation from conventional CID, and the gas phase radical reactions open up completely new dissociation channels for these molecules and therefore yield high fidelity confirmation of the structures of the target molecules. Due to the extensively studied peptide fragmentation, this review focuses only on nonpeptide biomolecules such as nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and phospholipids.

  4. Comparison of catalytic ethylene polymerization in slurry and gas phase

    Daftaribesheli, Majid

    2009-01-01

    Polyethylene (PE) with the annual consumption of 70 million tones in 2007 is mostly produced in slurry, gas-phase or combination of both processes. This work focuses on a comparison between the slurry and gas phase processes. Why does PE produced in theses two processes can show extremely different

  5. Site decontamination

    Bicker, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    Among the several DOE sites that have been radiologically decontaminated under the auspices of the Nevada Operations Office are three whose physical characteristics are unique. These are the Tatum Dome Test Site (TDTS) near Hattiesburg, Mississippi; a location of mountainous terrain (Pahute Mesa) on the Nevada Test Site; and the GNOME site near Carlsbad, New Mexico. In each case the contamination, the terrain, and the climate conditions were different. This presentation includes a brief description of each site, the methods used to perform radiological surveys, the logistics required to support the decontamination (including health physics and sample analysis), and the specific techniques used to reduce or remove the contamination

  6. How Pt nanoparticles affect TiO2-induced gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation reactions

    Fraters, B.D.; Amrollahi Buky, Rezvaneh; Mul, Guido

    2015-01-01

    The effect of Pt nanoparticles on the gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation activity of TiO2 is shown to be largely dependent on the molecular functionality of the substrate. We demonstrate that Pt nanoparticles decrease rates in photocatalytic oxidation of propane, whereas a strong beneficial effect

  7. Surfactants from the gas phase may promote cloud droplet formation.

    Sareen, Neha; Schwier, Allison N; Lathem, Terry L; Nenes, Athanasios; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-02-19

    Clouds, a key component of the climate system, form when water vapor condenses upon atmospheric particulates termed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Variations in CCN concentrations can profoundly impact cloud properties, with important effects on local and global climate. Organic matter constitutes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol mass, and can influence CCN activity by depressing surface tension, contributing solute, and influencing droplet activation kinetics by forming a barrier to water uptake. We present direct evidence that two ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases, methylglyoxal (MG) and acetaldehyde, known to be surface-active, can enhance aerosol CCN activity upon uptake. This effect is demonstrated by exposing acidified ammonium sulfate particles to 250 parts per billion (ppb) or 8 ppb gas-phase MG and/or acetaldehyde in an aerosol reaction chamber for up to 5 h. For the more atmospherically relevant experiments, i.e., the 8-ppb organic precursor concentrations, significant enhancements in CCN activity, up to 7.5% reduction in critical dry diameter for activation, are observed over a timescale of hours, without any detectable limitation in activation kinetics. This reduction in critical diameter enhances the apparent particle hygroscopicity up to 26%, which for ambient aerosol would lead to cloud droplet number concentration increases of 8-10% on average. The observed enhancements exceed what would be expected based on Köhler theory and bulk properties. Therefore, the effect may be attributed to the adsorption of MG and acetaldehyde to the gas-aerosol interface, leading to surface tension depression of the aerosol. We conclude that gas-phase surfactants may enhance CCN activity in the atmosphere.

  8. Decontamination processes for waste glass canisters

    Rankin, W.N.

    1981-06-01

    The process which will be used to decontaminate waste glass canisters at the Savannah River Plant consists of: decontamination (slurry blasting); rinse (high-pressure water); and spot decontamination (high-pressure water plus slurry). No additional waste will be produced by this process because glass frit used in decontamination will be mixed with the radioactive waste and fed into the glass melter. Decontamination of waste glass canisters with chemical and abrasive blasting techniques was investigated. The ability of a chemical technique with HNO 3 -HF and H 2 C 2 O 4 to remove baked-on contamination was demonstrated. A correlation between oxide removal and decontamination was observed. Oxide removal and, thus, decontamination by abrasive blasting techniques with glass frit as the abrasive was proposed and demonstrated

  9. Decontamination processes for waste glass canisters

    Rankin, W.N.

    1981-01-01

    The process which will be used to decontaminate waste glass canisters at the Savannah River Plant consists of: decontamination (slurry blasting); rinse (high-pressure water); and spot decontamination (high-pressure water plus slurry). No additional waste will be produced by this process because glass frit used in decontamination will be mixed with the radioactive waste and fed into the glass melter. Decontamination of waste glass canisters with chemical and abrasive blasting techniques was investigated. The ability of a chemical technique with HNO 3 -HF and H 2 C 2 O 4 to remove baked-on contamination was demonstrated. A correlation between oxide removal and decontamination was observed. Oxide removal and, thus, decontamination by abrasive blasting techniques with glass frit as the abrasive was proposed and demonstrated

  10. C-terminal peptide extension via gas-phase ion/ion reactions

    Peng, Zhou; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of peptide bonds is of great importance from both a biological standpoint and in routine organic synthesis. Recent work from our group demonstrated the synthesis of peptides in the gas-phase via ion/ion reactions with sulfo-NHS reagents, which resulted in conjugation of individual amino acids or small peptides to the N-terminus of an existing ‘anchor’ peptide. Here, we demonstrate a complementary approach resulting in the C-terminal extension of peptides. Individual amino acids or short peptides can be prepared as reagents by incorporating gas phase-labile protecting groups to the reactive C-terminus and then converting the N-terminal amino groups to the active ketenimine reagent. Gas-phase ion/ion reactions between the anionic reagents and doubly protonated “anchor” peptide cations results in extension of the “anchor” peptide with new amide bond formation at the C-terminus. We have demonstrated that ion/ion reactions can be used as a fast, controlled, and efficient means for C-terminal peptide extension in the gas phase. PMID:26640400

  11. Nuclear decontamination

    LeSurf, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    Decontamination may be accomplished by chemical, electrical, or mechanical means. Recently there have been significant developments in all three categories as well as an increased tendency to combine techniques, either simultaneously (e.g. by adding chemicals to water jets) or sequentially (e.g. by using a mechanical method to remove loose contamination, followed by a chemical method for more tightly bound activity). Some developments in the different techniques are discussed, together with typical applications of each. (author)

  12. Decontaminating method

    Furukawa, Toshiharu; Shibuya, Kiichiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a method of eliminating radioactive contaminations capable of ease treatment for decontaminated liquid wastes and grinding materials. Method: Those organic grinding materials such as fine wall nuts shell pieces cause no secondary contaminations since they are softer as compared with inorganic grinding materials, less pulverizable upon collision against the surface to be treated, being capable of reusing and producing no fine scattering powder. In addition, they can be treated by burning. The organic grinding material and water are sprayed by a nozzle to the surface to be treated, and decontaminated liquid wastes are separated into solid components mainly composed of organic grinding materials and liquid components mainly composed of water by filtering. The thus separated solid components are recovered in a storage tank for reuse as the grinding material and, after repeating use, subjected to burning treatment. While on the other hand, water is recovered into a storage tank and, after repeating use, purified by passing through an ion exchange resin-packed column and decontaminated to discharge. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. The Ultrafast Wolff Rearrangement in the Gas Phase

    Steinbacher, Andreas; Roeding, Sebastian; Brixner, Tobias; Nuernberger, Patrick

    The Wolff rearrangement of gas-phase 5-diazo Meldrum's acid is disclosed with femtosecond ion spectroscopy. Distinct differences are found for 267 nm and 200 nm excitation, the latter leading to even two ultrafast rearrangement reactions.

  14. GAS PHASE ION CHEMISTRY OF COUMARINS: AB INITIO ...

    B. S. Chandravanshi

    The gas phase ion chemistry of coumarins using electron ionization (EI), positive chemical ionization (PCI) and ... Figure 1. Generic chemical structures of the coumarins in this study. ..... Part of this work was conducted using the resources of ...

  15. Diode Laser Raman Scattering Prototype Gas-Phase Environmental Monitoring

    Benner, Robert

    1999-01-01

    We proposed developing a diode-laser-based, full spectrum Raman scattering instrument incorporating a multipass, external cavity enhancement cell for full spectrum, gas phase analysis of environmental pollutants...

  16. Laser spectroscopy and gas-phase chemistry in CVD

    Ho, P.; Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    The experimental work involves the use of laser spectroscopic techniques for in situ measurements on the gas phase in a chemical vapor deposition reactor. The theoretical part of the program consists of a computer model of the coupled fluid mechanics and gas-phase chemical kinetics of silane decomposition and subsequent reactions of intermediate species. The laser measurements provide extensive data for thoroughly testing the predictive capabilities of the model

  17. Comparison of catalytic ethylene polymerization in slurry and gas phase

    Daftaribesheli, Majid

    2009-01-01

    Polyethylene (PE) with the annual consumption of 70 million tones in 2007 is mostly produced in slurry, gas-phase or combination of both processes. This work focuses on a comparison between the slurry and gas phase processes. Why does PE produced in theses two processes can show extremely different properties and extremely different reaction behaviour even if the same Ziegler-Natta (ZN) catalyst is used? Generally, it is known that the reason can be found in the differences of local condition...

  18. Gas-phase synthesis of semiconductor nanocrystals and its applications

    Mandal, Rajib

    Luminescent nanomaterials is a newly emerging field that provides challenges not only to fundamental research but also to innovative technology in several areas such as electronics, photonics, nanotechnology, display, lighting, biomedical engineering and environmental control. These nanomaterials come in various forms, shapes and comprises of semiconductors, metals, oxides, and inorganic and organic polymers. Most importantly, these luminescent nanomaterials can have different properties owing to their size as compared to their bulk counterparts. Here we describe the use of plasmas in synthesis, modification, and deposition of semiconductor nanomaterials for luminescence applications. Nanocrystalline silicon is widely known as an efficient and tunable optical emitter and is attracting great interest for applications in several areas. To date, however, luminescent silicon nanocrystals (NCs) have been used exclusively in traditional rigid devices. For the field to advance towards new and versatile applications for nanocrystal-based devices, there is a need to investigate whether these NCs can be used in flexible and stretchable devices. We show how the optical and structural/morphological properties of plasma-synthesized silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) change when they are deposited on stretchable substrates made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Synthesis of these NCs was performed in a nonthermal, low-pressure gas phase plasma reactor. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of direct deposition of NCs onto stretchable substrates. Additionally, in order to prevent oxidation and enhance the luminescence properties, a silicon nitride shell was grown around Si NCs. We have demonstrated surface nitridation of Si NCs in a single step process using non?thermal plasma in several schemes including a novel dual-plasma synthesis/shell growth process. These coated NCs exhibit SiNx shells with composition depending on process parameters. While measurements including

  19. Gas-phase polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in vehicle exhaust: A method for collection and analysis

    Seigl, W.O.; Chladek, E.

    1990-01-01

    Gas-phase polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are emitted at low levels in vehicle exhaust compared to other hydrocarbon emissions. A method has been developed involving the trapping of gas phase emissions on Tenax, a macrorecticular porous polymer, followed by thermal desorption onto a capillary gas chromatography column. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used for the chemical analysis. A detection limit of 0.05 ng was achieved for several gas-phase PAH. This high sensitivity enables the speciation and quantitation of gas-phase PAH collected from a dilution tube during standard driving (test) cycles. The method was demonstrated for the analysis of 9 PAH in the exhaust from a 1987 vehicle (with and without catalyst) during the hot start transient phase of the EPA urban dynamometer driving schedule. The PAH measured include naphthalene, 2-methyl- and 1-methylnaphthalene, biphenyl, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene. The four most abundant PAH observed are naphthalene, 2-methyl and 1-methylnaphthalene, and biphenyl, in that order

  20. Multiple Multidentate Halogen Bonding in Solution, in the Solid State, and in the (Calculated) Gas Phase.

    Jungbauer, Stefan H; Schindler, Severin; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Keller, Sandro; Huber, Stefan M

    2015-09-21

    The binding properties of neutral halogen-bond donors (XB donors) bearing two multidentate Lewis acidic motifs toward halides were investigated. Employing polyfluorinated and polyiodinated terphenyl and quaterphenyl derivatives as anion receptors, we obtained X-ray crystallographic data of the adducts of three structurally related XB donors with tetraalkylammonium chloride, bromide, and iodide. The stability of these XB complexes in solution was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and the results were compared to X-ray analyses as well as to calculated binding patterns in the gas phase. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on the gas-phase complexes indicated that the experimentally observed distortion of the XB donors during multiple multidentate binding can be reproduced in 1:1 complexes with halides, whereas adducts with two halides show a symmetric binding pattern in the gas phase that is markedly different from the solid state structures. Overall, this study demonstrates the limitations in the transferability of binding data between solid state, solution, and gas phase in the study of complex multidentate XB donors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Decontamination Data - Blister Agents

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Decontamination efficacy data for blister agents on various building materials using various decontamination solutions. This dataset is associated with the following...

  2. Soil decontamination with Extraksol

    Paquin, J.; Mourato, D.

    1989-01-01

    The Extraksol process is a mobile decontamination technology which treats unconsolidated materials by solvent extraction. Treatment with Extraksol involves material washing, drying and solvent regeneration. Contaminant removal is achieved through desorption/dissolution mechanisms. The treated material is dry and acceptable to be reinstalled in its original location. The process provides a fast, efficient and versatile alternative for decontamination of soil and sludge. The organic contaminants extracted from the matrix are transferred to the extraction fluids. These are thereafter concentrated in the residues of distillation after solvent regeneration. Removal and concentration of the contaminants ensures an important waste volume reduction. This paper presents the process is operational principles and the steps involved in Extraksol's development with results of the pilot tests and full-scale demonstrations

  3. LIAD-fs: A novel method for studies of ultrafast processes in gas phase neutral biomolecules

    Calvert, C R; Kelly, O; Duffy, M J; Belshaw, L; King, R B; Williams, I D; Greenwood, J B

    2012-01-01

    A new experimental technique for femtosecond (fs) pulse studies of gas phase biomolecules is reported. Using Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption (LIAD) to produce a plume of neutral molecules, a time-delayed fs pulse is employed for ionisation/fragmentation, with subsequent products extracted and mass analysed electrostatically. By varying critical laser pulse parameters, this technique can be used to implement control over molecular fragmentation for a range of small biomolecules, with specific studies of amino acids demonstrated.

  4. Gas Phase Sulfur, Chlorine and Potassium Chemistry in Biomass Combustion

    Løj, Lusi Hindiyarti

    2007-01-01

    Gas Phase Sulfur, Chlorine and Alkali Metal Chemistry in Biomass Combustion Concern about aerosols formation, deposits, corrosion, and gaseous emissions during biomass combustion, especially straw, continues to be a driving force for investigation on S, Cl, K-containing species under combustions...... conditions. These trace species contained in the biomass structure will be released to the gas phase during combustion and contribute to the problems generated during the process. The investigation during this PhD project is done to stepwise improve the understanding in the chemistry and reduce...... the uncertainties. In the present work, the detailed kinetic model for gas phase sulfur, chlorine, alkali metal, and their interaction has been updated. The K/O/H/Cl chemistry, S chemistry, and their interaction can reasonably predict a range of experimental data. In general, understanding of the interaction...

  5. Post-flame gas-phase sulfation of potassium chloride

    Li, Bo; Sun, Zhiwei; Li, Zhongshan

    2013-01-01

    The sulfation of KCl during biomass combustion has implications for operation and emissions: it reduces the rates of deposition and corrosion, it increases the formation of aerosols, and it leads to higher concentrations of HCl and lower concentrations of SO2 in the gas phase. Rigorously homogene......The sulfation of KCl during biomass combustion has implications for operation and emissions: it reduces the rates of deposition and corrosion, it increases the formation of aerosols, and it leads to higher concentrations of HCl and lower concentrations of SO2 in the gas phase. Rigorously...

  6. Device to remove hydrogen isotopes from a gas phase

    Morlock, G.; Wiesemes, J.; Bachner, D.

    1977-01-01

    The device described here guarantees the selective removal of hydrogen isotopes from gas phases in order to prevent the occurence of explosive H 2 gas mixtures, or to separate off radioactive tritium in nuclear plants from the gas phase. It consists of a closed container whose walls are selectively penetrable by hydrogen isotopes. It is simultaneously filled compactly and presssure-resistant with a metal bulk (e.g. powder, sponges or the like of titanium or other hydrogen isotope binding metal). Walling and bulk are maintained at suitable working temperatures by means of a system according to the Peltier effect. The whole thing is safeguarded by protective walling. (RB) [de

  7. Reactive intermediates in the gas phase generation and monitoring

    Setser, D W

    2013-01-01

    Reactive Intermediates in the Gas Phase: Generation and Monitoring covers methods for reactive intermediates in the gas phase. The book discusses the generation and measurement of atom and radical concentrations in flow systems; the high temperature flow tubes, generation and measurement of refractory species; and the electronically excited long-lived states of atoms and diatomic molecules in flow systems. The text also describes the production and detection of reactive species with lasers in static systems; the production of small positive ions in a mass spectrometer; and the discharge-excite

  8. Excimer laser decontamination

    Sentis, Marc L.; Delaporte, Philippe C.; Marine, Wladimir; Uteza, Olivier P.

    2000-04-01

    The application of excimer laser ablation process to the decontamination of radioactive surfaces is discussed. This technology is very attractive because it allows to efficiently remove the contaminated particles without secondary waste production. To demonstrate the capability of such technology to efficiently decontaminate large area, we studied and developed a prototype which include a XeCl laser, an optical fiber delivery system and an ablated particles collection cell. The main physical processes taking place during UV laser ablation will be explained. The influence of laser wavelength, pulse duration and absorption coefficient of material will be discussed. Special studies have been performed to understand the processes which limit the transmission of high average power excimer laser through optical fiber, and to determine the laser conditions to optimize the value of this transmission. An in-situ spectroscopic analysis of laser ablation plasma allows the real time control of the decontamination. The results obtained for painting or metallic oxides removal from stainless steel surfaces will be presented.

  9. Gas phase reactivity of thermal metal clusters

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.; Harms, A.C.; Leuchtner, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Reaction kinetics of metal cluster ions under well defined thermal conditions were studied using a flow tube reactor in combination with laser vaporization. Aluminum anions and cations were reacted with oxygen, and several species which are predicted jellium shell closings, were found to have special stability. Metal alloy cluster anions comprised of Al, V and Nb were also seen to react with oxygen. Alloy clusters with an even number of electrons reacted more slowly than odd electron species, and certain clusters appeared to be exceptionally unreactive. Copper cation clusters were observed to associate with carbon monoxide with reactivities that approach bulk behavior at surprisingly small cluster size. These reactions demonstrate how the rate of reaction changes with cluster size. (orig.)

  10. Gas phase reactivity of thermal metal clusters

    Castleman, A. W., Jr.; Harms, A. C.; Leuchtner, R. E.

    1991-03-01

    Reaction kinetics of metal cluster ions under well defined thermal conditions were studied using a flow tube reactor in combination with laser vaporization. Aluminum anions and cations were reacted with oxygen, and several species which are predicted jellium shell closings, were found to have special stability. Metal alloy cluster anions comprised of Al, V and Nb were also seen to react with oxygen. Alloy clusters with an even number of electrons reacted more slowly than odd electron species, and certain clusters appeared to be exceptionally unreactive. Copper cation clusters were observed to associate with carbon monoxide with reactivities that approach bulk behavior at surprisingly small cluster size. These reactions demonstrate how the rate of reaction changes with cluster size.

  11. Exploring the Photoreduction of Au(III) Complexes in the Gas-Phase

    Marcum, Jesse C.; Kaufman, Sydney H.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2010-06-01

    We have used photodissociation spectroscopy to probe the electronic structure and photoreduction of Au(III) in gas-phase complexes containing Cl- and OH-. The gas-phase electronic spectrum of [AuCl_4]- closely resembles the aqueous solution spectrum, showing a lack of strong solvatochromic shifts. Substitution of Cl- ligands with OH- results in a strong blue shift, in agreement with ligand-field theory. Upon excitation, [AuCl_4]- can dissociate by loss of either one or two neutral Cl atoms, resulting in the reduction of gold from Au(III) to Au(II) and Au(I) respectively. The hydroxide substituted complex, [AuCl_2(OH)_2]-, demonstrates similar behavior but the only observable fragment channel is the loss of two neutral OH ligands, leading only to Au(I).

  12. SVOC partitioning between the gas phase and settled dust indoors

    Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, W. W.

    2010-01-01

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are a major class of indoor pollutants. Understanding SVOC partitioning between the gas phase and settled dust is important for characterizing the fate of these species indoors and the pathways by which humans are exposed to them. Such knowledge also helps...

  13. Gas-Phase IR Spectroscopy of Deprotonated Amino Acids

    Oomens, J.; Steill, J. D.; Redlich, B.

    2009-01-01

    Gas-phase infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectra have been recorded for the conjugate bases of a series of amino acids (Asp, Cys, Glu, Phe, Set, Trp, Tyr). The spectra are dominated by strong symmetric and antisymmetric carboxylate stretching modes around 1300 and 1600 cm(-1),

  14. Gas phase toluene isopropylation over high silica mordenite

    Mordenite (HM) catalysts with three different Si/Al ratios were compared for their activity and selectivities in gas phase toluene isopropylation with isopropanol. Catalyst with Si/Al ratio 44.9 offered better cumene selectivity, hence, it was chosen for detailed kinetic investigations. The influence of various process parameters ...

  15. Multiphase flow and transport caused by spontaneous gas phase growth in the presence of dense non-aqueous phase liquid.

    Roy, James W; Smith, James E

    2007-01-30

    Disconnected bubbles or ganglia of trapped gas may occur below the top of the capillary fringe through a number of mechanisms. In the presence of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL), the disconnected gas phase experiences mass transfer of dissolved gases, including volatile components from the DNAPL. The properties of the gas phase interface can also change. This work shows for the first time that when seed gas bubbles exist spontaneous gas phase growth can be expected to occur and can significantly affect water-gas-DNAPL distributions, fluid flow, and mass transfer. Source zone behaviour was observed in three different experiments performed in a 2-dimensional flow cell. In each case, a DNAPL pool was created in a zone of larger glass beads over smaller glass beads, which served as a capillary barrier. In one experiment effluent water samples were analyzed to determine the vertical concentration profile of the plume above the pool. The experiments effectively demonstrated a) a cycle of spontaneous gas phase expansion and vertical advective mobilization of gas bubbles and ganglia above the DNAPL source zone, b) DNAPL redistribution caused by gas phase growth and mobilization, and c) that these processes can significantly affect mass transport from a NAPL source zone.

  16. Chemical decontamination of metals

    Partridge, J.A.; Lerch, R.E.

    1979-10-01

    A metal decontamination process based upon removal of contamination by treatment with a cerium (IV)-nitric acid solution (or other redox agent in nitric acid) is feasible and highly promising. The technique is effective in dissolving the surface layer of stainless steel. Dissolution rates of approximately 1.5 mils/h were demonstrated with cerium (IV)-nitric acid solutions. Removal of plutonium contamination from stainless steel was demonstrated in laboratory tests, in which activity levels were reduced from greater than 5 x 10 5 counts per minute to nondetectable levels in approximately one hour at 90 0 C. Removal of paint from stainless steel surfaces was also demonstrated. Advantages of this process over other chemical solutions include: (1) The solutions are not high salt systems; therefore, there is potentially less waste generated. (2) Cerium(IV) in nitric acid is a good dissolution agent for plutonium oxide. (3) Regeneration of Ce(IV) during the decontamination is accomplished by electrolysis. (4) The process should be effective for irregularly shaped equipment. (5) It could be effective as a spray or a flow-through system. 13 figures

  17. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Chong Hun; Choi, Wang Kyu; Won, Hui Jun; Kim, Gye Nam

    2004-02-01

    Technology development of surface decontamination in the uranium conversion facility before decommissioning, technology development of component decontamination in the uranium conversion facility after decommissioning, uranium sludge treatment technology development, radioactive waste soil decontamination technology development at the aim of the temporary storage soil of KAERI, Optimum fixation methodology derivation on the soil and uranium waste, and safety assessment methodology development of self disposal of the soil and uranium waste after decontamination have been performed in this study. The unique decontamination technology applicable to the component of the nuclear facility at room temperature was developed. Low concentration chemical decontamination technology which is very powerful so as to decrease the radioactivity of specimen surface under the self disposal level was developed. The component decontamination technology applicable to the nuclear facility after decommissioning by neutral salt electro-polishing was also developed. The volume of the sludge waste could be decreased over 80% by the sludge waste separation method by water. The electrosorption method on selective removal of U(VI) to 1 ppm of unrestricted release level using the uranium-containing lagoon sludge waste was tested and identified. Soil decontamination process and equipment which can reduce the soil volume over 90% were developed. A pilot size of soil decontamination equipment which will be used to development of real scale soil decontamination equipment was designed, fabricated and demonstrated. Optimized fixation methodology on soil and uranium sludge was derived from tests and evaluation of the results. Safety scenario and safety evaluation model were development on soil and uranium sludge aiming at self disposal after decontamination

  18. Decontamination in a Russian settlement

    Fogh, C.L.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Barkovsky, A.N.

    1999-01-01

    Decontamination was carried out in an area with three houses in Novo Bobovichi, Bryansk region, Russia, in the autumn of 1995. It was demonstrated that significant reductions in the dose rate both indoor (DRF = 0.34) and outdoor (DRF = 0.20) can be achieved when a controlled cleaning is undertake...

  19. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    Choi, W. K.; Jung, C. H.; Oh, W. Z.

    2007-06-01

    The originative CO 2 pellet blasting equipment was developed by improving additional components such as feed screw, idle roller and air-lock feeder to clear up the problems of freezing and discontinuity of blasting and by adopting pneumatically operated vacuum suction head and vacuum cup to prevent recontamination by collecting contaminant particulates simultaneously with the decontamination. The optimum decontamination process was established according to the kind of materials such as metal, concrete and plastic and the type of contaminants such as particulate, fixed chemical compound and oil. An excellent decontamination performances were verified by means of the lab-scale hot test with radioactive specimen and the technology demonstration in IMEF hot cell. The PFC dry decontamination equipment applicable to the surface contaminated with high radioactive particulate was developed. This equipment consists of the unit processes such as spray, collection, filtration and dry distillation designed originatively applicable to inside of dry hot cell. Through the demonstration of PFC spray decontamination process in IMEF hot cell, we secured on-site applicability and the decontamination efficiency more than 90 %. We investigated the characteristics of dismantled metal waste melting and the radionuclide(Co, Cs, U) distribution into ingot and slag by melting decontamination experiments using electric arc melter. We obtained the decontamination factors greater than 100 for Cs and of 10∼100 for uranium. The pilot scale(200 kg/batch) demonstration for melting decontamination was carried out successfully using high temperature melting facility at KAERI. The volume reduction factor of 1/7 and the economical feasibility of the melting decontamination were verified.

  20. Long-lived gas-phase radicals from combustion

    Kaneko, Takashi; Furusawa, Koji; Amano, Toshiji; Okubo, Yoichi; Tsuchiya, Jun' ichi; Yoshizawa, Fujiroku; Akutsu, Yoshiaki; Tamura, Masamitsu; Yoshida, Tadao (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-04-20

    On indoor air pollution or fire, it is feared that the gas-phase radicals from the combustion of inflammables or fuel seriously exert an influence on the organisms as harmful matter. The gas-phase radicals were studied using the electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping technique. For the spin trap solution, 0.1 mol solution of {alpha}-phenyl-N-t-butylnitron in benzene was used. As a result, apparently long-lived and highly reactive oxygen-centered radicals were detected in the smoke from polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polymethylmethacrylate, cellulose, kerosene, benzene, acetone, methanol and butylalcohol. It is suggested that the production mechanism for the radicals should be different from olefin-NOx-air system reaction, which is considered for the radicals from cigarette smoke. 11 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Reactions of newly formed fission products in the gas phase

    Strickert, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    A dynamic gas-flow system was constructed which stopped fission products in the gas phase and rapidly separated (in less than 2 sec) volatile compounds from non-volatile ones. The filter assembly designed and used was shown to stop essentially all non-volatile fission products. Between 5 percent and 20 percent of tellurium fission-product isotopes reacted with several hydrocarbon gases to form volatile compounds, which passed through the filter. With carbon monoxide gas, volatile tellurium compound(s) (probably TeCO) were also formed with similar efficiencies. The upper limits for the yields of volatile compounds formed between CO and tin and antimony fission products were shown to be less than 0.3 percent, so tellurium nuclides, not their precursors, reacted with CO. It was found that CO reacted preferentially with independently produced tellurium atoms; the reaction efficiency of beta-produced atoms was only 27 +- 3 percent of that of the independently formed atoms. The selectivity, which was independent of the over-all reaction efficiency, was shown to be due to reaction of independently formed atoms in the gas phase. The gas phase reactions are believed to occur mainly at thermal energies because of the independence of the yield upon argon moderator mole-fraction (up to 80 percent). It was shown in some experiments that about one-half of the TeCO decomposed in passing through a filter and that an appreciable fraction (approximately 20 percent) of the tellurium atoms deposited on the filter reacted agin with CO. Other tellurium atoms on the filter surface (those formed by beta decay and those formed independently but not reacting in the gas phase) also reacted with CO, but probably somewhat less efficiently than atoms formed by TeCO decomposition. No evidence was found for formation of TeCO as a direct result of beta-decay

  2. Gas phase fractionation method using porous ceramic membrane

    Peterson, Reid A.; Hill, Jr., Charles G.; Anderson, Marc A.

    1996-01-01

    Flaw-free porous ceramic membranes fabricated from metal sols and coated onto a porous support are advantageously used in gas phase fractionation methods. Mean pore diameters of less than 40 .ANG., preferably 5-20 .ANG. and most preferably about 15 .ANG., are permeable at lower pressures than existing membranes. Condensation of gases in small pores and non-Knudsen membrane transport mechanisms are employed to facilitate and increase membrane permeability and permselectivity.

  3. Gas Phase Hydrogenation of Levulinic Acid to gamma-Valerolactone

    Bonrath, Werner; Castelijns, Anna Maria Cornelia Francisca; de Vries, Johannes Gerardus; Guit, Rudolf Philippus Maria; Schuetz, Jan; Sereinig, Natascha; Vaessen, Henricus Wilhelmus Leonardus Marie

    The gas phase hydrogenation of levulinic acid to gamma-valerolactone over copper and ruthenium based catalysts in a continuous fixed-bed reactor system was investigated. Among the catalysts a copper oxide based one [50-75 % CuO, 20-25 % SiO2, 1-5 % graphite, 0.1-1 % CuCO3/Cu(OH)(2)] gave

  4. Understanding Gas-Phase Ammonia Chemistry in Protoplanetary Disks

    Chambers, Lauren; Oberg, Karin I.; Cleeves, Lauren Ilsedore

    2017-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks are dynamic regions of gas and dust around young stars, the remnants of star formation, that evolve and coagulate over millions of years in order to ultimately form planets. The chemical composition of protoplanetary disks is affected by both the chemical and physical conditions in which they develop, including the initial molecular abundances in the birth cloud, the spectrum and intensity of radiation from the host star and nearby systems, and mixing and turbulence within the disk. A more complete understanding of the chemical evolution of disks enables a more complete understanding of the chemical composition of planets that may form within them, and of their capability to support life. One element known to be essential for life on Earth is nitrogen, which often is present in the form of ammonia (NH3). Recent observations by Salinas et al. (2016) reveal a theoretical discrepancy in the gas-phase and ice-phase ammonia abundances in protoplanetary disks; while observations of comets and protostars estimate the ice-phase NH3/H2O ratio in disks to be 5%, Salinas reports a gas-phase NH3/H2O ratio of ~7-84% in the disk surrounding TW Hydra, a young nearby star. Through computational chemical modeling of the TW Hydra disk using a reaction network of over 5000 chemical reactions, I am investigating the possible sources of excess gas-phase NH3 by determining the primary reaction pathways of NH3 production; the downstream chemical effects of ionization by ultraviolet photons, X-rays, and cosmic rays; and the effects of altering the initial abundances of key molecules such as N and N2. Beyond providing a theoretical explanation for the NH3 ice/gas discrepancy, this new model may lead to fuller understanding of the gas-phase formation processes of all nitrogen hydrides (NHx), and thus fuller understanding of the nitrogen-bearing molecules that are fundamental for life as we know it.

  5. Electrochemical decontamination system for actinide processing gloveboxes

    Wedman, D.E.; Lugo, J.L.; Ford, D.K.; Nelson, T.O.; Trujillo, V.L.; Martinez, H.E.

    1998-03-01

    An electrolytic decontamination technology has been developed and successfully demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the decontamination of actinide processing gloveboxes. The technique decontaminates the interior surfaces of stainless steel gloveboxes utilizing a process similar to electropolishing. The decontamination device is compact and transportable allowing it to be placed entirely within the glovebox line. In this way, decontamination does not require the operator to wear any additional personal protective equipment and there is no need for additional air handling or containment systems. Decontamination prior to glovebox decommissioning reduces the potential for worker exposure and environmental releases during the decommissioning, transport, and size reduction procedures which follow. The goal of this effort is to reduce contamination levels of alpha emitting nuclides for a resultant reduction in waste level category from High Level Transuranic (TRU) to low Specific Activity (LSA, less than or equal 100 nCi/g). This reduction in category results in a 95% reduction in disposal and disposition costs for the decontaminated gloveboxes. The resulting contamination levels following decontamination by this method are generally five orders of magnitude below the LSA specification. Additionally, the sodium sulfate based electrolyte utilized in the process is fully recyclable which results in the minimum of secondary waste. The process bas been implemented on seven gloveboxes within LANL's Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55. Of these gloveboxes, two have been discarded as low level waste items and the remaining five have been reused

  6. Ontario Hydro decontamination experience

    Lacy, C S; Patterson, R W; Upton, M S [Chemistry and Metallurgy Department, Central Production Services, Ontario Hydro, ON (Canada)

    1991-04-01

    Ontario Hydro currently operates 18 nuclear electric generating units of the CANDU design with a net capacity of 12,402 MW(e). An additional 1,762 MW(e) is under construction. The operation of these facilities has underlined the need to have decontamination capability both to reduce radiation fields, as well as to control and reduce contamination during component maintenance. This paper presents Ontario Hydro decontamination experience in two key areas - full heat transport decontamination to reduce system radiation fields, and component decontamination to reduce loose contamination particularly as practised in maintenance and decontamination centres. (author)

  7. Reactive decontamination formulation

    Giletto, Anthony [College Station, TX; White, William [College Station, TX; Cisar, Alan J [Cypress, TX; Hitchens, G Duncan [Bryan, TX; Fyffe, James [Bryan, TX

    2003-05-27

    The present invention provides a universal decontamination formulation and method for detoxifying chemical warfare agents (CWA's) and biological warfare agents (BWA's) without producing any toxic by-products, as well as, decontaminating surfaces that have come into contact with these agents. The formulation includes a sorbent material or gel, a peroxide source, a peroxide activator, and a compound containing a mixture of KHSO.sub.5, KHSO.sub.4 and K.sub.2 SO.sub.4. The formulation is self-decontaminating and once dried can easily be wiped from the surface being decontaminated. A method for decontaminating a surface exposed to chemical or biological agents is also disclosed.

  8. Ontario Hydro decontamination experience

    Lacy, C.S.; Patterson, R.W.; Upton, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Ontario Hydro currently operates 18 nuclear electric generating units of the CANDU design with a net capacity of 12,402 MW(e). An additional 1,762 MW(e) is under construction. The operation of these facilities has underlined the need to have decontamination capability both to reduce radiation fields, as well as to control and reduce contamination during component maintenance. This paper presents Ontario Hydro decontamination experience in two key areas - full heat transport decontamination to reduce system radiation fields, and component decontamination to reduce loose contamination particularly as practised in maintenance and decontamination centres. (author)

  9. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  10. Fundamental thermochemical properties of amino acids: gas-phase and aqueous acidities and gas-phase heats of formation.

    Stover, Michele L; Jackson, Virgil E; Matus, Myrna H; Adams, Margaret A; Cassady, Carolyn J; Dixon, David A

    2012-03-08

    The gas-phase acidities of the 20 L-amino acids have been predicted at the composite G3(MP2) level. A broad range of structures of the neutral and anion were studied to determine the lowest energy conformer. Excellent agreement is found with the available experimental gas-phase deprotonation enthalpies, and the calculated values are within experimental error. We predict that tyrosine is deprotonated at the CO(2)H site. Cysteine is predicted to be deprotonated at the SH but the proton on the CO(2)H is shared with the S(-) site. Self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) calculations with the COSMO parametrization were used to predict the pK(a)'s of the non-zwitterion form in aqueous solution. The differences in the non-zwitterion pK(a) values were used to estimate the free energy difference between the zwitterion and nonzwitterion forms in solution. The heats of formation of the neutral compounds were calculated from atomization energies and isodesmic reactions to provide the first reliable set of these values in the gas phase. Further calculations were performed on five rare amino acids to predict their heats of formation, acidities, and pK(a) values.

  11. A combined heating cooling stage for cluster thermalization in the gas phase

    Ievlev, D.N.; Kuester, A.; Enders, A.; Malinowski, N.; Schaber, H.; Kern, K.

    2003-01-01

    We report on the design and performance of a combined heating/cooling stage for the thermalization of clusters in a gas phase time-of-flight mass spectrometer. With this setup the cluster temperature can sensitively be adjusted within the range from 100 up to 800 K and higher. The unique combination of a heating stage with a subsequent cooling stage allows us to perform thermodynamic investigations on clusters at very high temperatures without quality losses in the spectra due to delayed fragmentation in the drift tube of the mass spectrometer. The performance of the setup is demonstrated by the example of (C 60 ) n clusters

  12. Noncovalent Halogen Bonding as a Mechanism for Gas-Phase Clustering

    Wegeberg, Christina; Donald, William A.; McKenzie, Christine

    2017-01-01

    in the crystalline phases of PhIO2 and its derivatives serve as models for the structures of larger gas-phase clusters, and calculations on simple model gas-phase dimer and trimer clusters result in similar motifs. This is the first account of halogen bonding playing an extensive role in gas-phase associations....

  13. Position for determining gas-phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 2

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R. [Benchmark Environmental Corp. (United States)

    1998-06-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations.

  14. Position for determining gas phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 1

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations

  15. Position for determining gas-phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 2

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J.

    1998-06-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations

  16. Chemical decontamination method

    Nishiwaki, Hitoshi.

    1996-01-01

    Metal wastes contaminated by radioactive materials are contained in a rotational decontamination vessel, and the metal wastes are rotated therein while being in contact with a slight amount of a decontamination liquid comprising a mineral acid. As the mineral acid, a mixed acid of nitric acid, hydrochloric acid and fluoric acid is preferably used. Alternatively, chemical decontamination can also be conducted by charging an acid resistant stirring medium in the rotational decontamination vessel. The surface of the metal wastes is uniformly covered by the slight amount of decontamination liquid to dissolve the surface layer. In addition, heat of dissolution generated in this case is accumulated in the inside of the rotational decontamination vessel, the temperature is elevated with no particular heating, thereby enabling to obtain an excellent decontamination effect substantially at the same level as in the case of heating the liquid to 70degC in a conventional immersion decontamination method. Further, although contact areas between the metal wastes and the immersion vessel are difficult to be decontaminated in the immersion decontamination method, all of areas can be dissolved uniformly in the present invention. (T.M.)

  17. Guide for decontaminating swimming pool at schools

    Matsuhashi, Shimpei; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Ryo; Takano, Takao; Seko, Noriaki; Naganawa, Hirochika; Kuroki, Ryota; Saegusa, Jun

    2012-07-01

    Because of TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident due to the Great East Japan Earthquake, a huge amount of radioactive materials was widely dispersed and precipitated into the environment. Swimming pools in Fukushima prefectures were contaminated with the radioactives. We JAEA carried out several demonstration tests to decontaminate the radioactives and discharge the pool water safely. We concluded the results obtained from the tests as 'Guide for decontaminating Swimming Pool at School' and released it quickly. Following this, we also released the guide in English. This manuscript, as an experimental report of the swimming pool water decontamination, is consisted from the guide in Japanese and English prepared. (author)

  18. Guide for decontaminating swimming pool at schools

    Matsuhashi, Shimpei; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Ryo; Takano, Takao; Seko, Noriaki; Naganawa, Hirochika; Kuroki, Ryota; Saegusa, Jun

    2012-07-15

    Because of TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident due to the Great East Japan Earthquake, a huge amount of radioactive materials was widely dispersed and precipitated into the environment. Swimming pools in Fukushima prefectures were contaminated with the radioactives. We JAEA carried out several demonstration tests to decontaminate the radioactives and discharge the pool water safely. We concluded the results obtained from the tests as 'Guide for decontaminating Swimming Pool at School' and released it quickly. Following this, we also released the guide in English. This manuscript, as an experimental report of the swimming pool water decontamination, is consisted from the guide in Japanese and English prepared. (author)

  19. Gas phase spectroscopic study of unstable molecules using FTIR technique

    Allaf, A.W.; Alibrahim, M.; Kassem, M.

    1998-01-01

    A new route has been developed, leading to the production of phosphorus (III) oxycyanide, OPCN and phosphorus (III) oxycyanate, OPOCN by an on-line process using phosphoryl chloride, POCL 3 as a starting material passed over heated silver at 870 Centigrade and then reacted with AgCN and KOCN heated at 270 Centigrade and 590 Centigrade to produce OPCN and OPOCN respectively. The gas phase fourier transform infrared spectra reported for the first time show the two characterized bonds of OPCN and OPOCN at 2165 cm -1 and 2130 cm -1 , assigned to the C≡N stretching fundamentals of OPCN and OPOCN respectively. (Author)

  20. Gas-phase spectroscopy of ferric heme-NO complexes

    Wyer, J.A.; Jørgensen, Anders; Pedersen, Bjarke

    2013-01-01

    and significantly blue-shifted compared to ferric heme nitrosyl proteins (maxima between 408 and 422 nm). This is in stark contrast to the Q-band absorption where the protein microenvironment is nearly innocent in perturbing the electronic structure of the porphyrin macrocycle. Photodissociation is primarily...... maxima of heme and its complexes with amino acids and NO. Not so innocent: Weakly bound complexes between ferric heme and NO were synthesised in the gas phase, and their absorption measured from photodissociation yields. Opposite absorption trends in the Soret-band are seen upon NO addition to heme ions...

  1. The nuclear liquid gas phase transition and phase coexistence

    Chomaz, Ph.

    2001-01-01

    In this talk we will review the different signals of liquid gas phase transition in nuclei. From the theoretical side we will first discuss the foundations of the concept of equilibrium, phase transition and critical behaviors in infinite and finite systems. From the experimental point of view we will first recall the evidences for some strong modification of the behavior of hot nuclei. Then we will review quantitative detailed analysis aiming to evidence phase transition, to define its order and phase diagram. Finally, we will present a critical discussion of the present status of phase transitions in nuclei and we will draw some lines for future development of this field. (author)

  2. The nuclear liquid gas phase transition and phase coexistence

    Chomaz, Ph

    2001-07-01

    In this talk we will review the different signals of liquid gas phase transition in nuclei. From the theoretical side we will first discuss the foundations of the concept of equilibrium, phase transition and critical behaviors in infinite and finite systems. From the experimental point of view we will first recall the evidences for some strong modification of the behavior of hot nuclei. Then we will review quantitative detailed analysis aiming to evidence phase transition, to define its order and phase diagram. Finally, we will present a critical discussion of the present status of phase transitions in nuclei and we will draw some lines for future development of this field. (author)

  3. Angular intensity of a gas-phase field ionization source

    Orloff, J.; Swanson, L.W.

    1979-01-01

    Angular intensities of 1 μA sr -1 have been measured for a gas-phase field ionization source in an optical column under practical operating conditions. The source, which was differentially pumped and cooled to 77 K, utilized a -oriented iridium emitter and precooled hydrogen gas at 10 -2 Torr. The ion beam was collimated with an electrostatic lens and detected below an aperture subtending 0.164 msr. A transmitted current of approx.10 -10 A was measured at voltages corresponding to a field of approx. =2.2 V/A at the emitter

  4. Decontamination device for pipeline

    Harashina, Heihachi.

    1994-01-01

    Pipelines to be decontaminated are parts of pipelines contaminated with radioactive materials, and they are connected to a fluid transfer means (for example, a bladeless pump) and a ball collector by way of a connector. The fluid of a mixture of chemical decontaminating liquid and spheres is sent into pipelines to be decontaminated. The spheres are, for example, heat resistant porous hard or soft rubber spheres. The fluid discharged from the pipelines to be decontaminated are circulated by way of bypassing means. The inner surface of the pipelines is decontaminated by the circulation of the fluid. When the bypass means is closed, the fluid discharged from the pipelines to be decontaminated is sent to the ball collector, and the spheres are captured by a hopper. Further, the liquid is sent to the filtrating means to filter the chemical contaminating liquid, and sludges contained in the liquid are captured. (I.N.)

  5. Gross decontamination experiment report

    Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

    1983-07-01

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment

  6. Decontamination of radioactive isotopes

    Despotovic, R.; Music, S.; Subotic, B.; Wolf, R.H.H.

    1979-01-01

    Removal of radioactive isotopes under controlled conditions is determined by a number of physical and chemical properties considered radiocontaminating and by the characteristics of the contaminated object. Determination of quantitative and qualitative factors for equilibrium in a contamination-decontamination system provides the basis for rational and successful decontamination. The decontamination of various ''solid/liquid'' systems is interesting from the scientific and technological point of view. These systems are of great importance in radiation protection (decontamination of various surfaces, liquids, drinking water, fixation or collection of radiocontaminants). Different types of decontamination systems are discussed. The dependence of rate and efficiency of the preparation conditions and on the ageing of the scavenger is described. The influence of coagulating electrolyte on radioactive isotope fixation efficiency was also determined. The fixation of fission radionuclide on oxide scavengers has been studied. The connection between fundamental investigations and practical decontamination of the ''solid/liquid'' systems is discussed. (author)

  7. Gross decontamination experiment report

    Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

    1983-07-01

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment.

