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Sample records for gas plenum experiment

  1. Requirements for the GCFR plenum streaming experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, R.G.; Rouse, C.A.; Hamilton, C.J.

    1980-09-01

    This report gives the experiment objectives and generic descriptions of experimental configurations for the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) plenum shield experiment. This report defines four experiment phases. Each phase represents a distinct area of uncertainty in computing radiation transport from the GCFR core to the plenums, through the upper and lower plenum shields, and ultimately to the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) liner: (1) the shield heterogeneity phase; (2) the exit shield simulation phase; (3) the plenum streaming phase; and (4) the plenum shield simulation phase

  2. Experiments on the lower plenum response during a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, Robert E.; Hammersley, Robert J.; Klopp, George T.; Merilo, Mati

    2004-01-01

    Severe accident evaluations for nuclear reactors consider the response when the core materials have been overheated sufficient to melt and change geometry. One possible consequence of this is that molten core debris could drain into the lower plenum, as occurred in the TMI-2 accident. Given this state, several physical processes need to be analyzed, i.e. the extent of debris particulation and cooling, the potential for thermal attack of lower plenum structures, the thermal transient of the RPV and the potential for external cooling of the RPV lower head. These are important and complex processes, the evaluations of which need to be guided by well founded experiments. To support the development of the MAAP codes, recent experiments have been performed on specific issues such as: 1. the response of lower head penetrations submerged in a high temperature melt, 2. the net steam generation rate when molten debris drains into the lower plenum, 3. the formation of a contact resistance when molten debris drains through water and contacts the RPV wall and 4. the potential for external cooling of the RPV lower head. This paper discusses these experiments and their results. More importantly, it discusses how these are used in formulating models to represent the lower plenum response in the MAAP codes. (author)

  3. Design of pellet surface grooves for fission gas plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, T.J.; Jones, L.R.; Macici, N.; Miller, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    In the Canada deuterium uranium pressurized heavy water reactor, short (50-cm) Zircaloy-4 clad bundles are fueled on-power. Although internal void volume within the fuel rods is adequate for the present once-through natural uranium cycle, the authors have investigated methods for increasing the internal gas storage volume needed in high-power, high-burnup, experimental ceramic fuels. This present work sought to prove the methodology for design of gas storage volume within the fuel pellets - specifically the use of grooves pressed or machined into the relatively cool pellet/cladding interface. Preanalysis and design of pellet groove shape and volume was accomplished using the TRUMP heat transfer code. Postirradiation examination (PIE) was used to check the initial design and heat transfer assumptions. Fission gas release was found to be higher for the grooved pellet rods than for the comparison rods with hollow or unmodified pellets. This had been expected from the initial TRUMP thermal analyses. The ELESIM fuel modeling code was used to check in-reactor performance, but some modifications were necessary to accommodate the loss of heat transfer surface to the grooves. It was concluded that for plenum design purposes, circumferential pellet grooves could be adequately modeled by the codes TRUMP and ELESIM

  4. Numerical simulation and geometry optimization of hot-gas mixing in lower plenum of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hang; Wang Jie; Laurien, E.

    2010-01-01

    The lower plenum in high temperature gas-cooled reactor was designed to mix the gas of different temperatures from the reactor core. Previous researches suggest the current geometry of the lower plenum to be improved for better mixing capability and lower pressure drop. In the presented work, a series of varied geometries were investigated with numerical simulation way. The choice of appropriate mesh type and size used in the geometry variation was discussed with the reference of experimental data. The original thin ribs in the current design were merged into thicker ones, and a junction located at the starting end of the outlet pipe was introduced. After comparing several potential optimization methods, an improved geometry was selected with the merged ribs increasing the pre-defined mixing coefficient and the junction reducing the pressure drop. Future work was discussed based on the simulation of real reactor case. The work shows a direction for design improvements of the lower plenum geometry. (authors)

  5. Experimental optimization of temperature distribution in the hot-gas duct through the installation of internals in the hot-gas plenum of a high-temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henssen, J.; Mauersberger, R.

    1990-01-01

    The flow conditions in the hot-gas plenum and in the adjacent hot-gas ducts and hot-gas pipes for the high-temperature reactor project PNP-1000 (nuclear process heat project for 1000 MW thermal output) have been examined experimentally. The experiments were performed in a closed loop in which the flow model to be analyzed, representing a 60deg sector of the core bottom of the PNP-1000 with connecting hot-gas piping and diverting arrangements, was installed. The model scale was approx. 1:5.6. The temperature and flow velocity distribution in the hot-gas duct was registered by means of 14 dual hot-wire flowmeters. Through structural changes and/or the installation of internals into the hot-gas plenum of the core bottom offering little flow resistance coolant gas temperature differentials produced in the core could be reduced to such an extent that a degree of mixture amounting to over 80% was achieved at the entrance of the connected heat exchanger systems. Thereby the desired goal of an adequate degree of mixture of the hot gas involving an acceptable pressure loss was reached. (orig.)

  6. Final report on 3-D experiment project air-water upper plenum experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacoby, J.K.; Mohr, C.M.

    1978-11-01

    The results are presented from upper plenum air-water reflood behavior testing performed as part of the program to investigate three-dimensional aspects of PWR LOCA research. Tests described were performed at near ambient temperature and pressure in a plexiglass vessel which included the important features of the upper core and upper plenum regions corresponding to a single fuel bundle in both Westinghouse Electric Corporation (Trojan) and Kraftwerk Union (KKU) PWR designs. The data included observed two-phase flow characteristics, particularly with regard to countercurrent flow, and cinematography of the characteristic upper plenum flow patterns

  7. Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ICONE 15

    2007-04-01

    Abstract The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (“thermal striping”) in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums.

  8. Estimated Uncertainties in the Idaho National Laboratory Matched-Index-of-Refraction Lower Plenum Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donald M. McEligot; Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Ryan C. Johnson

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the fluid dynamics experiments in the MIR (Matched-Index-of-Refraction) flow system at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing, and turbulence models for typical Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) plenum geometries in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties. The experiments use optical techniques, primarily particle image velocimetry (PIV) in the INL MIR flow system. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in passages and around objects to be obtained without locating a disturbing transducer in the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. The objective of the present report is to develop understanding of the magnitudes of experimental uncertainties in the results to be obtained in such experiments. Unheated MIR experiments are first steps when the geometry is complicated. One does not want to use a computational technique, which will not even handle constant properties properly. This report addresses the general background, requirements for benchmark databases, estimation of experimental uncertainties in mean velocities and turbulence quantities, the MIR experiment, PIV uncertainties, positioning uncertainties, and other contributing measurement uncertainties

  9. Development Of An Experiment For Measuring Flow Phenomena Occurring In A Lower Plenum For VHTR CFD Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. McEligot; K.G. Condie; G. E. Mc Creery; H. M. Mc Ilroy

    2005-09-01

    The objective of the present report is to document the design of our first experiment to measure generic flow phenomena expected to occur in the lower plenum of a typical prismatic VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) concept. In the process, fabrication sketches are provided for the use of CFD (computational fluid dynamics) analysts wishing to employ the data for assessment of their proposed codes. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/systems code calculations for the same geometry. One aspect of the complex flow in a prismatic VHTR is being addressed: flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue). Current prismatic VHTR concepts were examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses were applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple jets into a confined crossflow -- with obstructions. Flow is expected to be turbulent with momentum-dominated turbulent jets entering; buoyancy influences are estimated to be negligible in normal full power operation. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments available are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other.

  10. IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY PROGRAM TO OBTAIN BENCHMARK DATA ON THE FLOW PHENOMENA IN A SCALED MODEL OF A PRISMATIC GAS-COOLED REACTOR LOWER PLENUM FOR THE VALIDATION OF CFD CODES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2008-01-01

    The experimental program that is being conducted at the Matched Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to obtain benchmark data on measurements of flow phenomena in a scaled model of a typical prismatic gas-cooled (GCR) reactor lower plenum using 3-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is presented. A detailed description of the model, scaling, the experimental facility, 3-D PIV system, measurement uncertainties and analysis, experimental procedures and samples of the data sets that have been obtained are included. Samples of the data set that are presented include mean-velocity-field and turbulence data in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic GCR design. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. The measurements reveal undeveloped, non-uniform flow in the inlet jets and complicated flow patterns in the model lower plenum. Data include three-dimensional vector plots, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and charts that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model. Information on inlet flow is also presented

  11. Optimization of inlet plenum of A PBMR using surrogate modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Moon; Kim, Kwang-Yong

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of present work is to optimize the design of inlet plenum of PBMR type gas cooled nuclear reactor numerically using a combining of three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) analysis and surrogate modeling technique. Shear stress transport (SST) turbulence model is used as a turbulence closure. Three geometric design variables are selected, namely, rising channel diameter to plenum height ratio, aspect ratio of the plenum cross section, and inlet port angle. The objective function is defined as a linear combination of uniformity of three-dimensional flow distribution term and pressure drop in the inlet plenum and rising channels of PBMR term with a weighting factor. Twenty design points are selected using Latin-hypercube method of design of experiment and objective function values are obtained at each design point using RANS solver. (author)

  12. Simulation experiments of small break LOCA in upper plenum joint pipe for 5 MW heating test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bo Jinhai; Jiang Shengyao; Zhang Youjie; Tong Yunxian; Sun Shusen; Yao Meisheng

    1988-12-01

    A simulation experiment of small break LOCA is introduced, which was caused by the breakdown of a small size or middle size pipe located at upper plenum, or by unexpected opening the safety valve. In the tests, the system pressure, temperature, void fraction and total loss of water were studied. The results showed that the total loss of water was nearly 20% of initial loading water. It means under this condition the 5MW low temperature heating reactor being built in Institute of Nnclear Engergy Technology of Tsinghua University is safe

  13. PIV Experiments to Measure Flow Phenomena in a Scaled Model of a VHTR Lower Plenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Richard R. Schultz; Daniel Christensen; Robert J. Pink; Ryan C. Johnson

    2006-09-01

    A report of experimental data collected at the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Laboratory in support of contract DE-AC07-05ID14517 and the INL Standard Problem on measurements of flow phenomena occurring in a lower plenum of a typical prismatic VHTR concept reactor to assess CFD code is presented. Background on the experimental setup and procedures is provided along with several samples of data obtained from the 3-D PIV system and an assessment of experimental uncertainty is provided. Data collected in this study include 3-dimensional velocity-field descriptions of the flow in all four inlet jets and the entire lower plenum with inlet jet Reynolds numbers (ReJet) of approximately 4300 and 12,400. These investigations have generated over 2 terabytes of data that has been processed to describe the various velocity components in formats suitable for external release and archived on removable hard disks. The processed data from both experimental studies are available in multi-column text format.

  14. RELAP/MOD3.2 Assessment Using an 11% Upper Plenum Break Experiment in the PSB Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayless, P.D.

    2003-01-17

    The RELAP/MOD3.2 computer code has been assessed using an 11% upper plenum break experiment in the PSB test facility at the Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Center. This work was performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's International Nuclear Safety Program, and is part of the effort addressing the capability of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code to model transients in Soviet-designed reactors. Designated VVER Standard Problem PSBV1, the test addressed several important phenomena related to VVER behavior that the code needs to simulate well. The code was judged to reasonably model the phenomena of two-phase flow natural circulation in the primary coolant system, asymmetric loop behavior, leak flow, loop seal clearance in the cold legs, heat transfer in a covered core, heat transfer in a partially covered core, pressurizer thermal-hydraulics, and integral system effects. The code was judged to be in minimal agreement with the experiment data for the mixture level and entrainment in the core, leading to a user recommendation to assess the sensitivity of transient calculations to the interphase drag modeling in the core. No judgments were made for the phenomena of phase separation without mixture level formation, mixture level and entrainment in the steam generators, pool formation in the upper plenum, or flow stratification in horizontal pipes because either the phenomenon did not occur in the test or there were insufficient measurements to characterize the behavior.

  15. RELAP/MOD3.2 Assessment Using an 11% Upper Plenum Break Experiment in the PSB Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayless, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    The RELAP/MOD3.2 computer code has been assessed using an 11% upper plenum break experiment in the PSB test facility at the Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Center. This work was performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's International Nuclear Safety Program, and is part of the effort addressing the capability of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code to model transients in Soviet-designed reactors. Designated VVER Standard Problem PSBV1, the test addressed several important phenomena related to VVER behavior that the code needs to simulate well. The code was judged to reasonably model the phenomena of two-phase flow natural circulation in the primary coolant system, asymmetric loop behavior, leak flow, loop seal clearance in the cold legs, heat transfer in a covered core, heat transfer in a partially covered core, pressurizer thermal-hydraulics, and integral system effects. The code was judged to be in minimal agreement with the experiment data for the mixture level and entrainment in the core, leading to a user recommendation to assess the sensitivity of transient calculations to the interphase drag modeling in the core. No judgments were made for the phenomena of phase separation without mixture level formation, mixture level and entrainment in the steam generators, pool formation in the upper plenum, or flow stratification in horizontal pipes because either the phenomenon did not occur in the test or there were insufficient measurements to characterize the behavior

  16. RELAP-5/MOD 3.2 Assessment Using an 11% Upper Plenum Break Experiment in the PSB Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul D. Bayless

    2003-01-01

    The RELAP/MOD3.2 computer code has been assessed using an 11% upper plenum break experiment in the PSB test facility at the Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Center. This work was performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's International Nuclear Safety Program, and is part of the effort addressing the capability of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code to model transients in Soviet-designed reactors. Designated VVER Standard Problem PSBV1, the test addressed several important phenomena related to VVER behavior that the code needs to simulate well. The code was judged to reasonably model the phenomena of two-phase flow natural circulation in the primary coolant system, asymmetric loop behavior, leak flow, loop seal clearance in the cold legs, heat transfer in a covered core, heat transfer in a partially covered core, pressurizer thermal-hydraulics, and integral system effects. The code was judged to be in minimal agreement with the experiment data for the mixture level and entrainment in the core, leading to a user recommendation to assess the sensitivity of transient calculations to the interphase drag modeling in the core. No judgments were made for the phenomena of phase separation without mixture level formation, mixture level and entrainment in the steam generators, pool formation in the upper plenum, or flow stratification in horizontal pipes because either the phenomenon did not occur in the test or there were insufficient measurements to characterize the behavior.

  17. Fundamental validation of simulation method for thermal stratification in upper plenum of fast reactors. Analysis of sodium experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Shuji; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Sugahara, Akihiro; Ohki, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic analyses have been carried out for a sodium experiment in a relatively simple axis-symmetric geometry using a commercial CFD code in order to validate simulating methods for thermal stratification behavior in an upper plenum of sodium-cooled fast reactor. Detailed comparison between simulated results and experimental measurement has demonstrated that the code reproduced fairly well the fundamental thermal stratification behaviors such as vertical temperature gradient and upward movement of a stratification interface when utilizing high-order discretization scheme and appropriate mesh size. Furthermore, the investigation has clarified the influence of RANS type turbulence models on phenomena predictability; i.e. the standard k-ε model, the RNG k-ε model and the Reynolds Stress Model. (author)

  18. Evaluation of axial fission gas transport in power ramping experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Motoyasu

    1986-01-01

    The LINUS code calculates advective and diffusional transport of fission gas towards an upper plenum through the pellet-cladding gap. The basic equations were modified for analyzing a multi-component gas mixture in the gap and also for dealing with opening and/or closing of the gap, which induces additional axial gas flow. Analysis of the Petten ramp experiment shows that helium pressurization is effective in suppressing an ascending rate of fission gas concentration. After the maximum concentration is achieved through power ramping, the gas concentration could be described by a steady state analytical solution which does not depend on the filling gas pressure. (author)

  19. Upper plenum dump during reflood in PWR loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Yukio; Griffith, Peter.

    1981-01-01

    Upper plenum dump during reflood in a large break loww-of-coolant accident of PWR is studied with the emergency core coolant injection into the upper plenum in addition to the cold leg. Transient experiments were carried out by injecting water into the upper plenum and the simple analysis based on a one-dimensional model was done using the drift flux model in order to investigate the conditions under which water dump through the core occurs during reflood. The most significant result is an upper plenum dump occurs when the pressure (hydrostatic head) in the upper plenum is greater than that in the lower plenum. Under those circumstances the flow regime isco-current down flow in which the upper plenum is rapidly emptied. On the other hand, when the upper plenum pressure (hydrostatic head) is less than the lower plenum pressure (hydrostatic head), the co-current down flow is not realized but a counter-current flow occurs. With subcooled water injection to the upper plenum, co-current down flow is realized even when the upper plenum hydrostatic head is less than the lower plenum hydrostatic head. The importance of this effect varies according to the magnetude of water subcooling. (author)

  20. Coolant mixing in the LMFBR outlet plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.B.; Golay, M.W.

    1977-06-01

    Small scale experiments involving water flows are used to provide mean flow and turbulence field data for LMFBR outlet plenum flows. Measurements are performed at Reynolds Number (Re) values of 33000 and 70000 in a 1/15-scale FFTF geometry and at Re = 35000 in a 3/80-scale CRBR geometry. The experimental behavior is predicted using two different turbulence model computer programs, TEACH-T and VARR-II. It is found that the qualitative nature of the flow field within the plenum depends strongly upon the distribution of the mean inlet velocity field, upon the degree of inlet turbulence, and upon the turbulence momentum exchange model used in the calculations. It is found in the FFTF geometry that the TEACH-T predictions are better than that of VARR-II, and in the CRBR geometry neither code provides a good prediction of the observed behavior. From the sensitivity analysis, it is found that the production and dissipation of turbulence are the dominant terms in the transport equations for turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent energy dissipation rate, and the diffusion terms are relatively small. From the same study a new set of empirical constants for the turbulence model is evolved for the prediction of plenum flows

  1. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes Khz at > 100 kV/m E field

  2. Experimental and CFD Studies of Coolant Flow Mixing within Scaled Models of the Upper and Lower Plenums of NGNP Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Yassin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Anand, Nk [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-03-30

    A 1/16th scaled VHTR experimental model was constructed and the preliminary test was performed in this study. To produce benchmark data for CFD validation in the future, the facility was first run at partial operation with five pipes being heated. PIV was performed to extract the vector velocity field for three adjacent naturally convective jets at statistically steady state. A small recirculation zone was found between the pipes, and the jets entered the merging zone at 3 cm from the pipe outlet but diverged as the flow approached the top of the test geometry. Turbulence analysis shows the turbulence intensity peaked at 41-45% as the jets mixed. A sensitivity analysis confirmed that 1000 frames were sufficient to measure statistically steady state. The results were then validated by extracting the flow rate from the PIV jet velocity profile, and comparing it with an analytic flow rate and ultrasonic flowmeter; all flow rates lie within the uncertainty of the other two methods for Tests 1 and 2. This test facility can be used for further analysis of naturally convective mixing, and eventually produce benchmark data for CFD validation for the VHTR during a PCC or DCC accident scenario. Next, a PTV study of 3000 images (1500 image pairs) were used to quantify the velocity field in the upper plenum. A sensitivity analysis confirmed that 1500 frames were sufficient to precisely estimate the flow. Subsequently, three (3, 9, and 15 cm) Y-lines from the pipe output were extracted to consider the output differences between 50 to 1500 frames. The average velocity field and standard deviation error that accrued in the three different tests were calculated to assess repeatability. The error was varied, from 1 to 14%, depending on Y-elevation. The error decreased as the flow moved farther from the output pipe. In addition, turbulent intensity was calculated and found to be high near the output. Reynolds stresses and turbulent intensity were used to validate the data by

  3. Experimental and CFD Studies of Coolant Flow Mixing within Scaled Models of the Upper and Lower Plenums of NGNP Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Yassin; Anand, Nk

    2016-01-01

    A 1/16th scaled VHTR experimental model was constructed and the preliminary test was performed in this study. To produce benchmark data for CFD validation in the future, the facility was first run at partial operation with five pipes being heated. PIV was performed to extract the vector velocity field for three adjacent naturally convective jets at statistically steady state. A small recirculation zone was found between the pipes, and the jets entered the merging zone at 3 cm from the pipe outlet but diverged as the flow approached the top of the test geometry. Turbulence analysis shows the turbulence intensity peaked at 41-45% as the jets mixed. A sensitivity analysis confirmed that 1000 frames were sufficient to measure statistically steady state. The results were then validated by extracting the flow rate from the PIV jet velocity profile, and comparing it with an analytic flow rate and ultrasonic flowmeter; all flow rates lie within the uncertainty of the other two methods for Tests 1 and 2. This test facility can be used for further analysis of naturally convective mixing, and eventually produce benchmark data for CFD validation for the VHTR during a PCC or DCC accident scenario. Next, a PTV study of 3000 images (1500 image pairs) were used to quantify the velocity field in the upper plenum. A sensitivity analysis confirmed that 1500 frames were sufficient to precisely estimate the flow. Subsequently, three (3, 9, and 15 cm) Y-lines from the pipe output were extracted to consider the output differences between 50 to 1500 frames. The average velocity field and standard deviation error that accrued in the three different tests were calculated to assess repeatability. The error was varied, from 1 to 14%, depending on Y-elevation. The error decreased as the flow moved farther from the output pipe. In addition, turbulent intensity was calculated and found to be high near the output. Reynolds stresses and turbulent intensity were used to validate the data by

  4. Plenum separator system for pool-type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharbaugh, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    This invention provides a plenum separator system for pool-type nuclear reactors which substantially lessens undesirable thermal effects on major components. A primary feature of the invention is the addition of one or more intermediate plena, containing substantially stagnant and stratified coolant, which separate the hot and cold plena and particularly the hot plena from critical reactor components. This plenum separator system also includes a plurality of components which together form a dual pass flow path annular region spaced from the reactor vessel wall by an annular gas space. The bypass flow through the flow path is relatively small and is drawn from the main coolant pumps and discharged to an intermediate plenum

  5. Upper plenum mixing in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamgir, M.; Andersen, J.G.M.; Parameswaran, V.

    1984-01-01

    A model for the emergency core cooling injection into the upper plenum of a boiling water reactor has been formulated and implemented into the TRACB02 computer program. The model consists of a spray model and a submerged jet model. The submerged jet model is used when the spray nozzles are covered by a two-phase mixture, and the spray model is used when the nozzles are uncovered. The upper plenum model has been assessed by comparison to an upper plenum mixing test in the Steam Sector Test Facility. It is found that the model accurately predicts the phenomena in the upper plenum of a boiling water reactor

  6. Stratification in SNR-300 outlet plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinders, R.

    1983-01-01

    In the inner outlet plenum of the SNR-300 under steady state conditions a large toroidal vortex is expected. The main flow passes through the gap between dipplate and shield vessel to the outer annular space. Only 3% of the flow pass the 24 emergency cooling holes, situated in the shield vessel. The sodium leaves the reactor tank through the 3 symmetrically arranged outlet nozzles. For a scram flow rates and temperatures are decreased simultaneously, so it is expected, that stratification occurs in the inner outlet plenum. A measure of stratification effects is the Archimedes Number Ar, which is the relation of buoyancy forces (negative) to kinetic energy. (The Archimedes Number is nearly identical with the Richardson Number). For values Ar>1 stratification can occur. Under the assumption of stratification the code TIRE was developed, which is only applicable for the period of time after some 50 sec after scram. This code serves for long term calculations. As the equations are very simple, it is a very fast code which gives the possibility to calculate transients for some hours real time. This code mainly has to take into account the pressure difference between inner plenum and outlet annulus caused by geodatic pressure. That force is in equilibrium with the pressure drop over the gap and holes in the shield vessel. For more detailed calculations of flow pattern and temperature distribution the code MIX and INKO 2T are applied. MIX was developed and validated at ANL, INKO 2T is a development of INTERATOM. INKO 2T is under validation. Mock up experiments were carried out with water to simulate the transient behavior of the SNR-300 outlet plenum. Calculations obtained by INKO 2T for steady state and the transient are shown for the flow pattern. Results of measurements also prove that stratification begins after about 30 sec. Measurements and detailed calculations show that it is admissible to use the code TIRE for the long term calculations. Calculations for a scram

  7. Gas Detection for Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Hay, D

    2001-01-01

    Flammable gases are often used in detectors for physics experiments. The storage, distribution and manipulation of such flammable gases present several safety hazards. As most flammable gases cannot be detected by human senses, specific well-placed gas detection systems must be installed. Following a request from the user group and in collaboration with CERN safety officers, risk analyses are performed. An external contractor, who needs to receive detailed user requirements from CERN, performs the installations. The contract is passed on a guaranteed results basis. Co-ordination between all the CERN groups and verification of the technical installation is done by ST/AA/AS. This paper describes and focuses on the structured methodology applied to implement such installations based on goal directed project management techniques (GDPM). This useful supervision tool suited to small to medium sized projects facilitates the task of co-ordinating numerous activities to achieve a completely functional system.

  8. Validation of turbulence models for LMFBR outlet plenum flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.B.; Golay, M.W.

    1977-01-01

    Small scale experiments involving water flows are used to provide mean flow and turbulence field data for LMFBR outlet plenum flows. Measurements are performed at Reynolds number (Re) values of 33000 and 70000 in a 1/15 - scale FFTF geometry and at Re = 35000 in a 3/80-scale CRBR geometry. The experimental behavior is predicted using two different two-equation turbulence model computer programs, TEACH-T and VARR-II. It is found that the qualitative nature of the flow field within the plenum depends strongly upon the distribution of the mean inlet flow field, importantly also upon the degree of inlet turbulence, and also upon the turbulent momentum exchange model used in the calculations. In the FFTF geometry, the TEACH-T predictions agree well with the experiments. 7 refs

  9. Determination of fission gas release of spent nuclear fuel in puncturing test and in leaching experiments under anoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Robles, E., E-mail: ernesto.gonzalez-robles@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Metz, V. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Wegen, D.H. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU), P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Herm, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Papaioannou, D. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU), P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Bohnert, E. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Gretter, R. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU), P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Müller, N. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Nasyrow, R.; Weerd, W. de; Wiss, T. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU), P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Kienzler, B. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    During reactor operation the fission gases Kr and Xe are formed within the UO{sub 2} matrix of nuclear fuel. Their quantification is important to evaluate their impact on critical parameters regarding the fuel behaviour during irradiation and (long-term) interim storage, such as internal pressure of the fuel rod and fuel swelling. Moreover the content of Kr and Xe in the plenum of a fuel rod and their content in the UO{sub 2} fuel itself are widely used as indicators for the release properties of {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, and other safety relevant radionuclides with respect to final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The present study deals with the fission gas release from spent nuclear fuel exposed to simulated groundwater in comparison with the fission gas previously released to the fuel rod plenum during irradiation in reactor. In a unique approach we determined both the Kr and Xe inventories in the plenum by means of a puncturing test and in leaching experiments with a cladded fuel pellet and fuel fragments in bicarbonate water under 3.2 bar H{sub 2} overpressure. The fractional inventory of the fission gases released during irradiation into the plenum was (8.3 ± 0.9) %. The fraction of inventory of fission gases released during the leaching experiments was (17 ± 2) % after 333 days of leaching of the cladded pellet and (25 ± 2) % after 447 days of leaching of the fuel fragments, respectively. The relatively high release of fission gases in the experiment with fuel fragments was caused by the increased accessibility of water to the Kr and Xe occluded in the fuel.

  10. Experiments on graphite block gaps connected with leak flow in bottom-core structure of experimental very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Takizuka, Takakazu; Kaburaki, Hideo; Sanokawa, Konomo

    1984-01-01

    In order to minimize the leak flow rate of an experimental VHTR (a multi-purpose very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor), the graphite blocks are tightened to reduce the gap distance between blocks by core restrainers surrounded outside of the fixed reflectors of the bottom-core structure and seal elements are placed in the gaps. By using a 1/2.75-scale model of the bottom-core structure, the experiments on the following items have been carried out: a relationship between core restraint force and block gap, a relationship between core restraint force and inclined angle of the model, leak flow characteristics of seal elements etc. The conclusions derived from the experiments are as follows: (1) Core restraint force is significantly effective for decreasing the gap distance between hot plenum blocks, but ineffective for the gap between hot plenum block and fixed reflector. (2) Graphite seal element reduces the leak flow rate from the top surface of hot plenum block into plenum region to one-third. (author)

  11. TMI-2 reactor vessel plenum final lift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    Removal of the plenum assembly from the TMI-2 reactor vessel was necessary to gain access to the core region for defueling. The plenum was lifted from the reactor vessel by the polar crane using three specially designed pendant assemblies. It was then transferred in air to the flooded deep end of the refueling canal and lowered onto a storage stand where it will remain throughout the defueling effort. The lift and transfer were successfully accomplished on May 15, 1985 in just under three hours by a lift team located in a shielded area within the reactor building. The success of the program is attributed to extensive mockup and training activities plus thorough preparations to address potential problems. 54 refs

  12. Influence of graphite discs, chamfers, and plenums on temperature distributions in high burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranger, A.; Tayal, M.; Singh, P.

    1990-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the desirability to increase the fuel burnups in CANDU reactors from 7-9 GW.d/t to 21 GW.d/t. At high burnups, one consideration in fuel integrity is fission gas pressure, which is predicted to reach about 13 MPa. The gas pressure can be kept below the coolant pressure (about 10 MPa) via a variety of options such as bigger chamfers, deeper dishes, central hole, and plenums. However, it is important to address the temperature perturbations produced by the bigger chamfers and plenums which in turn, affect the gas pressure. Another consideration in fuel integrity is to reduce the likelihood of fuel failures via environmentally assisted cracking. Insertion of graphite discs between neighbouring pellets will lower the pellet temperatures, hence, lower fission gas release and lower expansion of the pellet. Therefore, it is desired to quantify the effect of graphite discs on pellet temperatures. Thermal analyses of different fuel element geometries: with and without chamfers, graphite discs, and plenums were performed. The results indicate that the two-dimensional distributions of temperatures due to the presence of chamfers, graphite discs, or plenums can have a significant impact on the integrity of high burnup fuel as we have been able to quantify in this paper

  13. Flow distribution in the inlet plenum of steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadamakar, H.P.; Patwardhan, A.W.; Padmakumar, G.; Vaidyanathan, G.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Various flow distribution devices have been studied to make the flow distribution uniform in axial as well as tangential direction. → Experiments were performed using Ultrasonic Velocity Profiler (UVP) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). → CFD modeling has been carried out to give more insights. → Various flow distribution devices have been compared. - Abstract: The flow distribution in a 1/5th and 1/8th scale models of inlet plenum of steam generator (SG) has been studied by a combination of experiments and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. The distribution of liquid sodium in the inlet plenum of the SG strongly affects the thermal as well as mechanical performance of the steam generator. Various flow distribution devices have been used to make the flow distribution uniform in axial as well as tangential direction in the window region. Experiments have been conducted to measure the radial velocity distribution using Ultrasonic Velocity Profiler (UVP) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) under a variety of conditions. CFD modeling has been carried out for various configurations to give more insight into the flow distribution phenomena. The various flow distribution devices have been compared on the basis of a non-uniformity index parameter.

  14. Review of ORNL-TSF shielding experiments for the gas-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, L.S.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Muckenthaler, F.J.; Slater, C.O.

    1982-01-01

    During the period between 1975 and 1980 a series of experiments was performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility in support of the shield design for a 300-MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Demonstration Plant. This report reviews the experiments and calculations, which included studies of: (1) neutron streaming in the helium coolant passageways in the GCFR core; (2) the effectiveness of the shield designed to protect the reactor grid plate from radiation damage; (3) the adequacy of the radial shield in protecting the PCRV (prestressed concrete reactor vessel) from radiation damage; (4) neutron streaming between abutting sections of the radial shield; and (5) the effectiveness of the exit shield in reducing the neutron fluxes in the upper plenum region of the reactor

  15. Gratiae plenum: Latin, Greek and the Cominform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Movrin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The survival of classics in the People’s Republic of Slovenia after World War II was dominated by the long shadow of the Coryphaeus of the Sciences, Joseph Stalin. Since 1945, the profile of the discipline was determined by the Communist Party, which followed the Soviet example, well-nigh destroying the classical education in the process. Fran Bradač, head of Classics at the University of Ljubljana, was removed for political reasons; the classical gymnasium belonging to the Church was closed down; Greek was struck from the curriculum of the two remaining state classical gymnasia; Latin, previously a central subject at every gymnasium, was severely reduced in 1945, only to disappear entirely in 1946. The classicists who continued to teach were forced to take ‘reorientation courses’ which enabled them to teach Russian and other more suitable subjects. By 1949, only two out of the 42 classicists employed by the Ministry of Education were actually teaching Latin. The Classics department at the university, where only two students were studying in 1949, was on the brink of closure.  Paradoxically, the classical tradition was saved by Stalin’s attack on the same Party. The Cominform conflict in 1948 astonished the Yugoslav communists and pushed them towards a tactical détente with the West, prompting a revision of some of their policies, including education. The process was led by the top echelons of the Party — such as Milovan Djilas, head of the central Agitprop, Boris Kidrič, in charge of Yugoslav economy, and Edvard Kardelj, the Party’s chief ideologue — during the Third Plenum of the Central Committee Politburo in Belgrade in December 1949. Their newly discovered love of Latin and Greek, documented in the minutes of the Politburo Plenum, was overseen only by the discriminating eye of Josip Broz Tito. Classical gymnasia were revived, Latin was reintroduced to some of the other gymnasia, students returned to study classics at the

  16. A CFD Study on Inlet Plenum Flow Field of Pebble Bed Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Hwan; Lee, Won Jae; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2005-01-01

    High temperature gas cooled reactor, largely divided into two types of PBR (Pebble Bed Reactor) and PMR (Prismatic Modular Reactor), has becomes great interest of researchers in connection with the hydrogen production. KAERI has started a project to develop the gas cooled reactor for the hydrogen production and has been doing in-depth study for selecting the reactor type between PBR and PMR. As a part of the study, PBMR (Pebble Bed Modular Reactor) was selected as a reference PBR reactor for the CFD analysis and the flow field of its inlet plenum was simulated with computational fluid dynamics program CFX5. Due to asymmetrical arrangement of pipes to the inlet plenum, non-uniform flow distribution has been expected to occur, giving rise to non-uniform power distribution at the core. Flow fields of different arrangement of inlet pipes were also investigated, as one of measures to reduce the non-uniformity

  17. Analytical model for transient fluid mixing in upper outlet plenum of an LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.W.; Agrawal, A.K.

    1976-01-01

    A two-zone mixing model based on the lumped-parameter approach was developed for the analysis of transient thermal response in the outlet plenum of an LMFBR. The maximum penetration of core flow is used as the criterion for dividing the sodium region into two mixing zones. The model considers the transient sodium temperature affected by the thermal expansion of sodium, heat transfer with cover gas, heat capacity of different sections of metal and the addition of by-pass flow into the plenum. The results of numerical calculations indicate that effects of flow stratification, chimney height, metal heat capacity and by-pass flow are important for transient sodium temperature calculation. Thermal expansion of sodium and heat transfer with the cover gas do not play any significant role on sodium temperature

  18. Ideal Gas Laws: Experiments for General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Walter J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a series of experiments designed to verify the various relationships implicit in the ideal gas equation and shows that the success of the Graham's law effusion experiments can be explained by elementary hydrodynamics. (GS)

  19. Application of mesh free lattice Boltzmann method to the analysis of very high temperature reactor lower plenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Woon [Dongguk Univ., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Energy and Environment

    2011-11-15

    Inside a helium-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR) lower plenum, hot gas jets from upper fuel channels with very high velocities and temperatures and is mixed before flowing out. One of the major concerns is local hot spots in the plenum due to inefficient mixing of the helium exiting from differentially heated fuel channels and it involves complex fluid flow physics. For this situation, mesh-free technique, especially Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), is thus of particular interest owing to its merit of no mesh generation. As an attempt to find efficiency of the method in such a problem, 3 dimensional flow field inside a scaled test model of the VHTR lower plenum is computed with commercial XFLOW code. Large eddy simulation (LES) and classical Smagorinsky eddy viscosity (EV) turbulence models are employed to investigate the capability of the LBM in capturing large scale vortex shedding. (orig.)

  20. Experimental Measurement of Flow Phenomena in a VHTR Lower Plenum Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Keith G. Condie; Glenn E. McCreery; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2006-06-01

    The Very-High-Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is one of six reactor technologies chosen for further development by the Generation IV International Forum. In addition this system is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. In preparation for the thermal-hydraulics and safety analyses that will be required to confirm the performance of the NGNP, work has begun on readying the computational tools that will be needed to predict the thermal-hydraulics conditions and safety margins of the reactor design. Meaningful feasibility studies for VHTR designs will require accurate, reliable predictions of material temperatures which depend upon the thermal convection in the coolant channels of the core and other components. Unfortunately, one-dimensional system codes for gas-cooled reactors typically underpredict these temperatures, particularly for reduced power operations and hypothesized accident scenarios. Likewise, most turbulence models in general-purpose CFD codes also underpredict these temperatures. Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) fluid dynamics experiments have been designed and built to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of CFD solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing and turbulence models for typical VHTR plenum geometries in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties.

  1. Study on mixed convective flow penetration into subassembly from reactor hot plenum in FBRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, J.; Ohshima, H.; Kamide, H.; Ieda, Y. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Fundamental experiments using water were carried out in order to reveal the phenomenon of mixed convective flow penetration into subassemblies from a reactor`s upper plenum of fast breeder reactors. This phenomenon appears under a certain natural circulation conditions during the operation of the direct reactor auxiliary cooling system for decay heat removal and might influence the natural circulation head which determines the core flow rate and therefore affects the core coolability. In the experiment, a simplified model which simulates an upper plenum and a subassembly was used and the ultrasonic velocity profile monitor as well as thermocouples were applied for the simultaneous measurement of velocity and temperature distributions in the subassembly. From the measured data, empirical equations related to the penetration flow onset condition and the penetration depth were obtained using relevant parameters which were derived from dimensional analysis.

  2. Heavy ion source support gas mixing experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments on mixing an easily ionized support gas with the primary ion source gas have produced large beam enhancements for high charge state light ions (masses less than or equal to 20). In the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC), the beam increase has been a factor of 5 or greater, depending on ion species and charge state. Approximately 0.1 cc/min of the easily ionized support gas (argon, krypton, or xenon) is supplied to the ion source through a separate gas line and the primary gas flow is reduced by approximately 30 percent. The proposed mechanism for increased intensity is as follows: The heavier support gas ionizes readily to a higher charge state, providing increased cathode heating. The increased heating permits a reduction in primary gas flow (lower pressure) and the subsequent beam increase

  3. Determining Bond Sodium Remaining in Plenum Region of Spent Nuclear Driver Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaden, D.; Li, S.X.

    2008-01-01

    The Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) treats spent nuclear fuel using an electro-chemical process that separates the uranium from the fission products, sodium thermal bond, and cladding materials (REF 1). Upon immersion into the ER electrolyte, the sodium used to thermally bond the fuel to the clad jacket chemically reacts with the UCl3 in the electrolyte producing NaCl and uranium metal. The uranium in the spent fuel is separated from the cladding and fission products by taking advantage of the electro-chemical potential differences between uranium and the other fuel components. Assuming all the sodium in the thermal bond is converted to NaCl in the ER, the difference between the cumulative bond sodium mass in the fuel elements and the cumulative sodium mass found in the driver ER electrolyte inventory provides an upper mass limit for the sodium that migrated to the upper gas region, or plenum section, of the fuel element during irradiation in the reactor. The plenums are to be processed as metal waste via melting and metal consolidation operations. However, depending on the amount of sodium in the plenums, additional processing may be required to remove the sodium before metal waste processing

  4. Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows during Normal Operation and Pressurized Conduction Cooldown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn E McCreery; Keith G Condie

    2006-09-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. The present document addresses experimental modeling of flow and thermal mixing phenomena of importance during normal or reduced power operation and during a loss of forced reactor cooling (pressurized conduction cooldown) scenario. The objectives of the experiments are, 1), provide benchmark data for assessment and improvement of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, and, 2), obtain a better understanding of related phenomena, behavior and needs. Physical models of VHTR vessel upper and lower plenums which use various working fluids to scale phenomena of interest are described. The models may be used to both simulate natural convection conditions during pressurized conduction cooldown and turbulent lower plenum flow during normal or reduced power operation.

  5. Improved plenum pressure gradient facemaps for PKL reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley, D.A.; Hamm, L.L.

    1988-05-01

    This report documents the development of improved plenum pressure gradient facemaps* for PKL Mark 16--31 and Mark 22 reactor charges. These new maps are based on the 1985 L-area AC flow tests. Use of the L-area data base for estimating C-area plenum pressure gradient maps is inappropriate because the nozzle geometry plays a major role in determining the shape of the plenum pressure profile. These plenum pressure gradient facemaps are used in the emergency cooling system (ECS) and in the flow instability (FI) loss of coolant accident (LOCA) limits calculations. For the ECS LOCA limits calculations, the maps are used as input to the FLOWZONE computer code to determine the average flow within a flowzone during normal operating conditions. For the FI LOCA limits calculations, the maps are used as plenum pressure boundary conditions in the FLOWTRAN computer code to determine the maximum pre-incident assembly flow within a flowzone. These maps will also be used for flowzoning and transient protection limits analyses

  6. Experience with unconventional gas turbine fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, D K [ABB Power Generation Ltd., Baden (Switzerland)

    1997-12-31

    Low grade fuels such as Blast Furnace Gas, biomass, residual oil, coke, and coal - if used in conjunction with appropriate combustion, gasification, and clean-up processes and in combination with a gas turbine combined cycle -offer attractive and environmentally sound power generation. Recently, the Bao Shan Iron and Steel Company in Shanghai placed an order with Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Japan, to supply a combined-cycle power plant. The plant is to employ ABB`s GT 11N2 with a combustor modified to burn blast furnace gas. Recent tests in Shanghai and at Kawasaki Steel, Japan, have confirmed the burner design. The same basic combustor concept can also be used for the low BTU gas derived from airblown gasification processes. ABB is also participating in the API project: A refinery-residual gasification combined-cycle plant in Italy. The GT 13E2 gas turbine employees MBTU EV burners that have been successfully tested under full operating conditions. These burners can also handle the MBTU gas produced in oxygenblown coal gasification processes. ABB`s vast experience in burning blast furnace gas (21 plants built during the 1950s and 1960s), residuals, crude, and coal in various gas turbine applications is an important asset for building such power plants. This presentation discusses some of the experience gained in such plants. (orig.) 6 refs.

  7. Experience with unconventional gas turbine fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, D.K. [ABB Power Generation Ltd., Baden (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    Low grade fuels such as Blast Furnace Gas, biomass, residual oil, coke, and coal - if used in conjunction with appropriate combustion, gasification, and clean-up processes and in combination with a gas turbine combined cycle -offer attractive and environmentally sound power generation. Recently, the Bao Shan Iron and Steel Company in Shanghai placed an order with Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Japan, to supply a combined-cycle power plant. The plant is to employ ABB`s GT 11N2 with a combustor modified to burn blast furnace gas. Recent tests in Shanghai and at Kawasaki Steel, Japan, have confirmed the burner design. The same basic combustor concept can also be used for the low BTU gas derived from airblown gasification processes. ABB is also participating in the API project: A refinery-residual gasification combined-cycle plant in Italy. The GT 13E2 gas turbine employees MBTU EV burners that have been successfully tested under full operating conditions. These burners can also handle the MBTU gas produced in oxygenblown coal gasification processes. ABB`s vast experience in burning blast furnace gas (21 plants built during the 1950s and 1960s), residuals, crude, and coal in various gas turbine applications is an important asset for building such power plants. This presentation discusses some of the experience gained in such plants. (orig.) 6 refs.

  8. Development of whole core thermal-hydraulic analysis program ACT. 4. Incorporation of three-dimensional upper plenum model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2003-03-01

    The thermal-hydraulic analysis computer program ACT is under development for the evaluation of detailed flow and temperature fields in a core region of fast breeder reactors under various operation conditions. The purpose of this program development is to contribute not only to clarifying thermal hydraulic characteristics that cannot be revealed by experiments due to measurement difficulty but also to performing rational safety design and assessment. This report describes the incorporation of a three-dimensional upper plenum model to ACT and its verification study as part of the program development. To treat the influence of three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic behavior in a upper plenum on the in-core temperature field, the multi-dimensional general purpose thermal-hydraulic analysis program AQUA, which was developed and validated at JNC, was applied as the base of the upper plenum analysis module of ACT. AQUA enables to model the upper plenum configuration including immersed heat exchangers of the direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS). In coupling core analysis module that consists of the fuel-assembly and the inter-wrapper gap calculation parts with the upper plenum module, different types of computation mesh systems were jointed using the staggered quarter assembly mesh scheme. A coupling algorithm among core, upper plenum and heat transport system modules, which can keep mass, momentum and energy conservation, was developed and optimized in consideration of parallel computing. ACT was applied to analyzing a sodium experiment (PLANDTL-DHX) performed at JNC, which simulated the natural circulation decay heat removal under DRACS operation conditions for the program verification. From the calculation result, the validity of the improved program was confirmed. (author)

  9. Numerical investigation of flow characteristics in a prototypical lower plenum of a prismatic VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, Alice; Narula, Manmeet; Abdou, Mohamed; Tsai, Peter; Ando, Yuya

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to obtain insights into the flow behavior, as well as to develop predictive capability with regards to the flow and thermal mixing, that occurs in the lower plenum of a typical prismatic VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) concept. In this paper, numerical modeling has been used to capture qualitative phenomena observed during an experiment performed at INL, using a finite volume, thermo-fluid solver system, 'SC/Tetra' from CRADLE. The choice of the correct turbulence model is critical to accurately predict the flow in the VHTR lower plenum. Four different turbulence models have been used in this study and the flow predictions are significantly different. A trail of marker particles and fluid temperature as a passive scalar have been used to qualitatively study the flow characteristics, specifically the turbulent mixing of water jets. The quantitative experimental data, when available, will be used to compare and improve on the available turbulence models. Preliminary numerical modeling has been carried out to address the issue of hot streaking and buoyancy effects of hot helium jets in the lower plenum. (author)

  10. Hydraulics in the RPV lower-plenum of EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barois, G.; Goreaud, N.; Nicaise, N.

    2001-01-01

    The in-core instrumentation penetrations of the European Pressurised water Reactor (EPR) have been removed from RPV-bottom to RPV-head, leaving empty the lower plenum of the RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel). In a lower plenum with no internal structure, huge vortices may appear, with negative consequences, such as high disturbance of the core inlet flow distribution, and high increase of the RPV pressure loss. FRAMATOME ANP developed a specific Flow Distribution Device (FDD), annular shaped, located in the RPV lower plenum below the core support plate, which prevents huge vortices from appearing and guarantees a satisfying flow distribution at core inlet in normal operating conditions. The design of the FDD has been optimised with a numerical approach, using the 3-D CFD-code STAR-CD, previously qualified on scale mockup tests. The model developed represents the EPR RPV from the cold leg to core inlet. Thus, the flow distribution at core inlet, the mixing between loop-flows upstream core inlet and the pressure loss in the lower plenum can be evaluated. The optimised FDD provides satisfying performances for all these relevant functional items. (author)

  11. CFD predictions of standby liquid control system mixing in lower plenum of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, Christopher; Skarda, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Computational fluid dynamics analysis of BWR lower plenum. • Mixing and stratification of the standby liquid control system injection. • Scoping study highlights the expected flow paths and limitations of experiments. - Abstract: During an anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) scenario in certain boiling water reactor (BWR) systems, a standby liquid control system (SLCS) is used to inject a sodium pentaborate solution into the reactor system in order to quickly shut down (scram) the reactor without the use of the control rods. Some BWR designs utilize a SLCS that injects through a set of nozzles on a vertical pipe in the peripheral region of the lower plenum of the reactor vessel. During the scenario, system water levels are reduced and natural circulation flow rates down through the jet pump nozzles and up into the core are a small fraction of the rated system flow. It is during this period that the SLCS flows are considered. This work outlines some initial scoping studies completed by the staff at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). An attempt at benchmarking the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach using a set of available test data from a small facility is outlined. Due to our lack of information related to specific details of the facility geometry along with the limited data available from the test, the benchmark exercise produced only a qualitative basis for selecting turbulence models and mesh density. A CFD model simulating a full-scale reactor system is developed for the lower plenum of a representative BWR/4 design and SLCS flows and mixing are studied under a range of flow conditions. The full-scale BWR simulation builds upon the lessons learned from the benchmark exercise. One challenge for this work is the large size of the domain and the relatively small size of the geometric details such as flow passages and gaps. The geometry is simplified to make meshing feasible by eliminating some of the small features. The

  12. Analysis of transient thermal response in the outlet plenum of an LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.W.

    1976-05-01

    A two-zone mixing model based on the lumped-parameter approach was developed for the analysis of transient thermal response in the upper outlet plenum of an LMFBR. The one-dimensional turbulent jet flow equations were solved to determine the maximum penetration of the core flow. The maximum penetration is used as the criterion for dividing the sodium region into two mixing zones. The lumped-parameter model considers the transient sodium temperature affected by the thermal expansion of sodium, heat transfer with cover gas, heat capacity of different sections of metal and the addition of bypass flow into the plenum. Numerical calculations were performed for two cases. The first case corresponds to a normal scram followed by flow coast-down. The second case represents the double-ended pipe rupture at the inlet of cold leg followed by reactor scram. The results indicate that effects of flow stratification, chimney height, metal heat capacity and bypass flow are important for transient sodium temperature calculation. Thermal expansion of sodium and heat transfer with the cover gas does not play any significant role on sodium temperature. This two-zone mixing model will be a part of the thermohydraulic transient code SSC

  13. Development of thermal mixing enhancement method for lower plenum of the High Temperature Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gradecka, Malwina Joanna, E-mail: malgrad@gmail.com; Woods, Brian G., E-mail: brian.woods@oregonstate.edu

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Coolant mixing in lower plenum might be insufficient and pose operational issues. • Two mixing methods were developed to lower the coolant temperature variation. • The methods resulted with reduction of the temperature variation by 60% and 71%. - Abstract: The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is one of the most mature Gen IV reactor concepts under development today. The High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) at Oregon State University is a test facility that supports the R&D needs for HTGRs. This study focuses on the issue of helium mixing after the core section in the HTTF, the results of which are generally applicable in HTGRs. In the HTTF, hot helium jets at different temperatures are supposed to uniformly mix in the lower plenum (LP) chamber. However, the level of mixing is not sufficient to reduce the peak helium temperature before the hot jet impinges the LP structure, which can cause issues with structural materials and operational issues in the heat exchanger downstream. The maximum allowable temperature variation in the outlet duct connected to the lower plenum is defined as 40 K (±20 K from the average temperature), while the CFD simulations of this study indicate that the reference design suffers temperature variations in the duct as high as 100 K. To solve this issue, the installation of mixing-enhancing structures within the outlet duct were proposed and analyzed using CFD modeling. We show that using either an optimized “Kwiat” structure (developed in this study) or a motionless mixer installed in the outlet duct, the temperature variations can be brought dramatically, with acceptable increases in pressure drop. The optimal solution appears to be to install double motionless mixers with long blades in the outlet duct, which brings the temperature variation into the acceptable range (from 100 K down to 18 K), with a resulting pressure drop increase in the HTTF loop of 0.73 kPa (6% of total pressure drop).

  14. Development of thermal mixing enhancement method for lower plenum of the High Temperature Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradecka, Malwina Joanna; Woods, Brian G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Coolant mixing in lower plenum might be insufficient and pose operational issues. • Two mixing methods were developed to lower the coolant temperature variation. • The methods resulted with reduction of the temperature variation by 60% and 71%. - Abstract: The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is one of the most mature Gen IV reactor concepts under development today. The High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) at Oregon State University is a test facility that supports the R&D needs for HTGRs. This study focuses on the issue of helium mixing after the core section in the HTTF, the results of which are generally applicable in HTGRs. In the HTTF, hot helium jets at different temperatures are supposed to uniformly mix in the lower plenum (LP) chamber. However, the level of mixing is not sufficient to reduce the peak helium temperature before the hot jet impinges the LP structure, which can cause issues with structural materials and operational issues in the heat exchanger downstream. The maximum allowable temperature variation in the outlet duct connected to the lower plenum is defined as 40 K (±20 K from the average temperature), while the CFD simulations of this study indicate that the reference design suffers temperature variations in the duct as high as 100 K. To solve this issue, the installation of mixing-enhancing structures within the outlet duct were proposed and analyzed using CFD modeling. We show that using either an optimized “Kwiat” structure (developed in this study) or a motionless mixer installed in the outlet duct, the temperature variations can be brought dramatically, with acceptable increases in pressure drop. The optimal solution appears to be to install double motionless mixers with long blades in the outlet duct, which brings the temperature variation into the acceptable range (from 100 K down to 18 K), with a resulting pressure drop increase in the HTTF loop of 0.73 kPa (6% of total pressure drop).

  15. Modeling study of deposition locations in the 291-Z plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, L.A.; Glissmeyer, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    The TEMPEST (Trent and Eyler 1991) and PART5 computer codes were used to predict the probable locations of particle deposition in the suction-side plenum of the 291-Z building in the 200 Area of the Hanford Site, the exhaust fan building for the 234-5Z, 236-Z, and 232-Z buildings in the 200 Area of the Hanford Site. The Tempest code provided velocity fields for the airflow through the plenum. These velocity fields were then used with TEMPEST to provide modeling of near-floor particle concentrations without particle sticking (100% resuspension). The same velocity fields were also used with PART5 to provide modeling of particle deposition with sticking (0% resuspension). Some of the parameters whose importance was tested were particle size, point of injection and exhaust fan configuration

  16. Sounding experiments of high pressure gas discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biele, Joachim K.

    1998-01-01

    A high pressure discharge experiment (200 MPa, 5·10 21 molecules/cm 3 , 3000 K) has been set up to study electrically induced shock waves. The apparatus consists of the combustion chamber (4.2 cm 3 ) to produce high pressure gas by burning solid propellant grains to fill the electrical pump chamber (2.5 cm 3 ) containing an insulated coaxial electrode. Electrical pump energy up to 7.8 kJ at 10 kV, which is roughly three times of the gas energy in the pump chamber, was delivered by a capacitor bank. From the current-voltage relationship the discharge develops at rapidly decreasing voltage. Pressure at the combustion chamber indicating significant underpressure as well as overpressure peaks is followed by an increase of static pressure level. These data are not yet completely understood. However, Lorentz forces are believed to generate pinching with subsequent pinch heating, resulting in fast pressure variations to be propagated as rarefaction and shock waves, respectively. Utilizing pure axisymmetric electrode initiation rather than often used exploding wire technology in the pump chamber, repeatable experiments were achieved

  17. Molten material relocation into the lower plenum: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This report, prepared by the task group 'Degraded Core Cooling' (DCC) for the CSNI, summarizes the experimental and theoretical knowledge of molten material relocation from a degraded core to the lower plenum of the reactor vessel under the main severe accident scenarios envisaged for both PWRs and BWRs, and boundary conditions. Consequences of movement of material to the lower head are considered with respect to the potential for reactor pressure vessel failure. The following models are reviewed: SCDAP/RELAP5, ICARE/CATHARE, ATHLET-CD/KESS, MELCOR, MAAP4, ESCADRE, etc.

  18. Gas puff modulation experiments in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, J.C.M. de; Devynck, P.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Garbet, X.; Gil, C.; Harris, G.; Laviron, C.; Martin, G.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments with a modulation of the gas puff have been done in Tore Supra with the aim to investigate the transport of particles and heat. The target plasma is ohmically heated, sawtoothing with frequencies between 12 and 20 Hz, deuterium for both the plasma and the injection, and with various densities, rising in a series of shots. Both the diffusion coefficient and the pinch velocity for the particle transport were determined using an harmonic modulation. The method gives reasonable results, even for small perturbations, and the obtained values are able to reproduce the stationary values. The heat flow carried by electrons also shows a modulation. The part of the modulation which is not caused by the density can in principle be used to discriminate diffusive and convective terms in the heat flux. An ion temperature profile calculated with empirically determined value of heat diffusivity reproduces the slow evolution of the total kinetic energy. 6 figs., 7 refs

  19. A "Greenhouse Gas" Experiment for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Elaine; Paul, Melissa; Como, Charles; Barat, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This experiment and analysis offer an effective experience in greenhouse gas reduction. Ammoniated water is flowed counter-current to a simulated flue gas of air and CO2 in a packed column. The gaseous CO2 concentrations are measured with an on-line, non- dispersive, infrared analyzer. Column operating parameters include total gas flux, dissolved…

  20. Melt jet fragmentation and oxidation in the lower plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthoud, G.

    2001-01-01

    During the late phases of a PWR Severe Accident, the core materials discharge into the lower plenum in which water is still present. In that case, we are then concerned by the possible occurrence of a Steam Explosion which may endanger the vessel structure and by the following cooling of the melt debris. So, we have two possible ways of vessel rupture: a mechanical one following an energetic Steam Explosion and a thermal one due to insufficient debris cooling. Both types of problems are linked with the degree of fragmentation of the core material during its penetration into the water of the lower plenum. One of the most likely mode of discharge consists in corium streams or jets. The fragmentation will build a corium-water mixture (the pre-mixing sequence) which, under certain circumstances, may undergo a fine fragmentation sequence leading to an energetic Steam Explosion (the explosion sequence). Whatever the occurrence of a Steam Explosion, the resulting debris will accumulate at the bottom of the Reactor Vessel and the cooling of such a ''debris bed'' is known to be highly dependant of the granulometry and build up of the debris bed which are linked with the previous sequence of corium fragmentation and dispersion. In CEA, the MC3D Code has been developed to deal with all these phenomena. (author)

  1. Ben Macdhui High Altitude Trace Gas and Aerosol Transport Experiment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Piketh, SJ

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ben Macdhui High Altitude Aerosol and Trace Gas Transport Experiment (BHATTEX) was started to characterize the nature and magnitude of atmospheric, aerosol and trace gas transport paths recirculation over and exiting from southern Africa...

  2. Numerical study of hot-leg ECC injection into the upper plenum of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, B.J.; Torrey, M.D.; Rivard, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    In certain pressurized water reactor (PWR) designs, emergency core coolant (ECC) is injected through the hot legs into the upper plenum. The condensation of steam on this subcooled liquid stream reduces the pressure in the hot legs and upper plenum and thereby affects flow conditions throughout the reactor. In the present study, we examine countercurrent steam-water flow in the hot leg to determine the deceleration of the ECC flow that results from an adverse pressure gradient and from momentum exchange from the steam by interfacial drag and condensation. For the parameters examined in the study, water flow reversal is observed for a pressure drop of 22 to 32 mBar over the 1.5 m hot leg. We have also performed a three-dimensional study of subcooled water injection into air and steam environments of the upper plenum. The ECC water is deflected by an array of cylindrical guide tubes in its passage through the upper plenum. Comparisons of the air-water results with data obtained in a full scale experiment shows reasonable agreement, but indicates that there may be too much resistance to horizontal flow about the columns because of the use of a stair-step representation of the cylindrical guide tube cross section. Calculations of flow past single columns of stair-step, square and circular cross section do indicate excessive water deeentrainment by the noncircular column. This has prompted the use of an arbitrary mesh computational procedure to more accuratey represent the circular cross-section guide tubes. 15 figures

  3. Mitigation of thermal transients by tube bundle inlet plenum design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oras, J.J.; Kasza, K.E.

