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Sample records for gas condensate reservoirs

  1. Development of gas and gas condensate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    In the study of gas reservoir development, the first year topics are restricted on reservoir characterization. There are two types of reservoir characterization. One is the reservoir formation characterization and the other is the reservoir fluid characterization. For the reservoir formation characterization, calculation of conditional simulation was compared with that of unconditional simulation. The results of conditional simulation has higher confidence level than the unconditional simulation because conditional simulation considers the sample location as well as distance correlation. In the reservoir fluid characterization, phase behavior calculations revealed that the component grouping is more important than the increase of number of components. From the liquid volume fraction with pressure drop, the phase behavior of reservoir fluid can be estimated. The calculation results of fluid recombination, constant composition expansion, and constant volume depletion are matched very well with the experimental data. In swelling test of the reservoir fluid with lean gas, the accuracy of dew point pressure forecast depends on the component characterization. (author). 28 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. Liquid oil production from shale gas condensate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, James J.

    2018-04-03

    A process of producing liquid oil from shale gas condensate reservoirs and, more particularly, to increase liquid oil production by huff-n-puff in shale gas condensate reservoirs. The process includes performing a huff-n-puff gas injection mode and flowing the bottom-hole pressure lower than the dew point pressure.

  3. Importance of water Influx and waterflooding in Gas condensate reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Faizan

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of losing valuable liquid and lower gas well deliverability have made gas condensate reservoirs very important and extra emphasizes are made to optimize hydrocarbon recovery from a gas condensate reservoir. Methods like methanol treatments, wettability alteration and hydraulic fracturing are done to restore the well deliverability by removing or by passing the condensate blockage region. The above mentioned methods are applied in the near wellbore region and only improve the w...

  4. The Effect of Capillary Number on a Condensate Blockage in Gas Condensate Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Saifon DAUNGKAEW; Alain C GRINGARTEN

    2004-01-01

    In the petroleum industry, gas condensate reservoirs are becoming more common as exploration targets. However, there is a lack of knowledge of the reservoir behaviour mainly due to its complexity in the near wellbore region, where two phases, i.e. reservoir gas and condensate coexist when the wellbore pressure drops below the dew point pressure. The condensation process causes a reduction of the gas productivity (1). It has been reported in the literature that there is an increasing gas mobil...

  5. Sensitivity analysis and economic optimization studies of inverted five-spot gas cycling in gas condensate reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Shams Bilal; Yao Jun; Zhang Kai; Zhang Lei

    2017-01-01

    Gas condensate reservoirs usually exhibit complex flow behaviors because of propagation response of pressure drop from the wellbore into the reservoir. When reservoir pressure drops below the dew point in two phase flow of gas and condensate, the accumulation of large condensate amount occurs in the gas condensate reservoirs. Usually, the saturation of condensate accumulation in volumetric gas condensate reservoirs is lower than the critical condensate saturation that causes trapping of large...

  6. Gas condensate reservoir performance : part 1 : fluid characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, F.B.; Bennion, D.B. [Hycal Energy Research Laboratories Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Andersen, G. [ChevronTexaco, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Phase behaviour in gas condensate reservoirs is sensitive to changes in pressure and temperature, which can lead to significant errors in fluid characterization. The challenging task of characterizing in situ fluids in gas condensate reservoirs was discussed with reference to the errors that occur as a result of the complex coupling between phase behavior and geology. This paper presented techniques for reservoir sampling and characterization and proposed methods for minimizing errors. Errors are often made in the classification of dew point systems because engineering criteria does not accurately represent the phase behavior of the reservoir. For example, the fluid of a certain condensate yield may be categorized as a wet gas rather than a retrograde condensate fluid. It was noted that the liquid yield does not dictate whether the fluid is condensate or wet gas, but rather where the reservoir temperature is situated in the pressure temperature phase loop. In order to proceed with a viable field development plan and optimization, the reservoir fluid must be understood. Given that gas productivity decreases with liquid drop out in the near wellbore region, capillary pressure plays a significant role in retrograde reservoirs. It was noted that well understood parameters will lead to a better assessment of the amount of hydrocarbon in place, the rate at which the resource can be produced and optimization strategies as the reservoir matures. It was concluded that multi-rate sampling is the best method to use in sampling fluids since the liquid yield changes as a function of rate. Although bottom-hole sampling in gas condensate reservoirs may be problematic, it should always be performed to address any concerns for liquid-solid separation. Produced fluids typically reveal a specific signature that informs the operator of in situ properties. This paper presented examples that pertain to wet versus retrograde condensate behavior and the presence of an oil zone. The

  7. Compositional simulations of producing oil-gas ratio behaviour in low permeable gas condensate reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Gundersen, Pål Lee

    2013-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering Gas condensate flow behaviour below the dew point in low permeable formations can make accurate fluid sampling a difficult challenge. The objective of this study was to investigate the producing oil-gas ratio behaviour in the infinite-acting period for a low permeable gas condensate reservoir. Compositional isothermal flow simulations were performed using a single-layer, radial and two-dimensional, gas condensate reservoir model with low permeabili...

  8. Sensitivity analysis and economic optimization studies of inverted five-spot gas cycling in gas condensate reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shams Bilal

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gas condensate reservoirs usually exhibit complex flow behaviors because of propagation response of pressure drop from the wellbore into the reservoir. When reservoir pressure drops below the dew point in two phase flow of gas and condensate, the accumulation of large condensate amount occurs in the gas condensate reservoirs. Usually, the saturation of condensate accumulation in volumetric gas condensate reservoirs is lower than the critical condensate saturation that causes trapping of large amount of condensate in reservoir pores. Trapped condensate often is lost due to condensate accumulation-condensate blockage courtesy of high molecular weight, heavy condensate residue. Recovering lost condensate most economically and optimally has always been a challenging goal. Thus, gas cycling is applied to alleviate such a drastic loss in resources.

  9. Optimization of fracture length in gas/condensate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, J.; Sharma, M.M.; Pope, G.A. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)

    2006-07-01

    A common practice that improves the productivity of gas-condensate reservoirs is hydraulic fracturing. Two important variables that determine the effectiveness of hydraulic fractures are fracture length and fracture conductivity. Although there are no simple guidelines for the optimization of fracture length and the factors that affect it, it is preferable to have an optimum fracture length for a given proppant volume in order to maximize productivity. An optimization study was presented in which fracture length was estimated at wells where productivity was maximized. An analytical expression that takes into account non-Darcy flow and condensate banking was derived. This paper also reviewed the hydraulic fracturing process and discussed previous simulation studies that investigated the effects of well spacing and fracture length on well productivity in low permeability gas reservoirs. The compositional simulation study and results and discussion were also presented. The analytical expression for optimum fracture length, analytical expression with condensate dropout, and equations for the optimum fracture length with non-Darcy flow in the fracture were included in an appendix. The Computer Modeling Group's GEM simulator, an equation-of-state compositional simulator, was used in this study. It was concluded that for cases with non-Darcy flow, the optimum fracture lengths are lower than those obtained with Darcy flow. 18 refs., 5 tabs., 22 figs., 1 appendix.

  10. Sensitivity analysis and economic optimization studies of inverted five-spot gas cycling in gas condensate reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Bilal; Yao, Jun; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Lei

    2017-08-01

    Gas condensate reservoirs usually exhibit complex flow behaviors because of propagation response of pressure drop from the wellbore into the reservoir. When reservoir pressure drops below the dew point in two phase flow of gas and condensate, the accumulation of large condensate amount occurs in the gas condensate reservoirs. Usually, the saturation of condensate accumulation in volumetric gas condensate reservoirs is lower than the critical condensate saturation that causes trapping of large amount of condensate in reservoir pores. Trapped condensate often is lost due to condensate accumulation-condensate blockage courtesy of high molecular weight, heavy condensate residue. Recovering lost condensate most economically and optimally has always been a challenging goal. Thus, gas cycling is applied to alleviate such a drastic loss in resources. In gas injection, the flooding pattern, injection timing and injection duration are key parameters to study an efficient EOR scenario in order to recover lost condensate. This work contains sensitivity analysis on different parameters to generate an accurate investigation about the effects on performance of different injection scenarios in homogeneous gas condensate system. In this paper, starting time of gas cycling and injection period are the parameters used to influence condensate recovery of a five-spot well pattern which has an injection pressure constraint of 3000 psi and production wells are constraint at 500 psi min. BHP. Starting injection times of 1 month, 4 months and 9 months after natural depletion areapplied in the first study. The second study is conducted by varying injection duration. Three durations are selected: 100 days, 400 days and 900 days. In miscible gas injection, miscibility and vaporization of condensate by injected gas is more efficient mechanism for condensate recovery. From this study, it is proven that the application of gas cycling on five-spot well pattern greatly enhances condensate recovery

  11. Fluid flow in gas condensate reservoirs. The interplay of forces and their relative strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ursin, Jann-Rune [Stavanger University College, Department of Petroleum Engineering, PO Box 8002, Stavanger, 4068 (Norway)

    2004-02-01

    Natural production from gas condensate reservoirs is characterized by gas condensation and liquid dropout in the reservoir, first in the near wellbore volume, then as a cylindrical shaped region, dynamically developing into the reservoir volume. The effects of liquid condensation are reduced productivity and loss of production. Successful forecast of well productivity and reservoir production depends on detailed understanding of the effect of various forces acting on fluid flow in time and space. The production form gas condensate reservoirs is thus indirectly related to the interplay of fundamental forces, such as the viscosity, the capillary, the gravitational and the inertial force and their relative strengths, demonstrated by various dimensionless numbers. Dimensionless numbers are defined and calculated for all pressure and space coordinates in a test reservoir. Various regions are identified where certain forces are more important than others. Based on reservoir pressure development, liquid condensation and the numerical representation of dimensionless numbers, a conceptual understanding of a varying reservoir permeability has been reached.The material balance, the reservoir fluid flow and the wellbore flow calculations are performed on a cylindrical reservoir model. The ratios between fundamental forces are calculated and dimensionless numbers defined. The interplay of forces, demonstrated by these numbers, are calculated as function of radial dimension and reservoir pressure.

  12. EOS simulation and GRNN modeling of the constant volume depletion behavior of gas condensate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsharkawy, A.M.; Foda, S.G. [Kuwait University, Safat (Kuwait). Petroleum Engineering Dept.

    1998-03-01

    Currently, two approaches are being used to predict the changes in retrograde gas condensate composition and estimate the pressure depletion behavior of gas condensate reservoirs. The first approach uses the equation of states whereas the second uses empirical correlations. Equations of states (EOS) are poor predictive tools for complex hydrocarbon systems. The EOS needs adjustment against phase behavior data of reservoir fluid of known composition. The empirical correlation does not involve numerous numerical computations but their accuracy is limited. This study presents two general regression neural network (GRNN) models. The first model, GRNNM1, is developed to predict dew point pressure and gas compressibility at dew point using initial composition of numerous samples while the second model, GRNNM2, is developed to predict the changes in well stream effluent composition at any stages of pressure depletion. GRNNM2 can also be used to determine the initial reservoir fluid composition using dew point pressure, gas compressibility at dew point, and reservoir temperature. These models are based on analysis of 142 sample of laboratory studies of constant volume depletion (CVD) for gas condensate systems forming a total of 1082 depletion stages. The database represents a wide range of gas condensate systems obtained worldwide. The performance of the GRNN models has been compared to simulation results of the equation of state. The study shows that the proposed general regression neural network models are accurate, valid, and reliable. These models can be used to forecast CVD data needed for many reservoir engineering calculations in case laboratory data is unavailable. The GRNN models save computer time involved in EOS calculations. The study also show that once these models are properly trained they can be used to cut expenses of frequent sampling and laborious experimental CVD tests required for gas condensate reservoirs. 55 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. A Simple Approach to Dynamic Material Balance in Gas-Condensate Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidari Sureshjani M.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In traditional material balance calculations, shut-in well pressure data are used to determine average reservoir pressure while recent techniques do not require the well to be shut-in and use instead flowing well pressure-rate data. These methods, which are known as “dynamic” material balance, are developed for single-phase flow (oil or gas in reservoirs. However, utilization of such methods for gas-condensate reservoirs may create significant errors in prediction of average reservoir pressure due to violation of the single-phase assumption in such reservoirs. In a previous work, a method for production data analysis in gas-condensate reservoirs was developed. The method required standard gas production rate, producing gas-oil ratio, flowing well pressure, CVD data and relative permeability curves. This paper presents a new technique which does not need relative permeability curves and flowing well pressure. In this method, the producing oil-gas ratio is interpolated in the vaporized oil in gas phase (Rv versus pressure (p data in the CVD table and the corresponding pressure is located. The parameter pressure/two-phase deviation factor (p/ztp is then evaluated at the determined pressure points and is plotted versus produced moles (np which forms a straight line. The nature of this plot is such that its extrapolation to point where p/ztp = 0 will give initial moles in place. Putting initial pressure/initial two-phase deviation factor (pi/ztp,i (known parameter and estimated initial moles (ni into the material balance equation, average reservoir pressure can be determined. A main assumption behind the method is that the region where both gas and condensate phases are mobile is of negligible size compared to the reservoir. The approach is quite simple and calculations are much easier than the previous work. It provides a practical engineering tool for industry studies as it requires data which are generally available in normal production

  14. Effect of retrograde gas condensate in low permeability natural gas reservoir; Efeito da condensacao retrograda em reservatorios de gas natural com baixa permeabilidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Paulo Lee K.C. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica; Ligero, Eliana L.; Schiozer, Denis J. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Engenharia de Petroleo

    2008-07-01

    Most of Brazilian gas fields are low-permeability or tight sandstone reservoirs and some of them should be gas condensate reservoir. In this type of natural gas reservoir, part of the gaseous hydrocarbon mixture is condensate and the liquid hydrocarbon accumulates near the well bore that causes the loss of productivity. The liquid hydrocarbon formation inside the reservoir should be well understood such as the knowledge of the variables that causes the condensate formation and its importance in the natural gas production. This work had as goal to better understanding the effect of condensate accumulation near a producer well. The influence of the porosity and the absolute permeability in the gas production was studied in three distinct gas reservoirs: a dry gas reservoir and two gas condensate reservoirs. The refinement of the simulation grid near the producer well was also investigated. The choice of simulation model was shown to be very important in the simulation of gas condensate reservoirs. The porosity was the little relevance in the gas production and in the liquid hydrocarbon formation; otherwise the permeability was very relevant. (author)

  15. Maximize Liquid Oil Production from Shale Oil and Gas Condensate Reservoirs by Cyclic Gas Injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, James [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Li, Lei [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Yu, Yang [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Meng, Xingbang [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Sharma, Sharanya [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Huang, Siyuan [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Shen, Ziqi [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Zhang, Yao [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Wang, Xiukun [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Carey, Bill [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nguyen, Phong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Porter, Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jimenez-Martinez, Joaquin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Viswanathan, Hari [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mody, Fersheed [Apache Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Barnes, Warren [Apache Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Cook, Tim [Apache Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Griffith, Paul [Apache Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-11-17

    The current technology to produce shale oil reservoirs is the primary depletion using fractured wells (generally horizontal wells). The oil recovery is less than 10%. The prize to enhance oil recovery (EOR) is big. Based on our earlier simulation study, huff-n-puff gas injection has the highest EOR potential. This project was to explore the potential extensively and from broader aspects. The huff-n-puff gas injection was compared with gas flooding, water huff-n-puff and waterflooding. The potential to mitigate liquid blockage was also studied and the gas huff-n-puff method was compared with other solvent methods. Field pilot tests were initiated but terminated owing to the low oil price and the operator’s budget cut. To meet the original project objectives, efforts were made to review existing and relevant field projects in shale and tight reservoirs. The fundamental flow in nanopores was also studied.

  16. Decoupling damage mechanisms in acid-fractured gas/condensate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, R.C.; Walters, D.A. [Taurus Reservoir Solutions Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Settari, A. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada); Rahim, Z.; Ahmed, M.S. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2006-07-01

    The Khuff is a gas condensate field located 11,500 feet beneath the producing Ghawar oil field in Saudi Arabia. Wells are mainly acid fracture stimulated following drilling with excellent fracture conductivity and length properties. The wells experience a quick production loss however, after tie-in which eventually stabilizes after two to five months. In order to identify the source of productivity loss, such as near well liquid dropout, fracture conductivity loss, reservoir permeability loss due to increased effective stress, a study of a well in the Khuff field was conducted. The study reviewed basic geomechanical and reservoir properties and identified the mechanisms of production loss. The paper presented the methodology, data and preliminary analysis, relative permeability and results of the history matching. It was concluded that traditional production type curves in cases with changing skin may indicate that transient flow is occurring when boundary effects are felt. In addition, stress dependent fracture conductivity and reservoir permeability can be modeled with simpler pressure dependent functions for relatively low overall loss in reservoir pressure. 30 refs., 25 figs., 1 appendix.

  17. Fuzzy logic prediction of dew point pressure of selected Iranian gas condensate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowroozi, Saeed [Shahid Bahonar Univ. of Kerman (Iran); Iranian Offshore Oil Company (I.O.O.C.) (Iran); Ranjbar, Mohammad; Hashemipour, Hassan; Schaffie, Mahin [Shahid Bahonar Univ. of Kerman (Iran)

    2009-12-15

    The experimental determination of dew point pressure in a window PVT cell is often difficult especially in the case of lean retrograde gas condensate. Besides all statistical, graphical and experimental methods, the fuzzy logic method can be useful and more reliable for estimation of reservoir properties. Fuzzy logic can overcome uncertainty existent in many reservoir properties. Complexity, non-linearity and vagueness are some reservoir parameter characteristics, which can be propagated simply by fuzzy logic. The fuzzy logic dew point pressure modeling system used in this study is a multi input single output (MISO) Mamdani system. The model was developed using experimentally constant volume depletion (CVD) measured samples of some Iranian fields. The performance of the model is compared against the performance of some of the most accurate and general correlations for dew point pressure calculation. Results show that this novel method is more accurate and reliable with an average absolute deviation of 1.33% and 2.68% for developing and checking, respectively. (orig.)

  18. Development of a neural fuzzy system for advanced prediction of dew point pressure in gas condensate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowroozi, Saeed; Hashemipour, Hasan; Schaffie, Mahin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman (Iran); ERC, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman (Iran); Ranjbar, Mohammad [Department of Mining Engineering, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman (Iran); ERC, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman (Iran)

    2009-03-15

    Dew point pressure is one of the most critical quantities for characterizing a gas condensate reservoir. So, accurate determination of this property has been the main challenge in reservoir development and management. The experimental determination of dew point pressure in PVT cell is often difficult especially in case of lean retrograde gas condensate. Empirical correlations and some equations of state can be used to calculate reservoir fluid properties. Empirical correlations do not have ability to reliable duplicate the temperature behavior of constant composition fluids. Equations of state have convergence problem and need to be tuned against some experimental data. Complexity, non-linearity and vagueness are some reservoir parameter characteristic which can be propagated simply by intelligent system. With the advantage of fuzzy sets in knowledge representation and the high capacity of neural nets (NNs) in learning knowledge expressed in data, in this paper a neural fuzzy system(NFS) is proposed to predict dew point pressure of gas condensate reservoir. The model was developed using 110 measurements of dew point pressure. The performance of the model is compared against performance of some of the most accurate and general correlations for dew point pressure calculation. From the results of this study, it can be pointed out that this novel method is more accurate and reliable with the mean square error of 0.058%, 0.074% and 0.044% for training, validation and test processes, respectively. (author)

  19. Correcting underestimation of optimal fracture length by modeling proppant conductivity variations in hydraulically fractured gas/condensate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akram, A.H.; Samad, A. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[Schlumberger, Houston, TX (United States)

    2006-07-01

    A study was conducted in which a newly developed numerical simulator was used to forecast the productivity of a hydraulically fractured well in a retrograde gas-condensate sandstone reservoir. The effect of condensate dropout was modeled in both the reservoir and the proppant pack. The type of proppant and the stress applied to it are among the factors that determine proppant conductivity in a single-phase flow. Other factors include the high velocity of gas and the presence of liquid in the proppant pack. It was concluded that apparent proppant permeability in a gas condensate reservoir varies along the length of the hydraulic fracture and depends on the distance from the wellbore. It will increase towards the tip of the fracture where liquid ratio and velocity are lower. Apparent proppant permeability also changes with time. Forecasting is most accurate when these conditions are considered in the simulation. There are 2 problems associated with the use of a constant proppant permeability in a gas condensate reservoir. The first relates to the fact that it is impossible to obtain a correct single number that will mimic the drawdown of the real fracture at a particular rate without going through the process of determining the proppant permeability profile in a numerical simulator. The second problem relates to the fact that constant proppant permeability yields an optimal fracture length that is too short. Analytical modeling does not account for these complexities. It was determined that the only way to accurately simulate the behaviour of a hydraulic fracture in a high rate well, is by advanced numerical modeling that considers varying apparent proppant permeability in terms of time and distance along the fracture length. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 16 figs., 1 appendix.

  20. The use of contained nuclear explosions to create underground reservoirs, and experience of operating these for gas condensate storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kedrovskij, O.L.; Myasnikov, K.V.; Leonov, E.A.; Romadin, N.M.; Dorodnov, V.F.; Nikiforov, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations on the creation of underground reservoirs by means of nuclear explosions have been going on in the Soviet Union for many years. In this paper the authors consider three main kinds of sites or formations that can be used for constructing reservoirs by this method, namely, low-permeable rocks, worked-out mines and rock salt formations. Formulae are given for predicting the mechanical effect of an explosion in rocks, taking their strength characteristics into account. Engineering procedures are described for sealing and restoring the emplacement holes, so that they can be used for operating the underground reservoir. Experience with the contruction and operation of a 50 000 m 3 gas-condensate reservoir in a rock salt formation is described. In the appendix to the paper a method is presented for calculating the stability of spherical cavities created by nuclear explosions in rock salt, allowing for the development of elasto-plastic deformations and creep

  1. Determination of the vertical distribution and areal of the composition in volatile oil and/or gas condensate reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Santos, Nicolas; Ortiz Cancino, Olga Patricia; Barrios Ortiz, Wilson

    2005-01-01

    The compositional variation in vertical and areal direction due to gravitational and thermal effects plays an important role in the determination of the original reserves in-situ and in the selection of the operation scheme for volatile oil and/or gas condensate reservoirs. In this work we presented the mathematical formulation of the thermodynamic behavior experienced by compositional fluids, such as volatile oil and/or gas condensate, under the influence of the mentioned effects (gravitational and thermal), which was implemented in a software tool, this tool determine the compositional variation in vertical direction and, in addition, it allows to know the saturation pressure variation in the hydrocarbon column and the location of the gas-oil contact. With the obtained results, product of the use of this tool, was developed a methodology to obtain one first approach of the compositional variation in areal direction to obtain compositional spatial distribution (iso composition maps) in the reservoir, for components like the methane, which experiences the greater variations. These iso composition maps allow to determine the location of the hydrocarbon deposits, in such a way that the production strategies can be selected and be applied to maximize the recovery, such as in fill wells, perforation of new zones, EOR processes, etc

  2. Acoustic dew point and bubble point detector for gas condensates and reservoir fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaraman, A.; Hu, Y.; Thomas, F. B.; Bennion, D. B.; Jamaluddin, A. K. M. [Hycal Energy Research Labs. Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1997-08-01

    Detailed knowledge of bubblepoint and dewpoint pressures at reservoir temperature are crucial for natural gas processing, transportation, metering and utilization. This paper introduces a new acoustic dewpoint and bubblepoint detector that can be applied to a broad range of phase transitions, including very lean gas systems and opaque heavy oils. The system uses two acoustic transducers, one to stimulate and the other to detect normal mode vibrations of reservoir fluids in a small cylindrical resonator. The acoustic spectra are recorded at close intervals throughout the phase envelope, along with temperature, pressure and volume measurements, and the data is processed to obtain the specific condition of phase transition. Results of two systems, a binary mixture and live reservoir fluid, are presented. The detector system is claimed to be capable of operation in an isothermal mode with variable volume, and in a constant volume mode with variable temperatures. Interpretation of results is free of operator subjectivity; they show excellent agreement with results obtained by visual methods and equations of state calculations. 4 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  3. Recovery enhancement at the later stage of supercritical condensate gas reservoir development via CO2 injection: A case study on Lian 4 fault block in the Fushan sag, Beibuwan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Feng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lian 4 fault block is located in the northwest of Fushan sag, Beibuwan Basin. It is a high-saturated condensate gas reservoir with rich condensate oil held by three faults. In order to seek an enhanced condensate oil recovery technology that is suitable for this condensate gas reservoir at its later development stage, it is necessary to analyze its reserve producing degree and remaining development potential after depletion production, depending on the supercritical fluid phase behavior and depletion production performance characteristics. The supercritical fluid theories and multiple reservoir engineering dynamic analysis methods were adopted comprehensively, such as dynamic reserves, production decline, liquid-carrying capacity of a production well, and remaining development potential analysis. It is shown that, at its early development stage, the condensate in Lian 4 fault block presented the features of supercritical fluid, and the reservoir pressure was lower than the dew point pressure, so retrograde condensate loss was significant. Owing to the retrograde condensate effect and the fast release of elastic energy, the reserve producing degree of depletion production is low in Lian 4 fault block, and 80% of condensate oil still remains in the reservoir. So, the remaining development potential is great. The supercritical condensate in Lian 4 fault block is of high density. Based on the optimization design by numerical simulation of compositional model, it is proposed to inject CO2 at the top and build up pressure by alternating production and injection, so that the secondary gas cap is formed while the gravity-stable miscible displacement is realized. In this way, the recovery factor of condensate reservoirs can be improved by means of the secondary development technology.

  4. Application of fluorinated nanofluid for production enhancement of a carbonate gas-condensate reservoir through wettability alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhaei, Zahra; Azin, Reza; Naghizadeh, Arefeh; Osfouri, Shahriar; Saboori, Rahmatollah; Vahdani, Hosein

    2018-03-01

    Condensate blockage phenomenon in near-wellbore region decreases gas production rate remarkably. Wettability alteration using fluorinated chemicals is an efficacious way to vanquish this problem. In this study, new synthesized fluorinated silica nanoparticles with an optimized condition and mean diameter of 50 nm is employed to modify carbonate rock surface wettability. Rock characterization tests consisting Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Energy Dispersive x-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) were utilized to assess the nanofluid adsorption on rock surface after treatment. Contact angle, spontaneous imbibition and core flooding experiments were performed to investigate the effect of synthesized nanofluid adsorption on wettability of rock surface and liquid mobility. Results of contact angle experiments revealed that wettability of rock could alter from strongly oil-wetting to the intermediate gas-wetting even at elevated temperature. Imbibition rates of oil and brine were diminished noticeably after treatment. 60% and 30% enhancement in pressure drop of condensate and brine floods after wettability alteration with modified nanofluid were observed which confirm successful field applicability of this chemical.

  5. unconventional natural gas reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa G, Tomas F; Osorio, Nelson; Restrepo R, Dora P

    2009-01-01

    This work is an exploration about different unconventional gas reservoirs worldwide: coal bed methane, tight gas, shale gas and gas hydrate? describing aspects such as definition, reserves, production methods, environmental issues and economics. The overview also mentioned preliminary studies about these sources in Colombia.

  6. Problems in operation of gas-oil condensate fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheltov, Yu V; Martos, V N

    1966-12-01

    This is a review of various methods used to deplete gas-oil condensate reservoirs. Four depletion techniques are discussed: (1) natural depletion without injection of fluids into the reservoir; (2) depletion accompanied by gas cycling; (3) depletion in which the gas cap is separated from the oil by water injected into the reservoir, a method in which each part of the reservoir is produced essentially independently of the other; and (4) depletion in which reservoir temperature is raised above the cricondentherm point by in-situ combustion, so that gas and oil form a single phase. This method is prospective, and has not been tried in the field. Advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed. It is concluded that a gas condensate reservoir can be depleted most economically only if some secondary energy is added. (13 refs.)

  7. Off gas condenser performance modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cains, P.W.; Hills, K.M.; Waring, S.; Pratchett, A.G.

    1989-12-01

    A suite of three programmes has been developed to model the ruthenium decontamination performance of a vitrification plant off-gas condenser. The stages of the model are: condensation of water vapour, NO x absorption in the condensate, RuO 4 absorption in the condensate. Juxtaposition of these stages gives a package that may be run on an IBM-compatible desktop PC. Experimental work indicates that the criterion [HNO 2 ] > 10 [RuO 4 ] used to determine RuO 4 destruction in solution is probably realistic under condenser conditions. Vapour pressures of RuO 4 over aqueous solutions at 70 o -90 o C are slightly lower than the values given by extrapolating the ln K p vs. T -1 relation derived from lower temperature data. (author)

  8. Gas manufacture, processes for: condensers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, W

    1876-11-29

    In the production of illuminating gas from coal, shale, hydrocarbon oil, or other substance used in the production of gas, the volatile products inside the retort are agitated by means of moving pistons or jets of compressed gas, steam, or vapor in order to decompose them into permanent gases, and in some cases to increase the volume of gas by the decomposition of the injected gas, etc. or by blending or carburetting this gas with the decomposition products of the volatile matters. To separate the condensible hydrocarbons from the crude gas it is passed through heated narrow tortuous passages or is caused to impinge on surfaces. If the crude gases are cold these surfaces are heated and vice versa.

  9. The Researches on Reasonable Well Spacing of Gas Wells in Deep and low Permeability Gas Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Yu Bei; Hui, Li; Lin, Li Dong

    2018-06-01

    This Gs64 gas reservoir is a condensate gas reservoir which is relatively integrated with low porosity and low permeability found in Dagang Oilfield in recent years. The condensate content is as high as 610g/m3. At present, there are few reports about the well spacing of similar gas reservoirs at home and abroad. Therefore, determining the reasonable well spacing of the gas reservoir is important for ensuring the optimal development effect and economic benefit of the gas field development. This paper discusses the reasonable well spacing of the deep and low permeability gas reservoir from the aspects of percolation mechanics, gas reservoir engineering and numerical simulation. considering there exist the start-up pressure gradient in percolation process of low permeability gas reservoir, this paper combined with productivity equation under starting pressure gradient, established the formula of gas well spacing with the formation pressure and start-up pressure gradient. The calculation formula of starting pressure gradient and well spacing of gas wells. Adopting various methods to calculate values of gas reservoir spacing are close to well testing' radius, so the calculation method is reliable, which is very important for the determination of reasonable well spacing in low permeability gas reservoirs.

  10. Measurement and calculation of gas compressibility factor for condensate gas and natural gas under pressure up to 116 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Ke-Le; Liu, Huang; Sun, Chang-Yu; Ma, Qing-Lan; Chen, Guang-Jin; Shen, De-Ji; Xiao, Xiang-Jiao; Wang, Hai-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Volumetric properties of two reservoir fluid samples were measured with pressure up to 116 MPa. • Dew point pressures at four temperatures for condensate gas sample are obtained. • Correlations and thermodynamic model for describing gas compressibility factor under high pressure were compared. • The thermodynamic model recommended is most suitable for fluids produced from reservoirs with a wide pressure range. -- Abstract: The volumetric properties of two reservoir fluid samples collected from one condensate gas well and one natural gas well were measured under four groups of temperatures, respectively, with pressure up to 116 MPa. For the two samples examined, the experimental results show that the gas compressibility factor increases with the increase of pressure. But the influence of the temperature is related to the range of the experimental pressure. It approximately decreases with the increase of temperature when the pressure is larger than (45 to 50) MPa, while there is the opposite trend when the pressure is lower than (45 to 50) MPa. The dew point pressure was also determined for the condensate gas sample, which decreases with the increase of temperature. The capabilities of four empirical correlations and a thermodynamic model based on equation of state for describing gas compressibility factor of reservoir fluids under high pressure were investigated. The comparison results show that the thermodynamic model recommended is the most suitable for fluids whatever produced from high-pressure reservoirs or conventional mild-pressure reservoirs

  11. Millstone 3 condensate dissolved gas monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, T.F.; Grondahl, E.E.; Snyder, D.T.

    1988-01-01

    Condensate dissolved oxygen problems at Millstone Point Unit 3 (MP3) were investigated using the Dissolved Gas Monitoring System developed by Radiological and Chemical Technology, Inc. under EPRI sponsorship. Argon was injected into the turbine exhaust basket tips to perform a dissolved gas transport analysis and determine steam jet air ejector gas removal efficiency. The operating configuration of the steam jet air ejector system was varied to determine the effect on gas removal efficiency. Following circulating water chlorination, the gas removal efficiency was determined to evaluate the effect of condenser tube fouling on steam jet air ejector performance

  12. Using helical compressors for coke gas condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Privalov, V E; Rezunenko, Yu I; Lelyanov, N V; Zarnitzkii, G Eh; Gordienko, A A; Derebenko, I F; Venzhega, A G; Leonov, N P; Gorokhov, N N

    1982-08-01

    Coke oven gas compression is discussed. Presently used multilevel piston compressors are criticized. The paper recommends using helical machines which combine advantages of using volume condensing compressors and compact high-efficiency centrifugal machines. Two kinds of helical compressors are evaluated: dry and oil-filled; their productivities and coke oven gas chemical composition are analyzed. Experiments using helical compressors were undertaken at the Yasinovskii plant. Flowsheet of the installation is shown. Performance results are given in a table. For all operating conditions content of insolubles in oil compounds is found to be lower than the acceptable value (0.08%). Compressor productivity measurements with variable manifold pressure are evaluated. Figures obtained show that efficient condensation of raw coke oven gas is possible. Increasing oil-filled compressor productivity is recommended by decreasing amount of oil injected and simultaneously increasing rotation speed. The dry helical compressor with water seal is found to be most promising for raw coke oven gas condensation. (10 refs.)

  13. Direct hydrocarbon exploration and gas reservoir development technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Young Hoon; Oh, Jae Ho; Jeong, Tae Jin [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    1995-12-01

    In order to enhance the capability of petroleum exploration and development techniques, three year project (1994 - 1997) was initiated on the research of direct hydrocarbon exploration and gas reservoir development. This project consists of four sub-projects. (1) Oil(Gas) - source rock correlation technique: The overview of bio-marker parameters which are applicable to hydrocarbon exploration has been illustrated. Experimental analysis of saturated hydrocarbon and bio-markers of the Pohang E and F core samples has been carried out. (2) Study on surface geochemistry and microbiology for hydrocarbon exploration: the test results of the experimental device for extraction of dissolved gases from water show that the device can be utilized for the gas geochemistry of water. (3) Development of gas and gas condensate reservoirs: There are two types of reservoir characterization. For the reservoir formation characterization, calculation of conditional simulation was compared with that of unconditional simulation. In the reservoir fluid characterization, phase behavior calculations revealed that the component grouping is more important than the increase of number of components. (4) Numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation and full waveform inversion: Three individual sections are presented. The first one is devoted to the inversion theory in general sense. The second and the third sections deal with the frequency domain pseudo waveform inversion of seismic reflection data and refraction data respectively. (author). 180 refs., 91 figs., 60 tabs.

  14. Reservoir Greenhouse Gas Emissions at Russian HPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, M. P.; Elistratov, V. V.; Maslikov, V. I.; Sidorenko, G. I.; Chusov, A. N.; Atrashenok, V. P.; Molodtsov, D. V. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Savvichev, A. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, S. N. Vinogradskii Institute of Microbiology (Russian Federation); Zinchenko, A. V. [A. I. Voeikov Main Geophysical Observatory (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-15

    Studies of greenhouse-gas emissions from the surfaces of the world’s reservoirs, which has demonstrated ambiguity of assessments of the effect of reservoirs on greenhouse-gas emissions to the atmosphere, is analyzed. It is recommended that greenhouse- gas emissions from various reservoirs be assessed by the procedure “GHG Measurement Guidelines for Fresh Water Reservoirs” (2010) for the purpose of creating a data base with results of standardized measurements. Aprogram for research into greenhouse-gas emissions is being developed at the St. Petersburg Polytechnic University in conformity with the IHA procedure at the reservoirs impounded by the Sayano-Shushenskaya and Mainskaya HPP operated by the RusHydro Co.

  15. Drilling of gas and condensed gas wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geranin, M P; Chao, P L; Lomonosov, V V

    1981-01-01

    Cementing of boreholes drilled into underground gas fields and the requirements imposed on the grouting mortar are reviewed. Results are set forth from a study of the insulation capacity of cementing mortar used to increase the quality of reinforcements of boreholes at PKhG. Data are presented on the properties of different grouting mortars for boreholes at PKhG, including those that may be used at low temperatures. Information is also provided on the use of light mortar containing a CaCl/sub 2/ additive, grouting mortar with furfuryl alcohol added, and expanding grouting mortars.

  16. Reservoir Models for Gas Hydrate Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, R.

    2016-12-01

    Scientific and industrial drilling programs have now providing detailed information on gas hydrate systems that will increasingly be the subject of field experiments. The need to carefully plan these programs requires reliable prediction of reservoir response to hydrate dissociation. Currently, a major emphasis in gas hydrate modeling is the integration of thermodynamic/hydrologic phenomena with geomechanical response for both reservoir and bounding strata. However, also critical to the ultimate success of these efforts is the appropriate development of input geologic models, including several emerging issues, including (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) understanding of the initial petrophysical characteristics of the system (reservoirs and seals), the dynamic evolution of those characteristics during active dissociation, and the interdependency of petrophysical parameters and (3) the nature of reservoir boundaries. Heterogeneity is ubiquitous aspect of every natural reservoir, and appropriate characterization is vital. However, heterogeneity is not random. Vertical variation can be evaluated with core and well log data; however, core data often are challenged by incomplete recovery. Well logs also provide interpretation challenges, particularly where reservoirs are thinly-bedded due to limitation in vertical resolution. This imprecision will extend to any petrophysical measurements that are derived from evaluation of log data. Extrapolation of log data laterally is also complex, and should be supported by geologic mapping. Key petrophysical parameters include porosity, permeability and it many aspects, and water saturation. Field data collected to date suggest that the degree of hydrate saturation is strongly controlled by/dependant upon reservoir quality and that the ratio of free to bound water in the remaining pore space is likely also controlled by reservoir quality. Further, those parameters will also evolve during dissociation, and not necessary in a simple

  17. Fluid flow behaviour of gas-condensate and near-miscible fluids at the pore scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawe, Richard A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad and Tobago); Grattoni, Carlos A. [Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College, London, SW7 2BP (United Kingdom)

    2007-02-15

    Retrograde condensate reservoir behaviour is complex with much of the detailed mechanisms of the multiphase fluid transport and mass transfer between the phases within the porous matrix still speculative. Visual modelling of selected processes occurring at the pore level under known and controlled boundary conditions can give an insight to fluid displacements at the core scale and help the interpretation of production behaviour at reservoir scale. Visualisation of the pore scale two-phase flow mechanisms has been studied experimentally at low interfacial tensions, < 0.5 mN/m, using a partially miscible fluid system in glass visual micro models. As the interfacial tension decreases the balance between fluid-fluid forces (interfacial, spreading and viscous) and fluid-solid interactions (wettability and viscous interactions) changes. Data measurements in the laboratory, particularly relative permeability, will therefore always be difficult especially for condensate fluids just below their dew point. What is certain is that gas production from a gas-condensate leads to condensate dropout when pressure falls below the dew point, either within the wellbore or, more importantly, in the reservoir. This paper illustrates some pore scale physics, particularly interfacial phenomena at low interfacial tension, which has relevance to appreciating the flow of condensate fluids close to their dew point either near the wellbore (which affects well productivity) or deep inside the reservoir (which affects condensate recovery). (author)

  18. Greenhouse gas emissions from hydroelectric reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, L.P.; Schaeffer, R.

    1994-01-01

    In a recent paper, Rudd et al. have suggested that, per unit of electrical energy produced, greenhouse-gas emissions from some hydroelectric reservoirs in northern Canada may be comparable to emissions from fossil-fuelled power plants. The purpose of this comment is to elaborate these issues further so as to understand the potential contribution of hydroelectric reservoirs to the greenhouse effect. More than focusing on the total budget of carbon emissions (be they in the form of CH 4 or be they in the form of CO 2 ), this requires an evaluation of the accumulated greenhouse effect of gas emissions from hydroelectric reservoirs and fossil-fuelled power plants. Two issues will be considered: (a) global warming potential (GWP) for CH 4 ; and (b) how greenhouse-gas emissions from hydroelectric power plants stand against emissions from fossil-fuelled power plants with respect to global warming

  19. Boiling, condensation, and gas-liquid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whalley, P.B.

    1987-01-01

    Heat transfer phenomena involving boiling and condensation are an important aspect of engineering in the power and process industries. This book, aimed at advanced first-degree and graduate students in mechanical and chemical engineering, deals with these phenomena in detail. The first part of the book describes gas-liquid two-phase flow, as a necessary preliminary to the later discussion of heat transfer and change of phase. A detailed section on calculation methods shows how theory can be put to practical use, and there are also descriptions of some of the equipment and plant used in the process and power industries

  20. Integrating gravimetric and interferometric synthetic aperture radar data for enhancing reservoir history matching of carbonate gas and volatile oil reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Katterbauer, Klemens

    2016-08-25

    Reservoir history matching is assuming a critical role in understanding reservoir characteristics, tracking water fronts, and forecasting production. While production data have been incorporated for matching reservoir production levels and estimating critical reservoir parameters, the sparse spatial nature of this dataset limits the efficiency of the history matching process. Recently, gravimetry techniques have significantly advanced to the point of providing measurement accuracy in the microgal range and consequently can be used for the tracking of gas displacement caused by water influx. While gravity measurements provide information on subsurface density changes, i.e., the composition of the reservoir, these data do only yield marginal information about temporal displacements of oil and inflowing water. We propose to complement gravimetric data with interferometric synthetic aperture radar surface deformation data to exploit the strong pressure deformation relationship for enhancing fluid flow direction forecasts. We have developed an ensemble Kalman-filter-based history matching framework for gas, gas condensate, and volatile oil reservoirs, which synergizes time-lapse gravity and interferometric synthetic aperture radar data for improved reservoir management and reservoir forecasts. Based on a dual state-parameter estimation algorithm separating the estimation of static reservoir parameters from the dynamic reservoir parameters, our numerical experiments demonstrate that history matching gravity measurements allow monitoring the density changes caused by oil-gas phase transition and water influx to determine the saturation levels, whereas the interferometric synthetic aperture radar measurements help to improve the forecasts of hydrocarbon production and water displacement directions. The reservoir estimates resulting from the dual filtering scheme are on average 20%-40% better than those from the joint estimation scheme, but require about a 30% increase in

  1. Modeling the Phase Composition of Gas Condensate in Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudin, S. M.; Zemenkov, Yu D.; Shabarov, A. B.

    2016-10-01

    Gas condensate fields demonstrate a number of thermodynamic characteristics to be considered when they are developed, as well as when gas condensate is transported and processed. A complicated phase behavior of the gas condensate system, as well as the dependence of the extracted raw materials on the phase state of the deposit other conditions being equal, is a key aspect. Therefore, when designing gas condensate lines the crucial task is to select the most appropriate methods of calculating thermophysical properties and phase equilibrium of the transported gas condensate. The paper describes a physical-mathematical model of a gas-liquid flow in the gas condensate line. It was developed based on balance equations of conservation of mass, impulse and energy of the transported medium within the framework of a quasi-1D approach. Constitutive relationships are given separately, and practical recommendations on how to apply the research results are provided as well.

  2. Gas condensate--raw material for producing liquid paraffin hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliyeva, R.B.; Alikishi-Zade, G.Yu.; Kuliyev, A.M.; Leonidov, A.N.; Pereverzev, A.N.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of efficient utilization of gas condensates as raw material for removal of a valuable product, liquid paraffins, is examined. A classification of gas condensates is given which is used as raw material for removing these hydrocarbons: gas condensate with high content of n-alkanes (25-40 mass percent), with average content (18-25 mass percent), with low content (12-18 mass percent), light weight fractions compositions, which do not contain fractions up to 200/sup 0/, and also, content ofless than 12% n-alkanes. Gas condensate I-III groups are 30% of the total reserve of gas condensate. Liquid paraffins hydrocarbons, produced from fractions of diesel fuel, which has been removed from Shatlyk gas condensate under conditions which simulate virtual processes of caramide deparaffinization meet all requirements without additional refining.

  3. Accounting for Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Reservoirs ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearly three decades of research has demonstrated that the impoundment of rivers and the flooding of terrestrial ecosystems behind dams can increase rates of greenhouse gas emission, particularly methane. The 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories includes a methodology for estimating methane emissions from flooded lands, but the methodology was published as an appendix to be used as a ‘basis for future methodological development’ due to a lack of data. Since the 2006 Guidelines were published there has been a 6-fold increase in the number of peer reviewed papers published on the topic including reports from reservoirs in India, China, Africa, and Russia. Furthermore, several countries, including Iceland, Switzerland, and Finland, have developed country specific methodologies for including flooded lands methane emissions in their National Greenhouse Gas Inventories. This presentation will include a review of the literature on flooded land methane emissions and approaches that have been used to upscale emissions for national inventories. We will also present ongoing research in the United States to develop a country specific methodology. In the U.S., research approaches include: 1) an effort to develop predictive relationships between methane emissions and reservoir characteristics that are available in national databases, such as reservoir size and drainage area, and 2) a national-scale probabilistic survey of reservoir methane em

  4. Accouting for Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, J. J.; Deemer, B. R.; Harrison, J. A.; Nietch, C. T.; Waldo, S.

    2016-12-01

    Nearly three decades of research has demonstrated that the impoundment of rivers and the flooding of terrestrial ecosystems behind dams can increase rates of greenhouse gas emission, particularly methane. The 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories includes a methodology for estimating methane emissions from flooded lands, but the methodology was published as an appendix to be used as a `basis for future methodological development' due to a lack of data. Since the 2006 Guidelines were published there has been a 6-fold increase in the number of peer reviewed papers published on the topic including reports from reservoirs in India, China, Africa, and Russia. Furthermore, several countries, including Iceland, Switzerland, and Finland, have developed country specific methodologies for including flooded lands methane emissions in their National Greenhouse Gas Inventories. This presentation will include a review of the literature on flooded land methane emissions and approaches that have been used to upscale emissions for national inventories. We will also present ongoing research in the United States to develop a country specific methodology. In the U.S., research approaches include: 1) an effort to develop predictive relationships between methane emissions and reservoir characteristics that are available in national databases, such as reservoir size and drainage area, and 2) a national-scale probabilistic survey of reservoir methane emissions linked to the National Lakes Assessment.

  5. Possibility of removing condensate and scattered oil from gas-condensate field during bed flooding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkina, N.A.; Yagubov, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    The problem is set of evaluating the possible removal from the bed of scattered oil and condensate during flooding of the bed. For this purpose, an experimental study was made of the displacement by water from the porous medium of the oil and condensate saturating it. The obtained experimental results permit evaluation of the possible removal from the gas-condensate bed of scattered oil and condensate during flooding of the bed.

  6. Constructing a unique two-phase compressibility factor model for lean gas condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moayyedi, Mahmood; Gharesheikhlou, Aliashghar [Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azamifard, Arash; Mosaferi, Emadoddin [Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Generating a reliable experimental model for two-phase compressibility factor in lean gas condensate reservoirs has always been demanding, but it was neglected due to lack of required experimental data. This study presents the main results of constructing the first two-phase compressibility factor model that is completely valid for Iranian lean gas condensate reservoirs. Based on a wide range of experimental data bank for Iranian lean gas condensate reservoirs, a unique two-phase compressibility factor model was generated using design of experiments (DOE) method and neural network technique (ANN). Using DOE, a swift cubic response surface model was generated for two-phase compressibility factor as a function of some selected fluid parameters for lean gas condensate fluids. The proposed DOE and ANN models were finally validated using four new independent data series. The results showed that there is a good agreement between experimental data and the proposed models. In the end, a detailed comparison was made between the results of proposed models.

  7. Constructing a unique two-phase compressibility factor model for lean gas condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moayyedi, Mahmood; Gharesheikhlou, Aliashghar; Azamifard, Arash; Mosaferi, Emadoddin

    2015-01-01

    Generating a reliable experimental model for two-phase compressibility factor in lean gas condensate reservoirs has always been demanding, but it was neglected due to lack of required experimental data. This study presents the main results of constructing the first two-phase compressibility factor model that is completely valid for Iranian lean gas condensate reservoirs. Based on a wide range of experimental data bank for Iranian lean gas condensate reservoirs, a unique two-phase compressibility factor model was generated using design of experiments (DOE) method and neural network technique (ANN). Using DOE, a swift cubic response surface model was generated for two-phase compressibility factor as a function of some selected fluid parameters for lean gas condensate fluids. The proposed DOE and ANN models were finally validated using four new independent data series. The results showed that there is a good agreement between experimental data and the proposed models. In the end, a detailed comparison was made between the results of proposed models

  8. Mn nanoparticles produced by inert gas condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, M B; Brydson, R; Cochrane, R F

    2006-01-01

    The results from experiments using the inert gas condensation method to produce nanoparticles of manganese are presented. Structural and compositional data have been collected through electron diffraction, EDX (energy dispersive X-ray) and EELS (electron energy loss spectroscopy). Both Mn 3 O 4 and pure Mn particles have been produced. Moisture in untreated helium gas causes the particles to oxidize, whereas running the helium through a liquid nitrogen trap removes the moisture and produces β-Mn particles in a metastable state. The particle sizes and the size distribution have been determined. Particle sizes range from 2nm to above 100 nm, however the majority of particles lie in the range below 20 nm with a modal particle size of 6 nm. As well as the modal particle size of 6 nm, there is another peak in the frequency curve at 16 nm that represents another group particles that lie in the range 12 to 20 nm. The smaller particles are single crystals, but the larger particles appear to have a dense region around their edge with a less dense centre. Determination of their exact nature is ongoing

  9. Mathematical simulation of the process of condensing natural gas

    OpenAIRE

    Tastandieva G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Presents a two-dimensional unsteady model of heat transfer in terms of condensation of natural gas at low temperatures. Performed calculations of the process heat and mass transfer of liquefied natural gas (LNG) storage tanks of cylindrical shape. The influence of model parameters on the nature of heat transfer. Defined temperature regimes eliminate evaporation by cooling liquefied natural gas. The obtained dependence of the mass flow rate of vapor condensation gas temperature. Identified the...

  10. Conditions for maximum isolation of stable condensate during separation in gas-condensate systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivus, N.A.; Belkina, N.A.

    1969-02-01

    A thermodynamic analysis is made of the gas-liquid separation process in order to determine the relationship between conditions of maximum stable condensate separation and physico-chemical nature and composition of condensate. The analysis was made by considering the multicomponent gas-condensate fluid produced from Zyrya field as a ternary system, composed of methane, an intermediate component (propane and butane) and a heavy residue, C/sub 6+/. Composition of 5 ternary systems was calculated for a wide variation in separator conditions. At each separator pressure there is maximum condensate production at a certain temperature. This occurs because solubility of condensate components changes with temperature. Results of all calculations are shown graphically. The graphs show conditions of maximum stable condensate separation.

  11. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

  12. The shear viscosity of a trapped Bose-condensed gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahzamanian, M.A.; Yavary, H.

    2006-01-01

    By obtaining Kubo formula type and using nonequilibrium Green's functions, we calculate the shear viscosity of a trapped Bose-condensed gas below and above the Bose-Einstein condensation temperature (T BEC ). The contributions of the interactions between condensate and noncondensate atoms and between noncondensate atoms take into account to the viscous relaxation time, by evaluating second order self-energies in Beliaev approximation

  13. A case study to optimum selection of deliquification method for gas condensate well design: South Pars gas field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Khamehchi

    2016-06-01

    Today, the most effective liquid-removal devices are pumping, the combination of liquid-diverter with gas lift and velocity string. Considering mentioned complexities, the most efficient method of liquid removal is different from one well to the others. This paper discusses a multi-criteria decision making (MCDM strategy for ranking these methods based on ELECTRE and TOPSIS techniques in a gas condensate reservoir. The most efficient model in this case, regarding its high efficiency and level of reliability is continuous gas lift. These procedures can be extended to other cases easily by changing the comparison matrix and user defined weights.

  14. Condensation of an ideal gas obeying non-Abelian statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Behrouz; Mohammadzadeh, Hosein

    2011-09-01

    We consider the thermodynamic geometry of an ideal non-Abelian gas. We show that, for a certain value of the fractional parameter and at the relevant maximum value of fugacity, the thermodynamic curvature has a singular point. This indicates a condensation such as Bose-Einstein condensation for non-Abelian statistics and we work out the phase transition temperature in various dimensions.

  15. Mathematical simulation of the process of condensing natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tastandieva, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Presents a two-dimensional unsteady model of heat transfer in terms of condensation of natural gas at low temperatures. Performed calculations of the process heat and mass transfer of liquefied natural gas (LNG) storage tanks of cylindrical shape. The influence of model parameters on the nature of heat transfer. Defined temperature regimes eliminate evaporation by cooling liquefied natural gas. The obtained dependence of the mass flow rate of vapor condensation gas temperature. Identified the possibility of regulating the process of "cooling down" liquefied natural gas in terms of its partial evaporation with low cost energy.

  16. Mathematical simulation of the process of condensing natural gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tastandieva G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Presents a two-dimensional unsteady model of heat transfer in terms of condensation of natural gas at low temperatures. Performed calculations of the process heat and mass transfer of liquefied natural gas (LNG storage tanks of cylindrical shape. The influence of model parameters on the nature of heat transfer. Defined temperature regimes eliminate evaporation by cooling liquefied natural gas. The obtained dependence of the mass flow rate of vapor condensation gas temperature. Identified the possibility of regulating the process of “cooling down” liquefied natural gas in terms of its partial evaporation with low cost energy.

  17. Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilley, Lorie M. [Hattenburg Dilley & Linnell, LLC, Anchorage, AL (United States)

    2015-04-13

    The purpose of this project was to: 1) evaluate the relationship between geothermal fluid processes and the compositions of the fluid inclusion gases trapped in the reservoir rocks; and 2) develop methodologies for interpreting fluid inclusion gas data in terms of the chemical, thermal and hydrological properties of geothermal reservoirs. Phase 1 of this project was designed to conduct the following: 1) model the effects of boiling, condensation, conductive cooling and mixing on selected gaseous species; using fluid compositions obtained from geothermal wells, 2) evaluate, using quantitative analyses provided by New Mexico Tech (NMT), how these processes are recorded by fluid inclusions trapped in individual crystals; and 3) determine if the results obtained on individual crystals can be applied to the bulk fluid inclusion analyses determined by Fluid Inclusion Technology (FIT). Our initial studies however, suggested that numerical modeling of the data would be premature. We observed that the gas compositions, determined on bulk and individual samples were not the same as those discharged by the geothermal wells. Gases discharged from geothermal wells are CO2-rich and contain low concentrations of light gases (i.e. H2, He, N, Ar, CH4). In contrast many of our samples displayed enrichments in these light gases. Efforts were initiated to evaluate the reasons for the observed gas distributions. As a first step, we examined the potential importance of different reservoir processes using a variety of commonly employed gas ratios (e.g. Giggenbach plots). The second technical target was the development of interpretational methodologies. We have develop methodologies for the interpretation of fluid inclusion gas data, based on the results of Phase 1, geologic interpretation of fluid inclusion data, and integration of the data. These methodologies can be used in conjunction with the relevant geological and hydrological information on the system to

  18. Hysteresis phenomenon during operation of gas condensate fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadykh-Zade, E S; Karakashev, V K; Ismailov, D Kh

    1966-01-01

    Hysteresis behavior of gas-condensate mixtures was studied with a PVT apparatus. The study was conducted at 26 and 80/sup 0/C, with recombined samples having gas factors of 3,000, 6,500, and 10,000 cu meters per ton. Pressure on samples was decreased or increased at rates of 0.2; 0.1; 0.05; and 0.025 atm per sec. Composition of gas- condensate is given. It is reported that different amounts of liquid were produced by condensation and evaporation processes, i.e., results depended on whether pressure was being increased or decreased. It is suggested that the effect of hysteresis should be considered in operation of gas-condensate fields.

  19. Evaporation and condensation heat transfer with a noncondensable gas present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, M.; Kataoka, Y.; Fujii, T.

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the system pressure of an external water wall type containment vessel, which is one of the passive systems for containment cooling, the evaporation and condensation behavior under a noncondensable gas presence has been experimentally examined. In the system, steam evaporated from the suppression pool surface into the wetwell, filled with noncondensable gas, and condensed on the containment vessel wall. The system pressure was the sum of the noncondensable gas pressure and saturated steam pressure in the wetwell. The wetwell temperature was, however, lower than the suppression pool temperature and depended on the thermal resistance on the suppression pool surface. The evaporation and condensation heat transfer coefficients in the presence of air as noncondensable gas were measured and expressed by functions of steam/air mass ratio. The evaporation heat transfer coefficients were one order higher than the condensation heat transfer coefficients because the local noncondensable gas pressure was much lower on the evaporating pool surface than on the condensing liquid surface. Using logal properties of the heat transfer surfaces, there was a similar trend between evaporation and condensation even with a noncondensable gas present. (orig.)

  20. RADIATION SAFETY JUSTIFICATION FOR THE LONG-TERM STORAGE OF GAS CONDENSATE IN THE UNDERGROUND RESERVOURS FORMED BY THE NUCLEAR EXPLOSION TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Romanovich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents approaches to the safety justification of the gas condensate and brine long-term storage in the underground reservoirs formed by the nuclear explosion technology. Gas condensate and brine are the intermediate level liquid radioactive waste containing isotopes: 3Н, 137Cs and 90Sr, in traces - 239Pu, 235U, 241Am.Safety of the gas condensate and brine long-term storage in the underground reservoirs is assessed on the base of the multi-barrier principle implementation, used during radioactive waste disposal. It is shown that the gas condensate and brine long-term storage in the sealed underground reservoirs formed by nuclear explosion technologies in salt domes does not lead to the surface radioactive contamination and population exposure.

  1. Reservoir architecture and tough gas reservoir potential of fluvial crevasse-splay deposits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Toorenenburg, K.A.; Donselaar, M.E.; Weltje, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Unconventional tough gas reservoirs in low-net-to-gross fluvial stratigraphic intervals may constitute a secondary source of fossil energy to prolong the gas supply in the future. To date, however, production from these thin-bedded, fine-grained reservoirs has been hampered by the economic risks

  2. A comparative study of gas-gas miscibility processes in underground gas storage reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiee, M.M.; Schmitz, S. [DBI - Gastechnologisches Institut gGmbH, Freiberg (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    Intermixture of gases in underground gas reservoirs have had great weight for natural gas storage in UGS projects with substitution of cushion gas by inert gases or changing the stored gas quality or origin, as for the replacement of town gas by natural gas. It was also investigated during the last years for Enhanced Gas Recovery (EGR) and Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) projects. The actual importance of its mechanisms is discussed for the H{sub 2} storage in Power to Gas to Power projects (PGP). In these approaches miscibility of the injected gas with the gas in place in the reservoir plays an important role in the displacement process. The conditions and parameters for the gas-gas displacement and mixing have been investigated in previous projects, as e.g. the miscibility of CO{sub 2} with natural gas (CLEAN). Furthermore the miscibility process of town gas with natural gas and sauer gas with sweet gas were also previously measured and compared in laboratory. The objective of this work is to investigate the miscibility of H{sub 2} injection into natural gas reservoirs using a compositional and a black oil reservoir simulator. Three processes of convection, dispersion and diffusion are considered precisely. The effect of gas miscibility is studied for both simulators and the results are compared to find optimum miscibility parameters. The findings of this work could be helpful for further pilot and field case studies to predict and monitor the changes in gas composition and quality. In future this monitoring might become more important when PGP together with H{sub 2}-UGS, as storage technology, will help to successfully implement the change to an energy supply from more renewable sources. Similarly the method confirms the use of the black oil simulator as an alternative for gas-gas displacement and sequestration reservoir simulation in comparison to the compositional simulator. (orig.)

  3. Disposal of aqueous condensate from high efficiency gas boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardwick, G J; Pattison, J R

    1984-01-01

    If highly efficient gas-fired condensing heating appliances are installed in Britain, the aqueous condensate produced can be conveniently run into existing sewage drains. The part of the drainage system that is most vulnerable to corrosion from the mildly acid condensate is that portion adjacent to the domestic premises. The tests described indicate that this is not at risk and the only precaution that might be considered necessary is to avoid running the condensate over galvanized drain covers in order to prevent unsightly staining. Water authorities in Britain and detailed studies in the US and Holland confirm that the condensate - after dilution by domestic waste, sewage, and rainwater - would be harmless to municipal sewage systems and would not, either in volume or chemical composition, affect the working of existing sewage treatment plants.

  4. Performance Analysis of Depleted Oil Reservoirs for Underground Gas Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. C.I.C. Anyadiegwu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The performance of underground gas storage in depleted oil reservoir was analysed with reservoir Y-19, a depleted oil reservoir in Southern region of the Niger Delta. Information on the geologic and production history of the reservoir were obtained from the available field data of the reservoir. The verification of inventory was done to establish the storage capacity of the reservoir. The plot of the well flowing pressure (Pwf against the flow rate (Q, gives the deliverability of the reservoir at various pressures. Results of the estimated properties signified that reservoir Y-19 is a good candidate due to its storage capacity and its flow rate (Q of 287.61 MMscf/d at a flowing pressure of 3900 psig

  5. Evaporation and Condensation Flows of a Vapor-Gas Mixture from or onto the Condensed Phase with an Internal Structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Onishi, Yoshimoto; Yamada, Ken

    2005-01-01

    Transient motions of a vapor-gas mixture due to the evaporation and condensation processes from or onto the plane condensed phase, with a temperature field as its internal structure, have been studied...

