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Sample records for gas reactor test

  1. TESTING OF GAS REACTOR MATERIALS AND FUEL IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S.B.

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations

  2. Testing of Gas Reactor Materials and Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations

  3. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Laboratory; Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory; Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Laboratory; Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Laboratory; Kinsey, James Carl [Idaho National Laboratory; Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory; Kumar, Akansha [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-04-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technological readiness level, licensing approach and costs.

  4. Reactor cover gas monitoring at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtold, R A; Holt, F E; Meadows, G E; Schenter, R E [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1987-07-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400 megawatt (thermal) sodium cooled reactor designed for irradiation testing of fuels, materials and components for LMRs. It is operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the U. S. Department of Energy on the government-owned Hanford reservation near Richland, Washington. The first 100 day operating cycle began in April 1982 and the eighth operating cycle was completed In July 1986. Argon is used as the cover gas for all sodium systems at the plant. A program for cover gas monitoring has been in effect since the start of sodium fill in 1978. The argon is supplied to the FFTF by a liquid argon Dewar System and used without further purification. A liquid argon Dewar system provides the large volume of inert gas required for operation of the FFTF. The gas is used as received and is not recycled. Low concentrations of krypton and xenon in the argon supply are essential to preclude interference with the gas tag system. Gas chromatography has been valuable for detection of inadvertent air in leakage during refueling operations. A temporary system is installed over the reactor during outages to prevent oxide formation in the sodium vapor traps upstream from the on line gas chromatograph. On line gas monitoring by gamma spectrometry and grab sampling with GTSTs has been successful for the identification of numerous radioactive gas releases from creep capsule experiments as well as 9 fuel pin ruptures. A redundant fission gas monitoring system has been installed to insure constant surveillance of the reactor cover gas.

  5. Feasibility study of full-reactor gas core demonstration test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, J. F.; Lofthouse, J. H.; Shaffer, C. J.; Macbeth, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Separate studies of nuclear criticality, flow patterns, and thermodynamics for the gas core reactor concept have all given positive indications of its feasibility. However, before serious design for a full scale gas core application can be made, feasibility must be shown for operation with full interaction of the nuclear, thermal, and hydraulic effects. A minimum sized, and hence minimum expense, test arrangement is considered for a full gas core configuration. It is shown that the hydrogen coolant scattering effects dominate the nuclear considerations at elevated temperatures. A cavity diameter of somewhat larger than 4 ft (122 cm) will be needed if temperatures high enough to vaporize uranium are to be achieved.

  6. Reactor cover gas monitoring at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtold, R.A.; Holt, F.E.; Meadows, G.E.; Schenter, R.E.

    1986-09-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400-megawatt (thermal) sodium-cooled reactor designed for irradiation testing of fuels, materials and components for LMRs. It is operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy on the government-owned Hanford reservation near Richland, Washington. The first 100-day operating cycle began in April 1982 and the eighth operating cycle was completed in July 1986. Argon is used as the cover gas for all sodium systems at the plant. A program for cover gas monitoring has been in effect since the start of sodium fill in 1978. The argon is supplied to the FFTF by a liquid argon Dewar System and used without further purification

  7. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinsey, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  8. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  9. Test Results from a Direct Drive Gas Reactor Simulator Coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervol, David S.; Briggs, Maxwell H.; Owen, Albert K.; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Component level testing of power conversion units proposed for use in fission surface power systems has typically been done using relatively simple electric heaters for thermal input. These heaters do not adequately represent the geometry or response of proposed reactors. As testing of fission surface power systems transitions from the component level to the system level it becomes necessary to more accurately replicate these reactors using reactor simulators. The Direct Drive Gas-Brayton Power Conversion Unit test activity at the NASA Glenn Research Center integrates a reactor simulator with an existing Brayton test rig. The response of the reactor simulator to a change in Brayton shaft speed is shown as well as the response of the Brayton to an insertion of reactivity, corresponding to a drum reconfiguration. The lessons learned from these tests can be used to improve the design of future reactor simulators which can be used in system level fission surface power tests.

  10. Cavity temperature and flow characteristics in a gas-core test reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putre, H. A.

    1973-01-01

    A test reactor concept for conducting basic studies on a fissioning uranium plasma and for testing various gas-core reactor concepts is analyzed. The test reactor consists of a conventional fuel-element region surrounding a 61-cm-(2-ft-) diameter cavity region which contains the plasma experiment. The fuel elements provide the neutron flux for the cavity region. The design operating conditions include 60-MW reactor power, 2.7-MW cavity power, 200-atm cavity pressure, and an average uranium plasma temperature of 15,000 K. The analytical results are given for cavity radiant heat transfer, hydrogen transpiration cooling, and uranium wire or powder injection.

  11. Radiological considerations of the reactor cover gas processing system at the FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevo, P.R.

    1986-09-01

    Radiological and environmental protection experience associated with the reactor cover gas processing system at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has been excellent. Personnel radiation exposures received from operating and maintaining the reactor cover gas processing system have been very low, the system has remained free of radioactive particulate contamination through the first seven operating cycles (cesium contamination was detected at the end of Cycle 8A), and releases of radioactivity to the environment have been very low, well below environmental standards. This report discusses these three aspects of fast reactor cover gas purification over the first eight operating cycles of the FFTF (a duration of a little more than four years, from April 1982 through July 1986)

  12. Design of project management system for 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yan; Xu Yuanhui

    1998-01-01

    A framework of project management information system (MIS) for 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor is introduced. Based on it, the design of nuclear project management information system and project monitoring system (PMS) are given. Additionally, a new method of developing MIS and Decision Support System (DSS) has been tried

  13. STATUS OF TRISO FUEL IRRADIATIONS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR SUPPORTING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR DESIGNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, Michael; Petti, D. A.; Palmer, Joe

    2016-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and completed in October 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this experiment was to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment was significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control

  14. Gas reactor in-pile safety test project (GRIST-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, A.P. Jr.; Arbtin, E.; St Pierre, R.

    1979-01-01

    Although out-of-pile tests may be expected to confirm individual phenomena models in core disruptive accident analysis codes, only in-pile tests are capable of verifying the extremely complex integrated model effects within the appropriate time phase for these accidents. For this reason, the GRIST-2 project, the purpose of which is to design and construct an in-pile helium loop capable of transient safety testing in the TREAT facility in Idaho, forms a cornerstone of the US GCFR safety program. The project organization, experiment program, facility, helium system design, and schedule which have been selected to meet the objectives are described

  15. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  16. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-01-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: (1) Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements; (2) Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout; (3) Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required; (4) Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems; (5) Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs; and (6) Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs

  17. Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Materials Program. Reducing helium impurity depletion in HTGR materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, D.H.

    1984-08-01

    Moisture depletion in HTGR materials testing rigs has been empirically studied in the GE High Temperature Reactor Materials Testing Laboratory (HTRMTL). Tests have shown that increased helium flow rates and reduction in reactive (oxidizable) surface area are effective means of reducing depletion. Further, a portion of the depletion has been shown to be due to the presence of free C released by the dissociation of CH 4 . This depletion component can be reduced by reducing the helium residence time (increasing the helium flow rate) or by reducing the CH 4 concentration in the test gas. Equipment modifications to reduce depletion have been developed, tested, and in most cases implemented in the HTRMTL to date. These include increasing the Helium Loop No. 1 pumping capacity, conversion of metallic retorts and radiation shields to alumina, isolation of thermocouple probes from the test gas by alumina thermowells, and substitution of non-reactive Mo-TZM for reactive metallic structural components

  18. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S. Blaine

    2009-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy's lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In

  19. Testing and analyses of a high temperature duct for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, W.E.; Roberge, A.; Felten, P.; Bastien, R.

    1979-01-01

    A 0.6 scale model of a steam cycle gas-cooled reactor high temperature duct was tested in a closed loop helium facility. The object of the test series was to determine: 1) the thermal effects of gas permeation within the thermal barrier, 2) the plastic deformation of the metallic components, and 3) the thermal performance of the fibrous insulation. A series of tests was performed with thermal cyclings from 100 0 C to 760 0 C at 50 atmospheres until the system thermal performance had stabilized hence enabling predictions for the reactor life. Additional tests were made to assess permeation by deliberately simulating sealing weld failures thereby allowing gas flow by-pass within the primary thermal barrier. After 100 cycles the entire primary structure was found to have performed without structural failure. Due to high pressures exerted by the insulation on the cover plates and a design oversight, the thin seal sheets were unable to expand in an anticipated manner. Local buckling resulted. Pre and post test metallurgical analyses were conducted on the Hastelloy-X structures and reference specimens. The results gave evidence of aging in the form of noticeable changes in room temperature tensile and reduction in area parameters. The Hastelloy-X welds exhibited greater changes in properties due to thermal aging. The antifriction coating (Cr 3 C 2 ) performed well without spallation or excessive wear. (orig.)

  20. In-reactor testing of the closed cycle gas core reactor---the nuclear light bulb concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauntt, R.O.; Slutz, S.A.; Harms, G.A.; Latham, T.S.; Roman, W.C.; Rodgers, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Light Bulb (NLB) concept is an advanced closed cycle space propulsion rocket engine design that offers unprecidented performance characteristics in terms of specific impulse (>1800 s) and thrust (>445 kN). The NLB is a gas-core nuclear reactor making use of thermal radiation from a high temperature U-plasma core to heat the hydrogen propellant to very high temperatures (∼4000 K). The following paper describes analyses performed in support of the design of in-reactor tests that are planned to be performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories in order to demonstrate the technical feasibility of this advanced concept. The tests will examine the stability of a hydrodynamically confined fissioning U-plasma under steady and transient conditions. Testing will also involve study of propellant heating by thermal radiation from the plasma and materials performance in the nuclear environment of the NLB. The analyses presented here include neutronic performance studies and U-plasma radiation heat-transport studies of small vortex-confined fissioning U-plasma experiments that are irradiated in the ACRR. These analyses indicate that high U-plasma temperatures (4000 to 9000 K) can be sustained in the ACRR for periods of time on the order of 5 to 20 s. These testing conditions are well suited to examine the stability and performance requirements necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of this concept

  1. Program for aerodynamic performance tests of helium gas compressor model of the gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shoji; Takizuka, Takakazu; Kunimoto, Kazuhiko; Yan, Xing; Itaka, Hidehiko; Mori, Eiji

    2003-01-01

    Research and development program for helium gas compressor aerodynamics was planned for the power conversion system of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor (GTHTR300). The axial compressor with polytropic efficiency of 90% and surge margin more than 30% was designed with 3-dimensional aerodynamic design. Performance and surge margin of the helium gas compressor tends to be lower due to the higher boss ratio which makes the tip clearance wide relative to the blade height, as well as due to a larger number of stages. The compressor was designed on the basis of methods and data for the aerodynamic design of industrial open-cycle gas-turbine. To validate the design of the helium gas compressor of the GTHTR300, aerodynamic performance tests were planned, and a 1/3-scale, 4-stage compressor model was designed. In the tests, the performance data of the helium gas compressor model will be acquired by using helium gas as a working fluid. The maximum design pressure at the model inlet is 0.88 MPa, which allows the Reynolds number to be sufficiently high. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  2. Test case specifications for coupled neutronics-thermal hydraulics calculation of Gas-cooled Fast Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuský, F.; Bahdanovich, R.; Farkas, G.; Haščík, J.; Tikhomirov, G. V.

    2017-01-01

    The paper is focused on development of the coupled neutronics-thermal hydraulics model for the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor. It is necessary to carefully investigate coupled calculations of new concepts to avoid recriticality scenarios, as it is not possible to ensure sub-critical state for a fast reactor core under core disruptive accident conditions. Above mentioned calculations are also very suitable for development of new passive or inherent safety systems that can mitigate the occurrence of the recriticality scenarios. In the paper, the most promising fuel material compositions together with a geometry model are described for the Gas-cooled fast reactor. Seven fuel pin and fuel assembly geometry is proposed as a test case for coupled calculation with three different enrichments of fissile material in the form of Pu-UC. The reflective boundary condition is used in radial directions of the test case and vacuum boundary condition is used in axial directions. During these condition, the nuclear system is in super-critical state and to achieve a stable state (which is numerical representation of operational conditions) it is necessary to decrease the reactivity of the system. The iteration scheme is proposed, where SCALE code system is used for collapsing of a macroscopic cross-section into few group representation as input for coupled code NESTLE.

  3. Stability of test environments for performance evaluation of materials for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgemon, G.L.; Wilson, D.F.; Bell, G.E.C.

    1993-01-01

    Stability of the primary helium-based coolant test gas for use in performance ests of materials for the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) was determined. Results of tests of the initial gas chemistry from General Atomics (GA) at elevated temperatures, and the associated results predicted by the SOLGASMIX trademark modelling package are presented. Results indicated that for this gas composition and at flow rates obtainable in the test loop, 466 ± 24C is the highest temperature that can be maintained without significantly altering the specified gas chemistry. Four additional gas chemistries were modelled using SOLGASMIX trademark

  4. Gas utilization in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Kugel, H.W.; Grisham, L.R.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.; Jones, T.T.C.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of gas utilization were performed using hydrogen and deuterium beams in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) neutral beam test beamline to study the feasibility of operating tritium beams with existing ion sources under conditions of minimal tritium consumption. (i) It was found that the fraction of gas molecules introduced into the TFTR long-pulse ion sources that are converted to extracted ions (i.e., the ion source gas efficiency) was higher than with previous short-pulse sources. Gas efficiencies were studied over the range 33%--55%, and its effect on neutralization of the extracted ions was studied. At the high end of the gas efficiency range, the neutral fraction of the beam fell below that predicted from room-temperature molecular gas flow (similar to observations at the Joint European Torus). (ii) Beam isotope change studies were performed. No extracted hydrogen ions were observed in the first deuterium beam following a working gas change from H 2 to D 2 . There was no arc conditioning or gas injection preceding the first beam extraction attempt. (iii) Experiments were also performed to determine the reliability of ion source operation during the long waiting periods between pulses that are anticipated during tritium operation. It was found that an ion source conditioned to 120 kV could produce a clean beam pulse after a waiting period of 14 h by preceding the beam extraction with several acceleration voltage/filament warm-up pulses. It can be concluded that the operation of up to six ion sources on tritium gas should be compatible with on-site inventory restrictions established for D--T, Q = 1 experiments on TFTR

  5. Gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakilian, M.

    1977-05-01

    The present study is the second part of a general survey of Gas Cooled Reactors (GCRs). In this part, the course of development, overall performance and present development status of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTCRs) and advances of HTGR systems are reviewed. (author)

  6. Heat transfer tests of ribbed surfaces for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, O.H.

    1975-07-01

    The performance of gas-cooled reactors is often limited by the heat transfer in the reactor core. Means for modifying core heat transfer surfaces to improve their performance were investigated. The 0.3-in.-OD stainless steel clad heater rods were photo-etched to produce external ribs 0.006 in. high and 0.12 in. wide with a pitch of 0.072 in. Helical ribs with a helix angle of 37 0 (to promote interchannel flow mixing in a multirod array) were provided on one surface. For comparison purposes, a transversely ribbed surface and a smooth rod were also studied. The test surfaces were 49 in. long with a 24-in. heated region, concentrically arranged inside a smooth 0.602-in.-ID stainless steel tube. Nitrogen gas at pressures up to 400 psig was used as the coolant; the linear heat rating ranged to 6.8 kW/ft at surface temperatures up to 1400 0 F; T/sub w/T/sub b/ varied from 1.2 to 2.4 at Re values up to 450,000. Annulus results were recalculated for rod geometry using two different transformations. Good agreement was observed with applicable literature values. The effectiveness of the surfaces was assessed as the ratio E of the heat transfer coefficients of the roughened rods to that of a smooth rod at the same pumping power. The effectiveness of the spiral ribs ranged from 1.3 to 1.4, and from 1.2 to 1.4 for the transverse ribs, spanning Re values from 60,000 to 400,000. These data include variations introduced by alternate transformation methods that were used to make annulus test results applicable to rod geometry. The surfaces investigated in these tests were considered for fast gas-cooled reactors; however, the range of parameters studied also applies to heat transfer from ribbed rod-type fuel elements in thermal gas-cooled reactors. (U.S.)

  7. Evaluation of safety test needs for the gas cooled breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emon, D.E.; Buttemer, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    This paper deals with the process used in determining the safety test needs for the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR), reports existing tentative conclusions, and indicates the direction that the process is taking at this time. The process is based upon two ideas: (1) that the safety information needs will be identified through risk analysis directly dependent on the various design features of the GCFR and (2) that the safety program will be determined by a safety review committee. The paper limits itself to presenting thoughts on the safety test needs directly associated with the GCFR core during severe beyond design basis accident situations involving the loss of coolable core geometry. Representative event sequence diagrams are reported for the three generic classes of accidents considered. The following categories of information are identified: safety information needs, safety tests required to fulfill these information needs, and the facilities required to perform the tests

  8. Testing and analyses of a high temperature duct for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, W.E.; Roberge, A.; Felten, P.; Bastien, D.

    1979-01-01

    A 0.6 scale model of a steam cycle gas-cooled reactor high temperature duct was tested in a closed loop helium facility. The object of the test series was to determine: 1) the thermal effects of gas permeation within the thermal barrier, 2) the plastic deformation of the metallic components, and 3) the thermal performance of the fibrous insulation. A series of tests was performed with thermal cyclings from 100 0 C to 760 0 C at 50 atmospheres until the system thermal performance had stabilized hence enabling predictions for the reactor life. Additional tests were made to assess permeation by deliberately simulating sealing weld failures thereby allowing gas flow by-pass within the primary thermal barrier. After 100 cycles the entire primary structure was found to have performed without structural failure. Due to high pressures exerted by the insulation on the cover plates and a design oversight, the thin seal sheets were unable to expand in an anticipated manner. Local buckling resulted. The insulation retained an acceptable degree of resiliency. However, some fiber damage was observed within both the high and low temperature insulation blankets. A thermal analysis was conducted to correlate the hot duct heat transfer results with those obtained from the analytical techniques used for the HTGR design using a computer thermal model representative of the duct and test setup. The thermal performance of the insulation, the temperature gradient through the structural components, the heating load to the cooling system and the permeation flow effect on heat transfer were verified. Exellent correlation between the experimental data and the analytical techniques were obtained

  9. Heterogeneous gas core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.I.

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary investigations of a heterogeneous gas core reactor (HGCR) concept suggest that this potential power reactor offers distinct advantages over other existing or conceptual reactor power plants. One of the most favorable features of the HGCR is the flexibility of the power producing system which allows it to be efficiently designed to conform to a desired optimum condition without major conceptual changes. The arrangement of bundles of moderator/coolant channels in a fissionable gas or mixture of gases makes a truly heterogeneous nuclear reactor core. It is this full heterogeneity for a gas-fueled reactor core which accounts for the novelty of the heterogeneous gas core reactor concept and leads to noted significant advantages over previous gas core systems with respect to neutron and fuel economy, power density, and heat transfer characteristics. The purpose of this work is to provide an insight into the design, operating characteristics, and safety of a heterogeneous gas core reactor system. The studies consist mainly of neutronic, energetic and kinetic analyses of the power producing and conversion systems as a preliminary assessment of the heterogeneous gas core reactor concept and basic design. The results of the conducted research indicate a high potential for the heterogeneous gas core reactor system as an electrical power generating unit (either large or small), with an overall efficiency as high as 40 to 45%. The HGCR system is found to be stable and safe, under the conditions imposed upon the analyses conducted in this work, due to the inherent safety of ann expanding gaseous fuel and the intrinsic feedback effects of the gas and water coolant

  10. Testing and analyses of a high temperature thermal barrier for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, W.E.; Betts, W.S.; Felten, P.

    1979-01-01

    A full size, multi-panel section of a thermal barrier system was fabricated from a nickel-base superalloy and a combination of fibrous blanket insulation materials for specific application in a steam cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor. The 2.4 m square array was representative of the sidewall of the lower core outlet plenum and included coverplates, attachments, seals, and a simulated water-cooled liner. Testing was conducted in a reactor grade, helium-filled chamber at 816 0 C for 100 hours, which established a normal (baseline) condition; 982 0 C for 10 hours, which satisfied an emergency condition; 1093 0 C for 1 hour, which simulated a faulted condition; and 1260 0 C, which was a non-design condition test to demonstrate the temperature overshoot capability of the system. Post-test examination indicated: (1) an acceptable performance by the anti-friction chromium carbide (Cr 3 C 2 ) coating; (2) no significant galling between non-coated surfaces; (3) no distortion of attachment fixtures; (4) predictable coverplate deflection during the design conditions testing (normal, emergency, and faulted); and (5) considerable plastic deformation resulting from the near-incipient melting temperature. (orig.)

  11. Impact of closed Brayton cycle test results on gas cooled reactor operation and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, St.A.; Pickard, P.S.

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the measurements and model predictions for a series of tests supported by the U.S. Department of Energy that were performed using the recently constructed Sandia Brayton Loop (SBL-30). From the test results we have developed steady-state power operating curves, controls methodologies, and transient data for normal and off-normal behavior, such as loss of load events, and for decay heat removal conditions after shutdown. These tests and models show that because the turbomachinery operates off of the temperature difference (between the heat source and the heat sink), that the turbomachinery can continue to operate (off of sensible heat) for long periods of time without auxiliary power. For our test hardware, operations up to one hour have been observed. This effect can provide significant operations and safety benefits for nuclear reactors that are coupled to a Brayton cycles because the operating turbomachinery continues to provide cooling to the reactor. These capabilities mean that the decay-heat removal can be accommodated by properly managing the electrical power produced by the generator/alternator. In some conditions, it may even be possible to produce sufficient power to continue operating auxiliary systems including the waste heat circulatory system. In addition, the Brayton plant impacts the consequences of off-normal and accident events including loss of load and loss of on-site power. We have observed that for a loss of load or a loss of on-site power event, with a reactor scram, the transient consists initially of a turbomachinery speed increase to a new stable operating point. Because the turbomachinery is still spinning, the reactor is still being cooled provided the ultimate heat sink remains available. These highly desirable operational characteristics were observed in the Sandia Brayton loop. This type of behavior is also predicted by our models. Ultimately, these results provide the designers the opportunity to design gas

  12. Design of Fire/Gas Penetration Seals and fire exposure tests for Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor experimental areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalluzzo, S.

    1983-01-01

    A Fire/Gas Penetration Seal is required in every penetration through the walls and ceilings into the Test Cell housing the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), as well as other adjacent areas to protect the TFTR from fire damage. The penetrations are used for field coil lead stems, diagnostics systems, utilities, cables, trays, mechanical devices, electrical conduits, vacuum liner, air conditioning ducts, water pipes, and gas pipes. The function of the Fire/Gas Penetration Seals is to prevent the passage of fire and products of combustion through penetrations for a period of time up to three hours and remain structurally intact during fire exposure. The Penetration Seal must withstand, without rupture, a fire hose water stream directed at the hot surface. There are over 3000 penetrations ranging in size from several square inches to 100 square feet, and classified into 90 different types. The material used to construct the Fire/Gas Penetration Seals consist of a single and a two-component room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone rubber compound. Miscellaneous materials such as alumina silica refractory fibers in board, blanket and fiber forms are also used in the construction and assembly of the Seals. This paper describes some of the penetration seals and the test procedures used to perform the three-hour fire exposure tests to demonstrate the adequacy of the seals

  13. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH-[TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James; Bayless, Paul; Strydom, Gerhard; Kumar, Akansha; Gougar, Hans

    2016-11-01

    A point design for a graphite-moderated, high-temperature, gas-cooled test reactor (HTG TR) has been developed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) as part of a United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) initiative to explore and potentially expand the existing U.S. test reactor capabilities. This paper provides a summary of the design and its main attributes. The 200 MW HTG TR is a thermal-neutron spectrum reactor composed of hexagonal prismatic fuel and graphite reflector blocks. Twelve fuel columns (96 fuel blocks total and 6.34 m active core height) are arranged in two hexagonal rings to form a relatively compact, high-power density, annular core sandwiched between inner, outer, top, and bottom graphite reflectors. The HTG-TR is designed to operate at 7 MPa with a coolant inlet/outlet temperature of 325°C/650°C, and utilizes TRISO particle fuel from the DOE AGR Program with 425 ?m uranium oxycarbide (UCO) kernels and an enrichment of 15.5 wt% 235U. The primary mission of the HTG TR is material irradiation and therefore the core has been specifically designed and optimized to provide the highest possible thermal and fast neutron fluxes. The highest thermal neutron flux (3.90E+14 n/cm2s) occurs in the outer reflector, and the maximum fast flux levels (1.17E+14 n/cm2s) are produced in the central reflector column where most of the graphite has been removed. Due to high core temperatures under accident conditions, all the irradiation test facilities have been located in the inner and outer reflectors where fast flux levels decline. The core features a large number of irradiation positions with large test volumes and long test lengths, ideal for thermal neutron irradiation of large test articles. The total available test volume is more than 1100 liters. Up to four test loop facilities can be accommodated with pressure tube boundaries to isolate test articles and test fluids (e.g., liquid metal, liquid salt, light water) from the helium primary coolant system.

  14. Gas cooled fast reactor control rod drive mechanism deceleration unit. Test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, T.H.

    1981-10-01

    This report presents the results of the airtesting portion of the proof-of-principle testing of a Control Rod Scram Deceleration Device developed for use in the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR). The device utilizes a grooved flywheel to decelerate the translating assembly (T/A). Two cam followers on the translating assembly travel in the flywheel grooves and transfer the energy of the T/A to the flywheel. The grooves in the flywheel are straight for most of the flywheel length. Near the bottom of the T/A stroke the grooves are spiraled in a decreasing slope helix so that the cam followers accelerate the flywheel as they transfer the energy of the falling T/A. To expedite proof-of-principle testing, some of the materials used in the fabrication of certain test article components were not prototypic. With these exceptions the concept appears to be acceptable. The initial test of 300 scrams was completed with only one failure and the failure was that of a non-prototypic cam follower outer sleeve material

  15. Gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulten, R.; Trauger, D.B.

    1976-01-01

    Experience to date with operation of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors has been quite favorable. Despite problems in completion of construction and startup, three high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) units have operated well. The Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) in the United Kingdom has had an excellent operating history, and initial operation of commercial AGRs shows them to be satisfactory. The latter reactors provide direct experience in scale-up from the Windscale experiment to fullscale commercial units. The Colorado Fort St. Vrain 330-MWe prototype helium-cooled HTGR is now in the approach-to-power phase while the 300-MWe Pebble Bed THTR prototype in the Federal Republic of Germany is scheduled for completion of construction by late 1978. THTR will be the first nuclear power plant which uses a dry cooling tower. Fuel reprocessing and refabrication have been developed in the laboratory and are now entering a pilot-plant scale development. Several commercial HTGR power station orders were placed in the U.S. prior to 1975 with similar plans for stations in the FRG. However, the combined effects of inflation, reduced electric power demand, regulatory uncertainties, and pricing problems led to cancellation of the 12 reactors which were in various stages of planning, design, and licensing

  16. Gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Masayuki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable direct cooling of reactor cores thereby improving the cooling efficiency upon accidents. Constitution: A plurality sets of heat exchange pipe groups are disposed around the reactor core, which are connected by way of communication pipes with a feedwater recycling device comprising gas/liquid separation device, recycling pump, feedwater pump and emergency water tank. Upon occurrence of loss of primary coolants accidents, the heat exchange pipe groups directly absorb the heat from the reactor core through radiation and convection. Although the water in the heat exchange pipe groups are boiled to evaporate if the forcive circulation is interrupted by the loss of electric power source, water in the emergency tank is supplied due to the head to the heat exchange pipe groups to continue the cooling. Furthermore, since the heat exchange pipe groups surround the entire circumference of the reactor core, cooling is carried out uniformly without resulting deformation or stresses due to the thermal imbalance. (Sekiya, K.)

  17. Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

    2012-02-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

  18. Application of ultrasonic testing technique to detect gas accumulation in important pipings for pressurized water reactors safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fushimi, Yasuyuki [Inst. of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Since 1988, the USNRC has pointed out that gas-binding events might occur at high head safety injection (HHSI) pumps of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). In Japanese PWR plants, corrective actions were taken in response to gas-binding events that occurred on HHSI pumps in the USA, so no gas accumulation event has been reported so far. However, when venting frequency is prolonged with operating cycle extension, the probability of gas accumulation in pipings may increase as in the USA. The purpose of this study was to establish a technique to identify gas accumulation and to measure the gas volume accurately. Taking dominant causes of the gas-binding events in the USA into consideration, we pointed out the following sections in the Japanese PWRs where gas srtipping and/or gas accumulation might occur: residual heat removal system pipings and charging/safety injection pump minimum flow line. Then an ultrasonic testing technique, adopted to identify gas accumulation in the USA, was applied to those sections of the typical Japanese PWR. Consequently, no gas accumulation was found in those pipings. (author)

  19. Gas cooled fast breeder reactor design for a circulator test facility (modified HTGR circulator test facility)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    A GCFR helium circulator test facility sized for full design conditions is proposed for meeting the above requirements. The circulator will be mounted in a large vessel containing high pressure helium which will permit testing at the same power, speed, pressure, temperature and flow conditions intended in the demonstration plant. The electric drive motor for the circulator will obtain its power from an electric supply and distribution system in which electric power will be taken from a local utility. The conceptual design decribed in this report is the result of close interaction between the General Atomic Company (GA), designer of the GCFR, and The Ralph M. Parson Company, architect/engineer for the test facility. A realistic estimate of total project cost is presented, together with a schedule for design, procurement, construction, and inspection.

  20. Summary of thermocouple performance during advanced gas reactor fuel irradiation experiments in the advanced test reactor and out-of-pile thermocouple testing in support of such experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, A. J.; Haggard, DC; Herter, J. W.; Swank, W. D.; Knudson, D. L.; Cherry, R. S. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, MS 4112, Idaho Falls, ID, (United States); Scervini, M. [University of Cambridge, Department of Material Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, CB3 0FS, Cambridge, (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    High temperature gas reactor experiments create unique challenges for thermocouple-based temperature measurements. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time-dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time-dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. This drift is particularly severe for high temperature platinum-rhodium thermocouples (Types S, R, and B) and tungsten-rhenium thermocouples (Type C). For lower temperature applications, previous experiences with Type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly, Type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluence. Currently, the use of these nickel-based thermocouples is limited when the temperature exceeds 1000 deg. C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. High rates of open-circuit failure are also typical. Over the past 10 years, three long-term Advanced Gas Reactor experiments have been conducted with measured temperatures ranging from 700 deg. C - 1200 deg. C. A variety of standard Type N and specialty thermocouple designs have been used in these experiments with mixed results. A brief summary of thermocouple performance in these experiments is provided. Most recently, out-of-pile testing has been conducted on a variety of Type N thermocouple designs at the following (nominal) temperatures and durations: 1150 deg. C and 1200 deg. C for 2,000 hours at each temperature, followed by 200 hours at 1250 deg. C and 200 hours at 1300 deg. C. The standard Type N design utilizes high purity, crushed MgO insulation and an Inconel 600 sheath. Several variations on the standard Type N design were tested, including a Haynes 214 alloy sheath, spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) insulation instead of MgO, a customized sheath developed at the University of Cambridge, and finally a loose assembly

  1. Summary of Thermocouple Performance During Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor and Out-of-Pile Thermocouple Testing in Support of Such Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. J. Palmer; DC Haggard; J. W. Herter; M. Scervini; W. D. Swank; D. L. Knudson; R. S. Cherry

    2011-07-01

    High temperature gas reactor experiments create unique challenges for thermocouple based temperature measurements. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. This drift is particularly severe for high temperature platinum-rhodium thermocouples (Types S, R, and B); and tungsten-rhenium thermocouples (Types C and W). For lower temperature applications, previous experiences with type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluxes. Currently the use of these Nickel based thermocouples is limited when the temperature exceeds 1000°C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. High rates of open-circuit failure are also typical. Over the past ten years, three long-term Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been conducted with measured temperatures ranging from 700oC – 1200oC. A variety of standard Type N and specialty thermocouple designs have been used in these experiments with mixed results. A brief summary of thermocouple performance in these experiments is provided. Most recently, out of pile testing has been conducted on a variety of Type N thermocouple designs at the following (nominal) temperatures and durations: 1150oC and 1200oC for 2000 hours at each temperature, followed by 200 hours at 1250oC, and 200 hours at 1300oC. The standard Type N design utilizes high purity crushed MgO insulation and an Inconel 600 sheath. Several variations on the standard Type N design were tested, including Haynes 214 alloy sheath, spinel (MgAl2O4) insulation instead of MgO, a customized sheath developed at the University of Cambridge, and finally a loose assembly thermocouple with hard fired alumina

  2. Gas utilization in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Kugel, H.W.; Grisham, L.R.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1987-08-01

    Measurements of gas utilization in a test TFTR neutral beam injector have been performed to study the feasibility of running tritium neutral beams with existing ion sources. Gas consumption is limited by the restriction of 50,000 curies of T 2 allowed on site. It was found that the gas efficiency of the present long-pulse ion sources is higher than it was with previous short-pulse sources. Gas efficiencies were studied over the range of 35 to 55%. At the high end of this range the neutral fraction of the beam fell below that predicted by room temperature molecular gas flow. This is consistent with observations made on the JET injectors, where it has been attributed to beam heating of the neutralizer gas and a concomitant increase in conductance. It was found that a working gas isotope exchange from H 2 to D 2 could be accomplished on the first beam shot after changing the gas supply, without any intermediate preconditioning. The mechanism believed responsible for this phenomenon is heating of the plasma generator walls by the arc and a resulting thermal desorption of all previously adsorbed and implanted gas. Finally, it was observed that an ion source conditioned to 120 kV operation could produce a beam pulse after a waiting period of fourteen hours by preceding the beam extraction with several hi-pot/filament warm-up pulses, without any gas consumption. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The invention aims at simplying gas-cooled nuclear reactors. For the cooling gas, the reactor is provided with a main circulation system comprising one or several energy conversion main groups such as gas turbines, and an auxiliary circulation system comprising at least one steam-generating boiler heated by the gas after its passage through the reactor core and adapted to feed a steam turbine with motive steam. The invention can be applied to reactors the main groups of which are direct-cycle gas turbines [fr

  4. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James; Bayless, Paul; Strydom, Gerhard; Kumar, Akansha; Gougar, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis is an indispensable element of any substantial attempt in reactor simulation validation. The quantification of uncertainties in nuclear engineering has grown more important and the IAEA Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) initiated in 2012 aims to investigate the various uncertainty quantification methodologies for this type of reactors. The first phase of the CRP is dedicated to the estimation of cell and lattice model uncertainties due to the neutron cross sections co-variances. Phase II is oriented towards the investigation of propagated uncertainties from the lattice to the coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics core calculations. Nominal results for the prismatic single block (Ex.I-2a) and super cell models (Ex.I-2c) have been obtained using the SCALE 6.1.3 two-dimensional lattice code NEWT coupled to the TRITON sequence for cross section generation. In this work, the TRITON/NEWT-flux-weighted cross sections obtained for Ex.I-2a and various models of Ex.I-2c is utilized to perform a sensitivity analysis of the MHTGR-350 core power densities and eigenvalues. The core solutions are obtained with the INL coupled code PHISICS/RELAP5-3D, utilizing a fixed-temperature feedback for Ex. II-1a.. It is observed that the core power density does not vary significantly in shape, but the magnitude of these variations increases as the moderator-to-fuel ratio increases in the super cell lattice models.

  5. Study on the seismic verification test program on the experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taketani, K.; Aochi, T.; Yasuno, T.; Ikushima, T.; Shiraki, K.; Honma, T.; Kawamura, N.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes a program of experimental research necessary for qualitative and quantitative determination of vibration characteristics and aseismic safety on structure of reactor core in the multipurpose high temperature gas-cooled experimental reactor (VHTR Experimental Reactor) by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

  6. Simulations and field tests of a reactor coolant pump emergency start-up by means of remote gas units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omahen, P.; Gubina, F.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of the reactor coolant pump start-up in case of emergency by means of remote gas power plant units was analyzed. In this paper a simulation model is developed which enabled a detailed simulation of the transient process occurring at the start-up. The start-up of the RCP motor set was simulated in case of available one and two gas units. The field tests were performed and the measured variable values complied well with the simulation results. Two gas units have been determined as a safe start-up scheme of the RCP motor set considering for safety reasons accepted busbars and motor protection settings. A derived model for deep rotor bars was experimentally confirmed as effective means for the RCP motor set start-up transient simulation. Start-up procedures have been designed and adopted to the safety procedures of the Nuclear Power Plant Krsko

  7. Gas fluidized bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardelli, H. da C.

    1976-03-01

    The equations of motion for both gas and particles in a gas fluidised system are stablished through general assumptions which are generally accepted on physical grounds. The resulting model is used to study the velocity fields of each phase in the case of an isolated bubble rising close to the flat distributor plate. A well posed problem results for the solution of Laplace's equation of the potential flow of the particles when consideration is given to the presence of the distributor as a boundary condition. The corresponding stream functions are also obtained which enable the drawing of the motion patterns using numerical techniques. The following two dimensional cases are analysed: S/b=1; S/b=1,5; S/b=2,5; S/b=5 and the limiting case S/b→αinfinite. The results for the interphase exchange between bubbles and particulate phases are applied to a gas fluidised bed reactor and its effect on the chemical conversion is studied for the simplest cases of piston flow and perfect mixing in the particulate phase [pt

  8. Heterogeneous gas core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, N.J.; Dugan, E.T.

    1983-01-01

    A heterogeneous gas core nuclear reactor is disclosed comprising a core barrel provided interiorly with an array of moderator-containing tubes and being otherwise filled with a fissile and/or fertile gaseous fuel medium. The fuel medium may be flowed through the chamber and through an external circuit in which heat is extracted. The moderator may be a fluid which is flowed through the tubes and through an external circuit in which heat is extracted. The moderator may be a solid which may be cooled by a fluid flowing within the tubes and through an external heat extraction circuit. The core barrel is surrounded by moderator/coolant material. Fissionable blanket material may be disposed inwardly or outwardly of the core barrel

  9. Special power supply and control system for the gas-cooled fast reactor-core flow test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, T.L.

    1981-09-01

    The test bundle in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor-Core Flow Test Loop (GCFR-CFTL) requires a source of electrical power that can be controlled accurately and reliably over a wide range of steady-state and transient power levels and skewed power distributions to simulate GCFR operating conditions. Both ac and dc power systems were studied, and only those employing silicon-controlled rectifiers (SCRs) could meet the requirements. This report summarizes the studies, tests, evaluations, and development work leading to the selection. it also presents the design, procurement, testing, and evaluation of the first 500-kVa LMPL supply. The results show that the LMPL can control 60-Hz sine wave power from 200 W to 500 kVA

  10. Design of an Online Fission Gas Monitoring System for Post-irradiation Examination Heating Tests of Coated Fuel Particles for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawn Scates

    2010-10-01

    A new Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) has been designed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for use of monitoring online fission gas-released during fuel heating tests. The FGMS will be used with the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) at the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) within the INL campus. Preselected Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) TRISO (Tri-isotropic) fuel compacts will undergo testing to assess the fission product retention characteristics under high temperature accident conditions. The FACS furnace will heat the fuel to temperatures up to 2,000ºC in a helium atmosphere. Released fission products such as Kr and Xe isotopes will be transported downstream to the FGMS where they will accumulate in cryogenically cooledcollection traps and monitored with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors during the heating process. Special INL developed software will be used to monitor the accumulated fission products and will report data in near real-time. These data will then be reported in a form that can be readily available to the INL reporting database. This paper describes the details of the FGMS design, the control and acqusition software, system calibration, and the expected performance of the FGMS. Preliminary online data may be available for presentation at the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) conference.

  11. On-Line Fuel Failure Monitor for Fuel Testing and Monitoring of Gas Cooled Very High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Bourham, Mohamed A.

    2010-01-01

    Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) utilize the TRISO microsphere as the fundamental fuel unit in the core. The TRISO microsphere (∼ 1-mm diameter) is composed of a UO2 kernel surrounded by a porous pyrolytic graphite buffer, an inner pyrolytic graphite layer, a silicon carbide (SiC) coating, and an outer pyrolytic graphite layer. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel is expected to range from 4%-10% (higher enrichments are also being considered). The layer/coating system that surrounds the UO2 kernel acts as the containment and main barrier against the environmental release of radioactivity. To understand better the behavior of this fuel under in-core conditions (e.g., high temperature, intense fast neutron flux, etc.), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a fuel testing program that will take place at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During this project North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers will collaborate with INL staff for establishing an optimized system for fuel monitoring for the ATR tests. In addition, it is expected that the developed system and methods will be of general use for fuel failure monitoring in gas cooled VHTRs.

  12. Turbulent jet erosion of a stably stratified gas layer in a nuclear reactor test containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishay, Liel [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Bieder, Ulrich [Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives, Centre de SACLAY DEN/SAC/DANS/DM2S/STMF/LMSF, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ziskind, Gennady [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Rashkovan, Alex, E-mail: rashbgu@gmail.com [Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center Negev (NRCN), PO Box 9001, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We model stably stratified layer erosion by vertical turbulent round jet. • Separate effect studies are performed as a platform for choosing modeling approach. • A test performed in MISTRA facility, CEA, Saclay is modeled using Fluent and Trio-U codes. • The proposed modeling approach showed good agreement with the MISTRA facility LOWMA-3 test. - Abstract: A number of integral and separate effect experiments were performed in the last two decades for validation of containment computational tools. The main goal of these benchmark experiments was to assess the ability of turbulence models and computational fluid dynamics codes to predict hydrogen concentration distribution and steam condensation rate in a nuclear reactor containment in the course of severe accidents. It appears from the published literature that the predictive capability of the existing computational tools still needs to be improved. This work examines numerically the temporal evolution of helium concentration in the experiment called LOWMA-3, performed in the MISTRA facility of CEA-Saclay, France. In the experiment, helium is used to mimic hydrogen of a real-case accident. The aim of this separate effect experiment, where steam condensation was not involved, is to predict helium concentration field. The conditions of the experiment are such that both the momentum transport and molecular diffusion contributions to the mixing process are of the same order of magnitude (Fr ∼ 1). A commercial CFD code, Fluent, and a CEA in-house code, Trio-U, are used for flow and helium concentration fields temporal evolution prediction in the present study. The preliminary separate effect studies provide guidance to an optimal modeling approach for the LOWMA-3 experiment. Temporal evolution of helium concentration in the stratification layer is shown, and a comparison to the experiment is discussed. It is shown that correct modeling of the round jet flowfield is essential for a reliable

  13. Turbulent jet erosion of a stably stratified gas layer in a nuclear reactor test containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishay, Liel; Bieder, Ulrich; Ziskind, Gennady; Rashkovan, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We model stably stratified layer erosion by vertical turbulent round jet. • Separate effect studies are performed as a platform for choosing modeling approach. • A test performed in MISTRA facility, CEA, Saclay is modeled using Fluent and Trio-U codes. • The proposed modeling approach showed good agreement with the MISTRA facility LOWMA-3 test. - Abstract: A number of integral and separate effect experiments were performed in the last two decades for validation of containment computational tools. The main goal of these benchmark experiments was to assess the ability of turbulence models and computational fluid dynamics codes to predict hydrogen concentration distribution and steam condensation rate in a nuclear reactor containment in the course of severe accidents. It appears from the published literature that the predictive capability of the existing computational tools still needs to be improved. This work examines numerically the temporal evolution of helium concentration in the experiment called LOWMA-3, performed in the MISTRA facility of CEA-Saclay, France. In the experiment, helium is used to mimic hydrogen of a real-case accident. The aim of this separate effect experiment, where steam condensation was not involved, is to predict helium concentration field. The conditions of the experiment are such that both the momentum transport and molecular diffusion contributions to the mixing process are of the same order of magnitude (Fr ∼ 1). A commercial CFD code, Fluent, and a CEA in-house code, Trio-U, are used for flow and helium concentration fields temporal evolution prediction in the present study. The preliminary separate effect studies provide guidance to an optimal modeling approach for the LOWMA-3 experiment. Temporal evolution of helium concentration in the stratification layer is shown, and a comparison to the experiment is discussed. It is shown that correct modeling of the round jet flowfield is essential for a reliable

  14. Helium heater design for the helium direct cycle component test facility. [for gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, V. R.; Gunn, S. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a helium heater to be used to conduct non-nuclear demonstration tests of the complete power conversion loop for a direct-cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant. Requirements for the heater include: heating the helium to a 1500 F temperature, operating at a 1000 psia helium pressure, providing a thermal response capability and helium volume similar to that of the nuclear reactor, and a total heater system helium pressure drop of not more than 15 psi. The unique compact heater system design proposed consists of 18 heater modules; air preheaters, compressors, and compressor drive systems; an integral control system; piping; and auxiliary equipment. The heater modules incorporate the dual-concentric-tube 'Variflux' heat exchanger design which provides a controlled heat flux along the entire length of the tube element. The heater design as proposed will meet all system requirements. The heater uses pressurized combustion (50 psia) to provide intensive heat transfer, and to minimize furnace volume and heat storage mass.

  15. Low drift type N thermocouples in out-of-pile advanced gas reactor mock-up test: metallurgical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scervini, M.; Palmer, J.; Haggard, D.C.; Swank, W.D.

    2015-01-01

    Thermocouples are the most commonly used sensors for temperature measurement in nuclear reactors. They are crucial for the control of current nuclear reactors and for the development of GEN IV reactors. In nuclear applications thermocouples are strongly affected by intense neutron fluxes. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. Thermocouple drift can be very significant for in-pile temperature measurements and may render the temperature sensors unreliable after exposure to nuclear radiation for relatively short times compared to the life required for temperature sensors in nuclear applications. Previous experiences with type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluxes. Currently the use of Nickel based thermocouples is limited to temperatures lower than 1000 deg. C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. As part of a collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the University of Cambridge a variety of Type N thermocouples have been exposed at INL in an Advanced Gas Reactor mock-up test at 1150 deg. C for 2000 h, 1200 deg. C for 2000 h, 125 deg. C for 200 h and 1300 deg. C for 200 h, and later analysed metallurgically at the University of Cambridge. The use of electron microscopy allows to identify the metallurgical changes occurring in the thermocouples during high temperature exposure and correlate the time dependent thermocouple drift with the microscopic changes experienced by the thermoelements of different thermocouple designs. In this paper conventional Inconel 600 sheathed type N thermocouples and a type N using a customized sheath developed at the University of

  16. Low drift type N thermocouples in out-of-pile advanced gas reactor mock-up test: metallurgical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scervini, M. [University of Cambridge, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, CB30FS Cambridge, (United Kingdom); Palmer, J.; Haggard, D.C.; Swank, W.D. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840, (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Thermocouples are the most commonly used sensors for temperature measurement in nuclear reactors. They are crucial for the control of current nuclear reactors and for the development of GEN IV reactors. In nuclear applications thermocouples are strongly affected by intense neutron fluxes. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. Thermocouple drift can be very significant for in-pile temperature measurements and may render the temperature sensors unreliable after exposure to nuclear radiation for relatively short times compared to the life required for temperature sensors in nuclear applications. Previous experiences with type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluxes. Currently the use of Nickel based thermocouples is limited to temperatures lower than 1000 deg. C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. As part of a collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the University of Cambridge a variety of Type N thermocouples have been exposed at INL in an Advanced Gas Reactor mock-up test at 1150 deg. C for 2000 h, 1200 deg. C for 2000 h, 125 deg. C for 200 h and 1300 deg. C for 200 h, and later analysed metallurgically at the University of Cambridge. The use of electron microscopy allows to identify the metallurgical changes occurring in the thermocouples during high temperature exposure and correlate the time dependent thermocouple drift with the microscopic changes experienced by the thermoelements of different thermocouple designs. In this paper conventional Inconel 600 sheathed type N thermocouples and a type N using a customized sheath developed at the University of

  17. Study on simulation, control and online assistance integrated system of 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, S.; Shi, L.; Zhu, S.

    2004-01-01

    In order to provide a convenient tool for engineering designed, safety analysis, operator training and control system design of the high temperature gas-cooled test reactor (HTR), an integrated system for simulation, control and online assistance of the HTR-10 has been designed and is still under development by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in China. The whole system is based on a network environment and includes three subsystems: the simulation subsystem (SIMUSUB), the visualized control designed subsystem (VCDSUB) and the online assistance subsystem (OASUB). The SIMUSUB consists of four parts: the simulation calculating server (SCS), the main control client (MCC), the data disposal client (DDC) and the results graphic display client (RGDC), all of which can communicate with each other via network. The SIMUSUB is intended to analyze and calculate the physical processes of the reactor core, the main loop system and the stream generator, etc., as well as to simulate the normal operation and transient accidents, and the result data can be graphically displayed through the RGDC dynamically. The VCDSUB provides a platform for control system modeling where the control flow systems can be automatically generated and graphically simulated. Based on the data from the field bus, the OASUB provides some of the reactor core parameter, which are difficult to measure. This whole system can be used as an educational tool to understand the design and operational characteristics of the HTR-10, and can also provide online supports for operators in the main control room, or as a convenient powerful tool for the control system design. (authors)

  18. Program for tests on magnetic bearing suspended rotor dynamics for gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shoji; Takizuka, Takakazu; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Kosugiyama, Shinichi; Yan, Xing

    2003-01-01

    A program for test on rotor dynamics was planned for the turbo-machine of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor (GTHTR300). The rotor system of the turbo-machine consists of a turbo-compressor rotor and a generator rotor connected with a flexible coupling, each suspended with two radial magnetic bearings. The rotors, which are flexible rotors, pass over the critical speeds of bending mode. The magnetic bearing is required to have a high load capacity, about 10 times larger than any built thus far to support a flexible rotor. In the rotor design, the standard limit of the vibration amplitude of 75 μm at the rated rotational speed of 3,600 rpm was fulfilled by optimizing the stiffness of the magnetic bearings. A test apparatus was designed to verify the design of the magnetic bearing suspended turbo-machine rotor of the GTHTR300. The test apparatus is composed of 1/3-scale test rotors, which are connected with a flexible coupling and driven by a variable speed motor. The test magnetic bearing was designed within the state-of-the-art technology to have a load capacity about 1/10 of that of the actual one. The test rotors were designed to closely simulate the critical speeds and vibration modes of the actual ones. This paper shows the test apparatus and the test plan for the magnetic bearing suspended rotor system. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  19. Study on computer-aided control system design platform of 10MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yan; Shi Lei; Sun Yuliang; Luo Shaojie

    2004-01-01

    the 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor (HTR-10) is the first modular pebble bed reactor built in China, which needs to be researched on engineering design, control study, safety analysis and operator training. An integrated system for simulation, control design and online assistance of the HTR-10 (HTRSIMU) has been developed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University. The HTRSIMU system is based on a high-speed local area network, on which a computer-aided control system design platform (CDP) is developed and combined with the simulating subsystem in order to provide a visualized and convenient tool for the HTR-10 control system design. The CDP has friendly man-machine interface and good expansibility, in which eighteen types of control items are integrated. These control items are divided into two types: linear and non-linear control items. The linear control items include Proportion, Integral, Differential, Inertial, Leed-lag, Oscillation, Pure-lag, Common, PID and Fuzzy, while the non-linear control items include Saturation, Subsection, Insensitive, Backlash, Relay, Insensi-Relay, Sluggish-Relay and Insens-Slug. The CDP provides a visualized platform for control system modeling and the control loop system can be automatically generated and graphically simulated. Users can conveniently design control loop, modify control parameters, study control method, and analyze control results just by clicking mouse buttons. This kind of control system design method can provide a powerful tool and good reference for the actual system operation for HTR-10. A control scheme is also given and studied to demonstrate the functions of the CDP in this article. (author)

  20. REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS TESTING CONTAINER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitham, G.K.; Smith, R.R.

    1963-01-15

    This patent shows a method for detecting leaks in jacketed fuel elements. The element is placed in a sealed tank within a nuclear reactor, and, while the reactor operates, the element is sparged with gas. The gas is then led outside the reactor and monitored for radioactive Xe or Kr. (AEC)

  1. Full-fluence tests of experimental thermosetting fuel rods for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The irradiation performance of injected thermosetting fuel rods is compared to that of standard pitch-temperature gas-cooled reactor requirements. The primary objective of the experiments reported here was to obtain additional irradiation data at higher fluences for resin-based rods with intermediate binder char contents within the 15 to 30 wt% ''window of acceptability'' that had been previously established. 12 refs

  2. Irradiation Facilities at the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is the third generation and largest test reactor built in the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC) (formerly known as the Test Reactor Area), located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), to study the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The RTC was established in the early 1950s with the development of the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR), which operated until 1970. The second major reactor was the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), which operated from 1957 to 1981, and finally the ATR, which began operation in 1967 and will continue operation well into the future. These reactors have produced a significant portion of the world's data on materials response to reactor environments. The wide range of experiment facilities in the ATR and the unique ability to vary the neutron flux in different areas of the core allow numerous experiment conditions to co-exist during the same reactor operating cycle. Simple experiments may involve a non-instrumented capsule containing test specimens with no real-time monitoring or control capabilities. More sophisticated testing facilities include inert gas temperature control systems and pressurized water loops that have continuous chemistry, pressure, temperature, and flow control as well as numerous test specimen monitoring capabilities. There are also apparatus that allow for the simulation of reactor transients on test specimens

  3. Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor cost estimate for a circulator test facility (modified HTGR circulator test facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    This is a conceptual design cost estimate for a Helium Circulator Test Facility to be located at the General Atomic Company, San Diego, California. The circulator, drive motors, controllers, thermal barrier, and circulator service module installation costs are part of the construction cost included

  4. A preliminary neutronic evaluation of the high temperature gas-cooled test reactor HTR-10 using the scale 6.0 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Romulo V.; Fortini, Angela; Pereira, Claubia; Carvalho, Fernando R. de; Oliveira, Arno H.