  8. Photoisomerization action spectroscopy of the carbocyanine dye DTC+ in the gas phase.

    Adamson, Brian D; Coughlan, Neville J A; da Silva, Gabriel; Bieske, Evan J

    2013-12-19

    Molecular photoisomerization plays a crucial role in diverse biological and technological contexts. Here, we combine ion mobility spectrometry and laser spectroscopy to characterize the photoisomerization of molecular cations in the gas phase. The target molecular ions, polymethine dye cations 3,3'-diethylthiacarbocyanine (DTC(+)), are propelled through helium buffer gas by an electric field and are photoisomerized by light from a tunable laser. Photoexcitation over the 450-570 nm range converts trans-DTC(+) to cis-DTC(+), noticeably modifying the ions' arrival time distribution. The photoisomerization action spectrum, which has a maximum at 535 nm, resembles the absorption spectrum of DTC(+) in solution but is shifted 25 nm to shorter wavelength. Comparisons between measured and calculated mobilities suggest that the photoisomer involves a twist about the second C-C bond in the methine chain (8,9-cis isomer) rather than a twist about the first methine C-C bond (2,8-cis isomer). It is postulated that the excited gas-phase ions internally convert from the S1 Franck-Condon region to the S0 manifold and explore the conformational landscape as they cool through He buffer gas collisions. Master equation simulations of the relaxation process in the S0 manifold suggest that the 8,9-cis isomer is preferred over the 2,8-cis isomer because it lies lower in energy and because it is separated from the trans isomer by a substantially higher barrier. The study demonstrates that the photoisomerization of molecular ions can be probed selectively in the gas phase, providing insights into photoisomerization mechanisms and information on the solvent-free absorption spectrum.

  9. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  10. Gas phase absorption studies of photoactive yellow protein chromophore derivatives.

    Rocha-Rinza, Toms; Christiansen, Ove; Rajput, Jyoti; Gopalan, Aravind; Rahbek, Dennis B; Andersen, Lars H; Bochenkova, Anastasia V; Granovsky, Alexander A; Bravaya, Ksenia B; Nemukhin, Alexander V; Christiansen, Kasper Lincke; Nielsen, Mogens Brøndsted

    2009-08-27

    Photoabsorption spectra of deprotonated trans p-coumaric acid and two of its methyl substituted derivatives have been studied in gas phase both experimentally and theoretically. We have focused on the spectroscopic effect of the location of the two possible deprotonation sites on the trans p-coumaric acid which originate to either a phenoxide or a carboxylate. Surprisingly, the three chromophores were found to have the same absorption maximum at 430 nm, in spite of having different deprotonation positions. However, the absorption of the chromophore in polar solution is substantially different for the distinct deprotonation locations. We also report on the time scales and pathways of relaxation after photoexcitation for the three photoactive yellow protein chromophore derivatives. As a result of these experiments, we could detect the phenoxide isomer within the deprotonated trans p-coumaric acid in gas phase; however, the occurrence of the carboxylate is uncertain. Several computational methods were used simultaneously to provide insights and assistance in the interpretation of our experimental results. The calculated excitation energies S(0)-S(1) are in good agreement with experiment for those systems having a negative charge on a phenoxide moiety. Although our augmented multiconfigurational quasidegenerate perturbation theory calculations agree with experiment in the description of the absorption spectrum of anions with a carboxylate functional group, there are some puzzling disagreements between experiment and some calculational methods in the description of these systems.

  11. Closed-cage tungsten oxide clusters in the gas phase.

    Singh, D M David Jeba; Pradeep, T; Thirumoorthy, Krishnan; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2010-05-06

    During the course of a study on the clustering of W-Se and W-S mixtures in the gas phase using laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry, we observed several anionic W-O clusters. Three distinct species, W(6)O(19)(-), W(13)O(29)(-), and W(14)O(32)(-), stand out as intense peaks in the regular mass spectral pattern of tungsten oxide clusters suggesting unusual stabilities for them. Moreover, these clusters do not fragment in the postsource decay analysis. While trying to understand the precursor material, which produced these clusters, we found the presence of nanoscale forms of tungsten oxide. The structure and thermodynamic parameters of tungsten clusters have been explored using relativistic quantum chemical methods. Our computed results of atomization energy are consistent with the observed LDI mass spectra. The computational results suggest that the clusters observed have closed-cage structure. These distinct W(13) and W(14) clusters were observed for the first time in the gas phase.

  12. Decontamination of body surface

    Harase, Chieko.

    1989-01-01

    There are two important points for an effective application of decontamination procedures. One is the organizing method of responsible decontamination teams. The team should be directed by medical doctor with the knowledge of decontamination of radionuclides. The other point is the place of application of the decontamination. Hospitals and clinics, especially with a department of nuclear medicine, or specialized units such as an emergency medical center are preferable. Before decontamination procedures are initiated, adequate monitoring of the body surface should be undertaken by a competent person in order to demarcate the areas which are contaminated. There are fundamental principles which are applicable to all decontamination procedures. (1) Precautions must always be taken to prevent further spread of contamination during decontamination operations. (2) Mild decontamination methods should be tried before resorting to treatment which can damage the body surface. The specific feature of each contamination varies widely in radionuclides involved, place and area of the contamination, condition of the contaminated skin such as whether the skin is wounded or not, and others. Soap and water are usually good detergents in most cases. If they fail, orange oil cream (SUPERDECONCREAM, available from Tokyo Engineering Co.) specially prepared for decontamination of radionuclides of most fission and corrosion products may be used. Contaminated hair should be washed several times with an efficient shampoo. (author)

  13. Development of decontamination methods

    Kunze, S.; Dippel, T.; Hentschel, D.

    1976-01-01

    PVC floorings, fabricated by mixing of the basic components, showed no relation between content of fillers and decontamination results. Decontamination results are partly poorer, if the flooring contains a high concentration of the filler, especially if the latter consists mainly of hydrophilic materials. The coloring of the floorings seems to have no influence on the decontamination. Rubber floorings, fabricated by chemical reactions between polymers, vulcanization materials and fillers, show decontamination results depending definitely from the proper choice of the filler. Flooring types, containing lampblack, graphite, kaoline, barium sulfate and titanium oxide are easy to decontaminate. Increasing contents of hydrophilic filler cause a fall off in the decontamination results. The decontamination effectiveness and the homogenity of cleaning pastes based on hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, titanium oxide and polyethylene powders is strongly depended on the content of hydrochloric acid. Reduction of the content of this component to less than 2 w/O remains the effectiveness unchanged only if the titanium oxide-polyethylene powder mixture is substituted by a high density, highly surface active powder material. This type of paste containing no hydrochloric acid shows nearly the same decontamination effectiveness as standard pickling pastes containing about 30% hydrochlorid acid. Properly prepared salt powder turn out to be easily and successfully applied to metal surfaces by a flame spray technique. The thin layer of molten salts is a very effective decontamination to samples contaminated in the primary loop of a PWR. (orig.) [de

  14. Chemical decontamination and melt densification

    Dillon, R.L.; Griggs, B.; Kemper, R.S.; Nelson, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary studies on the chemical decontamination and densification of Zircaloy, stainless steel, and Inconel undissolved residues remaining after dissolution of the UO 2 --PuO 2 spent fuel material from sheared fuel bundles are reported. The studies were made on cold or very small samples to demonstrate the feasibility of the processes developed before proceeding to hot cell demonstrations with kg level of the sources. A promising aqueous decontamination method for Zr alloy cladding was developed in which oxidized surfaces are conditioned with HF prior to leaching with ammonium oxalate, ammonium citrate, ammonium fluoride, and hydrogen peroxide. Feasibility of molten salt decontamination of oxidized Zircaloy was demonstrated. A low melting alloy of Zircaloy, stainless steel, and Inconel was obtained in induction heated graphite crucibles. Segregated Zircaloy cladding sections were directly melted by the inductoslag process to yield a metal ingot suitable for storage. Both Zircaloy and Zircaloy--stainless steel--Inconel alloys proved to be highly satisfactory getters and sinks for recovered tritium

  15. Functionalized silica aerogels for gas-phase purification, sensing, and catalysis: A review

    Amonette, James E.; Matyáš, Josef

    2017-09-01

    Silica aerogels have a rich history and a unique, fascinating gas-phase chemistry that has lent them to many diverse applications. This review starts with a brief discussion of the fundamental issues driving the movement of gases in silica aerogels and then proceeds to provide an overview of the work that has been done with respect to the purification of gases, sensing of individual gases, and uses of silica aerogels as catalysts for gas-phase reactions. Salient features of the research behind these different applications are presented, and, where appropriate, critical aspects that affect the practical use of the aerogels are noted. Specific sections under the gas-purification category focus on the removal of airborne nanoparticles, carbon dioxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur gases and radioactive iodine from gas streams. The use of silica aerogels as sensors for humidity, oxygen, hydrocarbons, volatile acids and bases, various non-ammoniacal nitrogen gases, and viral particles is discussed. With respect to catalysis, the demonstrated use of silica aerogels as supports for oxidation, Fischer-Tropsch, alkane isomerization, and hydrogenation reactions is reviewed, along with a section on untested catalytic formulations involving silica aerogels. A short section focuses on recent developments in thermomolecular Knudsen compressor pumps using silica aerogel membranes. The review continues with an overview of the production methods, locations of manufacturing facilities globally, and a brief discussion of the economics before concluding with a few remarks about the present and future trends revealed by the work presented.

  16. Continuous-wave terahertz by photomixing: applications to gas phase pollutant detection and quantification

    Hindle, Francis; Cuisset, Arnaud; Bocquet, Robin; Mouret, Gaël

    2008-03-01

    Recent advances in the development of monochromatic continuous-wave terahertz sources suitable for high resolution gas phase spectroscopy and pollution monitoring are reviewed. Details of a source using an ultra fast opto-electronic photomixing element are presented. The construction of a terahertz spectrometer using this source has allowed spectroscopic characterisation and application studies to be completed. Analysis of H 2S and OCS under laboratory conditions are used to demonstrate the spectrometer performance, and the determination of the transition line strengths and pressure self broadening coefficients for pure rotational transitions of OCS. The spectral purity 5 MHz, tunability 0.3 to 3 THz, and long wavelength ≈200 μm of this source have been exploited to identify and quantify numerous chemical species in cigarette smoke. The key advantages of this frequency domain are its high species selectivity and the possibility to make reliable measurements of gas phase samples heavily contaminated by aerosols and particles. To cite this article: F. Hindle et al., C. R. Physique 9 (2008).

  17. Femtosecond time-resolved studies of coherent vibrational Raman scattering in large gas-phase molecules

    Hayden, C.C.; Chandler, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented from femtosecond time-resolved coherent Raman experiments in which we excite and monitor vibrational coherence in gas-phase samples of benzene and 1,3,5-hexatriene. Different physical mechanisms for coherence decay are seen in these two molecules. In benzene, where the Raman polarizability is largely isotropic, the Q branch of the vibrational Raman spectrum is the primary feature excited. Molecules in different rotational states have different Q-branch transition frequencies due to vibration--rotation interaction. Thus, the macroscopic polarization that is observed in these experiments decays because it has many frequency components from molecules in different rotational states, and these frequency components go out of phase with each other. In 1,3,5-hexatriene, the Raman excitation produces molecules in a coherent superposition of rotational states, through (O, P, R, and S branch) transitions that are strong due to the large anisotropy of the Raman polarizability. The coherent superposition of rotational states corresponds to initially spatially oriented, vibrationally excited, molecules that are freely rotating. The rotation of molecules away from the initial orientation is primarily responsible for the coherence decay in this case. These experiments produce large (∼10% efficiency) Raman shifted signals with modest excitation pulse energies (10 μJ) demonstrating the feasibility of this approach for a variety of gas phase studies. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  18. Decontamination of floor surfaces

    Smirous, F.

    1983-01-01

    Requirements are presented put on the surfaces of floors of radiochemical workplaces. The mechanism is described of retaining the contaminant in the surface of the flooring, ways of reducing the hazards of floor surface contamination, decontamination techniques and used decontamination agents. (J.P.)

  19. Separations canyon decontamination facilities

    Hershey, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    Highly radioactive process equipment is decontaminated at the Savannah River Plant in specially equipped areas of the separations canyon building so that direct mechanical repairs or alterations can be made. Using these facilities it is possible to decontaminate and repair equipment such as 10- x 11-ft storage tanks, 8- x 8-ft batch evaporator pots and columns, 40-in. Bird centrifuges, canyon pumps and agitators, and various canyon piping systems or ''jumpers.'' For example, centrifuge or evaporator pots can be decontaminated and rebuilt for about 60 percent of the 1974 replacement cost. The combined facilities can decontaminate and repair 6 to 10 pieces of major equipment per year. Decontamination time varies with type of equipment and radioactivity levels encountered

  20. Separations canyon decontamination facilities

    Hershey, J.H.

    1975-05-01

    Highly radioactive process equipment is decontaminated at the Savannah River Plant in specially equipped areas of the separations canyon buildings so that direct mechanical repairs or alterations can be made. Using these facilities it is possible to decontaminate and repair equipment such as 10- x 11-ft storage tanks, 8- x 8-ft batch evaporator pots and columns, 40-in. Bird centrifuges, canyon pumps and agitators, and various canyon piping systems or ''jumpers.'' For example, centrifuge or evaporator pots can be decontaminated and rebuilt for about 60 percent of the 1974 replacement cost. The combined facilities can decontaminate and repair 6 to 10 pieces of major equipment per year. Decontamination time varies with type of equipment and radioactivity levels encountered. (U.S.)

  1. Regenerable Air Purification System for Gas-Phase Contaminant Control

    Constantinescu, Ileana C.; Finn, John E.; LeVan, M. Douglas; Lung, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tests of a pre-prototype regenerable air purification system (RAPS) that uses water vapor to displace adsorbed contaminants from an adsorbent column have been performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A unit based on this design can be used for removing trace gas-phase contaminants from spacecraft cabin air or from polluted process streams including incinerator exhaust. During the normal operation mode, contaminants are removed from the air on the column. Regeneration of the column is performed on-line. During regeneration, contaminants are displaced and destroyed inside the closed oxidation loop. In this presentation we discuss initial experimental results for the performance of RAPS in the removal and treatment of several important spacecraft contaminant species from air.

  2. SILP catalysis in gas-phase hydroformylation and carbonylation

    Riisager, A.; Fehrmann, R. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Chemistry; Haumann, M.; Wasserscheid, P. [Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Chemische Reaktionstechnik

    2006-07-01

    Supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysts are new materials consisting of an ionic liquid-metal catalyst solution highly dispersed on a porous support. The use of a non-volatile, ionic liquid catalyst phase in SILP catalysts results in a stable heterogeneous-type material with selectivity and efficiency like homogeneous catalysts. The silica-supported SILP Rh-bisphosphine hydroformylation catalyst exhibited good activities and excellent selectivities in gas phase hydroformylation with stability exceeding 700 hours time-on-stream. Spectroscopic and kinetic data confirmed the homogeneous nature of the catalyst. In the Rh- SILP catalysed carbonylation of methanol the formation of undesired by-products could be suppressed by variation of residence time and gas pressure. (orig.)

  3. Raman study of vibrational dynamics of aminopropylsilanetriol in gas phase

    Volovšek, V.; Dananić, V.; Bistričić, L.; Movre Šapić, I.; Furić, K.

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectrum of aminopropylsilanetriol (APST) in gas phase has been recorded at room temperature in macro chamber utilizing two-mirror technique over the sample tube. Unlike predominantly trans molecular conformation in condensed phase, the spectra of vapor show that the molecules are solely in gauche conformation with intramolecular hydrogen bond N⋯Hsbnd O which reduces the molecular energy in respect to trans conformation by 0.152 eV. The assignment of the molecular spectra based on the DFT calculation is presented. The strong vibrational bands at 354 cm-1, 588 cm-1 and 3022 cm-1 are proposed for verifying the existence of the ring like, hydrogen bonded structure. Special attention was devoted to the high frequency region, where hydrogen bond vibrations are coupled to stretchings of amino and silanol groups.

  4. Synthesis and Gas Phase Thermochemistry of Germanium-Containing Compounds

    Classen, Nathan Robert [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The driving force behind much of the work in this dissertation was to gain further understanding of the unique olefin to carbene isomerization observed in the thermolysis of 1,1-dimethyl-2-methylenesilacyclobutane by finding new examples of it in other silicon and germanium compounds. This lead to the examination of a novel phenylmethylenesilacyclobut-2-ene, which did not undergo olefin to carbene rearrangement. A synthetic route to methylenegermacyclobutanes was developed, but the methylenegermacyclobutane system exhibited kinetic instability, making the study of the system difficult. In any case the germanium system decomposed through a complex mechanism which may not include olefin to carbene isomerization. However, this work lead to the study of the gas phase thermochemistry of a series of dialkylgermylene precursors in order to better understand the mechanism of the thermal decomposition of dialkylgermylenes. The resulting dialkylgermylenes were found to undergo a reversible intramolecular β C-H insertion mechanism.

  5. Zpif's law in the liquid gas phase transition of nuclei

    Ma, Y.G.

    1999-01-01

    Zpif's law in the field of linguistics is tested in the nuclear disassembly within the framework of isospin dependent lattice gas model. It is found that the average cluster charge (or mass) of rank n in the charge (or mass) list shows exactly inversely to its rank, i.e., there exists Zpif's law, at the phase transition temperature. This novel criterion shall be helpful to search the nuclear liquid gas phase transition experimentally and theoretically. In addition, the finite size scaling of the effective phase transition temperature at which the Zpif's law appears is studied for several systems with different mass and the critical exponents of ν and β are tentatively extracted. (orig.)

  6. FLUIDDYNAMIC ASPECTS OF GAS-PHASE ETHYLENE POLYMERIZATION REACTOR DESIGN

    Guardani R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The relative importance of design variables affecting the fluiddynamic behavior of a fluidized bed reactor for the gas-phase ethylene polymerization is discussed, based on mathematical modeling. The three-phase bubbling fluidized bed model is based on axially distributed properties for the bubble, cloud and emulsion phases, combined with correlations for population balance and entrainment. Under the operating conditions adopted in most industrial processes, the reactor performance is affected mainly by the reaction rate and solids entrainment. Simulation results indicate that an adequate design of the freeboard and particle collecting equipment is of primary importance in order to produce polymeric particles with the desired size distribution, as well as to keep entrainment and catalyst feed rates at adequate levels.

  7. Conformational Study of Taurine in the Gas Phase

    Cortijo, Vanessa; Sanz, M. Eugenia; López, Juan C.; Alonso, José L.

    2009-08-01

    The conformational preferences of the amino sulfonic acid taurine (NH2-CH2-CH2-SO3H) have been investigated in the gas phase by laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (LA-MB-FTMW) in the 6-14 GHz frequency range. One conformer has been observed, and its rotational, centrifugal distortion, and hyperfine quadrupole coupling constants have been determined from the analysis of its rotational spectrum. Comparison of the experimental constants with those calculated theoretically identifies the detected conformer unambiguously. The observed conformer of taurine is stabilized by an intramolecular hydrogen bond O-H···N between the hydrogen of the sulfonic acid group and the nitrogen atom of the amino group.

  8. Gas phase chromatography of halides of elements 104 and 105

    Tuerler, A.; Gregorich, K.E.; Czerwinski, K.R.; Hannink, N.J.; Henderson, R.A.; Hoffman, D.C.; Kacher, C.D.; Kadkhodayan, B.; Kreek, S.A.; Lee, D.M.; Leyba, J.D.; Nurmia, M.J.; Gaeggeler, H.W.; Jost, D.T.; Kovacs, J.; Scherer, U.W.; Vermeulen, D.; Weber, A.; Barth, H.; Gober, M.K.; Kratz, J.V.; Bruechle, W.; Schaedel, M.; Schimpf, E.; Gober, M.K.; Kratz, J.V.; Zimmermann, H.P.

    1991-04-01

    On-line isothermal gas phase chromatography was used to study halides of 261 104 (T 1/2 = 65 s) and 262,263 105 (T 1/2 = 34 s and 27 s) produced an atom-at-a time via the reactions 248 Cm( 18 O, 5n) and 249 Bk( 18 O, 5n, 4n), respectively. Using HBr and HCl gas as halogenating agents, we were able to produce volatile bromides and chlorides of the above mentioned elements and study their behavior compared to their lighter homologs in Groups 4 or 5 of the periodic table. Element 104 formed more volatile bromides than its homolog Hf. In contrast, element 105 bromides were found to be less volatile than the bromides of the group 5 elements Nb and Ta. Both 104 and Hf chlorides were observed to be more volatile than their respective bromides. 31 refs., 8 figs

  9. Technical Procedures Management in Gas-Phase Detoxification Laboratory

    Cardona Garcia, A. I.; Sanchez Cabrero, B.

    2000-01-01

    The natural cycle of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) has been disturbed by the industrial and socioeconomic activities of human beings. This imbalance in the environment has affected the ecosystems and the human health. Initiatives have been planned to mitigate these adverse effects. In order to minimize the hazardous effects, initiatives have been proposed for the treatment of gaseous emissions. The solar photo catalysis appears as a clear and renewable technology in front of the conventional ones.In CIEMAT this line is being investigated as the base of a future implementation at a pre industrial scale.Technical procedures are written in this document for testing Gas-Phase detoxification at lab scale in the Renewable Energy Department (DER) CIEMAT- Madrid to eliminate the VOCs by using the solar photo catalysis technology. (Author) 34 refs

  10. Gas-Phase Thermolysis of a Thioketen-S-Oxide

    Carlsen, Lars; Egsgaard, Helge; Schaumann, Ernst

    1980-01-01

    The unimolecular gas-phase thermolytic decomposition of 1,1,3,3-tetramethyl-2-thiocarbonylcyclohexane S-oxide (3) has been studied as a function of temperature by a flash vacuum thermolysis (f.v.t.) technique. The products detected are the carbenes (4) and (5), the ketone (6), the keten (7......), the thioketone (8), and the thioketen (9). The product ratio is highly dependent on the thermolysis temperature. The thermolysis of (3) is mechanistically rationalized by assuming the existence of only two concurrent primary processes, which are (a) extrusion of atomic oxygen, leading to the thioketen (9...... and CSO leading to the carbenes (5) and (4), respectively, are observed. Owing to an apparently very short half-life of the oxathiiran (10), only the decomposition products of the three-membered ring compound have been detected. These are the thioketone (8), formed by rearrangement of (10) into the α...

  11. Statistical Physics of Nanoparticles in the Gas Phase

    Hansen, Klavs

    2013-01-01

    Thermal processes are ubiquitous and an understanding of thermal phenomena is essential for a complete description of the physics of nanoparticles, both for the purpose of modeling the dynamics of the particles and for the correct interpretation of experimental data. This book has the twofold aim to present coherently the relevant results coming from the recent scientific literature and to guide the readers through the process of deriving results, enabling them to explore the limits of the mathematical approximations and test the power of the method. The book is focused on the fundamental properties of nanosystems in the gas phase. For this reason there is a strong emphasis on microcanonical physics. Each chapter is enriched with exercises and 3 Appendices provide additional useful materials.

  12. Studies on residue-free decontaminants for chemical warfare agents.

    Wagner, George W

    2015-03-17

    Residue-free decontaminants based on hydrogen peroxide, which decomposes to water and oxygen in the environment, are examined as decontaminants for chemical warfare agents (CWA). For the apparent special case of CWA on concrete, H2O2 alone, without any additives, effectively decontaminates S-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX), pinacolyl methylphosphorofluoridate (GD), and bis(2-choroethyl) sulfide (HD) in a process thought to involve H2O2 activation by surface-bound carbonates/bicarbonates (known H2O2 activators for CWA decontamination). A plethora of products are formed during the H2O2 decontamination of HD on concrete, and these are characterized by comparison to synthesized authentic compounds. As a potential residue-free decontaminant for surfaces other than concrete (or those lacking adsorbed carbonate/bicarbonate) H2O2 activation for CWA decontamination is feasible using residue-free NH3 and CO2 as demonstrated by reaction studies for VX, GD, and HD in homogeneous solution. Although H2O2/NH3/CO2 ("HPAC") decontaminants are active for CWA decontamination in solution, they require testing on actual surfaces of interest to assess their true efficacy for surface decontamination.

  13. Decontamination and renovation of the Master/Slave Manipulator Repair Shop and the Chemical Crane Room at the West Valley Demonstration Project. Final topical report, June 1982-June 1983

    Phillips, E.C.; Golden, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes the decontamination and renovation of the Master/Slave Manipulator Repair Shop (MSMRS) and the Chemical Crane Room (CCR) at the WVDP from radioactively contaminated conditions to essentially shirt sleeve environments. In both cases, subsequent use recontaminated the rooms. Before decontamination, general exposure rates as high as 20 mrad/hr and surface contamination as high as 10 5 dpm/100 cm 2 were measured in the MSMRS, while general exposure rates in the CCR were 50 to 100 mrad/hr with hot spots as high as 2000 mrad/hr. Smearable levels on the floor in each room were in the range of 10 5 to 10 6 dpm per 100/cm 2 . Respiratory protection was mandatory for entry into the CCR. The MSMRS, located at the north end of the Process Building on ground elevation, is needed for the refurbishment of plant manipulators and other equipment. The MSMRS has been decontaminated and renovated as follows: all tools, equipment and furnishings were removed, the walls were stripped and repainted, and the contaminated concrete floor was removed and disposal of as low-level waste. A new concrete floor was poured and a stainless steel liner covering the entire floor and extending 45.7 cm up the walls was added to provide the WVDP with a shop facility that can be easily decontaminated. Decontamination of the MSMRS has been completed and the facility is available for service. The CCR, located at the north end of the Chemical Process Cell (CPC) is for the storage and servicing of two bridge cranes used in the CPC. Decontamination and exposure reduction in the CCR has been completed using vacuum cleaning, damp wipe down, and surface grinding followed by shielding and painting

  14. ORO scrap metal decontamination program

    Jugan, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has approximately 80,000 tons of contaminated scrap metal at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio; and the Feed Materials Production Center in Fernald, Ohio. After unsuccessful in-house attempts to eliminate/recycle the contaminated metal, DOE is allowing private enterprise the opportunity to participate in this program. DOE is making this opportunity available under a two-phase approach, which is being supported by two separate and corresponding Request for Proposals. Phase I, which is nearing completion, is a demonstration phase to establish a group of companies that the DOE will consider qualified to eliminate the scrap at one or more sites. In Phase I, the companies decontaminated 25-50 tons of scrap to demonstrate capabilities to DOE and to gain the knowledge required to plan/bid on elimination of the scrap at one or more sites. Phase II will request proposals for elimination of the total scrap at one or more of the above noted sites. Multiple awards for Phase II are also anticipated. Companies participating in Phase II will be required to take title to the contaminated scrap and decontaminate/process the scrap for beneficial reuse. Radioactive wastes and metal that cannot be successfully decontaminated/processed will be returned to DOE

  15. Dry decontamination for tritiated wastes

    Shi Zhengkun; Wu Tao; Dan Guiping; Xie Yun

    2009-01-01

    To aim at decontamination of tritiated wastes, we have developed and fabricated a dry tritium decontamination system, which is designed to reduce tritium surface contamination of various alloy by UV, ozone and heating. The result indicates that the elevation of temperature can obviously improve decontamination effect. With 3 h irradiation by 365 nm UV at 220 degree C, it has a decontamination rate of 99% to stainless steel surface. Ozone can more obviously improve decontamination effect when metal was heated. Ozone has a decontamination effect beyond 95% to stainless steel, aluminum and brass at 220 degree C. Tritium surface concentration of metal has a little increase after decontamination. (authors)

  16. Long lasting decontamination foam

    Demmer, Ricky L.; Peterman, Dean R.; Tripp, Julia L.; Cooper, David C.; Wright, Karen E.

    2010-12-07

    Compositions and methods for decontaminating surfaces are disclosed. More specifically, compositions and methods for decontamination using a composition capable of generating a long lasting foam are disclosed. Compositions may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6. Such compositions may further include affinity-shifting chemicals. Methods may include decontaminating a contaminated surface with a composition or a foam that may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6.

  17. Preparation of sulfur/multiple pore size porous carbon composite via gas-phase loading method for lithium-sulfur batteries

    Li, Long-Yan; Chen, Yan-Xiao; Guo, Xiao-Dong; Zhong, Ben-He; Zhong, Yan-Jun

    2014-01-01

    A porous carbon with multiple pore size distribution was synthesized, and regarded as a carrier to obtain the sulfur/carbon (S/C) composite via a gas-phase loading method. We proposed this novel gas-phase loading method by using a specially designed fluid-bed reactor to encapsulate and sequester gas-phase sulfur molecules into the porous carbon in current study. The nitrogen Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) characterizations were investigated on both the porous carbon and the sulfur/carbon composite. The results show that the gas-phase loading method contributes to the combination of sulfur molecules and matrix porous carbon. Furthermore, the sulfur/multiple pore size distribution carbon composite based on the gas-phase loading method demonstrate an excellent electrochemical property. The initial specific discharge capacity is 795.0 mAh g −1 at 800 mA g −1 , with a capacity retention of 86.3% after 100 cycles

  18. UPS and DFT investigation of the electronic structure of gas-phase trimesic acid

    Reisberg, L., E-mail: rebban@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Oswaldi 1, EE-50411 Tartu (Estonia); Pärna, R. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Oswaldi 1, EE-50411 Tartu (Estonia); MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, Fotongatan 2, 225 94 Lund (Sweden); Kikas, A.; Kuusik, I.; Kisand, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Oswaldi 1, EE-50411 Tartu (Estonia); Hirsimäki, M.; Valden, M. [Surface Science Laboratory, Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland); Nõmmiste, E. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Oswaldi 1, EE-50411 Tartu (Estonia)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • In the current study outer valence band electronic structure of benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid was interpreted. • Experimental and calculated trimesic acid (TMA) spectrum were compared to ones of benzene and benzoic acid. • It is shown that similarities between MO energies and shapes for benzene and TMA exists. • Addition of carboxyl groups to the benzene ring clearly correlates with increasing binding energy of HOMO. - Abstract: Benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (trimesic acid, TMA) molecules in gas-phase have been investigated by using valence band photoemission. The photoelectron spectrum in the binding energy region from 9 to 22 eV is interpreted by using density functional theory calculations. The electronic structure of TMA is compared with benzene and benzoic acid in order to demonstrate changes in molecular orbital energies induced by addition of carboxyl groups to benzene ring.

  19. Concrete decontamination scoping tests

    Archibald, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    This report details the research efforts and scoping tests performed at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant using scabbling, chemical, and electro-osmotic decontamination techniques on radiologically contaminated concrete

  20. Recommendations for skin decontamination

    1989-01-01

    Further to the reecommendations for determining the surface contamination of the skin and estimating the radiation exposure of the skin after contamination (SAAS-Mitt--89-16), measures for skin decontamination are recommended. They are necessary if (1) after simple decontamination by means of water, soap and brush without damaging the skin the surface contamination limits are exceeded and the radiation exposure to be expected for the undamaged healthy skin is estimated as to high, and if (2) a wound is contaminated. To remove skin contaminations, in general universally applicable, non-aggressive decontamination means and methods are sufficient. In special cases, nuclide-specific decontamination is required taking into account the properties of the radioactive substance

  1. Some remarks about decontamination

    Bertini, A.

    1990-01-01

    Decontamination in itself is not the elimination of a problem, but corresponds to move that problem from one place to another. It is beneficial only if the contamination is less of a nuisance when moved to the ''other place''. Therefore any prospective decontamination process is to be considered essentially in terms of cost-benefit, and in particular in terms of reducing the burden on the waste management systems. The paper is not intended to deal with and to review critically the technical aspects of the various decontamination processes which are currently available. Its aim is to call the attention of those who may be faced with the problem of large-scale decontamination, so that this operation is carried out after all practical aspects have been examined. (author)

  2. Chemical decontamination: an overview

    Shaw, R.A.; Wood, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The source of radioactive contamination in various types of power reactors is discussed. The methods of chemical decontamination vary with the manner in which the radioactive contaminants are deposited on the surface. Two types of dilute decontamination systems are available. One system uses organic acids and chelating agents, which are mildly reducing in nature. In this process, the oxide contaminants are removed by simple acidic dissolution and reductive dissolution. The second type of decontamination process is based on low oxidation state metal ions, which are more strongly reducing and do not require a corrosion inhibitor. All processes commercially available for decontamination of power reactors are not detailed here, but a few key issues to be considered in the selection of a process are highlighted. 2 figures, 2 tables

  3. Food decontamination using nanomaterials

    The research indicates that nanomaterials including nanoemulsions are promising decontamination media for the reduction of food contaminating pathogens. The inhibitory effect of nanoparticles for pathogens could be due to deactivate cellular enzymes and DNA; disrupting of membrane permeability; and/...

  4. GAS-PHASE CHEMISTRY OF THE CYANATE ION, OCN−

    Cole, Callie A.; Wang, Zhe-Chen; Bierbaum, Veronica M.; Snow, Theodore P.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanate (OCN − ) is the only ion to date whose presence has been confirmed in the icy mantles that coat interstellar dust grains. Understanding the chemical behavior of cyanate at a fundamental level is therefore integral to the advancement of astrochemistry. We seek to unravel the chemistry of this intriguing anion through a combination of gas-phase experiments and theoretical explorations. Our approach is twofold: first, employing a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube apparatus, the reactions between OCN − and three of the most abundant atomic species in the interstellar medium, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen, are examined. Hydrogen atoms readily react by associative detachment, but the remarkable stability of OCN − does not give rise to an observable reaction with either nitrogen or oxygen atoms. To explain these results, the potential energy surfaces of several reactions are investigated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Second, collision induced dissociation experiments involving deprotonated uracil, thymine, and cytosine in an ion trap mass spectrometer reveal an interesting connection between these pyrimidine nucleobase anions and OCN − . Theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory are performed to delineate the mechanisms of dissociation and explore the possible role of OCN − as a biomolecule precursor

  5. The Influence of Mixing in High Temperature Gas Phase Reactions

    Østberg, Martin

    1996-01-01

    by injection of NH3 with carrier gas into the flue gas. NH3 can react with NO and form N2, but a competing reaction path is the oxidation of NH3 to NO.The SNR process is briefly described and it is shown by chemical kinetic modelling that OH radicals under the present conditions will initiate the reaction......The objective of this thesis is to describe the mixing in high temperature gas phase reactions.The Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction of NOx (referred as the SNR process) using NH3 as reductant was chosen as reaction system. This in-furnace denitrification process is made at around 1200 - 1300 K...... diffusion. The SNR process is simulated using the mixing model and an empirical kinetic model based on laboratory experiments.A bench scale reactor set-up has been built using a natural gas burner to provide the main reaction gas. The set-up has been used to perform an experimental investigation...

  6. Gas phase reactions of nitrogen oxides with olefins

    Altshuller, A P; Cohen, I

    1961-01-01

    The nature of the condensation products formed in the gas phase reactions of nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide with pentene-1, 2-methylbutene-2, and 2-methylbutadiene-1,3 was investigated. The reactants were combined at partial pressures in the range of 0.1 to 2.5 mm with the total pressure at one atmosphere. The products were determined by infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy and colorimetry. The condensates included primary and secondary nitro compounds and alkyl nitrates. Strong hydroxyl and single bond carbon to oxygen stretching vibrations indicate the presence of either nitroalcohols or simple aliphatic alcohols formed through oxidation reactions. Carbonyl stretching frequencies observable in some of the reactions support the conclusion that a portion of the reactants disappear by oxidation rather than by nitration processes. The available results do not indicate the presence of appreciable amounts of tert.-nitro compounds, conjugated nitro-olefins, or gem-dinitro-alkanes. The reactivities of the olefins with the nitrogen oxides are in the decreasing order: 2-methyl-butadiene-1,3, 2-methylbutene-2, pentene-1. 20 references.

  7. Frequency metrology of a photomixing source for gas phase spectroscopy

    Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gael; Yang, Chun; Cuisset, Arnaud; Bocquet, Robin; Lours, Michel; Rovera, Daniele

    2010-08-01

    The availability of frequency combs has opened new possibilities for the measurement of optical frequencies. Photomixing is an attractive solution for high resolution THz spectroscopy of gases due to the narrow spectral resolution and ability to access the 100 GHz to 3.5 THz range. One limitation of present photomixing spectrometers is the accuracy with which the THz frequency is established. Measurement of the centre frequency gas phase molecular transitions requires an accuracy better than 100 kHz in order to allow spectroscopic constants to be determined. Standard optical techniques like those employed in wavelength meters can only provide accuracies in the order of 50 MHz. We have used a turnkey fibre based frequency comb and a standard photomixing configuration to realize a THz synthesizer with an accuracy of around 50kHz. Two ECDLs used to pump the photomixer are phase locked onto the frequency comb and provide a tuning range of 10 MHz. In order to extend the tuning range an additional phase locked ECLD has been added to obtain a range in excess of 100 MHz. The absorption profiles of many Doppler limited transitions of carbonyl sulphide and formaldehyde have been measured to validate this instrument.

  8. Precursor-Less Coating of Nanoparticles in the Gas Phase

    Tobias V. Pfeiffer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a continuous, gas-phase method for depositing thin metallic coatings onto (nanoparticles using a type of physical vapor deposition (PVD at ambient pressure and temperature. An aerosol of core particles is mixed with a metal vapor cloud formed by spark ablation by passing the aerosol through the spark zone using a hollow electrode configuration. The mixing process rapidly quenches the vapor, which condenses onto the core particles at a timescale of several tens of milliseconds in a manner that can be modeled as bimodal coagulation. Gold was deposited onto core nanoparticles consisting of silver or polystyrene latex, and silver was deposited onto gold nanoparticles. The coating morphology depends on the relative surface energies of the core and coating materials, similar to the growth mechanisms known for thin films: a coating made of a substance having a high surface energy typically results in a patchy coverage, while a coating material with a low surface energy will normally “wet” the surface of a core particle. The coated particles remain gas-borne, allowing further processing.

  9. Nucleation and dissociation of nano-particles in gas phase

    Feiden, P.

    2007-09-01

    This work deals with the study of nano-particles formation in gas phase and their dissociation pathways after an optical excitation. The clusters formation decomposes in two steps: a seed is formed (nucleation phase) and sticks atoms during its propagation in a sodium atomic vapor (growth phase). Those two steps have been observed separately for homogeneous Na n and heterogeneous Na n X particles (X = (NaOH) 2 or (Na 2 O) 2 ). The growth mechanism is well interpreted by a Monte Carlo simulation taking into account an accretion mechanism with hard-sphere cross section. The homogeneous nucleation mechanism has been highlighted by a direct comparison with the Classical Nucleation Theory predictions. The clusters fragmentation of ionic Na + (NaOH) p et Na + (NaF) p particles is studied in the second part. The way clusters fragment with size when they are excited optically is compared with theoretical previsions: this highlights the existence of an energetic barrier for special size of clusters. Finally, the fragmentation of doubly charged Na + Na + (NaOH) p clusters shows a competition between the fission into two single charged fragments and the unimolecular evaporation of a neutral fragment. (author)

  10. Atomic and molecular physics in the gas phase

    Toburen, L.H.

    1990-09-01

    The spatial and temporal distributions of energy deposition by high-linear-energy-transfer radiation play an important role in the subsequent chemical and biological processes leading to radiation damage. Because the spatial structures of energy deposition events are of the same dimensions as molecular structures in the mammalian cell, direct measurements of energy deposition distributions appropriate to radiation biology are infeasible. This has led to the development of models of energy transport based on a knowledge of atomic and molecular interactions process that enable one to simulate energy transfer on an atomic scale. Such models require a detailed understanding of the interactions of ions and electrons with biologically relevant material. During the past 20 years there has been a great deal of progress in our understanding of these interactions; much of it coming from studies in the gas phase. These studies provide information on the systematics of interaction cross sections leading to a knowledge of the regions of energy deposition where molecular and phase effects are important and that guide developments in appropriate theory. In this report studies of the doubly differential cross sections, crucial to the development of stochastic energy deposition calculations and track structure simulation, will be reviewed. Areas of understanding are discussed and directions for future work addressed. Particular attention is given to experimental and theoretical findings that have changed the traditional view of secondary electron production for charged particle interactions with atomic and molecular targets

  11. Decommissioning and Decontamination

    Massaut, V.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's decommissioning and decontamination programme are (1) to develop, test and optimise the technologies and procedures for decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear installations in order to minimise the waste arising and the distributed dose; (2) to optimise the environmental impact; (3) to reduce the cost of the end-of-life of the installation; (4) to make these new techniques available to the industry; (5) to share skills and competences. The programme and achievements in 1999 are summarised

  12. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted

  13. Special zone territory decontamination

    Samojlenko, Yu.N.; Golubev, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    Special zone is the Chernobyl' NPP operating site (OS). OS decontamination is described including reactor ruins from the accident moment. The process was begun from reactor bombardment with absorbing and filtering materials (sand, clay, lead, boron compounds). Then were produced soil shovelling, territory filling by dry concrete and laying concrete layer with thickness up to 300 mm. NPP room and equipment decontamination is described. 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  14. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    None

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted. (DLC)

  15. Coolant system decontamination

    Anstine, L.D.; James, D.B.; Melaika, E.A.; Peterson, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution is described. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution. (author)

  16. Laser diagnostics of a diamond depositing chemical vapour deposition gas-phase environment

    Smith, James Anthony

    2002-07-01

    Studies have been carried out to understand the gas-phase chemistry underpinning diamond deposition in hot filament and DC-arcjet chemical vapour deposition (CVD) systems. Resonance enhanced Multiphoton lonisation (REMPI) techniques were used to measure the relative H atom and CH{sub 3} radical number densities and local gas temperatures prevalent in a hot filament reactor, operating on Ch{sub 4}/H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2} gas mixtures. These results were compared to a 3D-computer simulation, and hence provided an insight into the nature of the gas-phase chemistry with particular reference to C{sub 2}{yields}C{sub 1} species conversion. Similar experimental and theoretical studies were also carried out to explain the chemistry involved in NH{sub 3}/CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} gas mixtures. It was demonstrated that the reactive nature of the filament surface was dependent on the addition of NH{sub 3}, influencing atomic hydrogen production, and thus the H/C/N gas-phase chemistry. Studies of the DC-arcjet diamond CVD reactor consisted of optical emission spectroscopic studies of the plume during deposition from an Ar/H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} gas mixture. Spatially resolved species emission intensity maps were obtained for C{sub 2}(d{yields}a), CN(B{yields}X) and H{sub {beta}} from Abel-inverted datasets. The C{sub 2}(d{yields}a) and CN(B{yields}X) emission intensity maps both show local maxima near the substrate surface. SEM and Laser Raman analyses indicate that N{sub 2} additions lead to a reduction in film quality and growth rate. Photoluminescence and SIMS analyses of the grown films provide conclusive evidence of nitrogen incorporation (as chemically bonded CN). Absolute column densities of C{sub 2}(a) in a DC-arcjet reactor operating on an Ar/H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} gas mixture, were measured using Cavity ring down spectroscopy. Simulations of the measured C{sub 2}(v=0) transition revealed a rotational temperature of {approx

  17. Laser diagnostics of a diamond depositing chemical vapour deposition gas-phase environment

    Smith, James Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Studies have been carried out to understand the gas-phase chemistry underpinning diamond deposition in hot filament and DC-arcjet chemical vapour deposition (CVD) systems. Resonance enhanced Multiphoton lonisation (REMPI) techniques were used to measure the relative H atom and CH 3 radical number densities and local gas temperatures prevalent in a hot filament reactor, operating on Ch 4 /H 2 and C 2 H 2 /H 2 gas mixtures. These results were compared to a 3D-computer simulation, and hence provided an insight into the nature of the gas-phase chemistry with particular reference to C 2 →C 1 species conversion. Similar experimental and theoretical studies were also carried out to explain the chemistry involved in NH 3 /CH 4 /H 2 and N 2 /CH 4 /H 2 gas mixtures. It was demonstrated that the reactive nature of the filament surface was dependent on the addition of NH 3 , influencing atomic hydrogen production, and thus the H/C/N gas-phase chemistry. Studies of the DC-arcjet diamond CVD reactor consisted of optical emission spectroscopic studies of the plume during deposition from an Ar/H 2 /CH 4 /N 2 gas mixture. Spatially resolved species emission intensity maps were obtained for C 2 (d→a), CN(B→X) and H β from Abel-inverted datasets. The C 2 (d→a) and CN(B→X) emission intensity maps both show local maxima near the substrate surface. SEM and Laser Raman analyses indicate that N 2 additions lead to a reduction in film quality and growth rate. Photoluminescence and SIMS analyses of the grown films provide conclusive evidence of nitrogen incorporation (as chemically bonded CN). Absolute column densities of C 2 (a) in a DC-arcjet reactor operating on an Ar/H 2 /CH 4 gas mixture, were measured using Cavity ring down spectroscopy. Simulations of the measured C 2 (v=0) transition revealed a rotational temperature of ∼3300 K. This gas temperature is similar to that deduced from optical emission spectroscopy studies of the C 2 (d→a) transition. (author)

  18. Homolytic iodination and nitration of some benzene derivatives in the gas phase

    Vonk, W.F.M.

    1980-01-01

    Two gas phase reactions, involving the iodination and nitration of benzene derivatives, are described. The experimental techniques of the apparatus and the methods used are outlined. The kinetic H/D isotope effect in the gas phase nitration of benzene with NO 2 is determined. (C.F.)

  19. Lessons Learned from Decontamination Experiences

    Sorensen, JH

    2000-11-16

    This interim report describes a DOE project currently underway to establish what is known about decontamination of buildings and people and the procedures and protocols used to determine when and how people or buildings are considered ''clean'' following decontamination. To fulfill this objective, the study systematically examined reported decontamination experiences to determine what procedures and protocols are currently employed for decontamination, the timeframe involved to initiate and complete the decontamination process, how the contaminants were identified, the problems encountered during the decontamination process, how response efforts of agencies were coordinated, and the perceived social psychological effects on people who were decontaminated or who participated in the decontamination process. Findings and recommendations from the study are intended to aid decision-making and to improve the basis for determining appropriate decontamination protocols for recovery planners and policy makers for responding to chemical and biological events.

  20. Study of decontamination and waste management technologies for contaminated rural and forest environment

    Grebenkov, A.; Davydchuk, V.; Firsakova, S.; Jouve, A.; Kutlakhmedov, Y.; Rose, K.; Zhouchenko, T.; Antzypaw, G.

