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Sample records for gas-cooled reactors htgr

  1. Status of international HTGR [high-temperature gas-cooled reactor] development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Simon, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    Programs for the development of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology over the past 30 years in eight countries are briefly described. These programs have included both government sector and industrial participation. The programs have produced four electricity-producing prototype/demonstration reaactors, two in the United States, and two in the Federal Republic of Germany. Key design parameters for these reactors are compared with the design parameters planned for follow-on commercial-scale HTGRs. The development of HTGR technology has been enhanced by numerous cooperative agreements over the years, involving both government-sponsored national laboratories and industrial participants. Current bilateral cooperative agreements are described. A relatively new component in the HTGR international cooperation is that of multinational industrial alliances focused on supplying commercial-scale HTGR power plants. Current industrial cooperative agreements are briefly discussed

  2. Heat exchanger design considerations for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Vrable, D.L.; Van Hagan, T.H.; King, J.H.; Spring, A.H.

    1980-02-01

    Various aspects of the high-temperature heat exchanger conceptual designs for the gas turbine (HTGR-GT) and process heat (HTGR-PH) plants are discussed. Topics include technology background, heat exchanger types, surface geometry, thermal sizing, performance, material selection, mechanical design, fabrication, and the systems-related impact of installation and integration of the units in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel. The impact of future technology developments, such as the utilization of nonmetallic materials and advanced heat exchanger surface geometries and methods of construction, is also discussed

  3. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) graphite pebble fuel: Review of technologies for reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcwilliams, A. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-08

    This report reviews literature on reprocessing high temperature gas-cooled reactor graphite fuel components. A basic review of the various fuel components used in the pebble bed type reactors is provided along with a survey of synthesis methods for the fabrication of the fuel components. Several disposal options are considered for the graphite pebble fuel elements including the storage of intact pebbles, volume reduction by separating the graphite from fuel kernels, and complete processing of the pebbles for waste storage. Existing methods for graphite removal are presented and generally consist of mechanical separation techniques such as crushing and grinding chemical techniques through the use of acid digestion and oxidation. Potential methods for reprocessing the graphite pebbles include improvements to existing methods and novel technologies that have not previously been investigated for nuclear graphite waste applications. The best overall method will be dependent on the desired final waste form and needs to factor in the technical efficiency, political concerns, cost, and implementation.

  4. Evaluation, Comparison and Optimization of the Compact Recuperator for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Helium Turbine System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Haoran; Yang Xiaoyong; Wang Jie; Ye Ping; Yu Xiaoli; Zhao Gang

    2014-01-01

    Helium turbine system is a promising method to covert the nuclear power generated by the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) into electricity with inherent safety, compact configuration and relative high efficiency. And the recuperator is one of the key components for the HTGR helium turbine system. It is used to recover the exhaust heat out of turbine and pass it to the helium from high pressure compressor, and hence increase the cycle’s efficiency dramatically. On the other hand, the pressure drop within the recuperator will reduce the cycle efficiency, especially on low pressure side of recuperator. It is necessary to optimize the design of recuperator to achieve better performance of HTGR helium turbine system. However, this optimization has to be performed with the restriction of the size of the pressure vessel which contains the power conversion unit. This paper firstly presents an analysis to investigate the effects of flow channel geometry, recuperator’s power and size on heat transfer and pressure drop. Then the relationship between the recuperator design and system performance is established with an analytical model, followed by the evaluations of the current recuperator designs of GT-MHR, GTHTR300 and PBMR, in which several effective technical measures to optimize the recuperator are compared. Finally it is found that the most important factors for optimizing recuperator design, i.e. the cross section dimensions and tortuosity of flow channel, which can also be extended to compact intermediate heat exchangers. It turns out that a proper optimization can increase the cycle’s efficiency by 1~2 percentage, which could also raise the economy and competitiveness of future commercial HTGR plants. (author)

  5. The dynamic characteristics of HTGR (High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor) system, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Kazuhiko; Ohta, Masao; Kawasaki, Hidenori

    1979-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of a HTGR plant, which has two cooling loops, was investigated. The analytical model consists of the core with fuel sleeves, coolant channels and blocks, the upper and lower reflectors, the high and low temperature plenums, two double wall pipings, two intermediate heat exchangers and the secondary system. The key plant parameters for calculation were as follows: the core outlet gas temperature 1000 deg C, the reactor thermal output 50 MW, the flow rate of primary coolant gas 7.96 kg/sec-loop and the pressure of primary coolant gas 40 kg/cm 2 at the rated operating condition. The calculating parameters were fixed as follows: the time interval for core characteristic analysis 0.1 sec, the time interval for thermal characteristic analysis 5.0 sec, the number of division of fuel channels 130, and the number of division of an intermediate heat exchanger 200. The assumptions for making the model were evaluated especially for the power distribution in the core and the heat transmission coefficients in the core, the double wall piping and the intermediate heat exchangers. Concerning the analytical results, the self-control to the outer disturbance of reactivity and the plant dynamic behavior due to the change of flow rate of primary and secondary coolants, and the change of gas temperature of secondary coolant at the inlet of intermediate heat exchangers, are presented. (Nakai, Y.)

  6. Creep and fatigue properties of Incoloy 800H in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) helium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, J.G.Y.; Soo, P.; Epel, L.

    1978-01-01

    A mechanical test program to assess the effects of a simulated HTGR helium environment on the fatigue and creep properties of Incoloy 800H and other primary-circuit metals is described. The emphasis and the objectives of this work are directed toward obtaining information to assess the integrity and safety of an HTGR throughout its service life. The helium test environment selected for study contained 40 μ atm H 2 O, 200 μ atm H 2 , 40 μ atm CO, 10 μ atm CO 2 , and 20 μ atm CH 4 . It is believed that this ''wet'' environment simulates that which could exist in a steam-cycle HTGR containing some leaking steam-generator tubes. A recirculating helium loop operating at about 4 psi in which impurities can be maintained at a constant level, has been constructed to supply the desired environment for fatigue and creep testing

  7. Gas cooled reactor assessment. Volume II. Final report, February 9, 1976--June 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    This report was prepared to document the estimated power plant capital and operating costs, and the safety and environmental assessments used in support of the Gas Cooled Reactor Assessment performed by Arthur D. Little, Inc. (ADL), for the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration. The gas-cooled reactor technologies investigated include: the High Temperature Gas Reactor Steam Cycle (HTGR-SC), the HTGR Direct Cycle (HTGR-DC), the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) and the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR). Reference technologies used for comparison include: Light Water Reactors (LWR), the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR), conventional coal-fired steam plants, and coal combustion for process heat

  8. Gas-cooled reactors: the importance of their development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1979-06-01

    The nearest term GCR is the steam-cycle HTGR, which can be used for both power and process steam production. Use of SC-HTGRs permits timely introduction of thorium fuel cycles and of high-thermal-efficiency reactors, decreasing the need for mined U 3 O 8 before arrival of symbiotic fueling of fast-thermal reactor systems. The gas-turbine HTGR offers prospects of lower capital costs than other nuclear reactors, but it appears to require longer and more costly development than the SC-HTGR. Accelerated development of the GT-HTGR is needed to gain the advantages of timely introduction. The Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) offers the possibility of fast breeder reactors with lower capital costs and with higher breeding ratios from oxide fuels. The VHTR provides high-temperature heat for hydrogen production

  9. Gas-Cooled Reactors: the importance of their development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    Gas-Cooled Reactors are considered to have a significant future impact on the application of fission energy. The specific types are the steam-cycle High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor, the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor, the gas-turbine HTGR, and the Very High-Temperature Process Heat Reactor. The importance of developing the above systems is discussed relative to alternative fission power systems involving Light Water Reactors, Heavy Water Reactors, Spectral Shift Controlled Reactors, and Liquid-Metal-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactors. A primary advantage of developing GCRs as a class lies in the technology and cost interrelations, permitting cost-effective development of systems having diverse applications. Further, HTGR-type systems have highly proliferation-resistant characteristics and very attractive safety features. Finally, such systems and GCFRs are mutally complementary. Overall, GCRs provide interrelated systems that serve different purposes and needs; their development can proceed in stages that provide early benefits while contributing to future needs. It is concluded that the long-term importance of the various GCRs is as follows: HTGR, providing a technology for economic GCFRs and HTGR-GTs, while providing a proliferation-resistant reactor system having early economic and fuel utilization benefits; GCFR, providing relatively low cost fissile fuel and reducing overall separative work needs at capital costs lower than those for LMFBRs; HTGR-GT (in combination with a bottoming cycle), providing a very high thermal efficiency system having low capital costs and improved fuel utilization and technology pertinent to VHTRs; HTGR-GT, providing a power system well suited for dry cooling conditions for low-temperature process heat needs; and VHTR, providing a high-temperature heat source for hydrogen production processes

  10. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project.

  11. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project

  12. Specialists' meeting on gas-cooled reactor fuel development and spent fuel treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Topics covered during the 'Specialists' meeting on gas-cooled reactor fuel development and spent fuel treatment' were as follows: Selection of constructions and materials, fuel element development concepts; Fabrication of spherical coated fuel particles and fuel element on their base; investigation of fuel properties; Spent fuel treatment and storage; Head-end processing of HTGR fuel elements; investigation of HTGR fuel regeneration process; applicability of gas-fluorine technology of regeneration of spent HTGR fuel elements

  13. Advances in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuel Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    This publication reports on the results of a coordinated research project on advances in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel technology and describes the findings of research activities on coated particle developments. These comprise two specific benchmark exercises with the application of HTGR fuel performance and fission product release codes, which helped compare the quality and validity of the computer models against experimental data. The project participants also examined techniques for fuel characterization and advanced quality assessment/quality control. The key exercise included a round-robin experimental study on the measurements of fuel kernel and particle coating properties of recent Korean, South African and US coated particle productions applying the respective qualification measures of each participating Member State. The summary report documents the results and conclusions achieved by the project and underlines the added value to contemporary knowledge on HTGR fuel.

  14. Advances in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuel Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-12-01

    This publication reports on the results of a coordinated research project on advances in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel technology and describes the findings of research activities on coated particle developments. These comprise two specific benchmark exercises with the application of HTGR fuel performance and fission product release codes, which helped compare the quality and validity of the computer models against experimental data. The project participants also examined techniques for fuel characterization and advanced quality assessment/quality control. The key exercise included a round-robin experimental study on the measurements of fuel kernel and particle coating properties of recent Korean, South African and US coated particle productions applying the respective qualification measures of each participating Member State. The summary report documents the results and conclusions achieved by the project and underlines the added value to contemporary knowledge on HTGR fuel.

  15. International working group on gas-cooled reactors. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-15

    The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for exchange of information on safety and licensing aspects for gas-cooled reactors in order to provide comprehensive review of the present status and of directions for future applications and development. Contributions were made concerning the operating experience of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) HTGR Power Plant in the United States of America, the experimental power station Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) in the Federal Republic of Germany, and the CO/sub 2/-cooled reactors in the United Kingdom such as Hunterson B and Hinkley Point B. The experience gained at each of these reactors has proved the high safety potential of Gas-cooled Reactor Power Plants.

  16. Gas-cooled reactors and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to review and discuss the current status and recent progress made in the technology and design of gas-cooled reactors and their application for electricity generation, process steam and process heat production. The meeting was attended by more than 200 participants from 25 countries and International Organizations presenting 34 papers. The technical part of the meeting was subdivided into 7 sessions: A. Overview of the Status of Gas-Cooled Reactors and Their Prospects (2 papers); B. Experience with Gas-Cooled Reactors (5 papers); C. Description of Current GCR Plant Designs (10 papers); D. Safety Aspects (4 papers); E. Gas-Cooled Reactor Applications (3 papers); F. Gas-Cooled Reactor Technology (6 papers); G. User's Perspectives on Gas-Cooled Reactors (4 papers). At the end of the meeting a round table discussion was organized in order to summarize the meeting and to make recommendations for future activities. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 34 presentations of this meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Application of Hastelloy X in Gas-Cooled Reactor Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkman, C. R.; Rittenhouse, P. L.; Corwin, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    Hastelloy X, an Ni--Cr--Fe--Mo alloy, may be an important structural alloy for components of gas-cooled reactor systems. Expected applications of this alloy in the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) are discussed, and the development of interim mechanical properties and supporting data...... are reported. Properties of concern include tensile, creep, creep-rupture, fatigue, creep-fatigue interaction, subcritical crack growth, thermal stability, and the influence of helium environments with controlled amounts of impurities on these properties. In order to develop these properties in helium...... extensive amount of information has been generated on this material at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and elsewhere concerning behavior in air, which is reviewed. However, only limited data are available from tests conducted in helium. Comparisons of the fatigue and subcritical growth behavior in air between...

  18. Power Conversion Study for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh; Richard Moore; Robert Barner

    2005-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating a Brayton cycle efficiency improvement on a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as part of Generation-IV nuclear engineering research initiative. There are some technical issues to be resolved before the selection of the final design of the high temperature gas cooled reactor, called as a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is supposed to be built at the INEEL by year 2017. The technical issues are the selection of the working fluid, direct vs. indirect cycle, power cycle type, the optimized design in terms of a number of intercoolers, and others. In this paper, we investigated a number of working fluids for the power conversion loop, direct versus indirect cycle, the effect of intercoolers, and other thermal hydraulics issues. However, in this paper, we present part of the results we have obtained. HYSYS computer code was used along with a computer model developed using Visual Basic computer language

  19. High-temperature gas-cooled reactors and process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) are fueled with ceramic-coated microspheres of uranium and thorium oxides/carbides embedded in graphite blocks which are cooled with helium. Promising areas of HTGR application are in cogeneration, energy transport using Heat Transfer Salt, recovery of oils from oil shale, steam reforming of methane for chemical production, coal gasification, and in energy transfer using chemical heat jpipes in the long term. Further, HTGRs could be used as the energy source for hydrogen production through thermochemical water splitting in the long term. The potential market for Process Heat HTGRs is 100-200 large units by about the year 2020

  20. French activities on gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastien, D.

    1996-01-01

    The gas cooled reactor programme in France originally consisted of eight Natural Uranium Graphite Gas Cooled Reactors (UNGG). These eight units, which are now permanently shutdown, represented a combined net electrical power of 2,375 MW and a total operational history of 163 years. Studies related to these reactors concern monitoring and dismantling of decommissioned facilities, including the development of methods for dismantling. France has been monitoring the development of HTRs throughout the world since 1979, when it halted its own HTR R and D programme. France actively participates in three CRPs set up by the IAEA. (author). 1 tab

  1. Gas-cooled reactor technology: a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raleigh, H.D.

    1981-09-01

    Included are 3358 citations on gas-cooled reactor technology contained in the DOE Energy Data Base for the period January 1978 through June 1981. The citations include reports, journal articles, books, conference papers, patents, and monographs. Corporate, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number Indexes are provided

  2. Effect of heat source shape on the thermal field in the pebble bed core of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Leisheng; Lee, Jaeyoung [Handong Global University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, in order to minimize the error brought by non-uniform heat flux, the spherical heaters are employed as heat source; subsequently, thermal field and heat transfer characteristics of the pebbles are investigated. The thermal field of the pebble surface in PBR is measured with heat source in different shapes. The HTGR design concept exhibits excellent safety features due to the low power density and the large amount of graphite present in the core which gives a large thermal inertia in an accident such as loss of coolant. However, the possible appearance of hot spots in the pebble bed cores of HTGR may affect the integrity of the pebbles, which has drawn the attention of many scientists to investigate the thermal field and to predict the maximum temperature locations in the pebbles using CFD method, Lee et.al has also done some experimental work on measuring the surface temperature of the pebbles as well as visualizing flow patterns of the coolant gas, and it was found that the temperature near the contacting points between pebbles was not higher than the flow stagnation points due to the higher thermal conductivity of the pebble. Certain error of temperature measurement might occur because of not very uniform heat flux in the pebbles since heater in cylindrical shape was utilized as heat source in previous experiment. More uniform heat flux and more complicated thermal profile are found in the result obtained using spherical heaters. The result shows that the temperature in contact point is higher than that in the top point, which is different from the previous results. The complex thermal phenomena observed in the lower-half side-sphere can be explained by the flow pattern near the surface.

  3. Selection of design basis event for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Ohashi, Hirofumi

    2016-06-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been investigating safety requirements and basic approach of safety guidelines for modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) aiming to increase internarial contribution for nuclear safety by developing an international HTGR safety standard under International Atomic Energy Agency. In this study, we investigate a deterministic approach to select design basis events utilizing information obtained from probabilistic approach. In addition, selections of design basis events are conducted for commercial HTGR designed by JAEA. As a result, an approach for selecting design basis event considering multiple failures of safety systems is established which has not been considered as design basis in the safety guideline for existing nuclear facility. Furthermore, selection of design basis events for commercial HTGR has completed. This report provides an approach and procedure for selecting design basis events of modular HTGR as well as selected events for the commercial HTGR, GTHTR300. (author)

  4. High temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosegood, S.B.; Lockett, G.E.

    1975-01-01

    For high-temperature gas cooled reactors it is considered advantageous to design the core so that the moderator blocks can be removed and replaced by some means of standpipes normally situated in the top of the reactor vessel. An arrangement is here described to facilitate these operations. The blocks have end faces shaped as irregular hexagons with three long sides of equal length and three short sides also of equal length, one short side being located between each pair of adjacent long sides, and the long sides being inclined towards one another at 60 0 . The block defines a number of coolant channels located parallel to its sides. Application of the arrangement to a high temperature gas-cooled reactor with refuelling standpipes is described. The standpipes are located in the top of the reactor vessel above the tops of the columns and are disposed coaxially above the hexagonal channels, with diameters that allow the passage of the blocks. (U.K.)

  5. Gas-Cooled Reactor Programs annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1973. [HTGR fuel reprocessing, fuel fabrication, fuel irradiation, core materials, and fission product distribution; GCFR fuel irradiation and steam generator modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Coobs, J.H.; Lotts, A.L.

    1976-04-01

    Progress is summarized in studies relating to HTGR fuel reprocessing, refabrication, and recycle; HTGR fuel materials development and performance testing; HTGR PCRV development; HTGR materials investigations; HTGR fuel chemistry; HTGR safety studies; and GCFR irradiation experiments and steam generator modeling.

  6. Neutronic of heterogenous gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maturana, Roberto Hernan

    2008-01-01

    At present, one of the main technical features of the advanced gas cooled reactor under development is its fuel element concept, which implies a neutronic homogeneous design, thus requiring higher enrichment compared with present commercial nuclear power plants.In this work a neutronic heterogeneous gas cooled reactor design is analyzed by studying the neutronic design of the Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (AGR), a low enrichment, gas cooled and graphite moderated nuclear power plant.A search of merit figures (some neutronic parameter, characteristic dimension, or a mixture of both) which are important and have been optimized during the reactor design stage is been done, to aim to comprise how a gas heterogeneous reactor is been design, given that semi-infinity arrangement criteria of rods in LWRs and clusters in HWRs can t be applied for a solid moderator and a gas refrigerator.The WIMS code for neutronic cell calculations is been utilized to model the AGR fuel cell and to calculate neutronic parameters such as the multiplication factor and the pick factor, as function of the fuel burnup.Also calculation is been done for various nucleus characteristic dimensions values (fuel pin radius, fuel channel pitch) and neutronic parameters (such as fuel enrichment), around the design established parameters values.A fuel cycle cost analysis is carried out according to the reactor in study, and the enrichment effect over it is been studied.Finally, a thermal stability analysis is been done, in subcritical condition and at power level, to study this reactor characteristic reactivity coefficients.Present results shows (considering the approximation used) a first set of neutronic design figures of merit consistent with the AGR design. [es

  7. Use of thorium for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimarães, Cláudio Q., E-mail: claudio_guimaraes@usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Física; Stefani, Giovanni L. de, E-mail: giovanni.stefani@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Thiago A. dos, E-mail: thiago.santos@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The HTGR ( High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) is a 4{sup th} generation nuclear reactor and is fuelled by a mixture of graphite and fuel-bearing microspheres. There are two competitive designs of this reactor type: The German “pebble bed” mode, which is a system that uses spherical fuel elements, containing a graphite-and-fuel mixture coated in a graphite shell; and the American version, whose fuel is loaded into precisely located graphite hexagonal prisms that interlock to create the core of the vessel. In both variants, the coolant consists of helium pressurised. The HTGR system operates most efficiently with the thorium fuel cycle, however, so relatively little development has been carried out in this country on that cycle for HTGRs. In the Nuclear Engineering Centre of IPEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares), a study group is being formed linked to thorium reactors, whose proposal is to investigate reactors using thorium for {sup 233}U production and rejects burning. The present work intends to show the use of thorium in HTGRs, their advantages and disadvantages and its feasibility. (author)

  8. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Projected Markets and Preliminary Economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Demick

    2011-08-01

    This paper summarizes the potential market for process heat produced by a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), the environmental benefits reduced CO2 emissions will have on these markets, and the typical economics of projects using these applications. It gives examples of HTGR technological applications to industrial processes in the typical co-generation supply of process heat and electricity, the conversion of coal to transportation fuels and chemical process feedstock, and the production of ammonia as a feedstock for the production of ammonia derivatives, including fertilizer. It also demonstrates how uncertainties in capital costs and financial factors affect the economics of HTGR technology by analyzing the use of HTGR technology in the application of HTGR and high temperature steam electrolysis processes to produce hydrogen.

  9. Gas-cooled reactor commercialization study. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This report of the gas-cooled reactor commercialization study completes the technical and cost evaluation portions of this study contract. A final report in December will update the status of the incentive analyses and the issues of commercialization. This study was designed to bring together potential industry participants (utilities and suppliers) to evaluate the commercial potential of the HTGR-SC and to build channels of communication among the participating organizations at the same time that technical, economic and institutional issues were being evaluated. RAMCO, Inc., in suggesting and using this study approach, believes its application extends to any commercialization problem involving multi-party involvement in high capital, intensive, high risk energy technologies

  10. CEA programme on gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Fiorini, G.L.; Chapelot, Ph.; Gauthier, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Future nuclear energy systems studies conducted by the CEA aim at investigating and developing promising technologies for future reactors, fuels and fuel cycles, for nuclear power to play a major part in sustainable energy policies. Reactors and fuel cycles are considered as integral parts of a nuclear system to be optimised as a whole. Major goals assigned to future nuclear energy systems are the following: reinforced economic competitiveness with other electricity generation means, with a special emphasis on reducing the investment cost; enhanced reliability and safety, through an improved management of reactor operation in normal and abnormal plant conditions; minimum production of long lived radioactive waste; resource saving through an effective and flexible use of the available resources of fissile and fertile materials; enhanced resistance to proliferation risks. The three latter goals are essential for the sustainability of nuclear energy in the long term. Additional considerations such as the potentialities for other applications than electricity generation (co-generation, production of hydrogen, sea water desalination) take on an increasing importance. Sustainability goals call for fast neutron spectra (to transmute nuclear waste and to breed fertile fuel) and for recycling actinides from the spent fuel (plutonium and minor actinides). New applications and economic competitiveness call for high temperature technologies (850 deg C), that afford high conversion efficiencies and hence less radioactive waste production and discharged heat. These orientations call for breakthroughs beyond light water reactors. Therefore, as a result of a screening review of candidate technologies, the CEA has selected an innovative concept of high temperature gas cooled reactor with a fast neutron spectrum, robust refractory fuel, direct conversion with a gas turbine, and integrated on-site fuel cycle as a promising system for a sustainable energy development. This objective

  11. Circulating and plateout activity program for gas-cooled reactors with arbitrary radioactive chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apperson, C.E. Jr.

    1978-03-01

    A time-dependent method for estimating the fuel body, circulating, plateout, and filter inventory of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) during normal operation is discussed. The primary coolant model accounts for the source, buildup, decay, and cleanup of isotopes that are gas borne inside the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). This method has been implemented in the SUVIUS computer program that is described in detail.

  12. Concept of an inherently-safe high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Masuro

    2012-01-01

    As the challenge to ensure no harmful release of radioactive materials at the accidents by deterministic approach instead to satisfy acceptance criteria or safety goal for risk by probabilistic approach, new concept of advanced reactor, an inherently-safe high temperature gas-cooled reactor, is proposed based on the experience of the operation of the actual High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) in Japan, High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), and the design of the commercial plant (GTHTR300), utilizing the inherent safety features of the HTGR (i.e., safety features based on physical phenomena). The safety design philosophy of the inherently-safe HTGR for the safety analysis of the radiological consequences is determined as the confinement of radioactive materials is assured by only inherent safety features without engineered safety features, AC power or prompt actions by plant personnel if the design extension conditions occur. Inherent safety features to prevent the loss or degradation of the confinement function are identified. It is proposed not to apply the probabilistic approach for the evaluation of the radiological consequences of the accidents in the safety analysis because no inherent safety features fail for the mitigation of the consequences of the accidents. Consequently, there are no event sequences to harmful release of radioactive materials if the design extension conditions occur in the inherently-safe HTGR concept. The concept and future R and D items for the inherently-safe HTGR are described in this paper.

  13. High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuels and Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    At the third annual meeting of the technical working group on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options and Spent Fuel Management (TWG-NFCO), held in Vienna, in 2004, it was suggested 'to develop manuals/handbooks and best practice documents for use in training and education in coated particle fuel technology' in the IAEA's Programme for the year 2006-2007. In the context of supporting interested Member States, the activity to develop a handbook for use in the 'education and training' of a new generation of scientists and engineers on coated particle fuel technology was undertaken. To make aware of the role of nuclear science education and training in all Member States to enhance their capacity to develop innovative technologies for sustainable nuclear energy is of paramount importance to the IAEA Significant efforts are underway in several Member States to develop high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR) based on either pebble bed or prismatic designs. All these reactors are primarily fuelled by TRISO (tri iso-structural) coated particles. The aim however is to build future nuclear fuel cycles in concert with the aim of the Generation IV International Forum and includes nuclear reactor applications for process heat, hydrogen production and electricity generation. Moreover, developmental work is ongoing and focuses on the burning of weapon-grade plutonium including civil plutonium and other transuranic elements using the 'deep-burn concept' or 'inert matrix fuels', especially in HTGR systems in the form of coated particle fuels. The document will serve as the primary resource materials for 'education and training' in the area of advanced fuels forming the building blocks for future development in the interested Member States. This document broadly covers several aspects of coated particle fuel technology, namely: manufacture of coated particles, compacts and elements; design-basis; quality assurance/quality control and characterization techniques; fuel irradiations; fuel

  14. Safety and licensing of a small modular gas-cooled reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, N.W.; Kelley, A.P. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A modular side-by-side high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (SBS-HTGR) is being developed by Interatom/Kraftwerk Union (KWU). The General Electric Company and Interatom/KWU entered into a proprietary working agreement to continue develop jointly of the SBS-HTGR. A study on adapting the SBS-HTGR for application in the US has been completed. The study investigated the safety characteristics and the use of this type of design in an innovative approach to licensing. The safety objective guiding the design of the modular SBS-HTGR is to control radionuclide release by the retention of fission products within the fuel particles with minimal reliance on active design features. The philosophy on which this objective is predicated is that by providing a simple safety case, the safety criteria can be demonstrated as being met with high confidence through conduct of a full-scale module safety test

  15. Using Wireless Sensor Networks to Achieve Intelligent Monitoring for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghai Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR can incorporate wireless sensor network (WSN technology to improve safety and economic competitiveness. WSN has great potential in monitoring the equipment and processes within nuclear power plants (NPPs. This technology not only reduces the cost of regular monitoring but also enables intelligent monitoring. In intelligent monitoring, large sets of heterogeneous data collected by the WSN can be used to optimize the operation and maintenance of the HTGR. In this paper, WSN-based intelligent monitoring schemes that are specific for applications of HTGR are proposed. Three major concerns regarding wireless technology in HTGR are addressed: wireless devices interference, cybersecurity of wireless networks, and wireless standards selected for wireless platform. To process nonlinear and non-Gaussian data obtained by WSN for fault diagnosis, novel algorithms combining Kernel Entropy Component Analysis (KECA and support vector machine (SVM are developed.

  16. High temperature gas cooled reactor technology development. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    The successful introduction of an advanced nuclear power plant programme depends on many key elements. It must be economically competitive with alternative sources of energy, its technical development must assure operational dependability, the support of society requires that it be safe and environmentally acceptable, and it must meet the regulatory standards developed for its use and application. These factors interrelate with each other, and the ability to satisfy the established goals and criteria of all of these requirements is mandatory if a country or a specific industry is to proceed with a new, advanced nuclear power system. It was with the focus on commercializing the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) that the IAEA's International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors recommended this Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on HTGR Technology Development. Over the past few years, many Member States have instituted a re-examination of their nuclear power policies and programmes. It has become evident that the only realistic way to introduce an advanced nuclear power programme in today's world is through international co-operation between countries. The sharing of expertise and technical facilities for the common development of the HTGR is the goal of the Member States comprising the IAEA's International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. This meeting brought together key representatives and experts on the HTGR from the national organizations and industries of ten countries and the European Commission. The state electric utility of South Africa, Eskom, hosted this TCM in Johannesburg, from 13 to 15 November 1996. This TCM provided the opportunity to review the status of HTGR design and development activities, and especially to identify international co-operation which could be utilized to bring about the commercialization of the HTGR

  17. AREVA Modular Steam Cycle – High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Development Progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lommers, L.; Shahrokhi, F.; Southworth, F.; Mayer, J. III

    2014-01-01

    The AREVA Steam Cycle – High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (SCHTGR) is a modular graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactor currently being developed to support a wide variety of applications including industrial process heat, high efficiency electricity generation, and cogeneration. It produces high temperature superheated steam which makes it a good match for many markets currently dependent on fossil fuels for process heat. Moreover, the intrinsic safety characteristics of the SC-HTGR make it uniquely qualified for collocation with large industrial process heat users which is necessary for serving these markets. The NGNP Industry Alliance has selected the AREVA SC-HTGR as the basis for future development work to support commercial HTGR deployment. This paper provides a concise description of the SC-HTGR concept, followed by a summary of recent development activities. Since this concept was introduced, ongoing design activities have focused primarily on confirming key system capabilities and the suitability for potential future markets. These evaluations continue to confirm the suitability of the SC-HTGR for a variety of potential applications that are currently dependent on fossil fuels. (author)

  18. High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Projected Markets and Scoping Economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Demick

    2010-08-01

    The NGNP Project has the objective of developing the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology to supply high temperature process heat to industrial processes as a substitute for burning of fossil fuels, such as natural gas. Applications of the HTGR technology that have been evaluated by the NGNP Project for supply of process heat include supply of electricity, steam and high-temperature gas to a wide range of industrial processes, and production of hydrogen and oxygen for use in petrochemical, refining, coal to liquid fuels, chemical, and fertilizer plants.

  19. Status of and prospects for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The IAEA International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (IWGGCR) (see Annex I), which was established in 1978, recommended to the Agency that a report be prepared in order to provide an up-to-date summary of gas-cooled reactor technology. The present Technical Report is based mainly on submissions of Member Countries of the IWGGCR and consists of four main sections. Beside some general information about the gas-cooled reactor line, section 1 contains a description of the incentives for the development and deployment of gas-cooled reactors in various Agency Member States. These include both electricity generation and process steam and process heat production for various branches of industry. The historical development of gas-cooled reactors is reviewed in section 2. In this section information is provided on how, when and why gas-cooled reactors have been developed in various Agency Member States and, in addition, a detailed description of the different gas-cooled reactor lines is presented. Section 3 contains information about the technical status of gas-cooled reactors and their applications. Gas-cooled reactors that are under design or construction or in operation are listed and shortly described, together with an outlook for future reactor designs. In this section the various applications for gas-cooled reactors are described in detail. These include both electricity generation and process steam and process heat production. The last section (section 4) is entitled ''Special features of gas-cooled reactors'' and contains information about the technical performance, fuel utilization, safety characteristics and environmental impact, such as radiation exposure and heat rejection

  20. Characterization of effluents from a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel refabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, M.S.; Bradley, R.A.; Olsen, A.R.

    1975-12-01

    The types and quantities of chemical and radioactive effluents that would be released from a reference fuel refabrication facility for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) have been determined. This information will be used to predict the impact of such a facility on the environment, to identify areas where additional development work needs to be done to further identify and quantify effluent streams, and to limit effluent release to the environment

  1. Seismic behaviour of gas cooled reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-08-01

    On invitation of the French Government the Specialists' Meeting on the Seismic Behaviour of Gas-Cooled Reactor Components was held at Gif-sur-Yvette, 14-16 November 1989. This was the second Specialists' Meeting on the general subject of gas-cooled reactor seismic design. There were 27 participants from France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Israel, Japan, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, the United States, the CEC and IAEA took the opportunity to present and discuss a total of 16 papers reflecting the state of the art of gained experiences in the field of their seismic qualification approach, seismic analysis methods and of the capabilities of various facilities used to qualify components and verify analytical methods. Since the first meeting, the sophistication and expanded capabilities of both the seismic analytical methods and the test facilities are apparent. The two main methods for seismic analysis, the impedance method and the finite element method, have been computer-programmed in several countries with the capability of each of the codes dependent on the computer capability. The correlations between calculation and tests are dependent on input assumptions such as boundary conditions, soil parameters and various interactions between the soil, the buildings and the contained equipment. The ability to adjust these parameters and match experimental results with calculations was displayed in several of the papers. The expanded capability of some of the new test facilities was graphically displayed by the description of the SAMSON vibration test facility at Juelich, FRG, capable of dynamically testing specimens weighing up to 25 tonnes, and the TAMARIS facility at the CEA laboratories in Gif-sur-Yvette where the largest table is capable of testing specimens weighing up to 100 tonnes. The proceedings of this meeting contain all 16 presented papers. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Scram device for gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Atsushi; Takahashi, Suehiro.

    1989-01-01

    A scram device for gas-cooled reactors has a hopper disposed below a stand pipe standing upright passing through a reactor container and electromagnets disposed therein. It further comprises neutron absorbing steel balls maintained between the electromagnets and the hopper upon energization of the electromagnets. Upon emergency reactor shutdown, energization for the electromagnets is interrupted to drop the neutron absorption stainless steel balls into the reactor core. It is an object of the present invention to keep the mechanical strength of the electromagnets in a high temperature gas atmosphere and not to reduce the insulation performance. That is, coils for the electromagnets are constituted with a small oxide-insulated metal sheath cable (MI cable). As the feature of the MI cable, it can maintain the mechanical strength even when exposed to high temperature gas coolant and the insulation performance thereof does not reduce by virture of its gas sealing property. Accordingly, a scram device of stable reliability can be obtained. (K.M.)

  3. The modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neylan, A.J.; Graf, D.F.; Millunzi, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    GA Technologies Inc. and other U.S. corporations, in a cooperative program with the U.S. Department of Energy, is developing a Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) that will provide highly reliable, economic, nuclear power. The MHTGR system assures maximum safety to the public, the owner/operator, and the environment. The MHTGR is being designed to meet and exceed rigorous requirements established by the user industry for availability, operation and maintenance, plant investment protection, safety and licensing, siting flexibility and economics. The plant will be equally attractive for deployment and operation in the U.S., other major industrialized nations including Korea, Japan, and the Republic of China, as well as the developing nations. The High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is an advanced, third generation nuclear power system which incorporates distinctive technical features, including the use of pressurized helium as a coolant, graphite as the moderator and core structural material, and fuel in the form of ceramic coated uranium particles. The modular HTGR builds upon generic gas-cooled reactor experience and specific HTGR programs and projects. The MHTGR offers unique technological features and the opportunity for the cooperative international development of an advanced energy system that will help assure adaquate world energy resources for the future. Such international joint venturing of energy development can offer significant benefits to participating industries and governments and also provides a long term solution to the complex problems of the international balance of payments

  4. Consideration of emergency source terms for pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Liu; Jun, Zhao; Jiejuan, Tong; Jianzhu, Cao

    2009-01-01

    Being the last barrier in the nuclear power plant defense-in-depth strategy, emergency planning (EP) is an integrated project. One of the key elements in this process is emergency source terms selection. Emergency Source terms for light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant (NPP) have been introduced in many technical documents, and advanced NPP emergency planning is attracting attention recently. Commercial practices of advanced NPP are undergoing in the world, pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) power plant is under construction in China which is considered as a representative of advanced NPP. The paper tries to find some pieces of suggestion from our investigation. The discussion of advanced NPP EP will be summarized first, and then the characteristics of pebble-bed HTGR relating to EP will be described. Finally, PSA insights on emergency source terms selection and current pebble-bed HTGR emergency source terms suggestions are proposed

  5. Recovery of perchloroethylene scrubbing medium generated in the refabrication of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, M.S.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.; Rainey, W.T. Jr.

    1976-11-01

    During the refabrication of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel, perchloroethylene (C 2 Cl 4 ) is used as the nonmoderating scrubbing medium to remove condensable hydrocarbons, carbon soot, and uranium-bearing particulates from the off-gas streams. The process by which the contaminated perchloroethylene is recycled is discussed

  6. Gas cooled reactor experience and programs in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastoin, J.; Brisbois, J.

    1978-01-01

    After discussing the state of development of natural uranium graphite-gas cooled reactors in France, the current program focused on electricity generating high temperature reactors and the future program based on heat generating applications are presented

  7. Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Safety Basis and Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Petti; Jim Kinsey; Dave Alberstein

    2014-01-01

    Various international efforts are underway to assess the safety of advanced nuclear reactor designs. For example, the International Atomic Energy Agency has recently held its first Consultancy Meeting on a new cooperative research program on high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) safety. Furthermore, the Generation IV International Forum Reactor Safety Working Group has recently developed a methodology, called the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology, for use in Generation IV advanced reactor technology development, design, and design review. A risk and safety assessment white paper is under development with respect to the Very High Temperature Reactor to pilot the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology and to demonstrate its validity and feasibility. To support such efforts, this information paper on the modular HTGR safety basis and approach has been prepared. The paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach. The paper gives those involved in the assessment of advanced reactor designs an opportunity to assess an advanced design that has already received extensive review by regulatory authorities and to judge the utility of recently proposed new methods for advanced reactor safety assessment such as the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology.

  8. Evaluation of Hastelloy X for gas-cooled-reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, H.E.; King, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    Hastelloy X is a potential structural material for use in gas-cooled reactor systems. In this application data are necessary on the mechanical properties of base metals and weldments under realistic service conditions. The test environment studied was helium that contained small amounts of H 2 , CH 4 , and CO. It is shown that this environment is carburizing with the kinetics of this process, becoming rapid above 800 0 C. Suitable weldments of Hastelloy X were prepared by several processes; those weldments generally had properties similar to the base metal except for lower fracture strains under some conditions. Some samples were aged up to 20,000 h in the test gas and tested, and some creep tests on as-received material exceeded 40,000 h. The predominant effect of aging was the significant reduction of the fracture strains at ambient temperature; the strains were lower when the samples were aged in HTGR helium than when aged in inert gas. Under some conditions aging also increased the yield and ultimate tensile strength. Limited impact testing showed that the impact energy at 25 0 C was reduced drastically by aging at 871 and 704 0 C

  9. ORTAP: a simulator of high temperature gas-cooled reactor nuclear steam supply system dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleveland, J.C.; Hedrick, R.A.; Bell, S.J; Delene, J.G.

    1977-01-01

    ORTAP was developed to predict the dynamic behavior of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) Nuclear Steam Supply System for normal operational transients and postulated accidents. Normal operational transients which can be analyzed with ORTAP include both reactor startup and shutdown, and normal and rapid load charges. Upset transients that can be analyzed with ORTAP include reactor trip, turbine trip and sudden reduction in feedwater flow. ORTAP has been used to predict plant response to postulated emergency or faulted conditions such as primary system depressurization, loss of primary coolant flow and uncontrolled removal of control poison from the reactor core. A brief description of the HTGR system and the models used for each of the major components is presented, together with certain modeling and solution techniques used in ORTAP that are of general interest.

  10. Comparative evaluation of pebble-bed and prismatic fueled high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.; Bartine, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative evaluation has been performed of the HTGR and the Federal Republic of Germany's Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) for potential commercial applications in the US. The evaluation considered two reactor sizes [1000 and 3000 MW(t)] and three process applications (steam cycle, direct cycle, and process heat, with outlet coolant temperatures of 750, 850, and 950 0 C, respectively). The primary criterion for the comparison was the levelized (15-year) cost of producing electricity or process heat. Emphasis was placed on the cost impact of differences between the prismatic-type HTGR core, which requires periodic refuelings during reactor shutdowns, and the pebble bed PBR core, which is refueled continuously during reactor operations. Detailed studies of key technical issues using reference HTGR and PBR designs revealed that two cost components contributing to the levelized power costs are higher for the PBR: capital costs and operation and maintenance costs. A third cost component, associated with nonavailability penalties, tended to be higher for the PBR except for the process heat application, for which there is a large uncertainty in the HTGR nonavailability penalty at the 950 0 C outlet coolant temperature. A fourth cost component, fuel cycle costs, is lower for the PBR, but not sufficiently lower to offset the capital cost component. Thus the HTGR appears to be slightly superior to the PBR in economic performance. Because of the advanced development of the HTGR concept, large HTGRs could also be commercialized in the US with lower R and D costs and shorter lead times than could large PBRs. It is recommended that the US gas-cooled thermal reactor program continue giving primary support to the HTGR, while also maintaining its cooperative PBR program with FRG

  11. Comparative evaluation of pebble-bed and prismatic fueled high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Bartine, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative evaluation has been performed of the HTGR and the Federal Republic of Germany's Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) for potential commercial applications in the US. The evaluation considered two reactor sizes (1000 and 3000 MW(t)) and three process applications (steam cycle, direct cycle, and process heat, with outlet coolant temperatures of 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C, respectively). The primary criterion for the comparison was the levelized (15-year) cost of producing electricity or process heat. Emphasis was placed on the cost impact of differences between the prismatic-type HTGR core, which requires periodic refuelings during reactor shutdowns, and the pebble bed PBR core, which is refueled continuously during reactor operations. Detailed studies of key technical issues using reference HTGR and PBR designs revealed that two cost components contributing to the levelized power costs are higher for the PBR: capital costs and operation and maintenance costs. A third cost component, associated with nonavailability penalties, tended to be higher for the PBR except for the process heat application, for which there is a large uncertainty in the HTGR nonavailability penalty at the 950/sup 0/C outlet coolant temperature. A fourth cost component, fuel cycle costs, is lower for the PBR, but not sufficiently lower to offset the capital cost component. Thus the HTGR appears to be slightly superior to the PBR in economic performance. Because of the advanced development of the HTGR concept, large HTGRs could also be commercialized in the US with lower R and D costs and shorter lead times than could large PBRs. It is recommended that the US gas-cooled thermal reactor program continue giving primary support to the HTGR, while also maintaining its cooperative PBR program with FRG.

  12. Small high temperature gas-cooled reactors with innovative nuclear burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liem, Peng Hong; Ismail; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Since the innovative concept of CANDLE (Constant Axial shape of Neutron Flux, nuclide densities and power shape During Life of Energy producing reactor) burning strategy was proposed, intensive research works have been continuously conducted to evaluate the feasibility and the performance of the burning strategy on both fast and thermal reactors. We learned that one potential application of the burning strategy for thermal reactors is for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) with prismatic/block-type fuel elements. Several characteristics of CANDLE burning strategy such as constant reactor characteristics during burn-up, no need for burn-up reactivity control mechanism, proportionality of core height with core lifetime, sub-criticality of fresh fuel elements, etc. enable us to design small sized HTGR with a high degree of safety easiness of operation and maintenance, and long core lifetime which are required for introducing the reactors into remote areas or developing countries with limited infrastructures and resources. In the present work, we report our evaluation results on small sized block-type HTGR designs with CANDLE burning strategy and compared with other existing small HTGR designs including the ones with pebble fuel elements, under both uranium and thorium fuel cycles. (author)

  13. Latest developments in prestressed concrete vessels for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ople, F.S. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    This paper is an update of the design development of prestressed concrete vessels, commonly referred to as 'PCRVs' starting with the first single-cavity PCRV for the Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station to the latest multi-cavity PCRV configurations being utilized as the primary reactor vessels for both the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) and the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) in the U.S.A. The complexity of PCRV design varies not only due to the type of vessel configuration (single versus multi-cavity) but also on the application to the specific type of reactor concept. PCRV technology as applied to the Steam Cycle HTGR is fairly well established; however, some significant technical complexities are associated with PCRV design for the Gas Turbine HTGR and the GCFR. For the Gas Turbine HTGR, for instance, the fluid dynamics of the turbo-machinery cause multi-pressure conditions to exist in various portions of the power conversion loops during operation. This condition complicates the design approach and the proof test specification for the PCRV. The geometric configuration of the multi-cavity PCRV is also more complex due to the introduction of large horizontal cylindrical cavities (housing the turbo/machines for the Gas Turbine HTGR and circulators for the GCFR) in addition to the vertical cylindrical cavities for the core and heat exchangers. Because of this complex geometry, it becomes difficult to achieve an optimum prestressing arrangement for the PCRV. Other novel features of the multi-cavity PCRV resulting from the continuing design optimization effort are the incorporation of an asymmetric (offset core) configuration and the use of large vessel cavity/penetration concrete closures directly held down by prestressing tendons for both economic and safety reasons. (orig.)

  14. Parametric Investigation of Brayton Cycle for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh

    2004-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is investigating a Brayton cycle efficiency improvement on a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as part of Generation-IV nuclear engineering research initiative. In this project, we are investigating helium Brayton cycles for the secondary side of an indirect energy conversion system. Ultimately we will investigate the improvement of the Brayton cycle using other fluids, such as supercritical carbon dioxide. Prior to the cycle improvement study, we established a number of baseline cases for the helium indirect Brayton cycle. These cases look at both single-shaft and multiple-shaft turbomachinery. The baseline cases are based on a 250 MW thermal pebble bed HTGR. The results from this study are applicable to other reactor concepts such as a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR), fast gas-cooled reactor (FGR), supercritical water reactor (SWR), and others. In this study, we are using the HYSYS computer code for optimization of the helium Brayton cycle. Besides the HYSYS process optimization, we performed parametric study to see the effect of important parameters on the cycle efficiency. For these parametric calculations, we use a cycle efficiency model that was developed based on the Visual Basic computer language. As a part of this study we are currently investigated single-shaft vs. multiple shaft arrangement for cycle efficiency and comparison, which will be published in the next paper. The ultimate goal of this study is to use supercritical carbon dioxide for the HTGR power conversion loop in order to improve the cycle efficiency to values great than that of the helium Brayton cycle. This paper includes preliminary calculations of the steady state overall Brayton cycle efficiency based on the pebble bed reactor reference design (helium used as the working fluid) and compares those results with an initial calculation of a CO2 Brayton cycle

  15. Draft of standard for graphite core components in high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Taiju; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Eto, Motokuni; Kunimoto, Eiji; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Oku, Tatsuo; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    For the design of the graphite components in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), the graphite structural design code for the HTTR etc. were applied. However, general standard systems for the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) have not been established yet. The authors had studied on the technical issues which is necessary for the establishment of a general standard system for the graphite components in the HTGR. The results of the study were documented and discussed at a 'Special committee on research on preparation for codes for graphite components in HTGR' at Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ). As a result, 'Draft of Standard for Graphite Core Components in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor.' was established. In the draft standard, the graphite components are classified three categories (A, B and C) in the standpoints of safety functions and possibility of replacement. For the components in the each class, design standard, material and product standards, and in-service inspection and maintenance standard are determined. As an appendix of the design standard, the graphical expressions of material property data of 1G-110 graphite as a function of fast neutron fluence are expressed. The graphical expressions were determined through the interpolation and extrapolation of the irradiated data. (author)

  16. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor safety-reliability program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to present a safety plan as part of an overall program plan for the design and development of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). This plan is intended to establish a logical framework for identifying the technology necessary to demonstrate that the requisite degree of public risk safety can be achieved economically. This plan provides a coherent system safety approach together with goals and success criterion as part of a unifying strategy for licensing a lead reactor plant in the near term. It is intended to provide guidance to program participants involved in producing a technology base for the HTGR that is fully responsive to safety consideration in the design, evaluation, licensing, public acceptance, and economic optimization of reactor systems.

  17. Steady-state and transient simulations of gas cooled reactor with the computer code CATHARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauveron, N.; Saez, M.; Marchand, M.; Chataing, T.; Geffraye, G.; Cherel, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    This work concerns the design and safety analysis of Gas Cooled Reactors. The CATHARE code is used to test the design and safety of two different concepts, a High Temperature Gas Reactor concept (HTGR) and a Gas Fast Reactor concept (GFR). Relative to the HTGR concept, three transient simulations are performed and described in this paper: loss of electrical load without turbomachine trip, 10 inch cold duct break, 10 inch cold duct break combined with a tube rupture of a cooling exchanger. A second step consists in modelling a GFR concept. A nominal steady state situation at a power of 600 MW is obtained and first transient simulations are carried out to study decay heat removal situations after primary loop depressurisation

  18. Fuel arrangement for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a fuel arrangement for a high temperature gas cooled reactor including fuel assemblies with separate directly cooled fissile and fertile fuel elements removably inserted in an elongated moderator block also having a passageway for control elements

  19. Licensing topical report: interpretation of general design criteria for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orvis, D.D.; Raabe, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    This Licensing Topical Report presents a set of General Design Criteria (GDC) which is proposed for applicability to licensing of graphite-moderated, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Modifications as necessary to reflect HTGR characteristics and design practices have been made to the GDC derived for applicability to light-water-cooled reactors and presented in Appendix A of Part 50, Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, including the Introduction, Definitions, and Criteria. It is concluded that the proposed set of GDC affords a better basis for design and licensing of HTGRs

  20. The world trends of high temperature gas-cooled reactors and the mode of utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Jun-ichi

    1974-01-01

    After a long period of research and development, high temperature gas-cooled reactors are going to enter the practical stage. The combination of a HTGR with a closed cycle helium gas turbine is advantageous in thermal efficiency, reduction of environmental impact and economy. In recent years, the direct utilization of nuclear heat energy in industries has been attracting interest. The multi-purpose utilization of high temperature gas-cooled reactors is thus now the world trend. Reviewing the world developments in this field, the following matters are described: (1) development of HTGRs in the U.K., West Germany, France and the United States; (2) development of He gas turbine, etc. in West Germany; and (3) multi-purpose utilization of HTGRs in West Germany and Japan. (Mori, K.)

  1. Conceptual design study of high temperature gas-cooled reactor for plutonium incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    JAEA has started a conceptual design study of a Pu burner HTGR, which is called CBHTR (Clean Burn High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor). CBHTR’s fuel is TRISO-coated fuel particle with PuO 2 -YSZ (Yttria- Stabilized Zirconia) kernel, which increase proliferation resistance, safety of geological disposal, and Pu incineration. CBHTR can decrease Puf ratio from 60% to 20% with 520 GWd/t. In the future, 15% of electricity capacity is employed by 7 of CBHTRs and 59 of U-HTRs. JAEA has a R and D plan of manufacturing technology of TRISO-coated fuel with PuO 2 -YSZ kernel

  2. MHTGR [Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] technology development plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Neylan, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the approach used to define the technology program needed to support design and licensing of a Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). The MHTGR design depends heavily on data and information developed during the past 25 years to support large HTGR (LHTGR) designs. The technology program focuses on MHTGR-specific operating and accident conditions, and on validation of models and assumptions developed using LHTGR data. The technology program is briefly outlined, and a schedule is presented for completion of technology work which is consistent with completion of a Final Safety Summary Analysis Report (FSSAR) by 1992

  3. Modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core heatup accident simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, S.J.; Conklin, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The design features of the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) have the potential to make it essentially invulnerable to damage from postulated core heatup accidents. Simulations of long-term loss-of-forced-convection (LOFC) accidents, both with and without depressurization of the primary coolant and with only passive cooling available to remove afterheat, have shown that maximum core temperatures stay below the point at which fuel failures and fission product releases are expected. Sensitivity studies also have been done to determine the effects of errors in the predictions due both to uncertainties in the modeling and to the assumptions about operational parameters. 4 refs., 5 figs

  4. IAEA high temperature gas-cooled reactor activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The IAEA activities on high temperature gas-cooled reactors are conducted with the review and support of the Member states, primarily through the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (IWG-GCR). This paper summarises the results of the IAEA gas-cooled reactor project activities in recent years along with ongoing current activities through a review of Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), meetings and other international efforts. A series of three recently completed CRPs have addressed the key areas of reactor physics for LEU fuel, retention of fission products and removal of post shutdown decay heat through passive heat transport mechanisms. These activities along with other completed and ongoing supporting CRPs and meetings are summarised with reference to detailed documentation of the results. (authors)

  5. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor steam cycle/cogeneration application study update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    Since publication of a report on the application of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Steam Cycle/Cogeneration (HTGR-SC/C) plant in December of 1980, progress has continued on application related activities. In particular, a reference plant and an application identification effort has been performed, a variable cogeneration cycle balance-of-plant design was developed and an updated economic analysis was prepared. A reference HTGR-SC/C plant size of 2240 MW(t) was selected, primarily on the basis of 2240 MW(t) being in the mid-range of anticipated application needs and the availability of the design data from the 2240 MW(t) Steam Cycle/Electric generation plant design. A variable cogeneration cycle plant design was developed having the capability of operating at a range of process steam loads between the reference design load (full cogeneration) and the no process steam load condition

  6. Seismic response of high temperature gas-cooled reactor core with block-type fuel, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi; Honma, Toshiaki.