  6. On the Bose-Einstein condensation of an ideal gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landau, L.J.; Wilde, I.F.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematically precise treatment is given of the well-known Bose-Einstein condensation of an ideal gas in the grand canonical ensemble at fixed density. The method works equally well for any of the standard boundary conditions and it is shown that the finite volume activity converges and that in three dimensions condensation occurs for Dirichlet, Neumann, periodic, and repulsive walls. (orig.) 891 HJ/orig. 892 CKA

  7. Effect on non-condensable gas on steam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Y.; Abe, Y.; Iwaki, C.; Narabayashi, T.; Mori, M.; Ohmori, S.

    2004-01-01

    Next-generation reactor systems have been under development aiming at simplified system and improvement of safety and credibility. A steam injector has a function of a passive pump without large motor or turbo-machinery, and has been investigated as one of the most important component of the next-generation reactor. Its performance as a pump depends on direct contact condensation phenomena between a supersonic steam and a sub-cooled water jet. Although non-condensable gases are well known for reducing heat transfer, the effect of the non-condensable gas on the condensation of supersonic steam on high-speed water jet has not been cleared. The present paper presents an experimental study of condensation of supersonic steam around turbulent water jet with model steam injector made by transparent plastic. The experimental apparatus is described. The visual observation was carried out by using high-speed camera. The non-condensable gas effect on the pump performance and flow characteristics are clarified by the image processing technique for the jet shape and gas-liquid interface behavior. (authors)

  8. Condensed Rotational Separation to upgrade sour gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, J.J.H.; Kemenade, van H.P.

    2010-01-01

    A steadily increasing amount of newly located natural gas fields is severely contaminated with CO2 and/or H2S. Percentages of 30 % CO2/H2S or even larger are not uncommon. Fields with such high degrees of contaminant can not be economically exploited by conventional techniques based on amine

  9. Stepwise Bose-Einstein Condensation in a Spinor Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frapolli, C; Zibold, T; Invernizzi, A; Jiménez-García, K; Dalibard, J; Gerbier, F

    2017-08-04

    We observe multistep condensation of sodium atoms with spin F=1, where the different Zeeman components m_{F}=0,±1 condense sequentially as the temperature decreases. The precise sequence changes drastically depending on the magnetization m_{z} and on the quadratic Zeeman energy q (QZE) in an applied magnetic field. For large QZE, the overall structure of the phase diagram is the same as for an ideal spin-1 gas, although the precise locations of the phase boundaries are significantly shifted by interactions. For small QZE, antiferromagnetic interactions qualitatively change the phase diagram with respect to the ideal case, leading, for instance, to condensation in m_{F}=±1, a phenomenon that cannot occur for an ideal gas with q>0.

  10. A New Method for Fracturing Wells Reservoir Evaluation in Fractured Gas Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianchun Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural fracture is a geological phenomenon widely distributed in tight formation, and fractured gas reservoir stimulation effect mainly depends on the communication of natural fractures. Therefore it is necessary to carry out the evaluation of this reservoir and to find out the optimal natural fractures development wells. By analyzing the interactions and nonlinear relationships of the parameters, it establishes three-level index system of reservoir evaluation and proposes a new method for gas well reservoir evaluation model in fractured gas reservoir on the basis of fuzzy logic theory and multilevel gray correlation. For this method, the Gaussian membership functions to quantify the degree of every factor in the decision-making system and the multilevel gray relation to determine the weight of each parameter on stimulation effect. Finally through fuzzy arithmetic operator between multilevel weights and fuzzy evaluation matrix, score, rank, the reservoir quality, and predicted production will be gotten. Result of this new method shows that the evaluation of the production coincidence rate reaches 80%, which provides a new way for fractured gas reservoir evaluation.

  11. US production of natural gas from tight reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    For the purposes of this report, tight gas reservoirs are defined as those that meet the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) definition of tight. They are generally characterized by an average reservoir rock permeability to gas of 0.1 millidarcy or less and, absent artificial stimulation of production, by production rates that do not exceed 5 barrels of oil per day and certain specified daily volumes of gas which increase with the depth of the reservoir. All of the statistics presented in this report pertain to wells that have been classified, from 1978 through 1991, as tight according to the FERC; i.e., they are ''legally tight'' reservoirs. Additional production from ''geologically tight'' reservoirs that have not been classified tight according to the FERC rules has been excluded. This category includes all producing wells drilled into legally designated tight gas reservoirs prior to 1978 and all producing wells drilled into physically tight gas reservoirs that have not been designated legally tight. Therefore, all gas production referenced herein is eligible for the Section 29 tax credit. Although the qualification period for the credit expired at the end of 1992, wells that were spudded (began to be drilled) between 1978 and May 1988, and from November 5, 1990, through year end 1992, are eligible for the tax credit for a subsequent period of 10 years. This report updates the EIA's tight gas production information through 1991 and considers further the history and effect on tight gas production of the Federal Government's regulatory and tax policy actions. It also provides some high points of the geologic background needed to understand the nature and location of low-permeability reservoirs

  12. Sensitivity Analysis of Methane Hydrate Reservoirs: Effects of Reservoir Parameters on Gas Productivity and Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. J.; Gaddipati, M.; Nyayapathi, L.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a parametric study on production rates of natural gas from gas hydrates by the method of depressurization, using CMG STARS. Seven factors/parameters were considered as perturbations from a base-case hydrate reservoir description based on Problem 7 of the International Methane Hydrate Reservoir Simulator Code Comparison Study led by the Department of Energy and the USGS. This reservoir is modeled after the inferred properties of the hydrate deposit at the Prudhoe Bay L-106 site. The included sensitivity variables were hydrate saturation, pressure (depth), temperature, bottom-hole pressure of the production well, free water saturation, intrinsic rock permeability, and porosity. A two-level (L=2) Plackett-Burman experimental design was used to study the relative effects of these factors. The measured variable was the discounted cumulative gas production. The discount rate chosen was 15%, resulting in the gas contribution to the net present value of a reservoir. Eight different designs were developed for conducting sensitivity analysis and the effects of the parameters on the real and discounted production rates will be discussed. The breakeven price in various cases and the dependence of the breakeven price on the production parameters is given in the paper. As expected, initial reservoir temperature has the strongest positive effect on the productivity of a hydrate deposit and the bottom-hole pressure in the production well has the strongest negative dependence. Also resulting in a positive correlation is the intrinsic permeability and the initial free water of the formation. Negative effects were found for initial hydrate saturation (at saturations greater than 50% of the pore space) and the reservoir porosity. These negative effects are related to the available sensible heat of the reservoir, with decreasing productivity due to decreasing available sensible heat. Finally, we conclude that for the base case reservoir, the break-even price (BEP

  13. Flue gas condensing with heat pump; Roekgaskondensering med vaermepump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axby, Fredrik; Pettersson, Camilla [Carl Bro Energikonsult AB, Malmoe (Sweden)

    2004-11-01

    Flue gas condensing is often both a technically and economically efficient method to increase the thermal efficiency in a plant using fuels with high moisture and/or high hydrogen content. The temperature of the return water in district heating systems in Sweden is normally 50 deg C, which gives quite high efficiency for a flue gas condenser. The flue gas after the flue gas condenser still contains energy that to some extent can be recovered by a combustion air humidifier or a heat pump. The object of this project is to technically and economically analyse flue gas condensing with heat pump. The aim is that plant owners get basic data to evaluate if a coupling between a flue gas condenser and a heat pump could be of interest for their plant. With a heat pump the district heating water can be 'sub cooled' to increase the heat recover in the flue gas condenser and thereby increase the total efficiency. The project is set up as a case study of three different plants that represent different types of technologies and sizes; Aabyverket in Oerebro, Amagerforbraending in Copenhagen and Staffanstorp district heating central. In this report a system with a partial flow through the condenser of the heat pump is studied. For each plant one case with the smallest heat pump and a total optimization regarding total efficiency and cost for investment has been calculated. In addition to the optimizations sensitivity analyzes has been done of the following parameters: Moisture in fuel; Type of heat pump; Temperature of the return water in the district heating system; and, Size of plant. The calculations shows that the total efficiency increases with about 6 % by the installation of the heat pump at a temperature of the return water in the district heating system of 50 deg C at Aabyverket. The cost for production of heat is just below 210 kr/MWh and the straight time for pay-off is 5,4 years at 250 kr/MWh in heat credit and at 300 kr/MWh in basic price for electricity. The

  14. Gas geochemistry for the Los Azufres (Michoacán geothermal reservoir, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Segovia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Gas data of the Los Azufres geothermal field were analyzed using a method based on equilibrium of the Fischer- Tropsch (FT reaction: CH4 + 2H2O = 4H2 +CO2 and on the combined pyrite-hematite-magnetite (HSH2 reactions: 5/4 H2 +3/2 FeS2 +3/4 Fe2O3 + 7/4 H2O = 3 H2S +Fe3O4 in order to estimate reservoir temperature and excess steam. The solution of equilibrium equations produces a grid (FT-HSH2. This method is suitable for reservoirs with relatively high H2S but low H2 and NH3 concentrations in the fluid as is the case of the Los Azufres well discharges. Reservoir temperature and reservoir excess steam values were estimated for initial and present conditions in representative wells of the field to study the evolution of fluids, because of exploitation and waste fluids reinjection. This method was very useful in estimating reservoir temperatures in vapor wells, while in two-phase wells it was found that as the well produces a smaller fraction of water, the reservoir temperature estimation agrees qualitatively with results from cationic or silica geothermometers. For liquid-dominated wells the reservoir temperature estimations agree with temperatures obtained from the well simulator WELFLO. This indicates that FT-HSH2 results provide the temperature of the fluid entering the well where the last equilibrium occurs. Results show a decrease in reservoir temperatures in the southern zone of the field where intensive reinjection takes place. With exploitation, it was also noted that the deep liquid phase in the reservoir is changing to two-phase increasing the reservoir steam fraction and the non-condensable gases in well discharges.

  15. Behaviour of gas production from type 3 hydrate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pooladi-Darvish, M. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering]|[Fekete Associates Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada); Zatsepina, O. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; Hong, H. [Fekete Associates Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The possible role of gas hydrates as a potential energy resource was discussed with particular reference to methods for estimating the rate of gas production from hydrate reservoirs under different operating conditions. This paper presented several numerical simulations studies of gas production from type 3 hydrate reservoirs in 1-D and 2-D geometries. Type 3 reservoirs include gas production from hydrate-reservoirs that lie totally within the hydrate stability zone and are sandwiched by impermeable layers on top and bottom. The purpose of this study was to better understand hydrate decomposition by depressurization. The study questioned whether 1-D modeling of type 3 hydrate reservoirs is a reasonable approximation. It also determined whether gas rate increases or decreases with time. The important reservoir characteristics for determining the rate of gas production were identified. Last, the study determined how competition between fluid and heat flow affects hydrate decomposition. This paper also described the relation and interaction between the heat and fluid flow mechanisms in depressurization of type 3 hydrate reservoirs. All results of 1-D and 2-D numerical simulation and analyses were generated using the STARS simulator. It was shown that the rate of gas production depends on the initial pressure/temperature conditions and permeability of the hydrate bearing formation. A high peak rate may be achieved under favourable conditions, but this peak rate is obtained after an initial period where the rate of gas production increases with time. The heat transfer in the direction perpendicular to the direction of fluid flow is significant, requiring 2D modeling. The hydraulic diffusivity is low because of the low permeability of hydrate-bearing formations. This could result in competition between heat and fluid flow, thereby influencing the behaviour of decomposition. 6 refs., 3 tabs., 12 figs.

  16. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

    1992-10-01

    Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a heterogeneity matrix'' based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

  17. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the cooperative research program is to characterize Alaskan reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration and structure, and the development potential. The tasks completed during this period include: (1) geologic reservoir description of Endicott Field; (2) petrographic characterization of core samples taken from selected stratigraphic horizons of the West Sak and Ugnu (Brookian) wells; (3) development of a polydispersed thermodynamic model for predicting asphaltene equilibria and asphaltene precipitation from crude oil-solvent mixtures, and (4) preliminary geologic description of the Milne Point Unit.

  18. Microbial Life in an Underground Gas Storage Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombach, Petra; van Almsick, Tobias; Richnow, Hans H.; Zenner, Matthias; Krüger, Martin

    2015-04-01

    While underground gas storage is technically well established for decades, the presence and activity of microorganisms in underground gas reservoirs have still hardly been explored today. Microbial life in underground gas reservoirs is controlled by moderate to high temperatures, elevated pressures, the availability of essential inorganic nutrients, and the availability of appropriate chemical energy sources. Microbial activity may affect the geochemical conditions and the gas composition in an underground reservoir by selective removal of anorganic and organic components from the stored gas and the formation water as well as by generation of metabolic products. From an economic point of view, microbial activities can lead to a loss of stored gas accompanied by a pressure decline in the reservoir, damage of technical equipment by biocorrosion, clogging processes through precipitates and biomass accumulation, and reservoir souring due to a deterioration of the gas quality. We present here results from molecular and cultivation-based methods to characterize microbial communities inhabiting a porous rock gas storage reservoir located in Southern Germany. Four reservoir water samples were obtained from three different geological horizons characterized by an ambient reservoir temperature of about 45 °C and an ambient reservoir pressure of about 92 bar at the time of sampling. A complementary water sample was taken at a water production well completed in a respective horizon but located outside the gas storage reservoir. Microbial community analysis by Illumina Sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated the presence of phylogenetically diverse microbial communities of high compositional heterogeneity. In three out of four samples originating from the reservoir, the majority of bacterial sequences affiliated with members of the genera Eubacterium, Acetobacterium and Sporobacterium within Clostridiales, known for their fermenting capabilities. In

  19. Successful flow testing of a gas reservoir in 3,500 feet of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaughnessy, J.M.; Carpenter, R.S.; Coleman, R.A.; Jackson, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    The test of Viosca Knoll Block 957 Well No. 1 Sidetrack No. 2 was Amoco Production Co.'s deepest test from a floating rig. Viosca Knoll 957 is 115 miles southeast of New Orleans in 3,500 ft of water. The test, at a record water depth for the Gulf of Mexico, also set a world water-depth record for testing a gas reservoir. Safety to crew and the environmental were top priorities during the planning. A team consisting of drilling, completion, reservoir, and facilities engineers and a foreman were assigned to plan and implement the test. Early planning involved field, service company, and engineering groups. Every effort was made to identify potential problems and to design the system to handle them. This paper reports that the goals of the test were to determine reservoir properties and reservoir limits. Several significant challenges were involved in the well test. The reservoir was gas with a potentially significant condensate yield. The ability to dispose of the large volumes of produced fluids safely without polluting was critical to maintaining uninterrupted flow. Potential shut-in surface pressure was 6,500 psi. Seafloor temperature in 3,500 ft of water was 39 degrees F

  20. Gas adsorption and capillary condensation in nanoporous alumina films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casanova, Felix; Chiang, Casey E; Li, Chang-Peng; Roshchin, Igor V; Schuller, Ivan K [Physics Department, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Ruminski, Anne M; Sailor, Michael J [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)], E-mail: casanova@physics.ucsd.edu

    2008-08-06

    Gas adsorption and capillary condensation of organic vapors are studied by optical interferometry, using anodized nanoporous alumina films with controlled geometry (cylindrical pores with diameters in the range of 10-60 nm). The optical response of the film is optimized with respect to the geometric parameters of the pores, for potential performance as a gas sensor device. The average thickness of the adsorbed film at low relative pressures is not affected by the pore size. Capillary evaporation of the liquid from the nanopores occurs at the liquid-vapor equilibrium described by the classical Kelvin equation with a hemispherical meniscus. Due to the almost complete wetting, we can quantitatively describe the condensation for isopropanol using the Cohan model with a cylindrical meniscus in the Kelvin equation. This model describes the observed hysteresis and allows us to use the adsorption branch of the isotherm to calculate the pore size distribution of the sample in good agreement with independent structural measurements. The condensation for toluene lacks reproducibility due to incomplete surface wetting. This exemplifies the relevant role of the fluid-solid (van der Waals) interactions in the hysteretic behavior of capillary condensation.

  1. Gas adsorption and capillary condensation in nanoporous alumina films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casanova, Felix; Chiang, Casey E; Li, Chang-Peng; Roshchin, Igor V; Schuller, Ivan K; Ruminski, Anne M; Sailor, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Gas adsorption and capillary condensation of organic vapors are studied by optical interferometry, using anodized nanoporous alumina films with controlled geometry (cylindrical pores with diameters in the range of 10-60 nm). The optical response of the film is optimized with respect to the geometric parameters of the pores, for potential performance as a gas sensor device. The average thickness of the adsorbed film at low relative pressures is not affected by the pore size. Capillary evaporation of the liquid from the nanopores occurs at the liquid-vapor equilibrium described by the classical Kelvin equation with a hemispherical meniscus. Due to the almost complete wetting, we can quantitatively describe the condensation for isopropanol using the Cohan model with a cylindrical meniscus in the Kelvin equation. This model describes the observed hysteresis and allows us to use the adsorption branch of the isotherm to calculate the pore size distribution of the sample in good agreement with independent structural measurements. The condensation for toluene lacks reproducibility due to incomplete surface wetting. This exemplifies the relevant role of the fluid-solid (van der Waals) interactions in the hysteretic behavior of capillary condensation

  2. Gas adsorption and capillary condensation in nanoporous alumina films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Fèlix; Chiang, Casey E; Li, Chang-Peng; Roshchin, Igor V; Ruminski, Anne M; Sailor, Michael J; Schuller, Ivan K

    2008-08-06

    Gas adsorption and capillary condensation of organic vapors are studied by optical interferometry, using anodized nanoporous alumina films with controlled geometry (cylindrical pores with diameters in the range of 10-60 nm). The optical response of the film is optimized with respect to the geometric parameters of the pores, for potential performance as a gas sensor device. The average thickness of the adsorbed film at low relative pressures is not affected by the pore size. Capillary evaporation of the liquid from the nanopores occurs at the liquid-vapor equilibrium described by the classical Kelvin equation with a hemispherical meniscus. Due to the almost complete wetting, we can quantitatively describe the condensation for isopropanol using the Cohan model with a cylindrical meniscus in the Kelvin equation. This model describes the observed hysteresis and allows us to use the adsorption branch of the isotherm to calculate the pore size distribution of the sample in good agreement with independent structural measurements. The condensation for toluene lacks reproducibility due to incomplete surface wetting. This exemplifies the relevant role of the fluid-solid (van der Waals) interactions in the hysteretic behavior of capillary condensation.

  3. Liquid petroleum gas fracturing fluids for unconventional gas reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, R.S.; Funkhouser, G.P.; Watkins, H.; Attaway, D. [Halliburton Energy Services, Calgary, AB (Canada); Lestz, R.S.; Wilson, L. [Chevron Canada Resources, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    This paper presented details of a gelled liquid petroleum gas (LPG) based fracturing fluid designed to address phase trapping concerns by replacing water with a mixture of LPG and a volatile hydrocarbon fluid. The system eliminates the need for water, which is a growing concern in terms of its availability. In the application process, up to 100 per cent gelled LPG is used for the pad and flush. Sand slurry stages are comprised of a mixture of up to 90 per cent LPG, with the balance of the volume being a volatile hydrocarbon base fluid. The fluid system is not adversely affected by shear, which ensures that acceptable fluid rheology is delivered. Viscosity can be adjusted during the treatment because the surfactant gellant and crosslinker are run in a 1:1 ratio and have good tolerance to concentration variations. The application ratio also allows for fast and accurate visual checks on amounts pumped during the treatment. A portion of the LPG in the fluid can be reproduced as a gas, while the remaining LPG is dissolved in the hydrocarbon fluid and is produced back as a miscible mixture through the use of a methane drive mechanism. Clean-up is facilitated by eliminating water and having LPG as up to 80-90 per cent of the total fluid system, even when wells have low permeability and reservoir pressure. However, LPG and optimized base oils are more expensive than other fluids. It was concluded that the higher costs of the system can be recovered through eliminating the need for swabbing, coiled tubing and nitrogen. Higher final stabilized productions rates may also offset initial costs. 7 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  4. Accounting for Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearly three decades of research has demonstrated that the impoundment of rivers and the flooding of terrestrial ecosystems behind dams can increase rates of greenhouse gas emission, particularly methane. The 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories includes ...

  5. The effect of non-condensable gas on direct contact condensation of steam/air mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. C.; Park, S. K.; Kim, M. H.

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the effects of noncondensable gas on the direct contact film condensation of vapor mixture, a series of experiments has been carried out. The rectangular duct inclined 87.deg. to the horizontal plane was used for this experiment. The average heat transfer coefficient of the steam-air mixture was obtained at the atmospheric pressure with four main parameters, air-mass fraction, vapor velocity, film Reynolds number,and the degree of water film subcooling having an influence on the condensation heat transfer coefficient. With the analysis on 88 cases of experiments, a correlation of the average Nusselt number for direct contact film condensation of steam-air mixture at a vertical wall proposed as functions of film Reynolds number, mixture Reynolds number, air mass fraction, and Jacob number. The average heat transfer coefficient for steam-air mixture condensation decreased significantly while air mass fraction increases with the same inlet mixture velocity and inlet film temperature. The average heat transfer coefficients also decreased with the degree of film subcooling increasing and were scarcely affected by film Reynolds number below the mixture Reynolds number about 30,000

  6. Simulation study to determine the feasibility of injecting hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen gas injection to improve gas and oil recovery oil-rim reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Mohamed El Gohary

    This study is combining two important and complicated processes; Enhanced Oil Recovery, EOR, from the oil rim and Enhanced Gas Recovery, EGR from the gas cap using nonhydrocarbon injection gases. EOR is proven technology that is continuously evolving to meet increased demand and oil production and desire to augment oil reserves. On the other hand, the rapid growth of the industrial and urban development has generated an unprecedented power demand, particularly during summer months. The required gas supplies to meet this demand are being stretched. To free up gas supply, alternative injectants to hydrocarbon gas are being reviewed to support reservoir pressure and maximize oil and gas recovery in oil rim reservoirs. In this study, a multi layered heterogeneous gas reservoir with an oil rim was selected to identify the most optimized development plan for maximum oil and gas recovery. The integrated reservoir characterization model and the pertinent transformed reservoir simulation history matched model were quality assured and quality checked. The development scheme is identified, in which the pattern and completion of the wells are optimized to best adapt to the heterogeneity of the reservoir. Lateral and maximum block contact holes will be investigated. The non-hydrocarbon gases considered for this study are hydrogen sulphide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen, utilized to investigate miscible and immiscible EOR processes. In November 2010, re-vaporization study, was completed successfully, the first in the UAE, with an ultimate objective is to examine the gas and condensate production in gas reservoir using non hydrocarbon gases. Field development options and proces schemes as well as reservoir management and long term business plans including phases of implementation will be identified and assured. The development option that maximizes the ultimate recovery factor will be evaluated and selected. The study achieved satisfactory results in integrating gas and oil

  7. Bose-Einstein condensation in the relativistic ideal Bose gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grether, M; de Llano, M; Baker, George A

    2007-11-16

    The Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) critical temperature in a relativistic ideal Bose gas of identical bosons, with and without the antibosons expected to be pair-produced abundantly at sufficiently hot temperatures, is exactly calculated for all boson number densities, all boson point rest masses, and all temperatures. The Helmholtz free energy at the critical BEC temperature is lower with antibosons, thus implying that omitting antibosons always leads to the computation of a metastable state.

  8. Bose-Einstein Condensation in the Relativistic Ideal Bose Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grether, M.; Llano, M. de; Baker, George A. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) critical temperature in a relativistic ideal Bose gas of identical bosons, with and without the antibosons expected to be pair-produced abundantly at sufficiently hot temperatures, is exactly calculated for all boson number densities, all boson point rest masses, and all temperatures. The Helmholtz free energy at the critical BEC temperature is lower with antibosons, thus implying that omitting antibosons always leads to the computation of a metastable state

  9. Tracing the External Origin of the AGN Gas Fueling Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra I. Raimundo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Near-infrared observations of the active galaxy MCG–6-30-15 provide strong evidence that its molecular gas fueling reservoir is of external origin. MCG–6-30-15 has a counter-rotating core of stars within its central 400 pc and a counter-rotating disc of molecular gas that extends as close as ~50–100 pc from the central black hole. The gas counter-rotation establishes that the gas reservoir in the center of the galaxy originates from a past external accretion event. In this contribution we discuss the gas and stellar properties of MCG–6-30-15, its past history and how the findings on this galaxy can be used to understand AGN fueling in S0 galaxies with counter-rotating structures.

  10. Mechanistic Processes Controlling Gas Sorption in Shale Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaef, T.; Loring, J.; Ilton, E. S.; Davidson, C. L.; Owen, T.; Hoyt, D.; Glezakou, V. A.; McGrail, B. P.; Thompson, C.

    2014-12-01

    Utilization of CO2 to stimulate natural gas production in previously fractured shale-dominated reservoirs where CO2 remains in place for long-term storage may be an attractive new strategy for reducing the cost of managing anthropogenic CO2. A preliminary analysis of capacities and potential revenues in US shale plays suggests nearly 390 tcf in additional gas recovery may be possible via CO2 driven enhanced gas recovery. However, reservoir transmissivity properties, optimum gas recovery rates, and ultimate fate of CO2 vary among reservoirs, potentially increasing operational costs and environmental risks. In this paper, we identify key mechanisms controlling the sorption of CH4 and CO2 onto phyllosilicates and processes occurring in mixed gas systems that have the potential of impacting fluid transfer and CO2 storage in shale dominated formations. Through a unique set of in situ experimental techniques coupled with molecular-level simulations, we identify structural transformations occurring to clay minerals, optimal CO2/CH4 gas exchange conditions, and distinguish between adsorbed and intercalated gases in a mixed gas system. For example, based on in situ measurements with magic angle spinning NMR, intercalation of CO2 within the montmorillonite structure occurs in CH4/CO2 gas mixtures containing low concentrations (hydrocarbon recovery processes.

  11. Field synergy characteristics in condensation heat transfer with non-condensable gas over a horizontal tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxia Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Field synergy characteristics in condensation heat transfer with non-condensable gas (NCG over a horizontal tube were numerically simulated. Consequently, synergy angles between velocity and pressure or temperature gradient fields, gas film layer thickness, and induced velocity and shear stress on gas–liquid interface were obtained. Results show that synergy angles between velocity and temperature gradient fields are within 73.2°–88.7° and ascend slightly with the increment in mainstream velocity and that the synergy is poor. However, the synergy angle between velocity and pressure gradient fields decreases intensively with the increase in mainstream velocity at θ ≤ 30°, thereby improving the pressure loss. As NCG mass fraction increases, the gas film layer thickness enlarges and the induced velocity and shear stress on gas–liquid interface decreases. The synergy angles between velocity and temperature gradient fields increase, and the synergy angles between velocity and pressure gradient fields change at θ = 70°, decrease at θ 70°. When the horizontal tube circumference angle increases, the synergy angles between velocity and temperature or pressure gradient fields decrease, the synergy between velocity and pressure fields enhances, and the synergy between velocity and temperature fields degrades.

  12. Condensers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrieux, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    Characteristics of the condenser cooling waters of various French 900 MW nuclear power plants. Design and description of various types of condensers: condensers feeded directly with river water, condensers feeded by cooling towers, condensers feeded with sea water of brackish water. Presentation of the main problems encountered with the brass bundles (ammoniacal corrosion, erosion of the peripheral tubes, vibrations of the tubes), with the titanium bundles, with the tubular plates, the tubes-tubular plates assemblies, the coatings of the condenser water chamber (sea water), the vapor by-pass and with the air inlet. Analysis of the in service performances such as condensation pressure, oxygen content and availability [fr

  13. Condensation in gas transmission pipelines. Phase behavior of mixtures of hydrogen with natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schouten, J.A.; Michels, J.P.J. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Inst.; Rosmalen, R.J. van [Energy, Roden (Netherlands)

    2005-05-01

    Several pressure and temperature reductions occur along gas transmission lines. Since the pressure and temperature conditions of the natural gas in the pipeline are often close to the dew point curve, liquid dropout can occur. Injection of hydrogen into the natural gas will change the phase envelope and thus the liquid dropout. This condensation of the heavy hydrocarbons requires continuous operational attention and a positive effect of hydrogen may affect the decision to introduce hydrogen. In this paper we report on calculations of the amount of condensate in a natural gas and in this natural gas mixed with 16.7% hydrogen. These calculations have been performed at conditions prevailing in gas transport lines. The results will be used to discuss the difference in liquid dropout in a natural gas and in a mixture with hydrogen at pressure reduction stations, at crossings under waterways, at side-branching, and at separators in the pipelines. (author)

  14. The pyrolysis of gas condensate at the Shatlyk field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magaril, R.Z.; Khankuliyev, K.; Kul' zhayev, B.A.; Sergiyenko, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    The continuing growth in industrial demand for lower olefins for the manufacture of polymer materials has necessitated an expansion in the manufacture of ethylene. Gas condensate may serve as a source of ethylene manufacturing. The influence of the contact temperature and time in the pyrolysis of unseparated condensate from the Shatlyk field on the yield of lower olefins was investigated. It was discovered that the total yield of lower olefins (C2-C4) increases with an increase in the pyrolysis temperature, reaching a maximum of 63 to 67 percent by weight at a temperature of 1098 degrees Kelvin and contact time of .5 to .7 seconds, and at 1123 degrees Kelvin and .3 seconds, the maximum ethylene yield (40 percent) was obtained at 1123 degrees Kelvin, and at all previously noted temperatures with a contact time of .9 seconds.

  15. Development and operation of Northern Natural's aquifer gas storage reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinson, E V

    1969-01-01

    There are no depleted (or nondepleted) oil and gas fields in Northern Natural Gas Co.'s market area. Consequently, when the search was started for a possible underground field, the company had to resort to the possibility of locating a water-filled, porous-rock formation (aquifer) in a geological structure which would form a suitable trap for gas storage. Geological research and exploratory drilling was carried on in S. Minnesota, E. Nebraska, and W.-central Iowa. An area located about 40 miles northwest of Des Moines, Iowa, near Redfield, appeared to have the most desirable characteristics for development of a gas-storage field. Drilling of deep developmental wells was started in late 1953 on a double- plunging anticline. The geological structure is similar to that of many oil and gas fields, but the porous formations contained only fresh water. To date, 2 major reservoirs and a minor reservoir have been developed in this structure. As much as 120 billion cu ft has been stored in the 3 reservoirs which supplied 43 billion cu ft gas withdrawals this past season from a total of 85 wells. A second aquifer gas-storage field is under development in N.-central Iowa about 15 miles northeast of Ft. Dodge.

  16. A new algorithm predicts pressure and temperature profiles of gas/gas-condensate transmission pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhatab, Saied [OIEC - Oil Industries' Engineering and Construction Group, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vatani, Ali [University of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    The main objective of the present study has been the development of a relatively simple analytical algorithm for predicting flow temperature and pressure profiles along the two-phase, gas/gas-condensate transmission pipelines. Results demonstrate the ability of the method to predict reasonably accurate pressure gradient and temperature gradient profiles under operating conditions. (author)

  17. CO2 storage in depleted gas reservoirs: A study on the effect of residual gas saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Raza

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Depleted gas reservoirs are recognized as the most promising candidate for carbon dioxide storage. Primary gas production followed by injection of carbon dioxide after depletion is the strategy adopted for secondary gas recovery and storage practices. This strategy, however, depends on the injection strategy, reservoir characteristics and operational parameters. There have been many studies to-date discussing critical factors influencing the storage performance in depleted gas reservoirs while little attention was given to the effect of residual gas. In this paper, an attempt was made to highlight the importance of residual gas on the capacity, injectivity, reservoir pressurization, and trapping mechanisms of storage sites through the use of numerical simulation. The results obtained indicated that the storage performance is proportionally linked to the amount of residual gas in the medium and reservoirs with low residual fluids are a better choice for storage purposes. Therefore, it would be wise to perform the secondary recovery before storage in order to have the least amount of residual gas in the medium. Although the results of this study are useful to screen depleted gas reservoirs for the storage purpose, more studies are required to confirm the finding presented in this paper.

  18. A CFD study of wave influence on film steam condensation in the presence of non-condensable gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xianmao, E-mail: xm-wang11@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Chang, Huajian, E-mail: changhj@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Corradini, Michael, E-mail: corradini@engr.wisc.edu [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A condensation model is incorporated in the ANSYS FLUENT. • Different turbulence models are evaluated for flows over wavy surfaces. • Wavy surfaces with and without moving velocities are used to model the wave. • Various wavy surfaces with different wave heights and wavelengths are selected. • Wave influence on film steam condensation is investigated. - Abstract: Steam condensation plays an important role in removing heat from the containment of a nuclear plant during postulated accidents. However, due to the presence of non-condensable gases such as air and hydrogen in the containment, the condensation rate can decrease dramatically. Under certain conditions, the condensate film on the cold containment walls can affect the overall heat transfer rate. The wavy interface of the condensate film is a factor and is usually believed to enhance the condensation rate, since the waves can both increase the interfacial area and disturb the non-condensable gas boundary layer. However, it is not clear how to properly account for this factor and what is its quantitative influence in experiments. In this work, a CFD approach is applied to study the wave effects on film condensation in the presence of non-condensable gas. Wavy surfaces with and without moving velocities are used to replace the wavy interface of the falling film. A condensation model is incorporated in the ANSYS FLUENT simulation and a realizable k–ε turbulence model is applied. Various wavy surfaces with different wave heights and wavelengths are selected to conduct numerical experiments with a wide range of gas velocities. The results show that the wave structure can enhance condensation rate up to ten percent mainly due to the alteration of local flow structures in the gas phase. The increments of the condensation rate due to the wavy interface can vary with different gas velocities. The investigation shows that a multiplication factor accounts for the wave effects on film

  19. Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, D.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Nico, P.

    2010-11-30

    Tight gas sands are unconventional hydrocarbon energy resource storing large volume of natural gas. Microscopy and 3D imaging of reservoir samples at different scales and resolutions provide insights into the coaredo not significantly smaller in size than conventional sandstones, the extremely dense grain packing makes the pore space tortuous, and the porosity is small. In some cases the inter-granular void space is presented by micron-scale slits, whose geometry requires imaging at submicron resolutions. Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations simulate different scenarios of capillary-equilibrium two-phase fluid displacement. For tight sands, the simulations predict an unusually low wetting fluid saturation threshold, at which the non-wetting phase becomes disconnected. Flow simulations in combination with Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations evaluate relative permeability curves. The computations show that at the threshold saturation, when the nonwetting fluid becomes disconnected, the flow of both fluids is practically blocked. The nonwetting phase is immobile due to the disconnectedness, while the permeability to the wetting phase remains essentially equal to zero due to the pore space geometry. This observation explains the Permeability Jail, which was defined earlier by others. The gas is trapped by capillarity, and the brine is immobile due to the dynamic effects. At the same time, in drainage, simulations predict that the mobility of at least one of the fluids is greater than zero at all saturations. A pore-scale model of gas condensate dropout predicts the rate to be proportional to the scalar product of the fluid velocity and pressure gradient. The narrowest constriction in the flow path is subject to the highest rate of condensation. The pore-scale model naturally upscales to the Panfilov's Darcy-scale model, which implies that the condensate dropout rate is proportional to the pressure gradient squared. Pressure gradient is the greatest near the

  20. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-30

    In March, work continued on characterizing probabilities for determining natural fracturing associated with the GGRB for the Upper Cretaceous tight gas plays. Structural complexity, based on potential field data and remote sensing data was completed. A resource estimate for the Frontier and Mesa Verde play was also completed. Further, work was also conducted to determine threshold economics for the play based on limited current production in the plays in the Wamsutter Ridge area. These analyses culminated in a presentation at FETC on 24 March 1999 where quantified natural fracture domains, mapped on a partition basis, which establish ''sweet spot'' probability for natural fracturing, were reviewed. That presentation is reproduced here as Appendix 1. The work plan for the quarter of January 1, 1999--March 31, 1999 comprised five tasks: (1) Evaluation of the GGRB partitions for structural complexity that can be associated with natural fractures, (2) Continued resource analysis of the balance of the partitions to determine areas with higher relative gas richness, (3) Gas field studies, (4) Threshold resource economics to determine which partitions would be the most prospective, and (5) Examination of the area around the Table Rock 4H well.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Natural Gas Flow in Anisotropic Shale Reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Negara, Ardiansyah

    2015-11-09

    Shale gas resources have received great attention in the last decade due to the decline of the conventional gas resources. Unlike conventional gas reservoirs, the gas flow in shale formations involves complex processes with many mechanisms such as Knudsen diffusion, slip flow (Klinkenberg effect), gas adsorption and desorption, strong rock-fluid interaction, etc. Shale formations are characterized by the tiny porosity and extremely low-permeability such that the Darcy equation may no longer be valid. Therefore, the Darcy equation needs to be revised through the permeability factor by introducing the apparent permeability. With respect to the rock formations, several studies have shown the existence of anisotropy in shale reservoirs, which is an essential feature that has been established as a consequence of the different geological processes over long period of time. Anisotropy of hydraulic properties of subsurface rock formations plays a significant role in dictating the direction of fluid flow. The direction of fluid flow is not only dependent on the direction of pressure gradient, but it also depends on the principal directions of anisotropy. Therefore, it is very important to take into consideration anisotropy when modeling gas flow in shale reservoirs. In this work, the gas flow mechanisms as mentioned earlier together with anisotropy are incorporated into the dual-porosity dual-permeability model through the full-tensor apparent permeability. We employ the multipoint flux approximation (MPFA) method to handle the full-tensor apparent permeability. We combine MPFA method with the experimenting pressure field approach, i.e., a newly developed technique that enables us to solve the global problem by breaking it into a multitude of local problems. This approach generates a set of predefined pressure fields in the solution domain in such a way that the undetermined coefficients are calculated from these pressure fields. In other words, the matrix of coefficients

  2. Numerical Simulation of Natural Gas Flow in Anisotropic Shale Reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Negara, Ardiansyah; Salama, Amgad; Sun, Shuyu; Elgassier, Mokhtar; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2015-01-01

    Shale gas resources have received great attention in the last decade due to the decline of the conventional gas resources. Unlike conventional gas reservoirs, the gas flow in shale formations involves complex processes with many mechanisms such as Knudsen diffusion, slip flow (Klinkenberg effect), gas adsorption and desorption, strong rock-fluid interaction, etc. Shale formations are characterized by the tiny porosity and extremely low-permeability such that the Darcy equation may no longer be valid. Therefore, the Darcy equation needs to be revised through the permeability factor by introducing the apparent permeability. With respect to the rock formations, several studies have shown the existence of anisotropy in shale reservoirs, which is an essential feature that has been established as a consequence of the different geological processes over long period of time. Anisotropy of hydraulic properties of subsurface rock formations plays a significant role in dictating the direction of fluid flow. The direction of fluid flow is not only dependent on the direction of pressure gradient, but it also depends on the principal directions of anisotropy. Therefore, it is very important to take into consideration anisotropy when modeling gas flow in shale reservoirs. In this work, the gas flow mechanisms as mentioned earlier together with anisotropy are incorporated into the dual-porosity dual-permeability model through the full-tensor apparent permeability. We employ the multipoint flux approximation (MPFA) method to handle the full-tensor apparent permeability. We combine MPFA method with the experimenting pressure field approach, i.e., a newly developed technique that enables us to solve the global problem by breaking it into a multitude of local problems. This approach generates a set of predefined pressure fields in the solution domain in such a way that the undetermined coefficients are calculated from these pressure fields. In other words, the matrix of coefficients

  3. Materials in flue gas condensation plants; Materialval vid roekgaskondensering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, Barbara; Nordling Magnus

    2003-02-01

    This project is the first part of a larger project. In the part reported here, materials for flue gas condensers have been investigated by contact with plant owners and suppliers and by a literature review of reported failures. If it is decided to continue with another part of the project, a number of materials will be long term tested on site. The project is complementary to an earlier project, which investigated the operating experiences from flue gas condensers in biomass fired cogeneration plants. In the project materials (steel and polymeric) suitable for long term testing in existing plants are discussed. It is proposed that testing in the second part of the project is made with material coupons in one plant fired with only biomass and one plant where biomass is co fired with other fuels. In the biomass fired plant a number of steel materials should be tested. In the co fired plant, with its harsher operating conditions, the same steel materials plus a number of polymeric materials should be tested. Materials suitable for testing are summarised in the report.

  4. Nuclear Well Log Properties of Natural Gas Hydrate Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchwell, A.; Cook, A.

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing gas hydrate in a reservoir typically involves a full suite of geophysical well logs. The most common method involves using resistivity measurements to quantify the decrease in electrically conductive water when replaced with gas hydrate. Compressional velocity measurements are also used because the gas hydrate significantly strengthens the moduli of the sediment. At many gas hydrate sites, nuclear well logs, which include the photoelectric effect, formation sigma, carbon/oxygen ratio and neutron porosity, are also collected but often not used. In fact, the nuclear response of a gas hydrate reservoir is not known. In this research we will focus on the nuclear log response in gas hydrate reservoirs at the Mallik Field at the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada, and the Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg 2 sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Nuclear logs may add increased robustness to the investigation into the properties of gas hydrates and some types of logs may offer an opportunity to distinguish between gas hydrate and permafrost. For example, a true formation sigma log measures the thermal neutron capture cross section of a formation and pore constituents; it is especially sensitive to hydrogen and chlorine in the pore space. Chlorine has a high absorption potential, and is used to determine the amount of saline water within pore spaces. Gas hydrate offers a difference in elemental composition compared to water-saturated intervals. Thus, in permafrost areas, the carbon/oxygen ratio may vary between gas hydrate and permafrost, due to the increase of carbon in gas hydrate accumulations. At the Mallik site, we observe a hydrate-bearing sand (1085-1107 m) above a water-bearing sand (1107-1140 m), which was confirmed through core samples and mud gas analysis. We observe a decrease in the photoelectric absorption of ~0.5 barnes/e-, as well as an increase in the formation sigma readings of ~5 capture units in the water-bearing sand as

  5. Policy Considerations for Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Freshwater Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Mäkinen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Emerging concern over greenhouse gas (GHG emissions from wetlands has prompted calls to address the climate impact of dams in climate policy frameworks. Existing studies indicate that reservoirs can be significant sources of emissions, particularly in tropical areas. However, knowledge on the role of dams in overall national emission levels and abatement targets is limited, which is often cited as a key reason for political inaction and delays in formulating appropriate policies. Against this backdrop, this paper discusses the current role of reservoir emissions in existing climate policy frameworks. The distance between a global impact on climate and a need for local mitigation measures creates a challenge for designing appropriate mechanisms to combat reservoir emissions. This paper presents a range of possible policy interventions at different scales that could help address the climate impact of reservoirs. Reservoir emissions need to be treated like other anthropogenic greenhouse gases. A rational treatment of the issue requires applying commonly accepted climate change policy principles as well as promoting participatory water management plans through integrated water resource management frameworks. An independent global body such as the UN system may be called upon to assess scientific information and develop GHG emissions policy at appropriate levels.

  6. Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Lekov, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Residential space and water heating accounts for over 90percent of total residential primary gas consumption in the United States. Condensing space and water heating equipment are 10-30percent more energy-efficient than conventional space and water heating. Currently, condensing gas furnaces represent 40 percent of shipments and are common in the Northern U.S. market. Meanwhile, manufacturers are planning to develop condensing gas storage water heaters to qualify for Energy Star? certificati...

  7. Condensate recovery by cycling at declining pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havlena, Z G; Griffith, J D; Pot, R; Kiel, O G

    1967-06-05

    Cycling condensate reservoirs under conditions of declining pressure, rather than constant pressure, is advantageous from both a recovery and an economic standpoint. Wet gas displaced from the swept areas is recovered concurrently with wet gas recovered by gas expansion from the unswept portions of the reservoir. Any liquid condensed in the swept areas is revaporized by dry injection gas and recovered as an enriched gas. By this mode of operation, high condensate recovery is obtained, gas sales may be possible at an earlier stage of depletion, more flexibility in field and plant operations is feasible and reduction of 15% in investment and operating costs is achieved. Injection gas requirements are reduced by 40%. The Windfall reservoir in Canada has been successfully produced in this manner, starting in 1962. It is a typical retrograde type reservoir which in 1965 represented 15% of reservoirs exploited in North America.

  8. Shale gas reservoir characterization using LWD in real time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, S.Y.; Kok, J.C.L.; Tollefsen, E.M.; Baihly, J.D.; Malpani, R.; Alford, J. [Schlumberger Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Wireline logging programs are frequently used to evaluate vertical boreholes in shale gas plays. Data logged from the vertical hole are used to define reservoir profiles for the horizontal target window. The horizontal wells are then steered based on gamma ray measurements obtained using correlations against the vertical pilot wells. Logging-while-drilling tools are used in bottom hole assemblies (BHA) to ensure accurate well placement and to perform detailed reservoir characterizations across the target structure. The LWD measurements are also used to avoid hazards and enhance rates of penetration. LWD can also be used to enhance trajectory placement and provide an improved understanding of reservoirs. In this study, LWD measurements were conducted at a shale gas play in order to obtain accurate well placement, formation evaluation, and completion optimization processes. The study showed how LWD measurements can be used to optimize well completion and stimulation plans by considering well positions in relation to geological targets, reservoir property changes, hydrocarbon saturation disparity, and variations in geomechanical properties. 21 refs., 13 figs.

  9. Determination of turnover and cushion gas volume of a prospected gas storage reservoir under uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubik, A. [RAG-AG Wien (Austria); Baffoe, J.; Schulze-Riegert, R. [SPT Group GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    Gas storages define a key contribution for building a reliable gas supply chain from production to consumers. In a competitive gas market with short reaction times to seasonal and other gas injection and extraction requirements, gas storages also receive a strong focus on availability and precise prediction estimates for future operation scenarios. Reservoir management workflows are increasingly built on reservoir simulation support for optimizing production schemes and estimating the impact of subsurface uncertainties on field development scenarios. Simulation models for gas storages are calibrated to geological data and accurate reproduction of historical production data are defined as a prerequisite for reliable production and performance forecasts. The underlying model validation process is called history matching, which potentially generates alternative simulation models due to prevailing geological uncertainties. In the past, a single basecase reference model was used to predict production capacities of a gas storage. The working gas volume was precisely defined over a contracted plateau delivery and the required cushion gas volume maintains the reservoir pressure during the operation. Cushion and working gas Volume are strongly dependent on reservoir parameters. In this work an existing depleted gas reservoir and the operation target as a gas storage is described. Key input data to the reservoir model description and simulation is reviewed including production history and geological uncertainties based on large well spacing, limited core and well data and a limited seismic resolution. Target delivery scenarios of the prospected gas storage are evaluated under uncertainty. As one key objective, optimal working gas and cushion gas volumes are described in a probabilistic context reflecting geological uncertainties. Several work steps are defined and included in an integrated workflow design. Equiprobable geological models are generated and evaluated based on

  10. Earthquakes and depleted gas reservoirs: which comes first?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucciarelli, M.; Donda, F.; Valensise, G.

    2015-10-01

    While scientists are paying increasing attention to the seismicity potentially induced by hydrocarbon exploitation, so far, little is known about the reverse problem, i.e. the impact of active faulting and earthquakes on hydrocarbon reservoirs. The 20 and 29 May 2012 earthquakes in Emilia, northern Italy (Mw 6.1 and 6.0), raised concerns among the public for being possibly human-induced, but also shed light on the possible use of gas wells as a marker of the seismogenic potential of an active fold and thrust belt. We compared the location, depth and production history of 455 gas wells drilled along the Ferrara-Romagna arc, a large hydrocarbon reserve in the southeastern Po Plain (northern Italy), with the location of the inferred surface projection of the causative faults of the 2012 Emilia earthquakes and of two pre-instrumental damaging earthquakes. We found that these earthquake sources fall within a cluster of sterile wells, surrounded by productive wells at a few kilometres' distance. Since the geology of the productive and sterile areas is quite similar, we suggest that past earthquakes caused the loss of all natural gas from the potential reservoirs lying above their causative faults. To validate our hypothesis we performed two different statistical tests (binomial and Monte Carlo) on the relative distribution of productive and sterile wells, with respect to seismogenic faults. Our findings have important practical implications: (1) they may allow major seismogenic sources to be singled out within large active thrust systems; (2) they suggest that reservoirs hosted in smaller anticlines are more likely to be intact; and (3) they also suggest that in order to minimize the hazard of triggering significant earthquakes, all new gas storage facilities should use exploited reservoirs rather than sterile hydrocarbon traps or aquifers.

  11. On the design of residential condensing gas boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naeslund, M.

    1997-02-01

    Two main topics are dealt with in this thesis. Firstly, the performance of condensing boilers with finned tube heat exchangers and premix burners is evaluated. Secondly, ways of avoiding condensate formation in the flue system are evaluated. In the first investigation, a transient heat transfer approach is used to predict performance of different boiler configurations connected to different heating systems. The smallest efficiency difference between heat loads and heating systems is obtained when the heat exchanger gives a small temperature difference between flue gases and return water, the heat transfer coefficient is low and the thermostat hysteresis is large. Taking into account heat exchanger size, the best boiler is one with higher heat transfer per unit area which only causes a small efficiency loss. The total heating cost at part load, including gas and electricity, has a maximum at the lowest simulated heat load. The heat supplied by the circulation heat pump is responsible for this. The second investigation evaluates methods of drying the flue gases. Reheating the flue gases in different ways and water removal in an adsorbent bed are evaluated. Reheating is tested in two specially designed boilers. The necessary reheating is calculated to approximately 100-150 deg C if an uninsulated masonry chimney is used. The tested boilers show that it is possible to design a proper boiler. The losses, stand-by and convective/radiative, must be kept at a minimum in order to obtain a high efficiency. 86 refs, 70 figs, 16 tabs

  12. A new method for calculating gas saturation of low-resistivity shale gas reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyan Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Jiaoshiba shale gas field is located in the Fuling area of the Sichuan Basin, with the Upper Ordovician Wufeng–Lower Silurian Longmaxi Fm as the pay zone. At the bottom of the pay zone, a high-quality shale gas reservoir about 20 m thick is generally developed with high organic contents and gas abundance, but its resistivity is relatively low. Accordingly, the gas saturation calculated by formulas (e.g. Archie using electric logging data is often much lower than the experiment-derived value. In this paper, a new method was presented for calculating gas saturation more accurately based on non-electric logging data. Firstly, the causes for the low resistivity of shale gas reservoirs in this area were analyzed. Then, the limitation of traditional methods for calculating gas saturation based on electric logging data was diagnosed, and the feasibility of the neutron–density porosity overlay method was illustrated. According to the response characteristics of neutron, density and other porosity logging in shale gas reservoirs, a model for calculating gas saturation of shale gas was established by core experimental calibration based on the density logging value, the density porosity and the difference between density porosity and neutron porosity, by means of multiple methods (e.g. the dual-porosity overlay method by optimizing the best overlay coefficient. This new method avoids the effect of low resistivity, and thus can provide normal calculated gas saturation of high-quality shale gas reservoirs. It works well in practical application. This new method provides a technical support for the calculation of shale gas reserves in this area. Keywords: Shale gas, Gas saturation, Low resistivity, Non-electric logging, Volume density, Compensated neutron, Overlay method, Reserves calculation, Sichuan Basin, Jiaoshiba shale gas field

  13. Seismic Modeling Of Reservoir Heterogeneity Scales: An Application To Gas Hydrate Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Bellefleur, G.; Milkereit, B.

    2008-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates, a type of inclusion compound or clathrate, are composed of gas molecules trapped within a cage of water molecules. The occurrence of gas hydrates in permafrost regions has been confirmed by core samples recovered from the Mallik gas hydrate research wells located within Mackenzie Delta in Northwest Territories of Canada. Strong vertical variations of compressional and shear sonic velocities and weak surface seismic expressions of gas hydrates indicate that lithological heterogeneities control the distribution of hydrates. Seismic scattering studies predict that typical scales and strong physical contrasts due to gas hydrate concentration will generate strong forward scattering, leaving only weak energy captured by surface receivers. In order to understand the distribution of hydrates and the seismic scattering effects, an algorithm was developed to construct heterogeneous petrophysical reservoir models. The algorithm was based on well logs showing power law features and Gaussian or Non-Gaussian probability density distribution, and was designed to honor the whole statistical features of well logs such as the characteristic scales and the correlation among rock parameters. Multi-dimensional and multi-variable heterogeneous models representing the same statistical properties were constructed and applied to the heterogeneity analysis of gas hydrate reservoirs. The petrophysical models provide the platform to estimate rock physics properties as well as to study the impact of seismic scattering, wave mode conversion, and their integration on wave behavior in heterogeneous reservoirs. Using the Biot-Gassmann theory, the statistical parameters obtained from Mallik 5L-38, and the correlation length estimated from acoustic impedance inversion, gas hydrate volume fraction in Mallik area was estimated to be 1.8%, approximately 2x108 m3 natural gas stored in a hydrate bearing interval within 0.25 km2 lateral extension and between 889 m and 1115 m depth

  14. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Hydroelectric Reservoirs in Tropical Regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinguelli Rosa, L.; Aurelio dos Santos, M.; Oliveira dos Santos, E.; Matvienko, B.; Sikar, E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses emissions by power-dams in the tropics. Greenhouse gas emissions from tropical power-dams are produced underwater through biomass decomposition by bacteria. The gases produced in these dams are mainly nitrogen, carbon dioxide and methane. A methodology was established for measuring greenhouse gases emitted by various power-dams in Brazil. Experimental measurements of gas emissions by dams were made to determine accurately their emissions of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) gases through bubbles formed on the lake bottom by decomposing organic matter, as well as rising up the lake gradient by molecular diffusion. The main source of gas in power-dams reservoirs is the bacterial decomposition (aerobic and anaerobic) of autochthonous and allochthonous organic matter that basically produces CO2 and CH4. The types and modes of gas production and release in the tropics are reviewed

  15. Control systems for condensing flue-gas coolers related to natural-gas-fired heating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krighaar, M.; Paulsen, O.

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical study is made of the enthalpy-efficiency for a water-cooled heat exchanger added to a natural gas-fired boiler. Under varying conditions of both water flow and temperature and flue-gas flow and temperature, both in condensing and non-condensing mode, the efficiency seems to be constant. The result is very useful for comparison between two different working conditions. The efficiency is used to calculate the savings achieved for a district heating plant by using a heat exchanger. The energy economic calculations are also helpful for estimating the most appropriate size of heat exchanger. The annual savings are calculated by means of data regarding heat production, flue gas temperature and water return temperature. The savings achieved by using different connection principles such as bypass, reheating and controlled water temperature are also calculated. (author)

  16. The Noble Gas Fingerprint in a UK Unconventional Gas Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKavney, Rory; Gilfillan, Stuart; Györe, Domokos; Stuart, Fin

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, there has been an unprecedented expansion in the development of unconventional hydrocarbon resources. Concerns have arisen about the effect of this new industry on groundwater quality, particularly focussing on hydraulic fracturing, the technique used to increase the permeability of the targeted tight shale formations. Methane contamination of groundwater has been documented in areas of gas production1 but conclusively linking this to fugitive emissions from unconventional hydrocarbon production has been controversial2. A lack of baseline measurements taken before drilling, and the equivocal interpretation of geochemical data hamper the determination of possible contamination. Common techniques for "fingerprinting" gas from discrete sources rely on gas composition and isotopic ratios of elements within hydrocarbons (e.g. δ13CCH4), but the original signatures can be masked by biological and gas transport processes. The noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) are inert and controlled only by their physical properties. They exist in trace quantities in natural gases and are sourced from 3 isotopically distinct environments (atmosphere, crust and mantle)3. They are decoupled from the biosphere, and provide a separate toolbox to investigate the numerous sources and migration pathways of natural gases, and have found recent utility in the CCS4 and unconventional gas5 industries. Here we present a brief overview of noble gas data obtained from a new coal bed methane (CBM) field, Central Scotland. We show that the high concentration of helium is an ideal fingerprint for tracing fugitive gas migration to a shallow groundwater. The wells show variation in the noble gas signatures that can be attributed to differences in formation water pumping from the coal seams as the field has been explored for future commercial development. Dewatering the seams alters the gas/water ratio and the degree to which noble gases degas from the formation water. Additionally the

  17. Effect of non-condensable gas on steady-state operation of a loop thermosyphon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Jiang; Lin, Guiping; Bai, Lizhan; Miao, Jianyin; Zhang, Hongxing; Wang, Lu

    2014-01-01

    Non-condensable gas (NCG) generated inside two-phase heat transfer devices can adversely affect the thermal performance and limit the lifetime of such devices. In this work, extensive experimental investigation of the effect of NCG on the steady-state operation of an ammonia-stainless steel loop thermosyphon was conducted. In the experiments, nitrogen was injected into the loop thermosyphon as NCG, and the thermal performance of the loop thermosyphon was tested at different NCG inventories, heat loads applied to the evaporator and condenser cooling conditions, i.e. natural air cooling or circulating ethanol cooling. Experimental results reveal that NCG elevates the steady-state operating temperature of the evaporator, especially when the loop thermosyphon is operating in the low temperature range; meanwhile, the more NCG exists in the loop thermosyphon, the higher the operating temperature of the evaporator, and the lower the reservoir temperature. In addition, the existence of NCG results in the decrease of the overall thermal conductance of the loop thermosyphon, and the overall thermal conductance under the ethanol cooling condition may be even lower than that under the air cooling condition when the heat load is smaller than a certain value. Finally, the experimental results are theoretically analysed and explained. (authors)

  18. Study on condensation of biomass pyrolysis gas by spray bio-oil droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Kun; Cheng, Wen-Long [University of Science and Technology of China (China)], email: wlcheng@ustc.edu.cn; Chen, Jing [Anhui Electric Power Design Institute (China); Shi, Wen-Jing [Anhui Heli Co., Ltd (China)

    2011-07-01

    This is a study of bio-oil generated by fast pyrolysis; a biomass feedstock is heated to pyrolyze at a rapid rate, the gas pyrolyzed is then condensed rapidly. The interesting result is a potential alternative fuel oil. An analysis was made of the effects of the initial pyrolysis gas temperatures, the initial bio-oil droplets temperatures and diameters, and the flow ratio of the gas and the liquid droplets on the heat and mass transfer between the gas and the liquid droplets. A few criterion equations were achieved with respect to the spray condenser. This paper established the gas-liquid phase equilibrium of an aqueous multi-composition system and the spray condensation model coupling heat and mass transfer. Model calculation and analysis showed that: spray condensation can effectively cool the high-temperature pyrolysis gas quickly; with gas liquid flowing, mass transfer rate reduces; and the relationship of gas and liquid flow ratio can achieve good accuracy.

  19. Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blunt, Martin J.; Orr, Franklin M.

    1999-05-17

    This report describes research carried out in the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Stanford University from September 1997 - September 1998 under the second year of a three-year grant from the Department of Energy on the "Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs." The research effort is an integrated study of the factors affecting gas injection, from the pore scale to the field scale, and involves theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments, and numerical simulation. The original proposal described research in four areas: (1) Pore scale modeling of three phase flow in porous media; (2) Laboratory experiments and analysis of factors influencing gas injection performance at the core scale with an emphasis on the fundamentals of three phase flow; (3) Benchmark simulations of gas injection at the field scale; and (4) Development of streamline-based reservoir simulator. Each state of the research is planned to provide input and insight into the next stage, such that at the end we should have an integrated understanding of the key factors affecting field scale displacements.

  20. 30 CFR 250.1157 - How do I receive approval to produce gas-cap gas from an oil reservoir with an associated gas cap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I receive approval to produce gas-cap gas from an oil reservoir with an associated gas cap? 250.1157 Section 250.1157 Mineral Resources... do I receive approval to produce gas-cap gas from an oil reservoir with an associated gas cap? (a...

  1. Study of condensate composition during field processing of gas of the Shatlyk field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuldzhayev, B.A.; Annamukhamedov, M.B.; Makarov, V.V.; Serbnenko, S.R.; Talalayev, Ye.I.

    1983-01-01

    Studies were made of the composition and properties of condensates from field separators of the East Shatlyk field. The expediency is shown of separate collection of the condensates into a separate container and used for local needs as the diesel fuel. The condensates from the UNTS separators are used as chemical raw material to produce the lowest olephins by pyrolysis of gas-oil fraction and normal paraffins from kerosene-gas-oil part to obtain the protein-vitamin concentrates.

  2. TRACE assessment on local condensation heat transfer in presence of non-condensable gas inside a vertical tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yong Jin; Ahn, Seung Hoon; Kim, Kap; Kim, Hho Jung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    TRACE assessment was performed to investigate local condensation heat transfer coefficients in the presence of a noncondensable gas inside a vertical tube. The data obtained from pure steam and steam/nitrogen mixture condensation experiments were compared to study the effects of noncondensable nitrogen gas on the annular film condensation phenomena. The condenser tube had a small inner diameter of 13mm (about 1/2-in.) and this experiment had been performed to prove the effectiveness of the a Passive Residual Heat Removal System (PRHRS) of SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor), which is a small modular integral-type pressurized water reactor that is developed for the dual purposes of seawater desalination and small-scaled power generation. In the case of nitrogen presence, TRACE results show the converged results but the prediction is different from experimental data. The candidate reasons can be focused on several models, such as the film thickness calculation, surface area, and condensation heat transfer correlations, etc. In the case of pure steam condensation case, TRACE results shows large oscillations and do not converge. This should be investigated in detail to identify the reason. Until now, the oscillation in thermal hydraulic parameters results from the film thickness calculation and surface area calculation. For future works, the whole sets of the experiment will be assessed and the improvement of TRACE will be performed.