    1996-01-01

    Pilot and demonstrative scale in situ trials of several decontamination technologies proposed in the framework of ECP-4 project were carried out in real conditions of Chernobyl Zone. Their results proved that industrial scale decontamination of various types of land is feasible. The management of radioactive waste arising from decontamination techniques can be provided by ecologically sound and efficient technologies

  1. Diesel-related hydrocarbons can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in megacities

    R. E. Dunmore

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbons are key precursors to two priority air pollutants, ozone and particulate matter. Those with two to seven carbons have historically been straightforward to observe and have been successfully reduced in many developed cities through air quality policy interventions. Longer chain hydrocarbons released from diesel vehicles are not considered explicitly as part of air quality strategies and there are few direct measurements of their gaseous abundance in the atmosphere. This study describes the chemically comprehensive and continuous measurements of organic compounds in a developed megacity (London, which demonstrate that on a seasonal median basis, diesel-related hydrocarbons represent only 20–30 % of the total hydrocarbon mixing ratio but comprise more than 50 % of the atmospheric hydrocarbon mass and are a dominant local source of secondary organic aerosols. This study shows for the first time that 60 % of the winter primary hydrocarbon hydroxyl radical reactivity is from diesel-related hydrocarbons and using the maximum incremental reactivity scale, we predict that they contribute up to 50 % of the ozone production potential in London. Comparing real-world urban composition with regulatory emissions inventories in the UK and US highlights a previously unaccounted for, but very significant, under-reporting of diesel-related hydrocarbons; an underestimation of a factor ~4 for C9 species rising to a factor of over 70 for C12 during winter. These observations show that hydrocarbons from diesel vehicles can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in cities with high diesel fleet fractions. Future control of urban particulate matter and ozone in such locations requires a shift in policy focus onto gas phase hydrocarbons released from diesels as this vehicle type continues to displace gasoline world-wide.

  2. CHAOS. III. GAS-PHASE ABUNDANCES IN NGC 5457

    Croxall, Kevin V.; Pogge, Richard W. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Berg, Danielle A. [Center for Gravitation, Cosmology and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, 1900 East Kenwood Boulevard, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Moustakas, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2016-10-10

    We present Large Binocular Telescope observations of 109 H ii regions in NGC 5457 (M101) obtained with the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph. We have robust measurements of one or more temperature-sensitive auroral emission lines for 74 H ii regions, permitting the measurement of “direct” gas-phase abundances. Comparing the temperatures derived from the different ionic species, we find: (1) strong correlations of T [N ii] with T [S iii] and T [O iii], consistent with little or no intrinsic scatter; (2) a correlation of T [S iii] with T [O iii], but with significant intrinsic dispersion; (3) overall agreement between T [N ii], T [S ii], and T [O ii], as expected, but with significant outliers; (4) the correlations of T [N ii] with T [S iii] and T [O iii] match the predictions of photoionization modeling while the correlation of T [S iii] with T [O iii] is offset from the prediction of photoionization modeling. Based on these observations, which include significantly more observations of lower excitation H ii regions, missing in many analyses, we inspect the commonly used ionization correction factors (ICFs) for unobserved ionic species and propose new empirical ICFs for S and Ar. We have discovered an unexpected population of H ii regions with a significant offset to low values in Ne/O, which defies explanation. We derive radial gradients in O/H and N/O which agree with previous studies. Our large observational database allows us to examine the dispersion in abundances, and we find intrinsic dispersions of 0.074 ± 0.009 in O/H and 0.095 ± 0.009 in N/O (at a given radius). We stress that this measurement of the intrinsic dispersion comes exclusively from direct abundance measurements of H ii regions in NGC 5457.

  3. The properties of gas-phase multiply charged ions

    Newson, K.A.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of a series of experiments investigating the reactivity of gas-phase molecular dications with various neutral collision partners, at collision energies between 3 and 13 eV in the laboratory frame, using a crossed-beam apparatus. The experiment involves the measurement of product ion intensities, which are determined by means of time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The experimental apparatus and methodology, together with the areas of theory important to ion chemistry, are described in the thesis. The product ions of greatest interest are those ions formed by bond-forming (chemical) reactivity. The relative intensities of such product ions, and those ions formed as a result of electron-transfer reactions, are, when recorded as a function of the collision energy, a powerful probe of the reaction mechanism. Additionally, where appropriate, the reactions are examined for isotope effects by using the isotopic analogue of the neutral collision partner. The results of the experiments indicate that no intermolecular isotope effects are present in the reactions of CF 2 2+ and CF 3 2+ with H 2 and D 2 neutral targets. In addition, the observed collision energy dependence is symptomatic of the absence of a barrier to reaction. These observations suggest that the reactions proceed via an impulsive direct reaction mechanism. Such a conclusion casts doubt on the applicability of the Landau-Zener model of H - /D - transfer reactivity. Other results presented in this thesis include the first reported observation of a bond-forming reaction between a molecular dication (CF2 2+ ) and a polyatomic neutral species (NH 3 ). Finally, the branching ratio of the products of bond-forming reactions between CF 2 2+ with HD indicates the operation of a strong intramolecular isotope effect, favouring the formation of the deuterated product. This observation points to a reaction mechanism in which the bond-formation is preceded by electron-transfer. (author)

  4. Dissociative electron attachment to the gas-phase nucleobase hypoxanthine

    Dawley, M. Michele [Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Tanzer, Katrin; Denifl, Stephan, E-mail: Stephan.Denifl@uibk.ac.at, E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu [Institut für Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, and Center for Molecular Biosciences Innsbruck (CMBI), Leopold-Franzens Universität Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Carmichael, Ian [Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Ptasińska, Sylwia, E-mail: Stephan.Denifl@uibk.ac.at, E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu [Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    We present high-resolution measurements of the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to isolated gas-phase hypoxanthine (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}N{sub 4}O, Hyp), a tRNA purine base. The anion mass spectra and individual ion efficiency curves from Hyp were measured as a function of electron energy below 9 eV. The mass spectra at 1 and 6 eV exhibit the highest anion yields, indicating possible common precursor ions that decay into the detectable anionic fragments. The (Hyp − H) anion (C{sub 5}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}O{sup −}) exhibits a sharp resonant peak at 1 eV, which we tentatively assign to a dipole-bound state of the keto-N1H,N9H tautomer in which dehydrogenation occurs at either the N1 or N9 position based upon our quantum chemical computations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and U(MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ+)) and prior studies with adenine. This closed-shell dehydrogenated anion is the dominant fragment formed upon electron attachment, as with other nucleobases. Seven other anions were also observed including (Hyp − NH){sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}{sup −}/C{sub 4}HN{sub 3}O{sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 2}N{sub 3}{sup −}, C{sub 3}NO{sup −}/HC(HCN)CN{sup −}, OCN{sup −}, CN{sup −}, and O{sup −}. Most of these anions exhibit broad but weak resonances between 4 and 8 eV similar to many analogous anions from adenine. The DEA to Hyp involves significant fragmentation, which is relevant to understanding radiation damage of biomolecules.

  5. Uptake of Organic Gas Phase Species by 1-Methylnaphthalene

    Zhang, H.; Xia, J.; Davidovits, P.; Jayne, J. T.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2002-12-01

    Using a droplet train apparatus, the mass accommodation coefficients (α) on 1-methylnapthalene of gas phase m-xylene, ethylbenzene, butylbenzene, α-pinene, γ-terpinene, and 2-methyl-2-hexanol were measured as a function of temperature (265 K to 296 K). 1-methylnapthalene was selected as a surrogate for hydrophobic and aromatic hydrocarbons found in tropospheric aerosols. The mass accommodation coefficients (α) of all the molecules obtained from these measurements exhibit negative temperature dependence. The upper and lower values of α at 265 K and 296 K respectively are: for m-xylene 0.44 and 0.26; for ethylbenzene 0.37 and 0.22; for butylbenzene 0.47 and 0.31; for α-pinene 0.47 and 0.096; for γ-terpinene 0.39 and 0.12; for 2-methyl-2-hexanol 0.44 and 0.26. The uptake measurements also yielded values for the product HDl1/2 for most of the molecules studied (H = Henry's law constant, Dl = liquid phase diffusion coefficient). Using calculated values of Dl the Henry's law constant is obtained, and expressed in the form ln H (M/atm) = -A + B/T. The A and B values for the molecules studied are listed in Table 1. Table 1: A and B values for the Henry's law constant H expressed as ln H (M/atm) = -A + B/T \\ m-xylene: A=7.20, B=4060\\ethylbenzene: A=5.81, B=3660\\butylbenzene: A=16.95, B=7330α-pinene: A=15.69, B=6360\\2-methyl-2-hexanol: A=9.95, B=4760

  6. Kinetics of the gas-phase tritium oxidation reaction

    Failor, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Homogeneous gas-phase kinetics of tritium oxidation (2T 2 + O 2 →2T 2 O) have been studied with a model that accounts explicitly for radiolysis of the major species and the kinetics of the subsequent reactions of ionic, excited-state, and neutral species. Results from model calculations are given for 10 -4 -1.0 mol% T 2 in O 2 (298 K, 1 atm). As the reaction evolves three different mechanisms control T 2 O production, each with a different overall rate expression and a different order with respect to the T 2 concentration. The effects of self-radiolysis of pure T 2 on the tritium oxidation reaction were calculated. Tritium atoms, the primary product of T 2 self-radiolysis, altered the oxidation mechanism only during the first few seconds following the initiation of the T 2 -O 2 reaction. Ozone, an important intermediate in T 2 oxidation, was monitored in-situ by U.V. absorption spectroscopy for 0.01-1.0 mol% T 2 an 1 atm O 2 . The shape of the experimental ozone time profile agreed with the model predictions. As predicted, the measured initial rate of ozone production varied linearly with initial T 2 concentration ([T 2 ] 0.6 o ), but at an initial rate one-third the predicted value. The steady-state ozone concentration ([O 3 ]ss) was predicted to be dependent on [T 2 ] 0.3 o , but the measured value was [T 2 ] 0.6 o , resulting in four times higher [O 3 ]ss than predicted for a 1.0% T 2 -O 2 mixture. Adding H 2 to the T 2 -O 2 mixture, to provide insight into the differences between the radiolytic and chemical behavior of the tritium, produced a greater decrease in [O 3 ]ss than predicted. Adjusting the reaction cell surface-to-volume ratio showed implications of minor surface removal of ozone

  7. Dissociative attachment reactions of electrons with gas phase superacids

    Liu, X.

    1992-01-01

    Using the flowing afterglow Langmuir probe (FALP) technique, dissociative attachment coefficients β for reactions of electrons with gas phase superacids HCo(PF 3 ) 4 , HRh(PF 3 ) 4 and carbonyl hydride complexes HMn(CO) 5 , HRe(CO) 5 have been determined under thermal conditions over the approximate temperature range 300∼550 K. The superacids react relatively slowly ( max ) with free electrons in a thermal plasma, and the values of β obtained this far do not show a correlation between acidity and β. The pioneer researchers in this field had speculated that any superacid would be a rapid attacher of electrons; it was found that this speculation is not true in general. The product distribution of electron attachment reaction to HCo(PF 3 ) 4 was found to be independent of temperature even though the β[HCo(PF 3 ) 4 ] increases with temperature. This proposes that the electron attachment process occurs well before the excited complex dissociates. In addition, the activation energy of HCo(PF 3 ) 4 for electron attachment has been derived from the Arrhenius plots. The carbonyl hydride complexes, HMn(CO) 5 and HRe(CO) 5 , react relatively rapidly (>1/4 of β max ) with free electrons in thermal plasma. This indicates that these reactions cannot be significantly endothermic. Observation of rapid attachment for these non-superacids shows that the Mn-CO and Re-CO bonds are weaker than the Mn-H and Re-H bonds, respectively. Comparisons between the carbonyl and trifluorophosphine cases implies that fast electron capture is related more to the CO ligand than to the transition-metal species

  8. Gas-Phase Combustion Synthesis of Aluminum Nitride Powder

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Lottes, C. R.; Huertas, J. I.; Rosen, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Due to its combined properties of high electrical resistivity and high thermal conductivity aluminum nitride (AlN) is a highly desirable material for electronics applications. Methods are being sought for synthesis of unagglomerated, nanometer-sized powders of this material, prepared in such a way that they can be consolidated into solid compacts having minimal oxygen content. A procedure for synthesizing these powders through gas-phase combustion is described. This novel approach involves reacting AlCl3, NH3, and Na vapors. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations show that 100% yields can be obtained for these reactants with the products being AlN, NaCl, and H2. The NaCl by-product is used to coat the AlN particles in situ. The coating allows for control of AlN agglomeration and protects the powders from hydrolysis during post-flame handling. On the basis of thermodynamic and kinetic considerations, two different approaches were employed to produce the powder, in co-flow diffusion flame configurations. In the first approach, the three reactants were supplied in separate streams. In the second, the AlCl3 and NH3 were premixed with HCl and then reacted with Na vapor. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of as-produced powders show only NaCl for the first case and NaCl and AlN for the second. After annealing at 775 C tinder dynamic vacuum, the salt was removed and XRD spectra of powders from both approaches show only AlN. Aluminum metal was also produced in the co-flow flame by reacting AlCl3 with Na. XRD spectra of as-produced powders show the products to be only NaCl and elemental aluminum.

  9. Gentilly 1: decontamination program

    Le, H.; Denault, P.

    1985-01-01

    The Gentilly 1 station, a 250-MW(e) light-water-cooled and heavy-water-moderated nuclear reactor, is being decommissioned to a static state (variant of stage 1) condition by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). The scope of the decontamination program at the Gentilly 1 site includes the fuel pool and associated systems, the decontamination center, the laundry, the feedwater pumps and piping systems, the service building ventilation and drainage systems, and miscellaneous floor and wall areas. After an extensive literature review for acceptable decontamination methods, it was decided that the decontamination equipment used at Gentilly 1 during the program would include a hydrolaser, a scarifier, chipping hammers, a steam cleaner, an ultrasonic bath, and cutting tools. In addition, various foams, acids, detergents, surfactants, and abrasives are used alone and in tandem with the above equipment. This paper highlights the result of these decontaminations, their effectiveness, and the recommendation for future application. The methodology in performing these operations are also presented

  10. Results of chemical decontamination of DOE`s uranium-enrichment scrap metal

    Levesque, R.G.

    1997-02-01

    The CORPEX{reg_sign} Nuclear Decontamination Processes were used to decontaminate representative scrap metal specimens obtained from the existing scrap metal piles located at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. In September 1995, under contract to Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, MELE Associates, Inc. performed the on-site decontamination demonstration. The decontamination demonstration proved that significant amounts of the existing DOE scrap metal can be decontaminated to levels where the scrap metal could be economically released by DOE for beneficial reuse. This simple and environmentally friendly process can be used as an alternative, or in addition to, smelting radiologically contaminated scrap metal.

  11. TMI-2 containment decontamination plans

    McDougall, F.

    1980-01-01

    Because of other priorities such as reentry, purging, and recovery, containment decontamination is only in the preliminary planning stages. This paper summarizes the study with emphasis on the remote decontamination techniques

  12. Cold plasma decontamination using flexible jet arrays

    Konesky, Gregory

    2010-04-01

    Arrays of atmospheric discharge cold plasma jets have been used to decontaminate surfaces of a wide range of microorganisms quickly, yet not damage that surface. Its effectiveness in decomposing simulated chemical warfare agents has also been demonstrated, and may also find use in assisting in the cleanup of radiological weapons. Large area jet arrays, with short dwell times, are necessary for practical applications. Realistic situations will also require jet arrays that are flexible to adapt to contoured or irregular surfaces. Various large area jet array prototypes, both planar and flexible, are described, as is the application to atmospheric decontamination.

  13. Radioactive decontamination of equipment

    1982-03-01

    After a recall of some definitions relating to decontamination techniques and of the regulation into effect, the principles to be respected to arrange rationally work zones are quoted while insisting more particularly on the types of coatings which facilitate maintenance operations and the dismantling of these installations. Then, the processes and equipments to use in decontamination units for routine or particular operations are described; the list of recommended chemical products to decontaminate the equipment is given. The influence of these treatments on the state and the duration of life of equipments is studied, and some perfectible methods are quoted. In the appendix, are given: the limits of surface contamination accepted in the centers; a standard project which defines the criteria of admissible residual contamination in wastes considered as cold wastes; some remarks on the interest that certain special ventilation and air curtain devices for the protection of operators working on apparatus generating contaminated dusts [fr

  14. Decontamination of main coolant pumps

    Roofthooft, R.

    1988-01-01

    Last year a number of main coolant pumps in Belgian nuclear power plants were decontaminated. A new method has been developed to reduce the time taken for decontamination and the volume of waste to be treated. The method comprises two phases: Oxidation with permanganate in nitric acid and dissolution in oxalic acid. The decontamination of main coolant pumps can now be achieved in less than one day. The decontamination factors attained range between 15 and 150. (orig.) [de

  15. Detection methods for atoms and radicals in the gas phase

    Hack, W.

    This report lists atoms and free radicals in the gas phase which are of interest for environmental and flame chemistry and have been detected directly. The detection methods which have been used are discussed with respect to their range of application, specificity and sensitivity. In table 1, detection methods for the five atoms of group IV (C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and about 60 radicals containing at least one atom of group IV are summarized (CH, Cd, Cf, CC1, CBr, Cn, Cs, CSe, CH2, CD2, Chf, Cdf, CHC1, CHBr, CF2, CC12, CBr2, CFC1, CFBr, CH3, CD3, CF3, CH2F, CH2C1, CH2Br, CHF2, CHC12, CHBr2, Hco, Fco, CH30, CD30, CH2OH, CH3S, Nco, CH4N, CH302, CF302; C2, C2N, C2H, C20, C2HO, C2H3, C2F3, C2H5, C2HsO, C2H4OH, CH3CO, CD3CO, C2H3O, C2H502, CH3COO2, C2H4N, C2H6N, C3; Si, SiF, SiF2, SiO, SiC, Si2; Ge, GeC, GeO, GeF, GeF2, GeCl2, Sn, SnF, SnO, SnF2, Pb, PbF, PbF2, PbO, PbS). In table 2 detection methods for about 25 other atoms and 60 radicals are listed: (H, D, O, O2, Oh, Od, HO2, DO2, F, Ci, Br, I, Fo, Cio, BrO, Io, FO2, C1O2, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, N, N3, Nh, Nd, Nf, Nci, NBr, NH2, ND2, Nhd, Nhf, NF2, NC12, N2H3, No, NO2, NO3, Hno, Dno, P, Ph, Pd, Pf, Pci, PH2, PD2, PF2, Po, As, AsO, AsS, Sb, Bi, S, S2, Sh, Sd, Sf, SF2, So, Hso, Dso, Sn, Se, Te, Se2, SeH, SeD, SeF, SeO, SeS, SeN, TeH, TeO, Bh, BH2, Bo, Bn, B02, Cd, Hg, UF5). The tables also cite some recent kinetic applications of the various methods.

  16. Electron-beam synthesis of fuel in the gas phase

    Ponomarev, A.V.; Holodkova, E.M.; Ershov, B.G.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Tendencies of world development focus attention on a vegetative biomass as on the major raw resource for future chemistry and a fuel industry. The significant potential for perfection of biomass conversion processes is concentrated in the field of radiation-chemical methods. Both the mode of post-radiation distillation and mode of electron-beam distillation of biomass have been investigated as well as the mode of gas-phase synthesis of liquid engine fuel from of biomass distillation products. Synergistic action of radiation and temperature has been analyzed at use of the accelerated electron beams allowing to combine radiolysis with effective radiation heating of a material without use of additional heaters. At dose rate above 1 kGy/s the electron-beam irradiation results in intensive decomposition of a biomass and evaporation of formed fragments with obtaining of a liquid condensate (∼ 60 wt%), CO 2 and Co gases (13-18 wt%) and charcoal in the residue. Biomass distillation at radiation heating allows to increase almost three times an organic liquid yield in comparison with pyrolysis. The majority of liquid products from cellulose is represented by the furan derivatives considered among the very perspective components for alternative engine fuels. Distilled-off gases and vapors are diluted with gaseous C 1 -C 5 alkanes and again are exposed to an irradiation to produce liquid fuel from a biomass. This transformation is based on a method of electron-beam circulation conversion of gaseous C 1 -C 5 alkanes (Ponomarev, A.V., Radiat. Phys. Chem., 78, 48, 2009) which consists in formation and removal of liquid products with high degree of carbon skeleton branching. The isomers ratio in a liquid may be controlled by means of change of an irradiation condition and initial gas composition. The irradiation of gaseous alkanes together with vaporous products of biomass destruction allows to synthesize the fuel enriched by conventional

  17. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    Lomasney, H. [ISOTRON Corp., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has assigned a priority to the advancement of technology for decontaminating concrete surfaces which have become contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, and toxic organics. This agency is responsible for decontamination and decommissioning of thousands of buildings. Electrokinetic extraction is one of the several innovative technologies which emerged in response to this initiative. This technique utilizes an electropotential gradient and the subsequent electrical transport mechanism to cause the controlled movement of ionics species, whereby the contaminants exit the recesses deep within the concrete. This report discusses the technology and use at the Oak Ridge k-25 plant.

  18. Radiation decontamination of spices

    Jan, M.; Sattar, A.; Ahmad, W.A.; Khan, I.

    1990-06-01

    In this report radiation decontamination was initiated to investigate the red pepper, which is widely consumed in all parts of Pakistan. The samples were collected from local market and prepared for gamma radiation at dose level of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 kGy. The measurement of total fungal count was carried out immediately after irradiation and the at two months storage interval. It was reported that radiation dose 10.0 kGy is suitable for complete decontamination of red pepper. (A.B.)

  19. Development and design application of cerium (IV) decontamination process

    Bray, L.A.; Seay, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    A simple and effective method was developed for decontamination of high-level waste canisters. This method of chemical decontamination is applicable to a wide variety of contaminated equipment found in the nuclear industry. Conceptual design of the cerium [Ce(IV)] decontamination process equipment has been completed for the West Valley Demonstration project (WVDP) vitrification facility. This remote equipment, which is the first engineering scale application of this technology, will remove surface contamination from stainless-steel (SS) containers containing high-level waste (HLW) glass prior to placing them into temporary storage and ultimate shipment to a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) repository for disposal. The objective of the development and design study was to identify an effective chemical process and to design equipment to decontaminate the HLW glass canisters to limits that meet U.S. DOE requirements. The equipment includes canister-capping and smear stations in addition to the decontamination module and associated services

  20. Development and design application of cerium (IV) decontamination process

    Bray, L.A.; Seay, J.M.

    1988-10-01

    A simple and effective method was developed for decontamination of high-level waste canisters. This method of chemical decontamination is applicable to a wide variety of contaminated equipment found in the nuclear industry. Conceptual design of the cerium [Ce(IV)] decontamination process equipment has been completed for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) vitrification facility. This remote equipment, which is the first engineering scale application of this technology, will remove surface contamination from stainless-steel (SS) containers containing high-level waste (HLW) glass prior to placing them into temporary storage and ultimate shipment to a US Department of Energy (DOE) repository for disposal. The objective of the development and design study was to identify an effective chemical process and to design equipment to decontaminate the HLW glass canisters to limits that meet USDOE requirements. The equipment includes canister-capping and smear stations in addition to the decontamination module and associated services. 2 refs., 1 fig

  1. Infrared spectroscopy of gas-phase clusters using a free-electron laser

    Heijnsbergen, D. van; Helden, G. von; Meijer, G.

    2002-01-01

    Most clusters produced in the gas phase, especially those containing metals, remain largely uncharaterized, among these are transition metal - carbide, -oxide and -nitride clusters. A method for recording IR spectra of strongly bound gas-phase clusters is presented. It is based on a free-electron laser called Felix, characterized by wide wavelength tuning range, covering almost the full 'molecular finger print' region, high power and fluence which make it suited to excite gas-phase species i.e. gas -phase clusters. Neutral clusters were generated by laser vaporization technique, ions that were created after the interaction with the free-electron laser were analyzed in a flight mass spectrometer. Experiments were run with titanium carbide clusters and their IR spectra given. It was shown that this method is suited to strongly bound clusters with low ionization energies, a condition met for many pure metal clusters and metal compound clusters. (nevyjel)

  2. Gas-phase water-mediated equilibrium between methylglyoxal and its geminal diol

    Axson, Jessica L.; Takahashi, Kaito; De Haan, David O.; Vaida, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    In aqueous solution, aldehydes, and to a lesser extent ketones, hydrate to form geminal diols. We investigate the hydration of methylglyoxal (MG) in the gas phase, a process not previously considered to occur in water-restricted environments. In this study, we spectroscopically identified methylglyoxal diol (MGD) and obtained the gas-phase partial pressures of MG and MGD. These results, in conjunction with the relative humidity, were used to obtain the equilibrium constant, KP, for the water-mediated hydration of MG in the gas phase. The Gibbs free energy for this process, ΔG°, obtained as a result, suggests a larger than expected gas-phase diol concentration. This may have significant implications for understanding the role of organics in atmospheric chemistry. PMID:20142510

  3. Development of waste minimization and decontamination technologies at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    Ferguson, R.L.; Archibald, K.E.; Demmer, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    Emphasis on the minimization of decontamination secondary waste has increased because of restrictions on the use of hazardous chemicals and Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) waste handling issues. The Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co. (LITCO) Decontamination Development Subunit has worked to evaluate and introduce new performed testing, evaluations, development and on-site demonstrations for a number of novel decontamination techniques that have not yet previously been used at the ICPP. This report will include information on decontamination techniques that have recently been evaluated by the Decontamination Development Subunit

  4. Chemical decontamination solutions: Effects on PWR equipment

    Pezze, C.M.; Colvin, E.R.; Aspden, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical objective for the nuclear industry is the reduction of personnel exposure to radiation. Reductions have been achieved through industry's radiation management programs including training and radiation awareness concepts. Increased plant maintenance and higher radiation fields at many sites continue to raise concerns. To alleviate the radiation exposure problem, the sources of radiation which contribute to personnel exposure must be removed from the plant. A feasible was of significantly reducing these sources from a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is to chemically decontaminate the entire reactor coolant system (RCS). A program was conducted to determine the technical acceptability of using certain dilute chemical solvent processes for full RCS chemical decontamination. The two processes evaluated were CAN-DEREM and LOMI. The purpose of the program was to define and complete a systematic evaluation of the major issues that need to be addressed for the successful decontamination of the entire RCS and affected portions of the auxiliary systems of a four-loop PWR system. A test program was designed to evaluate the corrosion effects of the two decontamination processes under expected plant conditions. Materials and sample configurations dictated by generic PWR components were evaluated. The testing also included many standard corrosion coupons. The test data were then used to assess the impact of chemical decontamination on the physical condition and operability of the components, equipment and mechanical systems that make up the RCS. An overview of the test program, sample configurations, data and engineering evaluations is presented. The data demonstrate that through detailed engineering evaluations of corrosion data and equipment function, the impact of full RCS chemical decontamination on plant equipment is established

  5. Gas phase ion/molecule reactions as studied by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometry

    Joergensen, S.I.

    1985-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is gas phase ion/molecule reactions as studied by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (chapter 2 contains a short description of this method). Three chapters are mainly concerned with mechanistic aspects of gas phase ion/molecule reactions. An equally important aspect of the thesis is the stability and reactivity of α-thio carbanions, dipole stabilized carbanions and homoenolate anions, dealt with in the other four chapters. (Auth.)

  6. An atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase kinetics and mechanism in tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    Koontz, Steven L.; Davis, Dennis D.; Hansen, Merrill

    1988-01-01

    A new type of gas phase flow reactor, designed to permit the study of gas phase reactions near 1 atm of pressure, is described. A general solution to the flow/diffusion/reaction equations describing reactor performance under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions is presented along with a discussion of critical reactor parameters and reactor limitations. The results of numerical simulations of the reactions of ozone with monomethylhydrazine and hydrazine are discussed, and performance data from a prototype flow reactor are presented.

  7. Defect formation in fluoropolymer films at their condensation from a gas phase

    Luchnikov, P. A.

    2018-01-01

    The questions of radiation defects, factors of influence of electronic high-frequency discharge plasma components on the molecular structure and properties of the fluoropolymer vacuum films synthesized on a substrate from a gas phase are considered. It is established that at sedimentation of fluoropolymer coverings from a gas phase in high-frequency discharge plasma in films there are radiation defects in molecular and supramolecular structure because of the influence of active plasma components which significantly influence their main properties.

  8. Ultrafast electronic relaxation of excited state vitamin B12 in the gas phase

    Shafizadeh, Niloufar; Poisson, Lionel; Soep, Benoit

    2008-01-01

    The time evolution of electronically excited vitamin B 12 (cyanocobalamin) has been observed for the first time in the gas phase. It reveals an ultrafast decay to a state corresponding to metal excitation. This decay is interpreted as resulting from a ring to metal electron transfer. This opens the observation of the excited state of other complex biomimetic systems in the gas phase, the key to the characterisation of their complex evolution through excited electronic states

  9. Wigner Distribution Functions as a Tool for Studying Gas Phase Alkali Metal Plus Noble Gas Collisions

    2014-03-27

    WIGNER DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS AS A TOOL FOR STUDYING GAS PHASE ALKALI METAL PLUS NOBLE GAS COLLISIONS THESIS Keith A. Wyman, Second Lieutenant, USAF...the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENP-14-M-39 WIGNER DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS AS A TOOL FOR...APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT-ENP-14-M-39 WIGNER DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS AS A TOOL FOR STUDYING GAS PHASE ALKALI METAL PLUS

  10. A new method for determining gas phase heat of formation of aromatic energetic compounds

    Keshavarz, Mohammad H. [Department of Chemistry, Malek-ashtar University of Technology, Shahin-shahr P. O. Box 83145/115 (Iran); Tehrani, Masoud K. [Department of Physics, Malek-ashtar University of Technology, Shahin-shahr P. O. Box 83145/115 (Iran)

    2007-04-15

    A new correlation is introduced for desk calculation of gas phase heat of formation of aromatic energetic compounds that contain the elements of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. Predicted gas phase heats of formation for 26 energetic compounds have a root mean square of deviation from experiment of 20.67 kJ/mol, which is in good agreement with respect to measured values of oxygen-lean and oxygen-rich aromatic energetic compounds. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Molecular structure determination of cyclootane by ab initio and electron diffraction methods in the gas phase

    De Almeida, Wagner B.

    2000-01-01

    The determination of the molecular structure of molecules is of fundamental importance in chemistry. X-rays and electron diffraction methods constitute in important tools for the elucidation of the molecular structure of systems in the solid state and gas phase, respectively. The use of quantum mechanical molecular orbital ab initio methods offer an alternative for conformational analysis studies. Comparison between theoretical results and those obtained experimentally in the gas phase can ma...

  12. Concrete decontamination and demolition methods

    LaGuardia, T.S.

    1980-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Division of Environmental Control Technology, requested Nuclear Energy Services to prepare a handbook for the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of DOE-owned and commercially-owned radioactive facilities. the objective of the handbook is to provide the nuclear industry with guidance on the state-of-the-art methods and equipment available for decommissioning and to provide the means to estimate decommissioning costs and environmental impact. The methods available for concrete decontamination and demolition are summarized to provide an overview of some of the state-of-the-art techniques to be discussed at this workshop. The pertinent information on each method will include the selection factors such as the rate of performance in terms of concrete removal per unit time (cubic yards per day), manpower required by craft, unit cost (dollars per cubic yard) and the advantages and disadvantages. The methods included in this overview are those that have been routinely used in nuclear and nonnuclear applications or demonstrated in field tests. These methods include controlled blasting, wrecking ball or slab, backhoe mounted ram, flame torch, thermic lance, rock splitter, demolition compound, sawing, core stitch drilling, explosive cutting, paving breaker and power chisel, drill and spall, scarifying, water cannon and grinding

  13. Influence of Ionization Source Conditions on the Gas-Phase Protomer Distribution of Anilinium and Related Cations.

    Attygalle, Athula B; Xia, Hanxue; Pavlov, Julius

    2017-08-01

    The gas-phase-ion generation technique and specific ion-source settings of a mass spectrometer influence heavily the protonation processes of molecules and the abundance ratio of the generated protomers. Hitherto that has been attributed primarily to the nature of the solvent and the pH. By utilizing electrospray ionization and ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS), we demonstrate, even in the seemingly trivial case of protonated aniline, that the protomer ratio strongly depends on the source conditions. Under low in-source ion activation, nearly 100% of the N-protomer of aniline is produced, and it can be subsequently converted to the C-protomer by collisional activation effected by increasing the electrical potential difference between the entrance and exit orifices of the first vacuum region. This activation and transformation process takes place even before the ion is mass-selected and subjected to IM separation. Despite the apparent simplicity of the problem, the preferred protonation site of aniline in the gas phase-the amino group or the aromatic ring-has been a topic of controversy. Our results not only provide unambiguous evidence that ring- and nitrogen-protonated aniline can coexist and be interconverted in the gas phase, but also that the ratio of the protomers depends on the internal energy of the original ion. There are many dynamic ion-transformation and fragmentation processes that take place in the different physical compartments of a Synapt G2 HDMS instrument. Such processes can dramatically change the very identity even of small ions, and therefore should be taken into account when interpreting product-ion mass spectra. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  14. A decontamination technique for decommissioning waste

    Heki, H.; Hosaka, K.; Kuribayashi, N.; Ishikura, T.

    1993-01-01

    A large amount of radioactive metallic waste is generated from decommissioned commercial nuclear reactors. It is necessary from the point of environmental protection and resource utilization to decontaminate the contaminated metallic waste. A decommissioning waste processing system has been previously proposed considering such decommissioning waste characteristics as its large quantity, large radioactivity range, and various shapes and materials. The decontamination process in this system was carried out by abrasive blasting as pretreatment, electrochemical decontamination as the main process, and ultrasonic cleaning in water as post-treatment. For electrochemical decontamination, electrolytic decontamination for simple shaped waste and REDOX decontamination for complicated shaped waste were used as effective decontamination processing. This time, various kinds of actual radioactive contaminated samples were taken from operating power plants to simulate the decontamination of decommissioning waste. After analyzing the composition, morphogenesis and surface observation, electrolytic decontamination, REDOX decontamination, and ultrasonic cleaning experiments were carried out by using these samples. As a result, all the samples were decontaminated below the assumed exemption level(=4 x 10 -2 Bq/g). A maximum decontamination factor of over 104 was obtained by both electrolytic and REDOX decontamination. The stainless steel sample was easy to decontaminate in both electrochemical decontaminations because of its thin oxidized layer. The ultrasonic cleaning process after electrochemical decontamination worked effectively for removing adhesive sludge and the contaminated liquid. It has been concluded from the results mentioned above that electrolytic decontamination and REDOX decontamination are effective decontamination process for decontaminating decommissioning waste

  15. Nanoparticles from the Gas Phase as Building Blocks for Electrical Devices

    Fissan, H.; Kennedy, M.K.; Krinke, T.J.; Kruis, F.E.

    2003-01-01

    Electrical device development is driven by miniaturization and possibilities to use new chemical and physical effects. Nanotechnology offers both aspects. The structural dimensions of materials and devices are small and because of that large exchange surfaces are provided but also effects like quantum effects may occur and be used to get new or at least improved properties of nanostructured materials and devices.Nanoparticles are of special interest because of their nanodimensions in all three directions, so that nanoeffects become most prominent. They can be synthesized in solid materials, in liquids and in gases. Gas synthesis has several advantages compared to the other phases, especially the high cleanliness which can be achieved. In case of electrical devices the particles have to be deposited onto substrates in a structured way.The substrate may consist out of microelectronic devices in which the deposited nanoparticles are introduced for the basic function. In case of a transistor this would be the gate function, in case of a sensor this would be the sensing layer, where the contact with the measurement object takes place. For two kinds of particles SnO 2 and PbS, synthesized in the gas phase, we demonstrate the way how to create devices with improved sensor properties

  16. A Kinetic Study of the Gas-Phase Reaction of OH with Br2

    Bryukov, Mikhail G.; Dellinger, Barry; Knyazev, Vadim D.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental, temperature-dependent kinetic study of the gas-phase reaction of the hydroxyl radical with molecular bromine (reaction 1) has been performed using a pulsed laser photolysis/pulsed-laser-induced fluorescence technique over a wide temperature range of 297 – 766 K, and at pressures between 6.68 and 40.29 kPa of helium. The experimental rate coefficients for reaction 1 demonstrate no correlation with pressure and exhibit a negative temperature dependence with a slight negative curvature in the Arrhenius plot. A non-linear least-squares fit with two floating parameters of the temperature dependent k1(T) data set using an equation of the form k1(T) = ATn yields the recommended expression k1(T) = 1.85×10−9T − 0.66 cm3 molecule−1 s−1 for the temperature dependence of the reaction 1 rate coefficient. The potential energy surface (PES) of reaction 1 was investigated using quantum chemistry methods. The reaction proceeds through formation of a weakly bound OH···Br2 complex and a PES saddle point with an energy below that of the reactants. Temperature dependence of the reaction rate coefficient was modeled using the RRKM method on the basis of the calculated PES. PMID:16854030

  17. Role of isospin in nuclear-matter liquid-gas phase transition

    Ducoin, C.

    2006-10-01

    Nuclear matter presents a phase transition of the liquid-gas type. This well-known feature is due to the nuclear interaction profile (mean-range attractive, short-range repulsive). Symmetric-nuclear-matter thermodynamics is thus analogous to that of a Van der Waals fluid. The study shows up to be more complex in the case of asymmetric matter, composed of neutrons and protons in an arbitrary proportion. Isospin, which distinguishes both constituents, gives a measure of this proportion. Studying asymmetric matter, isospin is an additional degree of freedom, which means one more dimension to consider in the space of observables. The nuclear liquid-gas transition is associated with the multi-fragmentation phenomenon observed in heavy-ion collisions, and to compact-star physics: the involved systems are neutron rich, so they are affected by the isospin degree of freedom. The present work is a theoretical study of isospin effects which appear in the asymmetric nuclear matter liquid-gas phase transition. A mean-field approach is used, with a Skyrme nuclear effective interaction. We demonstrate the presence of a first-order phase transition for asymmetric matter, and study the isospin distillation phenomenon associated with this transition. The case of phase separation at thermodynamic equilibrium is compared to spinodal decomposition. Finite size effects are addressed, as well as the influence of the electron gas which is present in the astrophysical context. (author)

  18. Conformal and highly luminescent monolayers of Alq3 prepared by gas-phase molecular layer deposition.

    Räupke, André; Albrecht, Fabian; Maibach, Julia; Behrendt, Andreas; Polywka, Andreas; Heiderhoff, Ralf; Helzel, Jonatan; Rabe, Torsten; Johannes, Hans-Hermann; Kowalsky, Wolfgang; Mankel, Eric; Mayer, Thomas; Görrn, Patrick; Riedl, Thomas

    2014-01-22

    The gas-phase molecular layer deposition (MLD) of conformal and highly luminescent monolayers of tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum (Alq3) is reported. The controlled formation of Alq3 monolayers is achieved for the first time by functionalization of the substrate with amino groups, which serve as initial docking sites for trimethyl aluminum (TMA) molecules binding datively to the amine. Thereby, upon exposure to 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ), the self-limiting formation of highly luminescent Alq3 monolayers is afforded. The growth process and monolayer formation were studied and verified by in situ quartz crystal monitoring, optical emission and absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The nature of the MLD process provides an avenue to coat arbitrarily shaped 3D surfaces and porous structures with high surface areas, as demonstrated in this work for silica aerogels. The concept presented here paves the way to highly sensitive luminescent sensors and dye-sensitized metal oxides for future applications (e.g., in photocatalysis and solar cells).

  19. Tailoring gas-phase CO2 electroreduction selectivity to hydrocarbons at Cu nanoparticles

    Merino-Garcia, I.; Albo, J.; Irabien, A.

    2018-01-01

    Copper-based surfaces appear as the most active catalysts for CO2 electroreduction to hydrocarbons, even though formation rates and efficiencies still need to be improved. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the continuous gas-phase CO2 electroreduction to hydrocarbons (i.e. ethylene and methane) at copper nanoparticulated-based surfaces, paying attention to particle size influence (ranging from 25-80 nm) on reaction productivity, selectivity, and Faraday efficiency (FE) for CO2 conversion. The effect of the current density and the presence of a microporous layer within the working electrode are then evaluated. Copper-based gas diffusion electrodes are prepared by airbrushing the catalytic ink onto carbon supports, which are then coupled to a cation exchange membrane (Nafion) in a membrane electrode assembly. The results show that the use of smaller copper nanoparticles (25 nm) leads to a higher ethylene production (1148 μmol m-2 s-1) with a remarkable high FE (92.8%), at the same time, diminishing the competitive hydrogen evolution reaction in terms of FE. This work demonstrates the importance of nanoparticle size on reaction selectivity, which may be of help to design enhanced electrocatalytic materials for CO2 valorization to hydrocarbons.

  20. Gas-phase structure and fragmentation pathways of singly protonated peptides with N-terminal arginine.

    Bythell, Benjamin J; Csonka, István P; Suhai, Sándor; Barofsky, Douglas F; Paizs, Béla

    2010-11-25

    The gas-phase structures and fragmentation pathways of the singly protonated peptide arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) are investigated by means of collision-induced-dissociation (CID) and detailed molecular mechanics and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is demonstrated that despite the ionizing proton being strongly sequestered at the guanidine group, protonated RGD can easily be fragmented on charge directed fragmentation pathways. This is due to facile mobilization of the C-terminal or aspartic acid COOH protons thereby generating salt-bridge (SB) stabilized structures. These SB intermediates can directly fragment to generate b(2) ions or facilely rearrange to form anhydrides from which both b(2) and b(2)+H(2)O fragments can be formed. The salt-bridge stabilized and anhydride transition structures (TSs) necessary to form b(2) and b(2)+H(2)O are much lower in energy than their traditional charge solvated counterparts. These mechanisms provide compelling evidence of the role of SB and anhydride structures in protonated peptide fragmentation which complements and supports our recent findings for tryptic systems (Bythell, B. J.; Suhai, S.; Somogyi, A.; Paizs, B. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 14057-14065.). In addition to these findings we also report on the mechanisms for the formation of the b(1) ion, neutral loss (H(2)O, NH(3), guanidine) fragment ions, and the d(3) ion.

  1. Application of near ambient pressure gas-phase X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to the investigation of catalytic properties of copper in methanol oxidation

    Prosvirin, Igor P., E-mail: prosvirin@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Lavrentieva ave. 5, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bukhtiyarov, Andrey V., E-mail: avb@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Lavrentieva ave. 5, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Research and Educational Center for Energy Efficient Catalysis, Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bluhm, Hendrik, E-mail: hbluhm@lbl.gov [Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Bukhtiyarov, Valerii I., E-mail: vib@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Lavrentieva ave. 5, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Research and Educational Center for Energy Efficient Catalysis, Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Selective oxidation of CH{sub 3}OH to CH{sub 2}O over a Cu foil has been studied by in situ gas phase XPS. • C1s and O1s spectra were used for identification of reagents and reaction products in a gas phase. • Catalytic data (conversions and reaction products yields) calculated from XPS spectra are in a good agreement with QMS results. • The possible reasons of the observed variations in reaction mechanism have been discussed. - Abstract: Application of near ambient pressure (NAP) X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for characterization of catalytic properties of a heterogeneous catalyst through measurement and analysis of the core-level spectra from gas phase constituents, which become measurable in submillibar pressure range, has been demonstrated for the reaction of methanol oxidation over polycrystalline copper foil. To improve the accuracy of quantitative analysis of the gas phase signals for the routine XPS spectrometer with double Al/Mg anode used in these experiments, the sample was removed from XPS analysis zone, but it was still located in high-pressure gas cell. As consequence, only gas phase peaks from reagents and reaction products have been observed in XPS spectra. Quantitative analysis of the spectra has allowed us to calculate conversions of the reagents and yields of the reaction products, or, other words, to characterize the catalytic properties of the catalyst and to track their changes with temperature. Further comparison of the catalytic properties with concentration of the surface species measured by in situ XPS in separate experiments, but under the same conditions, gives a possibility to discuss the reaction mechanisms.

  2. Decontamination for free release

    Simpson, K A; Elder, G R [Bradtec Ltd., Bristol (United Kingdom)

    1997-02-01

    Many countries are seeking to treat radioactive waste in ways which meet the local regulatory requirements, but yet are cost effective when all contributing factors are assessed. In some countries there are increasing amounts of waste, arising from nuclear plant decommissioning, which are categorized as low level waste: however with suitable treatment a large part of such wastes might become beyond regulatory control and be able to be released as non-radioactive. The benefits and disadvantages of additional treatment before disposal need to be considered. Several processes falling within the overall description of decontamination for free release have been developed and applied, and these are outlined. In one instance the process seeks to take advantage of techniques and equipment used for decontaminating water reactor circuits intermittently through reactor life. (author). 9 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. Sunflowers to decontaminate water

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Sunflowers offer a new method of decontamination. 55 kilograms (dry weight) of sunflowers are able to decontaminate all the cesium 137 and the strontium 90 polluting a pond situated at one kilometer from Tchernobyl. These flowers are able to decrease 95% in 24 hours the uranium concentration in the american site of Ashtabula in Ohio getting this water from 350 parts by milliards to less than 5 parts by milliards. The radioactivity should stocked in the roots at concentrations 5 000 to 10 000 times higher than water concentration. The cost is cheaper than micro filtration and precipitation (2-6 dollars for 4 000 liters of water against 80 dollars for others technologies). when sunflowers are radioactive they can be reduced in dust and vitrified and stocked as solid radioactive wastes. (N.C.)

  4. OPO fabric decontamination

    Severa, J.; Bar, J.; Grujbar, V.

    1978-01-01

    Samples of five polypropylene-based man-made fabrics were studied with regard to the degree of contamination and possibilities of decontamination in order to assess their suitability as material for protective clothing in the nuclear industry. The contamination degree of the fabrics in an aqueous solution of a fission product mixture was found to be low. Soaking in a mixture of the Sapon detergent and sodium hexametaphosphate at a concentration of both materials of 1 g/l with subsequent washing in a solution of the Zenit detergent at a concentration of 3 g/l was suggested as the most suitable decontamination procedure. It reduces the initial contamination by almost 99%. (Z.M.)