    2013-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-cooled Test Reactor HTR-10 is a 10 MW modular pebble bed type reactor, which core is filled with 27,000 spherical fuel elements, e.g. TRISO coated particles. This reactor was built by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET), Tsinghua University, China, and its first criticality was attained on December 1, 2000. The main objectives of the HTR-10 are to verify and demonstrate the technical and safety features of the modular HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) and to establish an experimental base for developing nuclear process heat applications. In this work, using the Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) 6.0, a nuclear code developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the HTR-10 first critical core is modeled by the DEN/UFMG. The K eff was obtained and compared with the reference value obtained by the Idaho National Laboratory. The result presents good agreement with experimental value. The goal is to validate the DEN/UFMG model to be applied in transmutation studies changing the fuel. (author)

  5. CEA programme on gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Fiorini, G.L.; Chapelot, Ph.; Gauthier, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    partly builds on the past experience of the CEA on gas cooled reactors (UNGG, HTR) and on the current effort to revive and update High Temperature Reactor technologies to support the development of modular helium cooled reactors (∼300 MWe) by Framatome-ANP and international partners. In this context, the CEA decided to focus prospective R and D work on the development of a consistent set of gas cooled nuclear systems ranging from medium term reactor projects for electricity generation and other applications (robust and secure export model, process heat, hydrogen production at very high temperature, plutonium burning) to a longer term vision of sustainable nuclear systems using fast neutrons with a closed and integrated fuel cycle. This range of gas cooled nuclear systems covers a wide variety of high temperature applications as well as a broad range of fuel cycles, including synergistic fuel cycles with light water reactors (i.e. burning plutonium and possibly also minor actinides from PWR spent fuels). A specific research and development programme is being currently implemented to support the development of this consistent set of gas cooled systems. The major emphasis is put on fuel particles re-fabrication and possible adaptations to fast neutrons, on high temperature materials, high temperature systems technology, and compact spent fuel processing and re-fabrication processes. This programme anticipates the construction of large experimental facilities in the next decade, such as an He integral test loop (2007), a technology testing reactor and a lab scaled integrated fuel cycle (2012). A substantial effort is also invested in the validation of computational tools and procedures for feasibility and performance studies. Strong connections with fundamental research (nuclear physics, materials science, nuclear chemistry) are essential to improve the modelling capability and to achieve effective breakthroughs for the development of high temperature and high irradiation

  6. Artificial neural networks for dynamic monitoring of simulated-operating parameters of high temperature gas cooled engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seker, Serhat; Tuerkcan, Erdinc; Ayaz, Emine; Barutcu, Burak

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses to the problem of utilisation of the artificial neural networks (ANNs) for detecting anomalies as well as physical parameters of a nuclear power plant during power operation in real time. Three different types of neural network algorithms were used namely, feed-forward neural network (back-propagation, BP) and two types of recurrent neural networks (RNN). The data used in this paper were gathered from the simulation of the power operation of the Japan's High Temperature Engineering Testing Reactor (HTTR). For the wide range of power operation, 56 signals were generated by the reactor dynamic simulation code for several hours of normal power operation at different power ramps between 30 and 100% nominal power. Paper will compare the outcomes of different neural networks and presents the neural network system and the determination of physical parameters from the simulated operating data

  7. Nuclear reactor coolant and cover gas system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.A.; Redding, A.H.; Tower, S.N.

    1976-01-01

    A core cooling system is disclosed for a nuclear reactor of the type utilizing a liquid coolant with a cover gas above free surfaces of the coolant. The disclosed system provides for a large inventory of reactor coolant and a balanced low pressure cover gas arrangement. A flow restricting device disposed within a reactor vessel achieves a pressure of the cover gas in the reactor vessel lower than the pressure of the reactor coolant in the vessel. The low gas pressure is maintained over all free surfaces of the coolant in the cooling system including a coolant reservoir tank. Reactor coolant stored in the reservoir tank allows for the large reactor coolant inventory provided by the invention

  8. Gas-cooled fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    1982-07-01

    Almost all the R D works of gas-cooled fast breeder reactor in the world were terminated at the end of the year 1980. In order to show that the R D termination was not due to technical difficulties of the reactor itself, the present paper describes the reactor plant concept, reactor performances, safety, economics and fuel cycle characteristics of the reactor, and also describes the reactor technologies developed so far, technological problems remained to be solved and planned development schedules of the reactor. (author)

  9. Design and development of gas turbine high temperature reactor 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Katanishi, Shoji; Takada, Shoji; Yan, Xing; Takizuka, Takakazu

    2003-01-01

    JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) has been designing a Japan's original gas turbine high temperature reactor, GTHTR300 (Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300). The greatly simplified design based on salient features of the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled reactor) with a closed helium gas turbine enables the GTHTR300 a high efficient and economically competitive reactor to be deployed in early 2010s. Also, the GTHTR300 fully taking advantage of various experiences accumulated in design, construction and operation of the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) and fossil gas turbine systems reduces technological development concerning a reactor system and electric generation system. Original features of this system are core design with two-year refueling interval, conventional steel material usage for a reactor pressure vessel, innovative plant flow scheme and horizontally installed gas turbine unit. Due to these salient features, the capital cost of the GTHTR300 is less than a target cost of 200 thousands Yen/kWe, and the electric generation cost is close to a target cost of 4 Yen/kWh. This paper describes the original design features focusing on reactor core design, fuel design, in-core structure design and reactor pressure vessel design except PCU design. Also, R and D for developing the power conversion unit is briefly described. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  10. Advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeomans, R. M. [South of Scotland Electricity Board, Hunterston Power Station, West Kilbride, Ayshire, UK

    1981-01-15

    The paper describes the advanced gas-cooled reactor system, Hunterston ''B'' power station, which is a development of the earlier natural uranium Magnox type reactor. Data of construction, capital cost, operating performance, reactor safety and also the list of future developments are given.

  11. Irradiation facilitates at the advanced test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, Blaine S.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is the third generation and largest test reactor built in the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC - formerly known as the Test Reactor Area), located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), to study the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The RTC was established in the early 1950's with the development of the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR), which operated until 1970. The second major reactor was the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), which operated from 1957 to 1981, and finally the ATR, which began operation in 1967 and will continue operation well into the future. These reactors have produced a significant portion of the world's data on materials response to reactor environments. The wide range of experiment facilities in the ATR and the unique ability to vary the neutron flux in different areas of the core allow numerous experiment conditions to co-exist during the same reactor operating cycle. Simple experiments may involve a non-instrumented capsule containing test specimens with no real-time monitoring or control capabilities. More sophisticated testing facilities include inert gas temperature control systems and pressurized water loops that have continuous chemistry, pressure, temperature, and flow control as well as numerous test specimen monitoring capabilities. There are also apparatus that allow for the simulation of reactor transients on test specimens. The paper has the following contents: ATR description and capabilities; ATR operations, quality and safety requirements; Static capsule experiments; Lead experiments; Irradiation test vehicle; In-pile loop experiments; Gas test loop; Future testing; Support facilities at RTC; Conclusions. To summarize, the ATR has a long history in fuel and material irradiations, and will be fulfilling a critical role in the future fuel and material testing necessary to develop the next generation reactor systems and advanced fuel cycles. The

  12. Tokamak engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1975-07-01

    The design criteria for a tokamak engineering test reactor can be met by operating in the two-component mode with reacting ion beams, together with a new blanket-shield design based on internal neutron spectrum shaping. A conceptual reactor design achieving a neutron wall loading of about 1 MW/m 2 is presented. The tokamak has a major radius of 3.05 m, the plasma cross-section is noncircular with a 2:1 elongation, and the plasma radius in the midplane is 55 cm. The total wall area is 149 m 2 . The plasma conditions are T/sub e/ approximately T/sub i/ approximately 5 keV, and ntau approximately 8 x 10 12 cm -3 s. The plasma temperature is maintained by injection of 177 MW of 200-keV neutral deuterium beams; the resulting deuterons undergo fusion reactions with the triton-target ions. The D-shaped toroidal field coils are extended out to large major radius (7.0 m), so that the blanket-shield test modules on the outer portion of the torus can be easily removed. The TF coils are superconducting, using a cryogenically stable TiNb design that permits a field at the coil of 80 kG and an axial field of 38 kG. The blanket-shield design for the inner portion of the torus nearest the machine center line utilizes a neutron spectral shifter so that the first structural wall behind the spectral shifter zone can withstand radiation damage for the reactor lifetime. The energy attenuation in this inner blanket is 8 x 10 -6 . If necessary, a tritium breeding ratio of 0.8 can be achieved using liquid lithium cooling in the []outer blanket only. The overall power consumption of the reactor is about 340 MW(e). A neutron wall loading greater than 1 MW/m 2 can be achieved by increasing the maximum magnetic field or the plasma elongation. (auth)

  13. Nondestructive testing of welds in steam generators for advanced gas cooled reactors at Heyshamm II and Torness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkin, K.; Bainbridge, A.; Carver, K.; Hammell, R.; Lack, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    The paper concerns non-destructive testing (NDT) of welds in advanced gas cooled steam generators for Heysham II and Torness nuclear power stations. A description is given of the steam generator. The selection of NDT techniques is also outlined, including the factors considered to ascertain the viability of a technique. Examples are given of applied NDT methods which match particular fabrication processes; these include: microfocus radiography, ultrasonic testing of austenitic tube butt welds, gamma-ray isotope projection system, surface crack detection, and automated radiography. Finally, future trends in this field of NDT are highlighted. (UK)

  14. Research reactors and materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, H.

    1986-01-01

    Research reactors can be classified in three main groups according to the moderator which is used. Their technical characteristics are given and the three most recent research and materials testing reactors are described: OSIRIS, ORPHEE and the high-flux reactor of Grenoble. The utilization of research reactors is reviewed in four fields of activity: training, fundamental or applied research and production (eg. radioisotopes) [fr

  15. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-01-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3

  16. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  17. Fuel Development For Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. K. Meyer

    2006-06-01

    The Generation IV Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) concept is proposed to combine the advantages of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (such as efficient direct conversion with a gas turbine and the potential for application of high-temperature process heat), with the sustainability advantages that are possible with a fast-spectrum reactor. The latter include the ability to fission all transuranics and the potential for breeding. The GFR is part of a consistent set of gas-cooled reactors that includes a medium-term Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)-like concept, or concepts based on the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), and specialized concepts such as the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), as well as actinide burning concepts [ ]. To achieve the necessary high power density and the ability to retain fission gas at high temperature, the primary fuel concept proposed for testing in the United States is a dispersion coated fuel particles in a ceramic matrix. Alternative fuel concepts considered in the U.S. and internationally include coated particle beds, ceramic clad fuel pins, and novel ceramic ‘honeycomb’ structures. Both mixed carbide and mixed nitride-based solid solutions are considered as fuel phases.

  18. Radiation Protection Practices during the Helium Circulator Maintenance of the 10 MW High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor-Test Module (HTR-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengxiang Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current radiation protection methodology offers abundant experiences on light-water reactors, but very few studies on high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR. To fill this gap, a comprehensive investigation was performed to the radiation protection practices in the helium circulator maintenance of the Chinese 10 MW HTR test module (HTR-10 in this paper. The investigation reveals the unique behaviour of HTR-10’s radiation sources in the maintenance as well as its radionuclide species and presents the radiation protection methods that were tailored to these features. Owing to these practices, the radioactivity level was kept low throughout the maintenance and only low-level radioactive waste was generated. The quantitative analysis further demonstrates that the decontamination efficiency was over 89% for surface contamination and over 34% for γ dose rate and the occupational exposure was much lower than both the limits of regulatory and the exposure levels in comparable literature. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the reported radiation protection practices, which directly provides hands-on experience for the future HTR-PM reactor and adds to the completeness of the radiation protection methodology.

  19. Test reactor risk assessment methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, R.H.; Rawlins, J.K.; Stewart, M.E.

    1976-04-01

    A methodology has been developed for the identification of accident initiating events and the fault modeling of systems, including common mode identification, as these methods are applied in overall test reactor risk assessment. The methods are exemplified by a determination of risks to a loss of primary coolant flow in the Engineering Test Reactor

  20. Seismic behaviour of gas cooled reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-08-01

    On invitation of the French Government the Specialists' Meeting on the Seismic Behaviour of Gas-Cooled Reactor Components was held at Gif-sur-Yvette, 14-16 November 1989. This was the second Specialists' Meeting on the general subject of gas-cooled reactor seismic design. There were 27 participants from France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Israel, Japan, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, the United States, the CEC and IAEA took the opportunity to present and discuss a total of 16 papers reflecting the state of the art of gained experiences in the field of their seismic qualification approach, seismic analysis methods and of the capabilities of various facilities used to qualify components and verify analytical methods. Since the first meeting, the sophistication and expanded capabilities of both the seismic analytical methods and the test facilities are apparent. The two main methods for seismic analysis, the impedance method and the finite element method, have been computer-programmed in several countries with the capability of each of the codes dependent on the computer capability. The correlations between calculation and tests are dependent on input assumptions such as boundary conditions, soil parameters and various interactions between the soil, the buildings and the contained equipment. The ability to adjust these parameters and match experimental results with calculations was displayed in several of the papers. The expanded capability of some of the new test facilities was graphically displayed by the description of the SAMSON vibration test facility at Juelich, FRG, capable of dynamically testing specimens weighing up to 25 tonnes, and the TAMARIS facility at the CEA laboratories in Gif-sur-Yvette where the largest table is capable of testing specimens weighing up to 100 tonnes. The proceedings of this meeting contain all 16 presented papers. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Test reactors in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corella, M.R.; Gomez Alonso, M.

    1983-01-01

    INFCE work on research reactor core conversion from HEU to LEU, attracted a raising interest on this type of nuclear reactors. In this context, the present work shows a compilation of worldwide research and test nuclear reactors, now in operation, under construction, or planned, as well as decommissioned reactors (tables A to F). Brief descriptions of these reactors are included in tables G to L. In table M a summary view of reactors with power level between 10 and 30 MWt is shown. Attention is focused on that power range, as it has been considered in very preliminar studies for a new research reactor. Almost all data have been obtained from current available bibliography. (author)

  2. Simulator for materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Sugaya, Naoto; Ohtsuka, Kaoru; Hanakawa, Hiroki; Onuma, Yuichi; Hosokawa, Jinsaku; Hori, Naohiko; Kaminaga, Masanori; Tamura, Kazuo; Hotta, Kohji; Ishitsuka, Tatsuo

    2013-06-01

    A real-time simulator for both reactor and irradiation facilities of a materials testing reactor, “Simulator of Materials Testing Reactors”, was developed for understanding reactor behavior and operational training in order to utilize it for nuclear human resource development and to promote partnership with developing countries which have a plan to introduce nuclear power plant. The simulator is designed based on the JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor), and it simulates operation, irradiation tests and various kinds of anticipated operational transients and accident conditions caused by the reactor and irradiation facilities. The development of the simulator was sponsored by the Japanese government as one of the specialized projects of advanced research infrastructure in order to promote basic as well as applied researches. This report summarizes the simulation components, hardware specification and operation procedure of the simulator. (author)

  3. French activities on gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastien, D.

    1996-01-01

    The gas cooled reactor programme in France originally consisted of eight Natural Uranium Graphite Gas Cooled Reactors (UNGG). These eight units, which are now permanently shutdown, represented a combined net electrical power of 2,375 MW and a total operational history of 163 years. Studies related to these reactors concern monitoring and dismantling of decommissioned facilities, including the development of methods for dismantling. France has been monitoring the development of HTRs throughout the world since 1979, when it halted its own HTR R and D programme. France actively participates in three CRPs set up by the IAEA. (author). 1 tab

  4. MODEL SIMULATION OF GEOMETRY AND STRESS-STRAIN VARIATION OF BATAN FUEL PIN PROTOTYPE DURING IRRADIATION TEST IN RSG-GAS REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwardi Suwardi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MODEL SIMULATION OF GEOMETRY AND STRESS-STRAIN VARIATION OF BATAN FUEL PIN PROTOTYPE DURING IRRADIATION TEST IN RSG-GAS REACTOR*. The first short fuel pin containing natural UO2 pellet in Zry4 cladding has been prepared at the CNFT (Center for Nuclear Fuel Technology then a ramp test will be performed. The present work is part of designing first irradiation experiments in the PRTF (Power Ramp Test Facility of RSG-GAS 30 MW reactor. The thermal mechanic of the pin during irradiation has simulated. The geometry variation of pellet and cladding is modeled by taking into account different phenomena such as thermal expansion, densification, swelling by fission product, thermal creep and radiation growth. The cladding variation is modeled by thermal expansion, thermal and irradiation creeps. The material properties are modeled by MATPRO and standard numerical parameter of TRANSURANUS code. Results of irradiation simulation with 9 kW/m LHR indicates that pellet-clad contacts onset from 0.090 mm initial gaps after 806 d, when pellet radius expansion attain 0.015 mm while inner cladding creep-down 0.075 mm. A newer computation data show that the maximum measured LHR of n-UO2 pin in the PRTF 12.4 kW/m. The next simulation will be done with a higher LHR, up to ~ 25 kW/m. MODEL SIMULASI VARIASI GEOMETRI DAN STRESS-STRAIN DARI PROTOTIP BAHAN BAKAR PIN BATAN SELAMA UJI IRADIASI DI REAKTOR RSG-GAS. Pusat Teknologi Bahan Bakar Nuklir (PTBBN telah menyiapkan tangkai (pin bahan bakar pendek perdana yang berisi pelet UO2 alam dalam kelongsong paduan zircaloy untuk dilakukan uji iradiasi daya naik. Penelitian ini merupakan bagian dari perancangan percobaan iradiasi pertama di PRTF (Power Ramp Test Fasility yang terpasang di reaktor serbaguna RSG-GAS berdaya 30 MW. Telah dilakukan pemodelan dan simulasi kinerja termal mekanikal pin selama iradiasi. Variasi geometri pelet dan kelongsong selama pengujian dimodelkan dengan memperhatikan fenomena ekspansi termal

  5. IAEA high temperature gas cooled reactor activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    IAEA activities on high temperature gas cooled reactors are conducted with the review and support of Member States, primarily through the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors (IWGGCR). This paper summarises the results of the IAEA gas cooled reactor project activities in recent years along with ongoing current activities through a review of Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), meetings and other international efforts. A series of three recently completed CRPs have addressed the key areas of reactor physics for LEU fuel, retention of fission products, and removal of post shutdown decay heat through passive heat transport mechanisms. These activities along with other completed and ongoing supporting CRPs and meetings are summarised with reference to detailed documentation of the results. (author)

  6. Broad-Application Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motloch, C.G.

    1992-05-01

    This report is about a new, safe, and operationally efficient DOE reactor of nuclear research and testing proposed for the early to mid- 21st Century. Dubbed the Broad-Application Test Reactor (BATR), the proposed facility incorporates a multiple-application, multiple-mission design to support DOE programs such as naval reactors and space power and propulsion, as well as research in medical, science, isotope, and electronics arenas. DOE research reactors are aging, and implementing major replacement projects requires long lead times. Primary design drivers include safety, low risk, minimum operation cost, mission flexibility, waste minimization, and long life. Scientists and engineers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are evaluating possible fuel forms, structural materials, reactor geometries, coolants, and moderators

  7. Neutronic of heterogenous gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maturana, Roberto Hernan

    2008-01-01

    At present, one of the main technical features of the advanced gas cooled reactor under development is its fuel element concept, which implies a neutronic homogeneous design, thus requiring higher enrichment compared with present commercial nuclear power plants.In this work a neutronic heterogeneous gas cooled reactor design is analyzed by studying the neutronic design of the Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (AGR), a low enrichment, gas cooled and graphite moderated nuclear power plant.A search of merit figures (some neutronic parameter, characteristic dimension, or a mixture of both) which are important and have been optimized during the reactor design stage is been done, to aim to comprise how a gas heterogeneous reactor is been design, given that semi-infinity arrangement criteria of rods in LWRs and clusters in HWRs can t be applied for a solid moderator and a gas refrigerator.The WIMS code for neutronic cell calculations is been utilized to model the AGR fuel cell and to calculate neutronic parameters such as the multiplication factor and the pick factor, as function of the fuel burnup.Also calculation is been done for various nucleus characteristic dimensions values (fuel pin radius, fuel channel pitch) and neutronic parameters (such as fuel enrichment), around the design established parameters values.A fuel cycle cost analysis is carried out according to the reactor in study, and the enrichment effect over it is been studied.Finally, a thermal stability analysis is been done, in subcritical condition and at power level, to study this reactor characteristic reactivity coefficients.Present results shows (considering the approximation used) a first set of neutronic design figures of merit consistent with the AGR design. [es

  8. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and full nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system (Bragg-Sitton, 2005). The current paper applies the same testing methodology to a direct drive gas cooled reactor system, demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. In each testing application, core power transients were controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. Although both system designs utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility.

  9. High temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosegood, S.B.; Lockett, G.E.

    1975-01-01

    For high-temperature gas cooled reactors it is considered advantageous to design the core so that the moderator blocks can be removed and replaced by some means of standpipes normally situated in the top of the reactor vessel. An arrangement is here described to facilitate these operations. The blocks have end faces shaped as irregular hexagons with three long sides of equal length and three short sides also of equal length, one short side being located between each pair of adjacent long sides, and the long sides being inclined towards one another at 60 0 . The block defines a number of coolant channels located parallel to its sides. Application of the arrangement to a high temperature gas-cooled reactor with refuelling standpipes is described. The standpipes are located in the top of the reactor vessel above the tops of the columns and are disposed coaxially above the hexagonal channels, with diameters that allow the passage of the blocks. (U.K.)

  10. Fort St. Vrain high temperature gas-cooled reactor. Pt. 12. The dew point moisture monitor testing program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, H.G. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Brey, H.L. (Public Service Co. of Colorado, Denver (USA)); Swart, F.E. (Gas-Cooled Reactor Associates, La Jolla, CA (USA)); Forbis, J.M. (Storage Technology Corp., Louisville, CO (USA))

    1982-09-01

    Moisture ingress into the core volume could cause damaging reactions with the moderator-reflector graphite and burnable poison, therefore a dew point moisture monitoring system has been developed with the basic design criteria that a plant protective system trip is signaled after the system detects high primary coolant helium moisture levels and that the system is able to correctly identify which of two steam generator loops is leaking. Modifications to the sample supplies to the monitors were necessary to reduce the system's unsatisfactory response time at lower reactor power levels.

  11. Heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly du Bois, B.; Bernard, J.L.; Naudet, R.; Roche, R.

    1964-01-01

    France has based its main effort for the production of nuclear energy on natural Uranium Graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactors, and has a long term programme for fast reactors, but this country is also engaged in the development of heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors which appear to present the best middle term prospects. The economy of these reactors, as in the case of Graphite, arises from the use of natural or very slightly enriched Uranium; heavy water can take the best advantages of this fuel cycle and moreover offers considerable development potential because of better reactor performances. A prototype plant EL 4 (70 MW) is under construction and is described in detail in another paper. The present one deals with the programme devoted to the development of this reactor type in France. Reasons for selecting this reactor type are given in the first part: advantages and difficulties are underlined. After reviewing the main technological problems and the Research and Development carried out, results already obtained and points still to be confirmed are reported. The construction of EL 4 is an important step of this programme: it will be a significant demonstration of reactor performances and will afford many experimentation opportunities. Now the design of large power reactors is to be considered. Extension and improvements of the mechanical structures used for EL 4 are under study, as well as alternative concepts. The paper gives some data for a large reactor in the present state of technology, as a result from optimization studies. Technical improvements, especially in the field of materials could lead to even more interesting performances. Some prospects are mentioned for the long run. Investment costs and fuel cycles are discussed in the last part. (authors) [fr

  12. Medium temperature carbon dioxide gas turbine reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yasuyoshi; Nitawaki, Takeshi; Muto, Yasushi

    2004-01-01

    A carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) gas turbine reactor with a partial pre-cooling cycle attains comparable cycle efficiencies of 45.8% at medium temperature of 650 deg. C and pressure of 7 MPa with a typical helium (He) gas turbine reactor of GT-MHR (47.7%) at high temperature of 850 deg. C. This higher efficiency is ascribed to: reduced compression work around the critical point of CO 2 ; and consideration of variation in CO 2 specific heat at constant pressure, C p , with pressure and temperature into cycle configuration. Lowering temperature to 650 deg. C provides flexibility in choosing materials and eases maintenance through the lower diffusion leak rate of fission products from coated particle fuel by about two orders of magnitude. At medium temperature of 650 deg. C, less expensive corrosion resistant materials such as type 316 stainless steel are applicable and their performance in CO 2 have been proven during extensive operation in AGRs. In the previous study, the CO 2 cycle gas turbomachinery weight was estimated to be about one-fifth compared with He cycles. The proposed medium temperature CO 2 gas turbine reactor is expected to be an alternative solution to current high-temperature He gas turbine reactors

  13. Fission gas behaviour in water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    During irradiation, nuclear fuel changes volume, primarily through swelling. This swelling is caused by the fission products and in particular by the volatile ones such as krypton and xenon, called fission gas. Fission gas behaviour needs to be reliably predicted in order to make better use of nuclear fuel, a factor which can help to achieve the economic competitiveness required by today's markets. These proceedings communicate the results of an international seminar which reviewed recent progress in the field of fission gas behaviour in light water reactor fuel and sought to improve the models used in computer codes predicting fission gas release. State-of-the-art knowledge is presented for both uranium-oxide and mixed-oxide fuels loaded in water reactors. (author)

  14. Studies Related to the Oregon State University High Temperature Test Facility: Scaling, the Validation Matrix, and Similarities to the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schultz; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; William T. Taitano; James R. Wolf; Glenn E. McCreery

    2010-09-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5 year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant project. Because the NRC interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC). Since DOE has incorporated the HTTF as an ingredient in the NGNP thermal-fluids validation program, several important outcomes should be noted: 1. The reference prismatic reactor design, that serves as the basis for scaling the HTTF, became the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). The MHTGR has also been chosen as the reference design for all of the other NGNP thermal-fluid experiments. 2. The NGNP validation matrix is being planned using the same scaling strategy that has been implemented to design the HTTF, i.e., the hierarchical two-tiered scaling methodology developed by Zuber in 1991. Using this approach a preliminary validation matrix has been designed that integrates the HTTF experiments with the other experiments planned for the NGNP thermal-fluids verification and validation project. 3. Initial analyses showed that the inherent power capability of the OSU infrastructure, which only allowed a total operational facility power capability of 0.6 MW, is

  15. Neutronics of a mixed-flow gas-core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soran, P.D.; Hansen, G.E.

    1977-11-01

    The study was made to investigate the neutronic feasibility of a mixed-flow gas-core reactor. Three reactor concepts were studied: four- and seven-cell radial reactors and a seven-cell scallop reactor. The reactors were fueled with UF 6 (either U-233 or U-235) and various parameters were varied. A four-cell reactor is not practical nor is the U-235 fueled seven-cell radial reactor; however, the 7-cell U-233 radial and scallop reactors can satisfy all design criteria. The mixed flow gas core reactor is a very attractive reactor concept and warrants further investigation

  16. Scram device for gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Atsushi; Takahashi, Suehiro.

    1989-01-01

    A scram device for gas-cooled reactors has a hopper disposed below a stand pipe standing upright passing through a reactor container and electromagnets disposed therein. It further comprises neutron absorbing steel balls maintained between the electromagnets and the hopper upon energization of the electromagnets. Upon emergency reactor shutdown, energization for the electromagnets is interrupted to drop the neutron absorption stainless steel balls into the reactor core. It is an object of the present invention to keep the mechanical strength of the electromagnets in a high temperature gas atmosphere and not to reduce the insulation performance. That is, coils for the electromagnets are constituted with a small oxide-insulated metal sheath cable (MI cable). As the feature of the MI cable, it can maintain the mechanical strength even when exposed to high temperature gas coolant and the insulation performance thereof does not reduce by virture of its gas sealing property. Accordingly, a scram device of stable reliability can be obtained. (K.M.)

  17. Gas-cooled reactor technology: a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raleigh, H.D.

    1981-09-01

    Included are 3358 citations on gas-cooled reactor technology contained in the DOE Energy Data Base for the period January 1978 through June 1981. The citations include reports, journal articles, books, conference papers, patents, and monographs. Corporate, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number Indexes are provided

  18. Gas core reactors for coal gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinstein, H.

    1976-01-01

    The concept of using a gas core reactor to produce hydrogen directly from coal and water is presented. It is shown that the chemical equilibrium of the process is strongly in favor of the production of H 2 and CO in the reactor cavity, indicating a 98 percent conversion of water and coal at only 1500 0 K. At lower temperatures in the moderator-reflector cooling channels the equilibrium strongly favors the conversion of CO and additional H 2 O to CO 2 and H 2 . Furthermore, it is shown the H 2 obtained per pound of carbon has 23 percent greater heating value than the carbon so that some nuclear energy is also fixed. Finally, a gas core reactor plant floating in the ocean is conceptualized which produces H 2 , fresh water and sea salts from coal

  19. Gas pollutant cleaning by a membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topis, S.; Koutsonikolas, D.; Kaldis, S. (and others) [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2005-07-01

    An alternative technology for the removal of gas pollutants at the integrated gasification combined cycle process for power generation is the use of a catalytic membrane reactor. In the present study, ammonia decomposition in a catalytic reactor, with simultaneous removal of hydrogen through a ceramic membrane, was investigated. A Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was prepared by the dry and wet impregnation method and characterized by ICP, SEM, XRD and N{sub 2} adsorption before and after activation. Commercially available {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membranes were also characterized and the permeabilities and selectivities of H{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} were measured by the variable volume method. In parallel with the experimental analysis, the necessary mathematical models were developed to describe the operation of the catalytic membrane reactor and to compare its performance with the conventional reactor. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Gas pollutant cleaning by a membrane reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaldis Sotiris

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An alternative technology for the removal of gas pollutants at the integrated gasification combined cycle process for power generation is the use of a catalytic membrane reactor. In the present study, ammonia decomposition in a catalytic reactor, with a simultaneous removal of hydrogen through a ceramic membrane, was investigated. A Ni/Al2O3 catalyst was prepared by the dry and wet impregnation method and characterized by the inductively coupled plasma method, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and N2 adsorption before and after activation. Commercially available a-Al2O3 membranes were also characterized and the permeabilities and permselectivities of H2, N2, and CO2 were measured by the variable volume method. In parallel with the experimental analysis, the necessary mathematical models were developed to describe the operation of the catalytic membrane reactor and to compare its performance with the conventional reactor. .

  1. Gas pollutant cleaning by a membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George E. Skodras; Sotiris Kaldis; Savas G. Topis; Dimitris Koutsonikolas; George P. Sakellaropoulos [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Chemical Process Engineering Laboratory, Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    An alternative technology for the removal of gas pollutants at the intergrated gasification combined cycle process for power generation is the use of a catalytic membrane reactor. In the present study, ammonia decomposition in a catalytic reactor, with a simultaneous removal of hydrogen through a ceramic membrane, was investigated. A Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was prepared by the dry and wet impregnation method and characterized by ICP, SEM, XRD and N{sub 2} adsorption before and after activation. Commercially available {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membranes were also characterized and the permeabilities and permselectivities of H{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} were measured by the variable volume method. In parallel with the experimental analysis, the necessary mathematical models were developed to describe the operation of the catalytic membrane reactor and to compare its performance with the conventional reactor. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of work performed from January 1, 1977 through March 31, 1977 on the Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Process Heat and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (impure Helium), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes progress to date on alloy selection for VHTR Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) applications and for DCHT applications. The present status on the simulated reactor helium loop design and on designs for the testing and analysis facilities and equipment is discussed

  3. Gas-cooled breeder reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chermanne, J.; Burgsmueller, P. [Societe Belge pour l' Industrie Nucleaire, Brussels

    1981-01-15

    The European Association for the Gas-cooled Breeder Reactor (G B R A), set-up in 1969 prepared between 1972 and 1974 a 1200 MWe Gas-cooled Breeder Reactor (G B R) commercial reference design G B R 4. It was then found necessary that a sound and neutral appraisal of the G B R licenseability be carried out. The Commission of the European Communities (C E C) accepted to sponsor this exercise. At the beginning of 1974, the C E C convened a group of experts to examine on a Community level, the safety documents prepared by the G B R A. A working party was set-up for that purpose. The experts examined a ''Preliminary Safety Working Document'' on which written questions and comments were presented. A ''Supplement'' containing the answers to all the questions plus a detailed fault tree and reliability analysis was then prepared. After a final study of this document and a last series of discussions with G B R A representatives, the experts concluded that on the basis of the evidence presented to the Working Party, no fundamental reasons were identified which would prevent a Gas-cooled Breeder Reactor of the kind proposed by the G B R A achieving a satisfactory safety status. Further work carried out on ultimate accident have confirmed this conclusion. One can therefore claim that the overall safety risk associated with G B R s compares favourably with that of any other reactor system.

  4. PITR: Princeton Ignition Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    The principal objectives of the PITR - Princeton Ignition Test Reactor - are to demonstrate the attainment of thermonuclear ignition in deuterium-tritium, and to develop optimal start-up techniques for plasma heating and current induction, in order to determine the most favorable means of reducing the size and cost of tokamak power reactors. This report describes the status of the plasma and engineering design features of the PITR. The PITR geometry is chosen to provide the highest MHD-stable values of beta in a D-shaped plasma, as well as ease of access for remote handling and neutral-beam injection

  5. FASTER Test Reactor Preconceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandy, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Belch, H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brunett, A. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heidet, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hill, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoffman, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jin, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mohamed, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moisseytsev, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Passerini, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sumner, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vilim, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hayes, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The FASTER test reactor plant is a sodium-cooled fast spectrum test reactor that provides high levels of fast and thermal neutron flux for scientific research and development. The 120MWe FASTER reactor plant has a superheated steam power conversion system which provides electrical power to a local grid allowing for recovery of operating costs for the reactor plant.

  6. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm 2 , 1000 0 C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm 2 , 1200 0 C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370 0 C

  7. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

  8. Reactor operator screening test experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, W.J.; Penkala, J.L.; Witzig, W.F.

    1976-01-01

    When it became apparent to Duquesne Light Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, that the throughput of their candidate selection-Phase I training-reactor operator certification sequence was something short of acceptable, the utility decided to ask consultants to make recommendations with respect to candidate selection procedures. The recommendation implemented was to create a Nuclear Training Test that would predict the success of a candidate in completing Phase I training and subsequently qualify for reactor operator certification. The mechanics involved in developing and calibrating the Nuclear Training Test are described. An arbitration decision that resulted when a number of International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers union employees filed a grievance alleging that the selection examination was unfair, invalid, not job related, inappropriate, and discriminatorily evaluated is also discussed. The arbitration decision favored the use of the Nuclear Training Test

  9. The modular high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, D.E.; Lipps, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    Due to relatively high operating temperatures, the gas-cooled reactor has the potential to serve a wide variety of energy applications. This paper discusses the energy applications which can be served by the modular HTGR, the magnitude of the potential markets, and the HTGR product cost incentives relative to fossil fuel competition. Advantages of the HTGR modular systems are presented along with a description of the design features and performance characteristics of the current reference HTGR modular systems

  10. Gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon de los Santos, G.

    2009-10-01

    This work carries out the thermal evaluation from the conversion of nuclear energy to electric power and process heat, through to implement an outline gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration. Modeling and simulating with software Thermo flex of Thermo flow the performance parameters, based on a nuclear power plant constituted by an helium cooled reactor and helium gas turbine with three compression stages, two of inter cooling and one regeneration stage; more four heat recovery process, generating two pressure levels of overheat vapor, a pressure level of saturated vapor and one of hot water, with energetic characteristics to be able to give supply to a very wide gamma of industrial processes. Obtaining a relationship heat electricity of 0.52 and efficiency of net cogeneration of 54.28%, 70.2 MW net electric, 36.6 MW net thermal with 35% of condensed return to 30 C; for a supplied power by reactor of 196.7 MW; and with conditions in advanced gas turbine of 850 C and 7.06 Mpa, assembly in a shaft, inter cooling and heat recovery in cogeneration. (Author)

  11. Design codes for gas cooled reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants have been under development for about 30 years and experimental and prototype plants have been operated. The main line of development has been electricity generation based on the steam cycle. In addition the potential for high primary coolant temperature has resulted in research and development programmes for advanced applications including the direct cycle gas turbine and process heat applications. In order to compare results of the design techniques of various countries for high temperature reactor components, the IAEA established a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Design Codes for Gas-Cooled Reactor Components. The Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, Switzerland and the USSR participated in this Co-ordinated Research Programme. Within the frame of this CRP a benchmark problem was established for the design of the hot steam header of the steam generator of an HTGR for electricity generation. This report presents the results of that effort. The publication also contains 5 reports presented by the participants. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these reports. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Gas Test Loop Functional and Technical Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glen R. Longhurst; Soli T. Khericha; James L. Jones

    2004-01-01

    This document defines the technical and functional requirements for a gas test loop (GTL) to be constructed for the purpose of providing a high intensity fast-flux irradiation environment for developers of advanced concept nuclear reactors. This capability is needed to meet fuels and materials testing requirements of the designers of Generation IV (GEN IV) reactors and other programs within the purview of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Space nuclear power development programs may also benefit by the services the GTL will offer. The overall GTL technical objective is to provide developers with the means for investigating and qualifying fuels and materials needed for advanced reactor concepts. The testing environment includes a fast-flux neutron spectrum of sufficient intensity to perform accelerated irradiation testing. Appropriate irradiation temperature, gaseous environment, test volume, diagnostics, and access and handling features are also needed. This document serves to identify those requirements as well as generic requirements applicable to any system of this kind

  13. Gas Test Loop Functional and Technical Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glen R. Longhurst; Soli T. Khericha; James L. Jones

    2004-09-01

    This document defines the technical and functional requirements for a gas test loop (GTL) to be constructed for the purpose of providing a high intensity fast-flux irradiation environment for developers of advanced concept nuclear reactors. This capability is needed to meet fuels and materials testing requirements of the designers of Generation IV (GEN IV) reactors and other programs within the purview of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Space nuclear power development programs may also benefit by the services the GTL will offer. The overall GTL technical objective is to provide developers with the means for investigating and qualifying fuels and materials needed for advanced reactor concepts. The testing environment includes a fast-flux neutron spectrum of sufficient intensity to perform accelerated irradiation testing. Appropriate irradiation temperature, gaseous environment, test volume, diagnostics, and access and handling features are also needed. This document serves to identify those requirements as well as generic requirements applicable to any system of this kind.

  14. Advanced gas cooled reactors - Designing for safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, Barry A.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor Power Stations recently completed at Heysham in Lancashire, England, and Torness in East Lothian, Scotland represent the current stage of development of the commercial AGR. Each power station has two reactor turbo-generator units designed for a total station output of 2x660 MW(e) gross although powers in excess of this have been achieved and it is currently intended to uprate this as far as possible. The design of both stations has been based on the successful operating AGRs at Hinkley Point and Hunterston which have now been in-service for almost 15 years, although minor changes were made to meet new safety requirements and to make improvements suggested by operating experience. The construction of these new AGRs has been to programme and within budget. Full commercial load for the first reactor at Torness was achieved in August 1988 with the other three reactors following over the subsequent 15 months. This paper summarises the safety principles and guidelines for the design of the reactors and discusses how some of the main features of the safety case meet these safety requirements. The paper also summarises the design problems which arose during the construction period and explains how these problems were solved with the minimum delay to programme

  15. Advanced gas cooled reactors - Designing for safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keen, Barry A [Engineering Development Unit, NNC Limited, Booths Hall, Knutsford, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor Power Stations recently completed at Heysham in Lancashire, England, and Torness in East Lothian, Scotland represent the current stage of development of the commercial AGR. Each power station has two reactor turbo-generator units designed for a total station output of 2x660 MW(e) gross although powers in excess of this have been achieved and it is currently intended to uprate this as far as possible. The design of both stations has been based on the successful operating AGRs at Hinkley Point and Hunterston which have now been in-service for almost 15 years, although minor changes were made to meet new safety requirements and to make improvements suggested by operating experience. The construction of these new AGRs has been to programme and within budget. Full commercial load for the first reactor at Torness was achieved in August 1988 with the other three reactors following over the subsequent 15 months. This paper summarises the safety principles and guidelines for the design of the reactors and discusses how some of the main features of the safety case meet these safety requirements. The paper also summarises the design problems which arose during the construction period and explains how these problems were solved with the minimum delay to programme.

  16. Summary of ORNL high-temperature gas-cooled reactor program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) efforts on the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Program have been on HTGR fuel development, fission product and coolant chemistry, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) studies, materials studies, graphite development, reactor physics and shielding studies, application assessments and evaluations and selected component testing

  17. the JHR Material Testing Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roure, C.; Cornu, B.; Berthet, B.; Simon, E.; Estre, N.; Guimbal, P.; Kinnunen, P.; Kotiluoto, P.

    2013-06-01

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is a European experimental reactor under construction in CEA Cadarache. It will be dedicated to material and fuel irradiation tests, and to medical isotopes production. Non-Destructive nuclear Examinations systems (NDE) will be implemented in pools to analyse the irradiated fuel or tested material in their supporting experimental irradiation devices extracted from the core or its immediate periphery. The Nuclear Measurement Laboratory (NML) of CEA Cadarache is working in collaboration with VTT (Technical Research Centre in Finland) in designing and developing NDE systems implementing gamma-ray spectroscopy and high energy X-ray imaging of the sample and irradiation device. CEA is also designing a neutron radiography system for which NML is working on the detection system. Design studies are performed with Monte Carlo transport codes and specific simulation tools developed by the NML for Xray and neutron imaging. (authors)

  18. Reactor transients tests for SNR fuel elements in HFR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plitz, H.

    1989-01-01

    In HFR reactor, fuel pins of LMFBR reactors are putted in irradiation specimen capsules cooled with sodium for reactor transients tests. These irradiation capsules are instrumented and the experiences realized until this day give results on: - Fuel pins subjected at a continual variation of power - melting fuel - axial differential elongation of fuel pins

  19. Reactor recirculation pump test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taka, Shusei; Kato, Hiroyuki

    1979-01-01

    A test loop for a reactor primary loop recirculation pumps (PLR pumps) has been constructed at Ebara's Haneda Plant in preparation for production of PLR pumps under license from Byron Jackson Pump Division of Borg-Warner Corporation. This loop can simulate operating conditions for test PLR pumps with 130 per cent of the capacity of pumps for a 1100 MWe BWR plant. A main loop, primary cooling system, water demineralizer, secondary cooling system, instrumentation and control equipment and an electric power supply system make up the test loop. This article describes the test loop itself and test results of two PLR pumps for Fukushima No. 2 N.P.S. Unit 1 and one main circulation pump for HAZ Demonstration Test Facility. (author)

  20. FASTER test reactor preconceptual design report summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandy, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Belch, H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brunett, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heidet, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hill, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoffman, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jin, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mohamed, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moisseytsev, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Passerini, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sumner, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vilim, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hayes, Steven [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-29

    The FASTER reactor plant is a sodium-cooled fast spectrum test reactor that provides high levels of fast and thermal neutron flux for scientific research and development. The 120MWe FASTER reactor plant has a superheated steam power conversion system which provides electrical power to a local grid allowing for recovery of operating costs for the reactor plant.

  1. Preliminary study or RSG-GAS reactor fuel element integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soejoedi, A.; Tarigan, A.; Sujalmo; Prayoga, S.; Suhadi

    1996-01-01

    After 8 years of operation, RSG-GAS was able to reach 15 cycles of reactor operation with 116 irradiated fuels, whereas 49 fuels were produced by NUKEM; and the other 67 were produced by PEBN-BATAN. At the 15 T h cycles, it have been used 40 standard fuels and 8 control fuels (Forty standard fuels and eight control fuels have been used in the 15 t h core cycles). Several activities have been performed in the reactor, to investigate the fuel integrity, among of them are: .fuel visual test with under water camera, which the results were recorder in the video cassette, primary water quality test during, reactor operation, fuel failure detector system examination and compared the PIE results in the Radiometallurgy Installation (RMI). The results showed that the fuel integrity, before and after irradiation, have still good performance and the fission products have not been released yet

  2. The status of graphite development for gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The meeting was convened by the IAEA on the recommendation of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. It was attended by 61 participants from 6 countries. The meeting covered the following subjects: overview of national programs; design criteria, fracture mechanisms and component test; materials development and properties; non-destructive examination, inspection and surveillance. The participants presented 33 papers on behalf of their countries. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs, tabs, photos and diagrams

  3. Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program. Interim report. Construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors is summarized along with technical descriptions of the plants. Included in the report are the AVR Experimental Pebble Bed Reactor, the Dragon Reactor, AGR Reactors, and the Thorium High Temperature Reactor (THTR). The study demonstrates that the European experience has been favorable and forms a good foundation for the development of Advanced High Temperature Reactors

  4. Fire damp gas in a heavy water reactor; Praskavi gas u teskovodnom reaktoru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, V D [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Reaktor RA, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1963-07-01

    This document describes the process of fire damp gas creation in the reactor core and dependence of the gas percentage on the temperature, i.e. reactor power. It contains a detailed plan for measuring the the percent of fire damp gas at the RA reactor: before start-up, after longer shut-down periods, immediately after safety shutdown, periodically during operation campaign.

  5. Development of monitoring system using acoustic emission for detection of helium gas leakage for primary cooling system and flow-induced vibration for heat transfer tube of heat exchangers for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Furusawa, Takayuki; Shinozaki, Masayuki; Satoh, Yoshiyuki; Yanagibashi, Minoru

    1998-10-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) uses helium gas for its primary coolant, whose leakage inside reactor containment vessel is considered in design of the HTTR. It is necessary to detect leakage of helium gas at an early stage so that total amount of the leakage should be as small as possible. On the other hand, heat transfer tubes of heat exchangers of the HTTR are designed not to vibrate at normal operation, but the flow-induced vibration is to be monitored to provide against an emergency. Thus monitoring system of acoustic emission for detection of primary coolant leakage and vibration of heat transfer tubes was developed and applied to the HTTR. Before the application to the HTTR, leakage detection test was performed using 1/4 scaled model of outer tube of primary concentric hot gas duct. Result of the test covers detectable minimum leakage rate and effect of difference in gas, pressure, shape of leakage path and distance from the leaking point. Detectable minimum leakage rate was about 5 Ncc/sec. The monitoring system is promising in leakage detection, though countermeasure to noise is to be needed after the HTTR starts operating. (author)

  6. An analysis of the falling film gas-liquid reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, E.J.; Ouwerkerk-Dijkers, van M.P.; Venkatesh, S.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical model of the falling film reactor is developed to predict the conversion and temperature distribution in the reactor as a function of the gas and liquid flow rates, physical properties, the feed composition of the reactive gas and carrier gas and other parameters of the system.

  7. Safety philosophy of gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji Katanishi; Kazuhiko Kunitomi; Shusaku Shiozawa

    2002-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has undertaken the study of an original design concept of gas turbine high temperature reactor, the GTHTR300. The general concept of this study is development of a greatly simplified design that leads to substantially reduced technical and cost requirements. Newly proposed design features enable the GTHTR300 to be an efficient and economically competitive reactor in 2010's. Also, the GTHTR300 fully takes advantage of its inherent safety characteristics. The safety philosophy of the GTHTR300 is developed based on the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) of JAERI which is the first HTGR in Japan. Major features of the newly proposed safety philosophy for the GTHTR300 are described in this article. (authors)

  8. Real time simulator for material testing reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Imaizumi, Tomomi; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Suzuki, Masahide [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishitsuka, Tatsuo; Tamura, Kazuo [ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is now developing a real time simulator for a material testing reactor based on Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The simulator treats reactor core system, primary and secondary cooling system, electricity system and irradiation facility systems. Possible simulations are normal reactor operation, unusual transient operation and accidental operation. The developed simulator also contains tool to revise/add facility in it for the future development. (author)

  9. Real time simulator for material testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Imaizumi, Tomomi; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Suzuki, Masahide; Ishitsuka, Tatsuo; Tamura, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is now developing a real time simulator for a material testing reactor based on Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The simulator treats reactor core system, primary and secondary cooling system, electricity system and irradiation facility systems. Possible simulations are normal reactor operation, unusual transient operation and accidental operation. The developed simulator also contains tool to revise/add facility in it for the future development. (author)

  10. Graphites and composites irradiations for gas cooled reactor core structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Laan, J.G.; Vreeling, J.A.; Buckthorpe, D.E.; Reed, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Material investigations are undertaken as part of the European Commission 6. Framework Programme for helium-cooled fission reactors under development like HTR, VHTR, GCFR. The work comprises a range of activities, from (pre-)qualification to screening of newly designed materials. The High Flux Reactor at Petten is the main test bed for the irradiation test programmes of the HTRM/M1, RAPHAEL and ExtreMat Integrated Projects. These projects are supported by the European Commission 5. and 6. Framework Programmes. To a large extent they form the European contribution to the Generation-IV International Forum. NRG is also performing a Materials Test Reactor project to support British Energy in preparing extended operation of their Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR). Irradiations of commercial and developmental graphite grades for HTR core structures are undertaken in the range of 650 to 950 deg C, with a view to get data on physical and mechanical properties that enable engineering design. Various C- and SiC-based composite materials are considered for support structures or specific components like control rods. Irradiation test matrices are chosen to cover commercial materials, and to provide insight on the behaviour of various fibre and matrix types, and the effects of architecture and manufacturing process. The programme is connected with modelling activities to support data trending, and improve understanding of the material behaviour and micro-structural evolution. The irradiation programme involves products from a large variety of industrial and research partners, and there is strong interaction with other high technology areas with extreme environments like space, electronics and fusion. The project on AGR core structures graphite focuses on the effects of high dose neutron irradiation and simultaneous radiolytic oxidation in a range of 350 to 450 deg C. It is aimed to provide data on graphite properties into the parameter space

  11. Gas cooled fast reactor research in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stainsby, Richard; Peers, Karen; Mitchell, Colin; Poette, Christian; Mikityuk, Konstantin; Somers, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Research on the gas-cooled fast reactor system is directed towards fulfilling the ambitious long term goals of Generation IV (Gen IV), i.e., to develop a safe, sustainable, reliable, proliferation-resistant and economic nuclear energy system. In common with other fast reactors, gas-cooled fast reactors (GFRs) have exceptional potential as sustainable energy sources, for both the utilisation of fissile material and minimisation of nuclear waste through transmutation of minor actinides. The primary goal of GFR research is to develop the system primarily to be a reliable and economic electricity generator, with good safety and sustainability characteristics. However, for the longer term, GFR retains the potential for hydrogen production and other process heat applications facilitated through a high core outlet temperature which, in this case, is not limited by the characteristics of the coolant. In this respect, GFR can inherit the non-electricity applications of the thermal HTRs in a sustainable manner in a future in which natural uranium becomes scarce. GFR research within Europe is performed directly by those states who have signed the 'System Arrangement' document within the Generation IV International Forum (the GIF), specifically France and Switzerland and Euratom. Importantly, Euratom provides a route by which researchers in other European states, and other non-European affiliates, can contribute to the work of the GIF, even when these states are not signatories to the GFR System Arrangement in their own right. This paper is written from the perspective of Euratom's involvement in research on the GFR system, starting with the 5th Framework Programme (FP5) GCFR project in 2000, through the FP6 project between 2005 and 2009 and looking ahead to the proposed activities within the current 7th Framework Programme (FP7). The evolution of the GFR concept from the 1960s onwards is discussed briefly, followed by the current perceived role, objectives and progress with

  12. Status of and prospects for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The IAEA International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (IWGGCR) (see Annex I), which was established in 1978, recommended to the Agency that a report be prepared in order to provide an up-to-date summary of gas-cooled reactor technology. The present Technical Report is based mainly on submissions of Member Countries of the IWGGCR and consists of four main sections. Beside some general information about the gas-cooled reactor line, section 1 contains a description of the incentives for the development and deployment of gas-cooled reactors in various Agency Member States. These include both electricity generation and process steam and process heat production for various branches of industry. The historical development of gas-cooled reactors is reviewed in section 2. In this section information is provided on how, when and why gas-cooled reactors have been developed in various Agency Member States and, in addition, a detailed description of the different gas-cooled reactor lines is presented. Section 3 contains information about the technical status of gas-cooled reactors and their applications. Gas-cooled reactors that are under design or construction or in operation are listed and shortly described, together with an outlook for future reactor designs. In this section the various applications for gas-cooled reactors are described in detail. These include both electricity generation and process steam and process heat production. The last section (section 4) is entitled ''Special features of gas-cooled reactors'' and contains information about the technical performance, fuel utilization, safety characteristics and environmental impact, such as radiation exposure and heat rejection

  13. Depressurization test on hot gas duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanihira, Masanori; Kunitomi; Kazuhiko; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Sato, Yutaka.