    1984-06-01

    A multiphase program aimed at investigating the importance of thermal buoyancy to LMFBR steam-generator and heat-exchanger thermal hydraulics under low-flow transient conditions is being conducted in the Argonne Mixing Components Test Facility (MCTF) on a 60 0 sector shell-side flow model of the Westinghouse straight-tube steam generator being developed under the US/DOE large-component development program. A series of shell-side constant-flow thermal-downramp transient tests have been conducted focusing on the phenomenon of thermal-buoyancy-induced-flow channeling. In addition, it was discovered that a shell-inlet flow-distribution plenum can play a significant role in mitigating the severity of a thermal transient entering a steam generator or heat exchanger

  4. Fracture mechanics evaluation of LOFT lower plenum injection nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, P.K.; Reuter, W.G.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis to establish whether or not a leak-before-break concept would apply to the LOFT lower plenum injection nozzle is described. The analysis encompassed the structure from the inlet side of valve V-2170 to the lower plenum nozzle-to-reactor vessel weld on the left side of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS). The defect that was assumed to exist was of such a size that the probability of its being missed by the applicable inspection technique was near zero. The Inconel 600 nozzle forging with an initial assumed defect size of 0.64 cm (0.25 in.) deep would behave as follows: (1) the axially oriented defect would result in leak before rupture (the number of cycles to rupture was 11,000), (2) the circumferentially oriented defect would result in a rupture before leak. The number of cycles to failure would be in excess of 14,000. Based on the conservative assumption that the thermal stresses were membrane stresses as opposed to a bending stress, the following were found. For the Inconel 82 weld metal (thickness of 1.3 cm [0.53 in.]) and AISI 316 SST valve body, with an initial assumed defect of 0.25 cm (0.1 in.), the crack would grow through the thickness in a minimum of 3950 cycles and to a critical rupture crack length of 5.1 cm (2.0 in.) in an additional 80 cycles. The Inconel 82 weld metal at the shell body (thickness of 9.7 cm or 3.8 in.) with an assumed defect 1.3 cm (0.5 in.) deep would fail in 334 cycles. Calculations made assuming a linear stress gradient instead of the above-mentioned flat distribution through the wall indicated that the number of stress cycles increased to 2200

  5. The Spanish experience - future developments in the gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraleda, P.

    1996-01-01

    Spanish experience is presented concerned it may be useful at the time of setting up a natural gas industry. The Spanish natural gas industry is of recent creation. Developing infrastructure and securing gas supplies have been major challenges. Challenges which, are also common for majority of the countries. The presentation is split into two blocks: the first one is on our experience in the establishment and consolidation of the market for natural gas in Spain. The second block deals with future developments aiming to strengthen the security of supply; and with the opportunities and threats the gas industry will face

  6. Large Eddy Simulation of Fluid flow and Heat Transfer in the Upper Plenum of Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seokki; Lee, Taeho; Kim, Dongeun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sungho [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The important parameters in the thermal striping are the frequency and the amplitude of the temperature fluctuation. Since the sodium used as coolant in the PGSFR has a high thermal conductivity, the temperature fluctuation can be easily transferred to the solid walls of the components in the upper plenum. To remedy these problems, numerical studies are performed in the present study to analyze the thermal striping for possible improvement of the design and safety of the reactor. For the numerical works, Chacko et al. performed LES for the experiment by Nam and Kim, and found that the LES can produce the oscillation of temperature fluctuation properly, while the realizable k - ε model predicts the amplitude and frequency of the temperature fluctuation very poorly indicating that the LES method is an appropriate calculation method for the thermal striping. In this paper, the simulation of thermal striping in the upper plenum of PGSFR is performed using the LES method. The WALE eddy viscosity model by Nicoud and Ducros built in CFX-13 commercial code is employed for the LES eddy viscosity model. The numerical investigation of the thermal striping is performed with the LES method using the CFX-13 commercial code, where the solution domain is the upper plenum of the PGSFR. As the first step, dozens of monitoring points are set to locations that are anticipated to cause thermal striping. Then, the temperature fluctuations were calculated along with the time-averaged variables such as the velocity and temperature. From these results we have obtained the following conclusions. At the side wall of IHX, a slight fluctuation is observed, but it seems that there is no risk of thermal striping. The flows from the reactor core are not mixed when reaching the UIS. So both the first and second plates need to be considered. Among the first grid plate regions, the shape region is the weakest region for thermal striping. The second weakest region for thermal striping is the shape

  7. Two-phase flow in the upper plenum of a boiling water nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinoco, Hernan

    2003-01-01

    The end part of the Emergency Core Spray System (ECSS) of the Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) at Forsmark Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is situated in the Upper Plenum. It consists of a pipe network equipped with water injection nozzles. In case of Lost-of-Coolant Accidents (LOCAs), the ECSS should maintain the core covered by water and, at the same time, rapidly cool and decompress the reactor by means of cold water injection. In similar reactors, some welds belonging to the ECSS support have, after a period of time, shown crack indications. Inspection, repair or replacement of these welds is time consuming and expensive. For this reason, it has now been decided to permanently remove the end part of the ECSS and to replace it by water injection in the Downcomer. However, this removal should not be accompanied by undesirable effects like an increase in the moisture of the steam used for operating the turbines. To investigate the effect of this removal on the steam moisture, a CFD analysis of the two-phase flow in the Upper Plenum of Unit 3, with and without ECSS, has been carried out by means of a two-phase Euler model in FLUENT 6.0. The inlet conditions are given by an analysis of the core kinetics and thermal hydraulics by mean of the POLCA-code. The outlet conditions, i. e. the steam separator pressure drops, are given by empirical correlations from the experiments carried out at the SNORRE facility. The predicted the mass flow-rates to each separator, together with empirical correlations for the moisture content of the steam leaving the separators and the steam dryer, indicate a slight decrease in the steam moisture when the ECSS is removed. Also, a minor decrease in pressure losses over the Upper Plenum is achieved with this removal. On the other hand, rounding the sharp edges of the inlet openings to the steam separators at the shroud cover may give a large reduction in pressure losses

  8. Cover gas purification experience at KNK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, H; Stade, K Ch [Kernkraftwerk-Betriebsgesellschaft m.b.H., Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Stamm, H H [Institute of Radiochemistry, Nuclear Research Center, Karsruhe (Germany)

    1987-07-01

    KNK II is an experimental, sodium cooled fast breeder reactor. The reactor was operated until 1974 with a thermal core (KNK I). The plant was converted into a fast breeder reactor (KNK II) from 1974 to 1977. The commissioning of KNK II was started in October 1977 with the first fast core KNK 11/1. After 400 effective full power days (EFPD) the reactor was shut down in August 1982. After replacing the complete core by the second fast core KNK 11/2, the plant went into operation again in August 1983. In August 1986 nearly 400 EFPD were achieved with the second fast core. Argon is used as cover gas in the primary and secondary sodium systems of KNK. In former times fresh argon was supplied by a bundle of gas cylinders. Later on a liquid argon supply was installed. Purification of cover gas is done by flushing only. During KNK I operation no fuel failures occurred. The primary cover gas activity was characterized by the formation of Ar-41, only small quantities of fission gas were measured, released from 'tramp uranium'. Therefore, no problems existed during KNK I operation with regard to radioactive gas disposal. However, after start-up of KNK II, several fuel elements failed. Until August 1986, five fuel failures were observed, two in KNK 11/1, and three in KNK 11/2. Sometimes, operation with defective fuel pins caused problems when fission gases leaked into the containment atmosphere, and the access had to be restricted. The purging rate of the primary cover gas was limited by the capacity of the charcoal filters in the delay line. Of all non-radioactive impurities, hydrogen (H{sub z}) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) were of most importance in the primary cover gas. Main source of both impurities was the ingress of air and atmospheric moisture during handling operations in shutdown periods. An other possible source for hydrogen might be a release from the steel-clad zirconium hydride, used as moderator in the moderated driver fuel elements. Additional nitrogen may diffuse

  9. TFTR neutral beam D-T gas injection system operational experiences of the first two years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldaker, M.E.; Lawson, J.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; Kamperschroer, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    The TFTR Neutral Beam Tritium Gas Injection System (TGIS) has successfully performed tritium operations since December 1993. TGIS operation has been reliable, with no leaks to the secondary containment to date. Notable operational problems include throughput leaks on fill, exit and piezoelectric valves. Repair of a TGIS requires replacement of the assembly, involving TFTR downtime and extensive purging, since the TGIS assembly is highly contaminated with residual tritium, and is located within secondary containment. Modifications to improve reliability and operating range include adjustable reverse bias voltage to the piezoelectric valves, timing and error calculation changes to tune the PLC and hardwired timing control, and exercising piezoelectric valves without actually pulsing gas prior to use after extended inactivity. A pressure sensor failure required the development of an open loop piezoelectric valve drive control scheme, using a simple voltage ramp to partially compensate for declining plenum pressure. Replacement of TGIS's have been performed, maintaining twelve system tritium capability as part of scheduled project maintenance activity

  10. Study on in-vessel thermohydraulics phenomena of sodium-cooled fast reactors. 3. Numerical investigation for thermal stratification phenomena in the upper plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2002-06-01

    A large-scale sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor in the feasibility studies on commercialized fast reactors has a feature of consideration of thorough simplified and compacted systems and components design to realize drastic economical improvements. Therefore, special attentions should be paid to thermohydraulic designs for gas entrainment behavior from free surface, flow-induced vibration of in-vessel components, thermal stratification in the plenum, thermal shock for various structures due to high-speed coolant flows, nonsymmetrical coolant flows, etc. in the reactor vessel. In-vessel thermohydraulic analyses were carried out using a multi-dimensional code AQUA to understand the thermal stratification characteristics in the upper plenum, and to investigate trade-off relations between gas entrainment and thermal stratification phenomena on in-vessel structures for the elimination of gas entrainment possibility. From the analysis, the following results were obtained. (1) Dummy plug insertion to a slit of the upper core structure is one of the effective measures to stabilize the in-vessel flow patterns and to mitigate in-vessel thermal shocks. (2) Though flow guide device such as a baffle ring attached to reactor vessel wall is an effective measure to eliminate impinging jet to dipped plate, rising characteristics of the thermal stratification interface are affected by the baffle ring devise. (3) Thermal stratification characteristics are not influenced very much by the installation of a partial inner barrel to the dipped plate, which is an effective measure to reduce the horizontal flow velocity components at free surface. (4) Labyrinth structures to the gap between the reactor vessel wall and the outer dipped plate have direct effects upon in-vessel thermal shock characteristics including thermal stratification phenomena due to the closing of flow path between the upper plenum and the free surface plenum. (author)

  11. Experience in education and training of gas engineers in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basniev, K.; Vladimirov, A.

    1997-01-01

    Experience gained in training and retraining of engineers for gas industry is considered in the report. The report contains the material on modern state of higher technical education in Russia in view of the reforms taking place in this country. The report deals with questions concerning the experience gained in a specialized training of gas engineers at higher educational establishments of Russia including training of specialists for foreign countries. Conditions under which retraining of engineers involved in gas industry takes place are presented in the report. The report is based mainly on the experience gained by the Russian leading higher educational establishment of oil and gas profile, that is the State Gubkin Oil and Gas Academy. (au)

  12. Effects of lower plenum flow structure on core inlet flow of ABWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shun; Abe, Yutaka; Kaneko, Akiko; Watanabe, Fumitoshi; Tezuka, Kenichi

    2010-01-01

    The evaluation of coolant flow structure at a lower plenum of an advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) in which there are many structures is very important in order to improve generating power. Although the simulation results by CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes can predict such complicated flow in the lower plenum, it is required to establish the database of flow structure in lower plenum of ABWR experimentally for the benchmark of the CFD codes. In the model of the lower plenum, we measured velocity profiles with LDV and PIV. And differential pressure of constructed model is measured with differential pressure instrument. It was identified that the velocity and differential pressure profiles also showed the tendency to be flat in the core inlet. Moreover, vortexes were observed around side entry orifice by PIV measurement. (author)

  13. Intake plenum volume and its influence on the engine performance, cyclic variability and emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceviz, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Intake manifold connects the intake system to the intake valve of the engine and through which air or air-fuel mixture is drawn into the cylinder. Details of the flow in intake manifolds are extremely complex. Recently, most of engine companies are focused on variable intake manifold technology due to their improvement on engine performance. This paper investigates the effects of intake plenum volume variation on engine performance and emissions to constitute a base study for variable intake plenum. Brake and indicated engine performance characteristics, coefficient of variation in indicated mean effective pressure (COV imep ) as an indicator for cyclic variability, pulsating flow pressure in the intake manifold runner, and CO, CO 2 and HC emissions were taken into consideration to evaluate the effects of different plenum volumes. The results of this study showed that the variation in the plenum volume causes an improvement on the engine performance and the pollutant emissions. The brake torque and related performance characteristics improved pronouncedly about between 1700 and 2600 rpm by increasing plenum volume. Additionally, although the increase in the plenum volume caused the mixture leaner due to the increase in the intake runner pressure and lean mixtures inclined to increase the cyclic variability, a decrease was interestingly observed in the COV imep

  14. Modeling of modification experiments involving neutral-gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    Many experiments involve the injection of neutral gases into the upper atmosphere. Examples are critical velocity experiments, MHD wave generation, ionospheric hole production, plasma striation formation, and ion tracing. Many of these experiments are discussed in other sessions of the Active Experiments Conference. This paper limits its discussion to: (1) the modeling of the neutral gas dynamics after injection, (2) subsequent formation of ionosphere holes, and (3) use of such holes as experimental tools

  15. Gas box control system for Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, H.H. Jr.; Hunt, A.L.; Clower, C.A. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) uses several methods to feed gas (usually deuterium) at different energies into the plasma region of the machine. One is an arrangement of eight high-speed piezo-electric valves mounted on special manifolds (gas box) that feed cold gas directly to the plasma. This paper describes the electronic valve control and data acquisition portions of the gas box, which are controlled by a desk-top computer. Various flow profiles have been developed and stored in the control computer for ready access by the operator. The system uses two modes of operation, one that exercises and characterizes the valves and one that operates the valves with the rest of the experiment. Both the valve control signals and the pressure transducers data are recorded on the diagnostics computer so that they are available for experiment analysis

  16. Disruption mitigation experiment with massive gas injection of HT-7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Huidong; Zhang Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    Massive gas injection (MGI) is a promising method on disruption mitigation. The working principle of the fast valve for disruption mitigation was introduced. The disruption mitigation experiments by MGI on HT-7 were described. The experiment shows that the impurities radiation is improved by injecting appropriate amount of gas, and the current quench rate is slow down, so the electromagnetic load on the device is mitigated. The experiments show that the fast valve can completely satisfy the requirement of disruption mitigation on HT-7. (authors)

  17. Modeling for evaluation of debris coolability in lower plenum of reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Yu; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Nakamura, Hideo; Hirano, Masashi

    2003-01-01

    Effectiveness of debris cooling by water that fills a gap between the debris and the lower head wall was estimated through steady calculations in reactor scale. In those calculations, the maximum coolable debris depth was assessed as a function of gap width with combination of correlations for critical heat flux and turbulent natural convection of a volumetrically heated pool. The results indicated that the gap with a width of 1 to 2 mm was capable of cooling the debris under the conditions of the TMI-2 accident, and that a significantly larger gap width was needed to retain a larger amount of debris within the lower plenum. Transient models on gap growth and water penetration into the gap were developed and incorporated into CAMP code along with turbulent natural convection model developed by Yin, Nagano and Tsuji, categorized in low Reynolds number type two-equation model. The validation of the turbulent model was made with the UCLA experiment on natural convection of a volumetrically heated pool. It was confirmed that CAMP code predicted well the distribution of local heat transfer coefficients along the vessel inner surface. The gap cooling model was validated by analyzing the in-vessel debris coolability experiments at JAERI, where molten Al 2 O 3 was poured into a water-filled hemispherical vessel. The temperature history measured on the vessel outer surface was satisfactorily reproduced by CAMP code. (author)

  18. Enhancing the x-ray output of a single-wire explosion with a gas-puff based plasma opening switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Joseph T.; Ouart, Nicholas D.; Qi, Niansheng; de Grouchy, Philip W.; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Pikuz, Sergey A.; Banasek, Jacob T.; Potter, William M.; Rocco, Sophia V.; Hammer, David A.; Kusse, Bruce R.; Giuliani, John L.

    2018-02-01

    We present experiments performed on the 1 MA COBRA generator using a low density, annular, gas-puff z-pinch implosion as an opening switch to rapidly transfer a current pulse into a single metal wire on axis. This gas-puff on axial wire configuration was studied for its promise as an opening switch and as a means of enhancing the x-ray output of the wire. We demonstrate that current can be switched from the gas-puff plasma into the wire, and that the timing of the switch can be controlled by the gas-puff plenum backing pressure. X-ray detector measurements indicate that for low plenum pressure Kr or Xe shots with a copper wire, this configuration can offer a significant enhancement in the peak intensity and temporal distribution of radiation in the 1-10 keV range.

  19. High pressure gas spheres for neutron and photon experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, G.; Petrich, D.; Käppeler, F.; Kaltenbaek, J.; Leugers, B.; Reifarth, R.

    2009-09-01

    High pressure gas spheres have been designed and successfully used in several nuclear physics experiments on noble gases. The pros and cons of this solution are the simple design and the high reliability versus the fact that the density is limited to 40-60% of liquid or solid gas samples. Originally produced for neutron capture studies at keV energies, the comparably small mass of the gas spheres were an important advantage, which turned out to be of relevance for other applications as well. The construction, performance, and operation of the spheres are described and examples for their use are presented.

  20. Effects of upper plenum injection on thermo-hydrodynamic behavior under refill and reflood phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Sobajima, Makoto; Abe, Yutaka; Adachi, Hiromichi; Ohnuki, Akira; Osakabe, Masahiro

    1984-12-01

    In order to investigate the thermo-hydrodynamic behavior in core under simultaneous ECC water injection into the upper plenum and the intact cold leg during the refill and reflood phases of a PWR-LOCA, Tests S1-SH3 and S1-SH4 were performed by using Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) with the injection of saturated and 67K subcooled water into the upper plenum, respectively, under the same cold leg injection condition. The following major findings were obtained by examining these test results. (1) Although the core was cooled by the fall back water from the upper plenum into the core during the period of high injection rate into the upper plenum, the core was cooled mainly by the bottom flooding after the BOCREC (Bottom of core recovery). (2) The possible fall back flow rate estimated with a CCFL correlation rapidly decreased after the BOCREC because of the increase of steam generation rate in core. (3) Continuous fall back of subcooled water was not observed even under the condition with large upper plenum injection rate of subcooled water and with steam outflow through the lower plenum into the downcomer. The fall back was intermittently limited by the rapid increase of upward steam flow which was generated in the core due to the evaporation of the fall back water. (4) The rising of liquid level in the lower plenum was suppressed by the pressurization in core due to the evaporation of fall back water before the BOCREC and therefore the beginning of bottom reflood was delayed. Some selected data from Tests S1-SH3 and S1-SH4 are also included in this report. (author)

  1. Design of a new SI engine intake manifold with variable length plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceviz, M.A.; Akin, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of intake plenum length/volume on the performance characteristics of a spark-ignited engine with electronically controlled fuel injectors. Previous work was carried out mainly on the engine with carburetor producing a mixture desirable for combustion and dispatching the mixture to the intake manifold. The more stringent emission legislations have driven engine development towards concepts based on electronic-controlled fuel injection rather than the use of carburetors. In the engine with multipoint fuel injection system using electronically controlled fuel injectors has an intake manifold in which only the air flows and, the fuel is injected onto the intake valve. Since the intake manifolds transport mainly air, the supercharging effects of the variable length intake plenum will be different from carbureted engine. Engine tests have been carried out with the aim of constituting a base study to design a new variable length intake manifold plenum. Engine performance characteristics such as brake torque, brake power, thermal efficiency and specific fuel consumption were taken into consideration to evaluate the effects of the variation in the length of intake plenum. The results showed that the variation in the plenum length causes an improvement on the engine performance characteristics especially on the fuel consumption at high load and low engine speeds which are put forward the system using for urban roads. According to the test results, plenum length must be extended for low engine speeds and shortened as the engine speed increases. A system taking into account the results of the study was developed to adjust the intake plenum length.

  2. Experimental study on breakup and fragmentation behavior of molten material jet in complicated structure of BWR lower plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Ryusuke; Abe, Yutaka; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the state of reactor pressure vessel of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, it is important to clarify the breakup and fragmentation of molten material jet in the lower plenum of boiling water reactor (BWR) by a numerical simulation. To clarify the effects of complicated structures on the jet behavior experimentally and validate the simulation code, we conduct the visualized experiments simulating the severe accident in the BWR lower plenum. In this study, jet breakup, fragmentation and surrounding velocity profiles of the jet were observed by the backlight method and the particle image velocimetry (PIV) method. From experimental results using the backlight method, it was clarified that jet tip velocity depends on the conditions whether complicated structures exist or not and also clarified that the structures prevent the core of the jet from expanding. From measurements by the PIV method, the surrounding velocity profiles of the jet in the complicated structures were relatively larger than the condition without structure. Finally, fragment diameters measured in the present study well agree with the theory suggested by Kataoka and Ishii by changing the coefficient term. Thus, it was suggested that the fragmentation mechanism was mainly controlled by shearing stress. (author)

  3. New piezo driven gas inlet valve for fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usselmann, E.; Hemmerich, J.L.; How, J.; Holland, D.; Orchard, J.; Winkel, T.; Schargitz, U.; Pocheim, N.

    1989-01-01

    The gas inlet valves used at the JET experiment are described and their performances are discussed. A new gas-valve development suitable to replace the existing valves at JET and for future use in large fusion experiments is presented. The new valve is equipped with a piezo-electric translator and has a dosing range of 0-800 mbarls -1 for D 2 . The operating mode of the valve is fail-safe closed with a leak-rate of ≤ 10 -9 mbarls -1 . The design, the test results and throughput values in dependence of filling pressure and control voltage are presented and experiences with the prototype valve as a new gas inlet valve for the JET operation are described

  4. Experience curve for natural gas production by hydraulic fracturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Rokuhei; Greenfield, Carl; Pogue, Katie; Zwaan, Bob van der

    2017-01-01

    From 2007 to 2012 shale gas production in the US expanded at an astounding average growth rate of over 50%/yr, and thereby increased nearly tenfold over this short time period alone. Hydraulic fracturing technology, or “fracking”, as well as new directional drilling techniques, played key roles in this shale gas revolution, by allowing for extraction of natural gas from previously unviable shale resources. Although hydraulic fracturing technology had been around for decades, it only recently became commercially attractive for large-scale implementation. As the production of shale gas rapidly increased in the US over the past decade, the wellhead price of natural gas dropped substantially. In this paper we express the relationship between wellhead price and cumulative natural gas output in terms of an experience curve, and obtain a learning rate of 13% for the industry using hydraulic fracturing technology. This learning rate represents a measure for the know-how and skills accumulated thus far by the US shale gas industry. The use of experience curves for renewable energy options such as solar and wind power has allowed analysts, practitioners, and policy makers to assess potential price reductions, and underlying cost decreases, for these technologies in the future. The reasons for price reductions of hydraulic fracturing are fundamentally different from those behind renewable energy technologies – hence they cannot be directly compared – and hydraulic fracturing may soon reach, or maybe has already attained, a lower bound for further price reductions, for instance as a result of its water requirements or environmental footprint. Yet, understanding learning-by-doing phenomena as expressed by an industry-wide experience curve for shale gas production can be useful for strategic planning in the gas sector, as well as assist environmental policy design, and serve more broadly as input for projections of energy system developments. - Highlights: • Hydraulic

  5. Validation Studies for Numerical Simulations of Flow Phenomena Expected in the Lower Plenum of a Prismatic VHTR Reference Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard W. Johnson

    2005-01-01

    The final design of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) of the fourth generation of nuclear power plants (Gen IV) has not yet been established. The VHTR may be either a prismatic (block) or pebble bed type. It may be either gas-cooled or cooled with an as yet unspecified molten salt. However, a conceptual design of a gas-cooled VHTR, based on the General Atomics GT-MHR, does exist and is called the prismatic VHTR reference design, MacDonald et al [2003], General Atomics [1996]. The present validation studies are based on the prismatic VHTR reference design. In the prismatic VHTR reference design, the flow in the lower plenum will be introduced by dozens of turbulent jets issuing into a large crossflow that must negotiate dozens of cylindrical support columns as it flows toward the exit duct of the reactor vessel. The jets will not all be at the same temperature due to the radial variation of power density expected in the core. However, it is important that the coolant be well mixed when it enters the power conversion unit to ensure proper operation and long life of the power conversion machinery. Hence, it is deemed important to be able to accurately model the flow and mixing of the variable temperature coolant in the lower plenum and exit duct. Accurate flow modeling involves determining modeling strategies including the fineness of the grid needed, iterative convergence tolerance, numerical discretization method used, whether the flow is steady or unsteady, and the turbulence model and wall treatment employed. It also involves validation of the computer code and turbulence model against a series of separate and combined flow phenomena and selection of the data used for the validation. The present report describes progress made to date for the task entitled ''CFD software validation of jets in crossflow'' which was designed to investigate the issues pertaining to the validation process

  6. Partner Country Series: Gas Pricing - China's Challenges and IEA Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    China will play a positive role in the global development of gas, the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) Executive Director, Maria Van der Hoeven has said in Beijing on 11 September, 2012 when launching a new IEA report: Gas Pricing and Regulation, China’s challenges and IEA experiences. In line with its aim to meet growing energy demand while shifting away from coal, China has set an ambitious goal of doubling its use of natural gas from 2011 levels by 2015. Prospects are good for significant new supplies – both domestic and imported, conventional and unconventional – to come online in the medium-term, but notable challenges remain, particularly concerning gas pricing and the institutional and regulatory landscape. While China’s circumstances are, in many respects unique, some current issues are similar to those a number of IEA countries have faced. This report highlights some key challenges China faces in its transition to greater reliance on natural gas, then explores in detail relevant experiences from IEA countries, particularly in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and the United States as well as the European Union (EU). Preliminary suggestions about how lessons learned in other countries could be applied to China’s situation are offered as well. The aim of this report is to provide stakeholders in China with a useful reference as they consider decisions about the evolution of the gas sector in their country.

  7. Proposed retrofit of HEPA filter plenums with injection and sampling manifolds for in-place filter testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fretthold, J.K. [EG& G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The importance of testing HEPA filter exhaust plenums with consideration for As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) will require that new technology be applied to existing plenum designs. HEPA filter testing at Rocky Flats has evolved slowly due to a number of reasons. The first plenums were built in the 1950`s, preceding many standards. The plenums were large, which caused air dispersal problems. The systems were variable air flow. Access to the filters was difficult. The test methods became extremely conservative. Changes in methods were difficult to make. The acceptance of new test methods has been made in recent years with the change in plant mission and the emphasis on worker safety.

  8. Advanced divertor experiments on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffer, M.J.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Osborne, T.; Petrie, T.W.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Buchenauer, D.; Hill, D.N.; Klepper, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    The poloidal divertor is presently favored for next-step, high-power tokamaks. The DIII-D Advanced Divertor Program (ADP) aims to gain increased control over the divertor plasma and tokamak boundary conditions. This paper reports experiments done in the first phase of the ADP. The DIII-D lower divertor was modified by the addition of a toroidally symmetric, graphite-armoured, water-cooled divertor-biasing ring electrode at the entrance to a gas plenum. (In the past DIII-D operated with an open divertor.) The plenum will eventually contain a He cryogenic loop for active divertor pumping. The separatrix 'strike' position is controlled by the lower poloidal field shaping coils and can be varied smoothly from the ring electrode upper surface to the divertor floor far from the entrance aperture. External power, at up to 550 V and 8 kA separately, has been applied to the electrode to date. (author) 5 refs., 5 figs

  9. Advanced divertor experiments on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffer, M.J.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Osborne, T.; Petrie, T.W.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Buchenauer, D.; Hill, D.N.; Klepper, C.C.

    1991-04-01

    The poloidal divertor is presently favored for next-step, high-power tokamaks. The DIII-D Advanced Divertor Program (ADP) aims to gain increased control over the divertor plasma and tokamak boundary conditions. This paper reports experiments done in the first phase of the ADP. The DIII-D lower divertor was modified by the addition of a toroidally symmetric, graphite-armoured, water-cooled divertor-biasing ring electrode at the entrance to a gas plenum. The plenum will eventually contain a He cryogenic loop for active divertor pumping. The separatrix ''strike'' position is controlled by the lower poloidal field shaping coils and can be varied smoothly from the ring electrode upper surface to the divertor floor far from the entrance aperture. External power, at up to 550 V and 8 kA separately, has been applied to the electrode to date. 5 refs., 5 figs

  10. Enthalpy of Vaporization by Gas Chromatography: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Herbert R.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted to measure the enthalpy of vaporization of volatile compounds like methylene chloride, carbon tetrachloride, and others by using gas chromatography. This physical property was measured using a very tiny quantity of sample revealing that it is possible to measure the enthalpies of two or more compounds at the same time.

  11. French gas cooled reactor experience with moisture ingress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastien, D.; Brie, M.

    1995-01-01

    During the history of operation of six gas cooled reactors in France, some experience has been gained with accidental water ingress into the primary system. This occurred as a result of leaks in steam generators. This paper describes the cause of the leaks, and the resulting consequences. (author). 2 refs, 8 figs

  12. Empirical method to calculate Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) inlet plenum transient temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howarth, W.L.

    1976-01-01

    Sodium flow enters the CRBR inlet plenum via three loops or inlets. An empirical equation was developed to calculate transient temperatures in the CRBR inlet plenum from known loop flows and temperatures. The constants in the empirical equation were derived from 1/4 scale Inlet Plenum Model tests using water as the test fluid. The sodium temperature distribution was simulated by an electrolyte. Step electrolyte transients at 100 percent model flow were used to calculate the equation constants. Step electrolyte runs at 50 percent and 10 percent flow confirmed that the constants were independent of flow. Also, a transient was tested which varied simultaneously flow rate and electrolyte. Agreement of the test results with the empirical equation results was good which verifies the empirical equation

  13. ECC delivery to lower plenum under downcomer injection part 2. RELAP5 assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Young Seok; Shin, An Dong; Kim, Hho Jung

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, the capability of the thermal-hydraulic codes, RELAP5/MOD3.2.2 gamma, in predicting the steam-water interaction and the related ECC delivery to lower plenum under downcomer injection condition during refill phase is evaluated using the experimental data of the UPTF Test 21A. The facility is modeled in detail, and the test condition simulated for code calculations. The calculation result is compared with the applicable measurement data and discussed for the pressure response, ECC bypass behavior, lower plenum delivery, global water mass distribution, and local behavior in downcomer

  14. Gas-filled hohlraum experiments at the national ignition facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández, J. C. (Juan C.); Gautier, D. C. (Donald Cort); Goldman, S. R. (Sanford R.); Grimm, B. M.; Hegelich, B. M. (Bjorn M.); Kline, J. L. (John L.); Montgomery, D. S. (David S.); Lanier, N. E. (Nicholas E.); Rose, H. A. (Harvey A.); Schmidt, D. M. (David M.); Swift, D. C.; Workman, J. B. (Jonathan B.); Alvarez, Sharon; Bower, Dan.; Braun, Dave.; Campbell, K. (Katherine); DeWald, E.; Glenzer, S. (Siegfried); Holder, J. (Joe P.); Kamperschroer, J. H. (James H.); Kimbrough, Joe (Joseph R.); Kirkwood, Robert (Bob); Landen, O. L. (Otto L.); Mccarville, Tom (Tomas J.); Macgowan, B.; Mackinnon, A.; Niemann, C.; Schein, J.; Schneider, M; Watts, Phil; Young, Ben-li [number : znumber] 194154; Young B.

    2004-01-01

    The summary of this paper is: (1) We have fielded on NIF a gas-filled hohlraum designed for future ignition experiments; (2) Wall-motion measurements are consistent with LASNEX simulations; (3) LPI back-scattering results have confounded expectations - (a) Stimulated Brillouin (SBS) dominates Raman (SRS) for any gas-fill species, (b) Measured SBS time-averaged reflectivity values are high, peak values are even higher, (c) SRS and SBS peak while laser-pulse is rising; and (4) Plasma conditions at the onset of high back-scattering yield high SBS convective linear gain - Wavelengths of the back-scattered light is predicted by linear theory.

  15. Gas-filled hohlraum experiments at the national ignition facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.C.; Gautier, D.C.; Goldman, S.R.; Grimm, B.M.; Hegelich, B.M.; Kline, J.L.; Montgomery, D.S.; Lanier, N.E.; Rose, H.A.; Schmidt, D.M.; Swift, D.C.; Workman, J.B.; Alvarez, Sharon; Bower, Dan; Braun, Dave; Campbell, K.; DeWald, E.; Glenzer, S.; Holder, J.; Kamperschroer, J.H.; Kimbrough, Joe; Kirkwood, Robert; Landen, O.L.; Mccarville, Tom; Macgowan, B.; Mackinnon, A.; Niemann, C.; Schein, J.; Schneider, M.; Watts, Phil; Young, Ben-li; Young B.

    2004-01-01

    The summary of this paper is: (1) We have fielded on NIF a gas-filled hohlraum designed for future ignition experiments; (2) Wall-motion measurements are consistent with LASNEX simulations; (3) LPI back-scattering results have confounded expectations - (a) Stimulated Brillouin (SBS) dominates Raman (SRS) for any gas-fill species, (b) Measured SBS time-averaged reflectivity values are high, peak values are even higher, (c) SRS and SBS peak while laser-pulse is rising; and (4) Plasma conditions at the onset of high back-scattering yield high SBS convective linear gain - Wavelengths of the back-scattered light is predicted by linear theory.

  16. Natural gas market assessment. Canadian natural gas market mechanisms: Recent experiences and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The increase in natural gas demand and the associated expansions of most of the pipeline systems serving western Canada have reduced the excess deliverability or excess productive capacity that existed at the time of deregulation of the natural gas industry in 1985. Based on an industry survey, the responses of natural gas buyers and sellers to recent supply difficulties are described. Specific production, transportation, and contractual difficulties were encountered in winter 1992/93 as production was stretched to meet record levels of demand during periods of very cold temperatures and as short-term spot prices reached very high levels. Problems at this time included wellhead freezeups, pipeline outages, and inadequate contract terms and conditions. Methods used to maintain gas flows to end users are reviewed, including a discussion of force majeure, spot gas purchases, storage, supply curtailment, and special loan arrangements. In 1992/93, in most instances where the responsibility fell on the end-user to solve the supply problem, the difficulty was shifted to local distribution companies who have traditionally had more experience with such situations. No cases were identified where either a firm or interruptible end-user was forced to curtail gas consumption because of inadequate supply. New market mechanisms are emerging that will enable buyers and sellers of western Canadian gas to avoid many of the problems encountered in 1992/93. These include prearranged backstopping arrangements, short-term spot markets, access to other gas basins, standardized gas contracts, electronic trading, and price risk management tools. 11 figs

  17. Reduction of sound transmission across plenum windows by incorporating an array of rigid cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S. K.

    2018-02-01

    The potential improvement of plenum window noise reduction by installing rigid circular cylinder arrays into the window cavity is investigated numerically using the finite-element method in this study. A two-dimensional approach is adopted. The sound transmission characteristics and propagation within the plenum window are also examined in detail. Results show that the installation of the cylinders in general gives rise to broadband improvement of noise reduction across a plenum window regardless of the direction of sound incidence. Such acoustical performance becomes better when more cylinder columns are installed, but it is suggested that the number of cylinder rows should not exceed two. Results also show that the cylinder positions relative to the nodal/anti-nodal planes of the acoustic modes are crucial in the noise reduction enhancement mechanisms. Noise reduction can further be enhanced by staggering the cylinder rows, such that each cylinder row supports the development of a different acoustic mode. For the simple cylinder arrangements considered in this study, the traffic noise reduction enhancement observed in this study can be as high as 4-5 dB, which is already comparable to or higher than the maximum achieved by installing sound absorption into a plenum window.

  18. Potential for HEPA filter damage from water spray systems in filter plenums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Fretthold, J.K. [Rocky Flats Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States); Slawski, J.W. [Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The water spray systems in high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums that are used in nearly all Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for protection against fire was designed under the assumption that the HEPA filters would not be damaged by the water sprays. The most likely scenario for filter damage involves filter plugging by the water spray, followed by the fan blowing out the filter medium. A number of controlled laboratory tests that were previously conducted in the late 1980s are reviewed in this paper to provide a technical basis for the potential HEPA filter damage by the water spray system in HEPA filter plenums. In addition to the laboratory tests, the scenario for BEPA filter damage during fires has also occurred in the field. A fire in a four-stage, BEPA filter plenum at Rocky Flats in 1980 caused the first three stages of BEPA filters to blow out of their housing and the fourth stage to severely bow. Details of this recently declassified fire are presented in this paper. Although these previous findings suggest serious potential problems exist with the current water spray system in filter plenums, additional studies are required to confirm unequivocally that DOE`s critical facilities are at risk. 22 refs., 15 figs.

  19. Results from AFWL 230 kJ coaxial plasma gun experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, D.J.; Baker, W.L.; Beason, J.D.; Clouse, C.J.; Degnan, J.H.; Dietz, D.; Hackett, K.E.; Higgins, P.L.; Holmes, J.L.; Price, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    A coaxial plasma gun has been operated on the AFWL 0.5 MJ capacitor bank. A Marshall valve actuated by an explosive detonator is used to puff hydrogen gas from a small high pressure plenum into the breech of the gun. After a set delay from the explosion the capacitor bank is discharged across the electrodes of the coaxial gun. The operating mode of the gun can be changed by varying the plenum pressure and the firing delay. Over 150 shots have been fired, varying delay, plenum pressure, and initial stored energy. Initial plenum pressures were varied from 250 to 750 psi, and firing delays ranged from 0.8 msec to 2.2 msec. Experiments were conducted at 90, 176, and 230 kJ of initial stored energy (50, 70, adn 80 kV charge). Rogowski coils were used to measure current and magnetic field within the plasma at 25 axial locations along the gun. The coils were installed in grooves on the inner surface of the outer conductor. Signals from the coils were passively integrated. Integrator time constants ranged from 95 to 114 μsec. Time histories of magnetic field profiles are presented. These are used to describe the operating mode of the gun

  20. Experimental study on gas-puff Z-pinch load characteristics on yang accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Xiaodong; Huang Xianbin; Yang Libing; Dan Jiakun; Duan Shuchao; Zhang Zhaohui; Zhou Shaotong

    2010-01-01

    A supersonic single-shell gas-puff load has been developed for Z-pinch experiments on 'Yang' accelerator. Using a fast responding pressure probe to measure the supersonic gas flow, impact pressure at different position and plenum pressure were acquired, which were combined with gas dynamics formulas to determine gas pressures and densities. The radial density profile displays that positions of gas shell varies with axial position, and the gas densities on axis increases as the distance from nozzle increases. Integral radial densities indicates that the linear mass density peaks at nozzle exit and decreases as increasing the distance from nozzle. Using single-shell supersonic gas-puff load, Z-pinch implosion experiments were performed on 'Yang' accelerator. Primary analysis of implosion process was presented, and computational trajectories of imploding plasma shell using snowplow model are in agreement with the experimental results. (authors)

  1. Experiments with background gas in a vacuum arc centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallaqua, R.S.; Simpson, S.W.; Del Bosco, E.

    1996-01-01

    Since promising isotope separation results were first reported by Krishnan et al. in 1981, a range of vacuum arc centrifuge experiments have been conducted in laboratories around the world. The PCEN (Plasma CENtrifuge) vacuum arc centrifuge at the Brazilian National Institute for Space Research has been used for isotope separation studies with cathode materials of carbon and magnesium and also to investigate the performance in terms of the rotational velocity attained for different cathode materials. Here, a vacuum arc centrifuge has been operated with an initial filling gas of either argon or hydrogen for pressures ranging from 10 -3 to 10 -1 Pa. The angular velocity ω of the plasma has been determined by cross-correlating the signals from potential probes, and the electron temperature T has been deduced from Langmuir probe data. At high gas pressures and early times during the 14 ms plasma lifetime, high-frequency nonuniformities frequently observed in the vacuum discharge disappear, suggesting that the associated instability is suppressed. Under the same conditions, nonuniformities rotating with much lower angular velocities are observed in the plasma. Temperatures are reduced in the presence of the background gas, and the theoretical figure of merit for separation proportional to ω 2 /T is increased compared to its value in the vacuum discharge for both argon and hydrogen gas fillings

  2. A gas trapping method for high-throughput metabolic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krycer, James R; Diskin, Ciana; Nelson, Marin E; Zeng, Xiao-Yi; Fazakerley, Daniel J; James, David E

    2018-01-01

    Research into cellular metabolism has become more high-throughput, with typical cell-culture experiments being performed in multiwell plates (microplates). This format presents a challenge when trying to collect gaseous products, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), which requires a sealed environment and a vessel separate from the biological sample. To address this limitation, we developed a gas trapping protocol using perforated plastic lids in sealed cell-culture multiwell plates. We used this trap design to measure CO2 production from glucose and fatty acid metabolism, as well as hydrogen sulfide production from cysteine-treated cells. Our data clearly show that this gas trap can be applied to liquid and solid gas-collection media and can be used to study gaseous product generation by both adherent cells and cells in suspension. Since our gas traps can be adapted to multiwell plates of various sizes, they present a convenient, cost-effective solution that can accommodate the trend toward high-throughput measurements in metabolic research.

  3. Two-branch Gas Experiments for Hot Gas Mixing of HTR-PM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yangping; Hao Pengefei; He Heng; Li Fu; Shi Lei

    2014-01-01

    A model experiment is proposed to investigate the hot gas mixing efficiency of HTR-PM reactor outlet. The test facility is introduced which is set at a scale of 1:2.5 comparing with the design of thermal mixing structure at HTR-PM reactor outlet. The test facility using air as its flow media includes inlet pipe system, electric heaters, main body of test facility, hot gas duct, exhaust pipe system and I&C system. Two-branch gas experiments are conducted on the test facility and the values of thermal-fluid parameters are collected and analyzed which include the temperature, pressure and velocity of the flow as well as the temperature of the tube wall. The analysis result shows the mixing efficiency is higher than the requirement of thermal mixing by steam generator even with conservative assumption which indicates that the design of hog gas mixing structure of HTR-PM fulfills the requirement for thermal mixing at two-branch working conditions. (author)

  4. Gas-filled hohlraum experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Juan C.; Goldman, S.R.; Kline, J.L.; Dodd, E.S.; Gautier, C.; Grim, G.P.; Hegelich, B.M.; Montgomery, D.S.; Lanier, N.E.; Rose, H.; Schmidt, D.W.; Workman, J.B.; Braun, D.G.; Dewald, E.L.; Landen, O.L.; Campbell, K.M.; Holder, J.P.; MacKinnon, A.J.; Niemann, C.; Schein, J.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments done at the National Ignition Facility laser [J. A. Paisner, E. M. Campbell, and W. Hogan, Fusion Technol. 26, 755 (1994)] using gas-filled hohlraums demonstrate a key ignition design feature, i.e., using plasma pressure from a gas fill to tamp the hohlraum-wall expansion for the duration of the laser pulse. Moreover, our understanding of hohlraum energetics and the ability to predict the hohlraum soft-x-ray drive has been validated in ignition-relevant conditions. Finally, the laser reflectivity from stimulated Raman scattering in the fill plasma, a key threat to hohlraum performance, is shown to be suppressed by choosing a design with a sufficiently high ratio of electron temperature to density

  5. Vented fuel experiment for gas-cooled fast reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longest, A.W.; Gat, U.; Conlin, J.A.; Campana, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    A pressure-equalized and vented fuel rod is being irradiated in an instrumented capsule designated GB-10 to approximately 100MWd/kg-heavy metal. The fuel is a sol-gel-derived 88 at.% uranium (approximately 9% 235 U) and 12 at.% plutonium oxide, and the cladding is 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel. The capsule is being irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and has exceeded a burnup of 70MWd/kg. The fuel has been operated at linear power rates of 39 and 44kW/m, and peak outer cladding temperature of 565 and 630 0 C respectively. A similar fuel rod in a previous capsule (GB-9) was subjected to 48kW/m (685 0 C). Helium gas sweeps through any portion of the three regions of the fuel rod, namely: fuel, blanket, and charcoal trap. The charcoal trap is operated at about 300 0 C. An on-line Ge(Li) detector is used to analyse release rates of several gamma-emitting noble gas isotopes. Analyses are performed primarily on sweep gas flowing through the entire fuel rod, and for sweeps over the top of the charcoal trap. Sweep gas samples are analyzed for stable noble gas isotopes. Results in the form of ratios of release rate over birth rate (R/B) and venting rate over birth rate (V/B) are derived. R/B rates range from 10 -4 % to 30% while V/B ranges from 10 -6 % to 30%. Flow conductance in the capsule was monitored by recording the flow rate and pressure drop across the fuel rod and inlet sweep line. The flow conductance has been falling with increasing burnup, currently restricting the flow to about 20ml (s.t.p.)/min at a pressure difference of about 1.5MPa. Venting rates of the gaseous fission products as a function of gas pressure in the range 6.9 to 1.4MPa have also been measured. Planned future experiments include the monitoring of tritium release, venting and cladding permeation rates, and its molecular form. First measurements have been made. A simulated leak experiment will determine the mixture of fission gases as a function of flow rate and the most

  6. Analysis of turbulent natural convection heat transfer in a lower plenum during external cooling using the COSMO code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, H.; Sawatari, Y.; Imada, T.

    2000-01-01

    The behavior of a large volumetrically heated melt pool is important to evaluate the feasibility of in-vessel retention by external flooding as an accident management. The COSMO (Coolability Simulation of Molten corium during severe accident) code has been developed at NUPEC to simulate turbulent natural convection heat transfer with internal heat source. The COSMO code solves thermal hydraulic conservation equations with turbulent model and can simulate melting and solidification process. The standard k-ε model has a limitation to describe the turbulent natural convection in the very high Rayleigh number condition (10 16 -10 17 ) assumed to occur in a lower plenum of RPV during a severe accident. This limitation results from the assumption of an analogy of momentum and energy transfer phenomena in the standard model. In this paper the modified turbulent model in which the turbulent number is treated, as a function of the flux Richardson number derived from the experiment, has been incorporated and verified by using the BALI experiments. It was found that the prediction of averaged Nusselt number became better than that of the standard model. In order to extend the COSMO code to the actual scale analysis under the external flooding conditions, more realistic boundary condition derived from the experiments should be treated. In this work the CHF correlation from ULPU experiment or the heat transfer coefficient correlation from CYBL experiment have been applied. The preliminary analysis of an actual scale analysis has been carried out under the condition of the TMI-2 accident. (author)

  7. CELSS experiment model and design concept of gas recycle system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, K.; Oguchi, M.; Kanda, S.

    1986-01-01

    In order to prolong the duration of manned missions around the Earth and to expand the human existing region from the Earth to other planets such as a Lunar Base or a manned Mars flight mission, the controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) becomes an essential factor of the future technology to be developed through utilization of space station. The preliminary system engineering and integration efforts regarding CELSS have been carried out by the Japanese CELSS concept study group for clarifying the feasibility of hardware development for Space station experiments and for getting the time phased mission sets after FY 1992. The results of these studies are briefly summarized and the design and utilization methods of a Gas Recycle System for CELSS experiments are discussed.

  8. Analysis research on mixing characteristics of lower plenum of Qinshan phase Ⅱ NPP by CFD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Huihui; He Peifeng; Lu Chuan; Zhang Hongliang

    2015-01-01

    The flowing and mixing characteristics of the lower plenum of Qinshan Phase n NPP were analyzed by CFD method. The calculation results were compared with the results of the reactor hydraulic simulation test. On core inlet mass flow distributions, both upwind and high resolution advection schemes show good agreements with test results. While on lower plenum mixing characteristics, the calculation results from either upwind or high resolution advection schemes show relatively large differences to the test data. Relatively, upwind advection schemes predict better anticipations on maximum and minimum mixing factors. Furthermore, whether or not considering helix flow by main pump is the most possible key factor that leads to difference between CFD calculation and test results. (authors)

  9. Summary report of incineration plenum fire: Building 771, July 2, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fretthold, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    At about 1100 on July 2, 1980, a temperature rise above normal was recorded on charts monitoring operation of the incinerator in Room 149, Building 771. The plenum overheat alarm sounded at 1215, emergency actions initiated, and the fire was extinguished and mop-up began at about 1300. Investigation determined that the fire in the plenum was caused by a heat rise in the system, a deteriorated bypass valve on the No. 3 heat exchanger (KOH scrubber), nitration of the urethane seal on the HEPA filter media to the filter frame, and accumulation of metallic fines on the filter media. It was concluded that the management system responded properly, except for the ring- down system to activate the Emergency Operations Center

  10. Interferometric investigation of turbulently fluctuating temperature in an LMFBR outlet plenum geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, R.G.; Golay, M.W.

    1975-01-01

    A novel optical technique is described for the measurement of turbulently fluctuating temperature in a transparent fluid flow. The technique employs a Mach-Zehnder interferometer of extremely short field and a simple photoconductive diode detector. The system produces a nearly linear D.C. electrical analog of the turbulent temperature fluctuations in a small, 1 mm 3 volume. The frequency response extends well above 2500 Hz, and can be improved by the choice of a more sophisticated photodetector. The turbulent sodium mixing in the ANL 1 1 / 15 -scale FFTF outlet plenum is investigated with a scale model outlet mixing plenum, using flows of air. The scale design represents a cross section of the ANL outlet plenum, so that the average recirculating flow inside the test cell is two dimensional. The range of the instrument is 120 0 F above the ambient air temperature. The accuracy is generally +-5 0 F, with most of the error due to noise originating from building vibrations and room noise. The power spectral density of the fluctuating temperature has been observed experimentally at six different stations in the flow. A strong 300 Hz component is generated in the inlet region, which decays as the flow progresses along streamlines. The effect of the inlet Reynolds number and the temperature difference between the inlet flows on the power spectral density has also been investigated. Traces of the actual fluctuating temperature are included for the six stations

  11. Measurement of heat and momentum eddy diffusivities in recirculating LMFBR outlet plenum flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manno, V.P.; Golay, M.W.

    1978-06-01

    An optical technique has been developed for the measurement of the eddy diffusivity of heat in a transparent flowing medium. The method uses a combination of two established measurement tools: a Mach-Zehnder interferometer for the monitoring of turbulently fluctuating temperature and a Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) for the measurement of turbulent velocity fluctuations. The technique is applied to the investigation of flow fields characteristic of the LMFBR outlet plenum. The study is accomplished using air as the working fluid in a small scale Plexiglas test section. Lows are introduced into both the 1 / 15 scale FFTF outlet plenum and the 3 / 80 scale CRBR geometry plenum at inlet Reynolds numbers of 22,000. Measurements of the eddy diffusivity of heat and the eddy diffusivity of momentum are performed at a total of 11 measurement stations. Significant differences of the turbulence parameters are found between the two geometries, and the higher chimney structure of the CRBR case is found to be the major cause of the distinction. Spectral intensity studies of the fluctuating electronic analog signals of velocity and temperature are also performed. Error analysis of the overall technique indicates an experimental error of 10% in the determination of the eddy diffusivity of heat and 6% in the evaluation of turbulent momentum viscosity. In general it is seen that the turbulence in the cases observed is not isotropic, and use of isotropic turbulent heat and momentum diffusivities in transport modelling would not be a valid procedure

  12. Automation of experiments at Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyganov, Yu. S.

    2016-01-01

    Approaches to solving the problems of automation of basic processes in long-term experiments in heavy ion beams of the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS) facility are considered. Approaches in the field of spectrometry, both of rare α decays of superheavy nuclei and those for constructing monitoring systems to provide accident-free experiment running with highly radioactive targets and recording basic parameters of experiment, are described. The specific features of Double Side Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSDs) are considered, special attention is paid to the role of boundary effects of neighboring p-n transitions in the "active correlations" method. An example of an off-beam experiment attempting to observe Zeno effect is briefly considered. Basic examples for nuclear reactions of complete fusion at 48Ca ion beams of U-400 cyclotron (LNR, JINR) are given. A scenario of development of the "active correlations" method for the case of very high intensity beams of heavy ions at promising accelerators of LNR, JINR, is presented.

  13. Coolant mixing in LMFBR rod bundles and outlet plenum mixing transients. Progress report, December 1, 1975--February 29, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todreas, N.E.; Golay, M.W.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is summarized in the following task areas: assessment of available data, experimental water mixing investigations, analytic model development, and analytical and experimental investigation of velocity and temperature fields in outlet plenum flow mixing

  14. Coolant mixing in LMFBR rod bundles and outlet plenum mixing transients. Progress report, March 1, 1977--May 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todreas, N.E.; Golay, M.W.; Wolf, L.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is summarized in the following tasks: (1) bundle flow studies (wrapped and bare rods); (2) subchannel flow studies (bare rods); (3) LMFBR outlet plenum flow mixing; and (4) theoretical determination of local temperature fields in LMFBR fuel rod bundles

  15. CATHARE2 analysis on the loss of residual heat removal system during mid-loop operation : pressurizer and SGI outlet plenum manways open

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Young Jong; Chang, Won Pyo.

    1997-06-01

    The present study is to analyze the BETHSY test 6.9c using CATHARE2 v1.3u. BETHSY test 6.9c simulates plant conditions following loss of residual heat removal system under mid-loop operation. The configuration is that the pressurizer and steam generator outlet plenum manways are opened as vent paths in order to protect the system from overpressurization by removing the steam generated in the core. Most of the important physical phenomena are observed in the experiment have been predicted reasonably by the CATHARE2 code. Since the differential pressure between the pressurizer and the surge line is overestimated, the peak pressure in the upper plenum is predicted higher than the experimental value by 11 kPa and occurrence is delayed by 210s. Also earlier core uncovery is predicted, mainly due to overprediction of the manway flows. The analysis results are demonstrated that opening of the pressurizer and the steam generator outlet plenum manways is effective to prevent the core uncovery by only gravity feed injection. Although some disagreements found in detailed phenomena, the prediction of the overall system behavior by the code does not deviate from the experimental results unacceptably. The core bypass flowrate is found to be very sensitive to mass distribution in the core and the system behaviors are strongly affected by phase separation modeling under low pressure and particularly stratified flow condition. the main purpose of the present study is to understand physical phenomena under the accident and to assess the capability of CATHARE2 prediction for enhancement of reliability in actual plant analyses. (author). 11 refs., 3 tabs., 41 figs

  16. Compaction wave profiles: Simulations of gas gun experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2001-01-01

    Mesoscale simulations of a compaction wave in a granular bed of HMX have been performed. The grains are fully resolved in order that the compaction, i.e., the porosity behind the wave front, is determined by the elastic-plastic response of the grains rather than by an empirical law for the porosity as a function of pressure. Numerical wave profiles of the pressure and velocity are compared with data from a gas gun experiment. The experiment used an initial porosity of 36%, and the wave had a pressure comparable to the yield strength of the grains. The profiles are measured at the front and back of the granular bed. The transit time for the compaction wave to propagate between the gauges determines the wave speed. The wave speed depends on the porosity behind the wave and is affected by the strength model. The yield strength needed to match the experimental wave speed is discussed. Analysis of the lead wave through the granular bed, based on impedance matches using the Hugoniot loci, indicates that the compaction wave triggers a small amount of burn, less than 1% mass fraction, on the microsecond time scale of the experiment. copyright 2001 American Institute of Physics

  17. Forty years of experience on closed-cycle gas turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, C.

    1978-01-01

    Forty years of experience on closed-cycle gas turbines (CCGT) is emphasized to substantiate the claim that this prime-mover technology is well established. European fossil-fired plants with air as the working fluid have been individually operated over 100,000 hours, have demonstrated very high availability and reliability, and have been economically successful. Following the initial success of the small air closed cycle gas turbine plants, the next step was the exploitation of helium as the working fluid for plants above 50 MWe. The first fossil fired combined power and heat plant at Oberhausen, using a helium turbine, plays an important role for future nuclear systems and this is briefly discussed. The combining of an HTGR and an advanced proven power conversion system (CCGT) represents the most interesting and challenging project. The key to acceptance of the CCGT in the near term is the introduction of a small nuclear cogeneration plant (100 to 300 MWe) that utilizes the waste heat, demonstrating a very high fuel utilization efficiency: aspects of such a plant are outlined. (author)

  18. Velocity limitations in coaxial plasma gun experiments with gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axnaes, I.

    1976-04-01

    The velocity limitations found in many crossed field plasma experiments with neutral gas present are studied for binary mixtures of H 2 , He, N 2 O 2 , Ne and Ar. The apparatus used is a coaxial plasma gun with an azimuthal magnetic bias field. The discharge parameters are chosen so that the plasma is weakly ionized. In some of the mixtures it is found that one of the components tends to dominate in the sense that only a small amount (regarding volume) of that component is needed for the discharge to adopt a limiting velocity close to that for the pure component. Thus in a mixture between a heavy and a light component having nearly equal ionization potentials the heavy component dominates. Also if there is a considerable difference in ionization potential between the components, the component with the lowest ionization potential tends to dominate. (author)

  19. Gas-grain simulation experiment module conceptual design and gas-grain simulation facility breadboard development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamel, James M.; Petach, Michael; Gat, Nahum; Kropp, Jack; Luong, Christina; Wolff, Michael

    1993-12-01

    This report delineates the Option portion of the Phase A Gas-Grain Simulation Facility study. The conceptual design of a Gas-Grain Simulation Experiment Module (GGSEM) for Space Shuttle Middeck is discussed. In addition, a laboratory breadboard was developed during this study to develop a key function for the GGSEM and the GGSF, specifically, a solid particle cloud generating device. The breadboard design and test results are discussed and recommendations for further studies are included. The GGSEM is intended to fly on board a low earth orbit (LEO), manned platform. It will be used to perform a subset of the experiments planned for the GGSF for Space Station Freedom, as it can partially accommodate a number of the science experiments. The outcome of the experiments performed will provide an increased understanding of the operational requirements for the GGSF. The GGSEM will also act as a platform to accomplish technology development and proof-of-principle experiments for GGSF hardware, and to verify concepts and designs of hardware for GGSF. The GGSEM will allow assembled subsystems to be tested to verify facility level operation. The technology development that can be accommodated by the GGSEM includes: GGSF sample generation techniques, GGSF on-line diagnostics techniques, sample collection techniques, performance of various types of sensors for environmental monitoring, and some off-line diagnostics. Advantages and disadvantages of several LEO platforms available for GGSEM applications are identified and discussed. Several of the anticipated GGSF experiments require the de-agglomeration and dispensing of dry solid particles into an experiment chamber. During the GGSF Phase A study, various techniques and devices available for the solid particle aerosol generator were reviewed. As a result of this review, solid particle de-agglomeration and dispensing were identified as key undeveloped technologies in the GGSF design. A laboratory breadboard version of a solid

  20. ISOTHERMAL AIR INGRESS VALIDATION EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang H Oh; Eung S Kim

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory carried out air ingress experiments as part of validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. An isothermal test loop was designed and set to understand the stratified-flow phenomenon, which is important as the initial air flow into the lower plenum of the very high temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) when a large break loss-of-coolant accident occurs. The unique flow characteristics were focused on the VHTR air-ingress accident, in particular, the flow visualization of the stratified flow in the inlet pipe to the vessel lower plenum of the General Atomic’s Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR). Brine and sucrose were used as heavy fluids, and water was used to represent a light fluid, which mimics a counter current flow due to the density difference between the stimulant fluids. The density ratios were changed between 0.87 and 0.98. This experiment clearly showed that a stratified flow between simulant fluids was established even for very small density differences. The CFD calculations were compared with experimental data. A grid sensitivity study on CFD models was also performed using the Richardson extrapolation and the grid convergence index method for the numerical accuracy of CFD calculations . As a result, the calculated current speed showed very good agreement with the experimental data, indicating that the current CFD methods are suitable for predicting density gradient stratified flow phenomena in the air-ingress accident.

  1. Structure of gas pressure signal at two-orifice bubbling from a common plenum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Marek; Drahoš, Jiří; Zahradník, Jindřich; Thomas, N. H.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 2 (2000), s. 421-429 ISSN 0009-2509 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/98/1435; GA AV ČR KSK2040602 Grant - others:INCO-COPERNICUS(XE) ERB IC15-CT98-0904 Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.053, year: 2000

  2. Natural gas extraction and artificial gas injection experiments in Opalinus Clay, Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinsot, A.; Lundy, M. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Déchets Radioactifs ANDRA, Meuse Haute-Marne Center, Bure (France); Appelo, C.A.J. [Dr C.A.J. Appelo, Hydrochemical Consultant, Amsterdam (Netherlands); and others

    2017-04-15

    Two experiments have been installed at Mont Terri in 2004 and 2009 that allowed gas circulation within a borehole at a pressure between 1 and 2 bar. These experiments made it possible to observe the natural gases that were initially dissolved in pore-water degassing into the borehole and to monitor their content evolution in the borehole over several years. They also allowed for inert (He, Ne) and reactive (H{sub 2}) gases to be injected into the borehole with the aim either to determine their diffusion properties into the rock pore-water or to evaluate their removal reaction kinetics. The natural gases identified were CO{sub 2}, light alkanes, He, and more importantly N{sub 2}. The natural concentration of four gases in Opalinus Clay pore-water was evaluated at the experiment location: N{sub 2} 2.2 mmol/L ± 25%, CH{sub 4} 0.30 mmol/L ± 25%, C{sub 2}H{sub 6} 0.023 mmol/L ± 25%, C{sub 3}H{sub 8} 0.012 mmol/L ± 25%. Retention properties of methane, ethane, and propane were estimated. Ne injection tests helped to characterize rock diffusion properties regarding the dissolved inert gases. These experimental results are highly relevant towards evaluating how the fluid composition could possibly evolve in the drifts of a radioactive waste disposal facility. (authors)

  3. Microgravity experiments on a granular gas of elongated grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harth, K.; Trittel, T.; Kornek, U.; Höme, S.; Will, K.; Strachauer, U.; Stannarius, R.

    2013-06-01

    Granular gases represent well-suited systems to investigate statistical granular dynamics. The literature comprises numerous investigations of ensembles of spherical or irregularly shaped grains. Mainly computer models, analytical theories and experiments restricted to two dimensions were reported. In three-dimensions, the gaseous state can only be maintained by strong external excitation, e. g. vibrations or electro-magnetic fields, or in microgravity. A steady state, where the dynamics of a weakly disturbed granular gas are governed by particle-particle collisions, is hard to realize with spherical grains due to clustering. We present the first study of a granular gas of elongated cylinders in three dimensions. The mean free path is considerably reduced with respect to spheres at comparable filling fractions. The particles can be tracked in 3D over a sequence of frames. In a homogeneous steady state, we find non-Gaussian velocity distributions and a lack of equipartition of kinetic energy. We discuss the relations between energy input and vibrating plate accelerations. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editors, the PDF file of this article has been updated to amend some references present in the PDF file submitted to AIP Publishing. The references affected are listed here:[1] (c) K. Nichol and K. E. Daniels, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 018001 (2012); [11] (e) P. G. de Gennes and J. Prost, The Physics of Liquid Crystals, Clarendon Press, Oxford (1993); [17] (b) K. Harth, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 144102 (2013).A LaTeX processing error resulted in changes to the authors reference formatting, which was not detected prior to publication. Due apologies are given to the authors for this oversight. The updated article PDF was published on 12 August 2013.