  3. TRACE assessment on local condensation heat transfer in presence of non-condensable gas inside a vertical tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Jin; Ahn, Seung Hoon; Kim, Kap; Kim, Hho Jung

    2009-01-01

    TRACE assessment was performed to investigate local condensation heat transfer coefficients in the presence of a noncondensable gas inside a vertical tube. The data obtained from pure steam and steam/nitrogen mixture condensation experiments were compared to study the effects of noncondensable nitrogen gas on the annular film condensation phenomena. The condenser tube had a small inner diameter of 13mm (about 1/2-in.) and this experiment had been performed to prove the effectiveness of the a Passive Residual Heat Removal System (PRHRS) of SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor), which is a small modular integral-type pressurized water reactor that is developed for the dual purposes of seawater desalination and small-scaled power generation. In the case of nitrogen presence, TRACE results show the converged results but the prediction is different from experimental data. The candidate reasons can be focused on several models, such as the film thickness calculation, surface area, and condensation heat transfer correlations, etc. In the case of pure steam condensation case, TRACE results shows large oscillations and do not converge. This should be investigated in detail to identify the reason. Until now, the oscillation in thermal hydraulic parameters results from the film thickness calculation and surface area calculation. For future works, the whole sets of the experiment will be assessed and the improvement of TRACE will be performed

  4. Advanced Gas Hydrate Reservoir Modeling Using Rock Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Daniel

    2017-12-30

    Prospecting for high saturation gas hydrate deposits can be greatly aided with improved approaches to seismic interpretation and especially if sets of seismic attributes can be shown as diagnostic or direct hydrocarbon indicators for high saturation gas hydrates in sands that would be of most interest for gas hydrate production.

    A large 3D seismic data set in the deep water Eastern Gulf of Mexico was screened for gas hydrates using a set of techniques and seismic signatures that were developed and proven in the Central deepwater Gulf of Mexico in the DOE Gulf of Mexico Joint Industry Project JIP Leg II in 2009 and recently confirmed with coring in 2017.

    A large gas hydrate deposit is interpreted in the data where gas has migrated from one of the few deep seated faults plumbing the Jurassic hydrocarbon source into the gas hydrate stability zone. The gas hydrate deposit lies within a flat-lying within Pliocene Mississippi Fan channel that was deposited outboard in a deep abyssal environment. The uniform architecture of the channel aided the evaluation of a set of seismic attributes that relate to attenuation and thin-bed energy that could be diagnostic of gas hydrates. Frequency attributes derived from spectral decomposition also proved to be direct hydrocarbon indicators by pseudo-thickness that could be only be reconciled by substituting gas hydrate in the pore space. The study emphasizes that gas hydrate exploration and reservoir characterization benefits from a seismic thin bed approach.

  5. Molecular simulation of steady-state evaporation and condensation in the presence of a non-condensable gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel

    2018-02-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study evaporation and condensation of fluid Ar in the presence of a non-condensable Ne gas in a nanochannel. The evaporation and condensation are driven by the temperature difference, ΔTL, between the evaporating and condensing liquid surfaces. The steady-state evaporation and condensation fluxes (JMD) are also affected by the Ne concentration, ρNe, and the nanochannel length. We find that across a wide range of ΔTL and ρNe, JMD is in good agreement with the prediction from Stefan's law and from Schrage relationships. Furthermore, for ΔTL less than ˜20% of the absolute average temperature, we find that both steady-state heat and mass fluxes are proportional to ΔTL. This allows us to determine the interfacial resistance to the heat and mass transfer and compare it with the corresponding resistances in the gas phase. In this context, we derive an analytical expression for the effective thermal conductivity of the gas region in the nanochannel and the mass transport interfacial resistance equivalent length, i.e., the length of the nanochannel for which the resistance to the mass flow is the same as the interfacial resistance to the mass flow.

  6. An international effort to compare gas hydrate reservoir simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilder, J.W. [Akron Univ., Akron, OH (United States). Dept. of Theoretical and Applied Math; Moridis, G.J. [California Univ., Berkely, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div., Lawrence Berkely National Lab.; Wilson, S.J. [Ryder Scott Co., Denver, CO (United States); Kurihara, M. [Japan Oil Engineering Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); White, M.D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Hydrology Group, Richland, WA (United States); Masuda, Y. [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Geosystem Engineering; Anderson, B.J. [National Energy Technology Lab., Morgantown, WV (United States)]|[West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Collett, T.S. [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Hunter, R.B. [ASRC Energy Services, Anchorage, AK (United States); Narita, H. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, MEthane hydrate Research Lab., Sapporo (Japan); Pooladi-Darvish, M. [Fekete Associates Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada); Rose, K.; Boswell, R. [National Energy Technology Lab., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2008-07-01

    In this study, 5 different gas hydrate production scenarios were modeled by the CMG STARS, HydateResSim, MH-21 HYDRES, STOMP-HYD and the TOUGH+HYDRATE reservoir simulators for comparative purposes. The 5 problems ranged in complexity from 1 to 3 dimensional with radial symmetry, and in horizontal dimensions of 20 meters to 1 kilometer. The scenarios included (1) a base case with non-isothermal multi-fluid transition to equilibrium, (2) a base case with gas hydrate (closed-domain hydrate dissociation), (3) dissociation in a 1-D open domain, (4) gas hydrate dissociation in a one-dimensional radial domain, similarity solutions, (5) gas hydrate dissociation in a two-dimensional radial domain. The purpose of the study was to compare the world's leading gas hydrate reservoir simulators in an effort to improve the simulation capability of experimental and naturally occurring gas hydrate accumulations. The problem description and simulation results were presented for each scenario. The results of the first scenario indicated very close agreement among the simulators, suggesting that all address the basics of mass and heat transfer, as well as overall process of gas hydrate dissociation. The third scenario produced the initial divergence among the simulators. Other differences were noted in both scenario 4 and 5, resulting in significant corrections to algorithms within several of the simulators. The authors noted that it is unlikely that these improvements would have been identified without this comparative study due to a lack of real world data for validation purposes. It was concluded that the solution for gas hydrate production involves a combination of highly coupled fluid, heat and mass transport equations combined with the potential for formation or disappearance of multiple solid phases in the system. The physical and chemical properties of the rocks containing the gas hydrate depend on the amount of gas hydrate present in the system. Each modeling and

  7. Reservoir characteristics and control factors of Carboniferous volcanic gas reservoirs in the Dixi area of Junggar Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji'an Shi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Field outcrop observation, drilling core description, thin-section analysis, SEM analysis, and geochemistry, indicate that Dixi area of Carboniferous volcanic rock gas reservoir belongs to the volcanic rock oil reservoir of the authigenic gas reservoir. The source rocks make contact with volcanic rock reservoir directly or by fault, and having the characteristics of near source accumulation. The volcanic rock reservoir rocks mainly consist of acidic rhyolite and dacite, intermediate andesite, basic basalt and volcanic breccia: (1 Acidic rhyolite and dacite reservoirs are developed in the middle-lower part of the structure, have suffered strong denudation effect, and the secondary pores have formed in the weathering and tectonic burial stages, but primary pores are not developed within the early diagenesis stage. Average porosity is only at 8%, and the maximum porosity is at 13.5%, with oil and gas accumulation showing poor performance. (2 Intermediate andesite and basic basalt reservoirs are mainly distributed near the crater, which resembles the size of and suggests a volcanic eruption. Primary pores are formed in the early diagenetic stage, secondary pores developed in weathering and erosion transformation stage, and secondary fractures formed in the tectonic burial stage. The average porosity is at 9.2%, and the maximum porosity is at 21.9%: it is of the high-quality reservoir types in Dixi area. (3 The volcanic breccia reservoir has the same diagenetic features with sedimentary rocks, but also has the same mineral composition with volcanic rock; rigid components can keep the primary porosity without being affected by compaction during the burial process. At the same time, the brittleness of volcanic breccia reservoir makes it easily fracture under the stress; internal fracture was developmental. Volcanic breccia developed in the structural high part and suffered a long-term leaching effect. The original pore-fracture combination also made

  8. Gas coning control for smart wells using a dynamic coupled well-reservoir simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemhuis, A.P.; Nennie, E.D.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Alberts, G.J.N.; Peters, E.; Joosten, G.J.P.

    2008-01-01

    A strong increase in gas inflow due to gas coning and the resulting bean-back because of Gas to Oil Ratio (GOR) constraints can severely limit oil production and reservoir drive energy. In this paper we will use a coupled reservoir-well model to demonstrate that oil production can be increased by

  9. Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Technology for Unconventional Tight Gas Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Holditch; A. Daniel Hill; D. Zhu

    2007-06-19

    The objectives of this project are to develop and test new techniques for creating extensive, conductive hydraulic fractures in unconventional tight gas reservoirs by statistically assessing the productivity achieved in hundreds of field treatments with a variety of current fracturing practices ranging from 'water fracs' to conventional gel fracture treatments; by laboratory measurements of the conductivity created with high rate proppant fracturing using an entirely new conductivity test - the 'dynamic fracture conductivity test'; and by developing design models to implement the optimal fracture treatments determined from the field assessment and the laboratory measurements. One of the tasks of this project is to create an 'advisor' or expert system for completion, production and stimulation of tight gas reservoirs. A central part of this study is an extensive survey of the productivity of hundreds of tight gas wells that have been hydraulically fractured. We have been doing an extensive literature search of the SPE eLibrary, DOE, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Bureau of Economic Geology and IHS Energy, for publicly available technical reports about procedures of drilling, completion and production of the tight gas wells. We have downloaded numerous papers and read and summarized the information to build a database that will contain field treatment data, organized by geographic location, and hydraulic fracture treatment design data, organized by the treatment type. We have conducted experimental study on 'dynamic fracture conductivity' created when proppant slurries are pumped into hydraulic fractures in tight gas sands. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially; we pump proppant/frac fluid slurries into a fracture cell, dynamically placing the proppant just as it occurs in the field. From such tests, we expect to gain new insights into some of the critical

  10. Delta 37Cl and Characterisation of Petroleum-gas Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woulé Ebongué, V.; Jendrzejewski, N.; Walgenwitz, F.; Pineau, F.; Javoy, M.

    2003-04-01

    The geochemical characterisation of formation waters from oil/gas fields is used to detect fluid-flow barriers in reservoirs and to reconstruct the system dynamic. During the progression of the reservoir filling, the aquifer waters are pushed by hydrocarbons toward the reservoir bottom and their compositions evolve due to several parameters such as water-rock interactions, mixing with oil-associated waters, physical processes etc. The chemical and isotopic evolution of these waters is recorded in irreducible waters that have been progressively "fossilised" in the oil/gas column. Residual salts precipitated from these waters were recovered. Chloride being the most important dissolved anion in these waters and not involved in diagenetic reactions, its investigation should give insights into the different transport or mixing processes taking place in the sedimentary basin and point out to the formation waters origins. The first aim of our study was to test the Cl-RSA technique (Chlorine Residual Salts Analysis) based on the well-established Sr-RSA technique. The main studied area is a turbiditic sandstone reservoir located in the Lower Congo basin in Angola. Present-day aquifer waters, irreducible waters from sandstone and shale layers as well as drilling mud and salt dome samples were analysed. Formation waters (aquifer and irreducible trapped in shale) show an overall increase of chlorinity with depth. Their δ37Cl values range from -1.11 ppm to +2.30 ppm ± 0.05 ppm/ SMOC. Most Cl-RSA data as well as the δ37Cl obtained on a set of water samples (from different aquifers in the same area) are lower than -0.13 ppm with lower δ37Cl values at shallower depths. In a δ37Cl versus chlorinity diagram, they are distributed along a large range of chlorinity: 21 to 139 g/l, in two distinct groups. (1) Irreducible waters from one of the wells display a positive correlation between chlorinity and the δ37Cl values. (2) In contrary, the majority of δ37Cl measured on aquifers

  11. Effects of non-condensable gas on the condensation of steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.D.; An, P.; Reinert, A.; Ahmadinejad, M.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental work reported here was undertaken with the aim of extending the database currently available on the condensation of steam in the presence of non-condensable gases and thereby improving the empirical input to thermal-hydraulic codes which might be used for design and safety assessment of advanced water-cooled nuclear reactors. Heat was removed from flowing mixtures of steam and air in a test section by means of a water-cooled condensing plate. The test facility constructed for the study incorporates a degassing unit which supplies water to a boiler. This delivers steam steadily to a mixing chamber where it joins with a flow of preheated air. The mixture of steam and air is supplied to the bottom of a cylindrical test section in which it flows upwards over a double sided condensing plate which can be vertical, inclined or horizontal, The rate at which heat is removed by cooling water flowing through internal passages in the plate can de determined calorimetrically knowing the flow rate of the water and its temperature rise. After commissioning experiments had shown that reliable measurements of condensation heat transfer rate could be made using the test facility, a programme of development work followed in the course of which three different designs of condensing plate were evaluated in turn. The version eventually used in the main programme of experiments which followed was made from copper. However, its surfaces were coated with a thin layer of nickel and then with one of chromium. It was found that such a surface consistently promoted dropwise condensation and showed no signs of deterioration after lengthy periods of use. The rate of heat removal from pure steam and from mixtures of steam and air in varying proportions was measured as a function of plate sub-cooling for a variety of plate orientations. (author)

  12. Effects of Formation Damage on Productivity of Underground Gas Storage Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.I.C. Anyadiegwu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the effects of formation damage on the productivity of gas storage reservoirs was performed with depleted oil reservoir (OB-02, located onshore, Niger Delta, Nigeria. Information on the reservoir and the fluids from OB-02 were collected and used to evaluate the deliverabilities of the gas storage reservoir over a 10-year period of operation. The results obtained were used to plot graphs of deliverability against permeability and skin respectively. The graphs revealed that as the permeability decreased, the skin increased, and hence a decrease in deliverability of gas from the reservoir during gas withdrawal. Over the ten years of operating the reservoir for gas storage, the deliverability and permeability which were initially 2.7 MMscf/d and 50 mD, with a skin of 0.2, changed to new values of 0.88 MMscf/d and 24 mD with the skin as 4.1 at the tenth year.

  13. A coupling model for gas diffusion and seepage in SRV section of shale gas reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shusheng Gao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A prerequisite to effective shale gas development is a complicated fracture network generated by extensive and massive fracturing, which is called SRV (stimulated reservoir volume section. Accurate description of gas flow behaviors in such section is fundamental for productivity evaluation and production performance prediction of shale gas wells. The SRV section is composed of bedrocks with varying sizes and fracture networks, which exhibit different flow behaviors – gas diffusion in bedrocks and gas seepage in fractures. According to the porosity and permeability and the adsorption, diffusion and seepage features of bedrocks and fractures in a shale gas reservoir, the material balance equations were built for bedrocks and fractures respectively and the continuity equations of gas diffusion and seepage in the SRV section were derived. For easy calculation, the post-frac bedrock cube was simplified to be a sphere in line with the principle of volume consistency. Under the assumption of quasi-steady flow behavior at the cross section of the sphere, the gas channeling equation was derived based on the Fick's laws of diffusion and the density function of gas in bedrocks and fractures. The continuity equation was coupled with the channeling equation to effectively characterize the complicated gas flow behavior in the SRV section. The study results show that the gas diffusivity in bedrocks and the volume of bedrocks formed by volume fracturing (or the scale of fracturing jointly determines the productivity and stable production period of a shale gas well. As per the actual calculation for the well field A in the Changning–Weiyuan Block in the Sichuan Basin, the matrix has low gas diffusivity – about 10−5 cm2/s and a large volume with an equivalent sphere radius of 6.2 m, hindering the gas channeling from bedrocks to fractures and thereby reducing the productivity of the shale gas well. It is concluded that larger scale of volume fracturing

  14. Use of nuclear explosions to create gas condensate storage in the USSR. LLL Treaty Verification Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, I.Y.

    1982-01-01

    The Soviet Union has described industrial use of nuclear explosions to produce underground hydrocarbon storage. To examples are in the giant Orenburg gas condensate field. There is good reason to believe that three additional cavities were created in bedded salt in the yet to be fully developed giant Astrakhan gas condensate field in the region of the lower Volga. Although contrary to usual western practice, the cavities are believed to be used to store H 2 S-rich, unstable gas condensate prior to processing in the main gas plants located tens of kilometers from the producing fields. Detonations at Orenburg and Astrakhan preceded plant construction. The use of nuclear explosions at several sites to create underground storage of highly corrosive liquid hydrocarbons suggests that the Soviets consider this time and cost effective. The possible benefits from such a plan include degasification and stabilization of the condensate before final processing, providing storage of condensate during periods of abnormally high natural gas production or during periods when condensate but not gas processing facilities are undergoing maintenance. Judging from information provided by Soviet specialists, the individual cavities have a maximum capacity on the order of 50,000 m 3

  15. Bose-Einstein condensation in an ultra-hot gas of pumped magnons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serga, Alexander A; Tiberkevich, Vasil S; Sandweg, Christian W; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy I; Bozhko, Dmytro A; Chumak, Andrii V; Neumann, Timo; Obry, Björn; Melkov, Gennadii A; Slavin, Andrei N; Hillebrands, Burkard

    2014-03-11

    Bose-Einstein condensation of quasi-particles such as excitons, polaritons, magnons and photons is a fascinating quantum mechanical phenomenon. Unlike the Bose-Einstein condensation of real particles (like atoms), these processes do not require low temperatures, since the high densities of low-energy quasi-particles needed for the condensate to form can be produced via external pumping. Here we demonstrate that such a pumping can create remarkably high effective temperatures in a narrow spectral region of the lowest energy states in a magnon gas, resulting in strikingly unexpected transitional dynamics of Bose-Einstein magnon condensate: the density of the condensate increases immediately after the external magnon flow is switched off and initially decreases if it is switched on again. This behaviour finds explanation in a nonlinear 'evaporative supercooling' mechanism that couples the low-energy magnons overheated by pumping with all the other thermal magnons, removing the excess heat, and allowing Bose-Einstein condensate formation.

  16. Flue gas injection into gas hydrate reservoirs for methane recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jinhai; Okwananke, Anthony; Tohidi, Bahman; Chuvilin, Evgeny; Maerle, Kirill; Istomin, Vladimir; Bukhanov, Boris; Cheremisin, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Flue gas was injected for both methane recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration. • Kinetics of methane recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration was investigated. • Methane-rich gas mixtures can be produced inside methane hydrate stability zones. • Up to 70 mol% of carbon dioxide in the flue gas was sequestered as hydrates. - Abstract: Flue gas injection into methane hydrate-bearing sediments was experimentally investigated to explore the potential both for methane recovery from gas hydrate reservoirs and for direct capture and sequestration of carbon dioxide from flue gas as carbon dioxide hydrate. A simulated flue gas from coal-fired power plants composed of 14.6 mol% carbon dioxide and 85.4 mol% nitrogen was injected into a silica sand pack containing different saturations of methane hydrate. The experiments were conducted at typical gas hydrate reservoir conditions from 273.3 to 284.2 K and from 4.2 to 13.8 MPa. Results of the experiments show that injection of the flue gas leads to significant dissociation of the methane hydrate by shifting the methane hydrate stability zone, resulting in around 50 mol% methane in the vapour phase at the experimental conditions. Further depressurisation of the system to pressures well above the methane hydrate dissociation pressure generated methane-rich gas mixtures with up to 80 mol% methane. Meanwhile, carbon dioxide hydrate and carbon dioxide-mixed hydrates were formed while the methane hydrate was dissociating. Up to 70% of the carbon dioxide in the flue gas was converted into hydrates and retained in the silica sand pack.

  17. Condensation and dissociation rates for gas phase metal clusters from molecular dynamics trajectory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Goudeli, Eirini; Hogan, Christopher J.

    2018-04-01

    In gas phase synthesis systems, clusters form and grow via condensation, in which a monomer binds to an existing cluster. While a hard-sphere equation is frequently used to predict the condensation rate coefficient, this equation neglects the influences of potential interactions and cluster internal energy on the condensation process. Here, we present a collision rate theory-molecular dynamics simulation approach to calculate condensation probabilities and condensation rate coefficients. We use this approach to examine atomic condensation onto 6-56-atom Au and Mg clusters. The probability of condensation depends upon the initial relative velocity (v) between atom and cluster and the initial impact parameter (b). In all cases, there is a well-defined region of b-v space where condensation is highly probable, and outside of which the condensation probability drops to zero. For Au clusters with more than 10 atoms, we find that at gas temperatures in the 300-1200 K range, the condensation rate coefficient exceeds the hard-sphere rate coefficient by a factor of 1.5-2.0. Conversely, for Au clusters with 10 or fewer atoms and for 14- and 28-atom Mg clusters, as cluster equilibration temperature increases, the condensation rate coefficient drops to values below the hard-sphere rate coefficient. Calculations also yield the self-dissociation rate coefficient, which is found to vary considerably with gas temperature. Finally, calculations results reveal that grazing (high b) atom-cluster collisions at elevated velocity (>1000 m s-1) can result in the colliding atom rebounding (bounce) from the cluster surface or binding while another atom dissociates (replacement). The presented method can be applied in developing rate equations to predict material formation and growth rates in vapor phase systems.

  18. Improvement of degradation with non-condensable gas in micro steam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saihara, Atsushi; Horiki, Sachiyo; Osakabe, Masahiro; Ohmori, Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    Effect of non-condensable gas on a micro steam injector (MSI) to obtain a vacuum was experimentally studied. When a pure steam was used in the MSI, the high vacuum condition was obtained. However when the mass fraction of air included in the steam was larger than a cartain value, the MSI became unstable and the vacuum condition could not be obtained. It is considered that the malfunction is due to the instability triggered with the uncondensed steam remained at the throat in downstream of the condensing region. The water nozzle was expected to be a key component to mitigate the effect of non-condensable gas. Three kinds of water nozzle whose flow areas were round, star and screw shapes were used in the present experiment. The star-shaped nozzle where the increased surface area could be expected to compensate the degradation of condensation failed to improve the malfunction of MSI with the non-condensable gas. The screw nozzle expected to drive air away outside the condensing surface could mitigate the effect of non-condensable gas. (author)

  19. OPTIMIZATION OF INFILL DRILLING IN NATURALLY-FRACTURED TIGHT-GAS RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence W. Teufel; Her-Yuan Chen; Thomas W. Engler; Bruce Hart

    2004-05-01

    A major goal of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fossil energy program is to increase gas reserves in tight-gas reservoirs. Infill drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation in these reservoirs are important reservoir management strategies to increase production and reserves. Phase II of this DOE/cooperative industry project focused on optimization of infill drilling and evaluation of hydraulic fracturing in naturally-fractured tight-gas reservoirs. The cooperative project involved multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and simulation studies to determine infill well potential in the Mesaverde and Dakota sandstone formations at selected areas in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. This work used the methodology and approach developed in Phase I. Integrated reservoir description and hydraulic fracture treatment analyses were also conducted in the Pecos Slope Abo tight-gas reservoir in southeastern New Mexico and the Lewis Shale in the San Juan Basin. This study has demonstrated a methodology to (1) describe reservoir heterogeneities and natural fracture systems, (2) determine reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, (3) define the elliptical drainage area and recoverable gas for existing wells, (4) determine the optimal location and number of new in-fill wells to maximize economic recovery, (5) forecast the increase in total cumulative gas production from infill drilling, and (6) evaluate hydraulic fracture simulation treatments and their impact on well drainage area and infill well potential. Industry partners during the course of this five-year project included BP, Burlington Resources, ConocoPhillips, and Williams.

  20. Formation and migration of Natural Gases: gas composition and isotopes as monitors between source, reservoir and seep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoell, M.; Etiope, G.

    2015-12-01

    Natural gases form in tight source rocks at temperatures between 120ºC up to 200ºC over a time of 40 to 50my depending on the heating rate of the gas kitchen. Inferring from pyrolysis experiments, gases after primary migration, a pressure driven process, are rich in C2+ hydrocarbons (C2 to C5). This is consistent with gas compositions of oil-associated gases such as in the Bakken Shale which occur in immediate vicinity of the source with little migration distances. However, migration of gases along porous rocks over long distances (up to 200km in the case of the Troll field offshore Norway) changes the gas composition drastically as C2+ hydrocarbons tend to be retained/sequestered during migration of gas as case histories from Virginia and the North Sea will demonstrate. Similar "molecular fractionation" is observed between reservoirs and surface seeps. In contrast to gas composition, stable isotopes in gases are, in general, not affected by the migration process suggesting that gas migration is a steady state process. Changes in isotopic composition, from source to reservoir to surface seeps, is often the result of mixing of gases of different origins. Examples from various gas provinces will support this notion. Natural gas basins provide little opportunity of tracking and identifying gas phase separation. Future research on experimental phase separation and monitoring of gas composition and gas ratio changes e.g. various C2+ compound ratios over C1 or isomer ratios such as iso/n ratios in butane and pentane may be an avenue to develop tracers for phase separation that could possibly be applied to natural systems of retrograde natural condensate fields.

  1. Market diffusion, technological learning, and cost-benefit dynamics of condensing gas boilers in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Martin; Dittmar, Lars; Junginger, Martin; Patel, Martin K.; Blok, Kornelis

    2009-01-01

    High costs often prevent the market diffusion of novel and efficient energy technologies. Monitoring cost and price decline for these technologies is thus important in order to establish effective energy policy. Here, we present experience curves and cost-benefit analyses for condensing gas boilers produced and sold in the Netherlands between 1981 and 2006. For the most dominant boiler type on the Dutch market, i.e., condensing gas combi boilers, we identify learning rates of 14±1% for the average price and 16±8% for the additional price relative to non-condensing devices. Economies of scale, competitive sourcing of boiler components, and improvements in boiler assembly are among the main drivers behind the observed price decline. The net present value of condensing gas combi boilers shows an overall increasing trend. Purchasing in 2006 a gas boiler of this type instead of a non-condensing device generates a net present value of 970 EUR (Euro) and realizes CO 2 (carbon dioxide) emission savings at negative costs of -120 EUR per tonne CO 2 . We attribute two-thirds of the improvements in the cost-benefit performance of condensing gas combi boilers to technological learning and one-third to a combination of external effects and governmental policies.

  2. Feasibility study on application of volume acid fracturing technology to tight gas carbonate reservoir development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nianyin Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available How to effectively develop tight-gas carbonate reservoir and achieve high recovery is always a problem for the oil and gas industry. To solve this problem, domestic petroleum engineers use the combination of the successful experiences of North American shale gas pools development by stimulated reservoir volume (SRV fracturing with the research achievements of Chinese tight gas development by acid fracturing to propose volume acid fracturing technology for fractured tight-gas carbonate reservoir, which has achieved a good stimulation effect in the pilot tests. To determine what reservoir conditions are suitable to carry out volume acid fracturing, this paper firstly introduces volume acid fracturing technology by giving the stimulation mechanism and technical ideas, and initially analyzes the feasibility by the comparison of reservoir characteristics of shale gas with tight-gas carbonate. Then, this paper analyzes the validity and limitation of the volume acid fracturing technology via the analyses of control conditions for volume acid fracturing in reservoir fracturing performance, natural fracture, horizontal principal stress difference, orientation of in-situ stress and natural fracture, and gives the solution for the limitation. The study results show that the volume acid fracturing process can be used to greatly improve the flow environment of tight-gas carbonate reservoir and increase production; the incremental or stimulation response is closely related with reservoir fracturing performance, the degree of development of natural fracture, the small intersection angle between hydraulic fracture and natural fracture, the large horizontal principal stress difference is easy to form a narrow fracture zone, and it is disadvantageous to create fracture network, but the degradable fiber diversion technology may largely weaken the disadvantage. The practices indicate that the application of volume acid fracturing process to the tight-gas carbonate

  3. Natural gas and condensate occurrence in salt, specifically in the salt stock Gorleben-Rambow. Literature study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The study on the natural gas and condensate occurrence in salt, specifically in the salt stock Gorleben-Rambow covers the topics development of salt deposits, salt stocks, crude oil and natural gas, gas and condensate inclusions in evaporite. Experimental data on crude oil borehole studies in Gorleben, natural gas drill holes in the salt stock Rambow, Luechow Z1 - saltstock Wustrow, gas indications, gas occurrences and gas detection are summarized.

  4. Effect of non-condensable gas on heat transfer in steam turbine condenser and modelling of ejector pump system by controlling the gas extraction rate through extraction tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strušnik, Dušan; Golob, Marjan; Avsec, Jurij

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Control of the amount of the pumped gases through extraction tubes. The connecting locations interconnect the extraction tubes for STC gas pumping. The extraction tubes are fitted with 3 control valves to control the amount of the pumped gas depending on the temperature of the pumped gas. The amount of the pumped gas increases through the extraction tubes, where the pumped gases are cooler and decreases, at the same time, through the extraction tubes, where the pumped gases are warmer. As a result, pumping of a larger amount of NCG is ensured and of a smaller amount of CG, given that the NCG concentration is the highest on the colder places. This way, the total amount of the pumped gases from the STC can be reduced, the SEPS operates more efficiently and consumes less energy for its operation. - Highlights: • Impact of non-condensable gas on heat transfer in a steam turbine condenser. • The ejector system is optimised by selecting a Laval nozzle diameter. • Simulation model of the control of the amount of pumped gases through extraction tubes. • Neural network and fuzzy logic systems used to control gas extraction rate. • Simulation model was designed by using real process data from the thermal power plant. - Abstract: The paper describes the impact of non-condensable gas (NCG) on heat transfer in a steam turbine condenser (STC) and modelling of the steam ejector pump system (SEPS) by controlling the gas extraction rate through extraction tubes. The ideal connection points for the NCG extraction from the STC are identified by analysing the impact of the NCG on the heat transfer and measuring the existing system at a thermal power plant in Slovenia. A simulation model is designed using the Matlab software and Simulink, Neural Net Work, Fuzzy Logic and Curve Fitting Toolboxes, to control gas extraction rate through extraction tubes of the gas pumped from the STC, thus optimising the operation of the steam ejector pump system (SEPS). The

  5. Flue gas condensation in straw fired CHP plants; Roeggaskondensation i halmfyrede kraftvarmeanlaeg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-06-15

    The high price of straw and a general demand for increased use of straw in power and heat production are expected to result in an increased need for efficient fuel utilization. The use of flue gas condensation in straw fired CHP plants can contribute to a higher exploitation of energy, and at the same time open of the possibility of utilization of wet (cheaper) fuels without energy loss. Furthermore flue gas condensation can contribute to the flue gas cleaning process through removal of HCl and SO{sub 2} as well as in particle cleaning in wet cleaning processes. With starting point in a straw fired CHP plant the technical and economic consequences of installation of a flue gas condensation system are investigated. Fuel exploitation and power/heat production distribution is included in the investigation. (BA)

  6. Three types of gas hydrate reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico identified in LWD data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Woong; Collett, Timothy S.

    2011-01-01

    High quality logging-while-drilling (LWD) well logs were acquired in seven wells drilled during the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II in the spring of 2009. These data help to identify three distinct types of gas hydrate reservoirs: isotropic reservoirs in sands, vertical fractured reservoirs in shale, and horizontally layered reservoirs in silty shale. In general, most gas hydratebearing sand reservoirs exhibit isotropic elastic velocities and formation resistivities, and gas hydrate saturations estimated from the P-wave velocity agree well with those from the resistivity. However, in highly gas hydrate-saturated sands, resistivity-derived gas hydrate-saturation estimates appear to be systematically higher by about 5% over those estimated by P-wave velocity, possibly because of the uncertainty associated with the consolidation state of gas hydrate-bearing sands. Small quantities of gas hydrate were observed in vertical fractures in shale. These occurrences are characterized by high formation resistivities with P-wave velocities close to those of water-saturated sediment. Because the formation factor varies significantly with respect to the gas hydrate saturation for vertical fractures at low saturations, an isotropic analysis of formation factor highly overestimates the gas hydrate saturation. Small quantities of gas hydrate in horizontal layers in shale are characterized by moderate increase in P-wave velocities and formation resistivities and either measurement can be used to estimate gas hydrate saturations.

  7. Methane Ebullition in Temperate Hydropower Reservoirs and Implications for US Policy on Greenhouse Gas Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin L; Arntzen, Evan V; Goldman, Amy E; Richmond, Marshall C

    2017-10-01

    The United States is home to 2198 dams actively used for hydropower production. With the December 2015 consensus adoption of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Paris Agreement, it is important to accurately quantify anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Methane ebullition, or methane bubbles originating from river or lake sediments, has been shown to account for nearly all methane emissions from tropical hydropower reservoirs to the atmosphere. However, distinct ebullitive methane fluxes have been studied in comparatively few temperate hydropower reservoirs globally. This study measures ebullitive and diffusive methane fluxes from two eastern Washington reservoirs, and synthesizes existing studies of methane ebullition in temperate, boreal, and tropical hydropower reservoirs. Ebullition comprises nearly all methane emissions (>97%) from this study's two eastern Washington hydropower reservoirs to the atmosphere. Summer methane ebullition from these reservoirs was higher than ebullition in six southeastern U.S. hydropower reservoirs, however it was similar to temperate reservoirs in other parts of the world. Our literature synthesis suggests that methane ebullition from temperate hydropower reservoirs can be seasonally elevated compared to tropical climates, however annual emissions are likely to be higher within tropical climates, emphasizing the possible range of methane ebullition fluxes and the need for the further study of temperate reservoirs. Possible future changes to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and UNFCCC guidelines for national greenhouse gas inventories highlights the need for accurate assessment of reservoir emissions.

  8. Methane Ebullition in Temperate Hydropower Reservoirs and Implications for US Policy on Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin L.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Goldman, Amy E.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2017-10-01

    The United States is home to 2198 dams actively used for hydropower production. With the December 2015 consensus adoption of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Paris Agreement, it is important to accurately quantify anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Methane ebullition, or methane bubbles originating from river or lake sediments, has been shown to account for nearly all methane emissions from tropical hydropower reservoirs to the atmosphere. However, distinct ebullitive methane fluxes have been studied in comparatively few temperate hydropower reservoirs globally. This study measures ebullitive and diffusive methane fluxes from two eastern Washington reservoirs, and synthesizes existing studies of methane ebullition in temperate, boreal, and tropical hydropower reservoirs. Ebullition comprises nearly all methane emissions (>97%) from this study's two eastern Washington hydropower reservoirs to the atmosphere. Summer methane ebullition from these reservoirs was higher than ebullition in six southeastern U.S. hydropower reservoirs, however it was similar to temperate reservoirs in other parts of the world. Our literature synthesis suggests that methane ebullition from temperate hydropower reservoirs can be seasonally elevated compared to tropical climates, however annual emissions are likely to be higher within tropical climates, emphasizing the possible range of methane ebullition fluxes and the need for the further study of temperate reservoirs. Possible future changes to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and UNFCCC guidelines for national greenhouse gas inventories highlights the need for accurate assessment of reservoir emissions.

  9. Performance of casting aluminum-silicon alloy condensing heating exchanger for gas-fired boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Weixue; Liu, Fengguo; You, Xue-yi

    2018-01-01

    Condensing gas boilers are widely used due to their high heat efficiency, which comes from their ability to use the recoverable sensible heat and latent heat in flue gas. The condensed water of the boiler exhaust has strong corrosion effect on the heat exchanger, which restricts the further application of the condensing gas boiler. In recent years, a casting aluminum-silicon alloy (CASA), which boasts good anti-corrosion properties, has been introduced to condensing hot water boilers. In this paper, the heat transfer performance, CO and NOx emission concentrations and CASA corrosion resistance of a heat exchanger are studied by an efficiency bench test of the gas-fired boiler. The experimental results are compared with heat exchangers produced by Honeywell and Beka. The results show that the excess air coefficient has a significant effect on the heat efficiency and CO and NOx emission of the CASA water heater. When the excess air coefficient of the CASA gas boiler is 1.3, the CO and NOx emission concentration of the flue gas satisfies the design requirements, and the heat efficiency of water heater is 90.8%. In addition, with the increase of heat load rate, the heat transfer coefficient of the heat exchanger and the heat efficiency of the water heater are increased. However, when the heat load rate is at 90%, the NOx emission in the exhaust gas is the highest. Furthermore, when the temperature of flue gas is below 57 °C, the condensation of water vapor occurs, and the pH of condensed water is in the 2.5 5.5 range. The study shows that CASA water heater has good corrosion resistance and a high heat efficiency of 88%. Compared with the heat exchangers produced by Honeywell and Beka, there is still much work to do in optimizing and improving the water heater.

  10. Characterization of oil and gas reservoirs and recovery technology deployment on Texas State Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, R.; Major, R.P.; Holtz, M.H. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Texas State Lands oil and gas resources are estimated at 1.6 BSTB of remaining mobile oil, 2.1 BSTB, or residual oil, and nearly 10 Tcf of remaining gas. An integrated, detailed geologic and engineering characterization of Texas State Lands has created quantitative descriptions of the oil and gas reservoirs, resulting in delineation of untapped, bypassed compartments and zones of remaining oil and gas. On Texas State Lands, the knowledge gained from such interpretative, quantitative reservoir descriptions has been the basis for designing optimized recovery strategies, including well deepening, recompletions, workovers, targeted infill drilling, injection profile modification, and waterflood optimization. The State of Texas Advanced Resource Recovery program is currently evaluating oil and gas fields along the Gulf Coast (South Copano Bay and Umbrella Point fields) and in the Permian Basin (Keystone East, Ozona, Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields). The program is grounded in advanced reservoir characterization techniques that define the residence of unrecovered oil and gas remaining in select State Land reservoirs. Integral to the program is collaboration with operators in order to deploy advanced reservoir exploitation and management plans. These plans are made on the basis of a thorough understanding of internal reservoir architecture and its controls on remaining oil and gas distribution. Continued accurate, detailed Texas State Lands reservoir description and characterization will ensure deployment of the most current and economically viable recovery technologies and strategies available.

  11. The influence of surface-active agents in gas mixture on the intensity of jet condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yezhov, YV; Okhotin, VS

    2017-11-01

    The report presents: the methodology of calculation of contact condensation of steam from the steam-gas mixture into the stream of water, taking into account: the mass flow of steam through the boundary phase, particularly the change in turbulent transport properties near the interface and their connection to the interface perturbations due to the surface tension of the mixture; the method of calculation of the surface tension at the interface water - a mixture of fluorocarbon vapor and water, based on the previously established analytical methods we calculate the surface tension for simple one - component liquid-vapor systems. The obtained analytical relation to calculate the surface tension of the mixture is a function of temperature and volume concentration of the fluorocarbon gas in the mixture and is true for all sizes of gas molecules. On the newly created experimental stand is made verification of experimental studies to determine the surface tension of pure substances: water, steam, C3F8 pair C3F8, produced the first experimental data on surface tension at the water - a mixture of water vapor and fluorocarbon C3F8. The obtained experimental data allow us to refine the values of the two constants used in the calculated model of the surface tension of the mixture. Experimental study of jet condensation was carried out with the flow in the zone of condensation of different gases. The condensation process was monitored by measurement of consumption of water flowing from the nozzle, and the formed condensate. When submitting C3F8, there was a noticeable, intensification condensation process compared with the condensation of pure water vapor. The calculation results are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data on surface tension of the mixture and steam condensation from steam-gas mixture. Analysis of calculation results shows that the presence of surfactants in the condensation zone affects the partial vapor pressure on the interfacial surface, and

  12. Bose-Einstein condensation of a relativistic Bose gas trapped in a general external potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Guozhen; Chen Jincan; Chen Lixuan

    2006-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation of an ideal relativistic Bose gas trapped in a generic power-law potential is investigated. The analytical expressions for some important parameters such as the critical temperature, ground-state fraction and heat capacity are derived. The general criteria on the occurrence of Bose-Einstein condensation and the discontinuity of heat capacity at the critical temperature are obtained. The results obtained here present a unified description for the Bose-Einstein condensation of a class of ideal Bose systems so that many important conclusions in the literature are included in this paper

  13. Effect of non-condensation gas on pressure oscillation of submerged steam jet condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Quanbin; Cong, Yuelei; Wang, Yingchun; Chen, Weixiong; Chong, Daotong; Yan, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Oscillation intensity of steam–air jet increases with rise of water temperature. • Oscillation intensity reduces obviously when air is mixed. • Both first and second dominant frequencies decrease with rise of air mass fraction. • Air has little effect on power of 1st & 2nd frequency bands under low temperature. • The maximum oscillation power occurs under case of A = 1% and T ⩾ 50 °C. - Abstract: The effect of air with low mass fraction on the oscillation intensity and oscillation frequency of a submerged steam jet condensation is investigated under stable condensation region. With air mixing in steam, an obvious dynamic pressure peak appears along the jet direction. The intensity peak increases monotonously with the rise of steam mass flux and water temperature. Peak position moves downstream with the rise of air mass fraction. Moreover, when compared with that of pure steam jet, the oscillation intensity clearly decreases as air is mixed. However, when water temperature is lower than approximately 45 °C, oscillation intensity increases slightly with the rise of air mass fraction, and when water temperature is higher than 55 °C, the oscillation intensity decreases greatly with the rise of air mass fraction. Both the first and second dominant frequencies decrease with rise of air mass fraction. Finally, effect of air mass fractions on the oscillation power of the first and second dominant frequency bands shows similar trends. Under low water temperature, the mixed air has little effect on the oscillation power of both first and second frequency bands. However, when water temperature is high, the oscillation power of both first and second frequency bands appears an obvious peak when air mass fraction is about 1%. With further rise of air mass fraction, the oscillation power decreases gradually.

  14. High-yield well modes and production practices in the Longwangmiao Fm gas reservoirs, Anyue Gas Field, central Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongren Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The lithologic Longwangmiao Fm gas reservoirs are situated in the Moxi Block of the Anyue Gas Field, central Sichuan Basin. Due to their great heterogeneity affected by the differential roles of lithologic facies and karstification, huge differences exist in the single-well gas yield tests. To improve the development efficiency of gas reservoirs and achieve the goal of “high yield but with few wells to be drilled”, it is especially important to establish a high-yield gas well mode by use of cores, logging, seismic data, etc., and through analysis of reservoir properties, high-yield controlling factors, and seismic response features of quality reservoirs and so on. The following findings were achieved. (1 The positive relationship between yield and the thickness of dissolved vug reservoirs is obvious. (2 The dissolved vug reservoirs are reflected as the type of honeycomb dark patches from the image logging and the conventional logging is featured generally by “Three Lows and Two Highs (i.e., low GR, low RT and low DEN but high AC and high CNL”. (3 From the seismic profile, the highlighted spots (strong peaks correspond to the bottom boundary of the Longwangmiao Fm reservoirs. The trough waves in larger amplitude represents that there are more well-developed karsts in the reservoirs. On this basis, high-quality 3D seismic data was used for tracking and fine interpretation of those highlighted spots and trough waves on the strong peaks to describe the plane distribution of high-yield dissolved vug reservoirs in this study area. This study is of great significance to the good planning of development wells and well trajectory planning and adjustment. As a result, high-thickness dissolved vug reservoirs have been targeted in this study area with the tested gas yield of 28 wells reaching up to 100 × 104 m3/d among the completed and tested 30 wells in total.

  15. EVALUATION OF SOLVENTS EFFICIENCY IN CONDENSATE BANKING REMOVAL

    OpenAIRE

    CORREA, TOMAS; TIAB, DJEBBAR; RESTREPO, DORA PATRICIA

    2009-01-01

    This work describes experimental design and tests performed to simulate gas condensate reservoir conditions below dew point in the laboratory using three different compositions of synthetic gas condensate. Methanol, propanol and methylene chloride are the solvents used to remove the condensate banking and improve the gas effective permeability near to the wellbore. Solvents are injected in Berea sandstone rock with similar petrophysical properties in order to compare the efficiency at removin...

  16. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  17. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  18. Waste heat recovery system including a mechanism for collection, detection and removal of non-condensable gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Zigan, James A.

    2017-06-20

    The disclosure describes a non-condensable gas collection, detection, and removal system for a WHR system that helps to maintain cycle efficiency of the WHR system across the life of an engine system associated with the WHR system. A storage volume is configured to collect non-condensable gas received from the working fluid circuit, and a release valve is configured to selectively release non-condensable gas contained within the storage volume.

  19. Advanced treatment of flue gas condensate; Avancerad rening av roekgaskondensat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axby, Fredrik [Carl Bro Energikonsult AB, Malmoe (Sweden); Ekengren, Oesten; Bjurhem, Jan Erik [IVL Swedish Environmental Research Inst. (Sweden)

    2004-11-01

    The aim of the project is to study different techniques to recover water to the process and to reduce emission of ammonia to water and air. Membrane technology (ultra- (UF) and nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO)) and a stripper have been studied for ammonia separation. The use of bio-fuel in energy production is increasing. The off-gases are often condensed to increase energy yield and to decrease emissions to air. Since the concentration of nitrogen (ammonium) is high in condensates from units with SNCR for NO{sub x}-reduction (selective non-catalytic reduction) this water has to be treated further. Another aim of the project is to replace a great part of the tap water used in the process. This can be accomplished with membrane technology. Laboratory tests revealed a certain degree of membrane fouling. However, both NF and RO worked well in the full-scale unit, in spite of problems in the condensate treatment that resulted in tar products in the water. There was no obvious negative effect on these membranes. Analyses of PAH have shown a low base concentration that may lead to fouling after a long time. UF removes most of these PAH and thus protects the following NF- or RO-membranes. NF gave about 3 times higher filtration capacity (flux) than RO for the condensate at 30 bars. This can save a lot of money, since the membrane area can be reduced to a third. High temperature also increases the flux. The results are of high interest but ought to be certified during long run tests. Fouling was low in both NF and RO, and initial flux was retained after cleaning. The reason is probably the good pre-treatment (UF). The concentration could proceed very far, which make it possibly to reuse the concentrate to the system. Simulations of an ammonia stripper showed some parameters to be critical in certain ranges, while others didn't affect the result. Airflow is a critical parameter during stable conditions within the design data. Simulated data were verified

  20. Comparative study during condensation of R152 a and R134 a with presence of non-condensable gas inside a vertical tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charef, Adil; Feddaoui, M'barek; Najim, Monssif; Meftah, Hicham

    2018-04-01

    A computational study of the liquid film condensation from vapour-gas mixtures of HFC refrigerants inside a vertical tube is performed. The external wall of the tube is subjected to constant temperature. The model uses an implicit finite difference method to solve the governing equations for the liquid film and gas flow together including the boundary and interfacial matching conditions. Parametric computations were realised to examine the effects of inlet Reynolds number, tube length, and inlet temperature of the gas mixtures on the condensation mechanism. A comparative study between the results obtained for studied R152 a and R134 a with presence of non-condensable gas is made. The predicted results indicate that the condensation of R152 a-air corresponds to a higher accumulated condensation m c d and local heat transfer coefficient h T when compared to R134 a-air in the same conditions. Increasing the inlet Reynolds number or the tube length improve the condensation. Additionally, lower non-condensable gas in R152 a - a i r substantially enhances the heat and mass exchanges.

  1. Experimental substantiation of combined methods for designing processes for the commercial preparation of gas at gas condensate fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurevich, G R; Karlinskii, E D; Posypkina, T V

    1977-04-01

    An analysis is made of the possibility of using two analytical methods for studying vapor--liquid equilibrium of hydrocarbon mixtures that are used in designing the separation of natural gas and the stabilization of condensate--the Chao and Sider method, which uses computations by equilibrium constants. A combined computational method is proposed for describing a unified process of natural gas separation and condensate stabilization. The method of preparing the original data for the computation of the separation and stabilization processes can be significantly simplified. 10 references, 1 table.

  2. Condensation and critical exponents of an ideal non-Abelian gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaei, Zahra; Mirza, Behrouz; Mohammadzadeh, Hosein

    2017-11-01

    We investigate an ideal gas obeying non-Abelian statistics and derive the expressions for some thermodynamic quantities. It is found that thermodynamic quantities are finite at the condensation point where their derivatives diverge and, near this point, they behave as \\vert T-Tc\\vert^{-ρ} in which Tc denotes the condensation temperature and ρ is a critical exponent. The critical exponents related to the heat capacity and compressibility are obtained by fitting numerical results and others are obtained using the scaling law hypothesis for a three-dimensional non-Abelian ideal gas. This set of critical exponents introduces a new universality class.

  3. Vapour pressure of components made by the presence of HgS(s,alpha) in an oil/gas reservoir and consequences for the produced gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestvold, T.; Gustavsen, Oe.; Grande, K.; Aas, N.; Olsvik, Mimmi Kjetsaa

    2006-03-15

    A thermodynamic analysis is presented on how components made from HgS (s,alpha), existing in a oil/gas reservoir, will distribute themselves between gas, water, liquid and solid components as a function of temperature and pressure. The consequence of the formation of mercury containing components on gas injection and on gas quality is discussed. Since equilibrium is established in the model calculation, other gas components in the gas phase and components in condensed phases present will also influence the composition of the gas. Six cases are considered in the calculation: 1) HgS(s,alpha) - Ar(g), 2) HgS(s,alpha) - Ar (g) - water with 10-4 molal NaCl at pH = 7, 3) HgS(s,alpha) - CH{sub 4}(g), 4) HgS(s,alpha) - CH{sub 4} (g) - water with 10-4 molal NaCl at pH = 7 and 5) HgS(s,alpha) - natural gas - water with 10-4 molal NaCl at pH = 7, 6) HgS(s,alpha) - natural gas - water with 10-4 molal NaCl and 5*10-5 molal NO-3- at pH = 7. When HgS(s,alpha) is present in an oil reservoir at 170 deg C and 200 bar, these calculations show that the major components formed are: H{sub 2}(g), H{sub 2}S(g), Hg(l) and Hg(g) together with carbon. Mercury in the gas phase in the cases 1) is 4*10-7 bar and is determined by the evaporation and decomposition HgS(g) in the reservoir. In case 2) P{sub Hg} = 5.7*10-4 bar mainly determined by the formation of sulphate in the water phase. In the cases 3), 4) and 5) these calculations show that the major components formed are: H{sub 2}(g), H{sub 2}S(g), Hg(l) and Hg(g) together with carbon, and the gas phase is dominated by Hg(g) at approx. *10-3 bar. The water phase may contain Hg(CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}){sub 2}2+ if NO{sub 3}- for some reasons is introduced into the formation water, and the very carcinogenic dimethyl mercury compound, C{sub 2}HgH{sub 6}, can be formed in the gas phase. Both compounds, however, in insignificant low concentration/partial pressure. (Author)

  4. Net greenhouse gas emissions at Eastmain-1 reservoir, Quebec, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremblay, Alain; Bastien, Julie; Bonneville, Marie-Claude; del Giorgio, Paul; Demarty, Maud; Garneau, Michelle; Helie, Jean-Francois; Pelletier, Luc; Prairie, Yves; Roulet, Nigel; Strachan, Ian; Teodoru, Cristian

    2010-09-15

    The growing concern regarding the long-term contribution of freshwater reservoirs to atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHG), led Hydro-Quebec, to study net GHG emissions from Eastmain 1 reservoir, which are the emissions related to the creation of a reservoir minus those that would have been emitted or absorbed by the natural systems over a 100-year period. This large study was realized in collaboration with University du Quebec a Montreal, McGill University and Environnement IIlimite Inc. This is a world premiere and the net GHG emissions of EM-1 will be presented in details.

  5. Condensation heat transfer with noncondensable gas for passive containment cooling of nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonardi, Tauna [Schlumberger, 14910 Airline Rd., Rosharon, TX 77583 (United States)]. E-mail: Tleonardi@slb.com; Ishii, Mamoru [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)]. E-mail: Ishii@ecn.purdue.edu

    2006-09-15

    Noncondensable gases that come from the containment and the interaction of cladding and steam during a severe accident deteriorate a passive containment cooling system's performance by degrading the heat transfer capabilities of the condensers in passive containment cooling systems. This work contributes to the area of modeling condensation heat transfer with noncondensable gases in integral facilities. Previously existing correlations and models are for the through-flow of the mixture of steam and the noncondensable gases and this may not be applicable to passive containment cooling systems where there is no clear passage for the steam to escape. This work presents a condensation heat transfer model for the downward cocurrent flow of a steam/air mixture through a condenser tube, taking into account the atypical characteristics of the passive containment cooling system. An empirical model is developed that depends on the inlet conditions, including the mixture Reynolds number and noncondensable gas concentration.

  6. Enhanced Recovery in Tight Gas Reservoirs using Maxwell-Stefan Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, C. J. S.; Kantzas, A.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the steep production decline in unconventional gas reservoirs, enhanced recovery (ER) methods are receiving great attention from the industry. Wet gas or liquid rich reservoirs are the preferred ER candidates due to higher added value from natural gas liquids (NGL) production. ER in these reservoirs has the potential to add reserves by improving desorption and displacement of hydrocarbons through the medium. Nevertheless, analysis of gas transport at length scales of tight reservoirs is complicated because concomitant mechanisms are in place as pressure declines. In addition to viscous and Knudsen diffusion, multicomponent gas modeling includes competitive adsorption and molecular diffusion effects. Most models developed to address these mechanisms involve single component or binary mixtures. In this study, ER by gas injection is investigated in multicomponent (C1, C2, C3 and C4+, CO2 and N2) wet gas reservoirs. The competing effects of Knudsen and molecular diffusion are incorporated by using Maxwell-Stefan equations and the Dusty-Gas approach. This model was selected due to its superior properties on representing the physics of multicomponent gas flow, as demonstrated during the presented model validation. Sensitivity studies to evaluate adsorption, reservoir permeability and gas type effects are performed. The importance of competitive adsorption on production and displacement times is demonstrated. In the absence of adsorption, chromatographic separation is negligible. Production is merely dictated by competing effects between molecular and Knudsen diffusion. Displacement fronts travel rapidly across the medium. When adsorption effects are included, molecules with lower affinity to the adsorption sites will be produced faster. If the injected gas is inert (N2), an increase in heavier fraction composition occurs in the medium. During injection of adsorbing gases (CH4 and CO2), competitive adsorption effects will contribute to improved recovery of heavier

  7. Geological Characterisation of Depleted Oil and Gas Reservoirs for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Tse

    The reservoir formation consists of multilayered alternating beds of sandstone and shale cap rocks ... In the oil sector, Nigeria is one of the highest emitters ... Industrial emission and flaring .... integration of the 3D seismic data and wireline logs.

  8. Numerical modeling of condensation from vapor-gas mixtures for forced down flow inside a tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuann, R.Y.; Schrock, V.E.; Chen, Xiang, M.

    1995-01-01

    Laminar film condensation is the dominant heat transfer mode inside tubes. In the present paper direct numerical simulation of the detailed transport process within the steam-gas core flow and in the condensate film is carried out. The problem was posed as an axisymmetric two dimensional (r, z) gas phase inside an annular condensate film flow with an assumed smooth interface. The fundamental conservation equations were written for mass, momentum, species concentration and energy in the gaseous phase with effective diffusion parameters characterizing the turbulent region. The low Reynolds number two equation κ-ε model was employed to determine the eddy diffusion coefficients. The liquid film was described by similar formulation without the gas species equation. An empirical correlation was employed to correct for the effect of film waviness on the interfacial shear. A computer code named COAPIT (Condensation Analysis Program Inside Tube) was developed to implement numerical solution of the fundamental equations. The equations were solved by a marching technique working downstream from the entrance of the condensing section. COAPIT was benchmarked against experimental data and overall reasonable agreement was found for the key parameters such as heat transfer coefficient and tube inner wall temperature. The predicted axial development of radial profiles of velocity, composition and temperature and occurrence of metastable vapor add insight to the physical phenomena

  9. Numerical modeling of condensation from vapor-gas mixtures for forced down flow inside a tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuann, R Y [Taiwan Power Company, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Schrock, V E [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Xiang

    1995-09-01

    Laminar film condensation is the dominant heat transfer mode inside tubes. In the present paper direct numerical simulation of the detailed transport process within the steam-gas core flow and in the condensate film is carried out. The problem was posed as an axisymmetric two dimensional (r, z) gas phase inside an annular condensate film flow with an assumed smooth interface. The fundamental conservation equations were written for mass, momentum, species concentration and energy in the gaseous phase with effective diffusion parameters characterizing the turbulent region. The low Reynolds number two equation {kappa}-{epsilon} model was employed to determine the eddy diffusion coefficients. The liquid film was described by similar formulation without the gas species equation. An empirical correlation was employed to correct for the effect of film waviness on the interfacial shear. A computer code named COAPIT (Condensation Analysis Program Inside Tube) was developed to implement numerical solution of the fundamental equations. The equations were solved by a marching technique working downstream from the entrance of the condensing section. COAPIT was benchmarked against experimental data and overall reasonable agreement was found for the key parameters such as heat transfer coefficient and tube inner wall temperature. The predicted axial development of radial profiles of velocity, composition and temperature and occurrence of metastable vapor add insight to the physical phenomena.

  10. State of the Art Report On Condensation Phenomena Within Tubes in the Presence of Noncondensable Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polo, J.

    1998-01-01

    Condensation phenomena play an important role in many industrial applications; in particular; the nuclear industry uses such processes in different systems for both operation and safety aspects. Thus most of the engineering safety features in the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) plants as well as in the new advanced/passive type design are based on the condensation phenomena inside tubes to reduce the system pressure and to remove the decay heat released under accidental conditions. Regarding the new advanced/passive plant designs such a systems must ensure their capabilities under severe accident conditions, that means, under the presence of non-condensable gas an even aerosol particles. The presence of even a small quantity of non condensable gas in liquid-vapour has profound influence on the resistance to heat transfer at the liquid-vapour interface leading to reduce in the heat transfer rate. In consequence, the safety analysis of the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) promoted in increase in the modelling, model development and experimental research on the gas mixtures condensing inside vertical tubes. This report summarises the last models developed as well as the experimental findings on such processes. (Author) 51 refs

  11. Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria Cecilia Bravo

    2006-06-30

    This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. These dependencies are investigated by identifying the main transport mechanisms at the pore scale that should affect fluids flow at the reservoir scale. A critical review of commercial reservoir simulators, used to predict tight sand gas reservoir, revealed that many are poor when used to model fluid flow through tight reservoirs. Conventional simulators ignore altogether or model incorrectly certain phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization. We studied the effect of Knudsen's number in Klinkenberg's equation and evaluated the effect of different flow regimes on Klinkenberg's parameter b. We developed a model capable of explaining the pressure dependence of this parameter that has been experimentally observed, but not explained in the conventional formalisms. We demonstrated the relevance of this, so far ignored effect, in tight sands reservoir modeling. A 2-D numerical simulator based on equations that capture the above mentioned phenomena was developed. Dynamic implications of new equations are comprehensively discussed in our work and their relative contribution to the flow rate is evaluated. We performed several simulation sensitivity studies that evidenced that, in general terms, our formalism should be implemented in order to get more reliable tight sands gas reservoirs' predictions.

  12. Preliminary formation analysis for compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, William Payton

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an engineering and operational understanding of CAES performance for a depleted natural gas reservoir by evaluation of relative permeability effects of air, water and natural gas in depleted natural gas reservoirs as a reservoir is initially depleted, an air bubble is created, and as air is initially cycled. The composition of produced gases will be evaluated as the three phase flow of methane, nitrogen and brine are modeled. The effects of a methane gas phase on the relative permeability of air in a formation are investigated and the composition of the produced fluid, which consists primarily of the amount of natural gas in the produced air are determined. Simulations of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in depleted natural gas reservoirs were carried out to assess the effect of formation permeability on the design of a simple CAES system. The injection of N2 (as a proxy to air), and the extraction of the resulting gas mixture in a depleted natural gas reservoir were modeled using the TOUGH2 reservoir simulator with the EOS7c equation of state. The optimal borehole spacing was determined as a function of the formation scale intrinsic permeability. Natural gas reservoir results are similar to those for an aquifer. Borehole spacing is dependent upon the intrinsic permeability of the formation. Higher permeability allows increased injection and extraction rates which is equivalent to more power per borehole for a given screen length. The number of boreholes per 100 MW for a given intrinsic permeability in a depleted natural gas reservoir is essentially identical to that determined for a simple aquifer of identical properties. During bubble formation methane is displaced and a sharp N2methane boundary is formed with an almost pure N2 gas phase in the bubble near the borehole. During cycling mixing of methane and air occurs along the boundary as the air bubble boundary moves. The extracted gas mixture changes as a

  13. A study of stress change and fault slip in producing gas reservoirs overlain by elastic and viscoelastic caprocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlic, B.; Wassing, B.B.T.