    1989-05-01

    To study the integrity of internal structures and the characteristics in a hot gas duct under the rapid depressurization accident, depressurization tests have been carried out using a test apparatus installed the hot gas duct with the same size and the same structures as that of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). The tests have been performed with three parameters: depressurization rate (0.14-3.08 MPa/s) determined by orifice diameter, area of the open space at the slide joint (11.9-2036 mm 2 ), and initial pressure (1.0-4.0 MPa) filled up in a pressure vessel, by using nitrogen gas and helium gas. The maximum pressure difference applied on the internal structures of the hot gas duct was 2.69 MPa on the liner tube and 0.45 MPa on the separating plate. After all tests were completed, the hot gas duct which was used in the tests was disassembled. Inspection revealed that there were no failure and no deformation on the internal structures such as separating plates, insulation layers, a liner tube and a pressure tube. (author)

  14. A study of silver behavior in Gas-turbine High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawa, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Toshiyuki

    1995-11-01

    A Gas-turbine High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (GT-HTGR) is one of the promising reactor systems of future HTGRs. In the design of GT-HTGR, behavior of fission products, especially of silver, is considered to be important from the view point of maintenance of gas-turbine. A study of silver behavior in the GT-HTGR was carried out based on current knowledge. The purposes of this study were to determine an importance of the silver problem quantitatively, countermeasures to the problem and items of future research and development which will be needed. In this study, inventory, fractional release from fuel, plateout in the primary circuit and radiation dose were evaluated, respectively. Based on this study, it is predicted that gamma-ray from plateout silver in gas-turbine system contributes about a half of total radiation dose after reactor shutdown. In future, more detail data for silver release from fuel, plateout behavior, etc. using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), for example, will be needed to carry out reasonable design. (author)

  15. Test reactor: basic to U.S. breeder reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, B.J.; Harness, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    Long-range energy planning in the U. S. includes development of a national commercial breeder reactor program. U. S. development of the LMFBR is following a conservative sequence of extensive technology development through use of test reactors and demonstration plants prior to construction of commercial plants. Because materials and fuel technology development is considered the first vital step in this sequence, initial U. S. efforts have been directed to the design and construction of a unique test reactor. The Fast Flux Test Facility, FFTF, is a 400 MW(t) reactor with driver fuel locations, open test locations, and closed loops for higher risk experiments. The FFTF will provide a prototypic LMFBR core environment with sufficient instrumentation for detailed core environmental characterization and a testing capability substituted for breeder capability. The unique comprehensive fuel and materials testing capability of the FFTF will be key to achieving long-range objectives of increased power density, improved breeding gain and shorter doubling times. (auth)

  16. Behaviour of gas cooled reactor fuel under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    The Specialists Meeting on Behaviour of Gas Cooled Reactor Fuel under Accident Conditions was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency on the recommendation of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an international forum for the review of the development status and for the discussion on the behaviour of gas cooled reactor fuel under accident conditions and to identify areas in which additional research and development are still needed and where international co-operation would be beneficial for all involved parties. The meeting was attended by 45 participants from France, Germany, Japan, Switzerland, the Union of Soviet Socialists Republics, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, CEC and the IAEA. The meeting was subdivided into five technical sessions: Summary of Current Research and Development Programmes for Fuel; Fuel Manufacture and Quality Control; Safety Requirements; Modelling of Fission Product Release - Part I and Part II; Irradiation Testing/Operational Experience with Fuel Elements; Behaviour at Depressurization, Core Heat-up, Power Transients; Water/Steam Ingress - Part I and Part II. 22 papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. At the end of the meeting a round table discussion was held on Directions for Future R and D Work and International Co-operation. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Ground test facility for nuclear testing of space reactor subsystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quapp, W.J.; Watts, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    Two major reactor facilities at the INEL have been identified as easily adaptable for supporting the nuclear testing of the SP-100 reactor subsystem. They are the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) and the Loss of Fluid Test Reactor (LOFT). In addition, there are machine shops, analytical laboratories, hot cells, and the supporting services (fire protection, safety, security, medical, waste management, etc.) necessary to conducting a nuclear test program. This paper presents the conceptual approach for modifying these reactor facilities for the ground engineering test facility for the SP-100 nuclear subsystem. 4 figs

  18. Removal of tritium from gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, R.

    1976-01-01

    Tritium contained in the coolant gas in the primary circuit of a gas cooled nuclear reactor together with further tritium adsorbed on the graphite used as a moderator for the reactor is removed by introducing hydrogen or a hydrogen-containing compound, for example methane or ammonia, into the coolant gas. The addition of the hydrogen or hydrogen-containing compound to the coolant gas causes the adsorbed tritium to be released into the coolant gas and the tritium is then removed from the coolant gas by passing the mixture of coolant gas and hydrogen or hydrogen-containing compound through a gas purification plant before recirculating the coolant gas through the reactor. 14 claims, 1 drawing figure

  19. Status of national gas cooled reactor programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This report has been compiled as a central source of summary-level information on the present status of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) programmes in the world and on future plans for the continued development and deployment of HTGRs. Most of the information concerns the programmes in the United States, Germany, Japan and the Soviet Union, countries that have had large programmes related to HTGR technology for several years. Summary-level information is also provided in the report on HTGR-related activities in several other countries who either have an increasing interest in the technology and/or who are performing some development efforts related to HTGR technology. The report contains a summary-level update on the MAGNOX and AGR programmes. This is the twelfth issue of the document, the first of which was issued in March, 1979. The report has been prepared in the IAEA Nuclear Power Technology Development Section. Figs and tabs

  20. Gas-liquid reactor / separator: dynamics and operability characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranade, V.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, Geert

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model is developed to simulate gas¿liquid reactor in which both, reactants as well as products enter or leave the reactor in gas phase while the reactions take place in liquid phase. A case of first-order reaction (isothermal) was investigated in detail using the dynamic

  1. High-temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Sajad

    2011-05-01

    General Atomics (GA) has over 35 years experience in prismatic block High-temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technology design. During this period, the design has recently involved into a modular have been performed to demonstrate its versatility. This versatility is directly related to refractory TRISO coated - particle fuel that can contain any type of fuel. This paper summarized GA's fuel cycle studies individually and compares each based upon its cycle sustainability, proliferation-resistance capabilities, and other performance data against pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel cycle data. Fuel cycle studies LEU-NV;commercial HEU-Th;commercial LEU-Th;weapons-grade plutonium consumption; and burning of LWR waste including plutonium and minor actinides in the MHR. results show that all commercial MHR options, with the exception of HEU-TH, are more sustainable than a PWR fuel cycle. With LEU-NV being the most sustainable commercial options. In addition, all commercial MHR options out perform the PWR with regards to its proliferation-resistance, with thorium fuel cycle having the best proliferation-resistance characteristics.

  2. Single Pellet String Reactor for Intensification of Catalyst Testing in Gas/Liquid/Solid Configuration Réacteur catalytique de type “filaire” pour l’intensification de tests catalytiques en configuration gaz/liquide/solide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hipolito A.I.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Catalyst improvement is a key route toward process improvement in terms of yield, energy efficiency and selectivity optimization. The catalyst development strategy includes catalyst testing on a model or real feedstock. This key step has been the focus of many studies during the last decades concerning reactor design, analytical tool development and operating procedures. Most studies aim to determine catalytic grain activity in isothermal conditions so as to be able to understand and predict the kinetics. With catalyst improvement, in the lab-scale reactors available, the mass transfer rate can become the limiting step compared with the reaction rate, especially for fast exothermic reactions. A new reactor geometry is proposed to intensify the mass transfer and to accelerate the fluid superficial velocities: the single pellet string reactor. To characterize this new geometry, a hydrodynamic study was carried out in a horizontal single pellet string reactor with a 4.0 × 4.0 mm2 square section, filled with spherical particles of diameter varying between 2.0 and 4.0 mm. In this hydrodynamic study, visual observations of the flow patterns were performed, as well as pressure drop measurements and residence time distribution analysis in single liquid phase flow and two-phase flows. In every configuration tested, two main regimes were identified: the “isolated bubbles” regime and the “stratified” regime. Peclet number and liquid hold-up were deduced from the residence time distribution analysis. The measured liquid hold-ups are always higher than 0.6, which indicates, in addition to the visual observations and colorimetric tests, that the catalyst is always fully wetted by the liquid film. The axial dispersion measurements showed that the single liquid phase flow cannot be interpreted by a classical axial dispersion model. However, when a gas phase is added, the flow becomes closer to plug flow, with Peclet numbers always higher than 40. It

  3. Proposal of a fast gas-cooled reactor using transuranics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Anderson Altair Pinheiro de

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades, nations that have invested in research and energy generation through nuclear source have devoted part of their efforts in developing new technologies for nuclear reactors. Part of this investment focuses on new material testing, particularly regarding new fuels. In a world view that breaths sustainability, the reprocess and reuse of spent fuel from conventional reactors comes alive in nuclear technology, presenting itself as a real alternative of energy source for the latest generation of reactors. Different concepts of fourth generation reactors have been proposed and must meet some basic requirements, such as: extended burnup, improvement of passive safety, better radioactive waste management, possibility to use reprocessed fuel and proliferation resistance. In this context, the GFR (Gas-cooled Fast Reactor) is one of the future promises, presenting satisfactory neutronic results on the use of type of fuel (U, Pu) C. In the present work, the fuel of a traditional GFR reactor that uses (U, Pu)C was sub was replaced by a transuranic reprocessed fuel (TRU), obtained by non-proliferation reprocessing technology. The UO 2 fuel initially enriched by 3.1% was burned in a standard PWR, with full burn of 33,000 MWd/T. Afterward it was left in a pool for 5 years and finally reprocessed by UREX + method. Two fuels were studied and evaluated, one diluted with depleted uranium (U, TRU)C, and the other diluted in thorium (Th, TRU)C. Assessments were done in steady state and as well as during burning and were compared with results obtained using the standard fuel, (U, Pu) C. The outcome shows that the use of TRU as a fuel, in GFR type reactors, is a real possibility. The research was done using the SCALE 6.0 code modules. (author)

  4. Axial and Radial Gas Holdup in Bubble Column Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagh, Sameer M.; Ansari, Mohashin E Alan; Kene, Pragati T.

    2014-01-01

    Bubble column reactors are considered the reactor of choice for numerous applications including oxidation, hydrogenation, waste water treatment, and Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. They are widely used in a variety of industrial applications for carrying out gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid reactions. In this paper, the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is used for predicting the gas holdup and its distribution along radial and axial direction are presented. Gas holdup increases linearly with increase in gas velocity. Gas bubbles tends to concentrate more towards the center of the column and follows a wavy path

  5. Gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration; Turbina de gas reactor modular con helio en cogeneracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon de los Santos, G. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Division de Ingenieria Electrica, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)], e-mail: tesgleon@gmail.com

    2009-10-15

    This work carries out the thermal evaluation from the conversion of nuclear energy to electric power and process heat, through to implement an outline gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration. Modeling and simulating with software Thermo flex of Thermo flow the performance parameters, based on a nuclear power plant constituted by an helium cooled reactor and helium gas turbine with three compression stages, two of inter cooling and one regeneration stage; more four heat recovery process, generating two pressure levels of overheat vapor, a pressure level of saturated vapor and one of hot water, with energetic characteristics to be able to give supply to a very wide gamma of industrial processes. Obtaining a relationship heat electricity of 0.52 and efficiency of net cogeneration of 54.28%, 70.2 MW net electric, 36.6 MW net thermal with 35% of condensed return to 30 C; for a supplied power by reactor of 196.7 MW; and with conditions in advanced gas turbine of 850 C and 7.06 Mpa, assembly in a shaft, inter cooling and heat recovery in cogeneration. (Author)

  6. Metaphysics methods development for high temperature gas cooled reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seker, V.; Downar, T. J.

    2007-01-01

    Gas cooled reactors have been characterized as one of the most promising nuclear reactor concepts in the Generation-IV technology road map. Considerable research has been performed on the design and safety analysis of these reactors. However, the calculational tools being used to perform these analyses are not state-of-the-art and are not capable of performing detailed three-dimensional analyses. This paper presents the results of an effort to develop an improved thermal-hydraulic solver for the pebble bed type high temperature gas cooled reactors. The solution method is based on the porous medium approach and the momentum equation including the modified Ergun's resistance model for pebble bed is solved in three-dimensional geometry. The heat transfer in the pebble bed is modeled considering the local thermal non-equilibrium between the solid and gas, which results in two separate energy equations for each medium. The effective thermal conductivity of the pebble-bed can be calculated both from Zehner-Schluender and Robold correlations. Both the fluid flow and the heat transfer are modeled in three dimensional cylindrical coordinates and can be solved in steady-state and time dependent. The spatial discretization is performed using the finite volume method and the theta-method is used in the temporal discretization. A preliminary verification was performed by comparing the results with the experiments conducted at the SANA test facility. This facility is located at the Institute for Safety Research and Reactor Technology (ISR), Julich, Germany. Various experimental cases are modeled and good agreement in the gas and solid temperatures is observed. An on-going effort is to model the control rod ejection scenarios as described in the OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR-400 benchmark problem. In order to perform these analyses PARCS reactor simulator code will be coupled with the new thermal-hydraulic solver. Furthermore, some of the other anticipated accident scenarios in the benchmark

  7. A gas-cooled reactor surface power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, R.J.; Wright, S.A.; Lenard, R.X.; Harms, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  8. A gas-cooled reactor surface power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wright, Steven A.; Lenard, Roger X.; Harms, Gary A.

    1999-01-01

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars

  9. A Gas-Cooled Reactor Surface Power System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, G.A.; Lenard, R.X.; Lipinski, R.J.; Wright, S.A.

    1998-11-09

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life- cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitide clad in Nb 1 %Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-I 00 program The fiel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fbel and stabilizing the geometty against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality cannot occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars.

  10. Methods and devices prepared to eliminate activation and fission products from PEC reactor cover gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caponetti, R.; Gherardi, G.; Petrazzuolo, F.

    1987-01-01

    The major effort made in Italy for the development of fast nuclear reactor is concentrated in the PEC reactor, whose construction is now in the completion stage. The PEC reactor (Prova Elementi di Combustibile - Fuel Element Testing ) is a sodium-cooled reactor with a power rating of 120 MWt, being built for the purpose of studying the behavior of fuel elements under thermal and neutronic conditions similar to those of fast reactor power stations, whit particular attention to safety aspects. The PEC reactor represents a research instrument particularly suitable for studies and experiments in the following fields: performances of the fuel element and its economical optimization (also with the possibility of testing fuel elements not necessarily based on mixed oxides); experiments in the safety field, not only referred to fuel elements, but also to plant subsystems. The experimental program will cover the research of the limit conditions of the typical parameters, such as cladding temperature, linear power, radiation rate, etc. PEC will also allow researches on new-concept fuel elements and thermal, hydraulic and power transients and cycles foreseen in the commercial power plants under normal, upset and emergency conditions. A number of the solutions regarding the PEC reactor and preparatory approaches to its operation are reported in this paper. In particular the following items are discussed: a description of three cover-gas circuits present in the reactor; an estimate of the contamination conditions foreseen under operating conditions; a description of the equipment for the purification of the cover gas and relative operating conditions. There are three cover-gas circuits present in the PEC reactor. They concern the following sodium circuits: primary reactor, primary emergency reactor and sodium purification primary reactor; secondary reactor, test channel and emergency reactor; primary test channel

  11. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project

  12. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project.

  13. Gas reactor and associated nuclear experience in the UK relevant to high temperature reactor engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beech, D.J.; May, R.

    2000-01-01

    In the UK, the NNC played a leading role in the design and build of all of the UK's commercial magnox reactors and advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGRs). It was also involved in the DRAGON project and was responsible for producing designs for large scale HTRs and other gas reactor designs employing helium and carbon dioxide coolants. This paper addresses the gas reactor experience and its relevance to the current HTR designs under development which use helium as the coolant, through the consideration of a representative sample of the issues addressed in the UK by the NNC in support of the AGR and other reactor programmes. Modern HTR designs provide unique engineering challenges. The success of the AGR design, reflected in the extended lifetimes agreed upon by the licensing authorities at many stations, indicates that these challenges can be successfully overcome. The UK experience is unique and provides substantial support to future gas reactor and high temperature engineering studies. (authors)

  14. Application of Hastelloy X in gas-cooled reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkman, C.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Corwin, W.R.; Strizak, J.P.; Lystrup, A.; DiStefano, J.R.

    1976-10-01

    Hastelloy X, an Ni--Cr--Fe--Mo alloy, may be an important structural alloy for components of gas-cooled reactor systems. Expected applications of this alloy in the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) are discussed, and the development of interim mechanical properties and supporting data are reported. Properties of concern include tensile, creep, creep-rupture, fatigue, creep-fatigue interaction, subcritical crack growth, thermal stability, and the influence of helium environments with controlled amounts of impurities on these properties. In order to develop these properties in helium environments that are expected to be prototypic of HTGR operating conditions, it was necessary to construct special environmental test systems. Details of construction and operating parameters are described. Interim results from tests designed to determine the above properties are presented. To date a fairly extensive amount of information has been generated on this material at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and elsewhere concerning behavior in air, which is reviewed. However, only limited data are available from tests conducted in helium. Comparisons of the fatigue and subcritical growth behavior in air between Hastelloy X and a number of other structural alloys are given

  15. Scyllac fusion test reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudziak, D.J.; Gerstl, S.A.; Houck, D.L.; Jalbert, R.A.; Krakowski, R.A.; Linford, R.K.; McDonald, T.E.; Rogers, J.D.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1975-01-01

    A general design of the system is given. The implosion heating and compression systems (METS) are described. Tritium handling, shielding and activation of the reactor, and safety and environmental aspects are discussed

  16. The development of advanced gas cooled reactor iodine adsorber systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meddings, P.

    1986-01-01

    Advanced Gas Cooled Reactors (AGRs) are provided with plants to process the carbon dioxide coolant prior to its discharge to atmosphere. Included in these are beds of granular activated charcoal, contained within a suitable pressure vessel, through which the high pressure carbon dioxide is passed for the purpose of retaining iodine and iodine-containing compounds. Carry-over carbon dust from the adsorption beds was identified during active in-situ commissioning testing, radio-iodine being transported with the particulate material due to gross disturbance of the adsorber carbon bed and displacement of the vessel internals. The methods used to identify the causes of the problems and find solutions are described. A development programme for the Heysham-2 and Torness reactors iodine adsorber units was set up to identify a method of de-dusting granular charcoal and develop it for full-scale use, of assess the effect under conditions of high gas density of approach velocity on charcoal fines production and to establish the pressure drop characteristics of a packed granular bed and to develop an effective design of inlet gas diffuser manifold to ensure an acceptable velocity distribution. This has involved the construction of a small scale high pressure carbon dioxide rig and development of an air flow model. This work is described. (UK)

  17. Rise-to-power test in High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor. Test progress and summary of test results up to 30 MW of reactor thermal power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Shimakawa, Satoshi

    2002-08-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is a graphite moderated and gas cooled reactor with the thermal power of 30 MW and the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 850degC/950degC. Rise-to-power test in the HTTR was performed from April 23rd to June 6th in 2000 as phase 1 test up to 10 MW in the rated operation mode, from January 29th to March 1st in 2001 as phase 2 test up to 20 MW in the rated operation mode and from April 14th to June 8th in 2001 as phase 3 test up to 20 MW in the high temperature test the mechanism of the reactor outlet coolant temperature becomes 850degC at 30 MW in the rated operation mode and 950degC in the high temperature test operation mode. Phase 4 rise-to-power test to achieve the thermal reactor power of 30 MW started on October 23rd in 2001. On December 7th in 2001 it was confirmed that the thermal reactor power and the reactor outlet coolant temperature reached to 30 MW and 850degC respectively in the single loaded operation mode in which only the primary pressurized water cooler is operating. Phase 4 test was performed until March 6th in 2002. JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) obtained the certificate of the pre-operation test from MEXT (Ministry of Education Culture Sports Science and Technology) after all the pre-operation tests by MEXT were passed successfully with the reactor transient test at an abnormal event as a final pre-operation test. From the test results of the rise-up-power test up to 30 MW in the rated operation mode, performance of the reactor and cooling system were confirmed, and it was also confirmed that an operation of reactor facility can be performed safely. Some problems to be solved were found through the tests. By solving them, the reactor operation with the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950degC will be achievable. (author)

  18. Study on gas-liquid loop reactors with annular bubbling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei, L.M.; Wang, S.X.; Wu, X.Q.; Lu, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Bubbling column with draft tube is one of nearly developed reactor. On the background of hydrocarbon oxidations and biochemical engineerings, it has been widely used in chemical industry due to the well characteristics of mass and heat transfer. In this paper, the characteristics of fluid flow, such as gas hold-up, backmixing and mass transfer referred to the liquid volume were measured in a gas-liquid loop reactor with annular bubbling. Different materials - water, alcohol and oi l- were used in the study in measuring the gas hold-up in the annular of the reactor

  19. The SPHINX reactor for engineering tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Artamkin, K.N.; Bovin, A.P.; Bulkin, Y.M.; Kartashev, E.F.; Korneev, A.A.; Stenbok, I.A.; Terekhov, A.S.; Khmel'Shehikov, V.V.; Cherkashov, Y.M.

    1990-01-01

    A research reactor known as SPHINX is under development in the USSR. The reactor will be used mainly to carry out tests on mock-up power reactor fuel assemblies under close-to-normal parameters in experimental loop channels installed in the core and reflector of the reactor, as well as to test samples of structural materials in ampoule and loop channels. The SPHINX reactor is a channel-type reactor with light-water coolant and moderator. Maximum achievable neutron flux density in the experimental channels (cell composition 50% Fe, 50% H 2 O) is 1.1 X 10 15 neutrons/cm 2 · s for fast neutrons (E > 0.1 MeV) and 1.7 X 10 15 for thermal neutrons at a reactor power of 200 MW. The design concepts used represent a further development of the technical features which have met with approval in the MR and MIR channel-type engineering test reactors currently in use in the USSR. The 'in-pond channel' construction makes the facility flexible and eases the carrying out of experimental work while keeping discharges of radioactivity into the environment to a low level. The reactor and all associated buildings and constructions conform to modern radiation safety and environmental protection requirements

  20. High temperature friction and seizure in gas cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousseran, P.; Febvre, A.; Martin, R.; Roche, R.

    1978-01-01

    One of the most delicate problems encountered in the gas cooled nuclear reactors is the friction without lubrication in a dry and hot (800 0 C /1472 0 F) helium atmosphere even at very small velocity. The research and development programs are described together with special tribometers that operate at mode than 1000 0 C (1832 0 F) in dry helium. The most interesting test conditions and results are given for gas nitrited steels and for strongly alloyed Ni-Cr steels coated with chromium carbide by plasma sprayed. The effects of parameters live velocity, travelled distance, contact pressure, roughness, temperature and prolonged stops under charge are described together with the effects of negative phenomena like attachment and chattering [fr

  1. In-place testing of off-gas iodine filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duce, S.W.; Tkachyk, J.W.; Motes, B.G.

    1980-01-01

    At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, both charcoal and silver zeolite (AgX) filters are used for radioactive iodine off-gas cleanup of reactor systems. These filters are used in facilities which are conducting research in the areas of reactor fuel failure, reactor fuel inspection, and loss of fluids from reactor vessels. Iodine retention efficiency testing of these filters is dictated by prudent safety practices and regulatory guidelines. A procedure for determining iodine off-gas filter efficiency in-place has been developed and tested on both AgX and charcoal filters. The procedure involves establishing sample points upstream and downstream of the filter to be tested. A step-by-step approach for filter efficiency testing is presented

  2. Study of new structures adapted to gas-graphite and gas-heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.; Roche, R.

    1964-01-01

    The experience acquired as a result of the operation of the Marcoule reactors and of the construction and start-up of the E.D.F. reactors on the one hand, and the conclusions of research and tests carried out out-of-pile on the other hand, lead to a considerable change in the general design of reactors of the gas-graphite type. The main modifications envisaged are analysed in the paper. The adoption of an annular fuel element and of a down-current cooling will make it possible to increase considerably the specific power and the power output of each channel; as a result there will be a considerable reduction in the number of the channels and a corresponding increase in the size of the unit cell. The graphite stack will have to be adapted to there new conditions. For security reasons, the use of prestressed concrete for the construction of the reactor vessel is becoming more widespread; they could lead to the exchangers and the fuel-handling apparatus becoming integrated inside the vessel (the so-called 'attic' device). A full-size mode) of this attic has been built at Saclay with the participation of EURATOM; the operational results obtained are presented as well as a new original design for the control rods. As for as the gas-heavy-water system is concerned, the research is carried out on two points of design; the first, which retains the use of horizontal pressure tubes, takes into account the experience acquired during the construction of the EL 4 reactor of which it will constitute an extrapolation; the second, arising from the research carried out on the gas-graphite system, will use a pre-stressed concrete vessel for holding the pressure, the moderator being almost at the same pressure as the cooling fluid and the fuel being placed in vertical channels. The relative merits of these two variants are analysed in the present paper. (authors) [fr

  3. Decay heat removal and heat transfer under normal and accident conditions in gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The meeting was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency on the recommendation of the IAEA's International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. It was attended by participants from China, France, Germany, Japan, Poland, the Russian Federation, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. The meeting was chaired by Prof. Dr. K. Kugeler and Prof. Dr. E. Hicken, Directors of the Institute for Safety Research Technology of the KFA Research Center, and covered the following: Design and licensing requirements for gas cooled reactors; concepts for decay heat removal in modern gas cooled reactors; analytical methods for predictions of thermal response, accuracy of predictions; experimental data for validation of predictive methods - operational experience from gas cooled reactors and experimental data from test facilities. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. New facilities in Japan materials testing reactor for irradiation test of fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Sagawa, H.; Ishitsuka, E.; Sakamoto, N.; Niiho, T.

    1996-01-01

    The testing and evaluation of fusion reactor components, i.e. blanket, plasma facing components (divertor, etc.) and vacuum vessel with neutron irradiation is required for the design of fusion reactor components. Therefore, four new test facilities were developed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor: an in-pile functional testing facility, a neutron multiplication test facility, an electron beam facility, and a re-weldability facility. The paper describes these facilities

  5. Investigation of the loss of forced cooling test by using the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi; Inaba, Yoshitomo; Goto, Minoru; Tochio, Daisuke

    2007-09-01

    The three gas circulators trip test and the vessel cooling system stop test as the safety demonstration test by using the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) are under planning to demonstrate inherent safety features of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor. All three gas circulators to circulate the helium gas as the coolant are stopped to simulate the loss of forced cooling in the three gas circulators trip test. The stop of the vessel cooling system located outside the reactor pressure vessel to remove the residual heat of the reactor core follows the stop of all three gas circulators in the vessel cooling system stop test. The analysis of the reactor transient for such tests and abnormal events postulated during the test was performed. From the result of analysis, it was confirmed that the three gas circulators trip test and the vessel cooling system stop test can be performed within the region of the normal operation in the HTTR and the safety of the reactor facility is ensured even if the abnormal events would occur. (author)

  6. Material test reactor fuel research at the BR2 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Steven Van; Koonen, Edgar; Berghe, Sven van den [Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, SCK-CEN, Boeretang, Mol (Belgium)

    2012-03-15

    The construction of new, high performance material test reactor or the conversion of such reactors' core from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel requires several fuel qualification steps. For the conversion of high performance reactors, high density dispersion or monolithic fuel types are being developed. The Uranium-Molybdenum fuel system has been selected as reference system for the qualification of LEU fuels. For reactors with lower performance characteristics, or as medium enriched fuel for high performance reactors, uranium silicide dispersion fuel is applied. However, on the longer term, the U-Mo based fuel types may offer a more efficient fuel alternative and-or an easier back-end solution with respect to the silicide based fuels. At the BR2 reactor of the Belgian nuclear research center, SCK-CEN in Mol, several types of fuel testing opportunities are present to contribute to such qualification process. A generic validation test for a selected fuel system is the irradiation of flat plates with representative dimensions for a fuel element. By flexible positioning and core loading, bounding irradiation conditions for fuel elements can be performed in a standard device in the BR2. For fuel element designs with curved plates, the element fabrication method compatibility of the fuel type can be addressed by incorporating a set of prototype fuel plates in a mixed driver fuel element of the BR2 reactor. These generic types of tests are performed directly in the primary coolant flow conditions of the BR2 reactor. The experiment control and interpretation is supported by detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic modeling of the experiments. Finally, the BR2 reactor offers the flexibility for irradiation of full size prototype fuel elements, as 200mm diameter irradiation channels are available. These channels allow the accommodation of various types of prototype fuel elements, eventually using a dedicated cooling loop to provide the

  7. Reliability test for reactor internals rejuvenation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Junichi

    1998-01-01

    41 transparencies were presented on the subject of 'Reliability test for reactor internals rejuvenation technology'. The items presented give an introduction on the management of plant life in Japan and introduce the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC). The question of what reliability tests for rejuvenation of reactor internals are is discussed in some detail and an outline of each test is given. Altogether six methods to rejuvenate reactor internals are presented, two of which have already been applied to actual plants. The presentation was supported by many detailed drawings and images

  8. Fuel arrangement for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a fuel arrangement for a high temperature gas cooled reactor including fuel assemblies with separate directly cooled fissile and fertile fuel elements removably inserted in an elongated moderator block also having a passageway for control elements

  9. Reticulated Vitreous Carbon Electrodes for Gas Phase Pulsed Corona Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Locke, B

    1998-01-01

    A new design for gas phase pulsed corona reactors incorporating reticulated vitreous carbon electrodes is demonstrated to be effective for the removal of nitrogen oxides from synthetic air mixtures...

  10. Reticulated Vitreous Carbon Electrodes for Gas Phase Pulsed Corona Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LOCKE, B

    1999-01-01

    A new design for gas phase pulsed corona reactors incorporating reticulated vitreous carbon electrodes is demonstrated to be effective for the removal of nitrogen oxides from synthetic air mixtures...

  11. Main gas circulator for VG-400 reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitenkov, F.M.; Kostin, V.I.; Novinskij, E.G.; Kuropatov, A.I.; Protsenko, A.N.; Smirnov, V.P.; Stolyarevskij, A.Ya.

    1988-01-01

    Principle parameters and operating conditions of the main gas circulator (MGC) in VG-400 reactor plant are presented. Brief MGC design description and experimental work scope are given. (author). 4 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  12. Gas Test Loop Facilities Alternatives Assessment Report Rev 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    William J. Skerjanc; William F. Skerjanc

    2005-01-01

    An important task in the Gas Test Loop (GTL) conceptual design was to determine the best facility to serve as host for this apparatus, which will allow fast-flux neutron testing in an existing nuclear facility. A survey was undertaken of domestic and foreign nuclear reactors and accelerator facilities to arrive at that determination. Two major research reactors in the U.S. were considered in detail, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), each with sufficient power to attain the required neutron fluxes. HFIR routinely operates near its design power limit of 100 MW. ATR has traditionally operated at less than half its design power limit of 250 MW. Both of these reactors should be available for at least the next 30 years. The other major U.S. research reactor, the Missouri University Research Reactor, does not have sufficient power to reach the required neutron flux nor do the smaller research reactors. Of the foreign reactors investigated, BOR-60 is perhaps the most attractive. Monju and BN 600 are power reactors for their respective electrical grids. Although the Joyo reactor is vigorously campaigning for customers, local laws regarding transport of radioactive material mean it would be very difficult to retrieve test articles from either Japanese reactor for post irradiation examination. PHENIX is scheduled to close in 2008 and is fully booked until then. FBTR is limited to domestic (Indian) users only. Data quality is often suspect in Russia. The only accelerator seriously considered was the Fuel and Material Test Station (FMTS) currently proposed for operation at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron spectrum in FMTS is similar to that found in a fast reactor, but it has a pronounced high-energy tail that is atypical of fast fission reactor spectra. First irradiation in the FMTS is being contemplated for 2008. Detailed review of these facilities resulted in the recommendation that the ATR would be the best host for the GTL

  13. Gas cooled fast reactor research and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markoczy, G.; Hudina, M.; Richmond, R.; Wydler, P.; Stratton, R.W.; Burgsmueller, P.

    1980-03-01

    The research and development work in the field of core thermal-hydraulics, steam generator research and development, experimental and analytical physics and carbide fuel development carried out 1979 for the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research is described. (Auth.)

  14. Licensing experience of the HTR-10 test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Y.; Xu, Y.

    1996-01-01

    A 10MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor (HTR-10) is now being projected by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology within China's National High Technology Programme. The Construction Permit of HTR-10 was issued by the Chinese nuclear licensing authority around the end of 1994 after a period of about one year of safety review of the reactor design. HTR-10 is the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to be constructed in China. The purpose of this test reactor project is to test and demonstrate the technology and safety features of the advanced modular high temperature reactor design. The reactor uses spherical fuel elements with coated fuel particles. The reactor unit and the steam generator unit are arranged in a ''side-by-side'' way. Maximum fuel temperature under the accident condition of a complete loss of coolant is limited to values much lower than the safety limit set for the fuel element. Since the philosophy of the technical and safety design of HTR-10 comes from the high temperature modular reactor design, the reactor is also called the Test Module. HTR-10 represents among others also a licensing challenge. On the one side, it is the first helium reactor in China, and there are less licensing experiences both for the regulator and for the designer. On the other side, the reactor design incorporates many advanced design features in the direction of passive or inherent safety, and it is presently a world-wide issue how to treat properly the passive or inherent safety design features in the licensing safety review. In this presentation, the licensing criteria of HTR-10 are discussed. The organization and activities of the safety review for the construction permit licensing are described. Some of the main safety issues in the licensing procedure are addressed. Among these are, for example, fuel element behaviour, source term, safety classification of systems and components, containment design. The licensing experiences of HTR-10 are of

  15. H2 gas pressure calculation of FPM capsule failure at RSG-GAS reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastuti, Endiah Puji; Sunaryo, Geni Rina

    2002-01-01

    RSG-GAS has been irradiated FPM capsule for 236 times, one of those i.e. capsule number 228 has failure. The one of root cause of failure possibility is radiolysis reaction can be occurred in FPM capsule when it is filled with water during irradiation in the reactor core. The safety analysis of the radiolysis reaction in the capsule has been done. The oc cumulative hydrogen gas production can cause high pressure in the capsule then a mechanical damage occurred. The analysis was done at 10 MW of reactor power which equivalent with neutron flux of 0,6929 x 10 1 4 n/cm 2 sec and γ dose rate of 0,63x10 9 rad/hour. The assumption is the capsule is filled with water at maximum volume, i.e. 176.67 ml. The results of calculation showed that radiolysis reaction with γ and neutron produce hydrogen gas for nominal flow rate each are 494 atm and 19683 atm for γ and neutron radiolysis, respectively. H 2 gas pressure for 5% flow rate each are 723 atm. and 25772 atm., for γ and neutron radiolysis, respectively. The changing of the operation condition due to radiolysis together with one way valve' phenomena, can be produce hydrogen gas from water during irradiation in the reactor core and can be the one of root cause of capsule failure. This analysis recommended the FPM capsule preparation must be guaranteed no water or/and there is no possibility of water immersion in the capsule during irradiation in the core by more accurate leak test

  16. NOVEL REACTOR FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SYNTHESIS GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilis Papavassiliou; Leo Bonnell; Dion Vlachos

    2004-12-01

    Praxair investigated an advanced technology for producing synthesis gas from natural gas and oxygen This production process combined the use of a short-reaction time catalyst with Praxair's gas mixing technology to provide a novel reactor system. The program achieved all of the milestones contained in the development plan for Phase I. We were able to develop a reactor configuration that was able to operate at high pressures (up to 19atm). This new reactor technology was used as the basis for a new process for the conversion of natural gas to liquid products (Gas to Liquids or GTL). Economic analysis indicated that the new process could provide a 8-10% cost advantage over conventional technology. The economic prediction although favorable was not encouraging enough for a high risk program like this. Praxair decided to terminate development.

  17. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, Frances M.; Benson, Jeff; Thelen, Mary Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  18. Advanced Test Reactor probabilistic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, S.A.; Eide, S.A.; Khericha, S.T.; Thatcher, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses Level 1 probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) incorporating a full-scope external events analysis which has been completed for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

  19. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  20. Current and prospective fuel test programmes in the MIR reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izhutov, A.L.; Burukin, A.V.; Iljenko, S.A.; Ovchinnikov, V.A.; Shulimov, V.N.; Smirnov, V.P. [State Scientific Centre of Russia Research Institute of Atomic Reactors, Ulyanovsk region (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    MIR reactor is a heterogeneous thermal reactor with a moderator and a reflector made of metal beryllium, it has a channel-type design and is placed in a water pool. MIR reactor is mainly designed for testing fragments of fuel elements and fuel assemblies (FA) of different nuclear power reactor types under normal (stationary and transient) operating conditions as well as emergency situations. At present six test loop facilities are being operated (2 PWR loops, 2 BWR loops and 2 steam coolant loops). The majority of current fuel tests is conducted for improving and upgrading the Russian PWR fuel, these tests involve issues such as: -) long term tests of short-size rods with different modifications of cladding materials and fuel pellets; -) further irradiation of power plant re-fabricated and full-size fuel rods up to achieving 80 MW*d/kg U; -) experiments with leaking fuel rods at different burnups and under transient conditions; -) continuation of the RAMP type experiments at high burnup of fuel; and -) in-pile tests with simulation of LOCA and RIA type accidents. Testing of the LEU (low enrichment uranium) research reactor fuel is conducted within the framework of the RERTR programme. Upgrading of the gas cooled and steam cooled loop facilities is scheduled for testing the HTGR fuel and sub-critical water-cooled reactor, correspondingly. The present paper describes the major programs of the WWER high burn-up fuel behavior study in the MIR reactor, capabilities of the applied techniques and some results of the performed irradiation tests. (authors)

  1. PARs for combustible gas control in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosler, J.; Sliter, G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the progress being made in the United States to introduce passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR) technology as a cost-effective alternative to electric recombiners for controlling combustible gas produced in postulated accidents in both future Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) and certain U. S. operating nuclear plants. PARs catalytically recombine hydrogen and oxygen, gradually producing heat and water vapor. They have no moving parts and are self-starting and self-feeding, even under relatively cold and wet containment conditions. Buoyancy of the hot gases they create sets up natural convective flow that promotes mixing of combustible gases in a containment. In a non-inerted ALWR containment, two approaches each employing a combination of PARs and igniters are being considered to control hydrogen in design basis and severe accidents. In pre-inerted ALWRs, PARs alone control radiolytic oxygen produced in either accident type. The paper also discusses regulatory feedback regarding these combustible gas control approaches and describes a test program being conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Electricite de France (EdF) to supplement the existing PAR test database with performance data under conditions of interest to U.S. plants. Preliminary findings from the EPRI/EdF PAR model test program are included. Successful completion of this test program and confirmatory tests being sponsored by the U. S. NRC are expected to pave the way for use of PARs in ALWRs and operating plants. (author)

  2. The temperature distribution in a gas core fission reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.; Dam, H. van; Kuijper, J.C. (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)); Kistemaker, J.; Boersma-Klein, W.; Vitalis, F. (FOM-Instituut voor Atoom-en Molecuulfysica, Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1991-01-01

    A model is proposed for the heat transport in a nuclear reactor with gaseous fuel at high temperatures taking into account radiative and kinetic heat transfer. A derivation is given of the equation determining the temperature distribution in a gas core reactor and different numerical solution methods are discussed in detail. Results are presented of the temperature distribution. The influence of the kinetic heat transport and of dissociation of the gas molecules is shown. Also discussed is the importance of the temperature gradient at the reactor wall and its dependence on system parameters. (author).

  3. The temperature distribution in a gas core fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.; Dam, H. van; Kuijper, J.C.; Kistemaker, J.; Boersma-Klein, W.; Vitalis, F.

    1991-01-01

    A model is proposed for the heat transport in a nuclear reactor with gaseous fuel at high temperatures taking into account radiative and kinetic heat transfer. A derivation is given of the equation determining the temperature distribution in a gas core reactor and different numerical solution methods are discussed in detail. Results are presented of the temperature distribution. The influence of the kinetic heat transport and of dissociation of the gas molecules is shown. Also discussed is the importance of the temperature gradient at the reactor wall and its dependence on system parameters. (author)

  4. Thermal radiation in gas core nuclear reactors for space propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutz, S.A.; Gauntt, R.O.; Harms, G.A.; Latham, T.; Roman, W.; Rodgers, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    A diffusive model of the radial transport of thermal radiation out of a cylindrical core of fissioning plasma is presented. The diffusion approximation is appropriate because the opacity of uranium is very high at the temperatures of interest (greater than 3000 K). We make one additional simplification of assuming constant opacity throughout the fuel. This allows the complete set of solutions to be expressed as a single function. This function is approximated analytically to facilitate parametric studies of the performance of a test module of the nuclear light bulb gas-core nuclear-rocket-engine concept, in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories. Our findings indicate that radiation temperatures in range of 4000-6000 K are attainable, which is sufficient to test the high specific impulse potential (approximately 2000 s) of this concept. 15 refs

  5. Gas-cooled reactors: the importance of their development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1979-06-01

    The nearest term GCR is the steam-cycle HTGR, which can be used for both power and process steam production. Use of SC-HTGRs permits timely introduction of thorium fuel cycles and of high-thermal-efficiency reactors, decreasing the need for mined U 3 O 8 before arrival of symbiotic fueling of fast-thermal reactor systems. The gas-turbine HTGR offers prospects of lower capital costs than other nuclear reactors, but it appears to require longer and more costly development than the SC-HTGR. Accelerated development of the GT-HTGR is needed to gain the advantages of timely introduction. The Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) offers the possibility of fast breeder reactors with lower capital costs and with higher breeding ratios from oxide fuels. The VHTR provides high-temperature heat for hydrogen production

  6. Processing test of an upgraded mechanical design for PERMCAT reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgognoni, Fabio; Demange, David; Doerr, Lothar; Tosti, Silvano; Welte, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The PERMCAT membrane reactor is a coaxial combination of a Pd/Ag permeator membrane and a catalyst bed. This device has been proposed for processing fusion reactor plasma exhaust gas. A stream containing tritium (up to 1% of tritium in different chemical forms such as water, methane or molecular hydrogen) is decontaminated in the PERMCAT by counter-current isotopic swamping with protium. Different mechanical designs of the membrane reactor have been proposed to improve robustness and lifetime. The ENEA membrane reactor uses a permeator tube with a length of about 500 mm produced via cold-rolling and diffusion welding of Pd/Ag thin foils: two stainless steel pre-tensioned bellows have been applied to the Pd/Ag tube in order to avoid any significant compressive and bending stresses due to the permeator tube elongation consequent to the hydrogen uptake. An experimental test campaign has been performed using this reactor in order to assess the influence of different operating parameters and to evaluate the overall performance (decontamination factor). Tests have been carried out on two reactor prototypes: a defect-free membrane with complete (infinite) hydrogen selectivity and not perm-selective membrane. In this last case, the study has been aimed at verifying the behaviour of the PERMCAT devices under non-normal (accidental) conditions in the view of providing information for future safety analysis. The paper will present the specific mechanical design and the experimental results of tests based on isotopic exchange between H 2 O and D 2 .

  7. IAEA high temperature gas-cooled reactor activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The IAEA activities on high temperature gas-cooled reactors are conducted with the review and support of the Member states, primarily through the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (IWG-GCR). This paper summarises the results of the IAEA gas-cooled reactor project activities in recent years along with ongoing current activities through a review of Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), meetings and other international efforts. A series of three recently completed CRPs have addressed the key areas of reactor physics for LEU fuel, retention of fission products and removal of post shutdown decay heat through passive heat transport mechanisms. These activities along with other completed and ongoing supporting CRPs and meetings are summarised with reference to detailed documentation of the results. (authors)

  8. Natural gas turbine topping for the iris reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oriani, L.; Lombardi, C.; Paramonov, D.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power plant designs are typically characterized by high capital and low fuel costs, while the opposite is true for fossil power generation including the natural gas-fired gas turbine combined cycle currently favored by many utilities worldwide. This paper examines potential advantages of combining nuclear and fossil (natural gas) generation options in a single plant. Technical and economic feasibility and attractiveness of a gas turbine - nuclear reactor combined cycle where gas turbine exhaust is used to superheat saturated steam produced by a low power light water reactor are examined. It is shown that in a certain range of fuel and capital costs of nuclear and fossil options, the proposed cycle offers an immediate economic advantage over stand-alone plants resulting from higher efficiency of the nuclear plant. Additionally, the gas turbine topping will result in higher fuel flexibility without the economic penalty typically associated with nuclear power. (author)

  9. Natural gas turbine topping for the iris reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oriani, L.; Lombardi, C. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Paramonov, D. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Nuclear power plant designs are typically characterized by high capital and low fuel costs, while the opposite is true for fossil power generation including the natural gas-fired gas turbine combined cycle currently favored by many utilities worldwide. This paper examines potential advantages of combining nuclear and fossil (natural gas) generation options in a single plant. Technical and economic feasibility and attractiveness of a gas turbine - nuclear reactor combined cycle where gas turbine exhaust is used to superheat saturated steam produced by a low power light water reactor are examined. It is shown that in a certain range of fuel and capital costs of nuclear and fossil options, the proposed cycle offers an immediate economic advantage over stand-alone plants resulting from higher efficiency of the nuclear plant. Additionally, the gas turbine topping will result in higher fuel flexibility without the economic penalty typically associated with nuclear power. (author)

  10. The analysis for inventory of experimental reactor high temperature gas reactor type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Kuntjoro; Pande Made Udiyani

    2016-01-01

    Relating to the plan of the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) to operate an experimental reactor of High Temperature Gas Reactors type (RGTT), it is necessary to reactor safety analysis, especially with regard to environmental issues. Analysis of the distribution of radionuclides from the reactor into the environment in normal or abnormal operating conditions starting with the estimated reactor inventory based on the type, power, and operation of the reactor. The purpose of research is to analyze inventory terrace for Experimental Power Reactor design (RDE) high temperature gas reactor type power 10 MWt, 20 MWt and 30 MWt. Analyses were performed using ORIGEN2 computer code with high temperatures cross-section library. Calculation begins with making modifications to some parameter of cross-section library based on the core average temperature of 570 °C and continued with calculations of reactor inventory due to RDE 10 MWt reactor power. The main parameters of the reactor 10 MWt RDE used in the calculation of the main parameters of the reactor similar to the HTR-10 reactor. After the reactor inventory 10 MWt RDE obtained, a comparison with the results of previous researchers. Based upon the suitability of the results, it make the design for the reactor RDE 20MWEt and 30 MWt to obtain the main parameters of the reactor in the form of the amount of fuel in the pebble bed reactor core, height and diameter of the terrace. Based on the main parameter or reactor obtained perform of calculation to get reactor inventory for RDE 20 MWT and 30 MWT with the same methods as the method of the RDE 10 MWt calculation. The results obtained are the largest inventory of reactor RDE 10 MWt, 20 MWt and 30 MWt sequentially are to Kr group are about 1,00E+15 Bq, 1,20E+16 Bq, 1,70E+16 Bq, for group I are 6,50E+16 Bq, 1,20E+17 Bq, 1,60E+17 Bq and for groups Cs are 2,20E+16 Bq, 2,40E+16 Bq, 2,60E+16 Bq. Reactor inventory will then be used to calculate the reactor source term and it

  11. The advanced test reactor strategic evaluation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    Since the Chernobly accident, the safety of test reactors and irradiation facilities has been critically evaluated from the public's point of view. A systematic evaluation of all safety, environmental, and operational issues must be made in an integrated manner to prioritize actions to maximize benefits while minimizing costs. Such a proactive program has been initiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This program, called the Strategic Evaluation Program (STEP), is being conducted for the ATR to provide integrated safety and operational reviews of the reactor against the standards applied to licensed commercial power reactors. This has taken into consideration the lessons learned by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) and the follow-on effort known as the Integrated Safety Assessment Program (ISAP). The SEP was initiated by the NRC to review the designs of older operating nuclear power plants to confirm and document their safety. The ATR STEP objectives are discussed

  12. Performance tests of the reactor containment structures of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaba, Nariaki; Iigaki, Kazuhiko; Kawaji, Satoshi; Iyoku, Tatsuo

    1998-03-01

    The containment structures of the HTTR consist of the reactor containment vessel (CV), service area (SA) and emergency air purification system, which minimize the release of FPs in the postulated accidents with FP release from the reactor facilities. The CV is designed to withstand the temperature and pressure transients and to be leak-tight within the specified leakage limit even in the case of a rupture of the primary concentric hot gas duct. The pressure of inside of the SA should be maintained slightly lower than that of atmosphere by the emergency air purification system. The radioactive materials are released from the stack to environment via the emergency air purification system under the accident condition. Then the emergency air purification system should remove airborne radio-activities and should maintain proper pressure in the SA. We established the method to measure leak rate of the CV with closed reactor coolant pressure boundary although it is normally measured under opened reactor coolant pressure boundary as employed in LWRs. The CV leak rate test was carried out by the newly developed method and the expected performance was obtained. The SA and emergency air purification system were also confirmed by the performance test. We concluded that the reactor containment structures were fabricated to minimize the release of FPs in the postulated accidents with FP release from the reactor facilities. (author)

  13. Needs for development in nondestructive testing for advanced reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClung, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    The needs for development of nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques and equipment were surveyed and analyzed relative to problem areas for the Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactor, the Molten-Salt Breeder Reactor, and the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor. The paper first discusses the developmental needs that are broad-based requirements in nondestrutive testing, and the respective methods applicable, in general, to all components and reactor systems. Next, the requirements of generic materials and components that are common to all advanced reactor systems are examined. Generally, nondestructive techniques should be improved to provide better reliability and quantitativeness, improved flaw characterization, and more efficient data processing. Specific recommendations relative to such methods as ultrasonics, eddy currents, acoustic emission, radiography, etc., are made. NDT needs common to all reactors include those related to materials properties and degradation, welds, fuels, piping, steam generators, etc. The scope of applicability ranges from initial design and material development stages through process control and manufacturing inspection to in-service examination

  14. Liquid metal reactor cover gas purification and analysis in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, K J [Argonne National Laboratory, EBR-II Division, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Meadows, G E; Schuck, W J [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1987-07-01

    Two sodium cooled reactors are currently being operated In the United States of America for the U.S. Department of Energy. These are Experimental Breeder Reactor II, EBR-ll, and the Fast Flux Test Facility, FFTF. EBR-ll is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho and the FFTF is near Rich land, Washington. These reactors are currently engaged In a wide range of testing including fuels and materials tests, and plant system performance and safety development. The U.S. DOE program also includes designs of a next generation sodium cooled power reactor. This paper discusses the efforts to develop and operate cover gas systems for the sodium cooled nuclear reactor program in the USA.

  15. Liquid metal reactor cover gas purification and analysis in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, K.J.; Meadows, G.E.; Schuck, W.J.

    1986-09-01

    Two sodium cooled reactors are currently being operated in the United States of America for the US Department of Energy. These are Experimental Breeder Reactor 11, EBR-11, and the Fast Flux Test Facility, FFTF. EBR-11 is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho, and the FFTF is near Richland, Washington. These reactors are currently engaged in a wide range of testing including fuels and materials tests, and plant system performance and safety development. The US DOE program also includes designs of a next generation sodium cooled power reactor. The FFTF and EBR-11 communities are providing input to these designs. This paper discusses the efforts to develop and operate cover gas systems for the sodium cooled nuclear reactor program in the USA

  16. Liquid metal reactor cover gas purification and analysis in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, K.J.; Meadows, G.E.; Schuck, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    Two sodium cooled reactors are currently being operated In the United States of America for the U.S. Department of Energy. These are Experimental Breeder Reactor II, EBR-ll, and the Fast Flux Test Facility, FFTF. EBR-ll is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho and the FFTF is near Rich land, Washington. These reactors are currently engaged In a wide range of testing including fuels and materials tests, and plant system performance and safety development. The U.S. DOE program also includes designs of a next generation sodium cooled power reactor. This paper discusses the efforts to develop and operate cover gas systems for the sodium cooled nuclear reactor program in the USA

  17. Solar coal gasification reactor with pyrolysis gas recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiman, William R.; Gregg, David W.

    1983-01-01

    Coal (or other carbonaceous matter, such as biomass) is converted into a duct gas that is substantially free from hydrocarbons. The coal is fed into a solar reactor (10), and solar energy (20) is directed into the reactor onto coal char, creating a gasification front (16) and a pyrolysis front (12). A gasification zone (32) is produced well above the coal level within the reactor. A pyrolysis zone (34) is produced immediately above the coal level. Steam (18), injected into the reactor adjacent to the gasification zone (32), reacts with char to generate product gases. Solar energy supplies the energy for the endothermic steam-char reaction. The hot product gases (38) flow from the gasification zone (32) to the pyrolysis zone (34) to generate hot char. Gases (38) are withdrawn from the pyrolysis zone (34) and reinjected into the region of the reactor adjacent the gasification zone (32). This eliminates hydrocarbons in the gas by steam reformation on the hot char. The product gas (14) is withdrawn from a region of the reactor between the gasification zone (32) and the pyrolysis zone (34). The product gas will be free of tar and other hydrocarbons, and thus be suitable for use in many processes.

