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Sample records for gas charge-exchange target

  1. Study of the pd→→n{pp}s charge-exchange reaction using a polarised deuterium target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The vector and tensor analysing powers, Ay and Ayy, of the pd→→n{pp}s charge-exchange reaction have been measured at a beam energy of 600 MeV at the COSY-ANKE facility by using an unpolarised proton beam incident on an internal storage cell target filled with polarised deuterium gas. The low energy recoiling protons were measured in a pair of silicon tracking telescopes placed on either side of the target. Putting a cut of 3 MeV on the diproton excitation energy ensured that the two protons were dominantly in the S01 state, here denoted by {pp}s. The polarisation of the deuterium gas was established through measurements in parallel of proton–deuteron elastic scattering. By analysing events where both protons entered the same telescope, the charge-exchange reaction was measured for momentum transfers q≥160 MeV/c. These data provide a good continuation of the earlier results at q≤140 MeV/c obtained with a polarised deuteron beam. They are also consistent with impulse approximation predictions with little sign evident for any modifications due to multiple scatterings. These successful results confirm that the ANKE deuteron charge-exchange programme can be extended to much higher energies with a polarised deuterium target than can be achieved with a polarised deuteron beam.

  2. The charge-exchange induced coupling between plasma-gas counterflows in the heliosheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    Full Text Available Many hydrodynamic models have been presented which give similar views of the interaction of the solar wind plasma bubble with the counterstreaming partially ionized interstellar medium. In the more recent of these models it is taken into account that the solar and interstellar hydrodynamic flows of neutral atoms and protons are coupled by mass-, momentum-, and energy-exchange terms due to charge exchange processes. We shall reinvestigate the theoretical basis of this coupling here by use of a simplified description of the heliospheric interface and describe the main physics of the H-atom penetration through the more or less standing well-known plasma wall ahead of the heliopause. Thereby we can show that the type of charge exchange coupling terms used in up-to-now hydrodynamic treatments unavoidably leads to an O-type critical point at the sonic point of the H-atom flow, thus not allowing for a continuation of the integration of the hydrodynamic set of differential equations. The remedy for this problem is given by a more accurate formulation of the momentum exchange term for quasi-and sub-sonic H-atom flows. With a refined momentum exchange term derived from basic kinetic Boltzmann principles, we instead arrive at a characteristic equation with an X-type critical point, allowing for a continuous solution from supersonic to subsonic flow conditions. This necessitates that the often treated problem of the propagation of inter-stellar H-atoms through the heliosheath has to be solved using these newly derived, differently effective plasma – gas friction forces. Substantially different results are to be expected from this context for the filtration efficiency of the heliospheric interface.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (heliopause and solar wind termination; interstellar gas – Ionosphere (plasma temperature and density

  3. The charge-exchange induced coupling between plasma-gas counterflows in the heliosheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Many hydrodynamic models have been presented which give similar views of the interaction of the solar wind plasma bubble with the counterstreaming partially ionized interstellar medium. In the more recent of these models it is taken into account that the solar and interstellar hydrodynamic flows of neutral atoms and protons are coupled by mass-, momentum-, and energy-exchange terms due to charge exchange processes. We shall reinvestigate the theoretical basis of this coupling here by use of a simplified description of the heliospheric interface and describe the main physics of the H-atom penetration through the more or less standing well-known plasma wall ahead of the heliopause. Thereby we can show that the type of charge exchange coupling terms used in up-to-now hydrodynamic treatments unavoidably leads to an O-type critical point at the sonic point of the H-atom flow, thus not allowing for a continuation of the integration of the hydrodynamic set of differential equations. The remedy for this problem is given by a more accurate formulation of the momentum exchange term for quasi-and sub-sonic H-atom flows. With a refined momentum exchange term derived from basic kinetic Boltzmann principles, we instead arrive at a characteristic equation with an X-type critical point, allowing for a continuous solution from supersonic to subsonic flow conditions. This necessitates that the often treated problem of the propagation of inter-stellar H-atoms through the heliosheath has to be solved using these newly derived, differently effective plasma – gas friction forces. Substantially different results are to be expected from this context for the filtration efficiency of the heliospheric interface.Key words. Interplanetary physics (heliopause and solar wind termination; interstellar gas – Ionosphere (plasma temperature and density

  4. Development of the gas puff charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (GP-CXRS) technique for ion measurements in the plasma edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchill, R. M.; Theiler, C.; Lipschultz, B.; Dux, R.; Pütterich, T.; Viezzer, E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic method is presented, which uses a simple thermal gas puff for its donor neutral source, instead of the typical high-energy neutral beam. This diagnostic, named gas puff CXRS (GP-CXRS), is used to measure ion density, velocity, and temperature in the tokamak edge/pedestal region with excellent signal-background ratios, and has a number of advantages to conventional beam-based CXRS systems. Here we develop the physics basis for GP-CXRS, including the neutral transport, the charge-exchange process at low energies, and effects of energy-dependent rate coefficients on the measurements. The GP-CXRS hardware setup is described on two separate tokamaks, Alcator C-Mod and ASDEX Upgrade. Measured spectra and profiles are also presented. Profile comparisons of GP-CXRS and a beam based CXRS system show good agreement. Emphasis is given throughout to describing guiding principles for users interested in applying the GP-CXRS diagnostic technique

  5. Cross sections of electron excitation out of metastable helium levels with a fast metastable target product produced via charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagus, M.E.; Boffard, J.B.; Anderson, L.W.; Lin, C.C.

    1996-01-01

    Absolute direct cross sections for electron excitation out of the 2 3 S level and into the 3 3 D, 4 3 D, and 3 3 S levels of the helium atom from threshold to 500 eV and into the 3 3 P level over a more limited energy range have been measured using a fast metastable atomic beam target. We produce the metastable atoms via near-resonant charge exchange between a 1.6-keV He + ion beam and Cs vapor. Because this reaction is highly nonresonant with the ground state of helium, the charge-transfer process yields a primarily metastable beam. We use a thermal detector which we calibrate with ions to measure absolutely the neutral beam flux. The atomic beam is crossed by an electron beam, and we collect the resulting fluorescence at right angles to both the electron and atomic beams. We obtain the cross sections for excitation out of the 2 3 S level into the various excited levels by monitoring the emission out of the excited level of interest. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  6. Electronic device for measuring the polarization parameter in the π-p → π0n charge exchange reaction on a polarized proton target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brehin, S.

    1967-12-01

    An electronic apparatus has been constructed to measure the polarization parameter P 0 (t) in π - p → π 0 n charge exchange scattering at 5.9 GeV/c and 11,2 GeV/c on polarized proton target. This device insures triggering of a heavy plate spark chamber, allowing visualisation of γ rays from the π 0 decays when the associated neutron offers suitable characteristics in direction and energy. The neutron is detected by an array of 32 counters and his energy is measured by a time of flight method. Electronic circuits of this apparatus are described as test and calibration methods used. (author) [fr

  7. Sodium vapor charge exchange cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiddleston, H.R.; Fasolo, J.A.; Minette, D.C.; Chrien, R.E.; Frederick, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational sequential charge-exchange ion source yielding a 50 MeV H - current of approximately 8 mA is planned for use with the Argonne 500 MeV booster synchrotron. Progress is reported on the development of a sodium vapor charge-exchange cell as part of that planned effort. Design, fabrication, and operating results to date are presented and discussed

  8. Sodium vapor charge exchange cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiddleston, H.R.; Fasolo, J.A.; Minette, D.C.; Chrien, R.E.; Frederick, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational sequential charge-exchange ion source yielding a 50 MeV H - current of approximately 8 mA is planned for use with the Argonne 500 MeV booster synchrotron. We report on the progress for development of a sodium vapor charge-exchange cell as part of that planned effort. Design, fabrication, and operating results to date are presented and discussed. (author)

  9. Tokamak rotation and charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R.D.; Rowan, W.L.; Solano, E.R.; Valanju, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    In the absence of momentum input, tokamak toroidal rotation rates are typically small - no larger in particular than poloidal rotation - even when the radial electric field is strong, as near the plasma edge. This circumstance, contradicting conventional neoclassical theory, is commonly attributed to the rotation damping effect of charge exchange, although a detailed comparison between charge-exchange damping theory and experiment is apparently unavailable. Such a comparison is attempted here in the context of recent TEXT experiments, which compare rotation rates, both poloidal and toroidal, in helium and hydrogen discharges. The helium discharges provide useful data because they are nearly free of ion-neutral charge exchange; they have been found to rotate toroidally in reasonable agreement with neoclassical predictions. The hydrogen experiments show much smaller toroidal motion as usual. The theoretical calculation uses the full charge-exchange operator and assumes plateau collisionality, roughly consistent with the experimental conditions. The authors calculate the ion flow as a function of v cx /v c , where v cx is the charge exchange rate and v c the Coulomb collision frequency. The results are in reasonable accord with the observations. 1 ref

  10. Dissociative charge exchange of H2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruijn, D. de.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to molecular dissociation, in particular the dissociation of the hydrogen molecule H 2 arising from electron capture of its ion H 2 + in a collision. Thereby the important practical question how a chemical bond can be broken is implicitly addressed. This thesis opens (chapter I) with an overview of the available experimental approaches in molecular physics. Further the simple Demkov model for NRCE is described. In chapter II a novel experimental technique for measurements on dissociative processes is introduced which combines a high efficiency with a high energy resolution. A detailed description of the techniques applied in the detector, which has a high spatial and timing resolution with 30 μm and 350 psec FWHM respectively for the detection of one particle, is given in chapter III. A semi-classical theory for NRCE in the medium energy range between a diatomic molecular ion and an atom is developed in chapter IV. The experiments on dissociative charge exchange of H 2 + with Ar, Mg, Na and Cs targets at keV energies are described in Chapter V. The predissociation of the c 3 PIsub(u)-state of H 2 populated after charge exchange of H 2 with several targets at keV energies; is the subject of chapter VI. In chapter VII, orientational oscillations in the cross section for charge exchange of H 2 + with alkali targets are discussed. The last chapter deals with predissociation of highly excited states in H 2 . (Auth.)

  11. H- charge exchange injection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Curtis, C.; Hojvat, C.; Johnson, R.P.; Owen, C.; Schmidt, C.; Teng, L.; Webber, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    The techniques and components required for injection of protons into cyclic accelerators by means of H - charge exchange processes are reviewed, with emphasis on the experience at Fermilab. The advantages of the technique are described. The design and performance of the system of injection of H - ions into the Fermilab Booster are detailed. (Auth.)

  12. Transition density of charge-exchange processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovas, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    The transition density between parent and analogue states is studied with special reference to its role in charge-exchange nuclear reactions. The structure of the target nucleus is described in a perturbative approach, in which the Coulomb and asymmetry potentials mix the eigenstates of a charge-independent single-particle Hamiltonian. In this model formulae are derived for the transition density, the Coulomb displacement energy and the neutron-proton density difference, and their relationship is used to estimate the transition density. This estimate shows that: the largest contribution comes from the density of the excess neutrons; the weight of the Coulomb-mixing effect is small up to excess neutron number 10, and grows rapidly beyond; the weight of the core polarization term induced by the excess neutrons is modest and is the same for all nuclei. It is indicated that the Coulomb effect may explain the departure from the Lane model of nucleon charge-exchange scattering found for heavy nuclei, whereas the core polarization may account for the observed anomalous dependence of the deg 0 pion charge-exchange cross section on the number of excess neutrons. (author)

  13. Charge exchange in galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liyi; Mao, Junjie; de Plaa, Jelle; Raassen, A. J. J.; Shah, Chintan; Kaastra, Jelle S.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Though theoretically expected, the charge exchange emission from galaxy clusters has never been confidently detected. Accumulating hints were reported recently, including a rather marginal detection with the Hitomi data of the Perseus cluster. As previously suggested, a detection of charge exchange line emission from galaxy clusters would not only impact the interpretation of the newly discovered 3.5 keV line, but also open up a new research topic on the interaction between hot and cold matter in clusters. Aim. We aim to perform the most systematic search for the O VIII charge exchange line in cluster spectra using the RGS on board XMM-Newton. Methods: We introduce a sample of 21 clusters observed with the RGS. In order to search for O VIII charge exchange, the sample selection criterion is a >35σ detection of the O VIII Lyα line in the archival RGS spectra. The dominating thermal plasma emission is modeled and subtracted with a two-temperature thermal component, and the residuals are stacked for the line search. The systematic uncertainties in the fits are quantified by refitting the spectra with a varying continuum and line broadening. Results: By the residual stacking, we do find a hint of a line-like feature at 14.82 Å, the characteristic wavelength expected for oxygen charge exchange. This feature has a marginal significance of 2.8σ, and the average equivalent width is 2.5 × 10-4 keV. We further demonstrate that the putative feature can be barely affected by the systematic errors from continuum modeling and instrumental effects, or the atomic uncertainties of the neighboring thermal lines. Conclusions: Assuming a realistic temperature and abundance pattern, the physical model implied by the possible oxygen line agrees well with the theoretical model proposed previously to explain the reported 3.5 keV line. If the charge exchange source indeed exists, we expect that the oxygen abundance could have been overestimated by 8-22% in previous X

  14. ABC's of pion charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, W.R.; Kaufmann, W.B.; Siegel, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    Calculations of pion single charge exchange using the PWIA and DWIA are presented. Emphasis is given to the effects of absorbtion and blocking. A microscopic calculation of the 0 0 excitation and low energy angular distribution is in excellent agreement with the data. A fixed nucleon multiple scattering calculation of the pion double charge exchange reaction is presented. Various valence neutron wave functions are used, and the contributions of different spatial orientations of the last two neutrons to the reaction are examined. The DCX cross section is found to be very sensitive to the inclusion of correlations in the two-neutron wave function. Satisfactory agreement with DCX data on 14 C can be obtained using a nucleonic picture of the nucleus

  15. Measurement and Calculation of Absolute Single- and Multiple-Charge-Exchange Cross Sections for Feq+ Ions Impacting CO and CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simcic, J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory/Caltech; Schultz, David Robert [ORNL; Mawhorter, R. J. [Pomona College; Cadez, I. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Slovenia; Greenwood, J. B. [Queen' s University, Belfast; Chutjian, A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory/Caltech; Lisse, Carey M. [Johns Hopkins University; Smith, S. J. [Indiana Wesleyan University, Marion

    2010-01-01

    Absolute cross sections are reported for single, double, and triple charge exchange of Feq+ (q=5- 13) ions with CO and CO2. The highly-charged Fe ions are generated in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. Absolute data are derived from knowledge of the target gas pressure, target path length, and incident and charge-exchanged ion currents. Experimental results are compared with new calculations of these cross sections in the n-electron classical trajectory Monte-Carlo approximation, in which the ensuing radiative and non-radiative cascades are approximated with scaled hydrogenic transition probabilities and scaled Auger rates. The present data are needed in astrophysical applications of solar- and stellar-wind charge-exchange with comets, planetary atmospheres, and circumstellar clouds.

  16. Radiocarbon detection by ion charge exchange mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotchkis, Michael; Wei, Tao

    2007-01-01

    A method for detection of radiocarbon at low levels is described and the results of tests are presented. We refer to this method as ion charge exchange mass spectrometry (ICE-MS). The ICE-MS instrument is a two stage mass spectrometer. In the first stage, molecular interferences which would otherwise affect radiocarbon detection at mass 14 are eliminated by producing high charge state ions directly in the ion source (charge state ≥2). 14 N interference is eliminated in the second stage by converting the beam to negative ions in a charge exchange cell. The beam is mass-analysed at each stage. We have built a test apparatus consisting of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a pair of analysing magnets with a charge exchange cell in between, followed by an electrostatic analyser to improve the signal to background ratio. With this apparatus we have measured charge exchange probabilities for (C n+ → C - ) from 4.5 to 40.5 keV (n = 1-3). We have studied the sources of background including assessment of limits for nitrogen interference by searching for negative ions from charge exchange of 14 N ions. Our system has been used to detect 14 C in enriched samples of CO 2 gas with 14 C/ 12 C isotopic ratio down to the 10 -9 level. Combined with a measured sample consumption rate of 4 ng/s, this corresponds to a capability to detect transient signals containing only a few μBq of 14 C activity, such as may be obtained from chromatographic separation. The method will require further development to match the sensitivity of AMS with a gas ion source; however, even in its present state its sensitivity is well suited to tracer studies in biomedical research and drug development

  17. Experimental study on the influence of charge exchange on the stopping power in the interaction of chlorine with a gas and a deuterium plasma; Etude experimentale de l`influence des echanges de charges sur le pouvoir d`arret dans l`interaction d`ions chlore avec un gaz et un plasma de deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nectoux, Marie [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1998-01-06

    This thesis is placed in the context of the physics of energy deposition of a multicharged heavy ion beam in matter at intermediate energies. The experiment gave measurements of energy loss as a function of final charge state for chlorine ions at 1.7 MeV/u in deuterium gas or plasma. In this way, we explore the influence of charge state evolution, depending on experimentally measured capture and ionization cross sections and the electron density of the target, on energy loss. The target is cylindrical and enclosed by two fast valves. The plasma is created in the gas by a discharge, which induces a magnetic perturbation of the beam (lens effect). This effect induces a divergent and misaligned outgoing beam. A simulation including charge state and velocity evolution of the projectile in flight in the magnetic field has been made in order to optimize beam analysis, to reach a precision better than 10{sup -3} in energy measurement. This study led to removal of the target to the `Split Pole`, a refocusing magnetic spectrometer. The first results obtained clearly show the dependence of energy loss on exit charge and especially on its evolution in the target. This is explained in terms of the lengths covered by the projectile in its successive charge states in the target, which depends on target electron density and the medium considered. In plasma, we observed an energy distribution with exit charge twice that observed in gas, because of a strong decrease of charge exchange. A comparison of data obtained in gas with stopping power calculated from Bethe-Bloch-Barkas theory leads to the necessity of including spatial extension of the projectile charge in the theory. (author) 81 refs., 62 figs., 5tabs.

  18. μ+ charge exchange and muonium formation in low pressure gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, D.G.; Mikula, R.J.; Garner, D.M.

    1982-04-01

    Using the basic muon spin rotation technique, the fractions of energetic positive muons thermalizing in diamagnetic environments (fsub(μ)) or as the paramagnetic muonium atom (fsub(Mu)) have been measured in low pressure pure gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, H 2 , N 2 , NH 3 , and CH 4 ) as well as in several gas mixtures (Ne/Xe, Ne/Ar, Ne/NH 3 , Ne/CH 4 ). In the pure gases, the muonium fractions fsub(Mu) are generally found to be smaller than expected from analogous proton charge exchange studies, particularly in the molecular gases. This is probably due to hot atom reactions of muonium following the charge exchange regime. Comparisons with monium formation in condensed matter as well as positronium formation in gases are also presented. In the gas mixtures, the addition of only a few hundred ppm of a dopant gas, which is exothermic for muonium formation (e.g. Xe), gives rise to an fsub(Mu) characteristic of the pure dopant gas itself, demonstrating the importance of the neutralization process right down to thermal energies. In all cases, the experimental signal amplitudes are found to be strongly pressure dependent, which is interpreted in terms of the time spent by the muon as neutral muonium in the charge exchange regime: tsub(n) < 0.2 ns. This time is generally shorter in the case of molecular gases than in rare gases

  19. The effect of charge exchange with neutral deuterium on carbon emission in JET divertor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggi, C.; Horton, L.; Summers, H.

    1999-11-01

    High density, low temperature divertor plasma operation in tokamaks results in large neutral deuterium concentrations in the divertor volume. In these conditions, low energy charge transfer reactions between neutral deuterium and the impurity ions can in principle enhance the impurity radiative losses and thus help to reduce the maximum heat load to the divertor target. A quantitative study of the effect of charge exchange on carbon emission is presented, applied to the JET divertor. Total and state selective effective charge exchange recombination rate coefficients were calculated in the collisional radiative picture. These coefficients were coupled to divertor and impurity transport models to study the effect of charge exchange on the measured carbon spectral emission in JET divertor discharges. The sensitivity of the effect of charge exchange to the assumptions in the impurity transport model was also investigated. A reassessment was made of fundamental charge exchange cross section data in support of this study. (author)

  20. The effect of charge exchange with neutral deuterium on carbon emission in JET divertor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggi, C.F.; Horton, L.D.; Summers, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    High-density, low-temperature divertor plasma operation in tokamaks results in large neutral deuterium concentrations in the divertor volume. Under these conditions, low-energy charge transfer reactions between neutral deuterium and the impurity ions can, in principle, enhance the impurity radiative losses and thus help to reduce the maximum heat load to the divertor target. A quantitative study of the effect of charge exchange on carbon emission is presented, and applied to the JET divertor. Total and state-selective effective charge exchange recombination rate coefficients were calculated in the collisional radiative picture. These coefficients were coupled to divertor and impurity transport models in order to study the effect of charge exchange on the measured carbon spectral emission in JET divertor discharges. The sensitivity of the effect of charge exchange to the assumptions in the impurity transport model was also investigated. A reassessment of fundamental charge exchange cross section data in support of this study was made. (author)

  1. Elastic scattering and charge exchange reactions with exotic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Cortina-Gil, M.D.; Mittig, W.; Alamanos, N.; Auger, F.; Fekou-Youmbi, V.; Barrette, J.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Frascaria, N.; Al-Khalili, J.