    1980-01-01

    For the aseismic design of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) with block-type fuel, it is necessary to predict the motion and force of core columns and blocks. To reveal column vibration characteristics in three-dimensional space and impact response, column vibration tests were carried out with a scale model of a one-region section (seven columns) of the HTGR core. The results are as follows: (1) the column has a soft spring characteristic based on stacked blocks connected with loose pins, (2) the column has whirling phenomena, (3) the compression spring force simulating the gas pressure has the effect of raising the column resonance frequency, and (4) the vibration behavior of the stacked block column and impact response of the surrounding columns show agreement between experiment and analysis. (author)

  7. Design requirements, operation and maintenance of gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    At the invitation of the Government of the USA the Technical Committee Meeting on Design Requirements, Operation and Maintenance of Gas-Cooled Reactors, was held in San Diego on September 21-23, 1988, in tandem with the GCRA Conference. Both meetings attracted a large contingent of foreign participants. Approximately 100 delegates from 18 different countries participated in the Technical Committee meeting. The meeting was divided into three sessions: Gas-cooled reactor user requirement (8 papers); Gas-cooled reactor improvements to facilitate operation and maintenance (10 papers) and Safety, environmental impacts and waste disposal (5 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 23 papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  8. LOFC fission product release and circulating activity calculations for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apperson, C.E. Jr.; Carruthers, L.M.; Lee, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    The inventories of fission products in a gas-cooled reactor under accident and normal steady state conditions are time and temperature dependent. To obtain a reasonable estimate of these inventories it is necessary to consider fuel failure, a temperature dependent variable, and radioactive decay, a time dependent variable. Using arbitrary radioactive decay chains and published fuel failure models for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR), methods have been developed to evaluate the release of fission products during the Loss of Forced Circulation (LOFC) accident and the circulating and plateout fission product inventories during steady state non-accident operation. The LARC-2 model presented here neglects the time delays in the release from the HTGR due to diffusion of fission products from particles in the fuel rod through the graphite matrix. It also neglects the adsorption and evaporation process of metallics at the fuel rod-graphite and graphite-coolant hole interfaces. Any time delay due to the finite time of transport of fission products by convection through the coolant to the outside of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) is also neglected. This model assumes that all fission products released from fuel particles are immediately deposited outside the PCRV with no time delay

  9. Gas-cooled reactors in France in 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robin, M.G.; Bastien, D.

    1984-01-01

    France operates eight reactors cooled by carbon dioxide and has acquired a 25% interest in a reactor of the same type built by it in Spain (Vandellos). From their commissioning, to 31 December 1983, these power plants have together generated 185 million MWh net. Moreover, based on its participation in the Dragon experiment, France focused research activities on high-temperature helium-cooled reactors, and it also observes the international efforts aimed to develop gas-cooled breeder reactors. (author)

  10. Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor Program. Semiannual technical progress report, October 1, 1982-March 3, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report provides descriptions and results of the technical effort during the first half of FY 83 on the Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor Program. The work on Integration and Management (WBS 01) includes the preparation of the Advanced Systems Concept Evaluation Plan and the Advanced Systems Technology Development Plan in addition to the program management activities. The Market Definition (WBS 03) efforts considered the application of the Modular Reactor System with reforming (MRS-R) to the production of methanol and ammonia and the refining of petroleum. Within the Plant Technology (WBS 13) task there were activities to develop anlytical methods for investigation of Coolant Transport Behavior and to define methods and criteria for High Temperature Structural Engineering design. In addition to the work on the advanced HTGR for process heat users, new activities were initiated in support of the HTGR-SC/C Lead plant Protect (WBS 30 and 31). The Plant Simulation task (WBS 31) was initiated to develop a computer code for simulation of plant operation and for plant transient systems analysis. The efforts on the advanced HTGR systems was performed under the Modular Systems task (WBS 41) to study the potential for multiple small reactors to provide lower costs, improved safety, and higher availability than the large monolithic core reactors

  11. A study of silver behavior in Gas-turbine High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawa, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Toshiyuki

    1995-11-01

    A Gas-turbine High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (GT-HTGR) is one of the promising reactor systems of future HTGRs. In the design of GT-HTGR, behavior of fission products, especially of silver, is considered to be important from the view point of maintenance of gas-turbine. A study of silver behavior in the GT-HTGR was carried out based on current knowledge. The purposes of this study were to determine an importance of the silver problem quantitatively, countermeasures to the problem and items of future research and development which will be needed. In this study, inventory, fractional release from fuel, plateout in the primary circuit and radiation dose were evaluated, respectively. Based on this study, it is predicted that gamma-ray from plateout silver in gas-turbine system contributes about a half of total radiation dose after reactor shutdown. In future, more detail data for silver release from fuel, plateout behavior, etc. using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), for example, will be needed to carry out reasonable design. (author)

  12. Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor Program. Annual technical progress report for the period ending September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    This report provides descriptions and results of the technical effort during FY81 on the Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor Program. The FY81 work was organized according to the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for the National HTGR Program, and fell within five of the WBS tasks. The work on Market Definition and Development (WBS 03) was associated with estimating product costs for HTGR systems and their alternatives, projecting markets and market penetrations for these systems, and providing costs and market input to application analyses and component design. The Plant Technology (WBS 13) effort was mainly in the development of the systems dynamic computer code, STAR, for the transient analysis of HTGR's in reformer applications. The analysis of pebble bed reactors (PBR) was performed under Technology Transfer (WBS 15). The effort on components and systems within the nuclear heat source for reforming plants was performed under High Temperature Nuclear Heat Source (WBS 42)

  13. Plutonium-burn high temperature gas-cooled reactor for 3E+3S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Development in Japan is facing a very difficult conditions after Fukushima-Daiichi NPP Accident. Nuclear Energy has strong advantages on 3E, i.e., Energy security, Economical efficiency and Environment. However, people does not believe the Safety 'S' of Nuclear Energy, now. The disadvantage of 'S' overrides the advantages of '3E'. In Nuclear Energy, 'S' is expanded into 3S, i.e., Safety, Security and Safeguards. Especially, the management of Plutonium inventory in Spent Fuel generated by the NPP operation is very important in the viewpoints of non-proliferation. The high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) is the solution of these disadvantages of '3S' in Nuclear Energy. The fuel of HTGR is composed by 1 mm spherical fuel particle, i.e., TRISO made by fuel, graphite and silicon-carbide. The silicon-carbide can confine the fission products in any conditions of fuel life cycle, i.e., during operation, accidents and disposal for 1 million years. The confinement of the radioactive materials can be confirmed by the TRISO. The HTGR core has strong negative feedback for temperature. So, the fission automatically stopped at the accidental conditions, such as loss of flow and LOCA. Also, the residual heat can be cooled by the radiation heat transfer to reactor vessel wall. The HTGR system usually has passive vessel wall cooling system. When the passive cooling system had been failed, the heat can be transferred to the land by heat conductions, and fuel does not reach the SiC broken temperature. The fission chain reaction has been stopped automatically by negative feedback, i.e., physics. The residual heat had been cooled automatically by radiation. The radioactive materials had been confined automatically by silicon-carbide. The HTGR is superior for 'S' safety. Plutonium can be burned by the HTGR. In the viewpoints of non-proliferation, the fuel should be made by YSZ-PuO 2 , stabilized buffer

  14. On natural circulation in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors and pebble bed reactors for different flow regimes and various coolant gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melesed'Hospital, G.

    1983-01-01

    The use of CO 2 or N 2 (heavy gas) instead of helium during natural circulation leads to improved performance in both High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) and in Pebble Bed Reactors (PBR). For instance, the coolant temperature rise corresponding to a coolant pressure level and a rate of afterheat removal could be only 18% with CO 2 as compared to He, for laminar flow in HTGR; this value would be 40% in PBR. There is less difference between HTGR and PBR for turbulent flows; CO 2 is found to be always better than N 2 . These types of results derived from relationships between coolant properties, coolant flow, temperature rise, pressure, afterheat levels and core geometry, are obtained for HTGR and PBR for various flow regimes, both within the core and in the primary loop

  15. Fuel Development For Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. K. Meyer

    2006-06-01

    The Generation IV Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) concept is proposed to combine the advantages of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (such as efficient direct conversion with a gas turbine and the potential for application of high-temperature process heat), with the sustainability advantages that are possible with a fast-spectrum reactor. The latter include the ability to fission all transuranics and the potential for breeding. The GFR is part of a consistent set of gas-cooled reactors that includes a medium-term Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)-like concept, or concepts based on the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), and specialized concepts such as the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), as well as actinide burning concepts [ ]. To achieve the necessary high power density and the ability to retain fission gas at high temperature, the primary fuel concept proposed for testing in the United States is a dispersion coated fuel particles in a ceramic matrix. Alternative fuel concepts considered in the U.S. and internationally include coated particle beds, ceramic clad fuel pins, and novel ceramic ‘honeycomb’ structures. Both mixed carbide and mixed nitride-based solid solutions are considered as fuel phases.

  16. Pin-Type Gas Cooled Reactor for Nuclear Electric Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a point design for a pin-type Gas-Cooled Reactor concept that uses a fuel pin design similar to the SP100 fuel pin. The Gas-Cooled Reactor is designed to operate at 100 kWe for 7 years plus have a reduced power mode of 20% power for a duration of 5 years. The power system uses a gas-cooled, UN-fueled, pin-type reactor to heat He/Xe gas that flows directly into a recuperated Brayton system to produce electricity. Heat is rejected to space via a thermal radiator that unfolds in space. The reactor contains approximately 154 kg of 93.15 % enriched UN in 313 fuel pins. The fuel is clad with rhenium-lined Nb-1Zr. The pressures vessel and ducting are cooled by the 900 K He/Xe gas inlet flow or by thermal radiation. This permits all pressure boundaries to be made of superalloy metals rather than refractory metals, which greatly reduces the cost and development schedule required by the project. The reactor contains sufficient rhenium (a neutron poison) to make the reactor subcritical under water immersion accidents without the use of internal shutdown rods. The mass of the reactor and reflectors is about 750 kg.

  17. RCCS Experiments and Validation for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh; Cliff Davis; Goon C. Park

    2007-01-01

    A reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS), an air-cooled helical coil RCCS unit immersed in the water pool, was proposed to overcome the disadvantages of the weak cooling ability of air-cooled RCCS and the complex structure of water-cooled RCCS for the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). An experimental apparatus was constructed to investigate the various heat transfer phenomena in the water pool type RCCS, such as the natural convection of air inside the cavity, radiation in the cavity, the natural convection of water in the water pool and the forced convection of air in the cooling pipe. The RCCS experimental results were compared with published correlations. The CFX code was validated using data from the air-cooled portion of the RCCS. The RELAP5 code was validated using measured temperatures from the reactor vessel and cavity walls

  18. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Laboratory; Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory; Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Laboratory; Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Laboratory; Kinsey, James Carl [Idaho National Laboratory; Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory; Kumar, Akansha [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-04-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technological readiness level, licensing approach and costs.

  19. Review of the cost estimate and schedule for the 2240-MWt high-temperature gas-cooled reactor steam-cycle/cogeneration lead plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    This report documents Bechtel's review of the cost estimate and schedule for the 2240 MWt High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Steam Cycle/Cogeneration (HTGR-SC/C) Lead Plant. The overall objective of the review is to verify that the 1982 update of the cost estimate and schedule for the Lead Plant are reasonable and consistent with current power plant experience

  20. Capital cost: gas cooled fast reactor plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    The results of an investment cost study for a 900 MW(e) GCFR central station power plant are presented. The capital cost estimate arrived at is based on 1976 prices and a conceptual design only, not a mature reactor design.

  1. Capital cost: gas cooled fast reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    The results of an investment cost study for a 900 MW(e) GCFR central station power plant are presented. The capital cost estimate arrived at is based on 1976 prices and a conceptual design only, not a mature reactor design

  2. HTGR type reactors for the heat market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesterwind, D.

    1981-01-01

    Information about the standard of development of the HTGR type reactor are followed by an assessment of its utilization on the heat market. The utilization of HTGR type reactors is considered suitable for the production of synthesis gas, district heat, and industrial process heat. A comparison with a pit coal power station shows the economy of the HTGR. Finally, some aspects of introducing new technologies into the market, i.e. small plants in particular are investigated. (UA) [de

  3. Validation of SCALE for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Kelly, Ryan P [ORNL; Sunny, Eva E [ORNL

    2012-08-01

    This report documents verification and validation studies carried out to assess the performance of the SCALE code system methods and nuclear data for modeling and analysis of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) configurations. Validation data were available from the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhE Handbook), prepared by the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project, for two different HTGR designs: prismatic and pebble bed. SCALE models have been developed for HTTR, a prismatic fuel design reactor operated in Japan and HTR-10, a pebble bed reactor operated in China. The models were based on benchmark specifications included in the 2009, 2010, and 2011 releases of the IRPhE Handbook. SCALE models for the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed configuration at the PROTEUS critical facility in Switzerland have also been developed, based on benchmark specifications included in a 2009 IRPhE draft benchmark. The development of the SCALE models has involved a series of investigations to identify particular issues associated with modeling the physics of HTGRs and to understand and quantify the effect of particular modeling assumptions on calculation-to-experiment comparisons.

  4. Technology of steam generators for gas-cooled reactors. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The activity of the IAEA in the field of the technology of gas-cooled reactors was formalized by formation of an International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (IWGCR). The gas cooled reactor program considered by the IWGCR includes carbon-dioxide-cooled thermal reactors, helium cooled thermal high temperature reactors for power generation and for process heat applications and gas-cooled fast breeder reactors. This report covers the papers dealing with operating experience, steam generators for next generation of gas-cooled reactors, material development and corrosion problems, and thermohydraulics

  5. Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor heat source for coal conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleicher, R.W. Jr.; Lewis, A.C.

    1992-09-01

    In the industrial nations, transportable fuels in the form of natural gas and petroleum derivatives constitute a primary energy source nearly equivalent to that consumed for generating electric power. Nations with large coal deposits have the option of coal conversion to meet their transportable fuel demands. But these processes themselves consume huge amounts of energy and produce undesirable combustion by-products. Therefore, this represents a major opportunity to apply nuclear energy for both the environmental and energy conservation reasons. Because the most desirable coal conversion processes take place at 800 degree C or higher, only the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) have the potential to be adapted to coal conversion processes. This report provides a discussion of this utilization of HTGR reactors

  6. Modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor simulation using parallel processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, S.J.; Conklin, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The MHPP (Modular HTGR Parallel Processor) code has been developed to simulate modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) transients and accidents. MHPP incorporates a very detailed model for predicting the dynamics of the reactor core, vessel, and cooling systems over a wide variety of scenarios ranging from expected transients to very-low-probability severe accidents. The simulations routines, which had originally been developed entirely as serial code, were readily adapted to parallel processing Fortran. The resulting parallelized simulation speed was enhanced significantly. Workstation interfaces are being developed to provide for user (operator) interaction. In this paper the benefits realized by adapting previous MHTGR codes to run on a parallel processor are discussed, along with results of typical accident analyses

  7. Techno-economic analysis of seawater desalination using high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Linchun; Qin Zhenya

    2001-01-01

    Our world, including China (especially in big cities and foreland), is facing the increased global shortage of potable water and pollution of water. It is ideal to promote seawater desalination to satisfy the potable water demand in these areas. Among the various processes, MED, RO and VC have proven well developed and promising. Due to the inherent safety and its vapor produced with high parameters and features of small size and modular design, HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) of 2x200MW is chosen as the energy source for the desalination in dual production of clean water and power. This paper discusses the techno-economic feasibility of different seawater desalting systems using 2x200MW HTGR in the areas mentioned above, that is, ST-MED (Steam Turbine Cycle), RO, MED/TVC, RO/MED and GT-MED (Gas Turbine Cycle). The exergy concept is used in calculating availability to get cost of energy in desalination, and power credit method is used in economic assessment of different systems to get reasonable evaluating, while economic-life levelized cost method is adopted for calculating electricity cost of referred HTGR plant. In addition, sensitivity analysis on ST-MED economy is also presented. (author)

  8. Application of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor to oil shale recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadekamper, D.C.; Arcilla, N.T.; Impellezzeri, J.R.; Taylor, I.N.

    1983-01-01

    Current oil shale recovery processes combust some portion of the products to provide energy for the recovery process. In an attempt to maximize the petroleum products produced during recovery, the potentials for substituting nuclear process heat for energy generated by combustion of petroleum were evaluated. Twelve oil shale recovery processes were reviewed and their potentials for application of nuclear process heat assessed. The High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor-Reformer/Thermochemical Pipeline (HTGR-R/TCP) was selected for interfacing process heat technology with selected oil shale recovery processes. Utilization of these coupling concepts increases the shale oil product output of a conventional recovery facility from 6 to 30 percent with the same raw shale feed rate. An additional benefit of the HTGR-R/TCP system was up to an 80 percent decrease in emission levels. A detailed coupling design for a typical counter gravity feed indirect heated retorting and upgrading process were described. Economic comparisons prepared by Bechtel Group Incorporated for both the conventional and HTGR-R/TCP recovery facility were summarized

  9. Long-term prospects for the gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, W.P.S.

    1983-01-01

    Towards the second half of a 50-year time span the market for gas-cooled reactors as sources of high-temperature process heat and as highly fuel-efficient electricity producers should be reasonably bright, given a fair degree of technological maturity and consequent realization of inherent economic advantages. Declining fossil resources and increasing prices, initially in oil and gas, later in open-cast coal, provide the economic impetus towards substitution of nuclear for coal heat, not only in the generally accepted processes of coal conversion and steel making but also for oil shale pyrolysis and electrothermal aluminium smelting. Around 2010, if not sooner, the need for uranium conservation should allow the market penetration of breeders and thorium-cycle reactors for which gas cooling has a potential techno-economic edge. (author)

  10. Fuel performance and fission product behaviour in gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Validation of Predictive Methods for Fuel and Fission Product Behaviour was organized within the frame of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. This International Working Group serves as a forum for exchange of information on national programmes, provides advice to the IAEA on international co-operative activities in advanced technologies of gas cooled reactors (GCRs), and supports the conduct of these activities. The objectives of this CRP were to review and document the status of the experimental data base and of the predictive methods for GCR fuel performance and fission product behaviour; and to verify and validate methodologies for the prediction of fuel performance and fission product transport

  11. The status of graphite development for gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The meeting was convened by the IAEA on the recommendation of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. It was attended by 61 participants from 6 countries. The meeting covered the following subjects: overview of national programs; design criteria, fracture mechanisms and component test; materials development and properties; non-destructive examination, inspection and surveillance. The participants presented 33 papers on behalf of their countries. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs, tabs, photos and diagrams

  12. HTGR analytical methods and design verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neylan, A.J.; Northup, T.E.

    1982-05-01

    Analytical methods for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) include development, update, verification, documentation, and maintenance of all computer codes for HTGR design and analysis. This paper presents selected nuclear, structural mechanics, seismic, and systems analytical methods related to the HTGR core. This paper also reviews design verification tests in the reactor core, reactor internals, steam generator, and thermal barrier

  13. Behaviour of gas cooled reactor fuel under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    The Specialists Meeting on Behaviour of Gas Cooled Reactor Fuel under Accident Conditions was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency on the recommendation of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an international forum for the review of the development status and for the discussion on the behaviour of gas cooled reactor fuel under accident conditions and to identify areas in which additional research and development are still needed and where international co-operation would be beneficial for all involved parties. The meeting was attended by 45 participants from France, Germany, Japan, Switzerland, the Union of Soviet Socialists Republics, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, CEC and the IAEA. The meeting was subdivided into five technical sessions: Summary of Current Research and Development Programmes for Fuel; Fuel Manufacture and Quality Control; Safety Requirements; Modelling of Fission Product Release - Part I and Part II; Irradiation Testing/Operational Experience with Fuel Elements; Behaviour at Depressurization, Core Heat-up, Power Transients; Water/Steam Ingress - Part I and Part II. 22 papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. At the end of the meeting a round table discussion was held on Directions for Future R and D Work and International Co-operation. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Depletion Analysis of Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Loaded with LEU/Thorium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonat Sen; Gilles Youinou

    2013-02-01

    Thorium based fuel has been considered as an option to uranium-based fuel, based on considerations of resource utilization (Thorium is more widely available when compared to Uranium). The fertile isotope of Thorium (Th-232) can be converted to fissile isotope U-233 by neutron capture during the operation of a suitable nuclear reactor such as High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). However, the fertile Thorium needs a fissile supporter to start and maintain the conversion process such as U-235 or Pu-239. This report presents the results of a study that analyzed the thorium utilization in a prismatic HTGR, namely Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) that was designed by General Atomics (GA). The collected for the modeling of this design come from Chapter 4 of MHTGR Preliminary Safety Information Document that GA sent to Department of Energy (DOE) on 1995. Both full core and unit cell models were used to perform this analysis using SCALE 6.1 and Serpent 1.1.18. Because of the long mean free paths (and migration lengths) of neutrons in HTRs, using a unit cell to represent a whole core can be non-trivial. The sizes of these cells were set to match the spectral index between unit cell and full core domains. It was found that for the purposes of this study an adjusted unit cell model is adequate. Discharge isotopics and one-group cross-sections were delivered to the transmutation analysis team. This report provides documentation for these calculations

  15. Gas-cooled reactor power systems for space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    Efficiency and mass characteristics for four gas-cooled reactor power system configurations in the 2- to 20-MWe power range are modeled. The configurations use direct and indirect Brayton cycles with and without regeneration in the power conversion loop. The prismatic ceramic core of the reactor consists of several thousand pencil-shaped tubes made from a homogeneous mixture of moderator and fuel. The heat rejection system is found to be the major contributor to system mass, particularly at high power levels. A direct, regenerated Brayton cycle with helium working fluid permits high efficiency and low specific mass for a 10-MWe system

  16. The UK gas-cooled reactor programme - Progress report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askew, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper summarises key developments during 1988 on the 26 Magnox reactors and 14 AGRs now operating in the UK. Details are given of long-term safety reviews of the Berkeley and Bradwell Magnox stations which resulted in a decision by CEGB to cease generation at Berkeley but to continue operation at Bradwell. The summary of operating experience with the AGRs concentrates on the completion of construction and successful commissioning of the second generation AGRs at Heysham 2 and Torness. An appended article by John Wilson, Deputy Director of the UKAEA's gas-cooled reactor R and D programme, gives details of the aims and achievements of the programme during 1988. (author)

  17. Gas Cooled Fast Reactors: Recent advances and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poette, C.; Guedeney, P.; Stainsby, R.; Mikityuk, K.; Knol, S.

    2013-01-01

    Gas Cooled Fast Reactors: Conclusion - GFR: an attractive longer term option allowing to combine Fast spectrum & Helium coolant benefits; • Innovative SiC fuel cladding solutions were found; • A first design confirming the encouraging potential of the reactor system Design improvements are nevertheless recommended and interesting tracks have been identified (core & system design, DHR system); • The GFR requires large R&D needs to confirm its potential (fuel & core materials, specific Helium technology); • ALLEGRO prototype studies are the first step and are drawing the R&D priorities

  18. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  19. Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L [Albuquerque, NM; Williams, Brian E [Pacoima, CA; Benander, Robert E [Pacoima, CA

    2011-03-01

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  20. Methods for manufacturing porous nuclear fuel elements for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L [Albuquerque, NM; Williams, Brian E [Pocoima, CA; Benander, Robert E [Pacoima, CA

    2010-02-23

    Methods for manufacturing porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's). Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, a thin coating of nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made, for example, of reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  1. Fuel leak detection apparatus for gas cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnette, Richard D.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus is disclosed for detecting nuclear fuel leaks within nuclear power system reactors, such as high temperature gas cooled reactors. The apparatus includes a probe assembly that is inserted into the high temperature reactor coolant gaseous stream. The probe has an aperture adapted to communicate gaseous fluid between its inside and outside surfaces and also contains an inner tube for sampling gaseous fluid present near the aperture. A high pressure supply of noncontaminated gas is provided to selectively balance the pressure of the stream being sampled to prevent gas from entering the probe through the aperture. The apparatus includes valves that are operable to cause various directional flows and pressures, which valves are located outside of the reactor walls to permit maintenance work and the like to be performed without shutting down the reactor.

  2. Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor (WAGR) decommissioning project overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattinson, A.

    2003-01-01

    The current BNFL reactor decommissioning projects are presented. The projects concern power reactor sites at Berkely, Trawsfynydd, Hunterstone, Bradwell, Hinkley Point; UKAEA Windscale Pile 1; Research reactors within UK Scottish Universities at East Kilbride and ICI (both complete); WAGR. The BNFL environmental role include contract management; effective dismantling strategy development; implementation and operation; sentencing, encapsulation and transportation of waste. In addition for the own sites it includes strategy development; baseline decommissioning planning; site management and regulator interface. The project objectives for the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (WAGR) are 1) Safe and efficient decommissioning; 2) Building of good relationships with customer; 3) Completion of reactor decommissioning in 2005. The completed WAGR decommissioning campaigns are: Operational Waste; Hot Box; Loop Tubes; Neutron Shield; Graphite Core and Restrain System; Thermal Shield. The current campaign is Lower Structures and the remaining are: Pressure vessel and Insulation; Thermal Columns and Outer Vault Membrane. An overview of each campaign is presented

  3. A simplified Probabilistic Safety Assesment of a Steam-Methane Reforming Hydrogen Production Plant coupled to a High-Temperature Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson Edelstein, Pamela; Flores Flores, Alain; Francois Lacouture, Juan Luis

    2005-01-01

    A Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is being developed for a steam-methane reforming hydrogen production plant linked to a High-Temperature Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor (HTGR). This work is based on the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute’s (JAERI) High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR) prototype in Japan. This study has two major objectives: calculate the risk to onsite and offsite individuals, and calculate the frequency of different types of damage to the complex. A simplified HAZOP...

  4. Gas-cooled reactor coolant circulator and blower technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    In the previous 17 meetings held within the framework of the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors, a wide variety of topics and components have been addressed, but the San Diego meeting represented the first time that a group of specialists had been convened to discuss circulator and blower related technology. A total of 20 specialists from 6 countries attended the meeting in which 15 technical papers were presented in 5 sessions: circulator operating experience I and II (6 papers); circulator design considerations I and II (6 papers); bearing technology (3 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Fuel assembly for gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yellowlees, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    A fuel assembly is described for gas-cooled nuclear reactor which consists of a wrapper tube within which are positioned a number of spaced apart beds in a stack, with each bed containing spherical coated particles of fuel; each of the beds has a perforated top and bottom plate; gaseous coolant passes successively through each of the beds; through each of the beds also passes a bypass tube; part of the gas travels through the bed and part passes through the bypass tube; the gas coolant which passes through both the bed and the bypass tube mixes in the space on the outlet side of the bed before entering the next bed

  6. Dynamic simulation of a pebble bed high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodnizki, J.

    1988-09-01

    A safety analysis of the PNP 500 High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) was performed. The fuel is embedded in a matrix of graphite spheres containing UO 2 particles - Pebble Bed Reactor, and the output power of the plant is 500 MW (t). The safety analysis is aimed at describing the system behavior following perturbations in its state variables. Anticipated transients were studied using full-scale simulation of the PNP 500, and the resulting temperatures, pressures and mass flows were compared with their permitted values. The analysis was performed in a modular form in which each module stands for a physical component. The computer code was written using DSNP - Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power Plants - and the modules developed for HTGR were introduced into the DSNP libraries. The results obtained by simulation of the modules were compared with those derived from analytical calculations. The Gear integration method was included in the DSNP and a new integration method was developed for stiff equations (using the second order Runge - Kutta method with exponential fitting). These integration methods were compared with older ones, and Gear's was found to give the best performance. The following transients were studied: (a) a loss of coolent accident, (b) a step perturbation in reactivity, (c) a step reduction in turbine power, (d) coastdown of the main cooling system. The PNP was found to have a slow reaction time due to its high graphite heat capacity. The consequences of the studied accidents were shown to be limited due to the inherent safety features of the HTGR. The results were compared and found to be in good agreement with those obtained from the COROX and SHOVAV-JUL codes. (author)

  7. Personnel radiation exposure in HTGR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, S.; Engholm, B.A.

    1981-01-01

    Occupational radiation exposures in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants were assessed. The expected rate of dose accumulations for a large HTGR steam cycle unit is 0.07 man-rem/MW(e)y, while the design basis is 0.17 man-rem/MW(e)y. The comparable figure for actual light water reactor experience is 1.3 man-rem/MW(e)y. The favorable HTGR occupational exposure is supported by results from the Peach Bottom Unit No. 1 HTGR and Fort St. Vrain HTGR plants and by operating experience at British gas-cooled reactor stations

  8. Removal of tritium from gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, R.

    1976-01-01

    Tritium contained in the coolant gas in the primary circuit of a gas cooled nuclear reactor together with further tritium adsorbed on the graphite used as a moderator for the reactor is removed by introducing hydrogen or a hydrogen-containing compound, for example methane or ammonia, into the coolant gas. The addition of the hydrogen or hydrogen-containing compound to the coolant gas causes the adsorbed tritium to be released into the coolant gas and the tritium is then removed from the coolant gas by passing the mixture of coolant gas and hydrogen or hydrogen-containing compound through a gas purification plant before recirculating the coolant gas through the reactor. 14 claims, 1 drawing figure

  9. Description of the magnox type of gas cooled reactor (MAGNOX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, S.E.; Nonboel, E.

    1999-05-01

    The present report comprises a technical description of the MAGNOX type of reactor as it has been build in Great Britain. The Magnox reactor is gas cooled (CO 2 ) with graphite moderators. The fuels is natural uranium in metallic form, canned with a magnesium alloy called 'Magnox'. The Calder Hall Magnox plant on the Lothian coastline of Scotland, 60 km east of Edinburgh, has been chosen as the reference plant and is described in some detail. Data on the other stations are given in tables with a summary of design data. Special design features are also shortly described. Where specific data for Calder Hall Magnox has not been available, corresponding data from other Magnox plants has been used. The information presented is based on the open literature. The report is written as a part of the NKS/RAK-2 sub-project 3: 'Reactors in Nordic Surroundings', which comprises a description of nuclear power plants neighbouring the Nordic countries. (au)

  10. Acoustical environment of gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blevins, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for acoustical analysis of gas-cooled nuclear reactors in terms of the sources of sound, the propagation of sound about the coolant circuit and the response of reactor structures to sound, are described. Sources of sound that are considered are circulators, jets, vortex shedding and separated flow. Circulators are generally the dominant source of sound. At low frequency the sound propagates one dimensionally through the ducts and cavities of the reactor. At high frequency the sound excites closely spaced two- and three-dimensional acoustic modes, and the resultant sound field can be described only statistically. The sound excites plate and shell structures within the coolant circuit. Secondary steam piping can also be excited by pumps and valves. Formulations are presented for the resultant vibration. Vibration-induced damage is also reviewed. (author)

  11. Station Blackout Analysis of HTGR-Type Experimental Power Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syarip; Zuhdi, Aliq; Falah, Sabilul

    2018-01-01

    The National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia has decided to build an experimental power reactor of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) type located at Puspiptek Complex. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate a small modular nuclear power plant that can be operated safely. One of the reactor safety characteristics is the reliability of the reactor to the station blackout (SBO) event. The event was observed due to relatively high disturbance frequency of electricity network in Indonesia. The PCTRAN-HTR functional simulator code was used to observe fuel and coolant temperature, and coolant pressure during the SBO event. The reactor simulated at 10 MW for 7200 s then the SBO occurred for 1-3 minutes. The analysis result shows that the reactor power decreases automatically as the temperature increase during SBO accident without operator’s active action. The fuel temperature increased by 36.57 °C every minute during SBO and the power decreased by 0.069 MW every °C fuel temperature rise at the condition of anticipated transient without reactor scram. Whilst, the maximum coolant (helium) temperature and pressure are 1004 °C and 9.2 MPa respectively. The maximum fuel temperature is 1282 °C, this value still far below the fuel temperature limiting condition i.e. 1600 °C, its mean that the HTGR has a very good inherent safety system.

  12. Evaluation of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Performance: Benchmark Analysis Related to the PBMR-400, PBMM, GT-MHR, HTR-10 and the ASTRA Critical Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    The IAEA has facilitated an extensive programme that addresses the technical development of advanced gas cooled reactor technology. Included in this programme is the coordinated research project (CRP) on Evaluation of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Performance, which is the focus of this TECDOC. This CRP was established to foster the sharing of research and associated technical information among participating Member States in the ongoing development of the HTGR as a future source of nuclear energy. Within it, computer codes and models were verified through actual test results from operating reactor facilities. The work carried out in the CRP involved both computational and experimental analysis at various facilities in IAEA Member States with a view to verifying computer codes and methods in particular, and to evaluating the performance of HTGRs in general. The IAEA is grateful to China, the Russian Federation and South Africa for providing their facilities and benchmark programmes in support of this CRP.

  13. Parametric studies on different gas turbine cycles for a high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jie; Gu Yihua

    2005-01-01

    The high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) coupled with turbine cycle is considered as one of the leading candidates for future nuclear power plants. In this paper, the various types of HTGR gas turbine cycles are concluded as three typical cycles of direct cycle, closed indirect cycle and open indirect cycle. Furthermore they are theoretically converted to three Brayton cycles of helium, nitrogen and air. Those three types of Brayton cycles are thermodynamically analyzed and optimized. The results show that the variety of gas affects the cycle pressure ratio more significantly than other cycle parameters, however, the optimized cycle efficiencies of the three Brayton cycles are almost the same. In addition, the turbomachines which are required for the three optimized Brayton cycles are aerodynamically analyzed and compared and their fundamental characteristics are obtained. Helium turbocompressor has lower stage pressure ratio and more stage number than those for nitrogen and air machines, while helium and nitrogen turbocompressors have shorter blade length than that for air machine

  14. Sliding wear studies of sprayed chromium carbide-nichrome coatings for gas-cooled reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.C.; Lai, G.Y.

    1978-09-01

    Chromium carbide-nichrome coatings being considered for wear protection of some critical components in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR's) were investigated. The coatings were deposited either by the detonation gun or the plasma-arc process. Sliding wear tests were conducted on specimens in a button-on-plate arrangement with sliding velocities of 7.1 x 10 -3 and 7.9 mm/s at 816 0 C in a helium environment simulates HTGR primary coolant chemistry. The coatings containing 75 or 80 wt % chromium carbide exhibited excellent wear resistance. As the chromium carbide content decreased from either 80 or 75 to 55 wt %, with a concurrent decrease in coating hardness, wear-resistance deteriorated. The friction and wear behavior of the soft coating was similar to that of the bare metal--showing severe galling and significant amounts of wear debris. The friction characteristics of the hard coating exhibited a strong velocity dependence with high friction coefficients in low sliding velocity tests ad vice versa. Both the soft coating and bare metal showed no dependence on sliding velocity. The wear behavior observed in this study is of adhesive type, and the wear damage is believed to be controlled primarily by the delamination process

  15. Study on the properties of the fuel compact for High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chung-yong; Lee, Sung-yong; Choi, Min-young; Lee, Seung-jae; Jo, Young-ho [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young-woo; Cho, Moon-sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR), one of the Gen-IV reactors, have been using the fuel element which is manufactured by the graphite matrix, surrounding Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO)-coated Uranium particles. Factors with these characteristics effecting on the matrix of fuel compact are chosen and their impacts on the properties are studied. The fuel elements are considered with two types of concepts for HTGR, which are the block type reactor and the pebble bed reactor. In this paper, the cylinder-formed fuel element for the block type reactor is focused on, which consists of the large part of graphite matrix. One of the most important properties of the graphite matrix is the mechanical strength with the high reliability because the graphite matrix should be enabled to protect the TRISO particles from the irradiation environment and the impact from the outside. In this study, the three kinds of candidate graphites and the two kinds of candidate binder (Phenol and Polyvinyl butyral) were chosen and mixed with each other, formed and heated to measure mechanical properties. The objective of this research is to optimize the materials and composition of the mixture and the forming process by evaluating the mechanical properties before/after carbonization and heat treatment. From the mechanical test results, the mechanical properties of graphite pellets was related to the various conditions such as the contents and kinds of binder, the kinds of graphite and the heat treatments. In the result of the compressive strength and Vicker's hardness, the 10 wt% phenol binder added R+S graphite pellet was relatively higher mechanical properties than other pellets. The contents of Phenol binder, the kinds of graphite powder and the temperature of carbonization and heat treatment are considered important factors for the properties. To optimize the mechanical properties of fuel elements, the role of binders and the properties of graphites will be investigated as

  16. A gas-cooled reactor surface power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, R.J.; Wright, S.A.; Lenard, R.X.; Harms, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  17. A gas-cooled reactor surface power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wright, Steven A.; Lenard, Roger X.; Harms, Gary A.

    1999-01-01

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars

  18. A Gas-Cooled Reactor Surface Power System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, G.A.; Lenard, R.X.; Lipinski, R.J.; Wright, S.A.

    1998-11-09

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life- cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitide clad in Nb 1 %Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-I 00 program The fiel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fbel and stabilizing the geometty against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality cannot occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars.

  19. Development status on hydrogen production technology using high-temperature gas-cooled reactor at JAEA, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozawa, Shusaku; Ogawa, Masuro; Hino, Ryutaro

    2006-01-01

    The high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which is graphite-moderated and helium-cooled, is attractive due to its unique capability of producing high temperature helium gas and its fully inherent reactor safety. In particular, hydrogen production using the nuclear heat from HTGR (up to 900 deg. C) offers one of the most promising technological solutions to curb the rising level of CO 2 emission and resulting risk of climate change. The interests in HTGR as an advanced nuclear power source for the next generation reactor, therefore, continue to rise. This is represented by the Japanese HTTR (High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) Project and the Chinese HTR-10 Project, followed by the international Generation IV development program, US nuclear hydrogen initiative program, EU innovative HTR technology development program, etc. To enhance nuclear energy application to heat process industries, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has continued extensive efforts for development of hydrogen production system using the nuclear heat from HTGR in the framework of the HTTR Project. The HTTR Project has the objectives of establishing both HTGR technology and heat utilization technology. Using the HTTR constructed at the Oarai Research and Development Center of JAEA, reactor performance and safety demonstration tests have been conducted as planned. The reactor outlet temperature of 950 deg. C was successfully achieved in April 2004. For hydrogen production as heat utilization technology, R and D on thermo-chemical water splitting by the 'Iodine-Sulfur process' (IS process) has been conducted step by step. Proof of the basic IS process was made in 1997 on a lab-scale of hydrogen production of 1 L/h. In 2004, one-week continuous operation of the IS process was successfully demonstrated using a bench-scale apparatus with hydrogen production rate of 31 L/h. Further test using a pilot scale facility with greater hydrogen production rate of 10 - 30 m 3 /h is planned as

  20. Multi-scale analysis of gas cooled reactors through CFD and system codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cioni, Olivier; Perdu, Fabien; Ducros, Frederic; Geffraye, Genevieve; Tauveron, Nicolas; Tenchine, Denis; Ruby, Alain; Saez, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to define the space scales related to the thermalhydraulic phenomena in the case of a Gas Cooled Reactor (GCR), and to propose a coherent set of numerical descriptions adapted to each scale. These descriptions will have to allow, by coupling simulations on different scales, to perform parametric studies for the design, or very precise safety studies in specific zones of the reactor. After having identified the various scales, the various types of couplings will be listed. This document is limited primarily to the description of the vessel (core and plenums), even if other elements of the primary circuit can benefit from a multi-scales description (exchangers, decay heat removal system, for example). Lastly, a section is devoted to the first step of coupling with the CFD code Trio U and the system code CATHARE. The paper has the following structure: 1. Introduction; 2. The different scales; 2.1. The system scale (tens of meters); 2.2. The vessel scale (metres); 2.2.1. The plenums and the downcomer; 2.2.2. The core; 2.3. The subassembly scale (centimeters); 2.3.1. The subassembly; 2.3.2. The gaps between subassemblies; 2.4. The fuel element scale (centimeters); 2.5. The fuel ball scale (micrometers); 3. Coupling methods; 3.1. Two possible approaches of coupling; 3.1.1. Domain Decomposition Method without overlapping; 3.1.2. Domain Decomposition Method with overlapping; 4. First realizations; 4.1. The subassembly scale: Blocking of Helium channels in a HTGR; 4.1.1. Description of the study; 4.1.2. Main results; 4.1.3. Conclusion; 4.2. The plenum scale: Thermal fluctuations in the lower plenum of a HTGR; 4.2.1. Description of the study; 4.2.2. Example of results; 4.2.3. Conclusion; 4.3. Scale of the core; 4.3.1. Application to a pebble bed reactor; 4.4. Preliminary work of coupling between the system code CATHARE and the CFD code Trio U; 5. Conclusion. To summarize, this document underlines the various scales, relating to the thermalhydraulic

  1. Gas cooled fast reactor background, facilities, industries and programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.

    1980-05-01

    This report was prepared at the request of the OECD-NEA Coordinating Group on Gas Cooled Fast Reactor Development and it represents a contribution (Vol.II) to the jointly sponsored Vol.I (GCFR Status Report). After a chapter on background with a brief description of the early studies and the activities in the various countries involved in the collaborative programme (Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom and United States), the report describes the facilities available in those countries and at the Gas Breeder Reactor Association and the industrial capabilities relevant to the GCFR. Finally the programmes are described briefly with programme charts, conclusions and recommendations are given. (orig.) [de

  2. Proposed master-slave and automated remote handling system for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel refabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundmann, J.G.

    1974-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thorium-Uranium Recycle Facility (TURF) will be used to develop High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) fuel recycle technology which can be applied to future HTGR commercial fuel recycling plants. To achieve recycle capabilities it is necessary to develop an effective material handling system to remotely transport equipment and materials and to perform maintenance tasks within a hot cell facility. The TURF facility includes hot cells which contain remote material handling equipment. To extend the capabilities of this equipment, the development of a master-slave manipulator and a 3D-TV system is necessary. Additional work entails the development of computer controls to provide: automatic execution of tasks, automatic traverse of material handling equipment, automatic 3D-TV camera sighting, and computer monitoring of in-cell equipment positions to prevent accidental collisions. A prototype system which will be used in the development of the above capabilities is presented. (U.S.)

  3. Design and development of gas cooled reactors with closed cycle gas turbines. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    Technological advances over the past fifteen years in the design of turbomachinery, recuperators and magnetic bearings provide the potential for a quantum improvement in nuclear power generation economics through the use of the HTGR with a closed cycle gas turbine. Enhanced international co-operation among national gas cooled reactor programmes in these common technology areas could facilitate the development of this nuclear power concept thereby achieving safety, environmental and economic benefits with overall reduced development costs. This TCM and Workshop was convened to provide the opportunity to review and examine the status of design activities and technology development in national HTGR programmes with specific emphasis on the closed cycle gas turbine, and to identify pathways which take advantage of the opportunity for international co-operation in the development of this concept. Refs, figs, tabs

  4. Description of the advanced gas cooled type of reactor (AGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonboel, E.

    1996-11-01

    The present report comprises a technical description of the Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (AGR), a reactor type which has only been built in Great Britain. 14 AGR reactors have been built, located at 6 different sites and each station is supplied with twin-reactors. The Torness AGR plant on the Lothian coastline of Scotland, 60 km east of Edinburgh, has been chosen as the reference plant and is described in some detail. Data on the other 6 stations, Dungeness B, Hinkely Point B, Hunterston G, Hartlepool, Heysham I and Heysham II, are given only in tables with a summary of design data. Where specific data for Torness AGR has not been available, corresponding data from other AGR plans has been used, primarily from Heysham II, which belongs to the same generation of AGR reactors. The information presented is based on the open literature. The report is written as a part of the NKS/RAK-2 subproject 3: 'Reactors in Nordic Surroundings', which comprises a description of nuclear power plants neighbouring the Nordic countries. (au) 11 refs

  5. Gas-cooled reactor programs: high-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-06-01

    Information is presented concerning HTGR chemistry; fueled graphite development; irradiation services for General Atomic Company; prestressed concrete pressure vessel development; HTGR structural materials; graphite development; high-temperature reactor physics studies; shielding studies; component flow test loop studies; core support performance test; and application and project assessments.

  6. Gas-cooled reactor programs: high-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    Information is presented concerning HTGR chemistry; fueled graphite development; irradiation services for General Atomic Company; prestressed concrete pressure vessel development; HTGR structural materials; graphite development; high-temperature reactor physics studies; shielding studies; component flow test loop studies; core support performance test; and application and project assessments

  7. Improving fuel cycle design and safety characteristics of a gas cooled fast reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, W.F.G.

    2006-01-01

    This research concerns the fuel cycle and safety aspects of a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor, one of the so-called "Generation IV" nuclear reactor designs. The Generation IV Gas Cooled Fast Reactor uses helium as coolant at high temperature. The goal of the GCFR is to obtain a "closed nuclear fuel cycle",

  8. CFD Analysis of the Fuel Temperature in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, W. K.; Chun, T. H.; Lee, W. J.; Chang, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) have received a renewed interest as potential sources for future energy needs, particularly for a hydrogen production. Among the HTGRs, the pebble bed reactor (PBR) and a prismatic modular reactor (PMR) are considered as the nuclear heat source in Korea's nuclear hydrogen development and demonstration project. PBR uses coated fuel particles embedded in spherical graphite fuel pebbles. The fuel pebbles flow down through the core during an operation. PMR uses graphite fuel blocks which contain cylindrical fuel compacts consisting of the fuel particles. The fuel blocks also contain coolant passages and locations for absorber and control material. The maximum fuel temperature in the core hot spot is one of the important design parameters for both PBR and PMR. The objective of this study is to predict the fuel temperature distributions in PBR and PMR using a computational fluid dynamics(CFD) code, CFX-5. The reference reactor designs used in this analysis are PBMR400 and GT-MHR600

  9. HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE FLOWSHEETS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorensek, M.

    2011-07-06

    Two hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process flowsheets intended for use with high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are presented. The flowsheets were developed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, and couple a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer for the SO2-depolarized electrolysis step with a silicon carbide bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step. One presumes an HTGR reactor outlet temperature (ROT) of 950 C, the other 750 C. Performance was improved (over earlier flowsheets) by assuming that use of a more acid-tolerant PEM, like acid-doped poly[2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole] (PBI), instead of Nafion{reg_sign}, would allow higher anolyte acid concentrations. Lower ROT was accommodated by adding a direct contact exchange/quench column upstream from the bayonet reactor and dropping the decomposition pressure. Aspen Plus was used to develop material and energy balances. A net thermal efficiency of 44.0% to 47.6%, higher heating value basis is projected for the 950 C case, dropping to 39.9% for the 750 C case.

  10. Overview of gas cooled reactors' applications with CATHARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genevieve Geffraye; Fabrice Bentivoglio; Anne Messie; Alain Ruby; Manuel Saez; Nicolas Tauveron; Ola Widlund

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: For about four years, CEA has launched feasibility studies of future nuclear advanced systems in a consistent series of Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR) ranging from thermal reactors, as the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) for the mid term, to fast reactors (GFR) for the long term. Thermal hydraulic performances are a key issue for the core design, the evaluation of the thermal stresses on the structures and the decay heat removal systems. This analysis requires a 1D code able to simulate the whole reactor, including the core, the vessel, the piping and the components (turbine, compressors, heat exchangers). CATHARE is the reference code developed and extensively validated in collaboration between CEA, EDF, IRSN and FRAMATOME-ANP for the French Pressurized Water Reactors. CATHARE has the capabilities to model a Gas Cooled Reactor using standard 0D and 1D modules with some adaptations to treat the specificities of the GCR designs. In this paper, the different adaptations are presented and discussed. The direct coupling of a Gas Cooled Reactor with a closed gas-turbine cycle leads to a specific dynamic plant behaviour and a specific turbomachinery module has been developed. The thermal reactors' core consists of hexagonal graphite blocks with an annular-fueled region surrounded by reflectors and a special attention is paid on the thermal modeling of such a core leading to a quasi-2D thermal description. First designs of the VHTR are proposed and are based on an indirect cycle concept with a primary circuit, cooled by helium, and containing the core and a circulator. The core power is transmitted to the secondary circuit via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The secondary circuit contains a turbine and a compressor coupled on a single shaft. It uses a mixture of helium and nitrogen, in order to benefit from both the favourable thermal properties of helium for the heat exchanger, and from existing experience of turbomachines using

  11. Study on the nuclear heat application system with a high temperature gas-cooled reactor and its safety evaluation (Thesis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Yoshitomo

    2008-03-01

    Aiming at the realization of the nuclear heat application system with a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR), research and development on the whole evaluation of the system, the connection technology between the HTGR and a chemical plant such as the safety evaluation against the fire and explosion and the control technology, and the vessel cooling system of the HTGR were carried out. In the whole evaluation of the nuclear heat application system, an ammonia production system using nuclear heat was examined, and the technical subjects caused by the connection of the chemical plant to the HTGR were distilled. After distilling the subjects, the safety evaluation method against the fire and explosion to the reactor, the mitigation technology of thermal disturbance to the reactor, and the reactor core cooling by the vessel cooling system were discussed. These subjects are very important in terms of safety. About the fire and explosion, the safety evaluation method was established by developing the process and the numerical analysis code system. About the mitigation technology of the thermal disturbance, it was demonstrated that the steam generator, which was installed at the downstream of the chemical reactor in the chemical plant, could mitigate the thermal disturbance to the reactor. In order to enhance the safety of the reactor in accidents, the heat transfer characteristic of the passive indirect core cooling system was investigated, and the heat transfer equation considering both thermal radiation and natural convection was developed for the system design. As a result, some technical subjects related to safety in the nuclear heat application system were solved. (author)

  12. Options for treating high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel for repository disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotts, A.L.; Bond, W.D.; Forsberg, C.W.; Glass, R.W.; Harrington, F.E.; Micheals, G.E.; Notz, K.J.; Wymer, R.G.

    1992-02-01

    This report describes the options that can reasonably be considered for disposal of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel in a repository. The options include whole-block disposal, disposal with removal of graphite (either mechanically or by burning), and reprocessing of spent fuel to separate the fuel and fission products. The report summarizes what is known about the options without extensively projecting or analyzing actual performance of waste forms in a repository. The report also summarizes the processes involved in convert spent HTGR fuel into the various waste forms and projects relative schedules and costs for deployment of the various options. Fort St. Vrain Reactor fuel, which utilizes highly-enriched {sup 235}U (plus thorium) and is contained in a prismatic graphite block geometry, was used as the baseline for evaluation, but the major conclusions would not be significantly different for low- or medium-enriched {sup 235}U (without thorium) or for the German pebble-bed fuel. Future US HTGRs will be based on the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) fuel form. The whole block appears to be a satisfactory waste form for disposal in a repository and may perform better than light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. From the standpoint of process cost and schedule (not considering repository cost or value of fuel that might be recycled), the options are ranked as follows in order of increased cost and longer schedule to perform the option: (1) whole block, (2a) physical separation, (2b) chemical separation, and (3) complete chemical processing.

  13. Options for treating high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel for repository disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotts, A.L.; Bond, W.D.; Forsberg, C.W.; Glass, R.W.; Harrington, F.E.; Micheals, G.E.; Notz, K.J.; Wymer, R.G.

    1992-02-01

    This report describes the options that can reasonably be considered for disposal of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel in a repository. The options include whole-block disposal, disposal with removal of graphite (either mechanically or by burning), and reprocessing of spent fuel to separate the fuel and fission products. The report summarizes what is known about the options without extensively projecting or analyzing actual performance of waste forms in a repository. The report also summarizes the processes involved in convert spent HTGR fuel into the various waste forms and projects relative schedules and costs for deployment of the various options. Fort St. Vrain Reactor fuel, which utilizes highly-enriched 235 U (plus thorium) and is contained in a prismatic graphite block geometry, was used as the baseline for evaluation, but the major conclusions would not be significantly different for low- or medium-enriched 235 U (without thorium) or for the German pebble-bed fuel. Future US HTGRs will be based on the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) fuel form. The whole block appears to be a satisfactory waste form for disposal in a repository and may perform better than light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. From the standpoint of process cost and schedule (not considering repository cost or value of fuel that might be recycled), the options are ranked as follows in order of increased cost and longer schedule to perform the option: (1) whole block, (2a) physical separation, (2b) chemical separation, and (3) complete chemical processing

  14. High-temperature gas reactor (HTGR) market assessment, synthetic fuels analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    This study is an update of assessments made in TRW's October 1979 assessment of overall high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) markets in the future synfuels industry (1985 to 2020). Three additional synfuels processes were assessed. Revised synfuel production forecasts were used. General environmental impacts were assessed. Additional market barriers, such as labor and materials, were researched. Market share estimates were used to consider the percent of markets applicable to the reference HTGR size plant. Eleven HTGR plants under nominal conditions and two under pessimistic assumptions are estimated for selection by 2020. No new HTGR markets were identified in the three additional synfuels processes studied. This reduction in TRW's earlier estimate is a result of later availability of HTGR's (commercial operation in 2008) and delayed build up in the total synfuels estimated markets. Also, a latest date for HTGR capture of a synfuels market could not be established because total markets continue to grow through 2020. If the nominal HTGR synfuels market is realized, just under one million tons of sulfur dioxide effluents and just over one million tons of nitrous oxide effluents will be avoided by 2020. Major barriers to a large synfuels industry discussed in this study include labor, materials, financing, siting, and licensing. Use of the HTGR intensifies these barriers

  15. Auxiliary bearing design considerations for gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfield, S.R. Jr.; Rodwell, E.

    2001-01-01

    The need to avoid contamination of the primary system, along with other perceived advantages, has led to the selection of electromagnetic bearings (EMBs) in most ongoing commercial-scale gas cooled reactor (GCR) designs. However, one implication of magnetic bearings is the requirement to provide backup support to mitigate the effects of failures or overload conditions. The demands on these auxiliary or 'catcher' bearings have been substantially escalated by the recent development of direct Brayton cycle GCR concepts. Conversely, there has been only limited directed research in the area of auxiliary bearings, particularly for vertically oriented turbomachines. This paper explores the current state-of-the-art for auxiliary bearings and the implications for current GCR designs. (author)

  16. Development of failure detection system for gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feirreira, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    This work presents several kinds of Failure Detection Systems for Fuel Elements, stressing their functional principles and major applications. A comparative study indicates that the method of electrostatic precipitation of the fission gases Kr and Xe is the most efficient for fuel failure detection in gas-cooled reactors. A detailed study of the physical phenomena involved in electrostatic precipitation led to the derivation of an equation for the measured counting rate. The emission of fission products from the fuel and the ion recombination inside the chamber are evaluated. A computer program, developed to simulate the complete operation of the system, relates the counting rate to the concentration of Kr and Xe isotopes. The project of a mock-up is then presented. Finally, the program calculations are compared to experimental data, available from the literature, yielding a close agreement. (author)

  17. Progress in head-end reprocessing of spent fuels from high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yunfeng; Chen Jing

    2008-01-01

    The reprocessing of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) spent fuels is in favor of the sustainable development of nuclear energy because it is a strategy to realize the maximal use of nuclear resource and the minimum disposal of nuclear waste. The head-end of HTGR spent fuels reprocessing is different from that of the LWR spent fuels reprocessing because of the special structure of HTGR spent fuels. The dismantling of the graphite spent fuel and the smash of the coated granule are the most difficult process in the head-end of the reprocessing. Most of research work is focused on this area. The main methods to treat the graphite include the mechanical grinding, fluid bed burning, and melting, etc. The mechanical grinding method was studied to smash SiC. Some new techniques such as pulse currents method and jet grinding are un- der investigation. The jet grinding is a promising method. The main pyroreprocessing technology for HTGR spent fuels is the fluoride method. Up to now no ideal technology can solve the problem in the head-end of the reprocessing. It is necessary to speed the further study and develop the new methods. (authors)

  18. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor: reformer application study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    This Application Study evaluates the HTGR-R with a core outlet temperature of 850 0 C as a near-term Lead Project and as a vehicle to long-term HTGR Program objectives. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-R technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-R markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-R plants, and the evaluation of the program scope and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-R technology through the completion of the Lead Project. In order to properly assess the potential of the HTGR-R and the suitability of the HTGR-R as a Lead Project, additional work must be performed before a final judgment is rendered. Design trade-off studies and alternative applications must be investigated to determine if a commercial potential exists for the HTGR-R at 850 0 C. If commercial incentives are only identified for the HTGR-R with core outlet temperatures greater than 850 0 C, the design and development program duration and cost and the demonstration path for the HTGR-R must be reassessed

  19. Proposed Advanced Reactor Adaptation of the Standard Review Plan NUREG-0800 Chapter 4 (Reactor) for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors and Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Poore, III, Willis P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Flanagan, George F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holbrook, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Moe, Wayne [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sofu, Tanju [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-03-01

    This report proposes adaptation of the previous regulatory gap analysis in Chapter 4 (Reactor) of NUREG 0800, Standard Review Plan (SRP) for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR [Light Water Reactor] Edition. The proposed adaptation would result in a Chapter 4 review plan applicable to certain advanced reactors. This report addresses two technologies: the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) and the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (mHTGR). SRP Chapter 4, which addresses reactor components, was selected for adaptation because of the possible significant differences in advanced non-light water reactor (non-LWR) technologies compared with the current LWR-based description in Chapter 4. SFR and mHTGR technologies were chosen for this gap analysis because of their diverse designs and the availability of significant historical design detail.