  18. Advanced Demonstration and Test Reactor Options Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hill, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gehin, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Heidet, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kinsey, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Grandy, Christopher [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Qualls, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hoffman, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Croson, D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Global efforts to address climate change will require large-scale decarbonization of energy production in the United States and elsewhere. Nuclear power already provides 20% of electricity production in the United States (U.S.) and is increasing in countries undergoing rapid growth around the world. Because reliable, grid-stabilizing, low emission electricity generation, energy security, and energy resource diversity will be increasingly valued, nuclear power’s share of electricity production has a potential to grow. In addition, there are non electricity applications (e.g., process heat, desalination, hydrogen production) that could be better served by advanced nuclear systems. Thus, the timely development, demonstration, and commercialization of advanced nuclear reactors could diversify the nuclear technologies available and offer attractive technology options to expand the impact of nuclear energy for electricity generation and non-electricity missions. The purpose of this planning study is to provide transparent and defensible technology options for a test and/or demonstration reactor(s) to be built to support public policy, innovation and long term commercialization within the context of the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) broader commitment to pursuing an “all of the above” clean energy strategy and associated time lines. This planning study includes identification of the key features and timing needed for advanced test or demonstration reactors to support research, development, and technology demonstration leading to the commercialization of power plants built upon these advanced reactor platforms. This planning study is consistent with the Congressional language contained within the fiscal year 2015 appropriation that directed the DOE to conduct a planning study to evaluate “advanced reactor technology options, capabilities, and requirements within the context of national needs and public policy to support innovation in nuclear energy

  19. Advanced Demonstration and Test Reactor Options Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petti, David Andrew; Hill, R.; Gehin, J.; Gougar, Hans David; Strydom, Gerhard; Heidet, F.; Kinsey, J.; Grandy, Christopher; Qualls, A.; Brown, Nicholas; Powers, J.; Hoffman, E.; Croson, D.

    2017-01-01

    Global efforts to address climate change will require large-scale decarbonization of energy production in the United States and elsewhere. Nuclear power already provides 20% of electricity production in the United States (U.S.) and is increasing in countries undergoing rapid growth around the world. Because reliable, grid-stabilizing, low emission electricity generation, energy security, and energy resource diversity will be increasingly valued, nuclear power's share of electricity production has a potential to grow. In addition, there are non electricity applications (e.g., process heat, desalination, hydrogen production) that could be better served by advanced nuclear systems. Thus, the timely development, demonstration, and commercialization of advanced nuclear reactors could diversify the nuclear technologies available and offer attractive technology options to expand the impact of nuclear energy for electricity generation and non-electricity missions. The purpose of this planning study is to provide transparent and defensible technology options for a test and/or demonstration reactor(s) to be built to support public policy, innovation and long term commercialization within the context of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) broader commitment to pursuing an 'all of the above' clean energy strategy and associated time lines. This planning study includes identification of the key features and timing needed for advanced test or demonstration reactors to support research, development, and technology demonstration leading to the commercialization of power plants built upon these advanced reactor platforms. This planning study is consistent with the Congressional language contained within the fiscal year 2015 appropriation that directed the DOE to conduct a planning study to evaluate 'advanced reactor technology options, capabilities, and requirements within the context of national needs and public policy to support innovation in nuclear energy'. Advanced reactors are

  20. Gas-Cooled Reactors: the importance of their development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    Gas-Cooled Reactors are considered to have a significant future impact on the application of fission energy. The specific types are the steam-cycle High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor, the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor, the gas-turbine HTGR, and the Very High-Temperature Process Heat Reactor. The importance of developing the above systems is discussed relative to alternative fission power systems involving Light Water Reactors, Heavy Water Reactors, Spectral Shift Controlled Reactors, and Liquid-Metal-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactors. A primary advantage of developing GCRs as a class lies in the technology and cost interrelations, permitting cost-effective development of systems having diverse applications. Further, HTGR-type systems have highly proliferation-resistant characteristics and very attractive safety features. Finally, such systems and GCFRs are mutally complementary. Overall, GCRs provide interrelated systems that serve different purposes and needs; their development can proceed in stages that provide early benefits while contributing to future needs. It is concluded that the long-term importance of the various GCRs is as follows: HTGR, providing a technology for economic GCFRs and HTGR-GTs, while providing a proliferation-resistant reactor system having early economic and fuel utilization benefits; GCFR, providing relatively low cost fissile fuel and reducing overall separative work needs at capital costs lower than those for LMFBRs; HTGR-GT (in combination with a bottoming cycle), providing a very high thermal efficiency system having low capital costs and improved fuel utilization and technology pertinent to VHTRs; HTGR-GT, providing a power system well suited for dry cooling conditions for low-temperature process heat needs; and VHTR, providing a high-temperature heat source for hydrogen production processes

  1. Reliability tests for reactor internals replacement technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimaki, K.; Uchiyama, J.; Ohtsubo, T.

    2000-01-01

    Structural damage due to aging degradation of LWR reactor internals has been reported in several nuclear plants. NUPEC has started a project to test the reliability of the technology for replacing reactor internals, which was directed at preventive maintenance before damage and repair after damage for the aging degradation. The project has been funded by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) of Japan since 1995, and it follows the policy of a report that the MITI has formally issued in April 1996 summarizing the countermeasures to be considered for aging nuclear plants and equipment. This paper gives an outline of the whole test plans and the test results for the BWR reactor internals replacement methods; core shroud, ICM housing, and CRD Housing and stub tube. The test results have shown that the methods were reliable and the structural integrity was appropriate based on the evaluation. (author)

  2. Entropy Generation Minimization for Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Thermal design and optimization for reverse water gas shift (RWGS reactors is particularly important to fuel synthesis in naval or commercial scenarios. The RWGS reactor with irreversibilities of heat transfer, chemical reaction and viscous flow is studied based on finite time thermodynamics or entropy generation minimization theory in this paper. The total entropy generation rate (EGR in the RWGS reactor with different boundary conditions is minimized subject to specific feed compositions and chemical conversion using optimal control theory, and the optimal configurations obtained are compared with three reference reactors with linear, constant reservoir temperature and constant heat flux operations, which are commonly used in engineering. The results show that a drastic EGR reduction of up to 23% can be achieved by optimizing the reservoir temperature profile, the inlet temperature of feed gas and the reactor length simultaneously, compared to that of the reference reactor with the linear reservoir temperature. These optimization efforts are mainly achieved by reducing the irreversibility of heat transfer. Optimal paths have subsections of relatively constant thermal force, chemical force and local EGR. A conceptual optimal design of sandwich structure for the compact modular reactor is proposed, without elaborate control tools or excessive interstage equipment. The results can provide guidelines for designing industrial RWGS reactors in naval or commercial scenarios.

  3. Natural gas production verification tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) in compliance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to fund, through a contract with Petroleum Consulting Services, Inc. of Canton, Ohio, the testing of the effectiveness of a non-water based hydraulic fracturing treatment to increase gas recovery from low-pressure, tight, fractured Devonian Shale formations. Although Devonian Shales are found in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois Basins, testing will be done only in the dominant, historical five state area of established production. The objective of this proposed project is to assess the benefits of liquid carbon dioxide (CO 2 )/sand stimulations in the Devonian Shale. In addition, this project would evaluate the potential nondamaging (to the formation) properties of this unique fracturing treatment relative to the clogging or chocking of pores and fractures that act as gas flow paths to the wellbore in the target gas-producing zones of the formation. This liquid CO 2 /sand fracturing process is water-free and is expected to facilitate gas well cleanup, reduce the time required for post-stimulation cleanup, and result in improved production levels in a much shorter time than is currently experienced

  4. Advanced Instrumentation for Transient Reactor Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, Michael L.; Anderson, Mark; Imel, George; Blue, Tom; Roberts, Jeremy; Davis, Kurt

    2018-01-31

    Transient testing involves placing fuel or material into the core of specialized materials test reactors that are capable of simulating a range of design basis accidents, including reactivity insertion accidents, that require the reactor produce short bursts of intense highpower neutron flux and gamma radiation. Testing fuel behavior in a prototypic neutron environment under high-power, accident-simulation conditions is a key step in licensing nuclear fuels for use in existing and future nuclear power plants. Transient testing of nuclear fuels is needed to develop and prove the safety basis for advanced reactors and fuels. In addition, modern fuel development and design increasingly relies on modeling and simulation efforts that must be informed and validated using specially designed material performance separate effects studies. These studies will require experimental facilities that are able to support variable scale, highly instrumented tests providing data that have appropriate spatial and temporal resolution. Finally, there are efforts now underway to develop advanced light water reactor (LWR) fuels with enhanced performance and accident tolerance. These advanced reactor designs will also require new fuel types. These new fuels need to be tested in a controlled environment in order to learn how they respond to accident conditions. For these applications, transient reactor testing is needed to help design fuels with improved performance. In order to maximize the value of transient testing, there is a need for in-situ transient realtime imaging technology (e.g., the neutron detection and imaging system like the hodoscope) to see fuel motion during rapid transient excursions with a higher degree of spatial and temporal resolution and accuracy. There also exists a need for new small, compact local sensors and instrumentation that are capable of collecting data during transients (e.g., local displacements, temperatures, thermal conductivity, neutron flux, etc.).

  5. Fast reactor cover gas purification - The UK position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorley, A.W.

    1987-01-01

    The cover gas in the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) provides an inert gas blanket for both primary and secondary sodium circuits, ensures inert gas padding exists between the upper seals associated with penetrations through the reactor roof and provides argon to items of plant such as the control rods and the rotating shield and also to on line instruments such as the secondary circuit Katharometers. In order to meet these and other requirements purification of the argon cover gas is important to ensure: gas fed to purge gaps in the area of the magnetic hold device in the control rod mechanisms is not laden with sodium aerosols and reactive impurities (O 2 , H 2 ) which could cause blocking both within the gaps and pipelines; gas phase detection systems which provide early warning of steam generator failures or oil ingress into the sodium are not affected by the presence of gaseous impurities such as H 2 , CO/CO 2 and CH 4 ; mass transfer processes involving both corrosion products and interstitial atoms cannot be sustained in the cover gas environment due to the presence of high levels of O 2 , N 2 and carburising gases; background levels of radioactivity (eg Xe 133) are sufficiently low to enable gas phase detection of failed fuel pins, and the primary circuit gas blanket activity is sufficiently reduced so that discharges to the atmosphere are minimised. This paper describes how the PFR cover gas purification system is coping with these various items and how current thinking regarding the design of cover gas purification systems for a Civil Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR), where larger gas volumes and higher levels of radioactivity may be involved, is being guided by current experience on PFR. The paper also briefly review the experimental work planned to study aerosol and caesium behaviour in cove gas environments and discusses the behaviour of those impurities such as Zn, oil and N 2 which are potentially damaging if certain levels are exceeded in operating

  6. Measured gas and particle temperatures in VTT's entrained flow reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Sønnik; Sørensen, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    Particle and gas temperature measurements were carried out in experiments on VTTs entrained flow reactor with 5% and 10% oxygen using Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy (FTIR). Particle temperature measurements were performed on polish coal,bark, wood, straw particles, and bark...... and wood particles treated with additive. A two-color technique with subtraction of the background light was used to estimate particle temperatures during experiments. A transmission-emission technique was used tomeasure the gas temperature in the reactor tube. Gas temperature measurements were in good...... agreement with thermocouple readings. Gas lines and bands from CO, CO2 and H2O can be observed in the spectra. CO was only observed at the first measuring port (100ms) with the strongest CO-signal seen during experiments with straw particles. Variations in gas concentration (CO2 and H2O) and the signal from...

  7. International working group on gas-cooled reactors. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-15

    The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for exchange of information on safety and licensing aspects for gas-cooled reactors in order to provide comprehensive review of the present status and of directions for future applications and development. Contributions were made concerning the operating experience of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) HTGR Power Plant in the United States of America, the experimental power station Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) in the Federal Republic of Germany, and the CO/sub 2/-cooled reactors in the United Kingdom such as Hunterson B and Hinkley Point B. The experience gained at each of these reactors has proved the high safety potential of Gas-cooled Reactor Power Plants.

  8. Presentation summary: Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Numerous prototypes and demonstration plants have been constructed and operated beginning with the Dragon plant in the early 1960s. The MHTGR was the U.S. developed modular plant and underwent pre application review by NRC. The GT-MHR represents a further refinement on this concept with the steam cycle being replaced by a closed loop gas turbine (Brayton) cycle. Modular gas reactors and the GT-MHR represent a fundamental shift in reactor design and safety philosophy. The reactor system is contained in a 3 vessel, side-by-side arrangement. The reactor and a shutdown cooling system are in one vessel, and the gas turbine based power conversion system, including the generator, in a second parallel vessel. A more detailed look at the system shows the compact arrangement of gas turbine, compressors, recuperator, heat exchanges, and generator. Fueled blocks are stacked in three concentric rings with inert graphite blocks making up the inner and outer reflectors. Operating control rods are located outside the active core while startup control rods and channels for reserve shutdown pellets are located near the core center. Ceramic coated fuel is the key to the GT-MHR's safety and economics. A kernel of Uranium oxycarbide (or UO 2 ) is placed in a porous carbon buffer and then encapsulated in multiple layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. These micro pressure vessels withstand internal pressures of up to 2,000 psi and temperatures of nearly 2,000 C providing extremely resilient containment of fission products under both normal operating and accident conditions. The fuel particles are blended in carbon pitch, forming fuel rods, and then loaded into holes within large graphite fuel elements. Fuel elements are stacked to form the core. Fuel particle testing in has repeatedly demonstrated the high temperature resilience of coated particle fuel to temperature approaching 2,000 C. As an conservative design goal, GT-MHR has been sized to keep maximum fuel temperatures

  9. Startup testing of Romania dual-core test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittemore, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    Late in 1979 both the Annular Core Pulsed Reactor (ACPR) and the 14-MW steady-state reactor (SSR) were loaded to critical. The fuel loading in both was then carried to completion and low-power testing was conducted. Early in 1980 both reactors successfully underwent high-power testing. The ACPR was operated for several hours at 500 kW and underwent pulse tests culminating in pulses with reactivity insertions of $4.60, peak power levels of about 20,000 MW, energy releases of 100 MW-sec, and peak measured fuel temperatures of 830 deg. C. The SSR was operated in several modes, both with natural convection and forced cooling with one or more pumps. The reactor successfully completed a 120-hr full-power test. Subsequent fuel element inspections confirmed that the fuel has performed without fuel damage or distortion. (author)

  10. Reliability tests for reactor internals rejuvenation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimaki, Katsumi; Hitoki, Yoichi; Otsubo, Toru; Uchiyama, Junichi

    1998-01-01

    Structural damage due to aging degradation of LWR reactor internals has been reported in several nuclear plants. NUPEC has started a project to test the reliability of the technology for rejuvenating reactor internals which has been funded by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) of Japan since 1995. The project follows the policy of a report that the MITI has formally issued in April 1996 summarizing the countermeasures to be considered for aging nuclear plants and equipment. This paper gives an outline of the test plans and results which are directed at preventive maintenance before damage and repair after damage for reactor internals aging degradation. The test results for the replacement methods of ICM housing and BWR core shroud have shown that the methods were reliable and the structural integrity was appropriate based on the evaluation. (author)

  11. Design requirements, operation and maintenance of gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    At the invitation of the Government of the USA the Technical Committee Meeting on Design Requirements, Operation and Maintenance of Gas-Cooled Reactors, was held in San Diego on September 21-23, 1988, in tandem with the GCRA Conference. Both meetings attracted a large contingent of foreign participants. Approximately 100 delegates from 18 different countries participated in the Technical Committee meeting. The meeting was divided into three sessions: Gas-cooled reactor user requirement (8 papers); Gas-cooled reactor improvements to facilitate operation and maintenance (10 papers) and Safety, environmental impacts and waste disposal (5 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 23 papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Operation, test, research and development of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). FY2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) constructed at the Oarai Research Establishment of The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is the first high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan, which is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30MW of thermal power. Coolant of helium-gas circulates under the pressure of about 4Mpa, and the reactor inlet and outlet temperature are 395degC and 950degC (maximum), respectively coated particle fuel is used as fuel, and the HTTR core is composed of graphite prismatic blocks. The full power operation of 30MW was attained in December, 2001, and then JAERI received the commissioning license for the HTTR in March, 2002. Since 2002, we have been carrying out rated power operation, safety demonstration tests and several R and Ds, etc., and conducted the high-temperature test operation of 950degC in April, 2004. This report summarizes activities and test results on HTTR operation and maintenance as well as safety demonstration tests and several R and Ds, which were carried out in the fiscal year of 2003 before the high temperature test operation of 950degC. (author)

  13. Temperature monitoring of gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    The present paper deals with questions like : a) Why temperature monitoring in high-temperature reactors at all. b) How are the measuring positions arranged and how are the measurements designed. c) What technique of temperature measurement is applied. (RW) [de

  14. Capital cost: gas cooled fast reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    The results of an investment cost study for a 900 MW(e) GCFR central station power plant are presented. The capital cost estimate arrived at is based on 1976 prices and a conceptual design only, not a mature reactor design

  15. Cover gas seals: FFTF-LMFBR seal test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurzeka, W.; Oliva, R.; Welch, T.S.; Shimazaki, T.

    1974-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to: (1) conduct static and dynamic tests to demonstrate or determine the mechanical performance of full-size (cross section) FFTF fuel transfer machine and reactor vessel head seals intended for use in a sodium vapor-inert gas environment, (2) demonstrate that these FFTF seals or new seal configurations provide acceptable fission product and cover gas retention capabilities at Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) operating environmental conditions other than radiation, and (3) develop improved seals and seal technology for the CRBRP to support the national objective to reduce all atmospheric contaminations to low levels

  16. Unsteady thermal analysis of gas-cooled fast reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakkis, I.A.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis presents numerical analysis of transient heat transfer in an equivalent coolant-fuel rod cell of a typical gas cooled, fast nuclear reactor core. The transient performance is assumed to follow a complete sudden loss of coolant starting from steady state operation. Steady state conditions are obtained from solving a conduction problem in the fuel rod and a parabolic turbutent convection problem in the coolant section. The coupling between the two problems is accomplished by ensuring continuity of the thermal conditions at the interface between the fuel rod and the coolant. to model turbulence, the mixing tenght theory is used. Various fuel rod configurations have been tested for optimal transient performance. Actually, the loss of coolant accident occurs gradually at an exponential rate. Moreover, a time delay before shutting down the reactor by insertion of control rods usually exists. It is required to minimize maximum steady state cladding temperature so that the time required to reach its limiting value during transient state is maximum. This will prevent the escape of radioactive gases that endanger the environment and the public. However, the case considered here is a limiting case representing what could actually happen in the worst probable accident. So, the resutls in this thesis are very indicative regarding selection of the fuel rode configuration for better transient performance in case of accidents in which complete loss of collant occurs instantaneously

  17. Development of high temperature gas cooled reactor in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Wentao [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Dept. of Nuclear Energy and Safety; Schorer, Michael [Swiss Nuclear Forum, Olten (Switzerland)

    2018-02-15

    High temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) is one of the six Generation IV reactor types put forward by Generation IV International Forum (GIF) in 2002. This type of reactor has high outlet temperature. It uses Helium as coolant and graphite as moderator. Pebble fuel and ceramic reactor core are adopted. Inherit safety, good economy, high generating efficiency are the advantages of HTGR. According to the comprehensive evaluation from the international nuclear community, HTGR has already been given the priority to the research and development for commercial use. A demonstration project of the High Temperature Reactor-Pebble-�bed Modules (HTR-PM) in Shidao Bay nuclear power plant in China is under construction. In this paper, the development history of HTGR in China and the current situation of HTR-PM will be introduced. The experiences from China may be taken as a reference by the international nuclear community.

  18. Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor (WAGR) decommissioning project overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattinson, A.

    2003-01-01

    The current BNFL reactor decommissioning projects are presented. The projects concern power reactor sites at Berkely, Trawsfynydd, Hunterstone, Bradwell, Hinkley Point; UKAEA Windscale Pile 1; Research reactors within UK Scottish Universities at East Kilbride and ICI (both complete); WAGR. The BNFL environmental role include contract management; effective dismantling strategy development; implementation and operation; sentencing, encapsulation and transportation of waste. In addition for the own sites it includes strategy development; baseline decommissioning planning; site management and regulator interface. The project objectives for the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (WAGR) are 1) Safe and efficient decommissioning; 2) Building of good relationships with customer; 3) Completion of reactor decommissioning in 2005. The completed WAGR decommissioning campaigns are: Operational Waste; Hot Box; Loop Tubes; Neutron Shield; Graphite Core and Restrain System; Thermal Shield. The current campaign is Lower Structures and the remaining are: Pressure vessel and Insulation; Thermal Columns and Outer Vault Membrane. An overview of each campaign is presented

  19. Operation, test, research and development of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). FY2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-12-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30MW of thermal power, constructed at the Oarai Research and Development Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is the first high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan. The HTTR was attained at the full power operation of 30MW in December 2001 and achieved the 950degC of outlet coolant temperature at the outside the reactor pressure vessel in June 2004. To establish and upgrade basic technologies for HTGRs, we have obtained demonstration test data necessary for several R and Ds, and accumulated operation and maintenance experience of HTGRs throughout the HTTR's operation such as rated power operations, safety demonstration tests and long-term high temperature operations, and so on. In fiscal year 2013, we started to prepare the application document of reactor installation license for the HTTR to prove conformity with the new research reactor's safety regulatory requirements taken effect from December 2013. We had been making effort to restart the HTTR which was stopped since the 2011 when the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake (2011.3.11) occurred. This report summarizes activities and results of HTTR operation, maintenance, and several R and Ds, which were carried out in the fiscal year 2013. (author)

  20. Operation, test, research and development of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). FY2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-02-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW of thermal power, constructed at the Oarai Research and Development Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency is the first high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan. The HTTR was attained at the full power operation of 30 MW in December 2001 and achieved the 950degC of coolant outlet temperature at outside of the reactor pressure vessel in June 2004. To establish and upgrade basic technologies for HTGRs, we have obtained demonstration test data necessary for several R and Ds, and accumulated operation and maintenance experience of HTGRs throughout the HTTR's operation such as rated power operations, safety demonstration tests and long-term high temperature operations, and so on. In fiscal year 2014, we started to apply the application document of reactor installation license for the HTTR to prove conformity with the new research reactor's safety regulatory requirements taken effect from December 2013. We had been making effort to restart the HTTR which was stopped since the 2011 by the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake. This report summarizes activities and results of HTTR operation, maintenance, and several R and Ds, which were carried out in the fiscal year 2014. (author)

  1. Reactor group constants and benchmark test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Hideki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-08-01

    The evaluated nuclear data files such as JENDL, ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2 are validated by analyzing critical mock-up experiments for various type reactors and assessing applicability for nuclear characteristics such as criticality, reaction rates, reactivities, etc. This is called Benchmark Testing. In the nuclear calculations, the diffusion and transport codes use the group constant library which is generated by processing the nuclear data files. In this paper, the calculation methods of the reactor group constants and benchmark test are described. Finally, a new group constants scheme is proposed. (author)

  2. Gas-cooled reactor safety and accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    The Specialists' Meeting on Gas-Cooled Reactor Safety and Accident Analysis was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Oak Ridge on the invitation of the Department of Energy in Washington, USA. The meeting was hosted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an opportunity to compare and discuss results of safety and accident analysis of gas-cooled reactors under development, construction or in operation, to review their lay-out, design, and their operational performance, and to identify areas in which additional research and development are needed. The meeting emphasized the high safety margins of gas-cooled reactors and gave particular attention to the inherent safety features of small reactor units. The meeting was subdivided into four technical sessions: Safety and Related Experience with Operating Gas-Cooled Reactors (4 papers); Risk and Safety Analysis (11 papers); Accident Analysis (9 papers); Miscellaneous Related Topics (5 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  3. Technology of steam generators for gas-cooled reactors. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The activity of the IAEA in the field of the technology of gas-cooled reactors was formalized by formation of an International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (IWGCR). The gas cooled reactor program considered by the IWGCR includes carbon-dioxide-cooled thermal reactors, helium cooled thermal high temperature reactors for power generation and for process heat applications and gas-cooled fast breeder reactors. This report covers the papers dealing with operating experience, steam generators for next generation of gas-cooled reactors, material development and corrosion problems, and thermohydraulics

  4. Technology of steam generators for gas-cooled reactors. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-07-01

    The activity of the IAEA in the field of the technology of gas-cooled reactors was formalized by formation of an International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (IWGCR). The gas cooled reactor program considered by the IWGCR includes carbon-dioxide-cooled thermal reactors, helium cooled thermal high temperature reactors for power generation and for process heat applications and gas-cooled fast breeder reactors. This report covers the papers dealing with operating experience, steam generators for next generation of gas-cooled reactors, material development and corrosion problems, and thermohydraulics.

  5. Gas-phase photocatalysis in μ-reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Henriksen, Toke Riishøj

    2010-01-01

    Gas-phase photocatalysis experiments may benefit from the high sensitivity and good time response in product detection offered by μ-reactors. We demonstrate this by carrying out CO oxidation and methanol oxidation over commercial TiO2 photocatalysts in our recently developed high-sensitivity reac......Gas-phase photocatalysis experiments may benefit from the high sensitivity and good time response in product detection offered by μ-reactors. We demonstrate this by carrying out CO oxidation and methanol oxidation over commercial TiO2 photocatalysts in our recently developed high...

  6. Air leakage test of reactor hall using tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yanqiu; Yang Liang; Yang Tongzai

    2011-01-01

    The leakage ratios of three related reactor halls were tested by sulfur hexafluoride gaseous tracer technique. Moreover, the accumulation intensities of leak gas and its retention time in some important working rooms, the crossroads of corridors and anteroom of the building were detected. The results show that the air leakage ratios of the three reactor halls are (7.30±0.16) x 10 -4 , (1.88±0.12) x 10 -4 and (2.07±0.07) x 10 -4 h -1 . The leak gas accumulates in all the detected working rooms fast, and the retention time to various rooms is about 5 h. The heaviest intensities are in the clothes change rooms on the first floor. However, the retention time to the crossroads and the anteroom is about 10 h, and the accumulation intensities are much small. (authors)

  7. Data on test results of vessel cooling system of high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saikusa, Akio; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Tachibana, Yukio; Iyoku, Tatsuo

    2003-02-01

    High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is the first graphite-moderated helium gas cooled reactor in Japan. The rise-to-power test of the HTTR started on September 28, 1999 and thermal power of the HTTR reached its full power of 30 MW on December 7, 2001. Vessel Cooling System (VCS) of the HTTR is the first Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) applied for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors. The VCS cools the core indirectly through the reactor pressure vessel to keep core integrity during the loss of core flow accidents such as depressurization accident. Minimum heat removal of the VCS to satisfy its safety requirement is 0.3MW at 30 MW power operation. Through the performance test of the VCS in the rise-to-power test of the HTTR, it was confirmed that the VCS heat removal at 30 MW power operation was higher than 0.3 MW. This paper shows outline of the VCS and test results on the VCS performance. (author)

  8. Features, present condition of development and future scope on the high temperature gas reactor as an innovative one

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozawa, Shusaku

    2001-01-01

    The high temperature gas reactor has some features without previous reactors such as high temperature capable of taking-out, high specific safety, feasibility adaptable to versatile fuel cycle, and so on. Then, it is expected to be an innovative reactor to contribute to diversification of energy supply and expansion of energy application field. In Japan, under the HTTR (high temperature engineering test reactor) plan, construction of HTTR, which is the first high temperature gas reactor in Japan, was finished and its output upgrading test has been promoted. And, on the HTTR plan, together with promotion of full power operation, reactor performance tests, safety proof test, and so on, it is planned to carry out study on application of the high temperature heat such as hydrogen production and so on to aim to practise establishment and upgrading of technologies on high temperature gas reactor in Japan. Here were introduced features and present condition of development of the high temperature gas reactor as an innovative type reactor and described role and future scope in Japan. (G.K.)

  9. Integrated leak rate test results of JOYO reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, M.; Endo, J.

    1982-02-01

    Integrated leak rate tests of JOYO after the reactor coolant system had been filled with sodium have been performed two times since 1978 (February 1978 and December 1979). The tests were conducted with the in-containment sodium systems, primary argon cover gas system and air conditioning systems operating. Both the absolute pressure method and the reference chamber method were employed during the test. The results of both tests confirmed the functioning of the containment vessel, and leak rate limits were satisfied. In Addition, the adequancy of the test instrumentation system and the test method was demonstrated. Finally the plant conditions required to maintain reasonable accuracy for the leak rate testing of LMFBR were established. In this paper, the test conditions and the test results are described. (author)

  10. Gas-cooled reactor for space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, C.E.; Pearson, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    Reactor characteristics based on extensive development work on the 500-MWt reactor for the Pluto nuclear ramjet are described for space power systems useful in the range of 2 to 20 MWe for operating times of 1 y. The modest pressure drop through the prismatic ceramic core is supported at the outlet end by a ceramic dome which also serves as a neutron reflector. Three core materials are considered which are useful at temperatures up to about 2000 K. Most of the calculations are based on a beryllium oxide with uranium dioxide core. Reactor control is accomplished by use of a burnable poison, a variable-leakage reflector, and internal control rods. Reactivity swings of 20% are obtained with a dozen internal boron-10 rods for the size cores studied. Criticality calculations were performed using the ALICE Monte Carlo code. The inherent high-temperature capability of the reactor design removes the reactor as a limiting condition on system performance. The low fuel inventories required, particularly for beryllium oxide reactors, make space power systems based on gas-cooled near-thermal reactors a lesser safeguard risk than those based on fast reactors

  11. Specialists' meeting on fast reactor cover gas purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The tentative agenda was adopted by the participants without comment and was followed throughout the meeting. The following topics were discussed at the subsequent sessions of the meeting on 'Fast Reactor Cover Gas Purification': National Position Papers; Impurities: Sources and Measurement; Cover Gas Purification Techniques; Sodium Aerosol Trapping; Radiological Considerations. Based on the papers presented and the discussions following, session summaries and conclusions were prepared and are included in this report

  12. Specialists' meeting on fast reactor cover gas purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1987-07-01

    The tentative agenda was adopted by the participants without comment and was followed throughout the meeting. The following topics were discussed at the subsequent sessions of the meeting on 'Fast Reactor Cover Gas Purification': National Position Papers; Impurities: Sources and Measurement; Cover Gas Purification Techniques; Sodium Aerosol Trapping; Radiological Considerations. Based on the papers presented and the discussions following, session summaries and conclusions were prepared and are included in this report.

  13. Role of fission gas release in reactor licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-11-01

    The release of fission gases from oxide pellets to the fuel rod internal voidage (gap) is reviewed with regard to the required safety analysis in reactor licensing. Significant analyzed effects are described, prominent gas release models are reviewed, and various methods used in the licensing process are summarized. The report thus serves as a guide to a large body of literature including company reports and government documents. A discussion of the state of the art of gas release analysis is presented

  14. The development of the gas cooled fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe

    1975-01-01

    A survey of the present technological state is given on the basis of the developments made so far. Some milestones of development - e.g. the German gas breeder memorandum, the Gas Breeder Reactor Association the results of the BR-2 radiation experiments and of GfK-KWU design and safety studies - are described. The problems connected with a large store of plutonium are also discussed. (UA/AK) [de

  15. High Flux Materials Testing Reactor (HFR), Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-09-01

    After conversion to burnable poison fuel elements, the High Flux Materials Testing Reactor (HFR) Petten (Netherlands), operated through 1974 for 280 days at 45 MW. Equipment for irradiation experiments has been replaced and extended. The average annual occupation by experiments was 55% as compared to 38% in 1973. Work continued on thirty irradiation projects and ten development activities

  16. A simple nondestructive technique for monitoring the bond gas in sealed fast reactor nuclear fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriwastwa, B B; Mehrotra, R S; Ghosh, J K [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Radiometallurgy Div.

    1994-12-31

    A simple nondestructive testing technique has been developed to identify bond gas inside a welded fuel pin. The technique is based on the accurate surface temperature measurement of fuel pins heated in a constant temperature water bath. This technique can be applied in Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) fuel pin production line due to simplicity of the set up, simple operation and quick response time. An attempt was made to develop a non destructive test method for monitoring the bond gas composition. Preliminary development work carried out in this connection, the test method adopted and the test results are presented. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Simulation of the fuzzy-smith control system for the high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Deheng; Xu Xiaolin; Zheng Jie; Guo Renjun; Zhang Guifen

    1997-01-01

    The Fuzzy-Smith pre-estimate controller to solve the control of the big delay system is developed, accompanied with the development of the mathematical model of the 10 MW high temperature gas cooled test reactor (HTR-10) and the design of its control system. The simulation results show the Fuzzy-Smith pre-estimate controller has the advantages of both fuzzy control and Smith pre-estimate controller; it has better compensation to the delay and better adaptability to the parameter change of the control object. So it is applicable to the design of the control system for the high temperature gas cooled reactor

  18. Fundamental conceptual design of the experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimokawa, Junichi; Yasuno, Takehiko; Yasukawa, Shigeru; Mitake, Susumu; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1975-06-01

    The fundamental conceptual design of the experimental multi-purpose very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (experimental VHTR of thermal output 50 MW with reactor outlet-gas temperature 1,000 0 C) has been carried out to provide the operation modes of the system consisting of the reactor and the heat-utilization system, including characteristics and performance of the components and safety of the plant system. For the heat-utilization system of the plant, heat distribution, temperature condition, cooling system constitution, and the containment facility are specified. For the operation of plant, testing capability of the reactor and controlability of the system are taken into consideration. Detail design is made of the fuel element, reactor core, reactivity control and pressure vessel, and also the heat exchanger, steam reformer, steam generator, helium circulator, helium-gas turbine, and helium-gas purification, fuel handling, and engineered safety systems. Emphasis is placed on providing the increase of the reactor outlet-gas temperature. Fuel element design is directed to the prismatic graphite blocks of hexagonal cross-section accommodating the hollow or tubular fuel pins sheathed in graphite sleeve. The reactor core is composed of 73 fuel columns in 7 stages, concerning the reference design MK-II. Orificing is made in the upper portion of core; one orifice for every 7 fuel columns. Average core power density is 2.5 watts/cm 3 . Fuel temperature is kept below 1,300 0 C in rated power. The main components, i.e. pressure vessel, reformer, gas turbine and intermediate heat exchanger are designed in detail; the IHX is of a double-shell and helically-wound tube coils, the reformer is of a byonet tube type, and the turbine-compressor unit is of an axial flow type (turbine in 6 stages and compressor in 16 stages). (auth.)

  19. Present status of Japan materials testing reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, Naohiko; Kaminaga, Masanori; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Niimi, Motoji; Komori, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Masahide; Kawamura, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a light water cooled tank type reactor with first criticality in March 1968. Owing to the connection between the JMTR and hot laboratory by a canal, easy re-irradiation tests can be conducted with safe and quick transportation of irradiated samples. The JMTR has been applied to fuel/material irradiation examinations for LWRs, HTGR, fusion reactor and RI production. However, the JMTR operation was once stopped in August 2006, and check and review on the reoperation had been conducted by internal as well as external committees. As a result of the discussion, the JMTR reoperation was determined, and refurbishment works started from the beginning of JFY 2007. The refurbishment works have finished in March 2011 taking four years from JFY 2007. Unfortunately, at the end of the JFY 2010 on March 11, the Great-Eastern-Japan-Earthquake occurred, and functional tests before the JMTR restart, such as cooling system, reactor control system and so on, were delayed by the earthquake. Moreover, a detail inspection found some damages such as slight deformation of the truss structure at the roof of the JMTR reactor building. Consequently, the restart of the JMTR will be delayed from June to next October, 2012. Now, the safety evaluation after the earthquake disaster is being carried out aiming at the restart of the JMTR. The renewed JMTR will be started from JFY 2012 and operated for a period of about 20 years until around JFY 2030. The usability improvement of the JMTR, e.g. higher reactor availability, shortening turnaround time to get irradiation results, attractive irradiation cost, business confidence, is also discussed with users as the preparations for re-operation. (author)

  20. Present status of Japan materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Naohiko; Kaminaga, Masanori; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Niimi, Motoji; Komori, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Masahide; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a light water cooled tank type reactor with first criticality in March 1968. Owing to the connection between the JMTR and hot laboratory by a canal, easy re-irradiation tests can be conducted with safe and quick transportation of irradiated samples. The JMTR has been applied to fuel/material irradiation examinations for LWRs, HTGR, fusion reactor and RI production. However, the JMTR operation was once stopped in August 2006, and check and review on the reoperation had been conducted by internal as well as external committees. As a result of the discussion, the JMTR reoperation was determined, and refurbishment works started from the beginning of JFY 2007. The refurbishment works have finished in March 2011 taking four years from JFY 2007. Unfortunately, at the end of the JFY 2010 on March 11, the Great-Eastern-Japan-Earthquake occurred, and functional tests before the JMTR restart, such as cooling system, reactor control system and so on, were delayed by the earthquake. Moreover, a detail inspection found some damages such as slight deformation of the truss structure at the roof of the JMTR reactor building. Consequently, the restart of the JMTR will be delayed from June to next October, 2012. Now, the safety evaluation after the earthquake disaster is being carried out aiming at the restart of the JMTR. The renewed JMTR will be started from JFY 2012 and operated for a period of about 20 years until around JFY 2030. The usability improvement of the JMTR, e.g. higher reactor availability, shortening turnaround time to get irradiation results, attractive irradiation cost, business confidence, is also discussed with users as the preparations for re-operation. (author)

  1. Radiological considerations of the reactor cover gas processing system at the FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevo, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    Radiological and environmental protection experience associated with the reactor cover gas processing system at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has been excellent. Personnel radiation exposures received from operating and maintaining the reactor cover gas processing system have been very low, the system has remained free of radioactive particulate contamination through the first seven operating cycles (cesium contamination was detected at the end of Cycle 8A), and releases of radioactivity to the environment have been very low, well below environmental standards. This report discusses these three aspects of fast reactor cover gas purification over the first eight operating cycles of the FFTF (a duration of a little more than four years, from April 1982 through July 1986). (author)

  2. Transient thermal-hydraulic simulations of direct cycle gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauveron, Nicolas; Saez, Manuel; Marchand, Muriel; Chataing, Thierry; Geffraye, Genevieve; Bassi, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    This work concerns the design and safety analysis of gas cooled reactors. The CATHARE code is used to test the design and safety of two different concepts, a High Temperature Gas Reactor concept (HTGR) and a Gas Fast Reactor concept (GFR). Relative to the HTGR concept, three transient simulations are performed and described in this paper: loss of electrical load without turbo-machine trip, 10 in. cold duct break, 10 in. break in cold duct combined with a tube rupture of a cooling exchanger. A second step consists in modelling a GFR concept. A nominal steady state situation at a power of 600 MW is obtained and first transient simulations are carried out to study decay heat removal situations after primary loop depressurisation. The turbo-machine contribution is discussed and can offer a help or an alternative to 'active' heat extraction systems

  3. Steady-state and transient simulations of gas cooled reactor with the computer code CATHARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauveron, N.; Saez, M.; Marchand, M.; Chataing, T.; Geffraye, G.; Cherel, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    This work concerns the design and safety analysis of Gas Cooled Reactors. The CATHARE code is used to test the design and safety of two different concepts, a High Temperature Gas Reactor concept (HTGR) and a Gas Fast Reactor concept (GFR). Relative to the HTGR concept, three transient simulations are performed and described in this paper: loss of electrical load without turbomachine trip, 10 inch cold duct break, 10 inch cold duct break combined with a tube rupture of a cooling exchanger. A second step consists in modelling a GFR concept. A nominal steady state situation at a power of 600 MW is obtained and first transient simulations are carried out to study decay heat removal situations after primary loop depressurisation

  4. Correlations between power and test reactor data bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, G.L.; Simonen, E.P.

    1989-02-01

    Differences between power reactor and test reactor data bases have been evaluated. Charpy shift data has been assembled from specimens irradiated in both high-flux test reactors and low-flux power reactors. Preliminary tests for the existence of a bias between test and power reactor data bases indicate a possible bias between the weld data bases. The bias is nonconservative for power predictive purposes, using test reactor data. The lesser shift for test reactor data compared to power reactor data is interpreted primarily in terms of greater point defect recombination for test reactor fluxes compared to power reactor fluxes. The possibility of greater thermal aging effects during lower damage rates is also discussed. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Analysis of severe accidents on fast reactor test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cenerini, R.; Verzelletti, G.; Curioni, S.

    1975-01-01

    The Pec reactor is a sodium cooled fast reactor which is being designed for the primary purpose of accomodating closed sodium cooled test loops for the developmental and proof testing of fast reactor fuel assemblies. The test loops are located in the central test region of reactor. The basic function for which the loop is designed is burn-up to failure testing of fuel under advanced performance conditions. It is therefore necessary to design the loop for failure conditions. Basically two types of accidents can occur within the loops: rupture of gas plenum in the fuel pins and coolant starvation. Explosive tests on Pec loop, whose first set is described in this report, are devoted to investigate the effects of an accidental energy release on loop containment. The loop model reproduces in the test section the prototype dimensions in radial scale 1:1. Using a wire explosive charge of 300mm, the height of test section is sufficient for determining the containment capability of the loop that has a nearly constant deformation in a length of. 3-4 time the diameter. The inertial effects of the coolant column are reproduced by two tubes at the extremities of test section, closed with top plugs. Some tests has been performed by wrapping around the test section four layers of steel wire in order to evaluate the influence on the containment of tungsten wire that is foreseen in prototype loop. The influence of the coolant around the loop was evaluated by inserting the model in water. Dummy sub-assemblies was used and explosive substitutes the central rods. Piezoelectric pressure transducers were mounted on the three plugs and radial deformation was measured directly at different height. From experiments performed it resulted the importance of harmonic wires and inertial reaction of external water on loop containment; maximum containable energy is about 50 Cal with E.1 explosive

  6. Nuclear fuels for material test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, L.V.; Durazzo, M.; Freitas, C.T. de

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results related do the development of nuclear fuels for reactors cooled and moderated by water have been presented cylindrical and plate type fuels have been described in which the core consists of U compouns dispersed in an Al matrix and is clad with aluminium. Fabrication details involving rollmilling, swaging or hot pressing have been described. Corrosion and irradiation test results are also discussed. The performance of the different types of fuels indicates that it is possible to locally fabricate fuel plates with U 3 O 8 +Al cores (20% enriched U) for use in operating Brazilian research reactors. (Author) [pt

  7. Modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    The high financial risk involved in building large nuclear power reactors has been a major factor in halting investment in new plant and in bringing further technical development to a standstill. Increased public concern about the safety of nuclear plant, particularly after Chernobyl, has contributed to this stagnation. Financial and technical risk could be reduced considerably by going to small modular units, which would make it possible to build up power station capacity in small steps. Such modular plant, based on the helium-cooled high temperature reactor (HTR), offers remarkable advantages in terms of inherent safety characteristics, partly because of the relatively small size of the individual modules but more on account of the enormous thermal capacity and high temperature margins of the graphitic reactor assemblies. Assessments indicate that, in the USA, the cost of power from the modular systems would be less than that from conventional single reactor plant, up to about 600 MW(e), and only marginally greater above that level, a margin that should be offset by the shorter time required in bringing the modular units on line to earn revenue. The modular HTR would be particularly appropriate in the UK, because of the considerable British industrial background in gas-cooled reactors, and could be a suitable replacement for Magnox. The modular reactor would be particularly suited to combined heat and power schemes and would offer great potential for the eventual development of gas turbine power conversion and the production of high-temperature process heat. (author)

  8. Gas-cooled fast reactor program. Progress report, January 1, 1980-June 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1981-09-01

    Since the national Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program has been terminated, this document is the last progress report until reinstatement. It is divided into three sections: Core Flow Test Loop, GCFR shielding and physics, and GCFR pressure vessel and closure studies

  9. Periodic reviews of structural integrity of gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, P.J.; Stokoe, T.Y.; Thomas, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear Electric operates 12 gas-cooled reactor power stations which have been in service for between 5 and 30 years. Periodically, comprehensive reviews of the safety cases are carried out for each station. The approach followed in these reviews in respect of structural integrity is outlined with the use of illustrative examples. (author)

  10. French gas cooled reactor experience with moisture ingress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastien, D.; Brie, M.

    1995-01-01

    During the history of operation of six gas cooled reactors in France, some experience has been gained with accidental water ingress into the primary system. This occurred as a result of leaks in steam generators. This paper describes the cause of the leaks, and the resulting consequences. (author). 2 refs, 8 figs

  11. IAEA activities in gas-cooled reactor technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleveland, J.; Kupitz, J.

    1992-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has the charter to ''foster the exchange of scientific and technical information'', and ''encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful uses throughout the world''. This paper describes the Agency's activities in Gas-cooled Reactor (GCR) technology development

  12. Modelling of non-catalytic reactors in a gas-solid trickle flow reactor: Dry, regenerative flue gas desulphurization using a silica-supported copper oxide sorbent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiel, J.H.A.; Kiel, J.H.A.; Prins, W.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1992-01-01

    A one-dimensional, two-phase dispersed plug flow model has been developed to describe the steady-state performance of a relatively new type of reactor, the gas-solid trickle flow reactor (GSTFR). In this reactor, an upward-flowing gas phase is contacted with as downward-flowing dilute solids phase

  13. Design and development of gas turbine high temperature reactor 300 (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Katanishi, Shoji; Takada, Shoji; Takizuka, Takakazu; Yan, Xing; Kosugiyama, Shinichi

    2003-01-01

    JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) started design and development of the high temperature gas cooled reactor with a gas turbine electric generation system, GTHTR300, in April 2001. Design originalities of the GTHTR300 are a horizontally mounted highly efficient gas turbine system and an ultimately simplified safety system such as no containment building and no active emergency core cooling. These design originalities are proposed based on design and operational experiences in conventional gas turbine systems and Japan's first high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTTR: High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) so that many R and Ds are not required for the development. Except these original design features, devised core design, fuel design and plant design are adopted to meet design requirements and attain a target cost. This paper describes the unique design features focusing on the safety design, reactor core design and gas turbine system design together with a preliminary result of the safety evaluation carried out for a typical severe event. This study is entrusted from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  14. High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuels and Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    At the third annual meeting of the technical working group on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options and Spent Fuel Management (TWG-NFCO), held in Vienna, in 2004, it was suggested 'to develop manuals/handbooks and best practice documents for use in training and education in coated particle fuel technology' in the IAEA's Programme for the year 2006-2007. In the context of supporting interested Member States, the activity to develop a handbook for use in the 'education and training' of a new generation of scientists and engineers on coated particle fuel technology was undertaken. To make aware of the role of nuclear science education and training in all Member States to enhance their capacity to develop innovative technologies for sustainable nuclear energy is of paramount importance to the IAEA Significant efforts are underway in several Member States to develop high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR) based on either pebble bed or prismatic designs. All these reactors are primarily fuelled by TRISO (tri iso-structural) coated particles. The aim however is to build future nuclear fuel cycles in concert with the aim of the Generation IV International Forum and includes nuclear reactor applications for process heat, hydrogen production and electricity generation. Moreover, developmental work is ongoing and focuses on the burning of weapon-grade plutonium including civil plutonium and other transuranic elements using the 'deep-burn concept' or 'inert matrix fuels', especially in HTGR systems in the form of coated particle fuels. The document will serve as the primary resource materials for 'education and training' in the area of advanced fuels forming the building blocks for future development in the interested Member States. This document broadly covers several aspects of coated particle fuel technology, namely: manufacture of coated particles, compacts and elements; design-basis; quality assurance/quality control and characterization techniques; fuel irradiations; fuel

  15. Fast reactor primary cover gas system proposals for CDFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, L.M.T.

    1987-01-01

    A primary sodium gas cover has been designed for CDFR, it comprises plant to maintain and control; cover gas pressure for all reactor operating at fault conditions, cover gas purity by both blowdown and by a special clean-up facility and the clean argon supply for the failed fuel detection system and the primary pump seal purge. The design philosophy is to devise a cover gas system that can be specified for any LMFBR where only features like vessel and pipework size need to be altered to suit different design and operating conditions. The choice of full power and shutdown operating pressures is derived and the method chosen to control these values is described. A part active/part passive system is proposed for this duty, a surge volume of 250 m 3 gives passive control between full power and hot shutdown. Pressure control operation criteria is presented for various reactor operating conditions. A design for a sodium aerosol filter, based on that used on PFR is presented, it is specifically designed so that it can be fitted with an etched disc type particulate filter and maintenance is minimised. Two methods that maintain cover gas purity are described. The first, used during normal reactor operation with a small impurities ingress, utilises the continuous blowdown associated with the inevitable clean argon purge through the various reactor component seals. The second method physically removes the impurities xenon and krypton from the cover gas by their adsorption, at cryogenic temperature, onto a bed of activated carbon. The equipment required for these two duties and their mode of operation is described with the aid of a system flow diagram. The primary pump seals requires a gas purge to suppress aerosol migration. A system where the argon used for this task is recirculated and partially purified is described. (author)

  16. Core configuration of a gas-cooled reactor as a tritium production device for fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaya, H., E-mail: nakaya@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 8190395 (Japan); Matsuura, H.; Nakao, Y. [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 8190395 (Japan); Shimakawa, S.; Goto, M.; Nakagawa, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Nishikawa, M. [Malaysia-Japan International Institute of Technology, UTM, Kuala Lumpur 54100 (Malaysia)

    2014-05-01

    The performance of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor as a tritium production device is examined, assuming the compound LiAlO{sub 2} as the tritium-producing material. A gas turbine high-temperature reactor of 300 MWe nominal capacity (GTHTR300) is assumed as the calculation target, and using the continuous-energy Monte Carlo transport code MVP-BURN, burn-up simulations are carried out. To load sufficient Li into the core, LiAlO{sub 2} is loaded into the removable reflectors that surround the ring-shaped fuel blocks in addition to the burnable poison insertion holes. It is shown that module high-temperature gas-cooled reactors with a total thermal output power of 3 GW can produce almost 8 kg of tritium in a year.

  17. Analysis of Radioactivity Contamination Level of Kartini Reactor Efluen Gas to the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suratman; Purwanto; Aminjoyo, S

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of radioactivity contamination level of Kartini reactor efluen gas to the environment has been done from 13-10-'95 until 8-2-'96. The aim of this research is to determine the radioactivity contamination level on the environment resulted from the release of Kartini reactor efluen gas and other facilities at Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Centre through stack. The analysis methods is the student t-test, the first count factor test and the gamma spectrometry. The gas sampling were carried out in the stack reactor, reactor room, environment and in other room for comparison. Efluen gas was sucked through a filter by a high volume vacuum pump. The filter was counted for beta, gamma and alpha activities. The radioactivity contamination level of the efluen gas passing through the stack to the environment was measured between 0.57 - 1.34 Bq/m3, which was equal to the airborne radioactivity in environment between 0.69 - 1.12 Bq/m3. This radioactivity comes from radon daughter, decay products result from the natural uranium and thorium series of the materials of the building

  18. Gas cooled reactor assessment. Volume II. Final report, February 9, 1976--June 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    This report was prepared to document the estimated power plant capital and operating costs, and the safety and environmental assessments used in support of the Gas Cooled Reactor Assessment performed by Arthur D. Little, Inc. (ADL), for the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration. The gas-cooled reactor technologies investigated include: the High Temperature Gas Reactor Steam Cycle (HTGR-SC), the HTGR Direct Cycle (HTGR-DC), the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) and the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR). Reference technologies used for comparison include: Light Water Reactors (LWR), the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR), conventional coal-fired steam plants, and coal combustion for process heat

  19. Gas-cooled reactor thermal-hydraulics using CAST3M and CRONOS2 codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studer, E.; Coulon, N.; Stietel, A.; Damian, F.; Golfier, H.; Raepsaet, X.