  5. Sensitive Equipment Decontamination

    2017-10-01

    a ceramic-like material Polonium - 210 Metallic foil Radium-226 Radium bromide or radium chloride Strontium-90 Metallic strontium, strontium...extremely toxic toxins. 3.1.1.5 Routes of Infection Pathogenic microorganisms are transferred to human beings largely via air and food (including...regularly in the pharmaceutical industry to decontaminate manufacturing clean rooms. It is also used to sterilize packages used to store foods . It has

  6. Decommissioning and decontamination

    Dadoumont, J.; Cantrel, E.; Valenduc, P.; Noynaert, L.

    2009-01-01

    The SCK-CEN has built a large know-how in decommissioning and decontamination, thanks to its BR3 decommissioning project. In 2007, the decommissioning activities at BR3 have been continued according to the strategy. This article discusses main realisations the following domains: decommissioning of the neutron shield tank and installation of new ventilation for the controlled area, dismantling of the former one and characterization of the stack

  7. Decontamination analysis of a radiologically contaminated site

    Tawil, J.J.; Strenge, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a post-exercise analysis of decontamination options for the NUWAX-83 exercise site. Held in May 1983, the purpose of NUWAX-83 was to evaluate the ability of federal, state and local officials to respond to an accident involving nuclear weapons. A computer program, called DECON, was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and used to conduct the decontamination analysis in November 1983. DECON was designed to assist personnel engaged in the planning of decontamination activities. The many features of DECON that are demonstrated in this paper contribute to its potential usefulness as a planning tool for site restoration. Strategies that are analyzed with DECON include: 1) using a Quick-Vac option, under which exterior surfaces are vacuumed before it rains; 2) protecting surfaces against precipitation; 3) prohibiting specific operations on selected surfaces; 4) requiring that specific methods be used on selected surfaces; 5) evaluating the trade-off between cleanup standards and decontamination costs; and 6) varying clean-up standards according to expected human exposure to the surface

  8. Decontamination analysis of a radiologically contaminated site

    Tawil, J.J.; Strenge, D.L.

    1984-02-01

    This paper presents an analysis of decontamination options at the NUWAZX-83 exercise site. Held in May 1983, the purpose of the exercise was to evaluate the ability of federal, state and local officials to respond to a radiological accident involving nuclear weapons. A computer program developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory was used to conduct the decontamination analysis. The program, called DECON, was designed to assist personnel engaged in the planning of decontamination activities. The many features of DECON that are demonstrated in this paper contribute to its potential usefulness as a planning tool for site restoration. Strategies that are analyzed with DECON include: (1) using a Quick-Vac option, under which exterior surfaces are vacuumed before it rains; (2) protecting surfaces against precipitation; (3) prohibiting specific operations on selected surfaces; (4) requiring that specific methods be used on selected surfaces; (5) evaluating the trade-off between cleanup standards and decontamination costs; and (6) varying clean-up standards according to expected human exposure to the surface

  9. Decontamination for radiators by friction effect

    Nojima, Takeshi; Yoshida, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Radiators are equipped with cars, vending machines and outdoor units of air conditioners. Aluminum metal surfaces in their heat exchange part have been contaminated by radioactive material taking in dust after the nuclear accident. The dust adhering to the metal surface could be removed by flushing with water immediately after scattering radioactive material. But radioactive material such as cesium cannot be removed by water washing, because of growth of the oxide film and transfer of the nuclides in the metal surface due to aging. On the other hand, we have verified the effect of decontamination of radiators by friction cleaning using a cross flow shredder (CFS) and solvent washing of crushed metallic chips, as a different approach to high-pressure washing decontamination, and confirmed a certain decontamination effect. This paper describes the results of program, “Processing Technology of Radioactive Material Removal by Cross Flow Shredder,” in August to December 2015, on support of FY 2015 Demonstration Test Project for Decontamination and Volume Reduction of Ministry of the Environment. (author)

  10. Investigation on safety of gel decontamination technology

    Liu Zhihui; Song Fengli; Wang Yongxian; Zhang Taoge

    2014-01-01

    Gel decontamination technology is an advanced decontamination process of metal contaminated by radionuclide. It has the advantages such as simple operation process, high decontaminating factor, etc. But the disadvantages are that it has high spraying pressure and is strongly corrosive, which has safety risk to the operator and equipment. The effect of such factors as spraying pressure on operators was analyzed based on process feature, and it is proposed that it be worthwhile to make further study on the corrosion of gels to spraying equipment, taking into account corrosion feature of gels to stainless steel. Meanwhile, the safety issue was demonstrated on collecting and handling wastes from gel decontamination process. And then, protective measures, study methods, and solutions are put forward. The results show that protection should be strengthened during spraying to reduce the effect of splashing and fogging on workers; the equipment should be cleaned in time to reduce the effect of corrosion, and reducers should be added into waste liquid to eliminate the effect of residual detergent. (authors)

  11. Local strategies for decontamination

    Hubert, P [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); Ramzaev, V [Branch of Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Novozybkov, Bryansk region (Russian Federation); Antsypov, G [Chernnobyl State Committee of the Republic of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus); Sobotovich, E [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Ore formation, Kiev (Ukraine); Anisimova, L [EMERCOM, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-07-01

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, t and return from experience allowed to assess radiological efficiencies (e.g. 'decontamination factor') and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then, those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimization of decontamination strategies. Results will be presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies, and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement, and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined here.

  12. Local strategies for decontamination

    Hubert, P.; Ramzaev, V.; Antsypov, G.; Sobotovich, E.; Anisimova, L.

    1996-01-01

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, t and return from experience allowed to assess radiological efficiencies (e.g. 'decontamination factor') and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then, those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimization of decontamination strategies. Results will be presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies, and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement, and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined here

  13. Laser decontamination device

    Michishita, Shizuo; Akagawa, Katsuhiko.

    1997-01-01

    One end of an optical fiber inserted into an inner cylinder is opposed to a wall surface to be decontaminated, and an opened top end of an intermediate cylinder circumferentially surrounding the inner cylinder is tightly in contact with the wall surface to be decontaminated, an open end of an outer cylinder circumferentially surrounding the intermediate cylinder is tightly in contact with the wall surface to be decontaminated. Dust removing holes are perforated in the vicinity of the top end of the intermediate cylinder while being in communication with the inside and the outside of the intermediate cylinder, and one end of an air supply tube is in communication with the space between the outer circumferential surface of the inner cylinder and the inner circumferential surface of the intermediate cylinder. The other end of the air supply tube is connected to an air supply device, one end of a sucking tube is in communication with the space between the outer circumferential surface of the intermediate cylinder and the inner circumferential surface of the outer cylinder, the other end of the sucking tube is connected to a sucking device, and the other end of the optical fiber is connected to a laser generation device. The laser generation device is operated while determining the air sucking amount increased than the air supply amount, the materials deposited on the wall surface are crushed and peeled off, and the peeled off materials are transferred by air flow to a filter and collected. (N.H.)

  14. Decontamination impacts on solidification

    Piciulo, P.L.; Davis, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The increased occupational exposure resulting from the accumulation of activated corrosion products in the primary system of LWRs has led to the development of chemical methods to remove the contamination. In the past, the problem of enhanced migration of radionuclides away from trenches used to dispose of low-level radioactive waste, has been linked to the presence, at the disposal unit, of chelating or complexing agents such as those used in decontamination processes. These agents have further been found to reduce the normal sorptive capacity of soils for radionuclides. The degree to which these agents inhibit the normal sorptive processes is dependent on the type of complexing agent, the radionuclide of concern, the soil properties and whether the nuclide is present as a complex or is already sorbed to the soil. Since the quantity of reagent employed in a full system decontamination is large (200 to 25,000 kg), the potential for enhanced migration of radionuclides from a site used to dispose of the decontamination wastes should be addressed and guidelines established for the safe disposal of these wastes

  15. Overview of nonchemical decontamination techniques

    Allen, R.P.

    1984-09-01

    The decontamination techniques summarized in this paper represent a variety of surface cleaning methods developed or adapted for component and facility-type decontamination applications ranging from small hand tools to reactor cavities and other large surface areas. The major conclusion is that decontamination is a complex, demanding technical discipline. It requires knowledgeable, experienced and well-trained personnel to select proper techniques and combinations of techniques for the varied plant applications and to realize their full performance potential. Unfortunately, decontamination in many plants has the lowest priority of almost any activity. Operators are unskilled and turnover is so frequent that expensive decontamination capabilities remain unused while decontamination operations revert to the most rudimentary type of hand scrubbing and water spray cleaning

  16. Decontamination of outdoor school swimming pools in Fukushima

    Saegusa, Jun

    2013-01-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident following the Great East Japan Earthquake, many school swimming pools in Fukushima have suspended water discharge, due to concerns that pool water which contains radioactive fallout is discharged into a river or waterway for agricultural use. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency conducted researches and examinations on the existing absorbent method and the flocculation method as ways for decontaminating pool water. By reviewing and improving these methods through decontamination demonstrations at eight pools in Fukushima, a practical decontamination method for outdoor pools has been established. This report summarizes the methods and results of the decontamination demonstrations carried out at the schools. Also, the surface density of fallout estimated at one of the pools is also presented and discussed in connection with the overall collection ratio of radiocesium at the pool. (author)

  17. Liquid-gas phase transition and isospin fractionation in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    Xing Yongzhong; Liu Jianye; Guo Wenjun

    2004-01-01

    The liquid-gas phase transition in the heavy ion collisions and nuclear matter has been an important topic and got achievements, such as, based on the studies by H.Q. Song et al the critical temperature of liquid-gas phase transition enhances with increasing the mass of system and reduces as the increase of the neutron proton ratio of system. As authors know that both the liquid-gas phase transition and the isospin fractionation occur in the spinodal instability region at the nuclear density below the normal nuclear density. In particular, these two dynamical processes lead to the separation of nuclear matter into the liquid phase and gas phase. In this case to compare their dynamical behaviors is interested. The authors investigate the dependence of isospin fractionation degree on the mass and neutron proton ratio of system by using the isospin dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. The authors found that the degree of isospin fractionation (N/Z) n /(N/Z) imf decreases with increasing the mass of the system. This is just similar to the enhance of the critical temperature of liquid-gas phase transition T c as the increase of system mass. Because the enhance of T c is not favorable for the liquid-gas transition taking place, which reduces the isospin fractionation process and leads to decrease of (N/Z) n /(N/Z) imf . However the degree of isospin fractionation enhances with increasing the neutron proton ratio of the system. It is just corresponding to the reduce of T c of the liquid-gas phase transition as the increase of the isospin fractionation of the system. Because the reduce of T c enhances the liquid-gas phase transition process and also prompts the isospin fractionation process leading the increase of the isospin fractionation degree. To sum up, there are very similar dynamical behaviors for the degree of isospin fractionation and the critical temperature of the liquid-gas phase transition. So dynamical properties of the liquid-gas phase transition can

  18. Study on LOMI decontamination technology

    Huang Fuduan; Yu Degui; Lu Jingju; Xie Yinyan

    1993-10-01

    The results of decontamination technique of Low-Oxidation-State Metal-Ion (LOMI) reagents developed from 1986 to 1991 in the laboratory are introduced. The experiments included preparation of LOMI reagents, de-filming efficiency, corrosion behavior of typical alloys, decontamination factors of reagents for contaminated materials and components have proved that the NP/LOMI decontamination method and treatment technique of waste water are feasible and have some advantages. The preparation of LOMI reagent with low concentration of formic acid by reduced pressure distilling technique and the utilization ratio of vanadium reached to 95% by second electrolysis are the main contributions of the study to the decontamination technique

  19. Decontamination of radioisotope production facility

    Daryoko, M.; Yatim, S.; Suseno, H.; Wiratmo, M.

    1998-01-01

    The strippable coating method use phosphoric glycerol and irradiated latex as supporting agents have been investigated. The investigation used some decontaminating agents: EDTA, citric acid, oxalic acid and potassium permanganate were combined with phosphoric glycerol supporting agent, then EDTA Na 2 , sodium citric, sodium oxalic and potassium permanganate were combined with irradiated latex supporting agent. The study was needed to obtain the representative operating data, will be implemented to decontamination the Hot Cell for radioisotope production. The experiment used 50x50x1 mm stainless steel samples and contaminated by Cs-137 about 1.1x10 -3 μCi/cm 2 . This samples according to inner cover of Hot Cell material, and Hot Cell activities. The decontamination factor results of the investigation were: phosphoric glycerol as supporting agent, about 20 (EDTA as decontaminating agent) to 47 (oxalic acid as decontaminating agent), and irradiated latex as supporting agent, about 11.5 (without decontamination agent) to 27 (KMnO 4 as decontaminating agent). All composition of the investigation have been obtained the good results, and can be implemented for decontamination of Hot Cell for radioisotope production. The irradiated latex could be recommended as supporting agent without decontaminating agent, because it is very easy to operate and very cheap cost. (author)

  20. Manual on decontamination of surfaces

    1979-01-01

    The manual is intended for those who are responsible for the organization and implementation of decontamination programmes for facilities where radioactive materials are handled mainly on a laboratory scale. It contains information and guidelines on practical methods for decontaminating working spaces, equipment, laboratory benches and protective clothing. Useful information is also provided on the removal of loose skin contamination from personnel by mild, non-medical processes. Methods of removing skin contamination needing medical supervision, or of internal decontamination, which is entirely a medical process, are not covered in this manual. Large-scale decontamination of big nuclear facilities is also considered as outside its scope

  1. Decontamination of TRU glove boxes

    Crawford, J.H.

    1978-03-01

    Two glove boxes that had been used for work with transuranic nuclides (TRU) for about 12 years were decontaminated in a test program to collect data for developing a decontamination facility for large equipment highly contaminated with alpha emitters. A simple chemical technique consisting of a cycle of water flushes and alkaline permanganate and oxalic acid washes was used for both boxes. The test showed that glove boxes and similar equipment that are grossly contaminated with transuranic nuclides can be decontaminated to the current DIE nonretrievable disposal guide of <10 nCi TRU/g with a moderate amount of decontamination solution and manpower. Decontamination of the first box from an estimated 1.3 Ci to about 5 mCi (6 nCi/g) required 1.3 gallons of decontamination solution and 0.03 man-hour of work for each square foot of surface area. The second box was decontaminated from an estimated 3.4 Ci to about 2.8 mCi (4.2 nCi/g) using 0.9 gallon of decontamination solution and 0.02 man-hour for each square foot of surface area. Further reductions in contamination were achieved by repetitive decontamination cycles, but the effectiveness of the technique decreased sharply after the initial cycle

  2. Radiation level assessment of the Dresden-1 decontamination pilot loop

    1978-05-01

    The radionuclide concentrations of the Dresden-1 decontamination pilot loop were determined by gamma spectroscopy. The General Electric Ge(Li)pipe gamma scanning system was utilized to take measurements at eight locations both before and after the pilot demonstration of decontamination process. Dose rate measrurements were taken with a portable gamma monitor at 30 additional locations. The percentage of Co-60 removed was calculated and the results were interpreted

  3. Cavity-enhanced Raman spectroscopy with optical feedback cw diode lasers for gas phase analysis and spectroscopy.

    Salter, Robert; Chu, Johnny; Hippler, Michael

    2012-10-21

    A variant of cavity-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (CERS) is introduced, in which diode laser radiation at 635 nm is coupled into an external linear optical cavity composed of two highly reflective mirrors. Using optical feedback stabilisation, build-up of circulating laser power by 3 orders of magnitude occurs. Strong Raman signals are collected in forward scattering geometry. Gas phase CERS spectra of H(2), air, CH(4) and benzene are recorded to demonstrate the potential for analytical applications and fundamental molecular studies. Noise equivalent limits of detection in the ppm by volume range (1 bar sample) can be achieved with excellent linearity with a 10 mW excitation laser, with sensitivity increasing with laser power and integration time. The apparatus can be operated with battery powered components and can thus be very compact and portable. Possible applications include safety monitoring of hydrogen gas levels, isotope tracer studies (e.g., (14)N/(15)N ratios), observing isotopomers of hydrogen (e.g., radioactive tritium), and simultaneous multi-component gas analysis. CERS has the potential to become a standard method for sensitive gas phase Raman spectroscopy.

  4. Thin-film transistors with a channel composed of semiconducting metal oxide nanoparticles deposited from the gas phase

    Busch, C.; Schierning, G.; Theissmann, R.; Nedic, A.; Kruis, F. E.; Schmechel, R.

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication of semiconducting functional layers using low-temperature processes is of high interest for flexible printable electronics applications. Here, the one-step deposition of semiconducting nanoparticles from the gas phase for an active layer within a thin-film transistor is described. Layers of semiconducting nanoparticles with a particle size between 10 and 25 nm were prepared by the use of a simple aerosol deposition system, excluding potentially unwanted technological procedures like substrate heating or the use of solvents. The nanoparticles were deposited directly onto standard thin-film transistor test devices, using thermally grown silicon oxide as gate dielectric. Proof-of-principle experiments were done deploying two different wide-band gap semiconducting oxides, tin oxide, SnO x , and indium oxide, In 2 O 3 . The tin oxide spots prepared from the gas phase were too conducting to be used as channel material in thin-film transistors, most probably due to a high concentration of oxygen defects. Using indium oxide nanoparticles, thin-film transistor devices with significant field effect were obtained. Even though the electron mobility of the investigated devices was only in the range of 10 −6 cm 2V−1s−1 , the operability of this method for the fabrication of transistors was demonstrated. With respect to the possibilities to control the particle size and layer morphology in situ during deposition, improvements are expected.

  5. Full system decontamination. AREVAs experience in decontamination prior to decommissioning

    Topf, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Minimizing collective radiation exposure and producing free-release material are two of the highest priorities in the decommissioning of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Full System Decontamination (FSD) is the most effective measure to reduce source term and remove oxide layer contamination within the plant systems. FSD is typically a decontamination of the primary coolant circuit and the auxiliary systems. In recent years AREVA NP has performed several FSDs in PWRs and BWRs prior to decommissioning by applying the proprietary CORD copyright family and AMDA copyright technology. Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination or CORD represents the chemical decontamination process while AMDA stands for Automated Mobile Decontamination Appliance, AREVA NPs decontamination equipment. Described herein are the excellent results achieved for the FSDs applied at the German PWRs Stade in 2004 and Obrigheim in 2007 and for the FSDs performed at the Swedish BWRs, Barsebaeck Unit 1 in 2007 and Barsebaeck Unit 2 in 2008. All four FSDs were performed using the AREVA NP CORD family decontamination technology in combination with the AREVA NP decontamination equipment, AMDA. (orig.)

  6. The gas phase structure of α -pinene, a main biogenic volatile organic compound

    Neeman, Elias M.; Avilés Moreno, Juan Ramón; Huet, Thérèse R.

    2017-12-01

    The gas phase structure of the bicyclic atmospheric aerosol precursor α-pinene was investigated employing a combination of quantum chemical calculation and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy coupled to a supersonic jet expansion. The very weak rotational spectra of the parent species and all singly substituted 13C in natural abundance have been identified, from 2 to 20 GHz, and fitted to Watson's Hamiltonian model. The rotational constants were used together with geometrical parameters from density functional theory and ab initio calculations to determine the rs, r0, and rm(1 ) structures of the skeleton, without any structural assumption in the fit concerning the heavy atoms. The double C=C bond was found to belong to a quasiplanar skeleton structure containing 6 carbon atoms. Comparison with solid phase structure is reported. The significant differences of α-pinene in gas phase and other gas phase bicyclic monoterpene structures (β-pinene, nopinone, myrtenal, and bicyclo[3.1.1]heptane) are discussed.

  7. Photoresponse of the protonated Schiff-base retinal chromophore in the gas phase

    Toker, Jonathan; Rahbek, Dennis Bo; Kiefer, H V

    2013-01-01

    The fragmentation, initiated by photoexcitation as well as collisionally-induced excitation, of several retinal chromophores was studied in the gas phase. The chromophore in the protonated Schiff-base form (RPSB), essential for mammalian vision, shows a remarkably selective photoresponse. The sel......The fragmentation, initiated by photoexcitation as well as collisionally-induced excitation, of several retinal chromophores was studied in the gas phase. The chromophore in the protonated Schiff-base form (RPSB), essential for mammalian vision, shows a remarkably selective photoresponse...... modifications of the chromophore. We propose that isomerizations play an important role in the photoresponse of gas-phase retinal chromophores and guide internal conversion through conical intersections. The role of protein interactions is then to control the specificity of the photoisomerization in the primary...

  8. Molecular structure determination of cyclooctane by Ab Initio and electron diffraction methods in the gas phase

    Almeida, Wagner B. de

    2000-01-01

    The determination of the molecular structure of molecules is of fundamental importance in chemistry. X-rays and electron diffraction methods constitute in important tools for the elucidation of the molecular structure of systems in the solid state and gas phase, respectively. The use of quantum mechanical molecular orbital ab initio methods offer an alternative for conformational analysis studies. Comparison between theoretical results and those obtained experimentally in the gas phase can make a significant contribution for an unambiguous determination of the geometrical parameters. In this article the determination for an unambiguous determination of the geometrical parameters. In this article the determination of the molecular structure of the cyclooctane molecule by electron diffraction in the gas phase an initio calculations will be addressed, providing an example of a comparative analysis of theoretical and experimental predictions. (author)

  9. Decontamination of Soil Contaminated with Bacillus anthracis ...

    Technical Brief This technical summary will provide decontamination personnel rapid access to information on which decontamination approaches are most effective for soils contaminated with B anthracis.

  10. A gas-phase reactor powered by solar energy and ethanol for H2 production

    Ampelli, Claudio; Genovese, Chiara; Passalacqua, Rosalba; Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    In the view of H 2 as the future energy vector, we presented here the development of a homemade photo-reactor working in gas phase and easily interfacing with fuel cell devices, for H 2 production by ethanol dehydrogenation. The process generates acetaldehyde as the main co-product, which is more economically advantageous with respect to the low valuable CO 2 produced in the alternative pathway of ethanol photoreforming. The materials adopted as photocatalysts are based on TiO 2 substrates but properly modified with noble (Au) and not-noble (Cu) metals to enhance light harvesting in the visible region. The samples were characterized by BET surface area analysis, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and UV–visible Diffusive Reflectance Spectroscopy, and finally tested in our homemade photo-reactor by simulated solar irradiation. We discussed about the benefits of operating in gas phase with respect to a conventional slurry photo-reactor (minimization of scattering phenomena, no metal leaching, easy product recovery, etc.). Results showed that high H 2 productivity can be obtained in gas phase conditions, also irradiating titania photocatalysts doped with not-noble metals. - Highlights: • A gas-phase photoreactor for H 2 production by ethanol dehydrogenation was developed. • The photocatalytic behaviours of Au and Cu metal-doped TiO 2 thin layers are compared. • Benefits of operating in gas phase with respect to a slurry reactor are presented. • Gas phase conditions and use of not-noble metals are the best economic solution

  11. Research in Korea on Gas Phase Synthesis and Control of Nanoparticles

    Choi, Mansoo

    2001-01-01

    Research activity into the gas phase synthesis of nanoparticles has witnessed rapid growth on a worldwide basis, which is also reflected by Korean research efforts. Nanoparticle research is inherently a multi-disciplinary activity involving both science and engineering. In this paper, the recent studies undertaken in Korea on the gas phase synthesis and control of nanoparticles are reviewed. Studies on the synthesis of various kinds of nanoparticles are first discussed with a focus on the different types of reactors used. Recent experimental and theoretical studies and newly developed methods of measuring and modeling nanoparticle growth are also reviewed

  12. FORTRAN program for calculating liquid-phase and gas-phase thermal diffusion column coefficients

    Rutherford, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program (COLCO) was developed for calculating thermal diffusion column coefficients from theory. The program, which is written in FORTRAN IV, can be used for both liquid-phase and gas-phase thermal diffusion columns. Column coefficients for the gas phase can be based on gas properties calculated from kinetic theory using tables of omega integrals or on tables of compiled physical properties as functions of temperature. Column coefficients for the liquid phase can be based on compiled physical property tables. Program listings, test data, sample output, and users manual are supplied for appendices

  13. Direct gas-phase epoxidation of propylene to propylene oxide through radical reactions: A theoretical study

    Kizilkaya, Ali Can; Fellah, Mehmet Ferdi; Onal, Isik

    2010-03-01

    The gas-phase radical chain reactions which utilize O 2 as the oxidant to produce propylene oxide (PO) are investigated through theoretical calculations. The transition states and energy profiles were obtained for each path. The rate constants were also calculated. The energetics for the competing pathways indicate that PO can be formed selectively due to its relatively low activation barrier (9.3 kcal/mol) which is in a good agreement with the experimental value (11 kcal/mol) of gas-phase propylene epoxidation. The formation of the acrolein and combustion products have relatively high activation barriers and are not favored. These results also support the recent experimental findings.

  14. Acrolein Production by Gas-Phase Glycerol Dehydration Using PO₄/Nb₂O5 Catalysts.

    Lee, Kyu Am; Ryoo, HeeKyoung; Ma, Byung Chol; Kim, Youngchul

    2018-02-01

    In this study, modified niobium oxide were prepared to study the addictive effects on the catalytic performance for gas-phase glycerol dehydration. The catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, XRD, NH3-TPD, FT-IR. The amount of phosphoric acid was up to 50 wt% in niobium. As a result, the highest glycerol conversion was achieved over 20 wt% PO4/Nb2O5. It indicates that the optimal amount of phosphoric acid leads the catalyst to have appropriate acidity which is an important factor for gas-phase glycerol dehydration.

  15. Laser spectroscopy of a halocarbocation in the gas phase: CH2I+.

    Tao, Chong; Mukarakate, Calvin; Reid, Scott A

    2006-07-26

    We report the first gas-phase observation of the electronic spectrum of a simple halocarbocation, CH2I+. The ion was generated rotationally cold (Trot approximately 20 K) using pulsed discharge methods and was detected via laser spectroscopy. The identity of the spectral carrier was confirmed by modeling the rotational contour observed in the excitation spectra and by comparison of ground state vibrational frequencies determined by single vibronic level emission spectroscopy with Density Functional Theory (DFT) predictions. The transition was assigned as 3A1 gas phase should open new avenues for study of the structure and reactivity of these important ions.

  16. Gas phase THz spectroscopy of toxic agent simulant compounds using the AILES synchrotron beamline

    Cuisset, A.; Smirnova, I.; Bocquet, R.; Hindle, F.; Mouret, G.; Yang, C.; Pirali, O.; Roy, P.

    2010-02-01

    A new study is currently underway aiming at recording and assigning the gas phase rovibrational spectra of several organophosphorus and organosulphur compounds in the THz frequency domain. Thanks to the exceptional properties of flux, brilliance and spectral range of the AILES beamline coupled to the FTIR spectrometer, the gas phase vibrational spectra of low volatility organophosphorous compounds have been recorded across the entire THz frequency range. High resolution FTIR spectroscopy was used to record the pure rotational and the low-frequency rovibrational spectrum of DMSO. A comparison between the spectra measured with the AILES beamline and the spectra obtained with optoelectronic THz sources is possible.

  17. Studies of gas phase ion/molecule reactions by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    Kleingeld, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    An important field in which Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance has useful applications is that of gas phase ion chemistry, the subject of this thesis. First, the general picture of ion-molecule reactions in the gas phase is discussed. Next, some positive ion-molecule reactions are described, whereas the remaining chapters deal with negative ion-molecule reactions. Most of these studies have been performed using the FT-ICR method. Reactions involving H 3 O - and NH 4 - ions are described whereas the other chapters deal with larger organic complexes. (Auth.)

  18. Fischer Indole Synthesis in the Gas Phase, the Solution Phase, and at the Electrospray Droplet Interface.

    Bain, Ryan M; Ayrton, Stephen T; Cooks, R Graham

    2017-07-01

    Previous reports have shown that reactions occurring in the microdroplets formed during electrospray ionization can, under the right conditions, exhibit significantly greater rates than the corresponding bulk solution-phase reactions. The observed acceleration under electrospray ionization could result from a solution-phase, a gas-phase, or an interfacial reaction. This study shows that a gas-phase ion/molecule (or ion/ion) reaction is not responsible for the observed rate enhancement in the particular case of the Fischer indole synthesis. The results show that the accelerated reaction proceeds in the microdroplets, and evidence is provided that an interfacial process is involved. Graphical Abstract GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT TEXT HERE] -->.

  19. Optical processes in the performance and recovery of gas-phase switches

    Gundersen, M.

    1982-01-01

    In this paper several optical processes that may be used to affect gas-phase switch performance and operation are discussed, and approaches using a laser to increase recovery rates of switches are presented. In the latter the laser is used during the recovery phase rather than the conductive or closure phase. This papper suggests that it should be possible to use a low-power laser (e.g., one that is technologically feasible to use as part of a switch) to assist in opening the switch by quenching excited atomic and/or molecular species. The application of laser-induced energy extraction to gas-phase switches is also discussed

  20. The electron spectrum of UF6 recorded in the gas phase

    Mârtensson, N.; Malmquist, P.-Å.; Svensson, S.; Johansson, B.

    1984-06-01

    Gas phase core and valence electron spectra from UF6, excited by AlKα monochromatized x rays, in the binding energy range 0-1000 eV are presented. It is shown that the AlKα excited valence electron spectrum can be used to reassign the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) in UF6. Many-body effects on the core levels are discussed and core level lifetimes are determined. The shift between solid phase and gas phase electron binding energies for core lines is used to discuss the U5 f population in UF6.

  1. Unit for air decontamination

    Mariano H, E.

    1991-02-01

    To fulfill the applicable requirements of safety to the ventilation systems in nuclear facilities, it is necessary to make a cleaning of the air that hurtles to the atmosphere. For that which was designed and it manufactured an unit for decontamination of the air for the Pilot plant of production of Nuclear Fuel that this built one with national parts, uses Hepa national filters and the design can adapt for different dimensions of filters, also can be added a lodging for a prefilter or to adopt two Hepa filters. (Author)

  2. Decontamination solution development studies

    Allen, R.P.; Fetrow, L.K.; Kjarmo, H.E.; Pool, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This study was conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Hanford Grout Technology Program (HGTP). The objective of this study was to identify decontamination solutions capable of removing radioactive contaminants and grout from the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) process equipment and to determine the impact of these solutions on equipment components and disposal options. The reference grout used in this study was prepared with simulated double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) and a dry blend consisting of 40 wt % limestone flour, 28 wt % blast furnace slag, 28 wt % fly ash, and 4 wt % type I/II Portland cement

  3. Advance in radioactive decontamination; Avances en descontaminacion radiactiva

    Basteris M, J. A. [Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan, Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Diagnostico por Laboratorio y Gabinete, Av. Cupules No. 232, Col. Garcia Gineres, 97070 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Farrera V, R., E-mail: basteris@prodigy.net.m [Hospital de Especialidades de la UMAE, Centro Medico Nacional Ignacio Garcia Tellez, Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Calle 34 x 41, Exterrenos el Fenix s/n, Col. Industrial, 91750 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    The objective of the present work was to determine if the application of the Na hypochlorite has some utility in the radioactive decontamination, in comparison with the water, detergent and alcohol. Several methods were compared for decontaminate the iodine 131 and technetium 99, the work table and the skin it was carried out an initial count with the Geiger Muller. Later on, in a single occasion, the areas were washed with abundant water, alcohol, clothes detergent and sodium hypochlorite (used commercially as domestic bleacher) without diluting. Observing that the percentage in the decrease of the counted radioactivity by the Geiger Muller, decreased in the following way: It was demonstrated that the Na hypochlorite presents the highest index of radioactive decontamination with 100% of effectiveness. The Na hypochlorite is an excellent substance that can be used with effectiveness and efficiency like decontamination element in the accident cases of radioactive contamination in the clinical laboratories of nuclear medicine. (Author)

  4. Modeling pulsed excitation for gas-phase laser diagnostics

    Settersten, Thomas B.; Linne, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    Excitation dynamics for pulsed optical excitation are described with the density-matrix equations and the rate equations for a two-level system. A critical comparison of the two descriptions is made with complete and consistent formalisms that are amenable to the modeling of applied laser-diagnostic techniques. General solutions, resulting from numerical integration of the differential equations describing the excitation process, are compared for collisional conditions that range from the completely coherent limit to the steady-state limit, for which the two formalisms are identical. This analysis demonstrates the failure of the rate equations to correctly describe the transient details of the excitation process outside the steady-state limit. However, reasonable estimates of the resultant population are obtained for nonsaturating (linear) excitation. This comparison provides the laser diagnostician with the means to evaluate the appropriate model for excitation through a simple picture of the breakdown of the rate-equation validity

  5. Dilute chemical decontamination program review

    Anstine, L.D.; Blomgren, J.C.; Pettit, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Dilute Chemical Decontamination Program is to develop and evaluate a process which utilizes reagents in dilute concentrations for the decontamination of BWR primary systems and for the maintenance of dose rates on the out-of-core surfaces at acceptable levels. A discussion is presented of the process concept, solvent development, advantages and disadvantages of reagent systems, and VNC loop tests. Based on the work completed to date it is concluded that (1) rapid decontamination of BWRs using dilute reagents is feasible; (2) reasonable reagent conditions for rapid chemical decontamination are: 0.01M oxalic acid + 0.005M citric acid, pH3.0, 90/degree/C, 0.5 to 1.0 ppm dissolved oxygen; (3) control of dissolved oxygen concentration is important, since high levels suppress the rate of decontamination and low levels allow precipitation of ferrous oxalate. 4 refs

  6. Estimating fuel octane numbers from homogeneous gas-phase ignition delay times

    Naser, Nimal

    2017-11-05

    Fuel octane numbers are directly related to the autoignition properties of fuel/air mixtures in spark ignition (SI) engines. This work presents a methodology to estimate the research and the motor octane numbers (RON and MON) from homogeneous gas-phase ignition delay time (IDT) data calculated at various pressures and temperatures. The hypothesis under investigation is that at specific conditions of pressure and temperature (i.e., RON-like and MON-like conditions), fuels with IDT identical to that of a primary reference fuel (PRF) have the same octane rating. To test this hypothesis, IDTs with a detailed gasoline surrogate chemical kinetic model have been calculated at various temperatures and pressures. From this dataset, temperatures that best represent RON and MON have been correlated at a specified pressure. Correlations for pressures in the range of 10–50 bar were obtained. The proposed correlations were validated with toluene reference fuels (TRF), toluene primary reference fuels (TPRF), ethanol reference fuels (ERF), PRFs and TPRFs with ethanol, and multi-component gasoline surrogate mixtures. The predicted RON and MON showed satisfactory accuracy against measurements obtained by the standard ASTM methods and blending rules, demonstrating that the present methodology can be a viable tool for a first approximation. The correlations were also validated against an extensive set of experimental IDT data obtained from literature with a high degree of accuracy in RON/MON prediction. Conditions in homogeneous reactors such as shock tubes and rapid compression machines that are relevant to modern SI engines were also identified. Uncertainty analysis of the proposed correlations with linear error propagation theory is also presented.

  7. Quantum chaos in ultracold collisions of gas-phase erbium atoms.

    Frisch, Albert; Mark, Michael; Aikawa, Kiyotaka; Ferlaino, Francesca; Bohn, John L; Makrides, Constantinos; Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-03-27

    Atomic and molecular samples reduced to temperatures below one microkelvin, yet still in the gas phase, afford unprecedented energy resolution in probing and manipulating the interactions between their constituent particles. As a result of this resolution, atoms can be made to scatter resonantly on demand, through the precise control of a magnetic field. For simple atoms, such as alkalis, scattering resonances are extremely well characterized. However, ultracold physics is now poised to enter a new regime, where much more complex species can be cooled and studied, including magnetic lanthanide atoms and even molecules. For molecules, it has been speculated that a dense set of resonances in ultracold collision cross-sections will probably exhibit essentially random fluctuations, much as the observed energy spectra of nuclear scattering do. According to the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture, such fluctuations would imply chaotic dynamics of the underlying classical motion driving the collision. This would necessitate new ways of looking at the fundamental interactions in ultracold atomic and molecular systems, as well as perhaps new chaos-driven states of ultracold matter. Here we describe the experimental demonstration that random spectra are indeed found at ultralow temperatures. In the experiment, an ultracold gas of erbium atoms is shown to exhibit many Fano-Feshbach resonances, of the order of three per gauss for bosons. Analysis of their statistics verifies that their distribution of nearest-neighbour spacings is what one would expect from random matrix theory. The density and statistics of these resonances are explained by fully quantum mechanical scattering calculations that locate their origin in the anisotropy of the atoms' potential energy surface. Our results therefore reveal chaotic behaviour in the native interaction between ultracold atoms.

  8. Next Generation Offline Approaches to Trace Gas-Phase Organic Compound Speciation: Sample Collection and Analysis

    Sheu, R.; Marcotte, A.; Khare, P.; Ditto, J.; Charan, S.; Gentner, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    Intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs) are major precursors to secondary organic aerosol, and contribute to tropospheric ozone formation. Their wide volatility range, chemical complexity, behavior in analytical systems, and trace concentrations present numerous hurdles to characterization. We present an integrated sampling-to-analysis system for the collection and offline analysis of trace gas-phase organic compounds with the goal of preserving and recovering analytes throughout sample collection, transport, storage, and thermal desorption for accurate analysis. Custom multi-bed adsorbent tubes are used to collect samples for offline analysis by advanced analytical detectors. The analytical instrumentation comprises an automated thermal desorption system that introduces analytes from the adsorbent tubes into a gas chromatograph, which is coupled with an electron ionization mass spectrometer (GC-EIMS) and other detectors. In order to optimize the collection and recovery for a wide range of analyte volatility and functionalization, we evaluated a variety of commercially-available materials, including Res-Sil beads, quartz wool, glass beads, Tenax TA, and silica gel. Key properties for optimization include inertness, versatile chemical capture, minimal affinity for water, and minimal artifacts or degradation byproducts; these properties were assessed with a diverse mix of traditionally-measured and functionalized analytes. Along with a focus on material selection, we provide recommendations spanning the entire sampling-and-analysis process to improve the accuracy of future comprehensive I/SVOC measurements, including oxygenated and other functionalized I/SVOCs. We demonstrate the performance of our system by providing results on speciated VOCs-SVOCs from indoor, outdoor, and chamber studies that establish the utility of our protocols and pave the way for precise laboratory characterization via a mix of detection methods.

  9. Estimating fuel octane numbers from homogeneous gas-phase ignition delay times

    Naser, Nimal; Sarathy, Mani; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Fuel octane numbers are directly related to the autoignition properties of fuel/air mixtures in spark ignition (SI) engines. This work presents a methodology to estimate the research and the motor octane numbers (RON and MON) from homogeneous gas-phase ignition delay time (IDT) data calculated at various pressures and temperatures. The hypothesis under investigation is that at specific conditions of pressure and temperature (i.e., RON-like and MON-like conditions), fuels with IDT identical to that of a primary reference fuel (PRF) have the same octane rating. To test this hypothesis, IDTs with a detailed gasoline surrogate chemical kinetic model have been calculated at various temperatures and pressures. From this dataset, temperatures that best represent RON and MON have been correlated at a specified pressure. Correlations for pressures in the range of 10–50 bar were obtained. The proposed correlations were validated with toluene reference fuels (TRF), toluene primary reference fuels (TPRF), ethanol reference fuels (ERF), PRFs and TPRFs with ethanol, and multi-component gasoline surrogate mixtures. The predicted RON and MON showed satisfactory accuracy against measurements obtained by the standard ASTM methods and blending rules, demonstrating that the present methodology can be a viable tool for a first approximation. The correlations were also validated against an extensive set of experimental IDT data obtained from literature with a high degree of accuracy in RON/MON prediction. Conditions in homogeneous reactors such as shock tubes and rapid compression machines that are relevant to modern SI engines were also identified. Uncertainty analysis of the proposed correlations with linear error propagation theory is also presented.

  10. Gas Phase Structure of Amino Acids: La-Mb Studies

    Mata, I. Pena S.; Sanz, M. E.; Vaquero, V.; Cabezas, C.; Perez, C.; Blanco, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2009-06-01

    Recent improvements in our laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave (LA-MB-FTMW) spectrometer such as using Laval-type nozzles and picoseconds Nd:YAG lasers (30 to 150 ps) have allowed a major step forward in the capabilities of this experimental technique as demonstrated by the last results in serine cysteine and threonine^a for which seven, six and seven conformers have been respectively identified. Taking advantage of these improvements we have investigated the natural amino acids metionine, aspartic and glutamic acids and the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with the aim of identify and characterize their lower energy conformers. Searches in the rotational spectra have lead to the identification of seven conformers of metionine, six and five of aspartic and glutamic acids, respectively, and seven for the γ-aminobutyric. These conformers have been unambiguously identified by their spectroscopic constants. In particular the ^{14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, that depend heavily on the orientation of the amino group with respect to the principal inertial axes of the molecule, prove to be a unique tool to distinguish unambigously between conformations with similar rotational constants. For the γ-aminobutyric acid two of the seven observed structures are stablized by an intramolecular interaction n-π*. Two new conformers of proline have been identified together with the two previously observed. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys.Chem.Chem.Phys., 2009, 11, 617. D. B. Atkinson, M. A. Smith, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 1995, 66, 4434 S. Blanco, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA2007, 104, 20183. M. E. Sanz, S. Blanco, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.,2008, 120, 6312. A. Lesarri, S. Mata, E. J. Cocinero, S. Blanco, J.C. López, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. , 2002, 41, 4673

  11. Electrochemical decontamination of Pu contaminated stainless steel

    Turner, A.D.; Pottinger, J.S.; Junkison, A.R.

    1983-08-01

    Electrochemical decontamination has been demonstrated to be very effective in removing plutonium nitrate contamination (0.5 μg cm -2 ) on stainless steels. The amount of metal dissolved to achieve a DF of 10 2 to 10 3 was 2 to 7 μm depending on the electrolyte used. In unstirred electrolytes 1M HNO 3 , 1M HNO 3 /0.1M NaF, 5M HNO 3 perform best. Under stirred electrolyte conditions, there is a general marginal fall in effectiveness except for 5M HNO 3 where there is a slight improvement. The optimum performance is a compromise between maximizing the electrolyte throwing power and minimizing substrate surface roughening during decontamination. (author)

  12. Electrodialytic decontamination of spent ion exchange resins

    Nott, B.R.

    1982-01-01

    Development of a novel electrodialytic decontamination process for the selective removal of radioactive Cs from spent ion exchange resins containing large amounts of Li is described. The process involves passage of a dc electric current through a bed of the spent ion exchange resin in a specially designed electrodialytic cell. The radiocesium so removed from a volume of the spent resin is concentrated onto a much smaller volume of a Cs selective sorbent to achieve a significant radioactive waste volume reduction. Technical feasibility of the electrodialytic resin decontamination process has been demonstrated on a bench scale with a batch of simulated spent ion exchange resin and using potassium cobalt ferrocyanide as the Cs selective sorbent. A volume reduction factor between 10 and 17 has been estimated. The process appears to be economically attractive. Improvements in process economics can be expected from optimization of the process. Other possible applications of the EDRD process have been identified

  13. Tuning Catalytic Performance through a Single or Sequential Post-Synthesis Reaction(s) in a Gas Phase

    Shan, Junjun [Department; Department; Zhang, Shiran [Department; Department; Choksi, Tej [Department; Nguyen, Luan [Department; Department; Bonifacio, Cecile S. [Department; Li, Yuanyuan [Department; Zhu, Wei [Department; Department; College; Tang, Yu [Department; Department; Zhang, Yawen [College; Yang, Judith C. [Department; Greeley, Jeffrey [Department; Frenkel, Anatoly I. [Department; Tao, Franklin [Department; Department

    2016-12-05

    Catalytic performance of a bimetallic catalyst is determined by geometric structure and electronic state of the surface or even the near-surface region of the catalyst. Here we report that single and sequential postsynthesis reactions of an as-synthesized bimetallic nanoparticle catalyst in one or more gas phases can tailor surface chemistry and structure of the catalyst in a gas phase, by which catalytic performance of this bimetallic catalyst can be tuned. Pt–Cu regular nanocube (Pt–Cu RNC) and concave nanocube (Pt–Cu CNC) are chosen as models of bimetallic catalysts. Surface chemistry and catalyst structure under different reaction conditions and during catalysis were explored in gas phase of one or two reactants with ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The newly formed surface structures of Pt–Cu RNC and Pt–Cu CNC catalysts strongly depend on the reactive gas(es) used in the postsynthesis reaction(s). A reaction of Pt–Cu RNC-as synthesized with H2 at 200 °C generates a near-surface alloy consisting of a Pt skin layer, a Cu-rich subsurface, and a Pt-rich deep layer. This near-surface alloy of Pt–Cu RNC-as synthesized-H2 exhibits a much higher catalytic activity in CO oxidation in terms of a low activation barrier of 39 ± 4 kJ/mol in contrast to 128 ± 7 kJ/mol of Pt–Cu RNC-as synthesized. Here the significant decrease of activation barrier demonstrates a method to tune catalytic performances of as-synthesized bimetallic catalysts. A further reaction of Pt–Cu RNC-as synthesized-H2 with CO forms a Pt–Cu alloy surface, which exhibits quite different catalytic performance in CO oxidation. It suggests the capability of generating a different surface by using another gas. The capability of tuning surface chemistry and structure of bimetallic catalysts was also demonstrated in restructuring of Pt–Cu CNC-as synthesized.

  14. Do medium heavy fragments give evidence for a liquid-gas phase transition

    Trockel, R.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Lynen, U.; Mueller, W.F.J.; Rabe, H.J.; Sann, H.; Stelzer, H.; Wada, R.; Brummund, N.; Glasow, R.; Kampert, K.H.; Santo, R.; Pelte, D.; Pochodzalla, J.; Eckert, E.

    1985-09-01

    Light and medium heavy fragments have been measured in light ion induced reactions at intermediate energies. The energy spectra have been parametrized with moving source fits. The resulting temperatures and yields do not confirm the expectations of a liquid-gas phase transition. (orig.)

  15. Electron Attachment to the Gas Phase DNA Bases Cytosine and Thymine

    Denifl, S.; Ptasiňska, S.; Probst, M.; Hrušák, Jan; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 31 (2004), s. 6562-6569 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/02/0737 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : gas-phase * cytosine * thymine Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.639, year: 2004

  16. A gas phase work station for the Brazilian National Synchrotron Laboratory

    Souza, G.G.B. de

    1988-01-01

    A gas phase work station which has been proposed to the Brazilian National Synchrotron Laboratory is described with emphasis on the broad spectrum of physical and chemical processes which can be studied with the incorporated instrumentation. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  17. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  18. Structure Elucidation of Dimethylformamide-Solvated Alkylzinc Cations in the Gas Phase

    Dreiocker, F.; Oomens, J.; Meijer, Ajhm; Pickup, B. T.; Jackson, R. F. W.; Schafer, M.