    2013-01-01

    Geomechanical simulations were conducted to study the effects of reservoir depletion on the stability of internal and boundary faults in gas reservoirs overlain by elastic and viscoelastic salt caprocks. The numerical models were of a disk-shaped gas reservoir with idealized geometry; they mimic the

  14. Numerical analyses on the effect of capillary condensation on gas diffusivities in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Yuta; Hori, Takuma; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Takagi, Shu

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the effect of capillary condensation on gas diffusivities in porous media composed of randomly packed spheres with moderate wettability. Lattice density functional theory simulations successfully reproduce realistic adsorption/desorption isotherms and provide fluid density distributions inside the porous media. We find that capillary condensations lead to the occlusion of narrow pores because they preferentially occur at confined spaces surrounded by the solid walls. Consequently, the characteristic lengths of the partially wet structures are larger than those of the corresponding dry structures with the same porosities. Subsequent gas diffusion simulations exploiting the mean-square displacement method indicate that while effective diffusion coefficients significantly decrease in the presence of partially condensed liquids, they are larger than those in the dry structures with the same porosities. Most importantly, we find that the porosity-to-tortuosity ratio, which is a crucial parameter that determines the effective diffusion coefficient, can be reasonably related to the porosity even for the partially wet porous media.

  15. Theoretical modeling of steam condensation in the presence of a noncondensable gas in horizontal tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwon-Yeong; Kim, Moo Hwan; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical model was developed to investigate a steam condensation with a noncondensable gas in a horizontal tube. The heat transfer through the vapor/noncondensable gas mixture boundary layer consists of the sensible heat transfer and the latent heat transfer given up by the condensing vapor, and it must equal that from the condensate film to the tube wall. Therefore, the total heat transfer coefficient is given by the film, condensation and sensible heat transfer coefficients. The film heat transfer coefficients of the upper and lower portions of the tube were calculated separately from Rosson and Meyers (1965) correlation. The heat and mass transfer analogy was used to analyze the steam/noncondensable gas mixture boundary layer. Here, the Nusselt and Sherwood numbers in the gas phase were modified to incorporate the effects of condensate film roughness, suction, and developing flow. The predictions of the theoretical model for the experimental heat transfer coefficients at the top and bottom of the tube were reasonable. The calculated heat transfer coefficients at the top of the tube were higher than those at the bottom of it, as experimental results. As the temperature potential at the top of tube was lower than that at the bottom of it, the heat fluxes at the upper and lower portions of the tube were similar to each other. Generally speaking, however, the model predictions showed a good agreement with experimental data. The new empirical correlation proposed by Lee and Kim (2008) for the vertical tube was applied to the condensation of steam/noncondensable mixture in a horizontal tube. Nusselt theory and Chato correlation were used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients at top and bottom of the horizontal tube, respectively. The predictions of the new empirical correlation were good and very similar with the theoretical model. (author)

  16. Thermodynamic Characterization of Undefined Petroleum Fractions of Gas Condensate using Group Contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uribe-Vargas Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A methodology proposed in a previous paper [Carreón-Calderón et al. (2012 Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 51, 14188-14198] for thermodynamic characterization of undefined petroleum fractions was applied to gas-condensate fluids. Using this methodology, input parameters of cubic equations of state and their mixing rules, critical properties and chemical pseudostructures are determined for undefined fractions by minimizing their Gibbs free energy. The results show the feasibility of applying this approach to gas-condensate fluids without making use of either cubic equations of state or mixing rules with specific adjusted parameters for petroleum fluids. Besides, it is shown that the phase equilibrium envelopes of gas-condensate fluids are highly dependent on the critical properties assigned to the undefined petroleum fractions of such fluid fractions and less dependent on the equation used for modeling gas-condensate fluids as a whole. The Absolute Average Error (AAE considering the best arrangement is 1.79% in predicting the dew point.

  17. Market diffusion, technological learning, and cost-benefit dynamics of condensing gas boilers in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, M.; Dittmar, L.; Junginger, H.M.; Patel, M.K.; Blok, K.

    2009-01-01

    High costs often prevent the market diffusion of novel and efficient energy technologies. Monitoring cost and price decline for these technologies is thus important in order to establish effective energy policy. Here, we present experience curves and cost-benefit analyses for condensing gas boilers

  18. Experimental phase behavior study of a five-component model gas condensate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shariati - Sarabi, A.; Straver, E.J.M.; Florusse, L.J.; Peters, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the bubble points and dew points of a multicomponent mixture of methane, butane, heptane, decane and tetradecane as a model mixture representative of a gas condensate, have been measured experimentally. Ten samples with approximately the same composition were prepared and their

  19. Removal of fine particles in wet flue gas desulfurization system by heterogeneous condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L.J.; Bao, J.J.; Yan, J.P.; Liu, J.H.; Song, S.J.; Fan, F.X. [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). School of Energy & Environment

    2010-01-01

    A novel process to remove fine particles with high efficiency by heterogeneous condensation in a wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) system is presented. A supersaturated vapor phase, necessary for condensational growth of fine particles, was achieved in the SO{sub 2} absorption zone and at the top of the wet FGD scrubber by adding steam in the gas inlet and above the scrubbing liquid inlet of the scrubber, respectively. The condensational grown droplets were then removed by the scrubbing liquid and a high-efficiency demister. The results show that the effectiveness of the WFGD system for removal of fine particles is related to the SO{sub 2} absorbent employed. When using CaCO{sub 3} and NH{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O to remove SO{sub 2} from flue gas, the fine particle removal efficiencies are lower than those for Na2CO{sub 3} and water, and the morphology and elemental composition of fine particles are changed. This effect can be attributed to the formation of aerosol particles in the limestone and ammonia-based FGD processes. The performance of the WFGD system for removal of fine particles can be significantly improved for both steam addition cases, for which the removal efficiency increases with increasing amount of added steam. A high liquid to gas ratio is beneficial for efficient removal of fine particles by heterogeneous condensation of water vapor.

  20. Operando Spectroscopy of the Gas-Phase Aldol Condensation of Propanal over Solid Base Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernández-giménez, Ana M.; Ruiz-martínez, Javier; Puértolas, Begoña; Pérez-ramírez, Javier; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2017-01-01

    The gas-phase aldol condensation of propanal, taken as model for the aldehyde components in bio-oils, has been studied with a combined operando set-up allowing to perform FT-IR & UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) with on-line mass spectrometry (MS). The selected solid base catalysts, a

  1. Two-step condensation of the ideal Bose gas in highly anisotropic traps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Druten, N.J.; Ketterle, W.

    1997-01-01

    The ideal Bose gas in a highly anisotropic harmonic potential is studied. It is found that Bose-Einstein condensation occurs in two distinct steps as the temperature is lowered. In the first step the specific heat shows a sharp feature, but the system still occupies many one-dimensional quantum

  2. Influence of heat exchange of reservoir with rocks on hot gas injection via a single well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Vladimir E.; Ivanov, Gavril I.

    2017-11-01

    In the computational experiment the influence of heat exchange through top and bottom of the gas-bearing reservoir on the dynamics of temperature and pressure fields during hot gas injection via a single well is investigated. The experiment was carried out within the framework of modified mathematical model of non-isothermal real gas filtration, obtained from the energy and mass conservation laws and the Darcy law. The physical and caloric equations of state together with the Newton-Riemann law of heat exchange of gas reservoir with surrounding rocks, are used as closing relations. It is shown that the influence of the heat exchange with environment on temperature field of the gas-bearing reservoir is localized in a narrow zone near its top and bottom, though the size of this zone is increased with time.

  3. Appraisal of transport and deformation in shale reservoirs using natural noble gas tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, Jason E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kuhlman, Kristopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robinson, David G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gardner, William Payton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report presents efforts to develop the use of in situ naturally-occurring noble gas tracers to evaluate transport mechanisms and deformation in shale hydrocarbon reservoirs. Noble gases are promising as shale reservoir diagnostic tools due to their sensitivity of transport to: shale pore structure; phase partitioning between groundwater, liquid, and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing. Approximately 1.5-year time-series of wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells. The noble gas compositions and isotopes suggest a strong signature of atmospheric contribution to the noble gases that mix with deep, old reservoir fluids. Complex mixing and transport of fracturing fluid and reservoir fluids occurs during production. Real-time laboratory measurements were performed on triaxially-deforming shale samples to link deformation behavior, transport, and gas tracer signatures. Finally, we present improved methods for production forecasts that borrow statistical strength from production data of nearby wells to reduce uncertainty in the forecasts.

  4. The characteristics of operation of the Shatlyk gas condensate deposit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zatov, G.A.; Friman, Yu.M.; Frumson, Yu.V.; Koshayev, T.K.; Stepanov, N.G.; Tverkovkin, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    Results are correlated of the operation of the Shatlyksk deposit for a 10 year period from the start of its development through 1982. The rates of gas withdrawal from the deposits are analyzed, along with the conditions for manifestation of elastic, water thrust modes, the characteristics of the studied wells and other issues. The results of modeling the advancement of stratum waters are cited. The modeling was performed on a computer (EVM) using a system of two dimensional, two phase filtration.

  5. Mercury removal from natural gas and associated condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennico, A.; Barthel, Y.; Courty, P. (Institut Francais du Petrole, 31 - Rueil-Malmaison (France). Direction Industrielle)

    1990-01-01

    IFP mercury trapping systems are based on CMG 273, the recently developed Procatalyse product which is the heart of IFP's gas phase and liquid phase mercury removal technology. This material, made of highly macroporous alumina supporting a metal sulfide, presents a very high reactivity towards mecury within a broad range of operating conditions, including those operating in the liquid phase. Characteristics of CMG 273 are presented. (orig.).

  6. PP and PS seismic response from fractured tight gas reservoirs: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jianming, Tang; Shaonan, Zhang; Li, Xiang-Yang

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present an example of using PP and PS converted-wave data recorded by digital micro-eletro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) to evaluate a fractured tight gas reservoir from the Xinchang gas field in Sichuan, China. For this, we analyse the variations in converted shear-wave splitting, Vp/Vs ratio and PP and PS impedance, as well as other attributes based on absorption and velocity dispersion. The reservoir formation is tight sandstone, buried at a depth of about 5000 m, and the converted-wave data reveal significant shear-wave splitting over the reservoir formation. We utilize a rotation technique to extract the shear-wave polarization and time delay from the data, and a small-window correlation method to build time-delay spectra that allow the generation of a time-delay section. At the reservoir formation, the shear-wave time delay is measured at 20 ms, about 15% shear-wave anisotropy, correlating with the known gas reservoirs. Furthermore, the splitting anomalies are consistent with the characteristics of other attributes such as Vp/Vs ratio and P- and S-wave acoustic and elastic impedance. The P-wave shows consistent low impedance over the reservoir formation, whilst the S-wave impedance shows relatively high impedance. The calculated gas indicator based on absorption and velocity dispersion yields a high correlation with the gas bearing formations. This confirms the benefit of multicomponent seismic data from digital MEMS sensors

  7. The method of predicting the process of condensation of moisture and hydrate formation in the gas pipeline

    OpenAIRE

    Хвостова, Олена Вікторівна

    2014-01-01

    The problem of ensuring the required value of one of the natural gas quality indicators during its transportation to the consumer - moisture content is considered in the paper. The method for predicting possible moisture condensation and hydrate formation processes in gas pipelines considering mixing gas flows with different moisture content was developed.Predicting the moisture condensation and hydrate formation in gas pipelines is an actual task since a timely prevention of these processes ...

  8. Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Reeves

    2005-01-31

    In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

  9. Theoretical study on bubble formation and flow condensation in downflow channel with horizontal gas injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kang; Li, Yanzhong; Wang, Jiaojiao; Ma, Yuan; Wang, Lei; Xie, Fushou

    2018-05-01

    Bubble formation and condensation in liquid pipes occur widely in industrial systems such as cryogenic propellant feeding system. In this paper, an integrated theoretical model is established to give a comprehensive description of the bubble formation, motion and condensation process. The model is validated by numerical simulations and bubble condensation experiments from references, and good agreements are achieved. The bubble departure diameter at the orifice and the flow condensation length in the liquid channel are predicted by the model, and effects of various influencing parameters on bubble behaviors are analyzed. Prediction results indicate that the orifice diameter, the gas feeding rate, and the liquid velocity are the primary influence factors on the bubble departure diameter. The interfacial heat transfer as well as the bubble departure diameter has a direct impact on the bubble flow condensation length, which increases by 2.5 times over a system pressure range of 0.1 0.4 MPa, and decreases by 85% over a liquid subcooling range of 5 30 K. This work could be beneficial to the prediction of bubble formation and flow condensation processes and the design of cryogenic transfer pipes.

  10. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

    1992-10-01

    Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a ``heterogeneity matrix`` based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

  11. A condensation experiment in the accumulated conditions of noncondensable gas in a vertical tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwon Yeong; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: It has been well known that the presence of noncondensable gases in vapors can greatly inhibit the condensation process. Many analytical and experimental studies were conducted to investigate the effect of noncondensable gases on steam condensation for both stagnant and forced-convective situations either over a plate or outside a horizontal tube. Recently, several researches have been performed for the condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases taken place inside the vertical tube in order to give the information to design the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) in Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). Generally, the experimental results showed that the heat transfer coefficient depends on inlet noncondensable gas mass fraction, inlet saturated steam temperature related with system pressure and inlet mixture Reynolds number. This research was performed for the System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor-Pilot (SMART-P), in which the remaining heat is removed from the core passively by Passive Residual Heat Removal System (PRHRS) condenser in a period of serious accident. The PRHRS is separated from working fluid loop, and pressurized by a nitrogen gas during the normal operation of SMART-P. But when the PRHRS starts operating, the nitrogen gas acts as a noncondensable gas and affects the heat transfer characteristics of the PRHRS. The experimental conditions of this study were almost similar with those of previous researches except the noncondensable gas was accumulated and remained inside the vertical tube. In the previous researches, the noncondensable gas was flowing with constant flow rate. Because of the condensate inside condenser tube, the accumulation of noncondensable gas could be developed inside the vertical tube. At steady-state condition the local temperatures and system pressure were measured to obtain heat transfer characteristics. This study also gave the information about the distribution of the

  12. Evaluation of non-condensable gas effect during LBLOCA in an OPR1000 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung Hun; Seul, Kwang-Won; Bang, Young-Seok; Lee, Jun Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Gas accumulation in the nuclear power plant may cause diverse safety issues such as water hammer, pump cavitation and inadvertent valve actuation. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has published twenty Information Notices, two Generic Letters, and one NUREG report related to the issue of the gas accumulation. It has been considered that gas accumulation occurred since the beginning of commercial nuclear power plant operation and may occur in the currently operating plants. Gas accumulation in the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) is the condition that did not consider in Accident Analysis of Final Safety Analysis Report or Technical Specification and may finally result in degradation or loss of the safety functions. In this paper, the effect of gas accumulation in the ECCS has been analyzed by modeling non-condensable gas injection during the operation of Safety Injection Tank (SIT) and Low Pressure Safety Injection (LPSI) under the LBLOCA condition. Gas accumulation in the ECCS has been dealt with one of significant safety issues in the operating nuclear power plants. In order to identify the effect of the non-condensable gas in Hanul unit 3 and 4, the sensitivity studies for gas quantity, location or injection time was conducted for high or low pressure condition. At high pressure condition, the injected gas induced the reduced SIT flow rate and the reduced period of SIT injection. The reflood PCT at 5 ft''3 condition was 1150 K which was 49K higher than that at no gas condition. At low pressure condition, the reduced flow rate and the increased reflood PCT were also identified. However, the PCT deviation due to different gas quantity was not large as much as that at high pressure condition. We concluded that it is necessary to evaluate the effect of the accumulated gas with the consideration of plant- specific conditions such as system pressure, accumulated location, gas quantity and injection time.

  13. Effective water influx control in gas reservoir development: Problems and countermeasures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Feng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Because of the diversity of geological characteristics and the complexity of percolation rules, many problems are found ineffective water influx control in gas reservoir development. The problems mainly focus on how to understand water influx rules, to establish appropriate countermeasures, and to ensure the effectiveness of technical measures. It is hard to obtain a complete applicable understanding through the isolated analysis of an individual gas reservoir due to many factors such as actual gas reservoir development phase, research work, pertinence and timeliness of measures, and so on. Over the past four decades, the exploration, practicing and tracking research have been conducted on water control in gas reservoir development in the Sichuan Basin, and a series of comprehensive water control technologies were developed integrating advanced concepts, successful experiences, specific theories and mature technologies. Though the development of most water-drive gas reservoirs was significantly improved, water control effects were quite different. Based on this background, from the perspective of the early-phase requirements of water influx control, the influencing factors of a water influx activity, the dynamic analysis method of water influx performance, the optimizing strategy of a water control, and the water control experience of typical gas reservoirs, this paper analyzed the key problems of water control, evaluated the influencing factors of water control effect, explored the practical water control strategies, and proposed that it should be inappropriate to apply the previous water control technological model to actual work but the pertinence should be improved according to actual circumstances. The research results in the paper provide technical reference for the optimization of water-invasion gas reservoir development.

  14. Capacity expansion analysis of UGSs rebuilt from low-permeability fractured gas reservoirs with CO2 as cushion gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufei Tan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The techniques of pressurized mining and hydraulic fracturing are often used to improve gas well productivity at the later development stage of low-permeability carbonate gas reservoirs, but reservoirs are watered out and a great number of micro fractures are produced. Therefore, one of the key factors for underground gas storages (UGS rebuilt from low-permeability fractured gas reservoirs with CO2 as the cushion gas is how to expand storage capacity effectively by injecting CO2 to displace water and to develop control strategies for the stable migration of gas–water interface. In this paper, a mathematical model was established to simulate the gas–water flow when CO2 was injected into dual porosity reservoirs to displace water. Then, the gas–water interface migration rules while CO2 was injected in the peripheral gas wells for water displacement were analyzed with one domestic UGS rebuilt from fractured gas reservoirs as the research object. And finally, discussion was made on how CO2 dissolution, bottom hole flowing pressure (BHFP, CO2 injection rate and micro fracture parameters affect the stability of gas–water interface in the process of storage capacity expansion. It is shown that the speed of capacity expansion reaches the maximum value at the fifth cycle and then decreases gradually when UGS capacity is expanded in the pattern of more injection and less withdrawal. Gas–water interface during UGS capacity expansion is made stable due to that the solubility of CO2 in water varies with the reservoir pressure. When the UGS capacity is expanded at constant BHFP and the flow rate, the expansion speed can be increased effectively by increasing the BHFP and the injection flow rate of gas wells in the central areas appropriately. In the reservoir areas with high permeability and fracture-matrix permeability ratio, the injection flow rate should be reduced properly to prevent gas–water interface fingering caused by a high-speed flow

  15. High-efficiency condenser of steam from a steam-gas mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, O. O.; Krylov, V. S.; Ptakhin, A. V.; Kondratev, A. V.; Yankov, G. G.

    2017-12-01

    The design of a module for a high-efficiency condenser of steam with a high content (up to 15%) of noncondensable gases (NCGs) with a nearly constant steam-gas mixture (SGM) velocity during the condensation of steam has been developed. This module provides the possibility to estimate the operational efficiency of six condenser zones during the motion of steam from the inlet to the SGM suction point. Some results of the experimental tests of the pilot high-efficiency condenser module are presented. The dependence of the average heat transfer coefficient k¯ on the volumetric NCG concentration v¯ has been derived. It is shown that the high-efficiency condenser module can provide a moderate decrease in k¯ from 4400-4600 to 2600-2800 W/(m2 K) at v¯ ≈ 0.5-9.0%. The heat transfer coefficient distribution over different module zones at a heat duty close to its nominal value has been obtained. From this distribution, it can be seen that the average heat transfer coefficient decreases to 2600 W/(m2 K) at an NCG concentration v¯ = 7.5%, but the first condenser sections ( 1- 3) retain high values of k¯ at a level of no lower than 3200 W/(m2 K), and the last sections operate less well, having k¯ at a level of 1700 W/(m2 K). The dependence of the average heat transfer coefficient on the water velocity in condenser tubes has been obtained at a nearly nominal duty such that the extrapolation of this dependence to the water velocity of 2 m/s may be expected to give k¯ = 5000 W/(m2 K) for relatively pure steam, but an increase in k¯ at v¯ = 8% will be smaller. The effect of the gas removal device characteristic on the operation of the high-efficiency condenser module is described. The design developed for the steam condenser of a gas-turbine plant with a power of 25 MW, a steam flow rate of 40.2 t/h, and a CO2 concentration of up to 12% with consideration for the results of performed studies is presented.

  16. Seismic modeling of acid-gas injection in a deep saline reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ursenbach, C.P.; Lawton, D.C. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Geoscience, Consortium for Research in Elastic Wave Exploration Seismology

    2008-07-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) are common byproducts of the energy industry. As such, remediation studies are underway to determine the feasibility of sequestering these byproducts in subsurface reservoirs, including deep saline reservoirs. Acid gas injection at smaller gas wells holds promise. However, in order for such injection programs to work, the progress of the injection plume must be tracked. A modeling study of fluid substitution was carried out to gain insight into the ability of seismic monitoring to distinguish pre- and post-injection states of the reservoir medium. The purpose of this study was to carry out fluid substitution calculations for the modeling of an injection process. A methodology that may be applied or adapted to a variety of acid-gas injection scenarios was also developed. The general approach involved determining acoustic properties at reservoir temperature and pressure of relevant fluids; obtaining elastic properties of the reservoir rock for some reference saturated state, and the elastic properties of the mineral comprising it; and, determining the change in reservoir elastic properties due to fluid substitution via Gassmann's equation. Water, brine and non-aqueous acid gas were the 3 fluids of interest in this case. The feasibility of monitoring was judged by the sensitivity of travel times and reflection coefficients to fluid substitution. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Experimental investigation of condensation and mixing during venting of a steam / non-condensable gas mixture into a pressure suppression pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Walsche, C.; Cachard, F. de

    2000-07-01

    Experiments have been performed in the LINX facility to investigate condensation and mixing phenomena in pressure Suppression Pools (SPs), in the context of the European Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) study. As a contribution to the TEPSS project of the 4th European Framework Programme, eight medium-scale, separate-effect tests were carried out in which constant steam/air flow rates were injected below the surface of a two-metre diameter water pool, maintained at constant pressure, through a large downward vent. The vessel pressure was regulated, the pool temperature rising until equilibrium conditions with the incoming gas were reached. The SP temperature distribution was measured, as well as the inlet and outlet gas flow rates, and the overall condensation rate was estimated using mass and heat balances. The test matrix was based on steam mass floret and air mass fraction of the injected gas, the vent immersion depth, and the vessel pressure. Overall, the condensation was shown to be efficient for all tests performed, even for high non-condensable gas concentrations of the injected gas. Thermal stratification above the vent outlet was shown to be moderate. The tests performed allowed a better understanding to be gained of the mechanisms of condensation and mixing in the SP and Wetwell, and results were incorporated into an ORACLE database, to be used for further model development. (authors)

  18. An analysis of the thermodynamic efficiency for exhaust gas recirculation-condensed water recirculation-waste heat recovery condensing boilers (EGR-CWR-WHR CB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang-Eon; Yu, Byeonghun; Lee, Seungro

    2015-01-01

    This study presents fundamental research on the development of a new boiler that is expected to have a higher efficiency and lower emissions than existing boilers. The thermodynamic efficiency of exhaust gas recirculation-condensed water recirculation-waste heat recovery condensing boilers (EGR-CWR-WHR CB) was calculated using thermodynamic analysis and was compared with other boilers. The results show the possibility of obtaining a high efficiency when the temperature of the exhaust gas is controlled within 50–60 °C because water in the exhaust gas is condensed within this temperature range. In addition, the enthalpy emitted by the exhaust gas for the new boiler is smaller because the amount of condensed water is increased by the high dew-point temperature and the low exhaust gas temperature. Thus, the new boiler can obtain a higher efficiency than can older boilers. The efficiency of the EGR-CWR-WHR CB proposed in this study is 93.91%, which is 7.04% higher than that of existing CB that is currently used frequently. - Highlights: • The study presents the development of a new boiler expected to have a high efficiency. • Thermodynamic efficiency of EGR-CWR-WHR condensing boiler was calculated. • Efficiency of EGR-CWR-WHR CB is 93.91%, which is 7.04% higher than existing CB

  19. Use of modified nanoparticles in oil and gas reservoir management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkenburg, D.H.; Chin, P.T.K.; Fischer, H.R.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a water dispersed nano sensor cocktail based on InP/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) and atomic silver clusters with a bright and visible luminescence combined with optimized sensor functionalities for the water flooding process. The QDs and Ag nano sensors were tested in simulated reservoir

  20. Gas dynamics, optics and chemistry of an aircraft condensable wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinats, E.S.; Kashevarov, A.V.; Stasenko, A.L. [Central Aerohydrodynamic Inst., Zhukovsky (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    Prediction of the properties of a jet-and-vortex wake from an individual airplane is of great interest as the first step to assessment of the possible global changes in the atmosphere due to the world civil aviation. Several mathematical models of the different regions of an aircraft wake and corresponding numerical results are presented. The axisymmetric exhaust jet was simulated on the base of the well-known k-{epsilon} model of turbulence. Jet chemistry was investigated on the base of kinetic scheme of the gas phase reactions of enriched by including chemisorption by water droplets of several species and by taking into account of the photochemical processes. In the 3D far wake model, the numerical results for distribution of species exhausted by the engines and entrapped by the velocity field of two parallel vortices are shown. (R.P.) 7 refs.

  1. Gas dynamics, optics and chemistry of an aircraft condensable wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinats, E S; Kashevarov, A V; Stasenko, A L [Central Aerohydrodynamic Inst., Zhukovsky (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    Prediction of the properties of a jet-and-vortex wake from an individual airplane is of great interest as the first step to assessment of the possible global changes in the atmosphere due to the world civil aviation. Several mathematical models of the different regions of an aircraft wake and corresponding numerical results are presented. The axisymmetric exhaust jet was simulated on the base of the well-known k-{epsilon} model of turbulence. Jet chemistry was investigated on the base of kinetic scheme of the gas phase reactions of enriched by including chemisorption by water droplets of several species and by taking into account of the photochemical processes. In the 3D far wake model, the numerical results for distribution of species exhausted by the engines and entrapped by the velocity field of two parallel vortices are shown. (R.P.) 7 refs.

  2. Simulation of Flow Behavior of Gas Condensate at Low Interfacial Tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Peng; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Pope, Gary A.

    1996-01-01

    A vertical, long-core experiment of natural depletion of a gas condensate that was conducted by Elf Aquitaine is simulated by an equation-of-state (EOS) compositional simulator, UTCOMP. The Peng-Robinson (PR) EOS is used for phase-behavior calculation. Because of low interfactial tension (IFT......) in the measurement, more attention is paid to the influence of IFT on gas/oil flow behavior. Two different types of model are used to compute the relative permeability. Model I is a Corey-type model combined with the capillary number concept. Model II is a modified form of the model proposed by Coats.The simulation...... results indicate that the effect of low IFT on relative permeability can be reasonably described by the two models selected, although the producing gas-oil ratio (GOR) obtained using Model I deviates somewhat from the experimental values in later depletion stages. The condensed liquid can be a mobile...

  3. Flue gas moisture capacity calculation at the outlet of the condensation heat recovery unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galashov Nikolay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As a result, study equation has been obtained which determine the flue gas moisture capacity at the outlet of the condensation heat recovery unit with an error of less than 1%. It possible to at the temperature of the flue gas below the dew point and the known air-fuel ratio efficient. The equation can be used to calculate plants operating on products of gas combustion without Use of tables and programs for calculating the water-vapor saturation pressure.

  4. Terahertz Active Photonic Crystals for Condensed Gas Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Unterrainer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The terahertz (THz spectral region, covering frequencies from 1 to 10 THz, is highly interesting for chemical sensing. The energy of rotational and vibrational transitions of molecules lies within this frequency range. Therefore, chemical fingerprints can be derived, allowing for a simple detection scheme. Here, we present an optical sensor based on active photonic crystals (PhCs, i.e., the pillars are fabricated directly from an active THz quantum-cascade laser medium. The individual pillars are pumped electrically leading to laser emission at cryogenic temperatures. There is no need to couple light into the resonant structure because the PhC itself is used as the light source. An injected gas changes the resonance condition of the PhC and thereby the laser emission frequency. We achieve an experimental frequency shift of 10−3 times the center lasing frequency. The minimum detectable refractive index change is 1.6 × 10−5 RIU.

  5. Constant rate natural gas production from a well in a hydrate reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Chuang; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2003-01-01

    Using a computational model, production of natural gas at a constant rate from a well that is drilled into a confined methane hydrate reservoir is studied. It is assumed that the pores in the reservoir are partially saturated with hydrate. A linearized model for an axisymmetric condition with a fixed well output is used in the analysis. For different reservoir temperatures and various well outputs, time evolutions of temperature and pressure profiles, as well as the gas flow rate in the hydrate zone and the gas region, are evaluated. The distance of the decomposition front from the well as a function of time is also computed. It is shown that to maintain a constant natural gas production rate, the well pressure must be decreased with time. A constant low production rate can be sustained for a long duration of time, but a high production rate demands unrealistically low pressure at the well after a relatively short production time. The simulation results show that the process of natural gas production in a hydrate reservoir is a sensitive function of reservoir temperature and hydrate zone permeability

  6. Hydrogen condensation products of Turkmenistan gas fields as motor fuel components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kul-dzhaev, B.A.; Sergienko, S.R.; Tsibrova, E.G.

    1985-07-01

    Technical data are provided in tabular form on the composition of hydrocarbon condensation products obtained from various gas fields in Turkmenia, with an analysis of their usefulness as gasoline and diesel fuels. For example, high-paraffin condensates are characterized by low octane numbers (30-50) of the gasoline fraction (150-180/sup 0/C). However, lowering the temperature at the end of distillation to 120-130/sup 0/C increased the octane number to 73, one point higher than required by State Standards for automobile gasoline A-72. The cetane number of diesel fuels in general exceed the State Standards, especially in the case of fractions 150/sup 0/C and 180/sup 0/C of the high-paraffin condensates obtained from the Shatlyk site. Summarized data are presented on the suitability of the products obtained from the different site for the different types of fuels. 4 references.

  7. Effect of disorder on condensation in the lattice gas model on a random graph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handford, Thomas P; Dear, Alexander; Pérez-Reche, Francisco J; Taraskin, Sergei N

    2014-07-01

    The lattice gas model of condensation in a heterogeneous pore system, represented by a random graph of cells, is studied using an exact analytical solution. A binary mixture of pore cells with different coordination numbers is shown to exhibit two phase transitions as a function of chemical potential in a certain temperature range. Heterogeneity in interaction strengths is demonstrated to reduce the critical temperature and, for large-enough degreeS of disorder, divides the cells into ones which are either on average occupied or unoccupied. Despite treating the pore space loops in a simplified manner, the random-graph model provides a good description of condensation in porous structures containing loops. This is illustrated by considering capillary condensation in a structural model of mesoporous silica SBA-15.

  8. Condensing species from flue gas in Puertollano gasification power plant, Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oriol Font; Xavier Querol; Felica Plana; Pilar Coca; Silvia Burgos; Francisco Garcia Pena [Institute of Earth Sciences ' Jaume Almera' , Barcelona (Spain). Environmental Geology

    2006-10-15

    The occurrence and distribution of trace elements (Pb, Zn, As, Ge, Cd, Tl, Bi, Sn, and also Ni, Fe and V) in condensates arising from coal gasification was investigated through the study of samples physically deposited on the gas cooling system from the Puertollano IGCC 335 MW power plant. These highly metal enriched samples are suitable for a comprehensive evaluation of the mode of occurrence of these elements in IGCC fly ash. Pb, Zn, Ge, and Fe sulfides, Ni-Fe arsenides, Ge and V oxides as well as traces of K chloride and Pb, Zn and Fe sulfates were determined as the major bearing phases for these elements. Three condensation zones were differentiated as function of the condensation temperatures and metal content: 1. Pb zone (520-750{sup o}C), characterized by the dominance of galena (70-90% of the main crystalline phases), and by the condensation of pyrrhotite and nickeline. 2. Ge-Zn-Pb zone (520-470{sup o}C), with sphalerite and wurzite being the dominant crystalline phases (over 40%), and Ge compounds, GeS{sub 2} and GeO{sub 2}, reaching 30% of the bulk condensates. 3. Zn zone (300-400{sup o}C), characterized by the dominance of Zn sulfides (over 85% of the main crystalline phases). The results obtained from these highly metalliferous condensates show similar forms of occurrence for the studied elements to those obtained in the bulk Puertollano IGCC fly ash (by using XAFS spectroscopy), where the contents of these elements are much lower. Furthermore, the sequential condensation of sulfides during coal gasification is similar to that from volcanic fumaroles, and may thus promote a better understanding of volcanic deposits. 23 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Application of PLT (Production Loggin Tool) surveys to select a vertical grid refinement in gas reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Pablo Julian [Petrosynergy Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Schiozer, Denis Jose [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNISIM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Petroleo. Pesquisa em Simulacao e Gerenciamento de Reservatorios

    2012-07-01

    Most of the time, the fluid segregation in porous media between gas and water makes water breakthrough reach a well structurally from the bottom, even when coning effect is present. In this paper we describe a real case of a gas reservoir when water breakthrough reach the vertical well from the middle of the perforation, above gas phase. We also expose how to upgrade the geological model to represent the high permeability channels in the numerical simulation model. (author)

  10. Numerical solution of fractured horizontal wells in shale gas reservoirs considering multiple transport mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu-long; Tang, Xu-chuan; Zhang, Lie-hui; Tang, Hong-ming; Tao, Zheng-Wu

    2018-06-01

    The multiscale pore size and specific gas storage mechanism in organic-rich shale gas reservoirs make gas transport in such reservoirs complicated. Therefore, a model that fully incorporates all transport mechanisms and employs an accurate numerical method is urgently needed to simulate the gas production process. In this paper, a unified model of apparent permeability was first developed, which took into account multiple influential factors including slip flow, Knudsen diffusion (KD), surface diffusion, effects of the adsorbed layer, permeability stress sensitivity, and ad-/desorption phenomena. Subsequently, a comprehensive mathematical model, which included the model of apparent permeability, was derived to describe gas production behaviors. Thereafter, on the basis of unstructured perpendicular bisection grids and finite volume method, a fully implicit numerical simulator was developed using Matlab software. The validation and application of the new model were confirmed using a field case reported in the literature. Finally, the impacts of related influencing factors on gas production were analyzed. The results showed that KD resulted in a negligible impact on gas production in the proposed model. The smaller the pore size was, the more obvious the effects of the adsorbed layer on the well production rate would be. Permeability stress sensitivity had a slight effect on well cumulative production in shale gas reservoirs. Adsorbed gas made a major contribution to the later flow period of the well; the greater the adsorbed gas content, the greater the well production rate would be. This paper can improve the understanding of gas production in shale gas reservoirs for petroleum engineers.

  11. Asphalt features and gas accumulation mechanism of Sinian reservoirs in the Tongwan Palaeo-uplift, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Breakthroughs have been made in natural gas exploration in Sinian reservoirs in the Tongwan Palaeo-uplift, Sichuan Basin, recently. However, there are disputes with regard to the genetic mechanisms of natural gas reservoirs. The development law of asphalts in the Sinian reservoirs may play an extremely important role in the study of the relationships between palaeo oil and gas reservoirs. Accordingly, researches were conducted on the features and development patterns of asphalts in the Sinian reservoirs in this area. The following research results were obtained. (1 Asphalts in the Sinian reservoirs were developed after the important hydrothermal event in the Sichuan Basin, namely the well-known Emei Taphrogeny in the mid-late Permian Period. (2 Distribution of asphalts is related to palaeo oil reservoirs under the control of palaeo-structures of Indosinian-Yanshanian Period, when the palaeo-structures contained high content of asphalts in the high positions of the palaeo-uplift. (3 Large-scale oil and gas accumulations in the Sinian reservoirs occurred in the Indosinian-Yanshanian Period to generate the Leshan-Ziyang and Gaoshiti-Moxi-Guang'an palaeo oil reservoirs. Cracking of crude oil in the major parts of these palaeo oil reservoirs controlled the development of the present natural gas reservoirs. (4 The development of asphalts in the Sinian reservoirs indicates that hydrocarbons in the Dengying Formation originated from Cambrian source rocks and natural gas accumulated in the Sinian reservoirs are products of late-stage cracking of the Sinian reservoirs. (5 The Sinian palaeo-structures of Indosinian-Yanshanian Period in the Sichuan Basin are favorable regions for the development of the Sinian reservoirs, where discoveries and exploration practices will play an important role in the era of Sinian natural gas development in China.

  12. Cross-fault pressure depletion, Zechstein carbonate reservoir, Weser-Ems area, Northern German Gas Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona, F.V.; Brauckmann, F.; Beckmann, H.; Gobi, A.; Grassmann, S.; Neble, J.; Roettgen, K. [ExxonMobil Production Deutschland GmbH (EMPG), Hannover (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    A cross-fault pressure depletion study in Upper Permian Zechstein Ca2 carbonate reservoir was undertaken in the Weser-Ems area of the Northern German Gas Basin. The primary objectives are to develop a practical workflow to define cross-fault pressures scenarios for Zechstein Ca2 reservoir drillwells, to determine the key factors of cross-fault pressure behavior in this platform carbonate reservoir, and to translate the observed cross-fault pressure depletion to fault transmissibility for reservoir simulation models. Analysis of Zechstein Ca2 cross-fault pressures indicates that most Zechstein-cutting faults appear to act as fluid-flow baffles with some local occurrences of fault seal. Moreover, there appears to be distinct cross-fault baffling or pressure depletion trends that may be related to the extent of the separating fault or fault system, degree of reservoir flow-path tortuosity, and quality of reservoir juxtaposition. Based on the above observations, a three-part workflow was developed consisting of (1) careful interpretation and mapping of faults and fault networks, (2) analysis of reservoir juxtaposition and reservoir juxtaposition quality, and (3) application of the observed cross-fault pressure depletion trends. This approach is field-analog based, is practical, and is being used currently to provide reliable and supportable pressure prediction scenarios for subsequent Zechstein fault-bounded drill-well opportunities.

  13. Modeling of Gas Production from Shale Reservoirs Considering Multiple Transport Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaohua Guo

    Full Text Available Gas transport in unconventional shale strata is a multi-mechanism-coupling process that is different from the process observed in conventional reservoirs. In micro fractures which are inborn or induced by hydraulic stimulation, viscous flow dominates. And gas surface diffusion and gas desorption should be further considered in organic nano pores. Also, the Klinkenberg effect should be considered when dealing with the gas transport problem. In addition, following two factors can play significant roles under certain circumstances but have not received enough attention in previous models. During pressure depletion, gas viscosity will change with Knudsen number; and pore radius will increase when the adsorption gas desorbs from the pore wall. In this paper, a comprehensive mathematical model that incorporates all known mechanisms for simulating gas flow in shale strata is presented. The objective of this study was to provide a more accurate reservoir model for simulation based on the flow mechanisms in the pore scale and formation geometry. Complex mechanisms, including viscous flow, Knudsen diffusion, slip flow, and desorption, are optionally integrated into different continua in the model. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of different mechanisms on the gas production. The results showed that adsorption and gas viscosity change will have a great impact on gas production. Ignoring one of following scenarios, such as adsorption, gas permeability change, gas viscosity change, or pore radius change, will underestimate gas production.

  14. Synthesis of Fe Nanoparticles Functionalized with Oleic Acid Synthesized by Inert Gas Condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we study the synthesis of monodispersed Fe nanoparticles (Fe-NPs in situ functionalized with oleic acid. The nanoparticles were self-assembled by inert gas condensation (IGC technique by using magnetron-sputtering process. Structural characterization of Fe-NPs was performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Particle size control was carried out through the following parameters: (i condensation zone length, (ii magnetron power, and (iii gas flow (Ar and He. Typically the nanoparticles generated by IGC showed diameters which ranged from ~0.7 to 20 nm. Mass spectroscopy of Fe-NPs in the deposition system allowed the study of in situ nanoparticle formation, through a quadrupole mass filter (QMF that one can use together with a mass filter. When the deposition system works without quadrupole mass filter, the particle diameter distribution is around +/−20%. When the quadrupole is in line, then the distribution can be reduced to around +/−2%.

  15. Condensed Fraction of an Atomic Bose Gas Induced by Critical Correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Robert P.; Tammuz, Naaman; Campbell, Robert L. D.; Hadzibabic, Zoran; Holzmann, Markus

    2011-01-01

    We study the condensed fraction of a harmonically trapped atomic Bose gas at the critical point predicted by mean-field theory. The nonzero condensed fraction f 0 is induced by critical correlations which increase the transition temperature T c above T c MF . Unlike the T c shift in a trapped gas, f 0 is sensitive only to the critical behavior in the quasiuniform part of the cloud near the trap center. To leading order in the interaction parameter a/λ 0 , where a is the s-wave scattering length and λ 0 the thermal wavelength, we expect a universal scaling f 0 ∝(a/λ 0 ) 4 . We experimentally verify this scaling using a Feshbach resonance to tune a/λ 0 . Further, using the local density approximation, we compare our measurements with the universal result obtained from Monte Carlo simulations for a uniform system, and find excellent quantitative agreement.

  16. Critical behavior of the ideal-gas Bose-Einstein condensation in the Apollonian network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, I N; dos Santos, T B; de Moura, F A B F; Lyra, M L; Serva, M

    2013-08-01

    We show that the ideal Boson gas displays a finite-temperature Bose-Einstein condensation transition in the complex Apollonian network exhibiting scale-free, small-world, and hierarchical properties. The single-particle tight-binding Hamiltonian with properly rescaled hopping amplitudes has a fractal-like energy spectrum. The energy spectrum is analytically demonstrated to be generated by a nonlinear mapping transformation. A finite-size scaling analysis over several orders of magnitudes of network sizes is shown to provide precise estimates for the exponents characterizing the condensed fraction, correlation size, and specific heat. The critical exponents, as well as the power-law behavior of the density of states at the bottom of the band, are similar to those of the ideal Boson gas in lattices with spectral dimension d(s)=2ln(3)/ln(9/5)~/=3.74.

  17. The smoke ion source: A device for the generation of cluster ions via inert gas condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, K.M.; Sarkas, H.W.; Eaton, J.G.; Bowen, K.H.; Westgate, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    We report the development of an ion source for generating intense, continuous beams of both positive and negative cluster ions. This device is the result of the marriage of the inert gas condensation method with techniques for injecting electrons directly into expanding jets. In the preliminary studies described here, we have observed cluster ion size distributions ranging from n=1-400 for Pb n + and Pb n - and from n=12-5700 for Li n - . (orig.)

  18. Integration of gas phase condensed nanoparticles in YBa_2Cu_3O_7_-_δ multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparing, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The control and targeted variation of nanoparticles properties is a central challenge in research on particle induced defects in YBa_2Cu_3O_7_-_δ. Using a combined Sputter-PLD system with inert gas condensation particle size and density integrated into the YBCO multilayers were varied independently. The cooling process influences the electrical properties of the multilayers. The effect of HfO2 and FePt nanoparticles on the structural and electrical properties was studied.

  19. Water desalting schemes when using heat gas-vapor mixture in front of contact condenser

    OpenAIRE

    Kuznetsova, Svitlana A.

    2016-01-01

    Ukraine is a country with low quality of fresh water; there are regions with its deficiency. One of the possible solutions to this problem is the desalination of the brackish water from surface and groundwater sources by using heat of the mixture before the contact condenser in gas-steam turbine plants. The plants produce electricity and heat energy for the needs of the industrial, agricultural complexes and the population of Kherson, Nikolaev and Odessa regions. The studies were carried out ...

  20. Assessment of MELCOR condensation models with the presence of noncondensable gas in natural convection flow regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Dhongik S; Jo, HangJin; Corradini, Michael L

    2017-01-01

    Condensation of steam vapor is an important mode of energy removal from the reactor containment. The presence of noncondensable gas complicates the process and makes it difficult to model. MELCOR, one of the more widely used system codes for containment analyses, uses the heat and mass transfer analogy to model condensation heat transfer. To investigate previously reported nodalization-dependence in natural convection flow regime, MELCOR condensation model as well as other models are studied. The nodalization-dependence issue is resolved by using physical length from the actual geometry rather than node size of each control volume as the characteristic length scale for MELCOR containment analyses. At the transition to turbulent natural convection regime, the McAdams correlation for convective heat transfer produces a better prediction compared to the original MELCOR model. The McAdams correlation is implemented in MELCOR and the prediction is validated against a set of experiments on a scaled AP600 containment. The MELCOR with our implemented model produces improved predictions. For steam molar fractions in the gas mixture greater than about 0.58, the predictions are within the uncertainty margin of the measurements. The simulation results still underestimate the heat transfer from the gas-steam mixture, implying that conservative predictions are provided.

  1. Effect of capillary condensation on gas transport properties in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Yuta; Hori, Takuma; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Takagi, Shu

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the effect of capillary condensation on gas diffusivity in porous media composed of randomly packed spheres with moderate wettability. To simulate capillary phenomena at the pore scale while retaining complex pore networks of the porous media, we employ density functional theory (DFT) for coarse-grained lattice gas models. The lattice DFT simulations reveal that capillary condensations preferentially occur at confined pores surrounded by solid walls, leading to the occlusion of narrow pores. Consequently, the characteristic lengths of the partially wet structures are larger than those of the corresponding dry structures with the same porosities. Subsequent gas diffusion simulations exploiting the mean-square displacement method indicate that while the effective diffusion coefficients significantly decrease in the presence of partially condensed liquids, they are larger than those in the dry structures with the same porosities. Moreover, we find that the ratio of the porosity to the tortuosity factor, which is a crucial parameter that determines an effective diffusion coefficient, can be reasonably related to the porosity even for the partially wet porous media.

  2. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface ground water: background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas and water transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers examined gas and water transport between a deep tight shale gas reservoir and a shallow overlying aquifer in the two years following hydraulic fracturing, assuming a pre-existing connecting pathway.

  3. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, Matthew T; Moridis, George J; Keen, Noel D; Johnson, Jeffrey N

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes. Key Points: Short-term leakage fractured reservoirs requires high-permeability pathways Production strategy affects the likelihood and magnitude of gas release Gas release is likely short-term, without additional driving forces PMID

  4. Gas Condensates onto a LHC Type Cryogenic Vacuum System Subjected to Electron Cloud

    CERN Multimedia

    Baglin, V

    2004-01-01

    In the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the gas desorbed via photon stimulated molecular desorption or electron stimulated molecular desorption will be physisorbed onto the beam screen held between 5 and 20 K. Studies of the effects of the electron cloud onto a LHC type cryogenic vacuum chamber have been done with the cold bore experiment (COLDEX) installed in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Experiments performed with gas condensates such as H2, H2O, CO and CO2 are described. Implications for the LHC design and operation are discussed.

  5. Special features in choosing a development procedure for deep gas condensate fields with small reserves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rassokhin, G V; Soshnin, N M

    1971-01-01

    In planning the development and production schedule for fields with small gas-condensate reserves, the following factors need to be considered: capital investment per unit of production, value of produced gas, ultimate recovered reserves, geological structure of the field, depth of well, heterogeneity of producing sands, etc. The importance of such factors is discussed and it is shown that for small fields, the parameter of minimum net expense cannot be used as a planning tool. Both geological and economic factors must be included in field development.

  6. A Preliminary Study of Transverse Curvature Effects on Condensation Heat Transfer on Vertical Tube in the Presence of Non-condensable Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yeon Gun; Kim, Sin [Jeju National Univ., Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Jerng, Dong Wook [Chung Ang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, the effect of the transverse curvature on the condensation HTC on a vertical tube in the presence of air is preliminarily investigated by using the analysis of boundary layer for free convective heat transfer. The results indicate that the heat transfer performance can be enhanced as the outer diameter of condenser tubes is small. To confirm this curvature effect, an experimental program to obtain the condensation heat transfer data for various values of tube diameter is indispensable. Currently, by a joint research project of Jeju National University and Chung-Ang University, a condensation test facility is being designed and constructed to acquire the condensation HTC data as shown in Fig. 3. From a series of experiment on a single vertical tube, the effects of not only the tube diameter but the inclination, the existence of fins and the local velocity of a bulk mixture by natural circulation will be evaluated precisely. An empirical correlation for the condensation heat transfer of a steam-air mixture will also be developed for design optimization and performance evaluation of the PCCS. The Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) provides passive means to remove the decay heat and protect the integrity of the containment during severe accidents. Korea, in which all the NPPs employ the concrete containment, may adopt a PCCS using internal condensers. In the event of the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), steam released from the reactor coolant system is mixed with air inside the containment and condensed on the outer surface of inclined condenser tubes. It is noted that, among previous theoretical and empirical models for condensation on outer wall in the presence of non-condensable gas, no one took into account the effect of a tube diameter. Though the condensation heat transfer coefficient may vary with transverse curvature of condenser tubes, such a curvature effect has not been reported so far. In this study, a preliminary analysis is conducted

  7. A Preliminary Study of Transverse Curvature Effects on Condensation Heat Transfer on Vertical Tube in the Presence of Non-condensable Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yeon Gun; Kim, Sin; Jerng, Dong Wook

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effect of the transverse curvature on the condensation HTC on a vertical tube in the presence of air is preliminarily investigated by using the analysis of boundary layer for free convective heat transfer. The results indicate that the heat transfer performance can be enhanced as the outer diameter of condenser tubes is small. To confirm this curvature effect, an experimental program to obtain the condensation heat transfer data for various values of tube diameter is indispensable. Currently, by a joint research project of Jeju National University and Chung-Ang University, a condensation test facility is being designed and constructed to acquire the condensation HTC data as shown in Fig. 3. From a series of experiment on a single vertical tube, the effects of not only the tube diameter but the inclination, the existence of fins and the local velocity of a bulk mixture by natural circulation will be evaluated precisely. An empirical correlation for the condensation heat transfer of a steam-air mixture will also be developed for design optimization and performance evaluation of the PCCS. The Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) provides passive means to remove the decay heat and protect the integrity of the containment during severe accidents. Korea, in which all the NPPs employ the concrete containment, may adopt a PCCS using internal condensers. In the event of the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), steam released from the reactor coolant system is mixed with air inside the containment and condensed on the outer surface of inclined condenser tubes. It is noted that, among previous theoretical and empirical models for condensation on outer wall in the presence of non-condensable gas, no one took into account the effect of a tube diameter. Though the condensation heat transfer coefficient may vary with transverse curvature of condenser tubes, such a curvature effect has not been reported so far. In this study, a preliminary analysis is conducted

  8. Integrating gravimetric and interferometric synthetic aperture radar data for enhancing reservoir history matching of carbonate gas and volatile oil reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Katterbauer, Klemens; Arango, Santiago; Sun, Shuyu; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Reservoir history matching is assuming a critical role in understanding reservoir characteristics, tracking water fronts, and forecasting production. While production data have been incorporated for matching reservoir production levels

  9. A new method for calculating gas content of coal reservoirs with consideration of a micro-pore overpressure environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Song

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available When the gas content of a coal reservoir is calculated, the reservoir pressure measured by well logging and well testing is generally used for inversion calculation instead of gas pressure. However, the calculation result is not accurate because the reservoir pressure is not equal to the gas pressure in overpressure environments. In this paper, coal samples of different ranks in Shanxi and Henan are collected for testing the capillary pressure of coal pores. Based on the formation process of CBM reservoirs and the hydrocarbon generation and expulsion history of coal beds, the forming mechanisms of micro-pore overpressure environments in coal reservoirs were analyzed. Accordingly, a new method for calculating the gas content of coal reservoirs with consideration of a micro-pore overpressure environment was developed. And it was used to calculate the gas content of No. 1 coal bed of the 2nd member of Lower Permian Shanxi Fm in the Zhongmacun Coal Mine in Jiaozuo, Henan. It is indicated that during the formation and evolution of coals, some solid organic matters were converted into gas and water, and gas–water contact is surely formed in pores. In the end, capillary pressure is generated, so the gas pressure in micro-pores is much higher than the hydrostatic column pressure, which results in a micro-pore overpressure environment. Under such an environment, gas pressure is higher than reservoir pressure, so the gas content of coal reservoirs calculated previously based on the conventional reservoir pressure evaluation are usually underestimated. It is also found that the micro-pore overpressure environment exerts a dominating effect on the CBM content calculation of 3–100 nm pores, especially that of 3–10 nm pores, but a little effect on that of pores >100 nm. In conclusion, this new method clarifies the pressure environment of CBM gas reservoirs, thereby ensuring the calculation accuracy of gas content of coal reservoirs.

  10. Fault features and enrichment laws of narrow-channel distal tight sandstone gas reservoirs: A case study of the Jurassic Shaximiao Fm gas reservoir in the Zhongjiang Gas Field, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongping Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Jurassic Shaximiao Fm gas reservoir in the Zhongjiang Gas Field, Sichuan Basin, is the main base of Sinopec Southwest Oil & Gas Company for gas reserves and production increase during the 12th Five-Year Plan. However, its natural gas exploration and development process was restricted severely, since the exploration wells cannot be deployed effectively in this area based on the previous gas accumulation and enrichment pattern of “hydrocarbon source fault + channel sand body + local structure”. In this paper, the regional fault features and the gas accumulation and enrichment laws were discussed by analyzing the factors like fault evolution, fault elements, fault-sand body configuration (the configuration relationship between hydrocarbon source faults and channel sand bodies, trap types, and reservoir anatomy. It is concluded that the accumulation and enrichment of the Shaximiao Fm gas reservoir in this area is controlled by three factors, i.e., hydrocarbon source, sedimentary facies and structural position. It follows the accumulation laws of source controlling region, facies controlling zone and position controlling reservoir, which means deep source and shallow accumulation, fault-sand body conductivity, multiphase channel, differential accumulation, adjusted enrichment and gas enrichment at sweet spots. A good configuration relationship between hydrocarbon source faults and channel sand bodies is the basic condition for the formation of gas reservoirs. Natural gas accumulated preferentially in the structures or positions with good fault-sand body configuration. Gas reservoirs can also be formed in the monoclinal structures which were formed after the late structural adjustment. In the zones supported by multiple faults or near the crush zones, no gas accumulation occurs, but water is dominantly produced. The gas-bearing potential is low in the area with undeveloped faults or being 30 km away from the hydrocarbon source faults. So

  11. Characterizing gas shaly sandstone reservoirs using the magnetic resonance technology in the Anaco area, East Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fam, Maged; August, Howard [Halliburton, Houston, TX (United States); Zambrano, Carlos; Rivero, Fidel [PDVSA Gas (Venezuela)

    2008-07-01

    With demand for natural gas on the rise every day, accounting for and booking every cubic foot of gas is becoming very important to operators exploiting natural gas reservoirs. The initial estimates of gas reserves are usually established through the use of petrophysical parameters normally based on wireline and/or LWD logs. Conventional logs, such as gamma ray, density, neutron, resistivity and sonic, are traditionally used to calculate these parameters. Sometimes, however, the use of such conventional logs may not be enough to provide a high degree of accuracy in determining these petrophysical parameters, which are critical to reserve estimates. Insufficient accuracy can be due to high complexities in the rock properties and/or a formation fluid distribution within the reservoir layers that is very difficult to characterize with conventional logs alone. The high degree of heterogeneity in the shaly sandstone rock properties of the Anaco area, East Venezuela, can be characterized by clean, high porosity, high permeability sands to very shaly, highly laminated, and low porosity rock. This wide variation in the reservoir properties may pose difficulties in identifying gas bearing zones which may affect the final gas reserves estimates in the area. The application of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) logging technology in the area, combined with the application of its latest acquisition and interpretation methods, has proven to be very adequate in detecting and quantifying gas zones as well as providing more realistic petrophysical parameters for better reserve estimates. This article demonstrates the effectiveness of applying the MRI logging technology to obtain improved petrophysical parameters that will help better characterize the shaly-sands of Anaco area gas reservoirs. This article also demonstrates the value of MRI in determining fluid types, including distinguishing between bound water and free water, as well as differentiating between gas and liquid

  12. Digital Core Modelling for Clastic Oil and Gas Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belozerov, I.; Berezovsky, V.; Gubaydullin, M.; Yur’ev, A.

    2018-05-01

    "Digital core" is a multi-purpose tool for solving a variety of tasks in the field of geological exploration and production of hydrocarbons at various stages, designed to improve the accuracy of geological study of subsurface resources, the efficiency of reproduction and use of mineral resources, as well as applying the results obtained in production practice. The actuality of the development of the "Digital core" software is that even a partial replacement of natural laboratory experiments with mathematical modelling can be used in the operative calculation of reserves in exploratory drilling, as well as in the absence of core material from wells. Or impossibility of its research by existing laboratory methods (weakly cemented, loose, etc. rocks). 3D-reconstruction of the core microstructure can be considered as a cheap and least time-consuming method for obtaining petrophysical information about the main filtration-capacitive properties and fluid motion in reservoir rocks.

  13. MARS-KS Code Assessment for Condensation Heat Transfer in Horizontal Tube with the Presence of Non-Condensable Gas using Purdue Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Seong Su; Lee, Byung Chul; Park, Ju Yeop; Seul, Kwang Won

    2011-01-01

    In South Korea, advanced power reactor plus (APR+), as a Korean specific reactor, is currently under development for the export strategy. In order to raise competitiveness of the APR+ in the world market, it is necessary to develop the original technology for the improved technology, economics, and safety features. For this purpose, a passive auxiliary feedwater system (PAFS) was adopted as an improved safety design concept of APR+: and then there have been many efforts to develop the PAFS. According to PAFS design concept, PAFS can completely replace the auxiliary feedwater system. When the design basis accident, in which feedwater is unavailable, occurs, the PAFS can remove the residual heat in the core and then prevent the core damage. In the PAFS with the horizontal type heat exchanger, two-phase natural circulation, condensation heat transfer in tube, boiling heat transfer in pool, natural convection in pool, etc. are considered as very important thermalhydraulic phenomena (see Fig. 1). Compared with the vertical heat exchanger from these phenomena, the major difference of the horizontal heat exchanger is the condensation heat transfer phenomena in the tube side. There have been many efforts to understand the condensation heat transfer with in the presence of NC gas in tube but most researches focused on the condensation heat transfer in vertical tube. Therefore the details of the condensation heat transfer in the presence of NC gas in horizontal condenser tubes are not well understood. In order to develop the safety evaluation system for APR+ PAFS, it is required to evaluate the capability and applicability of the MARS-KS code for modeling the condensation heat transfer in the horizontal tube with NC gas because many heat transfer correlations in MARS-KS are known to have much uncertainty. In particular, there is no reliable model for the condensation phenomena in horizontal tube with NC gas. In order to assess the MARS-KS code results and identify the

  14. Study of flue gas condensing for biofuel fired heat and power plants; Studie av roekgaskondensering foer biobraensleeldade kraftvaermeanlaeggningar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axby, Fredrik; Gustafsson, J O; Nystroem, Johan; Johansson, Kent

    2000-11-01

    This report considers questions regarding flue gas condensing plants connected to bio-fuelled heat and power plants. The report consists of two parts, one where nine existing plants are described regarding technical issues and regarding the experience from the different plants. Part two is a theoretical study where heat balance calculations are made to show the technical and economical performance in different plant configurations and operating conditions. Initially the different parts in the flue gas condensing plant are described. Tube, plate and scrubber condensers are described briefly. The different types of humidifiers are also described, rotor, cross-stream plate heat exchanger and scrubber. Nine flue gas-condensing plants have been visited. The plants where chosen considering it should be bio-fuel fired plant primarily heat and power plants. Furthermore we tried to get a good dissemination considering plant configuration, supplier, geographical position, operating situation and plant size. The description of the different plants focuses on the flue gas condenser and the belonging components. The fuel, flue gas and condensate composition is described as well as which materials are used in the different parts of the plant. The experience from operating the plants and the reasons of why they decided to chose the actual condenser supplier are reported.