    2003-01-01

    The CEA R and D program on advanced Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR) relies on different concepts: modular High Temperature Reactor (HTR), its evolution dedicated to hydrogen production (Very High Temperature Reactor) and Gas Cooled Fast Reactors (GCFR). Some key safety questions are related to decay heat removal during potential accident. This is strongly connected to passive natural convection (including gas injection of Helium, CO 2 , Nitrogen or Argon) or forced convection using active safety systems (gas blowers, heat exchangers). To support this effort, thermal-hydraulics computer codes will be necessary tools to design, enhance the performance and ensure a high safety level of the different reactors. Accurate and efficient modeling of heat transfer by conduction, convection or thermal radiation as well as energy storage are necessary requirements to obtain a high level of confidence in the thermal-hydraulic simulations. To achieve that goal a thorough validation process has to ve conducted. CEA's CAST3M code dedicated to GCR thermal-hydraulics has been validated against different test cases: academic interaction between natural convection and thermal radiation, small scale in-house THERCE experiments and large scale High Temperature Test Reactor benchmarks such as HTTR-VC benchmark. Coupling with neutronics is also an important modeling aspect for the determination of neutronic parameters such as neutronic coefficient (Doppler, moderator,...), critical position of control rods...CEA's CAST3M and CRONOS2 computer codes allow this coupling and a first example of coupled thermal-hydraulics/neutronics calculations has been performed. Comparison with experimental data will be the next step with High Temperature Test Reactor experimental results at nominal power

  20. Fabrication of Fast Reactor Fuel Pins for Test Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsten, G. [Institute for Applied Reactor Physics, Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany); Dippel, T. [Institute for Radiochemistry, Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany); Laue, H. J. [Institute for Applied Reactor Physics, Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1967-09-15

    An extended irradiation programme is being carried out for the fuel element development of the Karlsruhe fast breeder project. A very important task within the programme is the testing of plutonium-containing fuel pins in a fast-reactor environment. This paper deals with fabrication of such pins by our laboratories at Karlsruhe. For the fast reactor test positions at present envisaged a fuel with 15% plutonium and the uranium fully enriched is appropriate. Hie mixed oxide is both pelletized and vibro-compacted with smeared densities between 80 and 88% theoretical. The pin design is, for example, such that there are two gas plena at the top and bottom, and one blanket above the fuel with the fuel zone fitting to the test reactor core length. The specifications both for fuel and cladding have been adapted to the special purpose of a fast-breeder reactor - the outer dimensions, the choice of cladding and fuel types, the data used and the kind of tests outline the targets of the development. The fuel fabrication is described in detail, and also the powder line used for vibro-compaction. The source materials for the fuel are oxalate PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} from the UF{sub 6} process. The special problems of mechanical mixing and of plutonium homogeneity have been studied. The development of the sintering technique and grain characteristics for vibratory compactive fuel had to overcome serious problems in order to reach 82-83% theoretical. The performance of the pin fabrication needed a major effort in welding, manufacturing of fits and decontamination of the pin surfaces. This was a stimulation for the development of some very subtle control techniques, for example taking clear X-ray photographs and the tube testing. In general the selection of tests was a special task of the production routine. In conclusion the fabrication of the pins resulted in valuable experiences for the further development of fast reactor fuel elements. (author)

  1. Heat Pipe Reactor Dynamic Response Tests: SAFE-100 Reactor Core Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2005-01-01

    The SAFE-I00a test article at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center was used to simulate a variety of potential reactor transients; the SAFEl00a is a resistively heated, stainless-steel heat-pipe (HP)-reactor core segment, coupled to a gas-flow heat exchanger (HX). For these transients the core power was controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. This type of non-nuclear test is expected to provide reasonable approximation of reactor transient behavior because reactivity feedback is very simple in a compact fast reactor (simple, negative, and relatively monotonic temperature feedback, caused mostly by thermal expansion) and calculations show there are no significant reactivity effects associated with fluid in the HP (the worth of the entire inventory of Na in the core is .tests, the point kinetics model was based on core thermal expansion via deflection measurements. It was found that core deflection was a strung function of how the SAFE-100 modules were fabricated and assembled (in terms of straightness, gaps, and other tolerances). To remove the added variable of how this particular core expands as compared to a different concept, it was decided to use a temperature based feedback model (based on several thermocouples placed throughout the core).

  2. Gas dynamics models for an oscillating gaseous core fission reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijper, J.C.; Dam, H. van; Hoogenboom, J.E. (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands))

    1991-01-01

    Two one-dimensional models are developed for the investigation of the gas dynamical behaviour of the fuel gas in a cylindrical gaseous core fission reactor. By numerical and analytical calculations, it is shown that, for the case where a direct energy extraction mechanism (such as magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD)) is not present, increasing density oscillations occur in the gas. Also an estimate is made of the attainable direct energy conversion efficiency, for the case where a direct energy extraction mechanism is present. (author).

  3. Development history of the gas turbine modular high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brey, H.L.

    2001-01-01

    The development of the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) as an environmentally agreeable and efficient power source to support the generation of electricity and achieve a broad range of high temperature industrial applications has been an evolutionary process spanning over four decades. This process has included ongoing major development in both the HTGR as a nuclear energy source and associated power conversion systems from the steam cycle to the gas turbine. This paper follows the development process progressively through individual plant designs from early research of the 1950s to the present focus on the gas turbine modular HTGR. (author)

  4. Fuel assembly for gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yellowlees, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    A fuel assembly is described for gas-cooled nuclear reactor which consists of a wrapper tube within which are positioned a number of spaced apart beds in a stack, with each bed containing spherical coated particles of fuel; each of the beds has a perforated top and bottom plate; gaseous coolant passes successively through each of the beds; through each of the beds also passes a bypass tube; part of the gas travels through the bed and part passes through the bypass tube; the gas coolant which passes through both the bed and the bypass tube mixes in the space on the outlet side of the bed before entering the next bed

  5. Processing test of an upgraded mechanical design for PERMCAT reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgognoni, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.borgognoni@enea.i [Associazione ENEA-Euratom sulla Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati, Roma I-00044 (Italy); Demange, David; Doerr, Lothar [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institute for Technical Physics, Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Tosti, Silvano [Associazione ENEA-Euratom sulla Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati, Roma I-00044 (Italy); Welte, Stefan [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institute for Technical Physics, Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    The PERMCAT membrane reactor is a coaxial combination of a Pd/Ag permeator membrane and a catalyst bed. This device has been proposed for processing fusion reactor plasma exhaust gas. A stream containing tritium (up to 1% of tritium in different chemical forms such as water, methane or molecular hydrogen) is decontaminated in the PERMCAT by counter-current isotopic swamping with protium. Different mechanical designs of the membrane reactor have been proposed to improve robustness and lifetime. The ENEA membrane reactor uses a permeator tube with a length of about 500 mm produced via cold-rolling and diffusion welding of Pd/Ag thin foils: two stainless steel pre-tensioned bellows have been applied to the Pd/Ag tube in order to avoid any significant compressive and bending stresses due to the permeator tube elongation consequent to the hydrogen uptake. An experimental test campaign has been performed using this reactor in order to assess the influence of different operating parameters and to evaluate the overall performance (decontamination factor). Tests have been carried out on two reactor prototypes: a defect-free membrane with complete (infinite) hydrogen selectivity and not perm-selective membrane. In this last case, the study has been aimed at verifying the behaviour of the PERMCAT devices under non-normal (accidental) conditions in the view of providing information for future safety analysis. The paper will present the specific mechanical design and the experimental results of tests based on isotopic exchange between H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}.

  6. Modeling and Simulation of the Multi-module High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dan; Sun Jun; Sui Zhe; Xu Xiaolin; Ma Yuanle; Sun Yuliang

    2014-01-01

    The modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) is characterized with the inherent safety. To enhance its economic benefit, the capital cost of MHTGR can be decreased by combining more reactor modules into one unit and realize the batch constructions in the concept of modularization. In the research and design of the multi-module reactors, one difficulty is to clarify the coupling effects of different modules in operating the reactors due to the shared feed water and main steam systems in the secondary loop. In the advantages of real-time simulation and coupling calculations of different modules and sub-systems, the operation of multi-module reactors can be studied and analyzed to understand the range and extent of the coupling effects. In the current paper; the engineering simulator for the multi-module reactors was realized and able to run in high performance computers, based on the research experience of the HTR-PM engineering simulator. The models were detailed introduced including the primary and secondary loops. The steady state of full power operation was demonstrated to show the good performance of six-module reactors. Typical dynamic processes, such as adjusting feed water flow rates and shutting down one reactor; were also tested to study the coupling effects in multi-module reactors. (author)

  7. Long-term prospects for the gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, W.P.S.

    1982-01-01

    Towards the second half of a fifty-year time span the market for gas-cooled reactors as sources of high temperature process heat and as highly fuel efficient electricity producers should be reasonably bright, given a fair degree of technological maturity and consequent realisation of inherent economic advantages. Declining fossil resources and increasing prices, initially in oil and gas later in open-cast coal, provide the economic impetus towards substitution of nuclear for coal heat, not only in the generally accepted processes of coal conversion and steel-making but also for oil shale pyrolysis and electrothermal aluminium smelting. Around 2010, if not sooner, the need for uranium conservation should allow the market penetration of breeders and thorium-cycle reactors for which gas cooling has a potential techno-economic edge. (author)

  8. Long-term prospects for the gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, W.P.S.

    1983-01-01

    Towards the second half of a 50-year time span the market for gas-cooled reactors as sources of high-temperature process heat and as highly fuel-efficient electricity producers should be reasonably bright, given a fair degree of technological maturity and consequent realization of inherent economic advantages. Declining fossil resources and increasing prices, initially in oil and gas, later in open-cast coal, provide the economic impetus towards substitution of nuclear for coal heat, not only in the generally accepted processes of coal conversion and steel making but also for oil shale pyrolysis and electrothermal aluminium smelting. Around 2010, if not sooner, the need for uranium conservation should allow the market penetration of breeders and thorium-cycle reactors for which gas cooling has a potential techno-economic edge. (author)

  9. Emergency cooling system for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, R.K.; Burylo, P.S.

    1975-01-01

    The site of the gas-cooled reactor with direct-circuit gas turbine is preferably the sea coast. An emergency cooling system with safety valve and emergency feed-water addition is designed which affects at least a part of the reactor core coolant after leaving the core. The emergency cooling system includes a water emergency cooling circuit with heat exchanger for the core coolant. The safety valve releases water or steam from the emergency coolant circuit when a certain temperature is exceeded; this is, however, replaced by the emergency feed-water. If the gas turbine exhibits a high and low pressure turbine stage, which are flowed through by coolant one behind another, a part of the coolant can be removed in front of each part turbine by two valves and be added to the haet exchanger. (RW/LH) [de

  10. Penetration of gas into concrete during a leakage rate test of reactor containments and its significance for the drop in pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson L.-O.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the project described in the paper was to develop a simulation model that describes transient air pressure distribution in concrete in order to see if the leakage rates obtained from the Containment Integrated Leakage Rate Tests can be explained by the transient air pressurization of concrete pores inside the steel liner. A partial differential equation was derived which describes transient air pressure distribution in concrete pores. The model was validated against experimental results. The simulation model shows that there are significant air fluxes into the concrete structures that can explain the pressure drop during a leakage test.

  11. Off-gas recirculation system for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eppler, M.; Lade, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    According to the invention, it is suggested to provide a buffer vessel in the ring main of the off-gas recirculation system for off-gases of a nuclear reactor to which all chambers or vessels which may contain radioactively contaminated gases are connected, within the connection line to outside air. This is to prevent the immediate release of an appreciable amount of gas to the outside air due to pressure variations conditioned by the sequence of operations - e.g. on the filling of the coolant storage. After the improvement, the released gas may be reduced to the amount of gas corresponding to the leakage gas flow entering the ring mains system. (TK) [de

  12. Present state and future prospect of development of high temperature gas-cooled reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanokawa, Konomo

    1994-01-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors can supply the heat of about 1000degC, and the high efficiency and the high rate of heat utilization can be attained. Also they have the features of excellent inherent safety, the easiness of operation, the high burnup of fuel and so on. The heat utilization of atomic energy in addition to electric power generation is very important in view of the protection of global environment and the diversification of energy supply. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has advanced the construction of the high temperature engineering test and research reactor (HTTR) of 30 MW thermal output, aiming at attaining the criticality in 1998. The progress of the development of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor is described. For 18 years, the design study of the reactor was advanced together with the research and development of the reactor physics, fuel and materials, high temperature machinery and equipment and others, and the decision of the design standard and the development of computation codes. The main specification and the construction schedule are shown. The reactor building was almost completed, and the reactor containment vessel was installed. The plan of the research and development by using the HTTR is investigated. (K.I.)

  13. Gas blanket fueling of a tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gralnick, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is a speculative investigation of the potential of fueling a Tokamak by introducing a sufficiently large quantity of gaseous deuterium and tritium at the vacuum wall boundary. It is motivated by two factors: current generation tokamaks are, in a manner of speaking, fueled from the edge quite successfully as is evidenced by pulse lengths that are long compared to particle recycling times, and by rapid plasma density increase produced by gas puffing, alternative, deep penetration fueling techniques that have been proposed possess severe technological problems and large costs

  14. Fast reactor cover gas purification - The UK position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorley, A W

    1987-07-01

    The cover gas in the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) provides an inert gas blanket for both primary and secondary sodium circuits, ensures inert gas padding exists between the upper seals associated with penetrations through the reactor roof and provides argon to items of plant such as the control rods and the rotating shield and also to on line instruments such as the secondary circuit Katharometers. In order to meet these and other requirements purification of the argon cover gas is important to ensure: gas fed to purge gaps in the area of the magnetic hold device in the control rod mechanisms is not laden with sodium aerosols and reactive impurities (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}) which could cause blocking both within the gaps and pipelines; gas phase detection systems which provide early warning of steam generator failures or oil ingress into the sodium are not affected by the presence of gaseous impurities such as H{sub 2}, CO/CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}; mass transfer processes involving both corrosion products and interstitial atoms cannot be sustained in the cover gas environment due to the presence of high levels of O{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and carburising gases; background levels of radioactivity (eg Xe 133) are sufficiently low to enable gas phase detection of failed fuel pins, and the primary circuit gas blanket activity is sufficiently reduced so that discharges to the atmosphere are minimised. This paper describes how the PFR cover gas purification system is coping with these various items and how current thinking regarding the design of cover gas purification systems for a Civil Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR), where larger gas volumes and higher levels of radioactivity may be involved, is being guided by current experience on PFR. The paper also briefly review the experimental work planned to study aerosol and caesium behaviour in cove gas environments and discusses the behaviour of those impurities such as Zn, oil and N{sub 2} which are potentially damaging if certain

  15. Design of high temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shinzo; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Sudo, Yukio

    1994-09-01

    Construction of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is now underway to establish and upgrade basic technologies for HTGRs and to conduct innovative basic research at high temperatures. The HTTR is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW in thermal output and outlet coolant temperature of 850degC for rated operation and 950degC for high temperature test operation. It is planned to conduct various irradiation tests for fuels and materials, safety demonstration tests and nuclear heat application tests. JAERI received construction permit of HTTR reactor facility in February 1990 after 22 months of safety review. This report summarizes evaluation of nuclear and thermal-hydraulic characteristics, design outline of major systems and components, and also includes relating R and D result and safety evaluation. Criteria for judgment, selection of postulated events, major analytical conditions for anticipated operational occurrences and accidents, computer codes used in safety analysis and evaluation of each event are presented in the safety evaluation. (author)

  16. Proliferation resistance assessment of high temperature gas reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikamatsu N, M. A. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Santa Fe, Av. Carlos Lazo No. 100, Santa Fe, 01389 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Puente E, F., E-mail: midori.chika@gmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The Generation IV International Forum has established different objectives for the new generation of reactors to accomplish. These objectives are focused on sustain ability, safety, economics and proliferation resistance. This paper is focused on how the proliferation resistance of the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) is assessed and the advantages that these reactors present currently. In this paper, the focus will be on explaining why such reactors, HTGR, can achieve the goals established by the GIF and can present a viable option in terms of proliferation resistance, which is an issue of great importance in the field of nuclear energy generation. The reason why the HTGR are being targeted in this writing is that these reactors are versatile, and present different options from modular reactors to reactors with the same size as the ones that are being operated today. Besides their versatility, the HTGR has designed features that might improve on the overall sustain ability of the nuclear reactors. This is because the type of safety features and materials that are used open up options for industrial processes to be carried out; cogeneration for instance. There is a small section that mentions how HTGR s are being developed in the international sector in order to present the current world view in this type of technology and the further developments that are being sought. For the proliferation resistance section, the focus is on both the intrinsic and the extrinsic features of the nuclear systems. The paper presents a comparison between the features of Light Water Reactors (LWR) and the HTGR in order to be able to properly compare the most used technology today and one that is gaining international interest. (Author)

  17. Proliferation resistance assessment of high temperature gas reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikamatsu N, M. A.; Puente E, F.

    2014-10-01

    The Generation IV International Forum has established different objectives for the new generation of reactors to accomplish. These objectives are focused on sustain ability, safety, economics and proliferation resistance. This paper is focused on how the proliferation resistance of the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) is assessed and the advantages that these reactors present currently. In this paper, the focus will be on explaining why such reactors, HTGR, can achieve the goals established by the GIF and can present a viable option in terms of proliferation resistance, which is an issue of great importance in the field of nuclear energy generation. The reason why the HTGR are being targeted in this writing is that these reactors are versatile, and present different options from modular reactors to reactors with the same size as the ones that are being operated today. Besides their versatility, the HTGR has designed features that might improve on the overall sustain ability of the nuclear reactors. This is because the type of safety features and materials that are used open up options for industrial processes to be carried out; cogeneration for instance. There is a small section that mentions how HTGR s are being developed in the international sector in order to present the current world view in this type of technology and the further developments that are being sought. For the proliferation resistance section, the focus is on both the intrinsic and the extrinsic features of the nuclear systems. The paper presents a comparison between the features of Light Water Reactors (LWR) and the HTGR in order to be able to properly compare the most used technology today and one that is gaining international interest. (Author)

  18. Unusual occurrences in fast breeder test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapoor, R.P.; Srinivasan, G.; Ellappan, T.R.; Ramalingam, P.V.; Vasudevan, A.T.; Iyer, M.A.K.; Lee, S.M.; Bhoje, S.B.

    2000-01-01

    Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) is a 40 MWt/13.2 MWe sodium cooled mixed carbide fuelled reactor. Its main aim is to generate experience in the design, construction and operation of fast reactors including sodium systems and to serve as an irradiation facility for the development of fuel and structural materials for future fast reactors. It achieved first criticality in Oct 85 with Mark I core (70% PuC - 30% UC). Steam generator was put in service in Jan 93 and power was raised to 10.5 MWt in Dec 93. Turbine generator was synchronised to the grid in Jul 97. The indigenously developed mixed carbide fuel has achieved a burnup of 44,000 MW-d/t max at a linear heat rating of 320 W/cm max without any fuel clad failure. The commissioning and operation of sodium systems and components have been smooth and performance of major components, viz., sodium pumps, intermediate heat exchangers and once through sodium heated steam generators (SG) have been excellent. There have been three minor incidents of Na/NaK leaks during the past 14 years, which are described in the paper. There have been no incident of a tube leak in SG. However, three incidents of water leaks from water / steam headers have been detailed. The plant has encountered some unusual occurrences, which were critically analysed and remedial measures, in terms of system and procedural modifications, incorporated to prevent recurrence. This paper describes unusual occurrences of fuel handling incident of May 1987, main boiler feed pump seizure in Apr 1992, reactivity transients in Nov 1994 and Apr 1995, and malfunctioning of the core cover plate mechanism in Jul 1995. These incidents have resulted in long plant shutdowns. During the course of investigation, various theoretical and experimental studies were carried out for better understanding of the phenomena and several inspection techniques and tools were developed resulting in enriching the technology of sodium cooled reactors. FBTR has 36 neutronic and process

  19. Advanced burner test reactor preconceptual design report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y. I.; Finck, P. J.; Grandy, C.; Cahalan, J.; Deitrich, L.; Dunn, F.; Fallin, D.; Farmer, M.; Fanning, T.; Kim, T.; Krajtl, L.; Lomperski, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Momozaki, Y.; Sienicki, J.; Park, Y.; Tang, Y.; Reed, C.; Tzanos, C; Wiedmeyer, S.; Yang, W.; Chikazawa, Y.; JAEA

    2008-12-16

    The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand, to address nuclear waste management concerns and to promote non-proliferation. Implementation of the GNEP requires development and demonstration of three major technologies: (1) Light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel separations technologies that will recover transuranics to be recycled for fuel but not separate plutonium from other transuranics, thereby providing proliferation-resistance; (2) Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) based on a fast spectrum that transmute the recycled transuranics to produce energy while also reducing the long term radiotoxicity and decay heat loading in the repository; and (3) Fast reactor fuel recycling technologies to recover and refabricate the transuranics for repeated recycling in the fast reactor system. The primary mission of the ABR Program is to demonstrate the transmutation of transuranics recovered from the LWR spent fuel, and hence the benefits of the fuel cycle closure to nuclear waste management. The transmutation, or burning of the transuranics is accomplished by fissioning and this is most effectively done in a fast spectrum. In the thermal spectrum of commercial LWRs, some transuranics capture neutrons and become even heavier transuranics rather than being fissioned. Even with repeated recycling, only about 30% can be transmuted, which is an intrinsic limitation of all thermal spectrum reactors. Only in a fast spectrum can all transuranics be effectively fissioned to eliminate their long-term radiotoxicity and decay heat. The Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) is the first step in demonstrating the transmutation technologies. It directly supports development of a prototype full-scale Advanced Burner Reactor, which would be followed by commercial deployment of ABRs. The primary objectives of the ABTR are: (1) To demonstrate reactor-based transmutation of transuranics as part of an

  20. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; J. E. Daw; S. C. Taylor

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  1. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.L.; Knudson, D.L.; Condie, K.G.; Daw, J.E.; Taylor, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  2. Gas-cooled reactor power systems for space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    Efficiency and mass characteristics for four gas-cooled reactor power system configurations in the 2- to 20-MWe power range are modeled. The configurations use direct and indirect Brayton cycles with and without regeneration in the power conversion loop. The prismatic ceramic core of the reactor consists of several thousand pencil-shaped tubes made from a homogeneous mixture of moderator and fuel. The heat rejection system is found to be the major contributor to system mass, particularly at high power levels. A direct, regenerated Brayton cycle with helium working fluid permits high efficiency and low specific mass for a 10-MWe system

  3. The UK gas-cooled reactor programme - Progress report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askew, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper summarises key developments during 1988 on the 26 Magnox reactors and 14 AGRs now operating in the UK. Details are given of long-term safety reviews of the Berkeley and Bradwell Magnox stations which resulted in a decision by CEGB to cease generation at Berkeley but to continue operation at Bradwell. The summary of operating experience with the AGRs concentrates on the completion of construction and successful commissioning of the second generation AGRs at Heysham 2 and Torness. An appended article by John Wilson, Deputy Director of the UKAEA's gas-cooled reactor R and D programme, gives details of the aims and achievements of the programme during 1988. (author)

  4. Gas Cooled Fast Reactors: Recent advances and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poette, C.; Guedeney, P.; Stainsby, R.; Mikityuk, K.; Knol, S.

    2013-01-01

    Gas Cooled Fast Reactors: Conclusion - GFR: an attractive longer term option allowing to combine Fast spectrum & Helium coolant benefits; • Innovative SiC fuel cladding solutions were found; • A first design confirming the encouraging potential of the reactor system Design improvements are nevertheless recommended and interesting tracks have been identified (core & system design, DHR system); • The GFR requires large R&D needs to confirm its potential (fuel & core materials, specific Helium technology); • ALLEGRO prototype studies are the first step and are drawing the R&D priorities

  5. Advanced test reactor testing experience-past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, Frances M.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The physical configuration of the ATR, a 4-leaf clover shape, allows the reactor to be operated at different power levels in the corner 'lobes' to allow for different testing conditions for multiple simultaneous experiments. The combination of high flux (maximum thermal neutron fluxes of 1E15 neutrons per square centimeter per second and maximum fast [E>1.0 MeV] neutron fluxes of 5E14 neutrons per square centimeter per second) and large test volumes (up to 122 cm long and 12.7 cm diameter) provide unique testing opportunities. The current experiments in the ATR are for a variety of test sponsors - US government, foreign governments, private researchers, and commercial companies needing neutron irradiation services. There are three basic types of test configurations in the ATR. The simplest configuration is the sealed static capsule, which places the capsule in direct contact with the primary coolant. The next level of experiment complexity is an instrumented lead experiment, which allows for active control of experiment conditions during the irradiation. The most complex experiment is the pressurized water loop, in which the test sample can be subjected to the exact environment of a pressurized water reactor. For future research, some ATR modifications and enhancements are currently planned. This paper provides more details on some of the ATR capabilities, key design features, experiments, and future plans

  6. Genetic algorithms and artificial neural networks for loading pattern optimisation of advanced gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziver, A.K. E-mail: a.k.ziver@imperial.ac.uk; Pain, C.C; Carter, J.N.; Oliveira, C.R.E. de; Goddard, A.J.H.; Overton, R.S

    2004-03-01

    A non-generational genetic algorithm (GA) has been developed for fuel management optimisation of Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors, which are operated by British Energy and produce around 20% of the UK's electricity requirements. An evolutionary search is coded using the genetic operators; namely selection by tournament, two-point crossover, mutation and random assessment of population for multi-cycle loading pattern (LP) optimisation. A detailed description of the chromosomes in the genetic algorithm coded is presented. Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) have been constructed and trained to accelerate the GA-based search during the optimisation process. The whole package, called GAOPT, is linked to the reactor analysis code PANTHER, which performs fresh fuel loading, burn-up and power shaping calculations for each reactor cycle by imposing station-specific safety and operational constraints. GAOPT has been verified by performing a number of tests, which are applied to the Hinkley Point B and Hartlepool reactors. The test results giving loading pattern (LP) scenarios obtained from single and multi-cycle optimisation calculations applied to realistic reactor states of the Hartlepool and Hinkley Point B reactors are discussed. The results have shown that the GA/ANN algorithms developed can help the fuel engineer to optimise loading patterns in an efficient and more profitable way than currently available for multi-cycle refuelling of AGRs. Research leading to parallel GAs applied to LP optimisation are outlined, which can be adapted to present day LWR fuel management problems.

  7. Operating experiences since rise-to-power test in high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochio, Daisuke; Watanabe, Shuji; Motegi, Toshihiro; Kawano, Shuichi; Kameyama, Yasuhiko; Sekita, Kenji; Kawasaki, Kozo

    2007-03-01

    The rise-to-power test of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) was actually started in April 2000. The rated thermal power of 30MW and the rated reactor outlet coolant temperature of 850degC were achieved in the middle of Dec. 2001. After that, the reactor thermal power of 30MW and the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950degC were achieved in the final rise-to-power test in April 2004. After receiving the operation licensing at 850degC, the safety demonstration tests have conducted to demonstrate inherent safety features of the HTGRs as well as to obtain the core and plant transient data for validation of safety analysis codes and for establishment of safety design and evaluation technologies. This paper summarizes the HTTR operating experiences for six years from start of the rise-to-power test that are categorized into (1) Operating experiences related to advanced gas-cooled reactor design, (2) Operating experiences for improvement of the performance, (3) Operating experiences due to fail of system and components. (author)

  8. Metabolic modeling of synthesis gas fermentation in bubble column reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Gomez, Jose A; Höffner, Kai; Barton, Paul I; Henson, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    A promising route to renewable liquid fuels and chemicals is the fermentation of synthesis gas (syngas) streams to synthesize desired products such as ethanol and 2,3-butanediol. While commercial development of syngas fermentation technology is underway, an unmet need is the development of integrated metabolic and transport models for industrially relevant syngas bubble column reactors. We developed and evaluated a spatiotemporal metabolic model for bubble column reactors with the syngas fermenting bacterium Clostridium ljungdahlii as the microbial catalyst. Our modeling approach involved combining a genome-scale reconstruction of C. ljungdahlii metabolism with multiphase transport equations that govern convective and dispersive processes within the spatially varying column. The reactor model was spatially discretized to yield a large set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in time with embedded linear programs (LPs) and solved using the MATLAB based code DFBAlab. Simulations were performed to analyze the effects of important process and cellular parameters on key measures of reactor performance including ethanol titer, ethanol-to-acetate ratio, and CO and H2 conversions. Our computational study demonstrated that mathematical modeling provides a complementary tool to experimentation for understanding, predicting, and optimizing syngas fermentation reactors. These model predictions could guide future cellular and process engineering efforts aimed at alleviating bottlenecks to biochemical production in syngas bubble column reactors.

  9. Description of the advanced gas cooled type of reactor (AGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonboel, E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1996-11-01

    The present report comprises a technical description of the Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (AGR), a reactor type which has only been built in Great Britain. 14 AGR reactors have been built, located at 6 different sites and each station is supplied with twin-reactors. The Torness AGR plant on the Lothian coastline of Scotland, 60 km east of Edinburgh, has been chosen as the reference plant and is described in some detail. Data on the other 6 stations, Dungeness B, Hinkely Point B, Hunterston G, Hartlepool, Heysham I and Heysham II, are given only in tables with a summary of design data. Where specific data for Torness AGR has not been available, corresponding data from other AGR plans has been used, primarily from Heysham II, which belongs to the same generation of AGR reactors. The information presented is based on the open literature. The report is written as a part of the NKS/RAK-2 subproject 3: `Reactors in Nordic Surroundings`, which comprises a description of nuclear power plants neighbouring the Nordic countries. (au) 11 refs.

  10. Description of the advanced gas cooled type of reactor (AGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonboel, E.

    1996-11-01

    The present report comprises a technical description of the Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (AGR), a reactor type which has only been built in Great Britain. 14 AGR reactors have been built, located at 6 different sites and each station is supplied with twin-reactors. The Torness AGR plant on the Lothian coastline of Scotland, 60 km east of Edinburgh, has been chosen as the reference plant and is described in some detail. Data on the other 6 stations, Dungeness B, Hinkely Point B, Hunterston G, Hartlepool, Heysham I and Heysham II, are given only in tables with a summary of design data. Where specific data for Torness AGR has not been available, corresponding data from other AGR plans has been used, primarily from Heysham II, which belongs to the same generation of AGR reactors. The information presented is based on the open literature. The report is written as a part of the NKS/RAK-2 subproject 3: 'Reactors in Nordic Surroundings', which comprises a description of nuclear power plants neighbouring the Nordic countries. (au) 11 refs

  11. Gas core reactor power plants designed for low proliferation potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowry, L.L.

    1977-09-01

    The feasibility of gas core nuclear power plants to provide adequate power while maintaining a low inventory and low divertability of fissile material is studied. Four concepts were examined. Two used a mixture of UF 6 and helium in the reactor cavities, and two used a uranium-argon plasma, held away from the walls by vortex buffer confinement. Power levels varied from 200 to 2500 MWth. Power plant subsystems were sized to determine their fissile material inventories. All reactors ran, with a breeding ratio of unity, on 233 U born from thorium. Fission product removal was continuous. Newly born 233 U was removed continuously from the breeding blanket and returned to the reactor cavities. The 2500-MWth power plant contained a total of 191 kg of 233 U. Less than 4 kg could be diverted before the reactor shut down. The plasma reactor power plants had smaller inventories. In general, inventories were about a factor of 10 less than those in current U.S. power reactors

  12. The Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation Facilities and Capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Blaine Grover; Raymond V. Furstenau

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. The ATR is a very versatile facility with a wide variety of experimental test capabilities for providing the environment needed in an irradiation experiment. These different capabilities include passive sealed capsule experiments, instrumented and/or temperature-controlled experiments, and pressurized water loop experiment facilities. The ATR has enhanced capabilities in experiment monitoring and control systems for instrumented and/or temperature controlled experiments. The control systems utilize feedback from thermocouples in the experiment to provide a custom blended flowing inert gas mixture to control the temperature in the experiments. Monitoring systems have also been utilized on the exhaust gas lines from the experiment to monitor different parameters, such as fission gases for fuel experiments, during irradiation. ATR's unique control system provides axial flux profiles in the experiments, unperturbed by axially positioned control components, throughout each reactor operating cycle and over the duration of test programs requiring many years of irradiation. The ATR irradiation positions vary in diameter from 1.6 cm (0.625 inches) to 12.7 cm (5.0 inches) over an active core length of 122 cm (48.0 inches). Thermal and fast neutron fluxes can be adjusted radially across the core depending on the needs of individual test programs. This paper will discuss the different irradiation capabilities available and the cost/benefit issues related to each capability. Examples of different experiments will also be discussed to demonstrate the use of the capabilities and facilities at ATR for performing irradiation experiments

  13. Analysis of calculated neutron flux response at detectors of G.A. Siwabessy multipurpose reactor (RSG-GAS Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taryo, Taswanda

    2002-01-01

    Multi Purpose Reactor G.A. Siwabessy (RSG-GAS) reactor core possesses 4 fission-chamber detectors to measure intermediate power level of RSG-GAS reactor. Another detector, also fission-chamber detector, is intended to measure power level of RSG-GAS reactor. To investigate influence of space to the neutron flux values for each detector measuring intermediate and power levels has been carried out. The calculation was carried out using combination of WIMS/D4 and CITATION-3D code and focused on calculation of neutron flux at different detector location of RSG-GAS typical working core various scenarios. For different scenarios, all calculation results showed that each detector, located at different location in the RSG-GAS reactor core, causes different neutron flux occurred in the reactor core due to spatial time effect

  14. Gas characterization system software acceptance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, C.V.

    1996-01-01

    This document details the Software Acceptance Testing of gas characterization systems. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases

  15. Gas characterization system software acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, C.V.

    1996-01-01

    This document details the results of software acceptance testing of gas characterization systems. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases

  16. Gas-cooled fast reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rickard, C.L.; Simon, R.H.; Buttemer, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    Initial conceptual design work on the GCFR began in the USA in the early 1960s and since the later 1960s has proceeded with considerable international cooperation. A 300 MWe GCFR demonstration plant employing three main cooling loops is currently being developed at General Atomic. A major preapplication licensing review of this demonstration plant was initiated in 1971 leading in 1974 to publication of a Safety Evaluation Report by the USAEC Directorate of Licensing. The preapplication review is continuing by addressing areas of concern identified in this report such that a major part of the work necessary to support the actual licensing of a GCFR demonstration plant has been established. The safety performance of the GCFR demonstration plant is based upon its inherent safety characteristics among which are the single phase and chemically inert coolant which is not activated and has a low reactivity worth, the negative core power and temperature reactivity coefficients and the small and negative steam reactivity worth. Recent studies of larger core designs indicate that as the reactor size increases central fuel, clad and coolant reactivity worths decrease and the Doppler coefficient becomes more negative. These inherent safety characteristics are complemented by safety design features such as enclosing the entire primary coolant system within a prestressed concrete pressure vessel (PCRV), providing two independent and diverse shutdown systems and residual heat removal (RHR) systems, limiting the worth of control rods to less than $1, employing pressure-equalized fuel rods, a core supported rigidly at its upper end and otherwise unrestrained and coolant downflow within the core to enhance debris removal should local melting occur. The structurally redundant PCRV design allows the potential depressurization leak area to be controlled and, since the PCRV is located within a containment building, coolant is present even after a depressurization accident and each RHR

  17. Contribution to the study of the transmission of ultrasound at a solid - gas - liquid interface. Application to non-destructive testing of the fourth generation of liquid sodium cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paumel, K.

    2008-01-01

    One of the ways envisaged for the ultrasonic inspection of the fourth generation of liquid sodium cooled reactors is to use a transducer immersed in sodium. A good acoustic coupling of the transducer with sodium is needed. However, without special precautions, it is not obtained in all situations. The goal is to study the conditions for the appearance of a very bad acoustic coupling. Under certain conditions, the non wetting of the surface of the transducer by sodium causes trapping gas pockets in the roughness. Moreover, increasing amounts of surface gas fraction induces a sharp drop in the transmission of ultrasound. A first quasi-static analysis based on the crevice model allows to study the dependence of the stability of these gas pockets on the temperature, the hydrostatic pressure, and the level of dissolved gas saturation of the liquid. Modelling the dynamic behaviour of a simple gas pocket geometry and conducting an in-water viewing experience show that the gas surface fraction does not increase as a result of sound pressure transducer. In order to develop a parametric study based on the size and gas surface fraction, several samples are made. An ultrasonic experiment using various frequencies can measure the transmission through these samples. Meanwhile, three different models describing the experimental setup are proposed. The comparison of experimental and analytical results (of the last model) show a similar pattern of the dependence of the transmission on the various parameters. (author) [fr

  18. Gas reactor international cooperative program interim report. Pebble bed reactor fuel cycle evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Nuclear fuel cycles were evaluated for the Pebble Bed Gas Cooled Reactor under development in the Federal Republic of Germany. The basic fuel cycle specified for the HTR-K and PNP is well qualified and will meet the requirements of these reactors. Twenty alternate fuel cycles are described, including high-conversion cycles, net-breeding cycles, and proliferation-resistant cycles. High-conversion cycles, which have a high probability of being successfully developed, promise a significant improvement in resource utilization. Proliferation-resistant cycles, also with a high probability of successful development, compare very favorably with those for other types of reactors. Most of the advanced cycles could be adapted to first-generation pebble bed reactors with no significant modifications

  19. CANDU reactors and greenhouse gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andseta, S.; Thompson, M.J.; Jarrell, J.P.; Pendergast, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper was originally presented at the 11th Pacific Basin Nuclear Conference, Banff, Alberta, Canada, May 3-7, 1998. It has been updated to include additional lifecycle data on chemical releases from ore treatment and CANDU fuel fabrication. It is sometimes stated that nuclear power plants can supply electricity with zero emissions of greenhouse gases. In fact, consideration of the entire fuel cycle indicates that some greenhouse gases are generated during their construction and decommissioning and by the preparation of fuel and other materials required for their operation. This follows from the use of fossil fuels in the preparation of materials and during the construction and decommissioning of the plants. This paper reviews life cycle studies of several different kinds of power plants. Greenhouse gases generated by fossil fuels during the preparation of fuel and heavy water used by operating CANDU power plants are estimated. The total greenhouse gas emissions from CANDU nuclear plants, per unit of electricity ultimately produced, are very small in comparison with emissions from most other types of power plants. (author)

  20. CANDU reactors and greenhouse gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andseta, S.; Thompson, M.J.; Jarrell, J.P.; Pendergast, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper was originally presented at the 11th Pacific Basin Nuclear Conference, Banff, Alberta, Canada, May 3-7, 1998. It has been updated to include additional lifecycle data on chemical releases from ore treatment and CANDU fuel fabrication. It is sometimes stated that nuclear power plants can supply electricity with zero emissions of greenhouse gases. In fact, consideration of the entire fuel cycle indicates that some greenhouse gases are generated during their construction and decommissioning and by the preparation of fuel and other materials required for their operation. This follows from the use of fossil fuels in the preparation of materials and during the construction and decommissioning of the plants. This paper reviews life cycle studies of several different kinds of power plants. Greenhouse gases generated by fossil fuels during the preparation of fuel and heavy water used by operating CANDU power plants are estimated. The total greenhouse gas emissions from CANDU nuclear plants, per unit of electricity ultimately produced, are very small in comparison with emissions from most other types of power plants. (author)

  1. Review of Transient Fuel Test Results at Sandia National Laboratories and the Potential for Future Fast Reactor Fuel Transient Testing in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A.; Pickard, Paul S.; Parma, Edward J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Kelly, John; Tikare, Veena [Sandia National Laboratories, Org 6872 MS-1146, PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Reactor driven transient tests of fast reactor fuels may be required to support the development and certification of new fuels for Fast Reactors. The results of the transient fuel tests will likely be needed to support licensing and to provide validation data to support the safety case for a variety of proposed fast fuel types and reactors. In general reactor driven transient tests are used to identify basic phenomenology during reactor transients and to determine the fuel performance limits and margins to failure during design basis accidents such as loss of flow, loss of heat sink, and reactivity insertion accidents. This paper provides a summary description of the previous Sandia Fuel Disruption and Transient Axial Relocation tests that were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission almost 25 years ago. These tests consisted of a number of capsule tests and flowing gas tests that used fission heating to disrupt fresh and irradiated MOX fuel. The behavior of the fuel disruption, the generation of aerosols and the melting and relocation of fuel and cladding was recorded on high speed cinematography. This paper will present videos of the fuel disruption that was observed in these tests which reveal stark differences in fuel behavior between fresh and irradiated fuel. Even though these tests were performed over 25 years ago, their results are still relevant to today's reactor designs. These types of transient tests are again being considered by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative to support the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership because of the need to perform tests on metal fuels and transuranic fuels. Because the Annular Core Research Reactor is the only transient test facility available within the US, a brief summary of Sandia's continued capability to perform these tests in the ACRR will also be provided. (authors)

  2. Overview of gas cooled reactors' applications with CATHARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genevieve Geffraye; Fabrice Bentivoglio; Anne Messie; Alain Ruby; Manuel Saez; Nicolas Tauveron; Ola Widlund

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: For about four years, CEA has launched feasibility studies of future nuclear advanced systems in a consistent series of Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR) ranging from thermal reactors, as the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) for the mid term, to fast reactors (GFR) for the long term. Thermal hydraulic performances are a key issue for the core design, the evaluation of the thermal stresses on the structures and the decay heat removal systems. This analysis requires a 1D code able to simulate the whole reactor, including the core, the vessel, the piping and the components (turbine, compressors, heat exchangers). CATHARE is the reference code developed and extensively validated in collaboration between CEA, EDF, IRSN and FRAMATOME-ANP for the French Pressurized Water Reactors. CATHARE has the capabilities to model a Gas Cooled Reactor using standard 0D and 1D modules with some adaptations to treat the specificities of the GCR designs. In this paper, the different adaptations are presented and discussed. The direct coupling of a Gas Cooled Reactor with a closed gas-turbine cycle leads to a specific dynamic plant behaviour and a specific turbomachinery module has been developed. The thermal reactors' core consists of hexagonal graphite blocks with an annular-fueled region surrounded by reflectors and a special attention is paid on the thermal modeling of such a core leading to a quasi-2D thermal description. First designs of the VHTR are proposed and are based on an indirect cycle concept with a primary circuit, cooled by helium, and containing the core and a circulator. The core power is transmitted to the secondary circuit via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The secondary circuit contains a turbine and a compressor coupled on a single shaft. It uses a mixture of helium and nitrogen, in order to benefit from both the favourable thermal properties of helium for the heat exchanger, and from existing experience of turbomachines using

  3. State of development of gas cooled reactors in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebennik, V.N.; Mosevitskij, I.S.

    1991-01-01

    In the context of the programme for the development of gas-cooled reactors in the USSR it is reported that pilot plants with VGR-50 MW(el) and VG-400 MW(el) have been developed up to the stage of engineering design and that now the efforts are concentrated on the project of pilot-commercial reactor plant VGM (PCRP VGM) of a modular type with unit thermal power of 200-250 MW. The installation is designed to solve the main scientific and engineering problems of construction of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors, to test equipment components, and to show advantages of the given type of installations having the enhanced safety and capability to generate high-potential heat. The status of work on the PCRP VGM project is described. 3 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  4. Medium-size high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peinado, C.O.; Koutz, S.L.

    1980-08-01

    This report summarizes high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) experience for the 40-MW(e) Peach Bottom Nuclear Generating Station of Philadelphia Electric Company and the 330-MW(e) Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station of the Public Service Company of Colorado. Both reactors are graphite moderated and helium cooled, operating at approx. 760 0 C (1400 0 F) and using the uranium/thorium fuel cycle. The plants have demonstrated the inherent safety characteristics, the low activation of components, and the high efficiency associated with the HTGR concept. This experience has been translated into the conceptual design of a medium-sized 1170-MW(t) HTGR for generation of 450 MW of electric power. The concept incorporates inherent HTGR safety characteristics [a multiply redundant prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), a graphite core, and an inert single-phase coolant] and engineered safety features

  5. Acoustical environment of gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blevins, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for acoustical analysis of gas-cooled nuclear reactors in terms of the sources of sound, the propagation of sound about the coolant circuit and the response of reactor structures to sound, are described. Sources of sound that are considered are circulators, jets, vortex shedding and separated flow. Circulators are generally the dominant source of sound. At low frequency the sound propagates one dimensionally through the ducts and cavities of the reactor. At high frequency the sound excites closely spaced two- and three-dimensional acoustic modes, and the resultant sound field can be described only statistically. The sound excites plate and shell structures within the coolant circuit. Secondary steam piping can also be excited by pumps and valves. Formulations are presented for the resultant vibration. Vibration-induced damage is also reviewed. (author)

  6. Description of the magnox type of gas cooled reactor (MAGNOX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, S.E.; Nonboel, E.

    1999-05-01

    The present report comprises a technical description of the MAGNOX type of reactor as it has been build in Great Britain. The Magnox reactor is gas cooled (CO 2 ) with graphite moderators. The fuels is natural uranium in metallic form, canned with a magnesium alloy called 'Magnox'. The Calder Hall Magnox plant on the Lothian coastline of Scotland, 60 km east of Edinburgh, has been chosen as the reference plant and is described in some detail. Data on the other stations are given in tables with a summary of design data. Special design features are also shortly described. Where specific data for Calder Hall Magnox has not been available, corresponding data from other Magnox plants has been used. The information presented is based on the open literature. The report is written as a part of the NKS/RAK-2 sub-project 3: 'Reactors in Nordic Surroundings', which comprises a description of nuclear power plants neighbouring the Nordic countries. (au)

  7. Non-equilibrium plasma reactor for natrual gas processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shair, F.H.; Ravimohan, A.L.

    1974-01-01

    A non-equilibrium plasma reactor for natural gas processing into ethane and ethylene comprising means of producing a non-equilibrium chemical plasma wherein selective conversion of the methane in natural gas to desired products of ethane and ethylene at a pre-determined ethane/ethylene ratio in the chemical process may be intimately controlled and optimized at a high electrical power efficiency rate by mixing with a recycling gas inert to the chemical process such as argon, helium, or hydrogen, reducing the residence time of the methane in the chemical plasma, selecting the gas pressure in the chemical plasma from a wide range of pressures, and utilizing pulsed electrical discharge producing the chemical plasma. (author)

  8. Power Conversion Study for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh; Richard Moore; Robert Barner

    2005-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating a Brayton cycle efficiency improvement on a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as part of Generation-IV nuclear engineering research initiative. There are some technical issues to be resolved before the selection of the final design of the high temperature gas cooled reactor, called as a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is supposed to be built at the INEEL by year 2017. The technical issues are the selection of the working fluid, direct vs. indirect cycle, power cycle type, the optimized design in terms of a number of intercoolers, and others. In this paper, we investigated a number of working fluids for the power conversion loop, direct versus indirect cycle, the effect of intercoolers, and other thermal hydraulics issues. However, in this paper, we present part of the results we have obtained. HYSYS computer code was used along with a computer model developed using Visual Basic computer language

  9. Fuel performance and fission product behaviour in gas cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Validation of Predictive Methods for Fuel and Fission Product Behaviour was organized within the frame of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. This International Working Group serves as a forum for exchange of information on national programmes, provides advice to the IAEA on international co-operative activities in advanced technologies of gas cooled reactors (GCRs), and supports the conduct of these activities. The objectives of this CRP were to review and document the status of the experimental data base and of the predictive methods for GCR fuel performance and fission product behaviour; and to verify and validate methodologies for the prediction of fuel performance and fission product transport. Refs, figs, tabs.

  10. Fuel performance and fission product behaviour in gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Validation of Predictive Methods for Fuel and Fission Product Behaviour was organized within the frame of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. This International Working Group serves as a forum for exchange of information on national programmes, provides advice to the IAEA on international co-operative activities in advanced technologies of gas cooled reactors (GCRs), and supports the conduct of these activities. The objectives of this CRP were to review and document the status of the experimental data base and of the predictive methods for GCR fuel performance and fission product behaviour; and to verify and validate methodologies for the prediction of fuel performance and fission product transport

  11. Gas cooled fast reactor background, facilities, industries and programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.

    1980-05-01

    This report was prepared at the request of the OECD-NEA Coordinating Group on Gas Cooled Fast Reactor Development and it represents a contribution (Vol.II) to the jointly sponsored Vol.I (GCFR Status Report). After a chapter on background with a brief description of the early studies and the activities in the various countries involved in the collaborative programme (Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom and United States), the report describes the facilities available in those countries and at the Gas Breeder Reactor Association and the industrial capabilities relevant to the GCFR. Finally the programmes are described briefly with programme charts, conclusions and recommendations are given. (orig.) [de

  12. Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, E.; Chrzanowski, J.; Gentile, C.; Parsells, R.; Rule, K.; Strykowsky, R.; Viola, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D and D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D and D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget

  13. Developing the MAPLE materials test reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.G.; Lidstone, R.F.; Donnelly, J.V.

    1992-05-01

    MAPLE-MTR is a new multipurpose research facility being planned by AECL Research as a possible replacement for the 35-year-old NRU reactor. In developing the MAPLE-MTR concept, AECL is starting from the recent design and licensing experience with the MAPLE-X10 reactor. By starting from technology developed to support the MAPLE-X10 design and adapting it to produce a concept that satisfies the requirements of fuel channel materials testing and fuel irradiation programs, AECL expects to minimize the need for major advances in nuclear technology (e.g., fuel, heat transfer). Formulation of the MAPLE-MTR concept is at an early stage. This report describes the irradiation requirements of the research areas, how these needs are translated into design criteria for the project and elements of the preliminary design concept

  14. An integration scheme for stiff solid-gas reactor models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjarne A. Foss

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Many dynamic models encounter numerical integration problems because of a large span in the dynamic modes. In this paper we develop a numerical integration scheme for systems that include a gas phase, and solid and liquid phases, such as a gas-solid reactor. The method is based on neglecting fast dynamic modes and exploiting the structure of the algebraic equations. The integration method is suitable for a large class of industrially relevant systems. The methodology has proven remarkably efficient. It has in practice performed excellent and been a key factor for the success of the industrial simulator for electrochemical furnaces for ferro-alloy production.

  15. Gas-cooled reactors for advanced terrestrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesavan, K.; Lance, J.R.; Jones, A.R.; Spurrier, F.R.; Peoples, J.A.; Porter, C.A.; Bresnahan, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Conceptual design of a power plant on an inert gas cooled nuclear coupled to an open, air Brayton power conversion cycle is presented. The power system, called the Westinghouse GCR/ATA (Gas-Cooled Reactors for Advanced Terrestrial Applications), is designed to meet modern military needs, and offers the advantages of secure, reliable and safe electrical power. The GCR/ATA concept is adaptable over a range of 1 to 10 MWe power output. Design descriptions of a compact, air-transportable forward base unit for 1 to 3 MWe output and a fixed-base, permanent installation for 3 to 10 MWe output are presented

  16. Gas-cooled reactor application for a university campus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colak, Ue.; Kadiroghlu, O.K.; Soekmen, C.N.; Schmitt, H.

    1991-01-01

    Large urban areas with unfavourable topographic and meteorological conditions suffer severe air pollution during the winter months. Use of low grade lignites, imported higher quality coal or imported fuel oil are the sources of air pollution in the form of sulphur dioxide, fly ash and soot. Large housing complexes or old and historical locations within the city are in need of pollution free centralized district heating systems. Natural gas imported from the Soviet Union is a solution for this problem. Lack of gas distribution network for high pressure gas within the city is the main bottle-neck for the heating systems utilizing natural gas. Concern of the safety of flammable high pressure gas circulating within the city is another drawback for the natural gas heating systems. Nuclear district heating is an environmentally viable option worth looking into it. Localized urban nuclear heating is an interesting solution for large urban areas with old and historical character. The results of a feasibility study on the HGR application for the Hacettepe University presented here, summarizes the concept of gas-cooled heating reactors specially designed for urban centers. The inherently safe characteristics of the pebble bed heating reactor makes localized urban nuclear heating a viable alternative to other heat sources. An economical analysis of various heat sources with equal power levels is done for the Beytepe campus of Hacettepe University in Ankara. Under special boundary conditions, the price for heat generation can be much lower for nuclear heating with GHR 20 than for hard coal or fuel oil. It is also possible that if the price escalation rate for natural gas exceeds 3%, then nuclear heating with GHR can be more competitive. It is concluded that the nuclear heating of Beytepe campus with a GHR 20 is feasible and economical. (author) 3 figs., 5 refs

  17. Performance tests for integral reactor nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Dong-Seong; Yim, Jeong-Sik; Lee, Chong-Tak; Kim, Han-Soo; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Cheon, Jin-Sik; Oh, Je-Yong

    2006-02-15

    An integral type reactor SMART plans to utilize metallic Zr-U fuel which is Zr-based alloy with 34{approx}38 wt% U. In order to verify the technologies for the design and manufacturing of the fuel and get a license, performance tests were carried out. Experimental Fuel Assembly (EFA) manufactured in KAERI is being successfully irradiated in the MIR reactor of RIAR from September 4 2004, and it has achieved burnup of 0.21 g/cc as of January 25 2006. Thermal properties of irradiated Zr-U fuel were measured. Up to the phase transformation temperature, thermal diffusivity increased linearly in proportion to temperature. However its dependence on the burnup was not significant. RIA tests with 4 unirradiated Zr-U fuel rods were performed in Kurchatov Institute to establish a safety criterion. In the case of the un-irradiated Zr-U fuel, the energy deposition during the control rod ejection accident should be less than 172 cal/g to prevent the failure accompanying fuel fragmentation and dispersal. Finally the irradiation tests of fuel rods have been performed at HANARO. The HITE-2 test was successfully completed up to a burnup of 0.31 g/cc. The HITE-3 test began in February 2004 and will be continued up to a target burnup of 0.6 g/cc.