    2010-01-01

    Organozinc iodides, useful for the synthesis of nonproteinogenic amino acids, are investigated in the gas phase by a combination of electrospray (ESI)-MS/MS, accurate ion mass measurements, and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy employing a free electron laser. ESI allowed the

  19. Gas-phase infrared spectrum of the anionic GFP-chromophore

    Almasian, M.; Grzetic, J.; G. Berden,; Bakker, B.; Buma, W. J.; Oomens, J.

    2012-01-01

    The gas-phase IR spectrum of the anionic chromophore of the green fluorescent protein (p-hydroxy-benzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolidinone, HBDI) is recorded in the 800–1800 cm−1 frequency range using the free electron laser FELIX in combination with an electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier

  20. Structure elucidation of dimethylformamide-solvated alkylzinc cations in the gas phase

    Dreiocker, F.; Oomens, J.; Meijer, A.J.H.M.; Pickup, B.T.; Jackson, R.F.W.; Schäfer, M.

    2010-01-01

    Organozinc iodides, useful for the synthesis of nonproteinogenic amino acids, are investigated in the gas phase by a combination of electrospray (ESI)-MS/MS, accurate ion mass measurements, and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy employing a free electron laser. ESI allowed the

  1. Gas phase hydrogen peroxide production in atmospheric pressure glow discharges operating in He - H2O

    Vasko, C.A.; Veldhuizen, van E.M.; Bruggeman, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    The gas phase production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a RF atmospheric pressure glow discharge with helium and water vapour has been investigated as a function of the gas flow. It is shown that the production of H2O2 is through the recombination of two OH radicals in a three body collision and the

  2. Highly Selective Continuous Gas-Phase Methoxycarbonylation of Ethylene with Supported Ionic Liquid Phase (SILP) Catalysts

    Khokarale, Santosh Govind; Garcia Suárez, Eduardo José; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) technology was applied for the first time to the Pd-catalyzed continuous, gas-phase methoxycarbonylation of ethylene to selectively produce methyl propanoate (MP) in high yields. The influence of catalyst and reaction parameters such as, for example, ionic liquid...

  3. Gas-phase salt bridge interactions between glutamic acid and arginine

    Jaeqx, S.; Oomens, J.; Rijs, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The gas-phase side chain-side chain (SC-SC) interaction and possible proton transfer between glutamic acid (Glu) and arginine (Arg) residues are studied under low-temperature conditions in an overall neutral peptide. Conformation-specific IR spectra, obtained with the free electron laser FELIX, in

  4. Humidity independent mass spectrometry for gas phase chemical analysis via ambient proton transfer reaction.

    Zhu, Hongying; Huang, Guangming

    2015-03-31

    In this work, a humidity independent mass spectrometric method was developed for rapid analysis of gas phase chemicals. This method is based upon ambient proton transfer reaction between gas phase chemicals and charged water droplets, in a reaction chamber with nearly saturate humidity under atmospheric pressure. The humidity independent nature enables direct and rapid analysis of raw gas phase samples, avoiding time- and sample-consuming sample pretreatments in conventional mass spectrometry methods to control sample humidity. Acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene were used to evaluate the analytical performance of present method. The limits of detection for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene are in the range of ∼0.1 to ∼0.3 ppbV; that of benzene is well below the present European Union permissible exposure limit for benzene vapor (5 μg m(-3), ∼1.44 ppbV), with linear ranges of approximately two orders of magnitude. The majority of the homemade device contains a stainless steel tube as reaction chamber and an ultrasonic humidifier as the source of charged water droplets, which makes this cheap device easy to assemble and facile to operate. In addition, potential application of this method was illustrated by the real time identification of raw gas phase chemicals released from plants at different physiological stages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Ab initio study of gas phase and water-assisted tautomerization of ...

    WINTEC

    Water-assisted tautomerization in maleimide and formamide showed that difference in energy barrier reduces to 2⋅83 kcal/mol from 10⋅41 kcal/mol (in gas phase) at B3LYP level, which resulted that maleimide readily undergoes tautomerization in water molecule. Keywords. Ab Initio calculations; maleimide; formamide; ...

  6. Continuous gas-phase hydroformylation of 1-butene using supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysts

    Haumann, Marco; Dentler, Katharina; Joni, Joni

    2007-01-01

    The concept of supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysis has been extended to 1-butene hydroformylation. A rhodium-sulfoxantphos complex was dissolved in [BMIM][n-C8H17OSO3] and this solution was highly dispersed on silica. Continuous gas-phase experiments in a fixed-bed reactor revealed...

  7. Gas-phase UF6 enrichment monitor for enrichment plant safeguards

    Strittmatter, R.B.; Tape, J.W.

    1980-03-01

    An in-line enrichment monitor is being developed to provide real-time enrichment data for the gas-phase UF 6 feed stream of an enrichment plant. The nondestructive gamma-ray assay method can be used to determine the enrichment of natural UF 6 with a relative precision of better than 1% for a wide range of pressures

  8. Mid-IR spectra of different conformers of phenylalanine in the gas phase

    von Helden, G.; Compagnon, I.; Blom, M. N.; Frankowski, M.; Erlekam, U.; Oomens, J.; Brauer, B.; Gerber, R. B.; Meijer, G.

    2008-01-01

    The experimental mid- and far-IR spectra of six conformers of phenylalanine in the gas phase are presented. The experimental spectra are compared to spectra calculated at the B3LYP and at the MP2 level. The differences between B3LYP and MP2 IR spectra are found to be small. The agreement between

  9. Operando Spectroscopy of the Gas-Phase Aldol Condensation of Propanal over Solid Base Catalysts

    Hernández-giménez, Ana M.; Ruiz-martínez, Javier; Puértolas, Begoña; Pérez-ramírez, Javier; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2017-01-01

    The gas-phase aldol condensation of propanal, taken as model for the aldehyde components in bio-oils, has been studied with a combined operando set-up allowing to perform FT-IR & UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) with on-line mass spectrometry (MS). The selected solid base catalysts, a

  10. Gas-Phase Oxidation of Aqueous Ethanol by Nanoparticle Vanadia/Anatase Catalysts

    Jørgensen, Betina; Kristensen, Steffen Buus; Kunov-Kruse, Andreas Jonas

    2009-01-01

    The gas-phase oxidation of aqueous ethanol with dioxygen has been examined with a new nanoparticle V2O5/TiO2 catalyst. Product selectivity could to a large extent be controlled by small alterations of reaction parameters, allowing production of acetaldehyde at a selectivity higher than 90%, near...

  11. Study of Iodine Behavior in the Gas Phase during a Severe Accident

    Kim, Hanchul; Cho, Yeonghun; Ryu, Myunghyun

    2014-01-01

    Among the iodine species, the organic iodides produced from the reaction between iodine and organics such as paint, are not easily trapped by the filters during the containment venting following a severe accident. Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) has been studying this issue, joining international research programs such as ISTP-EPICUR, OECDBIP and OECD-STEM. In the course of this study, a simple iodine model, RAIM (Radio-Active Iodine chemistry Model) has been developed (Oh et al., 2011), based on the IMOD methodology, and other previous studies. This paper deals with our recent activities on this study, including the development of the model for the iodine reactions in gas phase. Iodine reactions in gas phase were modeled and added to the RAIM code, taking into account several relevant reactions such as formation of ARP, iodine oxide, and organic iodides in gas phase. RAIM was then applied to analyze the S2-6-5-2 test for which iodine-loaded coupons were tested in gas phase. The analysis results show a reasonable estimation of volatile iodine concentration with the desorption rate constant of about 10 -6 s -1 , while those of the other iodine species overestimated for the whole period of the test. It reveals the need to determine appropriate values for the rate constants for formation of iodine oxides and organic iodides

  12. Biofilm structure and mass transfer in a gas phase trickle-bed biofilter.

    Zhu, X; Suidan, M T; Alonso, C; Yu, T; Kim, B J; Kim, B R

    2001-01-01

    Mass transport phenomena occurring in the biofilms of gas phase trickle-bed biofilters are investigated in this study. The effect of biofilm structure on mass transfer mechanisms is examined using experimental observation from the operating of biofilters, microelectrode techniques and microscopic examination. Since the biofilms of biofilters used for waste gas treatment are not completely saturated with water, there is not a distinguishable liquid layer outside the biofilm. Results suggest that due to this characteristic, gas phase substrates (such as oxygen or volatile organic compounds) may not be limited by the aqueous phase because transport of the compound into the biofilm can occur directly through non-wetted areas. On the other hand, for substrates that are present only in the liquid phase, such as nitrate, the mass transfer limitation is more serious because of the limited liquid supply. Microscopic observations show that a layered structure with void spaces exists within the biofilm. Oxygen concentration distributions along the depth of the biofilms are examined using an oxygen microelectrode. Results indicate that there are some high dissolved oxygen zones inside the biofilm, which suggests the existence of passages for oxygen transfer into the deeper sections of the biofilm in a gas phase trickle-bed biofilter. Both the low gas-liquid mass transfer resistance and the resulting internal structure contribute to the high oxygen penetration within the biofilms in gas phase trickle-bed biofilters.

  13. Gas-phase synthesis of magnesium nanoparticles : A high-resolution transmission electron microscopy study

    Kooi, B.J.; Palasantzas, G.; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    2006-01-01

    Magnesium nanoparticles with size above 10 nm, prepared by gas-phase syntheses, were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The dominant particle shape is a hexagonal prism terminated by Mg(0002) and Mg{1010} facets. Oxidation of Mg yields a MgO shell (similar to 3 nm

  14. Supported Rh-phosphine complex catalysts for continuous gas-phase decarbonylation of aldehydes

    Malcho, Phillip; Garcia-Suarez, Eduardo J.; Mentzel, Uffe Vie

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous silica supported rhodium-phosphine complex catalysts are employed for the first time in the catalytic decarbonylation of aldehydes in continuous gas-phase. The reaction protocol is exemplified for the decarbonylation of p-tolualdehyde to toluene and further extended to other aromatic...

  15. Hydrocarbon fuels from gas phase decarboxylation of hydrolyzed free fatty acid

    Wang, Weicheng; Roberts, William L.; Stikeleather, Larry F.

    2012-01-01

    Gas phase decarboxylation of hydrolyzed free fatty acid (FFA) from canola oil has beeninvestigated in two fix-bed reactors by changing reaction parameters such as temperatures,FFA feed rates, and H 2-to-FFA molar ratios. FFA, which contains mostly C

  16. Gas phase polymerization of propylene. Reaction kinetics and molecular weight distribution

    Meier, G.B.; Weickert, G.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2001-01-01

    Gas-phase polymerizations have been executed at different temperatures, pressures, and hydrogen concentrations using Me2Si[Ind]2ZrCl2 / methylaluminoxane / SiO2(Pennsylvania Quarts) as a catalyst. The reaction rate curves have been described by a kinetic model, which takes into account the initially

  17. Why do disk galaxies present a common gas-phase metallicity gradient?

    Chang, R.; Zhang, Shuhui; Shen, Shiyin; Yin, Jun; Hou, Jinliang

    2017-03-01

    CALIFA data show that isolated disk galaxies present a common gas-phase metallicity gradient, with a characteristic slope of -0.1dex/re between 0.3 and 2 disk effective radius re (Sanchez et al. 2014). Here we construct a simple model to investigate which processes regulate the formation and evolution.

  18. Gas-phase photoemission with soft x-rays: cross sections and angular distributions

    Shirley, D.A.; Kobrin, P.H.; Truesdale, C.M.; Lindle, D.W.; Ferrett, T.A.; Heimann, P.A.; Becker, U.; Kerkhoff, H.G.; Southworth, S.H.

    1983-09-01

    A summary is presented of typical gas-phase photoemission studies based on synchrotron radiation in the 50-5000 eV range, using beam lines at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Three topics are addressed: atomic inner-shell photoelectron cross sections and asymmetries, correlation peaks in rare gases, and core-level shape resonances in molecules

  19. Imaging Molecular Structure through Femtosecond Photoelectron Diffraction on Aligned and Oriented Gas-Phase Molecules

    Boll, Rebecca; Rouzee, Arnaud; Adolph, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an account of our progress towards performing femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules in a pump-probe setup combining optical lasers and an X-ray Free-Electron Laser. We present results of two experiments aimed at measuring photoelectron angular...

  20. Testing and evaluation of electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    DePaoli, D.W.; Harris, M.T.; Ally, M.R.

    1996-10-01

    The goals and objectives of the technical task plan (TTP) are to (1) describe the nature and extent of concrete contamination within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and emerging and commercial technologies applicable to these problems; (2) to match technologies to the concrete problems and recommend up to four demonstrations; (3) to initiate recommended demonstrations; and (4) to continue investigation and evaluation of the application of electrokinetic decontamination processes to concrete. This document presents findings of experimental and theoretical studies of the electrokinetic decontamination (EK) process and their implications for field demonstrations. This effort is an extension of the work performed under TTP 142005, ''Electroosmotic Concrete Decontamination. The goals of this task were to determine the applicability of EK for treating contaminated concrete and, if warranted, to evaluate EK as a potential technology for demonstration. 62 refs

  1. X-ray Diffraction from Isolated and Strongly Aligned Gas-Phase Molecules with a Free-Electron Laser

    Küpper, Jochen; Stern, Stephan; Holmegaard, Lotte

    2014-01-01

    We report experimental results on x-ray diffraction of quantum-state-selected and strongly aligned ensembles of the prototypical asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile using the Linac Coherent Light Source. The experiments demonstrate first steps toward a new approach to diffractive...... imaging of distinct structures of individual, isolated gas-phase molecules. We confirm several key ingredients of single molecule diffraction experiments: the abilities to detect and count individual scattered x-ray photons in single shot diffraction data, to deliver state-selected, e. g., structural......-isomer-selected, ensembles of molecules to the x-ray interaction volume, and to strongly align the scattering molecules. Our approach, using ultrashort x-ray pulses, is suitable to study ultrafast dynamics of isolated molecules....

  2. Two-beam ultrabroadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy for high resolution gas-phase multiplex imaging

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J., E-mail: cjkliew@sandia.gov [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-01-20

    We propose and develop a method for wideband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) in the gas phase and demonstrate the single-shot measurement of N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4}. Pure-rotational and vibrational O-, Q-, and S- branch spectra are collected simultaneously, with high spectral and spatial resolution, and within a single-laser-shot. The relative intensity of the rotational and vibrational signals can be tuned arbitrarily using polarization techniques. The ultrashort 7 fs pump and Stokes pulses are automatically overlapped temporally and spatially using a two-beam CARS technique, and the crossed probe beam allows for excellent spatial sectioning of the probed location.

  3. Two-beam ultrabroadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy for high resolution gas-phase multiplex imaging

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    We propose and develop a method for wideband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) in the gas phase and demonstrate the single-shot measurement of N 2 , H 2 , CO 2 , O 2 , and CH 4 . Pure-rotational and vibrational O-, Q-, and S- branch spectra are collected simultaneously, with high spectral and spatial resolution, and within a single-laser-shot. The relative intensity of the rotational and vibrational signals can be tuned arbitrarily using polarization techniques. The ultrashort 7 fs pump and Stokes pulses are automatically overlapped temporally and spatially using a two-beam CARS technique, and the crossed probe beam allows for excellent spatial sectioning of the probed location

  4. Chemical decontamination method in nuclear facility system

    Takahashi, Ryota; Sakai, Hitoshi; Oka, Shigehiro.

    1996-01-01

    Pumps and valves in a closed recycling loop system incorporating materials to be chemically decontaminated are decomposed, a guide plate having the decomposed parts as an exit/inlet of a decontaminating liquid is formed, and a decontaminating liquid recycling loop comprising a recycling pump and a heater is connected to the guide plate. Decontaminating liquid from a decontaminating liquid storage tank is supplied to the decontaminating liquid recycling loop. With such constitutions, the decontaminating liquid is filled in the recycling closed loop system incorporating materials to be decontaminated, and the materials to be decontaminated are chemically decontaminated. The decontaminating liquid after the decontamination is discharged and flows, if necessary, in a recycling system channel for repeating supply and discharge. After the decontamination, the guide plate is removed and returned to the original recycling loop. When pipelines of a reactor recycling system are decontaminated, the amount of decontaminations can be decreased, and reforming construction for assembling the recycling loop again, which requires cutting for pipelines in the system is no more necessary. Accordingly, the amount of wastes can be decreased, and therefore, the decontamination operation is facilitated and radiation dose can be reduced. (T.M.)

  5. Full system decontamination (FSD) at NPP Stade prior to dismantling activities

    Christoph Stiepani; Karl Seidelmann

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Introduction: Minimization of personnel dose rates and generation of material free for release is of the highest priority and requires Full System Decontamination (FSD) as a first and important measure when decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants. Framatome ANP has many years experience with Full System Decontaminations for operating nuclear power plants in general and for decommissioning in particular. The latest decommissioning project was the FSD at the PWR Stade which was permanently shut down in November 2003 after 31 years of operation. FSD was scheduled within a short period after shutdown and prior to decommissioning activities. Full System Decontamination at Stade: The PWR Stade is a 4 loop design. FSD included the entire primary circuit with RPV and the auxiliary systems (RHR, VCS and RWCU). The decontamination circuit had a total volume of ∼310 m 3 and an overall surface of ∼17000 m 2 . The Framatome ANP decontamination process HP/CORD R UV was selected for application. The decontamination was performed by using NPP systems in combination with the Framatome mobile decontamination equipment AMDA R (Automated Mobile Decontamination Appliance). A total of 4 decontamination cycles were performed and excellent results were obtained. The average decontamination factor (DF) was 160 for the steam generators with an outstanding ambient dose reduction factor (DRF) of 75. Conclusions: FSD at the PWR Stade has shown that the HP/CORD UV process yields excellent results in primary and auxiliary systems. The significant ambient dose reduction factor of 75 is remarkable. This very high DRF, no other decontamination application came even close, will result in excellent cost-benefit ratios for additional decommissioning activities at Stade. The applied HP/CORD UV process is not a specific decontamination process for decommissioning. Therefore the obtained decontamination and dose reduction factors demonstrate the advantage/potential for

  6. Diffusion Monte Carlo simulations of gas phase and adsorbed D2-(H2)n clusters

    Curotto, E.; Mella, M.

    2018-03-01

    We have computed ground state energies and analyzed radial distributions for several gas phase and adsorbed D2(H2)n and HD(H2)n clusters. An external model potential designed to mimic ionic adsorption sites inside porous materials is used [M. Mella and E. Curotto, J. Phys. Chem. A 121, 5005 (2017)]. The isotopic substitution lowers the ground state energies by the expected amount based on the mass differences when these are compared with the energies of the pure clusters in the gas phase. A similar impact is found for adsorbed aggregates. The dissociation energy of D2 from the adsorbed clusters is always much higher than that of H2 from both pure and doped aggregates. Radial distributions of D2 and H2 are compared for both the gas phase and adsorbed species. For the gas phase clusters, two types of hydrogen-hydrogen interactions are considered: one based on the assumption that rotations and translations are adiabatically decoupled and the other based on nonisotropic four-dimensional potential. In the gas phase clusters of sufficiently large size, we find the heavier isotopomer more likely to be near the center of mass. However, there is a considerable overlap among the radial distributions of the two species. For the adsorbed clusters, we invariably find the heavy isotope located closer to the attractive interaction source than H2, and at the periphery of the aggregate, H2 molecules being substantially excluded from the interaction with the source. This finding rationalizes the dissociation energy results. For D2-(H2)n clusters with n ≥12 , such preference leads to the desorption of D2 from the aggregate, a phenomenon driven by the minimization of the total energy that can be obtained by reducing the confinement of (H2)12. The same happens for (H2)13, indicating that such an effect may be quite general and impact on the absorption of quantum species inside porous materials.

  7. The Genealogical Tree of Ethanol: Gas-phase Formation of Glycolaldehyde, Acetic Acid, and Formic Acid

    Skouteris, Dimitrios; Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Vazart, Fanny; Puzzarini, Cristina; Barone, Vincenzo; Codella, Claudio; Lefloch, Bertrand

    2018-02-01

    Despite the harsh conditions of the interstellar medium, chemistry thrives in it, especially in star-forming regions where several interstellar complex organic molecules (iCOMs) have been detected. Yet, how these species are synthesized is a mystery. The majority of current models claim that this happens on interstellar grain surfaces. Nevertheless, evidence is mounting that neutral gas-phase chemistry plays an important role. In this paper, we propose a new scheme for the gas-phase synthesis of glycolaldehyde, a species with a prebiotic potential and for which no gas-phase formation route was previously known. In the proposed scheme, the ancestor is ethanol and the glycolaldehyde sister species are acetic acid (another iCOM with unknown gas-phase formation routes) and formic acid. For the reactions of the new scheme with no available data, we have performed electronic structure and kinetics calculations deriving rate coefficients and branching ratios. Furthermore, after a careful review of the chemistry literature, we revised the available chemical networks, adding and correcting several reactions related to glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, and formic acid. The new chemical network has been used in an astrochemical model to predict the abundance of glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, and formic acid. The predicted abundance of glycolaldehyde depends on the ethanol abundance in the gas phase and is in excellent agreement with the measured one in hot corinos and shock sites. Our new model overpredicts the abundance of acetic acid and formic acid by about a factor of 10, which might imply a yet incomplete reaction network.

  8. A rapid and inexpensive bioassay to evaluate the decontamination of organophosphates.

    Claborn, David M; Martin-Brown, Skylar A; Sagar, Sanjay Gupta; Durham, Paul

    2012-01-01

    An inexpensive and rapid bioassay using adult red flour beetles was developed for use in assessing the decontamination of environments containing organophosphates and related chemicals. A decontamination protocol was developed which demonstrated that 2 to 3 applications of 5% bleach solution were required to obtain nearly complete decontamination of malathion. The bioassay was also used to screen common household cleaners as potential decontaminating agents, but only 5% bleach was effective at improving survival of insects on steel plates treated with 25% malathion. A toxic degradation product (malaoxon) was detected using gas chromatography/mass spectrophotometry; this toxin affected the decontamination efficacy and resulted in continued toxicity to the beetles until subsequent decontaminations. The bioassay provides evidence to support the use of red flour beetles as a sensitive, less expensive method for determining safety levels of environments contaminated with malathion and other toxins, and may have application in the study of chemical warfare agents.

  9. Decontamination of some urban surfaces

    Thornton, E.W.

    1988-04-01

    The long-term consequences of external radiation dose to the public could be a cause for concern in the event of a severe accident at a nuclear power plant leading to the release of fission products to the atmosphere and subsequent contamination of buildings, roads and other components of the urban environment. This study has concentrated on the decontamination of building materials contaminated under wet conditions with soluble, ionic radiocaesium. Results are given on the decontamination of building materials contaminated without run-off, on the effects of waiting between contamination and decontamination and on the effect of pre-treatment with an ammonium salt solution. (author)

  10. Nova target chamber decontamination study

    1979-05-01

    An engineering study was performed to determine the most effective method for decontamination of the Nova target chamber. Manual and remote decontamination methods currently being used were surveyed. In addition, a concept that may not require in-situ decontamination was investigated. Based on the presently available information concerning material and system compatibility and particle penetration, it is recommended that a system of removable aluminum shields be considered. It is also recommended that a series of tests be performed to more precisely determine the vacuum compatibility and penetrability of other materials discussed in this report

  11. Skin decontamination: principles and perspectives.

    Chan, Heidi P; Zhai, Hongbo; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard I

    2013-11-01

    Skin decontamination is the primary intervention needed in chemical, biological and radiological exposures, involving immediate removal of the contaminant from the skin performed in the most efficient way. The most readily available decontamination system on a practical basis is washing with soap and water or water only. Timely use of flushing with copious amounts of water may physically remove the contaminant. However, this traditional method may not be completely effective, and contaminants left on the skin after traditional washing procedures can have toxic consequences. This article focuses on the principles and practices of skin decontamination.

  12. Organic decontamination by ion exchange

    Wilson, T.R.

    1994-01-01

    This study has successfully identified ion exchanger media suitable for decontaminating the 5500-gallon organic layer in Tank 241-C-103. Decontamination of radionuclides is necessary to meet shipping, incinerator site storage, and incineration feed requirements. The exchanger media were identified through a literature search and experiments at the Russian Institute for Physical Chemistry. The principal radionuclides addressed are Cs-137 and Sr-90. Recommendations for an experimental program plan conclude the discussion. The experimental program would provide the data necessary for plant design specifications for a column and for ion exchange media to be used in decontaminating the organic layer

  13. Decontamination and coating of lead

    Rankin, W.N.; Bush, S.P.; Lyon, C.E.; Walker, V.

    1988-01-01

    Technology is being developed to decontaminate lead used in shielding applications in contaminated environments for recycle as shieldings. Technology is also being developed to coat either decontaminated lead or new lead before it is used in contaminated environments. The surface of the coating is expected to be much easier to decontaminate than the original lead surface. If contamination becomes severely embedded in the coating and cannot be removed, it can be easily cut with a knife and removed from the lead. The used coating can be disposed of as radioactive (hot hazardous) waste. The lead can then be recoated for further use as a shielding material

  14. Decontamination of surfaces (1961)

    Mestre, E.

    1961-01-01

    The continued expansion of atomic Energy has led the S.C.R.G.R. to extend simultaneously the recovery of materials contaminated by use in radio-active media. The importance of this aspect of atomic Energy was not immediately obvious to those concerned but is now fully recognized due to the cost of the materials and installations, and also to the time required for the construction of special equipment for the C.E.A. Another very important reason is the dangers associated with the handling of contaminated material. The S.C.R.G.R. attacked this problem from the point of view of these dangers. It later became apparent to the users, once the decontamination methods had proved their worth, that the process presented advantages from the material and cost-saving point of view. (author) [fr

  15. Ultrasonic decontamination robot

    Patenaude, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    An ultrasonic decontamination robot removes radioactive contamination from the internal surface of the inlet and outlet headers, divider plate, tube sheet, and lower portions of tubes of a nuclear power plant steam generator. A programmable microprocessor controller guides the movement of a robotic arm mounted in the header manway. An ultrasonic transducer having a solvent delivery subsystem through which ultrasonic action is achieved is moved by the arm over the surfaces. A solvent recovery suction tube is positioned within the header to remove solvent therefrom while avoiding interference with the main robotic arm. The solvent composition, temperature, pressure, viscosity, and purity are controlled to optimize the ultrasonic scrubbing action. The ultrasonic transducer is controlled at a power density, frequency, and on-off mode cycle such as to optimize scrubbing action within the range of transducer-to-surface distance and solvent layer thickness selected for the particular conditions encountered. Both solvent and transducer control actions are optimized by the programmable microprocessor. (author)

  16. Stainless steel decontamination manipulators

    Sullivan, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Three, large-volume coverage manipulator systems were designed and built for the Defense Water Processing Facility at the Savannah River Laboratory. These stainless steel systems will be used for high-pressure spray decontamination of waste containers and large process equipment modules. Each system has a manipulator arm, folding boom, and vertical drive and guide structure. Handling capacity is 45 kg, horizontal reach is 4.6 m with a 180-deg swing motion, and the vertical travel is 6 m. The system is remotely removable and replaceable in modules using an overhead crane and an impact wrench. The manipulator arm has seven motions: Shoulder rotation and pivot, elbow pivot, wrist pivot and rotation, and grip open-close. All motions are variable speed and are slip-clutch protected to prevent overloading from external forces (collisions)

  17. Decontamination technology assessment

    Allen, R.P.; Konzek, G.J.; Schneider, K.R.; Smith, R.I.

    1988-10-01

    This study identifies and technically assesses foreign decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technology developments that may represent significant improvements over D and D technology currently available or under development in the United States. Technology need areas for nuclear power reactor decommissioning operations were identified and prioritized using the results of past light water reactor (LWR) decommissioning studies to quantitatively evaluate the potential for reducing cost and decommissioning worker radiation dose for each major decommissioning activity. Based on these identified needs, current foreign D and D technologies of potential interest to the US were identified through personal contacts and the collection and review of an extensive body of D and D literature. These technologies were then assessed qualitatively to evaluate their uniqueness, potential for a significant reduction in D and D costs and/or worker radiation dose, development status, and other factors affecting their value and applicability to US needs. 4 refs

  18. Granulated decontamination formulations

    Tucker, Mark D.

    2007-10-02

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a sorbent additive, and water. A highly adsorbent sorbent additive (e.g., amorphous silica, sorbitol, mannitol, etc.) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  19. Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System

    Gentile, Charles A.; Parker, John J.; Guttadora, Gregory L.; Ciebiera, Lloyd P.

    2002-01-01

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Tritium Systems Group has developed and fabricated an Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System (OTDS), which is designed to reduce tritium surface contamination on various components and items. The system is configured to introduce gaseous ozone into a reaction chamber containing tritiated items that require a reduction in tritium surface contamination. Tritium surface contamination (on components and items in the reaction chamber) is removed by chemically reacting elemental tritium to tritium oxide via oxidation, while purging the reaction chamber effluent to a gas holding tank or negative pressure HVAC system. Implementing specific concentrations of ozone along with catalytic parameters, the system is able to significantly reduce surface tritium contamination on an assortment of expendable and non-expendable items. This paper will present the results of various experimentation involving employment of this system

  20. Decontamination of organic waste

    Schulz, W.

    1977-01-01

    Decontamination stands for the sack collecting of wc-waste water of nuclear-medical tracts and especially the collecting of primary urine and primary faeces of patients after application of radio-isotopes (e.g. iodine 131). They are tied up in the sacks, treated with antiseptic and decomposition-preventing agents, and finally stored in a decupation depot over the time constant. The decupation depot can, for example, be a deep-freezor with separations and clocks, which is radiation-isolated. After the time constant a chemical and/or physical destruction (e.g. comminution) takes place, with simultaneous disinfection and thawing (vapour heating) and the transfer to the canalization. (DG) [de

  1. Glovebox decontamination technology comparison

    Quintana, D.M.; Rodriguez, J.B.; Cournoyer, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Reconfiguration of the CMR Building and TA-55 Plutonium Facility for mission requirements will require the disposal or recycle of 200--300 gloveboxes or open front hoods. These gloveboxes and open front hoods must be decontaminated to meet discharge limits for Low Level Waste. Gloveboxes and open front hoods at CMR have been painted. One of the deliverables on this project is to identify the best method for stripping the paint from large numbers of gloveboxes. Four methods being considered are the following: conventional paint stripping, dry ice pellets, strippable coatings, and high pressure water technology. The advantages of each technology will be discussed. Last, cost comparisons between the technologies will be presented

  2. Probing the Binding Interfaces of Protein Complexes Using Gas-Phase H/D Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Mistarz, Ulrik H; Brown, Jeffery M; Haselmann, Kim F

    2016-01-01

    Fast gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange mediated by ND3 gas and measured by mass spectrometry (gas-phase HDX-MS) is a largely unharnessed, fast, and sensitive method for probing primary- and higher-order polypeptide structure. Labeling of heteroatom-bound non-amide hydrogens in a sub-milliseco......Fast gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange mediated by ND3 gas and measured by mass spectrometry (gas-phase HDX-MS) is a largely unharnessed, fast, and sensitive method for probing primary- and higher-order polypeptide structure. Labeling of heteroatom-bound non-amide hydrogens in a sub......-millisecond time span after electrospray ionization by ND3 gas can provide structural insights into protein conformers present in solution. Here, we have explored the use of gas-phase HDX-MS for probing the higher-order structure and binding interfaces of protein complexes originating from native solution...

  3. Decontamination of a canyon crane at the Savannah River Plant

    Stevenson, D.A.; Moore, D.B.; Bowers, J.W.; Brown, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Decontamination of the crane is reviewed in terms of the health physics aspects, controls during decontamination efforts, and the resultant radiation exposure rates for decontamination efforts. 17 figs.,

  4. Decontamination strategies in contaminated settlement

    Hubert, P.; Jouve, A.; Tallec, V. Le

    1996-01-01

    Six years after the Chernobyl accident, decontamination actions had been completed in many places, the contamination could be considered as fixed, especially on urban surfaces and the social situation was felt to be stabilized. Under those conditions the efficiency of the 'classical' decontamination techniques was under question, it was worthwhile to look at new specific techniques. Besides it was necessary to discuss the interest of new decontamination actions in settlements. The European Union (EU) sponsored a project ECP 4 in order to look at the opportunities for further dose reduction actions in the contaminated territories of the three republics affected by the accident. The objective was to provide a local decision maker, faced with many alternatives for decontamination, with all the elements for determining what to do according to the various objectives he might pursue. The main results are presented here. (author)

  5. Contamination and decontamination of skin

    Severa, J.; Knajfl, J.

    1983-01-01

    In external contamination the beta radiation dose is the prevalent component of the total dose absorbed by the skin. There exist four types of radionUclide bonds to the skin: mechanical retention of solid particles or solution on the surface and in the pores, physical adsorption of nondissociated molecules or colloids, the ion exchange effect, and chemisorption. Radionuclides then penetrate the skin by transfollicular transfer. The total amount of radioactive substances absorbed into the skin depends on the condition of the skin. Skin is decontaminated by washing with lukewarm water and soap or with special decontamination solutions. The most widely used components of decontamination solutions are detergents, chelaton, sodium hexametaphosphate, oxalic acid, citric acid. The main principles of the decontamination of persons are given. (M.D.)

  6. BR-5 primary circuit decontamination

    Efimov, I.A.; Nikulin, M.P.; Smirnov-Averin, A.P.; Tymosh, B.S.; Shereshkov, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    Results and methodology of steam-water and acid decontamination of the primary coolant circuit SBR-5 reactor in 1971 are discussed. Regeneration process in a cold trap of the primary coolant circuit is discussed

  7. Decontaminating method for radioactive contaminant

    Suzuki, Ken-ichi.

    1994-01-01

    After decontamination of radioactive contaminates with d-limonene, a radioactive material separating agent not compatible with liquid wastes caused by decontamination is added to the liquid wastes. Then after stirring, they are stood still to be separated into two phases, and the radioactive materials in the liquid waste phase caused by decontamination are transferred to the phase of the radioactive material separating agent. With such procedures, they can satisfactorily be separated into two phases of d-limonene and the radioactive material separating agent. Further, d-limonene remaining after the separation can be used again as a decontaminating agent for radioactive contaminates. Therefore, the amount of d-limonene to be used can be reduced, to lower the cost for cleaning, thereby enabling to reduce the amount of radioactive wastes formed. (T.M.)

  8. Determination of gas phase protein ion densities via ion mobility analysis with charge reduction.

    Maisser, Anne; Premnath, Vinay; Ghosh, Abhimanyu; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Attoui, Michel; Hogan, Christopher J

    2011-12-28

    We use a charge reduction electrospray (ESI) source and subsequent ion mobility analysis with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA, with detection via both a Faraday cage electrometer and a condensation particle counter) to infer the densities of single and multiprotein ions of cytochrome C, lysozyme, myoglobin, ovalbumin, and bovine serum albumin produced from non-denaturing (20 mM aqueous ammonium acetate) and denaturing (1 : 49.5 : 49.5, formic acid : methanol : water) ESI. Charge reduction is achieved through use of a Po-210 radioactive source, which generates roughly equal concentrations of positive and negative ions. Ions produced by the source collide with and reduce the charge on ESI generated drops, preventing Coulombic fissions, and unlike typical protein ESI, leading to gas-phase protein ions with +1 to +3 excess charges. Therefore, charge reduction serves to effectively mitigate any role that Coulombic stretching may play on the structure of the gas phase ions. Density inference is made via determination of the mobility diameter, and correspondingly the spherical equivalent protein volume. Through this approach it is found that for both non-denaturing and denaturing ESI-generated ions, gas-phase protein ions are relatively compact, with average densities of 0.97 g cm(-3) and 0.86 g cm(-3), respectively. Ions from non-denaturing ESI are found to be slightly more compact than predicted from the protein crystal structures, suggesting that low charge state protein ions in the gas phase are slightly denser than their solution conformations. While a slight difference is detected between the ions produced with non-denaturing and denaturing ESI, the denatured ions are found to be much more dense than those examined previously by drift tube mobility analysis, in which charge reduction was not employed. This indicates that Coulombic stretching is typically what leads to non-compact ions in the gas-phase, and suggests that for gas phase

  9. A cylindrical quadrupole ion trap in combination with an electrospray ion source for gas-phase luminescence and absorption spectroscopy

    Stockett, Mark H.; Houmøller, Jørgen; Støchkel, Kristian; Svendsen, Annette; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2016-01-01

    A relatively simple setup for collection and detection of light emitted from isolated photo-excited molecular ions has been constructed. It benefits from a high collection efficiency of photons, which is accomplished by using a cylindrical ion trap where one end-cap electrode is a mesh grid combined with an aspheric condenser lens. The geometry permits nearly 10% of the emitted light to be collected and, after transmission losses, approximately 5% to be delivered to the entrance of a grating spectrometer equipped with a detector array. The high collection efficiency enables the use of pulsed tunable lasers with low repetition rates (e.g., 20 Hz) instead of continuous wave (cw) lasers or very high repetition rate (e.g., MHz) lasers that are typically used as light sources for gas-phase fluorescence experiments on molecular ions. A hole has been drilled in the cylinder electrode so that a light pulse can interact with the ion cloud in the center of the trap. Simulations indicate that these modifications to the trap do not significantly affect the storage capability and the overall shape of the ion cloud. The overlap between the ion cloud and the laser light is basically 100%, and experimentally >50% of negatively charged chromophore ions are routinely photodepleted. The performance of the setup is illustrated based on fluorescence spectra of several laser dyes, and the quality of these spectra is comparable to those reported by other groups. Finally, by replacing the optical system with a channeltron detector, we demonstrate that the setup can also be used for gas-phase action spectroscopy where either depletion or fragmentation is monitored to provide an indirect measurement on the absorption spectrum of the ion.

  10. A cylindrical quadrupole ion trap in combination with an electrospray ion source for gas-phase luminescence and absorption spectroscopy

    Stockett, Mark H., E-mail: stockett@phys.au.dk; Houmøller, Jørgen; Støchkel, Kristian; Svendsen, Annette; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2016-05-15

    A relatively simple setup for collection and detection of light emitted from isolated photo-excited molecular ions has been constructed. It benefits from a high collection efficiency of photons, which is accomplished by using a cylindrical ion trap where one end-cap electrode is a mesh grid combined with an aspheric condenser lens. The geometry permits nearly 10% of the emitted light to be collected and, after transmission losses, approximately 5% to be delivered to the entrance of a grating spectrometer equipped with a detector array. The high collection efficiency enables the use of pulsed tunable lasers with low repetition rates (e.g., 20 Hz) instead of continuous wave (cw) lasers or very high repetition rate (e.g., MHz) lasers that are typically used as light sources for gas-phase fluorescence experiments on molecular ions. A hole has been drilled in the cylinder electrode so that a light pulse can interact with the ion cloud in the center of the trap. Simulations indicate that these modifications to the trap do not significantly affect the storage capability and the overall shape of the ion cloud. The overlap between the ion cloud and the laser light is basically 100%, and experimentally >50% of negatively charged chromophore ions are routinely photodepleted. The performance of the setup is illustrated based on fluorescence spectra of several laser dyes, and the quality of these spectra is comparable to those reported by other groups. Finally, by replacing the optical system with a channeltron detector, we demonstrate that the setup can also be used for gas-phase action spectroscopy where either depletion or fragmentation is monitored to provide an indirect measurement on the absorption spectrum of the ion.

  11. Application of structured illumination to gas phase thermometry using thermographic phosphor particles: a study for averaged imaging

    Zentgraf, Florian; Stephan, Michael; Berrocal, Edouard; Albert, Barbara; Böhm, Benjamin; Dreizler, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Structured laser illumination planar imaging (SLIPI) is combined with gas phase thermometry measurements using thermographic phosphor (TGP) particles. The technique is applied to a heated jet surrounded by a coflow which is operated at ambient temperature. The respective air flows are seeded with a powder of BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ (BAM) which is used as temperature-sensitive gas phase tracer. Upon pulsed excitation in the ultraviolet spectral range, the temperature is extracted based on the two-color ratio method combined with SLIPI. The main advantage of applying the SLIPI approach to phosphor thermometry is the reduction of particle-to-particle multiple light scattering and diffuse wall reflections, yielding a more robust calibration procedure as well as improving the measurement accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. For demonstration, this paper focuses on sample-averaged measurements of temperature fields in a jet-in-coflow configuration. Using the conventional approach, which in contrast to SLIPI is based on imaging with an unmodulated laser light sheet, we show that for the present setup typically 40% of the recorded signal is affected by the contribution of multiply scattered photons. At locations close to walls even up to 75% of the apparent signal is due to diffuse reflection and wall luminescence of BAM sticking at the surface. Those contributions lead to erroneous temperature fields. Using SLIPI, an unbiased two-color ratio field is recovered allowing for two-dimensional mean temperature reconstructions which exhibit a more realistic physical behavior. This is in contrast to results deduced by the conventional approach. Furthermore, using the SLIPI approach it is shown that the temperature sensitivity is enhanced by a factor of up to 2 at 270 °C. Finally, an outlook towards instantaneous SLIPI phosphorescence thermometry is provided.

  12. Large-bore pipe decontamination

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of 1200 buildings within the US Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Complex will require the disposition of miles of pipe. The disposition of large-bore pipe, in particular, presents difficulties in the area of decontamination and characterization. The pipe is potentially contaminated internally as well as externally. This situation requires a system capable of decontaminating and characterizing both the inside and outside of the pipe. Current decontamination and characterization systems are not designed for application to this geometry, making the direct disposal of piping systems necessary in many cases. The pipe often creates voids in the disposal cell, which requires the pipe to be cut in half or filled with a grout material. These methods are labor intensive and costly to perform on large volumes of pipe. Direct disposal does not take advantage of recycling, which could provide monetary dividends. To facilitate the decontamination and characterization of large-bore piping and thereby reduce the volume of piping required for disposal, a detailed analysis will be conducted to document the pipe remediation problem set; determine potential technologies to solve this remediation problem set; design and laboratory test potential decontamination and characterization technologies; fabricate a prototype system; provide a cost-benefit analysis of the proposed system; and transfer the technology to industry. This report summarizes the activities performed during fiscal year 1997 and describes the planned activities for fiscal year 1998. Accomplishments for FY97 include the development of the applicable and relevant and appropriate regulations, the screening of decontamination and characterization technologies, and the selection and initial design of the decontamination system

  13. Decontamination of radioactively contaminated surfaces

    1986-10-01

    By this standard objective conditions to evaluate and test the ease of decontamination of surfaces under laboratory conditions are to be laid down. Ease of decontamination in this context denotes the summed-up effect of two material properties: a) the capacity of the material for retaining radioactive substances at its surface; b) the ease with which these substances are given off again in the course of cleaning processes. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Evaluation of a decontamination model

    Rippin, D.W.T.; Hanulik, J.; Schenker, E.; Ullrich, G.

    1981-02-01

    In the scale-up of a laboratory decontamination process difficulties arise due to the limited understanding of the mechanisms controlling the process. This paper contains some initial proposals which may contribute to the quantitative understanding of the chemical and physical factors which influence decontamination operations. General features required in a mathematical model to describe a fluid-solid reaction are discussed, and initial work is presented with a simple model which has had some success in describing the observed laboratory behaviour. (Auth.)

  15. Presolidification treatment of decontamination wastes

    Habayeb, M.A.

    1982-02-01

    Unsatisfactory leaching performance of several solidified decontamination solutions indicated a need for presolidification treatments to reduce the water sensitivity of the active chemicals. Chemical treatments examined in this work include pH adjustment, precipitation and oxidation-reduction reactions. The reactions involved in these treatments are discussed. The most suitable presolidification treatment for each decontamination solution has been identified. Further research is needed to test the effectivenss of these treatments

  16. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium trader pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of contaminated lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling

  17. Chemical Gel for Surface Decontamination

    Jung, Chong Hun; Moon, J. K.; Won, H. J.; Lee, K. W.; Kim, C. K.

    2010-01-01

    Many chemical decontamination processes operate by immersing components in aggressive chemical solutions. In these applications chemical decontamination technique produce large amounts of radioactive liquid waste. Therefore it is necessary to develop processes using chemical gels instead of chemical solutions, to avoid the well-known disadvantages of chemical decontamination techniques while retaining their high efficiency. Chemical gels decontamination process consists of applying the gel by spraying it onto the surface of large area components (floors, walls, etc) to be decontaminated. The gel adheres to any vertical or complex surface due to their thixotropic properties and operates by dissolving the radioactive deposit, along with a thin layer of the gel support, so that the radioactivity trapped at the surface can be removed. Important aspects of the gels are that small quantities can be used and they show thixitropic properties : liquid during spraying, and solid when stationary, allowing for strong adherence to surfaces. This work investigates the decontamination behaviors of organic-based chemical gel for SS 304 metallic surfaces contaminated with radioactive materials

  18. Random Vibration Analysis of the XM2l Decontaminant Pumper Module of the Modular Decontamination System

    Colclough, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    The XM21 Decontaminant Pumper module of the Modular Decontamination System was analyzed using finite element analysis techniques to show why the first design iteration passed transportation vibration...

  19. ICR studies of some anionic gas phase reactions and FTICR software design

    Noest, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis consists of two parts. Part one (Chs. 1-5) reports experimental results from mostly drift-cell ICR studies of negative ion-molecule reactions; part two (Chs. 6-11) concerns the design of software for an FTICR instrument. The author discusses successively: 1. ion cyclotron resonance spectrometry; 2. the gas phase allyl anion; 3. the (M-H) and (M-H2) anions from acetone; 4. negative ion-molecule reactions of aliphatic nitrites studied by cyclotron resonance; 5. homoconjugation versus charge-dipole interaction effects in the stabilization of carbanions in the gas phase; 6. the Fourier Transform ICR method; 7. the FTICR-software; 8. an efficient adaptive matcher filter for fast transient signals; 9. reduction of spectral peak height errors by time-domain weighing; 10. Chirp excitation; 11. Compact data storage. The book concludes with a Dutch and English summary (G.J.P.)