    1996-01-01

    The elastic scattering of 6 He, 10,11 Be secondary beams on a (CH 2 ) 3 target and the charge exchange reaction p( 6 He, 6 Li)n have been measured. Very good agreement was found for the 6 He+ 12 C data with a four-body eikonal scattering model. A microscopic optical potential was used to reproduce the proton-nucleus elastic scattering data. (author)

  2. Nuclear structure and the single charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.; Strottman, D.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of nuclear structure on meson-induced single-charge-exchange reactions on light nuclei is discussed within the context of the Glauber approximation. Selection rules which are expected to be approximately obeyed in elastic and inelastic pion and kaon scattering are proposed. Theoretical predictions are presented for (π + ,π 0 ) and (K + ,K 0 ) reactions on 13 C. 14 figures

  3. Pion double charge exchange and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginocchio, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    Pion double charge exchange to both the double-analog state and the ground state is studied for medium weight nuclei. The relative cross section of these two transitions and the importance of nuclear structure as a function of pion kinetic energy is examined. 16 figs., 5 tabs

  4. Charge exchange in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bransden, B.H.

    1990-01-01

    Charge exchange reactions in which electrons are transferred from one ion (or atom) to another during a collision have been studied both as interesting examples of rearrangement collisions and because of important applications in plasma physics. This article reviews the modern theory developed for use at non-relativistic energies, but excluding the thermal and very low energy region. (author)

  5. Charge exchange processes of high energy heavy ions channeled in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriamonje, S.; Dural, J.; Toulemonde, M.; Groeneveld, K.O.; Maier, R.; Quere, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction of moving ions with single crystals is very sensitive to the orientation of the incident beam with respect to the crystalline directions of the target. The experiments show that high energy heavy ion channeling deeply modifies the slowing down and charge exchange processes. In this review, we describe the opportunity offered by channeling conditions to study the charge exchange processes. Some aspects of the charge exchange processes with high energy channeled heavy ions are selected from the extensive literature published over the past few years on this subject. Special attention is given to the work performed at the GANIL facility on the study of Radiative Electron Capture (REG), Electron Impact Ionisation (EII), and convoy electron emission. Finally we emphasize the interest of studying resonant charge exchange processes such as Resonant Coherent Excitation (RCE), Resonant Transfer and Excitation (RTE) or Dielectronic Recombination (DR) and the recently proposed Nuclear Excitation by Electron Capture (NEEC)

  6. Double charge exchange of pions on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhibuti, R.I.; Kezerashvili, R.Y.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is made of the results of experimental and theoretical studies during the last ten years of a unique process: double charge exchange of pions on nuclei. On the one hand, the commissioning of meson factories and the use of new and more accurate experimental methods have led to the accumulation of rich and reliable material for not only light but also medium and heavy nuclei. On the other hand, the development and application of new microscopic theoretical approaches have led to a deepening of our ideas about the mechanism of these exotic reactions at low, intermediate, and high energies. The currently existing methods of theoretical investigation and all possible reaction mechanisms are considered. Particular attention is devoted to double charge exchange of pions on the lightest nuclei, for the theoretical description of which it is possible to use the well-developed methods for investigating few-particle systems. The experimental investigations of double-isobar analog and nonanalog transitions in the reaction of double charge exchange are systematized

  7. Production of antihydrogen via double charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muellers, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition of antihydrogen confined in a neutral atom trap and comparison with the equivalent spectral line in hydrogen will provide an accurate test of CPT symmetry and the first one in a mixed baryon-lepton system. Also, with neutral antihydrogen atoms, the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter can be tested unperturbed by the much stronger Coulomb forces. Antihydrogen is regularly produced at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator by three-body-recombination (TBR) of one antiproton and two positrons. The method requires injecting antiprotons into a cloud of positrons, which raises the average temperature of the antihydrogen atoms produced way above the typical 0.5 K trap depths of neutral atom traps. Therefore only very few antihydrogen atoms can be confined at a time. Precision measurements, like laser spectroscopy, will greatly benefit from larger numbers of simultaneously trapped antihydrogen atoms. Therefore, the ATRAP collaboration developed a different production method that has the potential to create much larger numbers of cold, trappable antihydrogen atoms. Positrons and antiprotons are stored and cooled in a Penning trap in close proximity. Laser excited cesium atoms collide with the positrons, forming Rydberg positronium, a bound state of an electron and a positron. The positronium atoms are no longer confined by the electric potentials of the Penning trap and some drift into the neighboring cloud of antiprotons where, in a second charge exchange collision, they form antihydrogen. The antiprotons remain at rest during the entire process, so much larger numbers of trappable antihydrogen atoms can be produced. Laser excitation is necessary to increase the efficiency of the process since the cross sections for charge-exchange collisions scale with the fourth power of the principal quantum number n. This method, named double charge-exchange, was demonstrated by ATRAP in 2004. Since then, ATRAP constructed a new combined

  8. Charge exchange processes involving iron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phaneuf, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A review and evaluation is given of the experimental data which are available for charge exchange processes involving iron ions and neutral H, H 2 and He. Appropriate scaling laws are presented, and their accuracy estimated for these systems. A bibliography is given of available data sources, as well as of useful data compilations and review articles. A procedure is recommended for providing single approximate formulae to the fusion community to describe total cross sections for electron capture by partially-stripped Fe/sup q+/ ions in collisions with H, H 2 and He, based on the scaling relationships suggested by Janev and Hvelplund

  9. Gas target neutron generator studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatoorgoon, V.

    1978-01-01

    The need for an intense neutron source for the study of radiation damage on materials has resulted in the proposal of various solid, liquid, and gas targets. Among the gas targets proposed have been the transonic gas target, two types of hypersonic gas target, and the subsonic gas target (SGT). It has been suggested that heat deposition in a subsonic channel might create a gas density step which would constitute an attractive gas target type. The first part of the present study examines this aspect of the SGT and shows that gas density gradients are indeed formed by heat deposition in subsonic flow. The variation of beam voltage, gas density, gas pressure, and gas temperature within the channel have been calculated as functions of the system parameters: beam voltage, beam current, channel diameter, stagnation tank temperature and pressure. The analysis is applicable to any beam particle and target gas. For the case of T + on D 2 , which is relevant to the fusion application, the 14 MeV neutron profiles are presented as a function of system parameters. It is found that the SGT is compatible with concentrated intense source operation. The possibility of instability was investigated in detail using a non-linear analysis which made it possible to follow the complete time development of the SGT. It was found that the SGT is stable against all small perturbations and certain types of large perturbations. It appears that the SGT is the most advantageous type of gas target, operating at a lower mass flow and less severe stagnation tank conditions than the other types. The second part of the thesis examines a problem associated with the straight hypersonic target, the deuterium spill into the tritium port. The regime of practical operation for this target is established. (auth)

  10. X-ray Signature of Charge Exchange in the Spectra of L-shell Iron Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Schweikhard, L; Liebisch, P; Brown, G V

    2007-01-05

    The X-ray signature of charge exchange between highly charged L-shell iron ions and neutral gas atoms was studied in the laboratory in order to assess its diagnostic utility. Significant differences with spectra formed by electron-impact excitation were observed. In particular, a strong enhancement was found of the emission corresponding to n {le} 4 {yields} n = 2 transitions relative to the n = 3 {yields} n = 2 emission. This enhancement was detectable even with relatively low-resolution X-ray instrumentation (E/{Delta}E {approx} 10) and may enable future identification of charge exchange as a line-formation mechanism in astrophysical spectra.

  11. Charge exchange recombination x-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawachi, Tetsuya; Namba, Shinichi; Kado, Masataka; Tanaka, Momoko; Hasegawa, Noboru; Nagashima, Keisuke; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2001-01-01

    A recombining plasma x-ray laser using charge exchange recombination (CXR) is proposed. Fully stripped carbon ions collide with neutral He atoms and become excited hydrogenlike carbon ions, in which the excited levels with n=3 or 4 are mainly populated. We calculate the gain coefficients of the Balmer α and the Lyman β line of the hydrogenlike carbon ions by the use of a collisional-radiative model in which the CXR process is included. The calculated result shows that substantial gain can be generated for the Lyman β and Balmer α lines and that the gain of the Balmer α line can be strongly enhanced by the effect of CXR. We also report a preliminary experiment of this scheme. (author)

  12. Systematics of pion double charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, R.A.

    1985-10-01

    Differential cross sections have been measured for pion-induced double-charge-exchange (DCX) reactions leading to double-isobaric-analog states (DIAS) and low-lying nonanalog states in the residual nuclei. A description of the experimental details and data analysis is presented. The experimentally observed systematics of reactions leading to DIAS, to nonanalog ground states, and to low-lying 2 + states are described. Lowest-order optical-model calculations of DIAS DCX are compared to the data. Efforts to understand the anomalies by invoking additional reaction-mechanism amplitudes and a higher-order optical potential are described. Calculations of nonanalog DCX reactions leading to J/sup π/ = 0 + states were performed within a distorted-wave impulse-approximation framework. The sensitivities of these calculations to input parameters are discussed. 58 refs., 41 figs., 16 tabs

  13. Systematics of pion double charge exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, R.A.

    1985-10-01

    Differential cross sections have been measured for pion-induced double-charge-exchange (DCX) reactions leading to double-isobaric-analog states (DIAS) and low-lying nonanalog states in the residual nuclei. A description of the experimental details and data analysis is presented. The experimentally observed systematics of reactions leading to DIAS, to nonanalog ground states, and to low-lying 2 states are described. Lowest-order optical-model calculations of DIAS DCX are compared to the data. Efforts to understand the anomalies by invoking additional reaction-mechanism amplitudes and a higher-order optical potential are described. Calculations of nonanalog DCX reactions leading to J/sup / = 0 states were performed within a distorted-wave impulse-approximation framework. The sensitivities of these calculations to input parameters are discussed. 58 refs., 41 figs., 16 tabs.

  14. Pion double charge exchange in the Δ33 resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirzba, A.; Toki, H.; Siciliano, E.R.; Johnson, M.B.; Gilman, R.

    1989-01-01

    We examine the model dependence and nuclear-structure sensitivity of several Δ 33 -dominated processes contributing to pion double charge exchange on nuclei in the region of the Δ 33 resonance. These processes include the Δ 33 -nucleon interaction V NΔ and sequential scattering, in which the pion undergoes single charge exchange on two different nucleons. In all cases, the scattering takes place through the exchange of an intermediate π and ρ meson. Sequential-mediated double charge exchange is found to be only moderately sensitive to short-range correlations, meson-nucleon form factors, and the rho meson, whereas V NΔ -mediated double charge exchange is very sensitive to all these effects. Results are given for double charge exchange on 18 O (double isobaric analog transitions) and 16 O (nonanalog transitions). Sequential double charge exchange is shown to favor non-spin-flip matrix elements of the transition operator whereas V NΔ -mediated double charge exchange favors spin-flip matrix elements. The energy dependence of the zero-degree cross sections for V NΔ and sequential scattering are also different: Sequential tends to increase monotonically from 100 to 300 MeV, whereas V NΔ peaks at about 150 MeV. The delta-nucleon interaction is found likely to dominate over sequential scattering in nonanalog double charge exchange. The V NΔ is also large in analog double charge exchange, but it does not enable us to explain the anomalous behavior of the 18 O differential cross sections

  15. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M(+.) decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  16. Active neutral particle diagnostics on LHD by locally enhanced charge exchange on an impurity pellet ablation cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, P.R.; Ozaki, T.; Sudo, S.; Tamura, N.; Kalinina, D.V.; Veshchev, E.A.

    2005-01-01

    Production, confinement and thermalization of high-energy particles are the fundamental issues in fusion plasma ion kinetics. The ion distribution function and its evolution under the ion cyclotron heating and neutral beam injection are studied by energy resolved charge exchange neutral flux measurements. For helical systems, such as LHD, local diagnostics are required due to the complex 3D magnetic field. In passive methods one needs to analyze the integral relation between the plasma ion distribution function and the observed neutral flux, which is a superposition along the diagnostic sightline, taking into account the charge exchange target density profile. In active measurements either a diagnostic neutral beam or a solid pellet injection are used to enhance the charge exchange locally. An impurity pellet ablation cloud r cloud plasma provides a localized charge exchange target scanning the plasma radially. Pellet-induced neutral fluxes were previously measured on LHD with a natural diamond detector. However, obtaining the energy spectra from these data in the main energy range of interest (10 1 -10 2 keV in the present experiments) is complicated due to the high operating speed, i.e. the spatial resolution requirement. A new diagnostic based on a compact neutral particle analyser (CNPA) has been installed on LHD for measurements in the H 0 energy range 1 - 170 keV. CNPA employs a thin 50 A diamond-like carbon stripping film instead of a traditional gas stripping cell, a high-field-strength permanent analysing magnet and an array of 40 channel electron multipliers (CEMs) for particle detection. CEMs can be used in both counting and current modes to be able to process high neutral particle fluxes from the charge exchange on the dense pellet cloud. Thus, the system is suitable for both passive measurements and the active probing with a diagnostic pellet. Pneumatically accelerated polystyrene (-C 8 H 8 -) n balls are injected transversally; typical D pel = 500

  17. Fixed target flammable gas upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.; Squires, B.; Gasteyer, T.; Richardson, R.

    1996-12-01

    In the past, fixed target flammable gas systems were not supported in an organized fashion. The Research Division, Mechanical Support Department began to support these gas systems for the 1995 run. This technical memo describes the new approach being used to supply chamber gasses to fixed target experiments at Fermilab. It describes the engineering design features, system safety, system documentation and performance results. Gas mixtures provide the medium for electron detection in proportional and drift chambers. Usually a mixture of a noble gas and a polyatomic quenching gas is used. Sometimes a small amount of electronegative gas is added as well. The mixture required is a function of the specific chamber design, including working voltage, gain requirements, high rate capability, aging and others. For the 1995 fixed target run all the experiments requested once through gas systems. We obtained a summary of problems from the 1990 fixed target run and made a summary of the operations logbook entries from the 1991 run. These summaries primarily include problems involving flammable gas alarms, but also include incidents where Operations was involved or informed. Usually contamination issues were dealt with by the experimenters. The summaries are attached. We discussed past operational issues with the experimenters involved. There were numerous incidents of drift chamber failure where contaminated gas was suspect. However analyses of the gas at the time usually did not show any particular problems. This could have been because the analysis did not look for the troublesome component, the contaminant was concentrated in the gas over the liquid and vented before the sample was taken, or that contaminants were drawn into the chambers directly through leaks or sub-atmospheric pressures. After some study we were unable to determine specific causes of past contamination problems, although in argon-ethane systems the problems were due to the ethane only

  18. Forward pion-nucleon charge exchange reaction and Regge constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Fei; Sibirtsev, A.; Krewald, S.; Hanhart, C.; Haidenbauer, J.; Meibner, U.-G.

    2009-01-01

    We present our recent study of pion-nucleon charge exchange amplitudes above 2 GeV. We analyze the forward pion-nucleon charge exchange reaction data in a Regge model and compare the resulting amplitudes with those from the Karlsruhe-Helsinki and George-Washington-University partial-wave analyses. We explore possible high-energy constraints for theoretical baryon resonance analyses in the energy region above 2 GeV. Our results show that for the pion-nucleon charge exchange reaction, the appropriate energy region for matching meson-nucleon dynamics to diffractive scattering should be around 3 GeV for the helicity flip amplitude. (authors)

  19. Charge exchange in slow collisions of Si3+ with H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, D. C.; Saha, B. C.

    2010-10-01

    Low energy electron capture from atomic hydrogen by multi-charged ions continues to be of interest and has wide applications including both magnetically confined^ fusion and astrophysical plasmas. The charge exchange process reported here, Si^3+ + H -- Si^2+ + H^+ is an important destruction mechanism of Si^3+ in photo-ionized gas. The soft X-ray emission from comets has been explained by charge transfer of solar wind ions, among them Si^3+, with neutrals in the cometary gas vapor. The state selective cross sections are evaluated using the semi-classical molecular orbital close coupling (MOCC) [1] methods. Adiabatic potentials and wave functions for a number of low-lying singlet and triplet states are calculated using the MRD-CI package [2]. Details will be presented at the conference. [1] M. Kimura and N. F. Lane, At. Mol. Opt. Phys 26, 79 (1990). [3] R. J. Buenker, ``Current Aspects of Quantum Chemistry'' 1981, Vol 21, edited by R. Carbo (Elsevier, Amsterdam) p 17.

  20. Proceedings of the LAMPF workshop on pion double charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, H.W.; Leitch, M.J.

    1985-09-01

    Experimental and theoretical aspects of double-analog, nonanalog, and continuum pion double charge exchange in the 50- to 310-MeV energy range are covered. Separate abstracts were prepared for 22 papers in these proceedings

  1. Single- and double-charge exchange at low pion energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, H.W.

    1991-01-01

    A review is given of pion single- and double-charge exchange reactions at incident energies of 25 to 65 MeV leading to isobaric analog states, and in the case of double-charge exchange leading to the ground state of the residual nucleus. The crucial role of the higher nuclear transparency at low pion energies for the analysis of the data in terms of single and double scattering is demonstrated. The large effects on double-charge exchange produced by the spatial correlations in nuclear wave functions are evident. The data on 1f 7/2 nuclei at 35 MeV are used to establish the general validity of a shell-model-based two-amplitude model for these transitions. Recent measurements of the energy dependence between 25 and 65 MeV of double-charge exchange cross sections at forward angles are presented and discussed. 33 refs., 19 figs

  2. Charge-exchange reactions with a secondary triton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Sherrill, B M; Austin, S M; Bazin, D; Berg, A; Berg, G P A; Caggiano, J; Daito, I; Fujimura, H; Fujita, Y; Fujiwara, M; Hara, K; Harakeh, M N; Jänecke, J; Kawabata, T; Navin, A; Roberts, D A; Steiner, M

    1999-01-01

    A secondary triton beam from fragmentation of 560-MeV alpha-particles has been used in a high-resolution (t, sup 3 He) charge-exchange experiment at intermediate bombarding energies. The experiment was carried out at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory using a sup 4 He beam from the K1200 cyclotron. The radioactive triton beam of (0.5-1.0)x10 sup 6 particles/s with a mean energy of 350 MeV was produced in a production target of the A1200 fragment separator and transported to the target position of the S800 magnetic spectrometer. Ray-tracing and dispersion-matching techniques were employed to detect sup 3 He particles from the sup 1 sup 2 C(t, sup 3 He) sup 1 sup 2 B reaction near 0 deg. . An energy resolution of DELTA E approx 160 keV or DELTA E/E approx 4.6x10 sup - sup 4 (FWHM) was achieved. This is an improvement over our previous results and opens the possibility for studying high-resolution (n,p)-type reactions at intermediate bombarding energies. (author)

  3. Charge exchange signatures in x-ray line emission accompanying plasma-wall interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Renner, Oldřich; Dalimier, E.; Liska, R.; Oks, E.; Šmíd, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 397, č. 1 (2012), s. 1-6 ISSN 1742-6588 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/0814; GA ČR GAP208/10/2302; GA AV ČR IAAX00100903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * particle jets generation * plasma-wall interaction * x-ray spectroscopy * charge exchange Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  4. Charge exchange and energy loss of slowed down heavy ions channeled in silicon crystals; Echanges de charge et perte d'energie d'ions lourds ralentis, canalises dans des cristaux de silicium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, E

    2005-10-15

    This work is devoted to the study of charge exchange processes and of the energy loss of highly charged heavy ions channeled in thin silicon crystals. The two first chapters present the techniques of heavy ion channeling in a crystal, the ion-electron processes and the principle of our simulations (charge exchange and trajectory of channeled ions). The next chapters describe the two experiments performed at the GSI facility in Darmstadt, the main results of which follow: the probability per target atom of the mechanical capture (MEC) of 20 MeV/u U{sup 91+} ions as a function of the impact parameter (with the help of our simulations), the observation of the strong polarization of the target electron gas by the study of the radiative capture and the slowing down of Pb{sup 81+} ions from 13 to 8,5 MeV/u in channeling conditions for which electron capture is strongly reduced. (author)

  5. Laboratory Studies of X-ray Spectra Formed by Charge Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, Peter; Ali, R.; Brown, G. V.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porter, F.

    2013-04-01

    Charge exchange between ions and neutral atoms or molecules has been accepted at an important soft producing process in our solar system. By extension, charge exchange may contribute to the X-ray emission of circumstellar material. It may also produce X-ray emission at the boundaries of supernova ejecta and star burst galaxies, or whenever hot plasma collides with neutral matter. X-ray spectra of K-shell and L-shell ions formed by charge exchange have now been studied in a variety of laboratory settings. These experiments have shown several characteristic features of line formation by charge exchange when compared to the X-ray emission produced by electron-impact excitation, e.g., enhancement emission of forbidden lines and of lines from levels with high principal quantum number. They have also shown a dependence on the interaction gas and on the energy of the ion-neutral collision. Moreover, the transfer of multiple electrons is typically preferred, provided the donor molecules or atoms have multiple valence-shell electrons. The laboratory measurements are in qualitative agreement with theory. However, the details of the observed X-ray spectra, especially those recorded with high spectral resolution, can differ substantially from predictions, especially for spectra produced at collision velocities equal to or lower than those found in thermal plasmas or produced with neutral gases other than atomic hydrogen. Puzzling discrepancies can be noted, such as enhanced emission from an upper level with the 'wrong' principal quantum number. Even more puzzling is a recent experiment in which two, co-mixed bare ion species of similar atomic number produce very different Lyman series emission upon charge exchange with a given neutral gas, defying both theoretical predictions and empirical scaling. Laboratory measurements have also shown that some of the characteristic features of charge exchange can be reproduced by radiative electron capture, i.e., by capture of a continuum

  6. Elastic scattering and charge exchange reaction studies with 6He, 10,11Be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Cortina-Gil, M.D.; Mittig, W.; Casandjian, J.M.; Chartier, M.; Alamanos, N.; Auger, F.; Fekou-Youmbi, V.; Blumenfeld, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The elastic scattering and charge exchange reaction of 6 He, 10,11 Be secondary beams on proton and 12 C targets have been measured. The combined use of SISSI and SPEG allowed to obtain very good quality data in terms of energy and angular resolution. Preliminary analyses of the angular distributions using global parameter set for the optical model potentials, as well as more microscopic approaches are presented. (author)

  7. Excitation of the Δ resonance in heavy ion charge exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy-Stephan, M.

    1987-06-01

    Results on the Δ excitation by heavy ion charge exchange are presented. 900 MeV per nucleon 12 C, 16 0, 20 Ne and 1100 MeV per nucleon 12 C have been used. The Δ excitation strength depends on the projectile - ejectile nature and on the incident energy. The role of the target mass is also discussed. The peak for the Δ in nuclei is energy shifted from the free Δ peak

  8. Study of multi-electron ionization and charge exchange in HIBF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Linchun

    Beam ion stripping on background gases or plasma in a Heavy Ion Beam Fusion (HIBF) chamber increases the charge state of the beam and the diameter of the focus, complicating the final focusing on the focusing target. To model beam transport in the chamber, it is necessary to know the beam charge-state evolution, including both ionization and charge exchange dynamics. The main objective of this research is to explore theoretical approaches including scaling law. Improved models are developed to calculate multi-electron loss, especially ion stripping and charge exchange cross sections, for both near-term experiments and future power plant scale HIBF research. First, a new space-charge neutralization approach that uses electron injection is proposed for the ion beam transport in HIBF chamber. An analytical study was performed to illustrate the plasma dynamics and final neutralization effects with this technique. The results examine the effect of different injected electron profiles. Next, to improve the accuracy of such simulations, methods to improve cross sections of ionization and charge exchange are studied. Both classical and quantum mechanical approaches are examined. Attention is focused on the interaction by low-charge-state heavy ions. Multi-electron processes for dressed ions, including screening and anti-screening effects, internuclear forces, are given special attention, This analysis is complex and requires a combining several different theoretical approaches. Finally, a Classic Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) model based on an improvement of Olson's n-body CTMC method is presented. This model solves the n-body ion-atom ionization problem in a regime of intent to HIBF. In the paper, a new and complete computational module for these interactions has been developed. The cross section data for Xe, Cs, and Bi ions colliding with various background gases (Xe, N2, Ar and Flibe) is presented. After the calculation of the cross section data, the predicted energy

  9. Absolute Charge Exchange Cross Sections for ^3He^2+ Collisions with ^4He and H_2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawhorter, R. J.; Greenwood, J.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2002-05-01

    The JPL charge exchange beam-line(J.B. Greenwood, et al., Phys. Rev A 63), 062707 (2001) was modified to increase the forward acceptance angle and enable the measurement of total charge-exchange cross sections for slow, light, highly-charged ion collisions with neutral targets(R. E. Olson and M. Kimura, J. Phys. B 15), 4231 (1982). Data are presented for single charge exchange cross sections for ^3He^2+ nuclei scattered by ^4He and H2 in the energy range 0.33-4.67 keV/amu. For both targets there is good agreement with Kusakabe, et al.(T. Kusakabe, et al., J. Phys. Soc. Japan 59), 1218 (1990). Angular collection is studied by a comparison with differential measurements(D. Bordenave-Montesquieu and R. Dagnac, J. Phys. B 27), 543 (1994), as well as with earlier JPL results(J.B. Greenwood, et al., Ap. J. 533), L175 (2000), ibid. 529, 605 (2000) using heavier projectiles and targets. This work was carried out at JPL/Caltech, and was supported through contract with NASA. RJM thanks the NRC for a Senior Associateship at JPL.

  10. Resonance charge exchange mechanism at high and moderate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, A.V.; Gevorkyan, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    Charge exchange mechanisms at high and medium energies are investigated, ta king the resonance charge exchange of a proton by an hydrogen atom as an example . It is established that there are two classical charge exchange mechanisms rel ated to direct proton knockout from the bound state and one quantum-mechanical mechanism corresponding to the electron tunnelling from one bound state to anoth er. The classical cross-section diverges for two of these mechanisms, and the quasiclassical scattering amplitude must be calculated on the base of a complex classical trajectory. Physical grounds for the choice of such trajectories are discussed and calculations of the Van Vleck determinant for these mechanisms a re presented. Contributions from different mechanisms to the total charge excha nge cross-section are analyzed. A comparison with experimental data and results of other authors is made

  11. Charge exchange reactions and the efficiency of solar neutrino detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, S.M.; Anantaraman, N.; Love, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    The efficiencies of solar neutrino detectors are often based in part on weak interaction strengths determined by (p,n) and other charge exchange reactions. Although the (p,n) determinations are surprisingly good, it is shown that they may be inaccurate for important Gamow-Teller transitions whose strengths are a small fraction of the sum rule limit. This emphasizes the importance of direct calibration with ν sources for detectors such as 127 I and 115 In where direct β-decay information cannot be obtained. It may also bear on recent attempts to compare charge exchange and beta decay in the mass-37 system

  12. The asymptotic theory of resonance charge exchange between diatomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yevsyev, A.V.; Radtsig, A.A.; Smirnov, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    The asymptotic theory of resonance charge exchange between a ground-state diatomic molecular ion and its neutral parent is presented. The parameters of the valence electron wavefunction and asymptotically precise exchange interaction potential are calculated. The role of rotational transitions is discussed. The vibrational excitation transfer is taken into account and the coupled equations, describing the charge exchange process between diatomics are solved both in limiting cases and numerically. The total charge transfer cross sections are calculated for many diatomic systems and the results are compared with experimental data. (author)

  13. O--H charge exchange in cold, dense, hydrogen plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.A.; Dylla, H.F.