  4. Comparison of FISGAS swelling and gas release predictions with experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostensen, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    FISGAS calculations were compared to fuel swelling data from the FD1 tests and to gas release data from the FGR39 test. Late swelling and gas release predictions are satisfactory if vacancy depletion effects are added to the code. However, early swelling predictions are not satisfactory, and early gas release predictions are very poor. Explanation of these discrepancies is speculative

  5. Initial Scaling Studies and Conceptual Thermal Fluids Experiments for the Prismatic NGNP Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. McEligot; G. E. McCreery

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this report is to document the initial high temperature gas reactor scaling studies and conceptual experiment design for gas flow and heat transfer. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/ATHENA/RELAP5-3D calculations for the same geometry. Two aspects of the complex flow in an NGNP are being addressed: (1) flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue) and (2) turbulence and resulting temperature distributions in reactor cooling channels ("hot channel" issue). Current prismatic NGNP concepts are being examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses are being applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. For normal operation, the flow in the coolant channels can be considered to be dominant forced convection with slight transverse property variation. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple buoyant jets into a confined density-stratified crossflow -- with obstructions. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other. Two heat transfer experiments are being considered. One addresses the "hot channel" problem, if necessary. The second experiment will treat heated jets entering a model plenum. Unheated MIR (Matched-Index-of-Refraction) experiments are first steps when the geometry is complicated. One does not want to use a computational technique which will not even handle constant properties properly. The MIR experiment will simulate flow features of the paths of jets

  6. Study of thermal-hydraulic characteristics in an LMFBR intermediate plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uotani, M.; Naohara, N.; Kinoshita, I.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental studies using water and liquid metal were conducted in order to investigate the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of an LMFBR intermediate plenum. The present study is an attempt to evaluate the effect of natural convection on the temperature field and to validate the prediction method of temperature profile in a thermally stratified cavity. The experimental results indicated that the effect of the natural convection on flow velocity and heat transfer in the cavity is reduced with increasing the modified stratification parameter. The calculation by FEM code and a simple 1-D model are effective to predict the temperature profile in the cavity

  7. Thermophysical, hydrodynamic and mechanical aspects of molten core relocation to lower plenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Kune Y.; Huh, Chang Wook [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents the current state of knowledge on molten material relocation into the lower plenum. Consequences of movement of material to the lower head are considered with regard to the potential for reactor pressure vessel failure from both thermal hydraulic and mechanical standpoints. The models are applied to evaluating various in-vessel retention strategies for the Korean Standard Power Plant (KSNPP) reactor. The results are summarized in terms of thermal response of the reactor vessel from the very relevant severe accident management perspective. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab. (Author)

  8. Measurement of two-phase flow at the core upper plenum interface under simulated reflood conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.G.; Combs, S.K.; Bagwell, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    Objectives of the Instrument Development Loop program were to simulate flows at the core/upper plenum interface during the reflood phase of a LOCA and to develop instruments for measuring mass-flows at this interface. A tie plate drag body was developed and tested successfully, and the data obtained were shown to be equivalent to pressure drops. The tie-plate drag body gave useful measurements in pure downflow, and the drag/turbine combination correlates with mass flow for high upflow

  9. Thermophysical, hydrodynamic and mechanical aspects of molten core relocation to lower plenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Kune Y; Huh, Chang Wook [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents the current state of knowledge on molten material relocation into the lower plenum. Consequences of movement of material to the lower head are considered with regard to the potential for reactor pressure vessel failure from both thermal hydraulic and mechanical standpoints. The models are applied to evaluating various in-vessel retention strategies for the Korean Standard Power Plant (KSNPP) reactor. The results are summarized in terms of thermal response of the reactor vessel from the very relevant severe accident management perspective. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab. (Author)

  10. Critical heat flux of water in vertical tubes with an upper plenum and a closed bottom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hong Chae; Baek, Won Pil; Chang, Soon Heung

    2000-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted for vertical round tubes with an upper plenum and a closed bottom to investigate CHF behavior and CHF onset location under the counter-current condition. The measured CHF values are well predicted by general Wallis type flooding correlations. A 1-D steady state analytical flooding model for thermosyphon by El-Genk and Saber was assessed with the data and the liquid film thickness at the liquid entrance was calculated. The CHF onset position becomes different with L/D and D, and liquid entrance geometry affects only CHF values not CHF onset positions

  11. Transient fission gas release during direct electrical heating experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Emerson, J.E.; Savoie, F.E.

    1983-12-01

    The gas release behavior of irradiated EBR-II fuel was observed to be dependent on several factors: the presence of cladding, the retained gas content, and the energy absorbed. Fuel that retained in excess of 16 to 17 μmoles/g of fission gas underwent spallation as the cladding melted and released 22 to 45% of its retained gas, while fuel with retained gas levels below approx. 15 to 16 μmoles/g released less than approx. 9% of its gas as the cladding melted. During subsequent direct electrical heating ramps, fuel that did not spall released an additional quantity of gas (up to 4 μmoles/g), depending on the energy absorbed

  12. Norm waste in oil and gas industry: The Syrian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M.S.; Suman, H.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the Syrian experience in respect to Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) waste in Syrian oil and gas industry. NORM can be concentrated and accumulated in tubing and surface equipment of oil and gas production lines in the form of scale and sludge. NORM waste (scale, sludge, production water) is therefore generated during cleaning, physical or chemical treatment of streams. Uncontrolled disposal of this type of waste could lead to environmental pollution, and thus eventually to exposure of members of the public. The presence of NORM in Syrian oil fields has been recognized since 1987 and AECS has initiated several studies, in cooperation with oil companies, to manage such type of waste. Three categories of NORM waste in Syrian oil fields were identified. Firstly, hard scales from either decontamination of contaminated equipment and tubular using high-pressure water systems or mechanical cleaning at site are considered to contain the highest levels of radium isotopes ( 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 224 Ra). Secondly, sludge wastes are generated with large amount but low levels of radium isotopes were found. Thirdly, contaminated soil with 226 Ra as a result of uncontrolled disposal of production water was also considered as NORM waste. The first waste type (scale) is stored in Standard storage barrels in a controlled area; the number of barrels is increasing with time. High levels of radium isotopes were found in these scales. The options for disposal of these wastes are still under investigations; one of the most predominant thinking is the re-injection into abundant wells. For sludge waste, plastic lined disposal pits were constructed in each area for temporary storage. Moreover, big gas power stations have been built and operated since the last ten years. Maintenance operations for these stations produce tens of tones of scales containing radon daughters, 210 Pb and 210 Po with relatively high concentrations. The common practice used to dispose

  13. Experimental system description for air-water CCFL tests of the 161-rod FLECHT-SEASET test vessel upper plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogdall, S.P.; Anderson, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A series of countercurrent flow limiting (CCFL) experiments has been performed by EG and G Idaho, Inc. in the Steam-Air-Water (SAW) test facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory on behalf of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Tests were performed in a mockup of the vessel for the 161-Rod Systems Effects Test (SET) facility of the FLECHT-SEASET program, conducted by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Westinghouse and the NRC will use the test results to provide a CCFL correlation to predict the flooding behavior in the upper plenum of the SET vessel. This paper presents a description of the experimental system and the test conduct, including data validation and uncertainty analysis. The test objectives centered on experimentally obtaining coefficients in the Wallis correlation for flooding with the specific vessel geometry. The test conditions and vessel configuration are described and the design of the test loop, instrumentation, and data acquisition are discussed. The establishment of a test point and the resultant data are described

  14. Analysis of turbulent natural convection heat transfer in a lower plenum during external cooling using the COSMO code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, H. [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Sawatari, Y.; Imada, T. [Fuji Research Institute Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    The behavior of a large volumetrically heated melt pool is important to evaluate the feasibility of in-vessel retention by external flooding as an accident management. The COSMO (Coolability Simulation of Molten corium during severe accident) code has been developed at NUPEC to simulate turbulent natural convection heat transfer with internal heat source. The COSMO code solves thermal hydraulic conservation equations with turbulent model and can simulate melting and solidification process. The standard k-{epsilon} model has a limitation to describe the turbulent natural convection in the very high Rayleigh number condition (10{sup 16}-10{sup 17}) assumed to occur in a lower plenum of RPV during a severe accident. This limitation results from the assumption of an analogy of momentum and energy transfer phenomena in the standard model. In this paper the modified turbulent model in which the turbulent number is treated, as a function of the flux Richardson number derived from the experiment, has been incorporated and verified by using the BALI experiments. It was found that the prediction of averaged Nusselt number became better than that of the standard model. In order to extend the COSMO code to the actual scale analysis under the external flooding conditions, more realistic boundary condition derived from the experiments should be treated. In this work the CHF correlation from ULPU experiment or the heat transfer coefficient correlation from CYBL experiment have been applied. The preliminary analysis of an actual scale analysis has been carried out under the condition of the TMI-2 accident. (author)

  15. Effect of upper plenum water accumuration on reflooding phenomena under forced-feed flooding in SCTF Core-I tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Yukio; Sobajima, Makoto; Iwamura, Takamichi; Osakabe, Masahiro; Ohnuki, Akira; Abe, Yutaka; Adachi, Hiromichi

    1983-07-01

    Large Scale Reflood Test Program has been performed under contract with the Atomic Energy Bureau of Science and Technology Agency of Japan since 1976. The Slab Core Test Program is a part of the Large Scale Reflood Test Program along with the Cylindrical Core Test Program. Major purpose of the Slab Core Test Program is to investigate two-dimensional, thermo-hydrodynamic behavior in the core and the effect of fluid communication between the core and the upper plenum on the reflood phenomena in a postulated loss-of-coolant accident of a PWR. A significant upper plenum water accumulation was observed in the Base Case Test Sl-01 which was carried out under forced-feed flooding condition. To investigate the effects of upper plenum water accumulation on reflooding phenomena, accumulated water is extracted out of the upper plenum in Test Sl-03 by full opening of valves for extraction lines located just above the upper core support plate. This report presents this effect of upper plenum water accumulation on reflooding phenomena through the comparison of Tests Sl-01 and Sl-03. In spite of full opening of valves for upper plenum water extraction in Test Sl-03, a little water accumulation was observed which is of the same magnitude as in Test Sl-01 for about 200 s after the beginning of reflood. From 200 s after the beginning of reflood, however, the upper plenum water accumulation is much less in Test Sl-03 than in Test Sl-01, showing the following effects of upper plenum water accumulation. In Test Sl-03, (1) the two-dimensionality of horizontal fluid distribution is much less both above and in the core, (2) water carryover through hot leg and water accumulation in the core are less, (3) quench time is rather delayed in the upper part of the core by less water fall back from the upper plenum, and (4) difference in the core thermal behavior and core heat transfer are not significant in the middle and lower part of the core. (author)

  16. Deformation and collapse of zircaloy fuel rod cladding into plenum axial gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfennigwerth, P.L.; Gorscak, D.A.; Selsley, I.A.

    1983-01-01

    To minimize support structure, blanket and reflector fuel rods of the thoria urania-fueled Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) were designed with non-freestanding Zircaloy-4 cladding. An analytical model was developed to predict deformation of unirradiated cladding into axial gaps of fuel rod plenum regions where it is unsupported. This model uses the ACCEPT finite element computer program to calculate elastic-plastic deformation of cladding due to external pressure. The finite element is 20-node, triquadratic, isoparametric, and 3-dimensional. Its curved surface permits accurate modeling of the tube geometry, including geometric nonuniformities such as circumferential wall thickness variation and initial tube out-of-roundness. Progressive increases in axial gap length due to cladding elongation and fuel stack shrinkage are modeled, as are deformations of fuel pellets and stainless steel support sleeves which bound plenum axial gaps in LWBR type blanket fuel rods. Zircaloy-4 primary and secondary thermal creep representations were developed from uniaxial creep testing of fuel rod tubing. Creep response to multi-axial loading is modeled with a variation of Hill's formulation for anisotropic materials. Coefficients accounting for anisotropic thermal creep in Zircaloy-4 tubes were developed from creep testing of externally pressurized tubes having fixed axial gaps in the range 2.5 cm to 5.7 cm and radial clearances over simulated fuel pellets ranging from zero to 0.089 mm. (orig./RW)

  17. Evaluation of Gas Retention in Waste Simulants: Tall Column Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Powell, Michael R.; Boeringa, Gregory K.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Karri, Naveen K.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Tran, Diana N.; Sande, Susan; Heldebrant, David J.; Meacham, Joseph E.; Smet, Dave; Bryan, Wesley E.; Calmus, Ronald B.

    2014-05-16

    Gas generation in Hanford’s underground waste storage tanks can lead to gas accumulation within the layer of settled solids (sludge) at the tank bottom. The gas, which typically has hydrogen as the major component together with other flammable species, is formed principally by radiation-driven chemical reactions. Accumulation of these gases within the sludge in a waste tank is undesirable and limits the amount of tank volume for waste storage. Further, accumulation of large amounts of gas in the sludge may potentially result in an unacceptable release of the accumulated gas if the sludge-layer density is reduced to less than that of the overlying sludge or that of the supernatant liquid. Rapid release of large amounts of flammable gases could endanger personnel and equipment near the tank. For this reason, a thorough understanding of the circumstances that can lead to a potentially problematic gas accumulation in sludge layers is needed. To respond to this need, the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Program (DSGREP) was commissioned to examine gas release behavior in sludges.

  18. Experiments in stratified gas-liquid pipe flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birvalski, M.

    2015-01-01

    The growing demand for energy in the future will necessitate the production of natural gas from fields which are located farther offshore, in deep water and in very cold environments. This will confront us with difficulties in ensuring continuous production of the fluids (natural gas, condensate and

  19. Greenhouse gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobler, Jeremy [Exelis Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Zaccheo, T. Scott [Exelis Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Blume, Nathan [Exelis Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Pernini, Timothy [Exelis Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Braun, Michael [Exelis Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Botos, Christopher [Exelis Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States)

    2016-03-31

    This report describes the development and testing of a novel system, the Greenhouse gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE), for Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) of CO2 at Geological Carbon Storage (GCS) sites. The system consists of a pair of laser based transceivers, a number of retroreflectors, and a set of cloud based data processing, storage and dissemination tools, which enable 2-D mapping of the CO2 in near real time. A system was built, tested locally in New Haven, Indiana, and then deployed to the Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) facility in Bozeman, MT. Testing at ZERT demonstrated the ability of the GreenLITE system to identify and map small underground leaks, in the presence of other biological sources and with widely varying background concentrations. The system was then ruggedized and tested at the Harris test site in New Haven, IN, during winter time while exposed to temperatures as low as -15 °CºC. Additional testing was conducted using simulated concentration enhancements to validate the 2-D retrieval accuracy. This test resulted in a high confidence in the reconstruction ability to identify sources to tens of meters resolution in this configuration. Finally, the system was deployed for a period of approximately 6 months to an active industrial site, Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP), where >1M metric tons of CO2 had been injected into an underground sandstone basin. The main objective of this final deployment was to demonstrate autonomous operation over a wide range of environmental conditions with very little human interaction, and to demonstrate the feasibility of the system for long term deployment in a GCS environment.

  20. Investigation of the coolability of a continuous mass of relocated debris to a water-filled lower plenum. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.L.; Wolf, J.R.; Chavez, S.A.; Condie, K.G.; Hagrman, D.L.; Carmack, W.J.

    1994-09-01

    This report documents work performed to support the development of an analytical and experimental program to investigate the coolability of a continuous mass of debris that relocates to a water-filled lower plenum. The objective of this program is to provide an adequate data base for developing and validating a model to predict the coolability of a continuous mass of debris relocating to a water-filled lower plenum. The model must address higher pressure scenarios, such as the TMI-2 accident, and lower pressure scenarios, which recent calculations indicate are more likely for most operating LWR plants. The model must also address a range of possible debris compositions

  1. Experience with environmental sampling at gas centrifuge enrichment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekenstam, G. af; Bush, W.; Janov, J.; Kuhn, E.; Ryjinski, M.

    2001-01-01

    Environmental sampling has been used routinely by the IAEA since 1996 after the IAEA Board of Governors approved it in March 1995 as a new technique to strengthen safeguards and improve efficiency. In enrichment plants it is used to confirm that there has been no production of highly enriched uranium (HEU), or production of uranium at above the declared enrichment. The use of environmental sampling is based on the assumption that every process, no matter how leak tight, will release small amounts of process material to the environment. Even though these releases of nuclear material are extremely small in gas centrifuge enrichment plants, and well below levels of concern from a health physics and safety standpoint, they are detectable and their analysis provides an indication of the enrichment of the material that has been processed in the plant. The environmental samples at enrichment plants are collected by swiping selected areas of the plant with squares of cotton cloth (10x10 cm) from sampling kits prepared in ultra clean condition. The squares of cotton cloth sealed in plastic bags are sent for analysis to the Network Analytical Laboratories. The analysis includes the measurement of the uranium isotopic composition in uranium-containing particles by Thermal lonization Mass Spectroscopy (TIMS) or Secondary ION Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Since the implementation of environmental sampling, swipes have been collected from 240 sampling points at three gas centrifuge plants of URENCO, which have a total throughput of more than 8,000 tonnes of uranium per year. The particle analysis results generally reflected the known operational history of the plants and confirmed that they had only been operated to produce uranium with enrichment less than 5% 235 U. The information about the content of the minor isotopes 234 U and 236 U also indicates that depleted and recycled uranium were sometimes used as feed materials in some plants. An example is given of the TIMS particle

  2. Intercooler flow path for gas turbines: CFD design and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, A.K.; Gollahalli, S.R.; Carter, F.L. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program was created by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for generating electricity. Intercooling or cooling of air between compressor stages is a feature under consideration in advanced cycles for the ATS. Intercooling entails cooling of air between the low pressure (LP) and high pressure (BP) compressor sections of the gas turbine. Lower air temperature entering the HP compressor decreases the air volume flow rate and hence, the compression work. Intercooling also lowers temperature at the HP discharge, thus allowing for more effective use of cooling air in the hot gas flow path. The thermodynamic analyses of gas turbine cycles with modifications such as intercooling, recuperating, and reheating have shown that intercooling is important to achieving high efficiency gas turbines. The gas turbine industry has considerable interest in adopting intercooling to advanced gas turbines of different capacities. This observation is reinforced by the US Navys Intercooled-Recuperative (ICR) gas turbine development program to power the surface ships. In an intercooler system, the air exiting the LP compressor must be decelerated to provide the necessary residence time in the heat exchanger. The cooler air must subsequently be accelerated towards the inlet of the HP compressor. The circumferential flow nonuniformities inevitably introduced by the heat exchanger, if not isolated, could lead to rotating stall in the compressors, and reduce the overall system performance and efficiency. Also, the pressure losses in the intercooler flow path adversely affect the system efficiency and hence, must be minimized. Thus, implementing intercooling requires fluid dynamically efficient flow path with minimum flow nonuniformities and consequent pressure losses.

  3. Development of Lower Plenum Molten Pool Module of Severe Accident Analysis Code in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Donggun; Kim, Dong-Ha; Park, Rae-Jun; Bae, Jun-Ho; Shim, Suk-Ku; Marigomen, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    To simulate a severe accident progression of nuclear power plant and forecast reactor pressure vessel failure, we develop computational software called COMPASS (COre Meltdown Progression Accident Simulation Software) for whole physical phenomena inside the reactor pressure vessel from a core heat-up to a vessel failure. As a part of COMPASS project, in the first phase of COMPASS development (2011 - 2014), we focused on the molten pool behavior in the lower plenum, heat-up and ablation of reactor vessel wall. Input from the core module of COMPASS is relocated melt composition and mass in time. Molten pool behavior is described based on the lumped parameter model. Heat transfers in between oxidic, metallic molten pools, overlying water, steam and debris bed are considered in the present study. The models and correlations used in this study are appropriately selected by the physical conditions of severe accident progression. Interaction between molten pools and reactor vessel wall is also simulated based on the lumped parameter model. Heat transfers between oxidic pool, thin crust of oxidic pool and reactor vessel wall are considered and we solve simple energy balance equations for the crust thickness of oxidic pool and reactor vessel wall. As a result, we simulate a benchmark calculation for APR1400 nuclear power plant, with assumption of relocated mass from the core is constant in time such that 0.2ton/sec. We discuss about the molten pool behavior and wall ablation, to validate our models and correlations used in the COMPASS. Stand-alone SIMPLE program is developed as the lower plenum molten pool module for the COMPASS in-vessel severe accident analysis code. SIMPLE program formulates the mass and energy balance for water, steam, particulate debris bed, molten corium pools and oxidic crust from the first principle and uses models and correlations as the constitutive relations for the governing equations. Limited steam table and the material properties are provided

  4. Rheinbraun`s experience in hot gas cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renzenbrink, W.; Wischnewski, R. [Rheinbraun AG, Koeln (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    For the introduction of modern types of power stations like IGCC, PCFBC, etc. the application of a functional hot gas filter is of essential importance. A hot gas filter with two tiers for dry and complete dedusting of the entire raw gas flow of 53,000 m{sup 3}(STP)/h was started up in 1993 in the High Temperature Winkler (HTW) coal gasification demonstration plant in Hurth/Berrenrath near Cologne, Germany. The operational data of the filter are a pressure of 10 bar and a temperature of 270{degree}C. The filter was supplied by the `LLB` company and is characterised by the principle of upright arrangement of the ceramic filter elements. During nearly 8,000 h of plant operation up to September 1995 the filter showed stable and safe operation, a separation efficiency of {gt}99.98%, a 21% reduction in filtration surface, reduction in cleaning gas requirement by factor 10, reduction in cleaning gas pressure to 16 bar and a significant reduction in maintenance and operating costs. The resultant clean gas dust content was {lt} 3 mg/m{sup 3}(STP) compared to the design value of 5 mg/m{sup 3}(STP). In a test to the limit of operation one failure occurred when 20 candles broke. In order to yield larger filtering surfaces in very large filter units, e.g. for IGCCs, without using more than one filter the multistage design is the only sensible solution. Prior to industrial-scale application such a system has to be tested. Therefore the two-tier filter was converted into a three-tier type with separate filter modules at the end of 1995. After another 5,400 h of plant operation this three-tier filter shows safe and stable operation with a clean gas dust content of {lt} 2 mg/m{sup 3}(STP). 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. European Experience after The Gas Directive On The Business

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, Tore

    1999-07-01

    The Gas Directive came into effect in August 1998. Its main building block is Third Party Access (TPA) to gas transmission and distribution. The transposition into national law in the Member States is in progress as planned. A much higher percentage of the market will be open to competition than the minimum required in the Gas Directive. This presentation asserts that those who have attempted to predict the outcome, the process and the timing of the ongoing development are largely people or organizations with vested interests either way or people who have simply ''transposed'' the UK model into a Continental setting. But there are much more important issues for the European gas industry than the EU liberalization process per se. The presentation discusses what the people in Shell call the Low Oil Price World, then the ''Tokyo'' implementation and then gas fundamentals in Europe. Finally, an attempt is given to see how the political and commercial processes that are already under way may unfold in the future.

  6. Study on cooling model for debris in lower plenum and countermeasures for prevention of focusing effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Zhonghua; Yu Hongxing; Jiang Guangming

    2008-01-01

    From the basic energy conservation equations and experimental or empirical correlations, an intact model is constructed for the thermal calculation of the core debris in the lower plenum. For verification of this model, the results of two calculations for AP600 and AP1000 plants are compared with those presented in relevant literature. The analysis highlights on the impact of the decay heat power density and the focusing effect. In order to mitigate the focusing effect, it is proposed in this paper to change the lower head profile from hemisphere to parabola. The results show that this change of lower head profile can change the heat flux distribution of the debris, and mitigate the focusing effect. (authors)

  7. Coolant mixing in LMFBR rod bundles and outlet plenum mixing transients. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todreas, N.E.; Cheng, S.K.; Basehore, K.

    1984-08-01

    This project principally undertook the investigation of the thermal hydraulic performance of wire wrapped fuel bundles of LMFBR configuration. Results obtained included phenomenological models for friction factors, flow split and mixing characteristics; correlations for predicting these characteristics suitable for insertion in design codes; numerical codes for analyzing bundle behavior both of the lumped subchannel and distributed parameter categories and experimental techniques for pressure velocity, flow split, salt conductivity and temperature measurement in water cooled mockups of bundles and subchannels. Flow regimes investigated included laminar, transition and turbulent flow under forced convection and mixed convection conditions. Forced convections conditions were emphasized. Continuing efforts are underway at MIT to complete the investigation of the mixed convection regime initiated here. A number of investigations on outlet plenum behavior were also made. The reports of these investigations are identified

  8. Ultrasonic experiment on hydrate formation of a synthesis gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Shicai; Fan, Shuanshi; Liang, Deqing; Zhang, Junshe; Feng, Ziping

    2005-07-01

    The effect of ultrasonic on the induction time and formation rate of natural gas hydrates was investigated in a stainless steel cell in this study. The results show that the induction time with ultrasonic was about 1/6 of that without ultrasonic and only about 1/10 if rehydration after decomposition in water-gas system. In sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution-gas system, the critical micellar concentration (CMC) was not identified with ultrasonic. The formation rate and storage capacity of hydrate increased with increasing SDS concentration at a range of 0 to 800ppm. However, the increase was insignificant as the SDS concentration increased from 600 to 800ppm, (Author)

  9. TRIO a general computer code for reactor 3-D flows analysis. Application to a LMFBR hot plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnaud, J.P.; Rouzaud, P.

    1985-09-01

    TRIO is a code developed at CEA to investigate general incompressible 2D and 3D viscous flows. Two calculations are presented: the lid driven cubic cavity at Re=400; steady state (velocity and temperature field) of a LMFBR hot plenum, carried out in order to prepare the calculation of a cold shock consecutive to a reactor scram. 8 refs., 26 figs.

  10. Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program. Interim report. Construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors is summarized along with technical descriptions of the plants. Included in the report are the AVR Experimental Pebble Bed Reactor, the Dragon Reactor, AGR Reactors, and the Thorium High Temperature Reactor (THTR). The study demonstrates that the European experience has been favorable and forms a good foundation for the development of Advanced High Temperature Reactors

  11. The first experience with LHC beam gas ionization monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M; Dehning, B; Guerrero, A; Patecki, M; Versteegen, R

    2012-01-01

    The Beam Gas Ionization Monitors (BGI) are used to measure beam emittance on LHC. This paper describes the detectors and their operation and discusses the issues met during the commissioning. It also discusses the various calibration procedures used to correct for non-uniformity of Multi-Channel plates and to correct the beam size for effects affecting the electron trajectory after ionization.

  12. Gas chromatographic column for the Viking 1975 molecular analysis experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, M.; Hayes, J. M.; Bruner, F.; Simmonds, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    A gas chromatographic column has been developed for use in the remote analysis of the Martian surface. The column, which utilizes a liquid-modified organic adsorbent (Tenax) as the stationary phase, provides efficient transmission and resolution of nanogram quantities of organic materials in the presence of millionfold excesses of water and carbon dioxide.

  13. Experience curve for natural gas production by hydraulic fracturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fukui, R.; Greenfield, C.; Pogue, K.; van der Zwaan, B.

    From 2007 to 2012 shale gas production in the US expanded at an astounding average growth rate of over 50yr, and thereby increased nearly tenfold over this short time period alone. Hydraulic fracturing technology, or ``fracking'', as well as new directional drilling techniques, played key roles in

  14. On-line gas chemistry experiments with trans actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turler, A.; Gaguller, B.; Jost, D.T.

    1993-01-01

    The latest achievements in the gas phase chemistry studies of elements 104 and 105 and their lighter homologs are reviewed. Experimental techniques employed in the studies are described. Experimental data on chlorides and bromides of the groups 4, 5 elements and elements 104, 105 are compared with their theoretically predicted chemical properties. 45 refs

  15. Resistive transition for two-dimensional superconductors: Comparison between experiments and Coulomb-gas-model predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minnhagen, P.

    1983-01-01

    The Coulomb-gas model of vortex fluctuations leads to scaling relations for the resistive transition which can be directly tested by experiments. By analyzing published resistance data, it is shown that there is experimental evidence for the Coulomb-gas scaling relation in the absence of a perpendicular magnetic field. It is also shown that there exists some suggestive support for the Coulomb-gas predictions in the presence of a magnetic field

  16. Preliminary findings of the Viking gas exchange experiment and a model for Martian surface chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, V.I.; Berdahl, B.J.; Carle, G.C.

    1977-01-01

    It is stated that O 2 and CO 2 were evolved from humidified Martian soil in the gas exchange experiment on Viking Lander 1. Small changes in N 2 gas were also recorded. A model of the morphology and a hypothesis of the mechanistics of the Martian surface are proposed. (author)

  17. Unconventional gas experience at El Paso Production Company : tapping into deep, tight gas and coalbed methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartley, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    The current conditions in the natural gas industry were reviewed, from the excellent current and projected energy prices to low activity and rig count. Various graphs were presented, depicting total proved dry gas reserves and annual production over time for the Gulf of Mexico, including its continental shelf, the Texas coastal plains, and the United States lower 48. Offshore growth of unconventional gas was also displayed. The key elements of the strategy were also discussed. These included: (1) earnings driven, (2) superior science, (3) innovative application of technology, (4) ability to act quickly and decisively, (5) leadership, management, and professional development, and (6) achieve learning curve economics. The core competencies were outlined along with recent discoveries in South Texas and the Upper Gulf Coast. figs

  18. A Membrane Gas Separation Experiment for the Undergraduate Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Richard A.; Sandall, Orville C.

    1991-01-01

    Described is a membrane experiment that provides students with experience in fundamental engineering skills such as mass balances, modeling, and using the computer as a research tool. Included are the experimental design, theory, method of solution, sample calculations, and conclusions. (KR)

  19. Small angle X-ray scattering experiments with three-dimensional imaging gas detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Monaca, A.; Iannuzzi, M.; Messi, R.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of small angle X-ray scattering of lupolen - R, dry collagen and dry cornea are presented. The experiments have been performed with synchrotron radiation and a new three-dimensional imaging drif-chamber gas detector

  20. Gas Chromatographic Determination of Methyl Salicylate in Rubbing Alcohol: An Experiment Employing Standard Addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Atta, Robert E.; Van Atta, R. Lewis

    1980-01-01

    Provides a gas chromatography experiment that exercises the quantitative technique of standard addition to the analysis for a minor component, methyl salicylate, in a commercial product, "wintergreen rubbing alcohol." (CS)

  1. Experience transfer in Norwegian oil and gas industry: Approaches and organizational mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aase, Karina

    1997-12-31

    The main objective of this thesis has been to explore how experience transfer works in Norwegian oil and gas industry. This includes how the concept of experience transfer is defined, what the barriers to achieve experience transfer are, how the oil and gas companies address experience transfer, and how these approaches work. The thesis is organized in five papers: (1) describes how organizational members perceive experience transfer and then specifies the organizational and structural barriers that must be overcome to achieve efficient transfer. (2) discusses the organizational means an oil company implements to address experience transfer. (3) describes a process of improving and using requirement and procedure handbooks for experience transfer. (4) explores how the use of information technology influences experience transfer. (5) compares organizational members` perceptions of experience transfer means in an oil company and an engineering company involved in offshore development projects. 277 refs., 3 figs., 29 tabs.

  2. Experience transfer in Norwegian oil and gas industry: Approaches and organizational mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aase, Karina

    1998-12-31

    The main objective of this thesis has been to explore how experience transfer works in Norwegian oil and gas industry. This includes how the concept of experience transfer is defined, what the barriers to achieve experience transfer are, how the oil and gas companies address experience transfer, and how these approaches work. The thesis is organized in five papers: (1) describes how organizational members perceive experience transfer and then specifies the organizational and structural barriers that must be overcome to achieve efficient transfer. (2) discusses the organizational means an oil company implements to address experience transfer. (3) describes a process of improving and using requirement and procedure handbooks for experience transfer. (4) explores how the use of information technology influences experience transfer. (5) compares organizational members` perceptions of experience transfer means in an oil company and an engineering company involved in offshore development projects. 277 refs., 3 figs., 29 tabs.

  3. Experience with managing, operating and maintaining gas turbine powerplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadman, B.

    1994-01-01

    Stewart ampersand Stevenson, a major supplier of gas turbine powered cogeneration systems to worldwide markets, established plant management, operations and maintenance capabilities in 1985 in order to provide complete service capability to the customer. As of the fall of 1993, twenty-two individual cogeneration facilities are now being operated and maintained by this company with a total capacity of 1100+ MW. More than 300 plant management and operating personnel are employed in this operation. To date, activities have been concentrated in North and South America. Negotiations are in process in a number of other areas including the Pacific Rim, China, and several Middle East countries. 7 figs

  4. Exposure experiments of trees to sulfur dioxide gas. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otani, A.

    1974-12-01

    The effects of gaseous sulfur dioxide on trees were studied. Twenty species of plant seedlings (70 cm in height) including Cedrus deodara, Metasequoia glyptostroboides, Ginkgo biloba, Celmus parvifolia var. albo-marginata, Pinus thumbergii, P. densiflora, Cryptomeria japonica, and Quercus myrsinaefolia, were exposed in a room to gaseous sulfur dioxide at 0.8 ppm for 7.5 hr/day (from 9 am to 4:30 pm) for 24 days at a temperature of 20-35 deg C and RH of 55-75%. Visible damage to plants was lighter in C.j. and Chamae cyparis obtusa, more severe in P.t., G.b., and C.d. The damage appeared earlier in G.b., Cinnamomum camphona, and Ilex rotunda, and the change of early symptoms was smaller in P.t., C.j., and C.o. The leaves of the 4-5th positions from the sprout were apt to be damaged. Although the sulfur content of exposed leaves increased markedly, that in other parts did not increase. Because of the high concentration of the gas and the short period of exposure, the absorption of sulfur into leaves should have differed from the situation in fields where longer exposure to lower concentrations of the gas would be expected. 6 references.

  5. Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure Ventilation Rates in Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunden, Melissa [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faulkner, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Heredia, Elizabeth [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cohn, Sebastian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dickerhoff, Darryl [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Noris, Federico [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Logue, Jennifer [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hotchi, Toshifumi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singer, Brett [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This report documents experiments performed in three homes to assess the methodology used to determine air exchange rates using passive tracer techniques. The experiments used four different tracer gases emitted simultaneously but implemented with different spatial coverage in the home. Two different tracer gas sampling methods were used. The results characterize the factors of the execution and analysis of the passive tracer technique that affect the uncertainty in the calculated air exchange rates. These factors include uncertainties in tracer gas emission rates, differences in measured concentrations for different tracer gases, temporal and spatial variability of the concentrations, the comparison between different gas sampling methods, and the effect of different ventilation conditions.

  6. In situ water and gas injection experiments performed in the Hades Underground Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volckaert, G.; Ortiz, L.; Put, M. [SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium). Geological Waste Disposal Unit

    1995-12-31

    The movement of water and gas through plastic clay is an important subject in the research at SCK-CEN on the possible disposal of high level radioactive waste in the Boom clay layer at Mol. Since the construction of the Hades underground research facility in 1983, SCK-CEN has developed and installed numerous piezometers for the geohydrologic characterization and for in situ radionuclide migration experiments. In situ gas and water injection experiments have been performed at two different locations in the underground laboratory. The first location is a multi filter piezometer installed vertically at the bottom of the shaft in 1986. The second location is a three dimensional configuration of four horizontal multi piezometers installed from the gallery. This piezometer configuration was designed for the MEGAS (Modelling and Experiments on GAS migration through argillaceous rocks) project and installed in 1992. It contains 29 filters at distances between 10 m and 15 m from the gallery in the clay. Gas injection experiments show that gas breakthrough occurs at a gas overpressure of about 0.6 MPa. The breakthrough occurs by the creation of gas pathways along the direction of lowest resistance i.e. the zone of low effective stress resulting from the drilling of the borehole. The water injections performed in a filter -- not used for gas injection -- show that the flow of water is also influenced by the mechanical stress conditions. Low effective stress leads to higher hydraulic conductivity. However, water overpressures up to 1.3 MPa did not cause hydrofracturing. Water injections performed in a filter previously used for gas injections, show that the occluded gas hinders the water flow and reduces the hydraulic conductivity by a factor two.

  7. Experiments on toroidal inductively coupled alternating-current gas discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lok, J.

    1976-01-01

    This report is on an experimental study of a toroidal, inductively coupled a.c. gas discharge sustained at pressures roughly between one tenth of a Torr and some tens of Torrs. After breakdown is obtained at low pressure, additional gas is let in. The energy is inductively coupled into the electrodeless discharge by means of an iron core transformer of which the toroidal plasma column is the secondary winding. The power dissipated in the plasma is between 80 and 260 kW and is delivered by a motor-generator system at a frequency of 8 kHz for times up to 2 seconds. A toroidal magnetic field of 0.5 T maximum can be supplied in a short pulse. Five different gases (hydrogen, deuterium, helium, argon, and nitrogen) are used. The pressure range in which the discharges are sustained is specified, and the dynamic current-voltage characteristics are given for different pressures. Some typical streak pictures with simultaneously obtained recordings of the time behaviour of the discharge current and of the loop voltage are presented for the initial phase - at low pressure - of the discharge. The shape and the position of fully developed discharges at various pressures are discussed on the basis of photographic observations. The temperature of hydrogen plasmas is derived both from the electrical conductivity and from the emission of line radiation. The values of the temperature obtained in these ways differ in magnitude and in time behaviour. A possible explanation of the discrepancy can be obtained in terms of expansion and contraction of electron density and temperature profiles during a period of the discharge current, if it is taken into account that the main part of the light emission always originates from the outer colder regions of the plasma. In a somewhat different pressure regime, this picture is confirmed by microwave measurements

  8. Preliminary experiences with 222Rn gas in Arizona homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearfott, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    Results of a survey of 222Rn gas using four-day charcoal canister tests in 759 Arizona homes are reported. Although the study was not random with respect to population or land area, it was useful in identifying areas at risk and locating several homes having elevated indoor 222Rn air concentrations. Approximately 18% of the homes tested exceeded 150 Bq m-3 (4 pCi L-1), with 7% exceeding 300 Bq m-3 (8 pCi L-1). Several Arizona cities had larger fractions of homes exceeding 150 Bq m-3 (4 pCi L-1), such as Carefree and Cave Creek (23%), Paradise Valley (30%), Payson (33%), and Prescott (31%). The Granite Dells and Groom Creek areas of Prescott had in excess of 40-60% of the houses tested exceeding 150 Bq m-3 (4 pCi L-1). Elevated 222Rn concentrations were measured for a variety of home types having different construction materials. Private well water was identified as a potentially significant source of 222Rn gas in Prescott homes, with water from one well testing over 3.5 MBq m-3 (94,000 pCi L-1). A 222Rn concentration in air exceeding 410,000 Bq m-3 (11,000 pCi L-1) was measured using a four-day charcoal canister test in a house in Prescott which had a well opening into a living space. Additional measurements in this 150-m3 dwelling revealed a strikingly heterogeneous 222Rn concentration. The excessive 222Rn level in the dwelling was reduced to less than 190 Bq m-3 (5.2 pCi L-1) by sealing the well head with caulking and providing passive ventilation through a pipe

  9. Size estimates of nobel gas clusters by Rayleigh scattering experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pinpin Zhu (朱频频); Guoquan Ni (倪国权); Zhizhan Xu (徐至展)

    2003-01-01

    Noble gases (argon, krypton, and xenon) are puffed into vacuum through a nozzle to produce clusters for studying laser-cluster interactions. Good estimates of the average size of the argon, krypton and xenon clusters are made by carrying out a series of Rayleigh scattering experiments. In the experiments, we have found that the scattered signal intensity varied greatly with the opening area of the pulsed valve. A new method is put forward to choose the appropriate scattered signal and measure the size of Kr cluster.

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of the VHTR Lower Plenum Standard Problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Richard W.; Schultz, Richard R.

    2009-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy is promoting the resurgence of nuclear power in the U. S. for both electrical power generation and production of process heat required for industrial processes such as the manufacture of hydrogen for use as a fuel in automobiles. The DOE project is called the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) and is based on a Generation IV reactor concept called the very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which will use helium as the coolant at temperatures ranging from 450 C to perhaps 1000 C. While computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has not been used for past safety analysis for nuclear reactors in the U.S., it is being considered for safety analysis for existing and future reactors. It is fully recognized that CFD simulation codes will have to be validated for flow physics reasonably close to actual fluid dynamic conditions expected in normal and accident operational situations. To this end, experimental data have been obtained in a scaled model of a narrow slice of the lower plenum of a prismatic VHTR. The present report presents results of CFD examinations of these data to explore potential issues with the geometry, the initial conditions, the flow dynamics and the data needed to fully specify the inlet and boundary conditions; results for several turbulence models are examined. Issues are addressed and recommendations about the data are made

  11. Current collector design for closed-plenum polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, F. A.; Attingre, C.; Kucernak, A. R.; Brett, D. J. L.

    2014-03-01

    This work presents a non-isothermal, single-phase, three-dimensional model of the effects of current collector geometry in a 5 cm2 closed-plenum polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell constructed using printed circuit boards (PCBs). Two geometries were considered in this study: parallel slot and circular hole designs. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package was used to account for species, momentum, charge and membrane water distribution within the cell for each design. The model shows that the cell can reach high current densities in the range of 0.8 A cm-2-1.2 A cm-2 at 0.45 V for both designs. The results indicate that the transport phenomena are significantly governed by the flow field plate design. A sensitivity analysis on the channel opening ratio shows that the parallel slot design with a 50% opening ratio shows the most promising performance due to better species, heat and charge distribution. Modelling and experimental analysis confirm that flooding inhibits performance, but the risk can be minimised by reducing the relative humidity of the cathode feed to 50%. Moreover, overheating is a potential problem due to the insulating effect of the PCB base layer and as such strategies should be implemented to combat its adverse effects.

  12. Upper plenum break LOCA investigation in the ISB-VVER and PSB-VVER facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blinkov, V. N.; Melikhov, O. I.; Lipatov, I. A.; Nikonov, S. M.; Dremin, G. I.; Galchanskaya, S. A.; Gashenko, M. P.; Rovnov, A. A.; Kapustin, A. V.; Elkin, I. V. [EREC, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2003-07-01

    The capability to define the actual NPP transient/accident scenario depends to a great extent on facilities' scaling and reliability of the system thermalhydraulic codes which, in turn, are assessed against the experimental data taken in the same facilities. At the present time, it is received fact that the rigorous modeling of the cumulative set of all thermalhydraulic processes in the plant primary and secondary sides during accident is unfeasible. Therefore, the extrapolation of the facilities loops behavior to the actual systems constitutes a fundamental problem in this area. In the paper, some aspects for the problem have been discussed in the course of comparative analysis of the data derived from the 11 % upper plenum break LOCA tests performed in the PSB-VVER and ISB-VVER integral test facilities under the close scenarios. Both facilities, PSB-VVER and ISB-VVER, are modeled the same VVER-1000 reactor in different scales. The thermalhydraulic behavior of the primary systems in both facilities has been discussed in the paper, and shown to be similar. Also, the attention has been focused upon the discrepancies in the significant variables trends. The discrepancies are shown to be caused by influence of peculiarities of the facilities hardware and due to the scale factor. The scaling study is an important aspect of the thermalhydraulic codes verification procedure. Being qualified against the experimentally simulated accident sequence in two test facilities of different scales, the thermalhydraulic codes will be capable of evaluation of the prototype behavior to greater accuracy.

  13. Studies of flow stratification in the hot plenum of an LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, P; Hickmott, S [Central Electricity Generating Board, Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories, Berkeley, Gloucestershire (United Kingdom)

    1983-07-01

    The paper reviews work at Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories on the extent and effects of buoyancy in the hot plenum of an LMFBR. It summarizes the experimental, theoretical and numerical work has has been conducted to aid the understanding of the complex transient flows which occur following a reactor trip. The experimental work has been conducted in small-scale idealised geometries which isolate the essential features of the reactor flows and is not intended to provide detailed design data. An integral theory has been devised to describe the thermal hydraulics of negatively-buoyant jets. The predictions are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results and emphasize the need to correctly represent the inlet velocity and temperature profiles. Some preliminary calculations with a transient, two-dimensional, finite-element code are compared with the experimental results. These calculations reproduce the overall features of the flows but not the details of the stratified interface. The development of turbulence models for stratified flows is seen as a fruitful area for further research. (author)

  14. Validation of mechanistic models for gas precipitation in solids during postirradiation annealing experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rest, J.

    1989-12-01

    A number of different phenomenological models for gas precipitation in solids during postirradiation annealing experiments have been proposed. Validation of such mechanistic models for gas release and swelling is complicated by the use of data containing large systematic errors, and phenomena characterized by synergistic effects as well as uncertainties in materials properties. Statistical regression analysis is recommended for the selection of a reasonably well characterized data base for gas release from irradiated fuel under transient heating conditions. It is demonstrated that an appropriate data selection method is required in order to realistically examine the impact of differing descriptions of the phenomena, and uncertainties in selected materials properties, on the validation results. The results of the analysis show that the kinetics of gas precipitation in solids depend on bubble overpressurization effects and need to be accounted for during the heatup phase of isothermal heating experiments. It is shown that if only the total gas release values (as opposed to time-dependent data) were available, differentiation between different gas precipitation models would be ambiguous. The observed sustained increase in the fractional release curve at relatively high temperatures after the total precipitation of intragranular gas in fission gas bubbles is ascribed to the effects of a grain-growth/grain-boundary sweeping mechanism.

  15. Validation of mechanistic models for gas precipitation in solids during postirradiation annealing experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rest, J.

    1989-01-01

    A number of different phenomenological models for gas precipitation in solids during postirradiation annealing experiments have been proposed. Validation of such mechanistic models for gas release and swelling is complicated by the use of data containing large systematic errors, and phenomena characterized by synergistic effects as well as uncertainties in materials properties. Statistical regression analysis is recommended for the selection of a reasonably well characterized data base for gas release from irradiated fuel under transient heating conditions. It is demonstrated that an appropriate data selection method is required in order to realistically examine the impact of differing descriptions of the phenomena, and uncertainties in selected materials properties, on the validation results. The results of the analysis show that the kinetics of gas precipitation in solid depend on bubble overpressurization effects and need to be accounted for during the heatup phase of isothermal heating experiments. It is shown that if only the total gas release values (as opposed to time-dependent data) were available, differentiation between different gas precipitation models would be ambiguous. The observed sustained increase in the fractional release curve at relatively high temperatures after the total precipitation of intragranular gas in fission gas bubbles is ascribed to the effects of a grain-growth/grain-boundary sweeping mechanism. (orig.)

  16. Compressible Convection Experiment using Xenon Gas in a Centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menaut, R.; Alboussiere, T.; Corre, Y.; Huguet, L.; Labrosse, S.; Deguen, R.; Moulin, M.

    2017-12-01

    We present here an experiment especially designed to study compressible convection in the lab. For significant compressible convection effects, the parameters of the experiment have to be optimized: we use xenon gaz in a cubic cell. This cell is placed in a centrifuge to artificially increase the apparent gravity and heated from below. With these choices, we are able to reach a dissipation number close to Earth's outer core value. We will present our results for different heating fluxes and rotation rates. We success to observe an adiabatic gradient of 3K/cm in the cell. Studies of pressure and temperature fluctuations lead us to think that the convection takes place under the form of a single roll in the cell for high heating flux. Moreover, these fluctuations show that the flow is geostrophic due to the high rotation speed. This important role of rotation, via Coriolis force effects, in our experimental setup leads us to develop a 2D quasigeostrophic compressible model in the anelastic liquid approximation. We test numerically this model with the finite element solver FreeFem++ and compare its results with our experimental data. In conclusion, we will present our project for the next experiment in which the cubic cell will be replace by a annulus cell. We will discuss the new expected effects due to this geometry as Rossby waves and zonal flows.

  17. Autoresonant-spectrometric determination of the residual gas composition in the ALPHA experiment apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amole, C.; Capra, A.; Menary, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3 (Canada); Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Little, A.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Turner, M. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States); Bertsche, W. [Department of Physics, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, United Kingdom and The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Butler, E. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cesar, C. L.; Silveira, D. M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Charlton, M.; Eriksson, S.; Isaac, C. A.; Madsen, N.; Napoli, S. C. [Department of Physics, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration; and others

    2013-06-15

    Knowledge of the residual gas composition in the ALPHA experiment apparatus is important in our studies of antihydrogen and nonneutral plasmas. A technique based on autoresonant ion extraction from an electrostatic potential well has been developed that enables the study of the vacuum in our trap. Computer simulations allow an interpretation of our measurements and provide the residual gas composition under operating conditions typical of those used in experiments to produce, trap, and study antihydrogen. The methods developed may also be applicable in a range of atomic and molecular trap experiments where Penning-Malmberg traps are used and where access is limited.

  18. Modeling gas migration experiments in repository host rocks for the MEGAS project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worgan, K.; Impey, M.; Volckaert, G.; DePreter, P.

    1993-01-01

    In response to concerns over the possibility of hydrogen gas generation within an underground repository for high-level radioactive waste, and its implications for repository safety, a joint European research study (MEGAS) is underway. Its aims are to understand and characterize the behavior of gas migration within an argillacious, host-rock. Laboratory experiments are being carried out by SCK/CEN, BGS and ISMES. SCK/CEN are also conducting in situ experiments at the underground laboratory at Mol, Belgium. Modeling of gas migration is being done in parallel with the experiments, by Intera Information Technologies. A two-phase flow code, TOPAZ, has been developed specifically for this work. In this paper the authors report on the results of some preliminary calculations performed with TOPAZ, in advance of the in situ experiments

  19. Prediction of corium debris characteristics in lower plenum of a nordic BWR in different accident scenarios using MELCOR code - 15367

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phung, V.A.; Galushin, S.; Raub, S.; Goronovski, A.; Villanueva, W.; Koeoep, K; Grishchenko, D.; Kudinov, P.

    2015-01-01

    Severe accident management strategy in Nordic boiling water reactors (BWRs) relies on ex-vessel core debris coolability. The mode of corium melt release from the vessel determines conditions for ex-vessel accident progression and threats to containment integrity, e.g., formation of a non-coolable debris bed and possibility of energetic steam explosion. In-vessel core degradation and relocation is an important stage which determines characteristics of corium debris in the vessel lower plenum, such as mass, composition, thermal properties, timing of relocation, and decay heat. These properties affect debris reheating and remelting, melt interactions with the vessel structures, and possibly vessel failure and melt ejection mode. Core degradation and relocation is contingent upon the accident scenario parameters such as recovery time and capacity of safety systems. The goal of this work is to obtain a better understanding of the impact of the accident scenarios and timing of the events on core relocation phenomena and resulting properties of the debris bed in the vessel lower plenum of Nordic BWRs. In this study, severe accidents in a Nordic BWR reference plant are initiated by a station black out event, which is the main contributor to core damage frequency of the reactor. The work focuses on identifying ranges of debris bed characteristics in the lower plenum as functions of the accident scenario with different recovery timing and capacity of safety systems. The severe accident analysis code MELCOR coupled with GA-IDPSA is used in this work. GA-IDPSA is a Genetic Algorithm-based Integrated Deterministic Probabilistic Safety Analysis tool, which has been developed to search uncertain input parameter space. The search is guided by different target functions. Scenario grouping and clustering approach is applied in order to estimate the ranges of debris characteristics and identify scenario regions of core relocation that can lead to significantly different debris bed

  20. Gas explosion characterization, wave propagation (small-scale experiments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, G.C.

    1985-01-01

    A number of experiments have been performed with blast waves arising from the ignition of homogeneous and well defined mixtures of methane, oxygen and nitrogen, contained within spherical balloons with controlled initial dimensions. In the initial small scale experiments pressure characteristics, ground reflection phenomena and pressure distribution on box like obstacles were studied. Both configurations with one box and two closely spaced boxes have been considered, and a wave-wave interaction phenomenom was observed in the case of closely spaced obstacles. Main emphasis has been placed on the half scale field experiments. In these, the maximum flame speed has been of the order of 100 m/s, resulting in positive peak pressures of 50-100.10 2 Pa in 5 - 10 m distance from the source. The explosion process was found to be reasonable symmetric. The attenuation of the blast wave due to vegetation and the influence of obstacles as banks, walls and houses on the pressure field have been investigated. The presence of the bank and the house was felt in a zone with a length corresponding to a typical dimension of the obstacles, whereas the overall pressure field is shown to be unaffected by the type of obstacles and vegetation investigated. For the wall and house, reflection factors have been established, and some variation over the surface has been measured. The scatter of the pressure measurements is estimated for stable, neutral and unstable atmospheric conditions, and an attempt to determine the ground reflection factor has been performed. Finally the accelerations of a house exposed to the blast wave have been examined

  1. Decontamination and demolition of a former plutonium processing facility's process exhaust system, firescreen, and filter plenum buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaFrate, P.J. Jr.; Stout, D.S.; Elliott, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Decommissioning Project has decontaminated, demolished, and decommissioned a process exhaust system, two filter plenum buildings, and a firescreen plenum structure at Technical Area 21 (TA-2 1). The project began in August 1995 and was completed in January 1996. These high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums and associated ventilation ductwork provided process exhaust to fume hoods and glove boxes in TA-21 Buildings 2 through 5 when these buildings were active plutonium and uranium processing and research facilities. This paper summarizes the history of TA-21 plutonium and uranium processing and research activities and provides a detailed discussion of integrated work process controls, characterize-as-you-go methodology, unique engineering controls, decontamination techniques, demolition methodology, waste minimization, and volume reduction. Also presented in detail are the challenges facing the LANL Decommissioning Project to safely and economically decontaminate and demolish surplus facilities and the unique solutions to tough problems. This paper also shows the effectiveness of the integrated work package concept to control work through all phases

  2. Decontamination and demolition of a former plutonium processing facility's process exhaust system, firescreen, and filter plenum buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaFrate, P.J. Jr.; Stout, D.S.; Elliott, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Decommissioning Project has decontaminated, demolished, and decommissioned a process exhaust system, two filter plenum buildings, and a firescreen plenum structure at Technical Area 21 (TA-21). The project began in August 1995 and was completed in January 1996. These high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums and associated ventilation ductwork provided process exhaust to fume hoods and glove boxes in TA-21 Buildings 2 through 5 when these buildings were active plutonium and uranium processing and research facilities. This paper summarizes the history of TA-21 plutonium and uranium processing and research activities and provides a detailed discussion of integrated work process controls, characterize-as-you-go methodology, unique engineering controls, decontamination techniques, demolition methodology, waste minimization, and volume reduction. Also presented in detail are the challenges facing the LANL Decommissioning Project to safely and economically decontaminate and demolish surplus facilities and the unique solutions to tough problems. This paper also shows the effectiveness of the integrated work package concept to control work through all phases

  3. Nondestructive fission gas release measurement and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Leary, P.M.; Packard, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Siemens Power Corporation (SPC) has performed reactor poolside gamma scanning measurements of fuel rods for fission gas release (FGR) detection for more than 10 yr. The measurement system has been previously described. Over the years, the data acquisition system, the method of spectrum analysis, and the means of reducing spectrum interference have been significantly improved. A personal computer (PC)-based multichannel analyzer (MCA) package is used to collect, display, and store high-resolution gamma-ray spectra measured in the fuel rod plenum. A PC spread sheet is used to fit the measured spectra and compute sample count rates after Compton background subtraction. A Zircaloy plenum spacer is often used to reduce positron annihilation interference that can arise from the INCONEL reg-sign plenum spring used in SPC-manufactured fuel rods

  4. Gas reactor and associated nuclear experience in the UK relevant to high temperature reactor engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beech, D.J.; May, R.

    2000-01-01

    In the UK, the NNC played a leading role in the design and build of all of the UK's commercial magnox reactors and advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGRs). It was also involved in the DRAGON project and was responsible for producing designs for large scale HTRs and other gas reactor designs employing helium and carbon dioxide coolants. This paper addresses the gas reactor experience and its relevance to the current HTR designs under development which use helium as the coolant, through the consideration of a representative sample of the issues addressed in the UK by the NNC in support of the AGR and other reactor programmes. Modern HTR designs provide unique engineering challenges. The success of the AGR design, reflected in the extended lifetimes agreed upon by the licensing authorities at many stations, indicates that these challenges can be successfully overcome. The UK experience is unique and provides substantial support to future gas reactor and high temperature engineering studies. (authors)

  5. Gas explosion characterization, wave propagation (small scale experiments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, G.C.

    1985-08-01

    A number of experiments have been performed with blast waves arising from the ignition of homogeneous and well defined mixtures of methane, oxygen and nitrogen, contained within spherical balloons with controlled initial dimensions. The pressure characteristics has been studied for blast waves with and without influence from reflected waves. The influence of obstacles in the flow field has also been treated. Both configuration with one box and two closely spaced boxes have been considered, and a wave-wave interaction phenomenon was observed in the case of closely spaced obstacles. Moreover reflection coefficients have been established and some pressure variations over the surfaces have been observed. An acoustic appriximation has been used to model the blast wave originating from an expanding sphere. It has been demonstrated, that the generated pressure pulse is very sensitive to the expansion rate. Calculated and measured data have been compared, and a reasonable agreement has been found. (author)

  6. Experience in oil field processing of gas and condensate at the Shatlyk deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmatov, V.V.; Chernikov, Ye.I.; Govorun, V.P.; Turevskiy, Ye.N.

    1983-01-01

    The operation of installations for preparing gas are analyzed, along with the operation of individual technological devices at the Shatlyk deposit, the basic things which hinder the support of the designed low temperature conditions are shown and recommendations for standardizing the operation of the technological installations are given. Experience in the operation of the gas preparation installations at the Shatlyk deposit is recommended for use in deposits being introduced into development.

  7. Three-dimensional Simulation of Gas Conductance Measurement Experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotler, D.P.; LaBombard, B.

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutral transport simulations of gas flow through the Alcator C-Mod subdivertor yield conductances comparable to those found in dedicated experiments. All are significantly smaller than the conductance found with the previously used axisymmetric geometry. A benchmarking exercise of the code against known conductance values for gas flow through a simple pipe provides a physical basis for interpreting the comparison of the three-dimensional and experimental C-Mod conductances

  8. Operating experiences of gas purification system of Heavy Water Plant Talcher (Paper No. 1.11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, R.; Mohanty, P.R.; Pandey, B.L.

    1992-01-01

    The operating experiences with the purification system installed at Heavy Water Plant, Talcher for purification of feed synthesis gas from fertilizer plant is described. The purification system has performed satisfactorily even with levels of impurities as much as 15 to 20 ppm of oxygen and carbon monoxide. The system could not however be tested at designed gas throughput and on a sustained basis. However, increase in gas throughput upto the design value is not expected to pose any problem on the performance of the purification system. (author). 5 figs

  9. Study of microstrip gas chambers for CMS experiment and measurement of the W boson mass in the DELPHI experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripp-Baudot, I.

    2004-06-01

    In this document the author describes 3 fields of his research activities: first, the development and validation tests of micro-strip gas chambers for the CMS experiment; secondly, the measurements of the W boson mass and width by analysing the events: e + e - → W + W - → qq-bar qq-bar whose data have been collected in the DELPHI experiment (at the LEP-2 accelerator); and thirdly, the tagging of b-jets that is an essential tool for the study of the top quark. The last chapter is dedicated to what is expected from LHC experiments concerning the properties of the quark top: mass, spin, production and decay channels

  10. Integral analysis of debris material and heat transport in reactor vessel lower plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, K.Y.; Henry, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    An integral, fast-running, two-region model has been developed to characterize the debris material and heat transport in the reactor lower plenum under severe accident conditions. The debris bed is segregated into the oxidic pool and an overlying metallic layer. Debris crusts can develop on three surfaces: the top of the molten pool, the RPV wall, and the internal structures. To account for the decay heat generation, the crust temperature profile is assumed to be parabolic. The oxidic debris pool is homogeneously mixed and has the same material composition, and hence the same thermophysical properties, as the crusts, while the metallic constituents are assumed to rise to the top of the debris pool. Steady-state relationships are used to describe the heat transfer rates, with the assessment of solid or liquid state, and the liquid superheat in the pool being based on the average debris temperature. Natural convection heat transfer from the molten debris pool to the upper, lower and embedded crusts is calculated based on the pool Rayleigh number with the conduction heat transfer from the crusts being determined by the crust temperature profile. The downward heat flux is transferred to the lowest part of the RPV lower head through a crust-to-RPV contact resistance. The sideward heat flux is transferred to the upper regions of the RPV lower head as well as to the internal structures. The upward heat flux goes to the metal layer, water, or available heat sink structures above. Quenching due to water ingression is modeled separately from the energy transfer through the crust. The RPV wall temperature distribution and the primary system pressure are utilized to estimate challenges to the RPV integrity. ((orig.))

  11. Helium turbomachinery operating experience from gas turbine power plants and test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Colin F.

    2012-01-01

    The closed-cycle gas turbine, pioneered and deployed in Europe, is not well known in the USA. Since nuclear power plant studies currently being conducted in several countries involve the coupling of a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a helium closed-cycle gas turbine power conversion system, the experience gained from operated helium turbomachinery is the focus of this paper. A study done as early as 1945 foresaw the use of a helium closed-cycle gas turbine coupled with a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor, and some two decades later this was investigated but not implemented because of lack of technology readiness. However, the first practical use of helium as a gas turbine working fluid was recognized for cryogenic processes, and the first two small fossil-fired helium gas turbines to operate were in the USA for air liquefaction and nitrogen production facilities. In the 1970's a larger helium gas turbine plant and helium test facilities were built and operated in Germany to establish technology bases for a projected future high efficiency large nuclear gas turbine power plant concept. This review paper covers the experience gained, and the lessons learned from the operation of helium gas turbine plants and related test facilities, and puts these into perspective since over three decades have passed since they were deployed. An understanding of the many unexpected events encountered, and how the problems, some of them serious, were resolved is important to avoid them being replicated in future helium turbomachines. The valuable lessons learned in the past, in many cases the hard way, particularly from the operation in Germany of the Oberhausen II 50 MWe helium gas turbine plant, and the technical know-how gained from the formidable HHV helium turbine test facility, are viewed as being germane in the context of current helium turbomachine design work being done for future high efficiency nuclear gas turbine plant concepts. - Highlights:

  12. Generation of the line radiation of argon added to DT gas in Iskra-5 experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel'kov, S.A.; Bessarab, A.V.; Veselov, A.V.; Gaidash, V.A.; Dolgoleva, G.V.; Zhidkov, N.V.; Izgorodin, V.M.; Kirillov, G.A.; Kochemasov, G.G.; Litvin, D.N.; Martynenko, S.P.; Mitrofanov, E.I.; Murugov, V.M.; Mkhitar'yan, L.S.; Petrov, S.I.; Pinegin, A.V.; Punin, V.T.; Suslov, N.A.