  20. Experimental redetermination of the gas-phase enthalpy of formation of ethyl 2-thiophenecarboxylate

    Santos, Ana Filipa L.O.M.; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A.V.

    2013-01-01

    The condensed phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation of ethyl-2-thiophenecarboxylate was derived from the remeasured standard molar energy of combustion, in oxygen, at T = 298.15 K, by rotating bomb combustion calorimetry and the standard molar enthalpy of vaporization, at T = 298.15 K, remeasured by Calvet microcalorimetry. Combining these two values, the following enthalpy of formation in the gas phase, at T = 298.15 K, was then derived for ethyl-2-thiophenecarboxylate: −(277.7 ± 2.9) kJ · mol −1 . The calculated gas-phase enthalpy of formation of the title compound, through the G3(MP2)//B3LYP approach was found to be 278.9 kJ · mol −1 , in excellent agreement with the experimental measured value

  1. Gas-phase infrared spectrum of phosphorus (III) oxycyanide, OPCN: experimental and theoretical investigations

    Allaf, Abdul. W.; Kassem, M.; Alibrahim, M.; Boustani, Ihsan

    1999-03-01

    An attempt was made to observe the gas-phase infrared spectrum of Phosphorus (III) oxycyanide, OPCN for the first time. This molecule was produced by an on-line process using phosphorus (III) oxychloride, OPCl as precursor passed over heated AgCN. The products were characterised by the infrared spectra of their vapours. The low resolution gas-phase Fourier transform infrared spectrum shows two bands centered at 2165 and 1385 cm -1. These bands are assigned to, ν1 (CN stretch) and ν2 (OP stretch), respectively. Ab initio self-consistent-field (SCF) molecular orbital (MO) and Møller-Plesset second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations were performed to determine the geometry, total energy and vibrational frequencies of OPCN.

  2. Gas-phase infrared spectrum of phosphorus (III) oxycyanide, OPCN: Experimental and theoretical and theoretical investigations

    Allaf, A.W.; Kassem, M.; Alibrahim, M.

    1999-01-01

    An attempt was made to observe the gas-phase infrared spectrum of phosphorus (III) oxycyanide, OPCN for the first time. This molecule was produced by on-line process using phosphorus (III) oxychloride, OPCI as precursor passed over heated Ag CN. The products were characterised by the infrared spectra of their vapours. The low resolution gas-phase Fourier transform infrared spectrum shows two bands at 2165 and 1385 cm -1 . These bands are assigned to ν 1 (C≡N stretch) and ν 2 (O=P stretch), respectively. Ab initio self-consistent-field (SCF) molecular orbital (MO) and Moeller - Plesset second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations were performed to determine the geometry, total energy and vibrational frequencies of OPCN. (authors)

  3. Effect of duty-cycles on the air plasma gas-phase of dielectric barrier discharges

    Barni, R.; Biganzoli, I.; Dell'Orto, E. C.; Riccardi, C.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental investigation concerning the effects of a duty-cycle in the supply of a dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric pressure air has been performed. Electrical characteristics of the discharge have been measured, focusing mainly on the statistical properties of the current filaments and on dielectric surface charging, both affected by the frequent repetition of breakdown imposed by the duty-cycle. Information on the gas-phase composition was gathered too. In particular, a strong enhancement in the ozone formation rate is observed when suitable long pauses separate the active discharge phases. A simulation of the chemical kinetics in the gas-phase, based on a simplified discharge modeling, is briefly described in order to shed light on the observed increase in ozone production. The effect of a duty-cycle on surface modification of polymeric films in order to increase their wettability has been investigated too.

  4. Ab initio treatment of gas phase GeO{sup 2+} doubly charged ion

    Mogren Al Mogren, M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Saud University, PO Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Ben Abdallah, D. [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moléculaire et Applications – LSAMA, Université de Tunis, Tunis (Tunisia); Department of General Studies, Riyadh Corporation of Technology, Technical and Vocational Training Corporation, PO Box 42826, Riyadh 11551 (Saudi Arabia); Hochlaf, M., E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France)

    2015-01-13

    Highlights: • Theoretical investigation of the novel gas-phase molecular species GeO{sup 2+}. • Spectroscopic parameters of this dication in its electronic ground and exited states. • Theoretical double ionization spectrum of GeO. - Abstract: Using multi reference configuration interaction methodology in connection with a large basis set, we show that GeO{sup 2+} is a metastable species either in the ground or in the electronically excited states. This confirms the observation of this dication in gas phase by mass spectrometry. In addition, we derived a set of accurate spectroscopic terms for GeO{sup 2+} bound states. At the MRCI/aug-cc-pV5Z level of theory, the adiabatic double ionization energy of GeO is computed to be ∼28.93 eV.

  5. Treatment of reduced sulphur compounds and SO2 by Gas Phase Advanced Oxidation

    Meusinger, Carl; Bluhme, Anders Brostrøm; Ingemar, Jonas L.

    2017-01-01

    Reduced sulphur compounds (RSCs) emitted from pig farms are a major problem for agriculture, due to their health and environmental impacts and foul odour. This study investigates the removal of RSCs, including H2S, and their oxidation product SO2 using Gas Phase Advanced Oxidation (GPAO). GPAO...... is a novel air cleaning technique which utilises accelerated atmospheric chemistry to oxidise pollutants before removing their oxidation products as particles. Removal efficiencies of 24.5% and 3.9% were found for 461 ppb of H2S and 714 ppb of SO2 in a laboratory system (volumetric flow Q = 75 m3/h......). A numerical model of the reactor system was developed to explore the basic features of the system; its output was in fair agreement with the experiment. The model verified the role of OH radicals in initiating the oxidation chemistry. All sulphur removed from the gas phase was detected as particulate matter...

  6. Photoelectron spectroscopy an introduction to ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy in the gas phase

    Eland, J H D

    2013-01-01

    Photoelectron Spectroscopy: An Introduction to Ultraviolet Photoelectronspectroscopy in the Gas Phase, Second Edition Photoelectron Spectroscopy: An Introduction to Ultraviolet PhotoelectronSpectroscopy in the Gas Phase, Second Edition aims to give practical approach on the subject of photoelectron spectroscopy, as well as provide knowledge on the interpretation of the photoelectron spectrum. The book covers topics such as the principles and literature of photoelectron microscopy; the main features and analysis of photoelectron spectra; ionization techniques; and energies from the photoelectron spectra. Also covered in the book are topics suc as photoelectron band structure and the applications of photoelectron spectroscopy in chemistry. The text is recommended for students and practitioners of chemistry who would like to be familiarized with the concepts of photoelectron spectroscopy and its importance in the field.

  7. The nuclear liquid-gas phase transition: Present status and future perspectives

    Pochodzalla, J.; Imme, G.; Maddalena, V.

    1996-07-01

    More than two decades ago, the van der Waals behavior of the nucleon -nucleon force inspired the idea of a liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter. Heavy-ion reactions at relativistic energies offer the unique possibility for studying this phase transition in a finite, hadronic system. A general overview of this subject is given emphasizing the most recent results on nuclear calorimetry. (orig.)

  8. Conformational Study of DNA Sugars: from the Gas Phase to Solution

    Uriarte, Iciar; Vallejo-López, Montserrat; Cocinero, Emilio J.; Corzana, Francisco; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2017-06-01

    Sugars are versatile molecules that play a variety of roles in the organism. For example, they are important in energy storage processes or as structural scaffolds. Here, we focus on the monosaccharide present in DNA by addressing the conformational and puckering properties in the gas phase of α- and β-methyl-2-deoxy-ribofuranoside and α- and β-methyl-2-deoxy-ribopiranoside. Other sugars have been previously studied in the gas phase The work presented here stems from a combination of chemical synthesis, ultrafast vaporization methods, supersonic expansions, microwave spectroscopy (both chirped-pulsed and Balle-Flygare cavity-based spectrometers) and NMR spectroscopy. Previous studies in the gas phase had been performed on 2-deoxyribose, but only piranose forms were detected. However, thanks to the combination of these techniques, we have isolated and characterized for the first time the conformational landscape of the sugar present in DNA in its biologically relevant furanose form. Our gas phase study serves as a probe of the conformational preferences of these biomolecules under isolation conditions. Thanks to the NMR experiments, we can characterize the favored conformations in solution and extract the role of the solvent in the structure and puckering of the monosaccharides. E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. Écija, F. J. Basterretxea, J.-U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández, F. Castaño, Angew. Chem. Int. Edit. 2012, 51, 3119. P. Écija, I. Uriarte, L. Spada, B. G. Davis, W. Caminati, F. J. Basterretxea, A. Lesarri, E. J. Cocinero, Chem. Commun. 2016, 52, 6241. I. Peña, E. J. Cocinero, C. Cabezas, A. Lesarri, S. Mata, P. Écija, A. M. Daly, Á. Cimas, C. Bermúdez, F. J. Basterretxea, S. Blanco, J. A. Fernández, J. C. López, F. Castaño, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Edit. 2013, 52, 11840.

  9. Gas Phase Transport, Adsorption and Surface Diffusion in Porous Glass Membrane

    Yang, J.; Čermáková, Jiřina; Uchytil, Petr; Hamel, Ch.; Seidel-Morgenstern, A.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 104, 2-4 (2005), s. 344-351 ISSN 0920-5861. [International Conference on Catalysis in Membrane Reactors /6./. Lahnstein, 06.07.2004-09.07.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : gas phase transport * vycor glass * adsorption Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.365, year: 2005

  10. Mechanisms of gas phase decomposition of C-nitro compounds from quantum chemical data

    Khrapkovskii, Grigorii M; Shamov, Alexander G; Nikolaeva, E V; Chachkov, D V

    2009-01-01

    Data on the mechanisms of gas-phase monomolecular decomposition of nitroalkanes, nitroalkenes and nitroarenes obtained using modern quantum chemical methods are described systematically. The attention is focused on the discussion of multistage decomposition of nitro compounds to elementary experimentally observed products. Characteristic features of competition of different mechanisms and the effect of molecular structure on the change in the Arrhenius parameters of the primary reaction step are considered.

  11. Origin of Asymmetric Charge Partitioning in the Dissociation of Gas-Phase Protein Homodimers

    Jurchen, John C.; Williams, Evan R.

    2003-01-01

    The origin of asymmetric charge and mass partitioning observed for gas-phase dissociation of multiply charged macromolecular complexes has been hotly debated. These experiments hold the potential to provide detailed information about the interactions between the macromolecules within the complex. Here, this unusual phenomenon of asymmetric charge partitioning is investigated for several protein homodimers. Asymmetric charge partitioning in these ions depends on a number of factors, including ...

  12. Dynamics of gas-phase transient species studied by dissociative photodetachment of molecular anions

    Lu, Zhou

    2007-01-01

    Gas-phase transient species, such as the CH₃CO₂ and HOCO free radicals, play important roles in combustion and environment chemistry. In this thesis work, the dynamics of these two radicals were studied by dissociative photodetachment (DPD) of the negative ions, CH₃CO₂-С and HOCO⁻, respectively. The experiments were carried out with a fast-ion-beam photoelectron-photofragment coincidence (PPC) spectrometer. Mass-selected molecular anions in a fast ion beam were intercepted by a linearly polar...

  13. Isospin and momentum dependence of liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter

    Xu, Jun; Ma, Hongru; Chen, Liewen; Li, Baoan

    2008-01-01

    The liquid-gas phase transition in hot neutron-rich nuclear matter is investigated within a self-consistent thermal model using different interactions with or without isospin and/or momentum dependence. The boundary of the phase-coexistence region is shown to be sensitive to the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy as well as the isospin and momentum dependence of the nuclear interaction. (author)

  14. Method and apparatus for selective capture of gas phase analytes using metal .beta.-diketonate polymers

    Harvey, Scott D [Kennewick, WA

    2011-06-21

    A process and sensor device are disclosed that employ metal .beta.-diketonate polymers to selectively capture gas-phase explosives and weaponized chemical agents in a sampling area or volume. The metal .beta.-diketonate polymers can be applied to surfaces in various analytical formats for detection of: improvised explosive devices, unexploded ordinance, munitions hidden in cargo holds, explosives, and chemical weapons in public areas.

  15. Mechanisms of gas phase decomposition of C-nitro compounds from quantum chemical data

    Khrapkovskii, Grigorii M; Shamov, Alexander G; Nikolaeva, E V; Chachkov, D V [Kazan State Technological University, Kazan (Russian Federation)

    2009-10-31

    Data on the mechanisms of gas-phase monomolecular decomposition of nitroalkanes, nitroalkenes and nitroarenes obtained using modern quantum chemical methods are described systematically. The attention is focused on the discussion of multistage decomposition of nitro compounds to elementary experimentally observed products. Characteristic features of competition of different mechanisms and the effect of molecular structure on the change in the Arrhenius parameters of the primary reaction step are considered.

  16. Thermodynamic Functions of Yttrium Trifluoride and Its Dimer in the Gas Phase

    Osina, E. L.; Kovtun, D. M.

    2018-05-01

    New calculations of the functions for YF3 and Y2F6 in the gas phase using quantum-chemical calculations by MP2 and CCSD(T) methods are performed in connection with the ongoing work on obtaining reliable thermodynamic data of yttrium halides. The obtained values are entered in the database of the IVTANTERMO software complex. Equations approximating the temperature dependence of the reduced Gibbs energy in the T = 298.15-6000 K range of temperatures are presented.

  17. Shear viscosity of neutron-rich nucleonic matter near its liquid–gas phase transition

    Xu, Jun; Chen, Lie-Wen; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Bao-An; Ma, Yu Gang

    2013-01-01

    Within a relaxation time approach using free nucleon–nucleon cross sections modified by the in-medium nucleon masses that are determined from an isospin- and momentum-dependent effective nucleon–nucleon interaction, we investigate the specific shear viscosity (η/s) of neutron-rich nucleonic matter near its liquid–gas phase transition. It is found that as the nucleonic matter is heated at fixed pressure or compressed at fixed temperature, its specific shear viscosity shows a valley shape in the temperature or density dependence, with the minimum located at the boundary of the phase transition. Moreover, the value of η/s drops suddenly at the first-order liquid–gas phase transition temperature, reaching as low as 4–5 times the KSS bound of ℏ/4π. However, it varies smoothly for the second-order liquid–gas phase transition. Effects of the isospin degree of freedom and the nuclear symmetry energy on the value of η/s are also discussed

  18. Thermodynamic analysis of fuels in gas phase: ethanol, gasoline and ethanol - gasoline predicted by DFT method.

    Neto, A F G; Lopes, F S; Carvalho, E V; Huda, M N; Neto, A M J C; Machado, N T

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study using density functional theory to calculate thermodynamics properties of major molecules compounds at gas phase of fuels like gasoline, ethanol, and gasoline-ethanol mixture in thermal equilibrium on temperature range up to 1500 K. We simulated a composition of gasoline mixture with ethanol for a thorough study of thermal energy, enthalpy, Gibbs free energy, entropy, heat capacity at constant pressure with respect to temperature in order to study the influence caused by ethanol as an additive to gasoline. We used semi-empirical computational methods as well in order to know the efficiency of other methods to simulate fuels through this methodology. In addition, the ethanol influence through the changes in percentage fractions of chemical energy released in combustion reaction and the variations on thermal properties for autoignition temperatures of fuels was analyzed. We verified how ethanol reduces the chemical energy released by gasoline combustion and how at low temperatures the gas phase fuels in thermal equilibrium have similar thermodynamic behavior. Theoretical results were compared with experimental data, when available, and showed agreement. Graphical Abstract Thermodynamic analysis of fuels in gas phase.

  19. Heavy haze in winter Beijing driven by fast gas phase oxidation

    Lu, K.; Tan, Z.; Wang, H.; Li, X.; Wu, Z.; Chen, Q.; Wu, Y.; Ma, X.; Liu, Y.; Chen, X.; Shang, D.; Dong, H.; Zeng, L.; Shao, M.; Hu, M.; Fuchs, H.; Novelli, A.; Broch, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Rohrer, F.; Bohn, B.; Georgios, G.; Schmitt, S. H.; Schlag, P.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Wahner, A.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Heavy haze conditions were frequently presented in the airsheds of Beijing and surrounding areas, especially during winter time. To explore the trace gas oxidation and the subsequent formation of aerosols, a comprehensive field campaign was performed at a regional site (in the campus of University of Chinese Academy of Science, UCAS) in Beijing winter 2016. Serious haze pollution processes were often observed with the fast increase of inorganic salt (especially nitrate) and these pollutions were always associated with enhanced humidity and the concentrations of PAN (PeroxyAcyl Nitrates) which is normally a marker of gas phase oxidations from NOx and VOCs. Moreover, based on the measurements of OH, HO2, RO2, total OH reactivity, N2O5, NO, NO2, SO2, particle concentrations/distributions/chemical compositions, and meteorological parameters, the gas phase oxidation rates that leads to the formation of sulfate, nitrate and secondary organic aerosols were estimated. These determined formation rates were clearly enhanced by several folds during pollution episodes compared to that of the clean air masses. Preliminary analysis result showed that the gas phase formation potential of nitrate and secondary organic aerosols were larger than the observed concentrations of nitrate and SOA of which the excess production may be explained by deposition and dilution.

  20. Improved machine learning method for analysis of gas phase chemistry of peptides

    Ahn Natalie

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate peptide identification is important to high-throughput proteomics analyses that use mass spectrometry. Search programs compare fragmentation spectra (MS/MS of peptides from complex digests with theoretically derived spectra from a database of protein sequences. Improved discrimination is achieved with theoretical spectra that are based on simulating gas phase chemistry of the peptides, but the limited understanding of those processes affects the accuracy of predictions from theoretical spectra. Results We employed a robust data mining strategy using new feature annotation functions of MAE software, which revealed under-prediction of the frequency of occurrence in fragmentation of the second peptide bond. We applied methods of exploratory data analysis to pre-process the information in the MS/MS spectra, including data normalization and attribute selection, to reduce the attributes to a smaller, less correlated set for machine learning studies. We then compared our rule building machine learning program, DataSqueezer, with commonly used association rules and decision tree algorithms. All used machine learning algorithms produced similar results that were consistent with expected properties for a second gas phase mechanism at the second peptide bond. Conclusion The results provide compelling evidence that we have identified underlying chemical properties in the data that suggest the existence of an additional gas phase mechanism for the second peptide bond. Thus, the methods described in this study provide a valuable approach for analyses of this kind in the future.

  1. All-gas-phase synthesis of UiO-66 through modulated atomic layer deposition

    Lausund, Kristian Blindheim; Nilsen, Ola

    2016-11-01

    Thin films of stable metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) such as UiO-66 have enormous application potential, for instance in microelectronics. However, all-gas-phase deposition techniques are currently not available for such MOFs. We here report on thin-film deposition of the thermally and chemically stable UiO-66 in an all-gas-phase process by the aid of atomic layer deposition (ALD). Sequential reactions of ZrCl4 and 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid produce amorphous organic-inorganic hybrid films that are subsequently crystallized to the UiO-66 structure by treatment in acetic acid vapour. We also introduce a new approach to control the stoichiometry between metal clusters and organic linkers by modulation of the ALD growth with additional acetic acid pulses. An all-gas-phase synthesis technique for UiO-66 could enable implementations in microelectronics that are not compatible with solvothermal synthesis. Since this technique is ALD-based, it could also give enhanced thickness control and the possibility to coat irregular substrates with high aspect ratios.

  2. The Gas-Phase Formation of Methyl Formate in Hot Molecular Cores

    Horn, Anne; Møllendal, Harald; Sekiguchi, Osamu; Uggerud, Einar; Roberts, Helen; Herbst, Eric; Viggiano, A. A.; Fridgen, Travis D.

    2004-08-01

    Methyl formate, HCOOCH3, is a well-known interstellar molecule prominent in the spectra of hot molecular cores. The current view of its formation is that it occurs in the gas phase from precursor methanol, which is synthesized on the surfaces of grain mantles during a previous colder era and evaporates while temperatures increase during the process of high-mass star formation. The specific reaction sequence thought to form methyl formate, the ion-molecule reaction between protonated methanol and formaldehyde followed by dissociative recombination of the protonated ion [HCO(H)OCH3]+, has not been studied in detail in the laboratory. We present here the results of both a quantum chemical study of the ion-molecule reaction between [CH3OH2]+ and H2CO as well as new experimental work on the system. In addition, we report theoretical and experimental studies for a variety of other possible gas-phase reactions leading to ion precursors of methyl formate. The studied chemical processes leading to methyl formate are included in a chemical model of hot cores. Our results show that none of these gas-phase processes produces enough methyl formate to explain its observed abundance.

  3. Conformational Preferences of Glycerol in the Gas Phase and in Water

    Jeong, Keun Hong [Korea Military Academy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Byung Jin; Kang, Young Kee [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The conformational study of glycerol has been carried out using the M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory in the gas phase and the SMD M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory in water in order to understand its conformational preferences and solvation effects. Most of the preferred conformers of glycerol have two C{sub 5} hydrogen bonds in the gas phase, as found by the analysis of calorimetric data. It has been known that the solvation drove the hydrogen bonds of glycerol to be weaker and its potential surface to be fatter and that glycerol exists as an ensemble of many feasible local minima in water. The calculated populations of glycerol in the gas phase and in water are consistent with the observed values, which are better than the previously calculated ones at the G2(MP2), CBS-QB3, and SM5.42 HF/6-31G(d) levels of theory

  4. Statistical parameter characteristics of gas-phase fluctuations for gas-liquid intermittent flow

    Matsui, G.; Monji, H.; Takaguchi, M. [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    This study deals with theoretical analysis on the general behaviour of statistical parameters of gas-phase fluctuations and comparison of statistical parameter characteristics for the real void fraction fluctuations measured with those for the wave form modified the real fluctuations. In order to investigate the details of the relation between the behavior of the statistical parameters in real intermittent flow and analytical results obtained from information on the real flow, the distributions of statistical parameters for general fundamental wave form of gas-phase fluctuations are discussed in detail. By modifying the real gas-phase fluctuations to a trapezoidaly wave, the experimental results can be directly compared with the analytical results. The analytical results for intermittent flow show that the wave form parameter, and the total amplitude of void fraction fluctuations, affects strongly on the statistical parameter characteristics. The comparison with experiment using nitrogen gas-water intermittent flow suggests that the parameters of skewness and excess may be better as indicators of flow pattern. That is, the macroscopic nature of intermittent flow can be grasped by the skewness and the excess, and the detailed flow structure may be described by the mean and the standard deviation.

  5. Systematic Search for Chemical Reactions in Gas Phase Contributing to Methanol Formation in Interstellar Space.

    Gamez-Garcia, Victoria G; Galano, Annia

    2017-10-05

    A massive search for chemical routes leading to methanol formation in gas phase has been conducted using computational chemistry, at the CBS-QB3 level of theory. The calculations were performed at five different temperatures (100, 80, 50, 20, and 10 K) and at three pressures (0.1, 0.01, and 0.001 atm) for each temperature. The search was focused on identifying reactions with the necessary features to be viable in the interstellar medium (ISM). A searching strategy was applied to that purpose, which allowed to reduce an initial set of 678 possible reactions to a subset of 11 chemical routes that are recommended, for the first time, as potential candidates for contributing to methanol formation in the gas phase of the ISM. They are all barrier-less, and thus they are expected to take place at collision rates. Hopefully, including these reactions in the currently available models, for the gas-phase methanol formation in the ISM, would help improving the predicted fractional abundance of this molecule in dark clouds. Further investigations, especially those dealing with grain chemistry and electronic excited states, would be crucial to get a complete picture of the methanol formation in the ISM.

  6. Statistical parameter characteristics of gas-phase fluctuations for gas-liquid intermittent flow

    Matsui, G.; Monji, H.; Takaguchi, M.

    1995-01-01

    This study deals with theoretical analysis on the general behaviour of statistical parameters of gas-phase fluctuations and comparison of statistical parameter characteristics for the real void fraction fluctuations measured with those for the wave form modified the real fluctuations. In order to investigate the details of the relation between the behavior of the statistical parameters in real intermittent flow and analytical results obtained from information on the real flow, the distributions of statistical parameters for general fundamental wave form of gas-phase fluctuations are discussed in detail. By modifying the real gas-phase fluctuations to a trapezoidaly wave, the experimental results can be directly compared with the analytical results. The analytical results for intermittent flow show that the wave form parameter, and the total amplitude of void fraction fluctuations, affects strongly on the statistical parameter characteristics. The comparison with experiment using nitrogen gas-water intermittent flow suggests that the parameters of skewness and excess may be better as indicators of flow pattern. That is, the macroscopic nature of intermittent flow can be grasped by the skewness and the excess, and the detailed flow structure may be described by the mean and the standard deviation

  7. Gas-phase advanced oxidation as an integrated air pollution control technique

    Getachew A. Adnew

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gas-phase advanced oxidation (GPAO is an emerging air cleaning technology based on the natural self-cleaning processes that occur in the Earth’s atmosphere. The technology uses ozone, UV-C lamps and water vapor to generate gas-phase hydroxyl radicals that initiate oxidation of a wide range of pollutants. In this study four types of GPAO systems are presented: a laboratory scale prototype, a shipping container prototype, a modular prototype, and commercial scale GPAO installations. The GPAO systems treat volatile organic compounds, reduced sulfur compounds, amines, ozone, nitrogen oxides, particles and odor. While the method covers a wide range of pollutants, effective treatment becomes difficult when temperature is outside the range of 0 to 80 °C, for anoxic gas streams and for pollution loads exceeding ca. 1000 ppm. Air residence time in the system and the rate of reaction of a given pollutant with hydroxyl radicals determine the removal efficiency of GPAO. For gas phase compounds and odors including VOCs (e.g. C6H6 and C3H8 and reduced sulfur compounds (e.g. H2S and CH3SH, removal efficiencies exceed 80%. The method is energy efficient relative to many established technologies and is applicable to pollutants emitted from diverse sources including food processing, foundries, water treatment, biofuel generation, and petrochemical industries.

  8. Decontamination and winter conditions

    Quenild, C.; Tveten, U.

    1984-12-01

    The report deals with two decontamonation experiments under winter conditions. A snow-covered parking lot was contaminated, and the snow was subsequently removed using standard snow-moving equipment. The snow left behind was collected and the content of contaminant was determined. A non-radioactive contaminant was used. A decontamination factor exceeding 100 was obtained. Although the eksperimental conditions were close to ideal, it is reason to believe that extremely efficient removal of deposited materials on a snow surface is achivable. In another investigation, run-off from agricultural surface, contaminated while covered with snow, was measured A lycimeter was used in this experiment. A stable layer of ice and snow was allowed to form before contamination. The run-off water was collected at each thaw period until all snow and ice was gone. Cs-134 was used as contaminant. Roughly 30% of the Cs-134 with which the area was contaminated ran off with the melt water. Following a reactor accident situation, this would have given a corresponding reduction in the long term doses. Both of these experiments show that consequence calculation assumptions, as they are currently applied to large accident assessment, tend to overestimate the consequences resulting from accidents taking place under winter conditions

  9. Solving decontaminable flooring problems

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Pennsylvania Power and Light wanted to cover deteriorating concrete in unit 2 of its Susquehanna BWR with a smooth, durable, decontaminable coating. Traditionally, floors in the plant had been coated with epoxy paint, but many of these floors suffered delamination, and failed in three to five years. Painting with epoxy would also interrupt operations for as much as three days while the floor dried, yet critical instruments in some areas had to be monitored at least once per shift. In addition, conventional floor surface preparation produced dust and vibration around sensitive equipment. The solution was a dustless scabbling system for surface preparation, followed by the installation of a high-strength acrylic industrial floor known as Silakal. The work was carried out by Pentek. Silikal bonds to the underlying concrete, so that delamination of the floor will not occur even under severe traffic conditions. Another advantage of this type of flooring is that it cures in one hour, so floor resurfacing has only minimal impact on plant operations. (author)

  10. Decontamination technology assessment

    Allen, R.P.; Konzek, G.J.; Schneider, K.J.; Smith, R.I.

    1988-01-01

    This study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to identify and technically assess foreign decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technology developments that may represent significant improvements over D and D technology currently available or under development in the United States. Technology need areas for nuclear power reactor decommissioning operations were identified and prioritized using the results of past light water rector (LWR) decommissioning studies to quantitatively evaluate the potential for reducing cost and decommissioning worker radiation dose for each major decommissioning activity. Based on these identified needs, current foreign D and D technologies of potential interest to the U.S. were identified through personal contacts and the collection and review of an extensive body of D and D literature. These technologies were then assessed qualitatively to evaluate their uniqueness, potential for a significant reduction in D and D costs and/or worker radiation dose, development status, and other factors affecting their value and applicability to U.S. needs

  11. Electroosmotic decontamination of concrete

    Bostick, W.D.; Bush, S.A.; Marsh, G.C.; Henson, H.M.; Box, W.D.; Morgan, I.L.

    1993-03-01

    A method is described for the electroosmotic decontamination of concrete surfaces, in which an electrical field is used to induce migration of ionic contaminants from porous concrete into an electrolyte solution that may be disposed of as a low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLRW); alternately, the contaminants from the solution can be sorbed onto anion exchange media in order to prevent contaminant buildup in the solution and to minimize the amount of LLRW generated. We have confirmed the removal of uranium (and infer the removal of 99 Tc) from previously contaminated concrete surfaces. In a typical experimental configuration, a stainless steel mesh is placed in an electrolyte solution contained within a diked cell to serve as the negative electrode (cathode) and contaminant collection medium, respectively, and an existing metal penetration (e.g., piping, conduit, or rebar reinforcement within the concrete surface) serves as the positive electrode (anode) to complete the cell. Typically we have achieved 70 to >90% reductions in surface activity by applying 2 )

  12. New decontamination technologies for environmental applications

    Allen, R.P.; Arrowsmith, H.W.; McCoy, M.W.

    1981-01-01

    The technologies discussed represent a versatile collection of tools and approaches for environmental decontamination applications. The fixatives provide a means for gaining and maintaining control of large contaminated areas, for decontaminating large surface areas, and for protecting equipment and supplies used in decontamination operations. The other decontamination techniques together provide a method for removing loose surface contamination from almost all classes of materials and surfaces. These techniques should have wide application both as direct decontamination processes and for the cleaning of tools and equipment used in the decontamination operations

  13. Oxidative potential of gas phase combustion emissions - An underestimated and potentially harmful component of air pollution from combustion processes

    Stevanovic, S.; Vaughan, A.; Hedayat, F.; Salimi, F.; Rahman, M. M.; Zare, A.; Brown, R. A.; Brown, R. J.; Wang, H.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, X.; Bottle, S. E.; Yang, I. A.; Ristovski, Z. D.

    2017-06-01

    The oxidative potential (OP) of the gas phase is an important and neglected aspect of environmental toxicity. Whilst prolonged exposure to particulate matter (PM) associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to lead to negative health effects, the potential for compounds in gas phase to cause similar effects is yet to be understood. In this study we describe: the significance of the gas phase OP generated through vehicle emissions; discuss the origin and evolution of species contributing to measured OP; and report on the impact of gas phase OP on human lung cells. The model aerosol for this study was exhaust emitted from a Euro III Common-rail diesel engine fuelled with different blends of diesel and biodiesel. The gas phase of these emissions was found to be potentially as hazardous as the particle phase. Fuel oxygen content was found to negatively correlate with the gas phase OP, and positively correlate with particle phase OP. This signifies a complex interaction between reactive species present in gas and particle phase. Furthermore, this interaction has an overarching effect on the OP of both particle and gas phase, and therefore the toxicity of combustion emissions.

  14. CB decontamination for first responders

    Mayer, M.D.G.; Purdon, J.G.; Burczyk, A. [Defence Research and Development Canada Suffield, Ralston, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The Universal Containment System (UCS) is designed to contain, mitigate and decontaminate chemical, biological and radiological warfare agents. The UCS consists of a lightweight, tent-like enclosure filled with a water-based surface decontaminating foam (SDF). The Canadian government funded a project to advance the understanding of the behaviour of the UCS. This paper described the success of the project as well as the technological advances in the UCS formulation and equipment. Vapour desorption experiments were conducted in which SDF was applied onto 12 surfaces found in a typical office environment. Both mustard and nerve agent were studied on the test surfaces. Both scrubbing and non-scrubbing decontamination methods were tested. SDF effectively decontaminated the non-porous substances, particularly when the scrubbing procedure was used. Results were more complicated for the non-porous samples. A dye added to the agent was useful for determining the fate of the agent. Liquid phase studies were conducted in which the reaction between SDF and various agents were studied in the liquid phase in order to estimate the rate of reaction, the stoichiometry and the reaction products formed. Both SDF and the commercial decontamination agent CASCAD were found to effectively kill 100 per cent of anthrax spores. The significance of this project to first responders was considerable. Changes to the formulation and equipment of UCS will increase its usefulness and safety. Users will also have a better knowledge of the amount of decontamination needed for complete effectiveness in specific situations. Recommendations have been made for use of the product on a range of indoor surfaces. Field trials have shown the blast mitigation and agent decontamination ability of the foam under explosive situations. 15 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. Development of Nuclear Decontamination Technology Using Supercritical Fluid

    Jung, Wonyoung; Park, Kwangheon; Park, Jihye; Lee, Donghee

    2014-01-01

    Soil cleaning technologies that have been developed thus far increase treatment costs in contaminated soil recovery processes because they generate large amounts of secondary wastes. In this respect, this study is intended to develop soil decontamination methods using CO 2 , which is a nontoxic, environmentally friendly substance, in order to fundamentally suppress the generation of secondary wastes from the decontamination process and to create high added values. In this study, to develop decontamination methods for uranium-contaminated soil using supercritical CO 2 , a soil decontamination system using supercritical CO 2 was constructed. In addition, the basic principle of supercritical CO 2 decontamination using a TBP-HNO3 complex was explained. According to the results of the study, sea-sand samples having the same degree of contamination showed different results of decontamination according to the quantities of the TBP-HNO3 complex used as an extraction agent, which resulted in high extraction rates. Thus far, a most widely used method of extracting uranium has been the dissolving of uranium in acids. However, this method has the large adverse effect of generating strong acidic wastes that cannot be easily treated. On the other hand, supercritical CO 2 requires critical conditions that are no more difficult to meet than those of other supercritical fluids, since its density can be changed from a very low state close to that of an ideal gas to a high state close to that of liquids. The critical gas conditions are a pressure of 71 bar and a temperature of 31 .deg. C, both of which are inexpensive to achieve. Moreover, CO 2 is a solvent that is not harmful to the human body and few effects on environmental pollution. Therefore, nontoxic and environment friendly processes can be developed using supercritical CO 2 . Supercritical CO 2 's advantages over prevailing methods suggest its potential for developing innovative decontamination methods, as demonstrated

  16. RSDL decontamination of human skin contaminated with the nerve agent VX.

    Thors, L; Lindberg, S; Johansson, S; Koch, B; Koch, M; Hägglund, L; Bucht, A

    2017-03-05

    also influenced the degradation rate since the degradation of VX was significantly faster when the NMR analysis was performed in the organic solvent acetonitrile compared to water. In conclusion, we have applied the in vitro flow-through diffusion cell for evaluation of skin decontamination procedures of human epidermis exposed to OPCs. It was demonstrated that early decontamination is crucial for efficient mitigation of epidermal penetration of VX and that almost complete removal of the nerve agent from the skin surface is possible. Our data also indicate that the pH of RSDL together with the solubility of OPC in RSDL are of primary importance for the decontamination efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCPY AND REACTIONS OF ACTINIDES IN THE GAS PHASE AND CRYOGENIC MATRICES

    Heaven, Michael C.; Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2009-02-01

    In this chapter we review the spectroscopic data for actinide molecules and the reaction dynamics for atomic and molecular actinides that have been examined in the gas phase or in inert cryogenic matrices. The motivation for this type of investigation is that physical properties and reactions can be studied in the absence of external perturbations (gas phase) or under minimally perturbing conditions (cryogenic matrices). This information can be compared directly with the results from high-level theoretical models. The interplay between experiment and theory is critically important for advancing our understanding of actinide chemistry. For example, elucidation of the role of the 5f electrons in bonding and reactivity can only be achieved through the application of experimentally verified theoretical models. Theoretical calculations for the actinides are challenging due the large numbers of electrons that must be treated explicitly and the presence of strong relativistic effects. This topic has been reviewed in depth in Chapter 17 of this series. One of the goals of the experimental work described in this chapter has been to provide benchmark data that can be used to evaluate both empirical and ab initio theoretical models. While gas-phase data are the most suitable for comparison with theoretical calculations, there are technical difficulties entailed in generating workable densities of gas-phase actinide molecules that have limited the range of species that have been characterized. Many of the compounds of interest are refractory, and problems associated with the use of high temperature vapors have complicated measurements of spectra, ionization energies, and reactions. One approach that has proved to be especially valuable in overcoming this difficulty has been the use of pulsed laser ablation to generate plumes of vapor from refractory actinide-containing materials. The vapor is entrained in an inert gas, which can be used to cool the actinide species to room

  18. Toshiba's decontamination technologies for the decommissioning

    Inoue, Yuki; Yaita, Yumi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    For the decommissioning, two types of decontamination process are necessary, 1) system decontamination before dismantling and 2) decontamination of dismantling waste. Toshiba has been developing the decontamination technologies for the both purposes from the viewpoint of minimizing the secondary waste. For the system decontamination before dismantling, chemical decontamination process, such as T-OZON, can be applicable for stainless steel or carbon steel piping. For the decontamination of dismantling waste, several types of process have been developed to apply variety of shapes and materials. For the simple shape materials, physical decontamination process, such as blast decontamination, is effective. We have developed new blast decontamination process with highly durable zirconia particle. It can be used repeatedly and secondary waste can be reduced compared with conventional blast particle. For the complex shape materials, chemical decontamination process can be applied that formic acid decontamination process for carbon steel and electrolytic reduction decontamination process with organic acid for stainless steel. These chemicals can be decomposed to carbon dioxide and water and amount of secondary waste can be small. (author)

  19. Decontaminating products for routine decontamination in nuclear power plants

    Henning, K.

    2001-01-01

    Routine decontamination work that has to be carried out in practical operation includes the cleaning of all kinds of surfaces such as floors, walls and apparatus, the decontamination of professional clothes and of the personnel. In order to ensure a trouble-free functioning of plants for the treatment of waste water and concentrate in nuclear power plants, radioactive liquid wastes appearing in the controlled area should be compatible with the treatment methods in practice. Radioactive concentrates and resides obtained from the treatment methods are mixed with matrix materials like cement or bitumen or treated by roller frame drying and thus are conditioned for intermediate or final storage. Several requirements should be made on decontaminating agents used in the controlled area. Some of these physical-chemical criteria will be described in detail. (R.P.)

  20. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    Lussiez, G.

    1994-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially of planned decommissioning operations. Thus lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for contaminated lead is removing the superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a scaled-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling

  1. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radionuclides and is therefore a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Lab. decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 100 metric tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 280 kPa (40 psig) rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a pump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process

  2. Liquid decontaminants for nuclear applications

    Henning, Klaus; Gojowczyk, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Decontaminants used in the nuclear field must meet a variety of requirements. On the one hand, the washing process must remove radioactive contamination and conventional dirt from the items washed. On the other hand, subsequent disposal of the washing water arisings must be feasible by the usual waste disposal pathway. One aspect of particular importance is unproblematic treatment of the radioactively contaminated waste water, as a rule low to medium active, whose final storage must be ensured. Decontaminants must not impair waste treatment processes, such as evaporation, filtration, and centrifuging, as well as further treatment of the concentrates and residues arising which are worked into matrix materials (cementation, bituminization), in drum drying or roller mill drying. For reasons of safety at work and environmental quality, also aspects of human toxicology and ecotoxicology must be taken into account. In this way, handling decontaminants will not jeopardize the health of personnel or cause potential long-term environmental damage. Liquid decontaminants, compared to powders, offer the advantage of automatic dosage. The liquid product is dosed accurately as a function of the washing program used. Liquid decontaminants can be handled safely in hot laundries without causing skin and eye contacts. (orig.)

  3. DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE

    Bossart, Steven J.; Blair, Danielle M.

    2003-01-01

    As nuclear research and production facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex are slated for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D), there is a need to decontaminate some facilities for reuse for another mission or continued use for the same mission. Improved technologies available in the commercial sector and tested by the DOE can help solve the DOE's decontamination problems. Decontamination technologies include mechanical methods, such as shaving, scabbling, and blasting; application of chemicals; biological methods; and electrochemical techniques. Materials to be decontaminated are primarily concrete or metal. Concrete materials include walls, floors, ceilings, bio-shields, and fuel pools. Metallic materials include structural steel, valves, pipes, gloveboxes, reactors, and other equipment. Porous materials such as concrete can be contaminated throughout their structure, although contamination in concrete normally resides in the top quarter-inch below the surface. Metals are normally only contaminated on the surface. Contamination includes a variety of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides and can sometimes include heavy metals and organic contamination regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes several advanced mechanical, chemical, and other methods to decontaminate structures, equipment, and materials

  4. Full system decontamination feasibility studies

    Denault, R.P.; LeSurf, J.E.; Walschot, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Many chemical decontaminations have been performed on subsystems in light water reactors (BWRs and PWRs) but none on the full system (including the fuel) of large, (>500 MWe) investor owned reactors. Full system decontaminations on pressure-tubed reactors have been shown to facilitate maintenance, inspection, repair and replacement of reactor components. Further advantages are increased reactor availability and plant life extension. A conceptual study has been performed for EPRI (for PWRs) and Commonwealth Edison Co (for BWRs) into the applicability and cost benefit of full system decontaminations (FSD). The joint study showed that FSDs in both PWRs and BWRs, with or without the fuel included in the decontamination, are feasible and cost beneficial provided a large amount of work is to be done following the decontamination. The large amounts of radioactive waste generated can be managed using current technologies. Considerable improvements in waste handling, and consequent cost savings, can be obtained if new techniques which are now reaching commercial application are used. (author)

  5. Radioactive Decontamination by Strippable Paint

    Chantaraparprachoom, N.; Mishima, K.

    1998-01-01

    The strippable paint, one of the adhesion method, is to decontaminate solid surface of materials or/and a large area. Two kinds of specimen planchet, SUS 304 stainless steel and polycarbonate plastic, contaminated with radioactive 137 Cs were studied under various conditions. It included surface bottom types, the flat and convex concentric circle type, normal condition at room temperature and overheat condition (∼80 degree celsius). This method used coating paints which contains some elements to have a reaction with radioactive materials selectively. ALARA-Decon clear, Rempack-X200 clear, JD-P5-Mrs.Coat and Pro-Blue-color guard were selected to use as the coating paints. The contaminated surface was coated by the strippable paint under the optimum time, followed by peeling the paint seal. The Rempack-X200 showed the best result, the highest decontamination efficiency which are about 99-100% for all conditions of specimens. The JD-P5 and ALARA-Decon showed good results, which are 98-99% decontamination efficiency for the normal condition set of specimens and about 94-97% for the overheat set of specimens. They can decontaminate polycarbonate specimens better than stainless steel specimens. The Pro-Blue-color guard showed the lowest decontamination efficiency of which 60% for polycarbonate specimens at normal condition and 40%, 30% for stainless steel specimens at normal and overheat conditions respectively. There was no effects of surface bottom types significantly

  6. An atmospheric pressure high-temperature laminar flow reactor for investigation of combustion and related gas phase reaction systems

    Oßwald, Patrick; Köhler, Markus [Institute of Combustion Technology, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Pfaffenwaldring 38-40, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    A new high-temperature flow reactor experiment utilizing the powerful molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) technique for detailed observation of gas phase kinetics in reacting flows is presented. The reactor design provides a consequent extension of the experimental portfolio of validation experiments for combustion reaction kinetics. Temperatures up to 1800 K are applicable by three individually controlled temperature zones with this atmospheric pressure flow reactor. Detailed speciation data are obtained using the sensitive MBMS technique, providing in situ access to almost all chemical species involved in the combustion process, including highly reactive species such as radicals. Strategies for quantifying the experimental data are presented alongside a careful analysis of the characterization of the experimental boundary conditions to enable precise numeric reproduction of the experimental results. The general capabilities of this new analytical tool for the investigation of reacting flows are demonstrated for a selected range of conditions, fuels, and applications. A detailed dataset for the well-known gaseous fuels, methane and ethylene, is provided and used to verify the experimental approach. Furthermore, application for liquid fuels and fuel components important for technical combustors like gas turbines and engines is demonstrated. Besides the detailed investigation of novel fuels and fuel components, the wide range of operation conditions gives access to extended combustion topics, such as super rich conditions at high temperature important for gasification processes, or the peroxy chemistry governing the low temperature oxidation regime. These demonstrations are accompanied by a first kinetic modeling approach, examining the opportunities for model validation purposes.

  7. An atmospheric pressure high-temperature laminar flow reactor for investigation of combustion and related gas phase reaction systems.

    Oßwald, Patrick; Köhler, Markus

    2015-10-01

    A new high-temperature flow reactor experiment utilizing the powerful molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) technique for detailed observation of gas phase kinetics in reacting flows is presented. The reactor design provides a consequent extension of the experimental portfolio of validation experiments for combustion reaction kinetics. Temperatures up to 1800 K are applicable by three individually controlled temperature zones with this atmospheric pressure flow reactor. Detailed speciation data are obtained using the sensitive MBMS technique, providing in situ access to almost all chemical species involved in the combustion process, including highly reactive species such as radicals. Strategies for quantifying the experimental data are presented alongside a careful analysis of the characterization of the experimental boundary conditions to enable precise numeric reproduction of the experimental results. The general capabilities of this new analytical tool for the investigation of reacting flows are demonstrated for a selected range of conditions, fuels, and applications. A detailed dataset for the well-known gaseous fuels, methane and ethylene, is provided and used to verify the experimental approach. Furthermore, application for liquid fuels and fuel components important for technical combustors like gas turbines and engines is demonstrated. Besides the detailed investigation of novel fuels and fuel components, the wide range of operation conditions gives access to extended combustion topics, such as super rich conditions at high temperature important for gasification processes, or the peroxy chemistry governing the low temperature oxidation regime. These demonstrations are accompanied by a first kinetic modeling approach, examining the opportunities for model validation purposes.