    1977-05-01

    It is pointed out that the accidentally resonant charge exchange reaction, O + + H 0 reverse arrows O 0 + H + , is an important mechanism for causing the loss of singly charged oxygen ions from oxygen contaminated hydrogen plasmas. Results of a Monte Carlo simulation are presented which show that the fraction of oxygen lost because of charge exchange exceeds 1 / 3 when the parameters n/sub e/ approx. 10 13 cm -3 , n/sub H//sup o/ approx. 10 11 cm -3 and T/sub e/ approx. 3 eV are attained

  14. Study of proton polarization in charge exchange process on optically oriented sodium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenskij, A.N.; Kokhanovskij, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    Using high-power adjustable dye lasers for electron spin orientation in a charge-exchange target enables to significantly increase the proton polarization efficiency. A device is described that permits to avoid growth of the polarized proton beam emittance in a charge-exchange process in a strong magnetic field. The devise main feature is the use of an intensive source of neutral hydrogen atoms and the presence of a helium additional charge-exchange target which actualy is a proton ''source''. The helium charge-exchange cell is placed in the same magnetic field of a solenoid where a cell with oriented sodium is placed, a polarized electron being captured by a proton in the latter cell. In this case the beam at the solenoid inlet and outlet is in a neutral state; emittance growth related to the effect of end magnetic fields is not observed. The device after all prouduces polarized protons, their polarization degree is measured and the effect of various factors on polarization degree is studied. The description of the laser source and laser system is given. Measurement results have shown the beam intensity of neutral 7 keV atoms which passed through a polarizer to be 2 mA. The proton current doesn't depend. On the beeld fin the region of chrge exchange for the 8 kGs magnetic field. The degree of sodium polarization was 80% and polarized proton current approximately 70 μA at a temperature of the polarized sodium cell corresponding to the density of sodium vapar approximately 3x10 13 at/cm 2

  15. Charge exchange spectroscopy as a fast ion diagnostic on TEXTOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delabie, E.; Jaspers, R.J.E.; von Hellermann, M.G.

    2008-01-01

    An upgraded charge exchange spectroscopy diagnostic has been taken into operation at the TEXTOR tokamak. The angles of the viewing lines with the toroidal magnetic field are close to the pitch angles at birth of fast ions injected by one of the neutral beam injectors. Using another neutral beam...

  16. Observed Limits on Charge Exchange Contributions to the Diffuse X-Ray Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowder, S. G.; Barger, K. A.; Brandl, D. E.; Eckart, M. E.; Galeazzi, M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; McCammon, D.; Pfendner, C. G.; Porter, F. S.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present a high-resolution spectrum of the diffuse X-ray background from 0.1 to 1 keV for an approximately 1 sr region of the sky centered at l = 90 degrees b = +60 degrees using a 36 pixel array of microcalorimeters flown on a sounding rocket. With an energy resolution of 11 eV FWHM below 1 keV, the spectrum s observed line ratios help separate charge exchange contributions originating within the heliosphere from thermal emission of hot gas in the interstellar medium. The X-ray sensitivity below 1 keV was reduced by about a factor of four from contamination that occurred early in the flight, limiting the significance of the results. The observed centroid of helium-like O VII is 568 (sup +2 (sub -3) eV at 90% confidence. Since the centroid expected for thermal emission is 568.4 eV and for charge exchange is 564.2 eV, thermal emission appears to dominate for this line complex. The dominance of thermal emission is consistent with much of the high-latitude O VII emission originating in 2-3 x 10(exp 6) K gas in the Galactic halo. On the other hand, the observed ratio of C VI Lygamma to Lyalpha is 0.3 plus or minus 0.2. The expected ratios are 0.04 for thermal emission and 0.24 for charge exchange, indicating that charge exchange must contribute strongly to this line and therefore potentially to the rest of the ROSAT R12 band usually associated with 10(sup 6) K emission from the Local Hot Bubble. The limited statistics of this experiment and systematic uncertainties due to the contamination require only greater than 32% thermal emission for O VII and greater than 20% from charge exchange for C VI at the 90% confidence level. An experimental gold coating on the silicon substrate of the array greatly reduced extraneous signals induced on nearby pixels from cosmic rays passing through the substrate, reducing the triggered event rate by a factor of 15 from a previous flight of the instrument.

  17. Signatures of the electron saddle swaps mechanism in the photon spectra following charge-exchange collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otranto, Sebastian

    2014-10-01

    During the last few years, several experimental and theoretical studies have focused on state selective charge exchange processes between charged ions and alkali metals. These data are of particular importance for the tokamak nuclear fusion reactor program, since diagnostics on the plasma usually rely on charge-exchange spectroscopy. In this sense, alkali metals, have been proposed as potential alternatives to excited hydrogen/deuterium for which laboratory experiments are not feasible at present. In this talk, we present our recent work involving ion collisions with alkali metals. Oscillatory structures in the angular differential charge-exchange cross sections obtained using the MOTRIMS technique are correctly described by classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations. These oscillations are found to originate from the number of swaps the electron undergoes around the projectile-target potential saddle before capture takes place and are very prominent at impact energies below 10 keV/amu. Moreover, cross sections of higher order of differentiability also indicate that the swaps leave distinctive signatures in the (n,l)-state selective cross sections and in the photon line emission cross sections. Oscillatory structures for the x-ray hardness ratio parameter are also predicted. In collaboration with Ronnie Hoekstra, Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen and Ronald Olson, Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology.

  18. Measurement of pion double charge exchange on carbon-13, carbon-14, magnesium-26, and iron-56

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, P.A.

    1985-02-01

    Cross sections for the /sup 13,14/C, 26 Mg, 56 Fe(π + ,π - )/sup 13,14/O, 26 Si, 56 Ni reactions were measured with the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility for 120 less than or equal to T/sub π/ less than or equal to 292 MeV and 0 less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 50. The double isobaric analog states (DIAS) are of primary interest. In addition, cross sections for transitions to 14 O(0 + , 5.92 MeV), 14 O(2 + , 7.77 MeV), 56 Ni(gs), 13 O(gs), and 13 O(4.21 MeV) are presented. The 13 O(4.21 MeV) state is postulated to have J/sup π/ = 1/2 - . The data are compared to previously measured double-charge-exchange cross sections on other nuclei, and the systematics of double charge exchange on T greater than or equal to 1 target nuclei leading to the DIAS are studied. Near the Δ 33 resonance, cross sections for the DIAS transitions are in disagreement with calculations in which the reaction is treated as sequential charge exchange through the free pion-nucleon amplitude, while for T/sub π/ > 200 MeV the anomalous features of the 164 MeV data are not apparent. This is evidence for significant higher order contributions to the double-charge-exchange amplitude near the reasonable energy. Two theoretical approaches that include two nucleon processes are applied to the DIAS data. 64 references

  19. Oxygen ionization rates at Mars and Venus - Relative contributions of impact ionization and charge exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Nagy, A. F.; Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1993-01-01

    Oxygen ion production rates above the ionopauses of Venus and Mars are calculated for photoionization, charge exchange, and solar wind electron impact ionization processes. The latter two require the use of the Spreiter and Stahara (1980) gas dynamic model to estimate magnetosheath velocities, densities, and temperatures. The results indicate that impact ionization is the dominant mechanism for the production of O(+) ions at both Venus and Mars. This finding might explain both the high ion escape rates measured by Phobos 2 and the greater mass loading rate inferred for Venus from the bow shock positions.

  20. Tensor exchange amplitudes in K +- N charge exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svec, M.

    1979-01-01

    Tensor (A 2 ) exchange amplitudes in K +- N charge exchange (CEX) are constructed from the K +- N CEX data supplemented by information on the vector (rho) exchange amplitudes from πN sca tering. We observed new features in the t-structure of A 2 exchange amplitudes which contradict the t-de pendence anticipated by most of the Regge models. The results also provide evidence for violation of weak exchange degeneracy

  1. Studies of nuclear structure in antinucleon charge-exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, N.

    1986-01-01

    The antinucleon-nucleus charge exchange reaction is discussed an its use as a probe of isovector excitations in nuclei is described. Attention is drawn to the fact that the (anti p,anti n) reaction will predominantly excite ''pionic'' (i.e., longitudinal spin) modes in nuclei. Comparison between (anti p,anti n) and (n,p) reactions is made. Plans for (anti p,anti n) experiments in the near future are mentioned. 21 refs., 3 figs

  2. Pion double charge exchange above the Δ(1232) resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.L.; Moore, C.F.; Agnew, L.; Atencio, L.G.; Baer, H.W.; McGill, J.A.; Morris, C.L.; Schilling, S.; Burlein, M.; Fortune, H.T.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Silk, J.D.; Burleson, G.R.; Kyle, G.S.; Dhuga, K.S.; Mordechai, S.; Rawool, M.W.; Zumbro, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    First measurements of exclusive cross sections for the (π + ,π - ) reaction at incident energies of 300-500 MeV are reported. For the analog-state transitions in 14 C and 18 O the 5 0 cross sections are found to remain nearly constant in this energy interval. This behavior is in disagreement both with predictions based on six-quark cluster models and with simple expectations based on recent single-charge-exchange measurements. (orig.)

  3. Charge exchange effect on laser isotope separation of atomic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niki, Hideaki; Izawa, Yasukazu; Otani, Hiroyasu; Yamanaka, Chiyoe

    1982-01-01

    Uranium isotope separating experiment was performed using the two-step photoionization technique with dye laser and nitrogen laser by heating uranium metal with electron beam and producing atomic beam using generated vapour. The experimental results are described after explaining the two-step photoionization by laser, experimental apparatus, the selection of exciting wavelength and others. Enrichment factor depends largely on the spectrum purity of dye laser which is the exciting source. A large enrichment factor of 48.3 times was obtained for spectrum width 0.03A. To put the uranium isotope separation with laser into practice, the increase of uranium atomic density is considered to be necessary for improving the yield. Experimental investigation was first carried out on the charge exchange effect that seems most likely to affect the decrease of enrichment factor, and the charge exchange cross-section was determined. The charge exchange cross-section depends on the relative kinetic energy between ions and atoms. The experimental result showed that the cross-section was about 5 x 10 -13 cm 2 at 1 eV and 10 -13 cm 2 at 90 eV. These values are roughly ten times as great as those calculated in Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, and it is expected that they become the greatest factor for giving the upper limit of uranium atomic density in a process of practical application. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  4. Novel gas target for laser wakefield accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniculaesei, C.; Kim, Hyung Taek; Yoo, Byung Ju; Oh, Kyung Hwan; Nam, Chang Hee

    2018-02-01

    A novel gas target for interactions between high power lasers and gaseous medium, especially for laser wakefield accelerators, has been designed, manufactured, and characterized. The gas target has been designed to provide a uniform density profile along the central gas cell axis by combining a gas cell and slit nozzle. The gas density has been tuned from ˜1017 atoms/cm3 to ˜1019 atoms/cm3 and the gas target length can be varied from 0 to 10 cm; both changes can be made simultaneously while keeping the uniform gas profile. The gas density profile inside the gas cell has been measured using interferometry and validated using computational fluid dynamics.

  5. Cometary X-rays. Solar wind charge exchange in cometary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodewits, Dennis

    2007-06-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with the planets and the interstellar medium is of key importance for the evolution of our solar system. The interaction with Earth's atmosphere is best known for the northern light. In case of Mars, the interaction with the solar wind might have lead to the erosion of its atmosphere. Solar wind-atmosphere interactions can be studied particularly well in cometary atmospheres, because in that case the solar wind flow is not attenuated by a planetary magnetic field and interacts directly with its atmosphere, the coma. The size of the cometary atmosphere (in the order of 10(4-10^5) km) allows remote tracking of the ions as they penetrate into the comet's atmosphere, offering a unique window on the cometary atmosphere, the solar wind and the interaction of these two plasmas. When solar wind ions fly through an atmosphere they are neutralized via charge exchange reactions with the neutral gaseous species. These reactions depend strongly on target species and collision velocity. The resulting X-ray and Far-UV emission can therefore be regarded as a fingerprint of the underlying reaction, with many diagnostic qualities. My thesis studies have focussed on all aspects relevant for X-ray emission from comets: experimental studies of state-to-state charge exchange cross sections, observations of X-ray emission from comets with Chandra, XMM, and Swift, and theoretical modelling of the interaction of solar wind ions with cometary gasses and the resulting X-ray emission spectrum. Together, this has greatly improved our understanding of the interaction of the solar wind with solar system objects and in more general, of physical processes in wind-environment collisions. The thorough understanding of cometary charge exchange emission has opened the door to the direct observation of more complex solar wind interactions such as those with Mars and Venus.

  6. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy as a plasma diagnostic tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonck, R.J.

    1984-12-01

    Intensity and line profile measurements of the spectra of light hydrogenic ion which are excited by charge exchange reactions with fast neutral atoms are being widely used as diagnostics for fusion plasma research. This technique, which is referred to as charge exchange recombination spectroscopy, allows measurements of the densities of fully stripped impurity ions and particle transport coefficients with only minor uncertainties arising from atomic processes. The excitation of long wavelength transitions in light ions such as He + , C 5+ , and O 7+ allows relatively easy measurements of ion velocity distributions to determine ion temperatures and plasma rotation velocities. Among its advantages for such measurements are the facts that fiber optic coupling between a remote spectrometer and the immediate reactor environment is possible in many cases. The measurement is localized by the intersection region of a neutral beamline and viewing sightline, and intrinsic ions can be used so that injection of potentially perturbing impurities can be avoided. A particularly challenging application of this technique lies in the diagnosis of alpha particles expected to be produced in the present generation of Q approx. = 1 tokamak experiments

  7. Analysis of JET charge exchange spectra using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, J.; Hellermann, M. von; Koenig, R.

    1998-01-01

    Active charge exchange spectra representing the local interaction of injected neutral beams and fully stripped impurity ions are hard to analyse due to the strong blending with passive emission from the plasma edge. As a result, the deduced plasma parameters (e.g. ion temperature, rotation velocity, impurity density) can not always be determined unambiguously. Also, the speed of the analysis is limited by the time consuming non-linear least-squares minimisation procedure. In practice, semi-manual analysis is necessary, and fast, automatic analysis, based on currently used techniques, does not seem feasible. In this paper the development of a robust and accurate analysis procedure based on Multi Layer Perception (MLP) neural networks is described. This procedure is fully automatic and fast, thus enabling a real-time analysis of charge exchange spectra. Accuracy has been increased in several ways as compared to earlier straight-forward neural network implementations and is comparable to a standard least squares based analysis. Robustness is achieved by using a combination of different confidence measures. A novel technique for the creation of training data, suitable for high dimensional inverse problems has been developed, and used extensively. A new method for fast calculation of error bars directly from the hidden neurons in a MLP network is also described, and used as part of the confidence calculations. For demonstration purposes, a real-time ion temperature profile diagnostic based on this has been implemented. (author)

  8. Neutron fragmentation and inclusive charge exchange in pd and π+d interactions at 195 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, Y.; Haber, B.; Hochman, D.; Koller, E.; Ronat, E.E.; Shapira, A.; Yaari, R.; Yekutieli, G.; Braun, H.; Etienne, F.; Fridman, A.; Gerber, J.P.; Jegham, E.; Juillot, P.; Maurer, G.; Voltolini, C.

    1977-01-01

    An excess of negative particles and depletion of positive particles in the backward hemisphere (c.m. system) is observed in π + and p interactions on neutron target. dsigma - /dy is compared with pp interactions and the difference is related to the slow-proton spectrum produced in the pn interactions. A neutron fragmentation component is observed, and the inclusive charge-exchange probability at the nucleon vertex is found to be about 0.4

  9. Polarized gas targets for storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    It is widely recognized that polarized gas targets in electron storage rings represent a new opportunity for precision nuclear physics studies. New developments in polarized target technology specific to internal applications will be discussed. In particular, polarized gas targets have been used in the VEPP-3 electron ring in Novosibirsk. A simple storage cell was used to increase the total target thickness by a factor of 15 over the simple gas jet target from an atomic beam source. Results from the initial phase of this project will be reported. In addition, the plans for increasing the luminosity by an additional order or magnitude will be presented. The application of this work to polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets for the HERA ring will be noted. The influence of beam-induced depolarization, a phenomena encountered in short-pulse electron storage rings, will be discussed. Finally, the performance tests of laser-driven sources will be presented. 8 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  10. Interdefect charge exchange in silicon particle detectors at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    MacEvoy, B; Hall, G; Moscatelli, F; Passeri, D; Santocchia, A

    2002-01-01

    Silicon particle detectors in the next generation of experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider will be exposed to a very challenging radiation environment. The principal obstacle to long-term operation arises from changes in detector doping concentration (N/sub eff/), which lead to an increase in the bias required to deplete the detector and hence achieve efficient charge collection. We have previously presented a model of interdefect charge exchange between closely spaced centers in the dense terminal clusters formed by hadron irradiation. This manifestly non-Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) mechanism leads to a marked increase in carrier generation rate and negative space charge over the SRH prediction. There is currently much interest in the subject of cryogenic detector operation as a means of improving radiation hardness. Our motivation, however, is primarily to investigate our model further by testing its predictions over a range of temperatures. We present measurements of spectra from /sup 241/Am alpha par...

  11. Charge-exchange collisions of multiply charged ions with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grozdanov, T.P.; Janev, R.K.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of electron transfer between neutral atoms and multiply charged ions is considered at low and medium energies. It is assumed that a large number of final states are available for the electron transition so that the electron-capture process is treated as a tunnel effect caused by the strong attractive Coulomb field of the multicharged ions. The electron transition probability is obtained in a closed form using the modified-comparison-equation method to solve the Schroedinger equation. An approximately linear dependence of the one-electron transfer cross section on the charge of multicharged ion is found. Cross-section calculations of a number of charge-exchange reactions are performed

  12. Line Ratios for Solar Wind Charge Exchange with Comets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullen, P. D.; Cumbee, R. S.; Lyons, D.; Shelton, R. L.; Stancil, P. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Center for Simulational Physics, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Gu, L.; Kaastra, J., E-mail: pmullen2@illinois.edu [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2017-07-20

    Charge exchange (CX) has emerged in X-ray emission modeling as a significant process that must be considered in many astrophysical environments—particularly comets. Comets host an interaction between solar wind ions and cometary neutrals to promote solar wind charge exchange (SWCX). X-ray observatories provide astronomers and astrophysicists with data for many X-ray emitting comets that are impossible to accurately model without reliable CX data. Here, we utilize a streamlined set of computer programs that incorporate the multi-channel Landau–Zener theory and a cascade model for X-ray emission to generate cross sections and X-ray line ratios for a variety of bare and non-bare ion single electron capture (SEC) collisions. Namely, we consider collisions between the solar wind constituent bare and H-like ions of C, N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, and Si and the cometary neutrals H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, OH, and O. To exemplify the application of this data, we model the X-ray emission of Comet C/2000 WM1 (linear) using the CX package in SPEX and find excellent agreement with observations made with the XMM-Newton RGS detector. Our analyses show that the X-ray intensity is dominated by SWCX with H, while H{sub 2}O plays a secondary role. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that CX cross sections have been implemented into a X-ray spectral fitting package to determine the H to H{sub 2}O ratio in cometary atmospheres. The CX data sets are incorporated into the modeling packages SPEX and Kronos .

  13. Review of Langmuir-wave-caused dips and charge-exchange-caused dips in spectral lines from plasmas and their applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dalimier, E.; Oks, E.; Renner, Oldřich

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2014), s. 178-194 ISSN 2218-2004 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101208 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Laser-matter interaction * spectral line profiles * Langmuir waves * plasma electron density * charge exchange rates Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  14. Initial Assessment of Electron and X-Ray Production and Charge Exchange in the NDCX-II Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to provide initial assessments of some atomic physics effects for the accelerator section of NDCX-II. There are several effects we address: the production of electrons associated with loss of beam ions to the walls, the production of electrons associated with ionization of background gas, the possibly resultant production of X-rays when these electrons hit bounding surfaces, and charge exchange of beam ions on background gas. The results presented here are based on a number of caveats that will be stated below, which we will attempt to remove in the near future.

  15. XMM-Newton Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    We present an XMM-Newton spectrum of diffuse X-ray emission from within the solar system. The spectrum is dominated by O VII and O VIII lines at 0.57 keV and 0.65 keV, O VIII (and possibly Fe XVII) lines at approximately 0.8 keV, Ne IX lines at approximately 0.92 keV, and Mg XI lines at approximately 1.35 keV. This spectrum is consistent with what is expected from charge exchange emission between the highly ionized solar wind and either interstellar neutrals in the heliosphere or material from Earth's exosphere. The emission is clearly seen as a low-energy ( E less than 1.5 keV) spectral enhancement in one of a series of observations of the Hubble Deep Field North. The X-ray enhancement is concurrent with an enhancement in the solar wind measured by the ACE satellite. The solar wind enhancement reaches a flux level an order of magnitude more intense than typical fluxes at 1 AU, and has ion ratios with significantly enhanced higher ionization states. Whereas observations of the solar wind plasma made at a single point reflect only local conditions which may only be representative of solar wind properties with spatial scales ranging from less than half of an Earth radii (approximately 10 s) to 100 Earth radii, X-ray observations of solar wind charge exchange are remote sensing measurements which may provide observations which are significantly more global in character. Besides being of interest in its own right for studies of the solar system, this emission can have significant consequences for observations of more cosmological objects. It can provide emission lines at zero redshift which are of particular interest (e.g., O VII and O VIII) in studies of diffuse thermal emission, and which can therefore act as contamination in objects which cover the entire detector field of view. We propose the use of solar wind monitoring data, such as from the ACE and Wind spacecraft, as a diagnostic to screen for such possibilities.

  16. Modeling pressure rise in gas targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, P.; Lapi, S. E.; Publicover, J.; Buckley, K.; Martinez, D. M.; Ruth, T. J.; Hoehr, C.

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to introduce a universal mathematical model to explain a gas target behaviour at steady-state time scale. To obtain our final goal, an analytical model is proposed to study the pressure rise in the targets used to produce medical isotopes on low-energy cyclotrons. The model is developed based on the assumption that during irradiation the system reaches steady-state. The model is verified by various experiments performed at different beam currents, gas type, and initial pressures at 13 MeV cyclotron at TRIUMF. Excellent agreement is achieved.

  17. The PLT and PDX charge-exchange analyzers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, D.; Hammett, G.; McCune, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    The perpendicularly-viewing mass-resolving charge-exchange analyzers for PLT and PDX were built to measure the plasma ion temperature, central neutral density and hydrogen to deuterium ratio. This paper discusses the measurements as they are affected by instrumental effects. In PDX with perpendicular neutral deuterium beam injection into hydrogen plasmas, a small (∼ 1%) hydrogen impurity in the beam gives rise to an energetic tail on the observed hydrogen neutral spectrum. A simple model indicates that this contamination of the thermal spectrum causes the apparent ion temperature to be 5-20% too high. This effect is included in the analysis. The neutral density measurement relies on knowledge of absolute detection efficiency. While this can in principle be measured in-situ with a diagnostic neutral beam, a large uncertainty remains. Measurement of the H/D ratio in the plasma is limited by the mass rejection (1:1000) of the analyzer. It is primarily the deuterium flux at 1/2 the hydrogen energy that places a lower limit on the measurable flux to H/D ratios above ∼ 0.5%

  18. Study of isovector resonances with pion charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, H.W.; Bolton, R.; Bowman, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    Studies with the pion charge exchange reactions (π/sup +-/,π 0 ) at 164 MeV using the LAMPF π 0 spectrometer are yielding new results on the existence and systematic features of isovector resonances in nuclei. These experiments possess an unusually high signal/background ratio for isovector resonances of low-multipolarity. Results obtained to date are: (1) observation and angular disribution measurement of the giant dipole resonance in nuclei 12 C, 40 Ca, 90 Zr, and 120 Sn; and (2) observation and angular distribution measurements in the (π - ,π 0 ) reaction on 90 Zr and 120 Sn of large signals possessing the expected angular distribution shapes and magnitudes for the isovector monopole resonance. Excitation energies are near the hydrodynamical model values 170 A - /sup 1/3/ MeV. Differential cross sections are approximately 0.7 J 1 2 (qR) mb/sr. An overview of this experimental program, with emphasis on new results and how they correlate with existing knowledge on the isovector resonances, is presented

  19. Nuclear isovector giant resonances excited by pion single charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, B.H.