    1998-01-01

    The first experiments measuring the density of a compressed deuterium and tritium mixture in microtargets of indirect irradiation (x-ray targets) were performed at the Iskra-5 facility. The density was determined according to the broadening of the lines of hydrogen- and helium-like argon added to the DT gas as a diagnostics material. A series of three experiments was performed with x-ray targets in which the central capsule filled with a DT+Ar mixture over a range of shell thicknesses. In two of the experiments, argon emission spectra were recorded and the density of the compressed gas was determined. For a microtarget approximately 280 μm in diameter with a wall approximately 7 μm thick, an analysis of the experimental results yielded an estimated density in the compressed gas of ∼1 g/cm 3 . Gas-dynamic calculations using the SNDA (spectral nonequilibrium diffusion with absorption) program show that argon emission takes place just after reaching maximum temperature, but much sooner than maximum compression. The results of a calculation for an experiment with low relative Ar concentration are in overall agreement with the experimental data. Additional investigations are needed to interpret experiments at a relatively high concentration

  13. Stimulating shale gas development in China: A comparison with the US experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Lei; Wang, Zhongmin; Krupnick, Alan; Liu, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we use the US shale gas experience to shed light on how China might overcome the innovation problem inherent in exploring and developing shale gas plays with complex geology. We separate shale gas development into two stages, an innovation stage and a scaling-up stage, with the first presenting a much bigger challenge than the latter. Our analysis suggests that China's national oil companies offer the best hope for overcoming the innovation problem. China's policy of opening shale gas development to new entrants is a market-oriented reform that can be justified on various grounds, but the new entrants will not play a major role in overcoming the innovation problem even though they may help scale up production later on. - Highlights: • We separate shale gas development into an innovation stage and a scaling up stage. • We use the US experience to elucidate how China may solve the innovation problem. • China has to rely on its national oil companies to solve the innovation problem. • Opening shale gas development to new entrants can be justified on several grounds. • New entrants will not help overcome the innovation problem

  14. Partner Country Series: Gas Pricing - China's Challenges and IEA Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    China will play a positive role in the global development of gas, the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) Executive Director, Maria Van der Hoeven has said in Beijing on 11 September, 2012 when launching a new IEA report: Gas Pricing and Regulation, China’s challenges and IEA experiences. In line with its aim to meet growing energy demand while shifting away from coal, China has set an ambitious goal of doubling its use of natural gas from 2011 levels by 2015. Prospects are good for significant new supplies – both domestic and imported, conventional and unconventional – to come online in the medium-term, but notable challenges remain, particularly concerning gas pricing and the institutional and regulatory landscape. While China’s circumstances are, in many respects unique, some current issues are similar to those a number of IEA countries have faced. This report highlights some key challenges China faces in its transition to greater reliance on natural gas, then explores in detail relevant experiences from IEA countries, particularly in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and the United States as well as the European Union (EU). Preliminary suggestions about how lessons learned in other countries could be applied to China’s situation are offered as well. The aim of this report is to provide stakeholders in China with a useful reference as they consider decisions about the evolution of the gas sector in their country.

  15. Noble Gas Leak Detector for Use in the SNS Neutron Electric Dipole Moment Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Chad; Huffman, Paul; Leung, Kent; Korobkina, Ekaterina; White, Christian; nEDM Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Common practice for leak-checking high vacuum systems uses helium as the probing gas. However, helium may permeate some materials at room temperature, making leak characterization difficult. The experiment to find a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron (nEDM), to be conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratories, will employ a large volume of liquid helium housed by such a helium-permeable composite material. It is desirable to construct a leak detector that can employ alternative test gases. The purpose of this experiment is to create a leak detector that can quantify the argon gas flux in a high vacuum environment and interpret this flux as a leak-rate. This apparatus will be used to check the nEDM volumes for leaks at room temperature before cooling down to cryogenic temperatures. Our leak detector uses a residual gas analyzer and a vacuum pumping station to characterize the gas present in an evacuated volume. The introduction of argon gas into the system is interpreted as a leak-rate into the volume. The device has been calibrated with NIST certified calibrated leaks and the machine's sensitivity has been calculated using background gas analysis. As a result of the device construction and software programming, we are able to leak-check composite and polyamide volumes This work was supported in part by the US Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER41042.

  16. Daily Thermal Predictions of the AGR-1 Experiment with Gas Gaps Varying with Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant Hawkes; James Sterbentz; John Maki; Binh Pham

    2012-06-01

    A new daily as-run thermal analysis was performed at the Idaho National Laboratory on the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) test experiment number one at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This thermal analysis incorporates gas gaps changing with time during the irradiation experiment. The purpose of this analysis was to calculate the daily average temperatures of each compact to compare with experimental results. Post irradiation examination (PIE) measurements of the graphite holder and fuel compacts showed the gas gaps varying from the beginning of life. The control temperature gas gap and the fuel compact – graphite holder gas gaps were linearly changed from the original fabrication dimensions, to the end of irradiation measurements. A steady-state thermal analysis was performed for each daily calculation. These new thermal predictions more closely match the experimental data taken during the experiment than previous analyses. Results are presented comparing normalized compact average temperatures to normalized log(R/B) Kr-85m. The R/B term is the measured release rate divided by the predicted birth rate for the isotope Kr-85m. Correlations between these two normalized values are presented.

  17. NACOWA experiments on LMFBR cover gas aerosols, heat transfer, and fission product enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minges, J.; Schuetz, W.

    1993-12-01

    Fifteen different NACOWA test series were carried out. The following items were investigated: sodium mass concentration in the cover gas, sodium aerosol particle size, radiative heat transfer across the cover gas, total heat transfer across the cover gas, sodium deposition on the cover plate, temperature profiles across the cover gas, phenomena if the argon cover gas is replaced by helium, enrichment of cesium, iodine, and zinc in the aerosol and in the deposits. The conditions were mainly related to the design parameters of the EFR. According to the first consistent design, a pool temperature of 545 C and a roof temperature of only 120 C were foreseen at a cover gas height of 85 cm. The experiments were carried out in a stainless steel test vessel of 0.6 m diameter and 1.14 m height. Pool temperature (up to 545 C), cover gas height (12.5 cm, 33 cm, and others), and roof temperature (from 110 C to 450 C) were the main parameters. (orig./HP) [de

  18. A summary of computational experience at GE Aircraft Engines for complex turbulent flows in gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerkle, Ronald D.; Prakash, Chander

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation summarizes some CFD experience at GE Aircraft Engines for flows in the primary gaspath of a gas turbine engine and in turbine blade cooling passages. It is concluded that application of the standard k-epsilon turbulence model with wall functions is not adequate for accurate CFD simulation of aerodynamic performance and heat transfer in the primary gas path of a gas turbine engine. New models are required in the near-wall region which include more physics than wall functions. The two-layer modeling approach appears attractive because of its computational complexity. In addition, improved CFD simulation of film cooling and turbine blade internal cooling passages will require anisotropic turbulence models. New turbulence models must be practical in order to have a significant impact on the engine design process. A coordinated turbulence modeling effort between NASA centers would be beneficial to the gas turbine industry.

  19. Experiences of small-scale consumers in the market for natural gas. Visible results of liberalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neeleman, J.

    2005-01-01

    The gas market, as the electricity market, has been fully liberalized for all consumers in the Netherlands since 1 July 2004. Was the market ready for this? What main changes have taken place? Health care institutions in the province of Zeeland have now had their first experiences with the liberalized gas market and the outcome has been a saving of 17%. A study of the tendering process for 86 care institutions reveals that not all the gas supply companies were ready to sign contracts with a combination of smaller and larger consuming organizations. Another conclusion is that these consumers expended some effort learning about the gas market, which appears to be nontransparent to outsiders. The latter is a striking observation because costs are the most important criterion for institutional consumers [nl

  20. SEASAT demonstration experiments with the offshore oil, gas and mining industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, A. G.; Robinson, A. C.; Balon, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Despite its failure, SEASAT-1 acquired a reasonable volume of data that can be used by industrial participants on a non-real-time basis to prove the concept of microwave sensing of the world's oceans from a satellite platform. The amended version of 8 experimental plans are presented, along with a description of the satellite, its instruments, and the data available. Case studies are summarized for the following experiments: (1) Beaufort Sea oil, gas, and Arctic operations; (2) Labrador Sea oil, gas, and sea ice; (3) Gulf of Mexico pipelines; (4) U.S. East Coast offshore oil and gas; (5) worldwide offshore drilling and production operations; (6) Equatorial East Pacific Ocean mining; (7) Bering Sea ice project; and (8) North Sea oil and gas.

  1. Energy derivatives, experiences in derivative trading from the natural gas industry : back to basics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmer, G.; Coyle, T.

    1998-01-01

    Some basic facts regarding derivatives in the electric power industry were discussed based on experiences in the natural gas industry. Derivatives were described as financial instruments that have no value of their own but derive their value from other assets, such as commodities. Futures and Options are the two forms of derivatives. Electricity as a commodity was characterized, and a historical parallel was drawn between deregulation in the natural gas and electric power industry. Short term and long term factors impacting the market and market dynamics impacting derivatives were identified. The latter include: (1) volatility, (2) liquidity, (3) correlations, and (4) price discovery. In contrast to the natural gas market, the electricity market is considered as lacking liquidity and in need of moving farther along the maturity timeline. The question of natural gas/ electricity convergence was also addressed refs., tabs., figs

  2. Three Years of Experience of Wet Gas Allocation on Canyon Express

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Aditya; Hall, James; Letton, Winsor

    2005-07-01

    In September 2002, production was begun from the three fields that together form the Canyon Express System- King's Peak, Aconcagua, and Camden Hills. The 9 wells from these fields are connected to a pair of 12-inch flow lines carrying the commingled wet gas a distance of approximately 92 kilometers back to the Canyon Station platform for processing. At the 21st NSFMW in October 2003, an initial report was given on the status of Wet Gas Allocation for the Canyon Express project. As discussed in that paper, dual-differential, subsea wet gas meters were chosen for the task of allocating gas and liquids back to individual wells. However, since the gas from all three fields was very dry (Lockhart-Martinelli parameter less than 0.01) and because the operating pressures were quite high (250 bar), application of the dual-differential function of the meters yielded errors in both liquid and gas flow rates. Furthermore, as these problems were being uncovered, scale was beginning to collect inside some of the meters. Taken together, these problems produced system imbalances as great as 20%. To address the problems, one of the individual flow metering elements within each wet gas meter was chosen as the allocation meter, operating as a single-phase gas meter. After three years of operation of the Canyon Express Project, considerable experience has been accumulated. Since at the time it held the record for deep water hydrocarbon production, application of the technologies discussed here were challenging and required considerable flexibility. It is believed that the Canyon Express experiences will benefit future deep water flow metering projects. The knowledge acquired thus far is surveyed and summarized. The emphasis is on the technical aspects. (tk)

  3. Study of gas-puff Z-pinches on COBRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, N.; Rosenberg, E. W.; Gourdain, P. A.; Grouchy, P. W. L. de; Kusse, B. R.; Hammer, D. A.; Bell, K. S.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Potter, W. M.; Atoyan, L.; Cahill, A. D.; Evans, M.; Greenly, J. B.; Hoyt, C. L.; Pikuz, S. A.; Schrafel, P. C. [Laboratory of Plasma Studies, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kroupp, E.; Fisher, A.; Maron, Y. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2014-11-15

    Gas-puff Z-pinch experiments were conducted on the 1 MA, 200 ns pulse duration Cornell Beam Research Accelerator (COBRA) pulsed power generator in order to achieve an understanding of the dynamics and instability development in the imploding and stagnating plasma. The triple-nozzle gas-puff valve, pre-ionizer, and load hardware are described. Specific diagnostics for the gas-puff experiments, including a Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence system for measuring the radial neutral density profiles along with a Laser Shearing Interferometer and Laser Wavefront Analyzer for electron density measurements, are also described. The results of a series of experiments using two annular argon (Ar) and/or neon (Ne) gas shells (puff-on-puff) with or without an on- (or near-) axis wire are presented. For all of these experiments, plenum pressures were adjusted to hold the radial mass density profile as similar as possible. Initial implosion stability studies were performed using various combinations of the heavier (Ar) and lighter (Ne) gasses. Implosions with Ne in the outer shell and Ar in the inner were more stable than the opposite arrangement. Current waveforms can be adjusted on COBRA and it was found that the particular shape of the 200 ns current pulse affected on the duration and diameter of the stagnated pinched column and the x-ray yield.

  4. Corporate social policy - problems of institutionalization and experience of Russian oil and gas companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhoda, E.; Kolbysheva, Yu; Makoveeva, V.

    2015-11-01

    The article examines a range of problems related to the process of institutionalization in the corporate social policy, characterizing the social responsibility of business and representing a part of the general strategy of corporate social responsibility. The experience of the social policy implementation in oil and gas companies is analyzed.

  5. Fireworks in noble gas clusters a first experiment with the new "free-electron laser"

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    An international group of scientists has published first experiments carried out using the new soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) at the research center DESY in Hamburg, Germany. Using small clusters of noble gas atoms, for the first time, researchers studied the interaction of matter with intense X-ray radiation from an FEL on extremely short time scales (1 page).

  6. A gas puff experiment for partial simulation of compact toroid formation on MARAUDER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englert, S.E.; Englert, T.J.; Degnan, J.H.; Gahl, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary results will be reported of a single valve gas puff experiment to determine spatial and spectral distribution of a gas during the early ionization stages. This experiment has been developed as a diagnostic test-bed for partial simulation of compact toroid formation on MARAUDER. The manner in which the experimental hardware has been designed allows for a wide range of diagnostic access to evaluate early time evolution of the ionization process. This evaluation will help contribute to a clearer understanding of the initial conditions for the formation stage of the compact toroid in the MARAUDER experiment, where 60 of the same puff valves are used. For the experiment, a small slice of the MARAUDER cylindrical gas injection and expansion region geometry have been re-created but in cartesian coordinates. All of the conditions in the experiment adhere as closely as possible to the MARAUDER experiment. The timing, current rise time, capacitance, resistance and inductance are appropriate to both the simulation of one of the 60 puff valves and current delivery to the load. Both time-resolved images and spectral data have been gathered for visible light emission of the plasma. Processed images reveal characteristics of spatial distribution of the current. Spectral data provide information with respect to electron temperature and density, and entrainment of contaminants

  7. Current status of gas migration and swelling experiments using engineering scale model for immediate depth disposal in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashihara, Tomohiro; Ono, Makoto; Kawaragi, Chie; Saito, Shigeyuki

    2010-01-01

    In intermediate depth disposal facility of radioactive waste in Japan, waste is surrounded with bentonite layer to retard interaction of the waste and groundwater, because the bentonite layer saturated with the groundwater has very low hydraulic conductivity. On the other hand, it is important to confirm stability of barrier system for stress generated together with swelling of the bentonite and to understand effect of increase of gas pressure because of generation of hydrogen gas by corrosion of metallic waste. To understand and evaluate the swelling behavior of the bentonite layer, JNES carries out the experiment. In the experiments, we carry out the swelling experiment to examine the swelling behavior of the bentonite layer and the gas migration experiment to understand the gas migration behavior in the bentonite layer, using engineering scale model of the disposal facility. The swelling experiment has been in operation since June 2010. After this experiment, the gas migration experiment will start in July 2011. (orig.)

  8. Operation experiences of landfill gas engines; Motorer foer deponigas - Tillgaenglighet och drifterfarenheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dejfors, Charlotte; Grimberger, Goeran [AaF-Energikonsult Stockholm AB (Sweden)

    2000-06-01

    The gas that is obtained from landfilled waste is produced by bacteria that digest organic material in an anaerobic environment. Landfill gas consists mainly of methane, carbon dioxide and water vapour. It may be used either as auxiliary fuel in boilers close to the landfill or to generate electricity by means of a gas engine. Several plants where landfill gas is used in gas engines have had serious problems, a. o. with burned exhaust valves. These problems may occur already after a short period of operation, which influences the profitability. The purposes of the project reported were to collect operational experience in Sweden with engines using landfill gas as fuel, to identify which problems there are and which actions or improvements have been implemented in order to correct for these problems. Today, there are 9 facilities where landfill gas is used to fuel a total of 13 gas engines. In addition, there is an engine in Goeteborg which has scarcely been in operation after its installation because there is not enough gas. Contact has been taken with all these facilities. Many have pointed out that the gas engines are sensitive in the vicinity of maximum load, where the control system requires an even gas flow and a stable composition of the gas. A counter-measure in the facilities is to avoid running the engine at full load. All engines are equipped with a lean-NO{sub x} system in order to minimise NO{sub x} emissions. Many have remarked that the lean-NO{sub x} system shuts the engine off when emissions exceed the allowed limits. There is a consensus that spark plugs and ignition cables have created operational problems. These have been changed more frequently than originally expected. Another problem, which has caused operational problems and a need for maintenance, is deposits mainly in the combustion chamber, in valves and cylinder heads. Deposits and high exhaust gas temperature have led to burnt exhaust gas valves and cylinder heads on half of the engines

  9. Comparison between gas puffing and supersonic molecular beam injection in plasma density feedback experiments in EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Xingwei; Li, Jiangang; Hu, Jiansheng; Li, Jiahong; Ding, Rui; Cao, Bin; Wu, Jinhua

    2013-01-01

    To achieve desirable plasma density control, a supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) feedback control system has been developed recently for the EAST tokamak. The performance of the SMBI and gas puffing (GP) feedback systems were used and compared. The performance of pulse width mode is better than that of pulse amplitude mode when GP was used for density feedback control. During one-day experiments, the variation of gas input and wall retention can be clarified into two stages. In the first stage the retention ratio is as high as 80–90%, and the gas input is about an order of 10 22 D 2 . However, in the second stage, the retention ratio is at a range of 50–70%. The gas input of a single discharge is small and the net wall retention grows slowly. The results of the SMBI feedback control experiment was analyzed. The shorter delay time of SMBI makes it faster at feeding back control the plasma density. The result showed that, compared with GP, the gas input of SMBI was decreased ∼30% and the wall retention was reduced ∼40%. This shows SMBI's advantage for the long pulse high density discharges in EAST. (paper)

  10. Three-dimensional calculation of the flow in the cold plenum of the Fast Breeder Reactor 1500 MW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabard, J.P.; Daubert, O.; Gregoire, J.P.; Hemmerich, P.

    1987-01-01

    To solve thermalhydraulics problems which are rising for example on the various parts of nuclear reactors, several departments of the Direction des Etudes et Recherches are developing the N3S code, three-dimensional code using the finite element method. First, this paper presents the basic equations (Navies-Stokes with turbulence modelling and coupled with the thermal equation) and well suited algorithms to solve them. The industrial adequacy of the code is clearly demonstrated through the application to the computation of the flow in the cold plenum of the Fast Breeder Reactor 1500 MW on a mesh of about 20000 velocity nodes [fr

  11. Experience Transfer in Norwegian Oil and Gas Industry: Approaches and Organizational Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aase, Karina

    1997-07-01

    The core aim of the study is to explore the concept of experience transfer in oil and gas industry, and how an oil company approaches this concept. The thesis consists of five papers which are combined in a general description entitled 'Experience transfer in Norwegian oil and gas industry: approaches and organizational mechanisms'. The first paper describes how organizational members perceive experience transfer, and then specifies the many organizational and structural barriers that have to be overcome to achieve efficient experience transfer. The second paper elaborates and assesses the organizational means an oil company implements to address experience transfer. The third paper describes a process of improving and using requirement and procedure handbooks for experience transfer. The fourth paper explores in more detail how the use of information technology influences experience transfer. And the fifth paper compares organizational members' perceptions of experience transfer means in an oil company and an engineering company involved in offshore development projects. Some of the papers are based upon the same data material. Therefore there are reiterations in parts of the contents, especially in the methodological sections.

  12. Experience Transfer in Norwegian Oil and Gas Industry: Approaches and Organizational Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aase, Karina

    1997-07-01

    The core aim of the study is to explore the concept of experience transfer in oil and gas industry, and how an oil company approaches this concept. The thesis consists of five papers which are combined in a general description entitled 'Experience transfer in Norwegian oil and gas industry: approaches and organizational mechanisms'. The first paper describes how organizational members perceive experience transfer, and then specifies the many organizational and structural barriers that have to be overcome to achieve efficient experience transfer. The second paper elaborates and assesses the organizational means an oil company implements to address experience transfer. The third paper describes a process of improving and using requirement and procedure handbooks for experience transfer. The fourth paper explores in more detail how the use of information technology influences experience transfer. And the fifth paper compares organizational members' perceptions of experience transfer means in an oil company and an engineering company involved in offshore development projects. Some of the papers are based upon the same data material. Therefore there are reiterations in parts of the contents, especially in the methodological sections.

  13. Experience Transfer in Norwegian Oil and Gas Industry: Approaches and Organizational Mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aase, Karina

    1997-01-01

    The core aim of the study is to explore the concept of experience transfer in oil and gas industry, and how an oil company approaches this concept. The thesis consists of five papers which are combined in a general description entitled 'Experience transfer in Norwegian oil and gas industry: approaches and organizational mechanisms'. The first paper describes how organizational members perceive experience transfer, and then specifies the many organizational and structural barriers that have to be overcome to achieve efficient experience transfer. The second paper elaborates and assesses the organizational means an oil company implements to address experience transfer. The third paper describes a process of improving and using requirement and procedure handbooks for experience transfer. The fourth paper explores in more detail how the use of information technology influences experience transfer. And the fifth paper compares organizational members' perceptions of experience transfer means in an oil company and an engineering company involved in offshore development projects. Some of the papers are based upon the same data material. Therefore there are reiterations in parts of the contents, especially in the methodological sections

  14. Injector design for liner-on-target gas-puff experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, J. C.; Krasheninnikov, I.; Conti, F.; Wessel, F.; Fadeev, V.; Narkis, J.; Ross, M. P.; Rahman, H. U.; Ruskov, E.; Beg, F. N.

    2017-11-01

    We present the design of a gas-puff injector for liner-on-target experiments. The injector is composed of an annular high atomic number (e.g., Ar and Kr) gas and an on-axis plasma gun that delivers an ionized deuterium target. The annular supersonic nozzle injector has been studied using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to produce a highly collimated (M > 5), ˜1 cm radius gas profile that satisfies the theoretical requirement for best performance on ˜1-MA current generators. The CFD simulations allowed us to study output density profiles as a function of the nozzle shape, gas pressure, and gas composition. We have performed line-integrated density measurements using a continuous wave (CW) He-Ne laser to characterize the liner gas density. The measurements agree well with the CFD values. We have used a simple snowplow model to study the plasma sheath acceleration in a coaxial plasma gun to help us properly design the target injector.

  15. Application of Gas Chromatographic analysis to RPC detectors in the ATLAS experiment at CERN-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    De Asmundis, R

    2007-01-01

    Starting from 2007 a large number (1200) Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) detectors will be used as muon trigger detectors in the ATLAS Experiment at CERN-LHC accelerator. RPC are gaseous detector in which the quality and the stability of the gas mixture as well as the design of the gas supplying system, play a fundamental role in their functioning. RPC are foreseen to work more than ten years in the high radiation environment of ATLAS and the gas mixture acts really as a "lifeguard" for the detectors. For this reason a great attention has been devoted to the gas studies in order to optimize RPC performance, robustness and reliability in a high radiation environment. In this paper we describe the work done to decide how to supply and control in an optimal way the gas to the detectors, in order to ensure their best performance for a long time. The activity, based on Gas Chromatographic (GC) analysis, has been carried on a sample of final RPC working in radiation conditions much more intense than those foreseen f...

  16. A gas microstrip wide angle X-ray detector for application in synchrotron radiation experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, J E; Derbyshire, G E; Duxbury, D M; Lipp, J; Mir, J A; Simmons, J E; Spill, E J; Stephenson, R; Dobson, B R; Farrow, R C; Helsby, W I; Mutikainen, R; Suni, I

    2002-01-01

    The Gas Microstrip Detector has counting rate capabilities several orders of magnitude higher than conventional wire proportional counters while providing the same (or better) energy resolution for X-rays. In addition the geometric flexibility provided by the lithographic process combined with the self-supporting properties of the substrate offers many exciting possibilities for X-ray detectors, particularly for the demanding experiments carried out on Synchrotron Radiation Sources. Using experience obtained in designing detectors for Particle Physics we have developed a detector for Wide Angle X-ray Scattering studies. The detector has a fan geometry which makes possible a gas detector with high detection efficiency, sub-millimetre spatial resolution and good energy resolution over a wide range of X-ray energy. The detector is described together with results of experiments carried out at the Daresbury Laboratory Synchrotron Radiation Source.

  17. HM modelling of in-situ gas injection tests in bentonite and argillite: the PGZ experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, P.; Charlier, R.; Radu, J.P.; La Vaissiere, R. de; Talandier, J.; Collin, F.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. During long-term repository of high and intermediate level nuclear waste in deep argillaceous geological formation, steel containers will corroded and organic material will be irradiated. The two processes lead mostly to hydrogen production. This study deals with the numerical modelling of the gas migration in both the host formation and a bentonite plug, with an emphasis on coupling between the gas transfer and the mechanical strains and stresses. More particularly the study aims to support the design of the PGZ in situ experiment that will be performed by Andra in its underground laboratory at Bure. The objective of the experiment is the analysis of the dynamics of the bentonite plug re-saturation, studying the competition between the liquid water coming from the argillite and a gas injection. The modelled experiment consists of a borehole drilled in rock clay, inside which a plug of MX-80 bentonite is set. The bentonite is naturally re-saturated by water coming from the host formation. At the same time a gas pressure, higher than the initial water pressure in the host rock, is imposed at both ends of the plug. The developed model takes into account the coupling between the mechanical behaviour and the water and gas transfers in undisturbed geo-materials. It manages explicitly liquid and vapour water, gaseous and dissolved hydrogen. Elastoplastic and non-linear elastic model are used to model the behaviour of, respectively, the argillaceous rock and the bentonite. The numerical results show the small desaturation obtained in bentonite and argillite. The influence of the coupling of the mechanic on the water and gas transfers is thus limited (due to the Bishop's effective stress). The swelling of the bentonite plug is not hindered by the gas migration and the confining effect of the engineered barrier is maintained. An analysis is made of the influence of the main transfer rock properties on the gas pressure

  18. Numerical analysis of gas puff modulation experiment on JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Keisuke; Sakasai, Akira

    1992-03-01

    In tokamak transport physics, source modulation experiments are one of the most effective methods. For an analysis of these modulation experiments, a simple numerical method was developed to solve the general transport equations. This method was applied to gas puff modulation experiments on JT-60U. From the comparison between the measured and calculated density perturbations, it was found that the particle diffusion coefficient is about 0.8 m 2 /sec in the edge region and 0.1-0.2 m 2 /sec in the central region. (author)

  19. Experience in producing LEU fuel elements for the RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suripto, A.; Soentono, S.

    1991-01-01

    To achieve a self-reliance in the operation of the 30 MW Multipurpose Research Reactor at Serpong (the RSG-GAS), a fuel element production facility has been constructed nearby. The main task of the facility is to produce MTR type fuel and control elements containing U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion LEU fuel for the RSG-GAS. The hot commissioning activity has started in early 1988 after completion of the cold commissioning using depleted uranium in 1987, marking the beginning of the real production activity. This paper briefly describes the main features of the fuel production facility, the production experience gained so far, and its current production activity. (orig.)

  20. Numerical modeling of plasma plume evolution against ambient background gas in laser blow off experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Bhavesh G.; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Singh, Rajesh; Kumar, Ajai

    2012-01-01

    Two dimensional numerical modelling based on simplified hydrodynamic evolution for an expanding plasma plume (created by laser blow off) against an ambient background gas has been carried out. A comparison with experimental observations shows that these simulations capture most features of the plasma plume expansion. The plume location and other gross features are reproduced as per the experimental observation in quantitative detail. The plume shape evolution and its dependence on the ambient background gas are in good qualitative agreement with the experiment. This suggests that a simplified hydrodynamic expansion model is adequate for the description of plasma plume expansion.

  1. Pennsylvania's technologically enhanced, naturally occurring radioactive material experiences and studies of the oil and gas industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, David J

    2015-02-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania's experiences and ongoing studies related to technologically enhanced, naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) in the oil and gas industry. It has been known for many years that Pennsylvania's geology is unique, with several areas having relatively high levels of natural uranium and thorium. In the 1950s, a few areas of the state were evaluated for commercial uranium production. In the late 1970s, scoping studies of radon in homes prompted the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Bureau of Radiation Protection (BRP) to begin planning for a larger state-wide radon study. The BRP and Oil and Gas Bureau also performed a TENORM study of produced water in the early 1990s for a number of conventional oil and gas wells. More recently, BRP and the Bureau of Solid Waste developed radiation monitoring regulations for all Pennsylvania solid waste disposal facilities. These were implemented in 2001, prompting another evaluation of oil and gas operations and sludge generated from the treatment of conventionally produced water and brine but mainly focused on the disposal of TENORM solid waste in the state's Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle D landfills. However, since 2008, the increase in volumes of gas well wastewater and levels of Ra observed in the unconventional shale gas well flow-back fracking water has compelled DEP to fully re-examine these oil and gas operations. Specifically, with BRP in the lead, a new TENORM study of oil and gas operations and related wastewater treatment operations has been initiated (), supported by an American National Standards Institute standard on TENORM () and a U.S. Government Accountability Office report on shale resource development and risks (). This study began in early 2013 and will examine the potential public and worker radiation exposure and environmental impact as well as re-evaluate TENORM waste disposal. This

  2. Utilization of ''CONTACT'' experiments to improve the fission gas release knowledge in PWR fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, M; Abassin, J J; Bruet, M; Baron, D; Melin, P

    1983-03-01

    The CONTACT experiments, which were carried out by the French CEA, within the framework of a CEA-FRAMATOME collaboration agreement, bear on the behaviour of in-pile irradiated PWR fuel rods. We will focus here upon their results dealing with fission gas release. The experimental device is briefly described, then the following results are given: the kinetics of stable fission gas release for various linear ratings; the instantaneous fractional release rates of radioactive gases versus their decay constant in the range 1.5 10/sup -6/-3.6 10/sup -3/s/sup -1/, for various burnups, as also the influence of fuel temperature. Moreover, the influence of the nature and the pressure of the filling gas upon the release is presented for various linear ratings. The experimental results are discussed and analysed with the purpose to model various physical phenomena involved in the release (low-temperature mechanisms, diffusion).

  3. Theoretical and experimental comparisons of Gamble 2 argon gas puff experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornhill, J.W.; Young, F.C.; Whitney, K.G.; Davis, J.; Stephanakis, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    A one-dimensional radiative MHD analysis of an imploding argon gas puff plasma is performed. The calculations are set up to approximate the conditions of a series of argon gas puff experiments that were carried out on the NRL Gamble II generator. Annular gas puffs (2.5 cm diameter) are imploded with a 1.2-MA peak driving current for different initial argon mass loadings. Comparisons are made with the experimental results for implosion times, K, L-shell x-ray emission, and energy coupled from the generator to the plasma load. The purpose of these calculations is to provide a foundation from which a variety of physical phenomena which influence the power and total energy of the x-ray emission can be analyzed. Comparisons with similar experimental and theoretical results for aluminum plasmas are discussed

  4. Design and operational experience with the off-gas cleaning system of the Seibersdorf incinerator plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patek, P.R.M.

    1983-01-01

    After a description of the design and the construction principles of the incinerator building, the furnace and its attached auxiliary devices are explained. The incinerator is layed out for low level wastes. It has a vertical furnace, operates with discontinuous feeding for trashes with heat-values between 600 and 10,000 kcal/kg waste. The maximum throughput amounts to 40 kg/h. The purification of the off-gas is guaranteed by a multistage filter system: 2 stages with ceramic candles, an electrostatic filter and a HEPA-filter system. The control of the off-gas cleaning is carried out by a stack instrumentation, consisting of an aerosol-, gas-, iodine- and tritium-monitor; the building is surveyed by doserate and aerosolmonitors. Finally the experiences of the first year of operation and the main problems in running the plant are described. (author)

  5. Gas-filled targets for large scalelength plasma interaction experiments on Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, L.V.; Berger, R.L.; Munro, D.H.

    1994-11-01

    Stimulated Brillouin backscatter from large scale length gas-filled targets has been measured on Nova. These targets were designed to approximate conditions in indirect drive ignition target designs in underdense plasma electron density (n e ∼10 21 /cm 3 ), temperature (T e >3 keV), and gradient scale lengths (L n ∼ mm, L v >6 mm) as well as calculated gain for stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). The targets used in these experiments were gas-filled balloons with polyimide walls (gasbags) and gas-filled hohlraums. Detailed characterization using x-ray imaging and x-ray and optical spectroscopy verifies that the calculated plasma conditions are achieved. Time-resolved SBS backscatter from these targets is <3% for conditions similar to ignition target designs

  6. Design and operational experience with the off-gas cleaning system of the Seibersdorf incinerator plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patek, P.

    1982-05-01

    After a description of the design and the construction principles of the incinerator building, the furnace and its attached auxilary devices are explained. The incinerator is layed out for low level wastes. It has a vertical furnace, operates with discontinuous feeding for trashes with heat-values between 600 and 10000 kcal/kg waste. The maximum throughput ammounts 40 kg/h. The purification of the off-gas is guaranteed by a multistage filter system: 2 stages with ceramic candles, an electrostatic filter and a HEPA-filter system. The control of the off-gas cleaning is carried out by a stack instrumentation, consisting of an aerosol-, gas-, iodine- and tritium-monitor; the building is surveilled by doserate- and aerosolmonitors. Finally the experiences of the first year of operation and the main problems in running the plant are described. (Author) [de

  7. Utilization of ''CONTACT'' experiments to improve the fission gas release knowledge in PWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles, M.; Abassin, J.J.; Bruet, M.

    1983-01-01

    The CONTACT experiments, which were carried out by the French CEA, within the framework of a CEA-FRAMATOME collaboration agreement, bear on the behaviour of in-pile irradiated PWR fuel rods. We will focus here upon their results dealing with fission gas release. The experimental device is briefly described, then the following results are given: the kinetics of stable fission gas release for various linear ratings; the instantaneous fractional release rates of radioactive gases versus their decay constant in the range 1.5 10 -6 -3.6 10 -3 s -1 , for various burnups, as also the influence of fuel temperature. Moreover, the influence of the nature and the pressure of the filling gas upon the release is presented for various linear ratings. The experimental results are discussed and analysed with the purpose to model various physical phenomena involved in the release (low-temperature mechanisms, diffusion)

  8. Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The French government has decided to modify the conditions of extension of local natural gas authorities to neighbouring districts. The European Union is studying the conditions of internal gas market with the objective of more open markets although considering public service requirements

  9. Creys-Malville nuclear plant. Simulation of the cold plenum thermal-hydraulics. 12 zone model presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulot, J.P.

    1990-05-01

    The CRUSIFI code has been developed by SEPTEN (Engineering and Construction Division) with SICLE software during 1983-1985 in order to study the CREYS-MALVILLE dynamic behavior. At the time, the version was based on project data (version 2.3). It includes a 2 zones model for the cold plenum thermal-hydraulics, modelling which does not allow to reproduce accurately dissymetries apt to occur as well in usual operating (hydraulic dissymetries bound to one or many systems out of order), as during incidentally operating (hydraulic dissymetries bound to primary pump working back or thermal dissymetries after a transient on one or many secondary loops). Moreover, a 2 zones model cannot simulate axial temperature gradients which appear during double stratification phenomenon (upper and lower part of the plenum) produced by alternating thermal shock. A 12 zones model (4 sectors with 3 axial zones each) such as model developed by R$DD (Research and Development Division) allows to satisfy correctly these problems. This report is a specification of the chosen modelling. This model is now operational after qualifying with experimental transients on mockup and reactor. It is to-day connected with the EDF general operating code CRUSIFI (calibrating version 3.0). It could be easily integrated in a four loops plant modelling such as the CREYS-MALVILLE simulator in a four loops plant modelling such as the CREYS-MALVILLE simulator under construction at the present time by THOMSON

  10. Fluid Phase Separation (FPS) experiment for flight on a space shuttle Get Away Special (GAS) canister

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Bruce; Wingo, Dennis; Bower, Mark; Amborski, Robert; Blount, Laura; Daniel, Alan; Hagood, Bob; Handley, James; Hediger, Donald; Jimmerson, Lisa

    1990-01-01

    The separation of fluid phases in microgravity environments is of importance to environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) and materials processing in space. A successful fluid phase separation experiment will demonstrate a proof of concept for the separation technique and add to the knowledge base of material behavior. The phase separation experiment will contain a premixed fluid which will be exposed to a microgravity environment. After the phase separation of the compound has occurred, small samples of each of the species will be taken for analysis on the Earth. By correlating the time of separation and the temperature history of the fluid, it will be possible to characterize the process. The experiment has been integrated into space available on a manifested Get Away Special (GAS) experiment, CONCAP 2, part of the Consortium for Materials Complex Autonomous Payload (CAP) Program, scheduled for STS-42. The design and the production of a fluid phase separation experiment for rapid implementation at low cost is presented.

  11. Commissioning experiment of the polarized internal gas target with deuterium at ANKE/COSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Boxing [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China); Collaboration: ANKE-Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    In order to conduct the production experiments with polarized deuterium target and (un)polarized proton beam at ANKE/COSY, a commissioning experiment of the polarized internal target with deuterium is imperative. The commissioning experiment includes the measurements of both the vector (Q{sub y}) and tensor (Q{sub yy}) polarization of the deuterium gas target through the nuclear reactions with large and well known analyzing powers, which can be detected in ANKE. The dependence of the polarizations along the storage cell is also determined. The poster presents the physics case for the experiments with deuterium polarized internal target and the apparatus needed for the commissioning experiment, as well as the procedure of extraction for spin observables.

  12. Recent experience with onshore oil and gas operations in the Mackenzie Delta, NWT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, J.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrocarbon deposits in the Beaufort Sea and Mackenzie Delta indicate mean discovered gas reserves of 5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, 67 million barrels of condensate, and 247 million barrels of oil in fields located onshore. There may be even bigger undiscovered reserves that could be proven by a surge in drilling likely to occur in this region within the next few years. There are a number of characteristics of this area that appeal to the oil and gas industry over and above the discovered and undiscovered reserves. There is a local aboriginal group with a settled land claim, clear and reasonable rules for access, a business-like approach to development and a sophisicated understanding of the oil and gas industry. There is reasonable access by road, commercial air service, rail and barge by Hay river or sea with an excellent harbour at Tuktoyaktuk. Local contractors and labour with applicable skills and good equipment are available. The Inuvialuit Petroleum Corp. and its partners Altagas Services Inc. and Enbridge Inc. completed a project to supply the town of Inuvik with natural gas for electricity generation and local distribution. This project is a small example of the physical, economic and regulatory environments that the oil industry will face with the undertaking of larger projects. Aspects of the region described include: the Inuvialuit, recent experience, logistics, regulatory environment, project approvels, environmental, and specific observations

  13. Intense ion beam transport in magnetic quadrupoles: Experiments on electron and gas effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, P.A.; Molvik, A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Cohen, R.H.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Kireef Covo, M.; Lund, S.M.; Prost, L.; Vay, J-L.

    2004-01-01

    Heavy-ion induction linacs for inertial fusion energy and high-energy density physics have an economic incentive to minimize the clearance between the beam edge and the aperture wall. This increases the risk from electron clouds and gas desorbed from walls. We have measured electron and gas emission from 1 MeV K + incident on surfaces near grazing incidence on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL. Electron emission coefficients reach values >100, whereas gas desorption coefficients are near 10 4 . Mitigation techniques are being studied: A bead-blasted rough surface reduces electron emission by a factor of 10 and gas desorption by a factor of 2. We also discuss the results of beam transport (of 0.03-0.18 A K + ) through four pulsed room-temperature magnetic quadrupoles in the HCX at LBNL. Diagnostics are installed on HCX, between and within quadrupole magnets, to measure the beam halo loss, net charge and expelled ions, from which we infer gas density, electron trapping, and the effects of mitigation techniques. A coordinated theory and computational effort has made significant progress towards a self-consistent model of positive-ion beam and electron dynamics. We are beginning to compare experimental and theoretical results

  14. Three-Dimensional Neutral Transport Simulations of Gas Puff Imaging Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotler, D.P.; DIppolito, D.A.; LeBlanc, B.; Maqueda, R.J.; Myra, J.R.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Zweben, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    Gas Puff Imaging (GPI) experiments are designed to isolate the structure of plasma turbulence in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. Three-dimensional aspects of this diagnostic technique as used on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) are examined via Monte Carlo neutral transport simulations. The radial width of the simulated GPI images are in rough agreement with observations. However, the simulated emission clouds are angled approximately 15 degrees with respect to the experimental images. The simulations indicate that the finite extent of the gas puff along the viewing direction does not significantly degrade the radial resolution of the diagnostic. These simulations also yield effective neutral density data that can be used in an approximate attempt to infer two-dimensional electron density and temperature profiles from the experimental images

  15. Design, fabrication and testing of the gas analysis system for the tritium recovery experiment, TRIO-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.; Reedy, G.T.; Homa, M.I.; Clemmer, R.G.; Pappas, G.; Slawecki, M.A.; Graczyk, D.G.; Bowers, D.L.; Clemmer, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    The tritium recovery experiment, TRIO-01, required a gas analysis system which detected the form of tritium, the amount of tritium (differential and integral), and the presence and amount of other radioactive species. The system had to handle all contingencies and function for months at a time unattended during weekend operation. The designed system, described herein, consisted of a train of components which could be grouped as desired to match tritium release behavior

  16. Results of gas exposure experiments for determination of HF concentrations injurious to plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guderian, R

    1971-01-01

    Gas exposure experiments were performed under greenhouse conditions to determine the effects of hydrogen fluoride on the growth capacity, yield and quality of plants. Damage to plants was assessed after HF concentrations of 0.85-25 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/. The effects of definite HF quantities on plants are described and relative sensitivities of 17 deciduous trees, 9 evergreens, 24 agricultural garden plants and 17 ornamental plants are presented. 2 references, 7 tables.

  17. Measurements of Plasma Expansion due to Background Gas in the Electron Diffusion Gauge Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Kyle A.; Paul, Stephen F.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2003-01-01

    The expansion of pure electron plasmas due to collisions with background neutral gas atoms in the Electron Diffusion Gauge (EDG) experiment device is observed. Measurements of plasma expansion with the new, phosphor-screen density diagnostic suggest that the expansion rates measured previously were observed during the plasma's relaxation to quasi-thermal-equilibrium, making it even more remarkable that they scale classically with pressure. Measurements of the on-axis, parallel plasma temperature evolution support the conclusion

  18. R & D of a Gas-Filled RF Beam Profile Monitor for Intense Neutrino Beam Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonehara, K. [Fermilab; Backfish, M. [Fermilab; Moretti, A. [Fermilab; Tollestrup, A. V. [Fermilab; Watts, A. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. M. [Fermilab; Abrams, R. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Cummings, M. A.; Dudas, A. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, R. P. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Kazakevich, G. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Neubauer, M. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Liu, Q. [Case Western Reserve U.

    2017-05-01

    We report the R&D of a novel radiation-robust hadron beam profile monitor based on a gas-filled RF cavity for intense neutrino beam experiments. An equivalent RF circuit model was made and simulated to optimize the RF parameter in a wide beam intensity range. As a result, the maximum acceptable beam intensity in the monitor is significantly increased by using a low-quality factor RF cavity. The plan for the demonstration test is set up to prepare for future neutrino beam experiments.

  19. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarre, Joseph; Walker, Richard; Cisewski, Michael; Zawodny, Joseph; Cheek, Dianne; Thornton, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS) mission will extend the SAGE data record from the ideal vantage point of the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS orbital inclination is ideal for SAGE measurements providing coverage between 70 deg north and 70 deg south latitude. The SAGE data record includes an extensively validated data set including aerosol optical depth data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) experiments in 1975 and 1978 and stratospheric ozone profile data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) in 1979. These and subsequent data records, notably from the SAGE II experiment launched on the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite in 1984 and the SAGE III experiment launched on the Russian Meteor-3M satellite in 2001, have supported a robust, long-term assessment of key atmospheric constituents. These scientific measurements provide the basis for the analysis of five of the nine critical constituents (aerosols, ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O), and air density using O2) identified in the U.S. National Plan for Stratospheric Monitoring. SAGE III on ISS was originally scheduled to fly on the ISS in the same timeframe as the Meteor-3M mission, but was postponed due to delays in ISS construction. The project was re-established in 2009.

  20. Fire and Gas Detection in the LHC Experiments The Sniffer Project

    CERN Document Server

    Nunes, R W

    2001-01-01

    The LHC experiments, due to their complexity and size, present many safety challenges. Cryogenic gases are used in large quantities as well as certain flammable mixtures. The electrical power involved calls for analysis of the fire risks. Access is restricted to the minimum and environmental conditions are extremely harsh, due to strong magnetic fields and ionising radiation. This paper will describe the Combined Fire/Gas/Oxygen deficiency Detection systems proposed for inside the ATLAS and CMS Experiments and possibly for the two others, if they deem it necessary. The requirements of the experiments and the development and implementation of such a system will be discussed. In parallel, commercial procedures to implement these systems by industry shall be described, taking into consideration that a previous development has already been undertaken by CERN for the LEP experiments. The stage is set for inter-divisional collaboration in a project of utmost importance for the safety of people and protection of the...

  1. Open access to the natural gas transport system. Experiences in North America and developing trends in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundgaard-Joergensen, U; Hopper, R J

    1988-09-01

    The treatise describes potential market forces which could evoke changes in the structure of the European gas industry or in its types of contract. It shows that a price differentiation at the borehole may lead to an increase in natural gas deliveries for the European markets. A study of the development of the North American gas industry over the last few decades supports this expectation. The treatise ends with the statement that an application of the North American experiences to the European gas industry is unlikely, but it does not rule out the possibility of market forces or the EEC Commission creating a basis for similar structural reforms in the European gas industry.

  2. City gates maintenance - TBG experience; Experiencia da TBG na manutencao de estacoes de entrega de gas natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Adir de Brito; Tavares, Cipriano Homem; Pinto, Jose Eduardo Christovao [Transportadora Brasileira Gasoduto Bolivia-Brasil, S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    Owner and sole operator in Brasilian territory of the Bolivia-Brazil Gas Pipeline (GASBOL), the largest of its kind in South America, TBG started operations on July 1 st, 1999. Since then, it has ensured transportation of Bolivian natural gas into Brazil swiftly and safely. This paper relates the TBG experiences on Natural Gas City Gates maintenance and its components like filtering, heating, pressure reducing redundant valves, turbine meters, flow computers, solar panel power supply, satellite monitoring system, acquired by 6 years of operation of Brazil Bolivia Gas Pipe Line. It describes the definitions of maintenance plans using RCM - Reliability-centered Maintenance concepts and the most important learning experiences. (author)

  3. A validation study for the gas migration modelling of the compacted bentonite using existing experiment data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawara, Y.; Mori, K.; Tada, K.; Shimura, T.; Sato, S.; Yamamoto, S.; Hayashi, H.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. After the field-scaled Gas Migration Test (GMT) was carried out at Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland from 1997 through 2005, a study on advanced gas migration modelling has been conducted as a part of R and D programs of the RWMC (Radioactive Waste Management funding and Research Center) to evaluate long-term behaviour of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) for the TRU waste disposal system in Japan. One of main objectives of this modelling study is to provide the qualified models and parameters in order to predict long-term gas migration behaviour in compacted bentonite. In addition, from a perspective of coupled THMC (Thermal, Hydrological, Mechanical and Chemical) processes, the specific processes which may have considerable impact to the gas migration behaviour are discussed by means of scoping calculations. Literature survey was conducted to collect experimental data related to gas migration in compacted bentonite in order to discuss an applicability of the existing gas migration models in the bentonite. The well-known flow rate controlled-gas injection experiment by Horseman, et al. and the pressure-controlled-gas injection test using several data with wide range of clay density and water content by Graham, et al, were selected. These literatures show the following characteristic behaviour of gas migration in high compacted and water-saturated bentonite. The observed gas flow rate from the outlet in the experiment by Horseman et al. was numerically reproduced by using the different conceptual models and computer codes, and then an applicability of the models and the identified key parameters such as relative permeability and capillary pressure were discussed. Helium gas was repeatedly injected into fully water-saturated and isotropically consolidated MX-80 bentonite (dry density: 1.6 Mg/m 3 ) in the experiment. One of the most important conclusions from this experiment is that it's impossible for

  4. Study on in-vessel thermohydraulics phenomena of sodium-cooled fast reactors. 1. Numerical investigation for the rationalization of hydrodynamics in the upper plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2002-02-01

    A large-scale sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor in feasibility studies on commercialized fast reactors has a tendency of consideration of thorough simplified and compacted system designs to realize drastic economical improvements. Therefore, special attention should be paid to thermohydraulic designs for a gas entrainment behavior from free surfaces, a flow-induced vibration of in-vessel components, a thermal shock for various structures due to high-speed coolant flows, nonsymmetrical coolant flows, etc. in the reactor vessel. In-vessel thermohydraulic analyses were carried out using a multi-dimensional code AQUA to understand the thermohydraulic characteristics in the upper plenum, and to investigate suitable in-vessel structure for the elimination of gas entrainment possibility. From the analysis, the following results were obtained. (1) It is difficult to rationale in-vessel flow patterns through adjustments of porous ratio and pressure loss for a hold down plate and baffle plates installed in an upper core structure. (2) Dummy plug insertion to a slit of the upper core structure is one of effective measures to stabilize in-vessel flow patterns. (3) Flow guide devices such as a baffle ring and a partial inner barrel are also effective measures to eliminate impinging jet to a dipped plate (D/P) and to reduce horizontal flow velocity components at free surface. (4) Installations of labyrinth structures to a R/V - D/P gap is successful for decreasing of free surface horizontal flows. (5) Gap closing of an in-vessel fuel pot and two cold trap components has the effects of reductions for free surface horizontal flows and for the difference of free surface levels. Following future investigations are important preventive measures against the gas entrainment from the free surface. (1) Flattening of spatial axial velocity distributions at the R/V - D/P gap. (2) Alleviation measures of vortex concentration at free surface. (3) Separation measures of 3-dimensional vortex

  5. High pressure deuterium-tritium gas target vessels for muon-catalyzed fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffrey, A.J.; Spaletta, H.W.; Ware, A.G.; Zabriskie, J.M.; Hardwick, D.A.; Maltrud, H.R.; Paciotti, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    In experimental studies of muon-catalyzed fusion, the density of the hydrogen gas mixture is an important parameter. Catalysis of up to 150 fusions per muon has been observed in deuterium-tritium gas mixtures at liquid hydrogen density; at room temperature, such densities require a target gas pressure of the order of 1000 atmospheres (100 MPa, 15,000 psi). We report here the design considerations for hydrogen gas target vessels for muon-catalyzed fusion experiments that operate at 1000 and 10,000 atmospheres. The 1000 atmosphere high pressure target vessels are fabricated of Type A-286 stainless steel and lined with oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OFHC) copper to provide a barrier to hydrogen permeation of the stainless steel. The 10,000 atmosphere ultrahigh pressure target vessels are made from 18Ni (200 grade) maraging steel and are lined with OFHC copper, again to prevent hydrogen permeation of the steel. In addition to target design features, operating requirements, fabrication procedures, and secondary containment are discussed. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  6. Validation of the new filters configuration for the RPC gas systems at LHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelli, Beatrice; Guida, Roberto; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are widely employed as muon trigger systems at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments. Their large detector volume and the use of a relatively expensive gas mixture make a closed-loop gas circulation unavoidable. The return gas of RPCs operated in conditions similar to the experimental background foreseen at LHC contains large amount of impurities potentially dangerous for long-term operation. Several gas-cleaning agents, characterized during the past years, are currently in use. New test allowed understanding of the properties and performance of a large number of purifiers. On that basis, an optimal combination of different filters consisting of Molecular Sieve (MS) 5Å and 4Å, and a Cu catalyst R11 has been chosen and validated irradiating a set of RPCs at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) for several years. A very important feature of this new configuration is the increase of the cycle duration for each purifier, which results in better system stabilit...

  7. Quantifying Reaeration Rates in Alpine Streams Using Deliberate Gas Tracer Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Benson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gas exchange across the air-water interface is a critical process that maintains adequate dissolved oxygen (DO in the water column to support life. Oxygen reaeration rates can be accurately measured using deliberate gas tracers, like sulfur hexafluoride (SF6 or xenon (Xe. Two continuous release experiments were conducted in different creeks in the Sierra Nevada of California: Sagehen Creek in September, 2009, using SF6 and Martis Creek in August, 2012, using both SF6 and Xe. Measuring gas loss along the creek, which was approximated with the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation, allows for the estimation of the SF6 or Xe reaeration coefficient (KSF6, KXe, which is converted to DO reaeration (KDO or K2 using Schmidt numbers. Mean KSF6 for upper and lower Sagehen and Martis Creeks were, respectively, 34 day−1, 37 day−1 and 33 day−1, with corresponding KDOs of 61 day−1, 66 day−1 and 47 day−1. In Martis Creek, KXe was slightly higher (21% than KSF6, but the calculated KDO from SF6 agreed with the calculated KDO from Xe within about 15%; this difference may be due to bubble-enhanced gas transfer. Established empirical equations of KDO using stream characteristics did a poor job predicting KDO for both creeks.

  8. Experience of iodine, caesium and noble gas release from AGR failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, C.J.; Harris, A.M.; Phillips, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    In the event of a fuel failure in an Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR), the quantity of fission products available for release to the environment is determined by the transport of fission products in the UO 2 fuel, by the possible retention of fission products in the fuel can interspace and by the deposition of fission products on gas circuit surfaces ('plate-out'). The fission products of principal radiological concern are radioactive caesium (Cs-137 and Cs-134) and iodine (principally I-131). Results are summarised of a number of experiments which were designed to study the release of these fission products from individual fuel failures in the prototype AGR at Windscale. Results are also presented of fission product release from failures in commercial AGRs. Comparisons of measured releases of caesium and iodine relative to the release of the noble gas fission products show that, for some fuel failures, there is a significant retention of caesium and iodine within the fuel can interspace. Under normal conditions circuit deposition reduces caesium and iodine gas concentrations by several orders of magnitude. Differing release behaviour of caesium and iodine from the failures is examined together with subsequent deposition within the sampling equipment. These observations are important factors which must be considered in developing an understanding of the mechanisms involved in circuit deposition. (author)

  9. Development of the design of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockett, G.E.; Huddle, R.A.U.

    1960-01-01

    Early in 1956 a small team was formed at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, to investigate the possibilities of the High Temperature Gas Cooled (H.T.G.C.) Reactor System. Although the primary objective of this team was to carry out a feasibility study of the system as a whole, it soon became apparent that, in addition to design studies and economic surveys of power producing reactors, the most appropriate approach to such a novel system was to carry out a design study of a relatively small (10 to 20 M.W.) Reactor Experiment, together with the necessary research and development work associated with such a reactor. This work proceeded within the U.K.A.E.A. during the three following years, and it was felt that realistic design proposals could be put forward with sufficient confidence to justify the detailed design and construction of a 20 M.W. Reactor Experiment. In April 1959 responsibility for this Reactor Experiment was taken over by the O.E.E.C. High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Project, the DRAGON Project, at the Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorset. In this Paper the research, development, and design work is reviewed, and the proposals for the Reactor Experiment are summarised. (author)

  10. Shale-Gas Experience as an Analog for Potential Wellbore Integrity Issues in CO2 Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, James W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Simpson, Wendy S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ziock, Hans-Joachim [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    Shale-gas development in Pennsylvania since 2003 has resulted in about 19 documented cases of methane migration from the deep subsurface (7,0000) to drinking water aquifers, soils, domestic water wells, and buildings, including one explosion. In all documented cases, the methane leakage was due to inadequate wellbore integrity, possibly aggravated by hydrofracking. The leakage of methane is instructive on the potential for CO{sub 2} leakage from sequestration operations. Although there are important differences between the two systems, both involve migrating, buoyant gas with wells being a primary leakage pathway. The shale-gas experience demonstrates that gas migration from faulty wells can be rapid and can have significant impacts on water quality and human health and safety. Approximately 1.4% of the 2,200 wells drilled into Pennsylvania's Marcellus Formation for shale gas have been implicated in methane leakage. These have resulted in damage to over 30 domestic water supplies and have required significant remediation via well repair and homeowner compensation. The majority of the wellbore integrity problems are a result of over-pressurization of the wells, meaning that high-pressure gas has migrated into an improperly protected wellbore annulus. The pressurized gas leaks from the wellbore into the shallow subsurface, contaminating drinking water or entering structures. The effects are localized to a few thousands of feet to perhaps two-three miles. The degree of mixing between the drinking water and methane is sufficient that significant chemical impacts are created in terms of elevated Fe and Mn and the formation of black precipitates (metal sulfides) as well as effervescing in tap water. Thus it appears likely that leaking CO{sub 2} could also result in deteriorated water quality by a similar mixing process. The problems in Pennsylvania highlight the critical importance of obtaining background data on water quality as well as on problems associated with

  11. The Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas jet target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipps, K.A.; Greife, U.; Bardayan, D.W.; Blackmon, J.C.; Kontos, A.; Linhardt, L.E.; Matos, M.; Pain, S.D.; Pittman, S.T.; Sachs, A.; Schatz, H.; Schmitt, K.T.; Smith, M.S.; Thompson, P.

    2014-01-01

    New radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities will push further away from stability and enable the next generation of nuclear physics experiments. Of great importance to the future of RIB physics are scattering, transfer, and capture reaction measurements of rare, exotic, and unstable nuclei on light targets such as hydrogen and helium. These measurements require targets that are dense, highly localized, and pure. Targets must also accommodate the use of large area silicon detector arrays, high-efficiency gamma arrays, and heavy ion detector systems to efficiently measure the reaction products. To address these issues, the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) Collaboration has designed, built, and characterized a supersonic gas jet target, capable of providing gas areal densities on par with commonly used solid targets within a region of a few millimeters diameter. Densities of over 5×10 18 atoms/cm 2 of helium have been achieved, making the JENSA gas jet target the most dense helium jet achieved so far

  12. Computer simulation of void formation in residual gas atom free metals by dual beam irradiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, Y.; Nishiguchi, R.; La Rubia, T.D. de; Guinan, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    In our recent experiments (1), we found that voids nucleate at vacancy clusters which trap gas atoms such as hydrogen and helium in ion- and neutron-irradiated copper. A molecular dynamics computer simulation, which implements an empirical embedded atom method to calculate forces that act on atoms in metals, suggests that a void nucleation occurs in pure copper at six and seven vacancy clusters. The structure of six and seven vacancy clusters in copper fluctuates between a stacking fault tetrahedron and a void. When a hydrogen is trapped at voids of six and seven vacancy, a void can keep their structure for appreciably long time; that is, the void do not relax to a stacking fault tetrahedron and grows to a large void. In order to explore the detailed atomics of void formation, it is emphasized that dual-beam irradiation experiments that utilize beams of gas atoms and self-ions should be carried out with residual gas atom free metal specimens. (author)

  13. Explaining experience curves for new energy technologies. A case study of liquefied natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greaker, Mads; Lund Sagen, Eirik

    2008-01-01

    Many new energy technologies seem to experience a fall in unit price as they mature. In this paper we study the unit price of liquefying natural gas in order to make it transportable by ship to gas power installations all over the world. Our point of departure is the experience curve approach, however unlike many other studies of new energy technologies, we also seek to account for autonomous technological change, scale effects and the effects of upstream competition among technology suppliers. To our surprise we find that upstream competition is by far the most important factor contributing to the fall in unit price. With respect to the natural gas business, this may have implications for the future development in prices as the effect of increased upstream competition is temporary and likely to weaken a lot sooner than effects from learning and technological change. Another more general policy implication, is that while promoting new energy technologies, governments must not forget to pay attention to competition policy. (author)

  14. Operation experience of the Indonesian multipurpose research reactor RSG-GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Tarigan, Alim [Multipurpose Reactor Center, National Nuclear Energy Agency of the Republic of Indonesia (PRSG-BATAN), Kawasan PUSPIPTEK Serpong, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    1999-08-01

    RSG-GAS is a multipurpose research reactor with nominal power of 30 MW, operated by BATAN since 1987. The reactor is an open pool type, cooled and moderated with light water, using the LEU-MTR fuel element in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al dispersion. Up to know, the reactor have been operated around 30,000 hours to serve the user. The reactor have been utilized to produce radioisotope, neutron beam experiments, irradiation of fuel element and its structural material, and reactor physics experiments. This report will explain in further detail concerning operational experience of this reactor, i.e. reactor operation data, reactor utilization, research program, technical problems and it solutions, plant modification and improvement, and development plan to enhance better reactor operation performance and its utilization. (author)

  15. Operation experience of the Indonesian multipurpose research reactor RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Tarigan, Alim

    1999-01-01

    RSG-GAS is a multipurpose research reactor with nominal power of 30 MW, operated by BATAN since 1987. The reactor is an open pool type, cooled and moderated with light water, using the LEU-MTR fuel element in the form of U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion. Up to know, the reactor have been operated around 30,000 hours to serve the user. The reactor have been utilized to produce radioisotope, neutron beam experiments, irradiation of fuel element and its structural material, and reactor physics experiments. This report will explain in further detail concerning operational experience of this reactor, i.e. reactor operation data, reactor utilization, research program, technical problems and it solutions, plant modification and improvement, and development plan to enhance better reactor operation performance and its utilization. (author)

  16. Some experiments on cold fusion by deuterium hydrogen gas infusion in titanium metal alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestnik Filho, J.; Geraldo, L.P.; Pugliese, R.; Saxena, R.N.; Morato, S.P.; Fulfaro, R.