  20. Validation of CATHARE for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrice Bentivoglio; Ola Widlund; Manuel Saez

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Extensively validated and qualified for light-water reactor safety studies, the thermo-hydraulics code CATHARE has been adapted to deal also with gas-cooled reactor applications. In order to validate the code for these novel applications, CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) has initiated an ambitious long-term experimental program. The foreseen experimental facilities range from small-scale loops for physical correlations, to component technology and system demonstration loops. In the short-term perspective, CATHARE is being validated against existing experimental data, in particular from the German power plant Oberhausen II and the South African Pebble-Bed Micro Model (PBMM). Oberhausen II, operated by the German utility EVO, is a 50 MW(e) direct-cycle Helium turbine plant. The power source is a gas burner rather than a nuclear reactor core, but the power conversion system resembles those of the GFR (Gas-cooled Fast Reactor) and other high-temperature reactor concepts. Oberhausen II was operated for more than 100 000 hours between 1974 and 1988. Design specifications, drawings and experimental data have been obtained through the European HTR project, offering a unique opportunity to validate CATHARE on a large-scale Brayton cycle. Available measurements of temperatures, pressures and mass flows throughout the circuit have allowed a very comprehensive thermohydraulic description of the plant, in steady-state conditions as well as during transients. The Pebble-Bed Micro Model (PBMM) is a small-scale model conceived to demonstrate the operability and control strategies of the South African PBMR concept. The model uses Nitrogen instead of Helium, and an electrical heater with a maximum rating of 420 kW. As the full-scale PBMR, the PBMM loop features three turbines and two compressors on the primary circuit, located on three separate shafts. The generator, however, is modelled by a third compressor on a separate circuit, with a

  1. Graphites and composites irradiations for gas cooled reactor core structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Laan, J.G.; Vreeling, J.A.; Buckthorpe, D.E.; Reed, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Material investigations are undertaken as part of the European Commission 6. Framework Programme for helium-cooled fission reactors under development like HTR, VHTR, GCFR. The work comprises a range of activities, from (pre-)qualification to screening of newly designed materials. The High Flux Reactor at Petten is the main test bed for the irradiation test programmes of the HTRM/M1, RAPHAEL and ExtreMat Integrated Projects. These projects are supported by the European Commission 5. and 6. Framework Programmes. To a large extent they form the European contribution to the Generation-IV International Forum. NRG is also performing a Materials Test Reactor project to support British Energy in preparing extended operation of their Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR). Irradiations of commercial and developmental graphite grades for HTR core structures are undertaken in the range of 650 to 950 deg C, with a view to get data on physical and mechanical properties that enable engineering design. Various C- and SiC-based composite materials are considered for support structures or specific components like control rods. Irradiation test matrices are chosen to cover commercial materials, and to provide insight on the behaviour of various fibre and matrix types, and the effects of architecture and manufacturing process. The programme is connected with modelling activities to support data trending, and improve understanding of the material behaviour and micro-structural evolution. The irradiation programme involves products from a large variety of industrial and research partners, and there is strong interaction with other high technology areas with extreme environments like space, electronics and fusion. The project on AGR core structures graphite focuses on the effects of high dose neutron irradiation and simultaneous radiolytic oxidation in a range of 350 to 450 deg C. It is aimed to provide data on graphite properties into the parameter space

  2. TRISO-Coated Fuel Processing to Support High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Cul, G.D.

    2002-10-01

    The initial objective of the work described herein was to identify potential methods and technologies needed to disassemble and dissolve graphite-encapsulated, ceramic-coated gas-cooled-reactor spent fuels so that the oxide fuel components can be separated by means of chemical processing. The purpose of this processing is to recover (1) unburned fuel for recycle, (2) long-lived actinides and fission products for transmutation, and (3) other fission products for disposal in acceptable waste forms. Follow-on objectives were to identify and select the most promising candidate flow sheets for experimental evaluation and demonstration and to address the needs to reduce technical risks of the selected technologies. High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) may be deployed in the next -20 years to (1) enable the use of highly efficient gas turbines for producing electricity and (2) provide high-temperature process heat for use in chemical processes, such as the production of hydrogen for use as clean-burning transportation fuel. Also, HTGR fuels are capable of significantly higher burn-up than light-water-reactor (LWR) fuels or fast-reactor (FR) fuels; thus, the HTGR fuels can be used efficiently for transmutation of fissile materials and long-lived actinides and fission products, thereby reducing the inventory of such hazardous and proliferation-prone materials. The ''deep-burn'' concept, described in this report, is an example of this capability. Processing of spent graphite-encapsulated, ceramic-coated fuels presents challenges different from those of processing spent LWR fuels. LWR fuels are processed commercially in Europe and Japan; however, similar infrastructure is not available for processing of the HTGR fuels. Laboratory studies on the processing of HTGR fuels were performed in the United States in the 1960s and 1970s, but no engineering-scale processes were demonstrated. Currently, new regulations concerning emissions will impact the

  3. Numerical evaluation of flow through a prismatic very high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros Filho, Jose A.; Santos, Andre A.C.; Navarro, Moyses A.; Ribeiro, Felipe Lopes

    2011-01-01

    The High-temperature Gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is a Next Generation Nuclear System that has a good chance to be used as energy generation source in the near future owing to its potential capacity to supply hydrogen without greenhouse gas emission for the future humanity. Recently, improvements in the HTGR design led to the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concept in which the outlet temperature of the coolant gas reaches to 1000 deg C increasing the efficiency of the hydrogen and electricity generation. Among the core concepts emerging in the VHTR development stands out the prismatic block which uses coated fuel microspheres named TRISO pressed into cylinders and assembled in hexagonal graphite blocks staked to form columns. The graphite blocks contain flow channels around the fuel cylinders for the helium coolant. In this study an analysis is performed using the CFD code CFX 13.0 on a prismatic fuel assembly in order to investigate its thermo-fluid dynamic performance. The simulations were made in a 1/12 fuel element model of the GT-MHR design which was developed by General Atomics. A numerical mesh verification process based on the Grid Convergence Index (GCI) was performed using five progressively refined meshes to assess the numerical uncertainty of the simulation and determine adequate mesh parameters. An analysis was also performed to evaluate different methods to define the inlet and outlet boundary conditions. In this study simulations of models with and without inlet and outlet plena were compared, showing that the presence of the plena offers a more realistic flow distribution. (author)

  4. Study on nuclear analysis method for high temperature gas-cooled reactor and its nuclear design (Thesis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Minoru

    2015-03-01

    An appropriate configuration of fuel and reactivity control equipment in a nuclear reactor core, which allows the design of the nuclear reactor core for low cost and high performance, is performed by nuclear design with high accuracy. The accuracy of nuclear design depends on a nuclear data library and a nuclear analysis method. Additionally, it is one of the most important issues for the nuclear design of a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) that an insertion depth of control rods into the reactor core should be retained shallow by reducing excess reactivity with a different method to keep fuel temperature below its limitation thorough a burn-up period. In this study, using experimental data of the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which is a Japan's HTGR with 30 MW of thermal power, the following issues were investigated: applicability of nuclear data libraries to nuclear analysis for HTGRs; applicability of the improved nuclear analysis method for HTGRs; and effectiveness of a rod-type burnable poison on HTGR reactivity control. A nuclear design of a small-sized HTGR with 50 MW of thermal power (HTR50S) was performed using these results. In the nuclear design of the HTR50S, we challenged to decrease the kinds of the fuel enrichments and to increase the power density compared with the HTTR. As a result, the nuclear design was completed successfully by reducing the kinds of the fuel enrichment to only three from twelve of the HTTR and increasing the power density by 1.4 times as much as that of the HTTR. (author)

  5. Evaluation of high temperature gas cooled reactor performance: Benchmark analysis related to initial testing of the HTTR and HTR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-11-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Evaluation of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Performance was initiated by the IAEA in 1998 on the recommendation of the Technical Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. This CRP was established to foster the sharing of research and associated technical information between participating Member States in the ongoing development of the HTGR as a future source of nuclear energy for high temperature process heat applications and the production of electricity. Of paramount significance in the development of new high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) concepts is the predicted capability for this advanced nuclear plant to achieve a high degree of safety through reliance on passive safety features. Because of this, the investigation and validation of the safety and operational aspects of the HTGR were the primary focus for many of the coordinated research programmes (CRPs) initiated by the IAEA in the 1990s. These included: the neutronic physics behaviour of the HTGR core, fuel performance and fission product behaviour, and the ability of the HTGR to dissipate decay heat by natural transport mechanisms under accident conditions. The principal tools utilized in these CRPs included scientific research and engineering development through analytical evaluation of benchmark problems, application of new and/or existing computer codes and models and utilization of test apparatus and loops for specific component validation. The next important step in bringing this advanced nuclear power programme from concept to actuality is to verify system performance and safety under actual HTGR operating conditions. It is the need for validation via testing in nuclear reactors that was the stimulus for the IAEA to initiate this CRP on 'Evaluation of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Performance'. The principal facilities utilized in the performance of this CRP included Japan's High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), China

  6. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) FY04 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. D. Weaver; T. C. Totemeier; D. E. Clark; E. E. Feldman; E. A. Hoffman; R. B. Vilim; T. Y. C. Wei; J. Gan; M. K. Meyer; W. F. Gale; M. J. Driscoll; M. Golay; G. Apostolakis; K. Czerwinski

    2004-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radio toxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. Nevertheless, the GFR was chosen as one of only six Generation IV systems to be pursued based on its ability to meet the Generation IV goals in sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection.

  7. Inherently safe high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masao; Hayakawa, Hitoshi

    1987-01-01

    It is recognized in general that High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors have remarkable characteristics in inherent safety and it is well known that credits of the time margin have been admitted for accident evaluation in the licensing of the currently operating prototype HTGRs (300 MWe class). Recently, more inherently safe HTGRs are being developed in various countries and drawing attention on their possibility for urban siting. The inherent safety characteristics of these HTRs differ each other depending on their design philosophy and on the features of the components/structures which constitute the plant. At first, the specific features/characteristics of the elemental components/structures of the HTRs are explained one by one and then the overall safety features/characteristics of these HTR plants are explained in connection with their design philosophy and combination of the elemental features. Taking the KWU/Interatom Modular Reactor System as an example, the particular design philosophy and safety characteristics of the inherently safe HTR are explained with a result of preliminary evaluation on the possibility of siting close to densely populated area. (author)

  8. Design study on evaluation for power conversion system concepts in high temperature gas cooled reactor with gas turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minatsuki, Isao; Mizokami, Yorikata

    2007-01-01

    The design studies on High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor with Gas Turbine (HTGR-GT) have been performed, which were mainly promoted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and supported by fabricators in Japan. HTGR-GT plant feature is almost determined by selection of power conversion system concepts. Therefore, plant design philosophy is observed characteristically in selection of them. This paper describes the evaluation and analysis of the essential concepts of the HTGR-GT power conversion system through the investigations based on our experiences and engineering knowledge as a fabricator. As a result, the following concepts were evaluated that have advantages against other competitive one, such as the horizontal turbo machine rotor, the turbo machine in an individual vessel, the turbo machine with single shaft, the generator inside the power conversion vessel, and the power conversion system cycle with an intercooler. The results of the study can contribute as reference data when the concepts will be selected. Furthermore, we addressed reasonableness about the concept selection of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor GTHTR300 power conversion system, which has been promoted by JAEA. As a conclusion, we recognized the GTHTR300 would be one of the most promising concepts for commercialization in near future. (author)

  9. Analysis of a sustainable gas cooled fast breeder reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Akansha; Chirayath, Sunil S.; Tsvetkov, Pavel V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A Thorium-GFBR breeder for actinide recycling ability, and thorium fuel feasibility. • A mixture of 232 Th and 233 U is used as fuel and LWR used fuel is used. • Detailed neutronics, fuel cycle, and thermal-hydraulics analysis has been presented. • Run this TGFBR for 20 years with breeding of 239 Pu and 233 U. • Neutronics analysis using MCNP and Brayton cycle for energy conversion are used. - Abstract: Analysis of a thorium fuelled gas cooled fast breeder reactor (TGFBR) concept has been done to demonstrate the self-sustainability, breeding capability, actinide recycling ability, and thorium fuel feasibility. Simultaneous use of 232 Th and used fuel from light water reactor in the core has been considered. Results obtained confirm the core neutron spectrum dominates in an intermediate energy range (peak at 100 keV) similar to that seen in a fast breeder reactor. The conceptual design achieves a breeding ratio of 1.034 and an average fuel burnup of 74.5 (GWd)/(MTHM) . TGFBR concept is to address the eventual shortage of 235 U and nuclear waste management issues. A mixture of thorium and uranium ( 232 Th + 233 U) is used as fuel and light water reactor used fuel is utilized as blanket, for the breeding of 239 Pu. Initial feed of 233 U has to be obtained from thorium based reactors; even though there are no thorium breeders to breed 233 U a theoretical evaluation has been used to derive the data for the source of 233 U. Reactor calculations have been performed with Monte Carlo radiation transport code, MCNP/MCNPX. It is determined that this reactor has to be fuelled once every 5 years assuming the design thermal power output as 445 MW. Detailed analysis of control rod worth has been performed and different reactivity coefficients have been evaluated as part of the safety analysis. The TGFBR concept demonstrates the sustainability of thorium, viability of 233 U as an alternate to 235 U and an alternate use for light water reactor used fuel as a

  10. Gas-cooled reactor technology safety and siting. Report of a technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    At the invitation of the Government of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the Eleventh International Conference on the HTGR and the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Gas-Cooled Reactor Technology, Safety and Siting were held in Dimitrovgrad, USSR, on June 21-23, 1989. The Technical Committee Meeting provided the Soviet delegates with an opportunity to display the breadth of their program on HTGRs to an international audience. Nearly one-half of the papers were presented by Soviet participants. Among the highlights of the meeting were the following: the diverse nature and large magnitude of the Soviet research and development program on high temperature gas-cooled reactors; the Government approval of the budget for the construction of the 30 MWt High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR) in Japan (The schedule contemplates a start of construction in spring 1990 on a site at the Oarai Research Establishment and about a five year construction period.); disappointment in the announced plans to shutdown both the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) plant in the United States (US) and the Thorium High Temperature Reactor (THTR-300) in Germany (These two reactors presently represent the only operating HTGRs in the world since the AVR plant in Juelich, Germany, was also shutdown at the end of 1988.); the continuing negotiations between Germany and the USSR on the terms of the co-operation between the two countries for the construction of a HTR Module supplemented by joint research and development activities aimed at increasing coolant outlet temperatures from 750 deg. C to 950 deg. C; the continued enthusiasm displayed by both the US and German representatives for the potential of the small modular designs under development in both countries and the ability for these designs to meet the stringent requirements demanded for the future expansion of nuclear power; the combining of the HTGR technology interest of ABB-Atom and Siemens in Germany into a joint enterprise, HTR GmbH, in May 1989

  11. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) FY05 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. D. Weaver; T. Marshall; T. Totemeier; J. Gan; E.E. Feldman; E.A Hoffman; R.F. Kulak; I.U. Therios; C. P. Tzanos; T.Y.C. Wei; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo; R. Nanstad; W. Corwin; V. G. Krishnardula; W. F. Gale; J. W. Fergus; P. Sabharwall; T. Allen

    2005-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radio toxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. Nevertheless, the GFR was chosen as one of only six Generation IV systems to be pursued based on its ability to meet the Generation IV goals in sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with on outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in

  12. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) Decay Heat Removal Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. D. Weaver; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo

    2005-01-01

    Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with an outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in participating in research related to the development of the GFR. These are Euratom (European Commission), France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Of these, Euratom (including the United Kingdom), France, and Japan have active research activities with respect to the GFR. The research includes GFR design and safety, and fuels/in-core materials/fuel cycle projects. This report is a compilation of work performed on decay heat removal systems for a 2400 MWt GFR during this fiscal year (FY05)

  13. Treatment and Disposal of the Radioactive Graphite Waste of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Junfeng

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) represent one of the Gen IV reactors in the future market, with efficient generation of energy and the supply of process heat at high temperature utilised in many industrial processes. HTGR development has been carried out within China’s National High Technology Research and Development Program. The first industrial demonstration HTGR of 200 MWe is under construction in Shandong Province China. HTGRs use ceramic-coated fuel particles that are strong and highly resistant to irradiation. Graphite is used as moderator and helium is used as coolant. The fuel particles and the graphite block in which they are imbedded can withstand very high temperature (up to ~1600℃). Graphite waste presents as the fuel element components of HTGR with up to 95% of the whole element beside the graphite blocks in the core. For example, a 200 MWe reactor could discharge about 90,000 fuel elements with 17 tonnes irradiated graphite included each year. The core of the HTGR in China consists of a pebble bed with spherical fuel elements. The UO 2 fuel kernel particles (0.5mm diameter) (triple-coated isotropic fuel particles) are coated by several layers including inner buffer layer with less dense pyrocarbon, dense pyro-carbon, SiC layer and outer layer of dense pyro-carbon, which can prevent the leaking of fission products (Fig. 1). Spherical fuel elements (60mm diameter) consist of a 50mm diameter inner zone and 5mm thick shell of fuel free zone [3]. The inner zone contains about 8300 triple-coated isotropic fuel particles of 0.92mm in diameter dispersed in the graphite matrix

  14. Gas-cooled reactor application for a university campus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colak, Ue.; Kadiroghlu, O.K.; Soekmen, C.N.; Schmitt, H.

    1991-01-01

    Large urban areas with unfavourable topographic and meteorological conditions suffer severe air pollution during the winter months. Use of low grade lignites, imported higher quality coal or imported fuel oil are the sources of air pollution in the form of sulphur dioxide, fly ash and soot. Large housing complexes or old and historical locations within the city are in need of pollution free centralized district heating systems. Natural gas imported from the Soviet Union is a solution for this problem. Lack of gas distribution network for high pressure gas within the city is the main bottle-neck for the heating systems utilizing natural gas. Concern of the safety of flammable high pressure gas circulating within the city is another drawback for the natural gas heating systems. Nuclear district heating is an environmentally viable option worth looking into it. Localized urban nuclear heating is an interesting solution for large urban areas with old and historical character. The results of a feasibility study on the HGR application for the Hacettepe University presented here, summarizes the concept of gas-cooled heating reactors specially designed for urban centers. The inherently safe characteristics of the pebble bed heating reactor makes localized urban nuclear heating a viable alternative to other heat sources. An economical analysis of various heat sources with equal power levels is done for the Beytepe campus of Hacettepe University in Ankara. Under special boundary conditions, the price for heat generation can be much lower for nuclear heating with GHR 20 than for hard coal or fuel oil. It is also possible that if the price escalation rate for natural gas exceeds 3%, then nuclear heating with GHR can be more competitive. It is concluded that the nuclear heating of Beytepe campus with a GHR 20 is feasible and economical. (author) 3 figs., 5 refs

  15. Quality control of coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Mitsunobu

    1987-01-01

    The quality control of the coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactors is characterized by the fact that the size of the target product to be controlled is very small, and the quantity is very large. Accordingly, the sampling plan and the method of evaluating the population through satisfically treating the measured data of the samples are the important subjects to see and evaluate the quality of a batch or a lot. This paper shows the fabrication process and the quality control procedure for the coated fuel particles. The development work of a HTGR was started by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in 1969, and as for the production technology for coated fuel particles, Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. has continued the development work. The pilot plan with the capacity of about 40 kg/year was established in 1972. The fuel product fabricated in this plant was put to the irradiation experiment and out-of-pile evaluation test. In 1983, the production capacity was expanded to 200 kg/year, and the fuel compacts for the VHTRC in JAERI were produced for two years. The basic fuel design, the fabrication process, the quality control, the process control and the quality assurance are reported. For the commercial product, the studies from the viewpoint of production and quality control costs are required. (Kako, I.)

  16. VALIDATION OF NUMERICAL METHODS TO CALCULATE BYPASS FLOW IN A PRISMATIC GAS-COOLED REACTOR CORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAM-IL TAK

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available For thermo-fluid and safety analyses of a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR, intensive efforts are in progress in the developments of the GAMMA+ code of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI and the AGREE code of the University of Michigan (U of M. One of the important requirements for GAMMA+ and AGREE is an accurate modeling capability of a bypass flow in a prismatic core. Recently, a series of air experiments were performed at Seoul National University (SNU in order to understand bypass flow behavior and generate an experimental database for the validation of computer codes. The main objective of the present work is to validate the GAMMA+ and AGREE codes using the experimental data published by SNU. The numerical results of the two codes were compared with the measured data. A good agreement was found between the calculations and the measurement. It was concluded that GAMMA+ and AGREE can reliably simulate the bypass flow behavior in a prismatic core.

  17. THATCH: A computer code for modelling thermal networks of high- temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeger, P.G.; Kennett, R.J.; Colman, J.; Ginsberg, T. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1991-10-01

    This report documents the THATCH code, which can be used to model general thermal and flow networks of solids and coolant channels in two-dimensional r-z geometries. The main application of THATCH is to model reactor thermo-hydraulic transients in High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs). The available modules simulate pressurized or depressurized core heatup transients, heat transfer to general exterior sinks or to specific passive Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems, which can be air or water-cooled. Graphite oxidation during air or water ingress can be modelled, including the effects of added combustion products to the gas flow and the additional chemical energy release. A point kinetics model is available for analyzing reactivity excursions; for instance due to water ingress, and also for hypothetical no-scram scenarios. For most HTGR transients, which generally range over hours, a user-selected nodalization of the core in r-z geometry is used. However, a separate model of heat transfer in the symmetry element of each fuel element is also available for very rapid transients. This model can be applied coupled to the traditional coarser r-z nodalization. This report described the mathematical models used in the code and the method of solution. It describes the code and its various sub-elements. Details of the input data and file usage, with file formats, is given for the code, as well as for several preprocessing and postprocessing options. The THATCH model of the currently applicable 350 MW{sub th} reactor is described. Input data for four sample cases are given with output available in fiche form. Installation requirements and code limitations, as well as the most common error indications are listed. 31 refs., 23 figs., 32 tabs.

  18. Overview of gas-cooled reactor systems, their importance and their interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.; Spiewak, I.; Tobias, M.L.

    1975-01-01

    The economic interactions between fueling, separative work, and capital requirements are illustrated for HTGR, GCFR, HTGR-GT, VHTR, LWRs and LMFBRs. The influence of finite low-cost uranium resources and of extensive LWR application within the next two decades on reactor use is also discussed. Technological developments required for the practical application of HTGRs, GCFRs, HTGR-GT and VHTRs are presented, along with the importance and environmental effects features of these applications. The technical advantages and disadvantages associated with use of the uranium and the thorium fuel cycles in HTGRs are given, including the implications a given fuel cycle has on fuel recycle and mined-fuel requirements. The influence of core design on HTGR fuel and coolant temperatures and on associated performance features are illustrated by considering prismatic and pebble-bed type cores. Finally, several scenarios relative to the development of the HTGR, GCFR, HTGR-GT and VHTR are presented. (auth)

  19. Safety concerns and suggested design approaches to the HTGR Reformer process concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, R.C.

    1981-09-01

    This report is a safety review of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Reformer Application Study prepared by Gas-Cooled Reactor Associates (GCRA) of La Jolla, California. The objective of this review was to identify safety concerns and suggests design approaches to minimize risk in the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Reformer (HTGR-R) process concept

  20. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James; Bayless, Paul; Strydom, Gerhard; Kumar, Akansha; Gougar, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis is an indispensable element of any substantial attempt in reactor simulation validation. The quantification of uncertainties in nuclear engineering has grown more important and the IAEA Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) initiated in 2012 aims to investigate the various uncertainty quantification methodologies for this type of reactors. The first phase of the CRP is dedicated to the estimation of cell and lattice model uncertainties due to the neutron cross sections co-variances. Phase II is oriented towards the investigation of propagated uncertainties from the lattice to the coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics core calculations. Nominal results for the prismatic single block (Ex.I-2a) and super cell models (Ex.I-2c) have been obtained using the SCALE 6.1.3 two-dimensional lattice code NEWT coupled to the TRITON sequence for cross section generation. In this work, the TRITON/NEWT-flux-weighted cross sections obtained for Ex.I-2a and various models of Ex.I-2c is utilized to perform a sensitivity analysis of the MHTGR-350 core power densities and eigenvalues. The core solutions are obtained with the INL coupled code PHISICS/RELAP5-3D, utilizing a fixed-temperature feedback for Ex. II-1a.. It is observed that the core power density does not vary significantly in shape, but the magnitude of these variations increases as the moderator-to-fuel ratio increases in the super cell lattice models.

  1. HTGR reactor physics, thermal-hydraulics and depletion uncertainty analysis: a proposed IAEA coordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyobeka, Bismark; Reitsma, Frederik; Ivanov, Kostadin

    2011-01-01

    The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of HTGR design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. The predictive capability of coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics and depletion simulations for reactor design and safety analysis can be assessed with sensitivity analysis and uncertainty analysis methods. In order to benefit from recent advances in modeling and simulation and the availability of new covariance data (nuclear data uncertainties) extensive sensitivity and uncertainty studies are needed for quantification of the impact of different sources of uncertainties on the design and safety parameters of HTGRs. Uncertainty and sensitivity studies are an essential component of any significant effort in data and simulation improvement. In February 2009, the Technical Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors recommended that the proposed IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling be implemented. In the paper the current status and plan are presented. The CRP will also benefit from interactions with the currently ongoing OECD/NEA Light Water Reactor (LWR) UAM benchmark activity by taking into consideration the peculiarities of HTGR designs and simulation requirements. (author)

  2. A Review of Gas-Cooled Reactor Concepts for SDI Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marshall, A

    1989-01-01

    .... Our study concluded that the principal reason for considering gas cooled reactors for burst mode operation was the potential for significant system mass savings over closed cycle systems if open...

  3. Specialists' meeting on fission product release and transport in gas-cooled reactors. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the Meeting on Fission Product Release and Transport in Gas-Cooled Reactors was to compare and discuss experimental and theoretical results of fission product behaviour in gas-cooled reactors under normal and accidental conditions and to give direction for future development. The technical part of the meeting covered operational experience and laboratory research, activity release, and behaviour of released activity

  4. Mechanical characterization of metallic materials for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors in air and in helium environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainfort, G.; Cappelaere, M.; Gregoire, J.; Sannier, J.

    1984-01-01

    In the French R and D program for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), three metallic alloys were studied: steel Chromesco-3 with 2.25% chromium, alloy 800H, and Hastelloy-X. The Chromesco-3 and alloy 800H creep behavior is the same in air and in HTGR atmosphere (helium). The tensile tests of Hastelloy-X specimens reveal that aging has embrittlement and hardening effects up to 700 0 C, but the creep tests at 800 0 C show opposite effects. This particular behavior could be due to induced precipitation by aging and the depletion of hardening elements from the matrix. Tests show a low influence of cobalt content on mechanical properties of Hastelloy-X

  5. Testing and analyses of a high temperature duct for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, W.E.; Roberge, A.; Felten, P.; Bastien, D.

    1979-01-01

    A 0.6 scale model of a steam cycle gas-cooled reactor high temperature duct was tested in a closed loop helium facility. The object of the test series was to determine: 1) the thermal effects of gas permeation within the thermal barrier, 2) the plastic deformation of the metallic components, and 3) the thermal performance of the fibrous insulation. A series of tests was performed with thermal cyclings from 100 0 C to 760 0 C at 50 atmospheres until the system thermal performance had stabilized hence enabling predictions for the reactor life. Additional tests were made to assess permeation by deliberately simulating sealing weld failures thereby allowing gas flow by-pass within the primary thermal barrier. After 100 cycles the entire primary structure was found to have performed without structural failure. Due to high pressures exerted by the insulation on the cover plates and a design oversight, the thin seal sheets were unable to expand in an anticipated manner. Local buckling resulted. The insulation retained an acceptable degree of resiliency. However, some fiber damage was observed within both the high and low temperature insulation blankets. A thermal analysis was conducted to correlate the hot duct heat transfer results with those obtained from the analytical techniques used for the HTGR design using a computer thermal model representative of the duct and test setup. The thermal performance of the insulation, the temperature gradient through the structural components, the heating load to the cooling system and the permeation flow effect on heat transfer were verified. Exellent correlation between the experimental data and the analytical techniques were obtained

  6. A carbon dioxide partial condensation direct cycle for advanced gas cooled fast and thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuyoshi, Kato; Takeshi, NItawaki; Yoshio, Yoshizawa

    2001-01-01

    A carbon dioxide partial condensation direct cycle concept has been proposed for gas cooled fast and thermal reactors. The fast reactor with the concept are evaluated to be a potential alternative option to liquid metal cooled fast reactors, providing comparable cycle efficiency at the same core outlet temperature, eliminating the safety problems, simplifying the heat transport system and making easier plant maintenance. The thermal reactor with the concept is expected to be an alternative solution to current high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs) with helium gas turbines, allowing comparable cycle efficiency at the moderate temperature of 650 C instead of 800 C in HTGRs. (author)

  7. Preliminary study on application of Pd composite membrane in helium purification system of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jianhua; Yang Xiaoyong; Wang Jie; Yu Suyuan

    2008-01-01

    Helium purification system (HPS) is the main part of the helium auxiliary system of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR), also in fusion reactors. Some exploratory work was carried out on the application of Pd composite membrane in the separation of He and H 2 . A typical single stripper permeator with recycle (SSP) system was designed, based on the design parameters of a small scale He purification test system CIGNE in CADARACHE, CEA, France, and finite element analysis method was used to solve the model. The total length of membrane module is fixed to 0.5 m. The results show that the concentration of H 2 is found to reduce from 1 000 μL/L in feed gas to 5 μL/L in the product He (the upper limitation of HPS in HTGR). And the molar ratio of product He to feed gas is 96.18% with the optimized ratio of sweep gas to retentive gas 0. 3970. It's an exponential distribution of H 2 concentration along the membrane module. The results were also compared with the other two popular designs, two stripper in series permeator (TSSP) and continuous membrane column (CMC). (authors)

  8. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    Research activities are described concerning HTGR chemistry; fueled graphite development; prestressed concrete pressure vessel development; structural materials; HTGR graphite studies; HTR core evaluation; reactor physics; shielding; application and project assessments; and HTR Core Flow Test Loop studies

  9. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-08-01

    Research activities are described concerning HTGR chemistry; fueled graphite development; prestressed concrete pressure vessel development; structural materials; HTGR graphite studies; HTR core evaluation; reactor physics; shielding; application and project assessments; and HTR Core Flow Test Loop studies.

  10. Current status and future development of modular high temperature gas cooled reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-02-01

    associated with these R and D programmes. Also, support of specific HTGR related research projects is included in the European Union's Fifth Framework Program beginning in 2000. Further opportunities and capabilities of the HTGR in the development of co-generation and non-electric applications are presented in Chapter 7. Spent fuel disposal and decommissioning are key issues that are significantly influencing the future of nuclear power. Chapter 8 addresses the anticipated manner of handling these areas within the PBMR and GT-MHR. Also addressed are the activities associated with spent fuel disposal and decommissioning of HTGRs previously shut down. The development and commissioning of any new nuclear plant concept is subject to risks and challenges to its commercialization. This is also evident in the closed cycle gas turbine, particularly with regard to the design and development of the power conversion system (PCS). The GT-MHR and the PBMR (as well as many other designs under consideration) incorporate state-of-the-art components in their PCS that must operate safely and efficiently for this concept to succeed. These components include magnetic bearings on the rotating machines, large compact plate-fin recuperator modules and seals between PCS components that have size, orientation or environmental operating characteristics yet to be fully demonstrated and proven. These challenges to the commercialization of the GT-MHR and PBMR are discussed in Chapter 9. The IAEA is advised on its activities in development and application of gas cooled reactors by the IWGGCR which is a committee of leaders in national programmes in this technology. The IWGGCR meets periodically to serve as a global forum for information exchange and progress reports on the national programmes, to identify areas of collaboration and to advise the IAEA on its programme. Countries with representation in the IWGGCR include Austria, China, France, Germany, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Poland, the

  11. Gas-Cooled Reactor Programs annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.; Coobs, J.H.; Lotts, A.L.

    1976-04-01

    Progress is summarized in studies relating to HTGR fuel reprocessing, refabrication, and recycle; HTGR fuel materials development and performance testing; HTGR PCRV development; HTGR materials investigations; HTGR fuel chemistry; HTGR safety studies; and GCFR irradiation experiments and steam generator modeling

  12. Development of safety analysis codes and experimental validation for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Oh

    2006-03-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of toxic gasses (CO and CO2) and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. Research Objectives As described above, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release in the VHTR. The objectives of this Korean/United States collaboration were to develop and validate advanced computational methods for VHTR safety analysis. The methods that have been developed are now

  13. A review of gas-cooled reactor concepts for SDI (Strategic Defense Initiative) applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, A.C.

    1989-08-01

    We have completed a review of multimegawatt gas-cooled reactor concepts proposed for SDI applications. Our study concluded that the principal reason for considering gas-cooled reactors for burst-mode operation was the potential for significant system mass savings over closed-cycle systems if open-cycle gas-cooled operation (effluent exhausted to space) is acceptable. The principal reason for considering gas-cooled reactors for steady-state operation is that they may represent a lower technology risk than other approaches. In the review, nine gas-cooled reactor concepts were compared to identify the most promising. For burst-mode operation, the NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) derivative reactor concept emerged as a strong first choice since its performance exceeds the anticipated operational requirements and the technology has been demonstrated and is retrievable. Although the NERVA derivative concepts were determined to be the lead candidates for the Multimegawatt Steady-State (MMWSS) mode as well, their lead over the other candidates is not as great as for the burst mode. 90 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. A novel nuclear combined power and cooling system integrating high temperature gas-cooled reactor with ammonia–water cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Chending; Zhao, Fuqiang; Zhang, Na

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a novel nuclear ammonia–water power and cooling cogeneration system. • The high temperature reactor is inherently safe, with exhaust heat fully recovered. • The thermal performances are improved compared with nuclear combined cycle. • The base case attains an energy efficiency of 69.9% and exergy efficiency of 72.5%. • Energy conservation and emission reduction are achieved in this cogeneration way. - Abstract: A nuclear ammonia–water power and refrigeration cogeneration system (NAPR) has been proposed and analyzed in this paper. It consists of a closed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) topping Brayton cycle and a modified ammonia water power/refrigeration combined bottoming cycle (APR). The HTGR is an inherently safe reactor, and thus could be stable, flexible and suitable for various energy supply situation, and its exhaust heat is fully recovered by the mixture of ammonia and water in the bottoming cycle. To reduce exergy losses and enhance outputs, the ammonia concentrations of the bottoming cycle working fluid are optimized in both power and refrigeration processes. With the HTGR of 200 MW thermal capacity and 900 °C/70 bar reactor-core-outlet helium, the system achieves 88.8 MW net electrical output and 9.27 MW refrigeration capacity, and also attains an energy efficiency of 69.9% and exergy efficiency of 72.5%, which are higher by 5.3%-points and 2.6%-points as compared with the nuclear combined cycle (NCC, like a conventional gas/steam power-only combined cycle while the topping cycle is a closed HTGR Brayton cycle) with the same nuclear energy input. Compared with conventional separate power and refrigeration generation systems, the fossil fuel saving (based on CH 4 ) and CO 2 emission reduction of base-case NAPR could reach ∼9.66 × 10 4 t/y and ∼26.6 × 10 4 t/y, respectively. The system integration accomplishes the safe and high-efficiency utilization of nuclear energy by power and refrigeration

  15. Axial turbomachine modelling with a quasi-2-D approach. Application to gas cooled reactor transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolas Tauveron; Manuel Saez; Pascal Ferrand; Francis Leboeuf

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the frame of the international forum GenIV, CEA has selected two innovative concepts of High Temperature gas cooled Reactor. The first has a fast neutron spectrum, a robust refractory fuel and a direct cycle conversion. The second is a very high temperature reactor with a thermal neutron spectrum. Both concepts make use of technology derived from High Temperature Gas Reactor. Thermal hydraulic performances are a key issue for the design. For transient conditions and decay heat removal situations, the thermal hydraulic performance must remain as high as possible. In this context, all the transient situations, the incidental and accidental scenarios must be evaluated by a validated system code able to correctly describe, in particular, the thermal-hydraulics of the whole plant. With this type of reactor a special emphasis must be laid on turbomachinery modelling. A first step was to compute a HTGR concept using the steady-state characteristics of each element of the turbomachinery with the computer code CATHARE. In a hypothetical transient event (a 10 inches cold duct break of primary loop which causes a rapid depressurization and a decrease of the core mass flow rate) the results seem of great interest (as a forced convection was maintained by the compressors during the entire transient) but not sufficiently justified in the frame of 0D modelling of turbomachinery. A more precise description of the turbomachinery has been developed based on a quasi-two dimensional approach. Although this type of flow analysis is a simplification of a complex three dimensional system, it is able to describe the behaviour of a compressor or a turbine with a better understanding than the models based on component characteristics. This approach consists in the solving of 2D radially averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the hypothesis of circumferentially uniform flow. The assumption of quasi-steady behaviour is made: source terms for the lift and

  16. Research and development for high temperature gas cooled reactor in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taketani, K.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the current status of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor research and development work in Japan, with emphasis on the Experimental Very High Temperature Reactor (Exp. VHTR) to be built by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) before the end of 1985. The necessity of construction of Exp. VHTR was explained from the points of Japanese energy problems and resources

  17. Closed Fuel Cycle and Minor Actinide Multirecycling in a Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rooijen, W.F.G.; Kloosterman, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    The Generation IV International Forum has identified the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) as one of the reactor concepts for future deployment. The GCFR targets sustainability, which is achieved by the use of a closed nuclear fuel cycle where only fission products are discharged to a repository; all

  18. Management of graphite material: a key issue for High Temperature Gas Reactor system (HTGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdeloie, C.; Marimbeau, P.; Robin, J.C.; Cellier, F.

    2005-01-01

    Graphite material is used in nuclear High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR, Fig.1) as moderator, thermal absorber and also as structural components of the core (Fig.2). This type of reactor was selected by the Generation IV forum as a potential high temperature provider for supplying hydrogen production plants and is under development in France in the frame of the AREVA ANTARES program. In order to select graphite grades to be used in these future reactors, the requirements for mechanical, thermal, physical-chemical properties must match the internal environment of the nuclear core, especially with regard to irradiation effect. Another important aspect that must be addressed early in design is the waste issue. Indeed, it is necessary to reduce the amount of nuclear waste produced by operation of the reactor during its lifetime. Preliminary assessment of the nuclear waste output for an ANTARES type 280 MWe HTGR over 60 year-lifetime gives an estimated 6000 m 3 of activated graphite waste. Thus, reducing the graphite waste production is an important issue for any HTGR system. First, this paper presents a preliminary inventory of graphite waste fluxes coming from a HTGR, in mass and volume, with magnitudes of radiological activities based on activation calculations of graphite during its stay in the core of the reactor. Normalized data corresponding to an output of 1 GWe.year electricity allows comparison of the waste production with other nuclear reactor systems. Second, possible routes to manage irradiated graphite waste are addressed in both the context of French nuclear waste management rules and by comparison to other national regulations. Routes for graphite waste disposal studied in different countries (concerning existing irradiated graphite waste) will be discussed with regard to new issues of large graphite waste from HTGR. Alternative or complementary solutions aiming at lowering volume of graphite waste to be managed will be presented. For example

  19. Safety design of the experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitake, Susumu; Yamada, M.; Morimoto, T.

    1979-01-01

    Studies have been made on methods to implement a proper safety design for the experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The experimental reactor is an advanced reactor, because it not only is a helium gas-cooled reactor, but also has an objective to achieve a very high reactor outlet gas temperature (1,000 0 C). In addition, it is planned to perform various tests during operation of the experimental reactor. In Japan, safety design method have been established for application to light water reactor nuclear power plants, and the related criteria and regulations are fairly well defined. Accordingly, the design of the experimental high-temperature gas-cooled reactor is required to be based on the light water reactor safety design method, even though the experimental reactor is of a different type and purpose. In another word, it is required to design the experimental reactor to conform to the currently established safety design criteria and regulations, as well as satisfy the requirements for performance of the experimental reactor. In recent years, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the Fuji Electric Co., Ltd. have performed a series of studies for the safety design of the experimental reactor and the results are summarized in this paper. (author)

  20. Simulation of the fuzzy-smith control system for the high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Deheng; Xu Xiaolin; Zheng Jie; Guo Renjun; Zhang Guifen

    1997-01-01

    The Fuzzy-Smith pre-estimate controller to solve the control of the big delay system is developed, accompanied with the development of the mathematical model of the 10 MW high temperature gas cooled test reactor (HTR-10) and the design of its control system. The simulation results show the Fuzzy-Smith pre-estimate controller has the advantages of both fuzzy control and Smith pre-estimate controller; it has better compensation to the delay and better adaptability to the parameter change of the control object. So it is applicable to the design of the control system for the high temperature gas cooled reactor

  1. Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor Program. Semiannual technical progress report, April 1, 1983-September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    An assessment of the HTGR opportunities from the year 2000 through 2045 was the principal activity on the Market Definition Task (WBS 03). Within the Plant Technology (WBS 13) task, there were activities to develop analytical methods for investigation of Coolant Transport Behavior and to define methods and criteria for High Temperature Structural Engineering design. The activities in support of the HTGR-SC/C Lead Plant (WBS 30 and 31) were the participation in the Lead Plant System Engineering (LPSE) effort and the plant simulation task. The efforts on the Advanced HTGR systems was performed under the Modular Reactor Systems (MRS) (WBS 41) to study the potential for multiple small reactors to provide lower costs, improved safety, and higher availability than the large monolithic core reactors

  2. Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor Program. Semiannual technical progress report, April 1, 1983-September 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-12-01

    An assessment of the HTGR opportunities from the year 2000 through 2045 was the principal activity on the Market Definition Task (WBS 03). Within the Plant Technology (WBS 13) task, there were activities to develop analytical methods for investigation of Coolant Transport Behavior and to define methods and criteria for High Temperature Structural Engineering design. The activities in support of the HTGR-SC/C Lead Plant (WBS 30 and 31) were the participation in the Lead Plant System Engineering (LPSE) effort and the plant simulation task. The efforts on the Advanced HTGR systems was performed under the Modular Reactor Systems (MRS) (WBS 41) to study the potential for multiple small reactors to provide lower costs, improved safety, and higher availability than the large monolithic core reactors.

  3. Experimental study on cryogenic adsorption of methane by activated carbon for helium coolant purification of High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hua; Wu, Zong-Xin; Jia, Hai-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The cryogenic CH 4 adsorption on activated carbon was studied for design of HTGR. • The breakthrough curves at different conditions were analyzed by the MTZ model. • The CH 4 adsorption isotherm was fitted well by the Toth model and the D-R model. • The work provides valuable reference data for helium coolant purification of HTGR. - Abstract: The cryogenic adsorption behavior of methane on activated carbon was investigated for helium coolant purification of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor by using dynamic column breakthrough method. With helium as carrier gas, experiments were performed at −196 °C and low methane partial pressure range of 0–120 Pa. The breakthrough curves at different superficial velocities and different feed concentrations were measured and analyzed by the mass-transfer zone model. The methane single-component adsorption isotherm was obtained and fitted well by the Toth model and the Dubinin-Radushkevich model. The adsorption heat of methane on activated carbon was estimated. The cryogenic adsorption process of methane on activated carbon has been verified to be effective for helium coolant purification of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor.

  4. Gas-Cooled Thorium Reactor with Fuel Block of the Unified Design

    OpenAIRE

    Shamanin, Igor; Bedenko, Sergey; Chertkov, Yuriy; Gubaydulin, Ildar

    2015-01-01

    Scientific researches of new technological platform realization carried out in Russia are based on ideas of nuclear fuel breeding in closed fuel cycle and physical principles of fast neutron reactors. Innovative projects of low-power reactor systems correspond to the new technological platform. High-temperature gas-cooled thorium reactors with good transportability properties, small installation time, and operation without overloading for a long time are considered perspective. Such small mod...

  5. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  6. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinsey, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  7. Gas-cooled reactor programs: High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Base-Technology Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-07-01

    Progress in HTGR studies is reported in the following areas: HTGR chemistry; fueled graphite development; prestressed concrete pressure vessel development; structural materials; HTGR graphite studies; and evaluation of the pebble-bed HTR.

  8. Engineering review of the core support structure of the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The review of the core support structure of the gas cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) covered such areas as the design criteria, the design and analysis of the concepts, the development plan, and the projected manufacturing costs. Recommendations are provided to establish a basis for future work on the GCFR core support structure

  9. Requirements for electricity producing gas-cooled reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, D.K.J.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes requirements to a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor from the view-point of a utility in the Federal Republic of Germany. The requirements presented in the paper address different areas including plant size, availability, safety and economics. (author)

  10. Engineering review of the core support structure of the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-09-01

    The review of the core support structure of the gas cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) covered such areas as the design criteria, the design and analysis of the concepts, the development plan, and the projected manufacturing costs. Recommendations are provided to establish a basis for future work on the GCFR core support structure.

  11. Gas-cooled fast reactor program. Progress report, January 1, 1980-June 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1981-09-01

    Since the national Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program has been terminated, this document is the last progress report until reinstatement. It is divided into three sections: Core Flow Test Loop, GCFR shielding and physics, and GCFR pressure vessel and closure studies. (DLC)

  12. Preliminary Sensitivity Study on Gas-Cooled Reactor for NHDD System Using MARS-GCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Wook; Jeong, Jae Jun; Lee, Won Jae

    2005-01-01

    A Gas-Cooled Reactor (GCR) is considered as one of the most outstanding tools for a massive hydrogen production without CO 2 emission. Till now, two types of GCR are regarded as a viable nuclear reactor for a hydrogen production: Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR), Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR). In this paper, a preliminary sensitivity study on two types of GCR is carried out by using MARS-GCR to find out the effect on the peak fuel and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) temperature, with varying the condition of a reactor inlet, outlet temperature, and system pressure for both PMR and PBR

  13. Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program. Interim report. Construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors is summarized along with technical descriptions of the plants. Included in the report are the AVR Experimental Pebble Bed Reactor, the Dragon Reactor, AGR Reactors, and the Thorium High Temperature Reactor (THTR). The study demonstrates that the European experience has been favorable and forms a good foundation for the development of Advanced High Temperature Reactors

  14. Safety analysis of the experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitake, Susumu; Ezaki, Masahiro; Suzuki, Katsuo; Takaya, Junichi; Shimazu, Akira

    1976-02-01

    Safety features of the experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas-cooled reactor being developed in JAERI were studied or the basis of its preliminary conceptual design of the reactor plant. Covered are control of the plant in transients, plant behaviour in accidents, and functions of engineered safeguards, and also dynamics of the uprant and frequencies of the accidents. These studies have shown, (i) the reactor plant can be operated both in plant slave to reactor and reactor slave to plant control, (ii) stable control of

  15. Thermal-hydraulic code selection for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komen, E.M.J.; Bogaard, J.P.A. van den

    1995-06-01

    In order to study the transient thermal-hydraulic system behaviour of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors, the thermal-hydraulic computer codes RELAP5, MELCOR, THATCH, MORECA, and VSOP are considered at the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN. This report presents the selection of the most appropriate codes. To cover the range of relevant accidents, a suite of three codes is recommended for analyses of HTR-M and MHTGR reactors. (orig.).

  16. Heat transport and afterheat removal for gas cooled reactors under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Heat Transport and Afterheat Removal for Gas Cooled Reactors Under Accident Conditions was organized within the framework of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors (IWGGCR). This International Working Group serves as a forum for exchange of information on national programmes, provides advice to the IAEA on international co-operative activities in advanced technologies of gas cooled reactors (GCRs) and supports the conduct of these activities. Advanced GCR designs currently being developed are predicted to achieve a high degree of safety through reliance on inherent safety features. Such design features should permit the technical demonstration of exceptional public protection with significantly reduced emergency planning requirements. For advanced GCRs, this predicted high degree of safety largely derives from the ability of the ceramic coated fuel particles to retain the fission products under normal and accident conditions, the safe neutron physics behaviour of the core, the chemical stability of the core and the ability of the design to dissipate decay heat by natural heat transport mechanisms without reaching excessive temperatures. Prior to licensing and commercial deployment of advanced GCRs, these features must first be demonstrated under experimental conditions representing realistic reactor conditions, and the methods used to predict the performance of the fuel and reactor must be validated against these experimental data. Within this CRP, the participants addressed the inherent mechanisms for removal of decay heat from GCRs under accident conditions. The objective of this CRP was to establish sufficient experimental data at realistic conditions and validated analytical tools to confirm the predicted safe thermal response of advance gas cooled reactors during accidents. The scope includes experimental and analytical investigations of heat transport by natural convection conduction and thermal

  17. A Review of Gas-Cooled Reactor Concepts for SDI Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    Gas-Cooled Reactor program. The fuel element for this concept consists of TRISO -like particles contained between two porous cylin- drical frits...it exits at one end of the element. The actual particles proposed for this reactor would not have an outer coating of carbon as standard TRISO ...requi- sition. From my cursory look at these specification files, I think some updating and reference to existing ASTM, ASME, and ANSI codes might

  18. Probabilistic safety assessment framework of pebble-bed modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tao; Tong Jiejuan; Zhao Jun; Cao Jianzhu; Zhang Liguo

    2009-01-01

    After an investigation of similar reactor type probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) framework, Pebble-bed Modular High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTR-PM) PSA framework was presented in correlate with its own design characteristics. That is an integral framework which spreads through event sequence structure with initiating events at the beginning and source term categories in the end. The analysis shows that it is HTR-PM design feature that determines its PSA framework. (authors)

  19. Thermal and flow design of helium-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melese, G.; Katz, R.

    1984-01-01

    This book continues the American Nuclear Society's series of monographs on nuclear science and technology. Chapters of the book include information on the first-generation gas-cooled reactors; HTGR reactor developments; reactor core heat transfer; mechanical problems related to the primary coolant circuit; HTGR design bases; core thermal design; gas turbines; process heat HTGR reactors; GCFR reactor thermal hydraulics; and gas cooling of fusion reactors

  20. Accident Analysis Simulation in Modular 300MWt Gas Cooled Fast Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Su'ud

    2017-01-01

    Safety analysis of 300MWt helium gas cooled long-life fast reactors has been performed. The analysis of unprotected loss of flow(ULOF) and unprotected rod run-out transient overpower (UTOP) are discussed. Some simulations for 300 MWt He gas cooled fast reactors has been performed and the results show that the reactor can anticipate complete pumping failure inherently by reducing power through reactivity feedback and remove the rest of heat through natural circulations. GCFR relatively has hard spectrum so it has relatively small Doppler coefficient. In the UTOP accident case the analysis has been performed against external reactivity up to 0.002dk/k. In addition the steam generator design has also consider excess power during severe UTOP case..

  1. A combined gas cooled nuclear reactor and fuel cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, David J.

    Rising oil costs, global warming, national security concerns, economic concerns and escalating energy demands are forcing the engineering communities to explore methods to address these concerns. It is the intention of this thesis to offer a proposal for a novel design of a combined cycle, an advanced nuclear helium reactor/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) plant that will help to mitigate some of the above concerns. Moreover, the adoption of this proposal may help to reinvigorate the Nuclear Power industry while providing a practical method to foster the development of a hydrogen economy. Specifically, this thesis concentrates on the importance of the U.S. Nuclear Navy adopting this novel design for its nuclear electric vessels of the future with discussion on efficiency and thermodynamic performance characteristics related to the combined cycle. Thus, the goals and objectives are to develop an innovative combined cycle that provides a solution to the stated concerns and show that it provides superior performance. In order to show performance, it is necessary to develop a rigorous thermodynamic model and computer program to analyze the SOFC in relation with the overall cycle. A large increase in efficiency over the conventional pressurized water reactor cycle is realized. Both sides of the cycle achieve higher efficiencies at partial loads which is extremely important as most naval vessels operate at partial loads as well as the fact that traditional gas turbines operating alone have poor performance at reduced speeds. Furthermore, each side of the cycle provides important benefits to the other side. The high temperature exhaust from the overall exothermic reaction of the fuel cell provides heat for the reheater allowing for an overall increase in power on the nuclear side of the cycle. Likewise, the high temperature helium exiting the nuclear reactor provides a controllable method to stabilize the fuel cell at an optimal temperature band even during transients helping

  2. State of development of high temperature gas-cooled reactors in foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Yukio

    1990-01-01

    Emphasis has been placed in the development of high temperature gas-cooled reactors on high thermal efficiency as power reactors and the reactor from which nuclear heat can be utilized. In U.K., as the international project 'Dragon Project', the experimental Dragon reactor for research use with 20 MWt output and exit coolant temperature 750 deg C was constructed, and operated till 1976. Coated fuel particles were developed. In West Germany, the experimental power reactor AVR with 46 MWt and 15 MWe output was operated till 1988. The prototype power reactor THTR-300 with 300 MWe output and 750 deg C exit temperature is in commercial operation. In USA, the experimental power reactor Peach Bottom reactor with 40 MWe output and 728 deg C exit temperature was operated till 1974. The prototype Fort Saint Vrain power reactor with 330 MWe output and 782 deg C exit temperature was operated till 1989. In USSR, the modular VGM with 200 MWh output is at the planning stage. Also in China, high temperature gas-cooled reactors are at the design stage. Switzerland has taken part in various international projects. (K.I.)

  3. Nuclear power for coexistence with nature, high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1996-01-01

    Until this century, it is sufficient to aim at the winner of competition in human society to obtain resources, and to entrust waste to natural cleaning action. However, the expansion of social activities has been too fast, and the scale has become too large, consequently, in the next century, the expansion of social activities will be caught by the structure of trilemma that is subjected to the strong restraint and selection from the problems of finite energy and resources and environment preservation. In 21st century, the problems change to those between mankind and nature. Energy supply and population increase, envrionment preservation and human activities, and the matters that human wisdom should bear regarding energy technology are discussed. In Japan, the construction of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is in progress. The design of high temperature gas-cooled reactors and their features on the safety are explained. The capability of reducing CO 2 release of high temperature gas-cooled reactors is reported. In future, it is expected that the time of introducing high temperature gas-cooled reactors will come. (K.I.)

  4. A preliminary neutronic evaluation of the high temperature gas-cooled test reactor HTR-10 using the scale 6.0 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Romulo V.; Fortini, Angela; Pereira, Claubia; Carvalho, Fernando R. de; Oliveira, Arno H.