    1993-07-01

    This thesis is an experimental study of isovector giant resonances in light nuclei excited by pion single charge exchange reactions. Giant dipole resonances in light nuclei are known to be highly structured. For the mass 9 and 13 giant dipole resonances, isospin considerations were found to be very important to understanding this structure. by comparing the excitation functions from cross section measurements of the (π + , π 0 ) and (π, π 0 ) inclusive reactions, the authors determined the dominant isospin structure of the analog IVGR's. The comparison was made after decomposing the cross section into resonant and non-resonant components. This decomposition is made in the framework of strong absorption and quasi-free scattering. Measurements in the region of the isovector giant dipole resonances (IVGDR) were made to cover the inclusive angular distributions out to the second minimum. Study of the giant resonance decay process provides further understanding of the resonances. This study was carried out by observing the (π + , π 0 p) coincident reactions involving the resonances of 9 B and 13 N excited from 9 Be and 13 C nuclei. These measurements determined the spectra of the decay protons. This method also permitted a decomposition of the giant resonances into their isospin components. The multipolarities of the resonances were revealed by the decay proton angular correlations which, for dipoles, are of the form 1 + A 2 P 2 (cos θ)

  20. Results obtained using the pellet charge exchange diagnostic on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McChesney, J.M.; Fisher, R.K.; Parks, P.B.; Duong, H.H.; Mansfield, D.K.; Medley, S.S.; Roquemore, A.L.; Petrov, M.P.

    1994-05-01

    Experiments are underway on TFTR to measure the confined alpha particle distribution functions using small low-Z pellets injected into the plasma. Upon entering the plasma, the pellet ablates, forming a plasma ablation cloud, elongated in the magnetic field direction, that travels alongside the pellet. A small fraction of the fusion produced 3.5 MeV alpha particles incident on the cloud are converted to helium neutrals. By measuring the resultant helium neutrals escaping from the plasma by means of a mass and energy resolving charge exchange analyzer, the energy distribution of the alpha particles incident on the cloud can be inferred. Preliminary experiments to observe neutrals from the 100-1000 keV He tail produced during ICRF minority heating experiments were successful. However, no significant alpha particle signals have been observed during D-T operation on TFTR. The authors attribute this lack of signal to stochastic toroidal field ripple loss in the outer regions of the plasma. They are studying ways to improve the pellet penetration so that the pellet penetrates into the central regions of the plasma where ripple induced losses are small and the alpha population is high

  1. Gas Production in the MEGAPIE Spallation Target

    OpenAIRE

    Thiollière , Nicolas; Zanini , Luca; David , Jean-Christophe; Eikenberg , Jost; Guertin , Arnaud; Konobeyev , Alexander Yu.; Lemaire , Sébastien; Panebianco , Stefano

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The MEGAwatt PIlot Experiment (MEGAPIE) project was started in 2000 to design, build, and operate a liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) spallation neutron target at the power level of 1 MW. The target was irradiated for 4 months in 2006 at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. Gas samples wereextracted in various phases of operation and analyzed by g spectroscopy, leading to the determination of the main radioactive isotopes released from the LBE. Comparison with ...

  2. Neutrino and antineutrino charge-exchange reactions on 12C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samana, A. R.; Krmpotic, F.; Paar, N.; Bertulani, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    We extend the formalism of weak interaction processes, obtaining new expressions for the transition rates, which greatly facilitate numerical calculations, for both neutrino-nucleus reactions and muon capture. Explicit violation of the conserved vector current hypothesis by the Coulomb field, as well as development of a sum-rule approach for inclusive cross sections, has been worked out. We have done a thorough study of exclusive (ground-state) properties of 12 B and 12 N within the projected quasiparticle random phase approximation (PQRPA). Good agreement with experimental data achieved in this way put into evidence the limitations of the standard RPA and QRPA models, which come from the inability of the RPA to open the p 3/2 shell and from the nonconservation of the number of particles in the QRPA. The inclusive neutrino/antineutrino (ν/ν-tilde) reactions 12 C(ν,e - ) 12 N and 12 C(ν-tilde,e + ) 12 B are calculated within both the PQRPA and the relativistic QRPA. It is found that (i) the magnitudes of the resulting cross sections are close to the sum-rule limit at low energy, but significantly smaller than this limit at high energies, for both ν and ν-tilde; (ii) they increase steadily when the size of the configuration space is augmented, particularly for ν/ν-tilde energies >200 MeV; and (iii) they converge for sufficiently large configuration space and final-state spin. The quasi-elastic 12 C(ν,μ - ) 12 N cross section recently measured in the MiniBooNE experiment is briefly discussed. We study the decomposition of the inclusive cross section based on the degree of forbiddenness of different multipoles. A few words are dedicated to the ν/ν-tilde- 12 C charge-exchange reactions related to astrophysical applications.

  3. Cross sections and rate coefficients for charge exchange reactions of protons with hydrocarbon molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.K.; Kato, T.; Wang, J.G.

    2001-05-01

    The available experimental and theoretical cross section data on charge exchange processes in collisions of protons with hydrocarbon molecules have been collected and critically assessed. Using well established scaling relationships for the charge exchange cross sections at low and high collision energies, as well as the known rate coefficients for these reactions in the thermal energy region, a complete cross section database is constructed for proton-C x H y charge exchange reactions from thermal energies up to several hundreds keV for all C x H y molecules with x=1, 2, 3 and 1 ≤ y ≤ 2x + 2. Rate coefficients for these charge exchange reactions have also been calculated in the temperature range from 0.1 eV to 20 keV. (author)

  4. A Markov chain approach to modelling charge exchange processes of an ion beam in monotonically increasing or decreasing potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrier, O; Khachan, J; Bosi, S

    2006-01-01

    A Markov chain method is presented as an alternative approach to Monte Carlo simulations of charge exchange collisions by an energetic hydrogen ion beam with a cold background hydrogen gas. This method was used to determine the average energy of the resulting energetic neutrals along the path of the beam. A comparison with Monte Carlo modelling showed a good agreement but with the advantage that it required much less computing time and produced no numerical noise. In particular, the Markov chain method works well for monotonically increasing or decreasing electrostatic potentials. Finally, a good agreement is obtained with experimental results from Doppler shift spectroscopy on energetic beams from a hollow cathode discharge. In particular, the average energy of ions that undergo charge exchange reaches a plateau that can be well below the full energy that might be expected from the applied voltage bias, depending on the background gas pressure. For example, pressures of ∼20 mTorr limit the ion energy to ∼20% of the applied voltage

  5. Comparative charge-exchange mass spectrometric and argon-sensitized radiolytic studies on methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, B.-O.; Lind, J.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that the formation of CO and CH 4 in the argon-sensitized γ-radiolysis of methanol is dependent on a mechanism of charge exchange with the species Ar + . On the other hand, the ion Ar + 2 formed from Ar* is of minor importance. The formation of CH + 3 from methanol after charge exchange with Ar + is a rapid process, taking about 10 -13 s. (author)

  6. Possible anisotropy of the angular distribution of charge-exchange fast neutrals wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulin, M.A.; Zhdanov, S.K.; Kurnaev, V.A.

    Angular distribution of neutrals is analytically investigated for estimation of the effects accompanying the interaction of charge-exchange fast neutrals with the first wall of thermonuclear devices. The results of calculations of angular distributions of fast charge-exchange neutrals at the plasma boundary for different conditions characteristic of large tokamaks are presented. The applied model gives an isotropic angular distribution with a most probable angle of incidence differing from the normal one.

  7. Laboratory Measurements Of Charge-exchange Produced X-ray Emission From K-shell Transitions In Hydrogenic And Helium-like Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Boyce, K. R.; Chen, H.; Gu, M. F.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Thorn, D.; Wargelin, B.

    2006-09-01

    We have used a microcalorimeter and solid state detectors to measure x-ray emission produced by charge exchange reactions between bare and hydrogenic Fe colliding with neutral helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen gas. We show the measured spectral signature produced by different neutral donors and compare our results to theory where available. We also compare our results to measurements of the Fe K line emission from the Galactic Center measured by the XIS on the Suzaku x-ray observatory. This comparison shows that charge exchange recombination between highly charged ions (either cosmic rays or thermal ions) and neutral gas is probably not the dominant source of diffuse line emission in the Galactic Center. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48, and is also supported by NASA APRA grants to LLNL, GSFC, Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, and Stanford University.

  8. Effect of charge exchange on ion guns and an application to inertial- electrostatic confinement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, D.C.; Stuart, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    In 1967, R. L. Hirsch [J. Appl. Phys. 38, 4522 (1967)] reported neutron production rates of 10 10 neutrons per second from an electrostatic inertial confinement device. The device consisted of six ion guns injecting deuterium or a mixture of deuterium and tritium ions into an evacuated cathode chamber at 30--150 keV. No previous theoretical model for this experiment has adequately explained the observed neutron fluxes. A new model that includes the effects of charge exchange and ionization in the ion guns is analyzed. This model predicts three main features of the observed neutron flux: Neutron output proportional to gun current, neutron production localized at the center of the evacuated chamber, and neutron production decreasing with increasing neutral background gas density. Previous analysis modelled the ion guns as being monoenergetic. In this study, the ion gun output is modelled as a mixture of ions and fast neutrals with energies ranging from zero to the maximum gun energy. Using this theoretical model, a survey of the possible operating parameters indicates that the device was probably operated at or near the most efficient combined values of voltage and background pressure. Applications of the theory to other devices are discussed

  9. Interference effects in inclusive charge-exchange p+p→n+X and n+p→p+X reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareev, F.A.; Ratis, Yu.L.; Korovin, P.P.; Strokovskij, E.A.; Vaagen, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    The formalism of Feynman diagrams to describe charge-exchange reactions p+p→n+X and n+p→p+X on a free proton target taking into account spectator and decay modes in the π+ρ+g'-model have used. It is shown that the interference between these modes depends on the set of vertex function parameters used. It is also shown that the constructive interference of the Δ + and Δ 0 -isobars is important. 22 refs.; 10 figs

  10. Design and operation of the pellet charge exchange diagnostic for measurement of energetic confined alphas and tritons on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medley, S.S.; Duong, H.H.

    1996-05-01

    Radially-resolved energy and density distributions of the energetic confined alpha particles in D-T experiments on TFTR are being measured by active neutral particle analysis using low-Z impurity pellet injection. When injected into a high temperature plasma, an impurity pellet (e.g. Lithium or Boron) rapidly ablates forming an elongated cloud which is aligned with the magnetic field and moves with the pellet. This ablation cloud provides a dense target with which the alpha particles produced in D-T fusion reactions can charge exchange. A small fraction of the alpha particles incident on the pellet ablation cloud will be converted to helium neutrals whose energy is essentially unchanged by the charge transfer process. By measuring the resultant helium neutrals escaping from the plasma using a mass and energy resolving charge exchange analyzer, this technique offers a direct measurement of the energy distribution of the incident high-energy alpha particles. Other energetic ion species can be detected as well, such as tritons generated in D-D plasmas and H or He 3 RF-driven minority ion tails. The diagnostic technique and its application on TFTR are described in detail

  11. Solar wind charge exchange observed through the lunar exosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S.; Stubbs, T. J.; Kuntz, K. D.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T. E.; Snowden, S. L.; Hills, H. K.; Porter, F. S.; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Carter, J. A.; Read, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 36, - (2009), L21102/1-L21102/5 ISSN 0094-8276 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : lunar exosphere * solar wind * X-rays Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.204, year: 2009

  12. Pion-nucleus double charge exchange and the nuclear shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, N.; Gibbs, W.R.; Ginocchio, J.N.; Kaufmann, W.B.

    1988-01-01

    The pion-nucleus double charge exchange reaction is studied with special emphasis on nuclear structure. The reaction mechanism and nuclear structure aspects of the process are separated using both the plane-wave and distorted-wave impulse approximations. Predictions are made employing both the seniority model and a full shell model (with a single active orbit). Transitions to the double analog state and to the ground state of the residual nucleus are computed. The seniority model yields particularly simple relations among double charge exchange cross sections for nuclei within the same shell. Limitations of the seniority model and of the plane-wave impulse approximation are discussed as well as extensions to the generalized seniority scheme. Applications of the foregoing ideas to single charge exchange are also presented

  13. A windowless gas target for secondary beam production

    CERN Document Server

    Kishida, T; Shibata, M; Watanabe, H; Tsutsumi, T; Motomura, S; Ideguchi, E; Zhou, X H; Morikawa, T; Kubo, T; Ishihara, M

    1999-01-01

    A windowless gas target was developed for the production of secondary high-spin isomer beams (HSIB). An sup 1 sup 6 O target in the compound form of CO sub 2 gas was used to produce a sup 1 sup 4 sup 5 sup m Sm beam by using an sup 1 sup 6 O( sup 1 sup 3 sup 6 Xe, 7n) sup 1 sup 4 sup 5 sup m Sm reaction. The target gas pressure was kept constant at 50 Torr. A target thickness of about 1 mg/cm sup 2 was achieved with a 10 cm target length. Gas was recirculated and the consumption was very little.

  14. Charge exchange laboratory studies relevant to solar-wind-induced cometary and planetary X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissa, Farhat

    The discovery of cometary X-ray emission for the first time in 1996, from comet Hyukatake using the Röntgen satellite (ROSAT) [Lisse, C. M. et al., 1996] was a highly surprising event. Since then, X-ray and extreme ultra violet (X-EUV) emission has been observed from a number of comets [Lisse, C. M. et al., 2001]. The production of such radiation is strongly believed to be the result of the charge exchange collisions of the minor heavy highly charged solar wind (SW) ions with cometary neutrals. This study reports the first state-selective He- like X-ray spectra resulting from single-electron capture (SEC) in charge exchange collisions of O 7+ and Ne 9+ with He and CO targets at a collision velocity of 800 km/s. The ions and velocity are typical of solar wind ions while the molecular and atomic targets are typical of cometary (CO) and interstellar (He) neutrals. The spectra have been obtained by means of simultaneous cold-target recoil ion momentum spectroscopic (COLTRIMS) and X-ray spectroscopic measurements that involved the triple-coincident detection of X- rays, scattered projectile, and target recoil ions. The spectra test the ability of theories to account for the relative population of triplet and singlet states in He-like product ions following SEC. The O 7+ +He spectra are compared with theoretical spectra based on quantal molecular-orbital close- coupling (QMOCC) and multi-channel Landau-Zener (MCLZ) calculations. In addition, all spectra have been used to extract angular momentum distributions based on the traditional 3:1 triplet-to-singlet ratio assumption for the populated states. The QMOCC and MCLZ calculations and the experimental results, however, suggest significant departures from this assumption. The extracted l - distributions are state-of-the-art at this time for modeling purposes due to the high differentiation power of the experimental procedure.

  15. Laboratory simulation of charge exchange-produced X-ray emission from comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; May, M; Olson, R E; Porter, F S; Stahle, C K; Tillotson, W A

    2003-06-06

    In laboratory experiments using the engineering spare microcalorimeter detector from the ASTRO-E satellite mission, we recorded the x-ray emission of highly charged ions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which simulates charge exchange reactions between heavy ions in the solar wind and neutral gases in cometary comae. The spectra are complex and do not readily match predictions. We developed a charge exchange emission model that successfully reproduces the soft x-ray spectrum of comet Linear C/1999 S4, observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  16. Pion double charge exchange on 16O at Tπ=300--500 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beatty, D.P.; Burleson, G.R.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.; El-Ghossain, M.; Fortune, H.T.; Williams, A.L.; Smith, D.A.; Morris, C.L.; Garnett, R.; Watson, D.L.; Johnson, J.; Ward, H.; Whitley, C.; Matthews, S.K.; Palarczyk, M.; Edwards, C.; Espy, M.; Hashimoto, O.; Tomoyuki, H.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of small-angle cross sections for the pion double-charge-exchange (DCX) reaction 16 O(π + ,π - ) 16 Ne (g.s.) at incident energies of 300--500 MeV are reported. These are the first measurements of DCX cross sections on a T=0 nucleus in this energy region. The behavior of the cross sections is similar to that of analog transitions, but they are smaller by more than an order of magnitude. This suggests sequential charge-exchange scattering as the dominant process, but suppressed by a mechanism not yet identified

  17. Role of wall implantation of charge exchange neutrals in the deuterium retention for Tore Supra long discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsitrone, E.; Reiter, D.; Loarer, T.; Brosset, C.; Bucalossi, J.; Begrambekov, L.; Grisolia, C.; Grosman, A.; Gunn, J.; Hogan, J.; Mitteau, R.; Pegourie, B.; Ghendrih, P.; Reichle, R.; Roubin, P.

    2005-01-01

    In Tore Supra long pulses, particle balance gives evidence that a constant fraction of the injected gas (typically 50%) is retained in the wall for the duration of the shot, showing no sign of wall saturation after more than 6 min of discharge. During the discharge, the retention rate first decreases (phase 1), then remains constant throughout the pulse (phase 2). Phase 1 could be interpreted as implantation of particles combined with a constant codeposition rate, while phase 2 could correspond to codeposition alone, once the implanted surfaces are saturated with deuterium. This paper presents a possible contribution of charge exchange neutrals to the implantation process, based on modelling results with the Eirene neutral transport code. A complex pattern of particle implantation is evidenced, with saturation time constants ranging from less than one to several hundreds seconds, compatible with the experimental behaviour during phase 1

  18. Total cross sections for pion charge exchange on the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitschopf, J.

    2006-04-28

    This work describes the measurement of total SCX cross sections employing a new 4{pi} scintillation counter to perform transmission measurements in the incident pion energy range from about 38 to 250 MeV. A small 4{pi} detector box consisting of thin plastic scintillators has been constructed. The transmission technique, which was used, relates the number of transmitted charged pions to that of incident beam pions and this way effectively counts events with neutral products. The incoming negative pions were counted by three beam defining counters before they hit a target of very well known size and chemical composition. The target was placed in the box detector which was not sensitive to the neutral particles resulting from the SCX. The total cross section for emerging neutral particles was derived from the comparison of the numbers of the incoming and transmitted charged particles. The total SCX cross section on hydrogen was derived from the transmissions of a CH{sub 2} target, a carbon target and an empty target. For a detailed offline analysis all TDC, QDC and FADC information was recorded in an event by event mode for each triggered beam event. Various corrections had to be applied to the data, such as random correction, the detection of neutrals in the detector, Dalitz decay, pion decay and the radiative pion capture. This measurement covers, as the only experiment, the whole {delta}-resonance and the sp-interference region in one single experimental setup and improves the available data base for the SCX reaction. It is shown that the description of the SCX cross sections is improved if the s-wave amplitudes, that have been fixed essentially by elastic pion-nucleon scattering data, is reduced by (4{+-}1.5)%. The exact value depends on the SCX literature data included and on the parameters of the {delta}{sup 0} Breit-Wigner resonance describing the p{sub 33}-waves. This shows that p-wave as well as s-wave effects should be considered in studies of isospin

  19. Total cross sections for pion charge exchange on the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitschopf, J.

    2006-01-01

    This work describes the measurement of total SCX cross sections employing a new 4π scintillation counter to perform transmission measurements in the incident pion energy range from about 38 to 250 MeV. A small 4π detector box consisting of thin plastic scintillators has been constructed. The transmission technique, which was used, relates the number of transmitted charged pions to that of incident beam pions and this way effectively counts events with neutral products. The incoming negative pions were counted by three beam defining counters before they hit a target of very well known size and chemical composition. The target was placed in the box detector which was not sensitive to the neutral particles resulting from the SCX. The total cross section for emerging neutral particles was derived from the comparison of the numbers of the incoming and transmitted charged particles. The total SCX cross section on hydrogen was derived from the transmissions of a CH 2 target, a carbon target and an empty target. For a detailed offline analysis all TDC, QDC and FADC information was recorded in an event by event mode for each triggered beam event. Various corrections had to be applied to the data, such as random correction, the detection of neutrals in the detector, Dalitz decay, pion decay and the radiative pion capture. This measurement covers, as the only experiment, the whole Δ-resonance and the sp-interference region in one single experimental setup and improves the available data base for the SCX reaction. It is shown that the description of the SCX cross sections is improved if the s-wave amplitudes, that have been fixed essentially by elastic pion-nucleon scattering data, is reduced by (4±1.5)%. The exact value depends on the SCX literature data included and on the parameters of the Δ 0 Breit-Wigner resonance describing the p 33 -waves. This shows that p-wave as well as s-wave effects should be considered in studies of isospin symmetry breaking. Interestingly

  20. Study of the charge-exchange reaction 24 Mg(t,3 He)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareev, F.A.; Semchenkov, A.G.

    1994-01-01

    The charge-exchange reaction 24 Mg(t, 3 He) in the region of Δ-isobar excitation at initial momentum 9.15 GeV/c is analyzed using (π + ρ + g')-model and effective number formalism. Contribution from different topologies and their influence on Δ-isobar inclusive peak are considered. (author). 15 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  1. High spatial and temporal resolution charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the HL-2A tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, Y. L.; Yu, D. L.; Liu, L.; Ida, K.; von Hellermann, M.; Cao, J. Y.; Sun, A. P.; Ma, Q.; Chen, W. J.; Liu, Yi; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Liu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    A 32/64-channel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic system is developed on the HL-2A tokamak (R = 1.65 m, a = 0.4 m), monitoring plasma ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity simultaneously. A high throughput spectrometer (F/2.8) and a pitch-controlled fiber bundle

  2. Charge exchange probes of nuclear structure and interactions with emphasis on (p,n)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    New results from (p,n) studies at IUCF show that it is possible to observe Gamow-Teller (GT) strength and extract GT matrix elements from (p,n) measurements. The charge exchange reactions ( 6 Li, 6 He) and (π + ,π 0 ) involve different projectile quantum numbers, and the relationships of these reactions to (p,n) is discussed

  3. Performance study of the TFTR diagnostic neutral beam for active charge exchange measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medley, S.S.; Goldston, R.J.; Towner, H.H.

    1980-06-01

    A neutral beam source will be incorporated in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) charge exchange diagnostic to provide a time modulated, spatially localized enhancement of the charge exchange efflux. Two autonomous Charge Exchange Neutral Analyzer (CENA) systems are being designed for the TFTR. One system measures the plasma ion temperature along twelve vertical line-of-sight chords spaced approximately equidistantly across the torus minor diameter. The other system is dedicated primarily to measurement of ion phenomena associated with neutral beam injection heating and has a fan-like field of view along eight sight-lines in the equitorial plane. The neutral beam is steerable in order to access the viewing field of both CENA systems, though in general not simultaneously. The performance of the diagnostic neutral beam is evaluated to determine the optimal beam specifications for active charge exchange measurements. Using the optimal beam design parameters, the efficacy of the neutral doping is examined for both CENA systems over the envisioned range of the TFTR plasma density and temperature

  4. X-ray and Far-Ultraviolet emission from comets : Relevant charge exchange processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, D; McCullough, RW; Tielens, AGGM; Hoekstra, R

    2004-01-01

    The surprising detection of strong X-ray and Far-Ultraviolet (FUV) emission from comets is the direct result of charge exchange reactions of multiply-charged solar wind ions with the neutral coma of the comet. A future diagnostics use of spectral features in cometary X-ray and FUV emission is

  5. Lattice Issues of the CERN PSB with H- Charge exchange injection hardware

    CERN Document Server

    Aiba, M; Chanel, M; Goddard, B; Martini, M; Weterings, W

    2010-01-01

    The motivation for the construction of CERN Linac4 is to improve the performance of the PSB by raising the injection energy and implementing a new H- charge exchange multiturn injection scheme. Lattice perturbations introduced by the new injection hardware are described. Strategies to mitigate the consequences, first by minimizing the additional focusing introduced and, by compensating the residual perturbation, are reported.