  18. Operation, test, research and development of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). (FY2005)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) constructed at the Oarai Research and Development Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is the first high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan, which is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW of thermal power. The full power operation of 30 MW was attained in December, 2001, and then JAERI (JAEA) received the commissioning license for the HTTR in March, 2002. Since 2002, we have been carrying out rated power operation, safety demonstration tests and several R and Ds, etc., and conducted the high-temperature test operation of 950degC in April, 2004. In fiscal 2005 year, periodical inspection and overhaul of reactivity control system were conducted, and safety demonstration tests were promoted. This report summarizes activities and test results on HTTR operation and maintenance as well as safety demonstration tests and several R and Ds, which were carried out in the fiscal year of 2005. (author)

  19. An atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase kinetics and mechanism in tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Davis, Dennis D.; Hansen, Merrill

    1988-01-01

    A new type of gas phase flow reactor, designed to permit the study of gas phase reactions near 1 atm of pressure, is described. A general solution to the flow/diffusion/reaction equations describing reactor performance under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions is presented along with a discussion of critical reactor parameters and reactor limitations. The results of numerical simulations of the reactions of ozone with monomethylhydrazine and hydrazine are discussed, and performance data from a prototype flow reactor are presented.

  20. Use of thorium for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimarães, Cláudio Q., E-mail: claudio_guimaraes@usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Física; Stefani, Giovanni L. de, E-mail: giovanni.stefani@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Thiago A. dos, E-mail: thiago.santos@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The HTGR ( High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) is a 4{sup th} generation nuclear reactor and is fuelled by a mixture of graphite and fuel-bearing microspheres. There are two competitive designs of this reactor type: The German “pebble bed” mode, which is a system that uses spherical fuel elements, containing a graphite-and-fuel mixture coated in a graphite shell; and the American version, whose fuel is loaded into precisely located graphite hexagonal prisms that interlock to create the core of the vessel. In both variants, the coolant consists of helium pressurised. The HTGR system operates most efficiently with the thorium fuel cycle, however, so relatively little development has been carried out in this country on that cycle for HTGRs. In the Nuclear Engineering Centre of IPEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares), a study group is being formed linked to thorium reactors, whose proposal is to investigate reactors using thorium for {sup 233}U production and rejects burning. The present work intends to show the use of thorium in HTGRs, their advantages and disadvantages and its feasibility. (author)

  1. Off reactor testings. Technological engineering applicative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doca, Cezar

    2001-01-01

    By the end of year 2000 over 400 nuclear electro-power units were operating world wide, summing up a 350,000 MW total capacity, with a total production of 2,300 TWh, representing 16% of the world's electricity production. Other 36 units, totalizing 28,000 MW, were in construction, while a manifest orientation towards nuclear power development was observed in principal Asian countries like China, India, Japan and Korea. In the same world's trend one find also Romania, the Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 generating electrical energy into the national system beginning with 2 December 1996. Recently, the commercial contract was completed for finishing the Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 and launching it into operation by the end of year 2004. An important role in developing the activity of research and technological engineering, as technical support for manufacturing the CANDU type nuclear fuel and supplying with equipment the Cernavoda units, was played by the Division 7 TAR of the INR Pitesti. Qualification testings were conducted for: - off-reactor CANDU type nuclear fuel; - FARE tools, pressure regulators, explosion proof panels; channel shutting, as well as functional testing for spare pushing facility as a first step in the frame of the qualification tests for the charging/discharging machine (MID) 4 and 5 endings. Testing facilities are described, as well as high pressure hot/cool loops, measuring chains, all of them fulfilling the requirements of quality assurance. The nuclear fuel off-reactor tests were carried out to determine: strength; endurance; impact, pressure fall and wear resistance. For Cernavoda NPP equipment testings were carried out for: the explosion proof panels, pressure regulators, behaviour to vibration and wear of the steam generation tubings, effects of vibration upon different electronic component, channel shutting (for Cernavoda Unit 2), MID operating at 300 and 500 cycles. A number of R and D programs were conducted in the frame of division 7 TAR of INR

  2. Evaluation of the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    Recent advances in gas-turbine and heat exchanger technology have enhanced the potential for a Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) incorporating a direct gas turbine (Brayton) cycle for power conversion. The resulting Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) power plant combines the high temperature capabilities of the MHR with the efficiency and reliability of modern gas turbines. While the passive safety features of the steam cycle MHR (SC-MHR) are retained, generation efficiencies are projected to be in the range of 48% and steam power conversion systems, with their attendant complexities, are eliminated. Power costs are projected to be reduced by about 20%, relative to the SC-MHR or coal. This report documents the second, and final, phase of a two-part evaluation that concluded with a unanimous recommendation that the direct cycle (DC) variant of the GT-MHR be established as the commercial objective of the US Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. This recommendation has been endorsed by industrial and utility participants and accepted by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Phase II effort, documented herein, concluded that the DC GT-MHR offers substantial technical and economic advantages over both the IDC and SC systems. Both the DC and IDC were found to offer safety advantages, relative to the SC, due to elimination of the potential for water ingress during power operations. This is the dominant consequence event for the SC. The IDC was judged to require somewhat less development than the direct cycle, while the SC, which has the greatest technology base, incurs the least development cost and risk. While the technical and licensing requirements for the DC were more demanding, they were judged to be incremental and feasible. Moreover, the DC offers significant performance and cost improvements over the other two concepts. Overall, the latter were found to justify the additional development needs.

  3. Evaluation of the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    Recent advances in gas-turbine and heat exchanger technology have enhanced the potential for a Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) incorporating a direct gas turbine (Brayton) cycle for power conversion. The resulting Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) power plant combines the high temperature capabilities of the MHR with the efficiency and reliability of modern gas turbines. While the passive safety features of the steam cycle MHR (SC-MHR) are retained, generation efficiencies are projected to be in the range of 48% and steam power conversion systems, with their attendant complexities, are eliminated. Power costs are projected to be reduced by about 20%, relative to the SC-MHR or coal. This report documents the second, and final, phase of a two-part evaluation that concluded with a unanimous recommendation that the direct cycle (DC) variant of the GT-MHR be established as the commercial objective of the US Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. This recommendation has been endorsed by industrial and utility participants and accepted by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Phase II effort, documented herein, concluded that the DC GT-MHR offers substantial technical and economic advantages over both the IDC and SC systems. Both the DC and IDC were found to offer safety advantages, relative to the SC, due to elimination of the potential for water ingress during power operations. This is the dominant consequence event for the SC. The IDC was judged to require somewhat less development than the direct cycle, while the SC, which has the greatest technology base, incurs the least development cost and risk. While the technical and licensing requirements for the DC were more demanding, they were judged to be incremental and feasible. Moreover, the DC offers significant performance and cost improvements over the other two concepts. Overall, the latter were found to justify the additional development needs

  4. Thermal Hydraulic Tests for Reactor Core Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S. K.; Baek, W. P.; Chun, S. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The main objectives of the present project are to resolve the current issues of reactor core thermal hydraulics, to develop an advanced measurement and analytical techniques, and to perform reactor core safety verification tests. 6x6 reflood experiments, various heat transfer experiments using Freon, and experiments on the spacer grids effects on the post-dryout are carried out using spacer grids developed in Korea in order to resolve the current issues of the reactor core thermal hydraulics. In order to develop a reflood heat transfer model, the detailed reflood phenomena are visualized and measured using round tube and 2x2 rod bundle. A detailed turbulent mixing phenomenon for subchannels is measured using advanced measurement techniques such as LDV and PIV. MARS and MATRA codes developed in Korea are assessed, verified and improved using the obtained experimental data. Finally, a systematic quality assurance program and experimental data generation system has been constructed in order to increase the reliability of the experimental data.

  5. The ICRH tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, F.W.

    1976-01-01

    A Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor where the ion are maintained at Tsub(i) approximately 20keV>Tsub(e) approximately 7keV by ion-cyclotron resonance heating is shown to produce an energy amplification of Q>2 provided the principal ion energy loss channel is via collisional transfer to the electrons. Such a reactor produces 19MW of fusion power to the electrons. Such a reactor produces 19MW of fusion power and requires a 50MHz radio-frequency generator capable of 50MW peak power; it is otherwise compatible with the conceptual design for the Princeton TFTR. The required n tausub(E) values for electrons and ions are respectively ntausub(Ee)>1.5.10 13 cm -3 -sec and ntausub(Ei)>4.10 13 cm -3 -sec. The principal areas where research is needed to establish this concept are: tokamak transport calculations, ICRH physics, trapped-particle instability energy losses, tokamak equilibria with high values of βsub(theta), and, of course, impurities

  6. Specialists' meeting on heat exchanging components of gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The objective of the Meeting sponsored by IAEA was to provide a forum for the exchange and discussion of technical information related to heat exchanging and heat conducting components for gas-cooled reactors. The technical part of the meeting covered eight subjects: Heat exchanging components for process heat applications, design and requirements, and research and development programs; Status of the design and construction of intermediate He/He exchangers; Design, construction and performance of steam generators; Metallic materials and design codes; Design and construction of valves and hot gas ducts; Description of component test facilities and test results; Manufacturing of heat exchanging components

  7. Specialists' meeting on heat exchanging components of gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1984-07-01

    The objective of the Meeting sponsored by IAEA was to provide a forum for the exchange and discussion of technical information related to heat exchanging and heat conducting components for gas-cooled reactors. The technical part of the meeting covered eight subjects: Heat exchanging components for process heat applications, design and requirements, and research and development programs; Status of the design and construction of intermediate He/He exchangers; Design, construction and performance of steam generators; Metallic materials and design codes; Design and construction of valves and hot gas ducts; Description of component test facilities and test results; Manufacturing of heat exchanging components.

  8. Retained Gas Sampler Calibration and Simulant Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CRAWFORD, B.A.

    2000-01-05

    This test plan provides a method for calibration of the retained gas sampler (RGS) for ammonia gas analysis. Simulant solutions of ammonium hydroxide at known concentrations will be diluted with isotopically labeled 0.04 M ammonium hydroxide solution. Sea sand solids will also be mixed with ammonium hydroxide solution and diluent to determine the accuracy of the system for ammonia gas analysis.

  9. Retained Gas Sampler Calibration and Simulant Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CRAWFORD, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    This test plan provides a method for calibration of the retained gas sampler (RGS) for ammonia gas analysis. Simulant solutions of ammonium hydroxide at known concentrations will be diluted with isotopically labeled 0.04 M ammonium hydroxide solution. Sea sand solids will also be mixed with ammonium hydroxide solution and diluent to determine the accuracy of the system for ammonia gas analysis

  10. Measurement of sulphur-35 in the coolant gas of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandalls, F.J.

    1978-03-01

    Sulphur is an important element in some food chains and the release of radioactive sulphur to the environment must be closely controlled if the chemical form is such that it is available or potentially available for entering food chains. The presence of sulphur-35 in the coolant gas of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor warranted a study to assess the quantity and chemical form of the radioactive sulphur in order to estimate the magnitude of the potential environmental hazard which might arise from the release of coolant gas from Civil Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors. A combination of gas chromatographic and radiochemical analyses revealed carbonyl sulphide to be the only sulphur-35 compound present in the coolant gas of the Windscale Reactor. The concentration of carbonyl sulphide was found to lie in the range 40 to 100 x 10 -9 parts by volume and the sulphur-35 specific activity was about 20 mCi per gramme. The analytical techniques are described in detail. The sulphur-35 appears to be derived from the sulphur and chlorine impurities in the graphite. A method for the preparation of carbonyl sulphide labelled with sulphur-35 is described. (author)

  11. Development of components for the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dee, J.B.; Macken, T.

    1977-01-01

    The gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) component development program is based on an extension of high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) component technology; therefore, the GCFR development program is addressed primarily to components which differ in design and requirements from HTGR components. The principal differences in primary system components are due to the increase in helium coolant pressure level, which benefits system size and efficiency in the GCFR, and differences in the reactor internals and fuel handling systems due to the use of the compact metal-clad core. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the principal component design differences between the GCFR and HTGR and the consequent influences of these differences on GCFR component development programs. Development program plans are discussed and include those for the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), the main helium circulator and its supporting systems, the steam generators, the reactor thermal shielding, and the fuel handling system. Facility requirements to support these development programs are also discussed. Studies to date show that GCFR component development continues to appear to be incremental in nature, and the required tests are adaptations of related HTGR test programs. (Auth.)

  12. Some study on radiation resistance and reliability of piston ring of waste gas compressor for fast breeder experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Takio; Hidaka, Tsukasa

    1976-01-01

    In the fast breeder experimental reactor ''Joyo'', the gaseous wastes such as reactor cover argon, reactor seal nitrogen gas, fuel handling waste gas etc. shall be collected, compressed and storaged for decaying their activity. Compressors applied in the above process have new type oilless piston rings of Teflon filled with graphite, which might be affected by radioactivity of the waste gases. This report deals with some study on the gamma iradiation effects on the plastic piston rings such as tensile strength, elongation, shock and hardness effects under several irradiation doses and on durability test of the irradiated piston rings under the same compression ratio. (auth.)

  13. In-reactor testing of self-powered neutron detectors and miniature fission chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchene, J.; LeMeur, R.; Verdant, R.

    1975-01-01

    The CEA has tested a variety of ''slow'' self-powered neutron detectors with rhodium, silver and vanadium emitters. Currently there are 120 vanadium detectors in the EL4 heavy water reactor. In addition, ''fast'' detectors with cobalt emitters have been tested at Saclay and 50 of these are in reactor. Other studies are concerned with 6 mm diameter miniature fission chambers. Two fast response chambers with argon-nitrogen filling gas became slow during irradiation, but operated to 600 deg C. An argon filled chamber of 4.7 mm diameter, for traversing in core system in pressurized water reactor, has shown satisfactory test results. (author)

  14. A review of helium gas turbine technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No, Hee Cheon; Kim, Ji Hwan; Kim, Hyeun Min

    2007-01-01

    Current High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) are based on a closed brayton cycle with helium gas as the working fluid. Thermodynamic performance of the axial-flow helium gas turbines is of critical concern as it considerably affects the overall cycle efficiency. Helium gas turbines pose some design challenges compared to steam or air turbomachinery because of the physical properties of helium and the uniqueness of the operating conditions at high pressure with low pressure ratio. This report present a review of the helium Brayton cycle experiences in Germany and in Japan. The design and availability of helium gas turbines for HTGR are also presented in this study. We have developed a new throughflow calculation code to calculate the design-point performance of helium gas turbines. Use of the method has been illustrated by applying it to the GTHTR300 reference

  15. Hydrogen enrichment and separation from synthesis gas by the use of a membrane reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, J.M.; Barreiro, M.M.; Marono, M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the objectives of the CHRISGAS project was to study innovative gas separation and gas upgrading systems that have not been developed sufficiently yet to be tested at a demonstration scale within the time frame of the project, but which show some attractive merits and features for further development. In this framework CIEMAT studied, at bench scale, hydrogen enrichment and separation from syngas by the use of membranes and membrane catalytic reactors. In this paper results about hydrogen separation from synthesis gas by means of selective membranes are presented. Studies dealt with the evaluation of permeation and selectivity to hydrogen of prepared and pre-commercial Pd-based membranes. Whereas prepared membranes turned out to be non-selective, due to discontinuities of the palladium layer, studies conducted with the pre-commercial membrane showed that by means of a membrane reactor it is possible to completely separate hydrogen from the other gas components and produce pure hydrogen as a permeate stream, even in the case of complex reaction system (H 2 /CO/CO 2 /H 2 O) under WGS conditions gas mixtures. The advantages of using a water-gas shift membrane reactor (MR) over a traditional fixed bed reactor (TR) have also been studied. The experimental device included the pre-commercial Pd-based membrane and a commercial high temperature Fe-Cr-based, WGS catalyst, which was packed in the annulus between the membrane and the reactor outer shell. Results show that in the MR concept, removal of H 2 from the reaction side has a positive effect on WGS reaction, reaching higher CO conversion than in a traditional packed bed reactor at a given temperature. On increasing pressure on the reaction side permeation is enhanced and hence carbon monoxide conversion increases. -- Highlights: → H 2 enrichment and separation using a bench-scale membrane reactor MR is studied. → Permeation and selectivity to H 2 of Pd-based membranes was determined. → Complete separation

  16. Measurement of dissolved hydrogen and hydrogen gas transfer in a hydrogen-producing reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizas, I.; Bagley, D.M. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a simple method to measure dissolved hydrogen concentrations in the laboratory using standard equipment and a series of hydrogen gas transfer tests. The method was validated by measuring hydrogen gas transfer parameters for an anaerobic reactor system that was purged with 10 per cent carbon dioxide and 90 per cent nitrogen using a coarse bubble diffuser stone. Liquid samples from the reactor were injected into vials and hydrogen was allowed to partition between the liquid and gaseous phases. The concentration of dissolved hydrogen was determined by comparing the headspace injections onto a gas chromatograph and a standard curve. The detection limit was 1.0 x 10{sup -5} mol/L of dissolved hydrogen. The gas transfer rate for hydrogen in basal medium and anaerobic digester sludge was used to validate the method. Results were compared with gas transfer models. In addition to monitoring dissolved hydrogen in reactor systems, this method can help improve hydrogen production potential. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  17. Improving fuel cycle design and safety characteristics of a gas cooled fast reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, W.F.G.

    2006-01-01

    This research concerns the fuel cycle and safety aspects of a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor, one of the so-called "Generation IV" nuclear reactor designs. The Generation IV Gas Cooled Fast Reactor uses helium as coolant at high temperature. The goal of the GCFR is to obtain a "closed nuclear fuel cycle",

  18. Simulation of Water Gas Shift Zeolite Membrane Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertiharta, I. G. B. N.; Rizki, Z.; Zunita, Megawati; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-07-01

    The search of alternative energy sources keeps growing from time to time. Various alternatives have been introduced to reduce the use of fossil fuel, including hydrogen. Many pathways can be used to produce hydrogen. Among all of those, the Water Gas Shift (WGS) reaction is the most common pathway to produce high purity hydrogen. The WGS technique faces a downstream processing challenge due to the removal hydrogen from the product stream itself since it contains a mixture of hydrogen, carbon dioxide and also the excess reactants. An integrated process using zeolite membrane reactor has been introduced to improve the performance of the process by selectively separate the hydrogen whilst boosting the conversion. Furthermore, the zeolite membrane reactor can be further improved via optimizing the process condition. This paper discusses the simulation of Zeolite Membrane Water Gas Shift Reactor (ZMWGSR) with variation of process condition to achieve an optimum performance. The simulation can be simulated into two consecutive mechanisms, the reaction prior to the permeation of gases through the zeolite membrane. This paper is focused on the optimization of the process parameters (e.g. temperature, initial concentration) and also membrane properties (e.g. pore size) to achieve an optimum product specification (concentration, purity).

  19. SRS reactor stack plume marking tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petry, S.F.

    1992-03-01

    Tests performed in 105-K in 1987 and 1988 demonstrated that the stack plume can successfully be made visible (i.e., marked) by introducing smoke into the stack breech. The ultimate objective of these tests is to provide a means during an emergency evacuation so that an evacuee can readily identify the stack plume and evacuate in the opposite direction, thus minimizing the potential of severe radiation exposure. The EPA has also requested DOE to arrange for more tests to settle a technical question involving the correct calculation of stack downwash. New test canisters were received in 1988 designed to produce more smoke per unit time; however, these canisters have not been evaluated, because normal ventilation conditions have not been reestablished in K Area. Meanwhile, both the authorization and procedure to conduct the tests have expired. The tests can be performed during normal reactor operation. It is recommended that appropriate authorization and procedure approval be obtained to resume testing after K Area restart

  20. Grey Rod Test in HANARO Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, K. N.; Kim, B. G.; Kang, Y. H. (and others)

    2008-08-15

    Westinghouse/KAERI/KNF agreed to perform an irradiation test in the HANARO reactor to obtain irradiation data on the new grey rods that will be part of an AP1000 system. As a preliminary test, two samples containing pure Ag (Reference) and Ag-In-Cd materials provided by Westinghouse Electric Company (WEC) were inserted in a KNF irradiation capsule of 07M-13N. The specimens were irradiated for 95.19days (4 cycles) in the CT test hole of the HANARO of a 30MW thermal output to have a fast neutron fluence of 1.11x10{sup 21}(n/cm{sup 2}) (E>1.0MeV). This report provides all the test conditions and data obtained during the irradiation test of the grey rods in HANARO requested by Westinghouse. The test was prepared according to the meeting minutes (June 26, 2007) and the on-going subject test was stopped midway by the request of Westinghouse.

  1. Gas reactor international cooperative program interim report: German Pebble Bed Reactor design and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    This report describes and evaluates several gas-cooled reactor plant concepts under development within the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). The concepts, based upon the use of a proven Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) fuel element design, include nuclear heat generation for chemical processes and electrical power generation. Processes under consideration for the nuclear process heat plant (PNP) include hydrogasification of coal, steam gasification of coal, combined process, and long-distance chemical heat transportation. The electric plant emphasized in the report is the steam turbine cycle (HTR-K), although the gas turbine cycle (HHT) is also discussed. The study is a detailed description and evaluation of the nuclear portion of the various plants. The general conclusions are that the PBR technology is sound and that the HTR-K and PNP plant concepts appear to be achievable through appropriate continuing development programs, most of which are either under way or planned

  2. Development of variable width ribbon heating elements for liquid metal and gas-cooled fast breeder reactor fuel rod simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, R.W.; Lovell, R.T.; Post, D.W.; Snyder, S.D.

    1980-01-01

    Variable width ribbon heating elements have been fabricated which provide a chopped cosine, variable heat flux profile for fuel rod simulators used in test loops by the Breeder Reactor Program Thermal Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety test facility and the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Core Flow Test Loop. Thermal, mechanical, and electrical design considerations result in the derivation of an analytical expression for the ribbon contours. From this, the ribbons are machined and wound on numerically controlled equipment. Postprocessing and inspection results in a wound, variable width ribbon with the precise dimensional, electrical, and mechanical properties needed for use in fuel pin simulators

  3. Tests of vacuum interrupters for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.; Parsons, M.; Honig, E.; Lindsay, J.

    1979-04-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project at Princeton University requires the insertion of a resistor in an excited ohmic-heating coil circuit to produce a plasma initiation pulse (PIP). It is expected that the maximum duty for the switching system will be an interruption of 24 kA with an associated recovery voltage of 25 kV. Vacuum interrupters were selected as the most economical means to satisfy these requirements. However, it was felt that some testing of available systems should be performed to determine their reliability under these conditions. Two interrupter systems were tested for over 1000 interruptions each at 24 kA and 25 kV. One system employed special Westinghouse type WL-33552 interrupters in a circuit designed by LASL. This circuit used a commercially available actuator and a minimum size counterpulse bank and saturable reactor. The other used Toshiba type VGB2-D20 interrupters actuated by a Toshiba mechanism in a Toshiba circuit using a larger counterpulse bank and saturable reactor

  4. Decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) will complete its experimental lifetime with a series of deuterium-tritium pulses in 1994. As a result, the machine structures will become radioactive, and vacuum components will also be contaminated with tritium. Dose rate levels will range from less than 1 mr/h for external structures to hundreds of mr/h for the vacuum vessel. Hence, decommissioning operations will range from hands on activities to the use of remotely operated equipment. After 21 months of cool down, decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations will commence and continue for approximately 15 months. The primary objective is to render the test cell complex re-usable for the next machine, the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). This paper presents an overview of decommissioning TFTR and discusses the D and D objectives

  5. FLUIDDYNAMIC ASPECTS OF GAS-PHASE ETHYLENE POLYMERIZATION REACTOR DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guardani R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The relative importance of design variables affecting the fluiddynamic behavior of a fluidized bed reactor for the gas-phase ethylene polymerization is discussed, based on mathematical modeling. The three-phase bubbling fluidized bed model is based on axially distributed properties for the bubble, cloud and emulsion phases, combined with correlations for population balance and entrainment. Under the operating conditions adopted in most industrial processes, the reactor performance is affected mainly by the reaction rate and solids entrainment. Simulation results indicate that an adequate design of the freeboard and particle collecting equipment is of primary importance in order to produce polymeric particles with the desired size distribution, as well as to keep entrainment and catalyst feed rates at adequate levels.

  6. Gas cooled fast breeder reactors using mixed carbide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kypreos, S.

    1976-09-01

    The fast reactors being developed at the present time use mixed oxide fuel, stainless-steel cladding and liquid sodium as coolant (LMFBR). Theoretical and experimental designing work has also been done in the field of gas-cooled fast breeder reactors. The more advanced carbide fuel offers greater potential for developing fuel systems with doubling times in the range of ten years. The thermohydraulic and physics performance of a GCFR utilising this fuel is assessed. One question to be answered is whether helium is an efficient coolant to be coupled with the carbide fuel while preserving its superior neutronic performance. Also, an assessment of the fuel cycle cost in comparison to oxide fuel is presented. (Auth.)

  7. A gas-phase reactor powered by solar energy and ethanol for H2 production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ampelli, Claudio; Genovese, Chiara; Passalacqua, Rosalba; Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    In the view of H 2 as the future energy vector, we presented here the development of a homemade photo-reactor working in gas phase and easily interfacing with fuel cell devices, for H 2 production by ethanol dehydrogenation. The process generates acetaldehyde as the main co-product, which is more economically advantageous with respect to the low valuable CO 2 produced in the alternative pathway of ethanol photoreforming. The materials adopted as photocatalysts are based on TiO 2 substrates but properly modified with noble (Au) and not-noble (Cu) metals to enhance light harvesting in the visible region. The samples were characterized by BET surface area analysis, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and UV–visible Diffusive Reflectance Spectroscopy, and finally tested in our homemade photo-reactor by simulated solar irradiation. We discussed about the benefits of operating in gas phase with respect to a conventional slurry photo-reactor (minimization of scattering phenomena, no metal leaching, easy product recovery, etc.). Results showed that high H 2 productivity can be obtained in gas phase conditions, also irradiating titania photocatalysts doped with not-noble metals. - Highlights: • A gas-phase photoreactor for H 2 production by ethanol dehydrogenation was developed. • The photocatalytic behaviours of Au and Cu metal-doped TiO 2 thin layers are compared. • Benefits of operating in gas phase with respect to a slurry reactor are presented. • Gas phase conditions and use of not-noble metals are the best economic solution

  8. Gas reactor international coope--ative program. Interim report: assessment of gas-cooled reactor economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    A computer analysis of domestic economic incentive is presented. Included are the sample computer data set for ten combinations of reprocessing and reactor assumptions; basic data set and computer output; higher uranium availability computer output; 50 percent higher GCR fabrication cost computer output; 50 percent higher GCR reprocessing cost computer output; year 1990 and year 2000 GCR introduction scenario computer outputs; 75 percent perceived capacity factor for PBR computer output; and capital cost of GCRs 1.2 times that of LWRs.

  9. The behavior of fission products during nuclear rocket reactor tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokor, P.C.; Kirk, W.L.; Bohl, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Fission product release from nuclear rocket propulsion reactor fuel is an important consideration for nuclear rocket development and application. Fission product data from the last six reactors of the Rover program are collected in this paper to provide as basis for addressing development and testing issues. Fission product loss from the fuel will depend on fuel composition and reactor design and operating parameters. During ground testing, fission products can be contained downstream of the reactor. The last Rover reactor tested, the Nuclear Furnance, was mated to an effluent clean-up system that was effective in preventing the discharge of fission products into the atmosphere

  10. Analysis of a sustainable gas cooled fast breeder reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Akansha; Chirayath, Sunil S.; Tsvetkov, Pavel V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A Thorium-GFBR breeder for actinide recycling ability, and thorium fuel feasibility. • A mixture of 232 Th and 233 U is used as fuel and LWR used fuel is used. • Detailed neutronics, fuel cycle, and thermal-hydraulics analysis has been presented. • Run this TGFBR for 20 years with breeding of 239 Pu and 233 U. • Neutronics analysis using MCNP and Brayton cycle for energy conversion are used. - Abstract: Analysis of a thorium fuelled gas cooled fast breeder reactor (TGFBR) concept has been done to demonstrate the self-sustainability, breeding capability, actinide recycling ability, and thorium fuel feasibility. Simultaneous use of 232 Th and used fuel from light water reactor in the core has been considered. Results obtained confirm the core neutron spectrum dominates in an intermediate energy range (peak at 100 keV) similar to that seen in a fast breeder reactor. The conceptual design achieves a breeding ratio of 1.034 and an average fuel burnup of 74.5 (GWd)/(MTHM) . TGFBR concept is to address the eventual shortage of 235 U and nuclear waste management issues. A mixture of thorium and uranium ( 232 Th + 233 U) is used as fuel and light water reactor used fuel is utilized as blanket, for the breeding of 239 Pu. Initial feed of 233 U has to be obtained from thorium based reactors; even though there are no thorium breeders to breed 233 U a theoretical evaluation has been used to derive the data for the source of 233 U. Reactor calculations have been performed with Monte Carlo radiation transport code, MCNP/MCNPX. It is determined that this reactor has to be fuelled once every 5 years assuming the design thermal power output as 445 MW. Detailed analysis of control rod worth has been performed and different reactivity coefficients have been evaluated as part of the safety analysis. The TGFBR concept demonstrates the sustainability of thorium, viability of 233 U as an alternate to 235 U and an alternate use for light water reactor used fuel as a

  11. Nuclear power for coexistence with nature, high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1996-01-01

    Until this century, it is sufficient to aim at the winner of competition in human society to obtain resources, and to entrust waste to natural cleaning action. However, the expansion of social activities has been too fast, and the scale has become too large, consequently, in the next century, the expansion of social activities will be caught by the structure of trilemma that is subjected to the strong restraint and selection from the problems of finite energy and resources and environment preservation. In 21st century, the problems change to those between mankind and nature. Energy supply and population increase, envrionment preservation and human activities, and the matters that human wisdom should bear regarding energy technology are discussed. In Japan, the construction of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is in progress. The design of high temperature gas-cooled reactors and their features on the safety are explained. The capability of reducing CO 2 release of high temperature gas-cooled reactors is reported. In future, it is expected that the time of introducing high temperature gas-cooled reactors will come. (K.I.)

  12. Analysis of Kinetic Parameter Effect on Reactor Operation Stability of the RSG-GAS Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rokhmadi

    2007-01-01

    Kinetic parameter has influence to behaviour on RSG-GAS reactor operation. In this paper done is the calculation of reactivity curve, period-reactivity relation and low power transfer function in silicide fuel. This parameters is necessary and useful for reactivity characteristic analysis and reactor stability. To know the reactivity response, it was done reactivity insertion at power 1 watt using POKDYN code because at this level of power no feedback reactivity so important for reactor operation safety. The result of calculation showed that there is no change of significant a period-reactivity relation and transfer function at low power for 2.96 gU/cc, 3.55 gU/cc and 4.8 gU/cc density of silicide fuels. The result of the transfer function at low power showed that the reactor is critical stability with no feedback. The result of calculation also showed that reactivity response no change among three kinds of fuel densities. It can be concluded that from kinetic parameter point of view period-reactivity relation, transfer function at low power, and reactivity response are no change reactor operation from reactivity effect when fuel exchanged. (author)

  13. Risk-informed design of a pebble bed gas reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritterbusch, Stanley; Dimitrijevic, Vesna; Simic Zdenko; Savkina Marina

    2003-01-01

    One of the major challenges to the successful deployment of new nuclear plants in the United States is the regulatory process, which is largely based on water-reactor design technology and operating experience. While ongoing and expected efforts to license new LWR designs are based primarily on current regulations, guidance, and past experience, the pre-application review of the gas-cooled Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) has shown that efforts are being made to provide additional 'risk-informed' improvements to the licensing process. These improvements are aimed at resolving new design and regulatory issues using a plant-wide integrated evaluation method - state-of-the-art Probabilistic Risk Assessment - which addresses all significant design features and operating modes. The integrated PRA evaluation is supported by the usual deterministic design analyses, engineering judgments, and margins added to address uncertainties (i.e., defense-in-depth). The work performed for this paper was completed as part of the United States Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. The purpose of this particular project was to develop the methods for a new 'highly risk-informed' design and regulatory process. In this work. PRA techniques were applied in order to provide an integrated and systematic analysis of the plant design, to quantify uncertainties and explicitly account for defense-in-depth features. This work concentrates on the application of the risk-informed principles to a new plant design such as the PBMR. The implementation example completed for this project included specification of the design configuration, use of the PRA to evaluate the design, and iterations to identify design changes that improve the overall level of safety and system reliability. This paper summarizes the new 'highly risk-informed' design process, the design of the PBMR, and the results obtained. These results, consistent with the known inherent safety features of a pebble

  14. Validation of CATHARE for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrice Bentivoglio; Ola Widlund; Manuel Saez

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Extensively validated and qualified for light-water reactor safety studies, the thermo-hydraulics code CATHARE has been adapted to deal also with gas-cooled reactor applications. In order to validate the code for these novel applications, CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) has initiated an ambitious long-term experimental program. The foreseen experimental facilities range from small-scale loops for physical correlations, to component technology and system demonstration loops. In the short-term perspective, CATHARE is being validated against existing experimental data, in particular from the German power plant Oberhausen II and the South African Pebble-Bed Micro Model (PBMM). Oberhausen II, operated by the German utility EVO, is a 50 MW(e) direct-cycle Helium turbine plant. The power source is a gas burner rather than a nuclear reactor core, but the power conversion system resembles those of the GFR (Gas-cooled Fast Reactor) and other high-temperature reactor concepts. Oberhausen II was operated for more than 100 000 hours between 1974 and 1988. Design specifications, drawings and experimental data have been obtained through the European HTR project, offering a unique opportunity to validate CATHARE on a large-scale Brayton cycle. Available measurements of temperatures, pressures and mass flows throughout the circuit have allowed a very comprehensive thermohydraulic description of the plant, in steady-state conditions as well as during transients. The Pebble-Bed Micro Model (PBMM) is a small-scale model conceived to demonstrate the operability and control strategies of the South African PBMR concept. The model uses Nitrogen instead of Helium, and an electrical heater with a maximum rating of 420 kW. As the full-scale PBMR, the PBMM loop features three turbines and two compressors on the primary circuit, located on three separate shafts. The generator, however, is modelled by a third compressor on a separate circuit, with a

  15. Automated reactor protection testing saves time and avoids errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondo, E.

    1990-01-01

    When the Pressurized Water Reactor units in the French 900MWe series were designed, the instrumentation and control systems were equipped for manual periodic testing. Manual reactor protection system testing has since been successfully replaced by an automatic system, which is also applicable to other instrumentation testing. A study on the complete automation of process instrumentation testing has been carried out. (author)

  16. TREAT [Transient Reactor Test Facility] reactor control rod scram system simulations and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solbrig, C.W.; Stevens, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    Air cylinders moving heavy components (100 to 300 lbs) at high speeds (above 300 in/sec) present a formidable end-cushion-shock problem. With no speed control, the moving components can reach over 600 in/sec if the air cylinder has a 5 ft stroke. This paper presents an overview of a successful upgrade modification to an existing reactor control rod drive design using a computer model to simulate the modified system performance for system design analysis. This design uses a high speed air cylinder to rapidly insert control rods (278 lb moved 5 ft in less than 300 msec) to scram an air-cooled test reactor. Included is information about the computer models developed to simulate high-speed air cylinder operation and a unique new speed control and end cushion design. A patent application is pending with the US Patent ampersand Trade Mark Office for this system (DOE case number S-68,622). The evolution of the design, from computer simulations thru operational testing in a test stand (simulating in-reactor operating conditions) to installation and use in the reactor, is also described. 6 figs

  17. Corrosion of spent Advanced Test Reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Croson, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    The results of a study of the condition of spent nuclear fuel elements from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) currently being stored underwater at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are presented. This study was motivated by a need to estimate the corrosion behavior of dried, spent ATR fuel elements during dry storage for periods up to 50 years. The study indicated that the condition of spent ATR fuel elements currently stored underwater at the INEL is not very well known. Based on the limited data and observed corrosion behavior in the reactor and in underwater storage, it was concluded that many of the fuel elements currently stored under water in the facility called ICPP-603 FSF are in a degraded condition, and it is probable that many have breached cladding. The anticipated dehydration behavior of corroded spent ATR fuel elements was also studied, and a list of issues to be addressed by fuel element characterization before and after forced drying of the fuel elements and during dry storage is presented

  18. Drop-in capsule testing of plutonium-based fuels in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, G.S.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Terry, W.K.; Ambrosek, R.G.; Palmer, A.J.; Roesener, R.A.

    1996-09-01

    The most attractive way to dispose of weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) is to use it as fuel in existing light water reactors (LWRs) in the form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel - i.e., plutonia (PuO[sub 2]) mixed with urania (UO[sub 2]). Before U.S. reactors could be used for this purpose, their operating licenses would have to be amended. Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. The proposed weapons-grade MOX fuel is unusual, even relative to ongoing foreign experience with reactor-grade MOX power reactor fuel. Some demonstration of the in- reactor thermal, mechanical, and fission gas release behavior of the prototype fuel will most likely be required in a limited number of test reactor irradiations. The application to license operation with MOX fuel must be amply supported by experimental data. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is capable of playing a key role in the irradiation, development, and licensing of these new fuel types. The ATR is a 250- MW (thermal) LWR designed to study the effects of intense radiation on reactor fuels and materials. For 25 years, the primary role of the ATR has been to serve in experimental investigations for the development of advanced nuclear fuels. Both large- and small-volume test positions in the ATR could be used for MOX fuel irradiation. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. Furthermore, these data can be obtained more quickly by using ATR instead of testing in a commercial LWR. Our previous work in this area has demonstrated that it is technically feasible to perform MOX fuel testing in the ATR. This report documents our analyses of sealed drop-in capsules containing plutonium-based test specimens placed in various ATR positions

  19. The real gas behaviour of helium as a cooling medium for high-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewing, G.

    1977-01-01

    The article describes the influence of the real gas behaviour on the variables of state for the helium gas and the effects on the design of high-temperature reactor plants. After explaining the basic equations for describing variables and changes of state of the real gas, the real and ideal gas behaviour is analysed. Finally, the influence of the real gas behaviour on the design of high-temperature reactors in one- and two-cycle plants is investigated. (orig.) [de

  20. Gas-cooled reactor coolant circulator and blower technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    In the previous 17 meetings held within the framework of the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors, a wide variety of topics and components have been addressed, but the San Diego meeting represented the first time that a group of specialists had been convened to discuss circulator and blower related technology. A total of 20 specialists from 6 countries attended the meeting in which 15 technical papers were presented in 5 sessions: circulator operating experience I and II (6 papers); circulator design considerations I and II (6 papers); bearing technology (3 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Refueling system for the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawke, B.C.

    1980-05-01

    Criteria specifically related to the handling of Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) fuel are briefly reviewed, and the most significant requirements with which the refueling system must comply are discussed. Each component of the refueling system is identified, and a functional description of the fuel handling machine is presented. An illustrated operating sequence describing the various functions involved in a typical refueling cycle is presented. The design status of components and subsystems selected for conceptual development is reviewed, and anticipated refueling time frames are given

  2. High-temperature gas-cooled reactors and process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) are fueled with ceramic-coated microspheres of uranium and thorium oxides/carbides embedded in graphite blocks which are cooled with helium. Promising areas of HTGR application are in cogeneration, energy transport using Heat Transfer Salt, recovery of oils from oil shale, steam reforming of methane for chemical production, coal gasification, and in energy transfer using chemical heat jpipes in the long term. Further, HTGRs could be used as the energy source for hydrogen production through thermochemical water splitting in the long term. The potential market for Process Heat HTGRs is 100-200 large units by about the year 2020

  3. Graphite development for gas-cooled reactors in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    This document discusses Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) graphite activities in the USA which currently include the following research and development tasks: coke examination; effects of irradiation; variability of physical properties (mechanical, thermal-physical, and fracture); fatigue behavior, oxidation behavior; NDE techniques; structural design criteria; and carbon-carbon composite control rod clad materials. These tasks support nuclear grade graphite manufacturing technology including nondestructive examination of billets and components. Moreover, data shall be furnished to support design and licensing of graphite components for the MHTGR

  4. Proposal of world network on material testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Ishihara, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Establishment of an international cooperation system of worldwide testing reactor network (world network) is proposed in order to achieve efficient facility utilization and provide high quality irradiation data by role sharing of irradiation tests with materials testing reactors in the world. As for the first step, mutual understanding among materials testing reactors is thought to be necessary. From this point, an international symposium on materials testing reactors (ISMTR) was held to construct the world network from 2008, and a common understanding of world network has begun to be shared. (author)

  5. Fast reactor safety testing in Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) in the 1980s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.E.; Dutt, D.S.; Harrison, L.J.

    1990-01-01

    Several series of fast reactor safety tests were performed in TREAT during the 1980s. These focused on the transient behavior of full-length oxide fuels (US reference, UK reference, and US advanced design) and on modern metallic fuels. Most of the tests addressed fuel behavior under transient overpower or loss-of-flow conditions. The test series were the PFR/TREAT tests; the RFT, TS, CDT, and RX series on oxide fuels; and the M series on metallic fuels. These are described in terms of their principal results and relevance to analyses and safety evaluation. 4 refs., 3 tabs

  6. Gas reactor international cooperative program. HTR-synfuel application assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    This study assesses the technical, environmental and economic factors affecting the application of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor (HTR) to: synthetic fuel production; and displacement of fossil fuels in other industrial and chemical processes. Synthetic fuel application considered include coal gasification, direct coal liquefaction, oil shale processing, and the upgrading of syncrude to motor fuel. A wide range of other industrial heat applications was also considered, with emphasis on the use of the closed-loop thermochemical energy pipeline to supply heat to dispersed industrial users. In this application syngas (H 2 +CO 2 ) is produced at the central station HTR by steam reforming and the gas is piped to individual methanators where typically 1000 0 F steam is generated at the industrial user sites. The products of methanation (CH 4 + H 2 O) are piped back to the reformer at the central station HTR

  7. Gas reactor international cooperative program. HTR-synfuel application assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    This study assesses the technical, environmental and economic factors affecting the application of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor (HTR) to: synthetic fuel production; and displacement of fossil fuels in other industrial and chemical processes. Synthetic fuel application considered include coal gasification, direct coal liquefaction, oil shale processing, and the upgrading of syncrude to motor fuel. A wide range of other industrial heat applications was also considered, with emphasis on the use of the closed-loop thermochemical energy pipeline to supply heat to dispersed industrial users. In this application syngas (H/sub 2/ +CO/sub 2/) is produced at the central station HTR by steam reforming and the gas is piped to individual methanators where typically 1000/sup 0/F steam is generated at the industrial user sites. The products of methanation (CH/sub 4/ + H/sub 2/O) are piped back to the reformer at the central station HTR.

  8. Integrated infrastructure initiatives for material testing reactor innovations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekeyser, Jean; Vermeeren, Ludo; Iracane, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The EU FP7 MTR+I3 project has initiated a durable cooperation between MTR operators. → Improvements in irradiation test device technology and instrumentation were achieved. → Professional training efforts were streamlined and best practices were exchanged. → A framework has been set up to coordinate and optimize the use of MTRs in the EU. - Abstract: The key goal of the European FP6 project MTR+I3 was to build a durable cooperation between Material Testing Reactor (MTR) operators and relevant laboratories that can maintain European leadership with updated capabilities and competences regarding reactor performances and irradiation technology. The MTR+I3 consortium was composed of 18 partners with a high level of expertise in irradiation-related services for all types of nuclear plants. This project covered activities that foster integration of the MTR community involved in designing, fabricating and operating irradiation devices through information exchange, know-how cross-fertilization, exchanges of interdisciplinary personnel, structuring of key-technology suppliers and professional training. The network produced best practice guidelines for selected irradiation activities. This project allowed to launch or to improve technical studies in various domains dealing with irradiation test device technology, experimental loop designs and instrumentation. Major results are illustrated in this paper. These concern in particular: on-line fuel power determination, neutron screen optimization, simulation of transmutation process, power transient systems, water chemistry and stress corrosion cracking, fission gas measurement, irradiation behaviour of electronic modules, mechanical loading under irradiation, high temperature gas loop technology, heavy liquid metal loop development and safety test instrumentation. One of the major benefits of this project is that, starting from a situation of fragmented resources in a strongly competitive sector, it has

  9. Core test reactor shield cooling system analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, E.M.; Elliott, R.D.

    1971-01-01

    System requirements for cooling the shield within the vacuum vessel for the core test reactor are analyzed. The total heat to be removed by the coolant system is less than 22,700 Btu/hr, with an additional 4600 Btu/hr to be removed by the 2-inch thick steel plate below the shield. The maximum temperature of the concrete in the shield can be kept below 200 0 F if the shield plug walls are kept below 160 0 F. The walls of the two ''donut'' shaped shield segments, which are cooled by the water from the shield and vessel cooling system, should operate below 95 0 F. The walls of the center plug, which are cooled with nitrogen, should operate below 100 0 F. (U.S.)

  10. The Advanced Test Reactor Strategic Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic evaluation of safety, environmental, and operational issues has been initiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This program, the Strategic Evaluation Program (STEP), provides an integrated review of safety and operational issues against the standards applied to licensed commercial facilities. In the review of safety issues, 18 deviations were identified which required prompt attention. Resolution of these items has been accelerated in the program. An integrated living schedule is being developed to address the remaining findings. A risk evaluation is being performed on the proposed corrective actions and these actions will then be formally ranked in order of priority based on considerations of safety and operational significance. Once the final ranking is completed, an integrated schedule will be developed, which will include considerations of availability of funding and operating schedule. 3 refs., 2 figs

  11. JENDL-3.3 thermal reactor benchmark test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akie, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    Integral tests of JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library have been carried out by Reactor Integral Test WG of Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. The most important problem in the thermal reactor benchmark testing was the overestimation of the multiplication factor of the U fueled cores. With several revisions of the data of 235 U and the other nuclides, JENDL-3.3 data library gives a good estimation of multiplication factors both for U and Pu fueled thermal reactors. (author)

  12. Economical evaluation on gas turbine high temperature reactor 300 (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takei, Masanobu; Kosugiyama, Shinichi; Mouri, Tomoaki; Katanishi, Shoji; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2006-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been developing a graphite moderate and helium cooled High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) with gas turbine, the GTHTR300 based on experience gained in development and operations of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) in JAERI. The GTHTR300 is a simplified and economical power plant with a high level of safety characteristics and a high plant efficiency of approximately 46%. Cost evaluation for plant construction and power generation is studied in order to clarify the economical feasibility of the GTHTR300. The construction cost is estimated to be about 200 thousands Yen/kWe. The power generation cost is estimated to be about 3.8 Yen/kWh by the conditions of 90% load factor and 3% discount rate. The economical feasibility of the GTHTR300 is certified. The present study is entrusted from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  13. Latest developments in prestressed concrete vessels for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ople, F.S. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    This paper is an update of the design development of prestressed concrete vessels, commonly referred to as 'PCRVs' starting with the first single-cavity PCRV for the Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station to the latest multi-cavity PCRV configurations being utilized as the primary reactor vessels for both the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) and the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) in the U.S.A. The complexity of PCRV design varies not only due to the type of vessel configuration (single versus multi-cavity) but also on the application to the specific type of reactor concept. PCRV technology as applied to the Steam Cycle HTGR is fairly well established; however, some significant technical complexities are associated with PCRV design for the Gas Turbine HTGR and the GCFR. For the Gas Turbine HTGR, for instance, the fluid dynamics of the turbo-machinery cause multi-pressure conditions to exist in various portions of the power conversion loops during operation. This condition complicates the design approach and the proof test specification for the PCRV. The geometric configuration of the multi-cavity PCRV is also more complex due to the introduction of large horizontal cylindrical cavities (housing the turbo/machines for the Gas Turbine HTGR and circulators for the GCFR) in addition to the vertical cylindrical cavities for the core and heat exchangers. Because of this complex geometry, it becomes difficult to achieve an optimum prestressing arrangement for the PCRV. Other novel features of the multi-cavity PCRV resulting from the continuing design optimization effort are the incorporation of an asymmetric (offset core) configuration and the use of large vessel cavity/penetration concrete closures directly held down by prestressing tendons for both economic and safety reasons. (orig.)

  14. High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor steam-cycle/cogeneration lead plant reactor vessel: system design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Reactor Vessel System contains the primary coolant inventory within a gas-tight pressure boundary, and provides the necessary flow paths and overpressure protection for this pressure boundary. The Reactor Vessel System also houses the components of the Reactor System, the Heat Transport System, and the Auxiliary Heat Removal System. The scope of the Reactor Vessel System includes the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) structure with its reinforcing steel and prestressing components; liners, penetrations, closures, and cooling water tubes attached to the concrete side of the liner; the thermal barrier (insulation) on the primary coolant side of the liner; instrumentation for structural monitoring; and a pressure relief system. Specifications are presented

  15. New deployment of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Tsuchie, Yasuo; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Konuki, Kaoru; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Hayakawa, Hitoshi

    2002-01-01

    The high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is now under a condition difficult to know it well, because of considering not only power generation, but also diverse applications of its nuclear heat, of having extremely different safe principle from that of conventional reactors, of having two types of pebble-bed and block which are extremely different types, of promoting its construction plan in South Africa, of including its application to disposition of Russian surplus weapons plutonium of less reporting HTTR in Japan in spite of its full operation, and so on. However, HTGR is expected for an extremely important nuclear reactor aiming at the next coming one of LWR. HTGR which is late started and developed under complete private leading, is strongly conscious at environmental problem since its beginning. Before 30 years when large scale HTGR was expected to operate, it advertised a merit to reduce wasted heat because of its high temperature. As ratio occupied by electricity expands among application of energies, ratio occupied by the other energies are larger. When considering applications except electric power, high temperature thermal energy from HTGR can be thought wider applications than that from LWR and so on. (G.K.)

  16. Very-high-temperature gas reactor environmental impacts assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, C.D.; Barton, C.J.; Compere, E.L.; Row, T.H.

    1977-08-01

    The operation of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), a slightly modified General Atomic type High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) with 1600 F primary coolant, as a source of process heat for the 1400 0 F steam-methanation reformer step in a hydrogen producing plant (via hydrogasification of coal liquids) was examined. It was found that: (a) from the viewpoint of product contamination by fission and activation products, an Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) is probably not necessary; and (b) long term steam corrosion of the core support posts may require increasing their diameter (a relatively minor design adjustment). However, the hydrogen contaminant in the primary coolant which permeates the reformer may reduce steam corrosion but may produce other problems which have not as yet been resolved. An IHX in parallel with both the reformer and steam generator would solve these problems, but probably at greater cost than that of increasing the size of the core support posts. It is recommended that this corrosion problem be examined in more detail, especially by investigating the performance of current fossil fuel heated reformers in industry. Detailed safety analysis of the VHTR would be required to establish definitely whether the IHX can be eliminated. Water and hydrogen ingress into the reactor system are potential problems which can be alleviated by an IHX. These problems will require analysis, research and development within the program required for development of the VHTR

  17. Gas-core reactor power transient analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kascak, A.F.

    1972-01-01

    The gas core reactor is a proposed device which features high temperatures. It has applications in high specific impulse space missions, and possibly in low thermal pollution MHD power plants. The nuclear fuel is a ball of uranium plasma radiating thermal photons as opposed to gamma rays. This thermal energy is picked up before it reaches the solid cavity liner by an inflowing seeded propellant stream and convected out through a rocket nozzle. A wall-burnout condition will exist if there is not enough flow of propellant to convect the energy back into the cavity. A reactor must therefore operate with a certain amount of excess propellant flow. Due to the thermal inertia of the flowing propellant, the reactor can undergo power transients in excess of the steady-state wall burnout power for short periods of time. The objective of the study was to determine how long the wall burnout power could be exceeded without burning out the cavity liner. The model used in the heat-transfer calculation was one-dimensional, and thermal radiation was assumed to be a diffusion process. (auth)

  18. Gas/liquid separator for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soma, Naoshi; Akimoto, Seiichi; Yokoyama, Iwao.

    1993-01-01

    A two phase gas/liquid flow generated at a heating portion of a nuclear reactor is swirled by inlet vanes. The phase gas/liquid flow uprises as a vortex flow in a vortex cylinder, and a liquid phase of a high density gathers at the outer circumference of the vortex cylinder. The liquid phase gathered at the outer circumference is collected at the inlet of a discharge flow channel which protrude into the vortex cylinder and in a three-step structure, and introduced into a recycling liquid phase passing through the discharge flow channel for liquid phase. There is provided a structure that separated liquid collected at the lowermost state in the inlet of the three-step discharge flow channel inlet descends in the discharge flow channel, then uprises in an uprising flow channel and is introduced into the recycling liquid phase by way of a discharge flow channel exit. The height of the discharge flow channel exit is determined equal to that of a liquid level of the recycling liquid phase during rated operation of the reactor. Accordingly, even in a case where the liquid level in the recycling liquid phase is lowered, the liquid level of the uprising flow channel is kept equal to that during rated operation. (I.N.)