  15. Synthesis and morphology of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles produced by high pressure gas condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xing, Lijuan; ten Brink, Gert H.; Chen, Bin; Schmidt, Franz P.; Haberfehlner, Georg; Hofer, Ferdinand; Kooi, Bart J.; Palasantzas, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Core-shell structured Fe nanoparticles (NPs) produced by high pressure magnetron sputtering gas condensation were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), tomographic reconstruction, and Wulff shape construction

  16. Physical simulation of gas reservoir formation in the Liwan 3-1 deep-water gas field in the Baiyun sag, Pearl River Mouth Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To figure out the process and controlling factors of gas reservoir formation in deep-waters, based on an analysis of geological features, source of natural gas and process of reservoir formation in the Liwan 3-1 gas field, physical simulation experiment of the gas reservoir formation process has been performed, consequently, pattern and features of gas reservoir formation in the Baiyun sag has been found out. The results of the experiment show that: ① the formation of the Liwan 3-1 faulted anticline gas field is closely related to the longstanding active large faults, where natural gas is composed of a high proportion of hydrocarbons, a small amount of non-hydrocarbons, and the wet gas generated during highly mature stage shows obvious vertical migration signs; ② liquid hydrocarbons associated with natural gas there are derived from source rock of the Enping & Zhuhai Formation, whereas natural gas comes mainly from source rock of the Enping Formation, and source rock of the Wenchang Formation made a little contribution during the early Eocene period as well; ③ although there was gas migration and accumulation, yet most of the natural gas mainly scattered and dispersed due to the stronger activity of faults in the early period; later as fault activity gradually weakened, gas started to accumulate into reservoirs in the Baiyun sag; ④ there is stronger vertical migration of oil and gas than lateral migration, and the places where fault links effective source rocks with reservoirs are most likely for gas accumulation; ⑤ effective temporal-spatial coupling of source-fault-reservoir in late stage is the key to gas reservoir formation in the Baiyun sag; ⑥ the nearer the distance from a trap to a large-scale fault and hydrocarbon source kitchen, the more likely gas may accumulate in the trap in late stage, therefore gas accumulation efficiency is much lower for the traps which are far away from large-scale faults and hydrocarbon source

  17. Numerical modeling of fracking fluid and methane migration through fault zones in shale gas reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherdangkoo, Reza; Tatomir, Alexandru; Sauter, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing operation in shale gas reservoir has gained growing interest over the last few years. Groundwater contamination is one of the most important environmental concerns that have emerged surrounding shale gas development (Reagan et al., 2015). The potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing could be studied through the possible pathways for subsurface migration of contaminants towards overlying aquifers (Kissinger et al., 2013; Myers, 2012). The intent of this study is to investigate, by means of numerical simulation, two failure scenarios which are based on the presence of a fault zone that penetrates the full thickness of overburden and connect shale gas reservoir to aquifer. Scenario 1 addresses the potential transport of fracturing fluid from the shale into the subsurface. This scenario was modeled with COMSOL Multiphysics software. Scenario 2 deals with the leakage of methane from the reservoir into the overburden. The numerical modeling of this scenario was implemented in DuMux (free and open-source software), discrete fracture model (DFM) simulator (Tatomir, 2012). The modeling results are used to evaluate the influence of several important parameters (reservoir pressure, aquifer-reservoir separation thickness, fault zone inclination, porosity, permeability, etc.) that could affect the fluid transport through the fault zone. Furthermore, we determined the main transport mechanisms and circumstances in which would allow frack fluid or methane migrate through the fault zone into geological layers. The results show that presence of a conductive fault could reduce the contaminant travel time and a significant contaminant leakage, under certain hydraulic conditions, is most likely to occur. Bibliography Kissinger, A., Helmig, R., Ebigbo, A., Class, H., Lange, T., Sauter, M., Heitfeld, M., Klünker, J., Jahnke, W., 2013. Hydraulic fracturing in unconventional gas reservoirs: risks in the geological system, part 2. Environ Earth Sci 70, 3855

  18. A Reduced Order Model for Fast Production Prediction from an Oil Reservoir with a Gas Cap

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yichen

    2016-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum geosciences engineering Economic evaluations are essential inputs for oil and gas field development decisions. These evaluations are critically dependent on the unbiased assessment of uncertainty in the future oil and gas production from wells. However, many production prediction techniques come at significant computational costs as they often require a very large number of highly detailed grid based reservoir simulations. In this study, we present an alter...

  19. Horizontal drilling in a natural gas storage horizon of 4 m thickness using reservoir navigation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastert, Thomas [E.ON Gas Storage GmbH, Essen (Germany); Liewert, Mathias; Rohde, Uwe [Baker Hughes INTEQ GmbH, Celle (Germany); Haberland, Joachim

    2010-09-15

    With a working gas capacity of 1,44 billion m{sup 3} (Vn) the natural gas storage facility at Bierwang is one of the largest storage facilities of E.ON Gas Storage (in Germany) and also one of the largest porous rock storages in Germany. The natural gas is stored in the tertiary storage horizons of the Chattian Hauptsand and Nebensand. To increase the storage capacity a second development well was planned for the Chattian Nebensand II (approx. 1680 m below ground). Following a comprehensive technical investigation the BW 502 well was planned as a horizontal well intended to provide a 300 m exposed section length through the reservoir. In a first step a pilot well was drilled to examine the Nebensand II which had been explored only to a limited extent before; the pilot well was also to provide accurate data on depth, thickness and dip. The results obtained indicated that the Nebensand II was only 4 m thick instead of 6 m as originally assumed. An azimuthal LWD resistivity tool was therefore used for reservoir navigation to allow horizontal drilling despite the lower thickness found. The technology allowed drilling of the horizontal well over its entire length of 315 m within a max. 1.5 m corridor relative to the reservoir top. Drilling confirmed that the actual formation found corresponded to the reservoir formation plan. Drilling operations were completed successfully. The well has been commissioned in the spring of 2010. (orig.)

  20. Quantitative monitoring of gas flooding in oil-bearing reservoirs using a pulsed neutron tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhovets, N.; Wyatt, D.F. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on quantitative monitoring of gas flooding in oil bearing reservoirs which is unique in that saturations of three fluids (gas, oil and water) in the effective pore space have to be determined, while in most other applications saturation behind casing is determined only for two fluids: hydrocarbons and water. A new method has been developed to monitor gas flooding of oil reservoirs. The method is based on computing two porosities: true effective (base) porosity determined before gas flooding, and apparent effective (monitor) porosity determined after gas flooding. The base porosity is determined from open and/or cased hole porosity logs run before the flooding. When open hole logs are available, the cased hole porosity logs are calibrated against open hole log. The monitor porosity is determined from one of the cased hole porosity logs, such as a neutron log or count rate ratio curve from a pulsed neutron log run after the gas flooding. The base and monitor porosities provide determination of the hydrogen index of the reservoir fluid after the flooding. This hydrogen index is then used to determine saturation of the flood agent after flooding. Water saturation after flooding can be determined from the equation which relates neutron total cross section (Σm) to volumetric constituent cross sections, using Σm values from a monitor run (after flooding)

  1. Offshore Antarctic Peninsula Gas Hydrate Reservoir Characterization by Geophysical Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Giustiniani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A gas hydrate reservoir, identified by the presence of the bottom simulating reflector, is located offshore of the Antarctic Peninsula. The analysis of geophysical dataset acquired during three geophysical cruises allowed us to characterize this reservoir. 2D velocity fields were obtained by using the output of the pre-stack depth migration iteratively. Gas hydrate amount was estimated by seismic velocity, using the modified Biot-Geerstma-Smit theory. The total volume of gas hydrate estimated, in an area of about 600 km2, is in a range of 16 × 109–20 × 109 m3. Assuming that 1 m3 of gas hydrate corresponds to 140 m3 of free gas in standard conditions, the reservoir could contain a total volume that ranges from 1.68 to 2.8 × 1012 m3 of free gas. The interpretation of the pre-stack depth migrated sections and the high resolution morpho-bathymetry image allowed us to define a structural model of the area. Two main fault systems, characterized by left transtensive and compressive movement, are recognized, which interact with a minor transtensive fault system. The regional geothermal gradient (about 37.5 °C/km, increasing close to a mud volcano likely due to fluid-upwelling, was estimated through the depth of the bottom simulating reflector by seismic data.

  2. Effect of carrier gas pressure on condensation in a supersonic nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyslouzil, B.E.; Wilemski, G.; Beals, M.G.; Frish, M.B.

    1994-01-01

    Supersonic nozzle experiments were performed with a fixed water or ethanol vapor pressure and varying amounts of nitrogen to test the hypothesis that carrier gas pressure affects the onset of condensation. Such an effect might occur if nonisothermal nucleation were important under conditions of excess carrier gas in the atmospheric pressure range, as has been suggested by Ford and Clement [J. Phys. A 22, 4007 (1989)]. Although a small increase was observed in the condensation onset temperature as the stagnation pressure was reduced from 3 to 0.5 atm, these changes cannot be attributed to any nonisothermal effects. The pulsed nozzle experiments also exhibited two interesting anomalies: (1) the density profiles for the water and ethanol mixtures were shifted in opposite directions from the dry N 2 profile; (2) a long transient period was required before the nozzle showed good pulse-to-pulse repeatability for condensible vapor mixtures. To theoretically simulate the observed onset behavior, calculations of nucleation and droplet growth in the nozzle were performed that took into account two principal effects of varying the carrier gas pressure: (1) the change in nozzle shape due to boundary layer effects and (2) the variation in the heat capacity of the flowing gas. Energy transfer limitations were neglected in calculating the nucleation rates. The trend of the calculated results matched that of the experimental results very well. Thus, heat capacity and boundary layer effects are sufficient to explain the experimental onset behavior without invoking energy transfer limited nucleation. The conclusions about the rate of nucleation are consistent with those obtained recently using an expansion cloud chamber, but are at odds with results from thermal diffusion cloud chamber measurements

  3. Stimulation technologies for Longwangmiao Fm gas reservoirs in the Sichuan Basin and their application results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yongqiang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Longwangmiao Fm group gas reservoirs in the Moxi structure in central Sichuan Basin feature high temperature, high pressure and high H2S content. The thickness of such high permeable reservoirs with great homogeneity is a geologic basis for a high-productivity gas well, and good match of natural fractures and vugs is the key factor to high well productivity. Overbalance drilling is likely to cause the opening-up of natural fractures, which will lead to the leakage of drilling fluid and severe damage to the reservoir. Experimental evaluation results show that the damage rate of the drilling fluid to the rock sample is between 82.2% and 89.2%, which severely restricts the productivity of gas wells. Therefore, it is necessary to deepen the experimental evaluation technologies and methods to promote the design pertinence of technical parameters. The study shows: first, the optimized gelling acid and steering acid are effective in slowing down speed and removing blockage, forming acidizing wormholes and effectively eliminating the blockage effect caused by drilling liquid pollution; second, the self-developed fiber steering agent and soluble temporary blocking ball can divert the acid, increasing the processing pressure at the well bottom by 5–15 MPa, realizing the even stimulation of heterogeneous reservoirs; third, based on experimental evaluation such as the acid penetration and acid rock reaction, it is recommended that the pumping rate be 3.0–3.5 m3/min in acidizing treatment and the acid intensity for blockage removal be 3.0–5.0 m3/m; fourth, the established blockage removal and steering acidizing technology have been applied in more than 20 wells with a remarkable productivity-increase effect, which gives full play to the natural productivity of gas wells and decreases the acid application scale. All these technologies and measures effectively enhance the development quality and profit of the gas reservoir.

  4. Transport of Gas Phase Radionuclides in a Fractured, Low-Permeability Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C. A.; Chapman, J.

    2001-12-01

    The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the Department of Energy, DOE) oversaw a joint program between industry and government in the 1960s and 1970s to develop technology to enhance production from low-permeability gas reservoirs using nuclear stimulation rather than conventional means (e.g., hydraulic and/or acid fracturing). Project Rio Blanco, located in the Piceance Basin, Colorado, was the third experiment under the program. Three 30-kiloton nuclear explosives were placed in a 2134 m deep well at 1780, 1899, and 2039 m below the land surface and detonated in May 1973. Although the reservoir was extensively fractured, complications such as radionuclide contamination of the gas prevented production and subsequent development of the technology. Two-dimensional numerical simulations were conducted to identify the main transport processes that have occurred and are currently occurring in relation to the detonations, and to estimate the extent of contamination in the reservoir. Minor modifications were made to TOUGH2, the multiphase, multicomponent reservoir simulator developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories. The simulator allows the explicit incorporation of fractures, as well as heat transport, phase change, and first order radionuclide decay. For a fractured two-phase (liquid and gas) reservoir, the largest velocities are of gases through the fractures. In the gas phase, tritium and one isotope of krypton are the principle radionuclides of concern. However, in addition to existing as a fast pathway, fractures also permit matrix diffusion as a retardation mechanism. Another retardation mechanism is radionuclide decay. Simulations show that incorporation of fractures can significantly alter transport rates, and that radionuclides in the gas phase can preferentially migrate upward due to the downward gravity drainage of liquid water in the pores. This project was funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Operations Office

  5. Impact of Petrophysical Properties on Hydraulic Fracturing and Development in Tight Volcanic Gas Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghao Shen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The volcanic reservoir is an important kind of unconventional reservoir. The aqueous phase trapping (APT appears because of fracturing fluids filtration. However, APT can be autoremoved for some wells after certain shut-in time. But there is significant distinction for different reservoirs. Experiments were performed to study the petrophysical properties of a volcanic reservoir and the spontaneous imbibition is monitored by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and pulse-decay permeability. Results showed that natural cracks appear in the samples as well as high irreducible water saturation. There is a quick decrease of rock permeability once the rock contacts water. The pores filled during spontaneous imbibition are mainly the nanopores from NMR spectra. Full understanding of the mineralogical effect and sample heterogeneity benefits the selection of segments to fracturing. The fast flow-back scheme is applicable in this reservoir to minimize the damage. Because lots of water imbibed into the nanopores, the main flow channels become larger, which are beneficial to the permeability recovery after flow-back of hydraulic fracturing. This is helpful in understanding the APT autoremoval after certain shut-in time. Also, Keeping the appropriate production differential pressure is very important in achieving the long term efficient development of volcanic gas reservoirs.

  6. Gross greenhouse gas fluxes from hydro-power reservoir compared to thermo-power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Marco Aurelio dos; Pinguelli Rosa, Luiz; Sikar, Bohdan; Sikar, Elizabeth; Santos, Ednaldo Oliveira dos

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of gross carbon dioxide and methane emissions measurements in several Brazilian hydro-reservoirs, compared to thermo power generation. The term 'gross emissions' means gas flux measurements from the reservoir surface without natural pre-impoundment emissions by natural bodies such as the river channel, seasonal flooding and terrestrial ecosystems. The net emissions result from deducting pre-existing emissions by the reservoir. A power dam emits biogenic gases such as CO 2 and CH 4 . However, studies comparing gas emissions (gross emissions) from the reservoir surface with emissions by thermo-power generation technologies show that the hydro-based option presents better results in most cases analyzed. In this study, measurements were carried in the Miranda, Barra Bonita, Segredo, Tres Marias, Xingo, and Samuel and Tucurui reservoirs, located in two different climatological regimes. Additional data were used here from measurements taken at the Itaipu and Serra da Mesa reservoirs. Comparisons were also made between emissions from hydro-power plants and their thermo-based equivalents. Bearing in mind that the estimated values for hydro-power plants include emissions that are not totally anthropogenic, the hydro-power plants studied generally posted lower emissions than their equivalent thermo-based counterparts. Hydro-power complexes with greater power densities (capacity/area flooded-W/m 2 ), such as Itaipu, Xingo, Segredo and Miranda, have the best performance, well above thermo-power plants using state-of-the-art technology: combined cycle fueled by natural gas, with 50% efficiency. On the other hand, some hydro-power complexes with low-power density perform only slightly better or even worse than their thermo-power counterparts

  7. Modeling of Single and Dual Reservoir Porous Media Compressed Gas (Air and CO2) Storage Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, C. M.; Liu, H.; Borgia, A.; Pan, L.

    2017-12-01

    Intermittent renewable energy sources are causing increasing demand for energy storage. The deep subsurface offers promising opportunities for energy storage because it can safely contain high-pressure gases. Porous media compressed air energy storage (PM-CAES) is one approach, although the only facilities in operation are in caverns (C-CAES) rather than porous media. Just like in C-CAES, PM-CAES operates generally by injecting working gas (air) through well(s) into the reservoir compressing the cushion gas (existing air in the reservoir). During energy recovery, high-pressure air from the reservoir is mixed with fuel in a combustion turbine to produce electricity, thereby reducing compression costs. Unlike in C-CAES, the storage of energy in PM-CAES occurs variably across pressure gradients in the formation, while the solid grains of the matrix can release/store heat. Because air is the working gas, PM-CAES has fairly low thermal efficiency and low energy storage density. To improve the energy storage density, we have conceived and modeled a closed-loop two-reservoir compressed CO2 energy storage system. One reservoir is the low-pressure reservoir, and the other is the high-pressure reservoir. CO2 is cycled back and forth between reservoirs depending on whether energy needs to be stored or recovered. We have carried out thermodynamic and parametric analyses of the performance of an idealized two-reservoir CO2 energy storage system under supercritical and transcritical conditions for CO2 using a steady-state model. Results show that the transcritical compressed CO2 energy storage system has higher round-trip efficiency and exergy efficiency, and larger energy storage density than the supercritical compressed CO2 energy storage. However, the configuration of supercritical compressed CO2 energy storage is simpler, and the energy storage densities of the two systems are both higher than that of PM-CAES, which is advantageous in terms of storage volume for a given

  8. Comparison of Gross Greenhouse Gas Fluxes from Hydroelectric Reservoirs in Brazil with Thermopower Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogerio, J. P.; Dos Santos, M. A.; Matvienko, B.; dos Santos, E.; Rocha, C. H.; Sikar, E.; Junior, A. M.

    2013-05-01

    shown a large variation in the data on greenhouse gas emissions, which would suggest that more care, should be taken in the choice of future projects by the Brazilian electrical sector. The emission of CH4 by hydroelectric reservoirs is always unfavorable, since even if the carbon has originated with natural sources, it is part of a gas with higher GWP in the final calculation. Emissions of CO2 can be attributed in part to the natural carbon cycle between the atmosphere and the water of the reservoir. Another part could be attributed to the decomposition of organic material, caused by the hydroelectric dam.

  9. Molecular Gas Reservoirs in Cluster Galaxies at z = 1.46

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masao; Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Kodama, Tadayuki; Kohno, Kotaro; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Koyama, Yusei; Shimakawa, Rhythm; Tamura, Yoichi; Suzuki, Tomoko L.

    2018-04-01

    We present molecular gas reservoirs of 18 galaxies associated with the XMMXCS J2215.9–1738 cluster at z = 1.46. From Band 7 and Band 3 data of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, we detect dust continuum emission at 870 μm and the CO J = 2–1 emission line from 8 and 17 member galaxies, respectively, within a clustercentric radius of R 200. The molecular gas masses derived from the CO and/or dust continuum luminosities show that the fraction of molecular gas mass and the depletion timescale for the cluster galaxies are larger than expected from the scaling relations of molecular gas on stellar mass and offset from the main sequence of star-forming galaxies in general fields. The galaxies closer to the cluster center in terms of both projected position and accretion phase seem to show a larger deviation from the scaling relations. We speculate that the environment of the galaxy cluster helps feed the gas through inflow to the member galaxies and reduce the efficiency of star formation. The stacked Band 3 spectrum of 12 quiescent galaxies with M stellar ∼ 1011 M ⊙ within 0.5R 200 shows no detection of a CO emission line, giving the upper limit of molecular gas mass and molecular gas fraction to be ≲1010 M ⊙ and ≲10%, respectively. Therefore, the massive galaxies in the cluster core quench the star formation activity while consuming most of the gas reservoirs.

  10. Mineral content prediction for unconventional oil and gas reservoirs based on logging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maojin, Tan; Youlong, Zou; Guoyue

    2012-09-01

    Coal bed methane and shale oil &gas are both important unconventional oil and gas resources, whose reservoirs are typical non-linear with complex and various mineral components, and the logging data interpretation model are difficult to establish for calculate the mineral contents, and the empirical formula cannot be constructed due to various mineral. The radial basis function (RBF) network analysis is a new method developed in recent years; the technique can generate smooth continuous function of several variables to approximate the unknown forward model. Firstly, the basic principles of the RBF is discussed including net construct and base function, and the network training is given in detail the adjacent clustering algorithm specific process. Multi-mineral content for coal bed methane and shale oil &gas, using the RBF interpolation method to achieve a number of well logging data to predict the mineral component contents; then, for coal-bed methane reservoir parameters prediction, the RBF method is used to realized some mineral contents calculation such as ash, volatile matter, carbon content, which achieves a mapping from various logging data to multimineral. To shale gas reservoirs, the RBF method can be used to predict the clay content, quartz content, feldspar content, carbonate content and pyrite content. Various tests in coalbed and gas shale show the method is effective and applicable for mineral component contents prediction

  11. Characterizing hydraulic fractures in shale gas reservoirs using transient pressure tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Wang

    2015-06-01

    This work presents an unconventional gas reservoir simulator and its application to quantify hydraulic fractures in shale gas reservoirs using transient pressure data. The numerical model incorporates most known physical processes for gas production from unconventional reservoirs, including two-phase flow of liquid and gas, Klinkenberg effect, non-Darcy flow, and nonlinear adsorption. In addition, the model is able to handle various types and scales of fractures or heterogeneity using continuum, discrete or hybrid modeling approaches under different well production conditions of varying rate or pressure. Our modeling studies indicate that the most sensitive parameter of hydraulic fractures to early transient gas flow through extremely low permeability rock is actually the fracture-matrix contacting area, generated by fracturing stimulation. Based on this observation, it is possible to use transient pressure testing data to estimate the area of fractures generated from fracturing operations. We will conduct a series of modeling studies and present a methodology using typical transient pressure responses, simulated by the numerical model, to estimate fracture areas created or to quantity hydraulic fractures with traditional well testing technology. The type curves of pressure transients from this study can be used to quantify hydraulic fractures in field application.

  12. Strategies to diagnose and control microbial souring in natural gas storage reservoirs and produced water systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, E.A.; Derr, R.M.; Pope, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrogen sulfide production (souring) in natural gas storage reservoirs and produced water systems is a safety and environmental problem that can lead to operational shutdown when local hydrogen sulfide standards are exceeded. Systems affected by microbial souring have historically been treated using biocides that target the general microbial community. However, requirements for more environmentally friendly solutions have led to treatment strategies in which sulfide production can be controlled with minimal impact to the system and environment. Some of these strategies are based on microbial and/or nutritional augmentation of the sour environment. Through research sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) in Chicago, Illinois, methods have been developed for early detection of microbial souring in natural gas storage reservoirs, and a variety of mitigation strategies have been evaluated. The effectiveness of traditional biocide treatment in gas storage reservoirs was shown to depend heavily on the methods by which the chemical is applied. An innovative strategy using nitrate was tested and proved ideal for produced water and wastewater systems. Another strategy using elemental iodine was effective for sulfide control in evaporation ponds and is currently being tested in microbially sour natural gas storage wells.

  13. Terahertz-dependent identification of simulated hole shapes in oil-gas reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ri-Ma; Zhan, Hong-Lei; Miao, Xin-Yang; Zhao, Kun; Feng, Cheng-Jing; Dong, Chen; Li, Yi-Zhang; Xiao, Li-Zhi

    2016-10-01

    Detecting holes in oil-gas reservoirs is vital to the evaluation of reservoir potential. The main objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of identifying general micro-hole shapes, including triangular, circular, and square shapes, in oil-gas reservoirs by adopting terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). We evaluate the THz absorption responses of punched silicon (Si) wafers having micro-holes with sizes of 20 μm-500 μm. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used to establish a model between THz absorbance and hole shapes. The positions of samples in three-dimensional spaces for three principal components are used to determine the differences among diverse hole shapes and the homogeneity of similar shapes. In addition, a new Si wafer with the unknown hole shapes, including triangular, circular, and square, can be qualitatively identified by combining THz-TDS and PCA. Therefore, the combination of THz-TDS with mathematical statistical methods can serve as an effective approach to the rapid identification of micro-hole shapes in oil-gas reservoirs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61405259), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB744302), and the Specially Founded Program on National Key Scientific Instruments and Equipment Development, China (Grant No. 2012YQ140005).

  14. Innovation-driven efficient development of the Longwangmiao Fm large-scale sulfur gas reservoir in Moxi block, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Ma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Lower Cambrian Longwangmiao Fm gas reservoir in Moxi block of the Anyue Gas field, Sichuan Basin, is the largest single-sandbody integrated carbonate gas reservoir proved so far in China. Notwithstanding this reservoir's advantages like large-scale reserves and high single-well productivity, there are multiple complicated factors restricting its efficient development, such as a median content of hydrogen sulfide, low porosity and strong heterogeneity of fracture–cave formation, various modes of gas–water occurrences, and close relation between overpressure and stress sensitivity. Up till now, since only a few Cambrian large-scale carbonate gas reservoirs have ever been developed in the world, there still exists some blind spots especially about its exploration and production rules. Besides, as for large-scale sulfur gas reservoirs, the exploration and construction is costly, and production test in the early evaluation stage is severely limited, all of which will bring about great challenges in productivity construction and high potential risks. In this regard, combining with Chinese strategic demand of strengthening clean energy supply security, the PetroChina Southwest Oil & Gas Field Company has carried out researches and field tests for the purpose of providing high-production wells, optimizing development design, rapidly constructing high-quality productivity and upgrading HSE security in the Longwangmiao Fm gas reservoir in Moxi block. Through the innovations of technology and management mode within 3 years, this gas reservoir has been built into a modern large-scale gas field with high quality, high efficiency and high benefit, and its annual capacity is now up to over 100 × 108 m3, with a desirable production capacity and development indexes gained as originally anticipated. It has become a new model of large-scale gas reservoirs with efficient development, providing a reference for other types of gas reservoirs in China.

  15. Advances in SAW gas sensors based on the condensate-adsorption effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiuling; Wang, Wen; Li, Shunzhou; Liu, Minghua; He, Shitang

    2011-01-01

    A surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) gas sensor with a low detection limit and fast response for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) based on the condensate-adsorption effect detection is developed. In this sensor a gas chromatography (GC) column acts as the separator element and a dual-resonator oscillator acts as the detector element. Regarding the surface effective permittivity method, the response mechanism analysis, which relates the condensate-adsorption effect, is performed, leading to the sensor performance prediction prior to fabrication. New designs of SAW resonators, which act as feedback of the oscillator, are devised in order to decrease the insertion loss and to achieve single-mode control, resulting in superior frequency stability of the oscillator. Based on the new phase modulation approach, excellent short-term frequency stability (±3 Hz/s) is achieved with the SAW oscillator by using the 500 MHz dual-port resonator as feedback element. In a sensor experiment investigating formaldehyde detection, the implemented SAW gas sensor exhibits an excellent threshold detection limit as low as 0.38 pg.

  16. Half-space problem of unsteady evaporation and condensation of polyatomic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Masashi; Yano, Takeru

    2016-11-01

    On the basis of polyatomic version of the ellipsoidal-statistical Bhatnager-Gross-Krook (ES-BGK) model, we consider time-periodic gas flows in a semi-infinite expanse of an initially equilibrium polyatomic gas (methanol) bounded by its planar condensed phase. The kinetic boundary condition at the vapor-liquid interface is assumed to be the complete condensation condition with periodically time-varying macroscopic variables (temperature, saturated vapor density and velocity of the interface), and the boundary condition at infinity is the local equilibrium distribution function. The time scale of variation of macroscopic variables is assumed to be much larger than the mean free time of gas molecules, and the variations of those from a reference state are assumed to be sufficiently small. We numerically investigate thus formulated time-dependent half-space problem for the polyatomic version of linearized ES-BGK model equation with the finite difference method for the case of the Strouhal number Sh=0.01 and 0.1. It is shown that the amplitude of the mass flux at the interface is the maximum, and the phase difference in time between the mass flux and v∞ - vℓ (v∞: vapor velocity at infinity, vℓ: velocity of the vapor-liquid interface) is the minimum absolute value, when the phase difference in time between the liquid surface temperature (the saturated vapor density) and the velocity of interface is close to zero.

  17. Characterization of the vadose zone above a shallow aquifer contaminated with gas condensate hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sublette, K.; Duncan, K.; Thoma, G.; Todd, T.

    2002-01-01

    A gas production site in the Denver Basin near Ft. Lupton, Colorado has leaked gas condensate hydrocarbons from an underground concrete tank used to store produced water. The leak has contaminated a shallow aquifer. Although the source of pollution has been removed, a plume of hydrocarbon contamination still remains for nearly 46 m from the original source. An extensive monitoring program was conducted in 1993 of the groundwater and saturated sediments. The objective was to determine if intrinsic aerobic or anaerobic bioremediation of hydrocarbons occurred at the site at a rate that would support remediation. Geochemical indicators of hydrogen biodegradation by microorganisms in the saturated zone included oxygen depletion, increased alkalinity, sulfate depletion, methane production and Fe2+ production associated with hydrogen contamination. The presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogens was also much higher in the contaminated sediments. Degraded hydrocarbon metabolites were found in contaminated groundwater. An extensive characterization of the vadose zone was conducted in which the vadose zone was sample in increments of 15 cm from the surface to the water table at contaminated and non contaminated sites. The samples were tested for individual C3+ hydrocarbons, methane, CO2, total organic carbon, total inorganic carbon, and total petroleum hydrocarbons. The vadose zone consisted of an active and aerobic bioreactor fueled by condensate hydrocarbons transported into the unsaturated zone by evaporation of hydrocarbons at the water table. It was concluded that the unsaturated zone makes an important contribution to the natural attenuation of gas condensate hydrocarbons in the area. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 28 figs

  18. Study of different factors affecting the electrical properties of natural gas reservoir rocks based on digital cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Liming; Sun, Jianmeng; Wang, Haitao; Liu, Xuefeng

    2011-01-01

    The effects of the wettability and solubility of natural gas in formation water on the electrical properties of natural gas reservoir rocks are studied using the finite element method based on digital cores. The results show that the resistivity index of gas-wet reservoir rocks is significantly higher than that of water-wet reservoir rocks in the entire range of water saturation. The difference between them increases with decreasing water saturation. The resistivity index of natural gas reservoir rocks decreases with increasing additional conduction of water film. The solubility of natural gas in formation water has a dramatic effect on the electrical properties of reservoir rocks. The resistivity index of reservoir rocks increases as the solubility of natural gas increases. The effect of the solubility of natural gas on the resistivity index is very obvious under conditions of low water saturation, and it becomes weaker with increasing water saturation. Therefore, the reservoir wettability and the solubility of natural gas in formation water should be considered in defining the saturation exponent

  19. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, Duane J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, Charles L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, William R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of canistered glass waste forms. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to be within acceptable concentration ranges in the LAW glass. Diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and investigates auxiliary evaporation to enable another disposition path. Unless an auxiliary evaporator is used, returning the stream to the tank farms would require evaporation in the 242-A evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter

  20. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of canistered glass waste forms. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to be within acceptable concentration ranges in the LAW glass. Diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and investigates auxiliary evaporation to enable another disposition path. Unless an auxiliary evaporator is used, returning the stream to the tank farms would require evaporation in the 242-A evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter

  1. Vortices in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates in the large-gas-parameter region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, J.K.; Mur-Petit, J.; Guilleumas, M.; Polls, A.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work we compare the results of the Gross-Pitaevskii and modified Gross-Pitaevskii equations with ab initio variational Monte Carlo calculations for Bose-Einstein condensates of atoms in axially symmetric traps. We examine both the ground state and excited states having a vortex line along the z axis at high values of the gas parameter and demonstrate an excellent agreement between the modified Gross-Pitaevskii and ab initio Monte Carlo methods, both for the ground and vortex states

  2. Assessment of natural hydrocarbon bioremediation at two gas condensate production sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, G.W.; Raterman, K.T.; Fisher, J.B.; Corgan, J.M.; Trent, G.L.; Brown, D.R.; Sublette, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    Condensate liquids are present in soil and groundwater at two gas production sites in the Denver-Julesburg Basin operated by Amoco. These sites have been closely monitored since July 1993 to determine whether intrinsic aerobic or anaerobic bioremediation of hydrocarbons occurs at a sufficient rate and to an adequate endpoint to support a no-intervention decision. Groundwater monitoring and analysis of soil cores strongly suggest that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at these sites by multiple pathways, including aerobic oxidation, Fe(III) reduction, and sulfate reduction

  3. Two-Step Condensation of the Ideal Bose Gas in Highly Anisotropic Traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Druten, N.J.; Ketterle, W.

    1997-01-01

    The ideal Bose gas in a highly anisotropic harmonic potential is studied. It is found that Bose-Einstein condensation occurs in two distinct steps as the temperature is lowered. In the first step the specific heat shows a sharp feature, but the system still occupies many one-dimensional quantum states. In the second step, at a significantly lower temperature, the ground state becomes macroscopically occupied. It should be possible to verify these predictions using present-day atom traps. The two-step behavior can occur in a rather general class of anisotropic traps, including the box potential. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  4. Characterization of condensed phase nitric acid particles formed in the gas phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Jia; Yongfu Xu

    2011-01-01

    The formation of nitric acid hydrates has been observed in a chamber during the dark reaction of NO2 with O3 in the presence of air.The size of condensed phase nitric acid was measured to be 40-100 nm and 20-65 nm at relative humidity (RH) ≤ 5% and RH = 67% under our experimental conditions, respectively.The nitric acid particles were collected on the glass fiber membrane and their chemical compositions were analyzed by infrared spectrum.The main components of nitric acid hydrates in particles are HNO3·3H2O and NO3-·xH2O (x≥ 4) at low RH, whereas at high RH HNO3·H2O, HNO3·2H2O, HNO3·3H2O and NO3-·xH2O (x≥ 4) all exist in the condensed phase.At high RH HNO3·xH2O (x ≤ 3) collected on the glass fiber membrane is greatly increased, while NO3-·xH2O (x ≥4) decreased, compared with low RH.To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to report that condensed phase nitric acid can be generated in the gas phase at room temperature.

  5. Modelling of steam condensation in the primary flow channel of a gas-heated steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Meister, G.

    1982-10-01

    A new simulation code has been developed for the analysis of steam ingress accidents in high temperatures reactors which evaluates the heat transfer in a steam generator headed by a mixture of helium and water steam. Special emphasis is laid on the analysis of steam condensation in the primary circuit of the steam generator. The code takes wall and bulk condensation into account. A new method is proposed to describe the entrainment of water droplets in the primary gas flow. Some typical results are given. Steam condensation in the primary channel may have a significant effect on temperature distributions. The effect on the heat transferred by the steam generator, however, is found to be not so prominent as might be expected. The reason is discussed. A simplified code will also be described, which gives results with reasonable accuracy within much shorter execution times. This code may be used as a program module in a program simulating the total primary circuit of a high temperature reactor. (orig.) [de

  6. Effect of non-condensable gas on startup of a loop thermosyphon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Jiang; Lin, Guiping; Bai, Lizhan; Miao, Jianyin; Zhang, Hongxing; Wang, Lu

    2013-01-01

    Non-condensable gas (NCG) generated inside two-phase heat transfer devices can adversely affect the thermal performance and limit the lifetime of such devices. In this work, experimental investigation of the effect of NCG on the startup of an ammonia-stainless steel loop thermosyphon was conducted. In the experiment, nitrogen was injected into the loop thermosyphon as NCG. The effect of NCG inventory on the startup behavior was investigated by adjusting the injected amount of nitrogen. The experimental results reveal that NCG prolongs the startup time and increases the startup liquid superheat and temperature overshoot; the more NCG exists in the loop thermosyphon, the higher the liquid superheat and temperature overshoot. When NCG is present in the system, boiling usually occurs in the evaporator before startup, but it does not mean the system will start up instantly, which differs from the conditions without NCG. Under all the conditions, increasing the heat load can effectively shorten the startup time but leads to a large temperature overshoot; forced convection cooling of the condenser has almost no effect on shortening the startup time especially for large NCG inventory situations, but it can effectively limit the temperature overshoot. For large NCG inventory situations, the loop thermosyphon can start up at a small heat load (5 W) or even without a heat load when the condenser is cooled by forced convection of ethanol. No failed start-ups occurred during any of the tests. (authors)

  7. Gas scavenging of insoluble vapors: Condensation of methyl salicylate vapor onto evaporating drops of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaver, Mark; Peele, J. R.; Rubel, Glenn O.

    We have observed the evaporation of acoustically levitated water drops at 0 and 32% relative humidity in a moving gas stream which is nearly saturated with methyl salicylate vapor. The initial evaporation rate is characteristic of a pure water drop and gradually slows until the evaporation rate becomes that of pure methyl salicylate. The quantity of condensed methyl salicylate exceeds its Henry's law solubility in water by factors of more than 30-50. This apparent violation of Henry's law agrees with the concentration enhancements in the liquid phase found by glotfelty et al. (1987, Nature235, 602-605) during their field measurements of organophorus pesticides in fog water. Under our conditions, visual evidence demonstrates the presence of two liquid phases, thus invalidating the use of Henry's law. A continuum evaporation-condensation model for an immiscible two-component system which accounts for evaporative self-cooling of the drop correctly predicts the amount of methyl salicylate condensed onto the water drops.

  8. Large turbulent reservoirs of cold molecular gas around high-redshift starburst galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falgarone, E; Zwaan, M A; Godard, B; Bergin, E; Ivison, R J; Andreani, P M; Bournaud, F; Bussmann, R S; Elbaz, D; Omont, A; Oteo, I; Walter, F

    2017-08-24

    Starburst galaxies at the peak of cosmic star formation are among the most extreme star-forming engines in the Universe, producing stars over about 100 million years (ref. 2). The star-formation rates of these galaxies, which exceed 100 solar masses per year, require large reservoirs of cold molecular gas to be delivered to their cores, despite strong feedback from stars or active galactic nuclei. Consequently, starburst galaxies are ideal for studying the interplay between this feedback and the growth of a galaxy. The methylidyne cation, CH + , is a most useful molecule for such studies because it cannot form in cold gas without suprathermal energy input, so its presence indicates dissipation of mechanical energy or strong ultraviolet irradiation. Here we report the detection of CH + (J = 1-0) emission and absorption lines in the spectra of six lensed starburst galaxies at redshifts near 2.5. This line has such a high critical density for excitation that it is emitted only in very dense gas, and is absorbed in low-density gas. We find that the CH + emission lines, which are broader than 1,000 kilometres per second, originate in dense shock waves powered by hot galactic winds. The CH + absorption lines reveal highly turbulent reservoirs of cool (about 100 kelvin), low-density gas, extending far (more than 10 kiloparsecs) outside the starburst galaxies (which have radii of less than 1 kiloparsec). We show that the galactic winds sustain turbulence in the 10-kiloparsec-scale environments of the galaxies, processing these environments into multiphase, gravitationally bound reservoirs. However, the mass outflow rates are found to be insufficient to balance the star-formation rates. Another mass input is therefore required for these reservoirs, which could be provided by ongoing mergers or cold-stream accretion. Our results suggest that galactic feedback, coupled jointly to turbulence and gravity, extends the starburst phase of a galaxy instead of quenching it.

  9. System-level modeling for economic evaluation of geological CO2 storage in gas reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2007-01-01

    One way to reduce the effects of anthropogenic greenhouse gases on climate is to inject carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from industrial sources into deep geological formations such as brine aquifers or depleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research is being conducted to improve understanding of factors affecting particular aspects of geological CO 2 storage (such as storage performance, storage capacity, and health, safety and environmental (HSE) issues) as well as to lower the cost of CO 2 capture and related processes. However, there has been less emphasis to date on system-level analyses of geological CO 2 storage that consider geological, economic, and environmental issues by linking detailed process models to representations of engineering components and associated economic models. The objective of this study is to develop a system-level model for geological CO 2 storage, including CO 2 capture and separation, compression, pipeline transportation to the storage site, and CO 2 injection. Within our system model we are incorporating detailed reservoir simulations of CO 2 injection into a gas reservoir and related enhanced production of methane. Potential leakage and associated environmental impacts are also considered. The platform for the system-level model is GoldSim [GoldSim User's Guide. GoldSim Technology Group; 2006, http://www.goldsim.com]. The application of the system model focuses on evaluating the feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas recovery (CSEGR) in the Rio Vista region of California. The reservoir simulations are performed using a special module of the TOUGH2 simulator, EOS7C, for multicomponent gas mixtures of methane and CO 2 . Using a system-level modeling approach, the economic benefits of enhanced gas recovery can be directly weighed against the costs and benefits of CO 2 injection

  10. Diagenesis and reservoir quality of Bhuban sandstones (Neogene), Titas Gas Field, Bengal Basin, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminul Islam, M.

    2009-06-01

    This study deals with the diagenesis and reservoir quality of sandstones of the Bhuban Formation located at the Titas Gas Field of Bengal Basin. Petrographic study including XRD, CL, SEM and BSE image analysis and quantitative determination of reservoir properties were carried out for this study. The sandstones are fine to medium-grained, moderately well to well sorted subfeldspathic arenites with subordinate feldspathic and lithic arenites. The diagenetic processes include clay infiltration, compaction and cementation (quartz overgrowth, chlorite, kaolinite, calcite and minor amount of pyrite, dolomite and K-feldspar overgrowth). Quartz is the dominant pore occluding cement and generally occurred as small euhedral crystals, locally as large pyramidal crystals in the primary pores. Pressure solution derived from grain contact is the main contributor of quartz overgrowths. Chlorite occurs as pore-lining and pore filling cement. In some cases, chlorite helps to retain porosity by preventing quartz overgrowth. In some restricted depth interval, pore-occlusion by calcite cement is very much intense. Kaolinite locally developed as vermiform and accelerated the minor porosity loss due to pore-occlusion. Kaolinite/chlorite enhances ineffective microporosity. Kaolinite is a by-product of feldspar leaching in the presence of acidic fluid produced during the maturation of organic matter in the adjacent Miocene or deeper Oligocene source rocks. The relation between diagenesis and reservoir quality is as follows: the initial porosity was decreased by compaction and cementation and then increased by leaching of the metastable grains and dissolution of cement. Good quality reservoir rocks were deposited in fluvial environment and hence quality of reservoir rocks is also environment selective. Porosity and permeability data exhibit good inverse correlation with cement. However, some data points indicate multiple controls on permeability. Reservoir quality is thus controlled by

  11. Numerical simulation of gas hydrate exploitation from subsea reservoirs in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2017-04-01

    Natural gas (methane) is the most environmental friendly source of fossil energy. When coal is replace by natural gas in power production the emission of carbon dioxide is reduced by 50 %. The vast amount of methane assumed in gas hydrate deposits can help to overcome a shortage of fossil energy resources in the future. To increase their potential for energy applications new technological approaches are being discussed and developed worldwide. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e. g. depressurization and/or carbon dioxide injection) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR - Submarine Gas Hydrate Reservoirs«. In order to simulate the exploitation of hydrate-bearing sediments in the subsea, an in-house simulation model HyReS which is implemented in the general-purpose software COMSOL Multiphysics is used. This tool turned out to be especially suited for the flexible implementation of non-standard correlations concerning heat transfer, fluid flow, hydrate kinetics, and other relevant model data. Partially based on the simulation results, the development of a technical concept and its evaluation are the subject of ongoing investigations, whereby geological and ecological criteria are to be considered. The results illustrate the processes and effects occurring during the gas production from a subsea gas hydrate deposit by depressurization. The simulation results from a case study for a deposit located in the Black Sea reveal that the production of natural gas by simple depressurization is possible but with quite low rates. It can be shown that the hydrate decomposition and thus the gas production strongly depend on the geophysical properties of the reservoir, the mass and heat transport within the reservoir, and

  12. Potential hazards of compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Paul W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2011-09-01

    This report is a preliminary assessment of the ignition and explosion potential in a depleted hydrocarbon reservoir from air cycling associated with compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media. The study identifies issues associated with this phenomenon as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media has been proposed to help supplement renewable energy sources (e.g., wind and solar) by providing a means to store energy when excess energy is available, and to provide an energy source during non-productive or low productivity renewable energy time periods. Presently, salt caverns represent the only proven underground storage used for CAES. Depleted natural gas reservoirs represent another potential underground storage vessel for CAES because they have demonstrated their container function and may have the requisite porosity and permeability; however reservoirs have yet to be demonstrated as a functional/operational storage media for compressed air. Specifically, air introduced into a depleted natural gas reservoir presents a situation where an ignition and explosion potential may exist. This report presents the results of an initial study identifying issues associated with this phenomena as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered.

  13. Mixed convection heat transfer between a steam / non-condensable gas mixture and an inclined finned tube bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachard, F. de; Lomperski, S.; Monauni, G.R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Thermal-Hydraulics

    1999-07-01

    An experimental and analytical program was performed at PSI to study the performance of a finned-tube condenser in the presence of non-condensable gases at low gas mass fluxes. The model developed for this application includes mixed convection heat transfer between the vapour/non-condensable mixture and the finned-tubes, heat conduction through the fins and tubes, and evaporative heat transfer inside the tubes. The finned-tubes condenser model has been assessed against data obtained at the PSI LINX facility with two test condensers. For the 62 LINX experiments performed, the model predictions are very good, i.e., less than 10 % standard deviation between experimental and predicted results. (authors)

  14. Coherent Control of Multiphoton Transitions in the Gas and Condensed Phases with Shaped Ultrashort Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantus, Marcos

    2008-01-01

    Controlling laser-molecule interactions has become an integral part of developing devices and applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, optical switching, micromachining and photochemistry. Coherent control of multiphoton transitions could bring a significant improvement of these methods. In microscopy, multi-photon transitions are used to activate different contrast agents and suppress background fluorescence; coherent control could generate selective probe excitation. In photochemistry, different dissociative states are accessed through two, three, or more photon transitions; coherent control could be used to select the reaction pathway and therefore the yield-specific products. For micromachining and processing a wide variety of materials, femtosecond lasers are now used routinely. Understanding the interactions between the intense femtosecond pulse and the material could lead to technologically important advances. Pulse shaping could then be used to optimize the desired outcome. The scope of our research program is to develop robust and efficient strategies to control nonlinear laser-matter interactions using ultrashort shaped pulses in gas and condensed phases. Our systematic research has led to significant developments in a number of areas relevant to the AMO Physics group at DOE, among them: generation of ultrashort phase shaped pulses, coherent control and manipulation of quantum mechanical states in gas and condensed phases, behavior of isolated molecules under intense laser fields, behavior of condensed phase matter under intense laser field and implications on micromachining with ultrashort pulses, coherent control of nanoparticles their surface plasmon waves and their nonlinear optical behavior, and observation of coherent Coulomb explosion processes at 10 16 W/cm 2 . In all, the research has resulted in 36 publications (five journal covers) and nine invention disclosures, five of which have continued on to patenting

  15. Deposition of Size-Selected Cu Nanoparticles by Inert Gas Condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez E

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nanometer size-selected Cu clusters in the size range of 1–5 nm have been produced by a plasma-gas-condensation-type cluster deposition apparatus, which combines a grow-discharge sputtering with an inert gas condensation technique. With this method, by controlling the experimental conditions, it was possible to produce nanoparticles with a strict control in size. The structure and size of Cu nanoparticles were determined by mass spectroscopy and confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning electron transmission microscopy (STEM measurements. In order to preserve the structural and morphological properties, the energy of cluster impact was controlled; the energy of acceleration of the nanoparticles was in near values at 0.1 ev/atom for being in soft landing regime. From SEM measurements developed in STEM-HAADF mode, we found that nanoparticles are near sized to those values fixed experimentally also confirmed by AFM observations. The results are relevant, since it demonstrates that proper optimization of operation conditions can lead to desired cluster sizes as well as desired cluster size distributions. It was also demonstrated the efficiency of the method to obtain size-selected Cu clusters films, as a random stacking of nanometer-size crystallites assembly. The deposition of size-selected metal clusters represents a novel method of preparing Cu nanostructures, with high potential in optical and catalytic applications.

  16. Deep microbial life in the Altmark natural gas reservoir: baseline characterization prior CO2 injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Daria; Shaheed, Mina; Vieth, Andrea; Krüger, Martin; Kock, Dagmar; Würdemann, Hilke

    2010-05-01

    Within the framework of the CLEAN project (CO2 Largescale Enhanced gas recovery in the Altmark Natural gas field) technical basics with special emphasis on process monitoring are explored by injecting CO2 into a gas reservoir. Our study focuses on the investigation of the in-situ microbial community of the Rotliegend natural gas reservoir in the Altmark, located south of the city Salzwedel, Germany. In order to characterize the microbial life in the extreme habitat we aim to localize and identify microbes including their metabolism influencing the creation and dissolution of minerals. The ability of microorganisms to speed up dissolution and formation of minerals might result in changes of the local permeability and the long-term safety of CO2 storage. However, geology, structure and chemistry of the reservoir rock and the cap rock as well as interaction with saline formation water and natural gases and the injected CO2 affect the microbial community composition and activity. The reservoir located at the depth of about 3500m, is characterised by high salinity fluid and temperatures up to 127° C. It represents an extreme environment for microbial life and therefore the main focus is on hyperthermophilic, halophilic anaerobic microorganisms. In consequence of the injection of large amounts of CO2 in the course of a commercial EGR (Enhanced Gas Recovery) the environmental conditions (e.g. pH, temperature, pressure and solubility of minerals) for the autochthonous microorganisms will change. Genetic profiling of amplified 16S rRNA genes are applied for detecting structural changes in the community by using PCR- SSCP (PCR-Single-Strand-Conformation Polymorphism) and DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis). First results of the baseline survey indicate the presence of microorganisms similar to representatives from other saline, hot, anoxic, deep environments. However, due to the hypersaline and hyperthermophilic reservoir conditions, cell numbers are low, so that

  17. Mapping the Fluid Pathways and Permeability Barriers of a Large Gas Hydrate Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A.; Zhang, Y. L.; Sun, L. F.; Saleh, R.; Pun, W.; Bellefleur, G.; Milkereit, B.

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of the relationship between the physical properties of gas hydrate saturated sedimentary basins aids in the detection, exploration and monitoring one of the world's upcoming energy resources. A large gas hydrate reservoir is located in the MacKenzie Delta of the Canadian Arctic and geophysical logs from the Mallik test site are available for the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) between depths of approximately 850 m to 1100 m. The geophysical data sets from two neighboring boreholes at the Mallik test site are analyzed. Commonly used porosity logs, as well as nuclear magnetic resonance, compressional and Stoneley wave velocity dispersion logs are used to map zones of elevated and severely reduced porosity and permeability respectively. The lateral continuity of horizontal permeability barriers can be further understood with the aid of surface seismic modeling studies. In this integrated study, the behavior of compressional and Stoneley wave velocity dispersion and surface seismic modeling studies are used to identify the fluid pathways and permeability barriers of the gas hydrate reservoir. The results are compared with known nuclear magnetic resonance-derived permeability values. The aim of investigating this heterogeneous medium is to map the fluid pathways and the associated permeability barriers throughout the gas hydrate stability zone. This provides a framework for an understanding of the long-term dissociation of gas hydrates along vertical and horizontal pathways, and will improve the knowledge pertaining to the production of such a promising energy source.

  18. Production of inert gas for substitution of a part of the cushion gas trapped in an aquifer underground storage reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, L.; Arnoult, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    In a natural gas storage reservoir operating over the different seasons, a varying fraction of the injected gas, the cushion gas, remains permanently trapped. This cushion gas may represent more than half the total gas volume, and more than 50% of the initial investment costs for the storage facility. Studies conducted by Gaz de France, backed up by experience acquired over the years, have shown that at least 20% of the cushion gas could be replaced by a less expensive inert gas. Nitrogen, carbon dioxide, or a mixture of the two, satisfy the specifications required for this inert gas. Two main production methods exist: recovery of natural gas combustion products (mixture of 88% N 2 and 12% Co 2 ) and physical separation of air components (more or less pure N 2 , depending on industrial conditions). For the specific needs of Gaz de France, the means of production must be suited to its programme of partial cushion gas substitution. The equipment must satisfy requirements of autonomy, operating flexibility and mobility. Gaz de France has tested two units for recovery of natural gas combustion products. In the first unit, the inert gas is produced in a combustion chamber, treated in a catalytic reactor to reduce nitrogen oxide content and then compressed by gas engine driven compressors. In the second unit, the exhaust gases of the compressor gas engines are collected, treated to eliminate nitrogen oxides and then compressed. The energy balance is improved. A PSA method nitrogen production unit by selective absorption of nitrogen in the air, will be put into service in 1989. The specific features of these two methods and the reasons for choosing them will be reviewed. (author). 1 fig

  19. Electrical Conductive Mechanism of Gas Hydrate-Bearing Reservoirs in the Permafrost Region of Qilian Mountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, C.; Zou, C.; Tang, Y.; Liu, A.; Hu, X.

    2017-12-01

    In the Qilian Mountain, gas hydrates not only occur in pore spaces of sandstones, but also fill in fractures of mudstones. This leads to the difficulty in identification and evaluation of gas hydrate reservoir from resistivity and velocity logs. Understanding electrical conductive mechanism is the basis for log interpretation. However, the research is insufficient in this area. We have collected well logs from 30 wells in this area. Well logs and rock samples from DK-9, DK-11 and DK-12 wells were used in this study. The experiments including SEM, thin section, NMR, XRD, synthesis of gas hydrate in consolidated rock cores under low temperature and measurement of their resistivity and others were performed for understanding the effects of pore structure, rock composition, temperature and gas hydrate on conductivity. The results show that the porosity of reservoir of pore filling type is less than 10% and its clay mineral content is high. As good conductive passages, fractures can reduce resistivity of water-saturated rock. If fractures in the mudstone are filled by calcite, resistivity increases significantly. The resistivity of water-saturated rock at 2°C is twice of that at 18°C. The gas hydrate formation process in the sandstone was studied by resistivity recorded in real time. In the early stage of gas hydrate formation, the increase of residual water salinity may lead to the decrease of resistivity. In the late stage of gas hydrate formation, the continuity decrease of water leads to continuity increase of resistivity. In summary, fractures, rock composition, temperature and gas hydrate are important factors influencing resistivity of formation. This study is helpful for more accurate evaluation of gas hydrate from resistivity log. Acknowledgment: We acknowledge the financial support of the National Special Program for Gas Hydrate Exploration and Test-production (GZH201400302).

  20. Geological rock property and production problems of the underground gas storage reservoir of Ketzin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, W

    1966-01-01

    The purpose of the program of operation for an industrial injection of gas is briefly reviewed. It is emphasized that the works constitute the final stage of exploration. The decisive economic and extractive aspects are given. Final remarks deal with the methods of floor consolidation and tightness control. In the interest of the perspective exploration of the reservoir it is concluded and must be realized as an operating principle that the main problem, after determining the probable reservoir structure, consists in determining step-by-step (by combined theoretical, technical and economic parameters) the surface equipment needed from the geological and rock property factors, which were determined by suitable methods (hydro-exploration, gas injection). The technique and time-table of the geological exploration, and the design and construction of the installations will depend on the solution of the main problem. At the beginning, partial capacities will be sufficient for the surface installation. (12 refs.)

  1. Mixed convection heat transfer between a steam/non-condensable gas mixture and an inclined finned tube bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Cachard, F.; Lompersky, S.; Monauni, G.R. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Thermal Hydraulic Lab.

    1999-07-01

    An experimental and analytical program was performed at PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute) to study the performance of a finned-tube condenser in the presence of non-condensable gases at low gas mass fluxes. The model developed for this application includes mixed convection heat transfer between the vapour/non-condensable mixture and the finned tubes, heat conduction through the fins and tubes, and evaporative heat transfer inside the tubes. On the gas, heat transfer correlations are used, and the condensation rate is calculated using the heat/mass transfer analogy. A combination of various available correlations for forced convection in staggered finned tube bundles is used, together with a correction accounting for superimposed natural convection. For the condensate heat transfer resistance, the beatty and Katz model for gravity driven liquid films on the tubes is used. The fine efficiency is accounted for using classical iterative calculations. Evaporative heat transfer inside the tubes is predicted using the Chen correlation. The finned tube condenser model has been assessed against data obtained at the PSI LINX facility with two test condensers. For the 62 LINX experiments performed, the model predictions are very good, i.e., less then 10% standard deviation between experimental and predicted results.

  2. Investigation of Bose Condensation in Ideal Bose Gas Trapped under Generic Power Law Potential in d Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehedi Faruk, Mir; Sazzad Hossain, Md.; Muktadir Rahman, Md.

    2016-02-01

    The changes in characteristics of Bose condensation of ideal Bose gas due to an external generic power law potential U=\\sumi=1dci\\vert xi/ai\\vertni are studied carefully. Detailed calculation of Kim et al. (J. Phys. Condens. Matter 11 (1999) 10269) yielded the hierarchy of condensation transitions with changing fractional dimensionality. In this manuscript, some theorems regarding specific heat at constant volume CV are presented. Careful examination of these theorems reveal the existence of hidden hierarchy of the condensation transition in trapped systems as well.

  3. Structural-Diagenetic Controls on Fracture Opening in Tight Gas Sandstone Reservoirs, Alberta Foothills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukar, Estibalitz; Eichhubl, Peter; Fall, Andras; Hooker, John

    2013-04-01

    In tight gas reservoirs, understanding the characteristics, orientation and distribution of natural open fractures, and how these relate to the structural and stratigraphic setting are important for exploration and production. Outcrops provide the opportunity to sample fracture characteristics that would otherwise be unknown due to the limitations of sampling by cores and well logs. However, fractures in exhumed outcrops may not be representative of fractures in the reservoir because of differences in burial and exhumation history. Appropriate outcrop analogs of producing reservoirs with comparable geologic history, structural setting, fracture networks, and diagenetic attributes are desirable but rare. The Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Nikanassin Formation from the Alberta Foothills produces gas at commercial rates where it contains a network of open fractures. Fractures from outcrops have the same diagenetic attributes as those observed in cores fractures relative to fold cores, hinges and limbs, 2) compare the distribution and attributes of fractures in outcrop vs. core samples, 3) estimate the timing of fracture formation relative to the evolution of the fold-and-thrust belt, and 4) estimate the degradation of fracture porosity due to postkinematic cementation. Cathodoluminescence images of cemented fractures in both outcrop and core samples reveal several generations of quartz and ankerite cement that is synkinematic and postkinematic relative to fracture opening. Crack-seal textures in synkinematic quartz are ubiquitous, and well-developed cement bridges abundant. Fracture porosity may be preserved in fractures wider than ~100 microns. 1-D scanlines in outcrop and core samples indicate fractures are most abundant within small parasitic folds within larger, tight, mesoscopic folds. Fracture intensity is lower away from parasitic folds; intensity progressively decreases from the faulted cores of mesoscopic folds to their forelimbs, with lowest intensities within

  4. Flue gas condensation in oxyfuel power plants. Heat- and mass transfer measurements and experimental validation of an efficient condensation concept; Rauchgaskondensation in Oxyfuel-Kraftwerken. Waerme- und Stoffuebergangsmessungen sowie experimentelle Validierung eines effizienten Kondensationskonzepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raindl, Markus

    2010-12-06

    Condensation of a steam-inert gas mixture in an Oxyfuel condenser differs significantly from condensation of pure steam: condenser pressure and rest gas content increase dramatically, heat- and mass transfer coefficients are lower and oversaturation of the steam-inert gas mixture yields to fog formation. In the context of this thesis, therefore, at first the optimal ranges of working parameters for Oxyfuel processes calculated. In the following some heat flux measurements were carried out on a horizontal, crossflow pipe to validate various heat- and mass transfer theories. Building on these results a new, efficient condensation concept was developed to reduce fog formation. The final results of the measurements with a laboratory model show great performance regarding fog reduction and condensation efficiency. (orig.)

  5. Azide-based cross-linking of polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) for condensable gas separation

    KAUST Repository

    Du, Naiying; Dal-Cin, Mauro M D; Pinnau, Ingo; Nicalek, Andrzej; Robertson, Gilles P.; Guiver, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-linked polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIM)s for gas separation membranes, were prepared by a nitrene reaction from a representative PIM in the presence of two different diazide cross-linkers. The reaction temperature was optimized using TGA. The homogenous membranes were cast from THF solutions of different ratios of PIM to azides. The resulting cross-linked structures of the PIMs membranes were formed at 175 °C after 7.5 h and confirmed by TGA, XPS, FT-IR spectroscopy and gel content analysis. These resulting cross-linked polymeric membranes showed excellent gas separation performance and can be used for O 2/N 2 and CO 2/N 2 gas pairs, as well as for condensable gases, such as CO 2/CH 4, propylene/propane separation. Most importantly, and differently from typical gas separation membranes derived from glassy polymers, the crosslinked PIMs showed no obvious CO 2 plasticization up to 20 atm pressure of pure CO 2 and CO 2/CH 4 mixtures. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Azide-based cross-linking of polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) for condensable gas separation

    KAUST Repository

    Du, Naiying

    2011-03-11

    Cross-linked polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIM)s for gas separation membranes, were prepared by a nitrene reaction from a representative PIM in the presence of two different diazide cross-linkers. The reaction temperature was optimized using TGA. The homogenous membranes were cast from THF solutions of different ratios of PIM to azides. The resulting cross-linked structures of the PIMs membranes were formed at 175 °C after 7.5 h and confirmed by TGA, XPS, FT-IR spectroscopy and gel content analysis. These resulting cross-linked polymeric membranes showed excellent gas separation performance and can be used for O 2/N 2 and CO 2/N 2 gas pairs, as well as for condensable gases, such as CO 2/CH 4, propylene/propane separation. Most importantly, and differently from typical gas separation membranes derived from glassy polymers, the crosslinked PIMs showed no obvious CO 2 plasticization up to 20 atm pressure of pure CO 2 and CO 2/CH 4 mixtures. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. The Coupling Effect Research of Ash Deposition and Condensation in Low Temperature Flue Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ash deposition is a key factor that deteriorates the heat transfer performance and leads to higher energy consumption of low pressure economizer working in low temperature flue gas. In order to study the ash deposition of heat exchange tubes in low temperature flue gas, two experiments are carried out with different types of heat exchange tubes in different flue gas environments. In this paper, Nusselt Number Nu and fouling factor ε are calculated to describe the heat transfer characteristics so as to study the ash deposition condition. The scanning electron microscope (SEM is used for the analysis of ash samples obtained from the outer wall of heat exchange tubes. The dynamic process of ash deposition is studied under different temperatures of outer wall. The results showed that ash deposition of heat exchanger will achieve a stable state in constant flue gas environment. According to the condition of condensation of acid vapor and water vapor, the process of ash deposition can be distinguished as mere ash deposition, acid-ash coupling deposition, and acid-water-ash coupling deposition.