  8. Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite for decontamination of sulfur mustard

    Praveen Kumar, J.; Prasad, G.K.; Ramacharyulu, P.V.R.K.; Garg, P.; Ganesan, K.

    2013-01-01

    Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard, a well known chemical warfare agent. They were prepared by precipitation pyrolysis method and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. Obtained data indicated the presence of mesopores with diameter ranging from 2 to 80 nm and the materials exhibited relatively high surface area 86 m 2 g −1 when compared to the individual metal oxide nanoparticles. Reactive sites of mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied by infrared spectroscopy technique using pyridine as a probe molecule. These materials demonstrated superior decontamination properties against sulfur mustard when compared to single component metal oxides and decontaminated it to divinyl sulfide, chloroethyl vinyl sulfide, hemisulfur mustard, etc. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard, a well known chemical warfare agent. These materials demonstrated superior decontamination properties against sulfur mustard and decontaminated it to divinyl sulfide, chloroethyl vinyl sulfide, hemisulfur mustard, etc. - Highlights: • Preparation of mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite. • CuO–ZnO with better surface area was synthesized by precipitation pyrolysis. • Decontamination of HD using mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite. • HD decontaminated by elimination and hydrolysis reactions

  9. Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite for decontamination of sulfur mustard

    Praveen Kumar, J.; Prasad, G.K., E-mail: gkprasad2001@yahoo.com; Ramacharyulu, P.V.R.K.; Garg, P.; Ganesan, K.

    2013-11-01

    Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard, a well known chemical warfare agent. They were prepared by precipitation pyrolysis method and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. Obtained data indicated the presence of mesopores with diameter ranging from 2 to 80 nm and the materials exhibited relatively high surface area 86 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} when compared to the individual metal oxide nanoparticles. Reactive sites of mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied by infrared spectroscopy technique using pyridine as a probe molecule. These materials demonstrated superior decontamination properties against sulfur mustard when compared to single component metal oxides and decontaminated it to divinyl sulfide, chloroethyl vinyl sulfide, hemisulfur mustard, etc. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard, a well known chemical warfare agent. These materials demonstrated superior decontamination properties against sulfur mustard and decontaminated it to divinyl sulfide, chloroethyl vinyl sulfide, hemisulfur mustard, etc. - Highlights: • Preparation of mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite. • CuO–ZnO with better surface area was synthesized by precipitation pyrolysis. • Decontamination of HD using mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite. • HD decontaminated by elimination and hydrolysis reactions.

  10. Binding affinity and decontamination of dermal decontamination gel to model chemical warfare agent simulants.

    Cao, Yachao; Elmahdy, Akram; Zhu, Hanjiang; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard

    2018-05-01

    Six chemical warfare agent simulants (trimethyl phosphate, dimethyl adipate, 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide, diethyl adipate, chloroethyl phenyl sulfide and diethyl sebacate) were studied in in vitro human skin to explore relationship between dermal penetration/absorption and the mechanisms of simulant partitioning between stratum corneum (SC) and water as well as between dermal decontamination gel (DDGel) and water. Both binding affinity to and decontamination of simulants using DDGel were studied. Partition coefficients of six simulants between SC and water (Log P SC/w ) and between DDGel and water (Log P DDGel/w ) were determined. Results showed that DDGel has a similar or higher binding affinity to each simulant compared to SC. The relationship between Log P octanol/water and Log P SC/w as well as between Log P octanol/water and Log P DDGel/w demonstrated that partition coefficient of simulants correlated to their lipophilicity or hydrophilicity. Decontamination efficiency results with DDGel for these simulants were consistent with binding affinity results. Amounts of percentage dose of chemicals in DDGel of trimethyl phosphate, dimethyl adipate, 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide, diethyl adipate, chloroethyl phenyl sulfide and diethyl sebacate were determined to be 61.15, 85.67, 75.91, 53.53, 89.89 and 76.58, with corresponding amounts absorbed in skin of 0.96, 0.65, 1.68, 0.72, 0.57 and 1.38, respectively. In vitro skin decontamination experiments coupled with a dermal absorption study demonstrated that DDGel can efficiently remove chemicals from skin surface, back-extract from the SC, and significantly reduced chemical penetration into skin or systemic absorption for all six simulants tested. Therefore, DDGel offers a great potential as a NextGen skin Decon platform technology for both military and civilian use. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Electrochemical Decontamination of Painted and Heavily Corroded Metals

    Marczak, S.; Anderson, J.; Dziewinski, J.

    1998-01-01

    The radioactive metal wastes that are generated from nuclear fuel plants and radiochemical laboratories are mainly contaminated by the surface deposition of radioactive isotopes. There are presently several techniques used in removing surface contamination involving physical and chemical processes. However, there has been very little research done in the area of soiled, heavily oxidized, and painted metals. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have been developing electrochemical procedures for the decontamination of bare and painted metal objects. These methods have been found to be effective on highly corroded as well as relatively new metals. This study has been successful in decontaminating projectiles and shrapnel excavated during environmental restoration projects after 40+ years of exposure to the elements. Heavily corroded augers used in sampling activities throughout the area were also successfully decontaminated. This process has demonstrated its effectiveness and offers several advantages over the present metal decontamination practices of media blasting and chemical solvents. These advantages include the addition of no toxic or hazardous chemicals, low operating temperature and pressure, and easily scaleable equipment. It is in their future plans to use this process in the decontamination of gloveboxes destined for disposal as TRU waste

  12. Development of remote electrochemical decontamination for hot cell applications

    Turner, A.D.; Junkison, A.R.; Pottinger, J.S.; Lain, M.J.; Neville, M.D.; Dawson, R.K.; Fletcher, P.A.; Fenn-Tye, I.A.

    1993-01-01

    Electrochemical dissolution into nitric acid has been developed as a decontamination process for metallic items, both for immersion and in-situ use. Not only is the spent electrolyte compatible with existing waste treatment routes, potentially yielding an immobilized product volume of 0.6 dm 3 /m 2 area treated, but it also suppresses any hydrogen production. Both processes have been developed from laboratory to microprocessor-controlled pilot-scale units, which have been demonstrated successfully for the treatment of genuine waste, reducing activity levels to background. For stainless steel substrates, the immersion tank process uses low current densities (10-50 A/m 2 ) in 1-5M HN0 3 for the treatment of extended areas. Decontamination factors > 10 4 can be achieved in two hours. The in-situ technique uses electropolishing in 6M HN0 3 at 1-2 A/cm 2 in an engineered head. Decontamination factors > 10 3 can be achieved in only 20 seconds. This device has also shown potential for incorporation into an integrated monitoring/decontaminating system under robotic control. Both techniques may be used remotely as a way of reducing man-dose and improving productivity during decontamination. Additional cost savings can be made over currently used techniques through the decategorization of the bulk of the waste volume, and the volume reduction of waste for interim storage and geological disposal

  13. Alpha Decontamination and Disassembly Pilot Facility. Final report

    Daugherty, B.A.; Clark, H.E.

    1985-04-01

    The Alpha Decontamination and Disassembly (AD and D) Pilot Facility was built to develop and demonstrate a reference process for the decontamination and size reduction of noncombustible transuranic (TRU) waste. The goals of the reference process were to remove >99% of the surface contamination to the high-level waste tanks, and to achieve volume reduction factors greater than 15:1. Preliminary bench-scale decontamination work was accomplished at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), establishing a reference decontamination process. Initially, the pilot facility did not achieve the decontamination goals. As the program continued, and modifications to the process were made, coupon analysis idicated that 99% of the surface contamination was removed to the high-level drain system. Prior to the AD and D Pilot Facility, no size reduction work had been done at SRL. Several other Department of Energy (DOE) facilities were experimenting with plasma arc torches for size reduction work. Their methods were employed in the AD and D hot cell with moderate success. The experimental work concluded with recommendations for further testing of other size reduction techniques. 11 figs., 6 tabs

  14. A Sandia National Laboratories decontamination and demolition success story

    Miller, D.R.; Barber, D.S.; Lipka, G.

    1994-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) has established a formal facility assessment, decontamination and demolition oversight process with the goal of ensuring that excess or contaminated facilities are managed in a cost-effective manner that is protective of human health and the environment. The decontamination and demolition process is designed so that all disciplines are consulted and have input from the initiation of a project. The committee consists of all essential Environmental, Safety and Health (ES and H) and Facilities disciplines. The interdisciplinary-team approach has provided a mechanism that verifies adequate building and site assessment activities are conducted. This approach ensures that wastes generated during decontamination and demolition activities are handled and disposed according to Department of Energy (DOE), Federal, state, and local requirements. Because of the comprehensive nature of the SNL decontamination and demolition process, the strategy can be followed for demolition, renovation and new construction projects, regardless of funding source. An overview of the SNL/NM decontamination and demolition process is presented through a case study which demonstrates the practical importance of the formal process

  15. Chemical decontaminating method for stainless steel

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive metal wastes comprising passivated stainless steels are chemically decontaminated to such a radioactivity level as that of usual wastes. The present invention for chemically decontaminating stainless steels comprises a first step of immersing decontaminates into a sulfuric acid solution and a second step of immersing them into an aqueous solution prepared by adding oxidative metal salts to sulfuric acid, in which a portion of the surface of stainless steels as decontaminates are chemically ground to partially expose substrate materials and then the above-mentioned decontamination steps are applied. More than 90% of radioactive materials are removed in this method by the dissolution of the exposed substrate materials and peeling of cruds secured to the surface of the materials upon dissolution. This method is applicable to decontamination of articles having complicate shapes, can reduce the amount of secondary wastes after decontamination and also remarkably shorten the time required for decontamination. (T.M.)

  16. PNL size reduction and decontamination facilities and capabilities

    Allen, R.P.; Fetrow, L.K.; McCoy, M.W.

    1983-07-01

    Studies sponsored by the US Department of Energy at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) have resulted in the development of an effective, integrated size reduction and decontamination system for transuranically contaminated components. Using this system, a reduction of more than 95% in the volume of transuranic waste requiring interim storage and eventual geologic disposal has been achieved for typical plutonium contaminated glove boxes. This paper describes the separate preparation, size reduction, decontamination and waste treatment operations and facilities that have been developed and demonstrated as part of this work

  17. Decontamination of 2-chloroethyl ethylsulfide using titanate nanoscrolls

    Kleinhammes, Alfred; Wagner, George W.; Kulkarni, Harsha; Jia, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qi; Qin, Lu-Chang; Wu, Yue

    2005-08-01

    Titanate nanoscrolls, a recently discovered variant of TiO 2 nanocrystals, are tested as reactive sorbent for chemical warfare agent (CWA) decontamination. The large surface area of the uncapped tubules provides the desired rapid absorption of the contaminant while water molecules, intrinsic constituents of titanate nanoscrolls, provide the necessary chemistry for hydrolytic reaction. In this study the decomposition of 2-chloroethyl ethylsulfide (CEES), a simulant for the CWA mustard, was monitored using 13C NMR. The NMR spectra reveal reaction products as expected from the hydrolysis of CEES. This demonstrates that titanate nanoscrolls could potentially be employed as a decontaminant for CWAs.

  18. Electrolytic decontamination of conductive materials for hazardous waste management

    Wedman, D.E.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.

    1996-01-01

    Electrolytic removal of plutonium and americium from stainless steel and uranium surfaces has been demonstrated. Preliminary experiments were performed on the electrochemically based decontamination of type 304L stainless steel in sodium nitrate solutions to better understand the metal removal effects of varying cur-rent density, pH, and nitrate concentration parameters. Material removal rates and changes in surface morphology under these varying conditions are reported. Experimental results indicate that an electropolishing step before contamination removes surface roughness, thereby simplifying later electrolytic decontamination. Sodium nitrate based electrolytic decontamination produced the most uniform stripping of material at low to intermediate pH and at sodium nitrate concentrations of 200 g L -1 and higher. Stirring was also observed to increase the uniformity of the stripping process

  19. Precipitation process for supernate decontamination

    Lee, L.M.; Kilpatrick, L.L.

    1982-11-01

    A precipitation and adsorption process has been developed to remove cesium, strontium, and plutonium from water-soluble, high-level radioactive waste. An existing waste tank serves as the reaction vessel and the process begins with the addition of a solution of sodium tetraphenylborate and a slurry of sodium titanate to the contained waste salt solution. Sodium tetraphenylborate precipitates the cesium and sodium titanate adsorbs the strontium and plutonium. The precipitate/adsorbate is then separated from the decontaminated salt solution by crossflow filtration. This new process offers significant capital savings over an earlier ion exchange process for salt decontamination. Chemical and small-scale engineering studies with actual waste are reported. The effect of many variables on the decontamination factors and filter performance are defined

  20. A scaffold easy to decontaminate

    Mourek, D.

    1992-01-01

    The conventional scaffold used in the assembling work and in revisions of technological facilities at nuclear power plants has many drawbacks. The most serious of them are a high amount of radioactive waste arising from the decontamination (planing) of the floor timber and from the discarding of damaged irreparable parts, and a considerable corrosion of the carbon steel supporting structure after the decontamination. A detailed description is given of a novel scaffold assembly which can be decontaminated and which exhibits many assets, in particular a good mechanical resistance (also to bad weather), a lower weight, and the use of prepreg floor girders for the construction of service platforms or scaffold bridges which can readily be assembled from the pressed pieces in a modular way. (Z.S.). 4 figs., 4 refs

  1. Chemical decontamination of stainless steel

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method for chemical decontamination of radioactive metal waste materials contaminated with radioactive materials on the surface, generated in radioactive materials-handling facilities. The invention is comprised of a method of chemical decontamination of stainless steel, characterized by comprising a first process of immersing a stainless steel-based metal waste material contaminated by radioactive materials on the surface in a sulfuric acid solution and second process of immersing in an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid and oxidizing metal salt, in which a portion of the surface of the stainless steel to be decontaminated is polished mechanically to expose a portion of the base material before the above first and second processes. 1 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Modeling of gas-phase chemistry in the chemical vapor deposition of polysilicon in a cold wall system

    Toprac, A.J.; Edgar, T.F.; Trachtenberg, I. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-06-01

    The relative contribution of gas-phase chemistry to deposition processes is an important issue both from the standpoint of operation and modeling of these processes. In polysilicon deposition from thermally activated silane in a cold wall rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD) system, the relative contribution of gas-phase chemistry to the overall deposition rate was examined by a mass-balance model. Evaluating the process at conditions examined experimentally, the model indicated that gas-phase reactions may be neglected to good accuracy in predicting polysilicon deposition rate. The model also provided estimates of the level of gas-phase generated SiH[sub 2] associated with deposition on the cold-process chamber walls.

  3. Heterogeneity-enhanced gas phase formation in shallow aquifers during leakage of CO2-saturated water from geologic sequestration sites

    Plampin, Michael R.; Lassen, Rune Nørbæk; Sakaki, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    sands. Soil moisture sensors were utilized to observe the formation of gas phase near the porous media interfaces. Results indicate that the conditions under which heterogeneity controls gas phase evolution can be successfully predicted through analysis of simple parameters, including the dissolved CO2......, it is important to understand the physical processes that CO2 will undergo as it moves through naturally heterogeneous porous media formations. Previous studies have shown that heterogeneity can enhance the evolution of gas phase CO2 in some cases, but the conditions under which this occurs have not yet been...... quantitatively defined, nor tested through laboratory experiments. This study quantitatively investigates the effects of geologic heterogeneity on the process of gas phase CO2 evolution in shallow aquifers through an extensive set of experiments conducted in a column that was packed with layers of various test...

  4. Decontamination of Savannah River Plant H-Area hot-canyon crane

    Rankin, W.N.; Sims, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Decontamination techniques applicable to the remotely operated bridge cranes in canyon buildings at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) were identified and were evaluated in laboratory-scale tests. High pressure Freon blasting was found to be the most attractive process available for this application. Strippable coatings were selected as an alternative technique in selected applications. The ability of high pressure Freon blasting plus two strippable coatings (Quadcoat 100 and Alara 1146) to remove the type of contamination expected on SRP cranes was demonstrated in laboratory-scale tests. Quadrex HPS was given a contract to decontaminate the H-Area hot canyon crane. Decontamination operations were successfully carried out within the specified time-frame window. The radiation level goals specified by SRP were met and decontamination was accomplished with 85% less personnel exposure than estimated by SRP before the job started. This reduction is attributed to the increased efficiency of the new decontamination techniques used. 6 refs., 1 tab

  5. Comparison of Selected Methods for Individual Decontamination of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Tomas Capoun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the individual decontamination of chemical warfare agents (CWA and other hazardous substances. The individual decontamination applies to contaminated body surfaces, protective clothing and objects immediately after contamination, performed individually or by mutual assistance using prescribed or improvised devices. The article evaluates the importance of individual decontamination, security level for Fire and Rescue Service Units of the Czech Republic (FRS CR and demonstrates some of the devices. The decontamination efficiency of selected methods (sorbent, glove and sponge, two-chamber foam device and wiping with alcohol was evaluated for protective clothing and painted steel plate contaminated with O-ethyl-S-(diisopropylaminoethyl-methylthiophosphonate (VX, sulfur mustard, o-cresol and acrylonitrile. The methods were assessed from an economic point of view and with regard to specific user parameters, such as the decontamination of surfaces or materials with poor accessibility and vertical surfaces, the need for a water rinse as well as toxic waste and its disposal.

  6. Delivering Transmembrane Peptide Complexes to the Gas Phase Using Nanodiscs and Electrospray Ionization

    Li, Jun; Richards, Michele R.; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2017-10-01

    The gas-phase conformations of dimers of the channel-forming membrane peptide gramicidin A (GA), produced from isobutanol or aqueous solutions of GA-containing nanodiscs (NDs), are investigated using electrospray ionization-ion mobility separation-mass spectrometry (ESI-IMS-MS) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The IMS arrival times measured for (2GA + 2Na)2+ ions from isobutanol reveal three different conformations, with collision cross-sections (Ω) of 683 Å2 (conformation 1, C1), 708 Å2 (C2), and 737 Å2 (C3). The addition of NH4CH3CO2 produced (2GA + 2Na)2+ and (2GA + H + Na)2+ ions, with Ω similar to those of C1, C2, and C3, as well as (2GA + 2H)2+, (2GA + 2NH4)2+, and (2GA + H + NH4)2+ ions, which adopt a single conformation with a Ω similar to that of C2. These results suggest that the nature of the charging agents, imparted by the ESI process, can influence dimer conformation in the gas phase. Notably, the POPC NDs produced exclusively (2GA + 2NH4)2+ dimer ions; the DMPC NDs produced both (2GA + 2H)2+ and (2GA + 2NH4)2+ dimer ions. While the Ω of (2GA + 2H)2+ is similar to that of C2, the (2GA + 2NH4)2+ ions from NDs adopt a more compact structure, with a Ω of 656 Å2. It is proposed that this compact structure corresponds to the ion conducting single stranded head-to-head helical GA dimer. These findings highlight the potential of NDs, combined with ESI, for transferring transmembrane peptide complexes directly from lipid bilayers to the gas phase. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Gas-Phase Thermal Tautomerization of Imidazole-Acetic Acid: Theoretical and Computational Investigations

    Saadullah G. Aziz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The gas-phase thermal tautomerization reaction between imidazole-4-acetic (I and imidazole-5-acetic (II acids was monitored using the traditional hybrid functional (B3LYP and the long-range corrected functionals (CAM-B3LYP and ωB97XD with 6-311++G** and aug-cc-pvdz basis sets. The roles of the long-range and dispersion corrections on their geometrical parameters, thermodynamic functions, kinetics, dipole moments, Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital–Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO–LUMO energy gaps and total hyperpolarizability were investigated. All tested levels of theory predicted the preference of I over II by 0.750–0.877 kcal/mol. The origin of predilection of I is assigned to the H-bonding interaction (nN8→σ*O14–H15. This interaction stabilized I by 15.07 kcal/mol. The gas-phase interconversion between the two tautomers assumed a 1,2-proton shift mechanism, with two transition states (TS, TS1 and TS2, having energy barriers of 47.67–49.92 and 49.55–52.69 kcal/mol, respectively, and an sp3-type intermediate. A water-assisted 1,3-proton shift route brought the barrier height down to less than 20 kcal/mol in gas-phase and less than 12 kcal/mol in solution. The relatively high values of total hyperpolarizability of I compared to II were interpreted and discussed.

  8. The Gas-Phase Photophysics of Eosin Y and its Maleimide Conjugate.

    Daly, Steven; Kulesza, Alexander; Knight, Geoffrey; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2016-05-26

    The use of the xanthene family of dyes as fluorescent probes in a wide range of applications has provided impetus for the studying of their photophysical properties. In particular, recent advances in gas-phase techniques such as FRET that utilize such chromophores have placed a greater importance on the characterization of these properties in the gas phase. Additionally, the use of synthetic linker chains to graft the chromophores in a site-specific manner to their target system is ubiquitous. There is, however, often limited information on how the addition of such a linker chain may affect the photophysical properties of the chromophores, which is of fundamental importance for interpretation of experimental data reliant on grafted chromophores. Here, we present data on the optical spectroscopy of different protonation states of Eosin Y, a fluorescein derivative. We compare the photophysics of Eosin Y to its maleimide conjugate, and to the thioether product of the reaction of this conjugate with cysteamine. Comparison of the mass spectra following laser irradiation shows that very different relaxation takes place upon addition of the maleimide moiety but that the photophysics of the bare chromophore are restored upon addition of cysteamine. This radical change in the photophysics is interpreted in terms of charge-transfer states, whose energy relative to the S1 ← S0 transition of the chromophore is dependent on the conjugation of the maleimide moiety. We also show that the shape of the absorption band is unchanged in the gas-phase as compared to the solution-phase, showing a maximum with a shoulder toward the blue, and examination of isotope distributions of the isolated ions show that this shoulder cannot be due to the presence of dimers. Consideration of the fluorescence emission spectrum allows a tentative assignment of the shoulder to be due to a vibrational progression with a high Franck-Condon factor.

  9. Aqueous nitrite ion determination by selective reduction and gas phase nitric oxide chemiluminescence

    Dunham, A. J.; Barkley, R. M.; Sievers, R. E.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    An improved method of flow injection analysis for aqueous nitrite ion exploits the sensitivity and selectivity of the nitric oxide (NO) chemilluminescence detector. Trace analysis of nitrite ion in a small sample (5-160 microL) is accomplished by conversion of nitrite ion to NO by aqueous iodide in acid. The resulting NO is transported to the gas phase through a semipermeable membrane and subsequently detected by monitoring the photoemission of the reaction between NO and ozone (O3). Chemiluminescence detection is selective for measurement of NO, and, since the detection occurs in the gas-phase, neither sample coloration nor turbidity interfere. The detection limit for a 100-microL sample is 0.04 ppb of nitrite ion. The precision at the 10 ppb level is 2% relative standard deviation, and 60-180 samples can be analyzed per hour. Samples of human saliva and food extracts were analyzed; the results from a standard colorimetric measurement are compared with those from the new chemiluminescence method in order to further validate the latter method. A high degree of selectivity is obtained due to the three discriminating steps in the process: (1) the nitrite ion to NO conversion conditions are virtually specific for nitrite ion, (2) only volatile products of the conversion will be swept to the gas phase (avoiding turbidity or color in spectrophotometric methods), and (3) the NO chemiluminescence detector selectively detects the emission from the NO + O3 reaction. The method is free of interferences, offers detection limits of low parts per billion of nitrite ion, and allows the analysis of up to 180 microL-sized samples per hour, with little sample preparation and no chromatographic separation. Much smaller samples can be analyzed by this method than in previously reported batch analysis methods, which typically require 5 mL or more of sample and often need chromatographic separations as well.

  10. Tuning structural motifs and alloying of bulk immiscible Mo-Cu bimetallic nanoparticles by gas-phase synthesis

    Krishnan, Gopi; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Ten Brink, Gert H.; Palasantzas, George; Kooi, Bart J.

    2013-05-01

    Nowadays bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as key materials for important modern applications in nanoplasmonics, catalysis, biodiagnostics, and nanomagnetics. Consequently the control of bimetallic structural motifs with specific shapes provides increasing functionality and selectivity for related applications. However, producing bimetallic NPs with well controlled structural motifs still remains a formidable challenge. Hence, we present here a general methodology for gas phase synthesis of bimetallic NPs with distinctively different structural motifs ranging at a single particle level from a fully mixed alloy to core-shell, to onion (multi-shell), and finally to a Janus/dumbbell, with the same overall particle composition. These concepts are illustrated for Mo-Cu NPs, where the precise control of the bimetallic NPs with various degrees of chemical ordering, including different shapes from spherical to cube, is achieved by tailoring the energy and thermal environment that the NPs experience during their production. The initial state of NP growth, either in the liquid or in the solid state phase, has important implications for the different structural motifs and shapes of synthesized NPs. Finally we demonstrate that we are able to tune the alloying regime, for the otherwise bulk immiscible Mo-Cu, by achieving an increase of the critical size, below which alloying occurs, closely up to an order of magnitude. It is discovered that the critical size of the NP alloy is not only affected by controlled tuning of the alloying temperature but also by the particle shape.Nowadays bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as key materials for important modern applications in nanoplasmonics, catalysis, biodiagnostics, and nanomagnetics. Consequently the control of bimetallic structural motifs with specific shapes provides increasing functionality and selectivity for related applications. However, producing bimetallic NPs with well controlled structural motifs still

  11. Deliberate and Accidental Gas-Phase Alkali Doping of Chalcogenide Semiconductors: Cu(In,Ga)Se2.

    Colombara, Diego; Berner, Ulrich; Ciccioli, Andrea; Malaquias, João C; Bertram, Tobias; Crossay, Alexandre; Schöneich, Michael; Meadows, Helene J; Regesch, David; Delsante, Simona; Gigli, Guido; Valle, Nathalie; Guillot, Jérome; El Adib, Brahime; Grysan, Patrick; Dale, Phillip J

    2017-02-24

    Alkali metal doping is essential to achieve highly efficient energy conversion in Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGSe) solar cells. Doping is normally achieved through solid state reactions, but recent observations of gas-phase alkali transport in the kesterite sulfide (Cu 2 ZnSnS 4 ) system (re)open the way to a novel gas-phase doping strategy. However, the current understanding of gas-phase alkali transport is very limited. This work (i) shows that CIGSe device efficiency can be improved from 2% to 8% by gas-phase sodium incorporation alone, (ii) identifies the most likely routes for gas-phase alkali transport based on mass spectrometric studies, (iii) provides thermochemical computations to rationalize the observations and (iv) critically discusses the subject literature with the aim to better understand the chemical basis of the phenomenon. These results suggest that accidental alkali metal doping occurs all the time, that a controlled vapor pressure of alkali metal could be applied during growth to dope the semiconductor, and that it may have to be accounted for during the currently used solid state doping routes. It is concluded that alkali gas-phase transport occurs through a plurality of routes and cannot be attributed to one single source.

  12. Gas-Phase Photocatalytic Oxidation of Dimethylamine: The Reaction Pathway and Kinetics

    Anna Kachina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation (PCO and thermal catalytic oxidation (TCO of dimethylamine (DMA on titanium dioxide was studied in a continuous flow simple tubular reactor. Volatile PCO products of DMA included ammonia, formamide, carbon dioxide, and water. Ammonia was further oxidized in minor amounts to nitrous oxide and nitrogen dioxide. Effective at 573 K, TCO resulted in the formation of ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water. The PCO kinetic data fit well to the monomolecular Langmuir-Hinshelwood model, whereas TCO kinetic behaviour matched the first-order process. No deactivation of the photocatalyst during the multiple long-run experiments was observed.

  13. Gas Phase Chromatography of some Group 4, 5, and 6 Halides

    Sylwester, Eric Robert [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-10-01

    Gas phase chromatography using The Heavy Element Volatility Instrument (HEVI) and the On Line Gas Apparatus (OLGA III) was used to determine volatilities of ZrBr4, HfBr4, RfBr4, NbBr5, TaOBr3, HaCl5, WBr6, FrBr, and BiBr3. Short-lived isotopes of Zr, Hf, Rf, Nb, Ta, Ha, W, and Bi were produced via compound nucleus reactions at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and transported to the experimental apparatus using a He gas transport system. The isotopes were halogenated, separated from the other reaction products, and their volatilities determined by isothermal gas phase chromatography. Adsorption Enthalpy (ΔHa) values for these compounds were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation program modeling the gas phase chromatography column. All bromides showed lower volatility than molecules of similar molecular structures formed as chlorides, but followed similar trends by central element. Tantalum was observed to form the oxybromide, analogous to the formation of the oxychloride under the same conditions. For the group 4 elements, the following order in volatility and ΔHa was observed: RfBr4 > ZrBr4 > HfBr4. The ΔHa values determined for the group 4, 5, and 6 halides are in general agreement with other experimental data and theoretical predictions. Preliminary experiments were performed on Me-bromides. A new measurement of the half-life of 261Rf was performed. 261Rf was produced via the 248Cm(18O, 5n) reaction and observed with a half-life of 74-6+7 seconds, in excellent agreement with the previous measurement of 78-6+11 seconds. We recommend a new half-life of 75±7 seconds for 261Rf based on these two measurements. Preliminary studies in transforming HEVI from an isothermal (constant

  14. Enantioselective supramolecular devices in the gas phase. Resorcin[4]arene as a model system

    Caterina Fraschetti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This review describes the state-of-art in the field of the gas-phase reactivity of diastereomeric complexes formed between a chiral artificial receptor and a biologically active molecule. The presented experimental approach is a ligand-displacement reaction carried out in a nano ESI-FT-ICR instrument, supported by a thermodynamic MS-study and molecular-mechanics and molecular-dynamics (MM/MD computational techniques. The noncovalent ion–molecule complexes are ideal for the study of chiral recognition in the absence of complicating solvent and counterion effects.

  15. Zwitterionic states in gas-phase polypeptide ions revealed by 157-nm ultra-violet photodissociation

    Kjeldsen, Frank; Silivra, Oleg A; Zubarev, Roman A

    2006-01-01

    carboxylic groups relative to competing COOH losses (45 Da) from neutral carboxylic groups. Loss of CO2 is a strong indication of the presence of a zwitterionic [(+)...(-)...(+)] salt bridge in the gas-phase polypeptide cation. This method provides a tool for studying, for example, the nature of binding...... of the fragment formation should be taken into account. Cations of Trp-cage proteins exist preferentially as zwitterions, with the deprotonation position divided between the Asp9 residue and the C terminus in the ratio 3:2. The majority of dications of the same molecule are not zwitterions. Furthermore, 157-nm...

  16. Liquid-gas phase transition in asymmetric nuclear matter at finite temperature

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Tatsumi, Toshitaka; Chiba, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Liquid-gas phase transition is discussed in warm asymmetric nuclear matter. Some peculiar features are figured out from the viewpoint of the basic thermodynamics about the phase equilibrium. We treat the mixed phase of the binary system based on the Gibbs conditions. When the Coulomb interaction is included, the mixed phase is no more uniform and the sequence of the pasta structures appears. Comparing the results with those given by the simple bulk calculation without the Coulomb interaction, we extract specific features of the pasta structures at finite temperature.

  17. Wettability in the liquid Cu-Ag alloy – fireproof material – gas phase system

    G. Siwiec

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, results of wettability studies on the liquid metal – fireproof material – gas phase system using copper and Cu-Ag alloys as well as typical fireproof materials, i.e. aluminium oxide, magnesium oxide and graphite, are presented. Contact angle measurements were conducted at 1 373–1 573 K by means of a high-temperature microscope coupled with a camera and a computer equipped with a program for recording and analysing images. For the measurements, the sessile drop method was used.

  18. Solvation of ions in the gas-phase: a molecular dynamics simulation

    Cabarcos, Orlando M.; Lisy, James M.

    1996-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on the collision between a cesium ion and a cluster of twenty methanol molecules. This process, generating a solvated ion, was studied over a range (1 to 25 eV) of eight collision energies. Preliminary analysis of this gas phase solvation has included the distribution of final ion cluster sizes, fragmentation patterns, solvation timescales and energetics. Two distinct patterns have emerged: a ballistic penetration of the neutral cluster at the higher collision energies and an evaporative evolution of the cluster ion at lower collision energies.

  19. Fluorometric method for the determination of gas-phase hydrogen peroxide

    Kok, Gregory L.; Lazrus, Allan L.

    1986-01-01

    The fluorometric gas-phase hydrogen peroxide procedure is based on the technique used by Lazrus et. al. for the determination of H2O2 in the liquid phase. The analytical method utilizes the reaction of H2O2 with horseradish peroxidase and p-hydroxphenylacetic acid (POPHA) to form the fluorescent dimer of POPHA. The analytical reaction responds stoichiometrically to both H2O2 and some organic hydroperoxides. To discriminate H2O2 from organic hydroperoxides, catalase is used to preferentially destroy H2O2. Using a dual-channel flow system the H2O2 concentration is determined by difference.

  20. A tetrapositive metal ion in the gas phase: Thorium(IV) coordinated by neutral tridentate ligands

    Gong, Yu; Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng; Gibson, John K.; Hu, Han-Shi; Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Sheltering thorium ions: A Th 4+ ion supported by three neutral tetramethyl-3-oxaglutaramide ligands (L=TMOGA) is produced in the gas phase by electrospray ionization. The thorium in chiral Th(L) 3 4+ is coordinated by nine oxygen atoms. Quantum chemical studies revealed a decrease in Th-O binding energies and bond orders and an increase in bond lengths, as the number of coordinating ligands increases. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. A tetrapositive metal ion in the gas phase: Thorium(IV) coordinated by neutral tridentate ligands

    Gong, Yu; Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng; Gibson, John K. [Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Hu, Han-Shi [Department of Chemistry and Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering of the Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University (China); Li, Jun [Department of Chemistry and Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering of the Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University (China); William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Sheltering thorium ions: A Th{sup 4+} ion supported by three neutral tetramethyl-3-oxaglutaramide ligands (L=TMOGA) is produced in the gas phase by electrospray ionization. The thorium in chiral Th(L){sub 3}{sup 4+} is coordinated by nine oxygen atoms. Quantum chemical studies revealed a decrease in Th-O binding energies and bond orders and an increase in bond lengths, as the number of coordinating ligands increases. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Detection of OH on photolysis of styrene oxide at 193 nm in gas phase

    Kumar, Awadhesh; SenGupta, Sumana; Pushpa, K. K.; Naik, P. D.; Bajaj, P. N.

    2006-10-01

    Photodissociation of styrene oxide at 193 nm in gas phase generates OH, as detected by laser-induced fluorescence technique. Under similar conditions, OH was not observed from ethylene and propylene oxides, primarily because of their low absorption cross-sections at 193 nm. Mechanism of OH formation involves first opening of the three-membered ring from the ground electronic state via cleavage of either of two C sbnd O bonds, followed by isomerization to enolic forms of phenylacetaldehyde and acetophenone, and finally scission of the C sbnd OH bond of enols. Ab initio molecular orbital calculations support the proposed mechanism.

  3. CASCADER: An m-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model

    Cawlfield, D.E.; Been, K.B.; Emer, D.F.; Lindstrom, F.T.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-06-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and/or diffusion. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. This is volume two to the CASCADER series, titled CASCADR8. It embodies the concepts presented in volume one of this series. To properly understand how the CASCADR8 model works, the reader should read volume one first. This volume presents the input and output file structure for CASCADR8, and a set of realistic scenarios for buried sources of radon gas

  4. CASCADER: An M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model

    Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Lindstrom, F.T.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and/or dispersion. Additionally during the transport of parent and daughter radionuclides in soil, radionuclide decay may occur. This version of CASCADER called CASCADR9 starts with the concepts presented in volumes one and three of this series. For a proper understanding of how the model works, the reader should read volume one first. Also presented in this volume is a set of realistic scenarios for buried sources of radon gas, and the input and output file structure for CASCADER9

  5. Liquid-gas phase transition in asymmetric nuclear matter at finite temperature

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Tatsumi, Toshitaka; Chiba, Satoshi

    2010-03-01

    Liquid-gas phase transition is discussed in warm asymmetric nuclear matter. Some peculiar features are figured out from the viewpoint of the basic thermodynamics about the phase equilibrium. We treat the mixed phase of the binary system based on the Gibbs conditions. When the Coulomb interaction is included, the mixed phase is no more uniform and the sequence of the pasta structures appears. Comparing the results with those given by the simple bulk calculation without the Coulomb interaction, we extract specific features of the pasta structures at finite temperature.

  6. Gas Phase Vibrational Spectroscopy of Weakly Volatil Safe Taggants Using a Synchrotron Source

    Cuisset, Arnaud; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gael; Gruet, Sebastien; Pirali, Olivier; Roy, Pascale

    2013-06-01

    The high performances of the AILES beamline of SOLEIL allow to study at medium resolution (0.5 cm^{-1}) the gas phase THz vibrational spectra of weakly volatil compounds. Between 2008 and 2010 we recorded and analyzed the THz/Far-IR spectra of phosphorous based nerve agents thanks to sufficient vapour pressures from liquid samples at room temperature. Recently, we extended these experiments towards the vibrational spectroscopy of vapour pressures from solid samples. This project is quite challenging since we target lower volatile compounds, and so requires very high sensitive spectrometers. Moreover a specially designed heated multipass-cell have been developped for the gas phase study of very weak vapor pressures. Thanks to skills acquired during initial studies and recent experiments performed on AILES with solid PAHs, we have recorded and assigned the gas phase vibrational fingerprints from the THz to the NIR spectral domain (10-4000 cm-1) of a set of targeted nitro-derivatives. The study was focused onto the para, ortho-mononitrotoluene (p-NT, o-NT), the 1,4 Dinitrobenzene (1,4 DNB), the 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-dinitrobutane (DMNB), and 2,4 and 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,4-2,6 DNT), which are safe taggants widely used for the detection of commercial explosives. These taggants are usually added to plastic explosives in order to facilitate their vapour detection. Therefore, there is a continuous interest for their detection and identification in realistic conditions via optical methods. A first step consists in the recording of their gas phase vibrational spectra. These expected spectra focused onto molecules involved into defence and security domains are not yet available to date and will be very useful for the scientific community. This work is supported by the contract ANR-11-ASTR-035-01. A. Cuisset, G. Mouret, O. Pirali, P. Roy, F. Cazier, H. Nouali, J. Demaison, J. Phys. Chem. B, 2008, 112:, 12516-12525 I. Smirnova, A. Cuisset, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, G. Mouret, O

  7. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: Theoretical Studies In Spectroscopy and Chemical Dynamics

    Yu H. G.; Muckerman, J.T.

    2012-05-29

    The main goal of this program is the development and application of computational methods for studying chemical reaction dynamics and molecular spectroscopy in the gas phase. We are interested in developing rigorous quantum dynamics algorithms for small polyatomic systems and in implementing approximate approaches for complex ones. Particular focus is on the dynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions and on the rovibrational spectra of species involved in combustion processes. This research also explores the potential energy surfaces of these systems of interest using state-of-the-art quantum chemistry methods, and extends them to understand some important properties of materials in condensed phases and interstellar medium as well as in combustion environments.

  8. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: Theoretical Studies in Spectroscopy and Chemical Dynamics

    Yu, H.G.; Muckerman, J.T.

    2010-06-01

    The goal of this program is the development and application of computational methods for studying chemical reaction dynamics and molecular spectroscopy in the gas phase. We are interested in developing rigorous quantum dynamics algorithms for small polyatomic systems and in implementing approximate approaches for complex ones. Particular focus is on the dynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions and on the rovibrational spectra of species involved in combustion processes. This research also explores the potential energy surfaces of these systems of interest using state-of-the-art quantum chemistry methods.

  9. Gas-phase isotope fractionation factor for the proton-bound dimer of the ethoxide

    Ellenberger, M.R.; Farneth, W.E.; Dixon, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The gas-phase isotope fractionation factor, phi/sub gp/, for A 2 L - where A = EtO and L = H or D has been measured by using ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy. Two approaches to the formation of the A 2 L - dimers are presented. The value for phi/sub gp/ is 0.46 +- 0.1. This low value for phi/sub gp/ is consistent with motion of a proton in a potential with a small central maximum or no maximum

  10. Headspace analysis gas-phase infrared spectroscopy: a study of xanthate decomposition on mineral surfaces

    Vreugdenhil, Andrew J.; Brienne, Stephane H. R.; Markwell, Ross D.; Butler, Ian S.; Finch, James A.

    1997-03-01

    The O-ethyldithiocarbonate (ethyl xanthate, CH 3CH 2OCS -2) anion is a widely used reagent in mineral processing for the separation of sulphide minerals by froth flotation. Ethyl xanthate interacts with mineral powders to produce a hydrophobic layer on the mineral surface. A novel infrared technique, headspace analysis gas-phase infrared spectroscopy (HAGIS) has been used to study the in situ thermal decomposition products of ethyl xanthate on mineral surfaces. These products include CS 2, COS, CO 2, CH 4, SO 2, and higher molecular weight alkyl-containing species. Decomposition pathways have been proposed with some information determined from 2H- and 13C-isotope labelling experiments.

  11. Gas-phase synthesis of magnesium nanoparticles: A high-resolution transmission electron microscopy study

    Kooi, B. J.; Palasantzas, G.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2006-01-01

    Magnesium nanoparticles with size above 10 nm, prepared by gas-phase syntheses, were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The dominant particle shape is a hexagonal prism terminated by Mg(0002) and Mg(1010) facets. Oxidation of Mg yields a MgO shell (∼3 nm thick), which has an orientation relation with the Mg. Inhomogeneous facet oxidation influences their growth kinetics resulting in a relatively broad size and shape distribution. Faceted voids between Mg and MgO shells indicate a fast outward diffusion of Mg and vacancy rearrangement into voids. The faceting of polar (220) planes is assisted by electron irradiation

  12. Gas-phase hydrosilylation of cyclohexene in an experimental radiation-chemical accelerator apparatus

    Pecherkin, A.S.; Sidorov, V.I.; Chernyshev, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    A process for the synthesis of methylcyclohexyldichlorosilane (a basic monomer for the production of organosilicon photoresists) has been investigated and perfected on an experimental apparatus with an ELV-2 electron accelerator; this synthesis involves gas-phase radiation-induced hydrosilylation of cyclohexene by methyldichlorosilane. Basic characteristics of the yield of the desired product under static conditions were determined. With the help of experiments on the synthesis of methylcyclohexyldichlorosilane in a flow- through mode, the technical features of the process of radiation-chemical hydrosilylation of cyclohexene on an accelerator apparatus were determined and studied, the optimal conditions for the synthesis were determined, and an experimental batch of the desired product was produced

  13. Probing Protein Structure and Folding in the Gas Phase by Electron Capture Dissociation

    Schennach, Moritz; Breuker, Kathrin

    2015-07-01

    The established methods for the study of atom-detailed protein structure in the condensed phases, X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, have recently been complemented by new techniques by which nearly or fully desolvated protein structures are probed in gas-phase experiments. Electron capture dissociation (ECD) is unique among these as it provides residue-specific, although indirect, structural information. In this Critical Insight article, we discuss the development of ECD for the structural probing of gaseous protein ions, its potential, and limitations.

  14. Vaporized Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP) Decontamination of a Section of a Boeing 747 Cabin

    Shaffstall, Robert M; Garner, Robert P; Bishop, Joshua; Cameron-Landis, Lora; Eddington, Donald L; Hau, Gwen; Spera, Shawn; Mielnik, Thaddeus; Thomas, James A

    2006-01-01

    The use of STERIS Corporation's Vaporized Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP)* technology as a potential biocide for aircraft decontamination was demonstrated in a cabin section of the Aircraft Environment Research Facility...

  15. Surface modification of superaustenitic and maraging stainless steels by low-temperature gas-phase carburization

    Gentil, Johannes

    Low-temperature gas-phase carburization of 316L austenitic stainless steel was developed in recent years by the Swagelok company. This process generates great mechanical and electrochemical surface properties. Hardness, wear resistance, fatigue behavior, and corrosion resistance are dramatically improved, while the formation of carbides is effectively suppressed. This new technique is of technical, economical, but especially of scientific interest because the surface properties of common stainless steel can be enhanced to a level of more sophisticated and more expensive superalloys. The consequential continuation of previous research is the application of the carburization process to other steel grades. Differences in chemical composition, microstructure, and passivity between the various alloys may cause technical problems and it is expected that the initial process needs to be optimized for every specific material. This study presents results of low-temperature carburization of AL-6XN (superaustenitic stainless steel) and PH13-8Mo (precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel). Both alloys have been treated successfully in terms of creating a hardened surface by introducing high amounts of interstitially dissolved carbon. The surface hardness of AL-6XN was increased to 12GPa and is correlated with a colossal carbon supersaturation at the surface of up to 20 at.%. The hardened case develops a carburization time-dependent thickness between 10mum after one carburization cycle and up to 35mum after four treatments and remains highly ductile. Substantial broadening of X-ray diffraction peaks in low-temperature carburized superaustenitic stainless steels are attributed to the generation of very large compressive biaxial residual stresses. Those large stresses presumably cause relaxations of the surface, so-called undulations. Heavily expanded regions of carburized AL-6XN turn ferromagnetic. Non-carburized AL-6XN is known for its outstanding corrosion resistance

  16. Soil decontamination at Rocky Flats

    Olsen, R.L.; Hayden, J.A.; Alford, C.E.; Kochen, R.L.; Stevens, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    A soils decontamination project was initiated, to remove actinides from soils at Rocky Flats. Wet screening, attrition scrubbing with Calgon at high pH, attrition scrubbing at low pH, and cationic flotation were investigated. Pilot plant studies were carried out. Conceptual designs have been generated for mounting the process in semi-trailers

  17. ORNL decontamination and decommissioning program

    Bell, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    A program has been initiated at ORNL to decontaminate and decommission surplus or abandoned nuclear facilities. Program planning and technical studies have been performed by UCC-ND Engineering. A feasibility study for decommissioning the Metal Recovery Facility, a fuel reprocessing pilot plant, has been completed

  18. Decontaminating reagents for radioactive systems

    Seddon, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    A decontaminating reagent composition has been developed comprising EDTA, citric acid, oxalic acid, and formic acid. Formic acid inhibits the decomposition of both EDTA and citric acid, and yields oxalic acid as a result of its own radiolysis. The invention includes the improvement of initially incorporating formic acid in the mixture and maintaining the presence of formic acid by at least one further addition

  19. Nuclear reactor vessel decontamination systems

    McGuire, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    There is disclosed in the present application, a decontamination system for reactor vessels. The system is operatable without entry by personnel into the contaminated vessel before the decontamination operation is carried out and comprises an assembly which is introduced into the vertical cylindrical vessel of the typical boiling water reactor through the open top. The assembly includes a circular track which is centered by guideways permanently installed in the reactor vessel and the track guides opposed pairs of nozzles through which water under very high pressure is directed at the wall for progressively cutting and sweeping a tenacious radioactive coating as the nozzles are driven around the track in close proximity to the vessel wall. The whole assembly is hoisted to a level above the top of the vessel by a crane, outboard slides on the assembly brought into engagement with the permanent guideways and the assembly progressively lowered in the vessel as the decontamination operation progresses. The assembly also includes a low pressure nozzle which forms a spray umbrella above the high pressure nozzles to contain radioactive particles dislodged during the decontamination

  20. Radioactive decontamination through UV laser

    Delaporte, Ph.; Gastaud, M.; Sentis, M.; Uteza, O.; Marine, W.; Thouvenot, P.; Alcaraz, J.L.; Le Samedy, J.M.; Blin, D.