  6. Conceptual design of the ITER upper port plug for charge exchange diagnostic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadakov, S.; Baross, T.; Biel, W.; Borsuk, V.; Hawkes, N.; Hellermann, M. von; Gille, P.; Kiss, G.; Koning, J.; Knaup, M.; Klinkhamer, J.F.F.; Krasikov, Yu.; Litnovsky, A.; Neubauer, O.; Panin, A.

    2009-01-01

    A plug for the ITER core charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (core CXRS) is located in the upper port 3. It transfers the light emitted by interaction of plasma ions with the diagnostic neutral beam (DNB). The plug consists of a main shell, a shielding cassette and a retractable tube. The

  7. Measurement of the $\\bar{p}p \\rightarrow \\bar{n}n$ Charge-Exchange Differential Cross-Section

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this proposal is a measurement of the differential cross-section of the $\\bar{p}$p $\\rightarrow$ $\\bar{n}$n charge-exchange reaction with a point-to-point precision of 1\\% in the forward direction, and an absolute normalization error of 3\\%. The high precision of the data should allow, inter alia, a determination of the $\\pi$NN coupling constant to better than 2\\%.\\\\ \\\\ The measurement will be done using the existing neutron and antineutron detectors built for experiment PS199 and liquid hydrogen target. In one week of running time, with a $\\bar{p}$ beam intensity of 3 $ 10 ^{5} $ $\\bar{p}$/sec, the reaction will be measured at a few $\\bar{p}$ momenta, in the range 500 to 900~MeV/c.

  8. π--induced single charge exchange on polarized 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Q.; Burleson, S.; Blanchard, T.

    1995-01-01

    Asymmetries, A y , for the (π - ,π 0 ) reaction on polarized 3 He were measured using the pion beam of the P3W channel at LAMPF. The π 0 were detected with the new Neutral Meson Spectrometer (NMS) in coincidence with recoiling tritons. The recoil detector consisted of scintillation-counter telescopes and a wire chamber that provided energy-loss and direction information, respectively. The polarized gaseous 3 He target developed at TRIUMF was modified and run with the use of two diode lasers. Polarizations were typically 50%. The A y taken at T π = 200 MeV between 60 and 105 degrees were found to be strongly angle-dependent. The results will be compared with the theoretical predictions

  9. Design of a cryogenic deuterium gas target for neutron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchnir, F.T.; Waterman, F.M.; Forsthoff, H.; Skaggs, L.S.; Vander Arend, P.C.; Stoy, S.

    1976-01-01

    A cryogenic deuterium gas target operating at 80 0 K and 10 atm pressure has been designed for use with a small cyclotron; the D(d,n) reaction is used to produce a neutron beam suitable for radiation therapy. The target is cooled by circulation of the gas in a closed loop between the target and an external heat exchanger immersed in liquid nitrogen

  10. ROSAT Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange with the Lunar Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, S. L.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T. E.; Hills, H. Kent; Hodges, R. R.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. Scott; Read, A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the ROSAT PSPC soft X-ray image of the Moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the count rate in three wedges, two wedges (one north and one south) 13-32 degrees off (19 degrees wide) the terminator towards the dark side and one wedge 38 degrees wide centered on the anti-solar direction. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show substantial limb brightening that is absent in the 38 degree wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the count rate increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere. Along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the Moon represents another solar system body at which solar wind charge exchange has been observed. This technique can be used to explore the solar wind-lunar interaction.

  11. Metastable Cadmium (53P1) production in the Cd+-Na charge-exchange collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    The 326.1 nm emission cross section for the collision process Cd + +Na -> Cd(5 3 P 1 ) + Na + was measured in the energy range 1.5-4.9 KeV. It decreases monotonically from 5 to 2x10 -15 cm 2 . Due to a near degeneracy in energy, this channel presents a much larges cross section than all others (except 5 3 P 0 and 5 3 P 2 , which are highly metastable). This justifies the neglect of the cascade mechanism for populating the 5 3 P 1 , state and, consequently, allows the identification of the 326.1 nm emission cross section with the 5 3 P 1 charge-exchanger excitation cross section. The measured values agree well with theoretical estimates obtained with Olson's model for near-resonant charge exchange. (author) [pt

  12. Charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy measurements of ion temperature and plasma rotation in PBX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaehnig, K.P.; Fonck, R.J.; Ida, K.; Powell, E.T.

    1984-11-01

    The primary diagnostic on PBX for ion temperature measurements is charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy of low Z ions, wherein fast neutrals from the heating neutral beams excite spectral lines from highly excited states (n greater than or equal to 4) of hydrogenic 0, C, and He via charge-exchange collisions with the respective fully stripped ions. Since the neutral beams on PBX provide relatively low velocity neutrals (i.e., D 0 beams at 44 keV), the best signals are obtained using the near-uv lines of 0 7+ (e.g., n = 8-7, 2976 A). Off-line analysis of the Doppler broadened and shifted line profiles includes non-linear least squares fitting to a model line profile, while a simplified on-line fast analysis code permits between-shot data analysis

  13. Low-energy pion double charge exchange and nucleon-nucleon correlations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitch, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent measurements of pion double-charge exchange (DCX) at energies 20 to 70 MeV are providing a new means for studying nucleon-nucleon correlations in nuclei. At these energies the nucleus is relatively transparent, allowing simpler theoretical models to be used in interpreting the data and leading to a clearer picture. Also the contribution to DCX of sequential charge-exchange scattering through the intermediate analog state is suppressed near 50 MeV and transitions through non-analog intermediate states become very important. Recent theoretical studies by several groups have shown that while transitions through the analog route involve relatively long nucleon-nucleon distances, those through non-analog intermediate states obtain nearly half their strength from nucleon pairs with less than 1 fermi separation. Thus DCX near 50 MeV is an excellent way to study short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations. 31 refs., 29 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Low-energy pion double charge exchange and nucleon-nucleon correlations in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitch, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent measurements of pion double-charge exchange (DCX) at energies 20 to 70 MeV are providing a new means for studying nucleon-nucleon correlations in nuclei. At these energies the nucleus is relatively transparent, allowing simpler theoretical models to be used in interpreting the data and leading to a clearer picture. Also the contribution to DCX of sequential charge-exchange scattering through the intermediate analog state is suppressed near 50 MeV and transitions through non-analog intermediate states become very important. Recent theoretical studies by several groups have shown that while transitions through the analog route involve relatively long nucleon-nucleon distances, those through non-analog intermediate states obtain nearly half their strength from nucleon pairs with less than 1 fermi separation. Thus DCX near 50 MeV is an excellent way to study short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations. 31 refs., 29 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Electron capture rates in stars studied with heavy ion charge exchange reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertulani, C. A.

    2018-01-01

    Indirect methods using nucleus-nucleus reactions at high energies (here, high energies mean ~ 50 MeV/nucleon and higher) are now routinely used to extract information of interest for nuclear astrophysics. This is of extreme relevance as many of the nuclei involved in stellar evolution are short-lived. Therefore, indirect methods became the focus of recent studies carried out in major nuclear physics facilities. Among such methods, heavy ion charge exchange is thought to be a useful tool to infer Gamow-Teller matrix elements needed to describe electron capture rates in stars and also double beta-decay experiments. In this short review, I provide a theoretical guidance based on a simple reaction model for charge exchange reactions.

  16. Charge-Exchange Neutral Particle Analyzer Diagnostic of TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontdecaba, J.M.; Balbin, R.; Petrov, S.; TJ-II team

    2003-01-01

    A description of the Charge Exchange Neutral Particle Analyzers in operation in the heliac flexible TJ-II is reported. A description of the detectors, as well as the operation characteristics, hardware and software used in the control and analysis of the data obtained with the diagnostic is detailed. Two NPAs are in operation in TJ-II. One of them is a 5-channel analyzer and another one is an Acord-12. The 5-channel analyzer provides measurements of charge exchange neutral fluxes at five energy channels, whereas the Acord-12 can measure simultaneously two different hydrogen isotopes (H and D) at six energy channels. Their lines of sight can be varied poloidally in order to observe the different sections of the plasma. (Author) 10 refs

  17. Charge-Exchange Neutral Particle Analyzer Diagnostic of TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontdecaba, J. M.; Balbin, R.; Petrov, S.; TJ-II team

    2003-07-01

    A description of the Charge Exchange Neutral Particle Analyzers in operation in the heliac flexible TJ-II is reported. A description of the detectors, as well as the operation characteristics, hardware and software used in the control and analysis of the data obtained with the diagnostic is detailed. Two NPAs are in operation in TJ-II. One of them is a 5-channel analyzer and another one is an Acord-12. The 5-channel analyzer provides measurements of charge exchange neutral fluxes at five energy channels, whereas the Acord-12 can measure simultaneously two different hydrogen isotopes (H and D) at six energy channels. Their lines of sight can be varied poloidally in order to observe the different sections of the plasma. (Author) 10 refs.

  18. SU3 comparison of line reversed charge exchange and hypercharge exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damerell, C.J.S.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Wickens, F.; Buran, T.; Homer, R.J.; Wilson, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    The recent data at 10.1 GeV/c on the hypercharge exchange reactions π + p→K + Σ + and π + p→K + Σ + (1385) and the line reversed processes are compared with the SU 3 related charge exchange processes K + n→K 0 p and K + p→K 0 Δ ++ and their line reversed partners in order to study the systematics of line reversal breaking. Allowing for a t-independent SU 3 breaking between charge and hypercharge exchange the data follow the SU 3 relations. It is concluded that the line reversal breaking in the hypercharge exchange reactions is in agreement with the breaking in exchange degeneracy (in both flip and non-flip amplitudes) which is observed for the charge exchange processes. (Auth.)

  19. Measurement on the emission of charge exchange recombination in HT-6M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wei; Wan Baonian

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of C VI line (at 207.1 nm) and the time behavior has been measured with Optical Spectroscope Multichannel Analyzer and single channel near ultra-violet system in HT-6M Tokamak. The result of the analysis of line shape and the time behavior show that C VI line (at 207.1 nm) stemmed from the emission of charge exchange recombination processes

  20. Study of Charge-Exchange Neutrals Emission from Hot Plasma at the Multimirror Trap GOL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdakov, A.V.; Derevyankin, G.E.; Koidan, V.S.; Shoshin, A.A.; Trunev, Yu.A.

    2005-01-01

    Tentative experiments on registration of the energy spectrum of fast charge exchange (CX) neutrals emitted from the high-density hot plasma of the GOL-3 facility were carried out. Experimental data provided by used 5-channel CX neutrals analyzer are presented and the procedure of determining of the energy distribution of registered CX neutrals is discussed. From calculated data of the neutrals energy distribution the estimated temperature is 1.5 ± 0.5 keV

  1. USING KAPPA FUNCTIONS TO CHARACTERIZE OUTER HELIOSPHERE PROTON DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE PRESENCE OF CHARGE-EXCHANGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zirnstein, E. J.; McComas, D. J., E-mail: ezirnstein@swri.edu, E-mail: dmccomas@swri.edu [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Kappa functions have long been used in the analysis and modeling of suprathermal particles in various space plasmas. In situ observations of the supersonic solar wind show its distribution contains a cold ion core and power-law tail, which is well-represented by a kappa function. In situ plasma observations by Voyager, as well as observations of energetic neutral atom (ENA) spectra by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX), showed that the compressed and heated inner heliosheath (IHS) plasma beyond the termination shock can also be represented by a kappa function. IBEX exposes the IHS plasma properties through the detection of ENAs generated by charge-exchange in the IHS. However, charge-exchange modifies the plasma as it flows through the IHS, and makes it difficult to ascertain the parent proton distribution. In this paper we investigate the evolution of proton distributions, initially represented by a kappa function, that experience losses due to charge-exchange in the IHS. In the absence of other processes, it is no longer representable by a single kappa function due to the energy-dependent, charge-exchange process. While one can still fit a kappa function to the evolving proton distribution over limited energy ranges, this yields fitting parameters (pseudo-density, pseudo-temperature, pseudo-kappa index) that depend on the energy range of the fit. We discuss the effects of fitting a kappa function to the IHS proton distribution over limited energy ranges, its dependence on the initial proton distribution properties at the termination shock, and implications for understanding the observations.

  2. Achievement of the charge exchange work diminishing of an internal combustion engine in part load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan POSTRZEDNIK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal combustion engines, used for driving of different cars, occurs not only at full load, but mostly at the part load. The relative load exchange work at the full (nominal engine load is significantly low. At the part load of the IC engine its energy efficiency ηe is significantly lower than in the optimal (nominal field range of the performance parameters. One of the numerous reasons of this effect is regular growing of the relative load exchange work of the IC engine. It is directly connected with the quantitative regulation method commonly used in the IC engines. From the thermodynamic point of view - the main reason of this effect is the throttling process (causing exergy losses occurring in the inlet and outlet channels. The known proposals for solving of this problem are based on applying of the fully electronic control of the motion of inlet, outlet valves and new reference cycles.The idea presented in the paper leads to diminishing the charge exchange work of the IC engines. The problem can be solved using presented in the paper a new concept of the reference cycle (called as eco-cycle of IC engine. The work of the engine basing on the eco-cycle occurs in two 3-stroke stages; the fresh air is delivered only once for both stages, but in range of each stage a new portion of fuel is burned. Normally the charge exchange occurs once during each engine cycle realized. Elaborated proposition bases on the elimination of chosen charge exchange processes and through this the dropping of the charge exchange work can be achieved.

  3. The evaluation study of high performance gas target system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, Min Goo; Yang, Seung Dae; Kim, Sang Wook

    2008-06-15

    The object of this study is a improvement of a gas target and targetry for increasing the radioisotope production yields. The main results are as follows 1. Improvement of beam entrance of the gas target : In this work, deep hole grid was designed for improvement of beam entrance. Using FEM(Finite Elements Method) analysis, it was verified that this design is more effective than the old one. 2. Improvement of target gas loading and withdrawing system : For the targetry, Helium gas and vacuum lines was installed for evaluating the production yields. Using these lines, it was proved that the recovery yields was improved and the residual impurity was reduced. 3. Improvement of target cooling efficiency : In case of the cylindrical target, it is more effective to use short length of target cavity for the high production yields. For improving the cooling efficiency, cooling fin was suggested to the target design. It is more effective to put the cooling fins inside the target cavity for the suppressed target pressure and density reduction effect during the proton beam irradiation. In conclusion, the target with fins inside the target cavity was better for high current irradiation and mass RI production.

  4. Moving Towards a State of the Art Charge-Exchange Reaction Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poxon-Pearson, Terri; Nunes, Filomena; Potel, Gregory

    2017-09-01

    Charge-exchange reactions have a wide range of applications, including late stellar evolution, constraining the matrix elements for neutrinoless double β-decay, and exploring symmetry energy and other aspects of exotic nuclear matter. Still, much of the reaction theory needed to describe these transitions is underdeveloped and relies on assumptions and simplifications that are often extended outside of their region of validity. In this work, we have begun to move towards a state of the art charge-exchange reaction code. As a first step, we focus on Fermi transitions using a Lane potential in a few body, Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) framework. We have focused on maintaining a modular structure for the code so we can later incorporate complications such as nonlocality, breakup, and microscopic inputs. Results using this new charge-exchange code will be shown compared to the analysis in for the case of 48Ca(p,n)48Sc. This work was supported in part by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program through the U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE- FG52-08NA2855.

  5. Thermal Loading of a Direct Drive Target Rarefied Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, B.R.; Raffray, A.R.; Tillack, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    In an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant, each fusion micro-explosion (∼10 Hz) causes thermal and structural loads on the IFE reactor wall and driver optics. The loading on the wall must remain sufficiently low to ensure that economic and safety constraints are met.One proposed method for decreasing the intensity of the wall loading is to fill the reaction chamber with a gas, such as Xe, at low density. The gas will absorb much of the radiation and ion energy from the fusion event, and then slowly release it to the chamber wall. Unfortunately the protective gas introduces major heat loads on the direct drive target. The thermal loading of a target, during injection, largely determines the viability of that target upon reaching chamber center. Thus, the density of the gas must be carefully selected to ensure that a target will survive injection.The objective of this work is to quantify and characterize the heat flux resulting from the interaction of the target and the protective gas. The loading of the target is modeled using DS2V, a commercial DSMC (Direct Simulation Monte Carlo) program. Using DS2V, this work explores the effect of the protective gas density, temperature, sticking (condensation) and accommodation coefficients on the heat flux to the target

  6. I. Pion charge-exchange at Fermilab, and II. Some remarks on hadron production at large transverse momenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pripstein, M.

    1975-06-01

    The discussion of pion charge-exchange and hadron production at large transverse momenta includes the physics motivation, the experimental method event selection criteria, results for the reaction π - p → nπ 0 (eta)

  7. Can tourism deliver its "aspirational" greenhouse gas emission reduction targets?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scott, D.; Peeters, P.M.; Gössling, S.

    2010-01-01

    This review paper examines the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction targets postulated by a range of organizations seeking to reduce the consequences of global climate change and how, or if, the global tourism sector can achieve its share of those targets. It takes both existing estimates of

  8. SPANDY: a Monte Carlo program for gas target scattering geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarmie, N.; Jett, J.H.; Niethammer, A.C.

    1977-02-01

    A Monte Carlo computer program is presented that simulates a two-slit gas target scattering geometry. The program is useful in estimating effects due to finite geometry and multiple scattering in the target foil. Details of the program are presented and experience with a specific example is discussed

  9. The Helium Warm Breeze in IBEX Observations As a Result of Charge-exchange Collisions in the Outer Heliosheath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bzowski, Maciej; Kubiak, Marzena A.; Czechowski, Andrzej; Grygorczuk, Jolanta, E-mail: bzowski@cbk.waw.pl [Space Research Centre PAS (CBK PAN) Bartycka 18A 00-716 Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-08-10

    We simulated the signal due to neutral He atoms, observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer ( IBEX ), assuming that charge-exchange collisions between neutral He atoms and He{sup +} ions operate everywhere between the heliopause and a distant source region in the local interstellar cloud, where the neutral and charged components are in thermal equilibrium. We simulated several test cases of the plasma flow within the outer heliosheath (OHS) and investigated the signal generation for plasma flows both in the absence and in the presence of the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF). We found that a signal in the portion of IBEX data identified as being due to the Warm Breeze (WB) does not arise when a homogeneous plasma flow in front of the heliopause is assumed, but it appears immediately when any reasonable disturbance in its flow due to the presence of the heliosphere is assumed. We obtained a good qualitative agreement between the data selected for comparison and the simulations for a model flow with the velocity vector of the unperturbed gas and the direction and intensity of magnetic field adopted from recent determinations. We conclude that direct-sampling observations of neutral He atoms at 1 au from the Sun are a sensitive tool for investigating the flow of interstellar matter in the OHS, that the WB is indeed the secondary population of interstellar helium, which was hypothesized earlier, and that the WB signal is consistent with the heliosphere distorted from axial symmetry by the ISMF.

  10. Spatially resolved charge exchange flux calculations on the Toroidal Pumped Limiter of Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marandet, Y.; Tsitrone, E.; Boerner, P.; Reiter, D.; Beaute, A.; Delchambre, E.; Escarguel, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Genesio, P.; Gunn, J.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Mitteau, R.; Pegourie, B.

    2009-01-01

    A spatially resolved calculation of the charge exchange particle and energy fluxes on the Toroidal Pumped Limiter (TPL) of Tore Supra is presented, as a first step towards a better understanding and modelling of carbon erosion, migration, as well as deuterium codeposition and bulk diffusion of deuterium in Tore Supra. The results are obtained with the EIRENE code run in a 3D geometry. Physical and chemical erosion maps on the TPL are calculated, and the contribution of neutrals to erosion, especially in the self-shadowed area, is calculated.

  11. Production of Polarized Ions with Nearly Resonant Charge-Exchange Collisions in Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, A. S.

    2008-02-01

    Review of results of development of polarized ion sources with nearly resonant charge-exchange plasma ionizer is presented. Pulsed beams of polarized protons with peak intensity up to 11 mA and polarization of 80% and polarized negative hydrogen ions with peak current of 4 mA and polarization of 91% have been obtained. Polarized deuterons, negative deuterium ions and 3He++ ions can be produced by this method as well. A study of a pulsed polarized atomic hydrogen beam has been performed. It was found that intensity of the pulsed atomic hydrogen beam is limited by a beam-skimmer interference and by noncomplete cooling of hydrogen atoms.

  12. Radiative corrections to Expt. 416. Backward πN charge exchange. Internal report No. 131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.T.Y.

    The importance of radiative corrections in elastic hadronic reactions has been reported recently. This report describes the computational techniques and results of applying the radiative corrections to a backward charge-exchange scattering experiment. The particular reaction considered is π - p → π 0 + n + γ Evaluation of the Schwinger term, evaluation of the numerical integration term, evaluation of the region in which the photon is detected and a check of the unitarity condition are considered. Appendixes contain listings of computer codes written to calculate radiative corrections. (19 figures, 2 tables) (U.S.)

  13. Production of Polarized Ions with Nearly Resonant Charge-Exchange Collisions in Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, A. S.

    2008-01-01

    Review of results of development of polarized ion sources with nearly resonant charge-exchange plasma ionizer is presented. Pulsed beams of polarized protons with peak intensity up to 11 mA and polarization of 80% and polarized negative hydrogen ions with peak current of 4 mA and polarization of 91% have been obtained. Polarized deuterons, negative deuterium ions and 3 He ++ ions can be produced by this method as well. A study of a pulsed polarized atomic hydrogen beam has been performed. It was found that intensity of the pulsed atomic hydrogen beam is limited by a beam-skimmer interference and by noncomplete cooling of hydrogen atoms

  14. High energy charge exchange np and antipp scattering using the dual fermion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weigt, G.

    1976-01-01

    The five independent helicity amplitudes Phisub(i)(s, t) calculated by Mandelstam from the Neveu-Schwarz-Ramond model for fermion-antifermion scattering are used in the Regge limit for a phenomenological description of high energy np and antipp charge exchange scattering. A forward spike which widens with increasing energy as well as an energy dependence changing from lower to higher energy data are reproduced by these non-evasive dual Born amplitudes using π, A 2 and rho Regge pole t-channel exchanges. (author)

  15. Effects of energy dependent Δ-nucleus optical potential in charge exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgesson, J.; Dmitriev, V.

    1994-01-01

    The Δ-nucleus optical potential from microscopic calculations in nuclear matter is used to study the effects of its energy dependence in charge-exchange (p, n) and ( 3 He, T) reactions. The neutron or triton spectrum is calculated via response function of a finite nucleus accounting for pion renormalization effects and short-range correlations. Only very small effects, 1-2%, were found for ( 3 He, T) reaction where the changes in the high energy part of the triton spectrum are enhanced relative to the low-energy part by ( 3 He, T) form factor. For the (p, n) reaction no visible effects were found. (orig.)

  16. The 10B (7Li, 7Be)10Be charge-exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etchegoyen, A.

    1987-01-01

    It is analysed the mechanisms: direct charge-exchange through the two-body residual force (Q opt ∼ 0.2 MeV, which is close to the reaction Q-value of - 1,42 MeV); and single-Nucleon Knock-on exchange (SNKE) due to the intereacting nucleons being undistinguishable. These mechanisms are analysed in detail for producing 10 B ( 7 Li, 7 Be) 10 Be reaction. The experience was carried out at the Tandar Laboratory using conventional electronics. The elastic scattering was simultaneously measured in order to obtain an optical model parameter set. (M.C.K.) [pt

  17. Molecular (Feshbach) treatment of charge exchange Li/sup 3 +/+He collisions. II. Cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errea, L.F.; Martin, F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.; Yanez, M.