    2013-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-cooled Test Reactor HTR-10 is a 10 MW modular pebble bed type reactor, which core is filled with 27,000 spherical fuel elements, e.g. TRISO coated particles. This reactor was built by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET), Tsinghua University, China, and its first criticality was attained on December 1, 2000. The main objectives of the HTR-10 are to verify and demonstrate the technical and safety features of the modular HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) and to establish an experimental base for developing nuclear process heat applications. In this work, using the Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) 6.0, a nuclear code developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the HTR-10 first critical core is modeled by the DEN/UFMG. The K eff was obtained and compared with the reference value obtained by the Idaho National Laboratory. The result presents good agreement with experimental value. The goal is to validate the DEN/UFMG model to be applied in transmutation studies changing the fuel. (author)

  5. Numerical investigation of heat transfer in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, g.; Anghaie, S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This paper proposes a computational model for analysis of flow and heat transfer in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The formulation of the problem is based on using the axisymmetric, thin layer Navier-Stokes equations. A hybrid implicit-explicit method based on finite volume approach is used to numerically solve the governing equations. A fast converging scheme is developed to accelerate the Gauss-Siedel iterative method for problems involving the wall heat flux boundary condition. Several cases are simulated and results of temperature and pressure distribution in the core are presented. Results of a parametric analysis for the assessment of the impact of power density on the convective heat transfer rate and wall temperature are discussed. A comparative analysis is conducted to identify the Nusselt number correlation that best fits the physical conditions of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactors.

  6. Decay Heat Removal in GEN IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lap-Yan Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety goal of the current designs of advanced high-temperature thermal gas-cooled reactors (HTRs is that no core meltdown would occur in a depressurization event with a combination of concurrent safety system failures. This study focused on the analysis of passive decay heat removal (DHR in a GEN IV direct-cycle gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR which is based on the technology developments of the HTRs. Given the different criteria and design characteristics of the GFR, an approach different from that taken for the HTRs for passive DHR would have to be explored. Different design options based on maintaining core flow were evaluated by performing transient analysis of a depressurization accident using the system code RELAP5-3D. The study also reviewed the conceptual design of autonomous systems for shutdown decay heat removal and recommends that future work in this area should be focused on the potential for Brayton cycle DHRs.

  7. CORTAP: a coupled neutron kinetics-heat transfer digital computer program for the dynamic simulation of the high temperature gas cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleveland, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    CORTAP (Core Transient Analysis Program) was developed to predict the dynamic behavior of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) core under normal operational transients and postulated accident conditions. CORTAP is used both as a stand-alone component simulation and as part of the HTGR nuclear steam supply (NSS) system simulation code ORTAP. The core thermal neutronic response is determined by solving the heat transfer equations for the fuel, moderator and coolant in an average powered region of the reactor core. The space independent neutron kinetics equations are coupled to the heat transfer equations through a rapidly converging iterative technique. The code has the capability to determine conservative fuel, moderator, and coolant temperatures in the ''hot'' fuel region. For transients involving a reactor trip, the core heat generation rate is determined from an expression for decay heat following a scram. Nonlinear effects introduced by temperature dependent fuel, moderator, and coolant properties are included in the model. CORTAP predictions will be compared with dynamic test results obtained from the Fort St. Vrain reactor owned by Public Service of Colorado, and, based on these comparisons, appropriate improvements will be made in CORTAP

  8. Experience with the commissioning of helically coiled advanced gas cooled reactor boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettle, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    The paper describes aspects of the experience gained during commissioning of the helically coiled pod boilers for an advanced gas-cooled reactor. The boiler geometry is shown to be a factor contributing to gas-side and water-side convection phenomena encountered during commissioning. Detailed information on thermal performance and vibrational response was obtained from commissioning tests on specially instrumented boiler units. (author)

  9. Reference modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Plant: Concept description report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    This report provides a summary description of the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) concept and interim results of assessments of costs, safety, constructibility, operability, maintainability, and availability. Conceptual design of this concept was initiated in October 1985 and is scheduled for completion in 1987. Participating industrial contractors are Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC), GA Technologies, Inc. (GA), General Electric Co. (GE), and Combustion Engineering, Inc

  10. Mechanical properties of structural materials for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D. W.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, W. G.; Yoon, J. H.

    2011-08-01

    Structural materials for high temperature gas cooled reactor should have good properties such as mechanical properties (tensile, creep, fatigue, creep-fatigue), microstructural stability, interaction between metal and gas, friction and wear, hydrogen and tritium permeation, irradiation behavior, corrosion by impurity in He. Mechanical properties of major structural materials, such as pressure vessel, heat exchanger, control rod, were investigated. Effect of He and irradiation on these structural materials were investigated

  11. Gas-Cooled Thorium Reactor with Fuel Block of the Unified Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Shamanin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific researches of new technological platform realization carried out in Russia are based on ideas of nuclear fuel breeding in closed fuel cycle and physical principles of fast neutron reactors. Innovative projects of low-power reactor systems correspond to the new technological platform. High-temperature gas-cooled thorium reactors with good transportability properties, small installation time, and operation without overloading for a long time are considered perspective. Such small modular reactor systems at good commercial, competitive level are capable of creating the basis of the regional power industry of the Russian Federation. The analysis of information about application of thorium as fuel in reactor systems and its perspective use is presented in the work. The results of the first stage of neutron-physical researches of a 3D model of the high-temperature gas-cooled thorium reactor based on the fuel block of the unified design are given. The calculation 3D model for the program code of MCU-5 series was developed. According to the comparison results of neutron-physical characteristics, several optimum reactor core compositions were chosen. The results of calculations of the reactivity margins, neutron flux distribution, and power density in the reactor core for the chosen core compositions are presented in the work.

  12. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  13. HTGR accident and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silady, F.A.; Everline, C.J.; Houghton, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper is a synopsis of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) performed by General Atomic Company. Principal topics presented include: HTGR safety assessments, peer interfaces, safety research, process gas explosions, quantitative safety goals, licensing applications of PRA, enhanced safety, investment risk assessments, and PRA design integration

  14. Nuclear heat source component design considerations for HTGR process heat reactor plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Kapich, D.; King, J.H.; Venkatesh, M.C.

    1982-01-01

    Using alternate energy sources abundant in the U.S.A. to help curb foreign oil imports is vitally important from both national security and economic standpoints. Perhaps the most forwardlooking opportunity to realize national energy goals involves the integrated use of two energy sources that have an established technology base in the U.S.A., namely nuclear energy and coal. The coupling of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and a chemical process facility has the potential for long-term synthetic fuel production (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, hydrogen, etc.) using coal as the carbon source. Studies are in progress to exploit the high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant for nuclear process heat. The process heat plant discussed in this paper has a 1170-MW(t) reactor as the heat source and the concept is based on indirect reforming, i.e., the high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported (via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX)) to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. Emphasis is placed on design considerations for the major nuclear heat source (NHS) components, and discussions are presented for the reactor core, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), rotating machinery, and heat exchangers

  15. Nuclear design for high temperature gas cooled reactor (GTHTR300C) using MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouri, Tomoaki; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    A design study of the hydrogen cogeneration high temperature gas cooled reactor (GTHTR300C) that can produce both electricity and hydrogen has been carried out in Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The GTHTR300C is the system with thermal power of 600MW and reactor outlet temperature of 950degC, which is expected to supply the hydrogen to fuel cell vehicles after 2020s. In future, the full deployment of fast reactor cycle without natural uranium will demand the use of Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuels in the GTHTR300C. Therefore, a nuclear design was performed to confirm the feasibility of the reactor core using MOX fuels. The designed reactor core has high performance and meets safety requirements. In this paper, the outline of the GTHTR300C and the nuclear design of the reactor core using MOX fuels are described. (author)

  16. Evaluation of proposed German safety criteria for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsell, A.W.

    1980-05-01

    This work reviews proposed safety criteria prepared by the German Bundesministerium des Innern (BMI) for future licensing of gas-cooled high-temperature reactor (HTR) concepts in the Federal Republic of Germany. Comparison is made with US General Design Criteria (GDCs) in 10CFR50 Appendix A and with German light water reactor (LWR) criteria. Implications for the HTR design relative to the US design and safety approach are indicated. Both inherent characteristics and design features of the steam cycle, gas turbine, and process heat concepts are taken into account as well as generic design options such as a pebble bed or prismatic core

  17. Liquid metal versus gas cooled reactor concepts for a turbo electric powered space vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Proust, E.; Schwartz, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Recent CNES/CEA prospective studies of an orbit transfer vehicule to be launched by ARIANE V, emphasize the advantage of the Brayton cycle over the thermionics and thermoelectricity, in minimizing the total mass of 100 to 300 kWsub(e) power systems under the constraint specific to ARIANE of a radiator area limited to 95 m 2 . The review of candidate reactor concepts for this application, finally recommends both liquid metal and gas cooled reactors, for their satisfactory adaptation to a reference Brayton cycle and for the available experience from the terrestrial operation of comparable systems

  18. The Preliminary Study of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha; Izhar Abu Hussin; Ridzuan Abdul Mutalib

    2015-01-01

    High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) have attracted worldwide interest because of their high outlet temperatures, which allow them to be used for applications beyond electricity generation. HTGRs have been built and operated since as far back as the 1970s. Experimental and demonstration reactors of this type have operated in China, Great Britain, Germany, Japan, and the United States of America. This paper is written to share the valuable knowledge and information of HTGRs technology as a mean to enrich peoples understanding of the technology. This paper will present the technological features of HTGRs that allow for a modular design with inherently safe characteristics. (author)

  19. Optimisation of gas-cooled reactors with the aid of mathematical computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margen, P.H.

    1959-04-01

    Reactor optimisation is the task of finding the combination of values of the independent variables in a reactor design producing the lowest cost of electricity. In a gas-cooled reactor the number of independent variables is particularly large and the optimisation process is, therefore, laborious. The present note describes a procedure for performing the entire optimisation procedure with the aid of a mathematical computer in a single operation, thus saving time for the design staff. Detailed equations and numerical constants are proposed for the thermal and cost relations involved. The reactor physics equations, on the other hand are merely stated as general functions of the relevant variables. The task of expressing these functions as detailed equations will be covered by separate documents prepared by the reactor physics department

  20. Monte Carlo Analysis of the Battery-Type High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzki, Marcin; Darnowski, Piotr; Niewiński, Grzegorz

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents a neutronic analysis of the battery-type 20 MWth high-temperature gas cooled reactor. The developed reactor model is based on the publicly available data being an `early design' variant of the U-battery. The investigated core is a battery type small modular reactor, graphite moderated, uranium fueled, prismatic, helium cooled high-temperature gas cooled reactor with graphite reflector. The two core alternative designs were investigated. The first has a central reflector and 30×4 prismatic fuel blocks and the second has no central reflector and 37×4 blocks. The SERPENT Monte Carlo reactor physics computer code, with ENDF and JEFF nuclear data libraries, was applied. Several nuclear design static criticality calculations were performed and compared with available reference results. The analysis covered the single assembly models and full core simulations for two geometry models: homogenous and heterogenous (explicit). A sensitivity analysis of the reflector graphite density was performed. An acceptable agreement between calculations and reference design was obtained. All calculations were performed for the fresh core state.

  1. Flow-induced and acoustically induced vibration experience in operating gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halvers, L.J.

    1977-03-01

    An overview has been presented of flow-induced and acoustically induced vibration failures that occurred in the past in gas-cooled graphite-moderated reactors, and the importance of this experience for the Gas-Cooled Fast-Breeder Reactor (GCFR) project has been assessed. Until now only failures in CO 2 -cooled reactors have been found. No problems with helium-cooled reactors have been encountered so far. It is shown that most of the failures occurred because flow-induced and acoustically induced dynamic loads were underestimated, while at the same time not enough was known about the influence of environmental parameters on material behavior. All problems encountered were solved. The comparison of the influence of the gas properties on acoustically induced and flow-induced vibration phenomena shows that the interaction between reactor design and the thermodynamic properties of the primary coolant precludes a general preference for either carbon dioxide or helium. The acoustic characteristics of CO 2 and He systems are different, but the difference in dynamic loadings due to the use of one rather than the other remains difficult to predict. A slight preference for helium seems, however, to be justified

  2. Simulation of a gas cooled reactor with the system code CATHARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentivoglio, Fabrice; Ruby, Alain; Geffraye, Genevieve; Messie, Anne; Saez, Manuel; Tauveron, Nicolas; Widlund, Ola

    2006-01-01

    In recent years the CEA has commissioned a wide range of feasibility studies of future advanced nuclear reactors, in particular gas-cooled reactors (GCR). This paper presents an overview of the use of the thermohydraulics code CATHARE in these activities. Extensively validated and qualified for pressurized water reactors, CATHARE has been adapted to deal also with gas-cooled reactor applications. Rather than branching off a separate GCR version of CATHARE, new features have been integrated as independent options in the standard version of the code, respecting the same stringent procedures for documentation and maintenance. CATHARE has evolved into an efficient tool for GCR applications, with first results in good agreement with existing experimental data and other codes. The paper give an example among the studies already carried out with CATHARE with the case of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concepts. Current and future activities for experimental validation of CATHARE for GCR applications are also discussed. Short-term validation activities are also included with the assessment of the German utility Oberhausen II. For the long term, CEA has initiated an ambitious experimental program ranging from small scale loops for physical correlations to component technology and system demonstration loops. (authors)

  3. Monte Carlo Analysis of the Battery-Type High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grodzki Marcin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a neutronic analysis of the battery-type 20 MWth high-temperature gas cooled reactor. The developed reactor model is based on the publicly available data being an ‘early design’ variant of the U-battery. The investigated core is a battery type small modular reactor, graphite moderated, uranium fueled, prismatic, helium cooled high-temperature gas cooled reactor with graphite reflector. The two core alternative designs were investigated. The first has a central reflector and 30×4 prismatic fuel blocks and the second has no central reflector and 37×4 blocks. The SERPENT Monte Carlo reactor physics computer code, with ENDF and JEFF nuclear data libraries, was applied. Several nuclear design static criticality calculations were performed and compared with available reference results. The analysis covered the single assembly models and full core simulations for two geometry models: homogenous and heterogenous (explicit. A sensitivity analysis of the reflector graphite density was performed. An acceptable agreement between calculations and reference design was obtained. All calculations were performed for the fresh core state.

  4. Gas cooled fast reactor 2400 MWTh, status on the conceptual design studies and preliminary safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malo, J.Y.; Alpy, N.; Bentivoglio, F.

    2009-01-01

    The Gas cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is considered by the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique as a promising concept, combining the benefits of fast spectrum and high temperature, using Helium as coolant. A status on the GFR preliminary viability was made at the end of 2007, ending the pre-conceptual design phase. A consistent overall systems arrangement was proposed and a preliminary safety analysis based on operating transient calculations and a simplified PSA had established a global confidence in the feasibility and safety of this baseline concept. Its potential for attractive performances had been pointed out. Compare to the more mature Sodium Fast Reactor technology, no demonstrator has ever been built and the feasibility demonstration will required a longer lead time. The next main project milestone is related to the GFR viability, scheduled in 2012. The current studies consist in revisiting the reactor reference design options as selected at the end of 2007. Most of them are being consolidated by going more in depth in the analysis. Some possible alternatives are assessed. The paper will give a status on the last studies performed on the core design and corresponding neutronics and cycle performance, the Decay Heat Removal strategy and preliminary safety analysis, systems design and balance of plant... This paper is complementary to the Icapp'09 papers 9062 dealing with the Gas cooled Fast Reactor Demonstrator ALLEGRO and 9378 related to GFR transients analysis. (author)

  5. Summary of the experimental multi-purpose very high temperature gas cooled reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    The report presents the design of Multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (the Experimental VHTR) based on the second stage of detailed design which was completed on March 1984, in the from of ''An application of reactor construction permit Appendix 8''. The Experimental VHTR is designed to satisfy with the design specification for the reactor thermal output 50 MW and reactor outlet temperature 950 0 C. The adequacy of the design is also checked by the safety analysis. The planning of plant system and safety is summarized such as safety design requirements and conformance with them, seismic design and plant arrangement. Concerning with the system of the Experimental VHTR the design basis, design data and components are described in the order. (author)

  6. Experimental facilities for gas-cooled reactor safety studies. Task group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, the NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) completed a study on Nuclear Safety Research in OECD Countries: Support Facilities for Existing and Advanced Reactors (SFEAR) which focused on facilities suitable for current and advanced water reactor systems. In a subsequent collective opinion on the subject, the CSNI recommended to conduct a similar exercise for Generation IV reactor designs, aiming to develop a strategy for ' better preparing the CSNI to play a role in the planned extension of safety research beyond the needs set by current operating reactors'. In that context, the CSNI established the Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) in 2008 with the objective of providing an overview of facilities suitable for performing safety research relevant to gas-cooled reactors and sodium fast reactors. This report addresses gas-cooled reactors; a similar report covering sodium fast reactors is under preparation. The findings of the TAREF are expected to trigger internationally funded CSNI projects on relevant safety issues at the key facilities identified. Such CSNI-sponsored projects constitute a means for efficiently obtaining the necessary data through internationally co-ordinated research. This report provides an overview of experimental facilities that can be used to carry out nuclear safety research for gas-cooled reactors and identifies priorities for organizing international co-operative programmes at selected facilities. The information has been collected and analysed by a Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) as part of an ongoing initiative of the NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) which aims to define and to implement a strategy for the efficient utilisation of facilities and resources for Generation IV reactor systems. (author)

  7. Optimization of the steam generator project of a gas cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Massao

    1978-01-01

    The present work is concerned with the modeling of the primary and secondary circuits of a gas cooled nuclear reactor in order to obtain the relation between the parameters of the two cycles and the steam generator performance. The procedure allows the optimization of the steam generator, through the maximization of the plant net power, and the application of the optimal control theory of dynamic systems. The heat balances for the primary and secondary circuits are carried out simultaneously with the optimized - design parameters of the steam generator, obtained using an iterative technique. (author)

  8. Specialists' meeting on heat exchanging components of gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The objective of the Meeting sponsored by IAEA was to provide a forum for the exchange and discussion of technical information related to heat exchanging and heat conducting components for gas-cooled reactors. The technical part of the meeting covered eight subjects: Heat exchanging components for process heat applications, design and requirements, and research and development programs; Status of the design and construction of intermediate He/He exchangers; Design, construction and performance of steam generators; Metallic materials and design codes; Design and construction of valves and hot gas ducts; Description of component test facilities and test results; Manufacturing of heat exchanging components

  9. Hypothetical air ingress scenarios in advanced modular high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Considering an extremely hypothetical scenario of complete cross duct failure and unlimited air supply into the reactor vessel of a modular high temperature gas cooled ractor, it is found that the potential air inflow remains limited due to the high friction pressure drop through the active core. All incoming air will be oxidized to CO and some local external burning would be temporarily possible in such a scenario. The accident would have to continue with unlimited air supply for hundreds of hours before the core structural integrity would be jeopardized

  10. Measurement of sulphur-35 in the coolant gas of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandalls, F.J.

    1978-03-01

    Sulphur is an important element in some food chains and the release of radioactive sulphur to the environment must be closely controlled if the chemical form is such that it is available or potentially available for entering food chains. The presence of sulphur-35 in the coolant gas of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor warranted a study to assess the quantity and chemical form of the radioactive sulphur in order to estimate the magnitude of the potential environmental hazard which might arise from the release of coolant gas from Civil Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors. A combination of gas chromatographic and radiochemical analyses revealed carbonyl sulphide to be the only sulphur-35 compound present in the coolant gas of the Windscale Reactor. The concentration of carbonyl sulphide was found to lie in the range 40 to 100 x 10 -9 parts by volume and the sulphur-35 specific activity was about 20 mCi per gramme. The analytical techniques are described in detail. The sulphur-35 appears to be derived from the sulphur and chlorine impurities in the graphite. A method for the preparation of carbonyl sulphide labelled with sulphur-35 is described. (author)

  11. Analysis of Precooling Injection Transient of Steam Generator for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After a postulated design basis accident leads high temperature gas cooled reactor to emergency shutdown, steam generator still remains with high temperature level and needs to be cooled down by a precooling before reactor restarts with clearing of fault. For the large difference of coolant temperature between inlet and outlet of steam generator in normal operation, the temperature distribution on the components of steam generator is very complicated. Therefore, the temperature descending rate of the components in steam generator needs to be limited to avoid the potential damage during the precooling stage. In this paper, a pebble-bed high temperature gas cooled reactor is modeled by thermal-hydraulic system analysis code and several postulated precooling injection transients are simulated and compared to evaluate their effects, which will provide support for the precooling design. The analysis results show that enough precooling injection is necessary to satisfy the precooling requirements, and larger mass flow rate of precooling water injection will accelerate the precooling process. The temperature decrease of steam generator is related to the precooling injection scenarios, and the maximal mass flow rate of the precooling injection should be limited to avoid the excessively quick temperature change of the structures in steam generator.

  12. Gas-cooled reactor thermal-hydraulics using CAST3M and CRONOS2 codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studer, E.; Coulon, N.; Stietel, A.; Damian, F.; Golfier, H.; Raepsaet, X.

    2003-01-01

    The CEA R and D program on advanced Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR) relies on different concepts: modular High Temperature Reactor (HTR), its evolution dedicated to hydrogen production (Very High Temperature Reactor) and Gas Cooled Fast Reactors (GCFR). Some key safety questions are related to decay heat removal during potential accident. This is strongly connected to passive natural convection (including gas injection of Helium, CO 2 , Nitrogen or Argon) or forced convection using active safety systems (gas blowers, heat exchangers). To support this effort, thermal-hydraulics computer codes will be necessary tools to design, enhance the performance and ensure a high safety level of the different reactors. Accurate and efficient modeling of heat transfer by conduction, convection or thermal radiation as well as energy storage are necessary requirements to obtain a high level of confidence in the thermal-hydraulic simulations. To achieve that goal a thorough validation process has to ve conducted. CEA's CAST3M code dedicated to GCR thermal-hydraulics has been validated against different test cases: academic interaction between natural convection and thermal radiation, small scale in-house THERCE experiments and large scale High Temperature Test Reactor benchmarks such as HTTR-VC benchmark. Coupling with neutronics is also an important modeling aspect for the determination of neutronic parameters such as neutronic coefficient (Doppler, moderator,...), critical position of control rods...CEA's CAST3M and CRONOS2 computer codes allow this coupling and a first example of coupled thermal-hydraulics/neutronics calculations has been performed. Comparison with experimental data will be the next step with High Temperature Test Reactor experimental results at nominal power

  13. Effect of foundation embedment on the seismic response of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.H.; Thompson, R.W.; Charman, C.M.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of soil-structure interaction during seismic events upon the dynamic response of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor plant (HTGR) have been investigated for both surface-founded and embedded basemats. The influence from foundation embedment has been quantitatively assessed through a series of theoretical studies on plants of various sizes. The surface-founded analyses were performed using frequency-independent soil impedance parameters, while the embedded plant analyses utilized finite element models simulated on the FLUSH computer program. The seismic response of the surface-founded plants has been used to establish the standard-site design in-structure response spectra. These analyses were performed by using the linear modal formulation based on conventional soil stiffness and damping values. They serve as reference solutions to which the response data of the corresponding embedded plants are compared. In these comparison studies the responses of embedded plants were generally found to be lower than those of the corresponding surface-founded plants. Additional studies on the surface-founded plants have recently been performed by considering inelastic soil behavior. These inelastic solutions, which treat the soil as an elasto-plastic medium exhibiting hysteretic unloading-reloading characteristics in time, have reduced the response of surface-founded plants. Numerical results are presented in terms of in-structure response spectra along with other pertinent seismic load data at key levels of the plant. Analysis techniques for future studies using viscoelastic halfspace representation and inelastic finite element modeling for soil are also discussed

  14. Safety aspects of forced flow cooldown transients in modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    During some of the design basis accidents in Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (MHTGRs) the main Heat Transport System (HTS) and the Shutdown Cooling System (SCS), are assumed to have failed. Decay heat is then removed by the passive Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) only. If either forced flow cooling system becomes available during such a transient, its restart could significantly reduce the down-time. This paper uses the THATCH code to examine whether such restart, during a period of elevated core temperatures, can be accomplished within safe limits for fuel and metal component temperatures. If the reactor is scrammed, either system can apparently be restarted at any time, without exceeding any safe limits. However, under unscrammed conditions a restart of forced cooling can lead to recriticality, with fuel and metal temperatures significantly exceeding the safety limits

  15. Neutronic modeling for a Gas-cooled Fast Reactor assuming coated fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golfier, H.; Buiron, C.; Poinot, B.; Pothet, J. F.; Salavy, E.; Studer

    2004-01-01

    The modeling of gas cooled fast reactor (GCFR) with the SAPHYR system and in particular APOLLO2 code assuming coated fuel particles, was investigated. It aims to estimate the APOLLO2 code accuracy, solving the neutron transport equation in range of fast neutron reactors. A two level PIJ/SN APOLLO2 scheme is proposed in which the first level is devoted to the self-shielding and the leakage calculation on a cell configuration. The efficiency of a new treatment of adsorption and scattering rates in the self-shielding module of the multigroup transport code APOLLO2 has been evaluated. The results show that two-level scheme provides promising results with 172-group cross section libraries, which confirm the APOLLO2 scheme as a tool for reactor designs. (authors)

  16. Transient analysis of nuclear graphite oxidation for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wei; Shi Lei; Zheng Yanhua

    2014-01-01

    Graphite is widely used in the high temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble-bed modular (HTR-PM). There are about 420,000 spherical fuel elements in the reactor core. The amount of graphite matrix in the reactor is dozens of tons. In normal operating conditions or water/air ingress accident, the matrix graphite of spherical fuel element may be oxidized by air or steam. This paper developed a new graphite oxidation model, considering the graphite porosity variation with the fractional burn-off. This model also considered the effects of microstructure development during oxidation and the resulting changing of diffusivity as well as the oxidation rate. Based on this theoretical model, this paper analyzed penetration depth and the graphite transient oxidation by oxygen. In addition, this paper obtained the weight loss ratio and oxidation rate trend over time and space. (author)

  17. Review of ORNL-TSF shielding experiments for the gas-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, L.S.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Muckenthaler, F.J.; Slater, C.O.

    1982-01-01

    During the period between 1975 and 1980 a series of experiments was performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility in support of the shield design for a 300-MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Demonstration Plant. This report reviews the experiments and calculations, which included studies of: (1) neutron streaming in the helium coolant passageways in the GCFR core; (2) the effectiveness of the shield designed to protect the reactor grid plate from radiation damage; (3) the adequacy of the radial shield in protecting the PCRV (prestressed concrete reactor vessel) from radiation damage; (4) neutron streaming between abutting sections of the radial shield; and (5) the effectiveness of the exit shield in reducing the neutron fluxes in the upper plenum region of the reactor.

  18. Safety design features for current UK advanced gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yellowlees, J.M.; Cobb, E.C.

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear power stations planned for Heysham II and Torness will each have twin 660 MW(e) Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR) based on the design of those which have been operating at Hinkley Point 'B' and Hunterston 'B' since 1976. This paper has described the way in which the shutdown and cooling systems for the Heysham II and Torness AGRs have been selected in order to meet current UK safety requirements. Fault tree analyses have been used to identify the credible fault sequences, the probabilities of which have been calculated. By this means the relative importance of the various protective systems has been established and redundancy and reliability requirements identified. This systematic approach has led to a balanced design giving protection over the complete spectrum of fault sequences. Current safety requirements for thermal reactors in the UK and particular requirements in the design of the Heysham II and Torness reactors are discussed

  19. Microscopical examination of carbon deposits formed in the Windscale advanced gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livesey, D.J.; Chatwin, W.H.; Pearce, J.H.

    1980-12-01

    Methods are described of sampling and examining carbon deposits on fuel cladding in the Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor. Deposition is observed on fuel cladding in both the reactor core and experimental loops in carbon dioxide coolants containing various amounts of carbon monoxide and methane. Deposit distribution over the cladding surface indicated that nucleation is dependent on local surface conditions. Microscopical examination showed that deposit thickness increases by carbon filament growth into the coolant gas stream and that the process can be markedly influenced by metallic impurities. There is evidence that nickel can play a particularly significant role in deposition in loop experiments but similar effects have not been observed in the reactor core. (author)

  20. IAEA Coordinated Research Project on HTGR Reactor Physics, Thermal-hydraulics and Depletion Uncertainty Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bostelmann, F. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of HTGR design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. The predictive capability of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics and depletion simulations for reactor design and safety analysis can be assessed with sensitivity analysis (SA) and uncertainty analysis (UA) methods. Uncertainty originates from errors in physical data, manufacturing uncertainties, modelling and computational algorithms. (The interested reader is referred to the large body of published SA and UA literature for a more complete overview of the various types of uncertainties, methodologies and results obtained). SA is helpful for ranking the various sources of uncertainty and error in the results of core analyses. SA and UA are required to address cost, safety, and licensing needs and should be applied to all aspects of reactor multi-physics simulation. SA and UA can guide experimental, modelling, and algorithm research and development. Current SA and UA rely either on derivative-based methods such as stochastic sampling methods or on generalized perturbation theory to obtain sensitivity coefficients. Neither approach addresses all needs. In order to benefit from recent advances in modelling and simulation and the availability of new covariance data (nuclear data uncertainties) extensive sensitivity and uncertainty studies are needed for quantification of the impact of different sources of uncertainties on the design and safety parameters of HTGRs. Only a parallel effort in advanced simulation and in nuclear data improvement will be able to provide designers with more robust and well validated calculation tools to meet design target accuracies. In February 2009, the Technical Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (TWG-GCR) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommended that the proposed Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on

  1. Model-based Approach for Long-term Creep Curves of Alloy 617 for a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Gon; Yin, Song Nan; Kim, Yong Wan

    2008-01-01

    Alloy 617 is a principal candidate alloy for the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) components, because of its high creep rupture strength coupled with its good corrosion behavior in simulated HTGR-helium and its sufficient workability. To describe a creep strain-time curve well, various constitutive equations have been proposed by Kachanov-Rabotnov, Andrade, Garofalo, Evans and Maruyama, et al.. Among them, the K-R model has been used frequently, because a secondary creep resulting from a balance between a softening and a hardening of materials and a tertiary creep resulting from an appearance and acceleration of the internal or external damage processes are adequately considered. In the case of nickel-base alloys, it has been reported that a tertiary creep at a low strain range may be generated, and this tertiary stage may govern the total creep deformation. Therefore, a creep curve for nickel-based Alloy 617 will be predicted appropriately by using the K-R model that can reflect a tertiary creep. In this paper, the long-term creep curves for Alloy 617 were predicted by using the nonlinear least square fitting (NLSF) method in the K-R model. The modified K-R model was introduced to fit the full creep curves well. The values for the λ and K parameters in the modified K-R model were obtained with stresses

  2. The HTR-10 test reactor project and potential use of HTGR for non-electric application in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yuliang; Zhong Daxin; Xu Yuanhui; Wu Zhongxin

    1997-01-01

    Coal is the dominant source of energy in China. This use of coal results in two significant problems for China; it is a major burden on the train, road and waterway transportation infrastructures and it is a significant source of environmental pollution. In order to ease the problems caused by the burning of coal and to help reduce the energy supply shortage in China, national policy has directed the development of nuclear power. This includes the erection of nuclear power plants with water cooled reactors and the development of advanced nuclear reactor types, specifically, the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). The HTGR was chosen for its favorable safety features and its ability to provide high reactor outlet coolant temperatures for efficient power generation and high quality process heat for industrial applications. As the initial modular HTGR development activity within the Chinese High Technology Programme, a 10MW helium cooled test reactor is currently under construction on the site of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology northwest of Beijing. This plant features a pebble-bed helium cooled reactor with initial criticality anticipated in 1999. There will be two phases of high temperature heat utilization from the HTR-10. The first phase will utilize a reactor outlet temperature of 700 deg. C with a steam generator providing steam for a steam turbine cycle which works on an electrical/heat co-generation basis. The second phase is planned for a core outlet temperature of 900 deg. C to investigate a steam cycle/gas turbine combined cycle system with the gas turbine and the steam cycle being independently parallel in the secondary side of the plant. This paper provides a review of the technical design, licensing, safety and construction schedule for the HTR-10. It also addresses the potential uses of the HTGR for non-electric applications in China including process steam for the petrochemical industry, heavy oil recovery, coal conversion and

  3. Application of assembly module to high-temperature gas-cooled reactor full-scope simulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Sifeng; Li Fu; Ma Yuanle; Shi Lei

    2007-01-01

    According to the circumstances that exist in the reactor full-scope simulators development as long development cycle, very difficult upgrade and narrow range of applicability, a kind of new model was developed based on assembly module which root in Linux kernel and successfully applied to the design of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor full-scope simulator system. The simulation results are coincident with the experimental ones, and it indicates that the new model based on assembly module is feasible to design of high-temperature gas cooled reactor simulation system. (authors)

  4. Technologies for gas cooled reactor decommissioning, fuel storage and waste disposal. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    Gas cooled reactors (GCRs) and other graphite moderated reactors have been important part of the world's nuclear programme for the past four decades. The wide diversity in status of this very wide spectrum of plants from initial design to decommissioning was a major consideration of the International Working group on Gas Cooled Reactors which recommended IAEA to convene a Technical Committee Meeting dealing with GCR decommissioning, including spent fuel storage and radiological waste disposal. This Proceedings includes papers 25 papers presented at the Meeting in three sessions entitled: Status of Plant Decommissioning Programmes; Fuels Storage Status and Programmes; waste Disposal and decontamination Practices. Each paper is described here by a separate abstract

  5. Lessons learned from the design and operation of steam generators for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    This report presents a brief description of operating experiences related to steam generators used in high temperature gas-cooled production and test reactor systems. The descriptions were obtained from a review of published reports and papers concerning such experiences. Design philosophies applied to steam generator advanced conceptual designs are also addressed. Highlights of the important lessons learned that may be applicable to the New Production Reactor-Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (NPR-MHTGR) steam generator are presented. 19 refs., 1 tab

  6. A 50-100 kWe gas-cooled reactor for use on Mars.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Curtis D. (.)

    2006-04-01

    In the space exploration field there is a general consensus that nuclear reactor powered systems will be extremely desirable for future missions to the outer solar system. Solar systems suffer from the decreasing intensity of solar radiation and relatively low power density. Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators are limited to generating a few kilowatts electric (kWe). Chemical systems are short-lived due to prodigious fuel use. A well designed 50-100 kWe nuclear reactor power system would provide sufficient power for a variety of long term missions. This thesis will present basic work done on a 50-100 kWe reactor power system that has a reasonable lifespan and would function in an extraterrestrial environment. The system will use a Gas-Cooled Reactor that is directly coupled to a Closed Brayton Cycle (GCR-CBC) power system. Also included will be some variations on the primary design and their effects on the characteristics of the primary design. This thesis also presents a variety of neutronics related calculations, an examination of the reactor's thermal characteristics, feasibility for use in an extraterrestrial environment, and the reactor's safety characteristics in several accident scenarios. While there has been past work for space reactors, the challenges introduced by thin atmospheres like those on Mars have rarely been considered.

  7. A 50-100 kWe gas-cooled reactor for use on Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Curtis D.

    2006-01-01

    In the space exploration field there is a general consensus that nuclear reactor powered systems will be extremely desirable for future missions to the outer solar system. Solar systems suffer from the decreasing intensity of solar radiation and relatively low power density. Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators are limited to generating a few kilowatts electric (kWe). Chemical systems are short-lived due to prodigious fuel use. A well designed 50-100 kWe nuclear reactor power system would provide sufficient power for a variety of long term missions. This thesis will present basic work done on a 50-100 kWe reactor power system that has a reasonable lifespan and would function in an extraterrestrial environment. The system will use a Gas-Cooled Reactor that is directly coupled to a Closed Brayton Cycle (GCR-CBC) power system. Also included will be some variations on the primary design and their effects on the characteristics of the primary design. This thesis also presents a variety of neutronics related calculations, an examination of the reactor's thermal characteristics, feasibility for use in an extraterrestrial environment, and the reactor's safety characteristics in several accident scenarios. While there has been past work for space reactors, the challenges introduced by thin atmospheres like those on Mars have rarely been considered

  8. Transient analysis of nuclear graphite oxidation for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wei, E-mail: wxu12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn; Shi, Lei; Zheng, Yanhua

    2016-09-15

    Graphite is widely used as moderator, reflector and structural materials in the high temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble-bed modular (HTR-PM). In normal operating conditions or water/air ingress accident, the nuclear graphite in the reactor may be oxidized by air or steam. Oxidation behavior of nuclear graphite IG-110 which is used as the structural materials and reflector of HTR-PM is mainly researched in this paper. To investigate the penetration depth of oxygen in IG-110, this paper developed the one dimensional spherical oxidation model. In the oxidation model, the equations considered graphite porosity variation with the graphite weight loss. The effect of weight loss on the effective diffusion coefficient and the oxidation rate was also considered in this model. Based on this theoretical model, this paper obtained the relative concentration and local weight loss ratio profile in graphite. In addition, the local effective diffusion coefficient and oxidation rate in the graphite were also investigated.

  9. Critical evaluation of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors applicable to coal conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiewak, I.; Jones, J.E. Jr.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; DeStefano, J.R.; Delene, J.G.

    1975-12-01

    A critical review is presented of the technology and costs of very high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTRs) applicable to nuclear coal conversion. Coal conversion processes suitable for coupling to reactors are described. Vendor concepts of the VHTR are summarized. The materials requirements as a function of process temperature in the range 1400 to 2000 0 F are analyzed. Components, environmental and safety factors, economics and nuclear fuel cycles are reviewed. It is concluded that process heat supply in the range 1400 to 1500 0 F could be developed with a high degree of assurance. Process heat at 1600 0 F would require considerably more materials development. While temperatures up to 2000 0 F appear to be attainable, considerably more research and risk were involved. A demonstration plant would be required as a step in the commercialization of the VHTR

  10. Development of the IAEA’s Knowledge Preservation Portals for Fast Reactors and Gas-Cooled Reactors Knowledge Preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batra, C.; Menahem, D. Beraha; Kriventsev, V.; Monti, S.; Reitsma, F.; Grosbois, J. de; Khoroshev, M.; Gladyshev, M.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA has been carrying out a dedicated initiative on fast reactor knowledge preservation since 2003. The main objectives of the Fast Reactor Knowledge Portal (FRKP) initiative are to, a) halt the on-going loss of information related to fast reactors (FR), and b) collect, retrieve, preserve and make accessible existing data and information on FR. This portal will help in knowledge sharing, development, search and discovery, collaboration and communication of fast reactor related information. On similar lines a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor Knowledge Preservation portal project also started in 2013. Knowledge portals are capable to control and manage both publicly available as well as controlled information. The portals will not only incorporate existing set of knowledge and information, but will also provide a systemic platform for further preservation of new developments. It will include fast reactor and gas cooled reactor document repositories, project workspaces for the IAEA’s Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs), Technical Meetings (TMs), forums for discussion, etc. The portal will also integrate a taxonomy based search tool, which will help using new semantic search capabilities for improved conceptual retrieve of documents. The taxonomy complies with international web standards as defined by the W3C (World Wide Web Consortium). (author

  11. Gas-Cooled Reactor Programs. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Base-Technology Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homan, F.J.; Kasten, P.R.

    1978-07-01

    Progress in HTGR studies is reported in the following areas: fission product technology and coolant impurity effects, fueled graphite development, PCRV development, structural materials, characterization and standardization of graphite, and evaluation of the pebble-bed type HTR.

  12. Measurement of flow field in the pebble bed type high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sa Ya; Lee, Jae Young

    2008-01-01

    In this study, flow field measurement of the Pebble Bed Reactor(PBR) for the High Temperature Gascooled Reactor(HTGR) was performed. Large number of pebbles in the core of PBR provides complicated flow channel. Due to the complicated geometries, numerical analysis has been intensively made rather than experimental observation. However, the justification of computational simulation by the experimental study is crucial to develop solid analysis of design method. In the present study, a wind tunnel installed with pebbles stacked was constructed and equipped with the Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV). We designed the system scaled up to realize the room temperature condition according to the similarity. The PIV observation gave us stagnation points, low speed region so that the suspected high temperature region can be identified. With the further supplementary experimental works, the present system may produce valuable data to justify the Computational Fluid Dynamics(CFD) simulation method

  13. Perspectives of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) on effluent management and siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, T.; Cardito, J.; Cunliffe, J.

    1989-07-01

    The MHTGR is an advanced reactor concept being developed under a cooperative program involving the US Government, the utilities and the nuclear industry. The programs objective is the development of an environmentally safe, reliable, and economic nuclear power option for the USA and other nations of the world. HTGR design features, such as the ceramic fuel, helium coolant, and graphite moderator, are incorporated into the MHTGR reference plant design which incorporates four 350 MW(t) reactor modules. This papers objective is to describe those plant features, which minimize the environmental impact of MHTGR operation through efficient energy production, management of normal plant non-radioactive/radioactive effluents, and inherent characteristics and passive safety features which ensure benign plant site suitability source terms. 16 refs

  14. Status of international HTGR development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Simon, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    Programs for the development of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology over the past 30 years in eight countries are briefly described. These programs have included both government sector and industrial sector participation. The programs have produced four electricity-producing prototype/demonstration reactors, two in the United States, and two in the Federal Republic of Germany. Key design parameters for these ractors are compared with the design parameters planned for follow-on commercial-scale HTGRs. The development of HTGR technology has been enhanced by numerous cooperative agreements over the years, involving both government-sponsored national laboratories and industrial participants. Current bilateral cooperative agreements are described. A relatively new component in the HTGR international cooperation is that of multinational industrial alliances focused on supplying commercial-scale HTGR power plants. Current industrial cooperative agreements are briefly discussed

  15. Contributions to the neutronic analysis of a gas-cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-del-Campo, Cecilia, E-mail: cecilia.martin.del.campo@gmail.com [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532. Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Reyes-Ramirez, Ricardo, E-mail: ricarera@yahoo.com.mx [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532. Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Francois, Juan-Luis, E-mail: juan.luis.francois@gmail.com [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532. Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Reinking-Cejudo, Arturo G., E-mail: reinking@servidor.unam.mx [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532. Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Differences on reactivity with MCNPX and TRIPOLI-4 are negligible. > Fuel lattice and core criticality calculations were done. > A higher Doppler coefficient than coolant density coefficient. > Zirconium carbide is a better reflector than silicon carbide. > Adequate active height, radial size and reflector thickness were obtained. - Abstract: In this work the Monte Carlo codes MCNPX and TRIPOLI-4 were used to perform the criticality calculations of the fuel assembly and the core configuration of a gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) concept, currently in development. The objective is to make contributions to the neutronic analysis of a gas-cooled fast reactor. In this study the fuel assembly is based on a hexagonal lattice of fuel-pins. The materials used are uranium and plutonium carbide as fuel, silicon carbide as cladding, and helium gas as coolant. Criticality calculations were done for a fuel assembly where the axial reflector thickness was varied in order to find the optimal thickness. In order to determine the best material to be used as a reflector, in the reactor core with neutrons of high energy spectrum, criticality calculations were done for three reflector materials: zirconium carbide, silicon carbide and natural uranium. It was found that the zirconium carbide provides the best neutron reflection. Criticality calculations using different active heights were done to determine the optimal height, and the reflector thickness was adjusted. Core criticality calculations were performed with different radius sizes to determine the active radial dimension of the core. A negative temperature coefficient of reactivity was verified for the fuel. The effect on reactivity produced by changes in the coolant density was also evaluated. We present the main neutronic characteristics of a preliminary fuel and core designs for the GFR concept. ENDF-VI cross-sections libraries were used in both the MCNPX and TRIPOLI-4 codes, and we verified that the obtained

  16. Perspectives on understanding and verifying the safety terrain of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Donald E., E-mail: donald@carlsonperin.net [11221 Empire Lane, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Ball, Sydney J., E-mail: beckysyd@comcast.net [100 Greywood Place, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    The passive safety characteristics of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are conceptually well known and are largely supported by insights from past and ongoing research. This paper offers perspectives on selected issues in areas where further analysis and testing achievable within existing research and demonstration programs could help address residual uncertainties and better support the analysis of safety performance and the regulatory assessment of defense in depth. Areas considered include the evaluation of normal and anomalous core operating conditions and the analysis of accidents involving loss of forced cooling, coolant depressurization, air ingress, moisture ingress, and reactivity events. In addition to discussing associated uncertainties and potential measures to address them, this paper also proposes supplemental “safety terrain” studies that would use realistic assessments of postulated extreme event sequences to establish a more comprehensive understanding of the inherent behaviors and ultimate safety capabilities of modular HTGRs.

  17. The rate of diffusion into advanced gas cooled reactor moderator bricks: an equivalent cylinder model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyte, W.S.

    1980-01-01

    The graphite moderator bricks which make up the moderator of an advanced gas-cooled nuclear reactor (AGR) are of many different and complex shapes. Many physico-chemical processes that occur within these porous bricks include a diffusional step and thus to model these processes it is necessary to solve the diffusion equation (with chemical reaction) in a porous medium of complex shape. A finite element technique is applied to calculating the rate at which nitrogen diffuses into and out of the porous moderator graphite during operation of a shutdown procedure for an AGR. However, the finite element method suffers from several disadvantages that undermine its general usefulness for calculating rates of diffusion in AGR moderator cores. A model which overcomes some of these disadvantages is presented (the equivalent cylinder model) and it is shown that this gives good results for a variety of different boundary and initial conditions

  18. Perspectives on Understanding and Verifying the Safety Terrain of Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    The inherent safety characteristics of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are conceptually well known and are largely supported by insights from past and ongoing research. This paper offers perspectives on selected issues in areas where further analysis and testing achievable within existing research and demonstration programs could help address residual uncertainties and better support the analysis of safety performance and the regulatory assessment of defense in depth. Areas considered include the evaluation of normal and anomalous core operating conditions and the analysis of accidents involving coolant depressurization, air ingress, moisture ingress, and reactivity insertion. In addition to discussing associated uncertainties and potential measures to address them, the paper also proposes supplemental “safety terrain” studies that would use realistic assessments of postulated extreme event sequences to establish a more comprehensive understanding of the inherent behaviors and ultimate safety capabilities of modular HTGRs. (author)

  19. Digital Information Platform Design of Fuel Element Engineering For High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Yuwei

    2014-01-01

    This product line provide fuel element for high temperature gas-cooled reactor nuclear power plant which is being constructed in Shidao bay in Shandong province. Its annual productive capacity is thirty ten thousands fuel elements whose shape is spherical . Compared with pressurized water fuel , this line has the feature of high radiation .In order to reduce harm to operators, the comprehensive information platform is designed , which can realize integration of automation and management for plant. This platform include two nets, automation net using field bus technique and information net using Ethernet technique ,which realize collection ,control, storage and publish of information.By means of construction, automatization and informatization of product line can reach high level. (author)

  20. Adaptation of a robot and tools for dismantling of a gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, C.J.A.; Vibert, C.J.T.

    1989-01-01

    This report details the progress on a research programme to develop the techniques and design necessary to facilitate the use of commercially available industrial manipulator systems and cutting tools in nuclear environments, particularly that envisaged whilst decommissioning a gas-cooled reactor. The technology for the type of control and the machines to perform it already exist in the form of industrial-type robots. Development of the techniques for using these machines in a more operator-sensitive environment, together with the requirements of decontamination and radiation tolerance will enable them to be used in place of expensive purpose-built machines at a considerable cost saving. From this work it was possible to highlight the viability and associated costs of modifying a standard manipulator for use in decommissioning operations

  1. Annular flow induced vibration associated with on-load refuelling of advanced gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, M.J.H.; Hodson, D.E.; Parkin, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    On-load refuelling of Advanced Gas Cooled Reactors results in a long, slender, articulated fuel assembly being suspended within a fuel channel, up which flows the high density gaseous coolant. The gas flow in the fuel assembly-channel annulus can cause vibration of the fuel assembly. This paper reports on continuing studies of this phenomenon. In particular it outlines the latest findings on the excitation mechanism, flow instabilities in an annular diffuser; successful developments in finite element modelling of the fuel assembly vibration which now include flow effects and non linearities caused by fuel assembly-channel impact; and finally experimental demonstration of the beneficial effect of introducing friction dampers into the fuel assembly. (author)

  2. Evaluation of safety test needs for the gas cooled breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emon, D.E.; Buttemer, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    This paper deals with the process used in determining the safety test needs for the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR), reports existing tentative conclusions, and indicates the direction that the process is taking at this time. The process is based upon two ideas: (1) that the safety information needs will be identified through risk analysis directly dependent on the various design features of the GCFR and (2) that the safety program will be determined by a safety review committee. The paper limits itself to presenting thoughts on the safety test needs directly associated with the GCFR core during severe beyond design basis accident situations involving the loss of coolable core geometry. Representative event sequence diagrams are reported for the three generic classes of accidents considered. The following categories of information are identified: safety information needs, safety tests required to fulfill these information needs, and the facilities required to perform the tests

  3. Utility/user requirements for the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, V.S.; Kendall, J.M.; Gotschall, H.L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the approach used by Gas-Cooled Reactor Associates (GCRA) in developing Utility/User Requirements for the Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR). As representatives of the Utility/User industry, it is GCRA's goal that the MHTGR concept be established as an attractive nuclear option offering competitive economics and limited ownership risks. Commercially deployed MHTGR systems should then compete favorably in a mixed-fuel economy with options using fossil, other nuclear and other non-fossil sources. To achieve this goal, the design of the MHTGR plant must address the problems experienced by the U.S. industrial infrastructure during deployment of the first generation of nuclear plants. Indeed, it is GCRA's intent to utilize the characteristics of MHTGR technology for the development of a nuclear alternative that poses regulatory, financial and operational demands on the Owner/Operator that are, in aggregate, comparable to those encountered with non-nuclear options. The dominant risks faced by U.S. Utilities with current nuclear plants derive from their operational complexity and the degree of regulatory involvement in virtually all aspects of utility operations. The MHTGR approach of using ceramic fuel coatings to contain fission products provides the technical basis for simplification of the plant and stabilization of licensing requirements and thus the opportunity for reducing the risks of nuclear plant ownership. The paper describes the rationale for the selection of key requirements for public safety, plant size and performance, operations and maintenance, investment protection, economics and siting in the context of a risk management philosophy. It also describes the ongoing participation of the Utility/User in interpreting requirements, conducting program and design reviews and establishing priorities from the Owner/Operator perspective. (author). 7 refs, 1 fig

  4. Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) fuel and In-Core Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, K.D.; Sterbentz, J.; Meyer, M.; Lowden, R.; Hoffman, E.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    2004-01-01

    The Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) has been chosen as one of six candidates for development as a Generation IV nuclear reactor based on: its ability to fully utilize fuel resources; minimize or reduce its own (and other systems) actinide inventory; produce high efficiency electricity; and the possibility to utilize high temperature process heat. Current design approaches include a high temperature (2 850 C) helium cooled reactor using a direct Brayton cycle, and a moderate temperature (550 C - 650 C) helium or supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2 ) cooled reactor using direct or indirect Brayton cycles. These design choices have thermal efficiencies that approach 45% to 50%, and have turbomachinery sizes that are much more compact compared to steam plants. However, there are challenges associated with the GCFR, which are the focus of current research. This includes safety system design for decay heat removal, development of high temperature/high fluence fuels and materials, and development of fuel cycle strategies. The work presented here focuses on the fuel and preliminary in-core fuel management, where advanced ceramic-ceramic (cercer) dispersion fuels are the main focus, and average burnups to 266 M Wd/kg appear achievable for the reference Si C/(U,TRU)C block/plate fuel. Solid solution (pellet) fuel in composite ceramic clad (Si C/Si C) is also being considered, but remains as a backup due to cladding fabrication challenges, and high centerline temperatures in the fuel. (Author)

  5. Current status of research and development on instrumentation sensors for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakayama, Naoaki; Esaki, Masahiro; Ara, Katsuyuki; Yamada, Kunitaka; Ukikusa, Hiroshi.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews current status of research and development on special instrumentation sensors and some instruments for high temperature gas-cooled reactors. Main topics described are high-temperature neutron detectors for the nuclear instrumentation system, high temperature thermocouples for in-core temperature-distribution monitoring, ex-core process sensors for the reactor plant, impurity monitors in helium cooling gas, fuel failure detection method, measurement of fission product plateout and surveillance of reactor components. (author)

  6. Fundamental conceptual design of the experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimokawa, Junichi; Yasuno, Takehiko; Yasukawa, Shigeru; Mitake, Susumu; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1975-06-01

    The fundamental conceptual design of the experimental multi-purpose very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (experimental VHTR of thermal output 50 MW with reactor outlet-gas temperature 1,000 0 C) has been carried out to provide the operation modes of the system consisting of the reactor and the heat-utilization system, including characteristics and performance of the components and safety of the plant system. For the heat-utilization system of the plant, heat distribution, temperature condition, cooling system constitution, and the containment facility are specified. For the operation of plant, testing capability of the reactor and controlability of the system are taken into consideration. Detail design is made of the fuel element, reactor core, reactivity control and pressure vessel, and also the heat exchanger, steam reformer, steam generator, helium circulator, helium-gas turbine, and helium-gas purification, fuel handling, and engineered safety systems. Emphasis is placed on providing the increase of the reactor outlet-gas temperature. Fuel element design is directed to the prismatic graphite blocks of hexagonal cross-section accommodating the hollow or tubular fuel pins sheathed in graphite sleeve. The reactor core is composed of 73 fuel columns in 7 stages, concerning the reference design MK-II. Orificing is made in the upper portion of core; one orifice for every 7 fuel columns. Average core power density is 2.5 watts/cm 3 . Fuel temperature is kept below 1,300 0 C in rated power. The main components, i.e. pressure vessel, reformer, gas turbine and intermediate heat exchanger are designed in detail; the IHX is of a double-shell and helically-wound tube coils, the reformer is of a byonet tube type, and the turbine-compressor unit is of an axial flow type (turbine in 6 stages and compressor in 16 stages). (auth.)