  8. A Mathematical Pressure Transient Analysis Model for Multiple Fractured Horizontal Wells in Shale Gas Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Multistage fractured horizontal wells (MFHWs have become the main technology for shale gas exploration. However, the existing models have neglected the percolation mechanism in nanopores of organic matter and failed to consider the differences among the reservoir properties in different areas. On that account, in this study, a modified apparent permeability model was proposed describing gas flow in shale gas reservoirs by integrating bulk gas flow in nanopores and gas desorption from nanopores. The apparent permeability was introduced into the macroseepage model to establish a dynamic pressure analysis model for MFHWs dual-porosity formations. The Laplace transformation and the regular perturbation method were used to obtain an analytical solution. The influences of fracture half-length, fracture permeability, Langmuir volume, matrix radius, matrix permeability, and induced fracture permeability on pressure and production were discussed. Results show that fracture half-length, fracture permeability, and induced fracture permeability exert a significant influence on production. A larger Langmuir volume results in a smaller pressure and pressure derivative. An increase in matrix permeability increases the production rate. Besides, this model fits the actual field data relatively well. It has a reliable theoretical foundation and can preferably describe the dynamic changes of pressure in the exploration process.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF MORE-EFFICIENT GAS FLOODING APPLICABLE TO SHALLOW RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William R. Rossen; Russell T. Johns; Gary A. Pope

    2003-08-21

    The objective of this research is to widen the applicability of gas flooding to shallow oil reservoirs by reducing the pressure required for miscibility using gas enrichment and increasing sweep efficiency with foam. Task 1 examines the potential for improved oil recovery with enriched gases. Subtask 1.1 examines the effect of dispersion processes on oil recovery and the extent of enrichment needed in the presence of dispersion. Subtask 1.2 develops a fast, efficient method to predict the extent of enrichment needed for crude oils at a given pressure. Task 2 develops improved foam processes to increase sweep efficiency in gas flooding. Subtask 2.1 comprises mechanistic experimental studies of foams with N2 gas. Subtask 2.2 conducts experiments with CO{sub 2} foam. Subtask 2.3 develops and applies a simulator for foam processes in field application.

  10. Water Saturation Relations and Their Diffusion-Limited Equilibration in Gas Shale: Implications for Gas Flow in Unconventional Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Shen, Weijun; Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Cihan, Abdullah; Zhang, Yingqi; Finsterle, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    Large volumes of water are used for hydraulic fracturing of low permeability shale reservoirs to stimulate gas production, with most of the water remaining unrecovered and distributed in a poorly understood manner within stimulated regions. Because water partitioning into shale pores controls gas release, we measured the water saturation dependence on relative humidity (rh) and capillary pressure (Pc) for imbibition (adsorption) as well as drainage (desorption) on samples of Woodford Shale. Experiments and modeling of water vapor adsorption into shale laminae at rh = 0.31 demonstrated that long times are needed to characterize equilibrium in larger (5 mm thick) pieces of shales, and yielded effective diffusion coefficients from 9 × 10-9 to 3 × 10-8 m2 s-1, similar in magnitude to the literature values for typical low porosity and low permeability rocks. Most of the experiments, conducted at 50°C on crushed shale grains in order to facilitate rapid equilibration, showed significant saturation hysteresis, and that very large Pc (˜1 MPa) are required to drain the shales. These results quantify the severity of the water blocking problem, and suggest that gas production from unconventional reservoirs is largely associated with stimulated regions that have had little or no exposure to injected water. Gravity drainage of water from fractures residing above horizontal wells reconciles gas production in the presence of largely unrecovered injected water, and is discussed in the broader context of unsaturated flow in fractures.

  11. Estimation of critical gas saturation during pressure depletion in virgin and waterflooded reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDougall, S.R.; Sorbie, K.S. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Dept. of Petroleum Engineering, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1999-08-01

    An important issue in petroleum engineering is the prediction of gas production during reservoir depletion - either following conventional waterflooding operations or in the early stages of hydrocarbon production. The estimation of critical gas saturation for use in corresponding simulation studies is clearly a primary concern. To this end, a 3D, three-phase numerical pore-scale simulator has been developed that can be used to estimate critical gas saturations over a range of different lengthscales and for a wide range of fluid and rock properties. The model incorporates a great deal of the known physics observed in associated laboratory micromodel experiments, including embryonic nucleation, supersaturation effects, multiphase diffusion, bubble growth/migration/fragmentation, oil shrinkage, and three-phase spreading coefficients. These precise pore-scale mechanisms governing gas evolution have been found to be far more subtle than earlier models would suggest because of the large variation of gas/oil interfacial tension (IFT) with pressure. This has a profound effect upon the migration of gas structures during depletion. In models pertaining to reservoir rock, the process of gas migration is consequently much slower than predictions from more simplistic models would imply. This is the first time that bubble fragmentation and IFT variations have been included in a model of gas evolution at the pore-scale and the implications for production forecasting are expected to be significant. In addition, novel scaling groups have been derived for a number of different facies under both virgin and waterflooded conditions. One future application of these groups would be to scale S{sub gc} values obtained from high rate depressurization experiments to the low rate conditions more characteristic of field operations. (Author)

  12. Colloidal gas-liquid condensation of polystyrene latex particles with intermediate kappa a values (5 to 160, a > kappa(-1)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Masamichi; Kitano, Ryota

    2010-02-16

    Polystyrene latex particles showed gas-liquid condensation under the conditions of large particle radius (a > kappa(-1)) and intermediate kappa a, where kappa is the Debye-Hückel parameter and a is the particle radius. The particles were dissolved in deionized water containing ethanol from 0 to 77 vol %, settled to the bottom of the glass plate within 1 h, and then laterally moved toward the center of a cell over a 20 h period in reaching a state of equilibrium condensation. All of the suspensions that were 1 and 3 microm in diameter and 0.01-0.20 vol % in concentration realized similar gas-liquid condensation with clear gas-liquid boundaries. In 50 vol % ethanol solvent, additional ethanol was added to enhance the sedimentation force so as to restrict the particles in a monoparticle layer thickness. The coexistence of gas-liquid-solid (crystalline solid) was microscopically recognized from the periphery to the center of the condensates. A phase diagram of the gas-liquid condensation was created as a function of KCl concentration at a particle diameter of 3 microm, 0.10 vol % concentration, and 50:50 water/ethanol solvent at room temperature. The miscibility gap was observed in the concentration range from 1 to 250 microM. There was an upper limit of salt concentration where the phase separation disappeared, showing nearly critical behavior of macroscopic density fluctuation from 250 microM to 1 mM. These results add new experimental evidence to the existence of colloidal gas-liquid condensation and specify conditions of like-charge attraction between particles.

  13. Impacts of bedding directions of shale gas reservoirs on hydraulically induced crack propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keming Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Shale gas reservoirs are different from conventional ones in terms of their bedding architectures, so their hydraulic fracturing rules are somewhat different. In this paper, shale hydraulic fracturing tests were carried out by using the triaxial hydraulic fracturing test system to identify the effects of natural bedding directions on the crack propagation in the process of hydraulic fracturing. Then, the fracture initiation criterion of hydraulic fracturing was prepared using the extended finite element method. On this basis, a 3D hydraulic fracturing computation model was established for shale gas reservoirs. And finally, a series of studies were performed about the effects of bedding directions on the crack propagation created by hydraulic fracturing in shale reservoirs. It is shown that the propagation rules of hydraulically induced fractures in shale gas reservoirs are jointly controlled by the in-situ stress and the bedding plane architecture and strength, with the bedding direction as the main factor controlling the crack propagation directions. If the normal tensile stress of bedding surface reaches its tensile strength after the fracturing, cracks will propagate along the bedding direction, and otherwise vertical to the minimum in-situ stress direction. With the propagating of cracks along bedding surfaces, the included angle between the bedding normal direction and the minimum in-situ stress direction increases, the fracture initiation and propagation pressures increase and the crack areas decrease. Generally, cracks propagate in the form of non-plane ellipsoids. With the injection of fracturing fluids, crack areas and total formation filtration increase and crack propagation velocity decreases. The test results agree well with the calculated crack propagation rules, which demonstrate the validity of the above-mentioned model.

  14. Reservoir creep and induced seismicity: inferences from geomechanical modeling of gas depletion in the Groningen field

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wees, Jan-Diederik; Osinga, Sander; Van Thienen-Visser, Karin; Fokker, Peter A.

    2018-03-01

    The Groningen gas field in the Netherlands experienced an immediate reduction in seismic events in the year following a massive cut in production. This reduction is inconsistent with existing models of seismicity predictions adopting compaction strains as proxy, since reservoir creep would then result in a more gradual reduction of seismic events after a production stop. We argue that the discontinuity in seismic response relates to a physical discontinuity in stress loading rate on faults upon the arrest of pressure change. The stresses originate from a combination of the direct poroelastic effect through the pressure changes and the delayed effect of ongoing compaction after cessation of reservoir production. Both mechanisms need to be taken into account. To this end, we employed finite-element models in a workflow that couples Kelvin-Chain reservoir creep with a semi-analytical approach for the solution of slip and seismic moment from the predicted stress change. For ratios of final creep and elastic compaction up to 5, the model predicts that the cumulative seismic moment evolution after a production stop is subject to a very moderate increase, 2-10 times less than the values predicted by the alternative approaches using reservoir compaction strain as proxy. This is in agreement with the low seismicity in the central area of the Groningen field immediately after reduction in production. The geomechanical model findings support scope for mitigating induced seismicity through adjusting rates of pressure change by cutting down production.

  15. Investigation of hydraulic fracture re-orientation effects in tight gas reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagemann, B.; Wegner, J.; Ganzer, L. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). ITE

    2013-08-01

    In tight gas formations where the low matrix permeability prevents successful and economic production rates, hydraulic fracturing is required to produce a well at economic rates. The initial fracture opens in the direction of minimum stress and propagates into the direction of maximum stress. As production from the well and its initial fracture declines, re-fracturing treatments are required to accelerate recovery. The orientation of the following hydraulic fracture depends on the actual stress-state of the formation in the vicinity of the wellbore. Previous investigations by Elbel and Mack (1993) demonstrated that the stress alters during depletion and a stress reversal region appears. This behavior causes a different fracture orientation of the re-fracturing operation. For the investigation of re-fracture orientation a two-dimensional reservoir model has been designed using COMSOL Multiphysics. The model represents a fractured vertical well in a tight gas reservoir of infinite thickness. A time dependent study was set up to simulate the reservoir depletion by the production from the fractured well. The theory of poroelasticity was used to couple the fluid flow and geo-mechanical behavior. The stress state is initially defined as uniform and the attention is concentrated to the alteration of stress due to the lowered pore pressure. Different cases with anisotropic and heterogeneous permeability are set up to determine its significance. The simulation shows that an elliptical shaped drainage area appears around the fracture. The poroelastic behavior effects that the stress re-orientates and a stress reversal region originates, if the difference between minimum and maximum horizontal stresses is small. The consideration of time indicates that the dimension of the region initially extends fast until it reaches its maximum. Subsequently, the stress reversal region's extent shrinks slowly until it finally disappears. The reservoir characteristics, e.g. the

  16. Laboratory optimization tests of technetium decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant low activity waste melter off-gas condensate simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable simplified operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  17. Condensing gas boilers for energy efficiency and reduction of CO2 and NOx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewardson, E.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the study are: 1) to demonstrate the effectiveness of condensing gas boiler hot water system in reducing energy costs and pollution; 2) to illustrate the importance of marketing this technology to uninformed end users. The development of condensing boilers in the European Community, the materials used, product designs, key performance measures, and the types of applications suited to these products are outlined. Using calculations from a body of work produced by the Chartered Institute of Building Service Engineers in Britain, it is demonstrated how seasonal efficiency differs from combustion efficiency, and how the added capital cost for these boilers may be recovered within an acceptable commercial pay back period from fuel cost savings. Applying current NO x and CO 2 information from a body of the CE Technical Committees, the author show how these products can reduce pollution levels both from CO 2 and NO x . An example of marketing these products to a largely uninformed end user customer market is cited. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 12 figs. (orig.)

  18. A New Tree-Type Fracturing Method for Stimulating Coal Seam Gas Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing is used widely to stimulate coalbed methane production in coal mines. However, some factors associated with conventional hydraulic fracturing, such as the simple morphology of the fractures it generates and inhomogeneous stress relief, limit its scope of application in coal mines. These problems mean that gas extraction efficiency is low. Conventional fracturing may leave hidden pockets of gas, which will be safety hazards for subsequent coal mining operations. Based on a new drilling technique applicable to drilling boreholes in coal seams, this paper proposes a tree-type fracturing technique for stimulating reservoir volumes. Tree-type fracturing simulation experiments using a large-scale triaxial testing apparatus were conducted in the laboratory. In contrast to the single hole drilled for conventional hydraulic fracturing, the tree-type sub-boreholes induce radial and tangential fractures that form complex fracture networks. These fracture networks can eliminate the “blank area” that may host dangerous gas pockets. Gas seepage in tree-type fractures was analyzed, and gas seepage tests after tree-type fracturing showed that permeability was greatly enhanced. The equipment developed for tree-type fracturing was tested in the Fengchun underground coal mine in China. After implementing tree-type fracturing, the gas extraction rate was around 2.3 times greater than that for traditional fracturing, and the extraction rate remained high for a long time during a 30-day test. This shortened the gas drainage time and improved gas extraction efficiency.

  19. Fracture detection, mapping, and analysis of naturally fractured gas reservoirs using seismic technology. Final report, November 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    Many basins in the Rocky Mountains contain naturally fractured gas reservoirs. Production from these reservoirs is controlled primarily by the shape, orientation and concentration of the natural fractures. The detection of gas filled fractures prior to drilling can, therefore, greatly benefit the field development of the reservoirs. The objective of this project was to test and verify specific seismic methods to detect and characterize fractures in a naturally fractured reservoir. The Upper Green River tight gas reservoir in the Uinta Basin, Northeast Utah was chosen for the project as a suitable reservoir to test the seismic technologies. Knowledge of the structural and stratigraphic geologic setting, the fracture azimuths, and estimates of the local in-situ stress field, were used to guide the acquisition and processing of approximately ten miles of nine-component seismic reflection data and a nine-component Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP). Three sources (compressional P-wave, inline shear S-wave, and cross-line, shear S-wave) were each recorded by 3-component (3C) geophones, to yield a nine-component data set. Evidence of fractures from cores, borehole image logs, outcrop studies, and production data, were integrated with the geophysical data to develop an understanding of how the seismic data relate to the fracture network, individual well production, and ultimately the preferred flow direction in the reservoir. The multi-disciplinary approach employed in this project is viewed as essential to the overall reservoir characterization, due to the interdependency of the above factors.

  20. Emissions from hydroelectric reservoirs and comparison of hydroelectricity, natural gas and oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagnon, L.; Chamberland, A.

    1993-01-01

    When reservoirs are created, a small fraction of the flooded organic matter decomposes into humic acids, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), methane (CH 4 ), nitrogen, phosphorus, and other elements. The major greenhouse gases produced are CO 2 and CH 4 . For northern projects, Canadian studies on emissions from hydroelectric reservoirs have reached similar conclusions: Emissions, including methane, are less than 35 kg CO 2 equivalent per MWh. Using a typical project in northern Quebec as the basis for analysis, none of the studies dispute the considerable advantages of hydroelectricity regarding greenhouse gas emissions. Taking into account all components of energy systems, emissions of greenhouse gases from natural-gas power plants are 24 to 26 times greater than emissions from hydroelectric plants. The Freshwater Institute, in an article published in Ambio suggests that emissions from hydroelectric plants could be a significant source of greenhouse gases. This conclusion does not apply to most hydroelectric projects for two reasons: First, the Freshwater Institute's studies concerned flooded peatlands and shallow reservoirs that are not typical of most hydro projects; and second, the Institute analyzed a hydro project with a ratio of flooded area to energy production that is 6 to 10 times higher than typical projects in Canada. 7 refs, 4 tabs

  1. Gas chromatographic determination of residual hydrazine and morpholine in boiler feed water and steam condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatsala, S.; Bansal, V.; Tuli, D.K.; Rai, M.M.; Jain, S.K.; Srivastava, S.P.; Bhatnagar, A.K.

    1994-01-01

    Hydrazine, an oxygen scavenger in boiler water, was derivatised to the corresponding acetone azine and determined at the ng ml -1 level by gas chromatography. Morpholine, a corrosion inhibitor used in steam boilers, was estimated either directly (if >2.0 μg ml -1 ) or by quantitative preconcentration (0.1 ng-2.0 μg ml -1 ). To obtain symmetrical peaks for these amines, the column packing was coated with KOH. Use of a nitrogen-specific detector improved accuracy of estimation of hydrazine and morpholine, giving a RSD of 1.9-3.6%. Chromatographic analysis of these amines in boiler feed water and steam condensate samples collected from boilers servicing a pertroleum refinery is described. Environmental safety regulations calls for monitoring of hydrazine and the methods developed can easily be adapted for this purpose. (orig.)

  2. Non-condensible gas fraction predictions using wet and dry bulb temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, J.; Griffith, P.

    1983-03-01

    A technique is presented whereby non-condensible gas mass fractions in a closed system can be determined using wet bulb and dry bulb temperature and system pressure measurements. This technique would have application in situations where sampling techniques could not be used. Using an energy balance about the wet bulb wick, and expression is obtained which relates the vapor concentration difference between the wet bulb wick and the free stream to the wet and dry bulb temperature difference and a heat to mass transfer coefficient ratio. This coefficient ratio was examined for forced and natural convection flows. This analysis was verified with forced and natural convection tests over the range of pressure and temperature from 50 to 557 psig and 415 to 576 0 F. All the data could best be fit by the natural convection analysis. This is useful when no information about the flow field is known

  3. Aspects of hyperspherical adiabaticity in an atomic-gas Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushibe, Daisuke; Mutou, Masaki; Morishita, Toru; Watanabe, Shinichi; Matsuzawa, Michio

    2004-01-01

    Excitation of an atomic-gas Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the zeroth-order ground-state channel is studied with the hyperspherical adiabatic method of Bohn et al. [Bohn et al., Phys. Rev. A 58, 584 (1998)] suitably generalized to accommodate the anisotropic trapping potential. The method exploits the system's size as an adiabatic parameter so that the explicit size dependence is immediately conducive to the virial theorem. The oscillation frequencies associated with the monopole (breathing) and quadrupole modes thus emerge naturally and converge to the well-known Thomas-Fermi limits. Analysis of the single-particle density and the projected excitation wave function shows that the excitation in the single hyperspherical ground-state channel merely represents a progressive increase in occupancy of the first excited single-particle state. The work paves the way for applying the adiabatic picture to other BEC phenomena

  4. Development Optimization and Uncertainty Analysis Methods for Oil and Gas Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettehadtavakkol, Amin, E-mail: amin.ettehadtavakkol@ttu.edu [Texas Tech University (United States); Jablonowski, Christopher [Shell Exploration and Production Company (United States); Lake, Larry [University of Texas at Austin (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Uncertainty complicates the development optimization of oil and gas exploration and production projects, but methods have been devised to analyze uncertainty and its impact on optimal decision-making. This paper compares two methods for development optimization and uncertainty analysis: Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and stochastic programming. Two example problems for a gas field development and an oilfield development are solved and discussed to elaborate the advantages and disadvantages of each method. Development optimization involves decisions regarding the configuration of initial capital investment and subsequent operational decisions. Uncertainty analysis involves the quantification of the impact of uncertain parameters on the optimum design concept. The gas field development problem is designed to highlight the differences in the implementation of the two methods and to show that both methods yield the exact same optimum design. The results show that both MC optimization and stochastic programming provide unique benefits, and that the choice of method depends on the goal of the analysis. While the MC method generates more useful information, along with the optimum design configuration, the stochastic programming method is more computationally efficient in determining the optimal solution. Reservoirs comprise multiple compartments and layers with multiphase flow of oil, water, and gas. We present a workflow for development optimization under uncertainty for these reservoirs, and solve an example on the design optimization of a multicompartment, multilayer oilfield development.

  5. Development Optimization and Uncertainty Analysis Methods for Oil and Gas Reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettehadtavakkol, Amin; Jablonowski, Christopher; Lake, Larry

    2017-01-01

    Uncertainty complicates the development optimization of oil and gas exploration and production projects, but methods have been devised to analyze uncertainty and its impact on optimal decision-making. This paper compares two methods for development optimization and uncertainty analysis: Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and stochastic programming. Two example problems for a gas field development and an oilfield development are solved and discussed to elaborate the advantages and disadvantages of each method. Development optimization involves decisions regarding the configuration of initial capital investment and subsequent operational decisions. Uncertainty analysis involves the quantification of the impact of uncertain parameters on the optimum design concept. The gas field development problem is designed to highlight the differences in the implementation of the two methods and to show that both methods yield the exact same optimum design. The results show that both MC optimization and stochastic programming provide unique benefits, and that the choice of method depends on the goal of the analysis. While the MC method generates more useful information, along with the optimum design configuration, the stochastic programming method is more computationally efficient in determining the optimal solution. Reservoirs comprise multiple compartments and layers with multiphase flow of oil, water, and gas. We present a workflow for development optimization under uncertainty for these reservoirs, and solve an example on the design optimization of a multicompartment, multilayer oilfield development.

  6. Know thy reservoir : multi-disciplinary shale gas solution integrates cased hole evaluation interpretation and stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.

    2009-11-15

    This article discussed Schlumberger's efforts in making shale gas a priority. Shale gas plays require maximum reservoir exposure to be economic. The exploitation of shale gas has been solved through the use of long horizontal wells that are fractured in multiple zones along their length. Companies have invested heavily into research to find increasingly novel ways to reduce costs and extract more molecules of gas from the ultra-low permeability rock. The tools and techniques that Schlumberger has developed for well stimulation and completion were described. Schlumberger was extremely focused on improving its ability to understand the Horn River reservoir and improve completion practices. Openhole logging was discussed as an option. Schlumberger in conjunction with its in-house data and consulting services group, also devised a method to log a lateral well after it had been cased, cemented, and the rig had been released. It was concluded that using such instruments as spectroscopy logging, epithermal neutron porosity logging and multidimensional shear sonic logging tools, Schlumberger could provide all the necessary measurements post-casing. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Mixed Finite Element Simulation with Stability Analysis for Gas Transport in Low-Permeability Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. El-Amin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas exists in considerable quantities in tight reservoirs. Tight formations are rocks with very tiny or poorly connected pors that make flow through them very difficult, i.e., the permeability is very low. The mixed finite element method (MFEM, which is locally conservative, is suitable to simulate the flow in porous media. This paper is devoted to developing a mixed finite element (MFE technique to simulate the gas transport in low permeability reservoirs. The mathematical model, which describes gas transport in low permeability formations, contains slippage effect, as well as adsorption and diffusion mechanisms. The apparent permeability is employed to represent the slippage effect in low-permeability formations. The gas adsorption on the pore surface has been described by Langmuir isotherm model, while the Peng-Robinson equation of state is used in the thermodynamic calculations. Important compatibility conditions must hold to guarantee the stability of the mixed method by adding additional constraints to the numerical discretization. The stability conditions of the MFE scheme has been provided. A theorem and three lemmas on the stability analysis of the mixed finite element method (MFEM have been established and proven. A semi-implicit scheme is developed to solve the governing equations. Numerical experiments are carried out under various values of the physical parameters.

  8. Utilizing natural gas huff and puff to enhance production in heavy oil reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenlong, G.; Shuhong, W.; Jian, Z.; Xialin, Z. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)]|[PetroChina Co. Ltd., Beijing (China); Jinzhong, L.; Xiao, M. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Beijing (China)

    2008-10-15

    The L Block in the north structural belt of China's Tuha Basin is a super deep heavy oil reservoir. The gas to oil ratio (GOR) is 12 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3} and the initial bubble point pressure is only 4 MPa. The low production can be attributed to high oil viscosity and low flowability. Although steam injection is the most widely method for heavy oil production in China, it is not suitable for the L Block because of its depth. This paper reviewed pilot tests in which the natural gas huff and puff process was used to enhance production in the L Block. Laboratory experiments that included both conventional and unconventional PVT were conducted to determine the physical property of heavy oil saturated by natural gas. The experiments revealed that the heavy oil can entrap the gas for more than several hours because of its high viscosity. A pseudo bubble point pressure exists much lower than the bubble point pressure in manmade foamy oils, which is relative to the depressurization rate. Elastic energy could be maintained in a wider pressure scope than natural depletion without gas injection. A special experimental apparatus that can stimulate the process of gas huff and puff in the reservoir was also introduced. The foamy oil could be seen during the huff and puff experiment. Most of the oil flowed to the producer in a pseudo single phase, which is among the most important mechanisms for enhancing production. A pilot test of a single well demonstrated that the oil production increased from 1 to 2 cubic metres per day to 5 to 6 cubic metres per day via the natural gas huff and puff process. The stable production period which was 5 to 10 days prior to huff and puff, was prolonged to 91 days in the first cycle and 245 days in the second cycle. 10 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs.

  9. Method of approximate electric modeling of oil reservoir operation with formation of a gas cap during mixed exploitation regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragin, V A; Lyadkin, V Ya

    1969-01-01

    A potentiometric model is used to simulate the behavior of a reservoir in which pressure was dropped rapidly and solution gas migrated to the top of the structure forming a gas cap. Behavior of the system was represented by a differential equation, which was solved by an electrointegrator. The potentiometric model was found to closely represent past history of the reservoir, and to predict its future behavior. When this method is used in reservoirs where large pressure drops occur, repeated determination should be made at various time intervals, so that changes in relative permeability are taken into account.

  10. Materials in flue gas condensation plants. Stage 2; Materialval vid roekgaskondensering. Etapp 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordling, Magnus; Bergman, Gunnar; Baeck, Gustaf; Jacobsson, Karin; Pahverk, Helen; Roemhild, Stefanie

    2004-12-01

    The corrosion resistance of some metallic and polymeric materials has been investigated in the flue gas scrubbers/condensers in the power plants at Igelsta using waste wood and Brista using bio fuel in the boilers. The materials were exposed inside the inlet part of the condenser and inside the flue gas duct after the condenser. In Brista, the polymeric materials were also exposed to the hot flue gases inside the duct before the condenser. The temperature of the gases before and after the condenser in Brista was 140 deg C and 50-60 deg C, respectively. In Igelsta, the flue gas temperature after the condenser was 45 deg C. The metallic coupons in the condenser were located in the spray-zone, both in Igelsta and Brista. That was true also for the polymeric material in Brista. In both plants, the wash-solution had a pH of 7-8, a temperature of 30 deg C, and a low content of chloride. The metallic materials investigated were stainless steels of the following grades: 17-12-2.5, 2205, SAF2507 and 254SMO. The major part of the polymeric materials investigated consisted of FRP laminates, which were made with different combinations of resin type of surface veil and type of chopped strand mat (CSM). Laminates with a new type of vinyl ester resin, Atlac E-Nova FW 1045, a new type of a stress-corrosion-resistant glass-fibre called Arcotex, and two types of surface reinforcement of carbon fibre have been compared to laminates of common type. Laminates with a special reinforcement of the type 3-D fabric were also included as well as five polypropylene materials (PP) with varying degree of stabilisation, two glass-flake materials applied on carbon steel and a butyl rubber. The corrosion resistance of the materials was evaluated after seven a months exposure at the different positions in the plants. The stainless steel materials were evaluated with respect to uniform corrosion, pitting and crevice attack. The corrosion resistance of the polymeric materials was evaluated with

  11. Numerical Method based on SIMPLE Algorithm for a Two-Phase Flow with Non-condensable Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Tae

    2009-08-01

    In this study, a numerical method based on SIMPLE algorithm for a two-phase flow with non-condensable gas has been developed in order to simulate thermal hydraulics in a containment of a nuclear power plant. As governing equations, it adopts a two-fluid three-field model for the two-phase flows. The three fields include gas, drops, and continuous liquid. The gas field can contains vapor and non-condensable gases such as air and hydrogen. In order to resolve mixing phenomena of gas species, gas transport equations for each species base on the gas mass fractions are solved with gas phase governing equations such as mass, momentum and energy equations. Methods to evaluate the properties of the gas species were implemented in the code. They are constant or polynomial function based a user input and a property library from Chemkin and JANAF table for gas specific heat. Properties for the gas mixture which are dependent on mole fractions of the gas species were evaluated by a mix rule

  12. Simulating the gas hydrate production test at Mallik using the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeschen, Katja; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Priegnitz, Mike; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja

    2014-05-01

    LARS, the LArge Reservoir Simulator, allows for one of the few pilot scale simulations of gas hydrate formation and dissociation under controlled conditions with a high resolution sensor network to enable the detection of spatial variations. It was designed and built within the German project SUGAR (submarine gas hydrate reservoirs) for sediment samples with a diameter of 0.45 m and a length of 1.3 m. During the project, LARS already served for a number of experiments simulating the production of gas from hydrate-bearing sediments using thermal stimulation and/or depressurization. The latest test simulated the methane production test from gas hydrate-bearing sediments at the Mallik test site, Canada, in 2008 (Uddin et al., 2011). Thus, the starting conditions of 11.5 MPa and 11°C and environmental parameters were set to fit the Mallik test site. The experimental gas hydrate saturation of 90% of the total pore volume (70 l) was slightly higher than volumes found in gas hydrate-bearing formations in the field (70 - 80%). However, the resulting permeability of a few millidarcy was comparable. The depressurization driven gas production at Mallik was conducted in three steps at 7.0 MPa - 5.0 MPa - 4.2 MPa all of which were used in the laboratory experiments. In the lab the pressure was controlled using a back pressure regulator while the confining pressure was stable. All but one of the 12 temperature sensors showed a rapid decrease in temperature throughout the sediment sample, which accompanied the pressure changes as a result of gas hydrate dissociation. During step 1 and 2 they continued up to the point where gas hydrate stability was regained. The pressure decreases and gas hydrate dissociation led to highly variable two phase fluid flow throughout the duration of the simulated production test. The flow rates were measured continuously (gas) and discontinuously (liquid), respectively. Next to being discussed here, both rates were used to verify a model of gas

  13. Reservoir Characterization using geostatistical and numerical modeling in GIS with noble gas geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, D. A.; Swift, J. N.; Tan, S.; Darrah, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    The integration of precise geochemical analyses with quantitative engineering modeling into an interactive GIS system allows for a sophisticated and efficient method of reservoir engineering and characterization. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is utilized as an advanced technique for oil field reservoir analysis by combining field engineering and geological/geochemical spatial datasets with the available systematic modeling and mapping methods to integrate the information into a spatially correlated first-hand approach in defining surface and subsurface characteristics. Three key methods of analysis include: 1) Geostatistical modeling to create a static and volumetric 3-dimensional representation of the geological body, 2) Numerical modeling to develop a dynamic and interactive 2-dimensional model of fluid flow across the reservoir and 3) Noble gas geochemistry to further define the physical conditions, components and history of the geologic system. Results thus far include using engineering algorithms for interpolating electrical well log properties across the field (spontaneous potential, resistivity) yielding a highly accurate and high-resolution 3D model of rock properties. Results so far also include using numerical finite difference methods (crank-nicholson) to solve for equations describing the distribution of pressure across field yielding a 2D simulation model of fluid flow across reservoir. Ongoing noble gas geochemistry results will also include determination of the source, thermal maturity and the extent/style of fluid migration (connectivity, continuity and directionality). Future work will include developing an inverse engineering algorithm to model for permeability, porosity and water saturation.This combination of new and efficient technological and analytical capabilities is geared to provide a better understanding of the field geology and hydrocarbon dynamics system with applications to determine the presence of hydrocarbon pay zones (or

  14. Geophysical assessments of renewable gas energy compressed in geologic pore storage reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hagrey, Said Attia; Köhn, Daniel; Rabbel, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Renewable energy resources can indisputably minimize the threat of global warming and climate change. However, they are intermittent and need buffer storage to bridge the time-gap between production (off peak) and demand peaks. Based on geologic and geochemical reasons, the North German Basin has a very large capacity for compressed air/gas energy storage CAES in porous saltwater aquifers and salt cavities. Replacing pore reservoir brine with CAES causes changes in physical properties (elastic moduli, density and electrical properties) and justify applications of integrative geophysical methods for monitoring this energy storage. Here we apply techniques of the elastic full waveform inversion FWI, electric resistivity tomography ERT and gravity to map and quantify a gradually saturated gas plume injected in a thin deep saline aquifer within the North German Basin. For this subsurface model scenario we generated different synthetic data sets without and with adding random noise in order to robust the applied techniques for the real field applications. Datasets are inverted by posing different constraints on the initial model. Results reveal principally the capability of the applied integrative geophysical approach to resolve the CAES targets (plume, host reservoir, and cap rock). Constrained inversion models of elastic FWI and ERT are even able to recover well the gradual gas desaturation with depth. The spatial parameters accurately recovered from each technique are applied in the adequate petrophysical equations to yield precise quantifications of gas saturations. Resulting models of gas saturations independently determined from elastic FWI and ERT techniques are in accordance with each other and with the input (true) saturation model. Moreover, the gravity technique show high sensitivity to the mass deficit resulting from the gas storage and can resolve saturations and temporal saturation changes down to ±3% after reducing any shallow fluctuation such as that of

  15. HIGH RESOLUTION PREDICTION OF GAS INJECTION PROCESS PERFORMANCE FOR HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklin M. Orr, Jr.

    2004-05-01

    This final technical report describes and summarizes results of a research effort to investigate physical mechanisms that control the performance of gas injection processes in heterogeneous reservoirs and to represent those physical effects in an efficient way in simulations of gas injection processes. The research effort included four main lines of research: (1) Efficient compositional streamline methods for 3D flow; (2) Analytical methods for one-dimensional displacements; (3) Physics of multiphase flow; and (4) Limitations of streamline methods. In the first area, results are reported that show how the streamline simulation approach can be applied to simulation of gas injection processes that include significant effects of transfer of components between phases. In the second area, the one-dimensional theory of multicomponent gas injection processes is extended to include the effects of volume change as components change phase. In addition an automatic algorithm for solving such problems is described. In the third area, results on an extensive experimental investigation of three-phase flow are reported. The experimental results demonstrate the impact on displacement performance of the low interfacial tensions between the gas and oil phases that can arise in multicontact miscible or near-miscible displacement processes. In the fourth area, the limitations of the streamline approach were explored. Results of an experimental investigation of the scaling of the interplay of viscous, capillary, and gravity forces are described. In addition results of a computational investigation of the limitations of the streamline approach are reported. The results presented in this report establish that it is possible to use the compositional streamline approach in many reservoir settings to predict performance of gas injection processes. When that approach can be used, it requires substantially less (often orders of magnitude) computation time than conventional finite difference

  16. The persistence of natural CO2 accumulations over millennial timescales: Integrating noble gas and reservoir data at Bravo Dome, NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhbari, D.

    2017-12-01

    Bravo Dome, the largest CO2 reservoir in the US, is a hydrogeologically closed system that has stored a very large amount of CO2 on millennial time scales. The pre-production gas pressures in Bravo Dome indicate that the reservoir is highly under-pressured and is divided into separate pressure compartments that do not communicate hydrologically. Previous studies used the noble gas composition at Bravo Dome to constrain the amount of dissolved CO2 into the brine. This CO2 dissolution into brine plays an important role in the observed under-pressure at the reservoir. However, the dissolution rates and transport mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we are looking into reservoir pressures and noble gas composition in the northeastern section of the reservoir to constrain timescales of CO2 dissolution. We are interested in northeastern part of the reservoir because the largest amount of CO2 was dissolved into brine in this section. Also, we specifically look into the evolution of the CO2/3He and 20Ne concentration during convective CO2 dissolution at Bravo Dome. 20Ne has atmospheric origin and is initially in the brine, while 3He and CO2 have magmatic sources and were introduced with the gas. CO2/3He decreases as more CO2 dissolves into brine, due to the higher solubility of CO2 compare to that of 3He. However, 20Ne concentration in the gas increases due to exsolution of 20Ne from brine into the gas phase. We present 2D numerical simulation that demonstrate the persistence of CO2 over 1Ma and reproduce the observed reservoir pressures and noble gas compositions. Our results indicate that convection is required to produce observed changes in gas composition. But diffusion makes a significant contribution to mass transport.

  17. Preparation of development plan for the gas-condensate pool with the use of a high speed computer (IBM-1620)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirkovsky, A I; Kumar, S

    1968-01-01

    The computation of all the technical, technological, and economic figures for a gas supply system by using the High Speed Computer IBM-1620 is presented. The gas supply system consists of a gas-condensate pool (source) and main gas pipeline from the pool to the consumer. All necessary analytical equations for correlating geological, technological, and economic variables have been used. Results of calculations and recommendations for the most profitable variant are given. Effects of geological, technological, and technical factors upon the economic figures are also shown.

  18. Secondary biogenic coal seam gas reservoirs in New Zealand: A preliminary assessment of gas contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butland, Carol I. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Moore, Tim A. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Solid Energy NZ Ltd., P.O. Box 1303, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2008-10-02

    Four coal cores, one from the Huntly (Eocene), two from the Ohai (Cretaceous) and one from the Greymouth (Cretaceous) coalfields, were sampled and analysed in terms of gas content and coal properties. The coals vary in rank from subbituminous B-A (Huntly) to subbituminous C-A (Ohai), and high volatile A bituminous (Greymouth). Average gas contents were 1.60 m{sup 3}/t (s 0.2) in the Huntly core, 4.80 m{sup 3}/t (s = 0.8) in the Ohai cores, and 2.39 m{sup 3}/t (s = 0.8) in the Greymouth core. The Ohai core not only contained more gas but also had the highest saturation (75%) compared with the Huntly (33%) and Greymouth (45%) cores. Carbon isotopes indicate that the Ohai gas is more mature, containing higher {delta}{sup 13}C isotopes values than either the Huntly or Greymouth gas samples. This may indicate that the gas was derived from a mixed biogenic and thermogenic source. The Huntly and Greymouth gases appear to be derived solely from a secondary biogenic (by CO{sub 2} reduction) source. Although the data set is limited, preliminary analysis indicates that ash yield is the dominant control on gas volume in all samples where the ash yield was above 10%. Below 10%, the amount of gas variation is unrelated to ash yield. Although organic content has some influence on gas volume, associations are basin and/or rank dependent. In the Huntly core total gas content and structured vitrinite increase together. Although this relationship does not appear for the other core data for the Ohai SC3 core, lost gas and fusinite are associated whereas gelovitrinite (unstructured vitrinite) correlates positively with residual gas for the Greymouth data. (author)

  19. Characterization and Prediction of the Gas Hydrate Reservoir at the Second Offshore Gas Production Test Site in the Eastern Nankai Trough, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machiko Tamaki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Following the world’s first offshore production test that was conducted from a gas hydrate reservoir by a depressurization technique in 2013, the second offshore production test has been planned in the eastern Nankai Trough. In 2016, the drilling survey was performed ahead of the production test, and logging data that covers the reservoir interval were newly obtained from three wells around the test site: one well for geological survey, and two wells for monitoring surveys, during the production test. The formation evaluation using the well log data suggested that our target reservoir has a more significant heterogeneity in the gas hydrate saturation distribution than we expected, although lateral continuity of sand layers is relatively good. To evaluate the spatial distribution of gas hydrate, the integration analysis using well and seismic data was performed. The seismic amplitude analysis supports the lateral reservoir heterogeneity that has a significant positive correlation with the resistivity log data at the well locations. The spatial distribution of the apparent low-resistivity interval within the reservoir observed from log data was investigated by the P-velocity volume derived from seismic inversion. The integrated results were utilized for the pre-drill prediction of the reservoir quality at the producing wells. These approaches will reduce the risk of future commercial production from the gas hydrate reservoir.

  20. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from fractured reservoir at Site NGHP-01-10, Krishna-Godavari Basin, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    During the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 (NGHP-Ol), one of the richest marine gas hydrate accumulations was discovered at Site NGHP-01-10 in the Krishna-Godavari Basin. The occurrence of concentrated gas hydrate at this site is primarily controlled by the presence of fractures. Assuming the resistivity of gas hydratebearing sediments is isotropic, th?? conventional Archie analysis using the logging while drilling resistivity log yields gas hydrate saturations greater than 50% (as high as ???80%) of the pore space for the depth interval between ???25 and ???160 m below seafloor. On the other hand, gas hydrate saturations estimated from pressure cores from nearby wells were less than ???26% of the pore space. Although intrasite variability may contribute to the difference, the primary cause of the saturation difference is attributed to the anisotropic nature of the reservoir due to gas hydrate in high-angle fractures. Archie's law can be used to estimate gas hydrate saturations in anisotropic reservoir, with additional information such as elastic velocities to constrain Archie cementation parameters m and the saturation exponent n. Theory indicates that m and n depend on the direction of the measurement relative to fracture orientation, as well as depending on gas hydrate saturation. By using higher values of m and n in the resistivity analysis for fractured reservoirs, the difference between saturation estimates is significantly reduced, although a sizable difference remains. To better understand the nature of fractured reservoirs, wireline P and S wave velocities were also incorporated into the analysis.

  1. Seismic fracture detection of shale gas reservoir in Longmaxi formation, Sichuan Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yujia; Cao, Junxing; Jiang, Xudong

    2017-11-01

    In the shale reservoirs, fractures play an important role, which not only provide space for the oil and gas, but also offer favorable petroleum migration channel. Therefore, it is of great significance to study the fractures characteristics in shale reservoirs for the exploration and development of shale gas. In this paper, four analysis technologies involving coherence, curvature attribute, structural stress field simulation and pre-stack P-wave azimuthal anisotropy have been applied to predict the fractures distribution in the Longmaxi formation, Silurian, southeast of Sichuan Basin, China. By using the coherence and curvature attribute, we got the spatial distribution characteristics of fractures in the study area. Structural stress field simulation can help us obtain distribution characteristics of structural fractures. And using the azimuth P-wave fracture detection technology, we got the characteristics about the fracture orientation and density of this region. Application results show that there are NW and NE fractures in the study block, which is basically consistent with the result of log interpretation. The results also provide reliable geological basis for shale gas sweet spots prediction.

  2. OPTIMAL SYSNTHESIS PROCESSES OF LOW-TEMPERATURE CONDENSATION ASSOCIATED OIL GAS PLANT REFRIGERATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Ostapenko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Design of modern high-efficient systems is a key priority for the Energy Sector of Ukraine. The cooling technological streams of gas and oil refineries, including air coolers, water cooling and refrigeration systems for specific refrigerants are the objectives of the present study. Improvement of the refrigeration unit with refrigerant separation into fractions is mandatory in order to increase cooling capacity, lowering the boiling point of coolant and increasing the coefficient of target hydrocarbons extraction from the associated gas flow. In this paper it is shown that cooling temperature plays significant role in low-temperature condensation process. Two operation modes for refrigeration unit were proposed: permanent, in which the concentration of the refrigerant mixture does not change and dynamic, in which the concentration of refrigerant mixtures depends on the ambient temperature. Based on the analysis of exergy losses the optimal concentration of refrigerant mixtures propane/ethane for both modes of operation of the refrigeration unit has been determined. On the basis of the conducted pinch-analysis the modification of refrigeration unit with refrigerant separation into fractions was developed. Additional recuperative heat exchangers for utilization heat were added to the scheme. Several important measures to increase the mass flow rate of refrigerant through the second section of the refrigeration centrifugal compressor from 22.5 to 25 kg/s without violating the agreed operational mode of the compressor sections were implemented.

  3. Intrinsic bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a gas condensate-contaminated aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieg, L.M.; McInerney; Tanner, R.S.; Harris, S.H. Jr.; Sublette, K.L.; Suflita, J.M.; Kolhatkar, R.V.

    1999-01-01

    A study was designed to determine if the intrinsic bioremediation of gas condensate hydrocarbons represented an important fate process in a shallow aquifer underlying a natural gas production site. For over 4 yr, changes in the groundwater, sediment, and vadose zone chemistry in the contaminated portion of the aquifer were interpreted relative to a background zone. Changes included decreased dissolved oxygen and sulfate levels and increased alkalinity, Fe(II), and methane concentrations in the contaminated groundwater, suggesting that aerobic heterotrophic respiration depleted oxygen reserves leaving anaerobic conditions in the hydrocarbon-impacted subsurface. Dissolved hydrogen levels in the contaminated groundwater indicated that sulfate reduction and methanogenesis were predominant biological processes, corroborating the geochemical findings. Furthermore, 10--1000-fold higher numbers of sulfate reducers and methanogens were enumerated in the contaminated sediment relative to background. Putative metabolites were also detected in the contaminated groundwater, including methylbenzylsuccinic acid, a signature intermediate of anaerobic xylene decay. Laboratory incubations showed that benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and each of the xylene isomers were biodegraded under sulfate-reducing conditions as was toluene under methanogenic conditions. These results coupled with a decrease in hydrocarbon concentrations in contaminated sediment confirm that intrinsic bioremediation contributes to the attenuation of hydrocarbons in this aquifer

  4. Steam condenser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Fujio

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable safe steam condensation by providing steam condensation blades at the end of a pipe. Constitution: When high temperature high pressure steam flows into a vent pipe having an opening under water in a pool or an exhaust pipe or the like for a main steam eacape safety valve, non-condensable gas filled beforehand in the steam exhaust pipe is compressed, and discharged into the water in the pool. The non-condensable gas thus discharged from the steam exhaust pipe is introduced into the interior of the hollow steam condensing blades, is then suitably expanded, and thereafter exhausted from a number of exhaust holes into the water in the pool. In this manner, the non-condensable gas thus discharged is not directly introduced into the water in the pool, but is suitable expanded in the space of the steam condensing blades to suppress extreme over-compression and over-expansion of the gas so as to prevent unstable pressure vibration. (Yoshihara, H.)

  5. Practices and prospect of petroleum engineering technologies in ultra-deep sour gas reservoirs, Yuanba Gasfield, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Xu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Located in the Sichuan Basin, the Yuanba Gasfield is the deepest marine sour gas field among those developed in China so far. Its biohermal gas reservoir of the Upper Permian Changxing Fm is characterized by ultra depth, high content of hydrogen sulfide, medium–low porosity and permeability, and small reservoir thickness. Economic evaluation on it shows that horizontal well drilling is the only way to develop this gas reservoir efficiently and to reduce the total development investment. At present, the petroleum engineering technology for this type of ultra-deep sour gas reservoir is less applied in the world, so an ultra-deep horizontal well is subject to a series of petroleum engineering technology difficulties, such as safe and fast well drilling and completion, mud logging, well logging, downhole operation, safety and environmental protection. Based on the successful development experience of the Puguang Gasfield, therefore, Sinopec Southwest Petroleum Engineering Co., Ltd. took the advantage of integrated engineering geology method to carry out specific technical research and perform practice diligently for 7 years. As a result, 18 key items of technologies for ultra-deep sour gas reservoirs were developed, including horizontal-well drilling speed increasing technology, horizontal-well mud logging and well logging technology, downhole operation technology, and safety and environmental protection technology. These technologies were applied in 40 wells during the first and second phases of productivity construction of the Yuanba Gasfield. All the 40 wells have been built into commercial gas wells, and the productivity construction goal of 3.4 billion m3 purified gas has also been achieved. These petroleum engineering technologies for ultra-deep sour gas fields play a reference role in exploring and developing similar gas reservoirs at home and abroad.

  6. Characterization of the deep microbial life in the Altmark natural gas reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, D.; Alawi, M.; Vieth-Hillebrand, A.; Kock, D.; Krüger, M.; Wuerdemann, H.; Shaheed, M.

    2010-12-01

    Within the framework of the CLEAN project (CO2 Largescale Enhanced gas recovery in the Altmark Natural gas field) technical basics with special emphasis on process monitoring are explored by injecting CO2 into a gas reservoir. Our study focuses on the investigation of the in-situ microbial community of the Rotliegend natural gas reservoir in the Altmark, located south of the city Salzwedel, Germany. In order to characterize the microbial life in the extreme habitat we aim to localize and identify microbes including their metabolism influencing the creation and dissolution of minerals. The ability of microorganisms to speed up dissolution and formation of minerals might result in changes of the local permeability and the long-term safety of CO2 storage. However, geology, structure and chemistry of the reservoir rock and the cap rock as well as interaction with saline formation water and natural gases and the injected CO2 affect the microbial community composition and activity. The reservoir located at the depth of approximately 3500 m, is characterised by high salinity (420 g/l) and temperatures up to 127°C. It represents an extreme environment for microbial life and therefore the main focus is on hyperthermophilic, halophilic anaerobic microorganisms. In consequence of the injection of large amounts of CO2 in the course of a commercial EGR (Enhanced Gas Recovery), the environmental conditions (e.g. pH, temperature, pressure and solubility of minerals) for the autochthonous microorganisms will change. Genetic profiling of amplified 16S rRNA genes are applied for detecting structural changes in the community by using PCR- SSCP (PCR-Single-Strand-Conformation Polymorphism), DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis) and 16S rRNA cloning. First results of the baseline survey indicate the presence of microorganisms similar to representatives from other deep environments. The sequence analyses revealed the presence of several H2-oxidising bacteria (Hydrogenophaga sp

  7. Interstellar silicate analogs for grain-surface reaction experiments: Gas-phase condensation and characterization of the silicate dust grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabri, T.; Jäger, C. [Laboratory Astrophysics Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena Institute of Solid State Physics, Helmholtzweg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G. [Observatoire de Paris/Université de Cergy-Pontoise, 5 mail Gay Lussac, F-95000 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Mutschke, H. [Laboratory Astrophysics Group of the Astrophysical Institute and University Observatory, Friedrich Schiller University Jena Schillergässchen 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Henning, T., E-mail: tolou.sabri@uni-jena.de [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-01-10

    Amorphous, astrophysically relevant silicates were prepared by laser ablation of siliceous targets and subsequent quenching of the evaporated atoms and clusters in a helium/oxygen gas atmosphere. The described gas-phase condensation method can be used to synthesize homogeneous and astrophysically relevant silicates with different compositions ranging from nonstoichiometric magnesium iron silicates to pyroxene- and olivine-type stoichiometry. Analytical tools have been used to characterize the morphology, composition, and spectral properties of the condensates. The nanometer-sized silicate condensates represent a new family of cosmic dust analogs that can generally be used for laboratory studies of cosmic processes related to condensation, processing, and destruction of cosmic dust in different astrophysical environments. The well-characterized silicates comprising amorphous Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, as well as the corresponding crystalline silicates forsterite and fayalite, produced by thermal annealing of the amorphous condensates, have been used as real grain surfaces for H{sub 2} formation experiments. A specifically developed ultra-high vacuum apparatus has been used for the investigation of molecule formation experiments. The results of these molecular formation experiments on differently structured Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} described in this paper will be the topic of the next paper of this series.

  8. Anomalies of natural gas compositions and carbon isotope ratios caused by gas diffusion - A case from the Donghe Sandstone reservoir in the Hadexun Oilfield, Tarim Basin, northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yangyang; Chen, Jianfa; Pang, Xiongqi; Zhang, Baoshou; Wang, Yifan; He, Liwen; Chen, Zeya; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2018-05-01

    Natural gases in the Carboniferous Donghe Sandstone reservoir within the Block HD4 of the Hadexun Oilfield, Tarim Basin are characterized by abnormally low total hydrocarbon gas contents ( δ13C ethane (C2) gas has never been reported previously in the Tarim Basin and such large variations in δ13C have rarely been observed in other basins globally. Based on a comprehensive analysis of gas geochemical data and the geological setting of the Carboniferous reservoirs in the Hadexun Oilfield, we reveal that the anomalies of the gas compositions and carbon isotope ratios in the Donghe Sandstone reservoir are caused by gas diffusion through the poorly-sealed caprock rather than by pathways such as gas mixing, microorganism degradation, different kerogen types or thermal maturity degrees of source rocks. The documentation of an in-reservoir gas diffusion during the post entrapment process as a major cause for gas geochemical anomalies may offer important insight into exploring natural gas resources in deeply buried sedimentary basins.

  9. An investigation of condensation from steam-gas mixtures flowing downward inside a vertical tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, S.Z.; Schrock, V.E.; Peterson, P.F. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Previous experiments have been carried out by Vierow, Ogg, Kageyama and Siddique for condensation from steam/gas mixtures in vertical tubes. In each case the data scatter relative to the correlation was large and there was not close agreement among the three investigations. A new apparatus has been designed and built using the lessons learned from the earlier studies. Using the new apparatus, an extensive new data base has been obtained for pure steam, steam-air mixtures and steam-helium mixtures. Three different correlations, one implementing the degradation method initially proposed by Vierow and Schrock, a second diffusion layer theory initially proposed by Peterson, and third mass transfer conductance model are presented in this paper. The correlation using the simple degradation factor method has been shown, with some modification, to give satisfactory engineering accuracy when applied to the new data. However, this method is based on very simplified arguments that do not fully represent the complex physical phenomena involved. Better representation of the data has been found possible using modifications of the more complex and phenomenologically based method which treats the heat transfer conductance of the liquid film in series with the conductance on the vapor-gas side with the latter comprised of mass transfer and sensible heat transfer conductance acting in parallel. The mechanistic models, based on the modified diffusion layer theory or classical mass transfer theory for mass transfer conductance with transpiration successfully correlate the data for the heat transfer of vapor-gas side. Combined with the heat transfer of liquid film model proposed by Blangetti, the overall heat transfer coefficients predicted by the correlations from mechanistic models are in close agreement with experimental values.

  10. Evaluation of the condensation potential of hydrocarbon fluids in the national gas pipeline system; establishing of adequate operational schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineda Gomez, Cesar Augusto; Arenas Mantilla, Oscar Armando; Santos Santos, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    For transporting industry of natural gas by pipeline systems, it's vital to guarantee the integrity of their lines, in order to decrease operational costs and prevent accidents that may damaging against people's safety, the environment or the infrastructure itself. in this paper it's presented the principal compounds from o technical study about principal net and its distribution branches to municipalities of the National System Transport of Natural Gas pointed by the Colombian Natural Gas Company - ECOGAS, (specifically the Cusiana - Porvenir - La Belleza, La Belleza - Cogua, La Belleza - Vasconia, Vasconia - Neiva and Vasconia - Cali gas lines, (see Figure 1). The principal objective is evaluate the possible condensation of hydrocarbons fluids inside gas lines, due to compositional characteristics of the gas, the different topographical conditions along the gas line route and the actual and future operational conditions to be implemented in the system. The evaluation performed over this gas streams, generates transcendental information in the creation of safe operational limits that minimizing the existence of obstacle problems and damages over pipeline systems and process equipment, due to the presence of liquid hydrocarbons inside these flow lines. This article has been prepared in four sections in order to guarantee easy access to each one of the steps involved in the study. Section one presents the compositional and thermodynamic analysis of feeding gas streams; in section two, its presented the required information for modeling gas lines with definition of the gas pipeline numerical simulation model in stable state; section three presents the sensitivity analysis for gas variation upon loading gas composition at the inlet point of the system, variation of the operational conditions (flow, pressure and gas temperature) and environment temperatures for the different inlet points (branches) with verification of compliance of the Unique Transport Regulation

  11. Fundamental Study of Disposition and Release of Methane in a Shale Gas Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Waste Disposal Research and Analysis; Xiong, Yongliang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Repository Performance; Criscenti, Louise J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geochemistry; Ho, Tuan Ahn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geochemistry; Weck, Philippe F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Storage and Transportation Technology; Ilgen, Anastasia G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geochemistry; Matteo, Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Waste Disposal Research and Analysis; Kruichak, Jessica N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Waste Disposal Research and Analysis; Mills, Melissa M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Waste Disposal Research and Analysis; Dewers, Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geomechanics; Gordon, Margaret E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Materials, Devices and Energy Technologies; Akkutlu, Yucel [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2016-09-01

    simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3 - 35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. We have successfully established experimental capabilities for measuring gas sorption and desorption on shale and model materials under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions. Both low and high pressure measurements show significant sorption of CH4 and CO2 onto clays, implying that methane adsorbed on clay minerals could contribute a significant portion of gas-in-place in an unconventional reservoir. We have also studied the potential impact of the interaction of shale with hydrofracking fluid on gas sorption. We have found that the CH4-CO2 sorption capacity for the reacted sample is systematically lower (by a factor of ~2) than that for the unreacted (raw) sample. This difference in sorption capacity may result from a mineralogical or surface chemistry change of the shale sample induced by fluid-rock interaction. Our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs.

  12. Elements and gas enrichment laws of sweet spots in shale gas reservoir: A case study of the Longmaxi Fm in Changning block, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renfang Pan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Identification of sweet spot is of great significance in confirming shale gas prospects to realize large-scale economic shale gas development. In this paper, geological characteristics of shale gas reservoirs were compared and analyzed based on abundant data of domestic and foreign shale gas reservoirs. Key elements of sweet spots were illustrated, including net thickness of gas shale, total organic carbon (TOC content, types and maturity (Ro of organic matters, rock matrix and its physical properties (porosity and permeability, and development characteristics of natural fractures. After the data in Changning and Weiyuan blocks, the Sichuan Basin, were analyzed, the geologic laws of shale gas enrichment were summarized based on the economic exploitation characteristics of shale gas and the correlation between the elements. The elements of favorable “sweet spots” of marine shale gas reservoirs in the Changning block and their distribution characteristics were confirmed. Firstly, the quality of gas source rocks is ensured with the continuous thickness of effective gas shale larger than 30 m, TOC > 2.0% and Ro = 2.4–3.5%. Secondly, the quality of reservoir is ensured with the brittle minerals content being 30–69%, the clay mineral content lower than 30% and a single lamination thickness being 0.1–1.0 m. And thirdly, the porosity is higher than 2.0%, the permeability is larger than 50 nD, gas content is higher than 1.45 m3/t, and formation is under normal pressure–overpressure system, which ensures the production modes and capacities. Finally, the primary and secondary elements that control the “sweet spots” of shale gas reservoirs were further analyzed and their restrictive relationships with each other were also discussed.

  13. Global mass conservation method for dual-continuum gas reservoir simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yi; Sun, Shuyu; Gong, Liang; Yu, Bo

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we find that the numerical simulation of gas flow in dual-continuum porous media may generate unphysical or non-robust results using regular finite difference method. The reason is the unphysical mass loss caused by the gas compressibility and the non-diagonal dominance of the discretized equations caused by the non-linear well term. The well term contains the product of density and pressure. For oil flow, density is independent of pressure so that the well term is linear. For gas flow, density is related to pressure by the gas law so that the well term is non-linear. To avoid these two problems, numerical methods are proposed using the mass balance relation and the local linearization of the non-linear source term to ensure the global mass conservation and the diagonal dominance of discretized equations in the computation. The proposed numerical methods are successfully applied to dual-continuum gas reservoir simulation. Mass conservation is satisfied while the computation becomes robust. Numerical results show that the location of the production well relative to the large-permeability region is very sensitive to the production efficiency. It decreases apparently when the production well is moved from the large-permeability region to the small-permeability region, even though the well is very close to the interface of the two regions. The production well is suggested to be placed inside the large-permeability region regardless of the specific position.

  14. Global mass conservation method for dual-continuum gas reservoir simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yi

    2018-03-17

    In this paper, we find that the numerical simulation of gas flow in dual-continuum porous media may generate unphysical or non-robust results using regular finite difference method. The reason is the unphysical mass loss caused by the gas compressibility and the non-diagonal dominance of the discretized equations caused by the non-linear well term. The well term contains the product of density and pressure. For oil flow, density is independent of pressure so that the well term is linear. For gas flow, density is related to pressure by the gas law so that the well term is non-linear. To avoid these two problems, numerical methods are proposed using the mass balance relation and the local linearization of the non-linear source term to ensure the global mass conservation and the diagonal dominance of discretized equations in the computation. The proposed numerical methods are successfully applied to dual-continuum gas reservoir simulation. Mass conservation is satisfied while the computation becomes robust. Numerical results show that the location of the production well relative to the large-permeability region is very sensitive to the production efficiency. It decreases apparently when the production well is moved from the large-permeability region to the small-permeability region, even though the well is very close to the interface of the two regions. The production well is suggested to be placed inside the large-permeability region regardless of the specific position.

  15. Understanding gas production mechanism and effectiveness of well stimulation in the Haynesville shale through reservoir simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, L.; Thompson, J.W.; Robinson, J.R. [Schlumberger, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The Haynesville Shale Basin is one of the large and most active shale gas plays in the United States, with 185 horizontal rigs currently in place. The Haynesville Shale is a very tight source rock and resource play. The gas resources are being converted into gas reserves with horizontal wells and hydraulic fracture treatments. A complex fracture network created during well stimulation is the main factor in generating superior early well performance in the area. The key to making better wells in all the gas shale plays is to understand how to create more surface area during hydraulic stimulation jobs and preserve the surface area for as long as possible. This paper presented a unique workflow and methodology that has enabled analysis of production data using reservoir simulation to explain the shale gas production mechanism and the effectiveness of stimulation treatments along laterals. Since 2008, this methodology has been used to analyze production data from more than 30 horizontal wells in the Haynesville Shale. Factors and parameters relating to short and long term well performance were investigated, including pore pressure, rock matrix quality, natural fractures, hydraulic fractures, and complex fracture networks. Operators can use the simulation results to determine where and how to spend resources to produce better wells and to reduce the uncertainties of developing these properties. 19 refs., 1 tab., 17 figs.

  16. Determination of Reasons of Obstruction in the Condensate Stabilizer System of Namconson Gas Treatment Terminal by Radioisotope Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui Quang Tri; Nguyen Huu Quang; Dang Nguyen The Duy; Tran Tri Hai; Tran Thanh Minh

    2008-01-01

    The Condensate Stabilizer System of Namconson Gas Treatment Terminal was designed with operational flow rate of 60 m 3 /h but for unknown reason it ran efficiently below 20 m 3 /h. The Radiotracer in combination with Gamma Scan was used to investigate in understanding the reasons. The results showed the build up at the bottom of Trap out Tray which caused obstruction of condensate flow in the outlet of Trap out Tray. As a results the feed flow rate to Reboiler from Trap out Tray lowered into 1/3 and the remaining 2/3 by passing the Reboiler by overflow to the Sump. (author)

  17. Secondary ions produced from condensed rare gas targets under highly charged MeV/amu heavy ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawara, H.; Tonuma, T.; Kumagai, H.; Matsuo, T.