    1986-05-15

    Using the wave functions calculated in the preceding article, and a common translation factor, the charge exchange cross section for the Li/sup 3 +/+He(1s/sup 2/) reaction is calculated, and the mechanism of the process discussed. We show how small deviations from the Landau--Zener model, which are unrelated to Nikitin's conditions for its validity, lead to a minimum of the cross section at an impact energy Eapprox. =1 keV, and to larger values of sigma at intermediate nuclear velocities.

  18. Determination of plasma ion velocity distribution via charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonck, R.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Jaehnig, K.P.

    1983-12-01

    Spectroscopy of line radiation from plasma impurity ions excited by charge-exchange recombination reactions with energetic neutral beam atoms is rapidly becoming recognized as a powerful technique for measuring ion temperature, bulk plasma motion, impurity transport, and more exotic phenomena such as fast alpha particle distributions. In particular, this diagnostic offers the capability of obtaining space- and time-resolved ion temperature and toroidal plasma rotation profiles with relatively simple optical systems. Cascade-corrected excitation rate coefficients for use in both fully stripped impurity density studies and ion temperature measurements have been calculated to the principal ..delta..n = 1 transitions of He+, C/sup 5 +/, and O/sup 7 +/ with neutral beam energies of 5 to 100 keV/amu. A fiber optically coupled spectrometer system has been used on PDX to measure visible He/sup +/ radiation excited by charge exchange. Central ion temperatures up to 2.4 keV and toroidal rotation speeds up to 1.5 x 10/sup 7/ cm/s were observed in diverted discharges with P/sub INJ/ less than or equal to 3.0 MW.

  19. Elastic and charge-exchange scattering of pions from 3He and 3H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, B.F.; Hess, A.T.

    1976-04-01

    We have examined (1) the elastic scattering of pions from the isodoublet 3 He and 3 H and (2) the single charge-exchange reaction 3 H(π + ,π 0 ) 3 He using a formalism which incorporates the π-N multiple scattering to all orders. Emphasis is placed on numerical results which illustrate those features of the differential cross sections that are expected to be of interest to the experimentalist. Realistic nuclear densities corresponding to the form factors of elastic electron scattering were used. Charge-exchange cross sections are presented in terms of angular distributions for both the π 0 and the recoil nucleus. In elastic scattering, Coulomb-nuclear interference effects are significant at incident pion kinetic energies of less than 100 MeV; form factor effects are apparent at large momentum transfer. Comparison of data and theory for π + - 3 He with that for π - - 3 He (or the conjugate π + - 3 H) will provide a test of the convergence of the fixed scatterer, multiple-scattering formalism utilized in this report. 21 figures

  20. Charge exchange during pion-nucleon scattering at low energy: experiment and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernin, Pascal

    1972-01-01

    This research thesis lies within the frame of a more general study of pion-nucleon scattering according to the following processes: π + p → π + p; π - p → π - p; π - p → π 0 n. It more precisely addresses the last reaction, so-called charge exchange. Pion-nucleon interactions are described by phase shifts of scattering waves. But the measurement of one of these phase shifts (that of the S wave) requires very low energy pions, and could not have been performed until now with a good precision. In order to fill this gap, the author performed charge exchange experiments at 180 deg. and for energies of 22.6, 33.9 and 42.6 MeV. After a recall on involved theoretical data, the author describes the experimental setup, and reports the detailed study of problems raised by neutron detection. He shows that the analysis of experimental data allows (a 3 - a 1 ) to be obtained with a precision which, without being as high as desired, is nevertheless satisfying [fr

  1. High spatial and temporal resolution charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the HL-2A tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Y. L.; Yu, D. L., E-mail: yudl@swip.ac.cn; Liu, L.; Cao, J. Y.; Sun, A. P.; Ma, Q.; Chen, W. J.; Liu, Yi; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Liu, Yong [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); Ida, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Hellermann, M. von [ITER Diagnostic Team, IO, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul lez Durance (France); FOM-Institute for Plasma physics “Rijnhuizen,” Association EURATOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2014-10-01

    A 32/64-channel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic system is developed on the HL-2A tokamak (R = 1.65 m, a = 0.4 m), monitoring plasma ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity simultaneously. A high throughput spectrometer (F/2.8) and a pitch-controlled fiber bundle enable the temporal resolution of the system up to 400 Hz. The observation geometry and an optimized optic system enable the highest radial resolution up to ~1 cm at the plasma edge. The CXRS system monitors the carbon line emission (C VI, n = 8–7, 529.06 nm) whose Doppler broadening and Doppler shift provide ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity during the neutral beam injection. The composite CX spectral data are analyzed by the atomic data and analysis structure charge exchange spectroscopy fitting (ADAS CXSFIT) code. First experimental results are shown for the case of HL-2A plasmas with sawtooth oscillations, electron cyclotron resonance heating, and edge transport barrier during the high-confinement mode (H-mode)

  2. Development of two-grating spectrometer for the charge exchange spectroscopy system on KSTAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyungho; Song, Eun-ji; Park, Young-dong; Oh, Soo-ghee; Ko, Won-Ha

    2011-06-01

    The charge exchange spectroscopy (CES) system on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) was installed last year and had been applied to measure the C VI ion temperature and rotation velocity profiles. The ion temperature and rotation velocity profiles had been estimated from the C VI 5290.5 Å (n = 8-7) charge-exchange spectrum signal measured by a Czerny-Turner type spectrometer and a thinned back-illuminated charge coupled device (CCD) camera. However, the Czerny-Turner type spectrometer used for the KSTAR CES system showed so low signal to noise ratio for KSTAR plasmas in the 2010 experimental campaign that the time resolution of the CES system had been limited to 100 ms due to the increased exposure time of the attached CCD camera. Then, new two-grating spectrometer had been developed in order to improve the time resolution of the CES system. The spectrometer consists of two gratings (1200 g/mm and 1800 g/mm each) with additive configuration, concave mirrors (f = 50 cm), and a cylindrical lens (f = 50 cm). The time resolution of the CES system increases by a factor of 2-4 with the two-grating spectrometer. The C VI ion temperature and rotation velocity profiles obtained by the two-grating spectrometer are compared to those by Czerny-Turner type spectrometer in this paper. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  3. Reaction mechanism and nuclear correlations study by low energy pion double charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinfeld, Z.

    1993-06-01

    In pion double-charge-exchange (DCX) reactions, a positive (negative) pion is incident on a nucleus and a negative (positive) pion emerges. These reactions are of fundamental interest since the process must involve at least two nucleons in order to conserve charge. Although two nucleon processes are present in many reactions they are usually masked by the dominant single nucleon processes. DCX is unique in that respect since it is a two nucleon process in lowest order and thus may be sensitive to two-nucleon correlations. Measurements of low energy pion double-charge-exchange reactions to the double-isobaric-analog-state (DIAS) and ground-state (GS) of the residual nucleus provide new means for studying nucleon-nucleon correlations in nuclei. At low energies (T π 7/2 shell at energies ranging from 25 to 65 MeV. Cross sections were measured on 42,44,48 Ca, 46,50 Ti and 54 Fe. The calcium isotopes make a good set of nuclei on which to study the effects of correlations in DCX reactions

  4. Energy loss of charged particles to molecular gas targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigmund, P.

    1976-01-01

    The energy loss spectrum of fast charged particles penetrating a dilute molecular gas target has been analysed theoretically, with a homogeneous gas mixture in the state of complete dissociation as a reference standard. It is shown that the geometrical structure of molecules causes the energy-loss straggling and higher moments over the energy-loss spectrum to be greater than the corresponding quantities for a completely dissociated gas of equal composition. Such deviations from additivity are shown to be most pronounced at energies around the stopping-power maximum. There is found supporting evidence in the experimental literature. (Auth.)

  5. A He-gas Cooled, Stationary Granular Target

    CERN Document Server

    Pugnat, P

    2003-01-01

    In the CERN approach to the design of a neutrino factory, the repetition frequency of the proton beam is high enough to consider stationary solid targets as a viable solution for multi-MW beams. The target consists of high density tantalum spheres of 2 mm diameter which can efficiently be cooled by passing a high mass flow He-gas stream through the voids between the Ta-granules. Very small thermal shocks and stresses will arise in this fine grained structure due to the relatively long burst of 3.3 ms from the SPL-proton linac. In a quadruple target system where each target receives only one quarter of the total beam power of 4 MW, conservative temperature levels and adequate lifetimes of the target are estimated in its very high radiation environment. A conceptual design of the integration of the target into the magnetic horn-pion-collector is presented.

  6. Gas-target method for the production of iodine-123

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.; Stuart, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    The object of this invention is to provide a means of producing iodine-123 in high yield and purity via a small accelerator. The process uses protons of about 30 MeV incident upon a target of isotopically-enriched xenon-124 gas. The product obtained has a useful life after preparation of at least 85 hours

  7. Aligning corporate greenhouse-gas emissions targets with climate goals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbe, Oskar; Linthorst, Giel; Blok, Kornelis; Crijns-Graus, Wina; Vuuren, Van Detlef P.; Höhne, Niklas; Faria, Pedro; Aden, Nate; Pineda, Alberto Carrillo

    2015-01-01

    Corporate climate action is increasingly considered important in driving the transition towards a low-carbon economy. For this, it is critical to ensure translation of global goals to greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions reduction targets at company level. At the moment, however, there is a lack of

  8. Aligning corporate greenhouse-gas emissions targets with climate goals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbe, Oskar; Linthorst, Giel; Blok, Kornelis|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07170275X; Crijns-Graus, Wina|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/308005015; Van Vuuren, Detlef P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/11522016X; Höhne, Niklas; Faria, Pedro; Aden, Nate; Pineda, Alberto Carrillo

    2015-01-01

    Corporate climate action is increasingly considered important in driving the transition towards a low-carbon economy. For this, it is critical to ensure translation of global goals to greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions reduction targets at company level. At the moment, however, there is a lack of clear

  9. Minimizing Residual Pressure within a Windowless Gas Target System - JENSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Orlando; Browne, Justin; Kontos, Antonios; Montes, Fernando; Jensa Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear reactions between light gases and radioactive isotope beams are essential to address open questions in nuclear structure and astrophysics. Pure light gas targets are critical for the measurements of proton- and alpha-induced reactions. J _ et E _ xperiments in N _ uclear S _ tructure and A _ strophysics (JENSA) is the world's most dense (~ 1019 atoms/cm2) windowless gas target system. Most of the gas flow is localized; however, escaping gas creates a pressure gradient which degrades experimental measurements and contaminates the beam line. JENSA contains a differential pumping system to maintain a vacuum. The previous design configuration was not optimized for experiments (pressure measurements 70 cm downstream from the jet were ~ 10-3 torr; optimal is less than 10-4 torr). We have altered the current differential pumping system to minimize the residual pressure profile. Several configurations of two gas-receiving catchers were tested, and the most efficient ones identified using Enhanced Pirani and Cold Cathode gauges. We have determined the 30 mm outer and 20 mm inner gas-receiving cones minimize JENSA central chamber pressure to 200 millitorr at 16,000 torr of discharge pressure. Altering the tubing configuration has additionally lowered the pressure 70 cm downstream to 10-5 torr. The new residual pressure allows operation of JENSA with planned expansion of a recoil mass separator SECAR.

  10. Ray tracing analysis of stray light for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajita, Shin; De Bock, Maarten; Von Hellermann, Manfred; Kukushkin, Andrei; Barnsley, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) provides basic measurements in ITER such as the ion temperature, plasma rotation, and the impurity and helium content. One of the issues concerning all spectroscopic measurements in ITER is the influence of the reflection of light in a vacuum vessel, since ITER will have a full metallic wall, which has higher optical reflectance than a carbon wall. The noise level can be enhanced and the signal can be disturbed by the reflection. In this study, the influences of the light reflection on the CXRS measurement have been investigated using a ray tracing simulation. Influences of the reflection of the active CXRS signal, the light emission from the divertor and scrape off layer, and bremsstrahlung are quantitatively shown in typical discharge scenario cases. (paper)

  11. Effect of injection energy on residual dose around the charge exchange foil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazami Yamamoto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC and the accumulator ring (AR of Spallation Neutron Source (SNS can be used as high-power pulsed neutron sources. In both cases, the injection region becomes one of the highest activation areas in the ring. However, residual dose distributions have revealed that the highest activation points in the J-PARC RCS and the SNS AR are different in detail. The dose of the charge exchange chamber in the SNS is more than 100 times larger than that of the RCS though the ratio of beam power is less than 10. We investigated the reason of this difference by Geant4 and MARS, and the calculation results indicated that the difference was due to the dependence of the neutron and pion production rate on the injection energy.

  12. Towards hot electron mediated charge exchange in hyperthermal energy ion-surface interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ray, M. P.; Lake, R. E.; Thomsen, Lasse Bjørchmar

    2010-01-01

    electrons useful for driving chemical reactions at surfaces. Using the binary collision approximation and a nonadiabatic model that takes into account the time-varying nature of the ion–surface interaction, the energy loss of the ions is reproduced. The energy loss for Na + ions incident on the devices......We have made Na + and He + ions incident on the surface of solid state tunnel junctions and measured the energy loss due to atomic displacement and electronic excitations. Each tunnel junction consists of an ultrathin film metal–oxide–semiconductor device which can be biased to create a band of hot...... shows that the primary energy loss mechanism is the atomic displacement of Au atoms in the thin film of the metal–oxide–semiconductor device. We propose that neutral particle detection of the scattered flux from a biased device could be a route to hot electron mediated charge exchange....

  13. A study of charge-exchange neutrals from a rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, L.W.; Sillesen, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of charge-exchange neutrals leaving a rotating plasma (a puffatron device) are reported. Neutrals are observed only during the breakdown phase (2-3 μs) indicating that the created plasma is fully ionized. Several energy spectra of the neutrals for different plasma parameters are obtained. These spectra are grossly explained using a single-particle orbit model of the plasma ions. Assuming a Maxwellian distribution for the spread in the ion Larmor energy for the central part of the measured energy spectra, it is possible to determine the ion energy during the breakdown phase. Neutral particle measurements at different distances from the puffatron midplane show ionization velocities parallel with the magnetic field of about 2 . 10 4 ms -1 and plasma expansion velocities of about 5-6 . 10 4 ms -1 corresponding to an electron temperature of about 25 eV. (author)

  14. Charge exchange as a recombination mechanism in high-temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulse, R.A.; Post, D.E.; Mikkelsen, D.R.

    1980-03-01

    Charge exchange with neutral hydrogen is examined as a recombination mechanism for multi-charged impurity ions present in high-temperature fusion plasmas. At sufficiently low electron densities, fluxes of atomic hydrogen produced by either the injection of neutral heating beams or the background of thermal neutrals can yield an important or even dominant recombination process for such ions. Equilibrium results are given for selected impurity elements showing the altered ionization balance and radiative cooling rate produced by the presence of various neutral populations. A notable result is that the stripping of impurities to relatively non-radiative ionization states with increasing electron temperature can be postponed or entirely prevented by the application of intense neutral beam heating power. A time dependent calculation modelling the behavior of iron in recent PLT tokamak high power neutral beam heating experiments is also presented

  15. Neutrino nuclear responses for double beta decays and astro neutrinos by charge exchange reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu

    2014-09-01

    Neutrino nuclear responses are crucial for neutrino studies in nuclei. Charge exchange reactions (CER) are shown to be used to study charged current neutrino nuclear responses associated with double beta decays(DBD)and astro neutrino interactions. CERs to be used are high energy-resolution (He3 ,t) reactions at RCNP, photonuclear reactions via IAR at NewSUBARU and muon capture reactions at MUSIC RCNP and MLF J-PARC. The Gamow Teller (GT) strengths studied by CERs reproduce the observed 2 neutrino DBD matrix elements. The GT and spin dipole (SD) matrix elements are found to be reduced much due to the nucleon spin isospin correlations and the non-nucleonic (delta isobar) nuclear medium effects. Impacts of the reductions on the DBD matrix elements and astro neutrino interactions are discussed.

  16. Theoretical study of charge exchange, ionization and electron loss processes, relevant to controlled thermonuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.

    1981-03-01

    The following processes have been studied: a) Single and double charge exchange in low, medium and high energy collisions of atoms with multiply charged ions; b) Excitation and ionization processes in low, medium and high energy collisions between multiply charged ions and atoms; c) Ion-ion recombination and ion-pair formation collision processes between hydrogen and alkali atoms (ions); d) Resonant and Auger processes in slow collisions of atomic particles with solid surfaces (including surfaces covered by a sub-monoatomic layer). Processes a) and b) are important for the ''impurity problem'' of magnetically confined tokamak plasmas, whereas processes c) and d) for the production and transport of intense neutral beams for plasma heating

  17. Quasielastic scattering charge exchange p3He→nFppp reaction at mean energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, A.V.; Vanyushin, I.A.; Grechko, V.E.

    1988-01-01

    The main characteristics of the quasi-elastic charge-exchange reaction p 3 He → n F ppp (where n F is fast neutron in the rest frame of 3 He nucleus) are studied making use of the ITEP 80-cm liquid-hydrogen bubble chamber exposed in the 3 He beams of 2.5 and 5 GeV/c momenta (the kinetic energy T p of the primary protons in the rest frame of the nucleus is, respectively, 0.318 and 0.978 GeV). The experimental data are compared with the Galuber - Sitenko multiple scattering theory predictions and with the pole-model calculations taking into account the final-state interaction of the spectator nucleons. In the mass spectrum of the 3p system at 3.05 GeV a prominent structure has been observed which cannot be described by the pole model. Possible resonance nature of this structure is discussed

  18. Elimination of ion losses in the EhGP-10-1 charge-exchange accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridrikh, M.

    1986-01-01

    To improve the ion transit factor in the EhGP-10-1 charge-exchange accelerator the injector ion-optical properties are studied. The injector operates at constant high voltage U a -23 kV. Using an immersion lens the negative ion energy before entering the accelerating tube is increased up to energy proportional to the conductor voltage. A single electrostatic lens provides a cross-over in the vicinity of immersion lens. By reducing the electric field gradient at the accelerating tube inlet, optimizing input electrode voltage and shifting the single lens by 0.26 m towards the accelerating tube inlet almost full beam transit is attained at all conductor voltages

  19. Molecular (Feshbach) treatment of charge exchange Li/sup 3 +/+He collisions. I. Energies and couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F.; Riera, A.; Yanez, M.

    1986-05-15

    We point out a fundamental difference between the molecular treatment of charge exchange X/sup n/++H(1s) and X/sup n/++He(1s/sup 2/) collisions, which is that the latter process involves molecular states that are formally autoionizing. Then standard ab initio methods do not, in general, yield the relevant wave functions that are needed in the collision treatment, irrespective of whether quasimolecular autoionization be significant or not during the collision. We implement a particularly simple and useful form of the Feshbach formalism to calculate the energies of those two electron systems, and a method to evaluate the corresponding dynamical couplings is presented for the first time. Our implementation of this formalism together with the new computational techniques involved are presented in detail.

  20. The neutron-proton charge-exchange amplitudes measured in the dp {yields} ppn reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mchedlishvili, D.; Chiladze, D. [Tbilisi State University, High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi (Georgia); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Centre for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Barsov, S.; Dzyuba, A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, High Energy Physics Department, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Carbonell, J. [Universite Paris-Sud, IN2P3-CNRS, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay Cedex (France); Dymov, S. [JINR, Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Dubna (Russian Federation); Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut II, Erlangen (Germany); Engels, R.; Gebel, R.; Hartmann, M.; Kacharava, A.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Lehrach, A.; Lorentz, B.; Maier, R.; Ohm, H.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Serdyuk, V.; Seyfarth, H.; Stein, H.J.; Stockhorst, H.; Stroeher, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Centre for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Glagolev, V. [JINR, Laboratory of High Energies, Dubna (Russian Federation); Grigoryev, K.; Mikirtychyants, M.; Mikirtychyants, S.; Valdau, Yu. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Centre for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, High Energy Physics Department, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Goslawski, P.; Khoukaz, A.; Mielke, M.; Papenbrock, M. [Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Keshelashvili, I. [Tbilisi State University, High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi (Georgia); University of Basel, Department of Physics, Basel (Switzerland); Komarov, V.; Kulikov, A. [JINR, Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kulessa, P. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Krakow (Poland); Lomidze, N.; Nioradze, M.; Tabidze, M. [Tbilisi State University, High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi (Georgia); Macharashvili, G. [Tbilisi State University, High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi (Georgia); JINR, Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Dubna (Russian Federation); Merzliakov, S. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Centre for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); JINR, Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Dubna (Russian Federation); Steffens, E. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut II, Erlangen (Germany); Trusov, S. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Institut fuer Kern- und Hadronenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Uzikov, Yu. [JINR, Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Dubna (Russian Federation); M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Wilkin, C. [UCL, Physics and Astronomy Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-15

    The unpolarised differential cross section and the two deuteron tensor analysing powers A{sub xx} and A{sub yy} of the vector dp {yields} {l_brace}pp{r_brace}{sub s}n charge-exchange reaction have been measured with the ANKE spectrometer at the COSY storage ring. Using deuteron beams with energies 1.2, 1.6, 1.8, and 2.27GeV, data were obtained for small momentum transfers to a {l_brace}pp{r_brace}{sub s} system with low excitation energy. The results at the three lower energies are consistent with impulse approximation predictions based upon the current knowledge of the neutron-proton amplitudes. However, at 2.27GeV, where these amplitudes are far more uncertain, agreement requires a reduction in the overall double-spin-flip contribution, with an especially significant effect in the longitudinal direction. These conclusions are supported by measurements of the deuteron-proton spin-correlation parameters C{sub x,x} and C{sub y,y} that were carried out in the vector dvector p {yields} {l_brace}pp{r_brace}{sub s}n reaction at 1.2 and 2.27GeV. The values obtained for the proton analysing power A{sub y}{sup p} also suggest the need for a radical re-evaluation of the neutron-proton elastic scattering amplitudes at the higher energy. It is therefore clear that such measurements can provide a valuable addition to the neutron-proton database in the charge-exchange region. (orig.)

  1. Inclusive measurements of pion double charge exchange and inelastic scattering on 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuly, M.E.

    1993-06-01

    A measurement was made at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) of the doubly differential cross sections for three inclusive pion reactions on 3 He: π - double charge exchange (DCX), and π + and π - inelastic scattering. The cross sections for DCX were measured at incident energies of 120, 180, 210, and 240 MeV, and at angles of 25, 50, 80, 105, and 130 degrees, while inelastic scattering cross sections were measured at 120, 180, and 240 MeV and scattering angles of 50, 80, 105, and 130 degrees. The final pion energy spectrum was measured from 10 MeV up to the kinematic limit. In the Δ resonance region, where the isospin T = 3/2 channel dominates, the inelastic π - scattering should be almost entirely from the lone neutron in 3 He. The π + inelastic scattering was expected to have significant contributions from both single and double scattering, because the T = 3/2 channel favors π + -p scattering from the two protons in 3 He. The 3 He DCX spectra are similar to those observed for DCX in 4 He. The forward angle double peaks can be understood as a consequence of sequential single charge exchange (SSCX). Calculations using the SSCX model are in rough agreement with the measured shape of the 3 He DCX spectra. The doubly differential cross sections measured for the inelastic scattering reactions exhibit a strong enhancement near the kinematics for free π - -p scattering. The ratios of π + to π - scattering cross sections may indicate multiple scattering, as well as the agreement of the low outgoing energy part of the π + inelastic scattering spectra with the corresponding properly scaled DCX spectra. A distorted-wave impulse-approximation (DWIA) calculation of the quasielastic cross sections has been performed and a comparison made with the measured inelastic cross sections

  2. CORRIGENDUM: Kinetics of highly excited states in Ar17+ charge exchange recombination fusion plasma spectroscopy Kinetics of highly excited states in Ar17+ charge exchange recombination fusion plasma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchuk, O.; Ralchenko, Yu; Janev, R. K.; Bertschinger, G.; Biel, W.

    2009-09-01

    The equation on page 6 for the rate coefficient of charge exchange contains a misprint in the integration limits, which should range from 0 to ∞. It should be replaced by the version in the associated PDF file. This error does not affect any results in the paper as the calculations were performed with the correct limits.