  19. Behavior of low-burnup metallic fuels for the integral fast reactor at elevated temperatures in ex-reactor tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Hanchung; Liu, Yung Y.; Wang, Da-Yung; Kramer, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    A series of ex-reactor heating tests on low burnup U-26wt.%Pu-10wt.%Zr metallic fuel for the PRISM reactor was conducted to evaluate fuel/cladding metallurgical interaction and its effect on cladding integrity at elevated temperatures. The reaction between the fuel and cladding caused liquid-phase formation and dissolution of the inner surface of the cladding. The rate of cladding penetration was below the existing design correlation, which provides a conservative margin to cladding failure. In a test which enveloped a wide range of postulated reactor transient events, a substantial temporal cladding integrity margin was demonstrated for an intact, whole fuel pin. The cause of the eventual pin breach was reaction-induced cladding thinning combined with fission-gas pressure loading. The behavior of the breached pin was benign. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  20. Coated particle fuel for high temperature gas cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl; Nabielek, Heinz [Research Center Julich (FZJ), Julich (Germany); Kendall, James M. [Global Virtual L1c, Prescott (United States)

    2007-10-15

    applications at 850-900 .deg. C and for process heat/hydrogen generation applications with 950 .deg. C outlet temperatures. There is a clear set of standards for modern high quality fuel in terms of low levels of heavy metal contamination, manufacture-induced particle defects during fuel body and fuel element making, irradiation/accident induced particle failures and limits on fission product release from intact particles. While gas-cooled reactor design is still open-ended with blocks for the prismatic and spherical fuel elements for the pebble-bed design, there is near worldwide agreement on high quality fuel: a 500 {mu}m diameter UO{sub 2} kernel of 10% enrichment is surrounded by a 100 {mu}m thick sacrificial buffer layer to be followed by a dense inner pyrocarbon layer, a high quality silicon carbide layer of 35 {mu}m thickness and theoretical density and another outer pyrocarbon layer. Good performance has been demonstrated both under operational and under accident conditions, i.e. to 10% FIMA and maximum 1600 .deg. C afterwards. And it is the wide-ranging demonstration experience that makes this particle superior. Recommendations are made for further work: 1. Generation of data for presently manufactured materials, e.g. SiC strength and strength distribution, PyC creep and shrinkage and many more material data sets. 2. Renewed start of irradiation and accident testing of modern coated particle fuel. 3. Analysis of existing and newly created data with a view to demonstrate satisfactory performance at burnups beyond 10% FIMA and complete fission product retention even in accidents that go beyond 1600 .deg. C for a short period of time. This work should proceed at both national and international level.

  1. Coated particle fuel for high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, Karl; Nabielek, Heinz; Kendall, James M.

    2007-01-01

    and for process heat/hydrogen generation applications with 950 .deg. C outlet temperatures. There is a clear set of standards for modern high quality fuel in terms of low levels of heavy metal contamination, manufacture-induced particle defects during fuel body and fuel element making, irradiation/accident induced particle failures and limits on fission product release from intact particles. While gas-cooled reactor design is still open-ended with blocks for the prismatic and spherical fuel elements for the pebble-bed design, there is near worldwide agreement on high quality fuel: a 500 μm diameter UO 2 kernel of 10% enrichment is surrounded by a 100 μm thick sacrificial buffer layer to be followed by a dense inner pyrocarbon layer, a high quality silicon carbide layer of 35 μm thickness and theoretical density and another outer pyrocarbon layer. Good performance has been demonstrated both under operational and under accident conditions, i.e. to 10% FIMA and maximum 1600 .deg. C afterwards. And it is the wide-ranging demonstration experience that makes this particle superior. Recommendations are made for further work: 1. Generation of data for presently manufactured materials, e.g. SiC strength and strength distribution, PyC creep and shrinkage and many more material data sets. 2. Renewed start of irradiation and accident testing of modern coated particle fuel. 3. Analysis of existing and newly created data with a view to demonstrate satisfactory performance at burnups beyond 10% FIMA and complete fission product retention even in accidents that go beyond 1600 .deg. C for a short period of time. This work should proceed at both national and international level

  2. Automated testing of reactor protection instrumentation made easy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iborra, A.; De Marcos, F.; Pastor, J.A.; Alvarez, B.; Jimenez, A.; Mesa, E.; Alsonso, L.; Regidor, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Maintenance and testing of reactor protection systems is an important cause of unplanned reactor trips. Automated testing is the answer because it minimises test times and reduces human error. The GAMA I system, developed and implemented at Vandellos II in Spain, has the added advantage that it uses visual programming, which means that changing the software does not need specialist programming skills. (author)

  3. The modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor - a new production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nulton, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    One of the reactor concepts being considered for application as a new production reactor (NPR) is a 350-MW(thermal) modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). The proposed MHTGR-NPR is based on the design of the commercial MHTGR and is being developed by a team that includes General Atomics and Combustion Engineering. The proposed design includes four modules combined into a production block that includes a shared containment, a spent-fuel storage facility, and other support facilities. The MHTGR has a helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, graphite-reflected annular core formed from prismatic graphite fuel blocks. The MHTGR fuel consists of highly enriched uranium oxycarbide (UCO) microsphere fuel particles that are coated with successive layers of pyrolytic carbon (PyC) and silicon carbide (SiC). Tritium-producing targets consist of enriched 6 Li aluminate microsphere target particles that are coated with successive layers of PyC and SiC similar to the fuel microspheres. Normal reactivity control is implemented by articulated control rods that can be inserted into channels in the inner and outer reflector blocks. Shutdown heat removal is accomplished by a single shutdown heat exchanger and electric motor-driven circulator located in the bottom of the reactor vessel. Current plans are to stack spent fuel elements in dry, helium-filled, water-cooled wells and store them for ∼1 yr before reprocessing. All phases of MHTGR fuel reprocessing have been demonstrated

  4. Thermodynamic performance of a gas-core fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, W.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the thermodynamic behaviour of a critical quantity of gaseous uranium-fluorides in chemical equilibrium with a graphite wall. From the very beginning a container was considered with cooled walls. As it was evident that a nuclear reactor working with gaseous fuel should run at much higher temperatures than classical LWR or HTGR reactors, most of the investigations were performed for walls with a surface temperature of 1800 to 2000 K. It was supposed that such a surface temperature would be technologically possible for a heat load between 1 and 5 MWatt m -2 . Cooling with high pressure helium-gas has to keep balance with this heat flux. The technical construction of such a wall will be a problem in itself. It is thought that the experiences with re-entry-vessels in space-technology can be used. A basic assumption in all the calculations is that the U-C-F reactor gas 'sees' a graphite wall, possibly graphite tiles supported by heat resistant materials like SiN 2 , SiC 2 and at a lower temperature level by niobium-steel. Such a gastight compound-system is not necessarily of high-tensile strength materials. It has to be surrounded by a cooled neutron moderator-reflector which in its turn must be supported by a steel-wall at room temperature holding pressure of the order of 100 bar (10 MPa). The design of such a compound-wall is a task for the future. 116 refs.; 28 figs.; 29 tabs

  5. Evaluation of tritium production rate in a gas-cooled reactor with continuous tritium recovery system for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Hideaki, E-mail: mat@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Nakaya, Hiroyuki; Nakao, Yasuyuki [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Shimakawa, Satoshi; Goto, Minoru; Nakagawa, Shigeaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Nishikawa, Masabumi [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The performance of a gas-cooled reactor as a tritium production system was studied. • A continuous tritium recovery using helium gas was considered. • Gas-cooled reactors with 3 GW output in all can produce ∼6 kg of tritium in a year • Performance of the system was examined for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and LiAlO{sub 2} compounds. -- Abstract: The performance of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor as a tritium production with continuous tritium recovery system is examined. A gas turbine high-temperature reactor of 300-MWe (600 MW) nominal capacity (GTHTR300) is assumed as the calculation target, and using the continuous-energy Monte Carlo transport code MVP-BURN, burn-up simulations for the three-dimensional entire-core region of the GTHTR300 were performed. A Li loading pattern for the continuous tritium recovery system in the gas-cooled reactor is presented. It is shown that module gas-cooled reactors with a total thermal output power of 3 GW in all can produce ∼6 kg of tritium maximum in a year.

  6. Advanced Test Reactor outage risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatcher, T.A.; Atkinson, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    Beginning in 1997, risk assessment was performed for each Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) outage aiding the coordination of plant configuration and work activities (maintenance, construction projects, etc.) to minimize the risk of reactor fuel damage and to improve defense-in-depth. The risk assessment activities move beyond simply meeting Technical Safety Requirements to increase the awareness of risk sensitive configurations, to focus increased attention on the higher risk activities, and to seek cost-effective design or operational changes that reduce risk. A detailed probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) had been performed to assess the risk of fuel damage during shutdown operations including heavy load handling. This resulted in several design changes to improve safety; however, evaluation of individual outages had not been performed previously and many risk insights were not being utilized in outage planning. The shutdown PRA provided the necessary framework for assessing relative and absolute risk levels and assessing defense-in-depth. Guidelines were written identifying combinations of equipment outages to avoid. Screening criteria were developed for the selection of work activities to receive review. Tabulation of inherent and work-related initiating events and their relative risk level versus plant mode has aided identification of the risk level the scheduled work involves. Preoutage reviews are conducted and post-outage risk assessment is documented to summarize the positive and negative aspects of the outage with regard to risk. The risk for the outage is compared to the risk level that would result from optimal scheduling of the work to be performed and to baseline or average past performance

  7. International Experience with Fast Reactor Operation & Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, John I.; Grandy, C.

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: • Worldwide experience with fast reactors has demonstrated the robustness of the technology and it stands ready for worldwide deployment. • The lessons learned are many and there is danger that what has been learned will be forgotten given that there is little activity in fast reactor development at the present time. • For this reason it is essential that knowledge of fast reactor technology be preserved, an activity supported in the U.S. as well as other countries

  8. Project accent: graphite irradiated creep in a materials test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooking, M.

    2014-01-01

    Atkins manages a pioneering programme of irradiation experiments for EDF Energy. One of these projects is Project ACCENT, designed to obtain evidence of a beneficial physical property of the graphite, which may extend the life of the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGRs). The project team combines the in-house experience of EDF Energy with two supplier organisations (providing the material test reactors and testing facilities) and supporting consultancies (Atkins and an independent technical expert). This paper describes: - Brief summary of the Project; - Discussion of the challenges faced by the Project; and - Conclusion elaborating on the aims of the Project. These challenging experiments use bespoke technology and both un-irradiated (virgin) and irradiated AGR graphite. The results will help to better understand graphite irradiation-induced creep (or stress modified dimensional change) properties and therefore more accurately determine lifetime and safe operating envelopes of the AGRs. The first round of irradiation has been completed, with a second round about to commence. This is a key step to realising the full lifetime ambition for AGRs, demonstrating the relaxation of stresses within the graphite bricks. (authors)

  9. ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoderbek, David [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Farrell, Helen [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Howard, James [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Raterman, Kevin [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Silpngarmlert, Suntichai [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Martin, Kenneth [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Smith, Bruce [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Klein, Perry [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-06-30

    Work began on the ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrates Production Test (DOE award number DE-NT0006553) on October 1, 2008. This final report summarizes the entire project from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013.

  10. Imperfection detection probability at ultrasonic testing of reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazinczy, F. de; Koernvik, L.Aa.

    1980-02-01

    The report is a lecture given at a symposium organized by the Swedish nuclear power inspectorate on February 1980. Equipments, calibration and testing procedures are reported. The estimation of defect detection probability for ultrasonic tests and the reliability of literature data are discussed. Practical testing of reactor vessels and welded joints are described. Swedish test procedures are compared with other countries. Series of test data for welded joints of the OKG-2 reactor are presented. Future recommendations for testing procedures are made. (GBn)

  11. Results of assembly test of HTTR reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, S.; Saikusa, A.; Shiozawa, S.; Tsuji, N.; Miki, T.

    1996-01-01

    The assembly test of the HTTR actual reactor internals had been carried out at the works, prior to their installation in the actual reactor pressure vessel(RPV) at the construction site. The assembly test consists of several items such as examining fabricating precision of each component and alignment of piled-up structures, measuring circumferential coolant velocity profile in the passage between the simulated RPV and the reactor internals as well as under the support plates, measuring by-pass flow rate through gaps between the reactor internals, and measuring the binding force of the core restraint mechanism. Results of the test showed good performance of the HTTR reactor internals. Installation of the reactor internals in the actual RPV was started at the construction site of HTTR in April, 1995. In the installation process, main items of the assembly test at the works were repeated to investigate the reproducibility of installation. (author). 5 refs, 11 figs

  12. Requalification of SPERT [Special Power Excursion Reactor Test] pins for use in university reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Dates, L.R.

    1986-12-01

    A series of nondestructive and destructive examinations have been performed on a representative sample of stainless steel-clad UO 2 fuel pins procured in the early-to-mid 1960s for the SPERT program. These examinations were undertaken in order to requalify the SPERT pins for use in converting university research reactors from the use of highly enriched uranium to the use of low-enriched uranium. The requalification program included visual and dimensional inspections of fuel pins and fuel pellets, radiographic inspections of welds, fill gas analyses, and chemical and spectrographic analyses of fuel and cladding materials. In general all attributes tested were within or very close to specified values, although some weld defects not covered by the original specifications were found. 1 ref., 4 figs., 11 tabs

  13. Material development for gas-cooled high temperature reactors for the production of nuclear process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.

    1977-04-01

    In the framework of the material development for gas-cooled high temperature reactors, considerable investigations of the materials for the reactor core and the primary cicuit are being conducted. Concerning the core components, the current state-of-the-art and the objectives of the development work on the spherical fuel elements, coated particles and structural graphite are discussed. As an example of the structural graphite, the non-replaceable reflector of the process heat reactor is discussed. The primary circuit will be constructed mainly from metallic materials, although some ceramics are also being considered. Components of interest are hot gas ducts, liners, methane reformer tubes and helium-helium intermediate heat exchangers. The gaseous impurities present in the helium coolant may cause oxidation and carburization of the nickel-base and iron-base alloys envisaged for use in these components, with a possible associated adverse effect on the mechanical properties such as creep and fatigue. Test capacity has therefore been installed to investigate materials behaviour in simulated reactor helium under both constant and alternating stress conditions. The first results on the creep behaviour of several alloys in impure helium are presented and discussed. (orig./GSC) [de

  14. Multicycle Optimization of Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor Loading Patterns Using Genetic Algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziver, A. Kemal; Carter, Jonathan N.; Pain, Christopher C.; Oliveira, Cassiano R.E. de; Goddard, Antony J. H.; Overton, Richard S.

    2003-01-01

    A genetic algorithm (GA)-based optimizer (GAOPT) has been developed for in-core fuel management of advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGRs) at HINKLEY B and HARTLEPOOL, which employ on-load and off-load refueling, respectively. The optimizer has been linked to the reactor analysis code PANTHER for the automated evaluation of loading patterns in a two-dimensional geometry, which is collapsed from the three-dimensional reactor model. GAOPT uses a directed stochastic (Monte Carlo) algorithm to generate initial population members, within predetermined constraints, for use in GAs, which apply the standard genetic operators: selection by tournament, crossover, and mutation. The GAOPT is able to generate and optimize loading patterns for successive reactor cycles (multicycle) within acceptable CPU times even on single-processor systems. The algorithm allows radial shuffling of fuel assemblies in a multicycle refueling optimization, which is constructed to aid long-term core management planning decisions. This paper presents the application of the GA-based optimization to two AGR stations, which apply different in-core management operational rules. Results obtained from the testing of GAOPT are discussed

  15. Concept of an inherently-safe high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Masuro

    2012-01-01

    As the challenge to ensure no harmful release of radioactive materials at the accidents by deterministic approach instead to satisfy acceptance criteria or safety goal for risk by probabilistic approach, new concept of advanced reactor, an inherently-safe high temperature gas-cooled reactor, is proposed based on the experience of the operation of the actual High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) in Japan, High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), and the design of the commercial plant (GTHTR300), utilizing the inherent safety features of the HTGR (i.e., safety features based on physical phenomena). The safety design philosophy of the inherently-safe HTGR for the safety analysis of the radiological consequences is determined as the confinement of radioactive materials is assured by only inherent safety features without engineered safety features, AC power or prompt actions by plant personnel if the design extension conditions occur. Inherent safety features to prevent the loss or degradation of the confinement function are identified. It is proposed not to apply the probabilistic approach for the evaluation of the radiological consequences of the accidents in the safety analysis because no inherent safety features fail for the mitigation of the consequences of the accidents. Consequently, there are no event sequences to harmful release of radioactive materials if the design extension conditions occur in the inherently-safe HTGR concept. The concept and future R and D items for the inherently-safe HTGR are described in this paper.

  16. Safety design philosophy of gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katanishi, Shoji; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2003-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been developing design studies of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor (GTHTR300). The original safety design philosophy has also been discussed and fixed for the GTHTR300 based on the experience of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of JAERI which is the first High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) in Japan. One of the unique feature of the safety philosophy of the GTHTR300 is that a depressurization accident induced by a large pipe break is postulated as a design basis accident in order to show the high level of safety characteristics, though its probability of occurrence is lower than the probability range of design basis accident. Another feature of safety design is to adopt a double confinement that is one of the original concepts for the GTHTR300. By using a double confinement, a feasibility of safety design without containment vessel was clarified even in case of the depressurization accident. The safety design philosophies for passive cooling system, reactor shutdown system, and so on were determined. The methodology for the safety evaluation, such as safety criteria and selection of events to be evaluated by using estimation of probability of occurrence, were also discussed and determined. This article describes the safety design philosophy and some results of preliminary evaluations which were conducted in order to clarify the feasibility of original safety design of the GTHTR300. The present study is entrusted from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  17. The variation of particle gas-borne concentration with time in a gas cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, J; Hall, D; Reeks, M W [Central Electricity Generating Board, Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories (United Kingdom)

    1985-07-01

    If volatile fission products are released from fuel during a reactor fault, a significant fraction could become attached to small particles also present in the coolant. In such circumstances the retention of those particles by the reactor circuit will limit the level of gas-borne particle concentration and hence be important in reducing the potential release of fission product activity to the atmosphere. Clearly the retention of particles will be influenced by both the deposition and resuspension of particles from surfaces exposed to the coolant flow. In this paper we consider deposition and resuspension but pay particular attention to the role of resuspension, which in the past has been given little consideration. A recently developed model for the resuspension of small particles by a turbulent flow is outlined. Traditionally, resuspension has been interpreted as a force balance between the aerodynamic removal forces and the surface adhesive forces. In contrast, this new approach embodies an energy balance criterion for particle resuspension. Furthermore, the stochastic nature of this new model has shown that resuspension can be sub-divided into two regimes: (i) initial resuspension (resuspension occurring in times less than a second) which reduces the net deposition of particles to a surface; and (ii) longer term resuspension (resuspension after 1 second) which determines the asymptotic decay of particle gas-borne concentration. It is seen that the asymptotic decay varies almost inversely as the decay time. Force balance models are unsuccessful in accounting for the experimentally observed longer term resuspension. We show that a Volterra integro-differential equation best describes the variation of particle gas-borne concentration with time in a recirculating gas flow such as a gas cooled reactor. It is seen that the longer term resuspension has a major influence in the final decay of particle concentration. (author)

  18. The variation of particle gas-borne concentration with time in a gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.; Hall, D.; Reeks, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    If volatile fission products are released from fuel during a reactor fault, a significant fraction could become attached to small particles also present in the coolant. In such circumstances the retention of those particles by the reactor circuit will limit the level of gas-borne particle concentration and hence be important in reducing the potential release of fission product activity to the atmosphere. Clearly the retention of particles will be influenced by both the deposition and resuspension of particles from surfaces exposed to the coolant flow. In this paper we consider deposition and resuspension but pay particular attention to the role of resuspension, which in the past has been given little consideration. A recently developed model for the resuspension of small particles by a turbulent flow is outlined. Traditionally, resuspension has been interpreted as a force balance between the aerodynamic removal forces and the surface adhesive forces. In contrast, this new approach embodies an energy balance criterion for particle resuspension. Furthermore, the stochastic nature of this new model has shown that resuspension can be sub-divided into two regimes: (i) initial resuspension (resuspension occurring in times less than a second) which reduces the net deposition of particles to a surface; and (ii) longer term resuspension (resuspension after 1 second) which determines the asymptotic decay of particle gas-borne concentration. It is seen that the asymptotic decay varies almost inversely as the decay time. Force balance models are unsuccessful in accounting for the experimentally observed longer term resuspension. We show that a Volterra integro-differential equation best describes the variation of particle gas-borne concentration with time in a recirculating gas flow such as a gas cooled reactor. It is seen that the longer term resuspension has a major influence in the final decay of particle concentration. (author)

  19. Non-equilibrium statistical thermodynamics of neutron gas in reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayasaka, Hideo

    1977-01-01

    The thermodynamic structures of non-equilibrium steady states of highly rarefied neutron gas in various media are considered for the irreversible processes owing to creative and destructive reactions of neutrons with nuclei of these media and supply from the external sources. Under the so-called clean and cold condition in reactor, the medium is regarded virtually as offering the different chemical potential fields for each subsystem of a steady neutron gas system. The fluctuations around a steady state are considered in a Markovian-Gaussian process. The generalized Einstein relations are derived for stationary neutron gas systems. The forces and flows of neutron gases in a medium are defined upon the general stationary solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. There exist the symmetry of the kinetic coefficients, and the minimum entropy production upon neutron-nuclear reactions. The distribution functions in various media are determined by each corresponding extremum condition under the vanishing of changes of the respective total entropies in the Gibbs equation. (auth.)

  20. The combined use of test reactor experiments and power reactor tests for the development of PCI-resistant fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkrans, S.; Vesterlund, G.; Vaernild, O.

    1980-01-01

    The theme of this paper is that for development of PCI-resistant fuel acceptable from the commercial and licensing aspects, extensive and time-consuming work is needed both in a test reactor and in power reactors. The test reactor is necessary for ramp testing to power levels not allowed in power reactors and with the aim of generating fuel failures. It is also used for other special irradiation experiments. The access to power reactors is necessary to generate information on performance in a real LWR core and to incubate at a reasonable cost the large amount of rods required for test reactor ramping. Selected results from the ASEA-ATOM work are used to support these conclusions. (author)

  1. Thermo-mechanical behaviour of FBTR reactor vessel due to natural convection in cover gas space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, G.; Varadarajan, S.; Kapoor, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Fast Breeder Test Reactor is a 40 MW(t), loop type sodium cooled reactor, similar in design to Rapsodie. The Reactor Assembly, which is the heart of FBTR, comprises the Reactor Vessel (RV) housed in a safety vessel within a concrete cell (A1 Cell). The RV which supports the core is shielded at the top by two rotatable plugs which are stacked with layers of borated graphite and steel. The smaller plug (SRP), is mounted excentric to the larger one (LRP). A nominal annular gap of 16 mm is provided between RV and LRP and between LRP and SRP to enable free rotation of the plugs. Stainless Steel insulation is fixed inside the steel vessel, to avoid overheating of the A1 Cell concrete. The core is supported by the Grid Plate (GP), bolted to the RV. During preheating, sodium charging and isothermal runs upto 350 0 C, temperature asymmetries were noticed in the reactor vessel wall in the cover gas space. This was attributable to convection currents in the annulus between RV and LRP. The asymmetries also resulted in a lateral shift of the grid plate. This paper discusses our experience in suppressing these convection currents, and minimising the grid plate shift

  2. Tracer gas diffusion sampling test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohay, V.J.

    1993-01-01

    Efforts are under way to employ active and passive vapor extraction to remove carbon tetrachloride from the soil in the 200 West Area an the Hanford Site as part of the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action. In the active approach, a vacuum is applied to a well, which causes soil gas surrounding the well to be drawn up to the surface. The contaminated air is cleaned by passage through a granular activated carbon bed. There are questions concerning the radius of influence associated with application of the vacuum system and related uncertainties about the soil-gas diffusion rates with and without the vacuum system present. To address these questions, a series of tracer gas diffusion sampling tests is proposed in which an inert, nontoxic tracer gas, sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 ), will be injected into a well, and the rates of SF 6 diffusion through the surrounding soil horizon will be measured by sampling in nearby wells. Tracer gas tests will be conducted at sites very near the active vacuum extraction system and also at sites beyond the radius of influence of the active vacuum system. In the passive vapor extraction approach, barometric pressure fluctuations cause soil gas to be drawn to the surface through the well. At the passive sites, the effects of barometric ''pumping'' due to changes in atmospheric pressure will be investigated. Application of tracer gas testing to both the active and passive vapor extraction methods is described in the wellfield enhancement work plan (Rohay and Cameron 1993)

  3. Methanol synthesis in a countercurrent gas-solid-solid trickle flow reactor. An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuczynski, M.; Oyevaar, M.H.; Pieters, R.T.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    The synthesis of methanol from CO and H2 was executed in a gas-solid-solid trickle flow reactor. The reactor consisted of three tubular reactor sections with cooling sections in between. The catalyst was Cu on alumina, the adsorbent was a silica-alumina powder and the experimental range 498–523 K,

  4. Gas-solid hydroxyethylation of potato starch in a stirred vibrating fluidized bed reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, N.J M; Stamhuis, Eize; Beenackers, A.A C M

    A novel reactor for modifying cohesive C-powders such as in the gas-solid hydroxyethylation of semidry potato starch is characterized, the so-called stirred vibrating fluidized bed reactor. Good fluidization characteristics are obtained in this reactor for certain combinations of stirring and

  5. Session 4: Test of a reactor for water-gas-shift reaction on a 3 kW{sub el.} scale at direct combination with auto-thermal reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasel, J.; Cremer, P.; Peters, R.; Stolten, D. [Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Institute for Materials and Processes in Energy Systems (IWV 3), Julich (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The goal of the work described in this paper was to test a reactor for WGS reaction on a larger scale of approx. 3 kW{sub el.} and to demonstrate a successful direct combination of two important components of fuel processing, i.e. a combination of ATR with WGS reaction. The value for the electric power of 3 kW{sub el.} fulfils quite well the demands of a technical application of a fuel cell system if e.g. a so-called Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) is considered. An APU can be used in passenger cars, heavy duty vehicles, ships and air planes. (authors)

  6. Testing of HTR UO{sub 2} TRISO fuels in AVR and in material test reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kania, Michael J., E-mail: MichaelJKania@googlemail.com [Retired from Lockheed Martin Corp, 20 Beach Road, Averill Park, NY 12018 (United States); Nabielek, Heinz, E-mail: heinznabielek@me.com [Retired from Research Center Jülich, Monschauerstrasse 61, 52355 Düren (Germany); Verfondern, Karl [Research Center Juelich,Research Center Jülich, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Allelein, Hans-Josef [Research Center Juelich,Research Center Jülich, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, 52425 Jülich (Germany); RWTH Aachen, 52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    The German High Temperature Reactor Fuel Development Program successfully developed, licensed and manufactured many thousands of spherical fuel elements that were used to power the experimental AVR reactor and the commercial THTR reactor. In the 1970s, this program extended the performance envelope of HTR fuels by developing and qualifying the TRISO-coated particle system. Irradiation testing in real-time AVR tests and accelerated MTR tests demonstrated the superior manufacturing process of this fuel and its irradiation performance. In the 1980s, another program direction change was made to a low enriched UO{sub 2} TRISO-coated particle system coupled with high-quality manufacturing specifications designed to meet new HTR plant design needs. These needs included requirements for inherent safety under normal operation and accident conditions. Again, the German fuel development program met and exceeded these challenges by manufacturing and qualifying the low-enriched UO{sub 2} TRISO-fuel system for HTR systems with steam generation, gas-turbine systems and very high temperature process heat applications. Fuel elements were manufactured in production scale facilities that contained near defect free UO{sub 2} TRISO coated particles, homogeneously distributed within a graphite matrix with very low levels of uranium contamination. Good irradiation performance for these elements was demonstrated under normal operating conditions to 12% FIMA and under accident conditions not exceeding 1600 °C.

  7. High Conduction Neutron Absorber to Simulate Fast Reactor Environment in an Existing Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillen, Donna; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Parry, James

    2014-06-22

    A need was determined for a thermal neutron absorbing material that could be cooled in a gas reactor environment without using large amounts of a coolant that would thermalize the neutron flux. A new neutron absorbing material was developed that provided high conduction so a small amount of water would be sufficient for cooling thereby thermalizing the flux as little as possible. An irradiation experiment was performed to assess the effects of radiation and the performance of a new neutron absorbing material. Neutron fluence monitors were placed inside specially fabricated holders within a set of drop-in capsules and irradiated for up to four cycles in the Advanced Test Reactor. Following irradiation, the neutron fluence monitor wires were analyzed by gamma and x-ray spectrometry to determine the activities of the activation products. The adjusted neutron fluences were calculated and grouped into three bins – thermal, epithermal and fast to evaluate the spectral shift created by the new material. Fluence monitors were evaluated after four different irradiation periods to evaluate the effects of burn-up in the absorbing material. Additionally, activities of the three highest activity isotopes present in the specimens are given.

  8. Development of gas cooled reactors and experimental setup of high temperature helium loop for in-pile operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miletić, Marija, E-mail: marija_miletic@live.com [Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Fukač, Rostislav, E-mail: fuk@cvrez.cz [Research Centre Rez Ltd., Rez (Czech Republic); Pioro, Igor, E-mail: Igor.Pioro@uoit.ca [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa (Canada); Dragunov, Alexey, E-mail: Alexey.Dragunov@uoit.ca [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    coolants. The purpose of the high temperature helium loop (HTHL) is to simulate technical and chemical conditions of VHTR's coolant. The loop is intended to serve an as experimental device for fatigue and creep tests of construction metallic materials for gas-cooled reactors and it should be also employed for research in field of gaseous coolant chemistry. The loop will serve also for tests of nuclear graphite, dosing and helium purification systems. Because the VHTR is a new reactor concept, major technical uncertainties remain relative to helium-cooled advanced reactor systems. This paper summarizes also the concept of the HTHL in the Research Centre Rez Ltd., its design, utilization and future plans for experimental setup.

  9. Auxiliary bearing design considerations for gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfield, S.R. Jr.; Rodwell, E.

    2001-01-01

    The need to avoid contamination of the primary system, along with other perceived advantages, has led to the selection of electromagnetic bearings (EMBs) in most ongoing commercial-scale gas cooled reactor (GCR) designs. However, one implication of magnetic bearings is the requirement to provide backup support to mitigate the effects of failures or overload conditions. The demands on these auxiliary or 'catcher' bearings have been substantially escalated by the recent development of direct Brayton cycle GCR concepts. Conversely, there has been only limited directed research in the area of auxiliary bearings, particularly for vertically oriented turbomachines. This paper explores the current state-of-the-art for auxiliary bearings and the implications for current GCR designs. (author)

  10. Advances in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuel Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-12-01

    This publication reports on the results of a coordinated research project on advances in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel technology and describes the findings of research activities on coated particle developments. These comprise two specific benchmark exercises with the application of HTGR fuel performance and fission product release codes, which helped compare the quality and validity of the computer models against experimental data. The project participants also examined techniques for fuel characterization and advanced quality assessment/quality control. The key exercise included a round-robin experimental study on the measurements of fuel kernel and particle coating properties of recent Korean, South African and US coated particle productions applying the respective qualification measures of each participating Member State. The summary report documents the results and conclusions achieved by the project and underlines the added value to contemporary knowledge on HTGR fuel.

  11. Advances in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuel Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    This publication reports on the results of a coordinated research project on advances in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel technology and describes the findings of research activities on coated particle developments. These comprise two specific benchmark exercises with the application of HTGR fuel performance and fission product release codes, which helped compare the quality and validity of the computer models against experimental data. The project participants also examined techniques for fuel characterization and advanced quality assessment/quality control. The key exercise included a round-robin experimental study on the measurements of fuel kernel and particle coating properties of recent Korean, South African and US coated particle productions applying the respective qualification measures of each participating Member State. The summary report documents the results and conclusions achieved by the project and underlines the added value to contemporary knowledge on HTGR fuel.

  12. Safety analysis of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazu, Akira; Morimoto, Toshio

    1975-01-01

    In recent years, in order to satisfy the social requirements of environment and safety and also to cope with the current energy stringency, the installation of safe nuclear power plants is indispensable. Herein, safety analysis and evaluation to confirm quantitatively the safety design of a nuclear power plant become more and more important. The safety analysis and its methods for a high temperature gas-cooled reactor are described, with emphasis placed on the practices by Fuji Electric Manufacturing Co. Fundamental rule of securing plant safety ; safety analysis in normal operation regarding plant dynamic characteristics and radioactivity evaluation ; and safety analysis at the time of accidents regarding plant response to the accidents and radioactivity evaluation are explained. (Mori, K.)

  13. Development of failure detection system for gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feirreira, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    This work presents several kinds of Failure Detection Systems for Fuel Elements, stressing their functional principles and major applications. A comparative study indicates that the method of electrostatic precipitation of the fission gases Kr and Xe is the most efficient for fuel failure detection in gas-cooled reactors. A detailed study of the physical phenomena involved in electrostatic precipitation led to the derivation of an equation for the measured counting rate. The emission of fission products from the fuel and the ion recombination inside the chamber are evaluated. A computer program, developed to simulate the complete operation of the system, relates the counting rate to the concentration of Kr and Xe isotopes. The project of a mock-up is then presented. Finally, the program calculations are compared to experimental data, available from the literature, yielding a close agreement. (author)

  14. Gas-cooled reactor commercialization study. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This report of the gas-cooled reactor commercialization study completes the technical and cost evaluation portions of this study contract. A final report in December will update the status of the incentive analyses and the issues of commercialization. This study was designed to bring together potential industry participants (utilities and suppliers) to evaluate the commercial potential of the HTGR-SC and to build channels of communication among the participating organizations at the same time that technical, economic and institutional issues were being evaluated. RAMCO, Inc., in suggesting and using this study approach, believes its application extends to any commercialization problem involving multi-party involvement in high capital, intensive, high risk energy technologies

  15. Experimental facilities for gas-cooled reactor safety studies. Task group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, the NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) completed a study on Nuclear Safety Research in OECD Countries: Support Facilities for Existing and Advanced Reactors (SFEAR) which focused on facilities suitable for current and advanced water reactor systems. In a subsequent collective opinion on the subject, the CSNI recommended to conduct a similar exercise for Generation IV reactor designs, aiming to develop a strategy for ' better preparing the CSNI to play a role in the planned extension of safety research beyond the needs set by current operating reactors'. In that context, the CSNI established the Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) in 2008 with the objective of providing an overview of facilities suitable for performing safety research relevant to gas-cooled reactors and sodium fast reactors. This report addresses gas-cooled reactors; a similar report covering sodium fast reactors is under preparation. The findings of the TAREF are expected to trigger internationally funded CSNI projects on relevant safety issues at the key facilities identified. Such CSNI-sponsored projects constitute a means for efficiently obtaining the necessary data through internationally co-ordinated research. This report provides an overview of experimental facilities that can be used to carry out nuclear safety research for gas-cooled reactors and identifies priorities for organizing international co-operative programmes at selected facilities. The information has been collected and analysed by a Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) as part of an ongoing initiative of the NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) which aims to define and to implement a strategy for the efficient utilisation of facilities and resources for Generation IV reactor systems. (author)

  16. The early history of high-temperature helium gas-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simnad, M.T.; California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA

    1991-01-01

    The original concepts in the proposals for high-temperature helium gas-cooled power reactors by Farrington Daniels, during the decade 1944-1955, are summarized. The early research on the development of the helium gas-cooled power reactors is reviewed, and the operational experiences with the first generation of HTGRs are discussed. (author)

  17. A PC-based high temperature gas reactor simulator for Indonesian conceptual HTR reactor basic training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syarip; Po, L. C. C.

    2018-05-01

    In planning for nuclear power plant construction in Indonesia, helium cooled high temperature reactor (HTR) is favorable for not relying upon water supply that might be interrupted by earthquake. In order to train its personnel, BATAN has cooperated with Micro-Simulation Technology of USA to develop a 200 MWt PC-based simulation model PCTRAN/HTR. It operates in Win10 environment with graphic user interface (GUI). Normal operation of startup, power maneuvering, shutdown and accidents including pipe breaks and complete loss of AC power have been conducted. A sample case of safety analysis simulation to demonstrate the inherent safety features of HTR was done for helium pipe break malfunction scenario. The analysis was done for the variation of primary coolant pipe break i.e. from 0,1% - 0,5 % and 1% - 10 % helium gas leakages, while the reactor was operated at the maximum constant power of 10 MWt. The result shows that the highest temperature of HTR fuel centerline and coolant were 1150 °C and 1296 °C respectively. With 10 kg/s of helium flow in the reactor core, the thermal power will back to the startup position after 1287 s of helium pipe break malfunction.

  18. Thermal performance test of the hot gas ducts of HENDEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishida, M.; Kunitomi, K.; Ioka, I.; Umenishi, K.; Tanaka, T.; Shimomura, H.; Sanokawa, K.

    1984-01-01

    A hot gas duct provided with internal thermal insulation is to be used for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR). This type of hot gas duct has not been used so far in industrial facilities, and only a couple of tests on such a large-scale model of a hot gas duct have been conducted. The present report deals with the results of the thermal performance of the single tube type hot gas ducts which are installed as parts of a helium engineering demonstration loop (HENDEL). Uniform temperature and heat flux distribution at the surface of the duct were observed, the experimental correlations being obtained for the effective thermal conductivity of the internal thermal insulation layer. The measured temperature distribution of the pressure tube was in good agreement with the calculation by a TRUMP heat transfer computer code. The temperature distribution of the inner tube of the co-axial hot gas duct was evaluated and no hot spot was detected. These results would be very valuable for the design and development of HTGR. (orig.)

  19. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) FY04 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. D. Weaver; T. C. Totemeier; D. E. Clark; E. E. Feldman; E. A. Hoffman; R. B. Vilim; T. Y. C. Wei; J. Gan; M. K. Meyer; W. F. Gale; M. J. Driscoll; M. Golay; G. Apostolakis; K. Czerwinski

    2004-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radio toxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. Nevertheless, the GFR was chosen as one of only six Generation IV systems to be pursued based on its ability to meet the Generation IV goals in sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection.

  20. Inherently safe high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masao; Hayakawa, Hitoshi

    1987-01-01

    It is recognized in general that High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors have remarkable characteristics in inherent safety and it is well known that credits of the time margin have been admitted for accident evaluation in the licensing of the currently operating prototype HTGRs (300 MWe class). Recently, more inherently safe HTGRs are being developed in various countries and drawing attention on their possibility for urban siting. The inherent safety characteristics of these HTRs differ each other depending on their design philosophy and on the features of the components/structures which constitute the plant. At first, the specific features/characteristics of the elemental components/structures of the HTRs are explained one by one and then the overall safety features/characteristics of these HTR plants are explained in connection with their design philosophy and combination of the elemental features. Taking the KWU/Interatom Modular Reactor System as an example, the particular design philosophy and safety characteristics of the inherently safe HTR are explained with a result of preliminary evaluation on the possibility of siting close to densely populated area. (author)

  1. Study on plant concept for gas cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moribe, Takeshi; Kubo, Shigenobu; Saigusa, Toshiie; Konomura, Mamoru

    2003-05-01

    In 'Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle System', technological options including various coolant (sodium, heavy metal, gas, water, etc.), fuel type (MOX, metal, nitride) and output power are considered and classified, and commercialized FBR that have economical cost equal to LWR are pursued. In conceptual study on gas cooled FBR in FY 2002, to identify the prospect of the technical materialization of the helium cooled FBR using coated particle fuel which is an attractive concept extracted in the year of FY2001, the preliminary conceptual design of the core and entire plant was performed. This report summarizes the results of the plant design study in FY2002. The results of study is as follows. 1) For the passive core shutdown equipment, the curie point magnet type self-actuated device was selected and the device concept was set up. 2) For the reactor block, the concept of the core supporting structure, insulators and liners was set up. For the material of the heat resistant structure, SiC was selected as a candidate. 3) For the seismic design of the plant, it was identified that a design concept with three-dimensional base isolation could be feasible taking the severe seismic condition into account. 4) For the core catcher, an estimation of possible event sequences under severe core damage condition was made. A core catcher concept which may suit the estimation was proposed. 5) The construction cost was roughly estimated based on the amount of materials and its dependency on the plant output power was evaluated. The value for a small sized plant exceeds the target construction cost about 20%. (author)

  2. Progress in the development of tooling and dismantling methodologies for the Windscale advanced gas cooled reactor (WAGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, M.T.; Wareing, M.I.; Dixon, C.

    1998-01-01

    Decommissioning of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (WAGR) is a major UK reactor decommissioning project co-funded by the UK Government, the European Commission and Magnox Electric. WAGR was a CO 2 cooled, graphite moderated reactor which served as a test bed for the development of Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor technology in the UK. It operated from 1963 until shutdown in 1981. AEA Technology plc are currently the Managing Agents on behalf of UKAEA for the WAGR decommissioning project and are responsible for the co-ordination of the project up to the point when the contents of the reactor core and associated radioactive materials are removed and either disposed of or packaged for disposal at some time in the future. Decommissioning has progressed to the point where the reactor has been dismantled down to the level of the hot gas collection manifold with the removal of the top biological shield, the refuelling standpipes and the top section of the reactor pressure vessel. The 4 heat exchangers have also been removed and committed to shallow land burial. This paper describes the work carried out by AEA Technology under separate contracts of UKAEA in developing some of the equipment and deployment methods for the next phase of active operations required in preparation for the dismantling of the core structure. Most recent work has concentrated on the development of specialist tooling for removal of items of operational waste stored within the reactor core, equipment for cutting and removal of the highly radioactive stainless steel 'loop' pressure tubes, diamond wire cutting equipment for sectioning large diameter pipework, and equipment for dismantling the reactor neutron shield. The paper emphasises the process of adaptation and extension of existing technologies for cost-effective application in the decommissioning environment, the need for adequate forward planning of decommissioning methodologies together with large-scale 'mock-up' testing of equipment to

  3. A Preliminary Analysis of Reactor Performance Test (LOEP) for a Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeonil; Park, Su-Ki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The final phase of commissioning is reactor performance test, which is to prove the integrated performance and safety of the research reactor at full power with fuel loaded such as neutron power calibration, Control Absorber Rod/Second Shutdown Rod drop time, InC function test, Criticality, Rod worth, Core heat removal with natural mechanism, and so forth. The last test will be safety-related one to assure the result of the safety analysis of the research reactor is marginal enough to be sure about the nuclear safety by showing the reactor satisfies the acceptance criteria of the safety functions such as for reactivity control, maintenance of auxiliaries, reactor pool water inventory control, core heat removal, and confinement isolation. After all, the fuel integrity will be ensured by verifying there is no meaningful change in the radiation levels. To confirm the performance of safety equipment, loss of normal electric power (LOEP), possibly categorized as Anticipated Operational Occurrence (AOO), is selected as a key experiment to figure out how safe the research reactor is before turning over the research reactor to the owner. This paper presents a preliminary analysis of the reactor performance test (LOEP) for a research reactor. The results showed how different the transient between conservative estimate and best estimate will look. Preliminary analyses have shown all probable thermal-hydraulic transient behavior of importance as to opening of flap valve, minimum critical heat flux ratio, the change of flow direction, and important values of thermal-hydraulic parameters.

  4. TR-EDB: Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base, Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB) is a collection of results from irradiation in materials test reactors. It complements the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB), whose data are restricted to the results from the analysis of surveillance capsules in commercial power reactors. The rationale behind their restriction was the assumption that the results of test reactor experiments may not be applicable to power reactors and could, therefore, be challenged if such data were included. For this very reason the embrittlement predictions in the Reg. Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, were based exclusively on power reactor data. However, test reactor experiments are able to cover a much wider range of materials and irradiation conditions that are needed to explore more fully a variety of models for the prediction of irradiation embrittlement. These data are also needed for the study of effects of annealing for life extension of reactor pressure vessels that are difficult to obtain from surveillance capsule results.

  5. TR-EDB: Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base, Version 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1994-01-01

    The Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB) is a collection of results from irradiation in materials test reactors. It complements the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB), whose data are restricted to the results from the analysis of surveillance capsules in commercial power reactors. The rationale behind their restriction was the assumption that the results of test reactor experiments may not be applicable to power reactors and could, therefore, be challenged if such data were included. For this very reason the embrittlement predictions in the Reg. Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, were based exclusively on power reactor data. However, test reactor experiments are able to cover a much wider range of materials and irradiation conditions that are needed to explore more fully a variety of models for the prediction of irradiation embrittlement. These data are also needed for the study of effects of annealing for life extension of reactor pressure vessels that are difficult to obtain from surveillance capsule results

  6. The Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor: A Promising Option for Near Term Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBar, Malcolm P.

    2002-01-01

    The Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) is an advanced nuclear power system that offers unparalleled safety, high thermal efficiency, environmental advantages, and competitive electricity generation costs. The GT-MHR module couples a gas-cooled modular helium reactor (MHR) with a high efficiency modular Brayton cycle gas turbine (GT) energy conversion system. The reactor and power conversion systems are located in a below grade concrete silo that provides protection against sabotage. The GT-MHR safety is achieved through a combination of inherent safety characteristics and design selections that take maximum advantage of the gas-cooled reactor coated particle fuel, helium coolant and graphite moderator. The GT-MHR is projected to be economically competitive with alternative electricity generation technologies due to the high operating temperature of the gas-cooled reactor, high thermal efficiency of the Brayton cycle power conversion system, high fuel burnup (>100,000 MWd/MT), and low operation and maintenance requirements. (author)

  7. Vented fuel experiment for gas-cooled fast reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longest, A.W.; Gat, U.; Conlin, J.A.; Campana, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    A pressure-equalized and vented fuel rod is being irradiated in an instrumented capsule designated GB-10 to approximately 100MWd/kg-heavy metal. The fuel is a sol-gel-derived 88 at.% uranium (approximately 9% 235 U) and 12 at.% plutonium oxide, and the cladding is 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel. The capsule is being irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and has exceeded a burnup of 70MWd/kg. The fuel has been operated at linear power rates of 39 and 44kW/m, and peak outer cladding temperature of 565 and 630 0 C respectively. A similar fuel rod in a previous capsule (GB-9) was subjected to 48kW/m (685 0 C). Helium gas sweeps through any portion of the three regions of the fuel rod, namely: fuel, blanket, and charcoal trap. The charcoal trap is operated at about 300 0 C. An on-line Ge(Li) detector is used to analyse release rates of several gamma-emitting noble gas isotopes. Analyses are performed primarily on sweep gas flowing through the entire fuel rod, and for sweeps over the top of the charcoal trap. Sweep gas samples are analyzed for stable noble gas isotopes. Results in the form of ratios of release rate over birth rate (R/B) and venting rate over birth rate (V/B) are derived. R/B rates range from 10 -4 % to 30% while V/B ranges from 10 -6 % to 30%. Flow conductance in the capsule was monitored by recording the flow rate and pressure drop across the fuel rod and inlet sweep line. The flow conductance has been falling with increasing burnup, currently restricting the flow to about 20ml (s.t.p.)/min at a pressure difference of about 1.5MPa. Venting rates of the gaseous fission products as a function of gas pressure in the range 6.9 to 1.4MPa have also been measured. Planned future experiments include the monitoring of tritium release, venting and cladding permeation rates, and its molecular form. First measurements have been made. A simulated leak experiment will determine the mixture of fission gases as a function of flow rate and the most

  8. The influence of the reactor pressure on the hydrodynamics in a cocurrent gas-liquid trickle-bed reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wammes, W.J.A.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of the reactor pressure on the liquid hold-up in the trickle-flow regime and on the transition between trickle-flow and pulse-flow has been investigated in a trickle-flow column operating up to 6.0 MPa with water, and nitrogen or helium as the gas phase. The effect of the gas velocity

  9. Evaluation of neutronic characteristics of in-pile test reactor for fast reactor safety research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uto, N.; Ohno, S.; Kawata, N. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1996-09-01

    An extensive research program has been carried out at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation for the safety of future liquid-metal fast breeder reactors to be commercialized. A major part of this program is investigation and planning of advanced safety experiments conducted with a new in-pile safety test facility, which is larger and more advanced than any of the currently existing test reactors. Such a transient safety test reactor generally has unique neutronic characteristics that require various studies from the reactor physics point of view. In this paper, the outcome of the neutronics study is highlighted with presenting a reference core design concept and its performance in regard to the safety test objectives. (author)

  10. Space reactor fuel element testing in upgraded TREAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todosow, M.; Bezler, P.; Ludewig, H.; Kato, W.Y.

    1993-01-01

    The testing of candidate fuel elements at prototypic operating conditions with respect to temperature, power density, hydrogen coolant flow rate, etc., is a crucial component in the development and qualification of nuclear rocket engines based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR), NERVA-derivative, and other concepts. Such testing may be performed at existing reactors, or at new facilities. A scoping study has been performed to assess the feasibility of testing PBR based fuel elements at the TREAT reactor. Initial results suggests that full-scale PBR elements could be tested at an average energy deposition of ∼60--80 MW-s/L in the current TREAT reactor. If the TREAT reactor was upgraded to include fuel elements with a higher temperture limit, average energy deposition of ∼100 MW/L may be achievable

  11. Ground testing of an SP-100 prototypic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motwani, K.; Pflasterer, G.R.; Upton, H.; Lazarus, J.D.; Gluck, R.

    1988-01-01

    SP-100 is a space power system which is being developed by GE to meet future space electrical power requirements. The ground testing of an SP-100 prototypic reactor system will be conducted at the Westinghouse Hanford Company site located at Richland, Washington. The objective of this test is to demonstrate the performance of a full scale prototypic reactor system, including the reactor, control system and flight shield. The ground test system is designed to simulate the flight operating conditions while meeting all the necessary nuclear safety requirements in a gravity environment. The goal of the reactor ground test system is to establish confidence in the design maturity of the SP-100 space reactor power system and resolve the technical issues necessary for the development of a flight mission design

  12. Space reactor fuel element testing in upgraded TREAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todosow, Michael; Bezler, Paul; Ludewig, Hans; Kato, Walter Y.

    1993-01-01

    The testing of candidate fuel elements at prototypic operating conditions with respect to temperature, power density, hydrogen coolant flow rate, etc., is a crucial component in the development and qualification of nuclear rocket engines based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR), NERVA-derivative, and other concepts. Such testing may be performed at existing reactors, or at new facilities. A scoping study has been performed to assess the feasibility of testing PBR based fuel elements at the TREAT reactor. Initial results suggests that full-scale PBR elements could be tested at an average energy deposition of ˜60-80 MW-s/L in the current TREAT reactor. If the TREAT reactor was upgraded to include fuel elements with a higher temperture limit, average energy deposition of ˜100 MW/L may be achievable.

  13. Italian position paper on heat and mass transfer in the reactor cover gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caponetti, R.; Olivieri, P.; Petrazzuolo, F.

    1986-01-01

    The major effort being made in Italy with regard to the development of fast nuclear reactors is concentrated, as is known, in the construction of the PEC reactor, whose mechanical completion is expected early in 1988. The 116MWt PEC (Prova Elementi di Combustibile; i.e. Fuel Element Testing) reactor is sodium cooled. It is being built to study the behavior of fuel elements under thermal and neutronic conditions similar to those of fast nuclear power stations. Particular attention is being dedicated to safety aspects. This document furnishes a number of construction solutions with regard to that reactor and preparatory approaches to its operation, namely: a brief description of the construction solutions as far as concerns the Closure Head Assembly and the cover gas circuit together with its main components; the description of some test facilities arranged for abatement and measurement of sodium aerosol concentration; a number of preliminary evaluation results obtained thus far with regard to the formation, transport and depositing of sodium aerosols

  14. Noble gas confinement for reactor fuel melting accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monson, P.R.

    1984-01-01

    In the unlikely event of a fuel melting accident, radioactive material would be released into the reactor room. This radioactive material would consist of particulate matter, iodine, tritium, and the noble gases krypton and xenon. In the case of reactors with containment domes the gases would be contained for subsequent cleanup. For reactors without contaiment the particulates and the iodine can be effectively removed with HEPA and carbon filters of current technology; however, noble gases cannot be easily removed and would be released to the atmosphere. In either case, it would be highly desirable to have a system that could be brought online to treat this contaminated air to minimize the population dose. A low temperature adsorption system has been developed at the Savannah River Laboratory to remove the airborne radioactive material from such a fuel melting accident. Over two dozen materials have been tested in extensive laboratory studies, and hydrogen mordenite and silver mordenite were found to be the most promising adsorbents. A full-scale conceptual design has also been developed. Results of the laboratory studies and the conceptual design are discussed along with plans for further development of this concept

  15. Noble gas confinement for reactor fuel melting accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monson, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    In the unlikely event of a fuel melting accident radioactive material would be released into the reactor room. This radioactive material would consist of particulate matter, iodine, tritium, and the noble gases krypton and xenon. In the case of reactors with containment domes, the gases would be contained for subsequent cleanup. For reactors without containment the particulates and the iodine can be effectively removed with HEPA and carbon filters of current technology; however, noble gases cannot be easily removed and would be released to the atmosphere. In either case, it would be highly desirable to have a system that could be brought online to treat this contaminated air to minimize the population dose. A low temperature adsorption system has been developed at the Savannah River Laboratory to remove the airborne radioactive material from such a fuel melting accident. Over two dozen materials have been tested in extensive laboratory studies, and hydrogen mordensite and silver mordenite were found to be the most promising absorbents. A full-scale conceptual design has also been developed. Results of the laboratory studies and the conceptual design will be discussed along with plans for further development of this concept

  16. Utilization of multi-purpose high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawada, Osamu; Onuki, Yoshiaki; Wasaoka, Takeshi.

    1974-01-01

    Concerning the utilization of multi-purpose high temperature gas-cooled reactors, the electric power generation with gas turbines is described: features of HTR-He gas turbine power plants; the state of development of He gas turbines; and combined cycle with gas turbines and steam turbines. The features of gas turbines concern heat dissipation into the environment and the mode of load operation. Outstanding work in the development of He gas turbines is that in Hochtemperatur Helium-Turbine Project in West Germany. The power generation with combined gas turbines and steam turbines appears to be superior to that with gas turbines alone. (Mori, K.)