    2003-01-01

    A device allowing the radioactive decontamination of metal surfaces through the use of a pulsed UV laser has been designed and tested. This device is composed of a 1 kW excimer laser linked to a bundle of optic fibers and of a system to recover particles and can operate in active zones. Metal surfaces have the peculiarities to trap radio-elements in a superficial layer of oxide that can be eaten away by laser radiation. Different contaminated metals (stainless steels, INCONEL and aluminium) issued from the nuclear industry have been used for the testing. The most important contaminants were 60 Co, 137 Cs, 154-155 Eu and 125 Sb. The ratio of decontamination was generally of 10 and the volume of secondary wastes generating during the process was very low compared with other decontamination techniques. A decontamination speed of 1 m 2 /h has been reached for aluminium. The state of the surface is an important parameter because radio-elements trapped in micro-cracks are very difficult to remove. (A.C.)

  1. Pipe and hose decontamination apparatus

    Fowler, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    A pipe and hose decontamination apparatus is disclosed using freshly filtered high pressure Freon solvent in an integrated closed loop to remove radioactive particles or other contaminants from items having a long cylindrical geometry such as hoses, pipes, cables and the like. The pipe and hose decontamination apparatus comprises a chamber capable of accomodating a long cylindrical work piece to be decontaminated. The chamber has a downward sloped bottom draining to a solvent holding tank. An entrance zone, a cleaning zone and an exit drying zone are defined within the chamber by removable partitions having slotted rubber gaskets in their centers. The entrance and exit drying zones contain a horizontally mounted cylindrical housing which supports in combination a plurality of slotted rubber gaskets and circular brushes to initiate mechanical decontamination. Solvent is delivered at high pressure to a spray ring located in the cleaning zone having a plurality of nozzles surrounding the work piece. The solvent drains into a solvent holding tank located below the nozzles and means are provided for circulating the solvent to and from a solvent cleaning, distilling and filter unit

  2. Gas-phase naphthalene concentration data recovery in ambient air and its relevance as a tracer of sources of volatile organic compounds

    Uria-Tellaetxe, Iratxe; Navazo, Marino; de Blas, Maite; Durana, Nieves; Alonso, Lucio; Iza, Jon

    2016-04-01

    Despite the toxicity of naphthalene and the fact that it is a precursor of atmospheric photooxidants and secondary aerosol, studies on ambient gas-phase naphthalene are generally scarce. Moreover, as far as we are concerned, this is the first published one using long-term hourly ambient gas-phase naphthalene concentrations. In this work, it has been also demonstrated the usefulness of ambient gas-phase naphthalene to identify major sources of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in complex scenarios. Initially, in order to identify main benzene emission sources, hourly ambient measurements of 60 VOC were taken during a complete year together with meteorological data in an urban/industrial area. Later, due to the observed co-linearity of some of the emissions, a procedure was developed to recover naphthalene concentration data from recorded chromatograms to use it as a tracer of the combustion and distillation of petroleum products. The characteristic retention time of this compound was determined comparing previous GC-MS and GC-FID simultaneous analysis by means of relative retention times, and its concentration was calculated by using relative response factors. The obtained naphthalene concentrations correlated fairly well with ethene (r = 0.86) and benzene (r = 0.92). Besides, the analysis of daily time series showed that these compounds followed a similar pattern, very different from that of other VOC, with minimum concentrations at day-time. This, together with the results from the assessment of the meteorological dependence pointed out a coke oven as the major naphthalene and benzene emitting sources in the study area.

  3. Decontamination in the Republic of Belarus

    Antsipov, G.V.; Matveenko, S.A.; Mirkhaidarov, A.Kh.

    2002-01-01

    To continue the decontamination work in the Republic of Belarus, which was carried out by the military troops, the state specialized enterprises were formed in Gomel and Mogilev in 1991. The organization and regulations were developed inside the country: instructions, rules, radiological and hygienic criteria and norms. The enterprises concentrated on decontamination of the most socially significant facilities: kindergartens, schools, medical institutions and industrial enterprises. During 9 years Gomel State Specialized Enterprise 'Polessje' decontaminated 130 kindergartens, schools and hospitals. The total decontaminated area was 450 000 m 2 . The ventilation systems and equipment at 27 industrial enterprises in Gomel were decontaminated. The practical decontamination methods for areas, buildings, roofs, industrial equipment, ventilation systems were developed and tested. The special rules for handling wastes contaminated with Cs were elaborated. The paper analyzes and sums up the acquired experience which is important for implementation of rehabilitation programs and improvement of decontamination methods. (author)

  4. Aromatic substitution in the gas phase. Alkylation of arenes by gaseous C4H9+ cations

    Cacace, F.; Ciranni, G.; Giacomello, P.

    1981-01-01

    Butyl cations, obtained in the dilute gas state from the radiolysis of butane in the pressure range from 70 to 750 torr, have been allowed to react with benzene, toluene, and their mixtures or with trace amounts of o-xylene in the gaseous system. The gas-phase butylation yields invariably sec-butylarenes, remarkably free of isomeric byproducts, namely n- and tert-butylarenes. Other alkylation experiments, where gaseous butyl cations from the reaction of butane with radiolytically formed H 3 + ions were used as reagent, confirmed the exclusive formation of sec-butylarenes. The butylation process displays the positional and substrate selectivity and the dependence of orientation on the pressure of the system, typical of other gas-phase ionic substitutions. At high pressures, orth-para orientation predominates in the sec-butylation of toluene, with a ortho:meta:para ratio of 43:30:27 at 715 torr. As the pressure is reduced, a gradual shift in favor of the thermodynamically most stable meta-substituted arenium ion is observed, leading to a ortho:meta:para ratio of 31:48:21 at 70 torr

  5. Mapping the conformational free energy of aspartic acid in the gas phase and in aqueous solution.

    Comitani, Federico; Rossi, Kevin; Ceriotti, Michele; Sanz, M Eugenia; Molteni, Carla

    2017-04-14

    The conformational free energy landscape of aspartic acid, a proteogenic amino acid involved in a wide variety of biological functions, was investigated as an example of the complexity that multiple rotatable bonds produce even in relatively simple molecules. To efficiently explore such a landscape, this molecule was studied in the neutral and zwitterionic forms, in the gas phase and in water solution, by means of molecular dynamics and the enhanced sampling method metadynamics with classical force-fields. Multi-dimensional free energy landscapes were reduced to bi-dimensional maps through the non-linear dimensionality reduction algorithm sketch-map to identify the energetically stable conformers and their interconnection paths. Quantum chemical calculations were then performed on the minimum free energy structures. Our procedure returned the low energy conformations observed experimentally in the gas phase with rotational spectroscopy [M. E. Sanz et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 12, 3573 (2010)]. Moreover, it provided information on higher energy conformers not accessible to experiments and on the conformers in water. The comparison between different force-fields and quantum chemical data highlighted the importance of the underlying potential energy surface to accurately capture energy rankings. The combination of force-field based metadynamics, sketch-map analysis, and quantum chemical calculations was able to produce an exhaustive conformational exploration in a range of significant free energies that complements the experimental data. Similar protocols can be applied to larger peptides with complex conformational landscapes and would greatly benefit from the next generation of accurate force-fields.

  6. Gas-phase ion-molecule reactions and high-pressure mass spectrometer, 1

    Hiraoka, Kenzo

    1977-01-01

    The reasons for the fact that the research in gas-phase ion-molecule reactions, to which wide interest is shown, have greatly contributed to the physical and chemical fields are that, first it is essential in understanding general phenomena concerning ions, second, it can furnish many unique informations in the dynamics of chemical reactions, and third, usefulness of '' chemical ionization'' methods has been established as its application to chemical analysis. In this review, the history and trend of studies and equipments in gas-phase ion-molecule reactions are surveyed. The survey includes the chemical ionization mass spectrometer for simultaneously measuring the positive and negative ions utilizing a quadrupole mass spectrometer presented by Hunt and others, flowing afterglow method derived from the flowing method which traces neutral chemical species mainly optically, ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer, trapped ion mass spectrometer and others. Number of reports referred to ion-molecule reactions issued during the last one year well exceeds the total number of reports concerning mass spectrometers presented before 1955. This truly shows how active the research and development are in this field. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  7. Biofiltration of mixtures of gas-phase styrene and acetone with the fungus Sporothrix variecibatus

    Rene, Eldon R.; Spackova, Radka; Veiga, Maria C. [University of La Coruna, Dpt. of Chemical Engineering, Campus da Zapateira, Rua da Fraga, 10, 15008 La Coruna (Spain); Kennes, Christian, E-mail: kennes@udc.es [University of La Coruna, Dpt. of Chemical Engineering, Campus da Zapateira, Rua da Fraga, 10, 15008 La Coruna (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    The biodegradation performance of a biofilter, inoculated with the fungus Sporothrix variecibatus, to treat gas-phase styrene and acetone mixtures under steady-state and transient conditions was evaluated. Experiments were carried out by varying the gas-flow rates (0.05-0.4 m{sup 3} h{sup -1}), leading to empty bed residence times as low as 17.1 s, and by changing the concentrations of gas-phase styrene (0.01-6.3 g m{sup -3}) and acetone (0.01-8.9 g m{sup -3}). The total elimination capacities were as high as 360 g m{sup -3} h{sup -1}, with nearly 97.5% removal of styrene and 75.6% for acetone. The biodegradation of acetone was inhibited by the presence of styrene, while styrene removal was affected only slightly by the presence of acetone. During transient-state experiments, increasing the overall pollutant load by almost 3-fold, i.e., from 220 to 600 g m{sup -3} h{sup -1}, resulted in a sudden drop of removal efficiency (>90-70%), but still high elimination capacities were maintained. Periodic microscopic observations revealed that the originally inoculated Sporothrix sp. remained present in the reactor and actively dominant in the biofilm.

  8. Oxo-exchange of gas-phase uranyl, neptunyl, and plutonyl with water and methanol.

    Lucena, Ana F; Odoh, Samuel O; Zhao, Jing; Marçalo, Joaquim; Schreckenbach, Georg; Gibson, John K

    2014-02-17

    A challenge in actinide chemistry is activation of the strong bonds in the actinyl ions, AnO2(+) and AnO2(2+), where An = U, Np, or Pu. Actinyl activation in oxo-exchange with water in solution is well established, but the exchange mechanisms are unknown. Gas-phase actinyl oxo-exchange is a means to probe these processes in detail for simple systems, which are amenable to computational modeling. Gas-phase exchange reactions of UO2(+), NpO2(+), PuO2(+), and UO2(2+) with water and methanol were studied by experiment and density functional theory (DFT); reported for the first time are experimental results for UO2(2+) and for methanol exchange, as well as exchange rate constants. Key findings are faster exchange of UO2(2+) versus UO2(+) and faster exchange with methanol versus water; faster exchange of UO2(+) versus PuO2(+) was quantified. Computed potential energy profiles (PEPs) are in accord with the observed kinetics, validating the utility of DFT to model these exchange processes. The seemingly enigmatic result of faster exchange for uranyl, which has the strongest oxo-bonds, may reflect reduced covalency in uranyl as compared with plutonyl.

  9. Synchrotron and small bio-molecules in gas phase and liquid environment: new opportunities in Brazil

    Naves de Brito, A. [State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Applied Physics

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Two techniques are critically related to the photoelectric law, namely: photoelectron spectroscopy and photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectroscopy. Both are strongly used now a day within synchrotron laboratories. Our group is employing both to investigate fragmentation of bio-molecules in gas phase such as amino acids and DNA basis using V UV and soft x-ray photons. In the near future lager scale instruments developed in Brazil will allow unique opportunities to apply these two spectroscopic methods to molecules immersed in liquids such as water. We will present details from this advanced x-ray source and experimental stations with capabilities not present in other places in the world. Experiments connected to the molecular origin of live will be shown. Among them an experiment where we mimic the atmosphere at Titan moon producing bio- molecules will discussed. Another experiment will be presented where we test the Panspermia viability using special bacteria. We will also present experiments where frozen simple molecules connected to pre-biotic mate- rial are bombardment by UV photons and energetic particles showing interesting trends. Spectroscopic studies of gas phase photo-fragmentation of bio-molecules may be critical to understand in the future these molecules immersed in liquids. We plan to spend some time showing our recent results in this area. (author)

  10. Properties of clusters in the gas phase: V. Complexes of neutral molecules onto negative ions

    Keesee, R.G.; Lee, N.; Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ion--molecules association reactions of the form A - (B)/sub n1/-+B=A - (B)/sub n/ were studied over a range of temperatures in the gas phase using high pressure mass spectrometry. Enthalpy and entropy changes were determined for the stepwise clustering reactions of (1) sulfur dioxide onto Cl - , I - , and NO 2 - with n ranging from one to three or four, and onto SO 2 - and SO 3 - with n equal to one; and (2) carbon dioxide onto Cl - , I - , NO 2 - , CO 3 - , and SO 3 - with n equal to one. From these data and earlier hydration results, the order of the magnitude of the enthalpy changes on the association of the first neutral for a series of negative ions was found to parallel the gas-phase basicity of those anions. For any given ion, the relative order of the addition enthalpies among the neutrals was found to be dependent on the polarizabilities of the neutrals and on the covalency in the ion-neutral bond. Dispersion of charge via covalent bonding was found to affect significantly the succeeding clustering steps

  11. Gas phase collision dynamics by means of pulse-radiolysis methods

    Hatano, Yoshihiko

    1989-01-01

    After a brief survey of recent advances in gas-phase collision dynamics studies using pulse radiolysis methods, the following two topics in our research programs are presented with emphasis on the superior advantages of the pulse radiolysis methods over the various methods of gas-phase collision dynamics, such as beam methods, swarm methods and flow methods. One of the topics is electron attachment to van der Waals molecules. The attachment rates of thermal electrons to O 2 and other molecules in dense gases have been measured in wide ranges of both gas temperatures and pressures, from which experimental evidence has been obtained for electron attachment to van der Waals molecules. The results have been compared with theories and discussed in terms of the effect of van der Waals interaction on the electron attachment resonance. The obtained conclusions have been related with investigations of electron attachment, solvation and localization in the condensed phase. The other is Penning ionization and its related processes. The rate constants for the de-excitation of He(2 1 P), He(2 3 S), Ne( 3 P 0 ), Ne( 3 P 1 ), Ne( 3 P 2 ), Ar( 1 P 1 ), Ar( 3 P 1 ), by atoms and molecules have been measured in the temperature range from 100 to 300 K, thus obtaining the collisional energy dependence of the de-excitation cross sections. The results are compared in detail with theories classified according to the excited rare gas atoms in the metastable and resonance states. (author)

  12. CASCADER: An M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.; Donahue, M.E.

    1993-02-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and diffusion. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. CASCADER is a gas-phase, one-space dimensional transport and fate model for M-chain radionuclides in very dry homogeneous or heterogeneous soil. This model contains barometric pressure-induced advection and diffusion together with linear irreversible and linear reversible sorption for each radionuclide. The advection velocity is derived from an embedded air-pumping submodel. The air-pumping submodel is based on an assumption of isothermal conditions, which is driven by barometric pressure. CASCADER allows the concentration of source radionuclides to decay via the classical Bateman chain of simple, first-order kinetic processes. The transported radionuclides also decay via first-order processes while in the soil. A mass conserving, flux-type inlet and exit set of boundary conditions are used. The user must supply the initial distribution for the parent radionuclide in the soil. The initial daughter distribution is found using equilibrium rules. The model is user friendly as it uses a prompt-driven, free-form input. The code is ANSI standard Fortran 77

  13. CASCADER: An m-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.; Donahue, M.E.

    1992-06-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes as they are advected and/or dispersed. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. CASCADER is a gas-phase, one space dimensional transport and fate model for an m-chain of radionuclides in very dry soil. This model contains barometric pressure-induced advection and diffusion together with linear irreversible and linear reversible sorption for each radionuclide. The advocation velocity is derived from an embedded air-pumping submodel. The airpumping submodel is based on an assumption of isothermal conditions and is barometric pressure driven. CASCADER allows the concentration of source radionuclides to decay via the classical Bateman chain of simple, first-order kinetic processes. The transported radionuclides also decay via first-order processes while in the soil. A mass conserving, flux-type inlet and exit set of boundary conditions is used. The user must supply the initial distribution for the parent radionuclide in the soil. The initial daughter distribution is found using equilibrium rules. The model is user friendly as it uses a prompt-driven, free-form input. The code is ANSI standard Fortran 77

  14. Probing Vitamine C, Aspirin and Paracetamol in the Gas Phase: High Resolution Rotational Studies

    Mata, S.; Cabezas, C.; Varela, M.; Pena, I.; Nino, A.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.; Grabow, J.-U.

    2011-06-01

    A solid sample of Vitamin C (m.p. 190°C) vaporized by laser ablation has been investigated in gas phase and characterized through their rotational spectra. Two spectroscopy techniques has been used to obtain the spectra: a new design of broadband chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy with in-phase/quadrature-phase-modulation passage-acquired-coherence technique (IMPACT) and conventional laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (LA-MB-FTMW). Up to now, two low-energy conformer have been observed and their rotational constants determined. Ab initio calculations at the MP2/6-311++G (d,p) level of theory predicted rotational constants which helped us to identify these conformers unequivocally. Among the molecules to benefit from the LA-MB-FTMW technique there are common important drugs never observed in the gas phase through rotational spectroscopy. We present here the results on acetyl salicylic acid and acetaminophen (m.p. 136°C), commonly known as aspirin and paracetamol respectively. We have observed two stable conformers of aspirin and two for paracetamol. The internal rotation barrier of the methyl group in aspirin has been determined for both conformers from the analysis of the A-E splittings due to the coupling of internal and overall rotation. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11,617-627 (2009)and references therein

  15. Optical Absorptions of Oxygenated Carbon Chain Cations in the Gas Phase

    Hardy, F.-X.; Rice, C. A.; Chakraborty, A.; Fulara, J.; Maier, J. P.

    2016-06-01

    The gas-phase electronic spectra of linear OC4O+ and a planar C6H2O+ isomer were obtained at a rotational temperature of ≈10 K. Absorption measurements in a 6 K neon matrix were followed by gas-phase observations in a cryogenic radiofrequency ion trap. The origin bands of the 1{}2{{{\\Pi }}}u ≤ftarrow X{}2{{{\\Pi }}}g transition of OC4O+ and the 1{}2A{}2 ≤ftarrow X{}2B1 of HCCC(CO)CCH+ lie at 417.31 ± 0.01 nm and 523.49 ± 0.01 nm, respectively. These constitute the first electronic spectra of oxygenated carbon chain cations studied under conditions that are relevant to the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), as both have a visible transition. The recent analysis of the 579.5 nm DIB indicates that small carriers, five to seven heavy atoms, continue to be possible candidates (Huang & Oka 2015). Astronomical implications are discussed regarding this kind of oxygenated molecules.

  16. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Rondo, L.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosolnucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detectionof gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased inthe presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was setup at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection ofH2SO4in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time inthe CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF(Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutralsulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presenceof dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS...

  17. Mapping the conformational free energy of aspartic acid in the gas phase and in aqueous solution

    Comitani, Federico; Rossi, Kevin; Ceriotti, Michele; Sanz, M. Eugenia; Molteni, Carla

    2017-04-01

    The conformational free energy landscape of aspartic acid, a proteogenic amino acid involved in a wide variety of biological functions, was investigated as an example of the complexity that multiple rotatable bonds produce even in relatively simple molecules. To efficiently explore such a landscape, this molecule was studied in the neutral and zwitterionic forms, in the gas phase and in water solution, by means of molecular dynamics and the enhanced sampling method metadynamics with classical force-fields. Multi-dimensional free energy landscapes were reduced to bi-dimensional maps through the non-linear dimensionality reduction algorithm sketch-map to identify the energetically stable conformers and their interconnection paths. Quantum chemical calculations were then performed on the minimum free energy structures. Our procedure returned the low energy conformations observed experimentally in the gas phase with rotational spectroscopy [M. E. Sanz et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 12, 3573 (2010)]. Moreover, it provided information on higher energy conformers not accessible to experiments and on the conformers in water. The comparison between different force-fields and quantum chemical data highlighted the importance of the underlying potential energy surface to accurately capture energy rankings. The combination of force-field based metadynamics, sketch-map analysis, and quantum chemical calculations was able to produce an exhaustive conformational exploration in a range of significant free energies that complements the experimental data. Similar protocols can be applied to larger peptides with complex conformational landscapes and would greatly benefit from the next generation of accurate force-fields.

  18. Biofiltration of mixtures of gas-phase styrene and acetone with the fungus Sporothrix variecibatus

    Rene, Eldon R.; Spackova, Radka; Veiga, Maria C.; Kennes, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The biodegradation performance of a biofilter, inoculated with the fungus Sporothrix variecibatus, to treat gas-phase styrene and acetone mixtures under steady-state and transient conditions was evaluated. Experiments were carried out by varying the gas-flow rates (0.05-0.4 m 3 h -1 ), leading to empty bed residence times as low as 17.1 s, and by changing the concentrations of gas-phase styrene (0.01-6.3 g m -3 ) and acetone (0.01-8.9 g m -3 ). The total elimination capacities were as high as 360 g m -3 h -1 , with nearly 97.5% removal of styrene and 75.6% for acetone. The biodegradation of acetone was inhibited by the presence of styrene, while styrene removal was affected only slightly by the presence of acetone. During transient-state experiments, increasing the overall pollutant load by almost 3-fold, i.e., from 220 to 600 g m -3 h -1 , resulted in a sudden drop of removal efficiency (>90-70%), but still high elimination capacities were maintained. Periodic microscopic observations revealed that the originally inoculated Sporothrix sp. remained present in the reactor and actively dominant in the biofilm.

  19. Photochemical reactions of triplet benzophenone and anthraquinone molecules with amines in the gas phase

    Zalesskaya, G.A.; Sambor, E.G.; Belyi, N.N.

    2004-01-01

    The intermolecular photoinduced reactions between triplet ketone molecules and aliphatic amines and pyridine are studied by the quenching of delayed fluorescence of anthraquinone and benzophenone vapors by diethylamine, dibutylamine, cyclohexylamine, triethylamine, and pyridine. In the temperature range 423-573 K, the delayed fluorescence quenching rate constants k q are estimated from changes in the decay rate constant and the intensity of delayed fluorescence upon increasing pressure of bath gases. It is ascertained that, in the gas phase, the mixtures under study exhibit both a negative and a positive dependence of k q on temperature, which indicates that some photoinduced reactions do not have activation barriers. The rate constant k q is shown to increase with decreasing ionization potential of the electron donors. This points to the importance of interactions with charge transfer in the photoreaction of triplet ketone molecules with aliphatic amines and pyridine in the gas phase. The relationship between k q and the change in the free energy ΔG upon the photoinduced intermolecular electron transfer, which is the primary stage of the photochemical reaction, is studied. It is shown that the dependence k q (ΔG) for the donor-acceptor pairs under study is described well by the Marcus equation, in which the average vibrational energies of the donor and acceptor are taken into account for the estimate of ΔG

  20. Effect of isotopic substitution upon the gas phase and solution electron affinities of nitrobenzene

    Stevenson, G.R.; Reiter, R.C.; Espe, M.E.; Bartmess, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance and electron spin resonance have been utilized to determine the equilibrium constant for the electron transfer from the nitrobenzene anion radical to 15 N labeled nitrobenzene (Ph 14 NO 2 - + Ph 15 NO 2 ↔ Ph 14 NO 2 + Ph 15 NO 2 9 . It was found that the equilibrium constant is within experimental error of unity at 305 K. Molecular orbital calculations indicate that this might be accounted for by the shortening of the C-N bond and a counterbalancing lengthening of the N-O bonds upon electron attachment to nitrobenzene. An equilibrium constant that is much larger than unity can be observed in liquid ammonia at 208 K when K + serves as the gegenion (K/sub eq/ = 2.1). However, when Na + serves as the gegenion, the solution electron affinity of Ph 14 NO 2 is greater than that of Ph 15 NO 2 (K/sub eq/ = 0.4). These results are explained in terms of ion association. When the hydrogen atoms are replaced with deuteriums, the gas phase electron affinity is decreased. A similar decrease is observed in liquid ammonia. In the gas phase this is attributed to the slight lengthening of all the C-H bonds upon electron attachment

  1. Gas-phase pesticide measurement using iodide ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    T. Murschell

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Volatilization and subsequent processing in the atmosphere are an important environmental pathway for the transport and chemical fate of pesticides. However, these processes remain a particularly poorly understood component of pesticide lifecycles due to analytical challenges in measuring pesticides in the atmosphere. Most pesticide measurements require long (hours to days sampling times coupled with offline analysis, inhibiting observation of meteorologically driven events or investigation of rapid oxidation chemistry. Here, we present chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with iodide reagent ions as a fast and sensitive measurement of four current-use pesticides. These semi-volatile pesticides were calibrated with injections of solutions onto a filter and subsequently volatilized to generate gas-phase analytes. Trifluralin and atrazine are detected as iodide–molecule adducts, while permethrin and metolachlor are detected as adducts between iodide and fragments of the parent analyte molecule. Limits of detection (1 s are 0.37, 0.67, 0.56, and 1.1 µg m−3 for gas-phase trifluralin, metolachlor, atrazine, and permethrin, respectively. The sensitivities of trifluralin and metolachlor depend on relative humidity, changing as much as 70 and 59, respectively, as relative humidity of the sample air varies from 0 to 80 %. This measurement approach is thus appropriate for laboratory experiments and potentially near-source field measurements.

  2. Chlorination of some eliphatic organic compounds in liquid and gas phase

    Hassan, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    The photochlorination of different organic compounds and the relative slectivities of different positions have been investigated in both gaseous and liquid phases at different temperatures. The results have shown that the relative selectivity generally decreased with increasing temperature and in the gas phase has a higher value. Polar solvents increase the selectivity relative to the chlorination of pure liquid phases. The differences in activation energy between two positions were much higher in the gas phases chlorination, relative to that in the liquid phase. It was also found that the functional groups have great influence on the rate of chlorine free radical attack on different positions, for example the electron withdrawing groups decreasing the selectivity on the first position, but the electron donating groups increase the selectivity on the first position, but the electron donating groups increase the selectivity on the first position. Furthermore it was found that the polar solvents, which stabilize the resonance between oxygen and carbon atoms, increases the selectivity on that position. 23 tabs.; 16 figs.; 50 refs

  3. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Li, He-Ping, E-mail: liheping@tsinghua.edu.cn; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Nie, Qiu-Yue [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province 150001 (China)

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A–X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  4. Fast and simple microwave synthesis of TiO2/Au nanoparticles for gas-phase photocatalytic hydrogen generation

    May-Masnou, Anna; Soler, Lluís; Torras, Miquel; Salles, Pol; Llorca, Jordi; Roig, Anna

    2018-04-01

    The fabrication of small anatase titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) attached to larger anisotropic gold (Au) morphologies by a very fast and simple two-step microwave-assisted synthesis is presented. The TiO2/Au NPs are synthesized using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as reducing, capping and stabilizing agent through a polyol approach. To optimize the contact between the titania and the gold and facilitate electron transfer, the PVP is removed by calcination at mild temperatures. The nanocatalysts activity is then evaluated in the photocatalytic production of hydrogen from water/ethanol mixtures in gas-phase at ambient temperature. A maximum value of 5.3 mmol·gcat-1·h-1 (7.4 mmol·gTiO2-1·h-1) of hydrogen is recorded for the system with larger gold particles at an optimum calcination temperature of 450 °C. Herein we demonstrate that TiO2-based photocatalysts with high Au loading and large Au particle size (≈ 50 nm) NPs have photocatalytic activity.

  5. Plasma-assisted partial oxidation of methane at low temperatures: numerical analysis of gas-phase chemical mechanism

    Goujard, Valentin; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Yuzawa, Shuhei; Okazaki, Ken [Department of Mechanical and Control Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro, 1528552, Tokyo (Japan); Agiral, Anil, E-mail: tnozaki@mech.titech.ac.jp [Mesoscale Chemical Systems, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2011-07-13

    Methane partial oxidation was investigated using a plasma microreactor. The experiments were performed at 5 and 300 deg. C. Microreactor configuration allows an efficient evacuation of the heat generated by methane partial oxidation and dielectric barrier discharges, allowing at the same time a better temperature control. At 5 deg. C, liquid condensation of low vapour pressure compounds, such as formaldehyde and methanol, occurs. {sup 1}H-NMR analysis allowed us to demonstrate significant CH{sub 3}OOH formation during plasma-assisted partial oxidation of methane. Conversion and product selectivity were discussed for both temperatures. In the second part of this work, a numerical simulation was performed and a gas-phase chemical mechanism was proposed and discussed. From the comparison between the experimental results and the simulation it was found that CH{sub 3}OO{center_dot} formation has a determinant role in oxygenated compound production, since its fast formation disfavoured radical recombination. At 5 deg. C the oxidation leads mainly towards oxygenated compound formation, and plasma dissociation was the major phenomenon responsible for CH{sub 4} conversion. At 300 deg. C, higher CH{sub 4} conversion resulted from oxidative reactions induced by {center_dot}OH radicals with a chemistry predominantly oxidative, producing CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O.

  6. Gas-Phase Enrichment of Multiply Charged Peptide Ions by Differential Ion Mobility Extend the Comprehensiveness of SUMO Proteome Analyses

    Pfammatter, Sibylle; Bonneil, Eric; McManus, Francis P.; Thibault, Pierre

    2018-04-01

    The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is a member of the family of ubiquitin-like modifiers (UBLs) and is involved in important cellular processes, including DNA damage response, meiosis and cellular trafficking. The large-scale identification of SUMO peptides in a site-specific manner is challenging not only because of the low abundance and dynamic nature of this modification, but also due to the branched structure of the corresponding peptides that further complicate their identification using conventional search engines. Here, we exploited the unusual structure of SUMO peptides to facilitate their separation by high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and increase the coverage of SUMO proteome analysis. Upon trypsin digestion, branched peptides contain a SUMO remnant side chain and predominantly form triply protonated ions that facilitate their gas-phase separation using FAIMS. We evaluated the mobility characteristics of synthetic SUMO peptides and further demonstrated the application of FAIMS to profile the changes in protein SUMOylation of HEK293 cells following heat shock, a condition known to affect this modification. FAIMS typically provided a 10-fold improvement of detection limit of SUMO peptides, and enabled a 36% increase in SUMO proteome coverage compared to the same LC-MS/MS analyses performed without FAIMS. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Exponential-fitted methods for integrating stiff systems of ordinary differential equations: Applications to homogeneous gas-phase chemical kinetics

    Pratt, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    Conventional algorithms for the numerical integration of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are based on the use of polynomial functions as interpolants. However, the exact solutions of stiff ODEs behave like decaying exponential functions, which are poorly approximated by polynomials. An obvious choice of interpolant are the exponential functions themselves, or their low-order diagonal Pade (rational function) approximants. A number of explicit, A-stable, integration algorithms were derived from the use of a three-parameter exponential function as interpolant, and their relationship to low-order, polynomial-based and rational-function-based implicit and explicit methods were shown by examining their low-order diagonal Pade approximants. A robust implicit formula was derived by exponential fitting the trapezoidal rule. Application of these algorithms to integration of the ODEs governing homogenous, gas-phase chemical kinetics was demonstrated in a developmental code CREK1D, which compares favorably with the Gear-Hindmarsh code LSODE in spite of the use of a primitive stepsize control strategy.

  8. Reactions of metal ions and their clusters in the gas phase using laser ionization: ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy

    Freiser, B.S.

    1981-04-01

    Two subjects are discussed in this report: advances in proposed studies on metal ion chemistry and expansion of laboratory facilities. The development of a combined pulsed laser source-ion cyclotron resonance spectrometer has proven to be a convenient and powerful method for generating metal ions and for studying their subsequent chemistry in the gas phase. The main emphasis of this research has been on the application of metal ions as a selective chemical ionization reagents and progress in this area are discussed. The goal is to identify trends in reactivity i.e. mechanisms useful in interpreting the chemical ionization spectra of unknown compounds and to test for the functional group selectivity of the various metal ions. The feasibility of these goals have been demonstrated in extensive studies on Cu + with esters and ketones, on Fe + with ethers, ketones, and hydrocarbons, and on Ti + with hydrocarbons. In addition, preliminary results on sulfur containing compounds and on a variety of other metallic ions have been obtained. Laboratory facilities were expanded from one ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectrometer to two, plus a third instrument the Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FTICR) spectrometer

  9. Gas phase synthesis of core-shell Fe@FeO{sub x} magnetic nanoparticles into fluids

    Aktas, Sitki, E-mail: aksitki61@gmail.com; Thornton, Stuart C.; Binns, Chris [University of Leicester, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Denby, Phil [Ensol As, Nesttun (Norway)

    2016-12-15

    Sorbitol, short chain molecules, have been used to stabilise of Fe@FeO{sub x} nanoparticles produced in the gas phase under the ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions. The sorbitol coated Fe@FeO{sub x} nanoparticles produced by our method have a narrow size distribution with a hydrodynamic diameter of 35 nm after NaOH is added to the solution. Magnetisation measurement shows that the magnetic nanoparticles are superparamagnetic at 100 K and demonstrate hysteresis at 5 K with an anisotropy constant of 5.31 × 10{sup 4} J/m{sup 3} (similar to bulk iron). Also, it is shown that sorbitol is only suitable for stabilising the Fe@FeO{sub x} suspensions, and it does not prevent further oxidation of the metallic Fe core. According to MRI measurement, the nanoparticles have a high transverse relaxation rate of 425 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1}.

  10. Chemical decontamination and melt densification of chop-leach fuel hulls

    Dillon, R.L.; Griggs, B.; Kemper, R.S.; Nelson, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    This paper reports on decontamination and densification studies of chop-leach fuel hull residues designed to minimize the transuranic element (TRU) contaminated waste stream. Decontamination requirements have been established from studies of TRU element distribution in the fuel hull residues. Effective surface decontamination of Zircaloy requires removal of zirconium oxide corrosion products. Good decontamination factors have been achieved with aqueous solutions following high temperature HF conditioning of oxide films. Molten fluoride salt mixtures are effective decontaminants, but pose problems in metal loss and salt dragout. Molten metal decontamination methods are highly preliminary, but may be required to reduce TRU originating from tramp uranium in Zircaloy. Low melting (1300 0 C) alloy of Zircaloy, stainless steel, and Inconel have been prepared in induction heated graphite crucibles. High quality ingots of Zircaloy-2 have been prepared directly from short sections of descaled fuel clad tubing using the Inductoslag process. This material is readily capable of refabrication. Inductoslag melts have also been prepared from heavily oxidized Zircaloy tubing demonstrating melt densification without prior decontamination is technically feasible. Hydrogen absorption kinetics have been demonstrated with cast Zircaloy-2 and cast Zircaloy-stainless steel-Inconel alloys. Metallic fuel hull residues have been proposed as a storage medium for tritium released from fuel during reprocessing. (author)

  11. Phase 2 microwave concrete decontamination results

    White, T.L.; Foster, D. Jr.; Wilson, C.T.; Schaich, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    The authors report on the results of the second phase of a four-phase program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop a system to decontaminate concrete using microwave energy. The microwave energy is directed at the concrete surface through the use of an optimized wave guide antenna, or applicator, and this energy rapidly heats the free water present in the interstitial spaces of the concrete matrix. The resulting steam pressure causes the surface to burst in much the same way popcorn pops in a home microwave oven. Each steam explosion removes several square centimeters of concrete surface that are collected by a highly integrated wave guide and vacuum system. The authors call this process the microwave concrete decontamination, or MCD, process. In the first phase of the program the principle of microwaves concrete removal concrete surfaces was demonstrated. In these experiments, concrete slabs were placed on a translator and moved beneath a stationary microwave system. The second phase demonstrated the ability to mobilize the technology to remove the surfaces from concrete floors. Area and volume concrete removal rates of 10.4 cm 2 /s and 4.9 cm 3 /S, respectively, at 18 GHz were demonstrated. These rates are more than double those obtained in Phase 1 of the program. Deeper contamination can be removed by using a longer residence time under the applicator to create multiple explosions in the same area or by taking multiple passes over previously removed areas. Both techniques have been successfully demonstrated. Small test sections of painted and oil-soaked concrete have also been removed in a single pass. Concrete with embedded metal anchors on the surface has also been removed, although with some increased variability of removal depth. Microwave leakage should not pose any operational hazard to personnel, since the observed leakage was much less than the regulatory standard

  12. Verification of wet blasting decontamination technology

    Matsubara, Sachito; Murayama, Kazunari; Yoshida, Hirohisa; Igei, Shigemitsu; Izumida, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Macoho Co., Ltd. participated in the projects of 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Ministry of the Environment' and 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Cabinet Office.' And we tested verification to use a wet blasting technology for decontamination of rubble and roads contaminated by the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of the Tokyo Electric Power Company. As a results of the verification test, the wet blasting decontamination technology showed that a decontamination rate became 60-80% for concrete paving, interlocking, dense-grated asphalt pavement when applied to the decontamination of the road. When it was applied to rubble decontamination, a decontamination rate was 50-60% for gravel and approximately 90% for concrete and wood. It was thought that Cs-134 and Cs-137 attached to the fine sludge scraped off from a decontamination object and the sludge was found to be separated from abrasives by wet cyclene classification: the activity concentration of the abrasives is 1/30 or less than the sludge. The result shows that the abrasives can be reused without problems when the wet blasting decontamination technology is used. (author)

  13. Non-destructive decontamination of building materials

    Holecek, Josef; Otahal, Petr

    2015-11-01

    For nondestructive radiation decontamination of surfaces it is necessary to use varnishes, such as ARGONNE, DG1101, DG1108, etc. This text evaluates the use of manufactured strippable coatings for radiation decontamination. To evaluate decontamination capability of such coatings the following varnishes were selected and subsequently used: AZ 1-700 and AXAL 1807S. The varnishes were tested on different building materials surfaces contaminated by short-term radioisotopes of Na-24 or La-140, in water soluble or water insoluble forms. Decontamination quality was assessed by the decontamination efficiency value, defined as the proportion of removed activity to the applied activity. It was found that decontamination efficiency of both used varnishes depends not only on the form of contaminant, but in the case of application of AXAL 1807S varnish it also depends on the method of its application on the contaminated surface. The values of the decontamination efficiency for AZ1-700 varnish range from 46% for decontamination of a soluble form of the radioisotope from concrete surface to 98% for the decontamination of a soluble form of the radioisotope from ceramic tile surface. The decontamination efficiency values determined for AXAL 1807S varnish range from 48% for decontamination of a soluble form of the radioisotope from concrete surface to 96% for decontamination of an insoluble form of the radioisotope from ceramic tile surface. Comparing these values to the values given for the decontaminating varnishes we can conclude that AXAL 1807S varnish is possible to use on all materials, except highly porous materials, such as plasterboard or breeze blocks, or plastic materials. AZ 1-700 varnish can be used for all dry materials except plasterboard.

  14. The coupling effect of gas-phase chemistry and surface reactions on oxygen permeation and fuel conversion in ITM reactors

    Hong, Jongsup

    2015-08-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. The effect of the coupling between heterogeneous catalytic reactions supported by an ion transport membrane (ITM) and gas-phase chemistry on fuel conversion and oxygen permeation in ITM reactors is examined. In ITM reactors, thermochemical reactions take place in the gas-phase and on the membrane surface, both of which interact with oxygen permeation. However, this coupling between gas-phase and surface chemistry has not been examined in detail. In this study, a parametric analysis using numerical simulations is conducted to investigate this coupling and its impact on fuel conversion and oxygen permeation rates. A thermochemical model that incorporates heterogeneous chemistry on the membrane surface and detailed chemical kinetics in the gas-phase is used. Results show that fuel conversion and oxygen permeation are strongly influenced by the simultaneous action of both chemistries. It is shown that the coupling somewhat suppresses the gas-phase kinetics and reduces fuel conversion, both attributed to extensive thermal energy transfer towards the membrane which conducts it to the air side and radiates to the reactor walls. The reaction pathway and products, in the form of syngas and C2 hydrocarbons, are also affected. In addition, the operating regimes of ITM reactors in which heterogeneous- or/and homogeneous-phase reactions predominantly contribute to fuel conversion and oxygen permeation are elucidated.

  15. Heterogeneity-enhanced gas phase formation in shallow aquifers during leakage of CO2-saturated water from geologic sequestration sites

    Plampin, Michael R.; Lassen, Rune N.; Sakaki, Toshihiro; Porter, Mark L.; Pawar, Rajesh J.; Jensen, Karsten H.; Illangasekare, Tissa H.

    2014-12-01

    A primary concern for geologic carbon storage is the potential for leakage of stored carbon dioxide (CO2) into the shallow subsurface where it could degrade the quality of groundwater and surface water. In order to predict and mitigate the potentially negative impacts of CO2 leakage, it is important to understand the physical processes that CO2 will undergo as it moves through naturally heterogeneous porous media formations. Previous studies have shown that heterogeneity can enhance the evolution of gas phase CO2 in some cases, but the conditions under which this occurs have not yet been quantitatively defined, nor tested through laboratory experiments. This study quantitatively investigates the effects of geologic heterogeneity on the process of gas phase CO2 evolution in shallow aquifers through an extensive set of experiments conducted in a column that was packed with layers of various test sands. Soil moisture sensors were utilized to observe the formation of gas phase near the porous media interfaces. Results indicate that the conditions under which heterogeneity controls gas phase evolution can be successfully predicted through analysis of simple parameters, including the dissolved CO2 concentration in the flowing water, the distance between the heterogeneity and the leakage location, and some fundamental properties of the porous media. Results also show that interfaces where a less permeable material overlies a more permeable material affect gas phase evolution more significantly than interfaces with the opposite layering.

  16. Development and assessment of two decontamination processes: closed electropolishing system for decontamination of underwater surfaces -vibratory decontamination with abrasives

    Benavides, E.; Fajardo, M.

    1992-01-01

    Two decontamination processes have been developed to decontaminate the stainless steel components of nuclear power plants. The first process uses an underwater closed electropolishing system for the decontamination of large stainless steel surfaces in flooded systems without loss of electrolyte. Large underwater contaminated areas can be treated with an electropolishing head covering an area of 2 m 2 in one step. The decontamination factors achieved with this technique range between 100 and 1000. The second process consists in the decontamination of nuclear components using vibratory equipment with self-cleaning abrasives generating a minimum quantity of waste. This technique may reach contamination factors similar to those obtained with other abrasive methods (brush abrasion, abrasive blasting, etc...). The obtained decontamination factors range between 5 and 50. Only a small quantity of waste is generated, which is treated and reduced in volume by filtration and evaporation

  17. Development of a mobile unit for 'in loco' sistematic decontamination in nuclear power plants components

    Camargo, G.A.M.

    1986-01-01

    A mobile decontamination unit was developed to perform 'in situ' decontamination of tanks and pressure vessels belonging to the reactor auxiliary and ancillary systems. The whole system, including a control desk, is assembled in 6 trolleys which can be moved inside the plant, thus enabling component decontamination by injecting demineralized water at a pressure of approx. 50 bar and temperatures up to 90 0 , with or without chemical additives. Considering the versatility and easy handling demonstrated after extensive testing, this new system shall be used in Angra 2 and 3. (Author) [pt

  18. New decontamination techniques generating a low volume of effluent

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document presents some decontamination techniques, their principles, characteristics and advantages and provides references on the subject. Techniques as foam and spray foam decontamination, dry steam decontamination, electro-decontamination and gel decontamination are presented. A presentation of TRIADE, cleanup dismantling servicing, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  19. New decontamination techniques generating a low volume of effluent

    2002-01-01

    This document presents some decontamination techniques, their principles, characteristics and advantages and provides references on the subject. Techniques as foam and spray foam decontamination, dry steam decontamination, electro-decontamination and gel decontamination are presented. A presentation of TRIADE, cleanup dismantling servicing, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  20. All-soft, battery-free, and wireless chemical sensing platform based on liquid metal for liquid- and gas-phase VOC detection.

    Kim, Min-Gu; Alrowais, Hommood; Kim, Choongsoon; Yeon, Pyungwoo; Ghovanloo, Maysam; Brand, Oliver

    2017-06-27

    Lightweight, flexible, stretchable, and wireless sensing platforms have gained significant attention for personal healthcare and environmental monitoring applications. This paper introduces an all-soft (flexible and stretchable), battery-free, and wireless chemical microsystem using gallium-based liquid metal (eutectic gallium-indium alloy, EGaIn) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), fabricated using an advanced liquid metal thin-line patterning technique based on soft lithography. Considering its flexible, stretchable, and lightweight characteristics, the proposed sensing platform is well suited for wearable sensing applications either on the skin or on clothing. Using the microfluidic sensing platform, detection of liquid-phase and gas-phase volatile organic compounds (VOC) is demonstrated using the same design, which gives an opportunity to have the sensor operate under different working conditions and environments. In the case of liquid-phase chemical sensing, the wireless sensing performance and microfluidic capacitance tunability for different dielectric liquids are evaluated using analytical, numerical, and experimental approaches. In the case of gas-phase chemical sensing, PDMS is used both as a substrate and a sensing material. The gas sensing performance is evaluated and compared to a silicon-based, solid-state gas sensor with a PDMS sensing film.