  3. Laser-driven nuclear-polarized hydrogen internal gas target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, J.; Crawford, C.; Clasie, B.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-01-01

    We report the performance of a laser-driven polarized internal hydrogen gas target (LDT) in a configuration similar to that used in scattering experiments. This target used the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping to produce nuclear spin polarized hydrogen gas that was fed into a cylindrical storage (target) cell. We present in this paper the performance of the target, methods that were tried to improve the figure-of-merit (FOM) of the target, and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results from the simulation. The best experimental result achieved was at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1x10 18 atoms/s, where the sample beam exiting the storage cell had 58.2% degree of dissociation and 50.5% polarization. Based on this measurement, the atomic fraction in the storage cell was 49.6% and the density averaged nuclear polarization was 25.0%. This represents the highest FOM for hydrogen from an LDT and is higher than the best FOM reported by atomic beam sources that used storage cells

  4. Price-related sensitivities of greenhouse gas intensity targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, Benito; Muller-Furstenberger, Georg

    2003-12-01

    Greenhouse gas intensities are an appealing tool to foster abatement without imposing constraints on economic growth. This paper shows, however, that the computation of intensities is subject to some significant statistical and conceptual problems which relate to the inflation proofing of GDP growth. It is shown that the choice of price-index, the updating of quantity weights and the choice of base year prices can have a significant impact upon the commitment of intensity targets

  5. Chandra Observations of a Collisionally and Optically Thin Charge Exchange System - Comet 2P/Encke 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, D. J.; Lisse, C. M.; Dennerl, K.; Wolk, S. J.; Bodewits, D.; Combi, M. R.; Hoekstra, R.; Makinen, J. T. T.; Weaver, H. A.

    2004-11-01

    The highly favorable perigee passage of the x-ray bright comet 2P/Encke in late 2003 provided an excellent opportunity to use Chandra's high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution to study cometary x-ray emission in the low neutral target density, low x-ray flux regime. The 1997 ROSAT/EUVE observations of Encke (Lisse et al. 1999) and the nucleus rotation studies of Luu and Jewitt (1990, most likely rotation period = 15 hours) suggested a simple Chandra experiment - continuous ACIS-S observations of Encke over 15 hours during the time of its closest approach to Earth. Here we report initial results from our X-ray observations. X-ray emission from comet Encke was found only in a small, asymmetric region between 1500 km - 40,000 km from the nucleus. The Encke ACIS-S3 200 -- 1000 eV spectrum shows many of the same x-ray emission lines previously observed from comets (C+5, O+6,O+7), including confirmation of several emission lines in the 800 to 1000 eV range. However, the Encke spectrum shows very different line ratios in the 200 - 700 eV range than any previous comet. A lightcurve with peak-to-peak amplitude of 20% and period 11.7 hours was found over the 15 hour observing period. Comparing the observations to contemporaneous measurements of the coma and solar wind made by other means, we find the combination of a low density, collisionally thin (to charge exchange) coma and a post-massive X-flare, high temperature, moderate density solar wind can explain our unusual Encke x-ray observations.

  6. Overview on R&D and design activities for the ITER core charge exchange spectroscopy diagnostic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biel, W.; Baross, T.; Bourauel, P.; Dunai, D.; Durkut, M.; Erdei, G.; Hawkes, N.; Hellermann, M. von; Hogenbirk, A.; Jaspers, R.; Kiss, G.; Klinkhamer, J.F.F.; Koning, J.F.; Kotov, V.; Krasikov, Y.; Krimmer, A.; Lischtschenko, O.; Litnovsky, A.; Marchuk, O.; Neubauer, O.; Offermanns, G.; Panin, A.; Patel, K.; Pokol, G.; Schrader, M.; Snijders, B.; Szabo, V.; Valk, N.J.C. van der; Voinchet, R.; Wolters, J.; Zoletnik, S.

    2011-01-01

    The ITER core charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (core CXRS) diagnostic system is designed to provide experimental access to various measurement quantities in the ITER core plasma such as ion densities, temperatures and velocities. The implementation of the approved CXRS diagnostic principle

  7. Tritons for the study of the charge-exchange reactions with the LHE streamer chamber: status and some possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avramenko, S.A.; Belikov, Yu.A.; Golokhvastov, A.I.; Kirillov, A.D.; Khorozov, S.A.; Komolov, L.N.; Lukstin'sh, Yu.; Rukoyatkin, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    The 6 and 9 GeV/c secondary tritons, produced in the 4 He+A→ 3 H+X reaction, were used to study the charge-exchange reactions using a streamer chamber in magnetic field. The triton formation schemes, the beam parameters achieved as well as a way to reduce the beam momentum spread are given in the paper

  8. 1st IAEA research co-ordination meeting on charge exchange cross section data for fusion plasma studies. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.K.

    1999-02-01

    A brief description of the proceedings and the conclusions of the 1st Research Coordination Meeting on 'Charge Exchange Cross Section Data for Fusion Plasma Studies', held on September 24-25, 1999, at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, is provided. The conclusions of the Meeting regarding the data collection, assessment and generation priorities are also included in the report. (author)

  9. Study of the elastic scattering and of the (p,n) charge exchange reaction with neutron-rich light exotic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortina Gil, D.

    1996-01-01

    We have measured at GANIL, with the high resolution spectrometer SPEG, the elastic scattering of several neutron rich secondary beams ( 6 He, 10 Be and 11 Be) on a polypropylene target and the charge exchange reaction p( 6 He, 6 Li)n. These exotic beams were produced by nuclear fragmentation and re-focalized with the SISSI device (superconducting solenoids). The signature of a halo structure in these nuclei has been analysed. Special attention has been paid to several aspects of the associated calculations namely, the proton and neutron density distributions and the small binding energy for the last nucleons in these exotic nuclei. Break-up mechanisms are seen to play an important role in these nuclei

  10. Attosecond pulse trains from long laser-gas interaction targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauri, C.P.; Lopez-Martens, R.; Varju, K.; Ruchon, T.; Gustafsson, E.; L'Huillier, A.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Many experiments in attosecond physics require high XUV photon flux as well as a clean attosecond pulse train (APT) temporal structure. Temporal characterization of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in long interaction targets is thus of high interest. HHG being a very inefficient process, a large effort has been made to increase the amount of XUV photons emitted per infrared laser pulse. Besides quasi phase-matching in a modulated capillary, loose driving laser focusing conditions and subsequent self-channeling have shown to significantly increase the conversion efficiency. We characterized the temporal structure of APTs generated during the self-channeling of an intense IR driving laser pulse. Our first results indicate, however, that the temporal structure of the APT generated during the HHG process might be affected by quantum path interference and spectral phase distortion due to the self-channeling process itself. In particular, our measurements show that the relative spectral phase between consecutive harmonics can strongly vary depending on the target length and the position of the laser focus with respect to the target. In general for short gas targets, no clean APT structure can be expected since the individual attosecond pulses carry significant chirp. For longer targets, however, we observe a flattening of the harmonic spectral phase, resulting in near-transform-limited attosecond pulse trains. A complete analysis of the process is complex and involves detailed knowledge of the spatial and temporal evolution of the self-channeling driver laser pulse throughout the gas target.

  11. Performance of the CERN PSB at 160 MeV with $H^{-}$ charge exchange injection

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084247; Santoni, Claudio

    As part of the LHC Injectors Upgrade Project, the CERN PS Booster (PSB) will be upgraded with a H- charge exchange injection system and its injection energy will be raised from 50 MeV to 160 MeV to obtain the beam brightness required for the LHC High-Luminosity Upgrade. Space charge effects like beam losses and transverse emittance blow-up at injection are expected to be the main limitations towards the achievement of the required high brightness. Studies of beam dynamics in presence of space charge in order to evaluate the performances of the PSB after the Upgrade have been performed. The first part of the work consists of measurements in the present machine, to study the effects of space charge and its interplay with resonances and to have a good set of data for code benchmarking. The code chosen for the beam tracking in presence of space charge is PTC-Orbit (and PyOrbit). Necessary numerical convergence studies are presented together with a benchmark with the PSB measurements. Once assessed the code and it...

  12. Monitoring Charge Exchange in P3HT-Nanotube Composites Using Optical and Electrical Characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lioudakis Emmanouil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Charge exchange at the bulk heterojunctions of composites made by mixing single wall nanotubes (SWNTs and polymers show potential for use in optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and optical sensors. The density/total area of these heterojunctions is expected to increase with increasing SWNT concentration but the efficiency of solar cell peaks at low SWNT concentrations. Most researchers use current–voltage measurements to determine the evolution of the SWNT percolation network and optical absorption measurements to monitor the spectral response of the composites. However, these methods do not provide a detailed account of carrier transport at the concentrations of interest; i.e., near or below the percolation threshold. In this article, we show that capacitance–voltage (C–V response of (metal-(oxide-(semiconducting composite devices can be used to fill this gap in studying bulk heterojunctions. In an approach where we combine optical absorption methods withC–Vmeasurements we can acquire a unified optoelectronic response from P3HT-SWNT composites. This methodology can become an important tool for optoelectronic device optimization.

  13. Development of Fast Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy by Using Interference Filter Method in JT-60U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shinji; Sakasai, Akira; Koide, Yoshihiko; Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Kamada, Yutaka; Hatae, Takaki; Oyama, Naoyuki; Miura, Yukitoshi

    Recent developments and results of fast charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) using interference filter method are reported. In order to measure the rapid change of the ion temperature and rotation velocity under collapse or transition phenomena with high-time resolution, two types of interference filter systems were applied to the CXRS diagnostics on the JT-60U Tokamak. One can determine the Doppler broadening and Doppler shift of the CXR emission using three interference filters having slightly different center wavelengths. A rapid estimation method of the temperature and rotation velocity without non-linear least square fitting is presented. The modification of the three-filters system enables us to improve the minimum time resolution up to 0.8 ms, which is better than that of 16.7 ms for the conventional CXRS system using the CCD detector in JT-60U. The other system having seven wavelength channels is newly fabricated to crosscheck the results obtained by the three-filters assembly, that is, to verify that the CXR emission forms a Gaussian profile under collapse phenomena. In a H-mode discharge having giant edge localized modes, the results obtained by the two systems are compared. The applicability of the three-filters system to the measurement of rapid changes in temperature and rotation velocity is demonstrated.

  14. Proposal for making a beam of antihydrogen by two charge exchange events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robicheaux, F

    2010-01-01

    We have performed calculations of two successive charge transfers in a geometry that could generate a beam of antihydrogen atoms (H-bar) or reliably produce cold H-bar without having to reach extremely cold plasma temperatures. The basic idea is similar to that proposed by Hessels et al (1998 Phys. Rev. A 57 1668) except that the order of the charge transfers is reversed. A beam of highly-excited (Rydberg) Cs atoms passes through an antiproton (p-bar) plasma where a charge transfer can take place; the result is an exotic Rydberg atom (Cs + ion and a bound p-bar) which has approximately the original velocity of the Cs atom since the Cs + mass is much greater than that of the p-bar. This exotic Rydberg atom travels into a positron plasma where a second charge exchange gives antihydrogen (H-bar). The velocity distribution of the resulting H-bar is directly related to the original velocity of the Rydberg Cs atom. The binding energy of the H-bar is roughly that of the original Cs Rydberg atom; thus, the starting state of the H-bar can be controlled by choosing the initial state of the Cs atom. Because the p-barCs + binding energy can be controlled in the charge transfer, this first step, by itself, could be of interest to the exotic atom community.

  15. A fast CCD detector for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.M.; Burrell, K.H.; Groebner, R.J.; Gohil, P.

    1996-05-01

    Charge Exchange Recombination (CER) spectroscopy has become a standard diagnostic for tokamaks. CER measurements have been used to determine spatially and temporally resolved ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal ion rotation speed, impurity density and radial electric field. Knowledge of the spatial profile and temporal evolution of the electric field shear in the plasma edge is crucial to understanding the physics of the L to H transition. High speed CER measurements are also valuable for Edge Localized Mode (ELM) studies. Since the 0.52 ms minimum time resolution of our present system is barely adequate to study the time evolution of these phenomena, we have developed a new CCD detector system with about a factor of two better time resolution. In addition, our existing system detects sufficient photons to utilize the shortest time resolution only under exceptional conditions. The new CCD detector has a quantum efficiency of about 0.65, which is a factor of 7 better than our previous image intensifier-silicon photodiode detector systems. We have also equipped the new system with spectrometers of lower f/number. This combination should allow more routine operation at the minimum integration time, as well as improving data quality for measurements in the divertor-relevant region outside of the separatrix. Construction details, benchmark data and initial tokamak measurements for the new system will be presented

  16. Development of AN Active 238UF6 Gas Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckardt, C.; Enders, J.; Freudenberger, M.; Göök, A.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Oberstedt, A.; Oberstedt, S.

    2014-09-01

    Detailed studies of the fission process, e.g., the search for parity nonconservation (PNC) effects, the energy dependence of fission modes or the population of fission isomers, depend on high quality data, therefore requiring high luminosities. An active gas target containing uranium may overcome the deterioration of energy and angular resolution caused by large solid target thicknesses. A single Frisch-grid ionization chamber has been built to test a mixture of standard counting gases (e.g., argon) with depleted uranium hexafluoride (238UF6), utilizing a triple alpha source to evaluate signal quality and drift velocity. For mass fractions of up to 4 percent of 238U the drift velocity increases with rising UF6 content, while a good signal quality and energy resolution is preserved.

  17. Upgrade to the Cryogenic Hydrogen Gas Target Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Michael; Tribble, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The cryogenic hydrogen gas target at Texas A&M is a vital component for creating a secondary radioactive beam that is then used in experiments in the Momentum Achromat Recoil Spectrometer (MARS). A stable beam from the K500 superconducting cyclotron enters the gas cell and some incident particles are transmuted by a nuclear reaction into a radioactive beam, which are separated from the primary beam and used in MARS experiments. The pressure in the target chamber is monitored so that a predictable isotope production rate can be assured. A ``black box'' received the analog pressure data and sent RS232 serial data through an outdated serial connection to an outdated Visual Basic 6 (VB6) program, which plotted the chamber pressure continuously. The black box has been upgraded to an Arduino UNO microcontroller [Atmel Inc.], which can receive the pressure data and output via USB to a computer. It has been programmed to also accept temperature data for future upgrade. A new computer program, with updated capabilities, has been written in Python. The software can send email alerts, create audible alarms through the Arduino, and plot pressure and temperature. The program has been designed to better fit the needs of the users. Funded by DOE and NSF-REU Program.

  18. Experimental study of the production of negative deuterons by double charge-exchange in xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliman, S.; Dousson, S.; Geller, R.; Jacquot, B.; Jacquot, C.; Tsekeris, J.; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38

    1979-01-01

    It is thought that additional heating of fusion plasma will result from D 0 energetic beam injection in large plasma devices. Due to the fact that the conversion rate D + to D 0 rapidly decreases at high energies, it seems that an interesting way to get these high energy neutrals should be: conversion of D + to D - , acceleration of D - and further neutralization of D - to have D 0 at the desired energy. The efficiency of D + to D - and D 2 + to D - conversion at low energies have been sdudied on a Xe gas target: it appears that D - /D + conversion efficiency shows a smooth variation peaking slightly at 5% for a D + energy of 5 keV. D - /D 2 + increases up to 4% at 12 keV and then decreases. It is shown that the agreement between sample calculation results and experimental values is quite fair for D - /D + [fr

  19. The challenge of meeting Canada's greenhouse gas reduction targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, Larry; Chaudhry, Nikhil

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the Government of Canada announced its medium- and long-term greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction plan entitled Turning the Corner, proposed emission cuts of 20% below 2006 levels by 2020 and 60-70% below 2006 levels by 2050. A report from a Canadian government advisory organization, the National Round Table on Environment and Economy (NRTEE), Achieving 2050: A carbon pricing policy for Canada, recommended 'fast and deep' energy pathways to emissions reduction through large-scale electrification of Canada's economy by relying on a major expansion of hydroelectricity, adoption of carbon capture and storage for coal and natural gas, and increasing the use of nuclear. This paper examines the likelihood of the pathways being met by considering the report's proposed energy systems, their associated energy sources, and the magnitude of the changes. It shows that the pathways assume some combination of technological advances, access to secure energy supplies, or rapid installation in order to meet both the 2020 and 2050 targets. This analysis suggests that NRTEE's projections are optimistic and unlikely to be achieved. The analysis described in this paper can be applied to other countries to better understand and develop strategies that can help reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. - Research highlights: → An analysis of a Canadian government advisory organization's GHG reduction plans. → Hydroelectricity and wind development is overly optimistic. → Declining coal and natural gas supplies and lack of CO 2 storage may hamper CCS. → Changing precipitation patterns may limit nuclear and hydroelectricity. → Bioenergy and energy reduction policies largely ignored despite their promise.

  20. Non-Regge and hyper-Regge effects in pion-nucleon charge exchange scattering at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joynson, D.; Leader, E.; Nicolescu, B.; Paris-6 Univ., 75; Lopez, C.

    1975-04-01

    The experimental data on the charge exchange differential cross-section and on the difference on the π + p and π - p total cross-sections between 5GeV/c to 200GeV/c are shown to be incompatible with conventional Regge asymptotic behavior. It is shown that an additional term is required which grows in importance with energy. The precise form of the new term cannot be ascertained, but it is shown that it corresponds to a singularity at J=1 in the complex angular momentum plane. Amongst the possible types of additional term there are two which have been closely analysed: a non-Regge behavior, a hyper-Regge term which have allowed very striking predictions in particular for the charge exchange polarisation [fr

  1. Solution of the Fokker-Planck equation with mixing of angular harmonics by beam-beam charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    A method for solving the linear Fokker-Planck equation with anisotropic beam-beam charge exchange loss is presented. The 2-D equation is transformed to a system of coupled 1-D equations which are solved iteratively as independent equations. Although isotropic approximations to the beam-beam losses lead to inaccurate fast ion distributions, typically only a few angular harmonics are needed to include accurately the effect of the beam-beam charge exchange loss on the usual integrals of the fast ion distribution. Consequently, the algorithm converges very rapidly and is much more efficient than a 2-D finite difference method. A convenient recursion formula for the coupling coefficients is given and generalization of the method is discussed. 13 refs., 2 figs

  2. CrossRef Large numbers of cold positronium atoms created in laser-selected Rydberg states using resonant charge exchange

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, R; Kolthammer, WS; Richerme, P; Müllers, A; Walz, J; Grzonka, D; Zielinski, M; Fitzakerley, D; George, MC; Hessels, EA; Storry, CH; Weel, M

    2016-01-01

    Lasers are used to control the production of highly excited positronium atoms (Ps*). The laser light excites Cs atoms to Rydberg states that have a large cross section for resonant charge-exchange collisions with cold trapped positrons. For each trial with 30 million trapped positrons, more than 700 000 of the created Ps* have trajectories near the axis of the apparatus, and are detected using Stark ionization. This number of Ps* is 500 times higher than realized in an earlier proof-of-principle demonstration (2004 Phys. Lett. B 597 257). A second charge exchange of these near-axis Ps* with trapped antiprotons could be used to produce cold antihydrogen, and this antihydrogen production is expected to be increased by a similar factor.

  3. SOLAR WIND CHARGE EXCHANGE EMISSION FROM THE HELIUM FOCUSING CONE: MODEL TO DATA COMPARISON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutroumpa, D.; Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lallement, R.

    2009-01-01

    A model for heliospheric solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-ray emission is applied to a series of XMM-Newton observations of the interplanetary focusing cone of interstellar helium. The X-ray data are from three coupled observations of the South Ecliptic Pole (SEP; to observe the cone) and the Hubble Deep Field-North (HDF-N, to monitor global variations of the SWCX emission due to variations in the solar wind (SW)) from the period 2003 November 24 to December 15. There is good qualitative agreement between the model predictions and the data, after the SEP data are corrected using the HDF-N data, with the maximum SWCX flux observed at an ecliptic longitude of ∼72 deg., consistent with the central longitude of the He cone. We observe a total excess of 2.1 ± 1.3 line unit (LU) in the O VII line and 2.0 ± 0.9 LU in the O VIII line. However, the SWCX emission model, which was adjusted for SW conditions appropriate for late 2003, predicts an excess from the He cone of only 0.5 LU and 0.2 LU, respectively, in the O VII and O VIII lines. We discuss the model to data comparison and provide possible explanations for the discrepancies. We also qualitatively re-examine our SWCX model predictions in the 1/4 keV band with data from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey toward the North Ecliptic Pole and SEP, when the He cone was probably first detected in soft X-rays.

  4. Systematic study of K+ and K- charge exchange at 8.36 and 12.8 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilchriese, M.G.D.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a wire chamber spectrometer experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center to study kaon charge exchange reactions are reported. The salient experimental features include good relative normalization between the K + and K - charge exchange reactions and a large increase, with respect to previous experiments, in the number of events obtained for K + n charge exchange at the higher energy. Approximately 1500 events at 12.8 GeV/c and 250 events at 8.36 GeV/c were obtained for each of the reactions K + n → K 0 p, K - p → anti K 0 n, K + p → K 0 Δ ++ and K - n → anti K 0 Δ - . The results of the experiment show that the K + charge exchange cross sections are larger than the K - cross sections at both energies. In particular it is found that sigma/sub tot/(K + n → K 0 p)/sigma/sub tot/(K - p → anti K 0 n) is 1.37 +- .22 at 8.36 GeV/c and 1.38 +- 0.9 at 12.8 GeV/c. The ratio of these two reactions is also consistent with no momentum transfer dependence at either beam energy. Similarly it was determined that sigma/sub tot/(K + p → K 0 Δ ++ )/sigma/sub tot/(K - n → anti K 0 Δ - ) is 1.05 +- .16 at 8.36 GeV/c and 1.56 +- .08 at 12.8 GeV/c. The ratio of these two reactions is also consistent with momentum transfer independence for both beam energies. These results are in clear conflict with the predictions of exchange degenerate Regge pole models

  5. Charge exchange recombination in X-ray spectra of He-like argon measured at the tokamak TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlummer, Tobias

    2014-06-16

    Charge exchange recombination between ions and atomic hydrogen is an important atomic process in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Besides radiative cooling of the plasma edge, charge exchange causes modifications of the ionization balance and the population densities of excited ion states. The central goal of this work is to investigate the influence of charge exchange on X-ray spectra measured at the tokamak TEXTOR. A new 2D X-ray spectrometer developed for future use at the stellarator W7-X was recently installed at TEXTOR. The spectrometer is optimized for measuring the K{sub α}-spectrum of He-like argon (1s2l - 1s{sup 2}) at wavelengths close to 4 Aa. K{sub α}-spectroscopy on He-like impurity ions is an established diagnostic for electron and ion temperature measurements in fusion plasmas. Still, up to now the observed intensity ratios of the K{sub α}-lines and their associated satellites are not fully understood. They show significant deviations from the predictions made by basic corona models. In the past charge exchange with the neutral particle background and radial impurity transport have been discussed as likely explanations. Yet a detailed description of the experimental spectra still has not been achieved. To reconstruct the 2D K{sub α}-spectra measured at TEXTOR the radial argon ion distribution is modeled using an impurity transport code. The model accounts for charge exchange and transport on basis of given radial profiles of the neutral particle density n{sub 0}(r) and the diffusion coefficient D {sub perpendicular} {sub to} (r). The theoretical spectrum is then constructed based on the processes relevant for line emission. Within an iterative procedure n{sub 0}(r) and D {sub perpendicular} {sub to} (r) are varied until consistency between the theoretical and the experimental spectra is achieved. It is shown that the 2D K{sub α}-spectra allow a clear distinction of charge exchange and transport effects, ensuring unique solutions for n

  6. Analysis of the charge exchange between the human body and ground: evaluation of "earthing" from an electrical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Kent; Smith, Wayne; Chirgwin, Christopher; Appasani, Seshank; Rioux, Paul

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate "earthing" from an electrical perspective through measurement and analysis of the naturally occurring electron flow between the human body or a control and ground as this relates to the magnitude of the charge exchange, the relationship between the charge exchange and body functions (respiration and heart rate), and the detection of other information that might be contained in the charge exchange. Sensitive, low-noise instrumentation was designed and fabricated to measure low-level current flow at low frequencies. This instrumentation was used to record current flow between human subjects or a control and ground, and these measurements were performed approximately 40 times under varied circumstances. The results of these measurements were analyzed to determine if information was contained in the current exchange. The currents flowing between the human body and ground were small (nanoamperes), and they correlated with subject motion. There did not appear to be any information contained in this exchange except for information about subject motion. This study showed that currents flow between the environment (earth) and a grounded human body; however, these currents are small (nanoamperes) and do not appear to contain information other than information about subject motion.