  7. The materials programme for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor in the Federal Republic of Germany: Status of the development of high-temperature materials, integrity concept, and design codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.; Bodmann, E.; Seehafer, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    During the last 15 years, the research and development of materials for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) applications in the Federal Republic of Germany have been concentrated on the qualification of high-temperature structural alloys. Such materials are required for heat exchanger components of advanced HTGRs supplying nuclear process heat in the temperature range between 750 deg. and 950 deg. C. The suitability of the candidate alloys for service in the HTGR has been established, and continuing research is aimed at verification of the integrity of components over the envisaged service lifetimes. The special features of the HTGR which provide a high degree of safety are the use of ceramics for the core construction and the low power density of the core. The reactor integrity concept which has been developed is based on these two characteristics. Previously, technical guidelines and design codes for nuclear plants were tailored exclusively to light water reactor systems. An extensive research project was therefore initiated which led to the formulation of the basic principles on which a high temperature design code can be based. (author)

  8. Improving Fuel Cycle Design and Safety Characteristics of a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooijen, W.F.G. van

    2006-01-01

    The Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR)is one of the Generation IV reactor concepts. This concept specifically targets sustainability of nuclear power generation. In nuclear reactors fertile material is converted to fissile fuel. If the neutrons inducing fission are highly energetic, the opportunity exists to convert more than one fertile nucleus per fission, thereby effectively breeding new nuclear fuel. Reactors operating on this principle are called ‘Fast Breeder Reactor’. Since natural uranium contains 99.3%of the fertile isotope 238 U, breeding increases the energy harvested from the nuclear fuel. If nuclear energy is to play an important role as a source of energy in the future, fast breeder reactors are essential for breeding nuclear fuel. Fast neutrons are also more efficient to destruct heavy (Minor Actinide, MA) isotopes, such as Np, Am and Cm isotopes, which dominate the long-term radioactivity of nuclear waste. So the waste life-time can be shortened if the MA nuclei are destroyed. An important prerequisite of sustainable nuclear energy is the closed fuel cycle, where only fission products are discharged to a final repository, and all Heavy Metal (HM) are recycled. The reactor should breed just enough fissile material to allow refueling of the same reactor, adding only fertile material to the recycled material. Other key design choices are highly efficient power conversion using a direct cycle gas turbine, and better safety through the use of helium, a chemically inert coolant which cannot have phase changes in the reactor core. Because the envisaged core temperatures and operating conditions are similar to thermal-spectrum High Temperature Reactor (HTR) concepts, the research for this thesis initially focused on a design based on existing HTR fuel technology: coated particle fuel, assembled into fuel assemblies. It was found that such a fuel concept could not meet the Generation IV criteria set for GCFR: self-breeding is difficult, the temperature

  9. Design study of the experimental multi-purpose high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunoda, Ryokichi

    1981-01-01

    In this paper, the design study carried out since 1973 is outlined. The basic conceptual design was performed in fiscal 1973. In this design, concept was established on the total system of the experimental high temperature gas-cooled reactor including heat-utilizing system. The first conceptual design was carried out in fiscal 1974. The range of design was limited to the experimental reactor and its direct heat-removing system. The part 2 of the first conceptual design was performed in fiscal 1975, and the system design concerning the plant characteristics was made. The part 1 of the adjustment design was carried out in fiscal 1976, and the subject was the adjustment design of plant systems. The part 2 was performed in fiscal 1977, and the characteristics of plant control system were analyzed. In fiscal 1978, the analysis of flow characteristics in the core was made. The integrated system design was carried out in fiscal 1979, and the design of the total plant system except heat-utilizing system was started again. The part 1 of the detailed design was performed in fiscal 1980, and in addition, the possibility of increasing power output was examined. The construction cost of the experimental reactor plant estimated in 1979 was far higher than that in 1973. (Kako, I.)

  10. A heterogeneous model for burnup calculation in high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perfetti, C. M.; Angahie, S.; Baxter, A.; Ellis, C.

    2008-01-01

    A high resolution MCNPX model is developed to simulate nuclear design characteristics and fuel cycle features of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Contrary to the conventional approach in the MCNPX model, fuel regions containing TRISO particles are not homogenized. A cube corner distribution approximation is used to directly model randomly dispersed TRISO fuel particles in a graphite matrix. The universe filling technique is used cover the entire range of fuel particles in the core. The heterogeneous MCNPX model is applied to simulate and analyze the complete fuel cycle of the General Atomics Plutonium-Consumption Modular Helium Reactor (PC-MHR). The PC-MHR reactor design is a variation of the General Atomic MHR design and is designed for the consumption or burning of excess Russian weapons plutonium. The MCNPX burnup calculation of the PC-MHR includes the simulation of a 260 effective full-power day fuel cycle at 600 MWt. Results of the MCNPX calculations suggest that during 260 effective full-power day cycle, 40% reduction in the whole core Pu-239 inventory could be achieved. Results of heterogeneous MCNPX burnup calculations in PC-MHR are compared with results of deterministically calculated values obtained from DIF3D codes. For the 260 effective full-power day cycle, the difference in mass Pu-239 mass reduction calculation using heterogeneous MCNPX and homogeneous DIF3D models is 6%. The difference in MCNPX and DIF3D calculated results for higher actinides are mostly higher than 6%. (authors)

  11. Real time thermal hydraulic model for high temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Zhe; Sun Jun; Ma Yuanle; Zhang Ruipeng

    2013-01-01

    A real-time thermal hydraulic model of the reactor core was described and integrated into the simulation system for the high temperature gas-cooled pebble bed reactor nuclear power plant, which was developed in the vPower platform, a new simulation environment for nuclear and fossil power plants. In the thermal hydraulic model, the helium flow paths were established by the flow network tools in order to obtain the flow rates and pressure distributions. Meanwhile, the heat structures, representing all the solid heat transfer elements in the pebble bed, graphite reflectors and carbon bricks, were connected by the heat transfer network in order to solve the temperature distributions in the reactor core. The flow network and heat transfer network were coupled and calculated in real time. Two steady states (100% and 50% full power) and two transients (inlet temperature step and flow step) were tested that the quantitative comparisons of the steady results with design data and qualitative analysis of the transients showed the good applicability of the present thermal hydraulic model. (authors)

  12. Helium circulator design concepts for the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Nichols, M.K.; Kaufman, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Two helium circulators are featured in the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) power plant - (1) the main circulator, which facilitates the transfer of reactor thermal energy to the steam generator, and (2) a small shutdown cooling circulator that enables rapid cooling of the reactor system to be realized. The 3170 kW(e) main circulator has an axial flow compressor, the impeller being very similar to the unit in the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) plant. The 164 kW(e) shutdown cooling circulator, the design of which is controlled by depressurized conditions, has a radial flow compressor. Both machines are vertically oriented, have submerged electric motor drives, and embody rotors that are supported on active magnetic bearings. As outlined in this paper, both machines have been conservatively designed based on established practice. The circulators have features and characteristics that have evolved from actual plant operating experience. With a major goal of high reliability, emphasis has been placed on design simplicity, and both machines are readily accessible for inspection, repair, and replacement, if necessary. In this paper, conceptual design aspects of both machines are discussed, together with the significant technology bases. As appropriate for a plant that will see service well into the 21st century, new and emerging technologies have been factored into the design. Examples of this are the inclusion of active magnetic bearings, and an automated circulator condition monitoring system. (author). 18 refs, 20 figs, 13 tabs

  13. Gas Cooled Fast Reactor Research and Development in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Stainsby

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR research is directed towards fulfilling the ambitious goals of Generation IV (Gen IV, that is, to develop a safe, sustainable, reliable, proliferation-resistant and economic nuclear energy system. The research is directed towards developing the GFR as an economic electricity generator, with good safety and sustainability characteristics. Fast reactors maximise the usefulness of uranium resources by breeding plutonium and can contribute to minimising both the quantity and radiotoxicity nuclear waste by actinide transmutation in a closed fuel cycle. Transmutation is particularly effective in the GFR core owing to its inherently hard neutron spectrum. Further, GFR is suitable for hydrogen production and process heat applications through its high core outlet temperature. As such GFR can inherit the non-electricity applications that will be developed for thermal high temperature reactors in a sustainable manner. The Euratom organisation provides a route by which researchers in all European states, and other non-European affiliates, can contribute to the Gen IV GFR system. This paper summarises the achievements of Euratom's research into the GFR system, starting with the 5th Framework programme (FP5 GCFR project in 2000, through FP6 (2005 to 2009 and looking ahead to the proposed activities within the 7th Framework Programme (FP7.

  14. Remote handling equipment for the decommissioning of the Windscale Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, A.; Birss, I.R.; Fish, G.

    1984-01-01

    A decision to decommission the Windscale Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor was taken shortly after reactor shutdown in 1981. The fuel has now been discharged and the decommissioning programme will last about 10-12 years. The paper describes the programme and objectives and deals with methods of handling and disposing of the radioactive waste material. The main new facility required is a Waste Packaging Building adjacent to the existing reactor in which the waste boxes will be filled, active waste encapsulated in concrete and the boxes cleaned, swabbed and monitored to comply with IAEA transport regulations. The handling machine concept and features are described. The assaying and packaging of the waste material, the control of box movement and the process of concrete encapsulation is described. The paper concludes with a description of the development programme to support the Project. The tasks include a study of cutting techniques, production and control of dust and smoke, viewing and lighting methods, filtration, decontamination and fixing of contamination

  15. Eighth meeting of the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors Vienna, 30 January - 1 February 1989. Summary report. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The Eighth Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors was held in Vienna, Austria, from 30 January - 1 February, 1989. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes in the field of Gas-Cooled Reactors and other presentations at the Meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Proposals of new basic concepts on safety and radioactive waste and of new High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor based on these basic concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Masuro, E-mail: ogawa.masuro@jaea.go.jp

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The author proposed new basic concepts on safety and radioactive waste. • A principle of ‘continue confining’ to realize the basic concept on safety is also proposed. • It is indicated that only a HTGR can attain the conditions required from the principle. • Technologies to realize the basic concept on radioactive waste are also discussed. • A New HTGR system based on the new basic concepts is proposed. - Abstract: A new basic concept on safety of ‘Not causing any serious catastrophe by any means’ and a new basic concept on radioactive waste of ‘Not returning any waste that possibly affects the environment’ are proposed in the present study, aiming at nuclear power plants which everybody can accept, in consideration of the serious catastrophe that happened at Fukushima Japan in 2011. These new basic concepts can be found to be valid in comparison with basic concepts on safety and waste in other industries. The principle to realize the new basic concept on safety is, as known well as the inherent safety, to use physical phenomena such as Doppler Effect and so on which never fail to work even if all equipment and facilities for safety lose their functions. In the present study, physical phenomena are used to ‘continue confining’, rather than ‘confine’, because the consequence of emission of radioactive substances to the environment cannot be mitigated. To ‘continue confining’ is meant to apply natural correction to fulfill inherent safety function. Fission products must be detoxified to realize the new basic concept on radioactive waste, aiming at the final processing and disposal of radioactive wastes as same as that in the other wastes such as PCB, together with much efforts not to produce radioactive wastes and to reduce their volume nevertheless if they are emitted. Technology development on the detoxification is one of the most important subjects. A new High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor, namely the New HTGR

  17. Proposals of new basic concepts on safety and radioactive waste and of new High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor based on these basic concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Masuro

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The author proposed new basic concepts on safety and radioactive waste. • A principle of ‘continue confining’ to realize the basic concept on safety is also proposed. • It is indicated that only a HTGR can attain the conditions required from the principle. • Technologies to realize the basic concept on radioactive waste are also discussed. • A New HTGR system based on the new basic concepts is proposed. - Abstract: A new basic concept on safety of ‘Not causing any serious catastrophe by any means’ and a new basic concept on radioactive waste of ‘Not returning any waste that possibly affects the environment’ are proposed in the present study, aiming at nuclear power plants which everybody can accept, in consideration of the serious catastrophe that happened at Fukushima Japan in 2011. These new basic concepts can be found to be valid in comparison with basic concepts on safety and waste in other industries. The principle to realize the new basic concept on safety is, as known well as the inherent safety, to use physical phenomena such as Doppler Effect and so on which never fail to work even if all equipment and facilities for safety lose their functions. In the present study, physical phenomena are used to ‘continue confining’, rather than ‘confine’, because the consequence of emission of radioactive substances to the environment cannot be mitigated. To ‘continue confining’ is meant to apply natural correction to fulfill inherent safety function. Fission products must be detoxified to realize the new basic concept on radioactive waste, aiming at the final processing and disposal of radioactive wastes as same as that in the other wastes such as PCB, together with much efforts not to produce radioactive wastes and to reduce their volume nevertheless if they are emitted. Technology development on the detoxification is one of the most important subjects. A new High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor, namely the New HTGR

  18. The modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neylan, A.J.; Millunzi, A.C.; Graf, D.V.

    1988-01-01

    The MHTGR is an advanced nuclear reactor concept being developed in the USA, under a cooperative program involving the U.S. Government, the nuclear industry, and the utilities. As its objective, this program is developing a safe, reliable, and economic nuclear power option for the USA, and the other nations of the world to consider in meeting their individual national electrical generation or process heat needs by the turn of the century. The design is based on a concept of modularization that can meet the various power needs by combining any number of 350 MW(t) reactor modules in parallel with a selected number of turbine plants in a variety of arrangements. Basic HTGR features of ceramic fuel, helium coolant, and graphite are sized and configured to provide a low power density core with passive safety features such that no operator action or external source of power is needed for the plant to meet 10CFR100 or Protective Action Guidelines limits at the 425 m site boundary. This precludes the necessity to plan for the evacuation or sheltering of the public during any licensing basis event. The safe behavior of the reactor plant is not dependent upon operator action and it is insensitive to operator error. The Conceptual Design is presently being vigorously reviewed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A safety evaluation report and a licensability statement are scheduled for issuance by the NRC in January 1988. (orig.)

  19. Design of small gas cooled fast reactor with two region of natural Uranium fuel fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Khairurrijal, Monado, Fiber; Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Sinsuke

    2012-06-01

    A design study of small Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with two region fuel has been performed. In this study, design GCFR with Helium coolant which can be continuously operated by supplying mixed Natural Uranium without fuel enrichment plant or fuel reprocessing plant. The active reactor cores are divided into two region fuel i.e. 60% fuel fraction of Natural Uranium as inner core and 65% fuel fraction of Natural Uranium as outer core. Each fuel core regions are subdivided into ten parts (region-1 until region-10) with the same volume in the axial direction. The fresh Natural Uranium initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 filled by fresh Natural Uranium. This concept is basically applied to all regions in both cores area, i.e. shifted the core of ith region into i+1 region after the end of 10 years burn-up cycle. For the next cycles, we will add only Natural Uranium on each region-1. The burn-up calculation is performed using collision probability method PIJ (cell burn-up calculation) in SRAC code which then given eight energy group macroscopic cross section data to be used in two dimensional R-Z geometry multi groups diffusion calculation in CITATION code. This reactor can results power thermal 600 MWth with average power density i.e. 80 watt/cc. After reactor start-up the operation, furthermore reactor only needs Natural Uranium supply for continue operation along 100 years. This calculation result then compared with one region fuel design i.e. 60% and 65% fuel fraction. This core design with two region fuel fraction can be an option for fuel optimization.

  20. Single phase and two phase erosion corrosion in broilers of gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, G.S.; Fountain, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    Erosion-corrosion is a phenomenon causing metal wastage in a variety of locations in water and water-steam circuits throughout the power generation industry. Erosion-corrosion can occur in a number of regions of the once-through boiler designs used in the later Magnox and AGR type of gas cooled nuclear reactor. This paper will consider two cases of erosion-corrosion damage (single and two phase) in once through boilers of gas cooled reactors and will describe the solutions that have been developed. The single phase problem is associated with erosion-corrosion damage of mild steel downstream of a boiler inlet flow control orifice. With metal loss rates of up to 1 mm/year at 150 deg. C and pH in the range 9.0-9.4 it was found that 5 μg/kg oxygen was sufficient to reduce erosion-corrosion rates to less than 0.02 mm/year. A combined oxygen-ammonia-hydrazine feedwater regime was developed and validated to eliminate oxygen carryover and hence give protection from stress corrosion in the austenitic section of the AGR once through boiler whilst still providing erosion-corrosion control. Two phase erosion-corrosion tube failures have occurred in the evaporator of the mild steel once through boilers of the later Magnox reactors operating at pressures in the range 35-40 bar. Rig studies have shown that amines dosed in the feedwater can provide a significant reduction in metal loss rates and a tube lifetime assessment technique has been developed to predict potential tube failure profiles in a fully operational boiler. The solutions identified for both problems have been successfully implemented and the experience obtained following implementation including any problems or other benefits arising from the introduction of the new regimes will be presented. Methods for monitoring and evaluating the efficiency of the solutions have been developed and the results from these exercises will also be discussed. Consideration will also be given to the similarities in the metal loss

  1. Modeling and performance of the MHTGR [Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] reactor cavity cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1990-04-01

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) of the Modular High- Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy is designed to remove the nuclear afterheat passively in the event that neither the heat transport system nor the shutdown cooling circulator subsystem is available. A computer dynamic simulation for the physical and mathematical modeling of and RCCS is described here. Two conclusions can be made form computations performed under the assumption of a uniform reactor vessel temperature. First, the heat transferred across the annulus from the reactor vessel and then to ambient conditions is very dependent on the surface emissivities of the reactor vessel and RCCS panels. These emissivities should be periodically checked to ensure the safety function of the RCCS. Second, the heat transfer from the reactor vessel is reduced by a maximum of 10% by the presence of steam at 1 atm in the reactor cavity annulus for an assumed constant in the transmission of radiant energy across the annulus can be expected to result in an increase in the reactor vessel temperature for the MHTGR. Further investigation of participating radiation media, including small particles, in the reactor cavity annulus is warranted. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  2. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor safety studies. Progress report for January 1, 1974--June 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, T.E.; Sanders, J.P.; Kasten, P.R.

    1977-07-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: systems and safety analysis; fission product technology; primary coolant technology; seismic and vibration technology; confinement components; primary system materials technology; safety instrumentation; loss of flow accident analysis using HEATUP code; use of coupled-conduction-convection model for core thermal analysis; development of multichannel conduction-convection program HEXEREI; cooling system performance after shutdown; core auxiliary cooling system performance; development of FLODIS code; air ingress into primary systems following DBDA; performance of PCRV thermal barrier cover plates; temperature limits for fuel particle coating failure; tritium distribution and release in HTGR; energy release to PCRV during DBDA; and mathematical models for HTGR reactor safety studies

  3. Gas cooled fast reactor materials: compatibility and reaction kinetics of fuel/matrices couples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechelle, J.; Aufore, L.; Basini, V.; Belin, R.; Vaudez, S.

    2004-01-01

    Fourth Generation Gas cooled Fast Reactor concept implies a fast neutron spectrum and aims to lead to an iso-generation of minor actinides. Criteria have been defined for these fuels such as: high core filling factor, efficient fuel cooling, low operation temperature, i.e. 400-850 deg C, good fission product retention, burn-ups in the range of 5-8 atom%, Pu content in the range of 15-25%. Materials matching this demand are considered: mixed uranium - plutonium nitrides and carbides as fuels, whereas TiN, TiC, ZrN, ZrC, SiC are investigated as inert matrices. Thermo-chemical compatibility studies have been carried out, mostly for (U,Pu)N/SiC and (U,Pu)N/TiN couples. They have been associated to matching diffusional studies. For the first studies, accidental reactor conditions have been chosen (1600 deg C) so as to select a couple. Results are presented in terms of nature and quantity of resulting phases identified by XRD and SEM for thermodynamical equilibrium experiments. (authors)

  4. The design status of the United States Department of Energy modular high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Raymond R. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is being designed using a systems engineering approach referred to as the integrated approach. The top level requirement for the plant is that it provides safe, reliable, economical energy. The safety requirements are established by the U.S. Licensing Authorities, principally the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The reliability and economic requirements associated with the top level functions have been established in close coordination and cooperation with the electrical utilities and other potential users, and the nuclear supply industry. The integrated approach uses functional analysis to define the functions and sub-functions for the plant and to identify quantitatively how the various functions must be fulfilled. The top four functions associated with the MHTGR are: maintain safe plant operation; maintain plant protection; maintain control of radionuclide release; maintain emergency preparedness. In addition to meeting all U.S. Regulatory Requirements this advanced reactor concept is being designed to meet the following requirements: do not require sheltering or evacuating of anyone outside the plant boundary of 425 meters as a result of normal or abnormal plant operation; do not require operator action in order to accomplish the above sheltering and evacuation objectives and the design must be insensitive to operator errors; utilize inherent characteristics of materials to develop passive safety features; provide very long times for corrective actions following the initiation of an abnormal event before plant damage would be incurred

  5. Sensitivity analysis of an Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor control rod model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, M.; Green, P.L.; O’Driscoll, D.; Worden, K.; Sims, N.D.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A model was made of the AGR control rod mechanism. • The aim was to better understand the performance when shutting down the reactor. • The model showed good agreement with test data. • Sensitivity analysis was carried out. • The results demonstrated the robustness of the system. - Abstract: A model has been made of the primary shutdown system of an Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor nuclear power station. The aim of this paper is to explore the use of sensitivity analysis techniques on this model. The two motivations for performing sensitivity analysis are to quantify how much individual uncertain parameters are responsible for the model output uncertainty, and to make predictions about what could happen if one or several parameters were to change. Global sensitivity analysis techniques were used based on Gaussian process emulation; the software package GEM-SA was used to calculate the main effects, the main effect index and the total sensitivity index for each parameter and these were compared to local sensitivity analysis results. The results suggest that the system performance is resistant to adverse changes in several parameters at once.

  6. A UKAEA review of gas-cooled reactors in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, E.C.; Knowles, A.N.

    1983-01-01

    The commercial use of nuclear power for electrical generation commenced in the UK in the 1950s with the Calder Hall reactors. Based on this concept, eighteen commercial reactor units, with two further units outside the UK, were constructed and have been in operation for periods ranging from 10 to 19 years. The paper reviews this experience mainly from the aspects of safety and the achieved costs, which compare favourably with current figures for fossil fired generation. The further development of the gas-cooled system in the UK commenced with the construction of the Windscale AGR, which came into operation in 1962. This led to the ordering of 14 large commercial AGR units, 4 of which have been in service since 1976, 6 are at an advanced stage of construction and 4 are at an early stage of construction. The paper reviews the main safety features of the AGR and considers the costs, taking achieved costs for the units which are in service and a combination of historical costs and projected costs for the units under construction. Again a clear advantage over fossil fuelled stations is shown. The paper also includes a preliminary account of the use of the prototype AGR at Windscale for the series of experiments concerning plateout, over-temperature in the fuel and simulated fault transients in the core which were carried out earlier in 1981. (author)

  7. Procedure of Active Residual Heat Removal after Emergency Shutdown of High-Temperature-Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingtuan Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available After emergency shutdown of high-temperature-gas-cooled reactor, the residual heat of the reactor core should be removed. As the natural circulation process spends too long period of time to be utilized, an active residual heat removal procedure is needed, which makes use of steam generator and start-up loop. During this procedure, the structure of steam generator may suffer cold/heat shock because of the sudden load of coolant or hot helium at the first few minutes. Transient analysis was carried out based on a one-dimensional mathematical model for steam generator and steam pipe of start-up loop to achieve safety and reliability. The results show that steam generator should be discharged and precooled; otherwise, boiling will arise and introduce a cold shock to the boiling tubes and tube sheet when coolant began to circulate prior to the helium. Additionally, in avoiding heat shock caused by the sudden load of helium, the helium circulation should be restricted to start with an extreme low flow rate; meanwhile, the coolant of steam generator (water should have flow rate as large as possible. Finally, a four-step procedure with precooling process of steam generator was recommended; sensitive study for the main parameters was conducted.

  8. Nonlinear Adaptive Power-Level Control for Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhe

    2013-04-01

    After the Fukushima nuclear accident, much more attention has to be drawn on the safety issues. The improvement of safety has already become the focus of the developing trend of the nuclear energy systems. Due to the inherent safety feature and the potential economic competitiveness, the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) has been seen as the central part of the next generation of nuclear plant (NGNP). Power-level control is one of the key techniques that guarantee the safe, stable and efficient operation for nuclear reactors. Since the MHTGR dynamics has the features of strong nonlinearity and uncertainty, in order to improve the operation performance, it is meaningful to develop the nonlinear adaptive power-level control law for the MHTGR. Based on using the natural dynamic features beneficial to system stabilization, a novel nonlinear adaptive power-level control is given for the MHTGR in this paper. It is theoretically proved that this newly-built controller does not only provide globally asymptotic closed-loop stability but is also adaptive to the system uncertainty. This control law is then applied to the power-level regulation of the pebble-bed MHTGR of the HTR-PM power plant. Numerical simulation results show the feasibility of this control law and the relationship between the performance and controller parameters.

  9. Coupling of Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with Supercritical Rankine Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shutang Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents investigations on the possible combination of modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR technology with the supercritical (SC steam turbine technology and the prospective deployments of the MHTGR SC power plant. Energy conversion efficiency of steam turbine cycle can be improved by increasing the main steam pressure and temperature. Investigations on SC water reactor (SCWR reveal that the development of SCWR power plants still needs further research and development. The MHTGR SC plant coupling the existing technologies of current MHTGR module design with operation experiences of SC FPP will achieve high cycle efficiency in addition to its inherent safety. The standard once-reheat SC steam turbine cycle and the once-reheat steam cycle with life-steam have been studied and corresponding parameters were computed. Efficiencies of thermodynamic processes of MHTGR SC plants were analyzed, while comparisons were made between an MHTGR SC plant and a designed advanced passive PWR - AP1000. It was shown that the net plant efficiency of an MHTGR SC plant can reach 45% or above, 30% higher than that of AP1000 (35% net efficiency. Furthermore, an MHTGR SC plant has higher environmental competitiveness without emission of greenhouse gases and other pollutants.

  10. The licensing experience of the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silady, F.A.; Cunliffe, J.C.; Walker, L.P.

    1991-01-01

    The MHTGR is an advanced reactor concept being developed under a cooperative program involving the US Government, the nuclear industry, and the utilities. The design utilizes the basic HTGR features of ceramic fuel, helium coolant, and a graphite moderator. However, the specific size and configuration are selected to utilize the inherent characteristics of these materials to develop passive safety features that provide a significantly higher margin of safety than current generation reactors. The design meets the US Environmental Protection Agency's Protective Action Guidelines at the site boundary, hence precluding the need for sheltering or evacuation of the public during any licensing basis event. This safe behavior is not dependent upon operator action and is insensitive to operator error. The MHTGR Licensing Plan agreed to with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is discussed with particular attention to the framework of the preapplication review. The objective and scope of each key document prepared for the NRC review is presented. A summary is provided of the safety response to events challenging the functions relied on to retain radionuclides within the coated fuel particles. The regulatory interaction process and results are discussed through the NRC staff, NRC contractor, and ACRS reviews. (author)

  11. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Lessons Learned Applicable to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M. Beck; L. F. Pincock

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify possible issues highlighted by these lessons learned that could apply to the NGNP in reducing technical risks commensurate with the current phase of design. Some of the lessons learned have been applied to the NGNP and documented in the Preconceptual Design Report. These are addressed in the background section of this document and include, for example, the decision to use TRISO fuel rather than BISO fuel used in the Peach Bottom reactor; the use of a reactor pressure vessel rather than prestressed concrete found in Fort St. Vrain; and the use of helium as a primary coolant rather than CO2. Other lessons learned, 68 in total, are documented in Sections 2 through 6 and will be applied, as appropriate, in advancing phases of design. The lessons learned are derived from both negative and positive outcomes from prior HTGR experiences. Lessons learned are grouped according to the plant, areas, systems, subsystems, and components defined in the NGNP Preconceptual Design Report, and subsequent NGNP project documents.

  12. The licensing experinece of the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silady, F.A.; Cunliffe, J.C.; Walker, L.P.

    1988-09-01

    The MHTGR is an advanced reactor concept being developed under a cooperative program involving the US Government, the nuclear industry, and the utilities. The design utilizes the basic HTGR features of ceramic fuel, helium coolant, and a graphite moderator. However, the specific size and configuration are selected to utilize the inherent characteristics of these materials to develop passive safety features that provide a significantly higher margin of safety than current generation reactors. The design meets the US Environmental Protection Agency's Protective Action Guidelines at the site boundary, hence precluding the need for sheltering or vacation of the public during any licensing basis event. This safe behavior is not dependent upon operator action and is insensitive to operator error. The MHTGR Licensing Plan agreed to with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is discussed with particular attention to the framework of the preapplication review. The objective and scope of each key document prepared for the NRC review is presented. A summary is provided of the safety response to events challenging the functions relied on to retain radionuclides within the coated fuel particles. The regulatory interaction process and results are discussed through the NRC staff, NRC contractor, and ACRS reviews. 11 refs., 3 figs

  13. The licensing experience of the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silady, F.A.; Cunliffe, J.C.; Walker, L.P.

    1989-01-01

    The MHTGR is an advanced reactor concept being developed under a cooperative program involving the U.S. Government, the nuclear industry, and the utilities. The design utilizes the basic HTGR features of ceramic fuel, helium coolant, and a graphite moderator. However, the specific size and configuration are selected to utilize the inherent characteristics of these materials to develop passive safety features that provide a significantly higher margin of safety than current generation reactors. The design meets the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Protective Action Guidelines at the site boundary, hence precluding the need for sheltering or evacuation of the public during any licensing basis event. This safe behavior is not dependent upon operator action and is insensitive to operator error. The MHTGR Licensing Plan agreed to with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is discussed with particular attention to the framework of the preapplication review. The objective and scope of each key document prepared for the NRC review is presented. A summary is provided of the safety response to events challenging the functions relied on to retain radionuclides within the coated fuel particles. The regulatory interaction process and results are discussed through the NRC staff, NRC contractor, and ACRS reviews. (author). 11 refs, 3 figs

  14. The decommissioning of commercial magnox gas cooled reactor power stations in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, G.

    1998-01-01

    There are nine commercial Magnox gas-cooled reactor power stations in the United Kingdom. Three of these stations have been shutdown and are being decommissioning, and plans have also been prepared for the eventual decommissioning of the remaining operational stations. The preferred strategy for the decommissioning of the Magnox power stations has been identified as 'Safestore' in which the decommissioning activities are carried out in a number of steps separated by quiescent periods of care and maintenance. The final clearance of the site could be deferred for up to 135 years following station shutdown so as to obtain maximum benefit from radioactive decay. The first step in the decommissioning strategy is to defuel the reactors and transport all spent and new fuel off the site. This work has been completed at all three shutdown stations. Decommissioning work is continuing on the three sites and has involved activities such as dismantling, decontamination, recycling and disposal of some plant and structures, and the preparation of others for retention on the site for a period of care and maintenance. Significant experience has been gained in the practical application of decommissioning, with successful technologies and processes being identified for a wide range of activities. For example, large and small metallic and concrete structures, some with complex geometries, have been successfully decontaminated. Also, the reactors have been prepared for a long period of care and maintenance, with instrumentation and sampling systems having been installed to monitor their continuing integrity. All of this work has been done under careful safety, technical, and financial control. (author)

  15. Gas cooled fast breeder reactor design for a circulator test facility (modified HTGR circulator test facility)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    A GCFR helium circulator test facility sized for full design conditions is proposed for meeting the above requirements. The circulator will be mounted in a large vessel containing high pressure helium which will permit testing at the same power, speed, pressure, temperature and flow conditions intended in the demonstration plant. The electric drive motor for the circulator will obtain its power from an electric supply and distribution system in which electric power will be taken from a local utility. The conceptual design decribed in this report is the result of close interaction between the General Atomic Company (GA), designer of the GCFR, and The Ralph M. Parson Company, architect/engineer for the test facility. A realistic estimate of total project cost is presented, together with a schedule for design, procurement, construction, and inspection.

  16. A global model for gas cooled reactors for the Generation-4: application to the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limaiem, I.

    2006-12-01

    Gas cooled high temperature reactor (HTR) belongs to the new generation of nuclear power plants called Generation IV. The Generation IV gathers the entire future nuclear reactors concept with an effective deployment by 2050. The technological choices relating to the nature of the fuel, the moderator and the coolant as well as the annular geometry of the core lead to some physical characteristics. The most important of these characteristics is the very strong thermal feedback in both active zone and the reflectors. Consequently, HTR physics study requires taking into account the strong coupling between neutronic and thermal hydraulics. The work achieved in this Phd consists in modeling, programming and studying of the neutronic and thermal hydraulics coupling system for block type gas cooled HTR. The coupling system uses a separate resolution of the neutronic and thermal hydraulics problems. The neutronic scheme is a double level Transport (APOLLO2) /Diffusion (CRONOS2) scheme respectively on the scale of the fuel assembly and a reactor core scale. The thermal hydraulics model uses simplified Navier Stokes equations solved in homogeneous porous media in code CAST3M CFD code. A generic homogenization model is used to calculate the thermal hydraulics parameters of the porous media. A de-homogenization model ensures the link between the porous media temperatures of the temperature defined in the neutronic model. The coupling system is made by external procedures communicating between the thermal hydraulics and neutronic computer codes. This Phd thesis contributed to the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) physics studies. In this field, we studied the VHTR core in normal operating mode. The studies concern the VHTR core equilibrium cycle with the control rods and using the neutronic and thermal hydraulics coupling system. These studies allowed the study of the equilibrium between the power, the temperature and Xenon. These studies open new perspective for core

  17. Interim Status Report on the Design of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, K. D.

    2005-01-01

    Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with on outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in participating in research related to the development of the GFR. These are Euratom (European Commission), France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Of these, Euratom (including the United Kingdom), France, and Japan have active research activities with respect to the GFR. The research includes GFR design and safety, and fuels/in-core materials/fuel cycle projects. This report outlines the current design status of the GFR, and includes work done in the areas mentioned above

  18. Technology assessment HTR. Part 5. Thorium fueled High Temperature gas cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bultman, J.H.

    1996-06-01

    Thorium as a fertile fuel component for the High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTR) instead of uranium has been reviewed. The use of thorium is generally believed to be more in agreement with philosophies of sustainability, low actinide waste production, and non-proliferation. The HTR is considered because of the inherent safety features, which excludes fuel melting due to decay heat during loss of coolant accidents. It has been concluded that the use of thorium might be beneficial to reduce the actinide waste production. Preferably, uranium has to be recycled and extra fissile material has to be used in the form of highly-enriched uranium. This is in contradiction with the current doctrines of non-proliferation, although the safeguard ability of highly-enriched uranium is generally accepted to be possible. A self-sustaining fuel cycle might be possible in the HTR, but this could reduce the inherent safety features of the design and it could lead to higher proliferation risks and fuel cycle costs. To obtain breeding in an HTR, a larger core size is necessary, which will reduce the passive cooling capabilities. The higher proliferation risks are due to the occurrence of the fissile U-233 in the fuel cycle. This can be prevented by diluting this fissile material with U-238, but this will change the thorium fuel cycle slowly into a fuel cycle containing mainly U-238 instead of Th-232. 6 figs., 8 tabs., 16 refs

  19. Thermochemical Analysis of Gas-Cooled Reactor Fuels Containing Am and Pu Oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemer, T.B.

    2002-01-01

    Literature values and estimated data for the thermodynamics of the actinide oxides and fission products are applied to explain the chemical behavior in gas-cooled-reactor fuels. Emphasis is placed on the Am-O-C and Pu-O-C systems and the data are used to plot the oxygen chemical potential versus temperature of solid-solid and solid-gas equilibria. These results help explain observations of vaporization in Am oxides, nitrides, and carbides and provide guidance for the ceramic processing of the fuels. The thermodynamic analysis is then extended to the fission product systems and the Si-C-O system. Existing data on oxygen release (primarily as CO) as a function of burnup in the thoria-urania fuel system is reviewed and compared to values calculated from thermodynamic data. The calculations of oxygen release are then extended to the plutonia and americia fuels. Use of ZrC not only as a particle coating that may be more resistant to corrosion by Pd and other noble-metal fission products, but also as a means to getter oxygen released by fission is discussed

  20. Gas cooled fast reactor control rod drive mechanism deceleration unit. Test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, T.H.

    1981-10-01

    This report presents the results of the airtesting portion of the proof-of-principle testing of a Control Rod Scram Deceleration Device developed for use in the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR). The device utilizes a grooved flywheel to decelerate the translating assembly (T/A). Two cam followers on the translating assembly travel in the flywheel grooves and transfer the energy of the T/A to the flywheel. The grooves in the flywheel are straight for most of the flywheel length. Near the bottom of the T/A stroke the grooves are spiraled in a decreasing slope helix so that the cam followers accelerate the flywheel as they transfer the energy of the falling T/A. To expedite proof-of-principle testing, some of the materials used in the fabrication of certain test article components were not prototypic. With these exceptions the concept appears to be acceptable. The initial test of 300 scrams was completed with only one failure and the failure was that of a non-prototypic cam follower outer sleeve material

  1. Gas-cooled fast reactor fuel-cost assessment. Final report, October 1978-September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    This program, contracted to provide a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) fuel assembly fabrication cost assessment, comprised the following basic activities: establish agreement on the ground rules for cost assessment, prepare a fuel factory flow sheet, and prepare a cost assessment for fuel assembly fabrication. Two factory sizes, 250 and 25 MTHM/year, were considered for fuel assembly fabrication cost assessment. The work on this program involved utilizing GE LMFBR cost assessment and fuel factory studies experience to provide a cost assessment of GCFR fuel assembly fabrication. The recent impact of highly sensitive safety and safeguards environment policies on fuel factory containment, safety, quality assurance and safeguards costs are significantly higher than might have been expected just a few years ago. Fuel assembly fabrication costs are significant because they represent an estimated 30 to 60% of the total fuel cycle costs. In light of the relative high cost of fabrication, changes in the core and assembly design may be necessary in order to enhance the overall fuel cycle economics. Fabrication costs are based on similar operations and experience used in other fuel cycle studies. Because of extrapolation of present technology (e.g., remote fuel fabrication versus present contact fabrication) and regulatory requirements, conservative cost estimates were made.

  2. Current design efforts for the gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, K.D.

    2005-01-01

    Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFC I) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GCFR: a helium-cooled, direct Brayton cycle power conversion system that will operate with an outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in participating in research related to the development of the GCFR. These are EURATOM (European Commission), France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Of these, EURATOM (including the United Kingdom), France, Japan, and Switzerland have active research activities with respect to the GCFR. The research includes GCFR design and safety, and fuels/in-core materials/fuel cycle projects. This paper outlines the current design status of the GCFR, and includes work done in the areas mentioned above. (Author)

  3. Improvements in quality of as-manufactured fuels for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Hironobu; Tobita, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Kousaku; Kaneko, Mitsunobu; Suzuki, Nobuyuki; Yoshimuta, Shigeharu; Tomimoto, Hiroshi.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms of coating failure of the fuel particles for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactors during coating and compaction processes of the fuel fabrication were studied to determine a way to reduce the defective particle fraction of the as-manufactured fuels. Through the observation of the defective particles, it was found that the coating failure during the coating process was mainly caused by the strong mechanical shocks to the particles given by violent particle fluidization in the coater and by unloading and loading of the particles. The coating failure during the compaction process was probably related to the direct contact with neighboring particles in the fuel compacts. The coating process was improved by optimizing the mode of the particle fluidization and by developing the process without unloading and loading of the particles at intermediate coating process. The compaction process was improved by optimizing the combination of the pressing temperature and the pressing speed of the overcoated particles. Through these modifications of the fabrication process, the quality of the as-manufactured fuel compacts was improved outstandingly. (author)

  4. Current design efforts for the gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, K.D. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415-3850 (United States)]. e-mail: Kevan.Weaver@inl.gov

    2005-07-01

    Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFC I) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GCFR: a helium-cooled, direct Brayton cycle power conversion system that will operate with an outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in participating in research related to the development of the GCFR. These are EURATOM (European Commission), France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Of these, EURATOM (including the United Kingdom), France, Japan, and Switzerland have active research activities with respect to the GCFR. The research includes GCFR design and safety, and fuels/in-core materials/fuel cycle projects. This paper outlines the current design status of the GCFR, and includes work done in the areas mentioned above. (Author)

  5. Gas-cooled fast reactors-Status of CEA preliminary design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumaz, P. [CEA/DEN/DER/SESI, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)]. E-mail: Patrick.Dumaz@cea.fr; Allegre, P. [CEA/DEN/DER/SESI, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bassi, C. [CEA/DEN/DER/SESI, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Cadiou, T. [CEA/DEN/DER/SESI, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Conti, A. [CEA/DEN/DER/SESI, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Garnier, J.C. [CEA/DEN/DER/SESI, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Malo, J.Y. [CEA/DEN/DER/SESI, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Tosello, A. [CEA/DEN/DER/SESI, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2007-09-15

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) is one of the six reactor concepts selected in the frame of the Generation IV initiative. The most significant GFR option is the use of a helium high temperature primary coolant. The helium option is very attractive (chemical inertness, neutron transparency, etc.) but it leads to very specific thermal-hydraulic issues. As far as the reactor core design is concerned, a ceramic fuel concept with a good thermal conductivity has been chosen. The main requirement is to obtain an average exit core temperature of 850 deg. C (energy conversion efficiency) with a maximum fuel temperature of about 1200 deg. C and with a low core pressure drop (in order to ease the decay heat removal). The main core characteristics have been determined for two reactor powers: a medium one (600 MWth) and a large one (2400 MWth). For various reasons, this latter became the CEA reference choice. A consistent set of core parameters has been determined taking into account the different constraints including the thermal-hydraulics. The reference arrangement proposed is based on plate fuel elements. A significant issue for the GFR is the decay heat removal. An innovative approach has been chosen in case of loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs). A 'guard containment' enclosing the primary system is used to maintain a medium gas pressure (10 bar) in order to remove the decay heat by low power forced convection systems in the short term and natural convection systems in the long term. This guard containment is not pressurized during normal operations and can be a metallic structure. As far as the energy conversion system is concerned, an indirect-combined cycle has been chosen. The significant advantages of this choice are: a moderate core inlet temperature (400 deg. C instead of 480 deg. C for the direct cycle) and an attractive compactness of the primary system (facilitating the guard containment design). Due to the novelty of these options, a significant

  6. Technical review of process heat applications using the HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brierley, G.

    1976-06-01

    The demand for process heat applications is surveyed. Those applications which can be served only by the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) are identified and the status of process heat applications in Europe, USA, and Japan in December 1975 is discussed. Technical problems associated with the HTGR for process heat applications are outlined together with an appraisal of the safety considerations involved. (author)

  7. Impact of closed Brayton cycle test results on gas cooled reactor operation and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, St.A.; Pickard, P.S.

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the measurements and model predictions for a series of tests supported by the U.S. Department of Energy that were performed using the recently constructed Sandia Brayton Loop (SBL-30). From the test results we have developed steady-state power operating curves, controls methodologies, and transient data for normal and off-normal behavior, such as loss of load events, and for decay heat removal conditions after shutdown. These tests and models show that because the turbomachinery operates off of the temperature difference (between the heat source and the heat sink), that the turbomachinery can continue to operate (off of sensible heat) for long periods of time without auxiliary power. For our test hardware, operations up to one hour have been observed. This effect can provide significant operations and safety benefits for nuclear reactors that are coupled to a Brayton cycles because the operating turbomachinery continues to provide cooling to the reactor. These capabilities mean that the decay-heat removal can be accommodated by properly managing the electrical power produced by the generator/alternator. In some conditions, it may even be possible to produce sufficient power to continue operating auxiliary systems including the waste heat circulatory system. In addition, the Brayton plant impacts the consequences of off-normal and accident events including loss of load and loss of on-site power. We have observed that for a loss of load or a loss of on-site power event, with a reactor scram, the transient consists initially of a turbomachinery speed increase to a new stable operating point. Because the turbomachinery is still spinning, the reactor is still being cooled provided the ultimate heat sink remains available. These highly desirable operational characteristics were observed in the Sandia Brayton loop. This type of behavior is also predicted by our models. Ultimately, these results provide the designers the opportunity to design gas

  8. Use of Distribution Devices for Hydraulic Profiling of Coolant Flow in Core Gas-cooled Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Satin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In setting up a reactor plant for the transportation-power module of the megawatt class an important task is to optimize the path of flow, i.e. providing moderate hydraulic resistance, uniform distribution of the coolant. Significant contribution to the hydraulic losses makes one selected design of the coolant supplies. It is, in particular, hemispherical or semi-elliptical shape of the supply reservoir, which is selected to reduce its mass, resulting in the formation of torusshaped vortex in the inlet manifold, that leads to uneven coolant velocity at the inlet into the core, the flow pulsations, hydraulic losses.To control the flow redistribution in the core according to the level of energy are used the switchgear - deflectors installed in a hemispherical reservoir supplying coolant to the fuel elements (FE of the core of gas-cooled reactor. This design solution has an effect on the structure of the flow, rate in the cooling duct, and the flow resistance of the collector.In this paper we present the results of experiments carried out on the gas dynamic model of coolant paths, deflectors, and core, comprising 55 fuel rod simulators. Numerical simulation of flow in two-parameter model, using the k-ε turbulence model, and the software package ANSYS CFX v14.0 is performed. The paper demonstrates that experimental results are in compliance with calculated ones.The results obtained suggest that the use of switchgear ensures a coolant flow balance directly at the core inlet, thereby providing temperature reduction of fuel rods with a uniform power release in the cross-section. Considered options to find constructive solutions for deflectors give an idea to solve the problem of reducing hydraulic losses in the coolant paths, to decrease pulsation components of flow in the core and length of initial section of flow stabilization.

  9. Structural instabilities of high temperature alloys and their use in advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.; Nickel, H.; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A.

    1989-01-01

    High-temperature, iron-nickel and nickel based alloys are the candidate heat exchanger materials for advanced high temperature gas-cooled reactors supplying process heat for coal gasification, where operation temperatures can reach 850-950 deg. C and service lives of more than 100,000 h are necessary. In the present paper, typical examples of structural changes which occur in two representative alloys (Alloy 800 H, Fe-32Ni-20Cr and Alloy 617, Ni-22Cr-12Co-9Mo-1Al) during high temperature exposure will be given and the effects on the creep rupture properties discussed. At service temperatures, precipitation of carbides occurs which has a significant effect on the creep behaviour, especially in the early stages of creep when the precipitate particles are very fine. During coarsening of the carbides, carbides at grain boundaries restrict grain boundary sliding which retards the development of creep damage. In the service environments, enhanced carbide precipitation may occur due to the ingress of carbon from the environment (carburization). Although the creep rate is not adversely affected, the ductility of the carburized material at low and intermediate temperatures is very low. During simulated service exposures, the formation of surface corrosion scales, the precipitation of carbides and the formation of internal oxides below the surface leads to depletion of the matrix in the alloying elements involved in the corrosion processes. In thin-walled tubes the depletion of Cr due to Cr 2 O 3 formation on the surface can lead to a loss of creep strength. An additional depletion effect resulting from environmental-metal reactions is the loss of carbon (decarburization) which may occur in specific environments. The compositions of the cooling gases which decarburize the material have been determined; they are to be avoided during reactor operation

  10. Thermal hydraulic challenges of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with passive safety features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, Michael A.; Lee, Jeong Ik; Hejzlar, Pavel; Driscoll, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Transient response of a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) coupled to a recompression supercritical CO 2 (S-CO 2 ) power conversion system (PCS) in a direct cycle to a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) and a Loss of Generator Load Accident is analyzed using RELAP5-3D. A number of thermal hydraulic challenges for GFR design are pointed out as the designers strive to accommodate cooling of the high power density core of a fast reactor by a gas with its inherently low heat transfer capability, in particular under post-LOCA events when system pressure is lost and when reliance on passive decay heat removal (DHR) is emphasized. Although it is possible to design a S-CO 2 cooled GFR that can survive LOCA by cooling the core through natural circulating loops between the core and elevated emergency cooling heat exchangers, it is not an attractive approach because of various bypass paths that can, depending on break location, degrade core cooling. Moreover, natural circulation gas loops can operate in deteriorated heat transfer regimes with substantial reduction of heat transfer coefficient: as low as 30% of forced convection values, and data and correlations in these regimes carry large uncertainties. Therefore, reliable battery powered blowers for post-LOCA decay heat removal that provide flow in well defined regimes with low uncertainty, and can be easily overdesigned to accommodate bypass flows were selected. The results confirm that a GFR with such a DHR system and negative coolant void worth can withstand LOCA with and without scram as well as loss of electrical load without exceeding core temperature and turbomachinery overspeed limits.

  11. The Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor: Report on Safety System Design for Decay Heat Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. D. Weaver; T. Marshall; T. Y. C. Wei; E. E. Feldman; M. J. Driscoll; H. Ludewig

    2003-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radiotoxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. This report addresses/discusses the decay heat removal options available to the GFR, and the current solutions. While it is possible to design a GFR with complete passive safety (i.e., reliance solely on conductive and radiative heat transfer for decay heat removal), it has been shown that the low power density results in unacceptable fuel cycle costs for the GFR. However, increasing power density results in higher decay heat rates, and the attendant temperature increase in the fuel and core. Use of active movers, or blowers/fans, is possible during accident conditions, which only requires 3% of nominal flow to remove the decay heat. Unfortunately, this requires reliance on active systems. In order to incorporate passive systems, innovative designs have been studied, and a mix of passive and active systems appears to meet the requirements for decay heat removal during accident conditions.

  12. Control rod shadowing and anti-shadowing effects in a large gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardin, G.; Chawla, R.; Rimpault, G.; Coddington, P.

    2007-01-01

    An investigation of control rod shadowing and anti-shadowing (interaction) effects has been carried out in the context of a design study of the control rod pattern for the large 2400 MWth Generation IV Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). For the calculations, the deterministic code system ERANOS-2.0 has been used, in association with a full core model including a European Fast Reactor (EFR)-type pattern for the control rods. More specifically, the core contains a total of 33 control (CSD) and safety (DSD) rods implemented in three banks: -1) a first bank of 6 CSD rods, placed at 64 cm from core centre in the inner fuel zone (Pu content 16.3 % vol.), -2) a safety bank consisting of 9 DSD rods, at an average distance of 118 cm, and -3) a third bank with 18 CSD rods, placed at 171 cm, i.e. at the interface between the inner and outer (Pu content 19.2 % vol.) core regions. Each control rod has been modelled as a homogeneous material containing 90%-enriched B 4 C, steel and helium. Considerable shadowing effects have been observed between the first bank and the safety bank, as also between individual rods within the first bank. Large anti-shadowing effects take place in an even greater number of the studied rod configurations. The largest interaction is between the two CSD banks, the anti-shadowing value being 46% in this case, implying that the total rod worth is increased by a factor of almost 2 when compared to the sum of the individual bank values. Additional investigations have been performed, in particular the computation of the first order eigenvalue and the eigenvalue separation. The main finding is that the interactions are lower when one of the control rod banks is located at a radial position corresponding to half the core radius. (authors)

  13. Ninth meeting of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors, Oak Ridge, USA, 8-9 November 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    This report contains the minutes of the meeting, the papers presented as overview of the national programmes in the field of gas-cooled reactors and the main results from discussions on the different items of the agenda. The meeting was attended by 20 members and/or alternates from 9 countries and 2 international organizations. 8 papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Output Feedback Dissipation Control for the Power-Level of Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Zhe

    2011-01-01

    Because of its strong inherent safety features and the high outlet temperature, the modular high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (MHTGR) is the chosen technology for a new generation of nuclear power plants. Such power plants are being considered for industrial applications with a wide range of power levels, thus power-level regulation is very important for their efficient and stable operation. Exploiting the large scale asymptotic closed-loop stability provided by nonlinear controller...

  15. An investigation of structural design methodology for HTGR reactor internals with ceramic materials (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2008-03-01

    To advance the performance and safety of HTGR, heat-resistant ceramic materials are expected to be used as reactor internals of HTGR. C/C composite and superplastic zirconia are the promising materials for this purpose. In order to use these new materials as reactor internals in HTGR, it is necessary to establish a structure design method to guarantee the structural integrity under environmental and load conditions. Therefore, C/C composite expected as reactor internals of VHTR is focused and an investigation on the structural design method applicable to the C/C composite and a basic applicability of the C/C composite to representative structures of HTGR were carried out in this report. As the results, it is found that the competing risk theory for the strength evaluation of the C/C composite is applicable to design method and C/C composite is expected to be used as reactor internals of HTGR. (author)

  16. Control room conceptual design of nuclear power plant with multiple modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Qianqian; Qu Ronghong; Zhang Liangju

    2014-01-01

    A conceptual design of the control room layout for the nuclear power plant with multiple modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors has been developed. The modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors may need to be grouped to produce as much energy as a utility demands to realize the economic efficiency. There are many differences between the multi-modular plant and the current NPPs in the control room. These differences may include the staffing level, the human-machine interface design, the operation mode, etc. The potential challenges of the human factor engineering (HFE) in the control room of the multi-modular plant are analyzed, including the operation workload of the multi-modular tasks, how to help the crew to keep situation awareness of all modules, and how to support team work, the control of shared system between modules, etc. A concept design of control room for the multi-modular plant is presented based on the design aspect of HTR-PM (High temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble bed module). HFE issues are considered in the conceptual design of control room for the multi-modular plant and some design strategies are presented. As a novel conceptual design, verifications and validations are needed, and focus of further work is sketch out. (author)

  17. Considerations in the development of safety requirements for innovative reactors: Application to modular high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    Member States of the IAEA have frequently requested this organization to assess, at the conceptual stage, the safety of the design of nuclear reactors that rely on a variety of technologies and are of a high degree of innovation. However, to date, for advanced and innovative reactors and for reactors with characteristics that are different from those of existing light water reactors, widely accepted design standards and rules do not exist. This TECDOC is an outcome of the efforts deployed by the IAEA to develop a general approach for assessing the safety of the design of advanced and innovative reactors, and of all reactors in general including research reactors, with characteristics that differ from those of light water reactors. This publication puts forward a method for safety assessment that is based on the well established and accepted principle of defence in depth. The need to develop a general approach for assessing the safety of the design of reactors that applies to all kinds of advanced reactors was emphasized by the request to the IAEA by South Africa to review the safety of the South African pebble bed modular reactor. This reactor, as other modular high temperature gas cooled reactors (MHTGRs), adopts very specific design features such as the use of coated particle fuel. The characteristics of the fuel deeply affect the design and the safety of the plant, thereby posing several challenges to traditional safety assessment methods and to the application of existing safety requirements that have been developed primarily for water reactors. In this TECDOC, the MHTGR has been selected as a case study to demonstrate the viability of the method proposed. The approach presented is based on an extended interpretation of the concept of defence in depth and its link with the general safety objectives and fundamental safety functions as set out in 'Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design', IAEA Safety Standards No. NS-R.1, issued by the IAEA in 2000. The objective

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisani, Angelo; Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2010-11-02

    The design of passive heat removal systems is one of the main concerns for the modular very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR) vessel cavity. The reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) is a key heat removal system during normal and off-normal conditions. The design and validation of the RCCS is necessary to demonstrate that VHTRs can survive to the postulated accidents. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) STAR-CCM+/V3.06.006 code was used for three-dimensional system modeling and analysis of the RCCS. A CFD model was developed to analyze heat exchange in the RCCS. The model incorporates a 180-deg section resembling the VHTR RCCS experimentally reproduced in a laboratory-scale test facility at Texas A&M University. All the key features of the experimental facility were taken into account during the numerical simulations. The objective of the present work was to benchmark CFD tools against experimental data addressing the behavior of the RCCS following accident conditions. Two cooling fluids (i.e., water and air) were considered to test the capability of maintaining the RCCS concrete walls' temperature below design limits. Different temperature profiles at the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall obtained from the experimental facility were used as boundary conditions in the numerical analyses to simulate VHTR transient evolution during accident scenarios. Mesh convergence was achieved with an intensive parametric study of the two different cooling configurations and selected boundary conditions. To test the effect of turbulence modeling on the RCCS heat exchange, predictions using several different turbulence models and near-wall treatments were evaluated and compared. The comparison among the different turbulence models analyzed showed satisfactory agreement for the temperature distribution inside the RCCS cavity medium and at the standpipes walls. For such a complicated geometry and flow conditions, the tested turbulence models demonstrated that the

  19. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH-[TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James; Bayless, Paul; Strydom, Gerhard; Kumar, Akansha; Gougar, Hans

    2016-11-01

    A point design for a graphite-moderated, high-temperature, gas-cooled test reactor (HTG TR) has been developed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) as part of a United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) initiative to explore and potentially expand the existing U.S. test reactor capabilities. This paper provides a summary of the design and its main attributes. The 200 MW HTG TR is a thermal-neutron spectrum reactor composed of hexagonal prismatic fuel and graphite reflector blocks. Twelve fuel columns (96 fuel blocks total and 6.34 m active core height) are arranged in two hexagonal rings to form a relatively compact, high-power density, annular core sandwiched between inner, outer, top, and bottom graphite reflectors. The HTG-TR is designed to operate at 7 MPa with a coolant inlet/outlet temperature of 325°C/650°C, and utilizes TRISO particle fuel from the DOE AGR Program with 425 ?m uranium oxycarbide (UCO) kernels and an enrichment of 15.5 wt% 235U. The primary mission of the HTG TR is material irradiation and therefore the core has been specifically designed and optimized to provide the highest possible thermal and fast neutron fluxes. The highest thermal neutron flux (3.90E+14 n/cm2s) occurs in the outer reflector, and the maximum fast flux levels (1.17E+14 n/cm2s) are produced in the central reflector column where most of the graphite has been removed. Due to high core temperatures under accident conditions, all the irradiation test facilities have been located in the inner and outer reflectors where fast flux levels decline. The core features a large number of irradiation positions with large test volumes and long test lengths, ideal for thermal neutron irradiation of large test articles. The total available test volume is more than 1100 liters. Up to four test loop facilities can be accommodated with pressure tube boundaries to isolate test articles and test fluids (e.g., liquid metal, liquid salt, light water) from the helium primary coolant system.