    1990-05-01

    New results on cold fusion are reported where three different experimental situations have been tried: a) deuterium gas loaded titanium; b) deuterium gas loaded Ti 0.8 Zr 0.2 CrMn alloy and c) titanium and the Ti 0.8 Zr 0.2 CrMn alloy loaded with a mixture of deuterium and hydrogen gases. With these experiments, new thermodynamical non equilibrium conditions were achieved and the possibility of cold fusion between protons and deuterons was also tested. Three independent neutron detectors and one NaI(Tl) were utilized. Despite some large values reported in the literature for the fusion rate, an upper limit of only 8 x 10 -24 fusions/sper deuterium pair or per deuterium-hydrogen pair was determined within the attained accuracy. (author) [pt

  17. Studies of Flow in Ionized Gas: Historical Perspective, Contemporary Experiments, and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.

    2007-01-01

    Since the first observations that a very small ionized fraction (order of 1 ppm) could strongly affect the gas flow, numerous experiments with partially or fully wall-free discharges have demonstrated the dispersion of shock waves, the enhancement of lateral forces in the flow, the prospects of levitation, and other aerodynamic effects with vast potential of application. A review of physical effects and observations are given along with current status of their interpretation. Special attention will be given to the physical problems of energy efficiency in generating wall-free discharges and the phenomenology of filamentary discharges. Comments and case examples are given on the current status of availability of necessary data for modelling and simulation of the aerodynamic phenomena in weakly ionized gas

  18. Numerical analysis of experiments with gas injection into liquid metal coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usov, E V; Lobanov, P D; Pribaturin, N A; Mosunova, N A; Chuhno, V I; Kutlimetov, A E

    2016-01-01

    Presented paper contains results of a numerical analysis of experiments with gas injection in water and liquid metal which have been performed at the Institute of Thermophysics Russian Academy of Science (IT RAS). Obtained experimental data are very important to predict processes that take place in the BREST-type reactor during the hypothetical accident with damage of the steam generator tubes, and may be used as a benchmark to validate thermo-hydraulic codes. Detailed description of models to simulate transport of gas phase in a vertical liquid column is presented in a current paper. Two-fluid model with closing relation for wall friction and interface friction coefficients was used to simulate processes which take place in a liquid during injection of gaseous phase. It has being shown that proposed models allow obtaining a good agreement between experimental data and calculation results. (paper)

  19. The unique field experiments on the assessment of accident consequences at industrial enterprises of gas-chemical complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, N.S.; Trebin, I.S.; Sorokovikova, O.

    1998-01-01

    Sour natural gas fields are the unique raw material base for setting up such large enterprises as gas chemical complexes. The presence of high toxic H 2 S in natural gas results in widening a range of dangerous and harmful factors for biosphere. Emission of such gases into atmosphere during accidents at gas wells and gas pipelines is of especial danger for environment and first of all for people. Development of mathematical forecast models for assessment of accidents progression and consequences is one of the main elements of works on safety analysis and risk assessment. The critical step in development of such models is their validation using the experimental material. Full-scale experiments have been conducted by the All-Union Scientific-Research institute of Natural Gases and Gas Technology (VNIIGAZ) for grounding of sizes of hazard zones in case of the severe accidents with the gas pipelines. The source of emergency gas release was the working gas pipelines with 100 mm dia. And 110 km length. This pipeline was used for transportation of natural gas with significant amount of hydrogen sulphide. During these experiments significant quantities of the gas including H 2 S were released into the atmosphere and then concentrations of gas and H 2 S were measured in the accident region. The results of these experiments are used for validation of atmospheric dispersion models including the new Lagrangian trace stochastic model that takes into account a wide range of meteorological factors. This model was developed as a part of computer system for decision-making support in case of accident release of toxic gases into atmosphere at the enterprises of Russian gas industry. (authors)

  20. Estimate of LOCA-FI plenum pressure uncertainty for a five-ring RELAP5 production reactor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griggs, D.P.

    1993-03-01

    The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code (RELAP5) is used to perform best-estimate analyses of certain postulated Design Basis Accidents (DBAs) in SRS production reactors. Currently, the most limiting DBA in terms of reactor power level is an instantaneous double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) loss of coolant accident (LOCA). A six-loop RELAP5 K Reactor model is used to analyze the reactor system behavior dozing the Flow Instability (FI) phase of the LOCA, which comprises only the first 5 seconds following the DEGB. The RELAP5 K Reactor model includes tank and plenum nodalizations having five radial rings and six azimuthal sectors. The reactor system analysis provides time-dependent plenum and tank bottom pressures for use as boundary conditions in the FLOWTRAN code, which models a single fuel assembly in detail. RELAP5 also performs the system analysis for the latter phase of the LOCA, denoted the Emergency Cooling System (ECS) phase. Results from the RELAP analysis are used to provide boundary conditions to the FLOWTRAN-TF code, which is an advanced two-phase version of FLOWTRAN. The RELAP5 K Reactor model has been tested for LOCA-FI and Loss-of-Pumping Accident analyses and the results compared with equivalent analyses performed with the TRAC-PF1/MOD1 code (TRAC). An equivalent RELAP5 six-loop, five-ring, six-sector L Reactor model has been benchmarked against qualified single-phase system data from the 1989 L-Area In-Reactor Test Program. The RELAP5 K and L Reactor models have also been subjected to an independent Quality Assurance verification

  1. Gas transfer under breaking waves: experiments and an improved vorticity-based model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Tsoukala

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper a modified vorticity-based model for gas transfer under breaking waves in the absence of significant wind forcing is presented. A theoretically valid and practically applicable mathematical expression is suggested for the assessment of the oxygen transfer coefficient in the area of wave-breaking. The proposed model is based on the theory of surface renewal that expresses the oxygen transfer coefficient as a function of both the wave vorticity and the Reynolds wave number for breaking waves. Experimental data were collected in wave flumes of various scales: a small-scale experiments were carried out using both a sloping beach and a rubble-mound breakwater in the wave flume of the Laboratory of Harbor Works, NTUA, Greece; b large-scale experiments were carried out with a sloping beach in the wind-wave flume of Delft Hydraulics, the Netherlands, and with a three-layer rubble mound breakwater in the Schneideberg Wave Flume of the Franzius Institute, University of Hannover, Germany. The experimental data acquired from both the small- and large-scale experiments were in good agreement with the proposed model. Although the apparent transfer coefficients from the large-scale experiments were lower than those determined from the small-scale experiments, the actual oxygen transfer coefficients, as calculated using a discretized form of the transport equation, are in the same order of magnitude for both the small- and large-scale experiments. The validity of the proposed model is compared to experimental results from other researchers. Although the results are encouraging, additional research is needed, to incorporate the influence of bubble mediated gas exchange, before these results are used for an environmental friendly design of harbor works, or for projects involving waste disposal at sea.

  2. First Argon Gas Puff Experiments With 500 ns Implosion Time On Sphinx Driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchini, F.; Calamy, H.; Lassalle, F.; Loyen, A.; Maury, P.; Grunenwald, J.; Georges, A.; Morell, A.; Bedoch, J.-P.; Ritter, S.; Combes, P.; Smaniotto, O.; Lample, R.; Coleman, P. L.; Krishnan, M.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments have been performed at the SPHINX driver to study potential of an Argon Gas Puff load designed by AASC. We present here the gas Puff hardware and results of the last shot series. The Argon Gas Puff load used is injected thanks to a 20 cm diameter nozzle. The nozzle has two annuli and a central jet. The pressure and gas type in each of the nozzle plena can be independently adjusted to tailor the initial gaz density distribution. This latter is selected as to obtain an increasing radial density from outer shell towards the pinch axis in order to mitigate the RT instabilities and to increase radiating mass on axis. A flashboard unit produces a high intensity UV source to pre-ionize the Argon gas. Typical dimensions of the load are 200 mm in diameter and 40 mm height. Pressures are adjusted to obtain an implosion time around 550 ns with a peak current of 3.5 MA. With the goal of improving k-shell yield a mass scan of the central jet was performed and implosion time, mainly given by outer and middle plena settings, was kept constant. Tests were also done to reduce the implosion time for two configurations of the central jet. Strong zippering of the radiation production was observed mainly due to the divergence of the central jet over the 40 mm of the load height. Due to that feature k-shell radiation is mainly obtained near cathode. Therefore tests were done to mitigate this effect first by adjusting local pressure of middle and central jet and second by shortening the pinch length. At the end of this series, best shot gave 5 kJ of Ar k-shell yield. PCD detectors showed that k-shell x-ray power was 670 GW with a FWHM of less than 10 ns.

  3. First Argon Gas Puff Experiments With 500 ns Implosion Time On Sphinx Driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchini, F.; Calamy, H.; Lassalle, F.; Loyen, A.; Maury, P.; Grunenwald, J.; Georges, A.; Morell, A.; Bedoch, J.-P.; Ritter, S.; Combes, P.; Smaniotto, O.; Lample, R.; Coleman, P. L.; Krishnan, M.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments have been performed at the SPHINX driver to study potential of an Argon Gas Puff load designed by AASC. We present here the gas Puff hardware and results of the last shot series.The Argon Gas Puff load used is injected thanks to a 20 cm diameter nozzle. The nozzle has two annuli and a central jet. The pressure and gas type in each of the nozzle plena can be independently adjusted to tailor the initial gaz density distribution. This latter is selected as to obtain an increasing radial density from outer shell towards the pinch axis in order to mitigate the RT instabilities and to increase radiating mass on axis. A flashboard unit produces a high intensity UV source to pre-ionize the Argon gas. Typical dimensions of the load are 200 mm in diameter and 40 mm height. Pressures are adjusted to obtain an implosion time around 550 ns with a peak current of 3.5 MA.With the goal of improving k-shell yield a mass scan of the central jet was performed and implosion time, mainly given by outer and middle plena settings, was kept constant. Tests were also done to reduce the implosion time for two configurations of the central jet. Strong zippering of the radiation production was observed mainly due to the divergence of the central jet over the 40 mm of the load height. Due to that feature k-shell radiation is mainly obtained near cathode. Therefore tests were done to mitigate this effect first by adjusting local pressure of middle and central jet and second by shortening the pinch length.At the end of this series, best shot gave 5 kJ of Ar k-shell yield. PCD detectors showed that k-shell x-ray power was 670 GW with a FWHM of less than 10 ns.

  4. Neutral Transport Simulations of Gas Puff Imaging Experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotler, D.P.; LaBombard, B.; Terry, J.L.; Zweben, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Visible imaging of gas puffs has been used on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak to characterize edge plasma turbulence, yielding data that can be compared with plasma turbulence codes. Simulations of these experiments with the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code have been carried out to explore the relationship between the plasma fluctuations and the observed light emission. By imposing two-dimensional modulations on the measured time-average plasma density and temperature profiles, we demonstrate that the spatial structure of the emission cloud reflects that of the underlying turbulence. However, the photon emission rate depends on the plasma density and temperature in a complicated way, and no simple scheme for inferring the plasma parameters directly from the light emission patterns is apparent. The simulations indicate that excited atoms generated by molecular dissociation are a significant source of photons, further complicating interpretation of the gas puff imaging results.Visibl e imaging of gas puffs has been used on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak to characterize edge plasma turbulence, yielding data that can be compared with plasma turbulence codes. Simulations of these experiments with the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code have been carried out to explore the relationship between the plasma fluctuations and the observed light emission. By imposing two-dimensional modulations on the measured time-average plasma density and temperature profiles, we demonstrate that the spatial structure of the emission cloud reflects that of the underlying turbulence. However, the photon emission rate depends on the plasma density and temperature in a complicated way, and no simple scheme for inferring the plasma parameters directly from the light emission patterns is apparent. The simulations indicate that excited atoms generated by molecular dissociation are a significant source of photons, further complicating interpretation of the gas puff imaging results

  5. Near Detectors based on gas TPCs for neutrino long baseline experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, A

    2017-01-01

    Time Projection Chambers have been used with success for the T2K ND280 near detector and are proposed for an upgrade of the T2K near detector. High pressure TPCs are also being considered for future long-baseline experiments like Hyper-Kamiokande and DUNE. A High Pressure TPC would be a very sensitive detector for the detailed study of neutrino-nucleus interactions, a limiting factor for extracting the ultimate precision in long baseline experiments. The requirements of TPCs for neutrino detectors are quite specific. We propose here the development of state-of-the-art near detectors based on gas TPC: atmospheric pressure TPCs for T2K-II and a high-pressure TPC for neutrino experiments. The project proposed here benefits from a strong involvement of the European (CERN) members of the T2K collaboration and beyond. It is a strongly synergetic precursor of other projects of near detectors using gas TPCs that are under discussion for the long baseline neutrino projects worldwide. It will help maintain and develop...

  6. Experiments on vertical gas-liquid pipe flows using ultrafast X-ray tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banowski, M.; Beyer, M.; Lucas, D.; Hoppe, D.; Barthel, F. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany). Inst. fuer Sicherheitsforschung

    2016-12-15

    For the qualification and validation of two-phase CFD-models for medium and large-scale industrial applications dedicated experiments providing data with high temporal and spatial resolution are required. Fluid dynamic parameter like gas volume fraction, bubble size distribution, velocity or turbulent kinetic energy should be measured locally. Considering the fact, that the used measurement techniques should not affect the flow characteristics, radiation based tomographic methods are the favourite candidate for such measurements. Here the recently developed ultrafast X-ray tomography, is applied to measure the local and temporal gas volume fraction distribution in a vertical pipe. To obtain the required frame rate a rotating X-ray source by a massless electron beam and a static detector ring are used. Experiments on a vertical pipe are well suited for development and validation of closure models for two-phase flows. While vertical pipe flows are axially symmetrically, the boundary conditions are well defined. The evolution of the flow along the pipe can be investigated as well. This report documents the experiments done for co-current upwards and downwards air-water and steam-water flows as well as for counter-current air-water flows. The details of the setup, measuring technique and data evaluation are given. The report also includes a discussion on selected results obtained and on uncertainties.

  7. Quantum state-resolved, bulk gas energetics: Comparison of theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCaffery, Anthony J., E-mail: A.J.McCaffery@sussex.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Sussex, Brighton, Sussex BN1 6SJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-21

    Until very recently, the computational model of state-to-state energy transfer in large gas mixtures, introduced by the author and co-workers, has had little experimental data with which to assess the accuracy of its predictions. In a novel experiment, Alghazi et al. [Chem. Phys. 448, 76 (2015)] followed the equilibration of highly vibrationally excited CsH(D) in baths of H{sub 2}(D{sub 2}) with simultaneous time- and quantum state-resolution. Modal temperatures of vibration, rotation, and translation for CsH(D) were obtained and presented as a function of pump-probe delay time. Here the data from this study are used as a test of the accuracy of the computational method, and in addition, the consequent changes in bath gas modal temperatures, not obtainable in the experiment, are predicted. Despite large discrepancies between initial CsH(D) vibrational states in the experiment and those available using the computational model, the quality of agreement is sufficient to conclude that the model’s predictions constitute at least a very good representation of the overall equilibration that, for some measurements, is very accurate.

  8. Conception and realization of optical diagnosis to characterize gas puffs in Z-Pinch experiments. Comparison between experiment and computation. Study of a new nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnier, J.N.

    1998-01-01

    The CEA develops research programs on plasma. A good way to generate such X-rays sources, is to realize Z-pinch experiments, so to realize the radial implosion on its axis of a conducting cylinder in a very high current. The AMBIORIX machine, allowing such experiments, calls for necessitates the use of gaseous conductors. The gas puff, coming from the nozzle, is ionised by a 2 MA current. The aim of this thesis is the characterisation of the gas source before the current impulse. For this purpose many optic diagnostics have been tested. Interferometric measures allow the gas profile density measurement. Various gas have been studied: neon, argon, helium and aluminium. For the aluminium, the resonant interferometric imagery method has been used. A new nozzle with an innovative injection technic, has been designed, characterized and tested in Z-pinch configuration. Finally measures of light diffusion (Rayleigh) have been realised to show dust in the gas. (A.L.B.)

  9. Development of a Time Projection Chamber using CF4 gas for relativistic heavy ion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, T.; Hamagaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Inuzuka, M.; Sakaguchi, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Kametani, S.; Kajihara, F.; Gunji, T.; Kurihara, N.; Oda, S.X.; Yamaguchi, Y.L.

    2006-01-01

    A prototype Time Projection Chamber (TPC) using pure CF 4 gas was developed for possible use in heavy ion experiments. Basic characteristics such as gain, drift velocity, longitudinal diffusion and attenuation length of produced electrons were measured with the TPC. At an electric field of 900V/cm, the drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion for 1cm drift were obtained as 10cm/μs and 60μm, respectively. The relatively large gain fluctuation is explained to be due to the electron attachment process in CF 4 . These characteristics are encouraging for the measurement of the charged particle trajectories under high multiplicity conditions at RHIC

  10. Experiences with a new soil gas technique for detecting petroleum pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazac, O.; Landa, I.; Rohde, J.R.; Kelly, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents field experiences obtained with a new technology for detecting petroleum pollution in soil and ground water based on in situ determination of hydrocarbon concentrations in soil air. Ecoprobe is a new soil gas device from RS-Dynamics in the Czech Republic. The rugged waterproof device is equipped with a built-in computer-controlled semiconductor sensor. Three case histories are presented that demonstrate the use of the equipment under typical conditions. Two case histories present the use of the device under typical field conditions; the third case history compares results from the Ecoprobe and a commercial photoionization detector (PID) device

  11. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Transit Bus Experience Survey: April 2009--April 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.; Horne, D. B.

    2010-09-01

    This survey was commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect and analyze experiential data and information from a cross-section of U.S. transit agencies with varying degrees of compressed natural gas (CNG) bus and station experience. This information will be used to assist DOE and NREL in determining areas of success and areas where further technical or other assistance might be required, and to assist them in focusing on areas judged by the CNG transit community as priority items.

  12. Contributed Review: The novel gas puff targets for laser-matter interaction experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw W., E-mail: wachulak@gmail.com [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, Ul. Gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-09-15

    Various types of targetry are used nowadays in laser matter interaction experiments. Such targets are characterized using different methods capable of acquiring information about the targets such as density, spatial distribution, and temporal behavior. In this mini-review paper, a particular type of target will be presented. The targets under consideration are gas puff targets of various and novel geometries. Those targets were investigated using extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray (SXR) imaging techniques, such as shadowgraphy, tomography, and pinhole camera imaging. Details about characterization of those targets in the EUV and SXR spectral regions will be presented.

  13. Flow-induced and acoustically induced vibration experience in operating gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halvers, L.J.

    1977-03-01

    An overview has been presented of flow-induced and acoustically induced vibration failures that occurred in the past in gas-cooled graphite-moderated reactors, and the importance of this experience for the Gas-Cooled Fast-Breeder Reactor (GCFR) project has been assessed. Until now only failures in CO 2 -cooled reactors have been found. No problems with helium-cooled reactors have been encountered so far. It is shown that most of the failures occurred because flow-induced and acoustically induced dynamic loads were underestimated, while at the same time not enough was known about the influence of environmental parameters on material behavior. All problems encountered were solved. The comparison of the influence of the gas properties on acoustically induced and flow-induced vibration phenomena shows that the interaction between reactor design and the thermodynamic properties of the primary coolant precludes a general preference for either carbon dioxide or helium. The acoustic characteristics of CO 2 and He systems are different, but the difference in dynamic loadings due to the use of one rather than the other remains difficult to predict. A slight preference for helium seems, however, to be justified

  14. Developments for transactinide chemistry experiments behind the gas-filled separator TASCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Topic of this thesis is the development of experiments behind the gas-filled separator TASCA (TransActinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus) to study the chemical properties of the transactinide elements. In the first part of the thesis, the electrodepositions of short-lived isotopes of ruthenium and osmium on gold electrodes were studied as model experiments for hassium. From literature it is known that the deposition potential of single atoms differs significantly from the potential predicted by the Nernst equation. This shift of the potential depends on the adsorption enthalpy of therndeposited element on the electrode material. If the adsorption on the electrode-material is favoured over the adsorption on a surface made of the same element as the deposited atom, the electrode potential is shifted to higher potentials. This phenomenon is called underpotential deposition. Possibilities to automatize an electro chemistry experiment behind the gas-filled separator were explored for later studies with transactinide elements. The second part of this thesis is about the in-situ synthesis of transition-metal-carbonyl complexes with nuclear reaction products. Fission products of uranium-235 and californium-249 were produced at the TRIGA Mainz reactor and thermalized in a carbon-monoxide containing atmosphere. The formed volatile metal-carbonyl complexes could be transported in a gas-stream. Furthermore, short-lived isotopes of tungsten, rhenium, osmium, and iridium were synthesised at the linear accelerator UNILAC at GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. The recoiling fusion products were separated from the primary beam and the transfer products in the gas-filled separator TASCA. The fusion products were stopped in the focal plane of TASCA in a recoil transfer chamber. This chamber contained a carbon-monoxide - helium gas mixture. The formed metal-carbonyl complexes could be transported in a gas stream to various experimental setups. All

  15. Gas transport below artificial recharge ponds: insights from dissolved noble gases and a dual gas (SF6 and 3He) tracer experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jordan F; Hudson, G Bryant; Avisar, Dror

    2005-06-01

    A dual gas tracer experiment using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and an isotope of helium (3He) and measurements of dissolved noble gases was performed at the El Rio spreading grounds to examine gas transport and trapped air below an artificial recharge pond with a very high recharge rate (approximately 4 m day(-1)). Noble gas concentrations in the groundwater were greater than in surface water due to excess air formation showing that trapped air exists below the pond. Breakthrough curves of SF6 and 3He at two nearby production wells were very similar and suggest that nonequilibrium gas transfer was occurring between the percolating water and the trapped air. At one well screened between 50 and 90 m below ground, both tracers were detected after 5 days and reached a maximum at approximately 24 days. Despite the potential dilution caused by mixing within the production well, the maximum concentration was approximately 25% of the mean pond concentration. More than 50% of the SF6 recharged was recovered by the production wells during the 18 month long experiment. Our results demonstrate that at artificial recharge sites with high infiltration rates and moderately deep water tables, transport times between recharge locations and wells determined with gas tracer experiments are reliable.

  16. Irradiation induced aerosol formation in flue gas: experiments on low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelae, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on irradiation induced aerosol formation from gaseous sulphur dioxide in humid air are presented. This work is connected to the aerosol particle formation process in the electron beam technique for cleaning flue gas. As a partial process of this method primary products of the radiolysis of water vapour convert sulphur dioxide into gaseous sulphuric acid which then nucleates with water vapour forming small acid droplets. This experimental work has been performed on relatively low absorbed doses. Aerosol particle formation is strongly dependent on dose. In the experiments, the first aerosol particles were detected already on absorbed doses of 0.1-10 mGy. The particle size in these cases is in the so-called ultrafine size range (1-20 nm). In this article three experimental set-ups with some characteristic results are presented. (Author)

  17. Prompt neutron decay constant estimation of RSG-GAS at high power noise experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jujuratisbela, U.; Kristedjo; Tukiran; Pinem, S.; Iman, J.; Puryono; Sanjaya, A.; Suwarno

    1998-01-01

    The determination of prompt neutron decay constant (α) of RGS-GAS by using low power noise experiment method at the equilibrium core indicated that the result is not good. The bad result was due to the small ratio of the noise signal to background which was caused by low detector efficiency or contaminated core after long time operation. To solve the problem is tried by using noise experiment technique at high power. The voltage output of neutron detectors at power of 5, 12, and 23 MW were connected to preamplifier and filter then to the Dynamic Signal Analyzer Version-2 and then the power spectral density of each channel of JKT04 and JKT03, the cut off frequency of each channel can be determined by using linear regression technique such that the prompt neutron decay constant can be estimated

  18. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDeavitt, Sean; Shao, Lin; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Wirth, Brian; Kennedy, Rory

    2014-01-01

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  19. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, Sean [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Shao, Lin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Tsvetkov, Pavel [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Kennedy, Rory [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-04-07

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  20. High density experiments with gas puffing and ECRH in T-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esipchuk, Yu V; Kirneva, N A; Borschegovskij, A A; Chistyakov, V V; Denisov, V Ph; Dremin, M M; Gorbunov, E P; Grashin, S A; Kalupin, D V; Khimchenko, L N; Khramenkov, A V; Kirnev, G S; Krilov, S V; Krupin, V A; Myalton, T B; Pavlov, Yu D; Piterskij, V V; Ploskirev, G N; Poznyak, V I; Roy, I N; Shelukhin, D A; Skosyrev, Yu V; Trukhin, V M; Trukhina, E V; Vershkov, V A; Veschev, E A; Volkov, V V; Zhuravlev, V A

    2003-01-01

    High density experiments were carried out in T-10 with gas puffing and electron cyclotron resonance heating (with absorbed power value up to 1.4 MW) with oblique and perpendicular power launch. Densities exceeding the Greenwald limit (n Gw ) by up to a factor of 1.8 were achieved in a regime with a high value of the edge safety factor at the current flat-top, q(a)≅8.2. The decrease of q(a) to a value of 3 led to the reduction of the ratio ( n-bar e ) lim /n Gw to 1. Confinement degradation with density increase was not significant up to the density limit. However, the typical T-10 linear increase of energy confinement time with density saturates at n-bar e ≥0.6n Gw . This saturation is the result of the development of an additional transport in the electron heat channel. However, the saturated τ E values exceeded the ITER L-mode scaling predictions by up to a factor of 1.2 and were close to the value predicted by the ITER H-mode scaling. Effect of the strong gas puffing on the plasma confinement and experiments with neon seeding are also discussed in this paper

  1. Generation of low-Btu fuel gas from agricultural residues experiments with a laboratory scale gas producer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R O

    1977-01-01

    Two successive laboratory-scale, downdraft gas producers were fabricated and tested. Agricultural and food processing residues including walnut shells, corn cobs, tree prunings, and cotton gin waste, were converted to a low Btu producer gas. The performance of 2 spark ignition engines, when running on producer gas, was highly satisfactory. The ability of the producer to maintain a continuous supply of good quality gas was determined largely by firebox configuration. Fuel handling and fuel flow control problems tended to be specific to individual types of residues. During each test run, air input, firebox temperature, fuel consumption rate, and pressure differential across the producer were monitored. An overall conversion efficiency of 65% was achieved.

  2. Analysis of the VVER Standard Problem INSC-PSBV1 '11% Coolant Leak from Upper Plenum' with RELAP5/MOD3.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melikhov, O.; Melikhov, V.; Parfenov, Yu.; Gavritenkova, O.; Lipatov, I.; Elkin, I.; Bayless, P.

    2004-01-01

    Analyses of a loss-of-coolant experiment carried out at the PSB-VVER test facility with the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code have been performed independently by analysts at the Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Center (EREC) and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The PSB-VVER facility is a full-height scale model of a VVER 1000 reactor that is approximately 1/300 scale in volume and power. VVER Standard Problem INSC-PSBV1 represents an 11% leak from the upper plenum of the PSB-VVER facility, simulating the rupture of one of the accumulator injection lines. The safety-significant thermalhydraulic phenomena occurring in VVER type reactors addressed by this experiment were identified in the test validation matrix. Most of the phenomena of the validation matrix were reasonably simulated by RELAP5/MOD3.2 in both calculations. The major differences between the test and the calculations were the timing of the core heatup, and the thermal response to the accumulator injection cycles in both calculations. The INEEL calculation had a more extensive axial heatup, with most of the core experiencing small heat-ups. The accumulator injection was more effective in quenching the core in the test than in the INEEL calculation. This difference is attributed to the liquid distribution in the core, rather than to the heat transfer models in the code. The code calculation had a more uniform axial distribution of the liquid in the core, and the accumulator injection did not have much impact on the core liquid inventory. In the EREC calculation, only one heatup of the cladding temperature was observed for upper and middle section of the fuel rods before the final heatup. The small heat-ups were not reproduced in EREC calculation. The difference could be attributed to differences in liquid distribution, namely the core region in the EREC calculation contains more liquid over most of the transient than in the experiment. The distribution of liquid in the core in

  3. Experiments on state selection and Penning ionisation with fast metastable rare gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, J.P.C.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis describes experiments with metastable He/Ne atoms. The experiments are performed in a crossed beam machine. Two different sources are used for the production of metastable atoms: a source for the production of metastable atoms in the thermal energy range and a hollow cathode arc for the production of metastable atoms in the superthermal energy range (1-7 eV). The progress made in the use of the hollow cathode arc is described as well as the experimental set-up. The rare gas energy-level diagram is characterized by two metastable levels. By optical pumping it is possible to select a single metastable level, both for He and Ne. For the case of He this is done by a recently built He quenchlamp which selectively quenches the metastable 2 1 S level population. In the thermal energy range the quenching is complete; in the superthermal energy range the 2 1 S level population is only partly quenched. For the optical pumping of Ne* atoms a cw dye laser is used. New experiments have been started on the measurement, in a crossed beam machine, of the fluorescence caused by inelastic collisions where metastable atoms are involved. The He* + Ne system is used as a pilot study for these experiments. The He-Ne laser is based on this collision system. (Auth.)

  4. Measuring Gas-Phase Basicities of Amino Acids Using an Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer: A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderlin, Lee S.; Ryzhov, Victor; Keller, Lanea M. M.; Gaillard, Elizabeth R.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is performed to measure the relative gas-phase basicities of a series of five amino acids to compare the results to literature values. The experiments use the kinetic method for deriving ion thermochemistry and allow students to perform accurate measurements of thermodynamics in a relatively short time.

  5. Gas-filled Rugby hohlraum energetics and implosions experiments on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, Alexis; Philippe, F.; Tassin, V.; Seytor, P.; Monteil, M. C.; Villette, B.; Reverdin, C.

    2010-11-01

    Recent experiments [1,2] have validated the x-ray drive enhancement provided by rugby-shaped hohlraums over cylinders in the indirect drive (ID) approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This class of hohlraum is the baseline design for the Laser Mégajoule program, is also applicable to the National Ignition Facility and could therefore benefit ID Inertial Fusion Energy studies. We have carried out a serie of energetics and implosions experiments with OMEGA ``scale 1'' rugby hohlraums [1,2]. For empty hohlraums these experiments provide complementary measurements of backscattered light along 42 cone, as well as detailed drive history. In the case of gas-filled rugby hohlraums we have also study implosion performance (symmetry, yield, bangtime, hotspot spectra...) using a high contrast shaped pulse leading to a different implosion regime and for a range of capsule convergence ratios. These results will be compared with FCI2 hydrocodes calculations and future experimental campaigns will be suggested. [4pt] [1] F. Philippe et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 035004 (2010). [0pt] [2] H. Robey et al., Phys. Plasnas 17, 056313 (2010).

  6. Developments for transactinide chemistry experiments behind the gas-filled separator TASCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Even, Julia

    2011-12-13

    Topic of this thesis is the development of experiments behind the gas-filled separator TASCA (TransActinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus) to study the chemical properties of the transactinide elements. In the first part of the thesis, the electrodepositions of short-lived isotopes of ruthenium and osmium on gold electrodes were studied as model experiments for hassium. From literature it is known that the deposition potential of single atoms differs significantly from the potential predicted by the Nernst equation. This shift of the potential depends on the adsorption enthalpy of therndeposited element on the electrode material. If the adsorption on the electrode-material is favoured over the adsorption on a surface made of the same element as the deposited atom, the electrode potential is shifted to higher potentials. This phenomenon is called underpotential deposition. Possibilities to automatize an electro chemistry experiment behind the gas-filled separator were explored for later studies with transactinide elements. The second part of this thesis is about the in-situ synthesis of transition-metal-carbonyl complexes with nuclear reaction products. Fission products of uranium-235 and californium-249 were produced at the TRIGA Mainz reactor and thermalized in a carbon-monoxide containing atmosphere. The formed volatile metal-carbonyl complexes could be transported in a gas-stream. Furthermore, short-lived isotopes of tungsten, rhenium, osmium, and iridium were synthesised at the linear accelerator UNILAC at GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. The recoiling fusion products were separated from the primary beam and the transfer products in the gas-filled separator TASCA. The fusion products were stopped in the focal plane of TASCA in a recoil transfer chamber. This chamber contained a carbon-monoxide - helium gas mixture. The formed metal-carbonyl complexes could be transported in a gas stream to various experimental setups. All

  7. Design/build/mockup of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant gas generation experiment glovebox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, K.E.; Benjamin, W.W.; Knight, C.J.; Michelbacher, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    A glovebox was designed, fabricated, and mocked-up for the WIPP Gas Generation Experiments (GGE) being conducted at ANL-W. GGE will determine the gas generation rates from materials in contact handled transuranic waste at likely long term repository temperature and pressure conditions. Since the customer's schedule did not permit time for performing R ampersand D of the support systems, designing the glovebox, and fabricating the glovebox in a serial fashion, a parallel approach was undertaken. As R ampersand D of the sampling system and other support systems was initiated, a specification was written concurrently for contracting a manufacturer to design and build the glovebox and support equipment. The contractor understood that the R ampersand D being performed at ANL-W would add additional functional requirements to the glovebox design. Initially, the contractor had sufficient information to design the glovebox shell. Once the shell design was approved, ANL-W built a full scale mockup of the shell out of plywood and metal framing; support systems were mocked up and resultant information was forwarded to the glovebox contractor to incorporate into the design. This approach resulted in a glovebox being delivered to ANL-W on schedule and within budget

  8. Experiment data report for semiscale MOD-1 test S-01-3 (isothermal blowdown with core resistance simulator)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zender, S.N.

    1975-03-01

    Recorded test data are presented for Test S-01-3 of the semiscale Mod-1 isothermal blowdown test series. Test S-01-3 is one of several semiscale Mod-1 experiments which are counterparts of the planned Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) nonnuclear experiments. System hardware is of the LOFT design, selected using volumetric scaling methods, and initial conditions duplicate those identified for the LOFT nonnuclear tests. Test S-01-3 employed an intact loop resistance that was low relative to that of the first test in the series (Test S-01-2) to establish the importance of intact loop resistance on system response during blowdown. An orificed structure was used in the pressure vessel to simulate the LOFT core simulator. The test was initiated at isothermal conditions of 2245 psig and 538 0 F by a simulated offset shear of the cold-leg broken loop piping. During system depressurization, coolant was injected into the lower plenum of the pressure vessel to provide data on the effects of emergency core cooling on system response. Additionally, to aid in determination of the effects of accumulator gas on pressure suppression system response, the nitrogen used to charge the accumulator systems for Test S-01-3 was allowed to vent into the lower plenum following depletion of the coolant. (U.S.)

  9. Measurements of electron density and temperature profiles in a gas blanket experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuthy, A.

    1979-02-01

    Radial profiles of electron density, temperature and H sub(β) intensity are presented for the rotating plasma device F-1. The hydrogen filling pressure, the average magnetic field strength at the midplane, and the power input to the discharge have been varied in the ranges 10-100 mTorr, 0.25-0.5 Tesla, and 0.1 to 1.5 MW, respectively. These experiments have been performed with the main purpose of studying the gas blanket (cold-mantle) state of the plasma. It is shown, that a simple spectroscopic method can be used to derive the radial distribution of the electron temperature in such plasmas. The observed peak temperatures and densities are in agreement with earlier theoretical estimates. (author)

  10. Experiment Plan of High Temperature Steam and Carbon dioxide Co-electrolysis for Synthetic Gas Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Duk-Joo; Ko, Jae-Hwa

    2008-01-01

    Currently, Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) come into the spotlight in the middle of the energy technologies of the future for highly effective conversion of fossil fuels into electricity without carbon dioxide emission. The SOFC is a reversible cell. By applying electrical power to the cell, which is solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC), it is possible to produce synthetic gas (syngas) from high temperature steam and carbon dioxide. The produced syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) can be used for synthetic fuels. This SOEC technology can use high temperature from VHTRs for high efficiency. This paper describes KEPRI's experiment plan of high temperature steam and carbon co-electrolysis for syngas production using SOEC technology

  11. Monte Carlo validation experiments for the gas Cherenkov detectors at the National Ignition Facility and Omega

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J. [Plasma Physics Department, AWE plc, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Herrmann, H.; Kim, Y.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C.; Evans, S.; Sedillo, T.; McEvoy, A.; Caldwell, S. E. [Plasma Physics Department, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Grafil, E.; Stoeffl, W. [Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Milnes, J. S. [Photek Limited UK, 26 Castleham Road, St. Leonards-on-sea TN38 9NS (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    The gas Cherenkov detectors at NIF and Omega measure several ICF burn characteristics by detecting multi-MeV nuclear γ emissions from the implosion. Of primary interest are γ bang-time (GBT) and burn width defined as the time between initial laser-plasma interaction and peak in the fusion reaction history and the FWHM of the reaction history respectively. To accurately calculate such parameters the collaboration relies on Monte Carlo codes, such as GEANT4 and ACCEPT, for diagnostic properties that cannot be measured directly. This paper describes a series of experiments performed at the High Intensity γ Source (HIγS) facility at Duke University to validate the geometries and material data used in the Monte Carlo simulations. Results published here show that model-driven parameters such as intensity and temporal response can be used with less than 50% uncertainty for all diagnostics and facilities.

  12. Cogeneration with natural gas fired internal combustion engines: Italian utility's 10 years operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montermini, G.P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the experience that AGAC, an Italian gas and water utility, has acquired in the operation of a 116 Km long district heating network serving about 40,000 inhabitants. The network is powered by a mix of methane fuelled Otto and diesel cycle engines, coal fired fluidized bed boilers, and methane fired boilers producing annually about 153,000 kW of thermal energy, 2,300 kW of cooling energy, and 28.8 million kWh of electric power. This paper reports on the performance of this system in terms of production and sales trends, equipment efficiency and compatibility with new European Communities air pollution standards

  13. Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions of the agriculture sector in France. Collection of territorial experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommier, Fabien; Martin, Sarah; Bajeat, Philippe; Larbodiere, Ludovic; Vergez, Antonin

    2013-06-01

    After having briefly indicated the different origins of direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by the agriculture sector, presented the technical and political context, and outlined the need for new practices to struggle against climate change and to adapt to changes to come, this publication reports some experiments undertaken in different French regions: a farm network as an animation tool to support farmers, a local partnership to conciliate town and agriculture, the development of actions on energy and greenhouse gases in agriculture, the implementation of climate and agriculture plan, a network of agricultural actors for a sustainable support of change, an agriculture with and for its territory and inhabitants, a debate on agriculture and climate

  14. Investigation on cold fusion phenomena using gas-metal loading experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, F.; Bertolini, G.; Vocino, V.; Parnisari, E.; Ronsecco, C.

    1992-01-01

    Previous experiments have shown that tritium is produced in deuterated titanium. The data obtained are highly scattered and non reproducible. In order to try to define better the phenomenon a series of tests have been performed using various metals and alloys and different deuterating conditions. Sheets and shavings of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, tantalum, zircaloy 2 and Ti-Zr 5O% alloy have been tested. The tritium production is obtained as a difference of the tritium content in the deuterated metal and the initial content of tritium in the deuterium gas. The amount of tritium produced is low and reproducibility is rather poor. A statistical analysis shows that significant differences are obtained varying the type of metal used. In general the tritium production increases with the atomic number of the metal. Moreover significantly higher productions of tritium have been obtained using materials of technical purity as tantalum, zircaloy 2 and Ti-Zr alloy

  15. Structure and dynamics of gas phase ions: Interplay between experiments and computations in IRMPD spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletti, Cecilia; Corinti, Davide; Paciotti, Roberto; Re, Nazzareno; Crestoni, Maria Elisa; Fornarini, Simonetta

    2017-11-01

    The investigation of the molecular structure and dynamics of ions in gas phase is an item of increasing interest, due the role such species play in many areas of chemistry and physics, not to mention that they often represent elusive intermediates in more complex reaction mechanisms. Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation spectroscopy is today one of the most advanced technique to this purpose, because of its high sensitivity to even small structure changes. The interpretation of IRMPD spectra strongly relies on high level quantum mechanical computations, so that a close interplay is needed for a detailed understanding of structure and kinetics properties which can be gathered from the many applications of this powerful technique. Recent advances in experiment and theory in this field are here illustrated, with emphasis on recent progresses for the elucidation of the mechanism of action of cisplatin, one of the most widely used anticancer drugs.

  16. Multiple scattering effects in fast neutron polarization experiments using high-pressure helium-xenon gas scintillators as analyzers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tornow, W.; Mertens, G.

    1977-01-01

    In order to study multiple scattering effects both in the gas and particularly in the solid materials of high-pressure gas scintillators, two asymmetry experiments have been performed by scattering of 15.6 MeV polarized neutrons from helium contained in stainless steel vessels of different wall thicknesses. A monte Carlo computer code taking into account the polarization dependence of the differential scattering cross sections has been written to simulate the experiments and to calculate corrections for multiple scattering on helium, xenon and the gas containment materials. Besides the asymmetries for the various scattering processes involved, the code yields time-of-flight spectra of the scattered neutrons and pulse height spectra of the helium recoil nuclei in the gas scintillator. The agreement between experimental results and Monte Carlo calculations is satisfactory. (Auth.)

  17. HRL Aespoe - two-phase flow experiment - gas and water flow in fractured crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kull, H.; Liedtke, L.

    1998-01-01

    (The full text of the contribution follows:) Gas generated from radioactive waste may influence the hydraulic and mechanical properties of the man-made barriers and the immediate surroundings of the repository. Prediction of alteration in fractured crystalline rock is difficult. There is a lack of experimental data, and calibrated models are not yet available. Because of the general importance of this matter the German Federal Ministry for Education, Science, Research and Technology decided to conduct a two-phase flow study at HRL Aespoe within the scope of the co-operation agreement with SKB. Within the presentation an overview of field experiments and modelling studies scheduled until end of '99 are given. Conceptual models for one- and two-phase flow, methodologies and with respect to numerical calculations necessary parameter set-ups are discussed. Common objective of in-situ experiments is to calibrate flow models to improve the reliability of predictions for gas migration through fractured rock mass. Hence, in a defined dipole flow field in niche 2/715 at HRL Aespoe effective hydraulic parameters are evaluated. Numerical modelling of non-isothermal, two-phase, two-component processes is feasible only for two-dimensional representation of a porous medium. To overcome this restriction a computer program will be developed to model three-dimensional, fractured, porous media. Rational aspects of two-phase flow studies are for the designing of geotechnical barriers and for the long-term safety analysis of potential radionuclide transport in a future repository required for the licensing process

  18. Simulation and uncertainties of the heat transfer from a heat-generating DEBRIS bed in the lower plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaaf, K.; Trambauer, K.

    1999-01-01

    The findings of the TMI-2 post-accident analyses indicated that internal cooling mechanisms may have a considerable potential to sustain the vessel integrity after a relocation of core material to the lower plenum, provided that water is continuously available in the RPV. Numerous analytical and experimental research activities are currently underway in this respect. This paper illustrates some major findings of the experimental work on internal cooling mechanisms and describes the limitations and the uncertainties in the simulation of the heat transfer processes. Reference is made especially to the joint German DEBRIS/ RPV research program, which encompasses the experimental investigation of the thermal-hydraulics in gaps, of the heat transfer within a particulate debris bed, and of the high temperature performance of vessel steel, as well as the development of simulation models for the heat transfer in the lower head and the structural response of the RPV. In particular, the results of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses are presented, which have been carried out at GRS using an integral model that describes the major phenomena governing the long-term integrity of the reactor vessel. The investigation of a large-scale relocation indicated that the verification of a gap cooling mechanism as an inherent mechanism is questionable in terms of a stringent probabilistic uncertainty criterion, as long as the formation of a large molten pool cannot be excluded. (author)

  19. Advanced technology for aero gas turbine components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-01

    The Symposium is aimed at highlighting the development of advanced components for new aero gas turbine propulsion systems in order to provide engineers and scientists with a forum to discuss recent progress in these technologies and to identify requirements for future research. Axial flow compressors, the operation of gas turbine engines in dust laden atmospheres, turbine engine design, blade cooling, unsteady gas flow through the stator and rotor of a turbomachine, gear systems for advanced turboprops, transonic blade design and the development of a plenum chamber burner system for an advanced VTOL engine are among the topics discussed.

  20. Instellar Gas Experiment (IGE): Testing interstellar gas particles to provide information on the processes of nucleosynthesis in the big bang stars and supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Don

    1985-01-01

    The Interstellar Gas Experiment (IGE) is designed to collect particles of the interstellar gas - a wind of interstellar media particles moving in the vicinity of the solar system. These particles will be returned to earth where the isotopic ratios of the noble gases among these particles will be measured. IGE was designed and programmed to expose 7 sets of six copper-beryllium metallic collecting foils to the flux of neutral interstellar gas particles which penetrate the heliosphere to the vicinity of the earth's orbit. These particles are trapped in the collecting foils and will be returned to earth for mass-spectrographic analysis when Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) on which IGE was launched, is recovered.

  1. 2D/3D program. Upper plenum test facility - UPTF. Test No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Test No.1 was a quasi-steady state, separate effect test involving the UPTF-System with blocked break valves and blocked pump simulators. Initially the test vessel, the cold and hot leg nozzels as well as the pump seals were completely filled witht hot water in this test. This test was designed to investigate the fluid-fluid mixing phenomena and the development of the fluid and wall temperature fields in the cold leg and downcomer region of a PWR. The experiment was performed by injecting a cold water stream into one cold leg of UPTF while the system was initially filled with stagnant hot water. (orig.)

  2. Design of Plant Gas Exchange Experiments in a Variable Pressure Growth Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Kenneth A.

    1996-01-01

    Sustainable human presence in extreme environments such as lunar and martian bases will require bioregenerative components to human life support systems where plants are used for generation of oxygen, food, and water. Reduced atmospheric pressures will be used to minimize mass and engineering requirements. Few studies have assessed the metabolic and developmental responses of plants to reduced pressure and varied oxygen atmospheres. The first tests of hypobaric pressures on plant gas exchange and biomass production at the Johnson Space Center will be initiated in January 1996 in the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC), a large, closed plant growth chamber rated for 10.2 psi. Experiments were designed and protocols detailed for two complete growouts each of lettuce and wheat to generate a general database for human life support requirements and to answer questions about plant growth processes in reduced pressure and varied oxygen environments. The central objective of crop growth studies in the VPGC is to determine the influence of reduced pressure and reduced oxygen on the rates of photosynthesis, dark respiration, evapotranspiration and biomass production of lettuce and wheat. Due to the constraint of one experimental unit, internal controls, called pressure transients, will be used to evaluate rates of CO2 uptake, O2 evolution, and H2O generation. Pressure transients will give interpretive power to the results of repeated growouts at both reduced and ambient pressures. Other experiments involve the generation of response functions to partial pressures of O2 and CO2 and to light intensity. Protocol for determining and calculating rates of gas exchange have been detailed. In order to build these databases and implement the necessary treatment combinations in short time periods, specific requirements for gas injections and removals have been defined. A set of system capability checks will include determination of leakage rates conducted prior to the actual crop

  3. Precalculation of the fission gas behaviour in the MOL 7C/6 experiment with the LAKU model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaeth, L.

    1988-03-01

    The fission gas behaviour in the planned experiment MOL 7C/6 is simulated with the Karlsruhe model LAKU, employing temperatures calculated with the pin behaviour model TRANSURANUS. Two different modes of experimental flow blockage simulation are investigated and compared to an estimated fission gas behaviour during a realistic blockage build-up. The results indicate, that the start-up procedure leading to greatly reduced fission gas content is the more realistic one. Details of the calculations and their results are presented in the report

  4. Fission product monitoring of TRISO coated fuel for the advanced gas reactor-1 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scates, Dawn M.; Hartwell, John K.; Walter, John B.; Drigert, Mark W.; Harp, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burnup of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B's) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  5. Operational experience with Dragon reactor experiment of relevance to commercial reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capp, P.D.; Simon, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    An important part of the experience gained during the first ten years of successful power operation of the Dragon Reactor is relevant to the design and operation of future High Temperature Reactors (HTRs). The aspects presented in this paper have been chosen as being particularly applicable to larger HTR systems. Core performance under a variety of conditions is surveyed with particular emphasis on a technique developed for the identification and location of unpurged releasing fuel and the presence of activation and fission products in the core area. The lessons learned during the reflector block replacement are presented. Operating experience with the primary circuit identifies the lack of mixing of gas streams within the hot plenum and the problems of gas streaming in ducts. Helium leakage from the circuit is often greater than the optimum 0.1%/d. Virtually all the leakage problems are associated with the small bore instrument pipework essential for the many experiments associated with the Dragon Reactor Experiment (DRE). Primary circuit maintenance work confirms the generally clean state of the DRE circuit but identifies 137 Cs and 110 Agsup(m) as possible hazards if fuel emitting these isotopes is irradiated. (author)

  6. Experiment and analysis of basic phenomena of gas catching by liquid surface. Observation by visualizing vortex structure and gas catching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamemoto, Takashi; Nishiyama, Tadao

    1995-01-01

    Since gravity, viscous force, surface tension and so on are related simultaneously to the inertia force of flow, in gas catching phenomena, it is often difficult to grasp exactly its similarity. At the time of designing actual equipment, careful model test is required, and the validity of the evaluation by model test for applying it to actual machines sometimes becomes a problem. In this research, for the purpose of elucidating the essential mechanism of the gas-catching phenomena by vortices, and obtaining the knowledge useful for the probability of the method of evaluating the limit of gas catching, the knowledge obtained so far on the similarity law and model testing method related to the air catching by vortices was put in order, and vortex structure and basic gas-catching process were observed by water flow visualizing experiment, thus the noteworthy flow characteristics for clarifying the essential mechanism of the phenomena were obtained. The main knowledges on the air catching by vortices obtained so far, the experiment of visualizing vortices using water flow and the experimental results are reported. (K.I.)

  7. Issues of Exercising the Right to Defence amid the Explanations of the Plenum of the Supreme Court of the Russian Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana A. Voltornist

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the explanations of the Plenum of the Supreme Court No. 29 dated June 30, 2015 “On application of laws by the courts ensuring the right to defense in criminal proceedings”. The author details the applied aspects of certain provisions of the aforementioned document within the criminal procedure legislation and estimates their significance for the judicial and investigative practice

  8. Reflooding phenomena of German PWR estimated from CCTF [Cylindrical Core Test Facility], SCTF [Slab Core Test Facility] and UPTF [Upper Plenum Test Facility] results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murao, Y.; Iguchi, T.; Sugimoto, J.

    1988-09-01

    The reflooding behavior in a PWR with a combined injection type ECCS was studied by comparing the test results from Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF), Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) and Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF). Core thermal-hydraulics is discussed mainly based on SCTF test data. In addition, the water accumulation behavior in hot legs and the break-through characteristics at tie plate are discussed

  9. Preliminary results of Resistive Plate Chambers operated with eco-friendly gas mixtures for application in the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Muhammad, S.; Saviano, G.; Auwegem, P. Van; Cauwenbergh, S.; Tytgat, M.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Passamonti, L.; Pierluigi, D.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Russo, A.; Ferrini, M.

    2016-01-01

    The operations of Resistive Plate Chambers in LHC experiments require Fluorine based (F-based) gases for optimal performance. Recent European regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. In view of the CMS experiment upgrade, several tests are ongoing to measure the performance of the detector with these new ecological gas mixtures, in terms of efficiency, streamer probability, induced charge and time resolution. Prototype chambers with readout pads and with the standard CMS electronic setup are under test. In this paper preliminary results on performance of RPCs operated with a potential eco-friendly gas candidate 1,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene, commercially known as HFO-1234ze, with CO 2 and CF 3 I based gas mixtures are presented and discussed for the possible application in the CMS experiment.

  10. Preliminary results of Resistive Plate Chambers operated with eco-friendly gas mixtures for application in the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abbrescia, M.

    2016-01-01

    The operations of Resistive Plate Chambers in LHC experiments require Fluorine based (F-based) gases for optimal performance. Recent European regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. In view of the CMS experiment upgrade, several tests are ongoing to measure the performance of the detector with these new ecological gas mixtures, in terms of efficiency, streamer probability, induced charge and time resolution. Prototype chambers with readout pads and with the standard CMS electronic setup are under test. In this paper preliminary results on performance of RPCs operated with a potential eco-friendly gas candidate 1,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene, commercially known as HFO-1234ze, with CO2 and CF3I based gas mixtures are presented and discussed for the possible application in the CMS experiment.

  11. The spray characteristic of gas-liquid coaxial swirl injector by experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Chen; Zhihui Yan; Yang Yang; Hongli Gao; Shunhua Yang; Lei Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Using the laser phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA), the spray characteristics of gas-liquid coaxial swirl injector were studied. The Sauter mean diameter (SMD), axial velocity and size data rate were measured under different gas injecting pressure drop and liquid injecting pressure drop. Comparing to a single liquid injection, SMD with gas presence is obviously improved. So the gas presence has a significant effect on the atomization of the swirl injector. What’s more, the atomization eff...

  12. Estimation of Knudsen diffusion coefficients from tracer experiments conducted with a binary gas system and a porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Kashihara, Ayumi

    2018-03-01

    A previous study has reported that Knudsen diffusion coefficients obtained by tracer experiments conducted with a binary gas system and a porous medium are consistently smaller than those obtained by permeability experiments conducted with a single-gas system and a porous medium. To date, however, that study is the only one in which tracer experiments have been conducted with a binary gas system. Therefore, to confirm this difference in Knudsen diffusion coefficients, we used a method we had developed previously to conduct tracer experiments with a binary carbon dioxide-nitrogen gas system and five porous media with permeability coefficients ranging from 10-13 to 10-11 m2. The results showed that the Knudsen diffusion coefficient of N2 (DN2) (cm2/s) was related to the effective permeability coefficient ke (m2) as DN2 = 7.39 × 107ke0.767. Thus, the Knudsen diffusion coefficients of N2 obtained by our tracer experiments were consistently 1/27 of those obtained by permeability experiments conducted with many porous media and air by other researchers. By using an inversion simulation to fit the advection-diffusion equation to the distribution of concentrations at observation points calculated by mathematically solving the equation, we confirmed that the method used to obtain the Knudsen diffusion coefficient in this study yielded accurate values. Moreover, because the Knudsen diffusion coefficient did not differ when columns with two different lengths, 900 and 1500 mm, were used, this column property did not influence the flow of gas in the column. The equation of the dusty gas model already includes obstruction factors for Knudsen diffusion and molecular diffusion, which relate to medium heterogeneity and tortuosity and depend only on the structure of the porous medium. Furthermore, there is no need to take account of any additional correction factor for molecular diffusion except the obstruction factor because molecular diffusion is only treated in a multicomponent

  13. Large-scale Experiment for Water and Gas Transport in Cementitious Backfill Materials (Phase 1 ): COLEX I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, G.; Wittmann, F.H.; Moetsch, H.A.

    1998-05-01

    In the planned Swiss repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste, the voids between the waste containers will be backfilled with a highly permeable mortar (NAGRA designation: mortar M1 ). As well as providing mechanical stability through filling of voids and sorbing radionuclides, the mortar must divert gases formed in the repository as a result of corrosion into the neighbouring host rock. This will prevent damage which could be caused by excess pressure on the repository structures. Water transport, which is coupled to gas transport, is also of interest. The former is responsible for the migration of radionuclides. Up till now, numerical simulations for a repository situation were carried out using transport parameters determined for small samples in the laboratory. However, the numerical simulations still had to be validated by a large-scale experiment. The investigations presented here should close this gap. Investigations into gas and water transport were carried out using a column (up to 5.4 m high) filled with backfill mortar. The column has a modular construction and can be sealed at the top end with a material of defined permeability (plug or top plug). The possibility to vary the material of the plug allows the influence of the more impermeable cavern lining or possible gas escape vents in the cavern roof to be investigated. A gas supply is connected to the bottom end and is used to simulate different gas generation rates from the waste. A total of 5 experiments were carried out in which the gas generation rate, the column height and the permeability of the plug were varied. Before the start of the experiments, the mortar in the column and the plug were saturated with water to approx. 95 %. In all the experiments, an increase in pressure with time could be observed. The higher the gas generation rate and the lower the permeability of the plug, the more quickly this occurred. At the beginning, only water flow out of the top of the column

  14. Study of a microstrip gas detector for the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clergeau, J. F.

    1997-01-01

    The micro-strip gas chambers (MSGC) were realized due to the technological advances in the field of micro-electronics. The wire of usual gas counters is replaced in these detectors by metallic stripes as a periodic sequence of electrodes (anodes and cathodes) spaced by around 200 μm. At a distance of 3 mm above the strip containing substrate, a metallic plane is placed, thus defining the gaseous room where the passage of a charged particle produces by ionization a primary electron signal collected by the detector anodes. Due to its granularity a MSGC can operate under very high particle fluxes since charge can be collected very rapidly. Also, the impact parameters can be determined with high accuracy due to the high space and time resolutions. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) or the MSGC detectors planned to equip one of the experiments proposed for LHC should detect, in extreme operational conditions, the particle impacts in a 4 Tesla magnetic field, for around ten years and for a particle flux of around 10 4 Hz/mm 2 . The CMS detector is described in chapter 2. The operation principle and the problems encountered in the development of MSGC detectors are summarized in chapter 3. The chapter 4 is dedicated to the study of the performances of MSGCs in magnetic fields. In the chapters 5 to 7 the processing of the signal from detectors of this type is described, particularly, the performances of various ways of treat the signal in terms of detection efficiency and counting loads are presented.The chapter 8 presents the results obtained with the prototype obtained at IPNL while the chapter 9 gives the conclusions of the performed works. (author)

  15. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III) on the International Space Station (ISS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisewski, Michael; Zawodny, Joseph; Gasbarre, Joseph; Eckman, Richard; Topiwala, Nandkishore; Rodriquez-Alvarez, Otilia; Cheek, Dianne; Hall, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS) mission will provide the science community with high-vertical resolution and nearly global observations of ozone, aerosols, water vapor, nitrogen dioxide, and other trace gas species in the stratosphere and upper-troposphere. SAGE III/ISS measurements will extend the long-term Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) and SAGE data record begun in the 1970s. The multi-decadal SAGE ozone and aerosol data sets have undergone intense scrutiny and are considered the international standard for accuracy and stability. SAGE data have been used to monitor the effectiveness of the Montreal Protocol. Key objectives of the mission are to assess the state of the recovery in the distribution of ozone, to re-establish the aerosol measurements needed by both climate and ozone models, and to gain further insight into key processes contributing to ozone and aerosol variability. The space station mid-inclination orbit allows for a large range in latitude sampling and nearly continuous communications with payloads. The SAGE III instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring atmospheric constituents with high vertical resolution. The SAGE III instrument is a moderate resolution spectrometer covering wavelengths from 290 nm to 1550 nm. Science data is collected in solar occultation mode, lunar occultation mode, and limb scatter measurement mode. A SpaceX Falcon 9 launch vehicle will provide access to space. Mounted in the unpressurized section of the Dragon trunk, SAGE III will be robotically removed from the Dragon and installed on the space station. SAGE III/ISS will be mounted to the ExPRESS Logistics Carrier-4 (ELC-4) location on the starboard side of the station. To facilitate a nadir view from this location, a Nadir Viewing Platform (NVP) payload was developed which mounts between the carrier and the SAGE III Instrument Payload (IP).