    1994-01-01

    Secondary ions produced from condensed rare gas targets are observed under MeV/amu, highly charged, heavy ion impact. The intensities of the observed cluster ions decrease smoothly as the cluster sizes become large but show some discontinuities at particular sizes of cluster ions. This seems to be closely related to the stabilities of cluster ion structures. It is also noted that very few doubly charged or practically no triply/higher charged ions have been observed, in sharp contrast to that of some condensed molecular targets. (orig.)

  18. A thermodynamic approach on vapor-condensation of corrosive salts from flue gas on boiler tubes in waste incinerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Nobuo

    2008-01-01

    Thermodynamic equilibrium calculation was conducted to understand the effects of tube wall temperature, flue gas temperature, and waste chemistry on the type and amount of vapor-condensed 'corrosive' salts from flue gas on superheater and waterwall tubes in waste incinerators. The amount of vapor-condensed compounds from flue gases at 650-950 deg. C on tube walls at 350-850 deg. C was calculated, upon combustion of 100 g waste with 1.6 stoichiometry (in terms of the air-fuel ratio). Flue gas temperature, rather than tube wall temperature, influenced the deposit chemistry of boiler tubes significantly. Chlorine, sulfur, sodium, potassium, and calcium contents in waste affected it as well

  19. AGN feedback on molecular gas reservoirs in quasars at z 2.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniani, S.; Marconi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Feruglio, C.; Brusa, M.; Cresci, G.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Cicone, C.; Balmaverde, B.; Fiore, F.; Ferrara, A.; Gallerani, S.; La Franca, F.; Mainieri, V.; Mannucci, F.; Netzer, H.; Piconcelli, E.; Sani, E.; Schneider, R.; Shemmer, O.; Testi, L.

    2017-09-01

    We present new ALMA observations aimed at mapping molecular gas reservoirs through the CO(3-2) transition in three quasars at z ≃ 2.4, LBQS 0109+0213, 2QZ J002830.4-281706, and [HB89] 0329-385. Previous [Oiii]λ5007 observations of these quasars showed evidence for ionised outflows quenching star formation in their host galaxies. Systemic CO(3-2) emission has been detected only in one quasar, LBQS 0109+0213, where the CO(3-2) emission is spatially anti-correlated with the ionised outflow, suggesting that most of the molecular gas may have been dispersed or heated in the region swept by the outflow. In all three sources, including the one detected in CO, our constraints on the molecular gas mass indicate a significantly reduced reservoir compared to main-sequence galaxies at the same redshift, supporting a negative feedback scenario. In the quasar 2QZ J002830.4-281706, we tentatively detect an emission line blob blue-shifted by v - 2000 km s-1 with respect to the galaxy systemic velocity and spatially offset by 0.2'' (1.7 kpc) with respect to the ALMA continuum peak. Interestingly, such emission feature is coincident in both velocity and space with the ionised outflow as seen in [Oiii]λ5007. This tentative detection must be confirmed with deeper observations but, if real, it could represent the molecular counterpart of the ionised gas outflow driven by the Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). Finally, in all ALMA maps we detect the presence of serendipitous line emitters within a projected distance 160 kpc from the quasars. By identifying these features with the CO(3-2) transition, we find that the serendipitous line emitters would be located within | Δv | < 500 km s-1 from the quasars, hence suggesting an overdensity of galaxies in two out of three quasars.

  20. Rate transient analysis for homogeneous and heterogeneous gas reservoirs using the TDS technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, Freddy Humberto; Sanchez, Jairo Andres; Cantillo, Jose Humberto

    2008-01-01

    In this study pressure test analysis in wells flowing under constant wellbore flowing pressure for homogeneous and naturally fractured gas reservoir using the TDS technique is introduced. Although, constant rate production is assumed in the development of the conventional well test analysis methods, constant pressure production conditions are sometimes used in the oil and gas industry. The constant pressure technique or rate transient analysis is more popular reckoned as decline curve analysis under which rate is allows to decline instead of wellbore pressure. The TDS technique, everyday more used even in the most recognized software packages although without using its trade brand name, uses the log-log plot to analyze pressure and pressure derivative test data to identify unique features from which exact analytical expression are derived to easily estimate reservoir and well parameters. For this case, the fingerprint characteristics from the log-log plot of the reciprocal rate and reciprocal rate derivative were employed to obtain the analytical expressions used for the interpretation analysis. Many simulation experiments demonstrate the accuracy of the new method. Synthetic examples are shown to verify the effectiveness of the proposed methodology

  1. The results interpretation of thermogasdynamic studies of vertical gas wells incomplete in terms of the reservoir penetration degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Shamsiev

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A method is proposed for interpreting thermogasdynamic studies of vertical gas wells that are incomplete in terms of the reservoir penetration degree on the basis of inverse tasks theory. The inverse task has the aim to determine the reservoir parameters for nonisothermal filtration of a real gas to a vertical well in an anisotropic reservoir. In this case, the values ​​of the pressure and temperature at the well bottom, recorded by deep instruments, are assumed to be known. The solution of the inverse task is to minimize the functional. The iterative sequence for minimizing the functional is based on the Levenberg-Marquardt method. The convergence and stability of the iterative process for various input information have been studied on specific examples. The effect of reservoir anisotropy on the pressure and temperature changes at the bottom of the well is studied. It is shown that if the reservoir is not completely penetrated by the results of pressure and temperature measurements at the bottom of the well, anisotropy of the reservoir can be estimated after its launch. It should be noted that when studying thermodynamic processes in the vicinity of a well, which penetrates thick layers, it is necessary to take into account not only the heat exchange of the reservoir with the surrounding rocks, but also the geothermal temperature gradient.

  2. Study of the mobility activation in ZnSe thin films deposited using inert gas condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeewan Sharma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ZnSe thin films were synthesized on glass substrates using the inert gas condensation technique at substrate temperature ranging from 25 °C to 100 °C. The hexagonal structure and average crystallite size (6.1–8.4 nm were determined from X-ray diffraction data. The transient photoconductivity was investigated using white light of intensity 8450 lx to deduce the effective density of states (Neff in the order of 1.02 × 1010–13.90 × 1010 cm−3, the frequency factor (S in the range 2.5 × 105–24.6 × 105 s−1 and the trap depth (E ranging between 0.37–0.64 eV of these films. The trap depth study revealed three different types of levels with quasi-continuous distribution below the conduction band. An increase in the photoconductivity was observed as a result of the formation of potential barriers (Vb and of the increase of carrier mobility at the crystallite boundaries. The study of the dependence of various mobility activation parameters on the deposition temperature and the crystallite size has provided better understanding of the mobility activation mechanism.

  3. Production of Au clusters by plasma gas condensation and their incorporation in oxide matrixes by sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, N. M.; Serra, R.; Manninen, N. K.; Cavaleiro, A.

    2018-05-01

    Gold clusters were produced by plasma gas condensation method and studied in great detail for the first time. The influence of argon flow, discharge power applied to the Au target and aggregation chamber length on the size distribution and deposition rate of Au clusters was evaluated. Au clusters with sizes between 5 and 65 nm were deposited with varying deposition rates and size dispersion curves. Nanocomposite Au-TiO2 and Au-Al2O3 coatings were then deposited by alternating sputtering. These coatings were hydrophobic and showed strong colorations due to the surface plasmon resonance effect. By simulating the optical properties of the nanocomposites it was possible to identify each individual contribution to the overall surface plasmon resonance signal. These coatings show great potential to be used as high performance localized surface plasmon resonance sensors or as robust self-cleaning decorative protective layers. The hybrid method used for depositing the nanocomposites offers several advantages over co-sputtering or thermal evaporation processes, since a broader range of particle sizes can be obtained (up to tens of nanometers) without the application of any thermal annealing treatments and the properties of clusters and matrix can be controlled separately.

  4. New methodology for aquifer influx status classification for single wells in a gas reservoir with aquifer support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available For gas reservoirs with strong bottom or edge aquifer support, the most important thing is avoiding aquifer breakthrough in a gas well. Water production in gas wells does not only result in processing problems in surface facilities, but it also explicitly reduces well productivity and reservoir recovery. There are a lot of studies on the prediction of water breakthrough time, but they are not completely practicable due to reservoir heterogeneity. This paper provides a new method together with three diagnostic curves to identify aquifer influx status for single gas wells; the aforementioned curves are based on well production and pressure data. The whole production period of a gas well can be classified into three periods based on the diagnostic curves: no aquifer influx period, early aquifer influx period, and middle-late aquifer influx period. This new method has been used for actual gas well analysis to accurately identify gas well aquifer influx status and the water breakthrough sequence of all wells in the same gas field. Additionally, the evaluation results are significantly beneficial for well production rate optimization and development of an effective gas field.

  5. Impact of Reservoir Fluid Saturation on Seismic Parameters: Endrod Gas Field, Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Abdel Moktader A.; El Sayed, Nahla A.

    2017-12-01

    Outlining the reservoir fluid types and saturation is the main object of the present research work. 37 core samples were collected from three different gas bearing zones in the Endrod gas field in Hungary. These samples are belonging to the Miocene and the Upper - Lower Pliocene. These samples were prepared and laboratory measurements were conducted. Compression and shear wave velocity were measured using the Sonic Viewer-170-OYO. The sonic velocities were measured at the frequencies of 63 and 33 kHz for compressional and shear wave respectively. All samples were subjected to complete petrophysical investigations. Sonic velocities and mechanical parameters such as young’s modulus, rigidity, and bulk modulus were measured when samples were saturated by 100%-75%-0% brine water. Several plots have been performed to show the relationship between seismic parameters and saturation percentages. Robust relationships were obtained, showing the impact of fluid saturation on seismic parameters. Seismic velocity, Poisson’s ratio, bulk modulus and rigidity prove to be applicable during hydrocarbon exploration or production stages. Relationships among the measured seismic parameters in gas/water fully and partially saturated samples are useful to outline the fluid type and saturation percentage especially in gas/water transitional zones.

  6. Pore characteristics of shale gas reservoirs from the Lower Paleozoic in the southern Sichuan Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianqing Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Data was acquired from both the drillings and core samples of the Lower Paleozoic Qiongzhusi and Longmaxi Formations' marine shale gas reservoirs in the southern Sichuan Basin by means of numerous specific experimental methods such as organic geochemistry, organic petrology, and pore analyses. Findings helped determine the characteristics of organic matter, total porosity, microscopic pore, and pore structure. The results show that the Lower Paleozoic marine shale in the south of the Sichuan Basin are characterized by high total organic carbon content (most TOC>2.0%, high thermal maturity level (RO = 2.3%–3.8%, and low total porosity (1.16%–6.87%. The total organic carbon content and thermal maturity level of the Qiongzhusi Formation shale are higher than those of the Longmaxi Formation shale, while the total porosity of the Qiongzhusi Formation shale is lower than that of the Longmaxi Formation shale. There exists intergranular pore, dissolved pore, crystal particle pore, particle edge pore, and organic matter pore in the Lower Paleozoic Qiongzhusi Formation and Longmaxi Formation shale. There are more micro-nano pores developed in the Longmaxi Formation shales than those in the Qiongzhusi Formation shales. Intergranular pores, dissolved pores, as well as organic matter pores, are the most abundant, these are primary storage spaces for shale gas. The microscopic pores in the Lower Paleozoic shales are mainly composed of micropores, mesopores, and a small amount of macropores. The micropore and mesopore in the Qiongzhusi Formation shale account for 83.92% of the total pore volume. The micropore and mesopore in the Longmaxi Formation shale accounts for 78.17% of the total pore volume. Thus, the micropores and mesopores are the chief components of microscopic pores in the Lower Paleozoic shale gas reservoirs in the southern Sichuan Basin.

  7. Noble gas and hydrocarbon tracers in multiphase unconventional hydrocarbon systems: Toward integrated advanced reservoir simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, T.; Moortgat, J.; Poreda, R. J.; Muehlenbachs, K.; Whyte, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Although hydrocarbon production from unconventional energy resources has increased dramatically in the last decade, total unconventional oil and gas recovery from black shales is still less than 25% and 9% of the totals in place, respectively. Further, the majority of increased hydrocarbon production results from increasing the lengths of laterals, the number of hydraulic fracturing stages, and the volume of consumptive water usage. These strategies all reduce the economic efficiency of hydrocarbon extraction. The poor recovery statistics result from an insufficient understanding of some of the key physical processes in complex, organic-rich, low porosity formations (e.g., phase behavior, fluid-rock interactions, and flow mechanisms at nano-scale confinement and the role of natural fractures and faults as conduits for flow). Noble gases and other hydrocarbon tracers are capably of recording subsurface fluid-rock interactions on a variety of geological scales (micro-, meso-, to macro-scale) and provide analogs for the movement of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. As such geochemical data enrich the input for the numerical modeling of multi-phase (e.g., oil, gas, and brine) fluid flow in highly heterogeneous, low permeability formations Herein we will present a combination of noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe abundances and isotope ratios) and molecular and isotopic hydrocarbon data from a geographically and geologically diverse set of unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs in North America. Specifically, we will include data from the Marcellus, Utica, Barnett, Eagle Ford, formations and the Illinois basin. Our presentation will include geochemical and geological interpretation and our perspective on the first steps toward building an advanced reservoir simulator for tracer transport in multicomponent multiphase compositional flow (presented separately, in Moortgat et al., 2015).

  8. Studies on the characteristics of the separated heat pipe system with non-condensible gas for the use of the passive decay heat removal in reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takao; Ishi, Takayuki; Hayakawa, Hitoshi; Ohashi, Kazutaka

    1997-01-01

    Experiments on the separated heat pipe system of variable conductance type, which enclose non-condensible gas, have been carried out with intention of applying such system to passive decay heat removal of the modular reactors such as HTR plant. Basic experiments have been carried out on the experimental apparatus consisting of evaporator, vapor transfer tube, condenser tube and return tube which returns the condensed liquid back to the evaporator. Water and methanol were examined as the working fluids and nitrogen gas was enclosed as the non-condensible gas. The behaviors of the system were examined for the parametric changes of the heat input under the various pressures of nitrogen gas initially enclosed, including the case without enclosing N 2 gas for the comparison. The results of the experiments shows very clear features of self control characteristics. The self control mechanism was made clear, that is, in such system in which the condensing area in the condenser expands automatically in accordance with the increase of the heat input to keep the system temperature nearly constant. The working temperature of the system are clearly dependent on the pressure of the non-condensable gas initially enclosed, with higher system working temperature with higher initial gas pressure enclosed. The analyses were done on water and methanol as the working fluids, which show very good agreement with the experimental results. A lot of attractive applications are expected including the self switching feature with minimum heat loss during normal operation with maintaining the sufficient heat removal at accidents. (author)

  9. Archie's Saturation Exponent for Natural Gas Hydrate in Coarse-Grained Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ann E.; Waite, William F.

    2018-03-01

    Accurately quantifying the amount of naturally occurring gas hydrate in marine and permafrost environments is important for assessing its resource potential and understanding the role of gas hydrate in the global carbon cycle. Electrical resistivity well logs are often used to calculate gas hydrate saturations, Sh, using Archie's equation. Archie's equation, in turn, relies on an empirical saturation parameter, n. Though n = 1.9 has been measured for ice-bearing sands and is widely used within the hydrate community, it is highly questionable if this n value is appropriate for hydrate-bearing sands. In this work, we calibrate n for hydrate-bearing sands from the Canadian permafrost gas hydrate research well, Mallik 5L-38, by establishing an independent downhole Sh profile based on compressional-wave velocity log data. Using the independently determined Sh profile and colocated electrical resistivity and bulk density logs, Archie's saturation equation is solved for n, and uncertainty is tracked throughout the iterative process. In addition to the Mallik 5L-38 well, we also apply this method to two marine, coarse-grained reservoirs from the northern Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project: Walker Ridge 313-H and Green Canyon 955-H. All locations yield similar results, each suggesting n ≈ 2.5 ± 0.5. Thus, for the coarse-grained hydrate bearing (Sh > 0.4) of greatest interest as potential energy resources, we suggest that n = 2.5 ± 0.5 should be applied in Archie's equation for either marine or permafrost gas hydrate settings if independent estimates of n are not available.

  10. A Theoretical Investigation of Radial Lateral Wells with Shockwave Completion in Shale Gas Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jia

    As its role in satisfying the energy demand of the U.S. and as a clean fuel has become more significant than ever, the shale gas production in the U.S. has gained increasing momentum over recent years. Thus, effective and environmentally friendly methods to extract shale gas are critical. Hydraulic fracturing has been proven to be efficient in the production of shale gas. However, environmental issues such as underground water contamination and high usage of water make this technology controversial. A potential technology to eliminate the environmental issues concerning water usage and contamination is to use blast fracturing, which uses explosives to create fractures. It can be further aided by HEGF and multi-pulse pressure loading technology, which causes less crushing effect near the wellbore and induces longer fractures. Radial drilling is another relatively new technology that can bypass damage zones due to drilling and create a larger drainage area through drilling horizontal wellbores. Blast fracturing and radial drilling both have the advantage of cost saving. The successful combination of blast fracturing and radial drilling has a great potential for improving U.S. shale gas production. An analytical productivity model was built in this study, considering linear flow from the reservoir rock to the fracture face, to analyze factors affecting shale gas production from radial lateral wells with shockwave completion. Based on the model analyses, the number of fractures per lateral is concluded to be the most effective factor controlling the productivity index of blast-fractured radial lateral wells. This model can be used for feasibility studies of replacing hydraulic fracturing by blast fracturing in shale gas well completions. Prediction of fracture geometry is recommended for future studies.

  11. Archie’s saturation exponent for natural gas hydrate in coarse-grained reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ann E.; Waite, William F.

    2018-01-01

    Accurately quantifying the amount of naturally occurring gas hydrate in marine and permafrost environments is important for assessing its resource potential and understanding the role of gas hydrate in the global carbon cycle. Electrical resistivity well logs are often used to calculate gas hydrate saturations, Sh, using Archie's equation. Archie's equation, in turn, relies on an empirical saturation parameter, n. Though n = 1.9 has been measured for ice‐bearing sands and is widely used within the hydrate community, it is highly questionable if this n value is appropriate for hydrate‐bearing sands. In this work, we calibrate n for hydrate‐bearing sands from the Canadian permafrost gas hydrate research well, Mallik 5L‐38, by establishing an independent downhole Sh profile based on compressional‐wave velocity log data. Using the independently determined Sh profile and colocated electrical resistivity and bulk density logs, Archie's saturation equation is solved for n, and uncertainty is tracked throughout the iterative process. In addition to the Mallik 5L‐38 well, we also apply this method to two marine, coarse‐grained reservoirs from the northern Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project: Walker Ridge 313‐H and Green Canyon 955‐H. All locations yield similar results, each suggesting n ≈ 2.5 ± 0.5. Thus, for the coarse‐grained hydrate bearing (Sh > 0.4) of greatest interest as potential energy resources, we suggest that n = 2.5 ± 0.5 should be applied in Archie's equation for either marine or permafrost gas hydrate settings if independent estimates of n are not available.

  12. Forecasting of reservoir pressures of oil and gas bearing complexes in northern part of West Siberia for safety oil and gas deposits exploration and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunov, P. A.; Vorobyov, S. V.

    2017-10-01

    In the paper the features of reservoir pressures changes in the northern part of West Siberian oil-and gas province are described. This research is based on the results of hydrodynamic studies in prospecting and explorating wells in Yamal-Nenets Autonomous District. In the Cenomanian, Albian, Aptian and in the top of Neocomian deposits, according to the research, reservoir pressure is usually equal to hydrostatic pressure. At the bottom of the Neocomian and Jurassic deposits zones with abnormally high reservoir pressures (AHRP) are distinguished within Gydan and Yamal Peninsula and in the Nadym-Pur-Taz interfluve. Authors performed the unique zoning of the territory of the Yamal-Nenets Autonomous District according to the patterns of changes of reservoir pressures in the section of the sedimentary cover. The performed zoning and structural modeling allow authors to create a set of the initial reservoir pressures maps for the main oil and gas bearing complexes of the northern part of West Siberia. The results of the survey should improve the efficiency of exploration drilling by preventing complications and accidents during this operation in zones with abnormally high reservoir pressures. In addition, the results of the study can be used to estimate gas resources within prospective areas of Yamal-Nenets Autonomous District.

  13. Developing of two-dimensional model of the corium cooling and behavior with non-condensible gas injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Chang Hyun; Cho, Jae Seon; Kim, Ju Youl; Kim, Do Hyoung [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the effect of the non-condensible gas injection into the molten corium on the heat transfer and dynamic behavior within the melt when molten core-concrete interaction occurs during the hypothetical severe accident. Corium behavior with gas injection effect is two phase fluid pattern in which droplet has dispersed gas phase in continuous liquid phase of corium. To analyze this behavior, two dimensional governing equation using the governing equation, the computer program is accomplished using the finite difference method and SIMPLER algorithm. And benchmarking calculation is performed for the KfK experiment, which consider the gas injection effect. After this pre-calculation, an analyses is performed with typical corium under severe accidents. It is concluded that the heat transfer within corium increases as the metal components of the corium and gas injection velocity increase. 88 refs., 23 tabs., 35 figs. (author)

  14. Electrical anisotropy of gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Anne E.; Anderson, Barbara I.; Rasmus, John; Sun, Keli; Li, Qiming; Collett, Timothy S.; Goldberg, David S.

    2012-01-01

    We present new results and interpretations of the electricalanisotropy and reservoir architecture in gashydrate-bearingsands using logging data collected during the Gulf of MexicoGasHydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II. We focus specifically on sandreservoirs in Hole Alaminos Canyon 21 A (AC21-A), Hole Green Canyon 955 H (GC955-H) and Hole Walker Ridge 313 H (WR313-H). Using a new logging-while-drilling directional resistivity tool and a one-dimensional inversion developed by Schlumberger, we resolve the resistivity of the current flowing parallel to the bedding, R| and the resistivity of the current flowing perpendicular to the bedding, R|. We find the sandreservoir in Hole AC21-A to be relatively isotropic, with R| and R| values close to 2 Ω m. In contrast, the gashydrate-bearingsandreservoirs in Holes GC955-H and WR313-H are highly anisotropic. In these reservoirs, R| is between 2 and 30 Ω m, and R| is generally an order of magnitude higher. Using Schlumberger's WebMI models, we were able to replicate multiple resistivity measurements and determine the formation resistivity the gashydrate-bearingsandreservoir in Hole WR313-H. The results showed that gashydrate saturations within a single reservoir unit are highly variable. For example, the sand units in Hole WR313-H contain thin layers (on the order of 10-100 cm) with varying gashydrate saturations between 15 and 95%. Our combined modeling results clearly indicate that the gashydrate-bearingsandreservoirs in Holes GC955-H and WR313-H are highly anisotropic due to varying saturations of gashydrate forming in thin layers within larger sand units.

  15. Spatial and temporal patterns of greenhouse gas emissions from Three Gorges Reservoir of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic activity has led to significant emissions of greenhouse gas (GHG, which is thought to play important roles in global climate changes. It remains unclear about the kinetics of GHG emissions, including carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4 and nitrous Oxide (N2O from the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR of China, which was formed after the construction of the famous Three Gorges Dam. Here we report monthly measurements for one year of the fluxes of these gases at multiple sites within the TGR region, including three major tributaries, six mainstream sites, two downstream sites and one upstream site. The tributary areas have lower CO2 fluxes than the main storage; CH4 fluxes in the tributaries and upper reach mainstream sites are relative higher. Overall, TGR showed significantly lower CH4 emission rates than most new reservoirs in temperate and tropical regions. We attribute this to the well-oxygenated deep water and high water velocities that may facilitate the consumption of CH4. TGR's CO2 fluxes were lower than most tropical reservoirs and higher than most temperate systems. This could be explained by the high load of labile soil carbon delivered through erosion to the Yangtze River. Compared to fossil-fuelled power plants of equivalent power output, TGR is a very small GHG emitter – annual CO2-equivalent emissions are approximately 1.7% of that of a coal-fired generating plant of comparable power output.

  16. Naturally fractured tight gas: Gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Economically viable natural gas production from the low permeability Mesaverde Formation in the Piceance Basin, Colorado requires the presence of an intense set of open natural fractures. Establishing the regional presence and specific location of such natural fractures is the highest priority exploration goal in the Piceance and other western US tight, gas-centered basins. Recently, Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) completed a field program at Rulison Field, Piceance Basin, to test and demonstrate the use of advanced seismic methods to locate and characterize natural fractures. This project began with a comprehensive review of the tectonic history, state of stress and fracture genesis of the basin. A high resolution aeromagnetic survey, interpreted satellite and SLAR imagery, and 400 line miles of 2-D seismic provided the foundation for the structural interpretation. The central feature of the program was the 4.5 square mile multi-azimuth 3-D seismic P-wave survey to locate natural fracture anomalies. The interpreted seismic attributes are being tested against a control data set of 27 wells. Additional wells are currently being drilled at Rulison, on close 40 acre spacings, to establish the productivity from the seismically observed fracture anomalies. A similar regional prospecting and seismic program is being considered for another part of the basin. The preliminary results indicate that detailed mapping of fault geometries and use of azimuthally defined seismic attributes exhibit close correlation with high productivity gas wells. The performance of the ten new wells, being drilled in the seismic grid in late 1996 and early 1997, will help demonstrate the reliability of this natural fracture detection and mapping technology.

  17. Geochemical analysis of atlantic rim water, carbon county, wyoming: New applications for characterizing coalbed natural gas reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, J.F.; Frost, C.D.; Sharma, Shruti

    2011-01-01

    Coalbed natural gas (CBNG) production typically requires the extraction of large volumes of water from target formations, thereby influencing any associated reservoir systems. We describe isotopic tracers that provide immediate data on the presence or absence of biogenic natural gas and the identify methane-containing reservoirs are hydrologically confined. Isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon and strontium, along with water quality data, were used to characterize the CBNG reservoirs and hydrogeologic systems of Wyoming's Atlantic Rim. Water was analyzed from a stream, springs, and CBNG wells. Strontium isotopic composition and major ion geochemistry identify two groups of surface water samples. Muddy Creek and Mesaverde Group spring samples are Ca-Mg-S04-type water with higher 87Sr/86Sr, reflecting relatively young groundwater recharged from precipitation in the Sierra Madre. Groundwaters emitted from the Lewis Shale springs are Na-HCO3-type waters with lower 87Sr/86Sr, reflecting sulfate reduction and more extensive water-rock interaction. To distinguish coalbed waters, methanogenically enriched ??13CDIC wasused from other natural waters. Enriched ??13CDIC, between -3.6 and +13.3???, identified spring water that likely originates from Mesaverde coalbed reservoirs. Strongly positive ??13CDIC, between +12.6 and +22.8???, identified those coalbed reservoirs that are confined, whereas lower ??13CDIC, between +0.0 and +9.9???, identified wells within unconfined reservoir systems. Copyright ?? 2011. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  18. Key seismic exploration technology for the Longwangmiao Fm gas reservoir in Gaoshiti–Moxi area, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangrong Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The dolomite reservoirs of the Lower Cambrian Longwangmiao Fm in the Gaoshiti–Moxi area, Sichuan Basin, are deeply buried (generally 4400–4900 m, with high heterogeneity, making reservoir prediction difficult. In this regard, key seismic exploration technologies were developed through researches. Firstly, through in-depth analysis on the existing geologic, drilling, seismic data and available research findings, basic surface and subsurface structures and geologic conditions within the study area were clarified. Secondly, digital seismic data acquisition technologies with wide azimuth, wide frequency band and minor bins were adopted to ensure even distribution of coverage of target formations through optimization of the 3D seismic geometry. In this way, high-accuracy 3D seismic data can be acquired through shallow, middle and deep formations. Thirdly, well-control seismic data processing technologies were applied to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of seismic data for deep formations. Fourthly, a seismic response model was established specifically for the Longwangmiao Fm reservoir. Quantitative prediction of the reservoir was performed through pre-stack geo-statistics. In this way, plan distribution of reservoir thicknesses was mapped. Fifthly, core tests and logging data analysis were conducted to determine gas-sensitive elastic parameters, which were then used in pre-stack hydrocarbon detection to eliminate the multiple solutions in seismic data interpretation. It is concluded that application of the above-mentioned key technologies effectively promote the discovery of largescale marine carbonate gas reservoirs of the Longwangmiao Fm.

  19. Scale-dependent gas hydrate saturation estimates in sand reservoirs in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Woong; Collett, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    Through the use of 2-D and 3-D seismic data, several gas hydrate prospects were identified in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea and thirteen drill sites were established and logging-while-drilling (LWD) data were acquired from each site in 2010. Sites UBGH2–6 and UBGH2–10 were selected to test a series of high amplitude seismic reflections, possibly from sand reservoirs. LWD logs from the UBGH2–6 well indicate that there are three significant sand reservoirs with varying thickness. Two upper sand reservoirs are water saturated and the lower thinly bedded sand reservoir contains gas hydrate with an average saturation of 13%, as estimated from the P-wave velocity. The well logs at the UBGH2–6 well clearly demonstrated the effect of scale-dependency on gas hydrate saturation estimates. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the high resolution LWD acquired ring resistivity (vertical resolution of about 5–8 cm) reaches about 90% with an average saturation of 28%, whereas gas hydrate saturations estimated from the low resolution A40L resistivity (vertical resolution of about 120 cm) reaches about 25% with an average saturation of 11%. However, in the UBGH2–10 well, gas hydrate occupies a 5-m thick sand reservoir near 135 mbsf with a maximum saturation of about 60%. In the UBGH2–10 well, the average and a maximum saturation estimated from various well logging tools are comparable, because the bed thickness is larger than the vertical resolution of the various logging tools. High resolution wireline log data further document the role of scale-dependency on gas hydrate calculations.

  20. Relationships between water and gas chemistry in mature coalbed methane reservoirs of the Black Warrior Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashin, Jack C.; McIntyre-Redden, Marcella R.; Mann, Steven D.; Kopaska-Merkel, David C.; Varonka, Matthew S.; Orem, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Water and gas chemistry in coalbed methane reservoirs of the Black Warrior Basin reflects a complex interplay among burial processes, basin hydrodynamics, thermogenesis, and late-stage microbial methanogenesis. These factors are all important considerations for developing production and water management strategies. Produced water ranges from nearly potable sodium-bicarbonate water to hypersaline sodium-chloride brine. The hydrodynamic framework of the basin is dominated by structurally controlled fresh-water plumes that formed by meteoric recharge along the southeastern margin of the basin. The produced water contains significant quantities of hydrocarbons and nitrogen compounds, and the produced gas appears to be of mixed thermogenic-biogenic origin.Late-stage microbial methanogenesis began following unroofing of the basin, and stable isotopes in the produced gas and in mineral cements indicate that late-stage methanogenesis occurred along a CO2-reduction metabolic pathway. Hydrocarbons, as well as small amounts of nitrate in the formation water, probably helped nourish the microbial consortia, which were apparently active in fresh to hypersaline water. The produced water contains NH4+ and NH3, which correlate strongly with brine concentration and are interpreted to be derived from silicate minerals. Denitrification reactions may have generated some N2, which is the only major impurity in the coalbed gas. Carbon dioxide is a minor component of the produced gas, but significant quantities are dissolved in the formation water. Degradation of organic compounds, augmented by deionization of NH4+, may have been the principal sources of hydrogen facilitating late-stage CO2 reduction.

  1. Eos modeling and reservoir simulation study of bakken gas injection improved oil recovery in the elm coulee field, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Wanli

    The Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin is one of the most productive liquid-rich unconventional plays. The Bakken Formation is divided into three members, and the Middle Bakken Member is the primary target for horizontal wellbore landing and hydraulic fracturing because of its better rock properties. Even with this new technology, the primary recovery factor is believed to be only around 10%. This study is to evaluate various gas injection EOR methods to try to improve on that low recovery factor of 10%. In this study, the Elm Coulee Oil Field in the Williston Basin was selected as the area of interest. Static reservoir models featuring the rock property heterogeneity of the Middle Bakken Member were built, and fluid property models were built based on Bakken reservoir fluid sample PVT data. By employing both compositional model simulation and Todd-Longstaff solvent model simulation methods, miscible gas injections were simulated and the simulations speculated that oil recovery increased by 10% to 20% of OOIP in 30 years. The compositional simulations yielded lower oil recovery compared to the solvent model simulations. Compared to the homogeneous model, the reservoir model featuring rock property heterogeneity in the vertical direction resulted in slightly better oil recovery, but with earlier CO2 break-through and larger CO2 production, suggesting that rock property heterogeneity is an important property for modeling because it has a big effect on the simulation results. Long hydraulic fractures shortened CO2 break-through time greatly and increased CO 2 production. Water-alternating-gas injection schemes and injection-alternating-shut-in schemes can provide more options for gas injection EOR projects, especially for gas production management. Compared to CO2 injection, separator gas injection yielded slightly better oil recovery, meaning separator gas could be a good candidate for gas injection EOR; lean gas generated the worst results. Reservoir

  2. Hydrocarbons in sediments adjacent to a gas and condensate development and production platform in northwestern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, S.J.; Alexander, R.; Kagi, R.I.

    1994-01-01

    In northwestern Australia during the period of 1983 to 1991, 23 wells were drilled from a gas/condensate production platform to the producing formation approximately 3000 m below the sea bed. Low toxicity water-based drilling muds formulated with hydrogenated kerosenes were used, with the resultant formation cuttings being legally discharged into the ocean. To study the fate of hydrocarbons associated with the cuttings, sea-floor samples were collected along two perpendicular transects from the platform. The first extended 10 km in the prevailing direction of the current and the other to 1.2 km. Subsequently, samples have been collected from one of these sites on two occasions, first one year and secondly two years after the initial collection. Samples collected from directly under the platform cuttings chute contained the highest hydrocarbon concentrations, determined gravimetrically, of 75000 mg/kg, decreasing to approximately 40 mg/kg within 800 m in the direction of the prevailing current. Concentrations in the more remote samples were determined by GC and decreased gradually to be barely discernible above background at less than 0.01 mg/kg at 10 km from the platform. This suite of samples provided an excellent opportunity to study the progress of hydrocarbon biodegradation as it occurs in the marine environment. Analysis by GC-FID, GC-MS and GC-FTIR revealed a number of features. For example, the extent of biodegradation and weathering with increasing distance from the platform, and the half life for biodegradation of total hydrocarbons appears to be approximately one year. The hydrocarbon components of the sediments are mainly from the drilling mud with minor contributions from the formation fluids

  3. A fast complex domain-matching pursuit algorithm and its application to deep-water gas reservoir detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jing; Huang, Handong; Li, Huijie; Miao, Yuxin; Wen, Junxiang; Zhou, Fei

    2017-12-01

    The main emphasis of exploration and development is shifting from simple structural reservoirs to complex reservoirs, which all have the characteristics of complex structure, thin reservoir thickness and large buried depth. Faced with these complex geological features, hydrocarbon detection technology is a direct indication of changes in hydrocarbon reservoirs and a good approach for delimiting the distribution of underground reservoirs. It is common to utilize the time-frequency (TF) features of seismic data in detecting hydrocarbon reservoirs. Therefore, we research the complex domain-matching pursuit (CDMP) method and propose some improvements. First is the introduction of a scale parameter, which corrects the defect that atomic waveforms only change with the frequency parameter. Its introduction not only decomposes seismic signal with high accuracy and high efficiency but also reduces iterations. We also integrate jumping search with ergodic search to improve computational efficiency while maintaining the reasonable accuracy. Then we combine the improved CDMP with the Wigner-Ville distribution to obtain a high-resolution TF spectrum. A one-dimensional modeling experiment has proved the validity of our method. Basing on the low-frequency domain reflection coefficient in fluid-saturated porous media, we finally get an approximation formula for the mobility attributes of reservoir fluid. This approximation formula is used as a hydrocarbon identification factor to predict deep-water gas-bearing sand of the M oil field in the South China Sea. The results are consistent with the actual well test results and our method can help inform the future exploration of deep-water gas reservoirs.

  4. GASCON and MHDGAS: FORTRAN IV computer codes for calculating gas and condensed-phase compositions in the coal-fired open-cycle MHD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackburn, P E

    1977-12-01

    Fortran IV computer codes have been written to calculate the equilibrium partial pressures of the gaseous phase and the quantity and composition of the condensed phases in the open-cycle MHD system. The codes are based on temperature-dependent equilibrium constants, mass conservation, the mass action law, and assumed ideal solution of compounds in each of two condensed phases. It is assumed that the phases are an oxide-silicate phase and a sulfate-carbonate-hydroxide phase. Calculations are iterated for gas and condensate concentrations while increasing or decreasing the total moles of elements, but keeping mole ratios constant, to achieve the desired total pressure. During iteration the oxygen partial pressure is incrementally changed. The decision to increase or decrease the oxygen pressure in this process depends on comparison of the oxygen content calculated in the gas and condensate phases with the initial amount of oxygen in the ash, coal, seed, and air. This process, together with a normalization step, allows the elements to converge to their initial quantities. Two versions of the computer code have been written. GASCON calculates the equilibrium gas partial pressures and the quantity and composition of the condensed phases in steps of thirteen temperature and pressure combinations in which the condensate is removed after each step, simulating continuous slag removal from the MHD system. MHDGAS retains the condensate for each step, simulating flow of condensate (and gas) through the MHD system.

  5. Temperature Programmed Desorption of Quench-condensed Krypton and Acetone in Air; Selective Concentration of Ultra-trace Gas Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Taku T; Sakaguchi, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Selective concentration of ultra-trace components in air-like gases has an important application in analyzing volatile organic compounds in the gas. In the present study, we examined quench-condensation of the sample gas on a ZnO substrate below 50 K followed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) (low temperature TPD) as a selective gas concentration technique. We studied two specific gases in the normal air; krypton as an inert gas and acetone as a reactive gas. We evaluated the relationship between the operating condition of low temperature TPD and the lowest detection limit. In the case of krypton, we observed the selective concentration by exposing at 6 K followed by thermal desorption at about 60 K. On the other hand, no selectivity appeared for acetone although trace acetone was successfully concentrated. This is likely due to the solvent effect by a major component in the air, which is suggested to be water. We suggest that pre-condensation to remove the water component may improve the selectivity in the trace acetone analysis by low temperature TPD.

  6. Bose-Einstein condensation of a charged relativistic ideal gas in a general homogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toms, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    It is shown how the effective action formalism and ζ-function regularization can be used to study Bose-Einstein condensation for a relativistic charged scalar field in a general homogeneous magnetic field in a spacetime of arbitrary dimension. In the special case where the magnetic field has only one component, Bose-Einstein condensation occurs at high temperature only for D≥5 where D is the spatial dimension. When Bose-Einstein condensation does occur the ground-state expectation value of the scalar field is not constant and we determine its value. If the magnetic field has p independent nonzero components we show that the condition for Bose-Einstein condensation is D≥3+2p. In particular, Bose-Einstein condensation can never occur if the magnetic field has all of its independent components nonzero. The problem of Bose-Einstein condensation in a cylindrical box in D spatial dimensions with a uniform magnetic field directed along the axis of the cylinder is also discussed

  7. Study of gas production from shale reservoirs with multi-stage hydraulic fracturing horizontal well considering multiple transport mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Mingzhen; Liu, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Development of unconventional shale gas reservoirs (SGRs) has been boosted by the advancements in two key technologies: horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing. A large number of multi-stage fractured horizontal wells (MsFHW) have been drilled to enhance reservoir production performance. Gas flow in SGRs is a multi-mechanism process, including: desorption, diffusion, and non-Darcy flow. The productivity of the SGRs with MsFHW is influenced by both reservoir conditions and hydraulic fracture properties. However, rare simulation work has been conducted for multi-stage hydraulic fractured SGRs. Most of them use well testing methods, which have too many unrealistic simplifications and assumptions. Also, no systematical work has been conducted considering all reasonable transport mechanisms. And there are very few works on sensitivity studies of uncertain parameters using real parameter ranges. Hence, a detailed and systematic study of reservoir simulation with MsFHW is still necessary. In this paper, a dual porosity model was constructed to estimate the effect of parameters on shale gas production with MsFHW. The simulation model was verified with the available field data from the Barnett Shale. The following mechanisms have been considered in this model: viscous flow, slip flow, Knudsen diffusion, and gas desorption. Langmuir isotherm was used to simulate the gas desorption process. Sensitivity analysis on SGRs’ production performance with MsFHW has been conducted. Parameters influencing shale gas production were classified into two categories: reservoir parameters including matrix permeability, matrix porosity; and hydraulic fracture parameters including hydraulic fracture spacing, and fracture half-length. Typical ranges of matrix parameters have been reviewed. Sensitivity analysis have been conducted to analyze the effect of the above factors on the production performance of SGRs. Through comparison, it can be found that hydraulic fracture

  8. Multiple Nebular Gas Reservoirs Recorded by Oxygen Isotope Variation in a Spinel-rich CAI in CO3 MIL 090019

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J. I.; Simon, S. B.; Nguyen, A. N.; Ross, D. K.; Messenger, S.

    2017-01-01

    We conducted NanoSIMS O-isotopic imaging of a primitive spinel-rich CAI spherule (27-2) from the MIL 090019 CO3 chondrite. Inclusions such as 27-2 are proposed to record inner nebula processes during an epoch of rapid solar nebula evolution. Mineralogical and textural analyses suggest that this CAI formed by high temperature reactions, partial melting, and condensation. This CAI exhibits radial O-isotopic heterogeneity among multiple occurrences of the same mineral, reflecting interactions with distinct nebular O-isotopic reservoirs.

  9. Design philosophy and practice of asymmetrical 3D fracturing and random fracturing: A case study of tight sand gas reservoirs in western Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianchun Guo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available At present two technical models are commonly taken in tight gas reservoir stimulation: conventional massive fracturing and SRV fracturing, but how to select a suitable fracturing model suitable for reservoir characteristics is still a question waiting to be answered. In this paper, based on the analysis of geological characteristics and seepage mechanism of tight gas and shale gas reservoirs, the differences between stimulation philosophy of tight gas reservoirs and shale reservoirs are elucidated, and the concept that a suitable stimulation model should be selected based on reservoir geological characteristics and seepage mechanism aiming at maximally improving the seepage capability of a reservoir. Based on this concept, two fracturing design methods were proposed for two tight gas reservoirs in western Sichuan Basin: asymmetrical 3D fracturing design (A3DF for the middle-shallow Upper Jurassic Penglaizhen Fm stacked reservoirs in which the hydraulic fractures can well match the sand spatial distribution and seepage capability of the reservoirs; SRV fracturing design which can increase fracture randomness in the sandstone and shale laminated reservoirs for the 5th Member of middle-deep Upper Triassic Xujiahe Fm. Compared with that by conventional fracturing, the average production of horizontal wells fractured by A3DF increased by 41%, indicating that A3DF is appropriate for gas reservoir development in the Penglaizhen Fm; meanwhile, the average production per well of the 5th Member of the Xujiahe Fm was 2.25 × 104 m3/d after SRV fracturing, showing that the SRV fracturing is a robust technical means for the development of this reservoir.

  10. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Reservoir Water Surfaces: A New Global Synthesis - journal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collectively, reservoirs are an important anthropogenic source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) to the atmosphere. Attempts to model reservoir GHG fluxes, however, have been limited by inconsistencies in methodological approaches and data availability. An increase in the number of pu...

  11. FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    1999-06-11

    different from that of gas displacement processes. The work is of experimental nature and clarifies several misconceptions in the literature. Based on experimental results, it is established that the main reason for high efficiency of solution gas drive from heavy oil reservoirs is due to low gas mobility. Chapter III presents the concept of the alteration of porous media wettability from liquid-wetting to intermediate gas-wetting. The idea is novel and has not been introduced in the petroleum literature before. There are significant implications from such as proposal. The most direct application of intermediate gas wetting is wettability alteration around the wellbore. Such an alteration can significantly improve well deliverability in gas condensate reservoirs where gas well deliverability decreases below dewpoint pressure. Part I of Chapter III studies the effect of gravity, viscous forces, interfacial tension, and wettability on the critical condensate saturation and relative permeability of gas condensate systems. A simple phenomenological network model is used for this study, The theoretical results reveal that wettability significantly affects both the critical gas saturation and gas relative permeability. Gas relative permeability may increase ten times as contact angle is altered from 0{sup o} (strongly liquid wet) to 85{sup o} (intermediate gas-wetting). The results from the theoretical study motivated the experimental investigation described in Part II. In Part II we demonstrate that the wettability of porous media can be altered from liquid-wetting to gas-wetting. This part describes our attempt to find appropriate chemicals for wettability alteration of various substrates including rock matrix. Chapter IV provides a comprehensive treatment of molecular, pressure, and thermal diffusion and convection in porous media Basic theoretical analysis is presented using irreversible thermodynamics.

  12. Gas-water-rock interactions induced by reservoir exploitation, CO2 sequestration, and other geological storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecourtier, J.

    2005-01-01

    Here is given a summary of the opening address of the IFP International Workshop: 'gas-water-rock interactions induced by reservoir exploitation, CO 2 sequestration, and other geological storage' (18-20 November 2003). 'This broad topic is of major interest to the exploitation of geological sites since gas-water-mineral interactions determine the physicochemical characteristics of these sites, the strategies to adopt to protect the environment, and finally, the operational costs. Modelling the phenomena is a prerequisite for the engineering of a geological storage, either for disposal efficiency or for risk assessment and environmental protection. During the various sessions, several papers focus on the great achievements that have been made in the last ten years in understanding and modelling the coupled reaction and transport processes occurring in geological systems, from borehole to reservoir scale. Remaining challenges such as the coupling of mechanical processes of deformation with chemical reactions, or the influence of microbiological environments on mineral reactions will also be discussed. A large part of the conference programme will address the problem of mitigating CO 2 emissions, one of the most important issues that our society must solve in the coming years. From both a technical and an economic point of view, CO 2 geological sequestration is the most realistic solution proposed by the experts today. The results of ongoing pilot operations conducted in Europe and in the United States are strongly encouraging, but geological storage will be developed on a large scale in the future only if it becomes possible to predict the long term behaviour of stored CO 2 underground. In order to reach this objective, numerous issues must be solved: - thermodynamics of CO 2 in brines; - mechanisms of CO 2 trapping inside the host rock; - geochemical modelling of CO 2 behaviour in various types of geological formations; - compatibility of CO 2 with oil-well cements

  13. Mutual Solubility of MEG, Water and Reservoir Fluid: Experimental Measurements and Modeling using the CPA Equation of State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2011-01-01

    This work presents new experimental phase equilibrium data of binary MEG-reservoir fluid and ternary MEG-water-reservoir fluid systems at temperatures 275-326 K and at atmospheric pressure. The reservoir fluid consists of a natural gas condensate from a Statoil operated gas field in the North Sea...... compounds. It has also been extended to reservoir fluids in presence of water and polar chemicals using a Pedersen like characterization method with modified correlations for critical temperature, pressure and acentric factor. In this work CPA is applied to the prediction of mutual solubility of reservoir...

  14. A thermodynamics model for morphology prediction of aluminum nano crystals fabricated by the inert gas condensation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yu; Xia, Dehong

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide scientific guidance for the morphological control of nanoparticle synthesis using the gas phase method. A universal thermodynamics model is developed to predict the morphology of nanoparticles fabricated using the inert gas condensation method. By using this model, the morphologies of aluminum nanocrystals are predicted under various preparation conditions. There are two types of energy that jointly determine the formation of nanoparticle morphology—Gibbs free energy for nanoparticles and energy variation during the process. The results show that energy variation dominates morphology formation when the cooling rate is less than 2 × 1011 K s-1 in the aluminum nanocrystal production process. At the beginning of the nanoparticle growth, the most stable morphology is predicted to be spherical, but the energetically preferred morphology becomes cubic as the particle grows. The turning point in the particle size at which spherical morphology is no longer the most stable morphology is exhibited as a function of pressure in a condensation chamber for different cooling rates. In this paper, we focus on the need for morphology prediction based on preparation conditions. It is concluded that nanoparticles with various morphologies could be obtained by adjusting the cooling rate and pressure in the condensation chamber.

  15. Key technologies for well drilling and completion in ultra-deep sour gas reservoirs, Yuanba Gasfield, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxiang Xia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Yuanba Gasfield is a large gas field discovered by Sinopec in the Sichuan Basin in recent years, and another main exploration area for natural gas reserves and production increase after the Puguang Gasfield. The ultra-deep sour gas reservoir in the Yuanba Gasfield is characterized by complicated geologic structure, deep reservoirs and complex drilled formation, especially in the continental deep strata which are highly abrasive with low ROP (rate of penetration and long drilling period. After many years of drilling practice and technical research, the following six key drilling and completion technologies for this type reservoir are established by introducing new tools and technologies, developing specialized drill bits and optimizing drilling design. They are: casing program optimization technology for ROP increasing and safe well completion; gas drilling technology for shallow continental strata and high-efficiency drilling technology for deep high-abrasion continental strata; drilling fluid support technologies of gas–liquid conversion, ultra-deep highly-deviated wells and horizontal-well lubrication and drag reduction, hole stability control and sour gas contamination prevention; well cementing technologies for gas medium, deep-well long cementing intervals and ultra-high pressure small space; horizontal-well trajectory control technologies for measuring instrument, downhole motor optimization and bottom hole assembly design; and liner completion modes and completion string optimization technologies suitable for this gas reservoir. Field application shows that these key technologies are contributive to ROP increase and efficiency improvement of 7000 m deep horizontal wells and to significant operational cycle shortening.

  16. Influence of environmental variables on diffusive greenhouse gas fluxes at hydroelectric reservoirs in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogério, J P; Santos, M A; Santos, E O

    2013-11-01

    For almost two decades, studies have been under way in Brazil, showing how hydroelectric reservoirs produce biogenic gases, mainly methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2), through the organic decomposition of flooded biomass. This somewhat complex phenomenon is due to a set of variables with differing levels of interdependence that directly or indirectly affect greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The purpose of this paper is to determine, through a statistical data analysis, the relation between CO2, CH4 diffusive fluxes and environmental variables at the Furnas, Itumbiara and Serra da Mesa hydroelectric reservoirs, located in the Cerrado biome on Brazil's high central plateau. The choice of this region was prompted by its importance in the national context, covering an area of some two million square kilometers, encompassing two major river basins (Paraná and Tocantins-Araguaia), with the largest installed power generation capacity in Brazil, together accounting for around 23% of Brazilian territory. This study shows that CH4 presented a moderate negative correlation between CO2 and depth. Additionally, a moderate positive correlation was noted for pH, water temperature and wind. The CO2 presented a moderate negative correlation for pH, wind speed, water temperature and air temperature. Additionally, a moderate positive correlation was noted for CO2 and water temperature. The complexity of the emission phenomenon is unlikely to occur through a simultaneous understanding of all the factors, due to difficulties in accessing and analyzing all the variables that have real, direct effects on GHG production and emission.

  17. Influence of environmental variables on diffusive greenhouse gas fluxes at hydroelectric reservoirs in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JP. Rogério

    Full Text Available For almost two decades, studies have been under way in Brazil, showing how hydroelectric reservoirs produce biogenic gases, mainly methane (CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2, through the organic decomposition of flooded biomass. This somewhat complex phenomenon is due to a set of variables with differing levels of interdependence that directly or indirectly affect greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. The purpose of this paper is to determine, through a statistical data analysis, the relation between CO2, CH4 diffusive fluxes and environmental variables at the Furnas, Itumbiara and Serra da Mesa hydroelectric reservoirs, located in the Cerrado biome on Brazil's high central plateau. The choice of this region was prompted by its importance in the national context, covering an area of some two million square kilometers, encompassing two major river basins (Paraná and Tocantins-Araguaia, with the largest installed power generation capacity in Brazil, together accounting for around 23% of Brazilian territory. This study shows that CH4 presented a moderate negative correlation between CO2 and depth. Additionally, a moderate positive correlation was noted for pH, water temperature and wind. The CO2 presented a moderate negative correlation for pH, wind speed, water temperature and air temperature. Additionally, a moderate positive correlation was noted for CO2 and water temperature. The complexity of the emission phenomenon is unlikely to occur through a simultaneous understanding of all the factors, due to difficulties in accessing and analyzing all the variables that have real, direct effects on GHG production and emission.

  18. Water-saturated systems of the largest gas and gas-condensate deposits of the USSR. Vodonapornye sistemy krupneishikh gazovykh i gazokondensatnykh mestorozhdenii sssr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortsenshtein, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of water-pressure systems in a number of the largest gas and gas-condensate fields of the Soviet Union, whose industrial reserves exceed 500 billion cubic meters. These include fields located in the concluding stage of development with sharply reduced recovery (Shebelinsk), fields that have just begun to operate and are characterized by increasing production (Vuktyl, Medved, Orenburg, Shatlyk, Urengoisk), and fields that are not yet developed (Yamburg and Zapolyar). Problems in the theory and practice of studying water-pressure systems of the largest gas and gas-condensate fields are analyzed primarily in connection with conditions required for their rational development which would provide for a maximum extraction of hydrocarbons from the interior. Importance is also given to the hydrogeological aspects of the formation of large hydrocarbon deposits and their distribution in the earth's crust. The most reliable factual materials on hydrogeology are utilized. The book is designed for personnel in the gas and oil industries, hydrogeologists, and scientists interested in problems of the formation, survey, and development of the largest hydrocarbon deposits. 92 references, 65 figures, 71 tables.

  19. Water recovery and air humidification by condensing the moisture in the outlet gas of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Z.M.; Wan, J.H.; Liu, J.; Tu, Z.K.; Pan, M.; Liu, Z.C.; Liu, W.

    2012-01-01

    Humidification is one of the most important factors for the operation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). To maintain the membrane at hydrated state, plenty of water is needed for the state-of-the-art of PEMFC technology, especially in large power applications or long time operation. A condenser is introduced to separate liquid water from the air outlet for air self-sufficient in water of the stack in this study. The condensed temperature at the outlet of the condenser and water recovered amount for air self-sufficient in water are investigated theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that the condensed temperature for air self-sufficient in water is irrelevant with the working current of the stack. When the condenser outlet temperature was above the theoretical line, recovery water was not sufficient for the air humidification. On the contrary, it is sufficient while the temperature was below the theoretical line. It is also shown that when the moisture is sufficiently cooled, large amount water can be separated from the outlet gas, and it increased almost linearly with the time. With the introduction of the condenser, the recovered amount of water can easily satisfy the air self-sufficient in water by condensing the outlet gas to a proper temperature. - Highlights: ► We introduce a condenser to separate liquid water from the air outlet in the stack. ► The mechanism of air self-sufficient in water by condensing gas is presented. ► The condensed temperature and water recovered amount are investigated. ► An experiment is present to validate simplicity and feasibility of the criterion. ► The criterion for air humidification is used for choosing the condenser.

  20. Oils; gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, D T

    1922-09-18

    Oils and gas are obtained from shale or oil-bearing sand by immersing the shale in and passing it through a bath of liquid oil, cracking the oil-soaked shale, and condensing the vapor and using the condensate to replenish the bath, preferably by passing the gases and vapors direct into the oil-bath container. Shale is fed continuously from a hopper to a bath of oil in an inclined chamber, is carried to the outlet by a conveyer, and through cracking tubes to an outlet pipe by conveyers. The gases and vapors escape by the pipe, a part condensing in the chamber and a run-back pipe and replenishing the bath, and the remainder passing through a condensing tower and condenser connected to reservoirs; the gas is further passed through a scrubber and a pipe to the burner of the retort. The oil condensed in the chamber overflows to the reservoir through a pipe provided with an open pipe to prevent siphoning. The conveyers and a valve on the pipe are operated by gearing. The operation may be conducted at reduced, normal, or increased pressure, e.g., 70 lbs. The temperature of the retort should be about 900 to 1400/sup 0/F, that of the inside of the tubes about 550 to 700/sup 0/F, and that of the chamber about 300/sup 0/F. The chamber and pipe may be insulated or artificially cooled.

  1. Laboratory Scoping Tests Of Decontamination Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, Charles L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, William R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-21

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also

  2. Noble gas composition of subcontinental lithospheric mantle: An extensively degassed reservoir beneath Southern Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalowitzki, Tiago; Sumino, Hirochika; Conceição, Rommulo V.; Orihashi, Yuji; Nagao, Keisuke; Bertotto, Gustavo W.; Balbinot, Eduardo; Schilling, Manuel E.; Gervasoni, Fernanda

    2016-09-01

    Patagonia, in the Southern Andes, is one of the few locations where interactions between the oceanic and continental lithosphere can be studied due to subduction of an active spreading ridge beneath the continent. In order to characterize the noble gas composition of Patagonian subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM), we present the first noble gas data alongside new lithophile (Sr-Nd-Pb) isotopic data for mantle xenoliths from Pali-Aike Volcanic Field and Gobernador Gregores, Southern Patagonia. Based on noble gas isotopic compositions, Pali-Aike mantle xenoliths represent intrinsic SCLM with higher (U + Th + K)/(3He, 22Ne, 36Ar) ratios than the mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) source. This reservoir shows slightly radiogenic helium (3He/4He = 6.84-6.90 RA), coupled with a strongly nucleogenic neon signature (mantle source 21Ne/22Ne = 0.085-0.094). The 40Ar/36Ar ratios vary from a near-atmospheric ratio of 510 up to 17700, with mantle source 40Ar/36Ar between 31100-6800+9400 and 54000-9600+14200. In addition, the 3He/22Ne ratios for the local SCLM endmember, at 12.03 ± 0.15 to 13.66 ± 0.37, are higher than depleted MORBs, at 3He/22Ne = 8.31-9.75. Although asthenospheric mantle upwelling through the Patagonian slab window would result in a MORB-like metasomatism after collision of the South Chile Ridge with the Chile trench ca. 14 Ma, this mantle reservoir could have remained unhomogenized after rapid passage and northward migration of the Chile Triple Junction. The mantle endmember xenon isotopic ratios of Pali-Aike mantle xenoliths, which is first defined for any SCLM-derived samples, show values indistinguishable from the MORB source (129Xe/132Xe =1.0833-0.0053+0.0216 and 136Xe/132Xe =0.3761-0.0034+0.0246). The noble gas component observed in Gobernador Gregores mantle xenoliths is characterized by isotopic compositions in the MORB range in terms of helium (3He/4He = 7.17-7.37 RA), but with slightly nucleogenic neon (mantle source 21Ne/22Ne = 0.065-0.079). We

  3. Continuous condensation in nanogrooves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2018-05-01

    We consider condensation in a capillary groove of width L and depth D , formed by walls that are completely wet (contact angle θ =0 ), which is in a contact with a gas reservoir of the chemical potential μ . On a mesoscopic level, the condensation process can be described in terms of the midpoint height ℓ of a meniscus formed at the liquid-gas interface. For macroscopically deep grooves (D →∞ ), and in the presence of long-range (dispersion) forces, the condensation corresponds to a second-order phase transition, such that ℓ ˜(μcc-μ ) -1 /4 as μ →μcc - where μc c is the chemical potential pertinent to capillary condensation in a slit pore of width L . For finite values of D , the transition becomes rounded and the groove becomes filled with liquid at a chemical potential higher than μc c with a difference of the order of D-3. For sufficiently deep grooves, the meniscus growth initially follows the power law ℓ ˜(μcc-μ ) -1 /4 , but this behavior eventually crosses over to ℓ ˜D -(μ-μc c) -1 /3 above μc c, with a gap between the two regimes shown to be δ ¯μ ˜D-3 . Right at μ =μc c , when the groove is only partially filled with liquid, the height of the meniscus scales as ℓ*˜(D3L) 1 /4 . Moreover, the chemical potential (or pressure) at which the groove is half-filled with liquid exhibits a nonmonotonic dependence on D with a maximum at D ≈3 L /2 and coincides with μc c when L ≈D . Finally, we show that condensation in finite grooves can be mapped on the condensation in capillary slits formed by two asymmetric (competing) walls a distance D apart with potential strengths depending on L . All these predictions, based on mesoscopic arguments, are confirmed by fully microscopic Rosenfeld's density functional theory with a reasonable agreement down to surprisingly small values of both L and D .

  4. Disrupting the balance of natural fluid systems during the working of gas condensate deposits. Narushenie ravnovesiya prirodnykh flyuidal'nykh sistem pri razrabotke gazovykh i gazokondensatnykh mestorozhdenii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortsenshtein, V.N.

    1980-01-01

    Natural processes that occur in the ground as a result of almost complete or partial depletion of large gas and gas-condensate deposits are analyzed. Problems concerned with the disruption of the fluid systems equilibrium are examined as represented by interstitial water and industrial gaseous and gas-condensate accumulations. Observations over a period of 20-25 years were made of the depleted deposits of North-Stavropol', Gazlin, and Shebel, whose initial hydrogeological background that serves as the basis of the reference system, has been studied in detail. Information is also presented on recently exploited water-vapor systems, such as the large Vuktyl', Orenburg, Medvezh', and Shatlyk deposits. The book is intended for a broad spectrum of geologists, hydrogeologists, and engineers interested in geology and the working of gas and gas condensate deposits. 36 references, 27 figures, 35 tables.