  20. Characteristic behaviour of Pebble Bed High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors during water ingress events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoza, Samukelisiwe N.; Serfontein, Dawid E.; Reitsma, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    The presence of water on the tube-side of the steam generators in high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) with indirect cycle layouts presents a possibility for a penetration of neutron moderating steam into the core, which may cause a power excursion. This article presents results on the effect of water ingress into the core of the two South African Pebble Bed Modular Reactor design concepts, i.e. the PBMR-200 MW th and the PBMR-400 MW th developed by PBMR SOC Ltd. The VSOP 99/05 suite of codes was used for the simulation of this event. Partial steam vapour pressures were added in stages into the primary circuit in order to investigate the effect of water ingress on reactivity, power profiles and thermal neutron flux profiles. The effects of water ingress into the core are explained by increased neutron moderation, due to the addition of 1 H, which leads to a decrease in resonance capture by 238 U and therefore an increase in the multiplication factor. The more effective moderation of neutrons by definition reduces the fast neutron flux and increases the thermal flux in the core, i.e. leads to a softer spectrum. The more effective moderation also increases the average increase in lethargy between collisions of a neutron with successive fuel kernels, which reduces the probability for neutron capture in the radiative capture resonances of 238 U. The resulting higher resonance escape probability also increases the thermal flux in the core. The softening of the neutron spectrum leads to an increased effective microscopic fission cross section in the fissile isotopes and thus to increased neutron absorption for fission, which reduces the remaining number of neutrons that can diffuse into the reflectors. Therefore water ingress into the core leads to a reduced thermal neutron flux in the reflectors. The power density spatial distribution behaved similarly to the thermal neutron flux in the core. Analysis of possible mechanisms was conducted. The results show that

  1. Research and development associated with licensing of MHTGR [Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, H.

    1990-01-01

    The Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) currently under development by the US Department of Energy (US-DOE) for commercial applications has top-level goals of producing safe, economical power for the US utility industry. The utility industry has been represented in formulating design and licensing requirements through both a ''Utility User Requirements Document'' and by participating in the DOE system engineering process known as the ''Integrated Approach.'' The result of this collaboration has been to set stringent goals for both the safety and operational reliability of the MHTGR. To achieve these goals, the designer must have access to a more comprehensive data base of properties in several fields of technology than is currently available. A technology development program has been planned to provide this data to the designer in time to support both his design activities and the submittal of formal licensing application documents. The US-DOE has chosen the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to take the lead in planning and executing these technology programs. When completed these will augment the designer's current data base and provide the necessary depth to meet the stringent goals which have been set for the MHTGR. It is worth noting that the goals of safety and operational reliability are complementary, and the data required from the technology development program will be similar. Therefore, the program to support the licensing of the MHTGR is not separate from that required for design, but is a subset of that which meets all the requirements that result from implementing the US-DOE's integrated approach. 38 figs

  2. Design Study of Modular Nuclear Power Plant with Small Long Life Gas Cooled Fast Reactors Utilizing MOX Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilham, Muhammad; Su'ud, Zaki

    2017-01-01

    Growing energy needed due to increasing of the world’s population encourages development of technology and science of nuclear power plant in its safety and security. In this research, it will be explained about design study of modular fast reactor with helium gas cooling (GCFR) small long life reactor, which can be operated over 20 years. It had been conducted about neutronic design GCFR with Mixed Oxide (UO2-PuO2) fuel in range of 100-200 MWth NPPs of power and 50-60% of fuel fraction variation with cylindrical pin cell and cylindrical balance of reactor core geometry. Calculation method used SRAC-CITATION code. The obtained results are the effective multiplication factor and density value of core reactor power (with geometry optimalization) to obtain optimum design core reactor power, whereas the obtained of optimum core reactor power is 200 MWth with 55% of fuel fraction and 9-13% of percentages.

  3. Problems of creating fuel elements for fast gas-cooled reactors working on N2O4-dissociating coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterenko, V.B.; Zelensky, V.F.; Kolykhan, L.I.; Karpenko, G.V.; Krasnorutsky, V.S.; Isakov, V.P.; Ashikhmin, V.P.; Permyakov, L.N.

    1985-01-01

    A variant of fast gas-cooled reactors is one using dissociating N 2 O 4 nitrogen tetroxide as a coolant. This type of reactors is promising because of great thermal effects of dissociation reactions while heating and recombination while cooling; small latent heat of evaporation; high heat transfer coefficient owing to additional heat transfer in a chemical reaction; high N 2 O 4 density in a gas state at operation parameters. The mentioned advantages give possibility to create a small turbine, heat exchange apparatus and to get high heat production in the active zone. All this opens new ways to increase power plants effectiveness

  4. HTGR Fuel performance basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamasundar, B.I.; Stansfield, O.M.; Jensen, D.D.

    1982-05-01

    The safety characteristics of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) during normal and accident conditions are determined in part by HTGR fuel performance. During normal operation, less than 0.1% fuel failure occurs, primarily from defective particles. This low fuel failure fraction limits circulating activity to acceptable levels. During severe accidents, the radiological consequence is influenced by high-temperature fuel particle behavior. An empirical fuel failure model, supported by recent experimental data, is presented. The onset of significant fuel particle failure occurs at temperatures in excess of 1600/sup 0/C, and complete fuel failure occurs at 2660/sup 0/C. This indicates that the fuel is more retentive at higher temperatures than previously assumed. The more retentive nature of the fuel coupled with the high thermal capacitance of the core results in slow release of fission products from the core during severe accidents.

  5. Improvement of the decay heat removal characteristics of the generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epiney, A. S.

    2010-09-01

    The majority of NPPs worldwide are currently light water reactors, using ordinary water as both coolant and moderator. (...) For the longer-term future, viz. beyond the year 2030, Research and Development is currently ongoing on Generation IV NPPs, aimed at achieving closure of the nuclear fuel cycle, and hence both drastically improved utilization of fuel resources and minimization of long-lived radioactive wastes. Since the very beginning of the international cooperation on Generation IV, viz. the year 2000, the main research interest in Europe as regards the advanced fast-spectrum systems needed for achieving complete fuel cycle closure, has been for the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). However, the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is currently considered as the main back-up solution. Like the SFR, the GFR is an efficient breeder, also able to work as iso-breeder using simply natural uranium as feed and producing waste which is predominantly in the form of fission products. The main drawback of the GFR is the difficulty to evacuate decay heat following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) due to the low thermal inertia of the core, as well as to the low coolant density. The present doctoral research focuses on the improvement of decay heat removal (DHR) for the Generation-IV GFR. The reference GFR system design considered in the thesis is the 2006 CEA concept, with a power of 2400 MWth. The CEA 2006 DHR strategy foresees, in all accidental cases (independent of the system pressure), that the reactor is shut down. For high pressure events, dedicated DHR loops with blowers and heat exchangers are designed to operate when the power conversion system cannot be used to provide acceptable core temperatures under natural convection conditions. For depressurized events, the strategy relies on a dedicated small containment (called the guard containment) providing an intermediate back-up pressure. The DHR blowers, designed to work under these pressure conditions, need to be

  6. Experience in the development of metal uranium-base nuclear fuel for heavy-water gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashikhmin, V.P.; Vorob'ev, M.A.; Gusarov, M.S.; Davidenko, A.S.; Zelenskij, V.F.; Ivanov, V.E.; Krasnorutskij, V.S.; Petel'guzov, I.A.; Stukalov, A.I.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations were carried out to solve the problem of making the development of radiation-resistant uranium fuel for power reactors including the heavy-water gas-cooled KS-150 reactor. Factors are considered that limit the lifetime of uranium fuel elements, and the ways of suppressing them are discussed. Possible reasons of the insufficient radiation resistance of uranium rod fuel element and the progress attained are analyzed. Some general problems on the fuel manufacture processes are discussed. The main results are presented on the operation of the developed fuel in research reactor loops and the commercial heavy-water KS-150 reactor. The results confirm an exceptionally high radiation resistance of fuel to burn-ups of 1.5-2%. The successful solution of a large number of problems associated with the development of metal uranium fuel provides for new possibilities of using metal uranium in power reactors

  7. The challenges on uncertainty analysis for pebble bed HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, C.; Li, F.; Zhang, H.

    2012-01-01

    The uncertainty analysis is very popular and important, and many works have been done for Light Water Reactor (LWR), although the experience for the uncertainty analysis in High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR) modeling is still in the primary stage. IAEA will launch a Coordination Research Project (CRP) on this topic soon. This paper addresses some challenges for the uncertainty analysis in HTGR modeling, based on the experience of OECD LWR Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling (UAM) activities, and taking into account the peculiarities of pebble bed HTGR designs. The main challenges for HTGR UAM are: the lack of experience, the totally different code packages, the coupling of power distribution, temperature distribution and burnup distribution through the temperature feedback and pebble flow. The most serious challenge is how to deal with the uncertainty in pebble flow, the uncertainty in pebble bed flow modeling, and their contribution to the uncertainty of maximum fuel temperature, which is the most interested parameter for the modular HTGR. (authors)

  8. Mitigating the Risk of Stress Corrosion of Austenitic Stainless Steels in Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, A.; Owen, J.; Quirk, G.; G, Lewis; Rudge, A.; Woolsey, I.S.

    2012-09-01

    Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors (AGRs) operated in the UK by EDF Energy have once-through boilers, which deliver superheated steam at high temperature (∼500 deg. C) and pressure (∼150 bar) to the HP turbine. The boilers have either a serpentine or helical geometry for the tubing of the main heat transfer sections of the boiler and each individual tube is fabricated from mild steel, 9%Cr1%Mo and Type 316 austenitic stainless steel tubing. Type 316 austenitic stainless steel is used for the secondary (final) superheater and steam tailpipe sections of the boiler, which, during normal operation, should operate under dry, superheated steam conditions. This is achieved by maintaining a specified margin of superheat at the upper transition joint (UTJ) between the 9%Cr1%Mo primary superheater and the Type 316 secondary superheater sections of the boiler. Operating in this mode should eliminate the possibility of stress corrosion cracking of the Type 316 tube material on-load. In recent years, however, AGRs have suffered a variety of operational problems with their boilers that have made it difficult to maintain the specified superheat margin at the UTJ. In the case of helical boilers, the combined effects of carbon deposition on the gas side and oxide deposition on the waterside of the tubing have resulted in an increasing number of austenitic tubes operating with less than the specified superheat margin at the UTJ and hence the possibility of wetting the austenitic section of the boiler. Some units with serpentine boilers have suffered creep-fatigue damage of the high temperature sections of the boiler, which currently necessitates capping the steam outlet temperature to prevent further damage. The reduction in steam outlet temperature has meant that there is an increased risk of operation with less than the specified superheat margin at the UTJ and hence stress corrosion cracking of the austenitic sections of the boiler. In order to establish the risk of stress

  9. Gas reactor international coope--ative program. Interim report: assessment of gas-cooled reactor economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    A computer analysis of domestic economic incentive is presented. Included are the sample computer data set for ten combinations of reprocessing and reactor assumptions; basic data set and computer output; higher uranium availability computer output; 50 percent higher GCR fabrication cost computer output; 50 percent higher GCR reprocessing cost computer output; year 1990 and year 2000 GCR introduction scenario computer outputs; 75 percent perceived capacity factor for PBR computer output; and capital cost of GCRs 1.2 times that of LWRs.

  10. HTGR Application Economic Model Users' Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandrik, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Application Economic Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Application Economic Model calculates either the required selling price of power and/or heat for a given internal rate of return (IRR) or the IRR for power and/or heat being sold at the market price. The user can generate these economic results for a range of reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for up to 16 reactor modules; and for module ratings of 200, 350, or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Application Economic Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Application Economic Model. This model was designed for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel and engineering economics. Modification of the HTGR Application Economic Model should only be performed by users familiar with the HTGR and its applications, Excel, and Visual Basic.

  11. Improvement of the decay heat removal characteristics of the generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epiney, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    Gas cooling in nuclear power plants (NPPs) has a long history, the corresponding reactor types developed in France, the UK and the US having been thermal neutron spectrum systems using graphite as the moderator. The majority of NPPs worldwide, however, are currently light water reactors, using ordinary water as both coolant and moderator. These NPPs - of the so-called second generation - will soon need replacement, and a third generation is now being made available, offering increased safety while still based on light water technology. For the longer-term future, viz. beyond the year 2030, R and D is currently ongoing on Generation IV NPPs, aimed at achieving closure of the nuclear fuel cycle, and hence both drastically improved utilization of fuel resources and minimization of long-lived radioactive wastes. Like the SFR, the GFR is an efficient breeder, also able to work as iso-breeder using simply natural uranium as feed and producing waste which is predominantly in the form of fission products. The main drawback of the GFR is the difficulty to evacuate decay heat following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) due to the low thermal inertia of the core, as well as to the low coolant density. The present doctoral research focuses on the improvement of decay heat removal (DHR) for the Generation-IV GFR. The reference GFR system design considered in the thesis is the 2006 CEA concept, with a power of 2400 MWth. The CEA 2006 DHR strategy foresees, in all accidental cases (independent of the system pressure), that the reactor is shut down. For high pressure events, dedicated DHR loops with blowers and heat exchangers are designed to operate when the power conversion system cannot be used to provide acceptable core temperatures under natural convection conditions. For de-pressurized events, the strategy relies on a dedicated small containment (called the guard containment) providing an intermediate back-up pressure. The DHR blowers, designed to work under these pressure

  12. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program. Selection of candidate alloys. Vol. 1. Advanced gas cooled reactor systems definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marvin, M.D.

    1978-10-31

    Candidate alloys for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heal (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications in terms of the effect of the primary coolant exposure and thermal exposure were evaluated. (FS)

  13. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program. Selection of candidate alloys. Vol. 1. Advanced gas cooled reactor systems definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marvin, M.D.

    1978-01-01

    Candidate alloys for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heal (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications in terms of the effect of the primary coolant exposure and thermal exposure were evaluated

  14. Finite element modeling of fluid/thermal/structural interaction for a gas-cooled fast reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.G.; Ju, F.D.

    1980-01-01

    Two nonlinear finite element formulations for application to a series of experiments in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) development program are described. An efficient beam column element for moderately large deformations is combined with a finite element developed for an engineering description of a convecting fluid. Typical results from both elements are illustrated. A combined application for a problem typical of the GCFR loss-of-coolant experiments is illustrated. These problems are not the usual fluid structural interaction problems in that the inertia coupling is negligible while the thermal coupling is very important

  15. The historical development of heat transfer surfaces for gas-cooled reactors analysed with a simple criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leslie, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of finned heat transfer surfaces for gas-cooled reactors, from longitudinal through transverse to the sophisticated helical polyzonal and herring-bone fins, is described, and their merits are compared using a simple criterion of heat transfer efficiency. These fins cannot be used in AGR's because of the high neutron absorption and low thermal conductivity of stainless steel, and artificial roughening in the form of ribbing is used instead; the same criterion can be applied to this type of surface. The interest of the material is largely historical. (author)

  16. Status and prospects for gas cooled reactor fuels. Proceedings of two IAEA meetings held in June 2004 and June 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-04-01

    Recently, efforts to develop high temperature gas cooled reactors with an aim to building futuristic nuclear energy systems with advanced nuclear fuel cycles in the context of the Generation IV International Forum have increased significantly. In addition, several development projects are ongoing, focusing on the burning of weapons grade plutonium, including civil plutonium and other transuranic elements using the 'deep-burn concept', or 'inert matrix fuels', especially in the form of coated particles in gas cooled reactor systems. There is also considerable global interest in developing 'nuclear hydrogen' energy systems using high temperature gas cooled reactors. Apart from these developments, the value of preserving the large technology base developed in Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States of America, as well as information developed in other countries, has also been a subject of interest to the IAEA. At the second annual meeting of the 'technical working group on nuclear fuel cycles options and spent fuel management' (TWG-NFCO), held in Vienna from 28-30 May 2003, it was recommended to hold a technical meeting on Current Status and Future Prospects of Gas Cooled Reactor Fuels. The meeting should cover the technological progress that has been made in the last three years and plan future fabrication and qualification facilities for GCR/HTR fuel. TWG-NFCO considered it timely that this progress should be presented and discussed in the interested community. Recognizing the numerous activities being pursued in many Member States, the IAEA convened the technical meeting on this topic in June 2004 in Vienna. Consequently, an update meeting was held in June 2005, which was hosted by the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology of Ukraine to review and integrate the latest developments. This publication combines the results of the technical meeting of June 2004 and the meeting of June 2005. The proceedings presented here contain 25 in depth papers on the

  17. Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor short term thermal response to flow and reactivity transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleveland, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The analyses reported here have been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Division of Regulatory Applications of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The short-term thermal response of the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is analyzed for a range of flow and reactivity transients. These include loss of forced circulation (LOFC) without scram, moisture ingress, spurious withdrawal of a control rod group, hypothetical large and rapid positive reactivity insertion, and a rapid core cooling event. The coupled heat transfer-neutron kinetics model is also described.

  18. Scaling analysis of the coupled heat transfer process in the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1986-08-01

    The differential equations representing the coupled heat transfer from the solid nuclear core components to the helium in the coolant channels are scaled in terms of representative quantities. This scaling process identifies the relative importance of the various terms of the coupled differential equations. The relative importance of these terms is then used to simplify the numerical solution of the coupled heat transfer for two bounding cases of full-power operation and depressurization from full-system operating pressure for the Fort St. Vrain High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. This analysis rigorously justifies the simplified system of equations used in the nuclear safety analysis effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  19. Integration of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors into Industrial Process Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Lee

    2009-01-01

    This report is a preliminary comparison of conventional and potential HTGR-integrated processes in several common industrial areas: (1) Producing electricity via a traditional power cycle; (2) Producing hydrogen; (3) Producing ammonia and ammonia-derived products, such as fertilizer; (4) Producing gasoline and diesel from natural gas or coal; (5) Producing substitute natural gas from coal; and (6) Steam-assisted gravity drainage (extracting oil from tar sands).

  20. INVESTIGATION OF FUNDAMENTAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC PHENOMENA IN ADVANCED GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    INVESTIGATION OF FUNDAMENTAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC PHE

    2006-09-01

    INL LDRD funded research was conducted at MIT to experimentally characterize mixed convection heat transfer in gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) core channels in collaboration with INL personnel. The GFR for Generation IV has generated considerable interest and is under development in the U.S., France, and Japan. One of the key candidates is a block-core configuration first proposed by MIT, has the potential to operate in Deteriorated Turbulent Heat Transfer (DTHT) regime or in the transition between the DTHT and normal forced or laminar convection regime during post-loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. This is contrary to most industrial applications where operation is in a well-defined and well-known turbulent forced convection regime. As a result, important new need emerged to develop heat transfer correlations that make possible rigorous and accurate predictions of Decay Heat Removal (DHR) during post LOCA in these regimes. Extensive literature review on these regimes was performed and a number of the available correlations was collected in: (1) forced laminar, (2) forced turbulent, (3) mixed convection laminar, (4) buoyancy driven DTHT and (5) acceleration driven DTHT regimes. Preliminary analysis on the GFR DHR system was performed and using the literature review results and GFR conditions. It confirmed that the GFR block type core has a potential to operate in the DTHT regime. Further, a newly proposed approach proved that gas, liquid and super critical fluids all behave differently in single channel under DTHT regime conditions, thus making it questionable to extrapolate liquid or supercritical fluid data to gas flow heat transfer. Experimental data were collected with three different gases (nitrogen, helium and carbon dioxide) in various heat transfer regimes. Each gas unveiled different physical phenomena. All data basically covered the forced turbulent heat transfer regime, nitrogen data covered the acceleration driven DTHT and buoyancy driven DTHT

  1. HTGR Cost Model Users' Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.M. Gandrik

    2012-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooler Reactor (HTGR) Cost Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Cost Model calculates an estimate of the capital costs, annual operating and maintenance costs, and decommissioning costs for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The user can generate these costs for multiple reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for a single or four-pack configuration; and for a reactor size of 350 or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Cost Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Cost Model. This model was design for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel. Modification of the HTGR Cost Model should only be performed by users familiar with Excel and Visual Basic.

  2. HTGR experience, programs, and future applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.A.; Kantor, M.E.; Brey, H.L.; Olson, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of the programs for the development of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) in the major industrial countries of the world. Existing demonstration plants and facilities are briefly described, and national programs for exploiting the unique high-temperature capabilities of the HTGR for commercial production of electricity and in process steam/heat application are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Gas-cooled reactor programs. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report, December 31, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Bartine, D.E.; Sanders, J.P.

    1984-06-01

    ORNL continues to make significant contributions to the national program. In the HTR fuels area, we are providing detailed statistical information on the fission product retention performance of irradiated fuel. Our studies are also providing basic data on the mechanical, physical, and chemical behavior of HTR materials, including metals, ceramics, graphite, and concrete. The ORNL has an important role in the development of improved HTR graphites and in the specification of criteria that need to be met by commercial products. We are also developing improved reactor physics design methods. Our work in component development and testing centers in the Component Flow Test Loop (CFTL), which is being used to evaluate the performance of the HTR core support structure. Other work includes experimental evaluation of the shielding effectiveness of the lower portions of an HTR core. This evaluation is being performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility. Researchers at ORNL are developing welding techniques for attaching steam generator tubing to the tubesheets and are testing ceramic pads on which the core posts rest. They are also performing extensive testing of aggregate materials obtained from potential HTR site areas for possible use in prestressed concrete reactor vessels. During the past year we continued to serve as a peer reviewer of small modular reactor designs being developed by GA and GE with balance-of-plant layouts being developed by Bechtel Group, Inc. We have also evaluated the national need for developing HTRs with emphasis on the longer term applications of the HTRs to fossil conversion processes.

  4. Gas-cooled reactor programs. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report, December 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Bartine, D.E.; Sanders, J.P.

    1984-06-01

    ORNL continues to make significant contributions to the national program. In the HTR fuels area, we are providing detailed statistical information on the fission product retention performance of irradiated fuel. Our studies are also providing basic data on the mechanical, physical, and chemical behavior of HTR materials, including metals, ceramics, graphite, and concrete. The ORNL has an important role in the development of improved HTR graphites and in the specification of criteria that need to be met by commercial products. We are also developing improved reactor physics design methods. Our work in component development and testing centers in the Component Flow Test Loop (CFTL), which is being used to evaluate the performance of the HTR core support structure. Other work includes experimental evaluation of the shielding effectiveness of the lower portions of an HTR core. This evaluation is being performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility. Researchers at ORNL are developing welding techniques for attaching steam generator tubing to the tubesheets and are testing ceramic pads on which the core posts rest. They are also performing extensive testing of aggregate materials obtained from potential HTR site areas for possible use in prestressed concrete reactor vessels. During the past year we continued to serve as a peer reviewer of small modular reactor designs being developed by GA and GE with balance-of-plant layouts being developed by Bechtel Group, Inc. We have also evaluated the national need for developing HTRs with emphasis on the longer term applications of the HTRs to fossil conversion processes

  5. Development status and operational features of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkleblack, R.K.

    1976-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the maturity of HTR-technology and to look out for possible technical problems, concerning introduction of large HTR power plants into the market. Further state and problems of introducing and closing the thorium fuel cycle is presented and judged. Finally, the state of development of advanced HTR-concepts for electricity production, the direct cycle HTR with helium turbine, and the gas-cooled fast breeder is discussed. In preparing the study, both HTR concepts with spherical and block-type fuel elements have been considered.

  6. Development status and operational features of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkleblack, R.K.

    1976-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the maturity of HTR-technology and to look out for possible technical problems, concerning introduction of large HTR power plants into the market. Further state and problems of introducing and closing the thorium fuel cycle is presented and judged. Finally, the state of development of advanced HTR-concepts for electricity production, the direct cycle HTR with helium turbine, and the gas-cooled fast breeder is discussed. In preparing the study, both HTR concepts with spherical and block-type fuel elements have been considered

  7. Study on disposal method of graphite blocks and storage of spent fuel for modular gas-cooled reactor. Joint research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumita, Junya; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Tsuchie, Yasuo; Urakami, Masao [Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    This report describes the result of study on disposal method of graphite blocks in future block-type reactor. Present study was carried out within a framework of joint research, ''Research of Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (No. 3)'', between Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPCO), in 2000. In this study, activities in fuel and reflector graphite blocks were evaluated and were compared with the disposal limits defined as low-level of radioactive waste. As a result, it was found that the activity for only C-14 was higher than disposal limits for the low-level of radioactive waste and that the amount of air in the graphite is important to evaluate precisely of C-14 activity. In addition, spent fuels can be stored in air-cooled condition at least after two years cooling in the storage pool. (author)

  8. Oxidation damage evaluation by non-destructive method for graphite components in high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Taiju; Tada, Tatsuya; Sumita, Junya; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    To develop non-destructive evaluation methods for oxidation damage on graphite components in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs), the applicability of ultrasonic wave and micro-indentation methods were investigated. Candidate graphites, IG-110 and IG-430, for core components of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) were used in this study. These graphites were oxidized uniformly by air at 500degC. The following results were obtained from this study. (1) Ultrasonic wave velocities with 1 MHz can be expressed empirically by exponential formulas to burn-off, oxidation weight loss. (2) The porous condition of the oxidized graphite could be evaluated with wave propagation analysis with a wave-pore interaction model. It is important to consider the non-uniformity of oxidized porous condition. (3) Micro-indentation method is expected to determine the local oxidation damage. It is necessary to assess the variation of the test data. (author)

  9. Preparation for Future Defuelling and Decommissioning Works on EDF Energy's UK Fleet of Advanced Gas Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryers, John; Ashmead, Simon

    2016-01-01

    EDF Energy/Nuclear Generation is the owner and operator of 14 Advanced Gas cooled Reactors (AGR) and one Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR), on 8 nuclear stations in the UK. EDF Energy/Nuclear Generation is responsible for all the activities associated with the end of life of its nuclear installations: de-fuelling, decommissioning and waste management. As the first AGR is forecast to cease generation within 10 years, EDF Energy has started planning for the decommissioning. This paper covers: - broad outline of the technical strategy and arrangements for future de-fuelling and decommissioning works on the UK AGR fleet, - high level strategic drivers and alignment with wider UK nuclear policy, - overall programme of preparation and initial works, - technical approaches to be adopted during decommissioning. (authors)

  10. FACTORS INFLUENCING HUMAN RELIABILITY OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS COOLED REACTOR OPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigit Santoso

    2016-10-01

    ABSTRAK Peran dan tindakan operator pada reaktor berpendingin gas akan berbeda dengan peran operator pada operasi tipe reaktor lain. Analisis unjuk kerja operator dan faktor yang berpengaruh dapat dilakukan secara komprehensif melalui analisis keandalan manusia(HRA. Melalui HRA dampak dari kesalahan manusia pada sistem maupun cara untuk mengurangi dampak dan frekuensi kesalahan dapat diketahui. Makalah membahas faktor yang berpengaruh pada tindakan operator, yaitu pada kejadian kecelakaan pendingin reaktor gas bersuhu tinggi-HTGR. Analisis untuk kualifikasi faktor pembentuk kinerja(PSF dilakukan berdasarkan kurva keandalan fungsi waktu, dan metode keandalan manusia yang dikembangkan berdasar pada aspek kognitif yaitu Cognitive Reliability and Error Analysis Method (CREAM. Hasil analisis berdasar kurva keandalan fungsi waktu menunjukkan komponen waktu berkontribusi positif pada peningkatan keandalan operator (PSF<1 pada kondisi semua fitur keselamatan berfungsi sesuai rancangan. Sedangkan pada metoda analisis dengan pendekatan kognitif CREAM diketahui selain faktor ketersediaan waktu, faktor pelatihan dan rancangan HMI juga berkontribusi meningkatkan keandalan operator. Faktor pembentuk kinerja keseluruhan diketahui sebesar 0,25 dengan faktor kontribusi positif dominan atau berpengaruh pada penurunan kesalahan manusia adalah ketersediaan waktu (PSF=0,01, dan faktor kontribusi negatif dominan adalah prosedur dan siklus kerja (PSF=5. Nilai PSF tersebut sebagai faktor pengali dalam perhitungan probabilitas kesalahan manusia. Analisis faktor pembentuk kinerja perlu dikembangkan pada skenario kejadian lain untuk selanjutnya digunakan untuk perhitungan dan analisis keandalan manusia yang komprehensif dan perancangan sistem interaksi manusia mesin di ruang kendali. Kata kunci: PSF, HTGR, operator, ruang kendali, keandalan manusia

  11. Generation of a Preliminary PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table) for Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Jae; Wei, Thomas Y. C.; Schultz, Richard R.

    2005-09-01

    In an effort to identify the major thermal-hydraulic phenomena required for the development and validation of thermal-hydraulic analysis tools of Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (VHTR), preliminary Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRT) have been developed. Since the VHTR designs have not yet been defined and are still evolving, preliminary PIRTs have been generated for two reference VHTR designs based on: 600MWth GT-MHR for the representative prismatic modular reactor (PMR) and 400MWth PBMR for the representative pebble bed reactor (PBR). The preliminary PIRTs focus on three highly-ranked event scenarios: high pressure conduction cooling (HPCC) event initiated by loss of flow and simultaneous failure of shutdown cooling system, low pressure conduction cooling (LPCC) event initiated by loss of coolant with air-ingress and load changes (LC) including normal operation conditions. In the case of events and, normal scram shutdown occurs. Each scenario is subdivided into several time phases reflecting the major thermal-hydraulic characteristics and processes of the event. For each phase, each component of the reference designs is examined to identify the various phenomena. The phenomena are then ranked with respect to their influence on the selected primary criteria, both safety and otherwise by an expert panel group in Korea and the US. The Korean experts from the institutes, universities and industries were involved in the ranking in which an Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP) was employed. The PIRTs generated in this study are also intended for use in identifying the experimental database and further experiment needs as well as qualifying the capability of existing analysis tools. This study has been performed under the auspices of the INERI project, 'Screening of Gas-Cooled Reactor Thermal-Hydraulic and Safety Analysis Tools and Experiment Database' between INL, ANL and KAERI

  12. CONTEMPT-G computer program and its application to HTGR containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macnab, D.I.

    1976-03-01

    The CONTEMPT-G computer program has been developed by General Atomic Company to simulate the temperature-pressure response of a containment atmosphere to postulated depressurization of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) primary or secondary coolant circuits. The mathematical models currently used in the code are described, and applications of the code in examples of the atmospheric response of a representative containment to a variety of postulated HTGR accident conditions are presented. In particular, maximum containment temperature and pressure, equilibrated long-term prestressed concrete reactor vessel and containment pressures, and peak containment conditions following steam pipe ruptures are examined for a representative 770-MW(e) HTGR

  13. Manufacturing and testing the HTGR refueling tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurin, V.A.; Gribanov, Yu.A.; Kolosenko, V.V.; Gujda, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the manufacturing technique for a refueling tube of a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR). Four refueling tube sections were made: two sections from GSP-50 material and two sections from carbon-carbon (C-C) composite materials. Radiation tests were carried out in the reactor BOR-60. Experimental results show that the strength characteristics and thermophysical properties of graphitized carbon materials, from which the sections have been manufactured, are higher by a factor of 2.5-3.5 as compared with the HTGR refueling tube requirements. The dimensional changes of GSP-50 and C-C composite materials at temperatures between 300 and 600 deg C up to the neutron fluence of 1·10 21 n/cm 2 are comparable and meet the specifications for HTGR refueling tube

  14. A study of sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor with thorium blanket for supply of U-233 to high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, H.; Nishimura, H.; Osugi, T.

    1978-08-01

    Symbiotic energy system between fast breeder reactor and thermal reactor would have a potential merit for nuclear proliferation problem. And when using HTGR as the thermal reactor in the system, the energy system appears to be promising as an energy system self-sufficient in fuels, which can generate both electricity and high temperature process heat. In the system the fast breeder reactor has to supply sufficient amount of fissile plutonium to keep the reactor going, and also produce U-233 necessary to the associated U-233 fuelled process heat production HTGR. Three types of LMFBR concepts with thorium blanket, conventional homogeneous core LMFBR, and axial and radial parfait heterogeneous core LMFBRs, have been investigated to find out suitable configurations of LMFBR for supply of U-233 to the HTGR with relatively high conversion ratio of 0.85, in the symbiotic energy system between LMFBR and HTGR. The investigation on LMFBR has been made on fuel sufficiency of the system, inherent safety such as sodium-void and Doppler coefficients, and fuel cycle cost. The followings were revealed; (1) Conventional homogeneous core LMFBR with thorium radial blanket well satisfies the condition of fuel sufficiency, if adequate radial blanket thickness is chosen. However, the sodium-void coefficient and fuel cycle cost are inferior to the other concepts. (2) Axial parfait heterogeneous core LMFBR can be regarded as one of the best LMFBR concepts installed in the symbiotic energy system, from the viewpoints of fuel sufficiency, inherent safety and fuel cycle cost. However, further investigations should be needed on reliability and operationability of the concept. (3) Radial parfait heterogeneous core LMFBR seems inadequate as the LMFBR in the system, because the configurations based on this concept does not satisfy plutonium and U-233 breedings, simultaneously. This LMFBR concept, however, has excellent breeding performance in the internal radial blanket. So further

  15. Preliminary design of the cooling system for a gas-cooled, high-fluence fast pulsed reactor (HFFPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteith, H.C.

    1978-10-01

    The High-Fluence Fast Pulsed Reactor (HFFPR) is a research reactor concept currently being evaluated as a source for weapon effects experimentation and advanced reactor safety experiments. One of the designs under consideration is a gas-cooled design for testing large-scale weapon hardware or large bundles of full-length, fast reactor fuel pins. This report describes a conceptual cooling system design for such a reactor. The primary coolant would be helium and the secondary coolant would be water. The size of the helium-to-water heat exchanger and the water-to-water heat exchanger will be on the order of 0.9 metre (3 feet) in diameter and 3 metres (10 feet) in length. Analysis indicates that the entire cooling system will easily fit into the existing Sandia Engineering Reactor Facility (SERF) building. The alloy Incoloy 800H appears to be the best candidate for the tube material in the helium-to-water heat exchanger. Type 316 stainless steel has been recommended for the shell of this heat exchanger. Estimates place the cost of the helium-to-water heat exchanger at approximately $100,000, the water-to-water heat exchanger at approximately $25,000, and the helium pump at approximately $450,000. The overall cost of the cooling system will approach $2 million

  16. Program prioritization system user requirements document for Gas Cooled Reactor Associates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Efficient management of the national HTGR program requires the establishment of an information system that will facilitate a more rational allocation of resources and task prioritization consistent with program policies. The system described in this document provides a data analysis mechanism for processing top level summary status and planning information in a rapid, timely and selective manner. Data produced by the system can be used by management to provide a rational basis for prioritizing tasks, evaluating program changes and program planning regarding costs, schedules and overall program development logic. The purpose of this document is to delineate the program prioritization system (PPS) requirements for use as a guide to acquiring and implementing the system

  17. Gas-cooled reactor programs. Fuel-management positioning and accounting module: FUELMANG Version V1.11, September 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medlin, T.W.; Hill, K.L.; Johnson, G.L.; Jones, J.E.; Vondy, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    This report documents the code module FUELMANG for fuel management of a reactor. This code may be used to position fuel during the calculation of a reactor history, maintain a mass balance history of the fuel movement, and calculate the unit fuel cycle component of the electrical generation cost. In addition to handling fixed feed fuel without recycle, provision has been made for fuel recycle with various options applied to the recycled fuel. A continuous fueling option is also available with the code. A major edit produced by the code is a detailed summary of the mass balance history of the reactor and a fuel cost analysis of that mass balance history. This code is incorporated in the system containing the VENTURE diffusion theory neutronics code for routine use. Fuel movement according to prescribed instructions is performed without the access of additional user input data during the calculation of a reactor operating history. Local application has been primarily for analysis of the performance of gas-cooled thermal reactor core concepts

  18. Gas-cooled reactor programs. Fuel-management positioning and accounting module: FUELMANG Version V1. 11, September 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medlin, T.W.; Hill, K.L.; Johnson, G.L.; Jones, J.E.; Vondy, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    This report documents the code module FUELMANG for fuel management of a reactor. This code may be used to position fuel during the calculation of a reactor history, maintain a mass balance history of the fuel movement, and calculate the unit fuel cycle component of the electrical generation cost. In addition to handling fixed feed fuel without recycle, provision has been made for fuel recycle with various options applied to the recycled fuel. A continuous fueling option is also available with the code. A major edit produced by the code is a detailed summary of the mass balance history of the reactor and a fuel cost analysis of that mass balance history. This code is incorporated in the system containing the VENTURE diffusion theory neutronics code for routine use. Fuel movement according to prescribed instructions is performed without the access of additional user input data during the calculation of a reactor operating history. Local application has been primarily for analysis of the performance of gas-cooled thermal reactor core concepts.

  19. Dragon project reference design assessment study for a 528 MW (E) thorium cycle high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosegood, S.B.

    1967-05-01

    The report presents an assessment of the feasibility, safety and cost of a large nuclear power station employing a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. A thermal output 1250 MW was chosen for the study, resulting in a net electrical output of 528.34 MW from a single reactor station, or 1056.7 MW from a twin reactor station. A reference design has been developed and is described. The reactor uses a U-235/Th-232/U-233 fuel cycle, on a feed and breed basis. It is believed that such a reactor could be built at an early date, requiring only a relatively modest development programme. Building costs are estimated to be Pound46.66/kW for a single unit station and Pound42.6/kW for a twin station, with power generation costs of 1.67p/kWh and 1.50p/kWh respectively. Optimisation studies have not been carried out and it should be possible to improve on the costs. The design has been made as flexible as possible to allow units of smaller or larger outputs to be designed with a minimum of change. (U.K.)

  20. HTGR structural-materials efforts in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittenhouse, P.L.; Roberts, D.I.

    1982-07-01

    The status of ongoing structural materials programs being conducted in the US to support development and deployment of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is described. While the total US program includes work in support of all variants of this reactor system, the emphasis of this paper is on the work aimed at support of the steam cycle/cogeneration (SC/C) version of the HTGR. Work described includes activities to develop design and performance prediction data on metals, ceramics, and graphite

  1. Magnitude and reactivity consequences of moisture ingress into the modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, O.L.

    1992-12-01

    Inadvertent admission of moisture into the primary system of a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor has been identified in US Department of Energy-sponsored studies as an important safety concern. The work described here develops an analytical methodology to quantify the pressure and reactivity consequences of steam-generator tube rupture and other moisture-ingress-related incidents. Important neutronic and thermohydraulic processes are coupled with reactivity feedback and safety and control system responses. The rate and magnitude of steam buildup are found to be dominated by major system features such as break size compared with safety valve capacity and reliability and less sensitive to factors such as heat transfer coefficients. The results indicate that ingress transients progress at a slower pace than previously predicted by bounding analyses, with milder power overshoots and more time for operator or automatic corrective actions

  2. Special power supply and control system for the gas-cooled fast reactor-core flow test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, T.L.

    1981-09-01

    The test bundle in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor-Core Flow Test Loop (GCFR-CFTL) requires a source of electrical power that can be controlled accurately and reliably over a wide range of steady-state and transient power levels and skewed power distributions to simulate GCFR operating conditions. Both ac and dc power systems were studied, and only those employing silicon-controlled rectifiers (SCRs) could meet the requirements. This report summarizes the studies, tests, evaluations, and development work leading to the selection. it also presents the design, procurement, testing, and evaluation of the first 500-kVa LMPL supply. The results show that the LMPL can control 60-Hz sine wave power from 200 W to 500 kVA

  3. Gas-cooled fast reactors. Motivation and presentation of the ENIGMA program in the MASURCA experimental critical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tommasi, Jean; Jacqmin, Robert; Mellier, Frederic

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a new experimental physics program in support of gas cooled fast reactor (GCFR) design studies, called ENIGMA, to be performed in the MASURCA critical facility at CEA-Cadarache, France. The prospective GCFR design studies at CEA are presented, as well as the specific neutronics features needing an extension of the validation of calculation tools and nuclear data. The relevant existing experiments are briefly reviewed and the need for new experimental data is pointed out. The first phase of the proposed new experiments includes a reference core with a representative spectrum, and a series of central core substitutions involving spectrum shifts, streaming studies, low-grade Pu substitutions, innovative material (Si, Zr) substitutions. Reflector substitution zones will include elements foreseen for the reflectors (Si, Zr, C). Subsequent phases will involve larger amounts of low-grade Pu or innovative materials, and configurations representative of experimental and demonstration GCFRs. (author)

  4. Modelling 3D crack propagation in ageing graphite bricks of Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi-Tuyet-Giang Vo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, crack propagation in Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR graphite bricks with ageing properties is studied using the eXtended Finite Element Method (X-FEM. A parametric study for crack propagation, including the influence of different initial crack shapes and propagation criteria, is conducted. The results obtained in the benchmark study show that the crack paths from X-FEM are similar to the experimental ones. The accuracy of the strain energy release rate computation in a heterogeneous material is also evaluated using a finite difference approach. Planar and non-planar 3D crack growth simulations are presented to demonstrate the robustness and the versatility of the method utilized. Finally, this work contributes to the better understanding of crack propagation behaviour in AGR graphite bricks and so contributes to the extension of the AGR plants’ lifetimes in the UK by reducing uncertainties.

  5. A system for regulating the pressure of resuperheated steam in high temperature gas-cooled reactor power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braytenbah, A.S.; Jaegines, K.O.

    1975-01-01

    The invention relates to a system for regulating steam-pressure in the re-superheating portion of a steam-boiler receiving heat from a gas-cooled high temperature nuclear reactor, provided with gas distributing pumps driven by steam-turbines. The system comprises means for generating a pressure signal of desired magnitude for the re-superheating portion, and means for providing a real pressure in the re-superheating portion, means (including a by-passing device) for generating steam-flow rate signal of desired magnitude, a turbine by-pass device comprising a by-pass tapping means for regulating the steam-flow-rate in said turbine according to the desired steam-flow rate signal and means for controlling said by-pass tapping means according to said desired steam-flow-rate signal [fr

  6. HTGR spent fuel storage study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgoyne, R.M.; Holder, N.D.

    1979-04-01

    This report documents a study of alternate methods of storing high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) spent fuel. General requirements and design considerations are defined for a storage facility integral to a fuel recycle plant. Requirements for stand-alone storage are briefly considered. Three alternate water-cooled storage conceptual designs (plug well, portable well, and monolith) are considered and compared to a previous air-cooled design. A concept using portable storage wells in racks appears to be the most favorable, subject to seismic analysis and economic evaluation verification

  7. Design study of gas cooled fast reactors using natural uranium as fuel cycle input employing radial shuffling strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irka, Feriska Handayani; Su'ud, Zaki; Aryani, Menik; Aziz, Ferhat; Sekimoto, H.

    2012-06-01

    Design study of gas cooled fast reactors with natural uranium as fuel cycle input has been performed. The reactors utilizes UN-PUN as fuel, helium as coolant, and can be operated without refueling for 10 years in each batch. Reactor design optimization is performed to utilize natural uranium as fuel cycle input. This reactor subdivided into 10 regions with equal volume in radial directions. The natural uranium is initially put in region 1, and after one cycle of 10 years of burnup it is shifted to region 2 and the region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all regions. To achieve criticality requirement relatively high fuel volume fraction is applied. In this study several parametric survey were performed for several parameters such as fuel-to-coolant volume fraction ratio, core radius, and core height. After some optimization process we determine a standard core with a height and a diameter of 350 cm and 240 cm respectively, and the volume fraction for this design is 65% fuel, 10% cladding and 25% coolant. Calculation has been done by using SRAC-Citation system code and JENDL-3.2 library.

  8. Sensitivity analysis of the kinetic behaviour of a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor to variations of the delayed neutron parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Rooijen, W. F. G.; Lathouwers, D.

    2007-01-01

    In advanced Generation IV (fast) reactors an integral fuel cycle is envisaged, where all Heavy Metal is recycled in the reactor. This leads to a nuclear fuel with a considerable content of Minor Actinides. For many of these isotopes the nuclear data is not very well known. In this paper the sensitivity of the kinetic behaviour of the reactor to the dynamic parameters λ k , β k and the delayed spectrum χ d,k is studied using first order perturbation theory. In the current study, feedback due to Doppler and/or thermohydraulic effects are not treated. The theoretical framework is applied to a Generation IV Gas Cooled Fast Reactor. The results indicate that the first-order approach is satisfactory for small variations of the data. Sensitivities to delayed neutron data are similar for increasing and decreasing transients. Sensitivities generally increase with reactivity for increasing transients. For decreasing transients, there are less clearly defined trends, although the sensitivity to the delayed neutron spectrum decreases with larger sub-criticality, as expected. For this research, an adjoint capable version of the time-dependent diffusion code DALTON is under development. (authors)

  9. Status of development of gas-cooled reactors in Switzerland, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbling, W.; Sarlos, G.

    1988-01-01

    Swiss industrial companies and the Federal Institute for Reactor Research are involved in the framework of German-Swiss cooperation in the HTR-500 project. Another effort in Switzerland is directed to the development of a small heating reactor, in the power range of 10 to 50 MW, for district heating, one of the concepts investigated being an HTR pebble-bed reactor

  10. The new technology in high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The fifth anniversary of CEA/INET cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Suyuan

    2006-11-01

    In 2001, CEA and INET signed the first agreement and a series of specific topics of cooperation (STC), which officially launched the cooperated program on HTGR technology between the two sides, Since 2002, INET has sent dozens of researchers to CEA on both short and long term basis to work with their French counterparts. Over the past five years, they have worked together in a variety of fields, such as materials, fuel, components and reactor physics. Besides, both sides sponsored workshops and technical visits to tackle the major problems. This volume with a collection of papers not only keeps a record of technical progress contributed by both sides, but also marks the fifth anniversary cooperation between CEA and INET. (authors)

  11. Status, results and usefulness of risk analyses for HTGR type reactors of different capacity accessory to planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, W.; Mertens, J.

    1985-01-01

    As regards system-inherent risks, HTGR type reactors are evaluated with reference to the established light-water-moderated reactor types. Probabilistic HTGR risk analyses have shown modern HTGR systems to possess a balanced safety concept with a risk remaining distinctly below legally accepted values. Inversely, the development and optimization of the safety concepts have been (and are being) essentially co-determined by the probabilistic analyses, as it is technically sensible and economically necessary to render the specific safety-related HTGR properties eligible for licensing. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Seventh meeting of the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors, Beckum, Federal Republic of Germany, 29-30 October 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The document contains a summary report on the seventh meeting of the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors and 8 reports describing the national GCR programmes of Austria, China, France, Japan, Switzerland, USSR, UK and Commission of European Communities. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these reports. Refs and tabs

  13. Gas-cooled reactor commercialization study: introduction scenario and commercialization analyses for process heat applications. Final report, July 8, 1977--November 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    This report identifies and presents an introduction scenario which can lead to the operation of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor demonstration plants for combined process heat and electric power generation applications, and presents a commercialization analysis relevant to the organizational and management plans which could implement a development program

  14. Gas-cooled reactor commercialization study: introduction scenario and commercialization analyses for process heat applications. Final report, July 8, 1977--November 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    This report identifies and presents an introduction scenario which can lead to the operation of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor demonstration plants for combined process heat and electric power generation applications, and presents a commercialization analysis relevant to the organizational and management plans which could implement a development program.

  15. Design Study of 200MWth Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with Nitride (UN-PuN Fuel Long Life without Refueling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syarifah Ratna Dewi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Design study of 200 MWth Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with UN-PuN fuel long life without refueling has been done. GFR is one type reactor in Generation IV reactor system. It uses helium coolant and fast neutron spectrum. Helium is chemical inert, single phase and low neutron moderation. In this study the calculations are performed by using SRAC code with PIJ calculation for the fuel pin cell calculation and CITATION calculation for core calculation. The data libraries use JENDL 3.2. The variation fuel fractions are 50% until 60%. The diameter active core is 150 cm and the height active core is 100 cm. The reflector radial-axial width is 50 cm. The variation of the powers are 100 MWth up to 500 MWth. The high power causes the high k-eff value. The optimum design is reached when the power is 200 MWth, variation percentage Plutonium for fuel F1:F2:F3=9%:11%:13%. The comparation of fuel:cladding:coolant fraction = 55%:10%:35%. The cooling down time of Plutonium is nine months. The optimum k-eff value is 1.0142 with excess reactivity value 1.403%. The decay of Plutonium decrease k-eff value in the beginning of burn up.

  16. The design, safety and project development status of the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mears, L.D.; Dean, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The cooperative government and industry Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) Program in the United States has advanced a 350 MW(t) plant design through the conceptual development stage. The system incorporates an annular core of prismatic fuel elements within a steel pressure vessel connected, in a side-by-side arrangement, by a concentric duct to a second steel vessel containing a steam generator and helium coolant circulator. The reference plant design consists of four reactor modules installed in separate below-grade silos, providing steam to two conventional turbine generators. The nominal net plant output is 540 MW(e). The small reactor system takes unique advantage of the high temperature capability of the refractory coated fuel and the large thermal inertia of the graphite moderator to provide a design capable of withstanding a complete loss of active core cooling without causing excessive core heatup and significant release of fission products from the fuel. Present program activities are concentrated on interactions with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission aimed at obtaining a Licensability Statement. A project initiative to build a prototype plant which would demonstrate the MHTGR-unique licensing process, plant performance, costs and schedule plus establish an industrial infrastructure to proceed with follow-on commercial MHTGR plants by the turn of the century, is being undertaken by the utility/vendor participants (author)

  17. HTGR Measurements and Instrumentation Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, Sydney J.; Holcomb, David Eugene; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit

    2012-01-01

    This report provides an integrated overview of measurements and instrumentation for near-term future high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Instrumentation technology has undergone revolutionary improvements since the last HTGR was constructed in the United States. This report briefly describes the measurement and communications needs of HTGRs for normal operations, maintenance and inspection, fuel fabrication, and accident response. The report includes a description of modern communications technologies and also provides a potential instrumentation communications architecture designed for deployment at an HTGR. A principal focus for the report is describing new and emerging measurement technologies with high potential to improve operations, maintenance, and accident response for the next generation of HTGRs, known as modular HTGRs, which are designed with passive safety features. Special focus is devoted toward describing the failure modes of the measurement technologies and assessing the technology maturity.

  18. Phenomena identification ranking table and knowledge base gaps and needs for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuhiro, Akira; Potirniche, Gabriel; Rink, Karl

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. is developing a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP); also known as the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). The generic MHTGR is a graphite-moderated, gas-cooled reactor (GCR) of either a prismatic modular (block-type, PMR) or pebble-bed (PBR) core configuration. The pebble-bed design requires new attention with respect to neutronics, materials, thermal hydraulic, safety and licensing relative to the set of phenomena and engineering analyses associated with the current fleet of legacy LWRs. In fact, the relative knowledge and experiential base on gas reactors is small in comparison to the LWR. There is a dated body of knowledge from some 25+ years ago on GCRs; recently there is a renewed interest. Thus in the present design and development phase of the NGNP/VHTR, there are relevant thermohydraulic safety issues surrounding the MHTGR with issues impacting foremost the design review process. A common phenomena with respect to PMR and PBR core design, is that concerning 'graphite dust' and its interaction and transport with potential fission products (FP) that may be present within the graphite and subsequently in the primary system. The nature of the graphite and FPs, when circulated or transported in the primary, and possibly beyond, is of concern as potentially an relevant 'source term' (radionuclide inventory) of the MHTGR. Based on NUREG/CR-6944, Volumes 1-5, the author briefly describes the state-of-the art knowledge base on graphite dust and FP transport with respect to the anticipated design of the MHTGR. In addition, from the Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) developed in these reports we concurrently identify and describe 'gaps and needs' of the knowledge base. That is, we also present the knowledge base gaps and needs with respect to the following: 1) R and D needs relative to PIRTs, 2) (experimental) database needs relative to PIRTs, and 3) simulation and modeling

  19. Creep-Rupture Properties and Corrosion Behaviour of 21/4 Cr-1 Mo Steel and Hastelloy X-Alloys in Simulated HTGR Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystrup, Aage; Rittenhouse, P. L.; DiStefano, J. R.

    Hastelloy X and 2/sup 1///sub 4/ Cr-1 Mo steel are being considered as structural alloys for components of a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) system. Among other mechanical properties, the creep behavior of these materials in HTGR primary coolant helium must be established to form part...... of the design criteria. This report describes the simulated HTGR-helium environmental creep facilities, summarizes preliminary creep properties of 2/sup 1///sub 4/ Cr-1 Mo steel and Hastelloy X generated in HTGR helium and compares these with data obtained by testing in air. Some corrosion characteristics...

  20. HTGR Application Economic Model Users' Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.M. Gandrik

    2012-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Application Economic Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Application Economic Model calculates either the required selling price of power and/or heat for a given internal rate of return (IRR) or the IRR for power and/or heat being sold at the market price. The user can generate these economic results for a range of reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for up to 16 reactor modules; and for module ratings of 200, 350, or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Application Economic Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Application Economic Model. This model was designed for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel and engineering economics. Modification of the HTGR Application Economic Model should only be performed by users familiar with the HTGR and its applications, Excel, and Visual Basic.

  1. An investigation on technical feasibilities of fuel cycle for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (Case study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Ueta, Shohei; Aihara, Jun; Shibata, Taiju; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2008-03-01

    In accordance with the basic policy of effectively using nuclear fuel resources, the FBR cycle, one of the most possible fuel cycle in the future, will be adapted after plu-thermal program by LWR in Japanese nuclear cycle plan. In this paper, a case study of technical investigation of HTGR fuel cycle based on HTGR fuel cycle proposed to adapt to Japanese nuclear fuel cycle plan were carried out from the viewpoint of effective utilization of uranium, fabrication technologies of MOX fuel, reprocessing technologies, amount of interim storage of HTGR fuel and graphite waste. As a result, the fuel cycle for HTGR is expected to be possible technically. (author)

  2. Status of work on gas-cooled reactors in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebennik, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The report presents the status of work on the following concepts for HTGRs: the modular VTR-265 reactor with integrated arrangement of the primary equipment in a single prestressed vessel; the modular VTR-250 reactor with the core and heat exchanging equipment accommodated in separate vessels. The pilot energotechnological installation VG-400 is intended for co-generation of heat, steam and electricity for large power-consuming industries. 5 refs

  3. Presentation of decay heat removal computer codes used for gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvallo, G.; Dobremelle, M.; Mejane, A.