  16. Implementing greenhouse gas trading in Europe. Lessons from economic literature and international experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boemare, Catherine; Quirion, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    The European Commission (document COM (2001) 581) has recently presented a directive proposal to the European Parliament and Council in order to implement a greenhouse gas emission trading scheme. If this proposal survives the policy process, it will create the most ambitious trading system ever implemented. However, the legislative process is an opportunity for various interest groups to amend environmental policies, which as a result generally deviate further from what economic literature proposes. A close look at implemented emission trading schemes, stressing their discrepancies with economic literature requests, is thus useful to increase the chances of forthcoming emission trading schemes to go through the political process. We thus review ten emission trading systems, which are either implemented or at an advanced stage of the policy process. We draw attention to major points to be aware of when designing an emission trading system: sectoral and spatial coverage, permits allocation, temporal flexibility, trading organisation, monitoring, enforcement, compliance, and the harmonisation vs. subsidiarity issue. The aim is to evaluate how far experiences in emission trading move away from theory and why. We then provide some lessons and recommendations on how to implement a greenhouse gas emission trading program in Europe. We identify some pros of the Commission proposal (spatial and sectoral coverage, temporal flexibility, trading organisation, compliance rules), some potential drawbacks (allocation rules, monitoring and enforcement) and items on which further guidance is needed (monitoring and allocation rules). Lastly, the European Commission should devote prominent attention to the US NO X Ozone Transport Commission budget program, as the only example of integration between the federal and state levels

  17. Broadening the debate on shale gas : guidelines for decision-making based on the Dutch experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waes, van A.H.M.; Vries, de A.; Est, van Q.C.; Brom, F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the debate on shale gas in the Netherlands. In the political decision-making process relating to shale gas, the national government has highlighted the importance of clarifying the opportunities and risks related to shale gas extraction, and the question of whether this is

  18. Deregulation and natural gas trade relationships: lessons from the Alberta-California experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Patrick Impero

    1997-01-01

    In 1978 the US government moved to deregulate the American natural gas industry. The market changes that resulted from this initial step took time to ripple their way out to regional and subnational gas trading relationships. This ripple effect required subnational governments (state and provincial regulators) to rethink their gas regulatory policies. This article examines the restructuring of the Alberta-California gas trade. It explores how changes in US policy forced California and Alberta regulators to recast their policies. It concludes with several lessons that can be drawn from this case about the complex challenge of restructuring international gas trading relationships. (author)

  19. Acute intensive care unit management of mustard gas victims: the Turkish experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Ertugrul; Ortatatli, Mesut; Sezigen, Sermet; Eyison, Rusen Koray; Kenar, Levent

    2018-05-07

    Sulphur mustard (SM) is an highly toxic and vesicant chemical weapon that was used in various military conflicts several times in the history. The severity of ocular, dermal, and pulmonary symptoms that may appear following a characteristic asymptomatic period are depending on the SM concentration and exposure duration. The aim of this study is to present the clinical features and share the intensive care unit (ICU) experiences for the medical management of mustard gas victims. Thirteen Free Syrian Army soldiers near Al-Bab region of North Syria were reportedly exposed to oily blackish smoke with garlic smell due to the explosion of a trapped bomb without causing any blast or thermal effect on 26th November 2016. None of them wore any chemical protective suits or gas masks during explosion. Since they observed skin lesions including bullous formation next day, they were admitted to the Turkish Field Hospital at the Turkish - Syrian border and then evacuated to the State Hospital of Gaziantep Province, Turkey for further management. Eight victims who were very close to point of explosion suffered burning eyes, sore throat, dry cough and dyspnoea after the chemical attack. On admission to hospital, all cases had conjunctivitis, hoarseness and bullae on various body areas. Blepharospasm and opacity were found in 8 patients and 5 of them had corneal erosions and periorbital oedema. Temporary loss of vision in 4 cases lasted for 24 h. Multiple fluid-filled blisters were observed especially on the scalp, neck, arms and hands, where direct skin exposure to the agent occurred. A definitive clinical care and infection prophylaxis measures along with the burn treatment and bronchodilators for respiratory effects were applied in ICU. Two patients received granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor due to the SM-mediated bone marrow suppression on the 16th day of exposure and one of them died because of necrotic bronchial pseudomembrane obstruction resulting in cardiopulmonary

  20. Water Resource Impacts During Unconventional Shale Gas Development: The Pennsylvania Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S. L.; Yoxtheimer, D.; Arjmand, S.; Grieve, P.; Vidic, R.; Abad, J. D.; Simon, C. A.; Pollak, J.

    2013-12-01

    The number of unconventional Marcellus shale wells in PA has increased from 8 in 2005 to more than 6000 today. This rapid development has been accompanied by environmental issues. We analyze publicly available data describing this Pennsylvania experience (data from www.shalenetwork.org and PA Department of Environmental Protection, i.e., PA DEP). After removing permitting and reporting violations, the average percent of wells/year with at least one notice of violation (NOV) from PA DEP is 35 %. Most violations are minor. An analysis of NOVs reported for wells drilled before 2013 revealed a rate of casing, cement, or well construction issues of 3.4%. Sixteen wells were given notices specifically related to migration of methane. A similarly low percent of wells were contaminated by brine components. Such contamination could derive from spills, subsurface migration of flowback water or shallow natural brines, or contamination by drill cuttings. Most cases of contamination of drinking water supplies with methane or brine components were reported in the previously glaciated part of the state. Before 2011, flowback and production water was often discharged legally into streams after minimal treatment, possibly increasing dissolved Br concentrations in some rivers. The rate of large spills or releases of gas-related industrial wastes in the state peaked in 2009 but little evidence of spills has been found in publicly available surface water chemistry data. The most likely indicators of spillage or subsurface release of flowback or production waters are the dissolved ions Na, Ca, and Cl. However, the data coverage for any given analyte is generally spatially and temporally sparse. Publicly available water quality data for before and after spills into Larrys Creek and Bobs Creek document the difficulties of detecting such events. An observation from the Pennsylvania experience is that the large number of people who have complained about their water supply (~1000 letters

  1. The spray characteristic of gas-liquid coaxial swirl injector by experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the laser phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA, the spray characteristics of gas-liquid coaxial swirl injector were studied. The Sauter mean diameter (SMD, axial velocity and size data rate were measured under different gas injecting pressure drop and liquid injecting pressure drop. Comparing to a single liquid injection, SMD with gas presence is obviously improved. So the gas presence has a significant effect on the atomization of the swirl injector. What’s more, the atomization effect of gas-liquid is enhanced with the increasing of the gas pressure drop. Under the constant gas pressure drop, the injector has an optimal liquid pressure drop under which the atomization performance is best.

  2. The experiment of the elemental mercury was removed from natural gas by 4A molecular sieve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cong; Chen, Yanhao

    2018-04-01

    Most of the world's natural gas fields contain elemental mercury and mercury compounds, and the amount of mercury in natural gas is generally 1μg/m3 200μg/m3. This paper analyzes the mercury removal principle of chemical adsorption process, the characteristics and application of mercury removal gent and the factors that affect the efficiency of mercury removal. The mercury in the natural gas is adsorbed by the mercury-silver reaction of the 4 molecular sieve after the manned treatment. The limits for mercury content for natural gas for different uses and different treatment processes are also different. From the environmental protection, safety and other factors, it is recommended that the mercury content of natural gas in the pipeline is less than 28μg / m3, and the mercury content of the raw material gas in the equipment such as natural gas liquefaction and natural gas condensate recovery is less than 0.01μg/m3. This paper mainly analyzes the existence of mercury in natural gas, and the experimental research process of using 4A molecular sieve to absorb mercury in natural gas.

  3. The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX: A test-bed for developing urban greenhouse gas emission measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J. Davis

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX is to develop, evaluate and improve methods for measuring greenhouse gas (GHG emissions from cities. INFLUX’s scientific objectives are to quantify CO2 and CH4 emission rates at 1 km2 resolution with a 10% or better accuracy and precision, to determine whole-city emissions with similar skill, and to achieve high (weekly or finer temporal resolution at both spatial resolutions. The experiment employs atmospheric GHG measurements from both towers and aircraft, atmospheric transport observations and models, and activity-based inventory products to quantify urban GHG emissions. Multiple, independent methods for estimating urban emissions are a central facet of our experimental design. INFLUX was initiated in 2010 and measurements and analyses are ongoing. To date we have quantified urban atmospheric GHG enhancements using aircraft and towers with measurements collected over multiple years, and have estimated whole-city CO2 and CH4 emissions using aircraft and tower GHG measurements, and inventory methods. Significant differences exist across methods; these differences have not yet been resolved; research to reduce uncertainties and reconcile these differences is underway. Sectorally- and spatially-resolved flux estimates, and detection of changes of fluxes over time, are also active research topics. Major challenges include developing methods for distinguishing anthropogenic from biogenic CO2 fluxes, improving our ability to interpret atmospheric GHG measurements close to urban GHG sources and across a broader range of atmospheric stability conditions, and quantifying uncertainties in inventory data products. INFLUX data and tools are intended to serve as an open resource and test bed for future investigations. Well-documented, public archival of data and methods is under development in support of this objective.

  4. An Advanced Analytical Chemistry Experiment Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, MATLAB, and Chemometrics to Predict Biodiesel Blend Percent Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Karisa M.; Schale, Stephen P.; Le, Trang M.; Larson, Joel C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a laboratory experiment for an advanced analytical chemistry course where we first focus on the chemometric technique partial least-squares (PLS) analysis applied to one-dimensional (1D) total-ion-current gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-TIC) separations of biodiesel blends. Then, we focus on n-way PLS (n-PLS) applied to…

  5. Comprehensive Interpretation of the Laboratory Experiments Results to Construct Model of the Polish Shale Gas Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzyna, Jadwiga A.; Krakowska, Paulina I.; Puskarczyk, Edyta; Wawrzyniak-Guz, Kamila; Zych, Marcin

    2018-03-01

    More than 70 rock samples from so-called sweet spots, i.e. the Ordovician Sa Formation and Silurian Ja Member of Pa Formation from the Baltic Basin (North Poland) were examined in the laboratory to determine bulk and grain density, total and effective/dynamic porosity, absolute permeability, pore diameters size, total surface area, and natural radioactivity. Results of the pyrolysis, i.e., TOC (Total Organic Carbon) together with S1 and S2 - parameters used to determine the hydrocarbon generation potential of rocks, were also considered. Elemental composition from chemical analyses and mineral composition from XRD measurements were also included. SCAL analysis, NMR experiments, Pressure Decay Permeability measurements together with water immersion porosimetry and adsorption/ desorption of nitrogen vapors method were carried out along with the comprehensive interpretation of the outcomes. Simple and multiple linear statistical regressions were used to recognize mutual relationships between parameters. Observed correlations and in some cases big dispersion of data and discrepancies in the property values obtained from different methods were the basis for building shale gas rock model for well logging interpretation. The model was verified by the result of the Monte Carlo modelling of spectral neutron-gamma log response in comparison with GEM log results.

  6. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments 1 and 2: Comparisons with ozonesondes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Robert E.; Cunnold, Derek M.; Chu, William P.; McCormick, M. Patrick

    1995-01-01

    Ozone profiles measured by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments (SAGE) 1 and 2 are compared with ozonesonde profiles at 24 stations over the period extending from 1979 through 1991. Ozonesonde/satellite differences at 21 stations with SAGE 2 overpasses were computed down to 11.5 km in midlatitudes, to 15.5 km in the lower latitudes, and for nine stations with SAGE 1 overpasses down to 15.5 km. The set of individual satellite and ozonesonde profile comparisons most closely colocated in time and space shows mean absolute differences relative to the satellite measurement of 6 +/- 2% for SAGE 2 and 8 +/- 3% for SAGE 1. The ensemble of ozonesonde/satellite differences, when averaged over all altitudes, shows that for SAGE 2, 70% were less than 5%, whereas for SAGE 1, 50% were less than 5%. The best agreement occurred in the altitude region near the ozone density maximum where almost all the relative differences were less than 5%. Most of the statistically significant differences occurred below the ozone maximum down to the tropopause in the region of steepest ozone gradients and typically ranged between 0 and -20%. Correlations between ozone and aerosol extinction in the northern midlatitudes indicate that aerosols had no discernible impact on the ozonesonde/satellite differences and on the SAGE 2 ozone retrieval for the levels of extinction encountered in the lower stratosphere during 1984 to mid-1991.

  7. Tracer gas experiment to verify the dispersion from a tall stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivertsen, B.; Irwin, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    At the request of the Ministerios de Obras Publicas y Urbanismo (MOPU) in Madrid, the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU) planned and carried out a comprehensive field experiment at the Andorra (Teruel) power plant in Spain. All together, eleven releases of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer were carried out at the 1,200 MW electric coal fired power plant. The tracer was emitted into the atmosphere from the 343 m high stack, stack exit diameter of 9 m. The stack gas emission characteristics were nearly constant during the period having an exit temperature of 175.1 C (1.9), exit velocity of 35.5 m/s (0.14) and sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) emission rate of 46.1 x 10 3 kg/hr (5.15 x 10 3 ); standard deviations are listed in parentheses. Samples were taken at the surface along sampling arcs located approximately 8, 23, 43 and 75 km downwind. The releases were undertaken during typical late spring daytime conditions. The synoptic weather conditions were dominated by a large high pressure system on the Atlantic, west of Spain. Fronts were passing the area from the north and a low pressure system was developing over central Europe (Germany). Winds at the surface were generally brisk from the northwest at 7 to 12 m/s

  8. Crises Management in the Oil and Gas Industry: The Niger Delta Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odemene, Glory C.

    The Niger Delta crises escalated beyond the borders of the Nigerian nation to become an issue that affected individuals and corporations around the world. This study led to the discovery of how the local crises escalated with international implications. This discovery was accomplished by addressing how the Niger Delta crises escalated from villages to international scenes, with notable impacts on the environment, health, safety, security, and financial segments of local, international, private, and corporate entities. Using Sweeny's crisis decision theory and Lazarus and Folkman's coping theory, the study considered the coping strategies of community members, the decisions, and actions they took in response to the management approaches of the government and the oil and gas companies (OGCs). This qualitative study utilized historical narrative to collect data by interviewing 4 participants who lived and worked in the region during the crises. NVivo was used for manual and automatic coding of data, as well as for categorization and connection of codes. Content analysis of identified codes and categories revealed the themes and trends in the experiences narrated by participants. Findings include the root causes, trend of escalation, and management strategies of the government and the OGCs that influenced the crises. These findings will help to influence policies and practices in the region and enhance effective management of current and emerging conflicts, with possibilities of restoring stability and security in the areas and in the nation at large.

  9. Cross-border trading and transmission networks. The natural gas experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavattoni, G.

    1992-01-01

    The volume and sources of gas imports to Europe and cross-border trading regulations for gas imports into and within Europe are outlined. The import of gas from Algeria to Italy is presented as a case study. It deals with the purchase contract, transmission through Tunisia, the crossing of the Strait of Sicily and transportation within Italy. The EC Transit Directive, the Draft Directive(s) on third party access and the impact of the directives on the gas market are then discussed. (UK)

  10. Position-specific 13C distributions within propane from experiments and natural gas samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, Alison; Sessions, Alex; Lawson, Michael; Ferreira, A. A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Lewan, Michael D.; Eiler, John M.

    2018-01-01

    Site-specific carbon isotope measurements of organic compounds potentially recover information that is lost in a conventional, 'bulk' isotopic analysis. Such measurements are useful because isotopically fractionating processes may have distinct effects at different molecular sites, and thermodynamically equilibrated populations of molecules tend to concentrate heavy isotopes in one molecular site versus another. Most recent studies of site-specific 13C in organics use specialized Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques or complex chemical degradations prior to mass spectrometric measurements. Herein we present the first application of a new mass spectrometric technique that reconstructs the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane based on measurements of the 13C/12C ratios of two or more fragment ions that sample different proportions of the terminal and central carbon sites. We apply this method to propane from laboratory experiments and natural gas samples to explore the relationships between site-specific carbon isotope composition, full-molecular δ13C, thermal maturity, and variation in organic matter precursors. Our goal is to advance the understanding of the sources and histories of short-chain alkanes within geologic systems. Our findings suggest that propane varies in its site-specific carbon isotope structure, which is correlated with increasing thermal maturity, first increasing in terminal position δ13C and then increasing in both center and terminal position δ13C. This pattern is observed in both experimental and natural samples, and is plausibly explained by a combination of site-specific, temperature-dependent isotope effects associated with conversion of different precursor molecules (kerogen, bitumen, and/or oil) to propane, differences in site-specific isotopic contents of those precursors, and possibly distillation of reactive components of those precursors with increasing maturity. We hypothesize that the largest changes in

  11. Position-specific 13C distributions within propane from experiments and natural gas samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, Alison; Sessions, Alex L.; Lawson, Michael; Ferreira, A.A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Lewan, Michael; Eilers, J.M.

    2018-01-01

    Site-specific carbon isotope measurements of organic compounds potentially recover information that is lost in a conventional, ‘bulk’ isotopic analysis. Such measurements are useful because isotopically fractionating processes may have distinct effects at different molecular sites, and thermodynamically equilibrated populations of molecules tend to concentrate heavy isotopes in one molecular site versus another. Most recent studies of site-specific 13C in organics use specialized Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques or complex chemical degradations prior to mass spectrometric measurements. Herein we present the first application of a new mass spectrometric technique that reconstructs the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane based on measurements of the 13C/12C ratios of two or more fragment ions that sample different proportions of the terminal and central carbon sites. We apply this method to propane from laboratory experiments and natural gas samples to explore the relationships between site-specific carbon isotope composition, full-molecular δ13C, thermal maturity, and variation in organic matter precursors. Our goal is to advance the understanding of the sources and histories of short-chain alkanes within geologic systems. Our findings suggest that propane varies in its site-specific carbon isotope structure, which is correlated with increasing thermal maturity, first increasing in terminal position δ13C and then increasing in both center and terminal position δ13C. This pattern is observed in both experimental and natural samples, and is plausibly explained by a combination of site-specific, temperature-dependent isotope effects associated with conversion of different precursor molecules (kerogen, bitumen, and/or oil) to propane, differences in site-specific isotopic contents of those precursors, and possibly distillation of reactive components of those precursors with increasing maturity. We hypothesize that the largest changes in

  12. Heat-flow patterns in Tian-Calvet microcalorimeters: Conductive, convective, and radiative transport in gas dosing experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilchiz, Luis Enrique; Pacheco-Vega, Arturo; Handy, Brent E.

    2005-01-01

    Mathematical models of a Tian-Calvet microcalorimeter were solved numerically by the finite-element method in an effort to understand the relative importance of the three basic heat transfer mechanisms operative during gas dosing experiments typically used to determine heats of adsorption on catalysts and adsorbents. The analysis pays particular attention to the quantitative release of heat through various elements of the cell and sensor cups to assess time delays and the deg.ree of thermal shunting that may result in inaccuracies in calorimetric measurements. Conductive transfer predominates in situations where there is high gas headspace pressure. The convection currents that arise when dosing with considerable gas pressure in the cell headspace region are not sufficiently strong to shunt significant amounts of sample heat away from being sensed by the surrounding thermopiles. Therefore, the heat capture fraction (heat sensed/heat produced) does not vary significantly with gas headspace pressure. During gas dosing under very low gas headspace pressure, radiation losses from the top of the sample bed may significantly affect the heat capture fraction, leading to underestimations of adsorption heats, unless the heat radiated from the top of the catalyst bed is effectively reflected back to the sample region or absorbed by an inert packing layer also in thermal contact with the thermopile wall

  13. Preliminary results of Resistive Plate Chambers operated with eco-friendly gas mixtures for application in the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abbrescia, Marcello; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Cauwenbergh, Simon Marc D; Ferrini, Mauro; Muhammad, Saleh; Passamontic, L; Pierluigi, Daniele; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Russo, Alessandro; Savianoc, G; Tytgat, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The operations of Resistive Plate Chambers in LHC experiments require F-based gases for optimal performance. Recent regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. In view of the CMS experiment upgrade several tests are ongoing to measure the performance of the detector in terms of efficiency, streamer probability, induced charge and time resolution. Prototype chambers with readout pads and with the standard cms electronic setup are under test. In this talk preliminary results on performance of RPCs operated with a potential eco-friendly gas candidate 1,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene, commercially known as HFO-1234ze and with CO2 based gas mixtures are presented and discussed for the possible application in the CMS experiment.

  14. Corporate realignments in the natural gas industry: does the North American experience foretell the future for the European Union?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutledge, I.; Wright, Ph. [Sheffield Univ., Energy Studies Programme (United Kingdom); Wright, Ph. [Montpellier-1 Univ., CREDEN-LASER, 34 (France)

    2000-09-01

    This paper seeks to explore the extent to which the corporate realignments which have occurred in the North American Natural Gas Industry during a now relatively lengthy experience with liberalization involving a large number of players, will be imitated in the future by European Union countries other than the UK (which is of course already long-embarked along the path of Anglo-Saxon liberalization). The paper first of all catalogues the North American experience, drawing on company performance data assembled by the authors over the last decade (Rutledge and Wright, 1993, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2000). Secondly, this empirical exploration gives way to theoretical speculation: are there elements of the North American experience for which explanatory generalizations are possible? Thirdly, these empirical and theoretical insights are employed to identify and explore actual and potential differences in the corporate evolution of the European Union natural gas industry. (authors)

  15. ALICE TPC gas system is the first of the LHC experiments to be put on line

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Picture 01 : the Physics Department's DT1 gas systems team in their laboratory. Picture 02 : Chilo Garabatos (ALICE) and Stefan Haider (PH-DT1-GS) in front of the gas system for the ALICE TPC which has just been put on line.

  16. The non-proliferation experiment and gas sampling as an on-site inspection activity: A progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrigan, C.R.

    1994-03-01

    The Non-proliferation Experiment (NPE) is contributing to the development of gas sampling methods and models that may be incorporated into future on-site inspection (OSI) activities. Surface gas sampling and analysis, motivated by nuclear test containment studies, have already demonstrated the tendency for the gaseous products of an underground nuclear test to flow hundreds of meters to the surface over periods ranging from days to months. Even in the presence of a uniform sinusoidal pressure variation, there will be a net flow of cavity gas toward the surface. To test this barometric pumping effect at Rainier Mesa, gas bottles containing sulfur hexaflouride and 3 He were added to the pre-detonation cavity for the 1 kt chemical explosives test. Pre-detonation measurements of the background levels of both gases were obtained at selected sites on top of the mesa. The background levels of both tracers were found to be at or below mass spectrographic/gas chromatographic sensitivity thresholds in the parts-per-trillion range. Post-detonation, gas chromatographic analyses of samples taken during barometric pressure lows from the sampling sites on the mesa indicate the presence of significant levels (300--600 ppt) of sulfur hexaflouride. However, mass spectrographic analyses of gas samples taken to date do not show the presence of 3 He. To explain these observations, several possibilities are being explored through additional sampling/analysis and numerical modeling. For the NPE, the detonation point was approximately 400 m beneath the surface of Rainier Mesa and the event did not produce significant fracturing or subsidence on the surface of the mesa. Thus, the NPE may ultimately represent an extreme, but useful example for the application and tuning of cavity gas detection techniques

  17. Operating experience of gas bearing helium circulators in HTGR development facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, H.; Kawaji, S.; Fujisaki, K.; Ihizuka, T.

    1988-01-01

    The large scale helium gas test facility (HENDEL) has been constructed and operated since March 1982 at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to develop HTGR components. The five electric driven gas circulators with dynamic gas bearings are used to circulate the helium gas of 4MPa and 400 deg. C in loops for their compactness, gas tightness, easy maintenance and free from gas contamination. All of these circulators are variable speed types of 3,000 to 12,000 rpm and have the same gas bearings and electric motors. The four machines among them are equipped with centrifugal impeller and one other machine has regenerative type, and the weight of both type rotors are nearly the same. After the troubles and repairing, both type of circulators were tested and the vibration characteristics were measured as preventing maintenance. From the test and measurements of the circulators, it was presumed that the first trouble on regenerative type was caused from excess unbalance force by falling off of a small pin from the rotating part and the second severe trouble on it was caused by the whipping in gas bearing. The static load on tilting pads indicated close relations to occurrence of the whirling through the measurements. It is recognized that fine balancing of the rotors and delicate clearance adjustment of the bearings are very important for the rotor stability and that the mechanism should be designed and machined so precise as to be adjustable. As the gas bearing would be damaged in an instantaneously short time, the monitoring technique for it should be so fast and predictive as to prevent serious damage. Through the tests, the vibration spectrum monitoring method seems to be predictive and useful for early detection of the shaft instability. It will be concluded that the gas bearing machine is an excellent system in its design philosophy, however, it also needs highly precise machining and delicate maintenance technique. 4 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab

  18. Experiments to investigate the effects of small changes in fuel stoichiometry on fission gas release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, P S; Smith, R C [Windscale Lab., AEA Technology, Seascale, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    Fuel pin failure in-reactor leads to fission product and in the case of a PWR fuel debris release to the coolant. For economic reasons immediate shutdown and discharge of failed fuel needs to be avoided but this needs to be counter-balanced against the increasing dose to operators. PWR practice is to continue running wit failed rods, monitoring coolant activity, and only shutting down the reactor and discharging the fuel when circuit activity levels become unacceptable. The rate of fission product release under failed fuel conditions is of key importance and considerable effort has been directed towards establishing the dependency of release on temperature, heating rate, burn-up, and also the extent of fuel oxidation. As a precursor to a possible wider investigation of this area, a small programme was mounted during 1992/1993 to confirm whether small changes in the oxidation state of the fuel, for example those caused by minor cladding defects, would significantly effect fuel behaviour during postulated design basis faults. The objective of the programme was to determine the effects of small departures from stoichiometric fuel composition on fission gas release, and to compare the results with the current methodology for calculating releases under fault conditions. A total of eight experiments was performed. Two were intended as baseline tests to provide a reference with which to compare the effect of oxidation state influenced behaviour with that of thermal effects. It was found that small changes in stoichiometry of {sup {approx}}1 x 10{sup -6} had little or no effect on release but that changes of {sup {approx}} 1 x 10{sup -4} were observed to increase the diffusion coefficient, for {sup 85}Kr, by up to an order of magnitude and hence greatly increase the release rate. The stoichiometry of the sample used in these tests was, for convenience, adjusted using He/H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O atmospheres. (Abstract Truncated)

  19. Developing a data life cycle for carbon and greenhouse gas measurements: challenges, experiences and visions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsch, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental research infrastructures and big data integration networks require common data policies, standardized workflows and sophisticated e-infrastructure to optimise the data life cycle. This presentation summarizes the experiences in developing the data life cycle for the Integrated Carbon Observation System (ICOS), a European Research Infrastructure. It will also outline challenges that still exist and visions for future development. As many other environmental research infrastructures ICOS RI built on a large number of distributed observational or experimental sites. Data from these sites are transferred to Thematic Centres and quality checked, processed and integrated there. Dissemination will be managed by the ICOS Carbon Portal. This complex data life cycle has been defined in detail by developing protocols and assigning responsibilities. Since data will be shared under an open access policy there is a strong need for common data citation tracking systems that allow data providers to identify downstream usage of their data so as to prove their importance and show the impact to stakeholders and the public. More challenges arise from interoperating with other infrastructures or providing data for global integration projects as done e.g. in the framework of GEOSS or in global integration approaches such as fluxnet or SOCAt. Here, common metadata systems are the key solutions for data detection and harvesting. The metadata characterises data, services, users and ICT resources (including sensors and detectors). Risks may arise when data of high and low quality are mixed during this process or unexperienced data scientists without detailed knowledge on the data aquisition derive scientific theories through statistical analyses. The vision of fully open data availability is expressed in a recent GEO flagship initiative that will address important issues needed to build a connected and interoperable global network for carbon cycle and greenhouse gas

  20. Summarizing evaluation of the results of in-pile experiments for the transient fission gas release under accidental conditions of fast breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, E.A.; Vaeth, L.

    1989-04-01

    The transient fission gas behaviour and the fission gas induced fuel motion were studied in in-pile experiments in different countries, under conditions typical for hypothetical accidents. This report summarizes first the different experiment series and the main results. Then, a comparative evaluation is given, which provides a basis for the choice of the fission gas parameters in the accident code SAS3D

  1. Transformations of manure during the course of an experiment on the production of gas from manure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppenet, M; Ducet, G

    1948-01-01

    A concrete vat was filled with a mixture of horse and cow manure and liquid manure and fermented for 106 days at 28--30/sup 0/C. A daily average of 524 liters gas/tonne was produced, the gas consisting of equal parts CO/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/, with H/sub 2/ varying from almost none to 25%. It was determined that the gas was produced by the destruction of cellulose and pentosans with little contribution from the lignins and humic acids.

  2. Perry's bio-gas experience 1995 ASME/EPRI radwaste workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenk, A.K.

    1995-01-01

    The Perry Power Plant has been in commercial operation for about ten years. Although we didn't know it at the time, we now believe our bio-gas problem may have started about seven years ago. Barnwell discovered we had a bio-gas problem about a year and a half ago. We found out we had a bio-gas problem a few hours later. The history associated with this process at Perry is outlined, and past as well as present efforts to monitor this process are also discussed

  3. Dry hyperbaric gas metal arc welding of subsea pipelines: experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azar, Amin S.

    2012-07-01

    amount of dissipated heat from each source should be differentiated. An intermediate heat source model was employed for this purpose. The latter model is after Myhr and Grong that is called distributed point heat sources. This model can be accurately fit to the weld cross section geometry if calibrated accurately. The calibrated parameters were found to be very close to the ones required by Double-ellipsoidal heat source model. By using this approach, not only the effect of welding parameters on weld bead geometry can be categorized, but also the spent time for double-ellipsoidal heat source adjustments will be cut by 90%.A Gaussian heat source was also employed for welding thermal cycle simulations. Accompanying experiments suggested that the thermal gradients hardly change as pressure elevates. However, it was found that the increased pressure level might not necessarily result in higher or lower cooling rates despite the geometrical changes. In a parallel investigation, the metallurgical effect of different shielding environments on phase transformation and mechanical properties of the bead-onplate weld samples was studies. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) techniques were used to identify the effect of five different shielding environments on the phase transformation. Argon and Helium chamber gases offer the conditions that facilitate the highest amount of acicular ferrite transformation, yet, they show some differences in a number of crystallographic details. Co2 gas provided conditions for a lot of porosity in addition to the dominant polygonal ferrite/bainite transformation. He+1/2Co2 mixture resulted in bainite transformation that was found to follow the maximum heat flow direction in terms of crystallographic orientations.(Author)

  4. Local content: worldwide trends and the Brazilian experience in the oil and gas sector; Conteudo local: tendencias mundiais e a experiencia brasileira no setor de oleo e gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrosa Junior, Oswaldo A.; Guimaraes, Paulo Buarque [Associacao Brasileira dos Produtores Independentes de Petroleo e Gas - ABPIP, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Fernandez y Fernandez, Eloi [Organizacao Nacional da Industria do Petroleo, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    In recent years a trend on increasing requirements for local investments has been observed worldwide in the petroleum industry. Host countries expect to have increasing social and economical benefits from the development of the oil and gas industry. This expectation drives at a more comprehensive concept of local content to include commitment with social, industrial, and technological development. The Brazilian experience has shown a lot of emphasis on local industry development. Initiatives from governmental authorities and the private sector have been implemented to increase the local industry participation in the oil and gas projects. The current regulation focus on the full and fair opportunities for the local suppliers and the local content commitment established in the E and P concession agreements. A key issue on promoting local content initiatives is to assure that the competitiveness of the indigenous industry will be developed and preserved. The constraints on building up the local industry competitiveness will be addressed, focusing on the taxation overburden, lack of adequate local financing, and internal structural aspects affecting industrial productivity. In addition to this, the experiences on measuring local content for offshore construction and drilling are highlighted. Technology development and technical capability have been addressed by incentive programs for the O and G sector. Finally, the technology learning process and the regulatory requirements to invest in R and D programs conducted by Brazilian technological institutions are discussed. (author)

  5. Dual-purpose power plants, experiences with exhaust gas purification plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, R.

    1993-01-01

    From 1984 to 1988, the research and development project ''pollutant reduction for exhaust gases from heat production systems'' sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology (BMFT) has been carried out by TUeV in Bavaria. This project was to show the state of exhaust gas technology for small and medium-sized plants (boilers and motoric heat generators). When publishing the final report, no positive balance could be given. Based on the results, the succession project ''Exhaust gas purification plants in field test'' (ARIF) has been started. This project has the following objectives: -Measuring technical investigation of the exhaust gas purification of motoric driven heat generator systems in field test. - Suitability of hand measuring devices for emissions for a discontinuous control of the exhaust gas purification plat by the operator. - Control of new methods regarding pollutant reduction for motoric and conventional heat generators. (orig.) [de

  6. Experience of the irradiation method under mixed gas (95% O2 plus 5% CO2) inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Michio; Tazaki, Eio

    1978-01-01

    The irradiation method under mixed gas of 95% O 2 plus CO 2 inhalation at one atomosphere was discussed to improve therapeutic results, in malignant tumors which are not greatly sensitive to irradiation. Randomized study was done in each attending institute, with common protocols. As a result, no positive effect was recognized in irradiation method under mixed gas inhalation with daily dose of 200 rad and 5 fractions per week, which is widely used clinically. But when irradiation dose was increased up to 500 to 600 rad per fraction, effect of the mixed gas was remarkable. But against this, observing for years, results in irradiation under mixed gas inhalation were not always related to the improvement of the long term survival. (author)

  7. Gas release during salt well pumping: model predictions and comparisons to laboratory experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peurrung, L.M.; Caley, S.M.; Bian, E.Y.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Nineteen of these SSTs have been placed on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) because they are known or suspected, in all but one case, to retain these flammable gases. Salt well pumping to remove the interstitial liquid from SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, posing a number of safety concerns. Research at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has sought to quantify the release of flammable gases during salt well pumping operations. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. Understanding and quantifying the physical mechanisms and waste properties that govern gas release during salt well pumping will help to resolve the associated safety issues

  8. Simulation experiments on the radial pool growth in gas-releasing melting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhadieh, R.; Purviance, R.; Carlson, N.

    1983-01-01

    Following an HCDA, molten core-debris can contact the concrete foundation of the reactor building resulting in a molten UO 2 /concrete interaction and considerable gas release. The released gas can pressurize the containment building potentially leading to radiological releases. Furthermore, directional growth of the molten core-debris pool can reduce the reactor building structural integrity. To implement design changes that insure structural integrity, an understanding of the thermal-hydraulic and mass-transfer process associated with such a growth is most desirable. Owing to the complex nature of the combined heat, mass, and hydrodynamic processes associated with the two-dimensional problem of gas release and melting, the downward and radial penetration problems have been investigated separately. The present experimental study addresses the question of sideward penetration of the molten core debris into a gas-releasing, meltable, miscible solid

  9. Japan’s experience of flue gas treatment by electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, S.

    2011-01-01

    The electron beam flue gas treatment technology was invented in Japan in 1970's. The paper presents the outlook of the Japanese activities on the development and present state of EBFGT technology. (author)

  10. Japan’s experience of flue gas treatment by electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machi, S.

    2011-07-01

    The electron beam flue gas treatment technology was invented in Japan in 1970's. The paper presents the outlook of the Japanese activities on the development and present state of EBFGT technology. (author)

  11. Fission gas release modelling: developments arising from instrumented fuel assemblies, out-of-pile experiments and microstructural observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leech, N.A.; Smith, M.R.; Pearce, J.H.; Ellis, W.E.; Beatham, N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of fission gas release modelling in thermal reactor fuel (both steady-state and transient) and in particular, illustrates the way in which experimental data have been, and continue to be, the main driving force behind model development. To illustrate this point various aspects of fuel performance are considered: temperature calculation, steady-state and transient fission gas release, grain boundary gas atom capacity and microstructural phenomena. The sources of experimental data discussed include end-of-life fission gas release measurements, instrumented fuel assemblies (e.g. rods with internal pressure transducers, fuel centre thermocouples), swept capsule experiments, out-of-pile annealing experiments and microstructural techniques applied during post-irradiation evaluation. In the case of the latter, the benefit of applying many observation and analysis techniques on the same fuel samples (the approach adopted at NRL Windscale) is emphasized. This illustrates a shift of emphasis in the modelling field from the development of large, complex thermo-mechanical computer codes to the assessment of key experimental data in order to develop and evaluate sub-models which correctly predict the observed behaviour. (author)

  12. Gas-puff Z-pinch experiment on the LIMAY-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasugi, K.; Miyamoto, T.; Akiyama, H.; Shimomura, N.; Sato, M.; Tazima, T.

    1989-01-01

    A gas-puff z-pinch plasma has been produced on the pulsed power generator LIMAY-I at IPP Nagoya University. The stored energy of the generator is 13 kJ, and it generates 600 kV-70 ns-3 Ω power pulse. Ar or He gas is puffed from a hollow nozzle with 18 mm diameter, and a z-pinch plasma is produced by a discharge between 3 mm gap electrodes

  13. Restructuring of oil and gas companies in financial difficulty: the Canadian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudec, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    The relationship, under Canadian law, between oil or gas company in financial difficulty and its various creditors is discussed. In particular, commercial bank lenders and non-defaulting co-venturers in the project are considered. The broad topics covered are: the financing of multi-party resource projects; recent developments in conventional oil and gas production loan facilities; alternative and new approaches to energy loan restructuring; minimizing the lender's environmental risk in realizing against an energy project. (UK)

  14. The Cloud Ice Mountain Experiment (CIME) 1998: experiment overview and modelling of the microphysical processes during the seeding by isentropic gas expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobrock, Wolfram; Flossmann, Andrea I.; Monier, Marie; Pichon, Jean-Marc; Cortez, Laurent; Fournol, Jean-François; Schwarzenböck, Alfons; Mertes, Stephan; Heintzenberg, Jost; Laj, Paolo; Orsi, Giordano; Ricci, Loretta; Fuzzi, Sandro; Brink, Harry Ten; Jongejan, Piet; Otjes, René

    The second field campaign of the Cloud Ice Mountain Experiment (CIME) project took place in February 1998 on the mountain Puy de Dôme in the centre of France. The content of residual aerosol particles, of H 2O 2 and NH 3 in cloud droplets was evaluated by evaporating the drops larger than 5 μm in a Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI) and by measuring the residual particle concentration and the released gas content. The same trace species were studied behind a round jet impactor for the complementary interstitial aerosol particles smaller than 5 μm diameter. In a second step of experiments, the ambient supercooled cloud was converted to a mixed phase cloud by seeding the cloud with ice particles by the gas release from pressurised gas bottles. A comparison between the physical and chemical characteristics of liquid drops and ice particles allows a study of the fate of the trace constituents during the presence of ice crystals in the cloud. In the present paper, an overview is given of the CIME 98 experiment and the instrumentation deployed. The meteorological situation during the experiment was analysed with the help of a cloud scale model. The microphysics processes and the behaviour of the scavenged aerosol particles before and during seeding are analysed with the detailed microphysical model ExMix. The simulation results agreed well with the observations and confirmed the assumption that the Bergeron-Findeisen process was dominating during seeding and was influencing the partitioning of aerosol particles between drops and ice crystals. The results of the CIME 98 experiment give an insight on microphysical changes, redistribution of aerosol particles and cloud chemistry during the Bergeron-Findeisen process when acting also in natural clouds.

  15. Gas-phase fragmentation of peptides to increase the spatial resolution of the Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    are produced after precursor ion selection and thus do not add complexity to the LC-MS analysis. The key to obtaining optimal spatial resolution in a hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HX-MS) experiment is the fragmentation efficiency. This chapter discusses common fragmentation techniques like collision....../D scrambling, thus making them suitable for HX applications. By combining the classic bottom-up HX-MS workflow with gas-phase fragmentation by ETD, detailed information on protein HX can be obtained....

  16. The design, fabrication and testing of the gas analysis system for the tritium recovery experiment, TRIO-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.; Bowers, D.L.; Clemmer, E.D.; Clemmer, R.G.; Graczyk, D.G.; Homa, M.I.; Pappas, G.; Reedy, G.T.; Slawecki, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    The tritium recovery experiment, TRIO-01, required a gas analysis system which detected the form of tritium, the amount of tritium (differential and integral), and the presence and amount of other radioactive species. The system had to handle all contingencies and function for months at a time; unattended during weekend operation. The designed system, described herein, consisted of a train of components which could be grouped as desired to match tritium release behavior

  17. Planning of in-situ experiment for understanding of gas migration behaviour in sedimentary rock. (1) Setting of gas injection procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanai, Kenji; Fujita, Tomoo; Noda, Masaru; Yamamoto, Shuichi; Shimura, Tomoyuki; Sato, Shin

    2013-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been planning in-situ gas migration test in Horonobe URL, Hokkaido. This paper discusses the optimum gas injection procedure for the test to understand gas migration behaviour in surrounded rock. The stepwise constant gas injection was selected, taking into account domestic and overseas gas related research results. Hydro-mechanical-gas coupling analysis which is able to consider the dissolved methane in Horonobe groundwater was applied to evaluate the gas behaviour. The results have indicated no significant mechanical damages to the rock and have supported the appropriateness of selected gas injection procedure for the test. (author)

  18. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion

  19. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion.

  20. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, 94550 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion.

  1. Saclay Reactor: acquired knowledge by two years experience in heat transfer using compressed gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yvon, J.

    1955-01-01

    Describes the conception and functioning of a new reactor (EL-2) using compressed gas as primary coolant. The aim of the use of compressed gas as primary coolant is to reduce the quantity of heavy water used in the functioning of the reactor. Description of the reactor vessel (dimensions, materials, reflector and protection). Description of the cells and the circulation of the gas within the cells. A complete explanation of the control and regulating of the reaction by the ionization chamber is given. Heavy water is used as modulator: it describes the heavy water system and its recombination system. The fuel slugs are cooled by compressed gas: its system is described as well as the blower and the heat exchanger system. Water is supplied by a cooling tower which means the reactor power is dependant of the atmospheric conditions. Particular attention has been given to the tightness of the different systems used. The relation between neutron flow and the thermal output is discussed: the thermal output can be calculated by measuring the gas flow and its heating or by measuring the neutron flow within the reactor, both methods gives closed results. Reactivity study: determination of the different factors which induce a variation of reactivity. Heat transfer: discussion on the use of different heat transfer systems, determination of the required chemical and physical properties of the primary coolant as well as the discussion of the nuclear and thermal requirements for the choice of it. A comparison between the use of nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas shows an advantage in using nitrogen with the existing knowledge. Reflexion on the relevance of this work and the future perspectives of the use of compressed gas as primary coolant. (M.P.)

  2. Modelling of fission gas release in rods from the International DEMO-RAMP-II Project at Studsvik

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malen, K.

    1983-01-01

    The DEMO-RAMP-II rods had a burn-up of 25-30 MWd/kg U. They were ramped to powers in the range 40-50 kW/m with hold times between 10 s and 4.5 minutes. In spite of the short hold times the fission gas release at the higher powers was more than 1%. With these short hold times it is natural to assume that mixing of released gas with plenum gas is limited. Modelling has been performed using GAPCONSV (a modified GAPCON-THERMAL-2) both with and without mixing of released gas with plenum gas. In particular for the high power-short duration ramps only the ''no mixing'' modelling yields release fractions comparable to the experimental values. (author)

  3. Operating experience with gas-bearing circulators in a high-pressure helium loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, J.P.; Gat, U.; Young, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    A high-pressure engineering test loop has been designed and constructed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for circulating helium through a test chamber at temperatures to 1,000 deg. C. The purpose of this loop is to determine the thermal and structural performance of proposed components for the primary loops of gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Three gas-bearing circulators, mounted in series, provide a maximum volumetric flow of 0.47 m 3 /s and a maximum head of 78 kJ/kg at operating pressures from 0.1 to 10.7 MPa. Control of gaseous impurities in the circulating gas was the significant operating requirement that dictated the choice of a circulator that is lubricated by the circulating gas. The motor for each circulator is contained within the pressure boundary, and it is cooled by circulating the gas in the motor cavity over water-cooled coils. Each motor is rated at 200 kW at a speed of 23,500 rpm. The circulators have been operated in the loop for more than 5,000 h. The flow of the gas in the loop is controlled by varying the speed of the circulators through the use of individual 250-kVA, solid state power supplies that can be continuously varied in frequency from 50 to 400 Hz. To prevent excessive wear on the gas bearings during startup, the circulator motor accelerates the rotor to 3,000 rpm in less than one second. During operation, no problems associated with the gas bearings, per se, were encountered; however, related problems pointed to design considerations that should be included in future applications of circulators of this type. The primary test that has been conducted in this loop required sustained operation for several weeks without interruption. After a number of unscheduled interruptions, the operating goals were attained. During part of this period, the loop was operated with only two circulators installed in the pressure vessels with a guard installed in the third vessel to protect the closure flange from the gas temperatures. Unattended

  4. Online gas analysis and diagnosis for RPC detectors in the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Asmundis, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    Resistive Plate Counters (RPC) detectors need a very strict control of gas parameters: motivations for this statement come from both the request of stability in the detector working point, and chemical consideration concerning potentially aggressive materials generated during the ionization processes into the sensitive gap; the latter point can be relevant because of a possible damage to the internal surface of the detector that has to be avoided in order to ensure an high detection efficiency of the RPC during their ten years or more of operation in ATLAS. In order to understand these aspects, detailed studies on gas behavior have been carried on at the GIF-X5 at CERN (2002-2005), based on Gas Chromatographic and spectroscopy techniques. Main results of these analysis are presented here, together with the design of the online analyzer to be installed on ATLAS conceived to keep control of gas quality and to trigger maintenance interventions on the gas system, in particular on the purification subsystem

  5. Experiments on gas springs with adjustable stiffness for a free-piston engine; Experimentelle Untersuchungen an Gasfedern mit einstellbarer Kennlinie fuer einen Freikolbenmotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohl, Sven-Erik; Ferrari, Cornelius; Offinger, Stefan [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Fahrzeugkonzepte

    2011-04-15

    In this paper two gas spring designs for a free-piston application are experimentally investigated and evaluated. The free-piston concept demands a gas spring that allows adjustable spring characteristics during operation. Spring characteristics can be changed either by introducing gas to the cylinder or by adjusting the cylinder volume. For both concepts, experimental setups are provided. The results of the experiments are thermodynamically investigated and further compared to find the best gas spring design. The mass-variable gas spring design can be shown to be preferable over the volume-variable. (orig.)

  6. Lateral Dynamics of Flexible Rotors Supported by Controllable Gas Bearings Theory & Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierart Vásquez, Fabián Gonzalo; Santos, Ilmar

    2015-01-01

    Active gas bearings might represent a mechatronic answer to the growing industrial need for high performance turbomachinery. In this framework, the paper gives a theoretical and experimental contribution to the improvement of lateral dynamics of rotating machines. The work aims at demonstrating...... theoretically as well as experimentally the feasibility of applying active lubrication to gas journal bearings. The operation principle is to generate active forces by regulating the radial injection of a compressible lubricant (gas) by means of piezoelectric actuators mounted on the back of the bearing sleeve....... The active control principle is built using eddy-current sensor signals to detect the lateral motion of the rotor. A feedback law is used to couple the lateral dynamics of a flexible rotor-bearing system with the pneumatic and dynamic characteristics of a piezoelectric actuated valve system. A proportional...

  7. The Nigerian experience in health, safety, and environmental matters during oil and gas exploration and production operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyekan, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Since crude oil was first discovered in commercial quantities in the Country, in 1956, Nigerian oil and gas exploration and production activities have steadily increased as petroleum assumed strategic importance in the nation's economy. However, just as occurs in many parts of the world, crude oil and gas are found and produced in Nigeria sometimes in very hostile and unfavorable environments. The search for oil and gas takes explorers to the hot regions of the Northern parts of the country, the swamp jungle location of the Niger Delta, as well as offshore locations in the Atlantic Ocean. Each terrain, whether land, swamp or offshore, in deep or shallow waters, present unique health, safety and environmental implications and challenges to the operators, as well as, to the Government regulators. From a background of existing Nigerian Laws and operational experience, this paper details the programmes that have been put in place to guarantee a healthy workforce, ensure the safety of personnel and equipment, and protect the Nigerian environment during oil and gas exploration and production operations, as well as their documented effectiveness. The paper discusses the performance of the Petroleum Industry by analyzing the health, safety and environmental records available from 1956 - 1990. The records of major incidents related to safety and environment over the period are discussed and evaluated. The paper notes that relatively speaking, in spite of the Bomu 2 and Funiwa V oil well blow-outs in 1970 and 1980 respectively which caused extensive environmental damages and the Anieze, Oniku and KC 1 gas well blow-out of 1972, 1975 and 1989 respectively, which resulted in the loss of the rigs drilling the locations concerned, the safety performance records in the Nigerian oil and gas exploration and production activities in the past thirty-five years have been satisfactory compared with the records of similar operations in most other parts of the world

  8. Capture reactions at astrophysically relevant energies: extended gas target experiments and GEANT simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kölle, V; Braitmayer, S E; Mohr, P J; Wilmes, S; Staudt, G; Hammer, J W; Jäger, M; Knee, H; Kunz, R; Mayer, A

    1999-01-01

    Several resonances of the capture reaction sup 2 sup 0 Ne(alpha, gamma) sup 2 sup 4 Mg were measured using an extended windowless gas target system. Detailed GEANT simulations were performed to derive the strength and the total width of the resonances from the measured yield curve. The crucial experimental parameters, which are mainly the density profile in the gas target and the efficiency of the gamma-ray detector, were analyzed by a comparison between the measured data and the corresponding simulation calculations. The excellent agreement between the experimental data and the simulations gives detailed insight into these parameters. (author)

  9. Model-Based Control Design for Flexible Rotors Supported by Active Gas Bearings - Theory & Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierart Vásquez, Fabián Gonzalo

    , abundant and clean. Nevertheless, this technology has important drawbacks: the low viscosity of the lubricant results in a low load carrying capacity and gas bearings also presents low damping properties, which often lead to a reduced stability range and make dangerous running close to, or across...... theoretical model for active gas bearings, with special attention to the modelling of the injection system. Secondly, experimentally validate the improved mathematical model in terms of static properties (journal equilibrium position and resulting aerodynamic forces) and dynamic properties (natural...

  10. Closed loop identification of a piezoelectrically controlled radial gas bearing: Theory and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekunda, André Krabdrup; Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2018-01-01

    Gas bearing systems have extremely small damping properties. Feedback control is thus employed to increase the damping of gas bearings. Such a feedback loop correlates the input with the measurement noise which in turn makes the assumptions for direct identification invalid. The originality...... of this article lies in the investigation of the impact of using different identification methods to identify a rotor-bearing systems’ dynamic model when a feedback loop is active. Two different identification methods are employed. The first method is open loop Prediction Error Method, while the other method...

  11. Operational experience in mitigating flammable gas releases from Hanford Site Tank 241-SY-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentsch, J.W.; Babad, H.; Kirch, N.W.

    1995-01-01

    Flammable gases consisting of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and methane are periodically released from Hanford Site waste tank 241-SY-101 at concentrations above the flammable limit. A large mixer pump installed in the tank in 1993 has effectively mitigated this problem by continuously releasing small amounts of the flammable gases at the rate they are generated. Tank 241-SY-101 is also equipped with multiple high-sensitivity gas monitoring systems and level detection systems to measure the quantity of gas that is retained in and released from the waste

  12. Study of micro-strip gas ionisation chambers substrates for CMS experiment at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallares, A.

    1996-01-01

    High luminosity, expected interaction and dose rates of the future LHC collider require the development of micro-strips gas chambers. In addition to optimization of this new detector, this work is concerned with understanding of gain loss phenomena. Influence of the gas substrate is carefully analysed, as well as theoretical concepts concerning glasses and their behaviour under polarization and irradiation, and the consequence on detection operations.Electron spin resonance is used to study, in standard glass, creation of radiation induced defects which may be charged. (D.L.)

  13. Numerical modeling of the plasma ring acceleration experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddleman, J.L.; Hammer, J.H.; Hartman, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    Modeling of the LLNL RACE experiment and its many applications has necessitated the development and use of a wide array of computational tools. The two-dimensional MHD code, HAM, has been used to model the formation of a compact torus plasma ring in a magnetized coaxial gun and its subsequent acceleration by an additional applied toroidal field. Features included in the 2-D calculations are self-consistent models for (1) the time-dependent poloidal field produced by a capacitor bank discharge through a solenoid field coil (located either inside the gun inner electrode or outside the outer gun electrode) and the associated diffusion of magnetic flux through neighboring conductors, (2) gas flow into the gun annular region from a simulated puffed gas valve plenum, (3) formation and motion of a current sheet produced by J x B forces resulting from discharge of the gun capacitor bank through the plasma load between the coaxial gun electrodes, (4) the subsequent stretching and reconnection of the poloidal field lines to form a compact torus plasma ring, and (5) finally the discharge of the accelerator capacitor bank producing an additional toroidal field for acceleration of the plasma ring. The code has been extended to include various models for gas breakdown, plasma anomalous resistivity, and mass entrainment from ablation of electrode material

  14. Wind and Wave Characteristics Observed During the LUMINY Gas Transfer Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caulliez, G.; Jaouen, L.; Larsen, S.E.; Hansen, F.Aa.; Lund, S.; Leeuw, G. de; Woolf, D.K.; Bowyer, P.A.; Leifer, I.; Kunz, G.J.; Nightingale, P.D.; Rhee, T.S.; Liddicoat, M.I.; Baker, J.; Rapsomanikis, S.; Hassoun, S.; Cohen, L.H.

    1999-01-01

    The parameterization of the greenhouse gas fluxes between the atmosphere and oceans as function of wind and sea state parameters remains a challenging problem, of key importance for climate modelling. It is well-known that exchange across the air-water interface of gases of poor solubility as carbon

  15. Modeling and experiments on differential pumping in linear plasma generators operating at high gas flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eck, van H.J.N.; Koppers, W.R.; Rooij, van G.J.; Goedheer, W.J.; Engeln, R.A.H.; Schram, D.C.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Kleyn, A.W.

    2009-01-01

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method was used to investigate the efficiency of differential pumping in linear plasma generators operating at high gas flows. Skimmers are used to separate the neutrals from the plasma beam, which is guided from the source to the target by a strong axial

  16. Competetive clustering in a bidisperse granular gas : experiment, molecular dynamics, and flux model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikkelsen, René; van der Meer, Devaraj; van der Weele, Ko; Lohse, Detlef

    2004-01-01

    A compartmentalized bidisperse granular gas clusters competitively [R. Mikkelsen, D. van der Meer, K. van der Weele, and D. Lohse, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 214301 (2002)]: By tuning the shaking strength, the clustering can be directed either towards the compartment initially containing mainly small

  17. COMBINED CYCLE GAS TURBINE FOR THERMAL POWER STATIONS: EXPERIENCE IN DESIGNING AND OPERATION, PROSPECTS IN APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Karnitsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper has reviewed main world tendencies in power consumption and power system structure. Main schemes of combined cycle gas turbines have been considered in the paper. The paper contains an operational analysis of CCGT blocks that are operating within the Belarusian energy system. The analysis results have been given in tables showing main operational indices of power blocks

  18. Environmental impacts of manufactured gas plant demolition: examples from site remediation experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unites, D. [Atlantic Environmental Services, Inc., Colchester, CT (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Inappropriate demolition of manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites may leave a continuing legacy in the environmental record. Much of the contamination encountered at former gas plants originated from on-site disposal or from spills and leaks during operations. However, some of the greatest potential for continual release comes from inappropriately decommissioned vessels and tanks. These structures contained liquids such as tars, oils, water, and other fluids associated with by-product removal or the gas stream purification process. Inorganic `solids` constitute another, although generally minor, source of contaminants during demolition. These contaminants include: cyanide- and sulfide-containing purifier materials; asbestos from roofing, pipe lagging, etc.; mercury from controls and manometers; and lead from painted surfaces. Normal elements of decommissioning and dismantling include: purging the piping system with inert gas; removal and sale of liquids having commercial value; disposal or abandonment of non-saleable liquids; scrapping and dismantling of above-grade metal vessels; abandonment of below-grade vessels; and demolition of above-grade buildings. Depending on the time from the cessation of operations to the demolition, some steps may have been omitted. Appropriate demolition would also take into account removal and disposal of asbestos, cyanide, lead, and mercury-containing materials prior to razing structures. By employing precautions during demolition, widespread contamination can be avoided and subsequent reuse of the site can be facilitated.

  19. Uncertainty in greenhouse-gas emission scenario projections: Experiences from Mexico and South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puig, Daniel

    This report outlines approaches to quantify the uncertainty associated with national greenhouse-gas emission scenario projections. It does so by describing practical applications of those approaches in two countries – Mexico and South Africa. The goal of the report is to promote uncertainty...

  20. Comparison of optical spectra recorded during DPF-1000U plasma experiments with gas-puffing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaloga Dobromil R.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The results are presented of the optical spectra measurements for free plasma streams generated with the use of the modified DPF-1000U machine. This facility was recently equipped with a gas injection system (the so-called gas-puff placed on the symmetry axis behind the central opening in the inner electrode. The DPF-1000U experimental chamber was filled up with pure deuterium at the initial pressure of 1.6 or 2.4 mbar. Additionally, when the use was made of the gas-puff system about 1 cm3 of pure deuterium was injected at the pressure of 2 bars. The gas injection was initiated 1.5 or 2 ms before the triggering of the main discharge. The investigated plasma discharges were powered from a condenser bank charged initially to 23 kV (corresponding to the energy of 352 kJ, and the maximum discharge current amounted to about 1.8 MA. In order to investigate properties of a dense plasma column formed during DPF-1000U discharges the use was made of the optical emission spectroscopy. The optical spectra were recorded along the line of sight perpendicular to the vacuum chamber, using a Mechelle®900 spectrometer. The recent analysis of all the recorded spectra made it possible to compare the temporal changes in the electron density of a freely propagating plasma stream for discharges without and with the gas-puffing. Using this data an appropriate mode of operation of the DPF-1000U facility could be determined.

  1. In gas laser ionization and spectroscopy experiments at the Superconducting Separator Spectrometer (S3): Conceptual studies and preliminary design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, R.; Bastin, B.; Boilley, D.; Creemers, P.; Delahaye, P.; Liénard, E.; Fléchard, X.; Franchoo, S.; Ghys, L.; Huyse, M.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Lecesne, N.; Lu, H.; Lutton, F.; Mogilevskiy, E.; Pauwels, D.; Piot, J.; Radulov, D.; Rens, L.; Savajols, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A setup to perform In-Gas Laser Ionization and Spectroscopy experiments at the Super Separator Spectrometer is presented. • The reported studies address important aspects necessary to applied the IGLIS technique to short-lived isotopes. • An R and D phase required to reach an enhanced spectral resolution will be carried out at KU Leuven. • High-sensitivity and enhanced-resolution laser spectroscopy studies will be possible with the IGLIS setup at S 3 . -- Abstract: The results of preparatory experiments and the preliminary designs of a new in-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy setup, to be coupled to the Super Separator Spectrometer S 3 of SPIRAL2-GANIL, are reported. Special attention is given to the development and tests to carry out a full implementation of the in-gas jet laser spectroscopy technique. Application of this novel technique to radioactive species will allow high-sensitivity and enhanced-resolution laser spectroscopy studies of ground- and excited-state properties of exotic nuclei

  2. Scaling studies and conceptual experiment designs for NGNP CFD assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. McEligot; G. E. McCreery

    2004-11-01

    The objective of this report is to document scaling studies and conceptual designs for flow and heat transfer experiments intended to assess CFD codes and their turbulence models proposed for application to prismatic NGNP concepts. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/systems code calculations for the same geometry. Two aspects of the complex flow in an NGNP are being addressed: (1) flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue) and (2) turbulence and resulting temperature distributions in reactor cooling channels ("hot channel" issue). Current prismatic NGNP concepts are being examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses have been applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. For normal operation, the flow in the coolant channels can be considered to be dominant turbulent forced convection with slight transverse property variation. In a pressurized cooldown (LOFA) simulation, the flow quickly becomes laminar with some possible buoyancy influences. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple hot jets into a confined crossflow -- with obstructions. Flow is expected to be turbulent with momentumdominated turbulent jets entering; buoyancy influences are estimated to be negligible in normal full power operation. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments available are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other. Two types of heat transfer experiments are being considered. One addresses the "hot channel" problem, if necessary

  3. Characterization of a plasma produced using a high power laser with a gas puff target for x-ray laser experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Gac, K.; Parys, P.; Szczurek, M.; Tyl, J.

    1995-01-01

    A high temperature, high density plasma can be produced by using a nanosecond, high-power laser with a gas puff target. The gas puff target is formed by puffing a small amount of gas from a high-pressure reservoir through a nozzle into a vacuum chamber. In this paper we present the gas puff target specially designed for x-ray laser experiments. The solenoid valve with the nozzle in the form of a slit 0.3-mm wide and up to 40-mm long, allows to form an elongated gas puff suitable for the creation of an x-ray laser active medium by its perpendicular irradiation with the use of a laser beam focused to a line. Preliminary results of the experiments on the laser irradiation of the gas puff targets, produced by the new valve, show that hot plasma suitable for x-ray lasers is created

  4. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S. Blaine

    2009-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy's lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In

  5. Fluid Phase Separation (FPS) experiment for flight on the shuttle in a Get Away Special (GAS) canister: Design and fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The separation of fluid phases in microgravity environments is of importance to environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) and materials processing in space. A successful fluid phase separation experiment will demonstrate a proof of concept for the separation technique and add to the knowledge base of material behavior. The phase separation experiment will contain a premixed fluid that will be exposed to a microgravity environment. After the phase separation of the compound has occurred, small samples of each of the species will be taken for analysis on Earth. By correlating the time of separation and the temperature history of the fluid, it will be possible to characterize the process. The phase separation experiment is totally self-contained, with three levels of containment on all fluids, and provides all necessary electrical power and control. The controller regulates the temperature of the fluid and controls data logging and sampling. An astronaut-activated switch will initiate the experiment and an unmaskable interrupt is provided for shutdown. The experiment has been integrated into space available on a manifested Get Away Special (GAS) experiment, CONCAP 2, part of the Consortium for Materials Complex Autonomous Payload (CAP) Program, scheduled for STS 42 in April 1991. Presented here are the design and the production of a fluid phase separation experiment for rapid implementation at low cost.