  5. 3D Reservoir Modeling of Semutang Gas Field: A lonely Gas field in Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt, with Integrated Well Log, 2D Seismic Reflectivity and Attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehin, Z.; Woobaidullah, A. S. M.; Snigdha, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Bengal Basin with its prolific gas rich province provides needed energy to Bangladesh. Present energy situation demands more Hydrocarbon explorations. Only 'Semutang' is discovered in the high amplitude structures, where rest of are in the gentle to moderate structures of western part of Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt. But it has some major thrust faults which have strongly breached the reservoir zone. The major objectives of this research are interpretation of gas horizons and faults, then to perform velocity model, structural and property modeling to obtain reservoir properties. It is needed to properly identify the faults and reservoir heterogeneities. 3D modeling is widely used to reveal the subsurface structure in faulted zone where planning and development drilling is major challenge. Thirteen 2D seismic and six well logs have been used to identify six gas bearing horizons and a network of faults and to map the structure at reservoir level. Variance attributes were used to identify faults. Velocity model is performed for domain conversion. Synthetics were prepared from two wells where sonic and density logs are available. Well to seismic tie at reservoir zone shows good match with Direct Hydrocarbon Indicator on seismic section. Vsh, porosity, water saturation and permeability have been calculated and various cross plots among porosity logs have been shown. Structural modeling is used to make zone and layering accordance with minimum sand thickness. Fault model shows the possible fault network, those liable for several dry wells. Facies model have been constrained with Sequential Indicator Simulation method to show the facies distribution along the depth surfaces. Petrophysical models have been prepared with Sequential Gaussian Simulation to estimate petrophysical parameters away from the existing wells to other parts of the field and to observe heterogeneities in reservoir. Average porosity map for each gas zone were constructed. The outcomes of the research

  6. Gas transport and separation with ceramic membranes. Part I: Multilayer diffusion and capillary condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uhlhorn, R.J.R.; Uhlhorn, R.J.R.; Keizer, Klaas; Burggraaf, Anthonie; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    Multilayer diffusion and capillary condensation of propylene on supported γ-alumina films greatly improved the permeability and selectivity. Multilayer diffusion, occurring at relative pressures of 0.4 to 0.8 strongly increased the permeability of 6 times the Knudsen permeability, yielding

  7. Conversion of straight-run gas-condensate benzenes into high- octane gasolines based on modified ZSM-5 zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erofeev, V; Reschetilowski, V; Khomajakov, I; Egorova, L; Volgina, T; Tatarkina, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the conversion of straight-run benzene of gas condensate into high-octane gasoline based on zeolite catalyst ZSM-5, modified in binary system oxide- based Sn (III) and Bi (III). It was defined that the introduction of the binary system oxide-based Sn(III) and Bi (III) into the basic zeolite results in the 2-fold increase of its catalytic activity.High-octane gasoline converted from straight-run benzene is characterized by a low benzol content in comparison to the high-octane benzenes produced during the catalytic reforming

  8. Investigation into the determination of trimethylarsine in natural gas and its partitioning into gas and condensate phases using (cryotrapping)/gas chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and liquid/solid sorption techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupp, E.M.; Johnson, C.; Rechsteiner, C.; Moir, M.; Leong, D.; Feldmann, J.

    2007-01-01

    Speciation of trialkylated arsenic compunds in natural gas, pressurized and stable condensate samples from the same gas well was performed using (Cryotrapping) Gas Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. The major species in all phases investigated was found to be trimethylarsine with a highest concentration of 17.8 ng/L (As) in the gas phase and 33.2 μg/L (As) in the stable condensate phase. The highest amount of trimethylarsine (121 μg/L (As)) was found in the pressurized condensate, along with trace amounts of non-identified higher alkylated arsines. Volatile arsenic species in natural gas and its related products cause concern with regards to environment, safety, occupational health and gas processing. Therefore, interest lies in a fast and simple field method for the determination of volatile arsenicals. Here, we use simple liquid and solid sorption techniques, namely absorption in silver nitrate solution and adsorption on silver nitrate impregnated silica gel tubes followed by total arsenic determination as a promising tool for field monitoring of volatile arsenicals in natural gas and gas condensates. Preliminary results obtained for the sorption-based methods show that around 70% of the arsenic is determined with these methods in comparison to volatile arsenic determination using GC-ICP-MS. Furthermore, an inter-laboratory- and inter-method comparison was performed using silver nitrate impregnated silica tubes on 14 different gas samples with concentrations varying from below 1 to 1000 μg As/m 3 natural gas. The results obtained from the two laboratories differ in a range of 10 to 60%, but agree within the order of magnitude, which is satisfactory for our purposes

  9. Simulation of a multistage fractured horizontal well in a water-bearing tight fractured gas reservoir under non-Darcy flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-Han; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Wang, Rui-He; Zhao, Yu-Long; Huang, Rui

    2018-06-01

    Reservoir development for unconventional resources such as tight gas reservoirs is in increasing demand due to the rapid decline of production in conventional reserves. Compared with conventional reservoirs, fluid flow in water-bearing tight gas reservoirs is subject to more nonlinear multiphase flow and gas slippage in nano/micro matrix pores because of the strong collisions between rock and gas molecules. Economic gas production from tight gas reservoirs depends on extensive application of water-based hydraulic fracturing of horizontal wells, associated with non-Darcy flow at a high flow rate, geomechanical stress sensitivity of un-propped natural fractures, complex flow geometry and multiscale heterogeneity. How to efficiently and accurately predict the production performance of a multistage fractured horizontal well (MFHW) is challenging. In this paper, a novel multicontinuum, multimechanism, two-phase simulator is established based on unstructured meshes and the control volume finite element method to analyze the production performance of MFHWs. The multiple interacting continua model and discrete fracture model are coupled to integrate the unstimulated fractured reservoir, induced fracture networks (stimulated reservoir volumes, SRVs) and irregular discrete hydraulic fractures. Several simulations and sensitivity analyses are performed with the developed simulator for determining the key factors affecting the production performance of MFHWs. Two widely applied fracturing models, classic hydraulic fracturing which generates long double-wing fractures and the volumetric fracturing aimed at creating large SRVs, are compared to identify which of them can make better use of tight gas reserves.

  10. Coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical Modeling of Water Leak-Off Process during Hydraulic Fracturing in Shale Gas Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The water leak-off during hydraulic fracturing in shale gas reservoirs is a complicated transport behavior involving thermal (T, hydrodynamic (H, mechanical (M and chemical (C processes. Although many leak-off models have been published, none of the models fully coupled the transient fluid flow modeling with heat transfer, chemical-potential equilibrium and natural-fracture dilation phenomena. In this paper, a coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC model based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics, hydrodynamics, thermo-poroelastic rock mechanics, and non-isothermal chemical-potential equations is presented to simulate the water leak-off process in shale gas reservoirs. The THMC model takes into account a triple-porosity medium, which includes hydraulic fractures, natural fractures and shale matrix. The leak-off simulation with the THMC model involves all the important processes in this triple-porosity medium, including: (1 water transport driven by hydraulic, capillary, chemical and thermal osmotic convections; (2 gas transport induced by both hydraulic pressure driven convection and adsorption; (3 heat transport driven by thermal convection and conduction; and (4 natural-fracture dilation considered as a thermo-poroelastic rock deformation. The fluid and heat transport, coupled with rock deformation, are described by a set of partial differential equations resulting from the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. The semi-implicit finite-difference algorithm is proposed to solve these equations. The evolution of pressure, temperature, saturation and salinity profiles of hydraulic fractures, natural fractures and matrix is calculated, revealing the multi-field coupled water leak-off process in shale gas reservoirs. The influences of hydraulic pressure, natural-fracture dilation, chemical osmosis and thermal osmosis on water leak-off are investigated. Results from this study are expected to provide a better understanding of the

  11. On the adequacy of wall functions to predict condensation rates from steam-noncondensable gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehbi, A., E-mail: abdel.dehbi@psi.ch

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Work investigates the effect of near-wall mesh resolution on CFD predictions. • Case study: turbulent condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases. • Wall functions largely underpredict condensation rates at boundary layer onset. • When boundary layer is developed, wall functions predictions are reasonable. • Prescribed wall functions must be compatible with prevailing flow regime. - Abstract: As one looks forward to applying CFD based methods to simulate turbulent flows in larger volumes up to containment scales, the mesh resolution, especially near the walls, becomes one of the main issues dictating the feasibility of the simulation. The wall-function approach is a natural choice to minimize the computational size of the problem and make it tractable. In the current investigation, we compare the wall-function to the fully resolved boundary layer approaches for the prediction of vapor condensation rates on cold walls in the presence of noncondensable gases. We simulate three sets of geometric configurations. The first two sets relate to domains which are small (height of 2 m) and medium (height 4.8 m), and for which experimental heat transfer data are available. In the third set, we look at a hypothetical large 2D rectangular domain in which the condenser height is comparable to that of typical NPP containments (20 m). In the developing region of the boundary layer, it is found that the wall function treatment leads to substantial deviations from the wall resolved approach and available experimental data. Further downstream, however, when the boundary layer is fully developed, the discrepancy is greatly reduced. It is therefore concluded that the wall-function formulation is able to provide predictions of condensation rates that are similar to wall-resolved treatments in simple forced flows for which fully developed boundary layers can be assumed over most of the domain. Care must however be exercised to ensure the chosen wall

  12. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Annual report, September 1993--September 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This report is an annual summarization of an ongoing research in the field of modeling and detecting naturally fractured gas reservoirs. The current research is in the Piceance basin of Western Colorado. The aim is to use existing information to determine the most optimal zone or area of fracturing using a unique reaction-transport-mechanical (RTM) numerical basin model. The RTM model will then subsequently help map subsurface lateral and vertical fracture geometries. The base collection techniques include in-situ fracture data, remote sensing, aeromagnetics, 2-D seismic, and regional geologic interpretations. Once identified, high resolution airborne and spaceborne imagery will be used to verify the RTM model by comparing surficial fractures. If this imagery agrees with the model data, then a further investigation using a three-dimensional seismic survey component will be added. This report presents an overview of the Piceance Creek basin and then reviews work in the Parachute and Rulison fields and the results of the RTM models in these fields.

  13. Studies of cluster-assembled materials: From gas phase to condensed phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin

    Clusters, defined as "a number of similar things that occur together" in Webster's dictionary, has different meanings depending on the given subject. To physicists and chemists, the word cluster means "a group of atoms or molecules formed by interactions ranging from very weak van der Waals interactions to strong ionic bonds." Unlike molecules, which are made by nature and are stable under ambient conditions, clusters discovered in a laboratory are often metastable. Molecules have specific stoichiometry, whereas the cluster's composition can usually be altered atom by atom. Thus, clusters can be taken as intrinsically "artificial molecules" with considerably more tunabilities in their properties. Research into the relative stability and instability of clusters has in recent years become a very active research area, especially following the study by Khanna and Castleman that first suggested that by varying size and composition, clusters can expand the periodic table to the 3 rd-dimension; that is, clusters can mimic the chemistry of atoms and may, therefore, be used as the building blocks of new materials. The discovery of Met-Cars has drawn worldwide interests and has been actively investigated by researchers from a variety of fields, including physics, chemistry and material science. However, the unsuccessful search for a solvent capable of isolating Met-Cars has impeded progress in characterizing the material in the condensed state and, hence, limited its potential applications as a novel nanoscale material. An alternative method involving the deposition of mass-gated species and the subsequent structural investigation via Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been employed. With particularly interesting results, soft-landed deposits of zirconium Met-Cars were found to form a face-centered-cubic (FCC) structure with a lattice parameter ˜ 15A. The production of Met-Cars is conducted with the direct laser vaporization (DLV) of metal/graphite composite pellets

  14. Application of Evaporative Cooling for the Condensation of Water Vapors from a Flue Gas Waste Heat Boilers CCP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galashov Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of the study are boilers that burn organic fuel and the recovery boilers (RB of the combined cycle plant (CCP, which are al-so working on the products of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The purpose of research is to find technologies that increase efficiency of the thermal power plant (TPP and technologies that reduce the environmental impact on the environment by burning fossil fuels. The paper deals with the technology of the boilers burning hydrocarbon fuel with condensation of water vapor from the exhaust flue gases. Considered the problems caused by using of this technology. Research shows that the main problem of this technology in the boilers is the lack of reliable methods of calculation of heat exchangers, condensers. Particular attention is paid to the application of this technology in the recovery boilers combined-cycle plants, which are currently gaining increasing use in the generation of electricity from the combustion of gas in power plants. It is shown that the application of technology of condensation of water vapor in RB CCP, the temperature decreases of exhaust gases from 100 to 40 °С, allows increasing the effi-ciency of the RB with 86.2 % to 99.5 %, i.e. at 12.3 %, and increase the ef-ficiency of the CCP at 2.8 %.

  15. Inert-Gas Condensed Co-W Nanoclusters: Formation, Structure and Magnetic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkar-Fard, Farhad Reza

    Rare-earth permanent magnets are used extensively in numerous technical applications, e.g. wind turbines, audio speakers, and hybrid/electric vehicles. The demand and production of rare-earth permanent magnets in the world has in the past decades increased significantly. However, the decrease in export of rare-earth elements from China in recent time has led to a renewed interest in developing rare-earth free permanent magnets. Elements such as Fe and Co have potential, due to their high magnetization, to be used as hosts in rare-earth free permanent magnets but a major challenge is to increase their magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant, K1, which largely drives the coercivity. Theoretical calculations indicate that dissolving the 5d transition metal W in Fe or Co increases the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The challenge, though, is in creating a solid solution in hcp Co or bcc Fe, which under equilibrium conditions have negligible solubility. In this dissertation, the formation, structure, and magnetic properties of sub-10 nm Co-W clusters with W content ranging from 4 to 24 atomic percent were studied. Co-W alloy clusters with extended solubility of W in hcp Co were produced by inert gas condensation. The different processing conditions such as the cooling scheme and sputtering power were found to control the structural state of the as-deposited Co-W clusters. For clusters formed in the water-cooled formation chamber, the mean size and the fraction crystalline clusters increased with increasing power, while the fraction of crystalline clusters formed in the liquid nitrogen-cooled formation chamber was not as affected by the sputtering power. For the low W content clusters, the structural characterization revealed clusters predominantly single crystalline hcp Co(W) structure, a significant extension of W solubility when compared to the equilibrium solubility, but fcc Co(W) and Co3W structures were observed in very small and large clusters, respectively. At high

  16. GPU-Based Computation of Formation Pressure for Multistage Hydraulically Fractured Horizontal Wells in Tight Oil and Gas Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongwang Yin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model for multistage hydraulically fractured horizontal wells (MFHWs in tight oil and gas reservoirs was derived by considering the variations in the permeability and porosity of tight oil and gas reservoirs that depend on formation pressure and mixed fluid properties and introducing the pseudo-pressure; analytical solutions were presented using the Newman superposition principle. The CPU-GPU asynchronous computing model was designed based on the CUDA platform, and the analytic solution was decomposed into infinite summation and integral forms for parallel computation. Implementation of this algorithm on an Intel i5 4590 CPU and NVIDIA GT 730 GPU demonstrates that computation speed increased by almost 80 times, which meets the requirement for real-time calculation of the formation pressure of MFHWs.

  17. Basic design of the test facility for the two-phase critical flow with non-condensable gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Seok Kyu; Kim, Chang Hwe; Chung, Chang Hwan

    2000-12-01

    The two-phase critical flow test with non-condensible gas is for the simulation of the critical flow phenomena which can be occurred during SB-LOCA on SMART reactor. The basic design of the test facility for the actual installation is performed from the basis of the previous conceptual design according to the test requirements. The 1.3m 3 pressure vessel has the circulation pipeline which contains pump(5m 3 /hr), main heater(150KW) and cooler for heating the working fluid to the test temperature within 6 hours. The N2 gas, water supply line are attached to the upper part and test section, flowmeter and various sensors are installed at the lower part of the pressure vessel. The suppression tank is for the storage and cooling of the discharged water. The N2 gas storage tank provides the system pressure to the pressure vessel during the test. The 0.7m 3 N2 gas injection tank supplies the required N2 gas to the entrance of the test section. Since these N2 supply systems require much amount of gas during short period, multistage valve systems and optimal control logics are needed and applied. For the filling of the N2 gas to the N2 storage tank, 5m 3 LN2 tank and related gas converting system were designed. The operating mode of the test facility can be classified to the starting, steady, main test and cooling modes and the proper monitoring and control logics are developed for each operating mode. The operation of the test facility is performed through the PLC and the acquisition of the test data is done with DAS

  18. Theory of a condensed charged-Bose, charged Fermi gas and Ginzburg--Landau studies of superfluid 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Two independent topics in the field of condensed matter physics are examined: the condensed charged-Bose, charged Fermi gas and superfluid 3 He. Green's function (field theoretic) methods are used to derive the low-temperature properties of a dense, neutral gas of condensed charged bosons and degenerate charged fermions. Restriction is made to the case where the fermion mass is much lighter than the boson mass. Linear response and the density-density correlation function are examined and shown to exhibit two collective modes: a plasmon branch and a phonon branch with speed equal to that of ionic sound in solids. Comparison with a possible astrophysical application (white dwarf stars) is made. The behavior near the superfluid transition temperature (Ginzburg--Landau regime) of 3 He is then studied. Gorkov equations are derived and studied in the weak-coupling limit. In this way the form and order of magnitude estimates of coefficients appearing in the Ginzburg--Landau theory are obtained. Weak-coupling particle and spin currents are derived. Various perturbations break the large degeneracy of the states and have experimental implications. The electric contribution to the Ginzburg--Landau free energy is studied for the proposed A and B phases. Imposition of an electric field orients the axial state, but does not give rise to shifts in the NMR resonances. Shifts and discontinuous jumps in the longitudinal and transverse signals are predicted for the Balian--Werthamer state, the details depending on the relative strengths of the fields, as well as the angle between them

  19. Condensation Mechanism of Hydrocarbon Field Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalin, Oleg; Vafina, Nailya

    2017-08-31

    Petroleum geology explains how hydrocarbon fluids are generated, but there is a lack of understanding regarding how oil is expelled from source rocks and migrates to a reservoir. To clarify the process, the multi-layer Urengoy field in Western Siberia was investigated. Based on this example, we have identified an alternative mechanism of hydrocarbon field formation, in which oil and gas accumulations result from the phase separation of an upward hydrocarbon flow. There is evidence that the flow is generated by the gases released by secondary kerogen destruction. This study demonstrates that oil components are carried by the gas flow and that when the flow reaches a low-pressure zone, it condenses into a liquid with real oil properties. The transportation of oil components in the gas flow provides a natural explanation for the unresolved issues of petroleum geology concerning the migration process. The condensation mechanism can be considered as the main process of oil field formation.

  20. Acute ecotoxicology of natural oil and gas condensate to coral reef larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, Andrew P; Brinkman, Diane L; Flores, Florita; Botté, Emmanuelle S; Jones, Ross J; Webster, Nicole S

    2016-02-19

    Risks posed by oil spills to coral reefs are difficult to evaluate, partially due to the absence of studies that adequately assess toxicity to relevant coral reef species. Here we experimentally tested the acute toxicity of condensate, representing a fraction of light crude oil, to coral (Acropora tenuis) and sponge (Rhopaloeides odorabile) larvae. The metamorphosis of coral larvae was inhibited at total petroleum aromatic hydrocarbon (TPAH) concentrations of water accommodated fractions (WAF) as low as 103 μg l(-1), similar to concentrations detected in seawater following large spills. The sensitivity of coral larvae increased by 40% when co-exposed to UV light that they might encounter in shallow reefal systems. Condensate WAF was more toxic to coral larvae than predicted by summing the toxicity of its main components (benzene, toluene, p-xylene and napthalene). In contrast, the sensitivity of sponge larvae to condensate WAF (>10,000 μg l(-1) TPAH) was far less than coral in the presence and absence of UV, but similar to that of other marine invertebrates. While these results highlight the relative sensitivity of coral larvae to oil, further research is needed to better understand and predict the impacts and risks posed by hydrocarbons to tropical reef systems.

  1. Off-diagonal long-range order, cycle probabilities, and condensate fraction in the ideal Bose gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallier, Maguelonne; Krauth, Werner

    2007-11-01

    We discuss the relationship between the cycle probabilities in the path-integral representation of the ideal Bose gas, off-diagonal long-range order, and Bose-Einstein condensation. Starting from the Landsberg recursion relation for the canonic partition function, we use elementary considerations to show that in a box of size L3 the sum of the cycle probabilities of length k>L2 equals the off-diagonal long-range order parameter in the thermodynamic limit. For arbitrary systems of ideal bosons, the integer derivative of the cycle probabilities is related to the probability of condensing k bosons. We use this relation to derive the precise form of the pik in the thermodynamic limit. We also determine the function pik for arbitrary systems. Furthermore, we use the cycle probabilities to compute the probability distribution of the maximum-length cycles both at T=0, where the ideal Bose gas reduces to the study of random permutations, and at finite temperature. We close with comments on the cycle probabilities in interacting Bose gases.

  2. ν-Dimensional ideal quantum q-gas: Bose-Einstein condensation and λ-point transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R-Monteiro, M.; Roditi, I.; Rodrigues, L.M.C.S.

    1994-01-01

    The authors consider an ideal quantum q-gas in ν spatial dimensions and energy spectrum ω i αp α . Departing from the Hamiltonian H = ω[N], the authors study the effect of the deformation on thermodynamic functions and equation of state of that system. The virial expansion is obtained for the high temperature (or low density) regime. The critical temperature is higher than in non-deformed ideal gases. They show that Bose-Einstein condensation always exists (unless when ν/α = 1) for finite q but not for q = ∞. Employing numerical calculations and selecting for ν/α the values 3/2, 2 and 3, the authors show the critical temperature as a function of q, the specific heat C V and the chemical potential μ as functions of T/T c q for q = 1.05 and q= 4.5. C V exhibits a λ-point discontinuity in all cases, instead of the cusp singularity found in the usual ideal gas. The results indicate that physical systems which have quantum symmetries can exhibit Bose-Einstein condensation phenomenon, the critical temperature being favored by the deformation parameter

  3. Bench scale experiments for the remediation of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant low activity waste melter off-gas condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Poirier, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-11

    The Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The plan for disposition of this stream during baseline operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. The primary reason to recycle this stream is so that the semi-volatile 99Tc isotope eventually becomes incorporated into the glass. This stream also contains non-radioactive salt components that are problematic in the melter, so diversion of this stream to another process would eliminate recycling of these salts and would enable simplified operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. This diversion from recycling this stream within WTP would have the effect of decreasing the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. The concept being tested here involves removing the 99Tc so that the decontaminated aqueous stream, with the problematic salts, can be disposed elsewhere.

  4. LABORATORY OPTIMIZATION TESTS OF TECHNETIUM DECONTAMINATION OF HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT LOW ACTIVITY WASTE OFF-GAS CONDENSATE SIMULANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

    2014-09-29

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also

  5. Accumulation conditions and enrichment patterns of natural gas in the Lower Cambrian Longwangmiao Fm reservoirs of the Leshan-Longnǚsi Palaeohigh, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Chunchun

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As several major new gas discoveries have been made recently in the Lower Cambrian Longwangmiao Fm reservoirs in the Leshan-Longnǚsi Palaeohigh of the Sichuan Basin, a super-huge gas reservoir group with multiple gas pay zones vertically and cluster reservoirs laterally is unfolding in the east segment of the palaeohigh. Study shows that the large-scale enrichment and accumulation of natural gas benefits from the good reservoir-forming conditions, including: (1 multiple sets of source rocks vertically, among which, the high-quality Lower Paleozoic source rocks are widespread, and have a hydrocarbon kitchen at the structural high of the Palaeohigh, providing favorable conditions for gas accumulation near the source; (2 three sets of good-quality reservoirs, namely, the porous-vuggy dolomite reservoirs of mound-shoal facies in the 2nd and 4th members of the Sinian Dengying Fm as well as the porous dolomite reservoirs of arene-shoal facies in the Lower Cambrian Longwangmiao Fm, are thick and wide in distribution; (3 structural, lithological and compound traps developed in the setting of large nose-like uplift provide favorable space for hydrocarbon accumulation. It is concluded that the inheritance development of the Palaeohigh and its favorable timing configuration with source rock evolution are critical factors for the extensive enrichment of gas in the Lower Cambrian Longwangmiao Fm reservoirs. The structural high of the Palaeohigh is the favorable area for gas accumulation. The inherited structural, stratigraphic and lithological traps are the favorable sites for gas enrichment. The areas where present structures and ancient structures overlap are the sweet-spots of gas accumulation.

  6. Geological Factors and Reservoir Properties Affecting the Gas Content of Coal Seams in the Gujiao Area, Northwest Qinshui Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Zou

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Coalbed methane (CBM well drilling and logging data together with geological data were adopted to provide insights into controlling mechanism of gas content in major coal seams and establish gas accumulation models in the Gujiao area, Northwest Qinshui Basin, China. Gas content of targeted coals is various in the Gujiao area with their burial depth ranging from 295 to 859 m. Highly variable gas content of coals should be derived from the differences among tectonism, magmatism, hydrodynamism, and sedimentation. Gas content preserved in the Gujiao area is divided into two parts by the geological structure. Gas tends to accumulate in the groundwater stagnant zone with a total dissolved solids (TDS value of 1300–1700 ppm due to water pressure in the Gujiao area. Reservoir properties including moisture content, minerals, and pore structure also significantly result in gas content variability. Subsequently, the gray correlation statistic method was adopted to determine the most important factors controlling gas content. Coal metamorphism and geological structure had marked control on gas content for the targeted coals. Finally, the favorable CBM exploitation areas were comprehensively evaluated in the Gujiao area. The results showed that the most favorable CBM exploitation areas were in the mid-south part of the Gujiao area (Block I.

  7. Visual Investigation of Retrograde Phenomena and Gas Condensate Flow in Porous Media Étude visuelle des phénomènes rétrogrades et de l'écoulement des gaz de condensat en milieux poreux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danesh A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of retrograde condensation and the flow of gas-condensate in horizontal porous media under simulated reservoir conditions were visually studied. Two-dimensional glass micromodels with homogeneous pore structures, as well as heterogeneous patterns, reproduced from real rock micrographs were employed in this study. Depletion tests were carried out using synthetic multicomponent hydrocarbon gas mixtures and also a North Sea gas condensate. The multiphase flow behaviour of the tested systems, as observed and recorded on video, is presented here along with the measured data. In water-wet pores, condensate was observed to be formed as a continuous thin film on connate water, which was the preferred site for condensation. Pressure reduction below the system cricondenbar resulted in the growth of the condensate almost exclusively on water rings at pore throats and dead end pores. The condensate was observed to flow through thin films even at low saturations, with little contribution to the condensate recovery. The rate of pressure depletion influenced the gas flow shear and was found to strongly affect the condensate propagation. Local instabilities could promote significant condensate movement in pore sections which would only be retarded further downstream by capillary effects diminishing the condensate recovery. Relative permeability-saturation relation-ships for gas-condensate flow should not be expected to take the same form as the oil-gas relative permeability for solution gas or external gas drive. Le mécanisme de la condensation rétrograde et l'écoulement des gaz de condensat en milieu poreux horizontal dans une simulation des conditions naturelles ont fait l'objet d'études visuelles. Des micromodèles en verre bi-dimensionnels à structure poreuse homogène, et des éléments hétérogènes reproduisant des micrographies de roches réelles, ont été utilisés pour cette étude. Des essais d'épuisement ont été effectu

  8. US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1991, as well as production volumes for the United States, and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1991. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), its two major components (nonassociated and associated-dissolved gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, two components of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, have their reserves and production data presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1991 is also presented

  9. Secondary natural gas recovery: Targeted applications for infield reserve growth in midcontinent reservoirs, Boonsville Field, Fort Worth Basin, Texas. Topical report, May 1993--June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardage, B.A.; Carr, D.L.; Finley, R.J.; Tyler, N.; Lancaster, D.E.; Elphick, R.Y.; Ballard, J.R.

    1995-07-01

    The objectives of this project are to define undrained or incompletely drained reservoir compartments controlled primarily by depositional heterogeneity in a low-accommodation, cratonic Midcontinent depositional setting, and, afterwards, to develop and transfer to producers strategies for infield reserve growth of natural gas. Integrated geologic, geophysical, reservoir engineering, and petrophysical evaluations are described in complex difficult-to-characterize fluvial and deltaic reservoirs in Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate Gas) field, a large, mature gas field located in the Fort Worth Basin of North Texas. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate approaches to overcoming the reservoir complexity, targeting the gas resource, and doing so using state-of-the-art technologies being applied by a large cross section of Midcontinent operators.

  10. Modeling of fault activation and seismicity by injection directly into a fault zone associated with hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    LBNL, in consultation with the EPA, expanded upon a previous study by injecting directly into a 3D representation of a hypothetical fault zone located in the geologic units between the shale-gas reservoir and the drinking water aquifer.

  11. Development of the first coal seam gas exploration program in Indonesia: Reservoir properties of the Muaraenim Formation, south Sumatra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosrowidjojo, I.B. [R and D Centre for Oil and Gas Technology, LEMIGAS, Jakarta (Indonesia); Saghafi, A. [CSIRO Energy Technology, P O Box 330, Newcastle, NSW, 2300 (Australia)

    2009-09-01

    The Late Miocene Muaraenim Formation in southern Sumatra contains thick coal sequences, mostly of low rank ranging from lignite to sub-bituminous, and it is believed that these thick low rank coals are the most prospective for the production of coal seam gas (CSG), otherwise known as coalbed methane (CBM), in Indonesia. As part of a major CSG exploration project, gas exploration drilling operations are being undertaken in Rambutan Gasfields in the Muaraenim Formation to characterize the CSG potential of the coals. The first stage of the project, which is described here, was designed to examine the gas reservoir properties with a focus on coal gas storage capacity and compositional properties. Some five CSG exploration boreholes were drilled in the Rambutan Gasfield, south of Palembang. The exploration boreholes were drilled to depths of {proportional_to} 1000 m into the Muaraenim Formation. Five major coal seams were intersected by these holes between the depths of 450 and 1000 m. The petrography of coal samples collected from these seams showed that they are vitrinite rich, with vitrinite contents of more than 75% (on a mineral and moisture free basis). Gas contents of up to 5.8 m{sup 3}/t were measured for the coal samples. The gas desorbed from coal samples contain mainly methane (CH{sub 4}) ranging from 80 to 93% and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) ranging from 6 to 19%. The composition of the gas released into the production borehole/well is, however, much richer in CH{sub 4} with about 94 to 98% CH{sub 4} and less than 5% CO{sub 2}. The initial results of drilling and reservoir characterization studies indicate suitable gas recovery parameters for three of the five coal seams with a total thickness of more than 30 m. (author)

  12. Geological significance of paleo-aulacogen and exploration potential of reef flat gas reservoirs in the Western Sichuan Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Confirming thick hydrocarbon generation center and discovering thick porous reservoirs are two key factors to start the Permian gas exploration of the Western Sichuan Depression. In this paper, the Sinian-Cambrian structures of this area were studied by adopting the layer-flattening technology and the Lower Paleozoic thickness map was prepared in order to describe the Permian hydrocarbon generation center. Then, combined with seismic facies analysis and field outcrop bioherm discovery, the distribution of Middle Permian reef flat reservoirs were predicted. Finally, the favorable conditions for reef flat reservoir dolomitization were analyzed based on fault features. The study indicates that: (1 Sinian top represents a huge depression in the profile flatted by the reflecting interface of Permian bottom, with normal faults filled by thick Lower Paleozoic sediments at both sides, revealing that a aulacogen formed during the Khanka taphrogeny exists in the Western Sichuan Depression, where very thick Cambrian strata may contain hydrocarbon generation center, making Permian strata have the material conditions for the formation of large gas pools; (2 the Middle Permian strata in the Western Sichuan Depression exhibit obvious abnormal response in reef flat facies, where three large abnormal bands are developed, which are predicted as bioherm complex combined with the Middle Permian bioherm outcrop discoveries in surface; and (3 deep and large extensional faults are developed in reef flat margin, manifesting as favorable conditions for the development of dolomite reservoirs. The results show that the Middle Permian traps in the Western Sichuan Depression contain resources up to 7400 × 108 m3, showing significant natural gas exploration prospects. By far, one risk exploration well has been deployed.

  13. Net Greenhouse Gas Emissions at the Eastmain 1 Reservoir, Quebec, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, I. B.; Tremblay, A.; Bastien, J.; Bonneville, M.; Del Georgio, P.; Demarty, M.; Garneau, M.; Helie, J.; Pelletier, L.; Prairie, Y.; Roulet, N. T.; Teodoru, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    Canada has much potential to increase its already large use of hydroelectricity for energy production. However, hydroelectricity production in many cases requires the creation of reservoirs that inundate terrestrial ecosystems. While it has been reasonably well established that reservoirs emit GHGs, it has not been established what the net difference between the landscape scale exchange of GHGs would be before and after reservoir creation. Further, there is no indication of how that net difference may change over time from when the reservoir was first created to when it reaches a steady-state condition. A team of University and private sector researchers in partnership with Hydro-Québec has been studying net GHG emissions from the Eastmain 1 reservoir located in the boreal forest region of Québec, Canada. Net emissions are defined as those emitted following the creation of a reservoir minus those that would have been emitted or absorbed by the natural systems over a 100-year period in the absence of the reservoir. Sedimentation rates, emissions at the surface of the reservoir and natural water bodies, the degassing emissions downstream of the power house as well as the emissions/absorption of the natural ecosystems (forest, peatlands, lakes, streams and rivers) before and after the impoundment were measured using different techniques (Eddy covariance, floating chambers, automated systems, etc.). This project provides the first measurements of CO2 and CH4 between a new boreal reservoir and the atmosphere as the reservoir is being created, the development of the methodology to obtain these, and the first attempt at approaching the GHGs emissions from northern hydroelectric reservoirs as a land cover change issue. We will therefore provide: an estimate of the change in GHG source the atmosphere would see; an estimate of the net emissions that can be used for intercomparison of GHG contributions with other modes of power production; and a basis on which to develop

  14. The specifics of operating minor deposits (as given by the examples of gas condensate deposits of the Northern Caucasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Р. А. Гасумов

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important directions in upgrading well productivity in the process of mining hydrocarbons consists in fighting with salt formation and salt deposition. Solving that problem becomes especially actual when operating deposits that are in their final stage of exploitation in complex mining and geological conditions accompanied by deposition of salts in the well foot area of oil bed and their sedimentation on the sub-surface and surface equipment. It provokes a drop in well productivity and results in off-schedule repair works. Specifics are considered of exploiting minor gas condensate deposits of the Northern Caucasus that are operated under complicated mining and geological conditions of anomalously high bed pressures, high temperatures, strong depressions on the beds and inflow of mineralized water from water saturated seams.Processes are studied of salt deposition from heavy hydrocarbons in the well foot and the bed area surrounding it. Water sample analyses data from different wells have demonstrated that the main salts carrier is the associated water, and the principal sedimenting agents are corrosion products, as confirmed by the results of microscopic studies. The dynamics is presented of salt deposition in the “well foot – wellhead – separator” system retrieved from the results of studies of reaction products in the well foot zone of oil bed.It is demonstrated that the efficiency of struggling with salt deposition in the course of mining hydrocarbons depends on comprehensive approach to the problem, the principal thrust lying with prevention of such deposition.Possible ways are considered to prevent precipitation of ferric compounds in the course of operating gas condensate wells, a way is suggested to intensify gas inflow.

  15. Determining the explosion effects on the Gasbuggy reservoir from computer simulation of the postshot gas production history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Leo A [El Paso Natural Gas Company (United States)

    1970-05-01

    Analysis of the gas production data from Gasbuggy to deduce reservoir properties outside the chimney is complicated by the large gas storage volume in the chimney because the gas flow from the surrounding reservoir into the chimney cannot be directly measured. This problem was overcome by developing a chimney volume factor F (M{sup 2}CF/PSI) based upon analysis of rapid drawdowns during the production tests. The chimney volume factor was in turn used to construct the time history of the required influx of gas into the chimney from the surrounding reservoir. The most probable value of F to describe the chimney is found to be 0.150 M{sup 2}CF/PSI. Postulated models of the reservoir properties outside the chimney are examined by calculating the pressure distribution and flow of gas through the reservoir with the experimentally observed chimney pressure history applied to the cavity wall. The calculated influx from the reservoir into the chimney is then compared to the required influx and the calculated pressure at a radius of 300 feet is compared to the observed pressures in a shut-in satellite well (GB-2RS) which intersects the gas-bearing formation 300 feet from the center of the chimney. A description of the mathematics in the computer program used to perform the calculations is given. Gas flow for a radial model wherein permeability and porosity are uniform through the gas producing sand outside the chimney was calculated for several values of permeability. These calculations indicated that for the first drawdown test (July 1968) the permeability-producing height product (kh) was in the region of 15 to 30 millidarcy-feet (md-ft) and that after several months of testing, the effective kh had dropped to less than 8 md-ft. Calculations wherein (1) the permeability decreases from the chimney out to the 'fracture' radius, and (2) an increased production height is used near the chimney, match the data better than the simple radial model. Reasonable fits to the data for

  16. Determining the explosion effects on the Gasbuggy reservoir from computer simulation of the postshot gas production history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, Leo A.

    1970-01-01

    Analysis of the gas production data from Gasbuggy to deduce reservoir properties outside the chimney is complicated by the large gas storage volume in the chimney because the gas flow from the surrounding reservoir into the chimney cannot be directly measured. This problem was overcome by developing a chimney volume factor F (M 2 CF/PSI) based upon analysis of rapid drawdowns during the production tests. The chimney volume factor was in turn used to construct the time history of the required influx of gas into the chimney from the surrounding reservoir. The most probable value of F to describe the chimney is found to be 0.150 M 2 CF/PSI. Postulated models of the reservoir properties outside the chimney are examined by calculating the pressure distribution and flow of gas through the reservoir with the experimentally observed chimney pressure history applied to the cavity wall. The calculated influx from the reservoir into the chimney is then compared to the required influx and the calculated pressure at a radius of 300 feet is compared to the observed pressures in a shut-in satellite well (GB-2RS) which intersects the gas-bearing formation 300 feet from the center of the chimney. A description of the mathematics in the computer program used to perform the calculations is given. Gas flow for a radial model wherein permeability and porosity are uniform through the gas producing sand outside the chimney was calculated for several values of permeability. These calculations indicated that for the first drawdown test (July 1968) the permeability-producing height product (kh) was in the region of 15 to 30 millidarcy-feet (md-ft) and that after several months of testing, the effective kh had dropped to less than 8 md-ft. Calculations wherein (1) the permeability decreases from the chimney out to the 'fracture' radius, and (2) an increased production height is used near the chimney, match the data better than the simple radial model. Reasonable fits to the data for the

  17. Numerical simulation of gas-liquid two-phase flow behavior with condensation heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamori, Kazuhide; Murase, Michio; Baba, Yoshikazu; Aihara, Tsuyoshi.

    1995-01-01

    In this study, condensation heat transfer experiments were performed in order to verify a condensation heat transfer model coupled with a three-dimensional two-phase flow analysis. In the heat transfer model, the liquid film flow rate on the heat transfer tubes was calculated by a mass balance equation and the liquid film thickness was calculated from the liquid film flow rate using Nusselt's laminar flow model and Fujii's equation for steam velocity effect. In the experiments, 112 horizontal staggered tubes with an outer diameter of 16 mm and length of 0.55 m were used. Steam and spray water were supplied to the test section, and inlet quality was controlled by the spray water flow rate. The temperature was 100degC and the pressure was 0.1 MPa. The overall heat transfer coefficients were measured for inlet quality of 13-100%. From parameter calculations for the falling liquid film ratio from the upper tubes to the lower tubes, the calculated overall heat transfer coefficients agreed with the data to within ±5% at the falling liquid film ratio of 0.7. (author)

  18. Conceptual design of the test facility for the two-phase critical flow with non-condensable gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Seok Kyu; Chung, Chang Hwan

    2000-12-01

    The two-phase critical flow test with non-condensible gas is for the simulation of the critical flow phenomena which can be occurred during SB-LOCA on SMART reactor. The requirements of the critical flow test are 7{approx}20mm pipe break dia., 7{approx}12MPa stagnation pressure, 0{approx}60 deg C subcooling degree and 0{approx}0.5kg/s N2 gas flow rate. For the satisfaction of these requirements on the test facility, critical flow rates were calculated with various models. With the selected reference pressure vessel(1.3m{sup 3}), the conceptual design of the test facility was performed. The important components of the test facility are the pressure vessel which has main circulation line, the test section attached to the bottom of the pressure vessel, suppression tank, the N2 gas supply tanks for maintaining the system pressure and N2 gas flow rate at test section and the auxiliary N2 gas converting system. For the measurements of the critical flow rate, flowmeter and level gauge is installed at the upstream of the test section and the pressure vessel, respectively. The realtime pressure control system is installed at the entrance of the pressure vessel for maintaining the system pressure and the N2 gas flow regulating system is also installed at the upstream of the test section. The design of the control and monitoring system for the operation of the test facility and the DAS for acquiring the test data were also performed. The conceptual operating process of the test facility was determined.

  19. Conceptual design of the test facility for the two-phase critical flow with non-condensable gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Seok Kyu; Chung, Chang Hwan

    2000-12-01

    The two-phase critical flow test with non-condensible gas is for the simulation of the critical flow phenomena which can be occurred during SB-LOCA on SMART reactor. The requirements of the critical flow test are 7∼20mm pipe break dia., 7∼12MPa stagnation pressure, 0∼60 deg C subcooling degree and 0∼0.5kg/s N2 gas flow rate. For the satisfaction of these requirements on the test facility, critical flow rates were calculated with various models. With the selected reference pressure vessel(1.3m 3 ), the conceptual design of the test facility was performed. The important components of the test facility are the pressure vessel which has main circulation line, the test section attached to the bottom of the pressure vessel, suppression tank, the N2 gas supply tanks for maintaining the system pressure and N2 gas flow rate at test section and the auxiliary N2 gas converting system. For the measurements of the critical flow rate, flowmeter and level gauge is installed at the upstream of the test section and the pressure vessel, respectively. The realtime pressure control system is installed at the entrance of the pressure vessel for maintaining the system pressure and the N2 gas flow regulating system is also installed at the upstream of the test section. The design of the control and monitoring system for the operation of the test facility and the DAS for acquiring the test data were also performed. The conceptual operating process of the test facility was determined

  20. pressure distribution in a layered reservoir with gas-cap and bottom

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-07-02

    Jul 2, 2012 ... Finally, only fluid ratios is recommended as adequate to reveal which ... pressure derivatives, interlayer cross flow, heterogeneity, reservoir characterization, pressure ... sure derivatives to thoroughly understand movement.

  1. Greenhouse gas emissions from reservoir water surfaces: A new global synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collectively, reservoirs created by dams are thought to be an important source ofgreenhouse gases (GHGs) to the atmosphere. So far, efforts to quantify, model, andmanage these emissions have been limited by data availability and inconsistenciesin methodological approach. Here we ...

  2. Problems of the protection of bioresources development ofthe Bovanenkovo gas condensate field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Dmitrievich Bogdanov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The data on the fish fauna and fish food resources in the Bovanenkovo gas field are presented. The estimation of fishery and fishery potential of water bodies, hydrobiological characteristics of water bodies in the studied area are given. It is shown that the arrangement of the gas field leads to overfishing BGKM fish and change the state of aquatic ecosystems associated with the violation of runoff, backfilling flood waters, crossing streams communications, water diversion, pollution, sand mining. Thehydrobionts reaction to anthropogenic influence in the area of the gas field developmentis identified and recommendations to reduce the impact on aquatic ecosystems in the period of construction are given

  3. Multi-zone coupling productivity of horizontal well fracturing with complex fracture networks in shale gas reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyao Zhu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a series of specific studies were carried out to investigate the complex form of fracture networks and figure out the multi-scale flowing laws of nano/micro pores–complex fracture networks–wellbore during the development of shale reservoirs by means of horizontal well fracturing. First, hydraulic fractures were induced by means of Brazilian splitting tests. Second, the forms of the hydraulic fractures inside the rock samples were observed by means of X-ray CT scanning to measure the opening of hydraulic fractures. Third, based on the multi-scale unified flowing model, morphological description of fractures and gas flowing mechanism in the matrix–complex fracture network–wellbore, the productivity equation of single-stage horizontal well fracturing which includes diffusion, slipping and desorption was established. And fourthly, a productivity prediction model of horizontal well multi-stage fracturing in the shale reservoir was established considering the interference between the multi-stage fracturing zones and the pressure drop in the horizontal wellbore. The following results were obtained. First, hydraulic fractures are in the form of a complex network. Second, the measured opening of hydraulic fractures is in the range of 4.25–453 μm, averaging 112 μm. Third, shale gas flowing in different shapes of fracture networks follows different nonlinear flowing laws. Forth, as the fracture density in the strongly stimulated zones rises and the distribution range of the hydraulic fractures in strongly/weakly stimulated zones enlarges, gas production increases gradually. As the interference occurs in the flowing zones of fracture networks between fractured sections, the increasing amplitude of gas production rates decreases. Fifth, when the length of a simulated horizontal well is 1500 m and the half length of a fracture network in the strongly stimulated zone is 100 m, the productivity effect of stage 10 fracturing is the

  4. Laboratory Optimization Tests of Technetium Decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Direct Feed Low Activity Waste Melter Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-12-23

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  5. Laboratory Optimization Tests of Decontamination of Cs, Sr, and Actinides from Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-01-06

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also substantially decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  6. Defect formation in fluoropolymer films at their condensation from a gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchnikov, P. A.

    2018-01-01

    The questions of radiation defects, factors of influence of electronic high-frequency discharge plasma components on the molecular structure and properties of the fluoropolymer vacuum films synthesized on a substrate from a gas phase are considered. It is established that at sedimentation of fluoropolymer coverings from a gas phase in high-frequency discharge plasma in films there are radiation defects in molecular and supramolecular structure because of the influence of active plasma components which significantly influence their main properties.

  7. Experience in oil field processing of gas and condensate at the Shatlyk deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmatov, V.V.; Chernikov, Ye.I.; Govorun, V.P.; Turevskiy, Ye.N.

    1983-01-01

    The operation of installations for preparing gas are analyzed, along with the operation of individual technological devices at the Shatlyk deposit, the basic things which hinder the support of the designed low temperature conditions are shown and recommendations for standardizing the operation of the technological installations are given. Experience in the operation of the gas preparation installations at the Shatlyk deposit is recommended for use in deposits being introduced into development.

  8. Pyrolysis of low-boiling gas condensate of the Shatlyk field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khankuliyev, K.; Kul' dzhayev, B.A.; Magaril, R.Z.; Sergiyenko, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    A study was made of pyrolysis of the 60-180/sup 0/C fraction of condensate from the Shatlyk field at temperature 800-850/sup 0/ and contact time of 0.3-1.5 sec. An optimal pyrolysis mode was selected (825/sup 0/C, contact time 0.5-0.7 sec) at which there is simultaenously high yield of ethylene (36-40%) and olefins C/sub 2/-C/sub 4/ (60-61%). It is shown that the total yield of olefins and ethylene, as well as the correlation in them of ethylene/propylene, can be regulated by changing the temperature and contact time in the process. The maximum ethylene yields with the highest selectivity indicators for ethylene are observed under the following conditions: temperature 825/sup 0/C and contact time 0.9 sec; 850/sup 0/C and 0.7 sec.

  9. Analysis of the test results for the two-phase critical flow with non-condensible gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S. K.; Chung, C. H.; Park, H. S.; Min, K. H.; Choi, N. H.; Kim, C. H.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, H. C.; Chang, M. H.

    2002-07-01

    The two-phase critical flow test was performed for simulating the pipe break accident of SMART reactor. The requirements of the critical flow test are 7∼20mm pipe break dia., 7∼12MPa stagnation pressure, 0∼60 .deg. C subcooling degree and 0∼0.5kg/s N 2 gas flow rate. The test section is sharp edged pipe type which has the dimension of I.D.=20, L=300mm and I.D.=10.9, L=1000mm. The test conditions are 4, 7, 10 MPa at stagnation pressure, 0, 20, 50 .deg. C of subcooling degree and 0.028∼0.39 kg/s of N 2 injection gas flowrate. The measured data at test section and other components in terms of pressure, temperature and flowrate were collected in DAS computer with maintaining the steady state conditions at least 60 seconds. From the test results, the critical characteristics of the break pipe were analysed and verified the capacity of the test facility. For the verification of the Modified Henry-Fauske model which can predict the two-phase critical flow with non-condensible gas, the code simulation using MARS which contains the option of the Modified Henry -Fauske model was performed. The simulation results of steady-state two-phase critical flow experiments show that they agree with the measured critical flow rates within 6% root-mean-square error

  10. Effect of scenedesmus acuminatus green algae extracts on the development of Candida lipolytic yeast in gas condensate-containing media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilmes, B. I.; Kasymova, G. A.; Runov, V. I.; Karavayeva, N. N.

    1980-01-01

    Data are given of a comparative study of the growth and development as well as the characteristics of the biomass of the C. Lipolytica yeast according to the content of raw protein, protein, lipids, vitamins in the B group, and residual hydrocarbons during growth in media with de-aromatized gas-condensate FNZ as the carbon source with aqueous and alcohol extracts of S. acuminatus as the biostimulants. It is shown that the decoction and aqueous extract of green algae has the most intensive stimulating effect on the yeast growth. When a decoction of algae is added to the medium, the content of residual hydrocarbons in the biomass of C. lipolytica yeast is reduced by 4%; the quantity of protein, lipids, thamine and inositol with replacement of the yeast autolysate by the decoction of algae is altered little.

  11. Detailed evaluation of gas hydrate reservoir properties using JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well downhole well-log displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    The JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well project was designed to investigate the occurrence of in situ natural gas hydrate in the Mallik area of the Mackenzie Delta of Canada. Because gas hydrate is unstable at surface pressure and temperature conditions, a major emphasis was placed on the downhole logging program to determine the in situ physical properties of the gas-hydrate-bearing sediments. Downhole logging tool strings deployed in the Mallik 2L-38 well included the Schlumberger Platform Express with a high resolution laterolog, Array Induction Imager Tool, Dipole Shear Sonic Imager, and a Fullbore Formation Microlmager. The downhole log data obtained from the log- and core-inferred gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary interval (897.25-1109.5 m log depth) in the Mallik 2L-38 well is depicted in a series of well displays. Also shown are numerous reservoir parameters, including gas hydrate saturation and sediment porosity log traces, calculated from available downhole well-log and core data. The gas hydrate accumulation delineated by the Mallik 2L-38 well has been determined to contain as much as 4.15109 m3 of gas in the 1 km2 area surrounding the drill site.

  12. Seismic prediction on the favorable efficient development areas of the Longwangmiao Fm gas reservoir in the Gaoshiti–Moxi area, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangrong Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Lower Cambrian Longwangmiao Fm gas reservoir in the Gaoshiti–Moxi area, the Sichuan Basin, is a super giant monoblock marine carbonate gas reservoir with its single size being the largest in China. The key to the realization of high and stable production gas wells in this gas reservoir is to identify accurately high-permeability zones where there are dissolved pores or dissolved pores are superimposed with fractures. However, high quality dolomite reservoirs are characterized by large burial depth and strong heterogeneity, so reservoir prediction is of difficult. In this paper, related seismic researches were carried out and supporting technologies were developed as follows. First, a geologic model was built after an analysis of the existing data and forward modeling was carried out to establish a reservoir seismic response model. Second, by virtue of well-oriented amplitude processing technology, spherical diffusion compensation factor was obtained based on VSP well logging data and the true amplitude of seismic data was recovered. Third, the resolution of deep seismic data was improved by using the well-oriented high-resolution frequency-expanding technology and prestack time migration data of high quality was acquired. And fourth, multiple shoal facies reservoirs were traced by using the global automatic seismic interpretation technology which is based on stratigraphic model, multiple reservoirs which are laterally continuous and vertically superimposed could be predicted, and the areal distribution of high quality reservoirs could be described accurately and efficiently. By virtue of the supporting technologies, drilling trajectory is positioned accurately, and the deployed development wells all have high yield. These technologies also promote the construction of a modern supergiant gas field of tens of billions of cubic meters.

  13. Applications of UT results to confirm defects findings by utilization of relevant metallurgical investigations techniques on gas/condensate pipeline working in wet sour gas environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Azhari, O. A.; Gajam, S. Y.

    2015-03-01

    The gas/condensate pipe line under investigation is a 12 inch diameter, 48 km ASTM, A106 steel pipeline, carrying hydrocarbons containing wet CO2 and H2S.The pipe line had exploded in a region 100m distance from its terminal; after 24 years of service. Hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) and sour gas corrosion were expected due to the presence of wet H2S in the gas analysis. In other areas of pipe line ultrasonic testing was performed to determine whether the pipeline can be re-operated. The results have shown presence of internal planner defects, this was attributed to the existence of either laminations, type II inclusions or some service defects such as HIC and step wise cracking (SWC).Metallurgical investigations were conducted on fractured samples as per NACE standard (TM-0284-84). The obtained results had shown macroscopic cracks in the form of SWC, microstructure of steel had MnS inclusions. Crack sensitivity analyses were calculated and the microhardness testing was conducted. These results had confirmed that the line material was suffering from sour gas deteriorations. This paper correlates the field UT inspection findings with those methods investigated in the laboratory. Based on the results obtained a new HIC resistance material pipeline needs to be selected.

  14. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S. Hydropower Reservoirs: FY2011 Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2012-05-01

    The primary objective of this study is to quantify the net emissions of key greenhouse gases (GHG) - notably, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} - from hydropower reservoirs in moist temperate areas within the U.S. The rationale for this objective is straightforward: if net emissions of GHG can be determined, it would be possible to directly compare hydropower to other power-producing methods on a carbon-emissions basis. Studies of GHG emissions from hydropower reservoirs elsewhere suggest that net emissions can be moderately high in tropical areas. In such areas, warm temperatures and relatively high supply rates of labile organic matter can encourage high rates of decomposition, which (depending upon local conditions) can result in elevated releases of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} emissions also tend to be higher for younger reservoirs than for older reservoirs, because vegetation and labile soil organic matter that is inundated when a reservoir is created can continue to decompose for several years (Galy-Lacaux et al. 1997, Barros et al. 2011). Water bodies located in climatically cooler areas, such as in boreal forests, could be expected to have lower net emissions of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} because their organic carbon supplies tend to be relatively recalcitrant to microbial action and because cooler water temperatures are less conducive to decomposition.

  15. Geochemical characteristics of natural gas in the hydrocarbon accumulation history, and its difference among gas reservoirs in the Upper Triassic formation of Sichuan Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of hydrocarbon generation, trap formation, inclusion homogenization temperature, authigenic illite dating, and ESR dating were used to understand the history of hydrocarbon accumulation and its difference among gas reservoirs in the Upper Triassic formation of Sichuan Basin. The results show the hydrocarbon accumulation mainly occurred during the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods; they could also be classified into three stages: (1 early hydrocarbon generation accumulation stage, (2 mass hydrocarbon generation accumulation stage before the Himalayan Epoch, (3 and parts of hydrocarbon adjustment and re-accumulation during Himalayan Epoch. The second stage is more important than the other two. The Hydrocarbon accumulation histories are obviously dissimilar in different regions. In western Sichuan Basin, the gas accumulation began at the deposition period of member 5 of Xujiahe Formation, and mass accumulation occurred during the early Middle Jurassic up to the end of the Late Cretaceous. In central Sichuan Basin, the accumulation began at the early Late Jurassic, and the mass accumulation occurred from the middle Early Cretaceous till the end of the Late Cretaceous. In southern Sichuan Basin, the accumulation began at the middle Late Jurassic, and the mass accumulation occurred from the middle of the Late Cretaceous to the end of the Later Cretaceous. The accumulation history of the western Sichuan Basin is the earliest, and the southern Sichuan Basin is the latest. This paper will help to understand the accumulation process, accumulation mechanism, and gas reservoir distribution of the Triassic gas reservoirs in the Sichuan Basin better. Meanwhile, it is found that the authigenic illite in the Upper Triassic formation of Sichuan Basin origin of deep-burial and its dating is a record of the later accumulation. This suggests that the illite dating needs to fully consider illite origin; otherwise the dating results may not accurately

  16. An experimental study of tracers for labelling of injection gas in oil reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugstad, Oe.

    1992-01-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of the PMCP and PMCH as tracers in field experiments. These compounds have properties which make them as well suited for well to well studies as the more common tracers CH 3 T and 85 Kr. In an injection project carried out at the Gullfaks field in the North Sea the two PFCs verified communication between wells. This implies communication between different geological layers in the reservoir and also communication across faults within the same layers. Laboratory studies carried out have focused on the retention of the tracers in dynamic flooding experiments under conditions comparable with those in the petroleum reservoirs. Simultaneous injection of a variety of tracers has shown individual variations in tracer retention which are caused by important reservoir parameters as fluid saturation and rock properties. By proper design of field injection programs the tracers response may therefore be used to estimate fluid saturation if actual rock properties are known. 45 refs., 20 figs., 13 tabs

  17. Bose condensation in an attractive fermion gas: From weak to strong coupling superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozieres, P.; Schmitt-Rink, S.

    1985-01-01

    We consider a gas of fermions interacting via an attractive potential. We study the ground state of that system and calculate the critical temperature for the onset of superconductivity as a function of the coupling strength. We compare the behavior of continuum and lattice models and show that the evolution from weak to strong coupling superconductivity is smooth

  18. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Annual report, November 1, 1990--October 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    The objective of the cooperative research program is to characterize Alaskan reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration and structure, and the development potential. The tasks completed during this period include: (1) geologic reservoir description of Endicott Field; (2) petrographic characterization of core samples taken from selected stratigraphic horizons of the West Sak and Ugnu (Brookian) wells; (3) development of a polydispersed thermodynamic model for predicting asphaltene equilibria and asphaltene precipitation from crude oil-solvent mixtures, and (4) preliminary geologic description of the Milne Point Unit.

  19. ALMA Shows that Gas Reservoirs of Star-forming Disks over the Past 3 Billion Years Are Not Predominantly Molecular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortese, Luca; Catinella, Barbara; Janowiecki, Steven, E-mail: luca.cortese@uwa.edu.au [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2017-10-10

    Cold hydrogen gas is the raw fuel for star formation in galaxies, and its partition into atomic and molecular phases is a key quantity for galaxy evolution. In this Letter, we combine Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array and Arecibo single-dish observations to estimate the molecular-to-atomic hydrogen mass ratio for massive star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 0.2 extracted from the HIGHz survey, i.e., some of the most massive gas-rich systems currently known. We show that the balance between atomic and molecular hydrogen in these galaxies is similar to that of local main-sequence disks, implying that atomic hydrogen has been dominating the cold gas mass budget of star-forming galaxies for at least the past three billion years. In addition, despite harboring gas reservoirs that are more typical of objects at the cosmic noon, HIGHz galaxies host regular rotating disks with low gas velocity dispersions suggesting that high total gas fractions do not necessarily drive high turbulence in the interstellar medium.

  20. Gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoir systems in the offshore of India: Results of the India National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Collett, Timothy S.; Vishwanath, K.; Shukla, K.M.; Nagalingam, J.; Lall, M.V.; Yamada, Y; Schultheiss, P.; Holland, M.

    2016-01-01

    The India National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 02 (NGHP-02) was conducted from 3-March-2015 to 28-July-2015 off the eastern coast of India using the deepwater drilling vessel Chikyu. The primary goal of this expedition was to explore for highly saturated gas hydrate occurrences in sand reservoirs that would become targets for future production tests. The first two months of the expedition were dedicated to logging-whiledrilling (LWD) operations, with a total of 25 holes drilled and logged. The next three months were dedicated to coring operations at 10 of the most promising sites. With a total of five months of continuous field operations, the expedition was the most comprehensive dedicated gas hydrate investigation ever undertaken.

  1. A new method in predicting productivity of multi-stage fractured horizontal well in tight gas reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsheng Wei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The generally accomplished technique for horizontal wells in tight gas reservoirs is by multi-stage hydraulic fracturing, not to mention, the flow characteristics of a horizontal well with multiple transverse fractures are very intricate. Conventional methods, well as an evaluation unit, are difficult to accurately predict production capacity of each fracture and productivity differences between wells with a different number of fractures. Thus, a single fracture sets the minimum evaluation unit, matrix, fractures, and lateral wellbore model that are then combined integrally to approximate horizontal well with multiple transverse hydraulic fractures in tight gas reservoirs. This paper presents a new semi-analytical methodology for predicting the production capacity of a horizontal well with multiple transverse hydraulic fractures in tight gas reservoirs. Firstly, a mathematical flow model used as a medium, which is disturbed by finite conductivity vertical fractures and rectangular shaped boundaries, is established and explained by the Fourier integral transform. Then the idea of a single stage fracture analysis is incorporated to establish linear flow model within a single fracture with a variable rate. The Fredholm integral numerical solution is applicable for the fracture conductivity function. Finally, the pipe flow model along the lateral wellbore is adapted to couple multi-stages fracture mathematical models, and the equation group of predicting productivity of a multi-stage fractured horizontal well. The whole flow process from the matrix to bottom-hole and production interference between adjacent fractures is also established. Meanwhile, the corresponding iterative algorithm of the equations is given. In this case analysis, the productions of each well and fracture are calculated under the different bottom-hole flowing pressure, and this method also contributes to obtaining the distribution of pressure drop and production for every