    1992-01-01

    For the existing French Magnox type reactors, two computer codes have been developed to analyze the transient after reactor shutdown: - The first one ('GITA', is representative of the short term evolution (less than 2 days) and it includes a refined representation of all the reactor components. - The second one, 'LOTE', has been developed to represent the long term evolution (from 2 days to several months) with a simplified representation of the main components of the reactor. One example of accident simulation is presented for existing Magnox reactor. Moreover, as a part of the French program on the future reactors, an analysis of the modular high temperature has been initiated. 2D and 3D general flow and conduction codes are used for this analysis: - DELFINE is a 2D conduction code including a 1D thermosyphon model, it has been used for decay heat removal analysis. TRIO is a 3D flow code including 3D radiation, conduction and convection heat transfer. It is used for detailed thermal analysis during accidental conditions

  4. Present status in research and development of a multi-purpose high-temperature gas cooled reactor in JAERI. 1985 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    In Japan, it is forecast that the energy demand in the industries consuming large amount of energy, such as iron and steel, paper and pulp, chemicals, ceramics and earth and stones, will decrease due to energy saving and the stagnant demand of those products, whereas mechatronics will largely grow. Accordingly, the demand and supply of whole energy will change. The development of high temperature gas-cooled reactors is highly significant for diversifying and stably ensuring energy resources in Japan. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has advanced the research and development of multi-purpose high temperature gas-cooled reactors since 1969, and the main accomplishment carried out so far is briefly reported. The important step in this development is the construction of an experimental reactor, and its preparation is in progress. At present, the rationalizing design of the experimental reactor is carried out, and the construction will begin in fiscal year 1989. In this report, concerning multi-purpose high temperature gas-cooled reactors, the outline of the research and development, the design of the experimental reactor, the research on fuel and graphite, metallic materials, reactor technology, high temperature equipment and structure and others are described. (Kako, I.)

  5. Helium heater design for the helium direct cycle component test facility. [for gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, V. R.; Gunn, S. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a helium heater to be used to conduct non-nuclear demonstration tests of the complete power conversion loop for a direct-cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant. Requirements for the heater include: heating the helium to a 1500 F temperature, operating at a 1000 psia helium pressure, providing a thermal response capability and helium volume similar to that of the nuclear reactor, and a total heater system helium pressure drop of not more than 15 psi. The unique compact heater system design proposed consists of 18 heater modules; air preheaters, compressors, and compressor drive systems; an integral control system; piping; and auxiliary equipment. The heater modules incorporate the dual-concentric-tube 'Variflux' heat exchanger design which provides a controlled heat flux along the entire length of the tube element. The heater design as proposed will meet all system requirements. The heater uses pressurized combustion (50 psia) to provide intensive heat transfer, and to minimize furnace volume and heat storage mass.

  6. Computer simulation of fuel behavior during loss-of-flow accidents in a gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehner, T.R.

    1980-01-01

    The sequence of events in a loss-of-flow accident without reactor shutdown in a gas-cooled fast breeder reactor is strongly influenced by the manner in which the fuel deforms. In order to predict the mode of initial gross fuel deformation, welling, melting or cracking, a thermomechanical computer simulation program was developed. Methods and techniques used make the simulation an economical, efficient, and flexible engineering tool. An innovative application of the enthalpy model within a finite difference scheme is used to caculate temperatures in the fuel rod. The method of successive elastic solutions is used to calculate the thermoelastic-creep response. Calculated stresses are compared with a brittle-fracture stress criterion. An independent computer code is used to calculate fission-gas-induced fuel swelling. Results obtained with the computer simulation indicate that swelling is not a mode of initial fuel deformation. Faster transients result in fuel melting, while slower transients result in fuel cracking. For investigated faster coolant flow coastdowns with time constants of 1 second and 10 seconds, compressive stresses in the outer radial portion of the fuel limit fuel swelling and inhibit fuel cracking. For a slower coolant flow coastdown with a 300 second time constant, tensile stresses in the outer radial portion of the fuel induce early fuel cracking before any melting or significant fuel swelling has occurred. Suggestions for further research are discussed. A derived noniterative solution for mechanics calculations may offer an order of magnitude decrease in computational effort

  7. An Artificial Neural Network Compensated Output Feedback Power-Level Control for Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Dong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Small modular reactors (SMRs could be beneficial in providing electricity power safely and also be viable for applications such as seawater desalination and heat production. Due to its inherent safety features, the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR has been seen as one of the best candidates for building SMR-based nuclear power plants. Since the MHTGR dynamics display high nonlinearity and parameter uncertainty, it is necessary to develop a nonlinear adaptive power-level control law which is not only beneficial to the safe, stable, efficient and autonomous operation of the MHTGR, but also easy to implement practically. In this paper, based on the concept of shifted-ectropy and the physically-based control design approach, it is proved theoretically that the simple proportional-differential (PD output-feedback power-level control can provide asymptotic closed-loop stability. Then, based on the strong approximation capability of the multi-layer perceptron (MLP artificial neural network (ANN, a compensator is established to suppress the negative influence caused by system parameter uncertainty. It is also proved that the MLP-compensated PD power-level control law constituted by an experientially-tuned PD regulator and this MLP-based compensator can guarantee bounded closed-loop stability. Numerical simulation results not only verify the theoretical results, but also illustrate the high performance of this MLP-compensated PD power-level controller in suppressing the oscillation of process variables caused by system parameter uncertainty.

  8. On-Line Fuel Failure Monitor for Fuel Testing and Monitoring of Gas Cooled Very High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Bourham, Mohamed A.

    2010-01-01

    Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) utilize the TRISO microsphere as the fundamental fuel unit in the core. The TRISO microsphere (∼ 1-mm diameter) is composed of a UO2 kernel surrounded by a porous pyrolytic graphite buffer, an inner pyrolytic graphite layer, a silicon carbide (SiC) coating, and an outer pyrolytic graphite layer. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel is expected to range from 4%-10% (higher enrichments are also being considered). The layer/coating system that surrounds the UO2 kernel acts as the containment and main barrier against the environmental release of radioactivity. To understand better the behavior of this fuel under in-core conditions (e.g., high temperature, intense fast neutron flux, etc.), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a fuel testing program that will take place at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During this project North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers will collaborate with INL staff for establishing an optimized system for fuel monitoring for the ATR tests. In addition, it is expected that the developed system and methods will be of general use for fuel failure monitoring in gas cooled VHTRs.

  9. On0Line Fuel Failure Monitor for Fuel Testing and Monitoring of Gas Cooled Very High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayman I. Hawari; Mohamed A. Bourham

    2010-04-22

    IVery High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) utilize the TRISO microsphere as the fundamental fuel unit in the core. The TRISO microsphere (~ 1- mm diameter) is composed of a UO2 kernel surrounded by a porous pyrolytic graphite buffer, an inner pyrolytic graphite layer, a silicon carbide (SiC) coating, and an outer pyrolytic graphite layer. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel is expected to range from 4% – 10% (higher enrichments are also being considered). The layer/coating system that surrounds the UO2 kernel acts as the containment and main barrier against the environmental release of radioactivity. To understand better the behavior of this fuel under in-core conditions (e.g., high temperature, intense fast neutron flux, etc.), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a fuel testing program that will take place at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During this project North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers will collaborate with INL staff for establishing an optimized system for fuel monitoring for the ATR tests. In addition, it is expected that the developed system and methods will be of general use for fuel failure monitoring in gas cooled VHTRs.

  10. Achievement of the level 1 PSA in support to the CEA 2400 MWth gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmain, M.; Bassi, C.; Azria, P.

    2012-01-01

    Within Generation IV International Forum, the CEA has developed since 2006 a Level 1 PSA to support the design of the 2400 MWth GFR (Gas-cooled Fast Reactor). A first period, with insights published in 2008, consisted in a model with few initiators representative of medium and high pressure situations, those used for the deterministic design of the Decay Heat Removal (DHR) dedicated loops. In a second period, an iterative work reached the probabilistic targets used for generation III reactors, with prior use of normal loops, and increase of DHR reliability in high pressure conditions. The PSA team covered all the internal initiators, and supported the design of components with instrumentation and control and electrical supplies, and the shutdown operating modes of secondary, tertiary circuits, with possible re-alignment to dedicated DHR loops. Besides, the completed PSA integrated more realistic success criteria than the preliminary model and than the deterministic approach, thanks to CATHARE2 code. In case of loss of Forced Convection, the probability of success of the Natural Convection DHR was assessed by a reliability method for passive systems. The paper underlines the PSA methodology knowledge from the EDF expertise, the improvements co-developed with CEA, and the iteration design-PSA-design. (authors)

  11. The IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Reactor Physics, Thermal-hydraulics and Depletion Uncertainty Analysis: Description of the Benchmark Test Cases and Phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederik Reitsma; Gerhard Strydom; Bismark Tyobeka; Kostadin Ivanov

    2012-10-01

    The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. The uncertainties in the HTR analysis tools are today typically assessed with sensitivity analysis and then a few important input uncertainties (typically based on a PIRT process) are varied in the analysis to find a spread in the parameter of importance. However, one wish to apply a more fundamental approach to determine the predictive capability and accuracies of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics and depletion simulations used for reactor design and safety assessment. Today there is a broader acceptance of the use of uncertainty analysis even in safety studies and it has been accepted by regulators in some cases to replace the traditional conservative analysis. Finally, there is also a renewed focus in supplying reliable covariance data (nuclear data uncertainties) that can then be used in uncertainty methods. Uncertainty and sensitivity studies are therefore becoming an essential component of any significant effort in data and simulation improvement. In order to address uncertainty in analysis and methods in the HTGR community the IAEA launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling early in 2012. The project is built on the experience of the OECD/NEA Light Water Reactor (LWR) Uncertainty Analysis in Best-Estimate Modelling (UAM) benchmark activity, but focuses specifically on the peculiarities of HTGR designs and its simulation requirements. Two benchmark problems were defined with the prismatic type design represented by the MHTGR-350 design from General Atomics (GA) while a 250 MW modular pebble bed design, similar to the INET (China) and indirect-cycle PBMR (South Africa) designs are also included. In the paper more detail on the benchmark cases, the different specific phases and tasks and the latest

  12. Preliminary design of a borax internal core-catcher for a gas cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Dorner, S.; Schumacher, G.

    1976-09-01

    Preliminary thermal calculations show that a core-catcher appears to be feasible, which is able to cope with the complete meltdown of the core and blankets of a 1,000 MWe GCFR. This core-catcher is based on borax (Na 2 B 4 O 7 ) as dissolving material of the oxide fuel and of the fission products occuring in oxide form. The borax is contained in steel boxes forming a 2.1 meter thick slab on the base of the reactor cavity inside the prestressed concrete reactor vessel, just underneath the reactor core. The fission products are dispersed in the pool formed by the liquid borax. The heat power density in the pool is conveniently reduced and the resulting heat fluxes at the borders of the pool can be safely carried away through the PCRV liner and its water cooling system. (orig.) [de

  13. Saturated Adaptive Output-Feedback Power-Level Control for Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Dong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Small modular reactors (SMRs are those nuclear fission reactors with electrical output powers of less than 300 MWe. Due to its inherent safety features, the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR has been seen as one of the best candidates for building SMR-based nuclear plants with high safety-level and economical competitive power. Power-level control is crucial in providing grid-appropriation for all types of SMRs. Usually, there exists nonlinearity, parameter uncertainty and control input saturation in the SMR-based plant dynamics. Motivated by this, a novel saturated adaptive output-feedback power-level control of the MHTGR is proposed in this paper. This newly-built control law has the virtues of having relatively neat form, of being strong adaptive to parameter uncertainty and of being able to compensate control input saturation, which are given by constructing Lyapunov functions based upon the shifted-ectropies of neutron kinetics and reactor thermal-hydraulics, giving an online tuning algorithm for the controller parameters and proposing a control input saturation compensator respectively. It is proved theoretically that input-to-state stability (ISS can be guaranteed for the corresponding closed-loop system. In order to verify the theoretical results, this new control strategy is then applied to the large-range power maneuvering control for the MHTGR of the HTR-PM plant. Numerical simulation results show not only the relationship between regulating performance and control input saturation bound but also the feasibility of applying this saturated adaptive control law practically.

  14. Information exchange on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen technology between JAEA and INET in 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Wang Hong

    2010-07-01

    The worldwide interests in the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) have been growing because the high temperature heat produced by the reactor can be utilized not only for efficient power generation but also for broad process heat applications, especially for thermo-chemical hydrogen production to fuel a prospective hydrogen economy in future. Presently only two HTGR reactors are operational in the world, including the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and the HTR-10 in the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in China. JAEA and INET have cooperated since 1986 in the field of HTGR development, particularly on the HTTR and HTR-10 projects. This report describes the cooperation activities on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen technology between JAEA and INET in 2009. (author)

  15. Information exchange mainly on HTGR operation and maintenance technique between JAEA and INET in 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Yukio; Hino, Ryutaro; Yu Suyuan

    2006-06-01

    The worldwide interests in the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) have been growing because the high temperature heat produced by the reactor can be utilized not only for efficient power generation but also for broad process heat applications, especially for thermo-chemical hydrogen production to fuel a prospective hydrogen economy in future. Presently only two HTGR reactors are operational in the world, including the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and the HTR-10 in the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in China. JAEA and INET have cooperated since 1986 in the field of HTGR development, particularly on the HTTR and HTR-10 projects. This report describes the cooperation with emphasis on HTGR operation and maintenance techniques between JAEA and INET and outlines cooperation activities during the fiscal year 2005. (author)

  16. Information exchange on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen technology between JAEA and INET in 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Tachibana, Yukio; Sun Yuliang

    2009-07-01

    The worldwide interests in the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) have been growing because the high temperature heat produced by the reactor can be utilized not only for efficient power generation but also for broad process heat applications, especially for thermo-chemical hydrogen production to fuel a prospective hydrogen economy in future. Presently only two HTGR reactors are operational in the world, including the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and the HTR-10 in the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in China. JAEA and INET have cooperated since 1986 in the field of HTGR development, particularly on the HTTR and HTR-10 projects. This report describes the cooperation activities on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen technology between JAEA and INET in 2008. (author)

  17. Information exchange mainly on HTGR operation and maintenance technique between JAEA and INET in 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Yukio; Hino, Ryutaro; Yu Suyuan

    2007-06-01

    The worldwide interests in the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) have been growing because the high temperature heat produced by the reactor can be utilized not only for efficient power generation but also for broad process heat applications, especially for thermo-chemical hydrogen production to fuel a prospective hydrogen economy in future. Presently only two HTGR reactors are operational in the world, including the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and the HTR-10 in the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in China. JAEA and INET have cooperated since 1986 in the field of HTGR development, particularly on the HTTR and HTR-10 projects. This report describes the cooperation with emphasis on HTGR operation and maintenance techniques between JAEA and INET and outlines cooperation activities in 2006. (author)

  18. CFD-DEM simulation of a conceptual gas-cooled fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Lucilla C.; Su, Jian, E-mail: lucillalmeida@gmail.com, E-mail: sujian@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Aguirre, Joao, E-mail: aguirre@rocky-dem.com [Engineering Simulation and Scientific Software (ESSS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Several conceptual designs of the fluidized-bed nuclear reactor have been proposed due to its many advantages over conventional nuclear reactors such as PWRs and BWRs. Amongst their characteristics, the enhanced heat transfer and mixing enables a more uniform temperature distribution, reducing the risk of hot-spot and excessive fuel temperature, in addition to resulting in a higher burnup of the fuel. Furthermore, the relationship between the bed height and reactor neutronics turns the coolant flow rate control into a power production mechanism. Moreover, the possibility of removing the fuel by gravity from the movable core in case of a loss-of-cooling accident increases its safety. High-accuracy modeling of particles and coolant flow in fluidized bed reactors is needed to evaluate reliably the thermal-hydraulic efficiency and safety margin. The two-way coupling between solid and fluid can account for high-fidelity solid-solid interaction and reasonable accuracy in fluid calculation and fluid-solid interaction. In the CFD-DEM model, the particles are modeled as a discrete phase, following the DEM approach, whereas the fluid flow is treated as a continuous phase, described by the averaged Navier-Stokes equations on a computational cell scale. In this work, the coupling methodology between Fluent and Rocky is described. The numerical approach was applied to the simulation of a bubbling fluidized bed and the results were compared to experimental data and showed good agreement. (author)

  19. Sustainability and Efficiency Improvements of Gas-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marmier, A.

    2012-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis covers three fundamental aspects of High Temperature Reactor (HTR) performance, namely fuel testing under irradiation for maximized safety and sustainability, fuel architecture for improved economy and sustainability, and a novel Balance of Plant concept to enable

  20. The approaches of safety design and safety evaluation at HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iigaki, Kazuhiko; Saikusa, Akio; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Shinozaki, Masayuki; Tochio, Daisuke; Honma, Fumitaka; Tachibana, Yukio; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Kawasaki, Kozo; Baba, Osamu

    2006-06-01

    Gas Cooled Reactor has long history of nuclear development, and High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) has been expected that it can be supply high temperature energy to chemical industry and to power generation from the points of view of the safety, the efficiency, the environment and the economy. The HTGR design is tried to installed passive safety equipment. The current licensing review guideline was made for a Low Water Reactor (LWR) on safety evaluation therefore if it would be directly utilized in the HTGR it needs the special consideration for the HTGR. This paper describes that investigation result of the safety design and the safety evaluation traditions for the HTGR, comparison the safety design and safety evaluation feature for the HTGT with it's the LWR, and reflection for next HTGR based on HTTR operational experiment. (author)

  1. Hybrid sulfur cycle operation for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorensek, Maximilian B

    2015-02-17

    A hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process for the production of hydrogen is provided. The process uses a proton exchange membrane (PEM) SO.sub.2-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) for the low-temperature, electrochemical reaction step and a bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step The process can be operated at lower temperature and pressure ranges while still providing an overall energy efficient cycle process.

  2. Design Configurations and Coupling High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor and Hydrogen Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Steven Sherman

    2008-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the high-temperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood

  3. Sustainability and Efficiency Improvements of Gas-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmier, Alain

    2012-01-01

    This thesis covers 3 fundamental aspects of High Temperature Reactor (HTR) performance: fuel testing under irradiation for maximized safety and sustainability, fuel architecture for improved economy and sustainability, and a novel Balance of Plant concept to enable future high-tech process heat applications with minimized R and D. The HTR concept features important inherent and passive safety characteristics: high thermal inertia and good thermal conductivity of the core; a negative Doppler coefficient; high quality of fuel elements and low power density. These features keep the core temperature within safe boundaries and minimise fission product release, even in case of severe accidents. The Very High Temperature reactor (VHTR) is based on the same safety concept as the initial HTR, but it aims at offering better economy with a higher reactor outlet temperature (and thus efficiency) and a high fuel discharge burn-up (and thus better sustainability). The inherent safety features of HTR have been demonstrated in small pebble-bed reactors in practice, but have to be replicated for reactors with industrially relevant size and power. An increase of the power density (in order to increase the helium coolant outlet temperature) leads to higher fuel temperatures and therefore higher fuel failure probability. The core of a pebble-bed reactor consists of 6 cm diameter spheres (pebbles) that form a randomly packed porous bed, which is cooled by high pressure helium. These pebbles contain thousands of 1 mm diameter fuel particles baked into a graphite matrix. These fuel particles, in turn, consist of a fuel kernel with successive coatings of pyrocarbon and silicon carbide layers. The coating layers are designed to contain the fission products that build up during operation of the reactor. The feasibility and performance of the fuel requires experimental verification in view of fuel qualification and licensing. For HTR fuel, the required test string comprises amongst others

  4. Development of a methodology for simulation of gas cooled reactors with purpose of transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Clarysson Alberto da

    2009-01-01

    This work proposes a methodology of MHR (Modular Helium Reactor) simulation using the WIMSD-5B (Winfrith Improved Multi/group Scheme) nuclear code which is validated by MCNPX 2.6.0 (Monte Carlo N-Particle transport eXtend) nuclear code. The goal is verify the capability of WIMSD-5B to simulate a reactor type GT-MHR (Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor), considering all the fuel recharges possibilities. Also is evaluated the possibility of WIMSD-5B to represent adequately the fuel evolution during the fuel recharge. Initially was verified the WIMSD-5B capability to simulate the recharge specificities of this model by analysis of neutronic parameters and isotopic composition during the burnup. After the model was simulated using both WIMSD-5B and MCNPX 2.6.0 codes and the results of k eff , neutronic flux and isotopic composition were compared. The results show that the deterministic WIMSD-5B code can be applied to a qualitative evaluation, representing adequately the core behavior during the fuel recharges being possible in a short period of time to inquire about the burned core that, once optimized, can be quantitatively evaluated by a code type MCNPX 2.6.0. (author)

  5. Contribution to the study on the flow rate adjustment for gas cooled power reactors (1964)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milliot, B.

    1961-06-01

    1. This original study firstly defines the problem of the adjustment of the coolant flow rate in a reactor channel as a function of the corresponding heat transfer equations and of the local and temporal neutron flux. The necessity of such an adjustment is pointed out and the modifying parameters are studied. An adjustment study using the envelope of the possible flux curves is developed. A short study on the technology and the economical advantage of this adjustment is presented. Some measurements, made on G-1 and G-2, show the precision one can obtain from adjustment apparatus itself as well as from the complete reactor adjustment system. 2. Evolution of nuclear properties of fuel in an heterogeneous thermal reactor. In the first port of this paper, the phenomena of fuel evolution have been mainly pointed out. Now a bibliographical study more qualitatively than quantitatively has been done. This survey specifies the present theories and relates to a real effective cross section and also yields to the bases of such a nuclear calculation. (author) [fr

  6. CFD Model Development and validation for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Yassin [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Corradini, Michael; Tokuhiro, Akira; Wei, Thomas Y.C.

    2014-07-14

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems (RCCS) is a passive safety system that will be incorporated in the VTHR design. The system was designed to remove the heat from the reactor cavity and maintain the temperature of structures and concrete walls under desired limits during normal operation (steady-state) and accident scenarios. A small scale (1:23) water-cooled experimental facility was scaled, designed, and constructed in order to study the complex thermohydraulic phenomena taking place in the RCCS during steady-state and transient conditions. The facility represents a portion of the reactor vessel with nine stainless steel coolant risers and utilizes water as coolant. The facility was equipped with instrumentation to measure temperatures and flow rates and a general verification was completed during the shakedown. A model of the experimental facility was prepared using RELAP5-3D and simulations were performed to validate the scaling procedure. The experimental data produced during the steady-state run were compared with the simulation results obtained using RELAP5-3D. The overall behavior of the facility met the expectations. The facility capabilities were confirmed to be very promising in performing additional experimental tests, including flow visualization, and produce data for code validation.

  7. Noble gas binary mixtures for gas-cooled reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of using noble gases and binary mixtures as reactor coolants and direct closed Brayton cycle (CBC) working fluids on the performance of terrestrial nuclear power plants and the size of the turbo-machines. While pure helium has the best transport properties and lowest pumping power requirement of all noble gases and binary mixtures, its low molecular weight increases the number of stages of the turbo-machines. The heat transfer coefficient for a He-Xe binary mixture having a molecular weight of 15 g/mole is 7% higher than that of helium, and the number of stages in the turbo-machines is 24-30% of those for He working fluid. However, for the same piping and heat exchange components design, the loop pressure losses with He-Xe are ∼3 times those with He. Consequently, for the same reactor exit temperature and pressure losses in piping and heat exchange components, the higher pressure losses in the nuclear reactor decrease the net peak efficiency of the plant with He-Xe working fluid (15 g/mole) by a little more than ∼2% points, at higher cycle compression ratio than with He working fluid

  8. Degradation of graphite in gas cooled reactors due to radiolytic oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskovic, R.

    2014-01-01

    Magnox reactors employ pile grade A (PGA) graphite as a moderator. Reactor cores are constructed typically of twelve to thirteen layers of graphite bricks. Fuel channels (FC) are in the centre of all bricks and interstitial channels (IC) at the centre of the corners of every second set of four bricks. The reactor core is cooled by carbon dioxide, the temperature of graphite core increases from 250 °C at the bottom to 360 °C at the top of the core. The neutron dose increases progressively with the operating time of the reactor. The graphite core looses mass as a result of radiolytic oxidation. The process is dependent on both total energy deposition and temperature which correlates with core height. Fast neutron dose accumulates at the same rate as the total energy deposited and is readily available. The reduction of density of moderator graphite increases the porosity and in turn changes both the physical and mechanical properties of graphite. The mechanical properties and density of graphite are measured either on samples installed in the reactor prior to service or trepanned from graphite bricks. The data obtained on these samples are interrogated using probability modelling to establish trends with increasing service life. Results of the analyses are illustrated in the paper. PGA graphite is an aggregate of coarse needle coke filler particles within a matrix of fine coke flour particles mixed with pitch binder. The bricks are fabricated in the green condition by extrusion of dry calcinated coke impregnated with liquid pitch binder and then graphitized at 2800 °C. This produces a polygranular aggregate with orthotropic properties. The strength properties of graphite are measured using different types of tests. The most commonly used tests involve bending, uniaxial and diametral compression. The initiation and propagation of cracks was investigated to improve understanding of strength behaviour. Cracking was examined on macro-scale using optical microscopy and

  9. Study on simulation, control and online assistance integrated system of 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, S.; Shi, L.; Zhu, S.

    2004-01-01

    In order to provide a convenient tool for engineering designed, safety analysis, operator training and control system design of the high temperature gas-cooled test reactor (HTR), an integrated system for simulation, control and online assistance of the HTR-10 has been designed and is still under development by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in China. The whole system is based on a network environment and includes three subsystems: the simulation subsystem (SIMUSUB), the visualized control designed subsystem (VCDSUB) and the online assistance subsystem (OASUB). The SIMUSUB consists of four parts: the simulation calculating server (SCS), the main control client (MCC), the data disposal client (DDC) and the results graphic display client (RGDC), all of which can communicate with each other via network. The SIMUSUB is intended to analyze and calculate the physical processes of the reactor core, the main loop system and the stream generator, etc., as well as to simulate the normal operation and transient accidents, and the result data can be graphically displayed through the RGDC dynamically. The VCDSUB provides a platform for control system modeling where the control flow systems can be automatically generated and graphically simulated. Based on the data from the field bus, the OASUB provides some of the reactor core parameter, which are difficult to measure. This whole system can be used as an educational tool to understand the design and operational characteristics of the HTR-10, and can also provide online supports for operators in the main control room, or as a convenient powerful tool for the control system design. (authors)

  10. Neutron dose rate analysis on HTGR-10 reactor using Monte Carlo code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwoto; Adrial, H.; Hamzah, A.; Zuhair; Bakhri, S.; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    The HTGR-10 reactor is cylinder-shaped core fuelled with kernel TRISO coated fuel particles in the spherical pebble with helium cooling system. The outlet helium gas coolant temperature outputted from the reactor core is designed to 700 °C. One advantage HTGR type reactor is capable of co-generation, as an addition to generating electricity, the reactor was designed to produce heat at high temperature can be used for other processes. The spherical fuel pebble contains 8335 TRISO UO2 kernel coated particles with enrichment of 10% and 17% are dispersed in a graphite matrix. The main purpose of this study was to analysis the distribution of neutron dose rates generated from HTGR-10 reactors. The calculation and analysis result of neutron dose rate in the HTGR-10 reactor core was performed using Monte Carlo MCNP5v1.6 code. The problems of double heterogeneity in kernel fuel coated particles TRISO and spherical fuel pebble in the HTGR-10 core are modelled well with MCNP5v1.6 code. The neutron flux to dose conversion factors taken from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP-74) was used to determine the dose rate that passes through the active core, reflectors, core barrel, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and a biological shield. The calculated results of neutron dose rate with MCNP5v1.6 code using a conversion factor of ICRP-74 (2009) for radiation workers in the radial direction on the outside of the RPV (radial position = 220 cm from the center of the patio HTGR-10) provides the respective value of 9.22E-4 μSv/h and 9.58E-4 μSv/h for enrichment 10% and 17%, respectively. The calculated values of neutron dose rates are compliant with BAPETEN Chairman’s Regulation Number 4 Year 2013 on Radiation Protection and Safety in Nuclear Energy Utilization which sets the limit value for the average effective dose for radiation workers 20 mSv/year or 10μSv/h. Thus the protection and safety for radiation workers to be safe from the radiation source has

  11. Maximization of Transuranic Deep-Burn in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Hee; Kim, K. S.; Hong, S. G.; Shim, H. J.; Jo, C. K.; Lee, S. W.

    2008-03-01

    An optimization study of a single-pass transuranic (TRU) deep burn (DB) has been performed for a block-type modular helium reactor (MHR) proposed. A high-burnup TRU feed vector from light water reactors is considered. For three dimensional equilibrium cores, the performance analysis is done by using the Monte Carlo code McCARD. The core optimization is performed from the viewpoints of the core configuration, fuel management, TRISO fuel specification, and neutron spectrum. With regard to core configuration, two annular cores are investigated in terms of the neutron economy. A conventional radial shuffling scheme of fuel blocks is compared with an axial-only block-shuffling strategy in terms of the fuel bum up and core power distributions. The impact of the kernel size of the TRISO fuel is evaluated, and a diluted kernel, instead of a conventional concentrated kernel, is introduced to maximize the TRU burnup by reducing the self-shielding effects of the TRISO particles. In addition, it is shown that the core power distribution can be effectively controlled by a zoning of the packing fraction of the TRISO fuels. We also have shown that a long-cycle DB-MHR core can be designed by using a two- or three-batch fuel-reloading scheme, at the expense of only a marginal decrease of the TRU discharge bum up. Preliminary safety characteristics of a DBMHR core have been investigated in terms of the temperature coefficients and effective delayed neutron fraction. It has been found that, depending on the fuel management scheme and fuel specifications, the TRU burnup in an optimized DB-MHR core can be over 60% in a single-pass irradiation campaign. In addition, the equilibrium cycle mass balance analyses were also performed for 12 fuel cycles and the impact of TRU deep-bum on the repository was evaluated as well. Additionally, an SFR (Sodium Fast Reactor) fed with DB-MHR spent fuel were designed and characterized

  12. A History of Dosimetry for the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Simon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a summary of the methods used in the first ∼40 years of AGR neutron dosimetry and nuclear heating calculations, and the influence of the earlier Magnox reactor dosimetry programme. While the current state-of-the-art Monte Carlo methods are extremely powerful they still require very careful consideration of the quality of the input data, nuclear data validation and variance reduction techniques; in particular, this paper examines the difficulties in assuring the adequate convergence of calculations when Monte Carlo acceleration is applied in the presence of significant streaming paths through attenuating or scattering media.

  13. Automatic X-ray inspection for escaped coated particles in spherical fuel elements of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Min; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Hongsheng; Li, Ziqiang; Liu, Bing; Li, Xingdong; Meng, Fanyong

    2014-01-01

    As a core unit of HTGRs (high-temperature gas-cooled reactors), the quality of spherical fuel elements is directly related to the safety and reliability of HTGRs. In line with the design and performance requirements of the spherical fuel elements, no coated fuel particles are permitted to enter the fuel-free zone of a spherical fuel element. For fast and accurate detection of escaped coated fuel particles, X-ray DR (digital radiography) imaging with a step-by-step circular scanning trajectory was adopted for Chinese 10 MW HTGRs. The scanning parameters dominating the volume of the blind zones were optimized to ensure the missing detection of the escaped coated fuel particles is as low as possible. We proposed a dynamic calibration method for tracking the projection of the fuel-free zone accurately, instead of using a fuel-free zone mask of fixed size and position. After the projection data in the fuel-free zone were extracted, image and graphic processing methods were combined for automatic recognition of escaped coated fuel particles, and some practical inspection results were presented. - Highlights: • An X-ray DR imaging system for quality inspection of spherical fuel elements was introduced. • A method for optimizing the blind-zone-related scanning parameter was proposed. • A dynamic calibration method for tracking the fuel-free zone accurately was proposed. • Some inspection results of the disqualified spherical fuel elements with escaped coated fuel particles were presented

  14. Fuel Summary for Peach Bottom Unit 1 High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Cores 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karel I. Kingrey

    2003-04-01

    This fuel summary report contains background and summary information for the Peach Bottom Unit 1, High-Temperature, Gas-Cooled Reactor Cores 1 and 2. This report contains detailed information about the fuel in the two cores, the Peach Bottom Unit 1 operating history, nuclear parameters, physical and chemical characteristics, and shipping and storage canister related data. The data in this document have been compiled from a large number of sources and are not qualified beyond the qualification of the source documents. This report is intended to provide an overview of the existing data pertaining to spent fuel management and point to pertinent reference source documents. For design applications, the original source documentation must be used. While all referenced sources are available as records or controlled documents at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), some of the sources were marked as informal or draft reports. This is noted where applicable. In some instances, source documents are not consistent. Where they are known, this document identifies those instances and provides clarification where possible. However, as stated above, this document has not been independently qualified and such clarifications are only included for information purposes. Some of the information in this summary is available in multiple source documents. An effort has been made to clearly identify at least one record document as the source for the information included in this report.

  15. Modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor short-term thermal response to flow and reactivity transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleveland, J.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1993-02-01

    The research reported here has been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Regulatory Applications of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The short-term thermal response of the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is analyzed for a range of flow and reactivity transients. These transients include loss of forced circulation without scram, spurious withdrawal of a control rod group, moisture ingress, control rod and control rod group ejections, and a rapid core cooling event. For each event analyzed, an event description, a discussion of the analysis approach and assumptions, and results are presented. When possible, results of these analyses are compared with those presented by the designers in the MHTGR Preliminary Safety Information Document and in the MHTGR Probabilistic Risk Assessment. The importance of inherent safety features is illustrated, and conclusions are presented regarding the safety performance of the MHTGR. Recommendations are made for a more in-depth examination of MHTGR response for some of the analyzed transients. The coupled heat transfer-neutron kinetics model is described in detail in Appendix A.

  16. Modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor short-term thermal response to flow and reactivity transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleveland, J.C.

    1993-02-01

    The research reported here has been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Regulatory Applications of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The short-term thermal response of the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is analyzed for a range of flow and reactivity transients. These transients include loss of forced circulation without scram, spurious withdrawal of a control rod group, moisture ingress, control rod and control rod group ejections, and a rapid core cooling event. For each event analyzed, an event description, a discussion of the analysis approach and assumptions, and results are presented. When possible, results of these analyses are compared with those presented by the designers in the MHTGR Preliminary Safety Information Document and in the MHTGR Probabilistic Risk Assessment. The importance of inherent safety features is illustrated, and conclusions are presented regarding the safety performance of the MHTGR. Recommendations are made for a more in-depth examination of MHTGR response for some of the analyzed transients. The coupled heat transfer-neutron kinetics model is described in detail in Appendix A

  17. Output Feedback Dissipation Control for the Power-Level of Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Dong

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Because of its strong inherent safety features and the high outlet temperature, the modular high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (MHTGR is the chosen technology for a new generation of nuclear power plants. Such power plants are being considered for industrial applications with a wide range of power levels, thus power-level regulation is very important for their efficient and stable operation. Exploiting the large scale asymptotic closed-loop stability provided by nonlinear controllers, a nonlinear power-level regulator is presented in this paper that is based upon both the techniques of feedback dissipation and well-established backstepping. The virtue of this control strategy, i.e., the ability of globally asymptotic stabilization, is that it takes advantage of the inherent zero-state detectability property of the MHTGR dynamics. Moreover, this newly built power-level regulator is also robust towards modeling uncertainty in the control rod dynamics. If modeling uncertainty of the control rod dynamics is small enough to be omitted, then this control law can be simplified to a classical proportional feedback controller. The comparison of the control performance between the newly-built power controller and the simplified controller is also given through numerical study and theoretical analysis.

  18. Study of the oxidation mechanisms between impurities and surfaces applied to the future gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duval, A.

    2010-01-01

    Inconel 617, main candidate for the heat exchangers of the gas-cooled next generation of nuclear reactors has been investigated. Two different problems occurring in the cooling system splits the study into two parts. Oxidizing impurities contained in the coolant can cause severe corrosion at 850 C. Radioactive impurities, coming from the fission reaction of the core can, in another hand contaminate the cooling loop and cause radioprotection problem for the maintenance and dismantling operations. Firstly, oxidizing gas partial pressure influence on oxidation of IN 617 at 850 C was investigated varying oxygen and water vapour partial pressure between 1.10 -5 mbar and 200 mbar. Oxide layers were characterized using XPS, SEM, EDX, GD-OES, XRD. Influence of partial pressure on layers structure and composition was determined. Effect of water vapour and partial pressure on growth mechanisms were also investigated. The second part of this study is focused on diffusion of Ag, stable isotope of Ag-110m in IN617 alloy and in the oxide layer forming at its surface at 850 C. Concentration profiles were obtained by GD-OES calibrated analysis. Diffusion coefficient could be obtained from these diffusion profiles: volume diffusion and grain boundary diffusion coefficients for the diffusion in the alloy, and an apparent diffusion coefficient for the diffusion in the oxide, due to the porosity of the structure. (author) [fr

  19. Numerical prediction on turbulent heat transfer of a spacer ribbed fuel rod for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Kazuyuki

    1994-11-01

    The turbulent heat transfer of a fuel rod with three-dimensional trapezoidal spacer ribs for high temperature gas-cooled reactors was analyzed numerically using the k-ε turbulence model, and investigated experimentally using a simulated fuel rod under the helium gas condition of a maximum outlet temperature of 1000degC and pressure of 4MPa. From the experimental results, it found that the turbulent heat transfer coefficients of the fuel rod were 18 to 80% higher than those of a concentric smooth annulus at a region of Reynolds number exceeding 2000. On the other hand, the predicted average Nusselt number of the fuel rod agreed well with the heat transfer correlation obtained from the experimental data within a relative error of 10% with Reynolds number of more than 5000. It was verified that the numerical analysis results had sufficient accuracy. Furthermore, the numerical prediction could clarify quantitatively the effects of the heat transfer augmentation by the spacer rib and the axial velocity increase due to a reduction in the annular channel cross-section. (author)

  20. Fine 3D neutronic characterization of a gas-cooled fast reactor based on plate-type sub-assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosq, J. C.; Peneliau, Y.; Rimpault, G.; Vanier, M.

    2006-01-01

    CEA neutronic studies have allowed the definition of a first 2400 MWth reference gas-cooled fast reactor core using plate-type sub-assemblies, for which the main neutronic characteristics were calculated by the so-called ERANOS 'design calculation scheme' relying on several method approximations. The last stage has consisted in a new refine characterization, using the reference calculation scheme, in order to confirm the impact of the approximations of the design route. A first core lay-out taking into account control rods was proposed and the reactivity penalty due to the control rod introduction in this hexagonal core lay-out was quantified. A new adjusted core was defined with an increase of the plutonium content. This leads to a significant decrease of the breeding gain which needs to be recovered in future design evolutions in order to achieve the self breeding goal. Finally, the safety criteria associated to the control rods were calculated with a first estimation of the uncertainties. All these criteria are respected, even if the safety analysis of GFR concepts and the determination of these uncertainties should be further studied and improved. (authors)

  1. HTGR safety research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroh, K.R.; Anderson, C.A.; Kirk, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    This paper summarizes activities undertaken at the Los Alamos National Laboratory as part of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Safety Research Program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Technical accomplishments and analysis capabilities in six broad-based task areas are described. These tasks are: fission-product technology, primary-coolant impurities, structural investigations, safety instrumentation and control systems, accident delineation, and phenomena modeling and systems analysis

  2. Scaling laws for HTGR core block seismic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of scaling laws, physical modeling, and seismic testing of a model designed to represent a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) core consisting of graphite blocks. The establishment of the proper scale relationships for length, time, force, and other parameters is emphasized. Tests to select model materials and the appropriate scales are described. Preliminary results obtained from both model and prototype systems tested under simulated seismic vibration are presented

  3. Corrosion of magnesium and some magnesium alloys in gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caillat, R.; Darras, R.

    1958-01-01

    The results of corrosion tests on magnesium and some magnesium alloys (Mg-Zr and Mg-Zr-Zn) in moist air (like G1 reactor) and in CO 2 : (like G2, G3, EDF1 reactors) are reported. The maximum temperature for exposure of magnesium to moist air without any risk of corrosion is 350 deg. C. Indeed, the oxidation rate follows a linear law above 350 deg. C although it reaches a constant level and keeps on very low under 350 deg. C. However, as far as corrosion is concerned this temperature limit can be raised up to 500 deg. C if moist air is very slightly charged with fluorinated compounds. Under pressure of CO 2 , these three materials oxidate much more slowly even if 500 deg. C is reached. The higher is the temperature, the higher is the constant level of the weight increase and the quicker is reached this one. However, Mg-Zr alloy behaves quite better than pure magnesium and especially than Mg-Zr-Zn alloy. (author) [fr

  4. Numerical investigation of the flow at the pebble bed of the high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Franklin C.; Navarro, Moyses A.; Santos, Andre A.C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the thermal and fluid dynamics among the fuel spheres and the cooling fluid, appearing in the core of pebble bed reactor (PBR-Peeble Bed Reactor) using the CFD-Computational Fluid Dynamics CFX 13.0. The paper presents the two analysis results. In the first phase it was considered two heat transfer models for the fuel spheres. In a model it was established volumetric load generation, with thermal conduction for both the fuel and coating. The other model prescribes a heat flux at the sphere surfaces. In this analysis, it was proceed two simulation in the two sphere arrangements, one considering the spheres in contact, and the other with 2 mm spacing between them. At the second analysis it was evaluated the sphere arrangement influence on the thermal and fluid dynamic behavior of the bed. The four simulations present differences in the flow and in the surface and maximum temperature profiles of the coating.(author)

  5. Principles, design and fuel performance characteristics of gas cooled thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boocock, P.M.; Eaton, J.R.P.

    1989-01-01

    Reactor output and availability are closely related to fuel design and performance and the SSEB, in collaboration with the Central Electricity Generating Board have followed a policy of continuous analysis and improvement. The position reached is set out and some views on further improvements, are given. The strategy of increasing fuel burn-up on Hunterston A power station has brought significant dividends in the form of major benefits in fuel cycle cost and station availability. Significant improvements in output and availability at Hunterston B have resulted from increasing the fuel cycle burn-up, from 18 GWd/t U to 21 GWd/t U and introducing on-load refuelling. Additional benefits are soon to be obtained by further extending the burn-up to 24 GWd/t U. Further reduction of typically Pound 2-7 million/year in fuel cycle costs over the remaining life of the stations would be made by extending the burn-up to 30 GWd/t U at Hunterston B and Torness. There would be additional savings of about Pound 4 million/year in replacement fuel costs if the reactors continued to be refuelled at 30% power at Hunterston B and 40% power at Torness. (author)

  6. Evaluation of Indirect Combined Cycle in Very High Temperature Gas--Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh; Robert Barner; Cliff Davis; Steven Sherman; Paul Pickard

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and Idaho National Laboratory are developing a very high temperature reactor to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is twofold: (a) efficient, low-cost energy generation and (b) hydrogen production. Although a next-generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual purpose, as assumed here. A dual-purpose design with a combined cycle of a Brayton top cycle and a bottom Rankine cycle was investigated. An intermediate heat transport loop for transporting heat to a hydrogen production plant was used. Helium, CO2, and a helium-nitrogen mixture were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms of the cycle efficiency. The relative component sizes were estimated for the different working fluids to provide an indication of the relative capital costs. The relative size of the turbomachinery was measured by comparing the power input/output of the component. For heat exchangers the volume was computed and compared. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the cycle were performed to determine the effects of varying conditions in the cycle. This gives some insight into the sensitivity of the cycle to various operating conditions as well as trade-offs between efficiency and component size. Parametric studies were carried out on reactor outlet temperature, mass flow, pressure, and turbine cooling

  7. Possible future roles for the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR) in the community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    Possible roles for HTR in different European nuclear energy strategies are examined from the standpoint of long-term uranium and capital conservation. Two different growth scenarios for European Community electrical energy demand have been assumed (fig. 1). Both curves have been developed from existing short-term forecasts and commitments already made by member states. The lower curve represents a realistic minimum development of per capita energy demand from 3.3 toe/y in 1975 to a ceiling of 6.1 toe/year in 2035 that still lies 30% below current U.S. consumption. Electricity is assumed to increase its share of the total energy market from 28% (1976) to 35%. The higher growth curve represents an increase in overall energy consumption to a level corresponding to 8 toe per capita per year, while the electricity share increase to 67% of the overall demand. It is appreciated that such an increase in the electricity share of the overall demand is unrealistic; its consideration in the present study must therefore be regarded as tending to explore an extreme case of electricity demand growth. A long-term view is taken to show how far future developments are affected by decisions taken in the medium-term. Saturation is assumed in order to force complete development of steady state conditions, in which the relationship between different reactors can be readily discerned and capital needs compared. At saturation uranium price and availability become unimportant in systems containing thermal and breeder reactors in symbiosis

  8. POWER CYCLE AND STRESS ANALYSES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Chang H; Davis, Cliff; Hawkes, Brian D; Sherman, Steven R

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold (1) efficient low cost energy generation and (2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed in order to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. Three configurations of the power conversion unit were demonstrated in this study. A three-shaft design with three turbines and four compressors, a combined cycle with a Brayton top cycle and a Rankine bottoming cycle, and a reheated cycle with three stages of reheat were investigated. An intermediate heat transport loop for transporting process heat to a High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) hydrogen production plant was used. Helium, CO2, and a 80% nitrogen, 20% helium mixture (by weight) were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms cycle efficiency and development cost. In each of these configurations the relative component size were estimated for the different working fluids. The relative size of the turbomachinery was measured by comparing the power input/output of the component. For heat exchangers the volume was computed and compared. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the three-shaft and combined cycles were performed to determine the effect of varying conditions in the cycle. This gives some insight into the sensitivity of these cycles to

  9. The long term storage of advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR) fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standring, P.N.

    1999-01-01

    The approach being taken by BNFL in managing the AGR lifetime spent fuel arisings from British Energy reactors is given. Interim storage for up to 80 years is envisaged for fuel delivered beyond the life of the Thorp reprocessing plant. Adopting a policy of using existing facilities, to comply with the principles of waste minimisation, has defined the development requirements to demonstrate that this approach can be undertaken safely and business issues can be addressed. The major safety issues are the long term integrity of both the fuel being stored and structure it is being stored in. Business related issues reflect long term interactions with the rest of the Sellafield site and storage optimisation. Examples of the development programme in each of these areas is given. (author)

  10. QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT JANUARY, FEBRUARY, MARCH, 1968 REACTOR FUELS AND MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS FOR FUELS AND MATERIALS BRANCH OF USAEC DIVISION OF REACTOR DEVELOPMENT AND TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, J. J.; de Halas, D. R.; Nightingale, R. E.; Worlton, D. C.

    1968-06-01

    Progress is reported in these areas: nuclear graphite; fuel development for gas-cooled reactors; HTGR graphite studies; nuclear ceramics; fast-reactor nitrides research; non-destructive testing; metallic fuels; basic swelling studies; ATR gas and water loop operation and maintenance; reactor fuels and materials; fast reactor dosimetry and damage analysis; and irradiation damage to reactor metals.

  11. Maintaining a critical spectra within Monteburns for a gas-cooled reactor array by way of control rod manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adigun, Babatunde J.; Fensin, Michael L.; Galloway, Jack D.; Trellue, Holly R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Tested here are 4 methods for estimating critical rod position, in Monteburns, of a reactor fuel array. • Inverse multiplication methods better predict critical rod position at the cost of more iterations. • A polynomial fit technique can predict most plutonium isotopics to within 5%. - Abstract: This burnup study examined the effect of a predicted critical control rod position on the nuclide predictability of several axial and radial locations within a 4 × 4 graphite moderated gas cooled reactor fuel cluster geometry. To achieve this, a control rod position estimator (CRPE) tool was developed within the framework of the linkage code Monteburns between the transport code MCNP and depletion code CINDER90, and four methodologies were proposed within the tool for maintaining criticality. Two of the proposed methods used an inverse multiplication approach – where the amount of fissile material in a set configuration is slowly altered until criticality is attained – in estimating the critical control rod position. Another method carried out several MCNP criticality calculations at different control rod positions, then used a linear fit to estimate the critical rod position. The final method used a second-order polynomial fit of several MCNP criticality calculations at different control rod positions to guess the critical rod position. The results showed that consistency in prediction of power densities as well as uranium and plutonium isotopics was mutual among methods within the CRPE tool that predicted critical position consistently well. While the CRPE tool is currently limited to manipulating a single control rod, future work could be geared toward implementing additional criticality search methodologies along with additional features.

  12. Safety assessment and maximum permissible activity concentration in the primary coolant of an experimental multipurpose high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Kenji; Hachiya, Yoichiro

    1979-01-01

    The safety and the maximum permissible activity concentration in primary coolant were evaluated for the experimental, multipurpose, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, JHTR. The maximum permissible activity concentration in primary coolant was set up, considering the following four items: 1) the public exposure dose under normal plant operation, 2) the public exposure dose under accident condition, 3) the exposure dose of the maintenance workers after plant shut down, and 4) the concentration of tritium in the primary coolant. The procedure of setting up the maximum permissible activity is shown with the flow chart. As for the analytical method, the analytical data for the transfer of fission products at the normal operating condition were at first defined as follows, the thermal output of the reactor 50 MWt, the inventory of the primary coolant gas 681 kg, the estimated fuel failure rate 0.1%, the plate out rate 40%, the filter efficiency 90% for iodine and 99% for metallic fission products and so on. Then, the analytical models of radioactivity release under the normal and accident conditions are shown. The calculation was conducted, utilizing the computer codes, FIPPIZ, RAD.MP, GASRUP, KATEC and HTCORE. The pressure drop behavior of the primary coolant system at primary pipe rupture, the subsequent temperature rise of the fuel and the pressure vessel, and the helium release rate within the auxiliary building after one tube ruptured in the intermediate heat exchanger are plotted as the analytical results. Finally, the actual values of the maximum permissible activity are presented for rare gas, iodine, solid fission products and tritium. (Nakai, Y.)

  13. Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

    2012-02-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

  14. The orificing of once-through boilers for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, J.G.; Whitmarsh-Everiss, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    The boilers at Hinkley Point B, Hunterston B (which are built to a common design) and Hartlepool and Heysham (which are identical to each other although different from Hinkley B/Hunterston B) are discussed. Heysham II and Torness have boilers developed from the Hinkley B/Hunterston B design. The boiler design is explained and the problems encountered are presented. The study presented in this address highlights the potential sensitivity of the performance of once-through boilers to the following factors - the uniformity of the gas inlet temperature profile, the choice of the operating point on the boiler characteristic (preferably this should be where the performance of the unit is not too sensitive to the primary side temperature and flow distribution); this can be achieved by greater levels of orificing reducing the steady state gains, and the various plant operating states which introduce asymmetries into the boundary conditions for the boiler. A number of computer codes have been used to model boiler performance. Using these, a new design was proposed for boiler feed regulating orifices and these revised orifices were installed during outages on the two Heysham reactors in 1985. (U.K.)

  15. Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schult, Richard R.; Bayless, Paul D.; Johnson, Richard W.; Wolf, James R.; Woods, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

  16. Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Publishable Final Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijper, J.C., E-mail: kuijper@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Somers, J.; Van Den Durpel, L.; Chauvet, V.; Cerullo, N.; Cetnar, J.; Abram, T.; Bakker, K.; Bomboni, E.; Bernnat, W.; Domanska, J.G.; Girardi, E.; De Haas, J.B.M.; Hesketh, K.; Hiernaut, J.P.; Hossain, K.; Jonnet, J.; Kim, Y.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Kopec, M.; Murgatroyd, J.; Millington, D.; Lecarpentier, D.; Lomonaco, G.; McEachern, D.; Meier, A.; Mignanelli, M.; Nabielek, H.; Oppe, J.; Petrov, B.Y.; Pohl, C.; Ruetten, H.J.; Schihab, S.; Toury, G.; Trakas, C.; Venneri, F.; Verfondern, K.; Werner, H.; Wiss, T.; Zakova, J.

    2010-11-15

    The PUMA project -the acronym stands for 'Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors'- was a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) within the EURATOM 6th Framework Program (EU FP6). The PUMA project ran from September 1, 2006, until August 31, 2009, and was executed by a consortium of 14 European partner organisations and one from the USA. This report serves 2 purposes. It is both the 'Publishable Final Activity Report' and the 'Final (Summary) Report', describing, per Work Package, the specific objectives, research activities, main conclusions, recommendations and supporting documents. PUMA's main objective was to investigate the possibilities for the utilisation and transmutation of plutonium and especially minor actinides in contemporary and future (high temperature) gas-cooled reactor designs, which are promising tools for improving the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. This contributes to the reduction of Pu and MA stockpiles, and also to the development of safe and sustainable reactors for CO{sub 2}-free energy generation. The PUMA project has assessed the impact of the introduction of Pu/MA-burning HTRs at three levels: fuel and fuel performance (modelling), reactor (transmutation performance and safety) and reactor/fuel cycle facility park. Earlier projects already indicated favourable characteristics of HTRs with respect to Pu burning. So, core physics of Pu/MA fuel cycles for HTRs has been investigated to study the CP fuel and reactor characteristics and to assure nuclear stability of a Pu/MA HTR core, under both normal and abnormal operating conditions. The starting point of this investigation comprised the two main contemporary HTR designs, viz. the pebble-bed type HTR, represented by the South-African PBMR, and hexagonal block type HTR, represented by the GT-MHR. The results (once again) demonstrate the flexibility of the contemporary (and near future) HTR

  17. Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Publishable Final Activity Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J.C.; Somers, J.; Van Den Durpel, L.; Chauvet, V.; Cerullo, N.; Cetnar, J.; Abram, T.; Bakker, K.; Bomboni, E.; Bernnat, W.; Domanska, J.G.; Girardi, E.; De Haas, J.B.M.; Hesketh, K.; Hiernaut, J.P.; Hossain, K.; Jonnet, J.; Kim, Y.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Kopec, M.; Murgatroyd, J.; Millington, D.; Lecarpentier, D.; Lomonaco, G.; McEachern, D.; Meier, A.; Mignanelli, M.; Nabielek, H.; Oppe, J.; Petrov, B.Y.; Pohl, C.; Ruetten, H.J.; Schihab, S.; Toury, G.; Trakas, C.; Venneri, F.; Verfondern, K.; Werner, H.; Wiss, T.; Zakova, J.