  6. A condensation experiment in the accumulated conditions of noncondensable gas in a vertical tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwon Yeong; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: It has been well known that the presence of noncondensable gases in vapors can greatly inhibit the condensation process. Many analytical and experimental studies were conducted to investigate the effect of noncondensable gases on steam condensation for both stagnant and forced-convective situations either over a plate or outside a horizontal tube. Recently, several researches have been performed for the condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases taken place inside the vertical tube in order to give the information to design the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) in Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). Generally, the experimental results showed that the heat transfer coefficient depends on inlet noncondensable gas mass fraction, inlet saturated steam temperature related with system pressure and inlet mixture Reynolds number. This research was performed for the System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor-Pilot (SMART-P), in which the remaining heat is removed from the core passively by Passive Residual Heat Removal System (PRHRS) condenser in a period of serious accident. The PRHRS is separated from working fluid loop, and pressurized by a nitrogen gas during the normal operation of SMART-P. But when the PRHRS starts operating, the nitrogen gas acts as a noncondensable gas and affects the heat transfer characteristics of the PRHRS. The experimental conditions of this study were almost similar with those of previous researches except the noncondensable gas was accumulated and remained inside the vertical tube. In the previous researches, the noncondensable gas was flowing with constant flow rate. Because of the condensate inside condenser tube, the accumulation of noncondensable gas could be developed inside the vertical tube. At steady-state condition the local temperatures and system pressure were measured to obtain heat transfer characteristics. This study also gave the information about the distribution of the

  7. A research of the development of electricity and natural gas markets and the experiences gained from implementation of the electricity and natural gas market laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, P.E.; Pakkanen, M.; Naervae, T.; Hernesniemi, L.; Partanen, J.; Viljainen, S.; Honkapuro, S.; Tahvanainen, K.; Jylhae, R.

    2007-01-01

    supply' to smaller customers. Generally and maybe surprisingly unbundling has tended to clearly increase electricity retail prices and their volatility, though it is too early to separately estimate the impact of the law changes on unbundling. Limitation of obligation to supply has not significantly influenced electricity prices. Public offer price information is believed to make different electricity suppliers' prices more similar to each other and possibly also higher. In the gas market, the recent developments have resulted mainly from other factors besides the legislative changes that came into force in the beginning of 2005. The legislative changes had perhaps the strongest impact on the supervision of the reasonableness of gas distribution pricing. However, it would be premature to evaluate the consequences of the new regulatory system at this stage because the new system has been in place only since the beginning of the year 2006. The recently adopted regulation principles in the gas distribution sector are largely determined based on the experiences obtained within the electricity distribution sector. In future, however, an approach that takes into account the structure and special characteristics of the Finnish gas markets is required when developing gas sector regulation. (orig.)

  8. Fabrication and testing of gas filled targets for large scale plasma experiments on Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, G.F.; Spragge, M.; Wallace, R.J.; Rivers, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental campaign on the Nova laser was started in July 1993 to study one st of target conditions for the point design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The targets were specified to investigate the current NIF target conditions--a plasma of ∼3 keV electron temperature and an electron density of ∼1.0 E + 21 cm -3 . A gas cell target design was chosen to confine as gas of ∼0.01 cm 3 in volume at ∼ 1 atmosphere. This paper will describe the major steps and processes necessary in the fabrication, testing and delivery of these targets for shots on the Nova Laser at LLNL

  9. The U.S. Gas Flooding Experience: CO2 Injection Strategies and Impact on Ultimate Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez-Lopez, Vanessa [The University of Texas at Austin; Hosseini, Seyyed; Gil-Egui, Ramon

    2017-09-29

    The Permian Basin in West Texas and southwestern New Mexico has seen 45 years of oil reserve growth through CO2 enhanced oil recovery (CO2 EOR). More than 60 CO2 EOR projects are currently active in the region’s limestone, sandstone and dolomite reservoirs. Water alternating gas (WAG) has been the development strategy of choice in the Permian for several technical and economic reasons. More recently, the technology started to get implemented in the much more porous and permeable clastic depositional systems of the onshore U.S. Gulf Coast. Continued CO2 injection (CGI), as opposed to WAG, was selected as the injection strategy to develop Gulf Coast oil fields, where CO2 injection volumes are significantly larger (up to 6 times larger) than those of the Permian. We conducted a compositional simulation based study with the objective of comparing the CO2 utilization ratios (volume of CO2 injected to produce a barrel of oil) of 4 conventional and novel CO2 injection strategies: (1) continuous gas injection (CGI), (2) water alternating gas (WAG), (3) water curtain injection (WCI), and (4) WAG and WCI combination. These injection scenarios were simulated using the GEM module from the Computer Modeling Group (CMG). GEM is an advanced general equation-of-state compositional simulator, which includes equation of state, CO2 miscible flood, CO2/brine interactions, and complex phase behavior. The simulator is set up to model three fluid phases including water, oil, and gas. Our study demonstrates how the selected field development strategy has a significant impact on the ultimate recovery of CO2-EOR projects, with GCI injection providing maximum oil recovery in absolute volume terms, but with WAG offering a more balanced technical-economical approach.

  10. Exploring the Liquefied Petroleum Gas - Ozone Relation in Guadalajara, Mexico, by Smog Chamber Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Jaimes-López, José Luis; Sandoval-Fernández, Julio; Zambrano-García, Angel

    2005-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) emissions can increase substantially the formation of ozone (O3) in the ambient air. We tested experimentally such hypothesis in Guadalajara's downtown by captive-air irradiation (CAI) techniques. During November 1997-January, 1998, morning ambient air samples were confined in outdoor smog chambers and subjected to the following treatments: 35% addition of commercial LPG or one out of two mixtures of major LPG compounds (propane/buta...

  11. Assessing risks and regulating safety standards in the oil and gas industry: the Peruvian experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Arturo Leonardo Vásquez Cordano; Julio Salvador Jácome; Raúl Lizardo García Carpio; Victor Fernández Guzman

    2013-01-01

    Environmental regulation has usually focused on controlling continuous sources of pollution such as CO2 emissions through carbon taxes. However, the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has shown that accidents associated to safety failures can also generate bursts of pollution with serious environmental consequences. Regulating safety conditions to prevent accidents in the oil and gas industry is challenging because public regulators cannot perfectly observe whether firms comply with safety ...

  12. Structural comparison of hazardous and non-hazardous coals based on gas sorption experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos, J.; Toth, J. [Research Lab. for Mining Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Miskolc-Egyetemvaros (Hungary); Radnai-Gyoengyoes, Z. [Geopard Ltd., Pecs (Hungary); Bokanyi, L. [Miskolc Univ., Miskolc-Egyetemvaros (Hungary). Dept. of Process Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Comparison of carbon-dioxide and propane sorption at ambient temperature was used for characterising the difference of the structure of hazardous and non hazardous coals. However, hazardous coals were found more microporous or contain more closed pores than non hazardous ones, this difference couldn`t have been enlarged and attributed to one petrographic component by producing the density fractions. Gas sorption isobars (nitrogen, methane, ethane) are proposed to make a distinction between fine pore structure of coals. (orig.)

  13. Tokamak experiments on JIPP T-II with pulsed gas injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, K.; Itoh, S.; Fujita, J.; Kadota, K.; Kawahata, K.

    1978-02-01

    The confinement of tokamak plasma has been investigated in the wide range of electron density average n sub(e) from 1 x 10 13 to 5 x 10 13 cm -3 by using the pulsed gas injection. The gross energy confinement time increases with increase of electron density and reaches 14 msec. The averaged effective ionic charge derived from plasma conductivity = is about 1 to 2 in the regime of small streaming parameter ( = 0.01 -- 0.08). The ratio of ion temperature to electron one is in the range greater than 0.5. This fact means that the ion energy confinement time is greater than the electron-ion energy relaxation time. Excessive injection of cold neutral gas excites m = 2 MHD oscillations. Much more gas injection leads to the remarkable cooling of plasma periphery and disruptive instabilities. These MHD oscillations and disruptive instabilities have been suppressed by the heating of plasma periphery with the second rapid rise of plasma current. (auth.)

  14. Interstellar silicate analogs for grain-surface reaction experiments: Gas-phase condensation and characterization of the silicate dust grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabri, T.; Jäger, C. [Laboratory Astrophysics Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena Institute of Solid State Physics, Helmholtzweg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G. [Observatoire de Paris/Université de Cergy-Pontoise, 5 mail Gay Lussac, F-95000 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Mutschke, H. [Laboratory Astrophysics Group of the Astrophysical Institute and University Observatory, Friedrich Schiller University Jena Schillergässchen 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Henning, T., E-mail: tolou.sabri@uni-jena.de [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-01-10

    Amorphous, astrophysically relevant silicates were prepared by laser ablation of siliceous targets and subsequent quenching of the evaporated atoms and clusters in a helium/oxygen gas atmosphere. The described gas-phase condensation method can be used to synthesize homogeneous and astrophysically relevant silicates with different compositions ranging from nonstoichiometric magnesium iron silicates to pyroxene- and olivine-type stoichiometry. Analytical tools have been used to characterize the morphology, composition, and spectral properties of the condensates. The nanometer-sized silicate condensates represent a new family of cosmic dust analogs that can generally be used for laboratory studies of cosmic processes related to condensation, processing, and destruction of cosmic dust in different astrophysical environments. The well-characterized silicates comprising amorphous Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, as well as the corresponding crystalline silicates forsterite and fayalite, produced by thermal annealing of the amorphous condensates, have been used as real grain surfaces for H{sub 2} formation experiments. A specifically developed ultra-high vacuum apparatus has been used for the investigation of molecule formation experiments. The results of these molecular formation experiments on differently structured Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} described in this paper will be the topic of the next paper of this series.

  15. HOT CELL SYSTEM FOR DETERMINING FISSION GAS RETENTION IN METALLIC FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sell, D. A.; Baily, C. E.; Malewitz, T. J.; Medvedev, P. G.; Porter, D. L.; Hilton, B. A.

    2016-09-01

    A system has been developed to perform measurements on irradiated, sodium bonded-metallic fuel elements to determine the amount of fission gas retained in the fuel material after release of the gas to the element plenum. During irradiation of metallic fuel elements, most of the fission gas developed is released from the fuel and captured in the gas plenums of the fuel elements. A significant amount of fission gas, however, remains captured in closed porosities which develop in the fuel during irradiation. Additionally, some gas is trapped in open porosity but sealed off from the plenum by frozen bond sodium after the element has cooled in the hot cell. The Retained fission Gas (RFG) system has been designed, tested and implemented to capture and measure the quantity of retained fission gas in characterized cut pieces of sodium bonded metallic fuel. Fuel pieces are loaded into the apparatus along with a prescribed amount of iron powder, which is used to create a relatively low melting, eutectic composition as the iron diffuses into the fuel. The apparatus is sealed, evacuated, and then heated to temperatures in excess of the eutectic melting point. Retained fission gas release is monitored by pressure transducers during the heating phase, thus monitoring for release of fission gas as first the bond sodium melts and then the fuel. A separate hot cell system is used to sample the gas in the apparatus and also characterize the volume of the apparatus thus permitting the calculation of the total fission gas release from the fuel element samples along with analysis of the gas composition.

  16. GAM - Gas Migration Experiments in a Heterogeneous Shear Zone of the Grimsel Test of the Grimsel Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschall, P.; Lunati, I.

    2006-12-01

    This report documents the scientific investigations carried out as part of the GAM project between June 1997 and April 2001 at the Grimsel Test Site within the framework of Investigation Phase V (1997 - 2001). Four radioactive waste management organisations participated in the GAM experiment, namely ANDRA, ENRESA, NAGRA and Sandia National Laboratories for the US Department of Energy. The experiment team consisted of the delegates of the participating organisations, research groups from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich and from the Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona and, last but not least, several contractor teams. Essential aims of the GAM investigation programme were the development and testing of laboratory and field equipment for tracer experiments. Innovative laboratory technologies were applied, such as Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy and X-ray tomography, flow visualisation in artificial fractures, nuclear magnetic resonance measurements and neutron radiography. Furthermore, a new technique was tested for the recovery of well preserved core samples from the GAM shear zone. Novelties in field testing comprised the use of an on-line counter for the particle tracer tests and a georadar survey of gas and brine injection tests with a high frequency borehole antenna. The development of upscaling methodologies and the derivation of effective parameters for single- and two-phase flow models was another issue of interest. The investigations comprised theoretical studies on solute transport in non-uniform flow fields and assessment of the impact of the microstructure on solute and gas transport. Closely related to these theoretical studies was the numerical interpretation of the combined solute and gas tracer tests, which revealed the great potential of such data sets with regard to model discrimination. As a final step in the synthesis task of the GAM project, a model abstraction process was established, aimed at integrating the

  17. Evaluation of gas-phase technetium decontamination and safety related experiments during FY 1994. A report of work in progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, D.W.; Munday, E.B.

    1995-05-01

    Laboratory activities for FY94 included: evaluation of decontamination of Tc by gas-phase techniques, evaluation of diluted ClF{sub 3} for removing U deposits, evaluation of potential hazard of wet air inlekage into a vessel containing ClF{sub 3}, planning and preparation for experiments to assess hazard of rapid reaction of ClF{sub 3} and hydrated UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} or powdered Al, and preliminary evaluation of compatibility of Tenic valve seat material.

  18. The Relation between Gas Flow and Combustibility using Actual Engine (Basic Experiment of Gas Flow and Combustibility under Low Load Condition)

    OpenAIRE

    田坂, 英紀; 泉, 立哉; 木村, 正寿

    2003-01-01

    Abstract ###Consideration of the global environment problems by exhaust gas is becoming important in recent years. ###Especially about internal combustion engine, social demand has been increasing about low pollution, high ###efficiency and so on. Controlling gas flow in cylinder becomes the key getting good combustion state in ###various driving states. ###The purpose of the research is analysis about the relation between gas flow and combustibility in the cylinder. ###So we measured gas flo...

  19. From Hybrid to Actively-Controlled Gas Lubricated Bearings – Theory and Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morosi, Stefano

    bearings, tilting pad and flexure pivot gas bearings. These solutions proved to be effective in improving static and dynamic properties of the bearings, however issues related to the manufacturing and accuracy of predictions has so far limited their applications. Another drawback is that passive bearings......-rig are backed by a comprehensive mathematical model that couples a finite element model of a flexible rotor, a thermohydrodynamic model based on a modified form of the Reynold’s equation for hybrid aerostatic-aerodynamic lubrication of compressible fluid, a piezoelectric injection system and a proportional...

  20. Optimization experiment of gas oil direct injection valve for CNG dual fuel diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B.Y. [Chonnam National University Graduate School, Jeonju (Korea); Park, C. K. [Chonnam National University, Jeonju (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    In this study, we studied for a conversion from diesel engine to natural gas dual fuel engine. For this experimental, we tested about the injection quantity characteristics of pilot valve with the plunger diameter at the retraction volume and investigated to the engine performance and exhaust emissions with the nozzle hole number and injection nozzle diameter. As a result, when the plunger diameter is 7.5 mm at the retraction volume, 25 mm{sup 3}/st, the injection quantity characteristics develop. Also, when a nozzle type is 4*{phi} 0.24, total hydrocarbon(THC) emission reduce at low equivalence ratio. (author). 5 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Experience with restoration of the EBPVD coatings in stationary power gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osyka, A.S. [State Area Power Station N 3 of Mosenergo, Electrogorsk (Russian Federation); Rybnikov, A.I. [Polzunov Central Boiler and Turbine Institute - NPO TsKTI, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Malashenko, I.S. [E. 0. Paton Electric Welding Institute, Kiev (Ukraine); Leontiev, S.A. [Leningradsky Metallithesky Zavod, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    The use of electron beam physical vapour deposition (EBPVD) technology for CoCrAlY protective metal coatings improved the resource of power gas turbine blades in 2-4 times. Alter 7000 h operation the pitting corrosive attack is observed by the mechanism of hot low-temperature corrosion. The technology Removing and redeposition for coating layer has been developed. Blades with redeposited layer after the specified reductive heat treatment have operating time over 3000 h. Coatings on blades are in good states. (orig.) 7 refs.

  2. Experience with restoration of the EBPVD coatings in stationary power gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osyka, A S [State Area Power Station N 3 of Mosenergo, Electrogorsk (Russian Federation); Rybnikov, A I [Polzunov Central Boiler and Turbine Institute - NPO TsKTI, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Malashenko, I S [E. 0. Paton Electric Welding Institute, Kiev (Ukraine); Leontiev, S A [Leningradsky Metallithesky Zavod, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1999-12-31

    The use of electron beam physical vapour deposition (EBPVD) technology for CoCrAlY protective metal coatings improved the resource of power gas turbine blades in 2-4 times. Alter 7000 h operation the pitting corrosive attack is observed by the mechanism of hot low-temperature corrosion. The technology Removing and redeposition for coating layer has been developed. Blades with redeposited layer after the specified reductive heat treatment have operating time over 3000 h. Coatings on blades are in good states. (orig.) 7 refs.

  3. Urban form, transportation and greenhouse gas emissions- Experiences in the Nordic Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmaajaervi, I; Heinonen, S.; Lahti, P. [VTT, Building and Transport (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    The main objective of the project was to identify instruments to develop urban form and transportation systems in a sustainable way to decrease greenhouse gas emissions in the Nordic countries. Instruments can be found on different levels: national, regional and local. The main sectors are land use and transportation planning, land use and transportation policies, tax policy, co-operation, information dissemination, interaction, monitoring and early warning systems. Instruments concern for example control of urban development, supporting residential activities in city centres, control of location of shopping malls, preventing long commuting trips, reduction of transportation need and car dependency, promotion of walking, cycling and public transport and eco-managed telework. (au)

  4. GE`s worldwide experience with IFO based gypsum producing flue gas desulfurization systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, A. [GE Environmental Systems, Lebanon, PA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The In-Situ Forced Oxidation (IFO) process to produce gypsum in a commercial scale flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system was first demonstrated by GE Environmental Systems in 1980 at the Monticello Generating Station of Texas Utilities. Since then, the IFO technology developed and demonstrated by GE has become the industry standard and is used extensively on a world-wide basis to produce both commercial and disposable-grade gypsum. The paper gives an overview of the development, demonstration, commercial design and current status of the IFO technology.

  5. Flow characteristics of centrifugal gas-liquid separator. Investigation with air-water two-phase flow experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Kimitoshi; Inada, Fumio

    2004-01-01

    Air-water two-phase flow experiment was conducted to examine the basic flow characteristics of a centrifugal gas-liquid separator. Vertical transparent test section, which is 4 m in height, was used to imitate the scale of a BWR separator. Flow rate conditions of gas and liquid were fixed at 0.1 m 3 /s and 0.033 m 3 /s, respectively. Radial distributions of two-phase flow characteristics, such as void fraction, gas velocity and bubble chord length, were measured by traversing dual optical void probes in the test section, horizontally. The flow in the standpipe reached to quasi-developed state within the height-to-diameter aspect ratio H/D=10, which in turn can mean the maximum value for an ideal height design of a standpipe. The liquid film in the barrel showed a maximum thickness at 0.5 to 1 m in height from the swirler exit, which was a common result for three different standpipe length conditions, qualitatively and quantitatively. The empirical database obtained in this study would contribute practically to the validation of numerical analyses for an actual separator in a plant, and would also be academically useful for further investigations of two-phase flow in large-diameter pipes. (author)

  6. Measurement of air and VOC vapor fluxes during gas-driven soil remediation: bench-scale experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heonki; Kim, Taeyun; Shin, Seungyeop; Annable, Michael D

    2012-09-04

    In this laboratory study, an experimental method was developed for the quantitative analyses of gas fluxes in soil during advective air flow. One-dimensional column and two- and three-dimensional flow chamber models were used in this study. For the air flux measurement, n-octane vapor was used as a tracer, and it was introduced in the air flow entering the physical models. The tracer (n-octane) in the gas effluent from the models was captured for a finite period of time using a pack of activated carbon, which then was analyzed for the mass of n-octane. The air flux was calculated based on the mass of n-octane captured by the activated carbon and the inflow concentration. The measured air fluxes are in good agreement with the actual values for one- and two-dimensional model experiments. Using both the two- and three-dimensional models, the distribution of the air flux at the soil surface was measured. The distribution of the air flux was found to be affected by the depth of the saturated zone. The flux and flux distribution of a volatile contaminant (perchloroethene) was also measured by using the two-dimensional model. Quantitative information of both air and contaminant flux may be very beneficial for analyzing the performance of gas-driven subsurface remediation processes including soil vapor extraction and air sparging.

  7. Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes and Large Eddy Simulations of Flows across Staggered Tube Bundle for a VHTR Lower Plenum Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyeon Kyeong; Park, Jong Woon

    2013-01-01

    In this work, behavior of unsteady and oscillating flow through a typical tube bundle array are analyzed by unsteady computations: 2D unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) and 3D Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and the results are compared with existing experimental data. In order to confirm appropriateness and limitations of CFD applications in the Korean VHTR design, two types of unsteady computations are performed such as 2D unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) and 3D Large Eddy Simulation (LES) for the existing tube bundle array. The velocity component profiles are compared with the experimental data and it is concluded that the URANS with the standard k-ω model is reasonably appropriate for cost-effective VHTR lower plenum analysis. Nevertheless, if more accurate results are needed, the LES-Smagorinsky computation is recommended considering limitations in the time averaged RANS in capturing small eddies

  8. Comparison of the initial ETA gas propagation experiments with theoretical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, F.W.; Clark, J.C.; Fessenden, T.J.

    1982-04-20

    This report contains a description of the initial ETA propagation experiments in air at a beam current of 4.5 kA. The beam was observed to propagate at the pressures anticipated on the basis of previous theory and experiment. A comparison of measured net current waveforms with predictions of the PHOENIX code showed good agreement over the pressure range 0.1 to 200 torr. However, the beam was observed to expand with Z at a faster rate than theory predicts. Excessive transverse beam modulation at injection complicated the experiments and limited their comparison with theory.

  9. Comparison of the initial ETA gas propagation experiments with theoretical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, F.W.; Clark, J.C.; Fessenden, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    This report contains a description of the initial ETA propagation experiments in air at a beam current of 4.5 kA. The beam was observed to propagate at the pressures anticipated on the basis of previous theory and experiment. A comparison of measured net current waveforms with predictions of the PHOENIX code showed good agreement over the pressure range 0.1 to 200 torr. However, the beam was observed to expand with Z at a faster rate than theory predicts. Excessive transverse beam modulation at injection complicated the experiments and limited their comparison with theory

  10. On-Line Digital Computer Applications in Gas Chromatography, An Undergraduate Analytical Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perone, S. P.; Eagleston, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    Presented are some descriptive background materials and the directions for an experiment which provides an introduction to on-line computer instrumentation. Assumes students are familiar with the Purdue Real-Time Basic (PRTB) laboratory computer system. (PR)

  11. Evaluation of the Home Energy Score: An Experiment with New Jersey Natural Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knittel, Christopher [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Wolfran, Catherine [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Gandhi, Raina [Evoworx Inc., Wilmington, DE (United States)

    2016-03-01

    A wide range of climate plans rely on energy efficiency to generate energy and carbon emissions reductions, but conventional wisdom holds that consumers have historically underinvested in energy efficiency upgrades. This underinvestment may occur for a variety of reasons, one of which is that consumers are not adequately informed about the benefits to energy efficiency. To address this, the U.S. Department of Energy created a tool called the Home Energy Score (HEScore) to act as a simple, low-cost means to provide clear information about a home’s energy efficiency and motivate homeowners and homebuyers to invest in energy efficiency. The Department of Energy is in the process of conducting four evaluations assessing the impact of the Home Energy Score on residential energy efficiency investments and program participation. This paper describes one of these evaluations: a randomized controlled trial conducted in New Jersey in partnership with New Jersey Natural Gas. The evaluation randomly provides homeowners who have received an audit, either because they have recently replaced their furnace, boiler, and/or gas water heater with a high-efficiency model and participated in a free audit to access an incentive, or because they requested an independent audit3, between May 2014 and October 2015, with the Home Energy Score.

  12. EMC3-EIRENE modeling of toroidally-localized divertor gas injection experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lore, J.D., E-mail: lorejd@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Reinke, M.L. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); LaBombard, B. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lipschultz, B. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Churchill, R.M. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Pitts, R.A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Feng, Y. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Experiments on Alcator C-Mod with toroidally and poloidally localized divertor nitrogen injection have been modeled using the three-dimensional edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE to elucidate the mechanisms driving measured toroidal asymmetries. In these experiments five toroidally distributed gas injectors in the private flux region were sequentially activated in separate discharges resulting in clear evidence of toroidal asymmetries in radiated power and nitrogen line emission as well as a ∼50% toroidal modulation in electron pressure at the divertor target. The pressure modulation is qualitatively reproduced by the modeling, with the simulation yielding a toroidal asymmetry in the heat flow to the outer strike point. Toroidal variation in impurity line emission is qualitatively matched in the scrape-off layer above the strike point, however kinetic corrections and cross-field drifts are likely required to quantitatively reproduce impurity behavior in the private flux region and electron temperatures and densities directly in front of the target.

  13. Development of a buffer gas trap for the confinement of positrons and study of positronium production in the GBAR experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2101248; van der Werf, Dirk

    The GBAR experiment relies on the production of antihydrogen positive ions to achieve its goal of measuring the gravitational acceleration of antimatter at rest. The ANTION project, included in the GBAR enterprise, is responsible for the production of these antimatter ions. Moreover, it also aims to measure the cross section of antihydrogen production throughout the collision of antiprotons and positronium atoms, as well as the matter cross sections of hydrogen and the hydrogen negative ion. These experiments imply the formation of a very dense positronium cloud, thus a large amount of positrons will be implanted on a positron/positronium converter material. This thesis reports the construction of a three stage buffer gas trap with the goal of trapping and accumulating positrons for the ANTION project. The combination of the Penning-type trap with a LINAC source constitutes a unique experimental setup. The trap was commissioned and optimized and is now fully operational. Trapping protocols were studied and...

  14. Quantitative study of quasi-one-dimensional Bose gas experiments via the stochastic Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockburn, S. P.; Gallucci, D.; Proukakis, N. P.

    2011-01-01

    The stochastic Gross-Pitaevskii equation is shown to be an excellent model for quasi-one-dimensional Bose gas experiments, accurately reproducing the in situ density profiles recently obtained in the experiments of Trebbia et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 250403 (2006)] and van Amerongen et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 090402 (2008)] and the density fluctuation data reported by Armijo et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 230402 (2010)]. To facilitate such agreement, we propose and implement a quasi-one-dimensional extension to the one-dimensional stochastic Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the low-energy, axial modes, while atoms in excited transverse modes are treated as independent ideal Bose gases.

  15. Review of operational experience with the gas-cooled Magnox reactors of the United Kingdom Central Electricity Generating Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cave, L.; Clarke, A.W.

    1984-01-01

    The paper provides a review, which is mainly of a statistical nature, of 260 reactor years of operating experience which the (United Kingdom) Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) has obtained with its gas-cooled, graphite moderated Magnox reactors. The main emphasis in the review is on safety rather than on availability. Data are provided on the overall incidence and frequencies of faults and it is shown that the plant items which are predominantly responsible for recorded faults are the gas circulators and the turbo-alternators. Analysis of the reactor trip experience shows that the incidence of events which necessitate an automatic shutdown of the reactor has been about one per reactor year and that of other events leading to a reactor trip has not been much higher (1.4 per reactor year). As would be expected from the length of the operating experience, some relatively rare events have occurred (expected frequency 10 -2 per reactor year, or less) but on each occasion the reactor shutdown system and decay heat removal systems functioned satisfactorily. No overheating of, or damage to, the fuel occurred as a result of these rare events or of other, more frequent, faults. Analysis of the trend of failure rates has shown an improvement with time in nearly all safety-related items and external inspection of the primary coolant circuits has shown no significant deterioration with time. However, some derating of the reactors has been necessary to reduce the effects of oxidation of mild steel in CO 2 , in order to obtain optimum service lives. In spite of major differences between the systems, a comparison of the failure rates of analogous systems and plant items in PWRs and the Magnox reactors show a considerable similarity. Overall, the review of CEGB's operational experience with its Magnos reactors has shown that the frequencies of faults in systems and plant items has been satisfyingly low. (author)

  16. Building and interconnecting hydrogen networks: Insights from the electricity and gas experience in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bento, Nuno

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the transition to a new energy system based on hydrogen in the European liberalized framework. After analyzing the literature on the hydrogen infrastructure needs in Europe, we estimate the size and scope of the transition challenge. We take the theoretical framework of network economics to analyze early hydrogen infrastructure needs. Therefore, several concepts are applied to hydrogen economics such as demand club effects, scale economies on large infrastructures, scope economies, and positive socio-economical externalities. Based on the examples of the electricity and natural gas industry formation in Europe, we argue for public intervention in order to create conditions to reach more rapidly the critical size of the network and to prompt network externalities, allowing for the market diffusion of and, thus, an effective transition to the new energy system

  17. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, H. W., E-mail: herrmann@lanl.gov; Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Malone, R. M. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J. [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Stoeffl, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Zylstra, A. B. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Shmayda, W. T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ∼400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  18. RCCS Experiments and Validation for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh; Cliff Davis; Goon C. Park

    2007-01-01

    A reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS), an air-cooled helical coil RCCS unit immersed in the water pool, was proposed to overcome the disadvantages of the weak cooling ability of air-cooled RCCS and the complex structure of water-cooled RCCS for the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). An experimental apparatus was constructed to investigate the various heat transfer phenomena in the water pool type RCCS, such as the natural convection of air inside the cavity, radiation in the cavity, the natural convection of water in the water pool and the forced convection of air in the cooling pipe. The RCCS experimental results were compared with published correlations. The CFX code was validated using data from the air-cooled portion of the RCCS. The RELAP5 code was validated using measured temperatures from the reactor vessel and cavity walls

  19. The Shoreline Environment Atmospheric Dispersion Experiment (SEADEX): Meteorological and gas tracer data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.B.; Cantrell, B.K.; Morley, B.M.; Uthe, E.E.; Nitz, K.C.

    1987-10-01

    The SEADEX atmospheric dispersion field study was conducted during the period May 28 to June 8, 1982, in northeastern Wisconsin, the vicinity of the Kewaunee Power Plant on the western shore of Lake Michigan. The specific objectives of SEADEX were to characterize (1) the atmospheric dispersion and (2) the meteorological conditions influencing this dispersion as completely as possible during the test period. This field study included a series of controlled tracer tests utilizing state-of-the-art tracer measurement technology to determine horizontal and vertical dispersion over both land and water. Extensive meteorological measurements were obtained to thoroughly characterize the three-dimensional structure of the atmospheric boundary controlling the dispersion process. This volume presents the meteorological and gas tracer data collected during the field study. 391 figs., 32 tabs

  20. Summary of thermocouple performance during advanced gas reactor fuel irradiation experiments in the advanced test reactor and out-of-pile thermocouple testing in support of such experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, A. J.; Haggard, DC; Herter, J. W.; Swank, W. D.; Knudson, D. L.; Cherry, R. S. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, MS 4112, Idaho Falls, ID, (United States); Scervini, M. [University of Cambridge, Department of Material Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, CB3 0FS, Cambridge, (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    High temperature gas reactor experiments create unique challenges for thermocouple-based temperature measurements. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time-dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time-dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. This drift is particularly severe for high temperature platinum-rhodium thermocouples (Types S, R, and B) and tungsten-rhenium thermocouples (Type C). For lower temperature applications, previous experiences with Type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly, Type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluence. Currently, the use of these nickel-based thermocouples is limited when the temperature exceeds 1000 deg. C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. High rates of open-circuit failure are also typical. Over the past 10 years, three long-term Advanced Gas Reactor experiments have been conducted with measured temperatures ranging from 700 deg. C - 1200 deg. C. A variety of standard Type N and specialty thermocouple designs have been used in these experiments with mixed results. A brief summary of thermocouple performance in these experiments is provided. Most recently, out-of-pile testing has been conducted on a variety of Type N thermocouple designs at the following (nominal) temperatures and durations: 1150 deg. C and 1200 deg. C for 2,000 hours at each temperature, followed by 200 hours at 1250 deg. C and 200 hours at 1300 deg. C. The standard Type N design utilizes high purity, crushed MgO insulation and an Inconel 600 sheath. Several variations on the standard Type N design were tested, including a Haynes 214 alloy sheath, spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) insulation instead of MgO, a customized sheath developed at the University of Cambridge, and finally a loose assembly

  1. Summary of Thermocouple Performance During Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor and Out-of-Pile Thermocouple Testing in Support of Such Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. J. Palmer; DC Haggard; J. W. Herter; M. Scervini; W. D. Swank; D. L. Knudson; R. S. Cherry

    2011-07-01

    High temperature gas reactor experiments create unique challenges for thermocouple based temperature measurements. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. This drift is particularly severe for high temperature platinum-rhodium thermocouples (Types S, R, and B); and tungsten-rhenium thermocouples (Types C and W). For lower temperature applications, previous experiences with type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluxes. Currently the use of these Nickel based thermocouples is limited when the temperature exceeds 1000°C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. High rates of open-circuit failure are also typical. Over the past ten years, three long-term Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been conducted with measured temperatures ranging from 700oC – 1200oC. A variety of standard Type N and specialty thermocouple designs have been used in these experiments with mixed results. A brief summary of thermocouple performance in these experiments is provided. Most recently, out of pile testing has been conducted on a variety of Type N thermocouple designs at the following (nominal) temperatures and durations: 1150oC and 1200oC for 2000 hours at each temperature, followed by 200 hours at 1250oC, and 200 hours at 1300oC. The standard Type N design utilizes high purity crushed MgO insulation and an Inconel 600 sheath. Several variations on the standard Type N design were tested, including Haynes 214 alloy sheath, spinel (MgAl2O4) insulation instead of MgO, a customized sheath developed at the University of Cambridge, and finally a loose assembly thermocouple with hard fired alumina

  2. Study of the characteristics of gas electron multipliers for the FAIR experiment CBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, S.; Abuhoza, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Hehner, J.; Schmidt, C.J.; Traeger, M.; Schmidt, H.R.; Colafranceschi, S.; Marinov, A.; Sharma, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany will use proton and heavy ion beams to study matter at extreme conditions. The CBM experiment at FAIR is designed to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high baryon densities. With CBM we will enter a new era of nuclear matter research by measuring rare diagnostic probes never observed before at FAIR energies, and thus CBM has a unique discovery potential. This will only be possible with the application of advanced instrumentation, including highly segmented and fast gaseous detectors

  3. Exobiological implications of dust aggregation in planetary atmospheres: An experiment for the gas-grain simulation facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, J. L.; Schwartz, D. E.; Marshall, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    The Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) will provide a microgravity environment where undesirable environmental effects are reduced, and thus, experiments involving interactions between small particles and grains can be more suitably performed. Slated for flight aboard the Shuttle in 1992, the ESA glovebox will serve as a scientific and technological testbed for GGSF exobiology experiments as well as generating some basic scientific data. Initial glovebox experiments will test a method of generating a stable, mono-dispersed cloud of fine particles using a vibrating sprinkler system. In the absence of gravity and atmospheric turbulence, it will be possible to determine the influence of interparticle forces in controlling the rate and mode of aggregation. The experimental chamber can be purged of suspended matter to enable multiple repetitions of the experiments. Of particular interest will be the number of particles per unit volume of the chamber, because it is suspected that aggregation will occur extremely rapidly if the number exceeds a critical value. All aggregation events will be recorded on high-resolution video film. Changes in the experimental procedure as a result of surprise events will be accompanied by real-time interaction with the mission specialist during the Shuttle flight.

  4. Experiment data report for Semiscale Mod-1 Test S-05-4 (alternate ECC injection test)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, B.L.; Feldman, E.M.

    1977-03-01

    Recorded test data are presented for Test S-05-4 of the Semiscale Mod-1 alternate emergency core coolant injection test series. These tests are among several Semiscale Mod-1 experiments conducted to investigate the thermal and hydraulic phenomena accompanying a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) system. Test S-05-4 was conducted from initial conditions of 2266 psia and 543 0 F to investigate the response of the Semiscale Mod-1 system to a depressurization and reflood transient following a simulated double-ended offset shear of the cold leg broken loop piping. During the test, cooling water was injected into the cold leg of each loop and into the vessel upper plenum to simulate emergency core coolant injection in a PWR. The upper plenum coolant injection was scaled according to the heat stored in the metal mass of the upper plenum

  5. National greenhouse gas emissions baseline scenarios. Learning from experiences in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-04-15

    This report reviews national approaches to preparing baseline scenarios of greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions. It does so by describing and comparing in non-technical language existing practices and choices made by ten developing countries - Brazil, China, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Mexico, South Africa, Thailand and Vietnam. The review focuses on a number of key elements, including model choices, transparency considerations, choices about underlying assumptions and challenges associated with data management. The aim is to improve overall understanding of baseline scenarios and facilitate their use for policy-making in developing countries more broadly. The findings are based on the results of a collaborative project involving a number of activities undertaken by the Danish Energy Agency, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the UNEP Risoe Centre (URC), including a series of workshops on the subject. The ten contributing countries account for approximately 40% of current global GHG emissions - a share that is expected to increase in the future. The breakdown of emissions by sector varies widely among these countries. In some countries, the energy sector is the leading source of emissions; for others, the land-use sector and/or agricultural sector dominate emissions. The report underscores some common technical and financial capacity gaps faced by developing countries when preparing baseline scenarios. It does not endeavour to propose guidelines for preparing baseline scenarios. Rather, it is hoped that the report will inform any future attempts at preparing such kind of guidelines. (Author)

  6. Hot Experiment on Fission Gas Release Behavior from Voloxidation Process using Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Geun Il; Park, J. J.; Jung, I. H.; Shin, J. M.; Cho, K. H.; Yang, M. S.; Song, K. C.

    2007-08-01

    Quantitative analysis of the fission gas release characteristics during the voloxidation and OREOX processes of spent PWR fuel was carried out by spent PWR fuel in a hot-cell of the DFDF. The release characteristics of 85 Kr and 14 C fission gases during voloxidation process at 500 .deg. C is closely linked to the degree of conversion efficiency of UO 2 to U 3 O 8 powder, and it can be interpreted that the release from grain-boundary would be dominated during this step. Volatile fission gases of 14 C and 85 Kr were released to near completion during the OREOX process. Both the 14 C and 85 Kr have similar release characteristics under the voloxidation and OREOX process conditions. A higher burn-up spent fuel showed a higher release fraction than that of a low burn-up fuel during the voloxidation step at 500 .deg. C. It was also observed that the release fraction of semi-volatile Cs was about 16% during a reduction at 1,000 .deg. C of the oxidized powder, but over 90% during the voloxidation at 1,250 .deg. C

  7. Experience of molecular monitoring techniques in upstream oil and gas operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Anthony F.; Anfindsen, Hilde; Liengen, Turid; Molid, Solfrid [Statoil ASA (Denmark)

    2011-07-01

    For a numbers of years, molecular monitoring tools have been used in upstream oil and gas operations but the results have given only limited added value. This paper discusses the various techniques available for upstream molecular monitoring which provides scope for identification of microbial influenced problems. The methodology, which consists of analyzing solid samples using traditional as well as molecular techniques, is detailed. Two cases were studied with the objective of determining if microbial contamination was contributing to the problem. The first case was a study of amorphous deposits in production wells and mainly iron sulphide was found. The second study was of amorphous deposits in water injection wells and the analysis showed typical components of drilling and completion fluids with some organic material. Two more cases, corrosion of tubing in a water injection well and flow line corrosion, are discussed and the results are given. From the study, it can be concluded that failure can be due to several factors, chemical and biological.

  8. Gas pressure measurements and control in the Tara tandem mirror experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.S.; Brau, K.; Casey, J.

    1986-05-01

    The Tara Tandem Mirror has a 10 m long, 22 cm diameter central cell plasma heated by fundamental ion cyclotron heating. Typical central cell parameters in unplugged operation are n = 3 x 10 12 /cm 3 . T/sub i perpendicular/ = 300 eV, T/sub i parallel/ ≅ 75 eV. The axisymmetric plug cell incorporates sloshing ions and ECH to generate axial confining potentials. The axisymmetric central cell and plug comprise a max-B mirror which is observed to operate in both flute stable and unstable regimes. The flute instability is m = 1 and can be stabilized by an outboard anchor. The anchor plasma is formed by electron and ion cyclotron heating. Satisfactory operation of a tandem mirror requires extensive control of neutral gas from neutral beam (NB) sources and startup. Tara makes extensive use of Ti gettering in the beamlines, beam dumps and plasma surfaces for both hydrogen pumping and reflux control. A description of this technology along with its impact on plasma performance is discussed

  9. Plume dispersion and deposition processes of tracer gas and aerosols in short-distance experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taeschner, M.; Bunnenberg, C.

    1988-01-01

    Data used in this paper were extracted from field experiments carried out in France and Canada to study the pathway of elementary tritium after possible emissions from future fusion reactors and from short-range experiments with nutrient aerosols performed in a German forest in view of a therapy of damaged coniferous trees by foliar nutrition. Comparisons of dispersion parameters evaluated from the tritium field experiments show that in the case of the 30-min release the variations of the wind directions represent the dominant mechanism of lateral plume dispersion under unstable weather conditions. This corresponds with the observation that for the short 2-min emission the plume remains more concentrated during propagation, and the small lateral dispersion parameters typical for stable conditions have to be applied. The investigations on the dispersion of aerosol plumes into a forest boundary layer show that the Gaussian plume model can be modified by a windspeed factor to be valid for predictions on aerosol concentrations and depositions even in a structured topography like a forest

  10. Experiments about the integrity of BWR relief pipes in postulated radiolysis gas combustion. Scenario No.2. Minor steam leakages without any lowering of the water level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, A.; Grune, J.; Sempert, K.; Stern, G.; Kuznetsov, M.; Redlinger, R.; Breitung, W.; Franke, T.

    2008-01-01

    The experiments described in this article were performed to study this comprehensive radiolysis gas scenario: - The relief pipe is filled completely with radiolysis gas (2H 2 +O 2 ). - After opening of the S and R valve, the radiolysis gas is compressed adiabatically by the incoming steam without mixing. - Roughly at the point of peak pressure in the relief pipe (20 bar) the radiolysis gas ignites. This dynamic scenario was studied in steady-state model experiments with a test pipe which corresponds to the relief pipes installed in KKP-1 in terms of materials, dimensions, and manufacturing control. The initial conditions and boundary conditions of the experiments were conservative. In the course of the tests, the maximum dynamic strain and the residual plastic deformation of the test pipe were measured via the transient detonation load. The maximum dynamic strain measured was 0.75%, the maximum residual plastic strain reached 0.15%. The pipe suffered no other deformation above and beyond this slight plastic strain. The radiolysis gas detonation was simulated very well numerically. Using the calculated pressure loads in a structural dynamics model also showed good agreement with the measured maximum dynamic pipe strains. In this way, the experimental findings were confirmed theoretically. The experiments and the calculations showed that postulated radiolysis gas reactions during pressure relief cannot jeopardize the integrity of the relief pipe. (orig.)

  11. The French experience concerning the contamination by inactive and radioactive impurities and the purification of the cover gas of LMFBRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaille, P [CEA/IRDI/DEDR/DRNR/STRA, C.E.N. Cadarache (France); Clerc, R [CEA/IRDI/DERPE/SCPx, C.E.N. Marcoule (France); comps.

    1987-07-01

    With regard to the problems related to the cover gas of LMFBRs, the French position based on the experience of RAPSODIE and PHENIX can be summarized as follows: 1. No particular difficulty has been encountered with impurities such as air. The consequences of lubricants leaks were limited to the maintenance of big components. 2. Concerning the contamination by radioactive species, the main source in the reactor tank is {sup 23}Ne, but fortunately its half decay period is very short (38 s). Two managements of fuel failures were experienced. On RAPSODIE, the failures were numerous for experimental purpose and - in the absence of an efficient localization device - often simultaneous. On PHENIX, the fuel failure rate appears to be very low. Furthermore, the gas analysis unit of the fuel failure localization device (LRG/gas) has been improved steadily, which permits to localize and follow the evolution of each individual failed sub-assembly from the very beginning of the clad failure. For both of the reactors, leaks through the roof were observed, for which solutions were found. 3. The analysis equipment of RAPSODIE and PHENIX evolved to account for: the needs of the operator; experimental programs. The experience gained permitted to select for SUPER PHENIX a simple instrumentation. 4. Limited efforts have been paid to the purification techniques towards the fission products: On RAPSODIE, the use of helium as cover gas allowed to use trapping with charcoal cooled with liquid nitrogen with a high efficiency not only towards xenons, but also kryptons. On PHENIX, it is not necessary to trap krypton: the release rates of {sup 85}Kr (T1/2=10,4 a) are very low, of the same order as {sup 37}Ar (T1/2=35 d) produced by activation, and the fuel failure localization is not performed by gas tagging. Therefore, cooled charcoal adsorption is sufficient. For experimental purpose, a cryogenic distillation column has been installed at PHENIX, but has not yet been put into operation

  12. Transient Fuel Behavior and Failure Condition in the CABRI-2 Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Ikken; Lemoine, Francette; Struwe, Dankward

    2004-01-01

    In the CABRI-2 program, 12 tests were performed under various transient conditions covering a wide range of accident scenarios using two types of preirradiated fast breeder reactor (FBR) fuel pins with different smear densities and burnups. For each fuel, a nonfailure-transient test was performed, and it provided basic information such as fuel thermal condition, fuel swelling, and gas release. From the failure tests, information on failure mode, failure time, and axial location was obtained. Based on this information, failure conditions such as fuel enthalpy and cladding temperature were evaluated. These failure conditions were compared with the CABRI-1 tests in which different fuels as well as different transient conditions were used. This comparison, together with supporting information available from existing in-pile and out-of-pile experiments, allowed an effective understanding on failure mechanisms depending on fuel and transient conditions. It is concluded that pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) due to fuel thermal expansion and fission-gas-induced swelling is playing an important role on mechanical clad loading especially with high smear density and low fuel-heating-rate conditions. At very high heating-rate conditions, there is no sufficient time to allow significant fuel swelling, so that cavity pressurization with fuel melting becomes the likely failure mechanism. Fuel smear density and fission-gas retention have a strong impact both on PCMI and cavity pressurization. Furthermore, pin failure is strongly dependent on cladding temperature, which plays an important role in the axial failure location. With the low smear-density fuel, considerable PCMI mitigation is possible leading to a high failure threshold as well as in-pin molten-fuel relocation along the central hole. However, even with the low smear density fuel, PCMI failure could take place with an elevated cladding-temperature condition. On the other hand, in case of a sufficiently long

  13. Comparison of beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging edge fluctuation measurements in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sechrest, Y.; Munsat, T. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Smith, D. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    In this study, the close physical proximity of the Gas Puff Imaging (GPI) and Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostics on the National Spherical torus Experiment (NSTX) is leveraged to directly compare fluctuation measurements, and to study the local effects of the GPI neutral deuterium puff during H-mode plasmas without large Edge Localized Modes. The GPI and BES views on NSTX provide partially overlapping coverage of the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) regions above the outboard midplane. The separation in the toroidal direction is 16°, and field lines passing through diagnostic views are separated by ∼20 cm in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. Strong cross-correlation is observed, and strong cross-coherence is seen for frequencies between 5 and 15 kHz. Also, probability distribution functions of fluctuations measured ∼3 cm inside the separatrix exhibit only minor deviations from a normal distribution for both diagnostics, and good agreement between correlation length estimates, decorrelation times, and structure velocities is found at the ±40% level. While the two instruments agree closely in many respects, some discrepancies are observed. Most notably, GPI normalized fluctuation levels exceed BES fluctuations by a factor of ∼9. BES mean intensity is found to be sensitive to the GPI neutral gas puff, and BES normalized fluctuation levels for frequencies between 1 and 10 kHz are observed to increase during the GPI puff.

  14. Gas shielded metal arc welding with fusible electrode wire. First returns on experience and opportunities in nuclear maintenance and fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet, Fr.; Joly, P.; Leconte, F.; Baritaux, S.; Prin, C.

    2013-06-01

    In a brief text and a Power Point Presentation, the authors report a return on experience for the implementation of two applications using gas shielded metal arc welding process (GMAW): the on-site welding of the final joint of steam generators, and the coating of a tubing flare. In the first case, the authors analyze not only the compliance with specified technical requirements, but also outline the need to support the process with new verification methods in real time, associated development and validation efforts, and organisational and decisional measures to guarantee a good implementation of the process on site. In the second case, they analyze the process ability to meet technical specifications requiring dilution control, a perfect reproducibility, as well a good control of the welding bath. The authors outline that these two applications which are both using the same term (gas shielded metal arc welding with fusible electrode wire), implement two different transfer regimes and processes. They also discuss operational constraints, and technical opportunities and constraints of fusible electrode wire

  15. The relevance of US experience to the completion of the European internal energy market for natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood-Collins, John [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., London (GB); Lee, William [Shearman and Sterling, Paris (FR)

    1990-01-01

    The European Commission's 1988 document on the completion of the internal energy market made a number of recommendations which, if adopted, would significantly affect the European natural gas industry. These were principally that: user's access to transmission systems should be facilitated, in order to permit them direct access to suppliers; greater price transparency should be encouraged, to remove competitive distortions; and fiscal harmonisation should be accelerated, in order to ''level the playing field'' between industrial users in different countries. Advocates of ''open access'' or ''common carriage'', i.e. of a system under which owners of gas pipeline and storage facilities would have a legal obligation to provide transportation and related services to third parties for a specific fee, have argued that adoption of a US-style regulatory system could improve the efficiency of European markets by removing anti-competitive practices. The purpose of this article is to review the arguments on both sides and, in particular, to consider whether US experience may be a relevant model for European authorities to adopt. (author).

  16. Long-time experience in catalytic flue gas cleaning and catalytic NO{sub x} reduction in biofueled boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahonen, M [Tampella Power Inc., Tampere (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    NO emissions are reduced by primary or secondary methods. Primary methods are based on NO reduction in the combustion zone and secondary methods on flue gas cleaning. The most effective NO reduction method is selective catalytic reduction (SCR). It is based on NO reduction by ammonia on the surface of a catalyst. Reaction products are water and nitrogen. A titanium-dioxide-based catalyst is very durable and selective in coal-fired power plants. It is not poisoned by sulphur dioxide and side reactions with ammonia and sulphur dioxide hardly occur. The long time experience and suitability of a titanium-dioxide-based catalyst for NO reduction in biofuel-fired power plants was studied. The biofuels were: peat, wood and bark. It was noticed that deactivation varied very much due to the type of fuel and content of alkalinities in fuel ash. The deactivation in peat firing was moderate, close to the deactivation noticed in coal firing. Wood firing generally had a greater deactivation effect than peat firing. Fuel and fly ash were analyzed to get more information on the flue gas properties. The accumulation of alkali and alkaline earth metals and sulphates was examined together with changes in the physical composition of the catalysts. In the cases where the deactivation was the greatest, the amount of alkali and alkaline earth metals in fuels and fly ashes and their accumulation were very significant. (author) (3 refs.)

  17. Long-time experience in catalytic flue gas cleaning and catalytic NO{sub x} reduction in biofueled boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahonen, M. [Tampella Power Inc., Tampere (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    NO emissions are reduced by primary or secondary methods. Primary methods are based on NO reduction in the combustion zone and secondary methods on flue gas cleaning. The most effective NO reduction method is selective catalytic reduction (SCR). It is based on NO reduction by ammonia on the surface of a catalyst. Reaction products are water and nitrogen. A titanium-dioxide-based catalyst is very durable and selective in coal-fired power plants. It is not poisoned by sulphur dioxide and side reactions with ammonia and sulphur dioxide hardly occur. The long time experience and suitability of a titanium-dioxide-based catalyst for NO reduction in biofuel-fired power plants was studied. The biofuels were: peat, wood and bark. It was noticed that deactivation varied very much due to the type of fuel and content of alkalinities in fuel ash. The deactivation in peat firing was moderate, close to the deactivation noticed in coal firing. Wood firing generally had a greater deactivation effect than peat firing. Fuel and fly ash were analyzed to get more information on the flue gas properties. The accumulation of alkali and alkaline earth metals and sulphates was examined together with changes in the physical composition of the catalysts. In the cases where the deactivation was the greatest, the amount of alkali and alkaline earth metals in fuels and fly ashes and their accumulation were very significant. (author) (3 refs.)

  18. Reanalysis of the gas-cooled fast reactor experiments at the zero power facility proteus - Spectral indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, G.; Pattupara, R. M. [Paul Scherrer Inst., 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Girardin, G. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Chawla, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst., 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) concept was investigated experimentally in the PROTEUS zero power facility at the Paul Scherrer Inst. during the 1970's. The experimental program was aimed at neutronics studies specific to the GCFR and at the validation of nuclear data in fast spectra. A significant part of the program used thorium oxide and thorium metal fuel either distributed quasi-homogeneously in the reference PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} lattice or introduced in the form of radial and axial blanket zones. Experimental results obtained at the time are still of high relevance in view of the current consideration of the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) as a Generation-IV nuclear system, as also of the renewed interest in the thorium cycle. In this context, some of the experiments have been modeled with modern Monte Carlo codes to better account for the complex PROTEUS whole-reactor geometry and to allow validating recent continuous neutron cross-section libraries. As a first step, the MCNPX model was used to test the JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-3.3 libraries against spectral indices, notably involving fission and capture of {sup 232}Th and {sup 237}Np, measured in GFR-like lattices. (authors)

  19. Nobel Lecture: Bose-Einstein condensation in a dilute gas, the first 70 years and some recent experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornell, E.A.; Wieman, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation, or BEC, has a long and rich history dating from the early 1920s. In this article we will trace briefly over this history and some of the developments in physics that made possible our successful pursuit of BEC in a gas. We will then discuss what was involved in this quest. In this discussion we will go beyond the usual technical description to try and address certain questions that we now hear frequently, but are not covered in our past research papers. These are questions along the lines of: How did you get the idea and decide to pursue it? Did you know it was going to work? How long did it take you and why? We will review some our favorites from among the experiments we have carried out with BEC. There will then be a brief encore on why we are optimistic that BEC can be created with nearly any species of magnetically trappable atom. Throughout this article we will try to explain what makes BEC in a dilute gas so interesting, unique, and experimentally challenging

  20. Comparison of beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging edge fluctuation measurements in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sechrest, Y.; Munsat, T.; Smith, D.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the close physical proximity of the Gas Puff Imaging (GPI) and Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostics on the National Spherical torus Experiment (NSTX) is leveraged to directly compare fluctuation measurements, and to study the local effects of the GPI neutral deuterium puff during H-mode plasmas without large Edge Localized Modes. The GPI and BES views on NSTX provide partially overlapping coverage of the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) regions above the outboard midplane. The separation in the toroidal direction is 16°, and field lines passing through diagnostic views are separated by ∼20 cm in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. Strong cross-correlation is observed, and strong cross-coherence is seen for frequencies between 5 and 15 kHz. Also, probability distribution functions of fluctuations measured ∼3 cm inside the separatrix exhibit only minor deviations from a normal distribution for both diagnostics, and good agreement between correlation length estimates, decorrelation times, and structure velocities is found at the ±40% level. While the two instruments agree closely in many respects, some discrepancies are observed. Most notably, GPI normalized fluctuation levels exceed BES fluctuations by a factor of ∼9. BES mean intensity is found to be sensitive to the GPI neutral gas puff, and BES normalized fluctuation levels for frequencies between 1 and 10 kHz are observed to increase during the GPI puff

  1. Effect of gas adsorption on acoustic wave propagation in MFI zeolite membrane materials: experiment and molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Etoungh D; Blasco, Hugues; Da-Costa, Philippe; Drobek, Martin; Ayral, André; Le Clezio, Emmanuel; Despaux, Gilles; Coasne, Benoit; Julbe, Anne

    2014-09-02

    The present study reports on the development of a characterization method of porous membrane materials which consists of considering their acoustic properties upon gas adsorption. Using acoustic microscopy experiments and atomistic molecular simulations for helium adsorbed in a silicalite-1 zeolite membrane layer, we showed that acoustic wave propagation could be used, in principle, for controlling the membranes operando. Molecular simulations, which were found to fit experimental data, showed that the compressional modulus of the composite system consisting of silicalite-1 with adsorbed He increases linearly with the He adsorbed amount while its shear modulus remains constant in a large range of applied pressures. These results suggest that the longitudinal and Rayleigh wave velocities (VL and VR) depend on the He adsorbed amount whereas the transverse wave velocity VT remains constant.

  2. The use of contained nuclear explosions to create underground reservoirs, and experience of operating these for gas condensate storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kedrovskij, O.L.; Myasnikov, K.V.; Leonov, E.A.; Romadin, N.M.; Dorodnov, V.F.; Nikiforov, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations on the creation of underground reservoirs by means of nuclear explosions have been going on in the Soviet Union for many years. In this paper the authors consider three main kinds of sites or formations that can be used for constructing reservoirs by this method, namely, low-permeable rocks, worked-out mines and rock salt formations. Formulae are given for predicting the mechanical effect of an explosion in rocks, taking their strength characteristics into account. Engineering procedures are described for sealing and restoring the emplacement holes, so that they can be used for operating the underground reservoir. Experience with the contruction and operation of a 50 000 m 3 gas-condensate reservoir in a rock salt formation is described. In the appendix to the paper a method is presented for calculating the stability of spherical cavities created by nuclear explosions in rock salt, allowing for the development of elasto-plastic deformations and creep

  3. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II measurements of the quasi-biennial oscillations in ozone and nitrogen dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawodny, Joseph M.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1991-01-01

    The first measurements ever to show a quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in NO2 have been made by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II) (SAGE II) and are presented in this work along with observations of the well-known QBO in stratospheric ozone. The SAGE II instrument was launched aboard the Earth Radiation Budget satellite near the end of 1984. Measurements of ozone and nitrogen dioxide through early 1990 are analyzed for the presence of a quasi-biennial oscillation. The measurements show the global extent of both the O3 and NO2 QBO in the 25- to 40-km region of the stratosphere. The SAGE II QBO results for ozone compare favorably to theory and previous measurements. The QBO in NO2 is found to be consistent with the vertical and horizontal transport of NOy. Both species exhibit a QBO at extratropical latitudes consistent with strong meridional transport into the winter hemisphere.

  4. In-vessel retention after relocation of corium into the lower plenum. Summary of the current project results. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altstadt, E.; Willschuetz, H.G.

    2003-03-01

    Considering the hypothetical core melt down scenario for a light water reactor (LWR) a possible failure mode of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and its failure time has to be investigated for a determination of the loadings on the containment. Numerous experiments have been performed accompanied with material properties evaluation, theoretical, and numerical work /REM 1993/, /THF 1997/, /CHU 1999/. For pre- and post-test calculations of Lower Head Failure experiments like OLHF or FOREVER it is necessary to model creep and plasticity processes. At the same time it is necessary to have suitable models which provide at least the temperature field in the vessel wall. At the FZR a Finite Element Model is developed simulating the thermal processes and the mechanical response of the loaded structure. In this report the conducted work is shortly described and illustrated by examples. The creep process is modeled using a numerical approach which avoids the use of a single creep law employing constants derived from the data for a limited stress and temperature range. Instead of this a numerical creep data base (CDB) is developed where the creep strain rate is evaluated in dependence on the current total strain, temperature and equivalent stress. An important task for this approach is the generation and validation of the CDB. Additionally the implementation of all relevant temperature dependent material properties has been performed. For an evaluation of the failure times a damage model according to an approach of Lemaitre is applied. The validation of the numerical model is performed by the simulation of and comparison with experiments. This is done in 3 levels: starting with the simulation of single uniaxial creep tests, which is considered as a 1D-problem. In the next level so called ''tube-failure-experiments'' are modeled: the RUPTHER-14 and the ''MPA-Meppen''-experiment. These experiments are considered as 2D-problems. Finally the numerical model is applied to scaled

  5. Field experience of indoor thoron gas measurements in a stable rural community in Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zunic, Z.S.; Fujimoto, K.; McLaughlin, J.P.; Birovljev, A.

    2000-01-01

    Attempts were made in Yugoslavia to identify rural populations receiving an elevated natural radiation exposure that might be a potential cohort for a planned future health study. In Gornja Stubla at Kosovo in southern Yugoslavia many houses are built mainly from local rock of trachyte which has a uranium content of the order of 25g/t, Th of 61 g/t and K-40 of 5.4%. Thoron and radon gas measurements were carried out in 49 locations in 23 houses in this rural community. Taking into account the short half-life of thoron passive alpha track dual radon-thoron detectors were placed within 10-20 cm from the walls, which were considered the potential source of thoron. Thoron concentrations were found to be extremely high in Gornja Stubla with a maximum measured value of 1,156 Bq/m -3 . Using another type of passive radon detector, designed by SSI/NRPB, annual indoor radon concentrations were measured. The highest indoor radon concentration of 9,591 Bq/m -3 was found in the same house, which had the highest thoron concentration. The absorbed dose rate in air, due to external penetrating radiation was also measured and the highest value found in Gornja Stubla was 430 nGy h -1 . Although high thoron concentrations were recorded it should be pointed out that due to its short half life large differences in thoron concentrations are to be expected as a function of the distance of the measuring point to the source. In addition, with the absence of information on thoron progeny concentration it is impossible to make any estimate of doses from the thoron series since the equilibrium factor between thoron and its progeny can vary greatly with time as well as location. However, the thoron measurements that have been performed in Gornja Stubla clearly indicate that the inhabitants there receive an elevated exposure not only from indoor radon and penetrating radiation but also from thoron. (author)

  6. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Critical Experiment and its Application to Thorium Absorption Rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardes, R.G.; Brown, J.R.; Drake, M.K.; Fischer, P.U.; Pound, D.C.; Sampson, J.B.; Stewart, H.B.