  17. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) FY05 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. D. Weaver; T. Marshall; T. Totemeier; J. Gan; E.E. Feldman; E.A Hoffman; R.F. Kulak; I.U. Therios; C. P. Tzanos; T.Y.C. Wei; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo; R. Nanstad; W. Corwin; V. G. Krishnardula; W. F. Gale; J. W. Fergus; P. Sabharwall; T. Allen

    2005-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radio toxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. Nevertheless, the GFR was chosen as one of only six Generation IV systems to be pursued based on its ability to meet the Generation IV goals in sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with on outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in

  18. Development and testing of the EDF-2 reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpeyroux, P.

    1964-01-01

    This technical report reviews the work which has been necessary for defining the EDF-2 fuel element. After giving briefly the EDF-2 reactor characteristics and the preliminary choice of parameters which made it possible to draw up a draft plan for the fuel element, the authors consider the research proper: - Uranium studies: tests on the passage into the β phase of an internal crown of a tube, bending of the tube under the effect of a localized force, welding of the end-pellets and testing for leaks. The resistance of the tube to crushing and of the pellets to yielding under the external pressure have been studied in detail in another CEA report. - Can studies: conditions of production and leak proof testing of the can, resistance of the fins to creep due to the effect of the gas flow. - Studies of the extremities of the element: creep under compression and welding of the plugs to the can. - Cartridge studies: determination of the characteristics of the can fuel fixing grooves and of the canning conditions, verification of the resistance of the fuel element to thermal cycling, determination of the temperature drop at the can-fuel interface dealt with in more detail in another CEA report. - Studies of the whole assembly: this work which concerns the graphite jacket, the support and the cartridge vibrations has been carried out by the Mechanical and Thermal Study Service (Mechanics Section). In this field the Fuel Element Study Section has investigated the behaviour of the centering devices in a gas current. The outcome of this research is the defining of the plan of the element the production process and the production specifications. The validity of ail these out-of-pile tests will be confirmed by the in-pile tests already under way and by irradiation of the elements in the EDF-2 reactor itself. In conclusion the programme is given for improving the fuel element and for defining the fuel element for the second charge. (authors) [fr

  19. Nondestructive testing of nuclear reactor components integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mala, M.; Miklos, M.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear energy must respond to current challenges in the energy market. The significant parameters are increase of the nuclear fuel price, closed fuel cycle, reduction and safe and the final disposal of high level radioactive waste. Nowadays, the discussions on suitable energy mix are taking place not only here in Czech Republic, but also in many other European countries. It is necessary to establish an appropriate ratio among the production of electricity from conventional, nuclear and renewable energy sources. Also, it is necessary to find ways how to streamline the economy, central part of the nuclear fuel cycle and thereby to increase the competitiveness of nuclear energy. This streamlining can be carried out by improving utilization of existing nuclear fuel with maintaining a high degree of nuclear facilities safety. Increasing operational reliability and safety together with increasing utilization of nuclear fuel place increasing demands on monitoring of changes during fuel burnup. The potential fuel assembly damages in light water reactors are prevented by the introduction of new procedures and programs of the fuel assembly monitoring. One of them is the Post Irradiation Inspection Program (PIIP) which is a good tool for monitoring of chemical regime impact on the fuel assembly cladding behavior. Main nondestructive techniques that are used at nuclear power plants for the fuel assembly integrity evaluation are ultrasonic measurements, eddy current measurements, radiographic testing, acoustic techniques and others. Ultrasonic system is usual tool for leak fuel rod evaluation and it is also used at Temelin NPP. Since 2009, Temelin NPP has cooperated with Research Center Rez Ltd in frame of PIIP program at both units WWER 1000. This program was established for US VVantage6 fuel assemblies and also it continues for Russian TVSA-T fuel assemblies. (author)

  20. Preliminary Sensitivity Study on Gas-Cooled Reactor for NHDD System Using MARS-GCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Wook; Jeong, Jae Jun; Lee, Won Jae

    2005-01-01

    A Gas-Cooled Reactor (GCR) is considered as one of the most outstanding tools for a massive hydrogen production without CO 2 emission. Till now, two types of GCR are regarded as a viable nuclear reactor for a hydrogen production: Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR), Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR). In this paper, a preliminary sensitivity study on two types of GCR is carried out by using MARS-GCR to find out the effect on the peak fuel and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) temperature, with varying the condition of a reactor inlet, outlet temperature, and system pressure for both PMR and PBR

  1. Liquid-metal-gas heat exchanger for HTGR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werth, G.

    1980-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the heat transfer characteristics of a liquid metal heat exchanger (HE) for a helium-cooled high temperature reactor. A tube-type heat exchanger is considered as well as two direct exchangers: a bubble-type heat exchanger and a heat exchanger according to the spray principle. Experiments are made in order to determine the gas content of bubble-type heat exchangers, the dependence of the droplet diameter on the nozzle diameter, the falling speed of the droplets, the velocity of the liquid jet, and the temperature variation of liquid jets. The computer codes developed for HE calculation are structured so that they may be used for gas/liquid HE, too. Each type of HE that is dealt with is designed by accousting for a technical and an economic assessment. The liquid-lead jet spray is preferred to all other types because of its small space occupied and its simple design. It shall be used in near future in the HTR by the name of lead/helium HE. (GL) [de

  2. An Analysis of Testing Requirements for Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    This report provides guidance on the component testing necessary during the next phase of fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) development. In particular, the report identifies and describes the reactor component performance and reliability requirements, provides an overview of what information is necessary to provide assurance that components will adequately achieve the requirements, and then provides guidance on how the required performance information can efficiently be obtained. The report includes a system description of a representative test scale FHR reactor. The reactor parameters presented in this report should only be considered as placeholder values until an FHR test scale reactor design is completed. The report focus is bounded at the interface between and the reactor primary coolant salt and the fuel and the gas supply and return to the Brayton cycle power conversion system. The analysis is limited to component level testing and does not address system level testing issues. Further, the report is oriented as a bottom-up testing requirements analysis as opposed to a having a top-down facility description focus.

  3. Proceedings of the international symposium on materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    This report is the Proceedings of the International Symposium on Materials Testing Reactors hosted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The symposium was held on July 16 to 17, 2008, at the Oarai Research and Development Center of JAEA. This symposium was also held for the 40th anniversary ceremony of Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) from achieving its first criticality. The objective of the symposium is to exchange the information on current status, future plan and so on among each testing reactors for the purpose of mutual understanding. There were 138 participants from Argentina, Belgium, France, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Korea, the Russian Federation, Sweden, the United State, Vietnam and Japan. The symposium was divided into four technical sessions and three topical sessions. Technical sessions addressed the general topics of 'status and future plan of materials testing reactors', 'material development for research and testing reactors', irradiation technology (including PIE technology)' and 'utilization with materials testing reactors', and 21 presentations were made. Also the topical sessions addressed 'establishment of strategic partnership', 'management on re-operation work at reactor trouble' and 'basic technology for neutron irradiation tests in MTRs', and panel discussion was made. The 21 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  4. Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

    2006-01-09

    Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

  5. Patterns identification in supervisory systems of nuclear reactors installations and gas pipelines systems using self-organizing maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doraskevicius Junior, Waldemar

    2005-01-01

    Self-Organizing Maps, SOM, of Kohonen were studied, implemented and tested with the aim of developing, for the energy branch, an effective tool especially for transient identification in nuclear reactors and for gas pipelines networks logistic supervision, by classifying operations and identifying transients or abnormalities. The digital system for the test was developed in Java platform, for the portability and scalability, and for belonging to free development platforms. The system, executed in personal computers, showed satisfactory results to aid in decision taking, by classifying IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) reactor operation conditions (data from simulator) and by classifying Southeast (owner: TRANSPETRO - Brazil) gas pipeline network. Various adaptations were needed for such business, as new topologies for the output layer of artificial neural network and particular preparation for the input data. (author)

  6. Preliminary Options Assessment of Versatile Irradiation Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Ramazan Sonat [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize the work undertaken at INL from April 2016 to January 2017 and aimed at analyzing some options for designing and building a versatile test reactor; the scope of work was agreed upon with DOE-NE. Section 2 presents some results related to KNK II and PRISM Mod A. Section 3 presents some alternatives to the VCTR presented in [ ] as well as a neutronic parametric study to assess the minimum power requirement needed for a 235U metal fueled fast test reactor capable to generate a fast (>100 keV) flux of 4.0 x 1015 n /cm2-s at the test location. Section 4 presents some results regarding a fundamental characteristic of test reactors, namely displacement per atom (dpa) in test samples. Section 5 presents the INL assessment of the ANL fast test reactor design FASTER. Section 6 presents a summary.

  7. Research and development program of hydrogen production system with high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Y.; Shiozawa, S.; Ogawa, M.; Inagaki, Y.; Nishihara, T.; Shimizu, S.

    2000-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been developing a hydrogen production system with a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). While the HTGR hydrogen production system has the following advantages compared with a fossil-fired hydrogen production system; low operation cost (economical fuel cost), low CO 2 emission and saving of fossil fuel by use of nuclear heat, it requires some items to be solved as follows; cost reduction of facility such as a reactor, coolant circulation system and so on, development of control and safety technologies. As for the control and safety technologies, JAERI plans demonstration test with hydrogen production system by steam reforming of methane coupling to 30 Wt HTGR, named high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). Prior to the demonstration test, a 1/30-scale out-of-pile test facility is in construction for safety review and detailed design of the HTTR hydrogen production system. Also, design study will start for reduction of facility cost. Moreover, basic study on hydrogen production process without CO 2 emission is in progress by thermochemical water splitting. (orig.)

  8. FUEL BURN-UP CALCULATION FOR WORKING CORE OF THE RSG-GAS RESEARCH REACTOR AT BATAN SERPONG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tukiran Surbakti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The neutronic parameters are required in the safety analysis of the RSG-GAS research reactor. The RSG-GAS research reactor, MTR (Material Testing Reactor type is used for research and also in radioisotope production. RSG-GAS has been operating for 30 years without experiencing significant obstacles. It is managed under strict requirements, especially fuel management and fuel burn-up calculations. The reactor is operated under the supervision of the Regulatory Body (BAPETEN and the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency. In this paper, the experience of managing RSG-GAS core fuels will be discussed, there are hundred possibilities of fuel placements on the reactor core and the strategy used to operate the reactor will be crucial. However, based on strict calculation and supervision, there is no incorrect placement of the fuels in the core. The calculations were performed on working core by using the WIMSD-5B computer code with ENDFVII.0 data file to generate the macroscopic cross-section of fuel and BATAN-FUEL code were used to obtain the neutronic parameter value such as fuel burn-up fractions. The calculation of the neutronic core parameters of the RSG-GAS research reactor was carried out for U3Si2-Al fuel, 250 grams of mass, with an equilibrium core strategy. The calculations show that on the last three operating cores (T90, T91, T92, all fuels meet the safety criteria and the fuel burn-up does not exceed the maximum discharge burn-up of 59%. Maximum fuel burn-up always exists in the fuel which is close to the position of control rod.

  9. Comparison of Direct and Indirect Gas Reactor Brayton Systems for Nuclear Electric Space Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M Postlehwait; P DiLorenzo; S Belanger; J Ashcroft

    2005-01-01

    Gas reactor systems are being considered as candidates for use in generating power for the Prometheus-1 spacecraft, along with other NASA missions as part of the Prometheus program. Gas reactors offer a benign coolant, which increases core and structural materials options. However, the gas coolant has inferior thermal transport properties, relative to other coolant candidates such as liquid metals. This leads to concerns for providing effective heat transfer and for minimizing pressure drop within the reactor core. In direct gas Brayton systems, i.e. those with one or more Brayton turbines in the reactor cooling loop, the ability to provide effective core cooling and low pressure drop is further constrained by the need for a low pressure, high molecular weight gas, typically a mixture of helium and xenon. Use of separate primary and secondary gas loops, one for the reactor and one or more for the Brayton system(s) separated by heat exchanger(s), allows for independent optimization of the pressure and gas composition of each loop. The reactor loop can use higher pressure pure helium, which provides improved heat transfer and heat transport properties, while the Brayton loop can utilize lower pressure He-Xe. However, this approach requires a separate primary gas circulator and also requires gas to gas heat exchangers. This paper focuses on the trade-offs between the direct gas reactor Brayton system and the indirect gas Brayton system. It discusses heat exchanger arrangement and materials options and projects heat exchanger mass based on heat transfer area and structural design needs. Analysis indicates that these heat exchangers add considerable mass, but result in reactor cooling and system resiliency improvements

  10. Research reactors for power reactor fuel and materials testing - Studsvik's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grounes, M.

    1998-01-01

    Presently Studsvik's R2 test reactor is used for BWR and PWR fuel irradiations at constant power and under transient power conditions. Furthermore tests are performed with defective LWR fuel rods. Tests are also performed on different types of LWR cladding materials and structural materials including post-irradiation testing of materials irradiated at different temperatures and, in some cases, in different water chemistries and on fusion reactor materials. In the past, tests have also been performed on HTGR fuel and FBR fuel and materials under appropriate coolant, temperature and pressure conditions. Fuel tests under development include extremely fast power ramps simulating some reactivity initiated accidents and stored energy (enthalpy) measurements. Materials tests under development include different types of in-pile tests including tests in the INCA (In-Core Autoclave) facility .The present and future demands on the test reactor fuel in all these cases are discussed. (author)

  11. Heat removal performance of auxiliary cooling system for the high temperature engineering test reactor during scrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Takeshi; Tachibana, Yukio; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Takenaka, Satsuki

    2003-01-01

    The auxiliary cooling system of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is employed for heat removal as an engineered safety feature when the reactor scrams in an accident when forced circulation can cool the core. The HTTR is the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor in Japan with reactor outlet gas temperature of 950 degree sign C and thermal power of 30 MW. The auxiliary cooling system should cool the core continuously avoiding excessive cold shock to core graphite components and water boiling of itself. Simulation tests on manual trip from 9 MW operation and on loss of off-site electric power from 15 MW operation were carried out in the rise-to-power test up to 20 MW of the HTTR. Heat removal characteristics of the auxiliary cooling system were examined by the tests. Empirical correlations of overall heat transfer coefficients were acquired for a helium/water heat exchanger and air cooler for the auxiliary cooling system. Temperatures of fluids in the auxiliary cooling system were predicted on a scram event from 30 MW operation at 950 degree sign C of the reactor outlet coolant temperature. Under the predicted helium condition of the auxiliary cooling system, integrity of fuel blocks among the core graphite components was investigated by stress analysis. Evaluation results showed that overcooling to the core graphite components and boiling of water in the auxiliary cooling system should be prevented where open area condition of louvers in the air cooler is the full open

  12. Operation experience of the Indonesian multipurpose research reactor RSG-GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Tarigan, Alim [Multipurpose Reactor Center, National Nuclear Energy Agency of the Republic of Indonesia (PRSG-BATAN), Kawasan PUSPIPTEK Serpong, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    1999-08-01

    RSG-GAS is a multipurpose research reactor with nominal power of 30 MW, operated by BATAN since 1987. The reactor is an open pool type, cooled and moderated with light water, using the LEU-MTR fuel element in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al dispersion. Up to know, the reactor have been operated around 30,000 hours to serve the user. The reactor have been utilized to produce radioisotope, neutron beam experiments, irradiation of fuel element and its structural material, and reactor physics experiments. This report will explain in further detail concerning operational experience of this reactor, i.e. reactor operation data, reactor utilization, research program, technical problems and it solutions, plant modification and improvement, and development plan to enhance better reactor operation performance and its utilization. (author)

  13. Operation experience of the Indonesian multipurpose research reactor RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Tarigan, Alim

    1999-01-01

    RSG-GAS is a multipurpose research reactor with nominal power of 30 MW, operated by BATAN since 1987. The reactor is an open pool type, cooled and moderated with light water, using the LEU-MTR fuel element in the form of U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion. Up to know, the reactor have been operated around 30,000 hours to serve the user. The reactor have been utilized to produce radioisotope, neutron beam experiments, irradiation of fuel element and its structural material, and reactor physics experiments. This report will explain in further detail concerning operational experience of this reactor, i.e. reactor operation data, reactor utilization, research program, technical problems and it solutions, plant modification and improvement, and development plan to enhance better reactor operation performance and its utilization. (author)

  14. Dynamics and inherent safety features of small modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, R.M.; Ball, S.J.; Cleveland, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations were made at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to characterize the dynamics and inherent safety features of various modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designs. This work was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's HTGR Safety Research program. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Gas Cooled Reactor Associates (GCRA) have sponsored studies of several modular HTGR concepts, each having it own unique advantageous economic and inherent safety features. The DOE design team has recently choses a 350-MW(t) annular core with prismatic, graphite matrix fuel for its reference plant. The various safety features of this plant and of the pebble-bed core designs similar to those currently being developed and operated in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) are described. A varity of postulated accident sequences involving combinations of loss of forced circulation of the helium primary coolant, loss of primary coolant pressurization, and loss of normal and backup heat sinks were studied and are discussed. Results demonstrate that each concept can withstand an uncontrolled heatup accident without reaching excessive peak fuel temperatures. Comparisons of calculated and measured response for a loss of forced circulation test on the FRG reactor, AVR, are also presented. 10 refs

  15. Draft of standard for graphite core components in high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Taiju; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Eto, Motokuni; Kunimoto, Eiji; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Oku, Tatsuo; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    For the design of the graphite components in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), the graphite structural design code for the HTTR etc. were applied. However, general standard systems for the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) have not been established yet. The authors had studied on the technical issues which is necessary for the establishment of a general standard system for the graphite components in the HTGR. The results of the study were documented and discussed at a 'Special committee on research on preparation for codes for graphite components in HTGR' at Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ). As a result, 'Draft of Standard for Graphite Core Components in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor.' was established. In the draft standard, the graphite components are classified three categories (A, B and C) in the standpoints of safety functions and possibility of replacement. For the components in the each class, design standard, material and product standards, and in-service inspection and maintenance standard are determined. As an appendix of the design standard, the graphical expressions of material property data of 1G-110 graphite as a function of fast neutron fluence are expressed. The graphical expressions were determined through the interpolation and extrapolation of the irradiated data. (author)

  16. Evaluation of high temperature gas reactor for demanding cogeneration load follow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Xing L.; Sato, Hiroyuki; Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Hino, Ryutaro

    2012-01-01

    Modular nuclear reactor systems are being developed around the world for new missions among which is cogeneration for industries and remote areas. Like existing fossil energy counterpart in these markets, a nuclear plant would need to demonstrate the feasibility of load follow including (1) the reliability to generate power and heat simultaneously and alone and (2) the flexibility to vary cogeneration rates concurrent to demand changes. This article reports the results of JAEA's evaluation on the high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) to perform these duties. The evaluation results in a plant design based on the materials and design codes developed with JAEA's operating test reactor and from additional equipment validation programs. The 600 MWt-HTGR plant generates electricity efficiently by gas turbine and 900degC heat by a topping heater. The heater couples via a heat transport loop to industrial facility that consumes the high temperature heat to yield heat product such as hydrogen fuel, steel, or chemical. Original control methods are proposed to automate transition between the load duties. Equipment challenges are addressed for severe operation conditions. Performance limits of cogeneration load following are quantified from the plant system simulation to a range of bounding events including a loss of either load and a rapid peaking of electricity. (author)

  17. Corrosion behaviour of high temperature alloys in the cooling gas of high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.

    1989-01-01

    The reactive impurities in the primary cooling helium of advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR) can cause oxidation, carburization or decarburization of the heat exchanging metallic components. By studies of the fundamental aspects of the corrosion mechanisms it became possible to define operating conditions under which the metallic construction materials show, from the viewpoint of technical application, acceptable corrosion behaviour. By extensive test programmes with exposure times of up to 30,000 hours, a data base has been obtained which allows a reliable extrapolation of the corrosion effects up to the envisaged service lives of the heat exchanging components. (author). 6 refs, 7 figs

  18. The passive safety characteristics of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodin, D.T.; Kania, M.J.; Nabielek, H.; Schenk, W.; Verfondern, K.

    1988-01-01

    High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) in both the US and West Germany use an all-ceramic, coated fuel particle to retain fission products. Data from irradiation, postirradiation examinations and postirradiation heating experiments are used to study the performance capabilities of the fuel particles. The experimental results from fission product release tests with HTGR fuel are discussed. These data are used for development of predictive fuel performance models for purposes of design, licensing, and risk analyses. During off normal events, where temperatures may reach up to 1600/degree/C, the data show that no significant radionuclide releases from the fuel will occur

  19. Assessment and status report High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor gas-turbine technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Purpose of this report is to present a brief summary assessment of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor - Gas Turbine (HTGR-GT) technology. The focal point for the study was a potential 2000 MW(t)/800 MW(e) HTGR-GT commercial plant. Principal findings of the study were that: the HTGR-GT is feasible, but with significantly greater development risk than the HTGR-SC (Steam Cycle). At the level of performance corresponding to the reference design, no incremental economic incentive can be identified for the HTGR-GT to offset the increased development costs and risk relative to the HTGR-SC. The relative economics of the HTGR-GT and HTGR-SC are not significantly impacted by dry cooling considerations. While reduced cycel complexity may ultimately result in a reliability advantage for the HTGR-GT, the value of that potential advantage was not quantified

  20. Back pressure helium leak testing of fuel elements for Dhruva research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, N G; Ahmad, Anis; Kulkarni, P G; Purushotham, D S.C. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Atomic Fuels Div.

    1994-12-31

    Leak tightness specification on fuel elements for reactor use is always very stringent. The fuel element fabricated for Dhruva reactor is specified to be leak-tight up to 1 x 10{sup -8} std. cc/sec. The fuel element consists of natural metallic uranium rod around 12.5 mm diameter and 3 meter long in encased in aluminium tube and seal welded at both ends. Since helium gas is not filled inside the fuel element while doing seal welding, the only way to do helium leak testing of such fuel rods is by back-pressure technique. This paper describes the development of test facility for carrying out such test and discusses the experiences of carrying out helium leak testing by back-pressure technique on more than 700 numbers of fuel rods for Dhruva reactor. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Design activity of IHI on the experimental multipurpose high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    With conspicuous interest and attention paid by iron and steel manufacturing industries, the development of the multipurpose high temperature gas-cooled reactor, namely the process heat reactor has been energetically discussed in Japan. The experimental multipurpose high temperature gas-cooled reactor, planned by JAERI (the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute), is now at the end of the adjustment design stage and about to enter the system synthesizing design stage. The design of the JAERI reactor as a pilot plant for process heat reactors that make possible the direct use of the heat, produced in the reactor, for other industrial uses was started in 1969, and has undergone several revisions up to now. The criticality of the JAERI reactor is expected to be realized before 1985 according to the presently published program. IHI has engaged in the developing work of HTGR (high temperature gas-cooled reactor) including VHTR (very high temperature gas-cooled reactor) for over seven years, producing several achievements. IHI has also participated in the JAERI project since 1973 with some other companies concerned in this field. The design activity of IHI in the development of the JAERI reactor is briefly presented in this paper. (auth.)

  2. Laser Welding Test Results with Gas Atmospheres in Welding Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, Chang-Young; Hong, Jin-Tae; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Heo, Sung-Ho; Jang, Seo-Yun; Yang, Tae-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The weld beads of specimens welded under identical conditions in the helium and argon gas were cleaner, more regular, and steadier than those in a vacuum. The penetration depth of the FZ in the vacuum was much deeper than those in the helium and argon gas. To measure the irradiation properties of nuclear fuel in a test reactor, a nuclear fuel test rod instrumented with various sensors must be fabricated with assembly processes. A laser welding system to assemble the nuclear fuel test rod was designed and fabricated to develop various welding technologies of the fuel test rods to joint between a cladding tube and end-caps. It is an air-cooling optical fiber type and its emission modes are a continuous (CW) mode of which the laser generates continuous emission, and pulse (QCW) mode in which the laser internally generates sequences of pulses. We considered the system welding a sample in a chamber that can weld a specimen in a vacuum and inert gas atmosphere, and the chamber was installed on the working plate of the laser welding system. In the chamber, the laser welding process should be conducted to have no defects on the sealing area between a cladding tube and an end-cap.

  3. Growth of plant root cultures in liquid- and gas-dispersed reactor environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, S A; Gehrig, J A; Hollar, K A; Curtis, W R

    1993-01-01

    The growth of Agrobacterium transformed "hairy root" cultures of Hyoscyamus muticus was examined in various liquid- and gas-dispersed bioreactor configurations. Reactor runs were replicated to provide statistical comparisons of nutrient availability on culture performance. Accumulated tissue mass in submerged air-sparged reactors was 31% of gyratory shake-flask controls. Experiments demonstrate that poor performance of sparged reactors is not due to bubble shear damage, carbon dioxide stripping, settling, or flotation of roots. Impaired oxygen transfer due to channeling and stagnation of the liquid phase are the apparent causes of poor growth. Roots grown on a medium-perfused inclined plane grew at 48% of gyratory controls. This demonstrates the ability of cultures to partially compensate for poor liquid distribution through vascular transport of nutrients. A reactor configuration in which the medium is sprayed over the roots and permitted to drain down through the root tissue was able to provide growth rates which are statistically indistinguishable (95% T-test) from gyratory shake-flask controls. In this type of spray/trickle-bed configuration, it is shown that distribution of the roots becomes a key factor in controlling the rate of growth. Implications of these results regarding design and scale-up of bioreactors to produce fine chemicals from root cultures are discussed.

  4. Refurbishing the BR2 materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baugnet, J.M.; Dekeyser, J.; Gubel, P.

    1995-01-01

    SCK/CEN is refurbishing its BR2 reactor to allow its further operation during the next 15 years; in doing so, it chooses to keep BR2 available for future scientific and technological irradiation programs within an international context. (author) 2 figs

  5. Reactor primary pumps dynamic balancing test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Qunxian

    2002-01-01

    Reactor primary Pump is the important equipment in the primary circuit, its working quality would directly influence the safety and operation of nuclear power plant. The author describes that the primary pump vibration status, vibration fault diagnosis and dynamic balancing process on site have been performed since commercial operation of DA YA BAY Nuclear Power plant

  6. Membrane steam reforming of natural gas for hydrogen production by utilization of medium temperature nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djati Hoesen Salimy

    2010-01-01

    The assessment of steam reforming process with membrane reactor for hydrogen production by utilizing of medium temperature nuclear reactor has been carried out. Difference with the conventional process of natural gas steam reforming that operates at high temperature (800-1000°C), the process with membrane reactor operates at lower temperature (~500°C). This condition is possible because the use of perm-selective membrane that separate product simultaneously in reactor, drive the optimum conversion at the lower temperature. Besides that, membrane reactor also acts the role of separation unit, so the plant will be more compact. From the point of nuclear heat utilization, the low temperature of process opens the chance of medium temperature nuclear reactor utilization as heat source. Couple the medium temperature nuclear reactor with the process give the advantage from the point of saving fossil fuel that give direct implication of decreasing green house gas emission. (author)

  7. A combined gas cooled nuclear reactor and fuel cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, David J.

    Rising oil costs, global warming, national security concerns, economic concerns and escalating energy demands are forcing the engineering communities to explore methods to address these concerns. It is the intention of this thesis to offer a proposal for a novel design of a combined cycle, an advanced nuclear helium reactor/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) plant that will help to mitigate some of the above concerns. Moreover, the adoption of this proposal may help to reinvigorate the Nuclear Power industry while providing a practical method to foster the development of a hydrogen economy. Specifically, this thesis concentrates on the importance of the U.S. Nuclear Navy adopting this novel design for its nuclear electric vessels of the future with discussion on efficiency and thermodynamic performance characteristics related to the combined cycle. Thus, the goals and objectives are to develop an innovative combined cycle that provides a solution to the stated concerns and show that it provides superior performance. In order to show performance, it is necessary to develop a rigorous thermodynamic model and computer program to analyze the SOFC in relation with the overall cycle. A large increase in efficiency over the conventional pressurized water reactor cycle is realized. Both sides of the cycle achieve higher efficiencies at partial loads which is extremely important as most naval vessels operate at partial loads as well as the fact that traditional gas turbines operating alone have poor performance at reduced speeds. Furthermore, each side of the cycle provides important benefits to the other side. The high temperature exhaust from the overall exothermic reaction of the fuel cell provides heat for the reheater allowing for an overall increase in power on the nuclear side of the cycle. Likewise, the high temperature helium exiting the nuclear reactor provides a controllable method to stabilize the fuel cell at an optimal temperature band even during transients helping

  8. Analysis of Neutron Flux Distribution in Rsg-Gas Reactor With U-Mo Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taswanda Taryo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of U-Mo fuels in research reactors seems to be promising and, recently, world researchers have carried out these such activities actively. The National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN which owns RSG-GAS reactor available in Serpong Research Center for Atomic Energy should anticipate this trend. It is, therefore, this research work on the use of U-Mo fuels in RSG-GAS reactor should be carried out. The work was focused on the analysis of neutron flux distribution in the RSG-GAS reactor using different content of molybdenum in U-Mo fuels. To begin with, RSG-GAS reactor core model was developed and simulated into X, Y and Z dimensions. Cross section of materials based on the developed cells of standard and control fuels was then generated using WIMS-D5-B. The criticality calculations were finally carried out applying BATAN-2DIFF code. The results showed that the neutron flux distribution obtained in U-Mo-fuel-based RSG-GAS core is very similar to those achieved in the 300-gram sillicide-fuel-based RSG-GAS reactor core. Indeed, the utilization of the U-Mo RSG-GAS core can be very similar to that of the high-density sillicide reactor core and even could be better in the future.

  9. Observations of the behaviour of gas in the wake behind a corner blockage in fast breeder reactor subassembly geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzawa, Y.

    1979-07-01

    Observations were made of gas behaviour in the wake behind a 21% corner blockage in the subassembly geometry of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. The test section used represented one half of the reactor fuel subassembly, divided along the vertical plane of symmetry through the blockage. A glass wall occupied the position of this plane. Water was allowed to flow between glass rods simulating fuel pins, the velocity being changed from 1.2 to 4.5 m/s. Argon was injected into the wake or into the flow upstream of the blockage, the injection rate being changed from 1 to 230 Ncm 3 /s (standard temperature and pressure). From the present experiment, the following is evident: The gas is accumulated in the wake behind the blockage, forming a gas cavity. The flow patterns of the two-phase mixture in the wake are classified into three types, depending on the liquid velocity. In the lower velocity range, a gas cavity cannot be present at rest, rising up through the wake as a single bubble due to buoyancy. In the higher velocity range, the gas cavity is broken up by the liquid flow forces, only small gas bubbles circulating in the wake. In the velocity range in between, the gas cavity is present in the wake. The cavity size depends on the gas injection rate and on the liquid velocity. From the results, the possibility of fuel failure caused by fission gas release at a blockage in the fast breeder reactor can be considered to depend on the operating conditions of the reactor, specially on the coolant velocity. (orig.) [de

  10. Detection of gas-permeable fuel particles for highl 7490 temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, B.A.; Stinton, D.P.; Costanzo, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    Fuel for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) consists of uranium oxide-carbide and thoria microspheres coated with layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. The pyrolytic carbon coatings must be gas-tight to perform properly during irradiation. Therefore, particles must be carefully characterized to determine the number of defective particles (ie bare kernels, and cracked or permeable coatings). Although techniques are available to determine the number of bare kernels or cracked coatings, no reliable technique has been available to measure coating permeability. This work describes a technique recently developed to determine whether coatings for a batch of particles are gas-tight or permeable. Although most of this study was performed on Biso-coated particles, the technique applies equally well to Triso-coated particles. About 150 randomly selected Biso-particle batches were studied in this work. These batches were first subjected to an 18-hr chlorination at 15000C, and the volatile thorium tetrachloride released through cracked or very permeable coatings was measured versus chlorination time. Chlorinated batches were also radiographed to detect any thorium that had migrated from the kernel into the coatings. From this work a technique was developed to determine coating permeability. This consists of an 18-hr chlorination of multiple samples without measurement of the heavy metal released. Each batch is then radiographed and the heavy metal diffusion within each particle is examined so it can be determined if a particle batch is permeable, slightly permeable, or gas-tight. (author)

  11. Safety re-assessment of AECL test and research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winfield, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited currently has four operating engineering test/research reactors of various sizes and ages; a new isotope-production reactor Maple-X10, under construction at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), and a heating demonstration reactor, SDR, undergoing high-power commissioning at Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment (WNRE). The company is also performing design studies of small reactors for hot water and electricity production. The older reactors are ZED-2, PTR, NRX, and NRU; these range in age from 42 years (NRX) to 29 years (ZED-2). Since 1984, limited-scope safety re-assessments have been underway on three of these reactors (ZED-2, NRX AND NRU). ZED-2 and PTR are operated by the Reactor Physics Branch; all other reactors are operated by the respective site Reactor Operations Branches. For the older reactors the original safety reports produced were entirely deterministic in nature and based on the design-basis accident concept. The limited scope safety re-assessments for these older reactors, carried out over the past 5 years, have comprised both quantitative probabilistic safety-assessment techniques, such as event tree and fault analysis, and/or qualitative techniques, such as failure mode and effect analysis. The technique used for an individual assessment was dependent upon the specific scope required. This paper discusses the types of analyses carried out, specific insights/recommendations resulting from the analysis, and the plan for future analysis. In addition, during the last four years safety assessments have been carried out on the new isotope-, heat-, and electricity-producing reactors, as part of the safety design review, commissioning and licensing activities

  12. Operation, test, research and development of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). FY1999-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-05-01

    The HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) with the thermal power of 30 MW and the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 850/950 degC is the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan, which uses coated fuel particle, graphite for core components, and helium gas for primary coolant. The HTTR, which locates at the south-west area of 50,000 m{sup 2} in the Oarai Research Establishment, had been constructed since 1991 before accomplishing the first criticality on November 10, 1998. Rise to power tests of the HTTR started in September, 1999 and the rated thermal power of 30 MW and the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 850 degC was attained in December 2001. JAERI received the certificate of pre-operation test, that is, the commissioning license for the HTTR in March 2002. This report summarizes operation, tests, maintenance, radiation control, and construction of components and facilities for the HTTR as well as R and Ds on HTGRs from FY1999 to 2001. (author)

  13. Testing plutonium fuel assembly production for fast-neutron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nougues, B.; Benhamou, A.; Bertothy, G.; Lepetit, H.

    1975-01-01

    The main characteristics of plutonium fuel elements for fast breeder reactors justify specific test procedures and special techniques. The specific tests relating to the Pu content consist of Pu enrichment and distribution tests, determination of the O/M ratio and external contamination tests. The specific tests performed on fuel configuration are: testing of sintered pellet diameter, testing of pin welding and checking of internal assmbly [fr

  14. Modeling and performance of the MHTGR [Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] reactor cavity cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1990-04-01

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) of the Modular High- Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy is designed to remove the nuclear afterheat passively in the event that neither the heat transport system nor the shutdown cooling circulator subsystem is available. A computer dynamic simulation for the physical and mathematical modeling of and RCCS is described here. Two conclusions can be made form computations performed under the assumption of a uniform reactor vessel temperature. First, the heat transferred across the annulus from the reactor vessel and then to ambient conditions is very dependent on the surface emissivities of the reactor vessel and RCCS panels. These emissivities should be periodically checked to ensure the safety function of the RCCS. Second, the heat transfer from the reactor vessel is reduced by a maximum of 10% by the presence of steam at 1 atm in the reactor cavity annulus for an assumed constant in the transmission of radiant energy across the annulus can be expected to result in an increase in the reactor vessel temperature for the MHTGR. Further investigation of participating radiation media, including small particles, in the reactor cavity annulus is warranted. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  15. Development and testing of control rod drives for ship reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruelheide, K.; Mundt, D.; Peters, C.-H.; Manthey, H.-J.

    1978-01-01

    The following paper deals with the development and testings of a new control rod drive design for marine reactors. Starting from the good operating experience with the advanced pressurized water reactor (FDR) of the NS OTTO HAHN a control rod drive system with an hermetically sealed drive principle was developed. A prototype control rod drive system was put through extensive tests and developed ready for standard production at the 'Gesellschaft fuer Kernenergieverwertung in Schiffbau und Schiffahrt'

  16. Reactor calculation benchmark PCA blind test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, F.B.K.; Stallmann, F.W.

    1980-01-01

    Further improvement in calculational procedures or a combination of calculations and measurements is necessary to attain 10 to 15% (1 sigma) accuracy for neutron exposure parameters (flux greater than 0.1 MeV, flux greater than 1.0 MeV, and dpa). The calculational modeling of power reactors should be benchmarked in an actual LWR plant to provide final uncertainty estimates for end-of-life predictions and limitations for plant operations. 26 references, 14 figures, 6 tables

  17. Reactor calculation benchmark PCA blind test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kam, F.B.K.; Stallmann, F.W.

    1980-01-01

    Further improvement in calculational procedures or a combination of calculations and measurements is necessary to attain 10 to 15% (1 sigma) accuracy for neutron exposure parameters (flux greater than 0.1 MeV, flux greater than 1.0 MeV, and dpa). The calculational modeling of power reactors should be benchmarked in an actual LWR plant to provide final uncertainty estimates for end-of-life predictions and limitations for plant operations. 26 references, 14 figures, 6 tables.

  18. Fission product monitoring of TRISO coated fuel for the advanced gas reactor-1 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scates, Dawn M.; Hartwell, John K.; Walter, John B.; Drigert, Mark W.; Harp, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burnup of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B's) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  19. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) Decay Heat Removal Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. D. Weaver; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo

    2005-01-01

    Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with an outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in participating in research related to the development of the GFR. These are Euratom (European Commission), France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Of these, Euratom (including the United Kingdom), France, and Japan have active research activities with respect to the GFR. The research includes GFR design and safety, and fuels/in-core materials/fuel cycle projects. This report is a compilation of work performed on decay heat removal systems for a 2400 MWt GFR during this fiscal year (FY05)

  20. GRSIS program to predict fission gas release and swelling behavior of metallic fast reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Lee, Byung Ho; Nam, Cheol; Sohn, Dong Seong

    1999-03-01

    A mechanistic model of fission gas release and swelling for the U-(Pu)-Zr metallic fuel in the fast reactor, GRSIS (Gas Release and Swelling in ISotropic fuel matrix) was developed. Fission gas bubbles are assumed to nucleate isotropically from the gas atoms in the metallic fuel matrix since they can nucleate at both the grain boundaries and the phase boundaries which are randomly distributed inside the grain. Bubbles can grow to larger size by gas diffusion and coalition with other bubbles so that they are classified as three classes depending upon their sizes. When bubble swelling reaches the threshold value, bubbles become interconnected each other to make the open channel to the external free space, that is, the open bubbles and then fission gases inside the interconnected open bubbles are released instantaneously. During the irradiation, fission gases are released through the open bubbles. GRSIS model can take into account the fuel gap closure by fuel bubble swelling. When the fuel gap is closed by fuel swelling, the contact pressure between fuel and cladding in relation to the bubble swelling and temperature is calculated. GRSIS model was validated by comparison with the irradiation test results of U-(Pu)-Zr fuels in ANL as well as the parametric studies of the key variable in the model. (author). 13 refs., 1 tab., 22 figs

  1. GRSIS program to predict fission gas release and swelling behavior of metallic fast reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Lee, Byung Ho; Nam, Cheol; Sohn, Dong Seong

    1999-03-01

    A mechanistic model of fission gas release and swelling for the U-(Pu)-Zr metallic fuel in the fast reactor, GRSIS (Gas Release and Swelling in ISotropic fuel matrix) was developed. Fission gas bubbles are assumed to nucleate isotropically from the gas atoms in the metallic fuel matrix since they can nucleate at both the grain boundaries and the phase boundaries which are randomly distributed inside the grain. Bubbles can grow to larger size by gas diffusion and coalition with other bubbles so that they are classified as three classes depending upon their sizes. When bubble swelling reaches the threshold value, bubbles become interconnected each other to make the open channel to the external free space, that is, the open bubbles and then fission gases inside the interconnected open bubbles are released instantaneously. During the irradiation, fission gases are released through the open bubbles. GRSIS model can take into account the fuel gap closure by fuel bubble swelling. When the fuel gap is closed by fuel swelling, the contact pressure between fuel and cladding in relation to the bubble swelling and temperature is calculated. GRSIS model was validated by comparison with the irradiation test results of U-(Pu)-Zr fuels in ANL as well as the parametric studies of the key variable in the model. (author). 13 refs., 1 tab., 22 figs.

  2. Safety analysis of the experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitake, Susumu; Ezaki, Masahiro; Suzuki, Katsuo; Takaya, Junichi; Shimazu, Akira

    1976-02-01

    Safety features of the experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas-cooled reactor being developed in JAERI were studied or the basis of its preliminary conceptual design of the reactor plant. Covered are control of the plant in transients, plant behaviour in accidents, and functions of engineered safeguards, and also dynamics of the uprant and frequencies of the accidents. These studies have shown, (i) the reactor plant can be operated both in plant slave to reactor and reactor slave to plant control, (ii) stable control of

  3. Postirradiation examination of recycle test elements from the Peach Bottom Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs, T.N.; Long, E.L. Jr.

    1978-12-01

    The Recycle Test Elements were a series of tests of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor fuels irradiated in Core 2 of the Peach Bottom Unit 1 Reactor. They tested a wide variety of fissile and fertile fuel types of prime interest when the tests were designed. The fuel types included UO 2 , UC 2 , (2Th,U)O 2 , (4Th,U)O 2 , ThC 2 , and ThO 2 . The mixed thorium--uranium oxides and the pure thorium oxide were tested as Biso-coated particles only, while the others were tested as both Biso- and Triso-coated particles. The Biso coatings on the fissile kernels contained the fission products inadequately but on the fertile kernels they did so acceptably. The results from accelerated and real-time tests on the particle types agreed well

  4. Seismic response of high temperature gas-cooled reactor core with block-type fuel, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi; Honma, Toshiaki.

    1980-01-01

    For the aseismic design of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) with block-type fuel, it is necessary to predict the motion and force of core columns and blocks. To reveal column vibration characteristics in three-dimensional space and impact response, column vibration tests were carried out with a scale model of a one-region section (seven columns) of the HTGR core. The results are as follows: (1) the column has a soft spring characteristic based on stacked blocks connected with loose pins, (2) the column has whirling phenomena, (3) the compression spring force simulating the gas pressure has the effect of raising the column resonance frequency, and (4) the vibration behavior of the stacked block column and impact response of the surrounding columns show agreement between experiment and analysis. (author)

  5. Development of the IAEA’s Knowledge Preservation Portals for Fast Reactors and Gas-Cooled Reactors Knowledge Preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batra, C.; Menahem, D. Beraha; Kriventsev, V.; Monti, S.; Reitsma, F.; Grosbois, J. de; Khoroshev, M.; Gladyshev, M.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA has been carrying out a dedicated initiative on fast reactor knowledge preservation since 2003. The main objectives of the Fast Reactor Knowledge Portal (FRKP) initiative are to, a) halt the on-going loss of information related to fast reactors (FR), and b) collect, retrieve, preserve and make accessible existing data and information on FR. This portal will help in knowledge sharing, development, search and discovery, collaboration and communication of fast reactor related information. On similar lines a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor Knowledge Preservation portal project also started in 2013. Knowledge portals are capable to control and manage both publicly available as well as controlled information. The portals will not only incorporate existing set of knowledge and information, but will also provide a systemic platform for further preservation of new developments. It will include fast reactor and gas cooled reactor document repositories, project workspaces for the IAEA’s Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs), Technical Meetings (TMs), forums for discussion, etc. The portal will also integrate a taxonomy based search tool, which will help using new semantic search capabilities for improved conceptual retrieve of documents. The taxonomy complies with international web standards as defined by the W3C (World Wide Web Consortium). (author

  6. Rotating bed reactor for CLC: Bed characteristics dependencies on internal gas mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Håkonsen, Silje Fosse; Grande, Carlos A.; Blom, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A mathematical model for the rotating CLC reactor has been developed. • The model reflects the gas distribution in the reactor during CLC operation. • Radial dispersion in the rotating bed is the main cause for internal gas mixing. • The model can be used to optimize the reactor design and particle characteristics. - Abstract: A newly designed continuous lab-scale rotating bed reactor for chemical looping combustion using CuO/Al 2 O 3 oxygen carrier spheres and methane as fuel gives around 90% CH 4 conversion and >90% CO 2 capture efficiency based on converted methane at 800 °C. However, from a series of experiments using a broad range of operating conditions potential CO 2 purities only in the range 20–65% were yielded, mostly due to nitrogen slip from the air side of the reactor into the effluent CO 2 stream. A mathematical model was developed intending to understand the air-mixing phenomena. The model clearly reflects the gas slippage tendencies observed when varying the process conditions such as rotation frequency, gas flow and the flow if inert gas in the two sectors dividing the air and fuel side of the reactor. Based on the results, it is believed that significant improvements can be made to reduce gas mixing in future modified and scaled-up reactor versions

  7. Utilization of fission reactors for fusion engineering testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deis, G.A.; Miller, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    Fission reactors can be used to conduct some of the fusion nuclear engineering tests identified in the FINESSE study. To further define the advantages and disadvantages of fission testing, the technical and programmatic constraints on this type of testing are discussed here. This paper presents and discusses eight key issues affecting fission utilization. Quantitative comparisons with projected fusion operation are made to determine the technical assets and limitations of fission testing. Capabilities of existing fission reactors are summarized and compared with technical needs. Conclusions are then presented on the areas where fission testing can be most useful

  8. Field tests and commercialization of natural gas leak detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, D S; Jeon, J S; Kim, K D; Cho, Y A [R and D Center, Korea Gas Corporation, Ansan (Korea)

    1999-09-01

    Objectives - (1) fields test of industrial gas leak detection monitoring system. (2) commericialization of residential gas leak detector. Contents - (1) five sets of gas leak detection monitoring system were installed at natural gas transmition facilities and tested long term stability and their performance. (2) improved residential gas leak detector was commercialised. Expected benefits and application fields - (1) contribution to the improvement of domestic gas sensor technology. (2) localization of fabrication technology for gas leak detectors. 23 refs., 126 figs., 37 tabs.

  9. Safety requirements, facility user needs, and reactor concepts for a new Broad Application Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Liebenthal, J.L.; Denison, A.B.; Fletcher, C.D.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes the EG ampersand G Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR) Project that was conducted in fiscal year 1991. The scope of this project was divided into three phases: a project process definition phase, a requirements development phase, and a preconceptual reactor design and evaluation phase. Multidisciplinary teams of experts conducted each phase. This report presents the need for a new test reactor, the project process definition, a set of current and projected regulatory compliance and safety requirements, a set of facility user needs for a broad range of projected testing missions, and descriptions of reactor concepts capable of meeting these requirements. This information can be applied to strategic planning to provide the Department of Energy with management options

  10. Conceptual design for simulator of irradiation test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Ohto, Tsutomu; Magome, Hirokatsu; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko

    2012-03-01

    A simulator of irradiation test reactors has been developed since JFY 2010 for understanding reactor behavior and for upskilling in order to utilize a nuclear human resource development (HRD) and to promote partnership with developing countries which have a plan to introduce nuclear power plant. The simulator is designed based on the JMTR, one of the irradiation test reactors, and it simulates operation, irradiation tests and various kinds of accidents caused by the reactor and irradiation facility. The development of the simulator is sponsored by the Japanese government as one of the specialized projects of advanced research infrastructure in order to promote basic as well as applied researches. The training using the simulator will be started for the nuclear HRD from JFY 2012. This report summarizes the result of the conceptual design of the simulator in JFY 2010. (author)

  11. Zeolite Membrane Reactor for Water Gas Shift Reaction for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jerry Y.S. [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2013-01-29

    Gasification of biomass or heavy feedstock to produce hydrogen fuel gas using current technology is costly and energy-intensive. The technology includes water gas shift reaction in two or more reactor stages with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given catalyst volume. This project is focused on developing a membrane reactor for efficient conversion of water gas shift reaction to produce a hydrogen stream as a fuel and a carbon dioxide stream suitable for sequestration. The project was focused on synthesizing stable, hydrogen perm-selective MFI zeolite membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation; fabricating tubular MFI zeolite membrane reactor and stable water gas shift catalyst for membrane reactor applications, and identifying experimental conditions for water gas shift reaction in the zeolite membrane reactor that will produce a high purity hydrogen stream. The project has improved understanding of zeolite membrane synthesis, high temperature gas diffusion and separation mechanisms for zeolite membranes, synthesis and properties of sulfur resistant catalysts, fabrication and structure optimization of membrane supports, and fundamentals of coupling reaction with separation in zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction. Through the fundamental study, the research teams have developed MFI zeolite membranes with good perm-selectivity for hydrogen over carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water vapor, and high stability for operation in syngas mixture containing 500 part per million hydrogen sulfide at high temperatures around 500°C. The research teams also developed a sulfur resistant catalyst for water gas shift reaction. Modeling and experimental studies on the zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction have demonstrated the effective use of the zeolite membrane reactor for production of high purity hydrogen stream.

  12. Simulating Neutronic Core Parameters in a Research and Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selim, H.K.; Amin, E.A.; Koutb, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    The present study proposes an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) modeling technique that predicts the control rods positions in a nuclear research reactor. The neutron, flux in the core of the reactor is used as the training data for the neural network model. The data used to train and validate the network are obtained by modeling the reactor core with the neutronic calculation code: CITVAP. The type of the network used in this study is the feed forward multilayer neural network with the backpropagation algorithm. The results show that the proposed ANN has good generalization capability to estimate the control rods positions knowing neutron flux for a research and test reactor. This method can be used to predict critical control rods positions to be used for reactor operation after reload

  13. On the helium gas leak test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Akira; Ozaki, Susumu

    1975-01-01

    The helium gas leak test (Helium mass spectrometer testing) has a leak detection capacity of the highest level in practical leak tests and is going to be widely applied to high pressure vessels, atomic and vacuum equipments that require high tightness. To establish a standard test procedure several series of experiments were conducted and the results were investigated. The conclusions are summarized as follows: (1) The hood method is quantitatively the most reliable method. The leak rate obtained by tests using 100% helium concentration should be the basis of the other method of test. (2) The integrating method, bell jar method, and vacuum spray method can be considered quantitative when particular conditions are satisfied. (3) The sniffer method is not to be considered quantitive. (4) The leak rate of the hood, integrating, and bell jar methods is approximately proportional to the square of the helium partial pressure. (auth.)

  14. Parametric studies on different gas turbine cycles for a high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jie; Gu Yihua

    2005-01-01

    The high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) coupled with turbine cycle is considered as one of the leading candidates for future nuclear power plants. In this paper, the various types of HTGR gas turbine cycles are concluded as three typical cycles of direct cycle, closed indirect cycle and open indirect cycle. Furthermore they are theoretically converted to three Brayton cycles of helium, nitrogen and air. Those three types of Brayton cycles are thermodynamically analyzed and optimized. The results show that the variety of gas affects the cycle pressure ratio more significantly than other cycle parameters, however, the optimized cycle efficiencies of the three Brayton cycles are almost the same. In addition, the turbomachines which are required for the three optimized Brayton cycles are aerodynamically analyzed and compared and their fundamental characteristics are obtained. Helium turbocompressor has lower stage pressure ratio and more stage number than those for nitrogen and air machines, while helium and nitrogen turbocompressors have shorter blade length than that for air machine

  15. Fabrication and Testing of a Modular Micro-Pocket Fission Detector Instrumentation System for Test Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenberger, Michael A.; Nichols, Daniel M.; Stevenson, Sarah R.; Swope, Tanner M.; Hilger, Caden W.; Roberts, Jeremy A.; Unruh, Troy C.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2018-01-01

    Advancements in nuclear reactor core modeling and computational capability have encouraged further development of in-core neutron sensors. Measurement of the neutron-flux distribution within the reactor core provides a more complete understanding of the operating conditions in the reactor than typical ex-core sensors. Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors have been developed and tested previously but have been limited to single-node operation and have utilized highly specialized designs. The development of a widely deployable, multi-node Micro-Pocket Fission Detector assembly will enhance nuclear research capabilities. A modular, four-node Micro-Pocket Fission Detector array was designed, fabricated, and tested at Kansas State University. The array was constructed from materials that do not significantly perturb the neutron flux in the reactor core. All four sensor nodes were equally spaced axially in the array to span the fuel-region of the reactor core. The array was filled with neon gas, serving as an ionization medium in the small cavities of the Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors. The modular design of the instrument facilitates the testing and deployment of numerous sensor arrays. The unified design drastically improved device ruggedness and simplified construction from previous designs. Five 8-mm penetrations in the upper grid plate of the Kansas State University TRIGA Mk. II research nuclear reactor were utilized to deploy the array between fuel elements in the core. The Micro-Pocket Fission Detector array was coupled to an electronic support system which has been specially developed to support pulse-mode operation. The Micro-Pocket Fission Detector array composed of four sensors was used to monitor local neutron flux at a constant reactor power of 100 kWth at different axial locations simultaneously. The array was positioned at five different radial locations within the core to emulate the deployment of multiple arrays and develop a 2-dimensional measurement of

  16. Thermal