    2010-11-01

    The PUMA project -the acronym stands for 'Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors'- was a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) within the EURATOM 6th Framework Program (EU FP6). The PUMA project ran from September 1, 2006, until August 31, 2009, and was executed by a consortium of 14 European partner organisations and one from the USA. This report serves 2 purposes. It is both the 'Publishable Final Activity Report' and the 'Final (Summary) Report', describing, per Work Package, the specific objectives, research activities, main conclusions, recommendations and supporting documents. PUMA's main objective was to investigate the possibilities for the utilisation and transmutation of plutonium and especially minor actinides in contemporary and future (high temperature) gas-cooled reactor designs, which are promising tools for improving the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. This contributes to the reduction of Pu and MA stockpiles, and also to the development of safe and sustainable reactors for CO 2 -free energy generation. The PUMA project has assessed the impact of the introduction of Pu/MA-burning HTRs at three levels: fuel and fuel performance (modelling), reactor (transmutation performance and safety) and reactor/fuel cycle facility park. Earlier projects already indicated favourable characteristics of HTRs with respect to Pu burning. So, core physics of Pu/MA fuel cycles for HTRs has been investigated to study the CP fuel and reactor characteristics and to assure nuclear stability of a Pu/MA HTR core, under both normal and abnormal operating conditions. The starting point of this investigation comprised the two main contemporary HTR designs, viz. the pebble-bed type HTR, represented by the South-African PBMR, and hexagonal block type HTR, represented by the GT-MHR. The results (once again) demonstrate the flexibility of the contemporary (and near future) HTR designs and their ability to accept a

  18. Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Publishable Final Activity Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J.C.; Somers, J.; Van Den Durpel, L.

    2013-01-01

    The PUMA project - the acronym stands for “Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors” - was a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) within the Euratom 6th Framework (EU FP6). The PUMA project ran from September 1, 2006, until August 31, 2009, and was executed by a consortium of 14 European partner organisations and one from the USA. This report serves 2 purposes. It is both the 'Publishable Final Activity Report' and the 'Final (Summary) Report', describing, per Work Package, the specific objectives, research activities, main conclusions, recommendations and supporting documents. PUMA's main objective was to investigate the possibilities for the utilisation and transmutation of plutonium and especially minor actinides in contemporary and future (high temperature) gas-cooled reactor designs, which are promising tools for improving the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. This contributes to the reduction of Pu and MA stockpiles, and also to the development of safe and sustainable reactors for CO2-free energy generation. The PUMA project has assessed the impact of the introduction of Pu/MA-burning HTRs at three levels: fuel and fuel performance (modelling), reactor (transmutation performance and safety) and reactor/fuel cycle facility park. Earlier projects already indicated favourable characteristics of HTRs with respect to Pu burning. So, core physics of Pu/MA fuel cycles for HTRs has been investigated to study the CP fuel and reactor characteristics and to assure nuclear stability of a Pu/MA HTR core, under both normal and abnormal operating conditions. The starting point of this investigation comprised the two main contemporary HTR designs, viz. the pebble-bed type HTR, represented by the South-African PBMR, and hexagonal block type HTR, represented by the GT-MHR. The results (once again) demonstrate the flexibility of the contemporary (and near future) HTR designs and their ability to accept a variety

  19. The fuel performance code Celaeno, conception and simulation of fuel elements for gas-cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfer, Thomas; Brunon, E.; Castelier, E.; Ravenet, A.; Chauvin, N. [CEA, Saint Paul Lez Durance, 04 100 (France)

    2009-06-15

    Gas-cooled fast reactor are extensively studied at Atomic Energy Commission for the fourth generation reactors. An innovative plate-type fuel element, made of two plates enclosing a honeycomb structure containing cylindrical fuel pellets, has been proposed to meet the specifications of these reactors. To sustain high coolant temperature, refractory materials have to be used for plates and honeycomb structure. The reference material is a silicon carbide composite matrix ceramic SiCf/SiC, but studies on refractory metals are also underway. The most regarded fuel material is a mixed uranium-plutonium carbide UPuC. To analyse and evaluate the performance of such fuel elements and materials, reactor concept design studies and experimental irradiations are being performed, both requiring advanced modelling tools. Based on the PLEIADES software platform, which uses Cast3M finite-element code as its thermomechanical component, the fuel-performance code celaeno has been designed for studying the thermal, mechanical and physical evolutions of the fuel-element concepts of interest under the following constraints: - provide a unified approach for all case studies, including experimental irradiations and basic material characterisation; - account for all relevant phenomena, such as mechanical non linear behaviour, irradiation induced swelling, fission gas release, or material properties evolution under irradiation, under normal and off-normal conditions; - provide robust and efficient numerical algorithms; - allow fast developpement of new case studies; - guarantee the flexibility of the code for almost all aspects of the fuel element, from geometrical changes to material changes; - assess the quality of studies by enabling designers to focus on physics, which is by far the most important and difficult task. This paper provides an overview of celaeno abilities. We demonstrate how complex simulations can easily be set up, the most time consuming part being the meshing. On the

  20. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demick, L.E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

  1. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.E. Demick

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

  2. Thermal response of core and central-cavity components of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor in the absence of forced convection coolant flow. [NATCON code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whaley, R.L.; Sanders, J.P.

    1976-09-01

    A means of determining the thermal responses of the core and the components of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor after loss of forced coolant flow is discussed. A computer program, using a finite-difference technique, is presented together with a solution of the confined natural convection. The results obtained are reasonable and demonstrate that the computer program adequately represents the confined natural convection.

  3. HTGR-GT closed-cycle gas turbine: a plant concept with inherent cogeneration (power plus heat production) capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.

    1980-04-01

    The high-grade sensible heat rejection characteristic of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor-gas turbine (HTGR-GT) plant is ideally suited to cogeneration. Cogeneration in this nuclear closed-cycle plant could include (1) bottoming Rankine cycle, (2) hot water or process steam production, (3) desalination, and (4) urban and industrial district heating. This paper discusses the HTGR-GT plant thermodynamic cycles, design features, and potential applications for the cogeneration operation modes. This paper concludes that the HTGR-GT plant, which can potentially approach a 50% overall efficiency in a combined cycle mode, can significantly aid national energy goals, particularly resource conservation

  4. Specialists' meeting on gas-cooled reactor core and high temperature instrumentation, Windermere, UK, 15-17 June 1982. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The Specialists' Meeting on ''Gas-Cooled Reactor Core and High Temperature Instrumentation'' was held at the Beech Hill Hotel, Windermere in England on June 15-17 1982. The meeting was sponsored by the IAEA on the recommendation of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors and was hosted by the Windscale Nuclear Power Development Laboratories of the UKAEA. The meeting was attended by 43 participants from Belgium, France, Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the United States of America. The objective of the meeting was to provide a forum, both formal and informal, for the exchange and discussion of technical information relating to instrumentation being used or under development for the measurement of core parameters, neutron flux, temperature, coolant flow etc. in gas cooled reactors. The technical part of the meeting was divided into five subject sessions: (A) Temperature Measurement (B) Neutron Detection Instrumentation (C) HTR Instrumentation - General (D) Gas Analysis and Failed Fuel Detection (E) Coolant Mass Flow and Leak Detection. A total of twenty-five papers were presented by the participants on behalf of their organizations during the meeting. A programme of the meeting and list of participants are given in appendices to this report

  5. Status of the United States national HTGR programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, R.; Kasten, P.R.; Penfield, S.R. Jr.; Mears, L.D.; Newby, G.A.; Pflasterer, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    Utility support for the HTGR in the U.S. spans a history of 25 years, and has led to the construction of two HTGR facilities: Peach Bottom I and Fort St. Vrain. Since 1978, U.S. utility support for the HTGR has been through Gas-Cooled Reactor Associates (GCRA) which comprises over 30 utility companies and collectively represents approximately 25% of the U.S. generating capacity. During the past two years, GCRA, in conjunction with all Program participants, has undertaken various HTGR application and project evaluation studies in support of establishing a HTGR Lead Project. The primary purpose of this paper is to provide a utility perspective on the U.S. HTGR Program and Lead Project plans. In addition, key results of the various application and project evaluation studies will be reviewed. Specific areas to be addressed are: 1. HTGR siting advantages associated with low cooling water requirements, low environmental impact and inherent safety features. 2. Cogeneration applications that produce electricity and process heat and thereby provide access to new markets for the utility industry. 3. Dedicated applications to synfuel processes such as coal gasification and oil shale production that may involve joint ventures between the utility industry and the synfuel industry. (author)

  6. Use of oxygen dosing to prevent flow accelerated corrosion in British Energy's Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirk, G.P.; Woolsey, I.S.; Rudge, A.

    2010-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) was recognized as major threat to the carbon steel feed and economizer tubing of the once-through boilers of the UK's Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGRs) following the observation of FAC damage of the boiler inlet orifice assemblies at two plants in 1977, and subsequent review of the likelihood of further damage elsewhere within the boilers of all AGRs. In most cases, replacement of susceptible tubing was not feasible; due to the inaccessibility of the boiler components within the reactor concrete pressure vessel. Preventing further FAC damage within the boilers therefore had to rely largely on changes to the boiler feedwater chemistry. Following extensive research programs carried out in the late 1970s and early 1980s two main feedwater chemistry regimes were adopted to suppress FAC in different AGRs. The four units found to be at greatest risk of FAC damage adopted an oxygen dosed All Volatile Treatment (AVT) regime during commissioning, while four other units retained the original deoxygenated ammonia dosed AVT regime, but with an increased feedwater pH. The deoxygenated ammonia dosed chemistry regime was also adopted in four AGR units subsequently built, which used 1%Cr0.5%Mo feed and economizer tubing in their once-through boilers. The oxygen dosed AVT chemistry regime adopted in four units having helical once-through boilers has proved highly effective in preventing FAC, with no evidence of damage after around 150,000 hours of operation. However, FAC damage was eventually found in some of the other units operating with a deoxygenated feedwater chemistry regime, in spite of having adopted an elevated feedwater pH. These units have now successfully converted to an oxygen dosed AVT feedwater chemistry regime to prevent further FAC damage, with the result that all 14 AGR reactors now operate with variants of the original oxygen dosed feedwater chemistry regime developed during the 1980s. The paper outlines the development of

  7. INTEGRATION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS REACTORS WITH IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric P. Robertson; Michael G. McKellar; Lee O. Nelson

    2011-05-01

    This paper evaluates the integration of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to an in situ oil shale retort operation producing 7950 m3/D (50,000 bbl/day). The large amount of heat required to pyrolyze the oil shale and produce oil would typically be provided by combustion of fossil fuels, but can also be delivered by an HTGR. Two cases were considered: a base case which includes no nuclear integration, and an HTGR-integrated case.

  8. Enriched-uranium feed costs for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled reactor: trends and comparison with other reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, W.E.

    1976-04-01

    This report discusses each of the components that affect the unit cost for enriched uranium; that is, ore costs, U 3 O 8 to UF 6 conversion cost, costs for enriching services, and changes in transaction tails assay. Historical trends and announced changes are included. Unit costs for highly enriched uranium (93.15 percent 235 U) and for low-enrichment uranium (3.0, 3.2, and 3.5 percent 235 U) are displayed as a function of changes in the above components and compared. It is demonstrated that the trends in these cost components will probably result in significantly less cost increase for highly enriched uranium than for low-enrichment uranium--hence favoring the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

  9. Particle image velocimetry measurements in a representative gas-cooled prismatic reactor core model for the estimation of bypass flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conder, Thomas E.

    Core bypass flow is considered one of the largest contributors to uncertainty in fuel temperature within the Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR). It refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial regions between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. These flows are of concern because they reduce the desired flow rates in the coolant channels, and thereby have significant influence on the maximum fuel element and coolant exit temperatures. Thus, accurate prediction of the bypass flow is important because it directly impacts core temperature, influencing the life and efficiency of the reactor. An experiment was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory to quantify the flow in the coolant channels in relation to the interstitial gaps between fuel blocks in a representative MHTGR core. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure the flow fields within a simplified model, which comprised of a stacked junction of six partial fuel blocks with nine coolant tubes, separated by a 6mm gap width. The model had three sections: The upper plenum, upper block, and lower block. Model components were fabricated from clear, fused quartz where optical access was needed for the PIV measurements. Measurements were taken in three streamwise locations: in the upper plenum and in the midsection of the large and small fuel blocks. A laser light sheet was oriented parallel to the flow, while velocity fields were measured at millimeter intervals across the width of the model, totaling 3,276 PIV measurement locations. Inlet conditions were varied to incorporate laminar, transition, and turbulent flows in the coolant channels---all which produced laminar flow in the gap and non-uniform, turbulent flow in the upper plenum. The images were analyzed to create vector maps, and the data was exported for processing and compilation. The bypass flow was estimated by calculating the flow rates through the coolant

  10. HTGR fuel particle crusher: Mark 2 design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, J.W.

    1979-06-01

    The double-roll crusher for fracturing the silicon carbide coatings of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel particles has been redesigned to improve the equipment. The housing was simplified and reduced to a two-piece assembly; the bearings were changed to accommodate thermal effects; the bearing protection seals were improved with triple redundancy; the bearing preload arrangement was simplified and improved; and localized wear areas were reinforced with better materials or special treatment. In addition, the crusher drive was changed for impoved characteristics and an increase in power

  11. HTGR fuel particle crusher: Mark 2 design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, J.W.

    1979-06-01

    The double-roll crusher for fracturing the silicon carbide coatings of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel particles has been redesigned to improve the equipment. The housing was simplified and reduced to a two-piece assembly; the bearings were changed to accommodate thermal effects; the bearing protection seals were improved with triple redundancy; the bearing preload arrangement was simplified and improved; and localized wear areas were reinforced with better materials or special treatment. In addition, the crusher drive was changed for impoved characteristics and an increase in power.

  12. Process for the production of pressed block fuel elements of high power for gas cooled high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackstein, K.G.; Hrovat, M.; Wolff, W.

    1976-01-01

    Molded or pressed block fuel elements of high power for gas cooled high temperatures are produced by molding in steel tools using outer dies or bars and punches arranged to be freely moveable in the axial direction and moving said moveable dies or bars and punches in the molding process. 6 claims, 2 figures

  13. Approach on a global HTGR R and D network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lensa, W. von

    1997-01-01

    The present situation of nuclear power in general and of the innovative nuclear reactor systems in particular requires more comprehensive, coordinated R and D efforts on a broad international level to respond to today's requirements with respect to public and economic acceptance as well as to globalization trends and global environmental problems. HTGR technology development has already reached a high degree of maturity that will be complemented by the operation of the two new test reactors in Japan and China, representing technological milestones for the demonstration of HTGR safety characteristics and Nuclear Process Heat generation capabilities. It is proposed by the IAEA 'International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors' to establish a 'Global HTGR R and D Network' on basic HTGR technology for the stable, long-term advancement of the specific HTGR features and as a basis for the future market introduction of this innovative reactor system. The background and the motivation for this approach are illustrated, as well as first proposals on the main objectives, the structure and the further procedures for the implementation of such a multinational working sharing R and D network. Modern telecooperation methods are foreseen as an interactive tool for effective communication and collaboration on a global scale. (author)

  14. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: reprocessing of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel containing U-233 and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W. Jr.; Blanco, R.E.; Finney, B.C.; Hill, G.S.; Moore, R.E.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1976-05-01

    A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of various radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials from a model high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel reprocessing plant and to determine the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released materials on the environment. The study is designed to assist the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in defining the term as low as reasonably achievable as it applies to this nuclear facility. The base case is representative of conceptual, developing technology of head-end graphite-burning operations and of extensions of solvent-extraction technology of current designs for light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel reprocessing plants. The model plant has an annual capacity of 450 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM, where heavy metal is uranium plus thorium), as charged to about fifty 1000-MW(e) HTGRs. Additional radwaste treatment systems are added to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The capital and annual costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding reductions in dose commitments are calculated for each case. In the final analysis, the cost/benefit of each case, calculated as additional cost of radwaste system divided by the reduction in dose commitment, is tabulated or the dose commitment is plotted with cost as the variable. The status of each of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed

  15. OSCIL: one-dimensional spring-mass system simulator for seismic analysis of high temperature gas cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasker, L.

    1976-01-01

    OSCIL is a program to predict the effects of seismic input on a HTGR core. The present model is a one-dimensional array of blocks with appropriate spring constants, inter-elemental and ground damping, and clearances. It can be used more generally for systems of moving masses separated by nonlinear springs and dampers

  16. OSCIL: one-dimensional spring-mass system simulator for seismic analysis of high temperature gas cooled reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasker, L. (ed.)

    1976-01-01

    OSCIL is a program to predict the effects of seismic input on a HTGR core. The present model is a one-dimensional array of blocks with appropriate spring constants, inter-elemental and ground damping, and clearances. It can be used more generally for systems of moving masses separated by nonlinear springs and dampers.

  17. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel recycle development. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotts, A.L.; Kasten, P.R.

    1978-09-01

    The status of the following tasks is reported: program management, studies and analysis, fuel processing, refabrication development, in-plant waste treatment, research general support, and major facilities including HTGR recycle reference facility, hot engineering test facility and cold prototype test facility-refabrication

  18. STATUS OF TRISO FUEL IRRADIATIONS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR SUPPORTING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR DESIGNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, Michael; Petti, D. A.; Palmer, Joe

    2016-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and completed in October 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this experiment was to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment was significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control

  19. Proceedings of the ANS/ASME/NRC international topical meeting on nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics: LMFBR and HTGR advanced reactor concepts and analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning the thermal-hydraulics of LMFBR type reactors; mathematical methods in nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics; heat transfer in gas-cooled reactors; and thermal-hydraulics of pebble-bed reactors. Two papers have been previously abstracted and input to the data base

  20. The calculating methods of the release of airborne radionuclides to environment during the normal operation of a module high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yuanzhong

    1993-01-01

    The calculations of the release of radionuclides to environment are the basis of environmental impact assessment during the normal operation of a module high temperature gas-cooled reactor of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, China. According to the features of the reactor it is pointed out that only five sources of the airborne radioactive materials released to environment are important. They are: (1) the activation of the air in the reactor cavity; (2) the escape from the primary coolant systems; (3) the release of radioactively contaminated helium from storage tanks; (4) the release of radioactively contaminated helium from the gas evacuation system of fuel load and unload system; (5) the leakage of the vapour from water-steam loop. In accordance with five release sources the calculating methods of radionuclides released to environment are worked out respectively and the respective calculating formulas are derived for the normal operation of the reactor

  1. Examination on small-sized cogeneration HTGR for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaba, Nariaki; Tachibana, Yukio; Shimakawa, Satoshi; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Yan, Xing; Murakami, Tomoyuki; Ohashi, Kazutaka; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Goto, Minoru; Ueta, Shohei; Mozumi, Yasuhiro; Imai, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Okuda, Hiroyuki; Iwatsuki, Jin; Kubo, Shinji; Takada, Shoji; Nishihara, Tetsuo; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2008-03-01

    The small-sized and safe cogeneration High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) that can be used not only for electric power generation but also for hydrogen production and district heating is considered one of the most promising nuclear reactors for developing countries where sufficient infrastructure such as power grids is not provided. Thus, the small-sized cogeneration HTGR, named High Temperature Reactor 50-Cogeneration (HTR50C), was studied assuming that it should be constructed in developing countries. Specification, equipment configuration, etc. of the HTR50C were determined, and economical evaluation was made. As a result, it was shown that the HTR50C is economically competitive with small-sized light water reactors. (author)

  2. Containment vs confinement trade study, small HTGR plant PCRV [prestressed concrete reactor vessel] concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1985-03-01

    This trade study has been conducted to evaluate the differences between four different HTGR nuclear power plants. All of the plants use a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) to house the core and steam generation equipment. The reactor uses LEU U/Th fuel in prismatic carbon blocks. All plant concepts meet the utility/user requirements established for small HTGR plants. All plants will be evaluated with regard to their ability to produce safe, economical power to satisfy Goals 1, 2, and 3 of the HTGR program and by meeting the MUST criteria established in the concept evaluation plan. Capital costs for each plant were evaluated on a differential cost basis. These costs were developed according to the ``NUS`` code of accounts as defined in the Cost Estimating and Control Procedure, HP-20901. Accounts that were identical in scope for all four plants were not used for the comparison. Table 1-1 is a list of capital cost accounts that were evaluated for each plant.

  3. New HTGR plant concept with inherently safe features aimed at small energy users needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Silady, F.S.; Shenoy, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    A small high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) concept is proposed which could provide the energy needs for certain sectors of industrialized nations and the developing countries. The key to the economic success for small reactors, which have potential benefits for special markets, lies in altering the traditional scaling laws. Toward this goal, a small HTGR concept embodying passive decay heat removal features is currently being evaluated. This paper emphasizes the safety-related aspects of a small HTGR. The proposed small reactor concept is new and still in the design development stage, and a significant effort must be expended to establish a design which is technically and economically feasible and will meet the increasingly demanding safety and licensing goals for reactors of the future

  4. TRITIUM PERMEATION AND TRANSPORT IN THE GASOLINE PRODUCTION SYSTEM COUPLED WITH HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS (HTGRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Mike Patterson

    2011-05-01

    This paper describes scoping analyses on tritium behaviors in the HTGR-integrated gasoline production system, which is based on a methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) plant. In this system, the HTGR transfers heat and electricity to the MTG system. This system was analyzed using the TPAC code, which was recently developed by Idaho National Laboratory. The global sensitivity analyses were performed to understand and characterize tritium behaviors in the coupled HTGR/MTG system. This Monte Carlo based random sampling method was used to evaluate maximum 17,408 numbers of samples with different input values. According to the analyses, the average tritium concentration in the product gasoline is about 3.05×10-3 Bq/cm3, and 62 % cases are within the tritium effluent limit (= 3.7x10-3 Bq/cm3[STP]). About 0.19% of released tritium is finally transported from the core to the gasoline product through permeations. This study also identified that the following four parameters are important concerning tritium behaviors in the HTGR/MTG system: (1) tritium source, (2) wall thickness of process heat exchanger, (3) operating temperature, and (4) tritium permeation coefficient of process heat exchanger. These four parameters contribute about 95 % of the total output uncertainties. This study strongly recommends focusing our future research on these four parameters to improve modeling accuracy and to mitigate tritium permeation into the gasol ine product. If the permeation barrier is included in the future study, the tritium concentration will be significantly reduced.

  5. Conceptual design study on very small long-life gas cooled fast reactor using metallic natural Uranium-Zr as fuel cycle input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conceptual design study of very small 350 MWth Gas-cooled Fast Reactors with Helium coolant has been performed. In this study Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was implemented to create small and long life fast reactors with natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Such system can utilize natural Uranium resources efficiently without the necessity of enrichment plant or reprocessing plant. The core with metallic fuel based was subdivided into 10 regions with the same volume. The fresh Natural Uranium is initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 is filled by fresh Natural Uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all axial regions. The reactor discharge burn-up is 31.8% HM. From the neutronic point of view, this design is in compliance with good performance

  6. Conceptual design study on very small long-life gas cooled fast reactor using metallic natural Uranium-Zr as fuel cycle input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monado, Fiber; Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul; Aziz, Ferhat; Permana, Sidik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    A conceptual design study of very small 350 MWth Gas-cooled Fast Reactors with Helium coolant has been performed. In this study Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was implemented to create small and long life fast reactors with natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Such system can utilize natural Uranium resources efficiently without the necessity of enrichment plant or reprocessing plant. The core with metallic fuel based was subdivided into 10 regions with the same volume. The fresh Natural Uranium is initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 is filled by fresh Natural Uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all axial regions. The reactor discharge burn-up is 31.8% HM. From the neutronic point of view, this design is in compliance with good performance.

  7. Regulatory Framework of Safety for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Chang Wook; Suh, Nam Duk

    2011-01-01

    Recent accident in Fukushima Daiichi plant in Japan makes big impacts on the future of nuclear business. Many countries are changing their nuclear projects and increased safety of nuclear plants is asked for from the public. Without providing safety the society accepts, it might be almost impossible to build new plants further. In this sense high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) which is under development needs to be licensed reflecting this new expectation regarding safety. It means we should have higher level of safety goal and a systematic regulatory framework to assure the safety. In our previous paper, we evaluated the current safety goal and design practice in view of this new safety expectation after Fukushima accident. It was argued that a top-down approach starting from safety goal is necessary to develop safety requirements or to assure safety. Thus we need to propose an ultimate safety goal public accepts and then establish a systematic regulatory framework. In this paper we are going to provide a conceptual regulatory framework to guarantee the safety of HTGR. Section 2 discusses the recent trend of IAEA safety requirements and then summarize the HTGR design approach. Incorporating these discussions, we propose a conceptual framework of regulation for safety of HTGR

  8. Modular HTGR Safety Basis and Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Hicks

    2011-08-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) capable of producing electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) process, as recommended in the NGNP Licensing Strategy - A Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy [DOE/NRC 2008]. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy for licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This information paper is one in a series of submittals that address key generic issues of the priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements. This information paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach with the NRC staff and public stakeholders. The NGNP project does not expect to receive comments on this information paper because other white papers are addressing key generic issues of the priority licensing topics in greater detail.

  9. Generation IV nuclear energy system initiative. Large GFR core subassemblydesign for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, E. A.; Kulak, R. F.; Therios, I. U.; Wei, T. Y. C.

    2006-07-31

    Gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) designs are being developed to meet Gen IV goals of sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, and proliferation resistance and physical protection as part of an International Generation IV Nuclear Energy System Research Initiative effort. Different organizations are involved in the development of a variety of GFR design concepts. The current analysis has focused on the evaluation of low-pressure drop, pin-core designs with favorable passive cooling properties. Initial evaluation of the passive cooling safety case for the GFR during depressurized decay heat removal accidents with concurrent loss of electric power have resulted in requirements for a reduction of core power density to the 100 w/cc level and a low core pressure drop of 0.5 bars. Additional design constraints and the implementation of their constraints are evaluated in this study to enhance and passive cooling properties of the reactor. Passive cooling is made easier by a flat radial distribution of the decay heat. One goal of this study was to evaluate the radial power distribution and determine to what extent it can be flattened, since the decay heat is nearly proportional to the fission power at shutdown. In line with this investigation of the radial power profile, an assessment was also made of the control rod configuration. The layout provided a large number of control rod locations with a fixed area provided for control rods. The number of control rods was consistent with other fast reactor designs. The adequacy of the available control rod locations was evaluated. Future studies will be needed to optimize the control rod designs and evaluate the shutdown system. The case for low pressure drop core can be improved by the minimization of pressure drop sources such as the number of required fuel spacers in the subassembly design and by the details of the fuel pin design. The fuel pin design is determined by a number of neutronic, thermal-hydraulic (gas dynamics

  10. ORR irradiation experiment OF-1: accelerated testing of HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs, T.N.; Long, E.L. Jr.; Kania, M.J.; Thoms, K.R.; Allen, E.J.

    1977-08-01

    The OF-1 capsule, the first in a series of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor fuel irradiations in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor, was irradiated for more than 9300 hr at full reactor power (30 MW). Peak fluences of 1.08 x 10 22 neutrons/cm 2 (> 0.18 MeV) were achieved. General Atomic Company's magazine P13Q occupied the upper two-thirds of the test space and the ORNL magazine OF-1 the lower one-third. The ORNL portion tested various HTGR recycle particles and fuel bonding matrices at accelerated flux levels under reference HTGR irradiation conditions of temperature, temperature gradient, and fast fluence exposure

  11. Nondestructive testing of welds in steam generators for advanced gas cooled reactors at Heyshamm II and Torness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkin, K.; Bainbridge, A.; Carver, K.; Hammell, R.; Lack, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    The paper concerns non-destructive testing (NDT) of welds in advanced gas cooled steam generators for Heysham II and Torness nuclear power stations. A description is given of the steam generator. The selection of NDT techniques is also outlined, including the factors considered to ascertain the viability of a technique. Examples are given of applied NDT methods which match particular fabrication processes; these include: microfocus radiography, ultrasonic testing of austenitic tube butt welds, gamma-ray isotope projection system, surface crack detection, and automated radiography. Finally, future trends in this field of NDT are highlighted. (UK)

  12. Reactor tests and post-reactor examination of HTGR fuel elements and coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degaltsev, Yu.G.; Khrulev, A.A.; Mosevitskii, I.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Tikhonov, N.I.; Yakovlev, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    Tests and examinations of HTGR fuel elements performed recently at I.V.Kurchatov AEI have been directed to solve the following problems: determination of correspondence of the operability characteristics of fuel elements and coated particles from different lots to requirements to be imposed on VGM and VG-400 designs being developed; comparison of the characteristics of fuel elements manufactured using two different technologies of matrix graphite (KPD and GSP) as well as coated particles of various designs and material composition; investigation of fuel element operability under severe accident conditions; investigation of processes occurring in fuel element and coated particle, resulting in formation of defects and release of GFP; construction of physical models of fuel element behaviour in the reactor on this basis. Tests and investigations were performed for fuel elements manufactured using the KPD and GSP technologies. For solving the above problems the experimental basis and methods described herein were used. The present paper is a short review of works covering these problems, with main emphasis being made on description and analysis of fuel element and coated particle tests under non-nominal accident and severe accident conditions. Such tests are of specific interest. While tests for confirming operability under nominal conditions are necessary for justification of the design characteristics and must be supported by sufficient statistics, tests for severe conditions have at least two objectives: 1) estimation of the limits of fuel element operability depending on the basing affecting factors (temperatures burnup, etc.); 2) getting the data for studying processes resulting in loss of operability; on the basis of these data physical models of fuel element operability and accident sequence in the reactor unit may be constructed and verified. The experiments presented herein are the first stage of such investigations on determination of influence of the

  13. Survey on the activities in Switzerland in the field of HTGR-development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarlos, G.; Brogli, R.; Mathews, D.; Bucher, K.H.; Helbling, W.

    1991-01-01

    The activities of the Swiss industry and of the ''Paul Scherrer Institute'' in the development and production of components and systems for the nuclear industry are reviewed. For the HTGR, major programs include the German HTR-500 project, the gas-cooled district heating reactor (GHR), and the PROTEUS critical experiments. The experiments are being performed in the framework of an IAEA coordinated research program. (author)

  14. Development of the control assembly pattern and dynamic analysis of the generation IV large gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardin, G.

    2009-01-01

    Among the systems selected by the GIF, the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is a highly innovative system with advanced fuel geometry and materials. It is in the context of the large, 2400 MWth reference GFR design that the present doctoral research has been conducted, the principal aim having been to develop and qualify the control assembly (CA) pattern and corresponding CA implementation scheme for this system. The work has been carried out in three successive and complementary phases: (1) validation of the neutronics tools, (2) the CA pattern development and related static analysis, and (3) dynamic core behavior studies for hypothetical CA driven transients. During the first phase of the thesis, the reference PROTEUS test lattice from these experiments has been analyzed with ERANOS-2.0 and its associated, adjusted nuclear data library ERALIB1. Additionally, benchmark calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX, allowing one to both check the deterministic results and to analyze the sensitivity to different modern data libraries. It has been found that, for the main reaction rate ratios, the new analysis of the GCFR-PROTEUS reference lattice generally yields good agreement - within 1σ measurement uncertainty - with experimental values and with the Monte Carlo simulations. As shown by the analysis, the predictions were in somewhat better agreement in the case of the adjusted ERALIB1 library. The applicability of ERANOS-2.0/ERALIB1 as the reference neutronics tool for the GFR analysis could thus be demonstrated. Furthermore, neutronics aspects related to the novel features of the GFR, for which new experimental investigations are needed, were highlighted. In the second phase of the research, the CA pattern was developed for the GFR, based on iterative neutronics and thermal-hydraulics calculations, 2D and 3D neutronics models for the reactor core having first been set up using the reference ERANOS-2.0/ERALIB1 computational scheme. For the thermal

  15. Model for the migration of the fission products along the coolant channels of a high temperature gas cooled reactor following a hypothetical accident of complete loss of cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickey, J.M.

    1978-05-01

    Under the assumption that a nonmechanistic accident induces a condition such that it is not possible to cool the core of a high temperature gas cooled reactor, the temperature of the core will gradually rise due to decay heat. There are several barriers to the release of fission products to the environment: the fuel particle coatings, the graphite moderator, the prestressed concrete reactor vessel and the containment. A code, EVAP, has been written to calculate one stage in the release and migration of the fission products along the coolant channels. The calculations, using the code, are reported for 10 fission products, based on typical conditions which might occur in the course of the hypothetical accident. The sensitivity of the results to several important parameters is examined

  16. The conceptual flowsheet of effluent treatment during total gelation of uranium process for preparing ceramic UO2 particles of high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan Ying; Chen Xiaotong; Wang Yang; Liu Bing; Tang Yaping; Tang Chunhe

    2014-01-01

    Today, more and more people pay attention to the environmental protection and ecological environment. Along with the development of nuclear industry, many radioactive effluents may be discharged into environment, which can lead to the pollutions of water, atmosphere and soil. So radioactive effluents including low-activity and medium-level wastes solution treatments have been becoming one of significant subjects. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR) is one of advanced nuclear reactors owing to its reliability, security and broad application in which the fabrication of spherical fuel element is a key technology. During the production of spherical fuel elements, the radioactive effluent treatment is necessary. Referring to the current treatment technologies and methods, the conceptual flowsheet of low-level radioactive effluent treatment during preparing spherical fuel elements was summarized which met the 'Zero Emission' demand. (authors)

  17. The Shandong Shidao Bay 200 MWe High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Pebble-Bed Module (HTR-PM Demonstration Power Plant: An Engineering and Technological Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuoyi Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available After the first concrete was poured on December 9, 2012 at the Shidao Bay site in Rongcheng, Shandong Province, China, the construction of the reactor building for the world's first high-temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble-bed module (HTR-PM demonstration power plant was completed in June, 2015. Installation of the main equipment then began, and the power plant is currently progressing well toward connecting to the grid at the end of 2017. The thermal power of a single HTR-PM reactor module is 250 MWth, the helium temperatures at the reactor core inlet/outlet are 250/750 °C, and a steam of 13.25 MPa/567 °C is produced at the steam generator outlet. Two HTR-PM reactor modules are connected to a steam turbine to form a 210 MWe nuclear power plant. Due to China's industrial capability, we were able to overcome great difficulties, manufacture first-of-a-kind equipment, and realize series major technological innovations. We have achieved successful results in many aspects, including planning and implementing R&D, establishing an industrial partnership, manufacturing equipment, fuel production, licensing, site preparation, and balancing safety and economics; these obtained experiences may also be referenced by the global nuclear community.

  18. The feasibility study of small long-life gas cooled fast reactor with mixed natural Uranium/Thorium as fuel cycle input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Khairurrijal, Monado, Fiber; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    A conceptual design study of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme has been performed. In this study, design GCFR with Helium coolant which can be continuously operated by supplying mixed Natural Uranium/Thorium without fuel enrichment plant or fuel reprocessing plant. The active reactor cores are divided into two region, Thorium fuel region and Uranium fuel region. Each fuel core regions are subdivided into ten parts (region-1 until region-10) with the same volume in the axial direction. The fresh Natural Uranium and Thorium is initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 is filled by fresh natural Uranium/Thorium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all regions in both cores area, i.e. shifted the core of ith region into i+1 region after the end of 10 years burn-up cycle. For the next cycles, we will add only Natural Uranium and Thorium on each region-1. The calculation results show the reactivity reached by mixed Natural Uranium/Thorium with volume ratio is 4.7:1. This reactor can results power thermal 550 MWth. After reactor start-up the operation, furthermore reactor only needs Natural Uranium/Thorium supply for continue operation along 100 years.

  19. HTGR nuclear heat source component design and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peinado, C.O.; Wunderlich, R.G.; Simon, W.A.

    1982-05-01

    The high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) nuclear heat source components have been under design and development since the mid-1950's. Two power plants have been designed, constructed, and operated: the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station and the Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station. Recently, development has focused on the primary system components for a 2240-MW(t) steam cycle HTGR capable of generating about 900 MW(e) electric power or alternately producing high-grade steam and cogenerating electric power. These components include the steam generators, core auxiliary heat exchangers, primary and auxiliary circulators, reactor internals, and thermal barrier system. A discussion of the design and operating experience of these components is included

  20. Reduced risk HTGR concept for industrial heat application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boardman, C.E.; Lipps, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    The industrial process heat market has been identified as major market for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR), however, this market introduces stringent availability requirements on the reactor system relative to electric plants which feed a large existing grid. The characteristics and requirements of the industrial heat markets are summarized; the risks associated with serving this market with a single large HTGR will be discussed; and the modular concept, which has the potential to reduce both safety and investment risks, will be described. The reference modular concept described consists of several small, relatively benign nuclear heat sources linked together to supply heat energy to a balance-of-plant incorporating a process gas train/thermochemical pipe line system and a normal steam-electric plant

  1. Synthetic-fuel production using Texas lignite and a very-high-temperature gas-cooled reactor for process heat and electrical power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, M.A.; Klein, D.E.

    1981-05-01

    This report presents two alternatives to increased reliance on foreign energy sources; each method utilizes the abundant domestic resources of coal, uranium, and thorium. Two approaches are studied in this report. First, the gasification and liquefaction of coal are accomplished with Lurgi gasifiers and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. A 50,000 barrel per day facility, consuming 15 million tons of lignite coal per year, is used. Second, a nuclear-assisted coal conversion approach is studied using a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor with a modified Lurgi gasifier and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. This is a preliminary report presenting background data and a means of comparison for the two approaches considered

  2. Development and verification of the LIFE-GCFR computer code for predicting gas-cooled fast-reactor fuel-rod performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, T.C.; Billone, M.C.; Rest, J.

    1982-03-01

    The fuel-pin modeling code LIFE-GCFR has been developed to predict the thermal, mechanical, and fission-gas behavior of a Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) fuel rod under normal operating conditions. It consists of three major components: thermal, mechanical, and fission-gas analysis. The thermal analysis includes calculations of coolant, cladding, and fuel temperature; fuel densification; pore migration; fuel grain growth; and plenum pressure. Fuel mechanical analysis includes thermal expansion, elasticity, creep, fission-product swelling, hot pressing, cracking, and crack healing of fuel; and thermal expansion, elasticity, creep, and irradiation-induced swelling of cladding. Fission-gas analysis simultaneously treats all major mechanisms thought to influence fission-gas behavior, which include bubble nucleation, resolution, diffusion, migration, and coalescence; temperature and temperature gradients; and fission-gas interaction with structural defects

  3. S/sub N/ computational benchmark solutions for slab geometry models of a gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) lattice cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    S/sub N/ computational benchmark solutions are generated for a onegroup and multigroup fuel-void slab lattice cell which is a rough model of a gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) lattice cell. The reactivity induced by the extrusion of the fuel material into the voided region is determined for a series of partially extruded lattice cell configurations. A special modified Gauss S/sub N/ ordinate array design is developed in order to obtain eigenvalues with errors less than 0.03% in all of the configurations that are considered. The modified Gauss S/sub N/ ordinate array design has a substantially improved eigenvalue angular convergence behavior when compared to existing S/sub N/ ordinate array designs used in neutron streaming applications. The angular refinement computations are performed in some cases by using a perturbation theory method which enables one to obtain high order S/sub N/ eigenvalue estimates for greatly reduced computational costs

  4. Liquid-metal-gas heat exchanger for HTGR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werth, G.

    1980-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the heat transfer characteristics of a liquid metal heat exchanger (HE) for a helium-cooled high temperature reactor. A tube-type heat exchanger is considered as well as two direct exchangers: a bubble-type heat exchanger and a heat exchanger according to the spray principle. Experiments are made in order to determine the gas content of bubble-type heat exchangers, the dependence of the droplet diameter on the nozzle diameter, the falling speed of the droplets, the velocity of the liquid jet, and the temperature variation of liquid jets. The computer codes developed for HE calculation are structured so that they may be used for gas/liquid HE, too. Each type of HE that is dealt with is designed by accousting for a technical and an economic assessment. The liquid-lead jet spray is preferred to all other types because of its small space occupied and its simple design. It shall be used in near future in the HTR by the name of lead/helium HE. (GL) [de

  5. Developments of HTGR thermofluid dynamic analysis codes and HTGR plant dynamic simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Mitsuhiro; Izaki, Makoto; Koike, Hiroyuki; Tokumitsu, Masashi

    1983-01-01

    In nuclear power plants as well as high temperature gas-cooled reactor plants, the design is mostly performed on the basis of the results after their characteristics have been grasped by carrying out the numerical simulation using the analysis code. Also in Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd., on the basis of the system engineering accumulated with gas-cooled reactors since several years ago, the preparation and systematization of analysis codes have been advanced, aiming at lining up the analysis codes for heat transferring flow and control characteristics, taking up HTGR plants as the main object. In this report, a part of the results is described. The example of the analysis applying the two-dimensional compressible flow analysis codes SOLA-VOF and SALE-2D, which were developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory in USA and modified for use in Kawasaki, to HTGR system is reported. Besides, Kawasaki has developed the control characteristics analyzing code DYSCO by which the change of system composition is easy and high versatility is available. The outline, fundamental equations, fundamental algorithms and examples of application of the SOLA-VOF and SALE-2D, the present status of system characteristic simulation codes and the outline of the DYSCO are described. (Kako, I.)

  6. Safety-related Innovative Nuclear Reactor Technology Elements R and D (SINTER) Network and Global HTGR R and D Network (GHTRN). Strategic benefits of international networking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Lensa, W.

    1998-01-01

    Action on 'Safety-related Innovative Nuclear Reactor Technology Elements - R and D - (SINTER) Network' both aim at the identification of priority items for sustainable innovations of nuclear technologies and work-shared European collaboration structures. Such an approach can also be realised for future R and D on HTGR-related R and D under the umbrella of the IAEA as already proposed by the 'International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (IWGGCR)' in 1996 and illustrated in this paper for the construction of a 'Global HTGR R and D Network (GHTRN)'. 3 refs

  7. A development strategy for the business plan of Mitsubishi Small-sized High Temperature Gas-cooled Modular Reactor (MHR-50/100is)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minatsuki, Isao; Otani, Tomomi; Shimizu, Katsusuke; Mizokami, Yorikata; Oyama, Sunao; Tsukamoto, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    A business plan and a new concept of Mitsubishi Small-sized High Temperature Gas-cooled Modular Reactor (MHR-50/100is) has been investigated toward a commercialization in near future by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries cooperated with Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in Japan. The potential market of small sized reactor is expected to increase from the points of view of smaller investment, industrial use of the nuclear heat and IPP (Independent Power Producer). Especially minimization of construction unit cost including R and D and plant construction period are important issues in order to realize a business plan for them. The study includes four pertinent subject areas of (1) a market analysis, (2) a conceptual design, (3) improvement of safety design and (4) plant dynamics. In summary, the MHR-50/100 is designed to target a short construction period, competitive cost, and an inherent safety feature while applying only the verified technology of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of JAEA or conventional technologies

  8. Use of a temperature-initiated passive cooling system (TIPACS) for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Conklin, J.; Reich, W.J.

    1994-04-01

    A new type of passive cooling system has been invented (Forsberg 1993): the Temperature-Initiated Passive Cooling System (TIPACS). The characteristics of the TIPACS potentially match requirements for an improved reactor-cavity-cooling system (RCCS) for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). This report is an initial evaluation of the TIPACS for the MHTGR with a Rankines (steam) power conversion cycle. Limited evaluations were made of applying the TIPACS to MHTGRs with reactor pressure vessel temperatures up to 450 C. These temperatures may occur in designs of Brayton cycle (gas turbine) and process heat MHTGRs. The report is structured as follows. Section 2 describes the containment cooling issues associated with the MHTGR and the requirements for such a cooling system. Section 3 describes TIPACS in nonmathematical terms. Section 4 describes TIPACS's heat-removal capabilities. Section 5 analyzes the operation of the temperature-control mechanism that determines under what conditions the TIPACS rejects heat to the environment. Section 6 addresses other design and operational issues. Section 7 identifies uncertainties, and Section 8 provides conclusions. The appendixes provide the detailed data and models used in the analysis

  9. System of large transport containers for waste from dismantling light water and gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, M.S.T.; Lafontaine, I.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this volume is to introduce the main types of nuclear reactor in the European Community (EC), select reference plants for further study, estimate the waste streams from the reference reactors, survey the transport regulations and assess existing containers

  10. HTGR Technology Family Assessment for a Range of Fuel Cycle Missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, Steven J.; Bays, Samuel E.; Soelberg, Nick

    2010-01-01

    This report examines how the HTGR technology family can provide options for the once through, modified open cycle (MOC), or full recycle fuel cycle strategies. The HTGR can serve all the fuel cycle missions that an LWR can; both are thermal reactors. Additional analyses are warranted to determine if HTGR 'full recycle' service could provide improved consumption of transuranic (TRU) material than LWRs (as expected), to analyze the unique proliferation resistance issues associated with the 'pebble bed' approach, and to further test and analyze methods to separate TRISO-coated fuel particles from graphite and/or to separate used HTGR fuel meat from its TRISO coating. The feasibility of these two separation issues is not in doubt, but further R and D could clarify and reduce the cost and enable options not adequately explored at present. The analyses here and the now-demonstrated higher fuel burnup tests (after the illustrative designs studied here) should enable future MOC and full recycle HTGR concepts to more rapidly consume TRU, thereby offering waste management advantages. Interest in 'limited separation' or 'minimum fuel treatment' separation approaches motivates study of impurity-tolerant fuel fabrication. Several issues are outside the scope of this report, including the following: thorium fuel cycles, gas-cooled fast reactors, the reliability of TRISO-coated particles (billions in a reactor), and how soon any new reactor or fuel type could be licensed and then deployed and therefore impact fuel cycle performance measures.

  11. HTGR Technology Family Assessment for a Range of Fuel Cycle Missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Nick Soelberg

    2010-08-01

    This report examines how the HTGR technology family can provide options for the once through, modified open cycle (MOC), or full recycle fuel cycle strategies. The HTGR can serve all the fuel cycle missions that an LWR can; both are thermal reactors. Additional analyses are warranted to determine if HTGR “full recycle” service could provide improved consumption of transuranic (TRU) material than LWRs (as expected), to analyze the unique proliferation resistance issues associated with the “pebble bed” approach, and to further test and analyze methods to separate TRISO-coated fuel particles from graphite and/or to separate used HTGR fuel meat from its TRISO coating. The feasibility of these two separation issues is not in doubt, but further R&D could clarify and reduce the cost and enable options not adequately explored at present. The analyses here and the now-demonstrated higher fuel burnup tests (after the illustrative designs studied here) should enable future MOC and full recycle HTGR concepts to more rapidly consume TRU, thereby offering waste management advantages. Interest in “limited separation” or “minimum fuel treatment” separation approaches motivates study of impurity-tolerant fuel fabrication. Several issues are outside the scope of this report, including the following: thorium fuel cycles, gas-cooled fast reactors, the reliability of TRISO-coated particles (billions in a reactor), and how soon any new reactor or fuel type could be licensed and then deployed and therefore impact fuel cycle performance measures.

  12. HTGR fuel and fuel cycle technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotts, A.L.; Coobs, J.H.

    1976-08-01

    The status of fuel and fuel cycle technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) is reviewed. The all-ceramic core of the HTGRs permits high temperatures compared with other reactors. Core outlet temperatures of 740 0 C are now available for the steam cycle. For advanced HTGRs such as are required for direct-cycle power generation and for high-temperature process heat, coolant temperatures as high as 1000 0 C may be expected. The paper discusses the variations of HTGR fuel designs that meet the performance requirements and the requirements of the isotopes to be used in the fuel cycle. Also discussed are the fuel cycle possibilities, which include the low-enrichment cycle, the Th- 233 U cycle, and plutonium utilization in either cycle. The status of fuel and fuel cycle development is summarized

  13. The study of capability natural uranium as fuel cycle input for long life gas cooled fast reactors with helium as coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present research is to assess the feasibility design of small long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with helium as coolant. GCFR included in the Generation-IV reactor systems are being developed to provide sustainable energy resources that meet future energy demand in a reliable, safe, and proliferation-resistant manner. This reactor can be operated without enrichment and reprocessing forever, once it starts. To obtain the capability of consuming natural uranium as fuel cycle input modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was adopted in this system with different core design. This study has compared the core with three designs of core reactors with the same thermal power 600 MWth. The fuel composition each design was arranged by divided core into several parts of equal volume axially i.e. 6, 8 and 10 parts related to material burn-up history. The fresh natural uranium is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region 2 and the region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all regions, i.e. shifted the core of the region (i) into region (i+1) region after the end of 10 years burn-up cycle. The calculation results shows that for the burn-up strategy on “Region-8” and “Region-10” core designs, after the reactors start-up the operation furthermore they only needs natural uranium supply to the next life operation until one period of refueling (10 years).

  14. The study of capability natural uranium as fuel cycle input for long life gas cooled fast reactors with helium as coolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariani, Menik; Satya, Octavianus Cakra; Monado, Fiber; Su'ud, Zaki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the present research is to assess the feasibility design of small long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with helium as coolant. GCFR included in the Generation-IV reactor systems are being developed to provide sustainable energy resources that meet future energy demand in a reliable, safe, and proliferation-resistant manner. This reactor can be operated without enrichment and reprocessing forever, once it starts. To obtain the capability of consuming natural uranium as fuel cycle input modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was adopted in this system with different core design. This study has compared the core with three designs of core reactors with the same thermal power 600 MWth. The fuel composition each design was arranged by divided core into several parts of equal volume axially i.e. 6, 8 and 10 parts related to material burn-up history. The fresh natural uranium is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region 2 and the region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all regions, i.e. shifted the core of the region (i) into region (i+1) region after the end of 10 years burn-up cycle. The calculation results shows that for the burn-up strategy on "Region-8" and "Region-10" core designs, after the reactors start-up the operation furthermore they only needs natural uranium supply to the next life operation until one period of refueling (10 years).

  15. CALIOP: a multichannel design code for gas-cooled fast reactors. Code description and user's guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, W.I.

    1980-10-01

    CALIOP is a design code for fluid-cooled reactors composed of parallel fuel tubes in hexagonal or cylindrical ducts. It may be used with gaseous or liquid coolants. It has been used chiefly for design of a helium-cooled fast breeder reactor and has built-in cross section information to permit calculations of fuel loading, breeding ratio, and doubling time. Optional cross-section input allows the code to be used with moderated cores and with other fuels.

  16. HTGR Economic / Business Analysis and Trade Studies Market Analysis for HTGR Technologies and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Matt [Ultra Safe Nuclear Corporation, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hamilton, Chris [Ultra Safe Nuclear Corporation, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This report provides supplemental information to the assessment of target markets provided in Appendix A of the 2012 Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Industry Alliance (NIA) business plan [NIA 2012] for deployment of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) in the 2025 – 2050 time frame. This report largely reiterates the [NIA 2012] assessment for potential deployment of 400 to 800 HTGR modules (100 to 200 HTGR plants with 4 reactor modules) in the 600-MWt class in North America by 2050 for electricity generation, co-generation of steam and electricity, oil sands operations, hydrogen production, and synthetic fuels production (e.g., coal to liquids). As the result of increased natural gas supply from hydraulic fracturing, the current and historically low prices of natural gas remain a significant barrier to deployment of HTGRs and other nuclear reactor concepts in the U.S. However, based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Agency (EIA) data, U.S. natural gas prices are expected to increase by the 2030 – 2040 timeframe when a significant number of HTGR modules could be deployed. An evaluation of more recent EIA 2013 data confirms the assumptions in [NIA 2012] of future natural gas prices in the range of approximately $7/MMBtu to $10/MMBtu during the 2030 – 2040 timeframe. Natural gas prices in this range will make HTGR energy prices competitive with natural gas, even in the absence of carbon-emissions penalties. Exhibit ES-1 presents the North American projections in each market segment including a characterization of the market penetration logic. Adjustments made to the 2012 data (and reflected in Exhibit ES-1) include normalization to the slightly larger 625MWt reactor module, segregation between steam cycle and more advanced (higher outlet temperature) modules, and characterization of U.S. synthetic fuel process applications as a separate market segment.

  17. Advanced Gas Cooled Fast Reactor Preliminary Design - 300 MWe Project Status And Trends For a Higher Unit Power Selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poette, C.; Garnier, J.C.; Conti, A.; Bosq, J.C.; Mathieu, B.; Gaillard, J.P.; Bassi, C.

    2004-01-01

    The requirements for future nuclear energy systems, among which sustainability by reduction of long term radioactive waste and full utilization of fuel resources, are strong incentives for the development of advanced fast reactors. Moreover, self-sustaining fuel cycle and homogeneous actinides recycling are searched for to provide a high proliferation resistance. This paper presents the current design status of the 600 MWth (300 MWe) direct cycle helium cooled fast reactor including core, primary system layout and preliminary safety options. Impact of unit power in the range of 600 MWth - 3000 MWth on core design, safety options and fuel development issues is also presented and discussed. Results indicate the feasibility of a higher unit power selection that could lead to the deployment of a large fleet of electricity generating reactors. As a key step in the gas fast 'reactor development, the Experimental Test and Demonstration Reactor (ETDR) to be built in CEA-Cadarache for operation in 2015 is necessary for the qualification of gas fast reactor fuel and materials technology as well as core physics tools validation. The paper details the ETDR objectives and current design options. (authors)

  18. System of large transport containers for waste from dismantling light water and gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, M.S.T.

    1986-09-01

    General descriptions of the main types of reactors in the European Economic Community are given, a series of reference plants selected for further study. Estimates are made of the radioactive decommissioning wastes for each, including neutron-activated and contaminated materials. Regulations governing the transport of radioactive materials, both international and national, are reviewed. (U.K.)

  19. Artificial neural networks for dynamic monitoring of simulated-operating parameters of high temperature gas cooled engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seker, Serhat; Tuerkcan, Erdinc; Ayaz, Emine; Barutcu, Burak

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses to the problem of utilisation of the artificial neural networks (ANNs) for detecting anomalies as well as physical parameters of a nuclear power plant during power operation in real time. Three different types of neural network algorithms were used namely, feed-forward neural network (back-propagation, BP) and two types of recurrent neural networks (RNN). The data used in this paper were gathered from the simulation of the power operation of the Japan's High Temperature Engineering Testing Reactor (HTTR). For the wide range of power operation, 56 signals were generated by the reactor dynamic simulation code for several hours of normal power operation at different power ramps between 30 and 100% nominal power. Paper will compare the outcomes of different neural networks and presents the neural network system and the determination of physical parameters from the simulated operating data

  20. Reference core design Mark-III of the experimental multi-purpose, high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Ryuiti; Watanabe, Takashi; Ishiguro, Okikazu; Kuroki, Syuzi

    1977-10-01

    The reactivity control system is one of the important items in reactor design, but it is much restricted by structural design of fuel element and pressure vessel in the experimental multi-purpose, high-temperature reactor. Preceding the first conceptual design of the reactor, therefore, the reactivity control system composed of control rod, burnable poison and reserve shutdown system in Mark-II design was re-studied, and several improvements were indicated. (1) The diameter of control rods must be as large as possible because it is impossible to increase the number of control rods. (2) The accuracy in estimation of the reactivity to be compensated with control rods is important because of the mutual interference of pair control rods with the twin configuration in a fuel element. (3) The improvement of core performance in burnup is accompanied by the reduction of design margin for control rods. (4) Increase of the reactivity to be compensated with the burnable poison leads to increase of the core reactivity recovery with burnup, and the assertion of the decrease for recovery of reactivity leads to increase of the temperature dependency of reactivity compensated with control rods. (5) Reduction of reactivity to be compensated with control rods is thus limited by cancellation of the effects in the reactivity recovery and the reactivity temperature dependency. (6) The reserve shutdown system can be designed with margin under the condition of excluding the reactivity of burnup from that to be compensated. (auth.)