    1964-01-01

    In developing the concept of the HTGR and its first prototype at Peach Bottom, General Atomic made the decision that a critical experiment was required to provide adequately certain necessary input data for the nuclear analysis. The specific needs of the nuclear design theory for input data relating to thorium absorptions led to an experimental design consisting of a central lattice-type critical assembly with surrounding buffer and driver regions. This type of assembly, in which the spectrum of interest can be established in the relatively small central lattice having a desired geometry, provides a useful tool for obtaining a variety of input data for nuclear analysis surveys of new concepts. The particular advantages of this approach over that of constructing a mock-up assembly will be discussed, as well as the role of the theory in determining what experiments are most useful and how these experiments are then used in verifying design techniques. Two relatively new techniques were developed for use in the lattice assembly. These were a reactivity oscillation technique for determining the thorium Doppler coefficient, and an activation technique for determining both the resonance integral of thorium dispersed in graphite and its temperature dependence (activation Doppler coefficient). The Doppler coefficient measurement by reactivity oscillation utilized the entire central fuel element in a technique which permitted heating this fuel element to 800°F and accurately subtracting experimentally the thermal-base effects, that is, those effects not contributing to the thorium resonance capture. Comparison of results with theory for a range of conditions shows excellent agreement. The measurement of the thorium resonance integral and its temperature dependence will be described. The technique developed for measuring resonance capture makes use of gold as the standard and vanadium as die material giving the 1/v absorption rate. This technique is dictated by the fact

  7. Access pricing on gas networks and capacity release markets: Lessons from North American and European experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, L.; Percebois, J.

    2004-01-01

    An evaluation of different access fee systems in North America and Europe in relation to normative prices is discussed. Among available alternatives the entry-exit pricing system as it is currently applied in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Italy and France, was judged to be the best solution to increased competition. Canadian and American experiences highlight the influence of the market power of shippers with regard to the efficacy of capping the market. Whether or not to cap the price on a capacity release market is a choice between the protection of shippers against market abuses and the promotion of secondary market liquidity, a choice that is linked to the level of congestion of a pipeline system. If there is much congestion, a price cap may be necessary; if there is little congestion, the need for market value given by an uncapped price may be more important than the market power of shippers. 15 refs., 2 tabs

  8. NORM waste management in the oil and gas industry. The Syrian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M.S.; Suman, H.

    2003-01-01

    Syrian experience with respect to naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) waste produced by the Syrian oil industry is described. Three main categories of NORM waste were identified. First, hard scales from decontamination of contaminated equipment and tubings which are considered to contain the highest levels of radium isotopes ( 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 224 Ra); this type of waste being currently stored in standard barrels in a controlled area. Second, sludge wastes containing low levels of radium isotopes were found in large amounts in each Syrian oilfield; plastic lined disposal pits were constructed in each area for temporary storage. However, disposal criteria for the above two categories of NORM waste are still under discussions. Third, soil contaminated with NORM as a result of uncontrolled disposal of production water was also considered as NORM waste. The Syrian criteria for disposal and clean up of this type of waste has been defined and approved by the Regulatory Office. (author)

  9. Multiphase flow experiments, mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of the water - gas - solute movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Ma, X.; Su, N.

    2013-12-01

    The movement of water and solute into and through the vadose zone is, in essence, an issue of immiscible displacement in pore-space network of a soil. Therefore, multiphase flow and transport in porous media, referring to three medium: air, water, and the solute, pose one of the largest unresolved challenges for porous medium fluid seepage. However, this phenomenon has always been largely neglected. It is expected that a reliable analysis model of the multi-phase flow in soil can truly reflect the process of natural movement about the infiltration, which is impossible to be observed directly. In such cases, geophysical applications of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides the opportunity to measure the water movements into soils directly over a large scale from tiny pore to regional scale, accordingly enable it available both on the laboratory and on the field. In addition, the NMR provides useful information about the pore space properties. In this study, we proposed both laboratory and field experiments to measure the multi-phase flow parameters, together with optimize the model in computer programming based on the fractional partial differential equations (fPDE). In addition, we establish, for the first time, an infiltration model including solute flowing with water, which has huge influence on agriculture and soil environment pollution. Afterwards, with data collected from experiments, we simulate the model and analyze the spatial variability of parameters. Simulations are also conducted according to the model to evaluate the effects of airflow on water infiltration and other effects such as solute and absorption. It has significant meaning to oxygen irrigation aiming to higher crop yield, and shed more light into the dam slope stability. In summary, our framework is a first-time model added in solute to have a mathematic analysis with the fPDE and more instructive to agriculture activities.

  10. Study of a microstrip gas detector for the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment; Etude d`un detecteur a micropistes pour l`experience Compact Muon Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clergeau, J F [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire

    1997-06-19

    The micro-strip gas chambers (MSGC) were realized due to the technological advances in the field of micro-electronics. The wire of usual gas counters is replaced in these detectors by metallic stripes as a periodic sequence of electrodes (anodes and cathodes) spaced by around 200 {mu}m. At a distance of 3 mm above the strip containing substrate, a metallic plane is placed, thus defining the gaseous room where the passage of a charged particle produces by ionization a primary electron signal collected by the detector anodes. Due to its granularity a MSGC can operate under very high particle fluxes since charge can be collected very rapidly. Also, the impact parameters can be determined with high accuracy due to the high space and time resolutions. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) or the MSGC detectors planned to equip one of the experiments proposed for LHC should detect, in extreme operational conditions, the particle impacts in a 4 Tesla magnetic field, for around ten years and for a particle flux of around 10{sup 4} Hz/mm{sup 2}. The CMS detector is described in chapter 2. The operation principle and the problems encountered in the development of MSGC detectors are summarized in chapter 3. The chapter 4 is dedicated to the study of the performances of MSGCs in magnetic fields. In the chapters 5 to 7 the processing of the signal from detectors of this type is described, particularly, the performances of various ways of treat the signal in terms of detection efficiency and counting loads are presented.The chapter 8 presents the results obtained with the prototype obtained at IPNL while the chapter 9 gives the conclusions of the performed works. (author) 55 refs.

  11. 1-MeV electron beam propagation experiments in neutral gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, M.A.; Rose, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were performed studying the propagation of a 1-MeV, 10-ns electron beam at currents of 2-8 kA. Propagation was studied in a 7.6-cm-diam glass guide tube, the same tube with a conducting screen inside, and in a 3.4-m-diam chamber. In the guide tube with the screen, ion-focused propagation is observed at low pressures (≤ 40 Pa) with net current equal to beam current. At higher pressures (55-130 Pa), a notch in beam current is observed for pressure time products of ≅ 100 Pa-ns. Between 270 Pa and 1070 Pa, good propagation is again observed with net currents of 50-70% of the beam current. The net current fraction of beam current increases with increasing pressure and with decreasing beam current. At pressure above 1070 Pa, hose instability occurs, and net current nearly equal to beam current is observed. The hose frequency is in reasonable accord with theory. Nose erosion is minimized at pressures for 1000-2000 Pa depending on beam current, and increases at lower and higher pressures

  12. Operational experiences of (in)direct co-combustion in coal and gas fired power plants in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Ree, R.; Korbee, R.; Meijer, R.; Konings, T.; Van Aart, F.

    2001-02-01

    The operational experiences of direct and indirect co-combustion of biomass/waste in European coal and natural gas fired power plants are addressed. The operational experiences of mainly Dutch direct co-combustion activities in coal fired power plants are discussed; whereas an overview of European indirect co-combustion activities is presented. The technical, environmental, and economic feasibility of different indirect co-combustion concepts (i.e. upstream gasification, pyrolysis, combustion with steam-side integration) is investigated, and the results are compared with the economic preferable concept of direct co-combustion. Main technical constraints that limit the co-combustion capacity of biomass/waste in conventional coal fired power plants are: the grindability of the biomass/coal blend, the capacity of available unit components, and the danger of severe slagging, fouling, corrosion and erosion. The main environmental constraints that have to be taken into account are the quality of produced solid waste streams (fly ash, bottom ash, gypsum) and the applicable air emission regulations. 6 refs

  13. Program plan for correction of US instrument degradation or failure in the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF) in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, G.S.; Chen, Y.S.; Shotkin, L.M.

    1987-07-01

    This report documents, as of September, 1986, the investigation of the failure or degradation of some of the advanced two-phase flow instruments supplied by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) to the German Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF). These instruments include Tie-Plate Drag Bodies (DBs), Breakthrough Detectors (BTDs), Loop Drag Disc (DD) paddles, Fluid Distribution Grid (FDG) sensors, and Liquid Level Detector (LLD) sensors. The exact causes for these instrument degradations or failures are not known, but several potential causes have been identified. For DBs and BTDs, the primary mechanism for the degradation appears to be a leakage in the Inconel 600 strain gage encapsulation and the subsequent burnout of the strain gage elements. Excessive loads appear to be the cause of the degradation or failure of the drag discs. The degradation cause for most of the FDGs and LLDs may be either steam/water erosion or mechanical abrasion of the sapphire sensor tips. However, some of the FDG tips were found to be cracked also. The corrective actions are being directed towards identification of the primary causes for the instrument degradation or failure and methods of preventing recurrance and toward minimizing the impact on the test program. All possible action items are being reviewed to arrange them in terms of priority and the likelihood of success so that the best results can be obtained under the constraints of a fixed amount of resources and limited time

  14. PBDOWN: A computer code for simulation of core material discharge and expansion in the upper coolant plenum in a hypothetical unprotected loss of flow accident in a LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royl, P.

    1985-01-01

    The report gives a description of the code PBDOWN (Pool Blow Down), its equations, input specifications and subroutines and it lists the input and output for some samples. Besides that some analysis results for the SNR-300 are discussed, that were obtained with this code. PBDOWN is an integral blow-down and expansion code, which simulates core material discharge and expansion into a sodium filled upper coolant plenum after build-up of vapour pressures in an unprotected loss of flow accident. The model includes the effect of sodium entrainment into an expending bubble of fuel or steel vapour with various assumptions for the heat transfer and vaporization of the entrained sodium droplets. The expanding vapour bubble is connected to the discharging pool via an orifice of a given size through which a time dependent ejection is simulated using quasi-stationary blow down correlations. The model allows bounding analysis of the possible influence of sodium vapour as a secondary working fluid, that is activated outside the pool on the overall expansion energy and discharge

  15. Benchmark Analyses of Sodium Natural Convection in the Upper Plenum of the Monju Reactor Vessel. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2008-2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-11-01

    The IAEA supports Member States in the area of advanced fast reactor technology development by providing a major fulcrum for information exchange and collaborative research programmes. The IAEA’s activities in this field are mainly carried out within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), which assists in the implementation of corresponding IAEA support, and ensures that all technical activities are in line with expressed needs of Member States. Among this broad range, the IAEA proposes and establishes coordinated research projects (CRPs), aimed at improving Member State capability in fast reactor design and analysis. An important opportunity to perform collaborative research activities was provided by the system startup tests carried out by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the prototype loop type sodium cooled fast reactor Monju, in particular a turbine trip test performed in December 1995. As the JAEA opened the experimental dataset to international collaboration in 2008, the IAEA launched the CRP on Benchmark Analyses of Sodium Natural Convection in the Upper Plenum of the Monju Reactor Vessel. The CRP, together with eight institutes from seven States, has contributed to improving capabilities in sodium cooled fast reactors simulation through code verification and validation, with particular emphasis on thermal stratification and natural circulation phenomena

  16. Off-gas characteristics of defense waste vitrification using liquid-fed Joule-heated ceramic melters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goles, R.W.; Sevigny, G.J.

    1983-09-01

    Off-gas and effluent characterization studies have been established as part of a PNL Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter development program supporting the Savannah River Laboratory Defense Waste Processing Facility (SRL-DWPF). The objectives of these studies were to characterize the gaseous and airborne emission properties of liquid-fed joule-heated melters as a function of melter operational parameters and feed composition. All areas of off-gas interest and concern including effluent characterization, emission control, flow rate behavior and corrosion effects have been studied using alkaline and formic-acid based feed compositions. In addition, the behavioral patterns of gaseous emissions, the characteristics of melter-generated aerosols and the nature and magnitude of melter effluent losses have been established under a variety of feeding conditions with and without the use of auxiliary plenum heaters. The results of these studies have shown that particulate emissions are responsible for most radiologically important melter effluent losses. Melter-generated gases have been found to be potentially flammable as well as corrosive. Hydrogen and carbon monoxide present the greatest flammability hazard of the combustibles produced. Melter emissions of acidic volatile compounds of sulfur and the halogens have been responsible for extensive corrosion observed in melter plenums and in associated off-gas lines and processing equipment. The use of auxiliary plenum heating has had little effect upon melter off-gas characteristics other than reducing the concentrations of combustibles

  17. Multiphase Transport in Porous Media: Gas-Liquid Separation Using Capillary Pressure Gradients International Space Station (ISS) Flight Experiment Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Holtsnider, John T.; Dahl, Roger W.; Deeks, Dalton; Javanovic, Goran N.; Parker, James M.; Ehlert, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the understanding of multiphase flow characteristics under variable gravity conditions will ultimately lead to improved and as of yet unknown process designs for advanced space missions. Such novel processes will be of paramount importance to the success of future manned space exploration as we venture into our solar system and beyond. In addition, because of the ubiquitous nature and vital importance of biological and environmental processes involving airwater mixtures, knowledge gained about fundamental interactions and the governing properties of these mixtures will clearly benefit the quality of life here on our home planet. The techniques addressed in the current research involving multiphase transport in porous media and gas-liquid phase separation using capillary pressure gradients are also a logical candidate for a future International Space Station (ISS) flight experiment. Importantly, the novel and potentially very accurate Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) modeling of multiphase transport in porous media developed in this work offers significantly improved predictions of real world fluid physics phenomena, thereby promoting advanced process designs for both space and terrestrial applications.This 3-year research effort has culminated in the design and testing of a zero-g demonstration prototype. Both the hydrophilic (glass) and hydrophobic (Teflon) media Capillary Pressure Gradient (CPG) cartridges prepared during the second years work were evaluated. Results obtained from ground testing at 1-g were compared to those obtained at reduced gravities spanning Martian (13-g), Lunar (16-g) and zero-g. These comparisons clearly demonstrate the relative strength of the CPG phenomena and the efficacy of its application to meet NASAs unique gas-liquid separation (GLS) requirements in non-terrestrial environments.LB modeling software, developed concurrently with the zero-g test effort, was shown to accurately reproduce observed CPG driven gas-liquid separation

  18. The pilot plant experiment of electron beam irradiation process for removal of NOx and SOx from sinter plant exhaust gas in the iron and steel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, K.; Katayama, T.; Kawamura, Ke.

    1981-01-01

    Air pollution problem has become more important in the progress of industry. Nitrogen oxides (NOx, mostly NO) and sulfur oxides (SOx, mostly SO 2 ) which are contained in a sinter plant exhaust gas, are known as serious air pollutants. In such circumstances, an attempt has been made to simultaneously remove NOx and SOx from the sinter plant exhaust gas by means of a new electron beam irradiation process. The process consists of adding a small amount of NH 3 to the exhaust gas, irradiating the gas by electron beam, forming ammonium salts by reactions of NOx and SOx with the NH 3 and collecting ammonium salts by dry electrostatic precipitator (E.P.). Basic research on the present process had been performed using heavy oil combustion gas. Based on the results research was launched to study the applicability of the process to the treatment of sinter plant exhaust gas. A pilot plant, capable of treating a gas flow of 3000 Nm 3 /H was set up, and experiments were performed from July 1977 to June 1978. The plant is described and the results are presented. (author)

  19. The contribution of research and development to operation and maintenance in gas transportation: SNAM's experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scopesi, Luigi

    1999-07-01

    Presentation. Snam S.p.A is the holding company of the ENI group, the national hydrocarbon corporation, responsible for the supply, transmission and large distribution of natural gas. With a network of 29,000 km of natural gas pipelines that cover a large part of the country, the company supplies gas to the industries, distribution companies and compression stations for NGV. The natural gas business is mainly concentrated in Italy, where Snam S.p.A. in 1998 sold about 56 billion cubic metres, which is about 28% of the total national energy consumption. Italy produces only part of the gas; most of it is imported by pipelines from the Netherlands, Russia, Algeria and Norway. One LNG terminal gasifies natural gas coming from Algeria. In Italy, the demand for natural gas has been growing steadily for many years and is expected to cover 37% of Italy's energy need by 2010.

  20. Experimental evaluation of blockage ratio and plenum evacuation system flow effects on pressure distribution for bodies of revolution in 0.1 scale model test section of NASA Lewis Research Center's proposed altitude wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Richard R.; Harrington, Douglas E.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the slotted test section of the 0.1-scale model of the proposed Altitude Wind Tunnel to evaluate wall interference effects at tunnel Mach numbers from 0.70 to 0.95 on bodies of revolution with blockage rates of 0.43, 3, 6, and 12 percent. The amount of flow that had to be removed from the plenum chamber (which surrounded the slotted test section) by the plenum evacuation system (PES) to eliminate wall interference effects was determined. The effectiveness of tunnel reentry flaps in removing flow from the plenum chamber was examined. The 0.43-percent blockage model was the only one free of wall interference effects with no PES flow. Surface pressures on the forward part of the other models were greater than interference-free results and were not influenced by PES flow. Interference-free results were achieved on the aft part of the 3- and 6-percent blockage models with the proper amount of PES flow. The required PES flow was substantially reduced by opening the reentry flaps.

  1. Pilot plant experience in electron-beam treatment of iron-ore sintering flue gas and its application to coal boiler flue gas cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, K.

    1984-01-01

    The present development status of the electron-beam flue gas treatment process, which is a dry process capable of removing SOx and NOx simultaneously, is described. The most advanced demonstration of this process was accomplished with a pilot plant in Japan where the maximum gas flow rate of 10,000 Nm 3 /h of an iron-ore sintering machine flue gas was successfully treated. The byproduct produced in this process is collected as a dry powder which is a mixture of ammonia sulfate and ammonium nitrate and is saleable as a fertilizer or a fertilizer component. A preliminary economic projection showed that this process costs less than the lime scrubber which removes SOx but does not remove NOx. Tests using simulated coal combustion gases suggest that this process will be applicable to coal-fired boiler flue gas treatment as well. However, tests on actual coal-fired flue gases are still required for commercial application decisions. A process development unit program consisting of the design, construction and testing of actual coal-fired power station flue gases is underway in the U.S.A. The design and engineering of the test plant is far advanced and the construction phase will be launched in the very near future. (author)

  2. Activation calculations for dismantling - The feedback of a 7 years experience in activation calculations for graphite gas cooled reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eid, M.; Nimal, J.C.; Gerat, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    This is a revision of the past seven years experience in activation calculations for dismantling. It aims at evaluating the experience and at making better understanding to help in decision making during the following phases. Five gas cooled reactors are shutdown and are waiting for the EDF (Electricite De France) dismantling decision. The sixth (BUGEY1) will be shutdown by 1994 and will be waiting a dismantling decision as well. (authors). 3 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Experience in developing control integrated multilevel systems for gas transport; Developpement de systemes integres de gestion multi-niveaux pour le transport du gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostyukov, V.Y. [NIIIS, (Russian Federation); Bityukov, V.S. [Gasprom, (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    This report describes the experience of the integrated control multilevel system (IACS) development and implementation for gas transport at the regional enterprises of JSC 'Gasprom', specificity of IACS creation by the Russian enterprises on the basis of the technical and licensed basic software SCADA Geamatics purchased from AEG company under the contract. (authors)

  4. Recent ORNL experience in site performance prediction: the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and the Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.

    1985-01-01

    The suitability of the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Landfill and the Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Central Waste Disposal Facility for disposal of low-level radioactive waste was evaluated using pathways analyses. For these evaluations, a conservative approach was selected; that is, conservatism was built into the analyses when assumptions concerning future events had to be made or when uncertainties concerning site or waste characteristics existed. Data from comprehensive laboratory and field investigations were used in developing the conceptual and numerical models that served as the basis for the numerical simulations of the long-term transport of contamination to man. However, the analyses relied on conservative scenarios to describe the generation and migration of contamination and the potential human exposure to the waste. Maximum potential doses to man were calculated and compared to the appropriate standards. Even under this conservative framework, the sites were found to provide adequate buffer to persons outside the DOE reservations and conclusions concerning site capacity and site acceptability were drawn. Our experience through these studies has shown that in reaching conclusions in such studies, some consideration must be given to the uncertainties and conservatisms involved in the analyses. Analytical methods to quantitatively assess the probability of future events to occur and to quantitatively determine the sensitivity of the results to data uncertainty may prove useful in relaxing some of the conservatism built into the analyses. The applicability of such methods to pathways analyses is briefly discussed

  5. Tag gas burnup based on three-dimensional FTR analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidman, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    Flux spectra from a three-dimensional diffusion theory analysis of the Fast Test Reactor (FTR) are used to predict gas tag ratio changes, as a function of exposure, for each FTR fuel and absorber subassembly plenum. These flux spectra are also used to predict Xe-125 equilibrium activities in absorber plena in order to assess the feasibility of using Xe-125 gamma rays to detect and distinguish control rod failures from fuel rod failures. Worst case tag burnup changes are used in conjunction with burnup and mass spectrometer uncertainties to establish the minimum spacing of tags which allows the tags to be unambiguously identified

  6. Computer experiments on ion beam cooling and guiding in fair-wind gas cell and extraction RF-funnel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varentsov, Victor; Wada, Michiharu

    2004-01-01

    Here we present results of the further development of two novel ideas in the field of slow RI-beams production. They are a fair-wind gas cell concept for big-size high-pressure buffer gas cells and a new approach to the extraction system. For this purpose, detailed gas dynamic simulations based on the solution of a full system of time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations have been performed for both the fair-wind gas cell of 500 mm length at 1 bar helium buffer gas pressure and the RF-funnel extraction system at low buffer gas pressure. The results of gas dynamic calculations were used for detailed microscopic Monte Carlo ion-beam trajectory simulations under the combined effect of the buffer gas flow and electric fields of the RF-funnels. The obtained results made it apparent that the use of the fair-wind gas cell concept and extraction RF-funnels look very promising for production of high-quality low-energy RI-beams

  7. Peculiarities occurrence and microstrip gas chambers studied through experiment WA97; La production d`etrangete et les chambres gazeuses a micropistes dans le cadre de l`experience WA97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachelhoffer, T.

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents the studies on development of a Monte-Carlo type generator used for inclusive production of odd baryons and antibaryons through proton- proton and proton- nucleus collisions. Experiment WA97 consisted in designing simulation software for MSGCs (Micro-strips Gas Chambers) as well as the redefining of particle paths with the help of these chambers. This work made it possible to design the MSGC detector for experiment WA97. (TEC). 71 refs., 88 figs.

  8. Emission of Gas and Al2O3 Smoke in Gas-Al Particle Deflagration: Experiments and Emission Modeling for Explosive Fireballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranc-Darbord, Isabelle; Baudin, Gérard; Genetier, Marc; Ramel, David; Vasseur, Pierre; Legrand, Julien; Pina, Vincent

    2018-03-01

    Emission of gas and Al2O3 smoke within the deflagration of H2{-}O2-{N2{-}CO2}-Al particles has been studied in a closed combustion chamber at pressures of up to 18 bar and at gas temperatures of up to 3700 K. Measurements of radiance intensity were taken using a five wavelength pyrometer (0.660 μ m, 0.850 μ m, 1.083 μ m, 1.260 μ m, 1.481 μ m) and a grating spectrometer in the range (4.10 μ m to 4.30 μ m). In order to characterize the aluminum oxide smoke size and temperature, an inversion method has been developed based on the radiation transfer equation and using pyrometer measurements and thermochemical calculations of Al2O3 smoke volume fractions. Temperatures in combustion gas have been determined using a method based on the assumed blackbody head of the 4.26 μ m CO2 emission line and on its spectral shift with pressure and temperature. For validation purpose, this method has been applied to measurements obtained when calibrated alumina particles are injected in a combustion chamber prior to gaseous deflagrations. This mathematical inversion method was developed to investigate explosive fireballs.

  9. Understanding and Improvement of an Experiment Measuring Chemical Reaction Rates by Monitoring Volume Change of a Gas: On the Reaction between HCl(aq) and Mg(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Jeong Ah; Yoon, Hee Sook; Jeong, Dae Hong; Choi, Won Ho

    2006-01-01

    In this study we analyzed and improved an experiment measuring chemical reaction rates introduced in the high school science textbooks through an understanding of the phenomena observed in carrying out the experiment. For this purpose, the contents of textbooks related to the experiment were analyzed, and the problems observed in carrying out the experiment were addressed through experimental analysis. When the experiment was carried out by the method of aquatic transposition presented in textbooks, the observed volume change of H 2 gas was delayed and chemical reaction rate was increased in the early stage of reaction period. To resolve these problems, an improved method for measuring the reaction rates was suggested. In the improved experiment the reaction rate was measured to be constant on time, which was interpreted in terms of the concentration of H + and the surface area of magnesium

  10. Pilot experiments with relativistic uranium projectile and fission fragments thermalized in a cryogenic gas-filled stopping cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiter, Moritz Pascal

    2015-07-01

    online experiments, which is about three times larger than any stopping cell, using RF structures for the extraction of ions, has demonstrated. The area density and therefore the stopping power of the CSC is limited by the differential pumping. To overcome this limitation the CSC was tested with neon as a stopping gas with area densities of up to 11.3 mg/cm{sup 2} helium equivalent, demonstrating a unprecedented area density for stopping cells based on RF structures. The RF carpet performed reliably and its potential for the future FAIR stopping cell was shown. During the experiments at GSI the mean extraction time of {sup 221}Ac ions from the CSC to a silicon surface detector was measured, it amounts to 24 ms. This value is well in agreement with offline measurements using a pulsed {sup 223}Ra recoil ion source. The combination of a high density stopping cell with high total efficiencies and a non-scanning high-resolution mass spectrometer can be used as an independent identification detector for exotic nuclei by their mass, allowing a recalibration of the in-flight detectors of any fragment separator. As a proof-of-principal experiment the CSC and a MR-TOF-MS have been used as a mass tagger for the FRS at GSI. 134-I ions were produced by in-flight fission from an {sup 238}U primary beam at 1000 MeV/u and identified by the mass tagger. The new method does not rely on specific decay properties and therefore allows a recalibration of the fragment separator independent of the fragment and can also be used with stable nuclides. The usage of the CSC and a MR-TOF-MS will allow fast recalibration and a more effective usage of the limited amount of beam time for all experiments with exotic nuclei even in the case the nuclide of interest is not clearly identified by the in-flight detection scheme. With the CSC low energy experiments such as high-precision mass measurements and decay spectroscopy were made possible, the half lifes of {sup 221}Ac and {sup 223}Th have been measured

  11. Pilot experiments with relativistic uranium projectile and fission fragments thermalized in a cryogenic gas-filled stopping cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, Moritz Pascal

    2015-01-01

    experiments, which is about three times larger than any stopping cell, using RF structures for the extraction of ions, has demonstrated. The area density and therefore the stopping power of the CSC is limited by the differential pumping. To overcome this limitation the CSC was tested with neon as a stopping gas with area densities of up to 11.3 mg/cm"2 helium equivalent, demonstrating a unprecedented area density for stopping cells based on RF structures. The RF carpet performed reliably and its potential for the future FAIR stopping cell was shown. During the experiments at GSI the mean extraction time of "2"2"1Ac ions from the CSC to a silicon surface detector was measured, it amounts to 24 ms. This value is well in agreement with offline measurements using a pulsed "2"2"3Ra recoil ion source. The combination of a high density stopping cell with high total efficiencies and a non-scanning high-resolution mass spectrometer can be used as an independent identification detector for exotic nuclei by their mass, allowing a recalibration of the in-flight detectors of any fragment separator. As a proof-of-principal experiment the CSC and a MR-TOF-MS have been used as a mass tagger for the FRS at GSI. 134-I ions were produced by in-flight fission from an "2"3"8U primary beam at 1000 MeV/u and identified by the mass tagger. The new method does not rely on specific decay properties and therefore allows a recalibration of the fragment separator independent of the fragment and can also be used with stable nuclides. The usage of the CSC and a MR-TOF-MS will allow fast recalibration and a more effective usage of the limited amount of beam time for all experiments with exotic nuclei even in the case the nuclide of interest is not clearly identified by the in-flight detection scheme. With the CSC low energy experiments such as high-precision mass measurements and decay spectroscopy were made possible, the half lifes of "2"2"1Ac and "2"2"3Th have been measured, alpha spectroscopy of short

  12. The development of the gas sector in Tanzania and Mozambique. The early stages of two asymmetric experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auge, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    As huge gas deposits have been discovered in 2010 in Mozambique and in Tanzania, and as the oil barrel price has dramatically decreased since mid-2014, this report, based on interview with local economic, industrial and political actors, describes the very different situations faced by these two countries regarding the development of their gas sector. First, Mozambique possesses four times more gas than Tanzania. Secondly, they display very different relationships between political power and private investors. Therefore the Mozambican project grows at a much higher rate than the Tanzanian one. The author thus proposes presentations of the status and projects of gas exploitation in these both countries, by mentioning involved actors (notably large oil companies), economic and political relationships between them, assessments and perspectives in terms of gas production

  13. The Pennsylvania Experience with Hydraulic Fracturing for Shale Gas Development: Relatively Infrequent Water Quality Incidents with Lots of Public Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S. L.; Li, Z.; Yoxtheimer, D.; Vidic, R.

    2015-12-01

    New techniques of hydraulic fracturing - "fracking" - have changed the United States over the last 10 years into a leading producer of natural gas extraction from shale. The first such gas well in Pennsylvania was drilled and completed using high-volume hydraulic fracturing in 2004. By late 2014, more than 8500 of these gas wells had been drilled in the Marcellus Shale gas field in Pennsylvania alone. Almost 1000 public complaints about groundwater quality were logged by the PA Department of Environmental Protection (PA DEP) between 2008 and 2012. Only a fraction of these were attributed to unconventional gas development. The most common problem was gas migration into drinking water, but contamination incidents also included spills, seepage, or leaks of fracking fluids, brine salts, or very occasionally, radioactive species. Many problems of gas migration were from a few counties in the northeastern part of the state. However, sometimes one gas well contaminated multiple water wells. For example, one gas well was reported by the state regulator to have contaminated 18 water wells with methane near Dimock PA. It can be argued that such problems at a relatively small fraction of gas wells initiated pockets of pushback against fracking worldwide. This resistance to fracking has grown even though fracking has been in use in the U.S.A. since the 1940s. We have worked as part of an NSF-funded project (the Shale Network) to share water quality data and publish it online using the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System. Sharing data has led to collaborative investigation of specific contamination incidents to understand how problems can occur, and to efforts to quantify the frequency of impacts. The Shale Network efforts have also highlighted the need for more transparency with water quality data in the arena related to the energy-water nexus. As more data are released, new techniques of data analysis will allow better understanding of how to tune best practices to be

  14. Inhalational anaesthesia with low fresh gas flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hönemann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During the inhalation of anaesthesia use of low fresh gas flow (0.35-1 L/min has some important advantages. There are three areas of benefit: pulmonary - anaesthesia with low fresh gas flow improves the dynamics of inhaled anaesthesia gas, increases mucociliary clearance, maintains body temperature and reduces water loss. Economic - reduction of anaesthesia gas consumption resulting in significant savings of > 75% and Ecological - reduction in nitrous oxide consumption, which is an important ozone-depleting and heat-trapping greenhouse gas that is emitted. Nevertheless, anaesthesia with high fresh gas flows of 2-6 L/min is still performed, a technique in which rebreathing is practically negligible. This special article describes the clinical use of conventional plenum vaporizers, connected to the fresh gas supply to easily perform low (1 L/min, minimal (0.5 L/min or metabolic flow anaesthesia (0.35 L/min with conventional Primus Draeger® anaesthesia machines in routine clinical practice.

  15. Mechanical energy release in CABRI-2 experiments with Viggen-4 fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, J.

    1993-07-01

    The results of mechanical energy release evaluations in CABRI-2 experiments with Viggen-4 fuel pins (12 atom % burnup) are described. In general the experience gained by the CABRI-1 experiments is confirmed. Those physical phenomena are enhanced which are influenced by the release of fission products. Especially the late blow-out of pressurized fission gases from the lower test pin plenum led to large flow variations. The corresponding mechanical power releases are low

  16. Remediation of Uranium in the Hanford Vadose Zone Using Ammonia Gas: FY 2010 Laboratory-Scale Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Zhong, Lirong; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Mark D.; McKinley, James P.; Wang, Zheming; Bargar, John; Faurie, Danielle K.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2010-01-01

    This investigation is focused on refining an in situ technology for vadose zone remediation of uranium by the addition of ammonia (NH3) gas. Objectives are to: (a) refine the technique of ammonia gas treatment of low water content sediments to minimize uranium mobility by changing uranium surface phases (or coat surface phases), (b) identify the geochemical changes in uranium surface phases during ammonia gas treatment, (c) identify broader geochemical changes that occur in sediment during ammonia gas treatment, and (d) predict and test injection of ammonia gas for intermediate-scale systems to identify process interactions that occur at a larger scale and could impact field scale implementation. Overall, NH3 gas treatment of low-water content sediments appears quite effective at decreasing aqueous, adsorbed uranium concentrations. The NH3 gas treatment is also fairly effective for decreasing the mobility of U-carbonate coprecipitates, but shows mixed success for U present in Na-boltwoodite. There are some changes in U-carbonate surface phases that were identified by surface phase analysis, but no changes observed for Na-boltwoodite. It is likely that dissolution of sediment minerals (predominantly montmorillonite, muscovite, kaolinite) under the alkaline conditions created and subsequent precipitation as the pH returns to natural conditions coat some of the uranium surface phases, although a greater understanding of these processes is needed to predict the long term impact on uranium mobility. Injection of NH3 gas into sediments at low water content (1% to 16% water content) can effectively treat a large area without water addition, so there is little uranium mobilization (i.e., transport over cm or larger scale) during the injection phase.

  17. Remediation of Uranium in the Hanford Vadose Zone Using Ammonia Gas: FY 2010 Laboratory-Scale Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Zhong, Lirong; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Mark D.; McKinley, James P.; Wang, Zheming; Bargar, John; Faurie, Danielle K.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2010-12-01

    This investigation is focused on refining an in situ technology for vadose zone remediation of uranium by the addition of ammonia (NH3) gas. Objectives are to: a) refine the technique of ammonia gas treatment of low water content sediments to minimize uranium mobility by changing uranium surface phases (or coat surface phases), b) identify the geochemical changes in uranium surface phases during ammonia gas treatment, c) identify broader geochemical changes that occur in sediment during ammonia gas treatment, and d) predict and test injection of ammonia gas for intermediate-scale systems to identify process interactions that occur at a larger scale and could impact field scale implementation.Overall, NH3 gas treatment of low-water content sediments appears quite effective at decreasing aqueous, adsorbed uranium concentrations. The NH3 gas treatment is also fairly effective for decreasing the mobility of U-carbonate coprecipitates, but shows mixed success for U present in Na-boltwoodite. There are some changes in U-carbonate surface phases that were identified by surface phase analysis, but no changes observed for Na-boltwoodite. It is likely that dissolution of sediment minerals (predominantly montmorillonite, muscovite, kaolinite) under the alkaline conditions created and subsequent precipitation as the pH returns to natural conditions coat some of the uranium surface phases, although a greater understanding of these processes is needed to predict the long term impact on uranium mobility. Injection of NH3 gas into sediments at low water content (1% to 16% water content) can effectively treat a large area without water addition, so there is little uranium mobilization (i.e., transport over cm or larger scale) during the injection phase.

  18. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment, SAGE III on ISS, An Earth Science Mission on the International Space Station, Schedule Risk Analysis, A Project Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonine, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    The presentation provides insight into the schedule risk analysis process used by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station Project. The presentation focuses on the schedule risk analysis process highlighting the methods for identification of risk inputs, the inclusion of generic risks identified outside the traditional continuous risk management process, and the development of tailored analysis products used to improve risk informed decision making.

  19. Earth Science With the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawodny, Joe; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Thomason, Larry; Roell, Marilee; Pitts, Mike; Moore, Randy; Hill, Charles; Flittner, David; Damadeo, Rob; Cisewski, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III is the fourth generation of solar occultation instruments operated by NASA, the first coming under a different acronym, to investigate the Earth's upper atmosphere. Three flight-ready SAGE III instruments were built by Ball Aerospace in the late 1990s, with one launched aboard the former Russian Aviation and Space Agency (now known as Roskosmos) Meteor-3M platform on 10 December 2001 (continuing until the platform lost power in 2006). Another of the original instruments was manifested for the ISS in the 2004 time frame, but was delayed because of budgetary considerations. Fortunately, that SAGE III/ISS mission was restarted in 2009 with a major focus upon filling an anticipated gap in ozone and aerosol observation in the second half of this decade. Here we discuss the mission architecture, its implementation, and data that will be produced by SAGE III/ISS, including their expected accuracy and coverage. The 52-degree inclined orbit of the ISS is well-suited for solar occultation and provides near-global observations on a monthly basis with excellent coverage of low and mid-latitudes. This is similar to that of the SAGE II mission (1985-2005), whose data set has served the international atmospheric science community as a standard for stratospheric ozone and aerosol measurements. The nominal science products include vertical profiles of trace gases, such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide and water vapor, along with multi-wavelength aerosol extinction. Though in the visible portion of the spectrum the brightness of the Sun is one million times that of the full Moon, the SAGE III instrument is designed to cover this large dynamic range and also perform lunar occultations on a routine basis to augment the solar products. The standard lunar products were demonstrated during the SAGE III/M3M mission and include ozone, nitrogen dioxide & nitrogen trioxide. The operational flexibility of the SAGE III spectrometer accomplishes

  20. Regulation aspects of the restructuring of Argentine oil and gas sector. The Brazilian experiences; Aspectos regulatorios da reestruturacao do setor de oleo e gas argentino. Experiencias a observar no caso brasileiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luczynski, Estanislau; Paula, Claudio Paiva de [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Programa Interunidades de Pos-Graduacao em Energia]. E-mail: stasczenco@zipmail.com.br; clpaiva@mandic.com.br

    1999-07-01

    During the last years, some countries have reorganized their oil and gas sector. The reforms included the opening of national basins to exploration by foreign companies, and the association of a national oil company with a foreign one. Argentina was the first country in Latin America to reform its sector. The major action was the privatisation of YPF, in 1993. Some years later Brazil also begun the process of reforming the national oil and gas sector. The first step was promulgating a new petroleum law. This law created an agency to regulate the national sector during and after the reforms. The Brazilian restructuring model is based on the foreign ones. This paper aims at discussing whether or not the weakness those foreign models could be avoided. The idea is to learn from those experiences and to propose a national reform lead by the Brazilian society instead. (author)

  1. Simulations of the Viking Gas Exchange Experiment using palagonite and Fe-rich montmorillonite as terrestrial analogs: implications for the surface composition of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, R; Orenberg, J

    1993-10-01

    Simulations of the Gas Exchange Experiment (GEX), one of the Viking Lander Biology Experiments, were run using palagonite and Fe-rich montmorillonite as terrestrial analogs of the Martian soil. These terrestrial analogs were exposed to a nutrient solution of the same composition as that of the Viking Landers under humid (no contact with nutrient) and wet (intimate contact) conditions. The headspace gases in the GEX sample cell were sampled and then analyzed by gas chromatography under both humid and wet conditions. Five gases were monitored: CO2, N2, O2, Ar, and Kr. It was determined that in order to simulate the CO2 gas changes of the Viking GEX experiment, the mixture of soil analog mineral plus nutrient medium must be slightly (pH = 7.4) to moderately basic (pH = 8.7). This conclusion suggests constraints upon the composition of terrestrial analogs to the Mars soil; acidic components may be present, but the overall mixture must be basic in order to simulate the Viking GEX results.

  2. Experimento didático sobre cromatografia gasosa: uma abordagem analítica e ambiental Didactic experiment on gas chromatography: an environmental and analytical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos P. Penteado

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an experiment to teach the principles of gas chromatography exploring the boiling points and polarities to explain the elution order of a series of alcohols, benzene and n-propanone, as well as to teach the response factor concept and the internal standard addition method. Retention times and response factors are used for qualitative identification and quantitative analysis of a hypothetical contamination source in a simulated water sample. The internal standard n-propanol is further used for quantification of benzene and n-butanol in the water sample. This experiment has been taught in the instrumental analysis course offered to chemistry and oceanography students.

  3. A system for the discharge of gas bubbles from the coolant flow of a nuclear reactor cooled by forced circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markfort, D.; Kaiser, A.; Dohmen, A.

    1975-01-01

    In a reactor cooled by forced circulation the gas bubbles carried along with the coolant flow are separated before entering the reactor core or forced away into the external zones. For this purpose the coolant is radially guided into a plenum below the core and deflected to a tangential direction by means of flow guide elements. The flow runs spirally downwards. On the bubbles, during their dwell time in this channel, the buoyant force and a force towards the axis of symmetry of the tank are exerted. The major part of the coolant is directed into a radial direction by means of a guiding apparatus in the lower section of the channel and guided through a chimney in the plenum to the center of the reactor core. This inner chimney is enclosed by an outer chimney for the core edge zones through which coolant with a small share of bubbles is taken away. (RW) [de

  4. Biochemical, hydrological and mechanical behaviors of high food waste content MSW landfill: Liquid-gas interactions observed from a large-scale experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Liang-Tong; Xu, Hui; Chen, Yun-Min; Lan, Ji-Wu; Lin, Wei-An; Xu, Xiao-Bing; He, Pin-Jing

    2017-10-01

    The high food waste content (HFWC) MSW at a landfill has the characteristics of rapid hydrolysis process, large leachate production rate and fast gas generation. The liquid-gas interactions at HFWC-MSW landfills are prominent and complex, and still remain significant challenges. This paper focuses on the liquid-gas interactions of HFWC-MSW observed from a large-scale bioreactor landfill experiment (5m×5m×7.5m). Based on the connected and quantitative analyses on the experimental observations, the following findings were obtained: (1) The high leachate level observed at Chinese landfills was attributed to the combined contribution from the great quantity of self-released leachate, waste compression and gas entrapped underwater. The contribution from gas entrapped underwater was estimated to be 21-28% of the total leachate level. (2) The gas entrapped underwater resulted in a reduction of hydraulic conductivity, decreasing by one order with an increase in gas content from 13% to 21%. (3) The "breakthrough value" in the gas accumulation zone was up to 11kPa greater than the pore liquid pressure. The increase of the breakthrough value was associated with the decrease of void porosity induced by surcharge loading. (4) The self-released leachate from HFWC-MSW was estimated to contribute to over 30% of the leachate production at landfills in Southern China. The drainage of leachate with a high organic loading in the rapid hydrolysis stage would lead to a loss of landfill gas (LFG) potential of 13%. Based on the above findings, an improved method considering the quantity of self-released leachate was proposed for the prediction of leachate production at HFWC-MSW landfills. In addition, a three-dimensional drainage system was proposed to drawdown the high leachate level and hence to improve the slope stability of a landfill, reduce the hydraulic head on a bottom liner and increase the collection efficiency for LFG. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Gas and Gas Pains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to produce gas. Often, relatively simple changes in eating habits can lessen bothersome gas. Certain digestive system disorders, ... such as soda and beer, increase stomach gas. Eating habits, such as eating too quickly, drinking through a ...

  6. Choosing the best energy purchasing option for your organization : benefiting from the experiences of other natural gas consumers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struthers, D.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation outlined natural gas purchasing strategies with particular reference to direct purchase agreements for multi-site, multi-tenant commercial properties. It included an overview of the commercial buyer, the importance of a direct purchase agreement, dealing with an agent, and the procurement process. Direct purchase gas agreements are used for multi-tenant dwellings where tenants pay a proportionate share of costs to heat the building with natural gas. These types of agreements optimize operating costs and offer price stability, thereby contributing to the marketability of the building. The issues that should be considered during the procurement process include: different risk profiles; terms of the contract; current market conditions; futures market; sale of property; acquisition of new properties; and, terms of property management

  7. Post-irradiation examination of fifteen UO2/PuO2-fuel pins from the experiment DFR-350

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geithoff, D.

    1975-06-01

    Within the framework of the fuel pin development for a sodium-cooled fast reactor a subassembly containing 77 fuel pins has been irradiated up to 5.65% fima in the Dounreay fast reactor. The pins were prototypes in terms of fuel and cladding material. The fuel consisted of mechanically mixed UO 2 (80%) and PuO 2 (20%) pressed into pellets whereas austenitic steels (W.-No. 1,4961 and 1,4988) were used as cladding material. Furthermore a blanket column of UO 2 pellets and a gas plenum were incorporated in the pin. For irradiation the conditions in a fast breeder were simulated by a linear rod power of 450 W/cm and a maximum cladding temperature of 630 0 C. After the successful completion of the irradiation, the subassembly was dismantled and fifteen pins were selected for a nondestructive and destructive examination. The tests included visual control, measurement of external dimensions, γ-spectroscopy, X-ray radiography, fission gas measurement, ceramography, radiochemical burn-up measurement. The results are presented. The most important results of the examinations seem to be the migration of fission product cesium and the fact that no signs of impending pin failure have been found. Thus the pin specification tested in this experiment is capable of achieving higher burnups under the irradiation conditions described above. (orig./AK) [de

  8. Experiments with a Gas-Puff-On-Wire-Array Load on the GIT-12 Generator for Al K-shell Radiation Production at Microsecond Implosion Times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishlov, Alexander V.; Baksht, Rina B.; Chaikovsky, Stanislav A.; Fedunin, Anatoly V.; Fursov, Fedor I.; Kovalchuk, Boris M.; Kokshenev, Vladimir A.; Kurmaev, Nikolai E.; Labetsky, Aleksey Yu.; Oreshkin, Vladimir I.; Rousskikh, Alexander G.; Lassalle, Francis; Bayol, Frederic

    2006-01-01

    Results of the experiments carried out on the GIT-12 generator at the current level of 3.5 MA and the Z-pinch implosion times from 700 ns to 1.1 μs are presented. A multi-shell (triple-shell) load configuration with the outer gas puffs (neon) and the inner wire array (aluminum) was used in the experiments. In the course of the research, implosion dynamics of the triple-shell z-pinch was studied, and the radiation yield in the spectral range of neon and aluminum K-lines have been measured. Optimization of the inner wire array parameters aimed at obtaining the maximum aluminum K-shell radiation yield has been carried out. As a result of optimization of the gas-puff-on-wire-array Z-pinch load, the aluminum K-shell radiation yield (hv> 1.55 keV) up to 4 kJ/cm in the radiation pulse with FWHM less than 30 ns has been obtained. Comparison of the experimental results with the results of preliminary 1D RMHD simulations allows a conclusion that at least 2/3 of the generator current is switched from a gas puff to an aluminum wire array. The radiation yield in the spectral range of neon K-lines (0.92-1.55 keV) increases considerably in the shots with the inner wire array in comparison with the shots carried out with the outer gas puffs only. The radiation yield in the spectral range above 1 keV registered in the experiments reached 10 kJ/cm. The presence of a high portion of the neon plasma inside an inner wire array can limit the radiation yield in the spectral range above 1.55 keV

  9. Studies of two stage gas turbine combustor for biomass powder. Part 1, Atmospheric cyclone gasification experiments with wood powder. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degerman, Bengt; Hedin, Johan; Fredriksson, Christian; Kjellstroem, Bjoern; Salman, Hassan [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2000-10-01

    This report summarises the research and development work regarding development of a two stage gas turbine combustor for wood powder carried out at the Luleaa University of Technology from July 1993 to December 1996. The process being studied is based on cyclone gasification of the wood powder and combustion of the product gas in a suitably adapted gas turbine combustion chamber, without other gas cleaning than that obtained by the cyclone. A critical issue to be studied in the project is if the burned gases from such a cyclone gasifier lead to acceptably low deposition rates for K- and Na-compounds in a gas turbine with 850 deg C inlet temperature. The project strategy has been to study wood powder feeding and cyclone gasification first at atmospheric pressure, then run separate pressurised cyclone gasification tests for studies of the possibilities to achieve stable operation when the air flow is supplied by a separate compressor and finally to run integrated gasifier/gas turbine tests for studies of the deposition problem in practical operation. During the period covered by this report the atmospheric test facility has been designed, built and commissioned. It has been used mainly for studies of injector feeding of wood powder into a cyclone gasifier and for gasification experiments where in particular the fate of ash elements introduced with the wood powder has been studied. The results of these experiments have shown that steam injection of wood powder is possible with a steam consumption of about 0.3 kg steam/kg wood. The effects of injector geometry on the performance has also been studied. The gasification experiments show clearly that ash elements, including K and Na remain in the ash until very late in the thermal conversion process, also at gas temperatures exceeding 900 deg C. The separation of K with the cyclone bottom char has been 50 - 60% and the separation of Na about 80% with the cyclone geometry and the wood powder tested. The resulting load of K

  10. LHC-GCS Process Tuning selection and use of PID and Smith predictor for the regulations of the LHC experiments' gas systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cabaret, S; Rachid, A; Coppier, H

    2005-01-01

    The LHC experiment’s Gas Control System (LHC GCS) has to provide LHC experiments with homogeneous control systems (supervision and process control layers) for their 23 gas systems. The LHC GCS process control layer is based on Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs), Field-Buses and on a library, UNICOS (UNified Industrial COntrol System). Its supervision layer is based on a commercial SCADA system and on the JCOP and UNICOS PVSS frameworks. A typical LHC experiment’s gas system is composed of up to ten modules, dedicated to specific functions (e.g. mixing, purification, circulation). Most of modules require control loops for the regulation of pressures, temperatures and flows or ratios of gases. The control loops of the 23 gas systems can be implemented using the same tools, but need specific tuning according to their respective size, volume, pipe lengths and required accuracy. Most of the control loops can be implemented by means a standard PID (Proportional, Integral and Derivative) controller. When this...

  11. The effect of diffusivity on gas-liquid mass transfer in stirred vessels. Experiments at atmospheric and elevated pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, G.F.; Blauwhoff, P.M.M.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1987-01-01

    Mass transfer has been studied in gas-liquid stirred vessels with horizontal interfaces which appeared to the eye to be completely smooth. Special attention has been paid to the influence of the coefficient of molecular diffusion. The results are compared with those published before. The simplifying

  12. Experience of the remote dismantling of the Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor and Windscale pile chimneys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper gives brief descriptions of some of the remote dismantling work and equipment used on two large decommissioning projects: the BNFL Windscale Pile Chimneys Project (remote handling machine, waste packaging machine, remotely controlled excavator, remotely controlled demolition machine) and the AEA Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor Project (remote dismantling machine, operational waste, bulk removal techniques, semi-remote cutting operations)

  13. The Iġnik Sikumi Field Experiment, Alaska North Slope: Design, operations, and implications for CO2−CH4 exchange in gas hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Schoderbek, David; Collett, Timothy S.; Ohtsuki, Satoshi; White, Mark; Anderson, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    The Iġnik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Exchange Field Experiment was conducted by ConocoPhillips in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy, the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation, and the U.S. Geological Survey within the Prudhoe Bay Unit on the Alaska North Slope during 2011 and 2012. The primary goals of the program were to (1) determine the feasibility of gas injection into hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and (2) observe reservoir response upon subsequent flowback in order to assess the potential for CO2 exchange for CH4 in naturally occurring gas hydrate reservoirs. Initial modeling determined that no feasible means of injection of pure CO2 was likely, given the presence of free water in the reservoir. Laboratory and numerical modeling studies indicated that the injection of a mixture of CO2 and N2 offered the best potential for gas injection and exchange. The test featured the following primary operational phases: (1) injection of a gaseous phase mixture of CO2, N2, and chemical tracers; (2) flowback conducted at downhole pressures above the stability threshold for native CH4 hydrate; and (3) an extended (30-days) flowback at pressures near, and then below, the stability threshold of native CH4 hydrate. The test findings indicate that the formation of a range of mixed-gas hydrates resulted in a net exchange of CO2 for CH4 in the reservoir, although the complexity of the subsurface environment renders the nature, extent, and efficiency of the exchange reaction uncertain. The next steps in the evaluation of exchange technology should feature multiple well applications; however, such field test programs will require extensive preparatory experimental and numerical modeling studies and will likely be a secondary priority to further field testing of production through depressurization. Additional insights gained from the field program include the following: (1) gas hydrate destabilization is self-limiting, dispelling any notion of the potential for

  14. Using an input manipulation experiment to partition greenhouse gas fluxes from a commercial Miscanthus plantation in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Andy; Davies, Christian; Smith, Pete; McNamara, Niall

    2014-05-01

    Miscanthus is a lignocellulosic C4 crop that can be grown for a number of practical end-uses but recently interest has increased in its viability as a bioenergy crop; both providing a renewable source of energy and helping to limit climate change by reducing carbon (C) emissions associated with energy generation. Recent studies have shown that Miscanthus plantations may increase stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC) however there is still considerable uncertainty surrounding estimates of net C exchange and the best management practices to achieve the best greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potential. Using an input manipulation experiment, we monitored emissions of N2O, CH4 and CO2 from living Miscanthus roots, aboveground plant litter and soil individually to quantify and partition these emissions and better understand the influence of abiotic factors on SOC and GHG dynamics under Miscanthus. In January 2009 twenty-five 2 m2 plots were set up in a three-year old 11 hectare commercial Miscanthus plantation in Lincolnshire, UK; with five replicates of five treatments. These treatments varied plant input (roots or senesced aboveground plant litter) to the soil by way of controlled exclusion techniques. The delta 13C value of soil C and CO2 emitted from each treatment was measured monthly between March 2009 and March 2013. Measurements of CH4 and N2O emissions were also taken at the soil surface from each treatment. Miscanthus-derived emissions were determined using the isotopic discrimination between C4 plant matter and C3 soil, and the treatments were compared to assess their effects on C inputs and outputs to the soil. Both CH4 and N2O emissions were below detection limits, mainly due to a lack of fertiliser additions and limited disturbance of the agricultural site. However, results for CO2 emissions indicate a strong seasonal variation; litter decomposition forms a large portion of the CO2 emissions in winter and spring whereas root respiration dominates the summer

  15. Custom ultrasonic instrumentation for flow measurement and real-time binary gas analysis in the CERN ATLAS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhroob, M.; Battistin, M.; Berry, S.; Bitadze, A.; Bonneau, P.; Boyd, G.; Crespo-Lopez, O.; Degeorge, C.; Deterre, C.; Di Girolamo, B.; Doubek, M.; Favre, G.; Hallewell, G.; Katunin, S.; Lombard, D.; Madsen, A.; McMahon, S.; Nagai, K.; O'Rourke, A.; Pearson, B.; Robinson, D.; Rossi, C.; Rozanov, A.; Stanecka, E.; Strauss, M.; Vacek, V.; Vaglio, R.; Young, J.; Zwalinski, L.

    2017-01-01

    The development of custom ultrasonic instrumentation was motivated by the need for continuous real-time monitoring of possible leaks and mass flow measurement in the evaporative cooling systems of the ATLAS silicon trackers. The instruments use pairs of ultrasonic transducers transmitting sound bursts and measuring transit times in opposite directions. The gas flow rate is calculated from the difference in transit times, while the sound velocity is deduced from their average. The gas composition is then evaluated by comparison with a molar composition vs. sound velocity database, based on the direct dependence between sound velocity and component molar concentration in a gas mixture at a known temperature and pressure. The instrumentation has been developed in several geometries, with five instruments now integrated and in continuous operation within the ATLAS Detector Control System (DCS) and its finite state machine. One instrument monitors C3F8 coolant leaks into the Pixel detector N2 envelope with a molar resolution better than 2ṡ 10-5, and has indicated a level of 0.14 % when all the cooling loops of the recently re-installed Pixel detector are operational. Another instrument monitors air ingress into the C3F8 condenser of the new C3F8 thermosiphon coolant recirculator, with sub-percent precision. The recent effect of the introduction of a small quantity of N2 volume into the 9.5 m3 total volume of the thermosiphon system was clearly seen with this instrument. Custom microcontroller-based readout has been developed for the instruments, allowing readout into the ATLAS DCS via Modbus TCP/IP on Ethernet. The instrumentation has many potential applications where continuous binary gas composition is required, including in hydrocarbon and anaesthetic gas mixtures.

  16. Design of experiments and principal component analysis as approaches for enhancing performance of gas-diffusional air-breathing bilirubin oxidase cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babanova, Sofia; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Ulyanova, Yevgenia; Singhal, Sameer; Atanassov, Plamen

    2014-01-01

    Two statistical methods, design of experiments (DOE) and principal component analysis (PCA) are employed to investigate and improve performance of air-breathing gas-diffusional enzymatic electrodes. DOE is utilized as a tool for systematic organization and evaluation of various factors affecting the performance of the composite system. Based on the results from the DOE, an improved cathode is constructed. The current density generated utilizing the improved cathode (755 ± 39 μA cm-2 at 0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl) is 2-5 times higher than the highest current density previously achieved. Three major factors contributing to the cathode performance are identified: the amount of enzyme, the volume of phosphate buffer used to immobilize the enzyme, and the thickness of the gas-diffusion layer (GDL). PCA is applied as an independent confirmation tool to support conclusions made by DOE and to visualize the contribution of factors in individual cathode configurations.

  17. The co-evolution of alternative fuel infrastructure and vehicles. A study of the experience of Argentina with compressed natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collantes, Gustavo; Melaina, Marc W.

    2011-01-01

    In a quest for strategic and environmental benefits, the developed countries have been trying for many years to increase the share of alternative fuels in their transportation fuel mixes. They have met very little success though. In this paper, we examine the experience of Argentina with compressed natural gas. We conducted interviews with a wide range of stakeholders and analyzed econometrically data collected in Argentina to investigate the factors, economic, political, and others that determined the high rate of adoption of this fuel. A central objective of this research was to identify lessons that could be useful to developed countries in their efforts to deploy alternative fuel vehicles. We find that fuel price regulation was a significant determinant of the adoption of compressed natural gas, while, contrary to expectations, government financing of refueling infrastructure was minimal. (author)

  18. Market power and the sale of Ontario residential natural gas: An institutional analysis and a laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemhof, Barbara Lynn

    2005-11-01

    The Ontario residential natural gas market underwent a significant institutional change in 1986, after the federal government decontrolled natural gas prices. Currently, consumers may sign up for fixed-cost natural gas from a broker, or they may continue to be served by the regulated distribution company. This thesis examines the economic effects on consumers of the institutional change, and particularly whether or not market power was enhanced by the change. In the thesis, I first present the industrial organization of the residential natural gas sector, and explain the institutional evolution using an institutional economic approach. I then construct a model of the market environment, with sellers acting as middlemen in a well-defined Bertrand oligopoly setting with no production constraints and single-unit consumer demands. In this model, the only Nash equilibrium in the one-period game is the joint profit maximizing price, and its likelihood of obtaining depends on the nature of the cost of signing up new customers. I then take a version of this model into the laboratory with human subject sellers and simulated buyers and run six replications each of a balanced treatment design under a unique information mechanism that parallels individual customer canvassing used by sellers in the naturally-occurring market. Treatment variables are: number of sellers, number of simulated at-cost sellers present, and presence of input cost uncertainty for sellers. I find that adding any seller to the market has about the same impact on market price, irrespective of whether it is a human subject or a simulated at-cost seller. Although increasing the number of sellers does decrease the market price somewhat, it does not bring about the competitive outcome predicted by the benchmark microeconomic model. This research contributes to the literature on policy making and energy market design, as well as to experimental methodology aimed at policy evaluation.

  19. Experiments on the possible usage of liquid industrial wastes from a paint and lacquer factory for flue gas desulphurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trzepierczynska, I.; Lech-Brzyk, K. [Technical University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw (Poland). Inst. of Environment Protection Engineering

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, the complex solution of environment protection against flue gases (comprising sulphur dioxide) and alkaline industrial wastewater is provided. Industrial wastes from a paint and lacquer factory were examined and their usage for sulphur dioxide absorption was determined. The combined method of alkaline waste neutralization and flue gas desulphurization is proposed. The liquid wastes come from the POLIFARB SA plant in Wroclaw. 9 refs., 7 tabs.

  20. Irradiation experiments of 3rd, 4th and 5th fuel assemblies by an in-pile gas loop, OGL-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Kousaku; Kobayashi, Fumiaki; Hayashi, Kimio; Minato, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Teruo; Adachi, Mamoru; Iwamoto, Kazumi; Ikawa, Katsuichi; Itami, Hiroharu.

    1986-07-01

    Three irradiation experiments for 3rd, 4th and 5th fuel assemblies which had been composed of VHTR reference coated particle fuels and graphite components were carried out by an in-pile gas loop, OGL-1 during 1979 and 1982. The main purposes of these experiments were to study on bowing of the fuel rod by irradiation for the 3rd fuel assembly, to study on fuel behavior under relatively low burnup irradiation for the 4th fuel assembly, and to study on fuel behavior up to full burnup of VHTR design for the 5th fuel assembly. For understanding in-pile fuel behavior, fractional releases of fission gases from each fuel assembly were estimated by measuring the fission gas concentrations in the primary loop of OGL-1. The post-irradiation examination (PIE) was carried out extensively on the fuel block, the fuel rods and the fuel compacts in Tokai Hot Laboratory. Also, made were the measurements of metallic fission product distributions in the fuel assemblies and the fuel rods. The results in these experiments were given as follows ; bowing of the fuel rod in the 3rd fuel assembly was 0.7 mm, but integrity of the rod was kept under irradiation. Fractional release of the fission gas from the 4th fuel assembly remained in the order of 10 -7 during irradiation, suggesting that the fuel performance was excellent. The fractional release from the 5th fuel assembly, on the other hand, was in the order of 10 -5 which was the same level in the VHTR design. (author)