  7. Critical validity assessment of theoretical models: charge-exchange at intermediate and high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkić, Dževad

    1999-06-01

    Exact comprehensive computations are carried out by means of four leading second-order approximations yielding differential cross sections dQ/ dΩ for the basic charge exchange process H ++H(1s)→H(1s)+H + at intermediate and high energies. The obtained extensive set of results is thoroughly tested against all the existing experimental data with the purpose of critically assessing the validity of the boundary corrected second-Born (CB2), continuum-distorted wave (CDW), impulse approximation (IA) and the reformulated impulse approximation (RIA). The conclusion which emerges from this comparative study clearly indicates that the RIA agrees most favorably with the measurements available over a large energy range 25 keV-5 MeV. Such a finding reaffirms the few-particle quantum scattering theory which imposes several strict conditions on adequate second-order methods. These requirements satisfied by the RIA are: (i) normalisations of all the scattering wave functions, (ii) correct boundary conditions in both entrance and exit channels, (iii) introduction of a mathematically justified two-center continuum state for the sum of an attractive and a repulsive Coulomb potential with the same interaction strength, (iv) inclusion of the multiple scattering effects neglected in the IA, (v) a proper description of the Thomas double scattering in good agreement with the experiments and without any unobserved peak splittings. Nevertheless, the performed comparative analysis of the above four approximations indicates that none of the methods is free from some basic shortcomings. Despite its success, the RIA remains essentially a high-energy model like the other three methods under study. More importantly, their perturbative character leaves virtually no room for further systematic improvements, since the neglected higher-order terms are prohibitively tedious for practical purposes and have never been computed exactly. To bridge this gap, we presently introduce the variational Pad

  8. Critical validity assessment of theoretical models: charge-exchange at intermediate and high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkic, Dzevad

    1999-01-01

    Exact comprehensive computations are carried out by means of four leading second-order approximations yielding differential cross sections dQ/dΩ for the basic charge exchange process H + +H(1s)→H(1s)+H + at intermediate and high energies. The obtained extensive set of results is thoroughly tested against all the existing experimental data with the purpose of critically assessing the validity of the boundary corrected second-Born (CB2), continuum-distorted wave (CDW), impulse approximation (IA) and the reformulated impulse approximation (RIA). The conclusion which emerges from this comparative study clearly indicates that the RIA agrees most favorably with the measurements available over a large energy range 25 keV-5 MeV. Such a finding reaffirms the few-particle quantum scattering theory which imposes several strict conditions on adequate second-order methods. These requirements satisfied by the RIA are: (i) normalisations of all the scattering wave functions, (ii) correct boundary conditions in both entrance and exit channels, (iii) introduction of a mathematically justified two-center continuum state for the sum of an attractive and a repulsive Coulomb potential with the same interaction strength, (iv) inclusion of the multiple scattering effects neglected in the IA, (v) a proper description of the Thomas double scattering in good agreement with the experiments and without any unobserved peak splittings. Nevertheless, the performed comparative analysis of the above four approximations indicates that none of the methods is free from some basic shortcomings. Despite its success, the RIA remains essentially a high-energy model like the other three methods under study. More importantly, their perturbative character leaves virtually no room for further systematic improvements, since the neglected higher-order terms are prohibitively tedious for practical purposes and have never been computed exactly. To bridge this gap, we presently introduce the variational Pade

  9. Modeling the Magnetospheric X-ray Emission from Solar Wind Charge Exchange with Verification from XMM-Newton Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-26

    Earth (i.e., hydrogen) to a heavy , high charge state, ion in the solarwind. The electron can be captured in an excited state and transition to lower... heavy ions , Geophys Res. Lett., 24, 105–109, doi:10.1029/96GL03780. Cravens, T. E. (2000), Heliospheric X-ray emission associated with charge transfer...quantifying charge exchange from other ions with emission lines around the 1 4 keV band have also been performed, though the lack of cross-sectional

  10. A high-statistics measurement of the pp→nn charge-exchange reaction at 875 MeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamanna, M.; Ahmidouch, A.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Bressani, T.; Dalla Torre-Colautti, S.; Giorgi, M.; Heer, E.; Hess, R.; Kunne, R.A.; Lechanoine-Le Luc, C.; Martin, A.; Mascarini, C.; Masoni, A.; Penzo, A.; Rapin, D.; Schiavon, P.; Tessarotto, F.

    1995-01-01

    A new measurement of the differential cross section and of the analysing power A 0n of the charge-exchange reaction pp→nn at 875 MeV/c is presented. The A 0n data cover the entire angular range and constitute a considerable improvement over previously published data, both in the forward and in the backward hemisphere. The cross-section data cover only the backward region, but are unique at this energy. A careful study of the long-term drifts of the apparatus has allowed to fully exploit the good statistics of the data. ((orig.))

  11. NUMEN Project @ LNS : Heavy ions double charge exchange reactions towards the 0νββ nuclear matrix element determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agodi, C., E-mail: agodi@lns.infn.it; Calabretta, L.; Calanna, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Colonna, M.; Cuttone, G.; Finocchiaro, P.; Pandola, L.; Rifuggiato, D.; Tudisco, S. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Cappuzzello, F.; Greco, V. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); Bonanno, D. L.; Bongiovanni, D. G.; Longhitano, F. [INFN - Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Branchina, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); Foti, A.; Lo Presti, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [Università di Enna, Enna (Italy); and others

    2015-10-28

    In the NUMEN Project it is proposed an innovative technique to access the nuclear matrix elements entering in the expression of the life-time of the neutrinoless double beta decay, using relevant cross sections of double charge exchange reactions. A key aspect is the use of MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, for the detection of the ejectiles, and of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) K800 Superconducting Cyclotron (CS), for the acceleration of the required high resolution and low emittance heavy-ion beams.

  12. A study of the charge-exchange reaction $pp \\to n\\Delta^{++} (1232)$ at ISR energies

    CERN Document Server

    De Kerret, H; Bartl, Walter; Brandt, A; Broll, C; Coignet, G; Dibon, Heinz; Eichinger, H; Favier, Jean; Flügge, G; Gottfried, Christian; Massonnet, Louis; Nagy, E; Neuhofer, G; Niebergall, F; Orr, R S; Regler, Meinhard; Schmidt-Parzefall, W; Schubert, K R; Schumacher, P E; Vivargent, M; Winter, Klaus

    1977-01-01

    A study is reported of the charge-exchange reaction pp to n Delta /sup ++/(1232) at the CERN intersecting storage rings (ISR) in the energy range square root s=23 to 53 GeV. From the analysis of the energy dependence of the total cross-section, of the differential cross- section d sigma /dt and of the decay angular distributions evidence is found that pion exchange is dominant up to square root s=23 GeV and that ( rho +A/sub 2/) exchange dominates the reaction for square root s>or=30 GeV, as described by simple Regge-pole models. (13 refs).

  13. Prospects of real-time ion temperature and rotation profiles based on neural-network charge exchange analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, R.W.T.; Von Hellermann, M. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Svensson, J. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1994-07-01

    A back-propagation neural network technique is used at JET to extract plasma parameters like ion temperature, rotation velocities or spectral line intensities from charge exchange (CX) spectra. It is shown that in the case of the C VI CX spectra, neural networks can give a good estimation (better than +-20% accuracy) for the main plasma parameters (Ti, V{sub rot}). Since the neural network approach involves no iterations or initial guesses the speed with which a spectrum is processed is so high (0.2 ms/spectrum) that real time analysis will be achieved in the near future. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Pulsed extraction of ionization from helium buffer gas

    OpenAIRE

    Morrissey, D. J.; Bollen, G.; Facina, M.; Schwarz, S.

    2008-01-01

    The migration of intense ionization created in helium buffer gas under the influence of applied electric fields is considered. First the chemical evolution of the ionization created by fast heavy-ion beams is described. Straight forward estimates of the lifetimes for charge exchange indicate a clear suppression of charge exchange during ion migration in low pressure helium. Then self-consistent calculations of the migration of the ions in the electric field of a gas-filled cell at the Nationa...

  15. A phenomenological study of the π- p → π0 n charge exchange reaction at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaud, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the behaviour of the proton-proton elastic scattering, for mass center energies around 10 GeV, and more especially to study the charge exchange reaction π - p → π 0 n for mass center energies between 3 and 20 GeV. A formalism based on the Glauber model has been used, and a Regge trajectory exchange term was introduced in the model in order to enable the description of the lower energy domain (inferior to 10 GeV) that is characterized by a large contribution of meson exchanges at the scattering amplitude. The Glauber model is then applied to the charge exchange reaction and the differential cross section is analyzed for a center mass energy comprised between 3 and 20 GeV, together with the polarization at 40 GeV/c. The approach is then validated through the study of the π - p → η n reaction. The size of the kernel of proton and pion components implied in the π - p → π 0 n reaction, is also investigated. 90 refs., 48 figs., 4 tabs., 5 appends

  16. Improved charge-coupled device detectors for high-speed, charge exchange spectroscopy studies on the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, K.H.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R.J.; Kaplan, D.H.; Robinson, J.I.; Solomon, W.M.

    2004-01-01

    Charge exchange spectroscopy is one of the key ion diagnostics on the DIII-D tokamak. It allows determination of ion temperature, poloidal and toroidal velocity, impurity density, and radial electric field E r throughout the plasma. For the 2003 experimental campaign, we replaced the intensified photodiode array detectors on the central portion of the DIII-D charge exchange spectroscopy system with advanced charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors mounted on faster (f/4.7) Czerny-Turner spectrometers equipped with toroidal mirrors. The CCD detectors are improved versions of the ones installed on our edge system in 1999. The combination improved the photoelectron signal level by about a factor of 20 and the signal to noise by a factor of 2-8, depending on the absolute signal level. The new cameras also allow shorter minimum integration times while archiving to PC memory: 0.552 ms for the slower, lower-read noise (15 e) readout mode and 0.274 ms in the faster, higher-read noise (30 e) mode

  17. Interaction of cover and target with xenon gas in the IFE-reaction chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuteev, Boris V.

    2001-11-01

    Interaction of a direct drive target and a cover, which is shielding the target against gas particle and heat flows in the reaction chamber of the Inertial Confinement Reactor, is considered. The cover is produced from solid gas -deuterium, neon of xenon. It is shown that at the SOMBRERO parameters the xenon cover with 5.6-mm size significantly reduces the heat flows onto the 4-mm target. The gas drag produces the deceleration of the target much larger than that for the cover due to large mass difference between them. The distance between the target and the cover is about 15 mm at the explosion point, which is sufficient for normal irradiation of the target by laser beams. Protection of the target against the wall radiation is necessary during the flight. Along with creation of reflecting layers over the target surface ablating layers from solid hydrogen or neon seem to be a solution. (author)

  18. H- ion current from a polarized vapor target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelius, W.D.

    1984-01-01

    A method of determining the polarization transferred to hydrogen atoms in charge-exchange reactions is outlined. The method also provides a means of determining target polarizations once the polarization transfer function is known

  19. Momentum losses by charge exchange with neutral particles in H-mode discharges at JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versloot, T. W.; de Vries, P. C.; Giroud, C.; Brix, M.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Lomas, P. J.; Moulton, D.; Mullane, M. O.; Nunes, I. M.; Salmi, A.; Tala, T.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Zastrow, K. D.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of a neutral density background on the toroidal angular momentum and kinetic energy profiles has been investigated in JET. Under equivalent conditions but with increasing gas fuelling during the flat top phase, it has been observed that both the edge rotation and temperature decrease. The

  20. Debris-free soft x-ray source with gas-puff target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qiliang; Chen, Bo; Gong, Yan; Cao, Jianlin; Lin, Jingquan; Lee, Hongyan

    2001-12-01

    We have been developing a debris-free laser plasma light source with a gas-puff target system whose nozzle is driven by a piezoelectric crystal membrane. The gas-puff target system can utilize gases such as CO2, O2 or some gas mixture according to different experiments. Therefore, in comparison with soft X-ray source using a metal target, after continuously several-hour laser interaction with gas from the gas-puff target system, no evidences show that the light source can produce debris. The debris-free soft X-ray source is prepared for soft X-ray projection lithography research at State Key Laboratory of Applied Optics. Strong emission from CO2, O2 and Kr plasma is observed.

  1. The influence of the charge-exchange reactions of carbon in the photoionization models for spectrum-line emitting region in the quasi-stellar objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Pellegrini, P.S. de.

    1976-08-01

    The charge exchange reactions: C +2 + H sub(e) 0 → H +1 + C +1 and C +2 + H 0 → H +1 + C +1 were taken into account in the ionization equilibrium of Carbon in photoionization models for line emitting regions of quasi-stellar objects. The new ionization structure of Carbon was obtained and the intensities of the most important emission lines of this element usually observed in QSO's with large redshifts were calculated. The charge exchange with Hidrogen produces negligible effects while the importance of taking into account the charge exchange with Helium can be seen from the change of the ionization structure of Carbon in all considered models. The homogeneous optically thin model is shown not to be consistent with the observations. For non homogeneous optically thick models observable changes in line intensities occur when in the region where charge exhange is dominant the electron density is high enough to produce collisional excitation and consequent line emission. (Author)

  2. Fast charge exchange spectroscopy using a Fabry-Perot spectrometer in the JIPP TII-U tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, K.; Xu, J.; Sato, K.N.; Sakakita, H.

    1997-01-01

    A new charge exchange spectroscopic technique using a Fabry-Port spectrometer has been developed to increase the photon flux at the detector, and to improve the time resolution of ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity measurements. The spectral resolution is obtained by arranging two-dimensional fiber-optics and a two-dimensional detector at the focal plane of a coupled lens located on both sides of a Fabry-Perot spectrometer. The effective finesse (the ratio of the spectral resolution to the free spectral range) of the Fabry-Perot interferometer in this system is 14. The time evolution of the ion temperature is obtained with a time resolution of 125 μs and with a spatial resolution of 3 cm (eight channels). (orig.)

  3. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.; Chan, A.A.; England, A.C.; Hendel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; Nieschmidt, E.; Roquemore, A.L.; Scott, S.D.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and /sup 3/He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n)/sup 3/He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the /sup 3/He(d,p)/sup 4/He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling.

  4. A microscopic approach based on particle-vibration coupling: application to charge-exchange transitions and multiplets in odd nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colò Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, we shall describe a formalism that goes beyond the simple time-dependent mean field and is based on particle-vibration coupling (PVC. Such a formalism has been developed with the idea of being self-consistent. It makes use of Skyrme effective forces, and has been used for several applications. We will focus on charge-exchange transitions, namely we will show that our model describes well both the Gamow-Teller giant resonance width, and the low-lying transitions associated with β-decay. In this latter case, including PVC produces a significant improvement of the half-lives obtained at mean-field level, and leads to a good agreement with experimental data. We will end by discussing particle-phonon multiplets in odd nuclei.

  5. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and 3 He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n) 3 He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the 3 He(d,p) 4 He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling

  6. Observation of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission From Exospheric Material in and Outside Earth's Magnetosheath 2008 September 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S. T.; Robertson, I.; Tomas, L.

    2009-01-01

    A long XMM-Newton exposure is used to observe solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission from exospheric material in and outside Earth's magnetosheath. The light curve of the O vii (0.5-0.62 keV) band is compared with a model for the expected emission, and while the emission is faint and the light curve has considerable scatter, the correlation is significant to better than 99.9%. This result demonstrates the validity of the geocoronal SWCX emission model for predicting a contribution to astrophysical observations to a scale factor of order unity (1.5). In addition, an average value of the SWCX O vii emission from the magnetosheath over the observation of 2.6 +/- 0.5 LU is derived. The results also demonstrate the potential utility of using X-ray observations to study global phenomena of the magnetosheath which currently are only investigated using in situ measurements.

  7. Charge-exchange measurements of beam ion thermalization in MHD-quiescent plasmas in the Poloidal Divertor Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Goldston, R.J.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    1984-10-01

    The horizontally scanning, multiangle charge-exchange analyzer on the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) was used to study the beam ion slowing-down process with high-power perpendicular injection. Measurements were made over a wide range in toroidal field (8 kG < B(T) < 22 kG), plasma current (200 kA < I(p) < 500 kA), and beam power (1 MW < P/sub B/ < 7 MW). In MHD-quiescent plasmas, good agreement is found between the measured slowing-down spectra and theoretical predictions as a function of both angle and energy. Classes of prompt orbit losses are observed with both co- and counter-injection which have been understood and applied to plasma diagnostics. The effects of MHD activity on fast ion thermalization will be the subject of a companion paper

  8. Study of the mass and energy resolution of the E parallel B charge exchange analyzer for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Medley, S.S.

    1979-09-01

    The charge exchange diagnostic for TFTR requires simultaneous multispecie (H + , D + , γ + ) analysis of particles in the energy range of 0.5 - 150 keV. The analyzer design chosen to provide this capability employs a wide gap semi-circular region of superimposed parallel electric and magnetic fields to accomplish mass and energy resolution, respectively. Combined with a large area, multi-anode microchannel plate detector, this arrangement will enable the energy distributions of protons, deuterions, and tritons to be measured concurrently as a function of time during each discharge. A computer simulation program for calculating ion trajectories through the analyzer was written that includes a realistic model of the magnetic and electrostatic fringe fields. This report presents the results of a study of the proposed E parallel B analyzer, and it reveals that the fringe fields are not detrimental to the performance of the analyzer

  9. Charge Exchange in Low-Energy H, D + C4+ Collisions with Full Account of Electron Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vaeck

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the application of the quantum approach, which takes full account of electron translation at low collisional energies, to the charge exchange process H, D + C4+ → H+, D+ + C3+(3s; 3p; 3d. The partial and the total integral cross sections of the process are calculated in the energy range from 1 till 60 eV/amu. It is shown that the present results are independent from the upper integration limit for numerical solution of the coupled channel equations although nonadiabatic couplings remain nonzero up to infinity. The calculated partial and total cross sections are in agreement with the previous low-energy calculations and the available experimental data. It is shown that for low collisional energies the isotopic effect takes place. The observed effect is explained in terms of the nonadiabatic dynamics.

  10. Theoretical research on charge exchange of uranum ions at thermal energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardsley, J.N.

    1975-01-01

    The cross section for resonant charge transfer in U + -U collisions is calculated as a function of the energy in the center-of-mass coordinate frame. The computed value decreases monotonically from approximately 300 A 2 at 0.025 eV to 100 A 2 at 50 eV. The latter value would be appropriate for ions of energy 100 eV moving through a gas of neutral atoms at thermal velocities

  11. Quasi-elastic transfer and charge-exchange reactions in collisions of 48Ti on 42Ca and 26Mg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brendel, C.

    1985-01-01

    At the GSI magnetic spectrometer quasi-elastic transfer and charge-exchange reactions of the system 48 Ti + 42 Ca at incident energies E lab = 240, 300, and 385 MeV and additionally at the higher projectile energy the system 48 Ti + 26 Mg were studied each in the excitation energy range up to E x ≅ 80 MeV. The transition strength was for each particle-hole configuration of the final system calculated by means of the DWBA and subsequently folded with a Breit-Wigner distribution. The localization of the strength of the cross section and the specific structure of the energy spectra were at incident energies between 6 and 8 MeV/amu for all angles well reproduced. By an extension of the core-excitation model to many-stage reactions the charge-exchange reaction 48 Ti + 42 Ca → 48 Sc + 42 Sc could be described as sequential two-stage process. In the two-neutron stripping reaction 48 Ti + 42 Ca → 46 Ti + 44 Ca a surprisingly narrow line with a width of the experimental resolution and an excitation energy of E x = 17.8 MeV was measured at angles smaller than the grazing angle. In the 48 Ti + 26 Mg system the corresponding 46 Ti spectra show also under forward angles structures at excitation energies between 8 and 16 MeV. These lines can be explained as two-neutron states with high spin. (orig./HSI) [de

  12. An analytical approach of thermodynamic behavior in a gas target system on a medical cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Pouyan; Zacchia, Nicholas A; Buckley, Ken; Bénard, François; Schaffer, Paul; Martinez, D Mark; Hoehr, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed to study the thermo-mechanical behavior of gas targets used to produce medical isotopes, assuming that the system reaches steady-state. It is based on an integral analysis of the mass and energy balance of the gas-target system, the ideal gas law, and the deformation of the foil. The heat transfer coefficients for different target bodies and gases have been calculated. Excellent agreement is observed between experiments performed at TRIUMF's 13 MeV cyclotron and the model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Coating synthesis on dielectric substrates assisted by pulsed beams of high-energy gas atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, S. N.; Melnik, Yu A.; Metel, A. S.

    2017-05-01

    Titanium nitride and aluminum nitride coatings have been deposited on glass and aluminum oxide substrates in a flow of metal atoms accompanied by high-energy gas atoms. The metal atoms are produced due to sputtering of a flat rectangular magnetron target. The gas atoms with energy up to 25 keV are produced due to charge exchange collisions of ions extracted from the magnetron discharge plasma and accelerated by high-voltage pulses applied to a flat grid parallel to the target. The metal atoms pass through the grid and deposit on the substrate. Conjunction of their trajectories with those of gas atoms bombarding the growing coating enables the coating synthesis on complex-shape dielectric products planetary rotating inside the vacuum chamber. Mixing high-energy gas atoms of the coating and substrate atoms substantially improves the coating adhesion.

  14. Excited state populations and charge-exchange of fast ions in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, P.D.; Sofield, C.J.; Woods, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    Excited state populations and charge state fractions of 445 MeV Cl ions have been measured for a range of thicknesses of solid C targets. Cross sections for electron capture, loss, excitation and excited state quenching have been determined and these data are found to predict a quantitative difference between equilibrium charge state distributions from gases and solids for a special case of the Bohr-Lindhard density effect model. 8 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  15. Laser-Irradiated Gas Puff Target Plasma Modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrba, Pavel; Vrbová, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 10 (2014), s. 2600-2601 ISSN 0093-3813 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/12/2043 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0092 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Gas puff laser plasma * water window radiation source * RHMD code Z* Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.101, year: 2014 http://ieeexplore.ieee.org

  16. Targeting Energy Management : Analysing targets, outcomes and impacts of corporate energy and greenhouse gas management programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietbergen, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Global greenhouse gas emissions must be reduced drastically to limit global increases in temperature to the relatively safe level of maximum 2 degrees Celsius. In the coming decades, energy efficiency improvement will be the main strategy for reducing energy-related greenhouse gas emissions. Energy

  17. Governing through visions : Evaluating the performativity of the European gas target models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dignum, M.; Correlje, A.F.; Groenleer, Martijn; Scholten, D.J.

    2017-01-01

    In 2010 an initiative was launched to realize a competitive single EU market for natural gas through the use of a future vision. This Gas Target Model (GTM) aimed to provide direction for concrete market development through regulatory structures as well as an overarching scope of what a

  18. Chandra observations of comet 2P/Encke 2003 : First detection of a collisionally thin, fast solar wind charge exchange system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisse, CM; Christian, DJ; Dennerl, K; Wolk, SJ; Bodewits, Dennis; Hoekstra, Ronnie; Combi, MR; Makinen, T; Dryer, M; Fry, CD; Weaver, H

    2005-01-01

    We report the results of 15 hr of Chandra observations of comet 2P/Encke 2003 on November 24. X-ray emission from comet Encke was resolved on scales of 500-40,000 km, with unusual morphology due to the presence of a low-density, collisionally thin (to charge exchange) coma. A light curve with

  19. Effects of small components of 3He wave function in quasi-elastic charge exchange reaction P+3He→nF+(ppp) at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, A.V.; Solov'ev, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    The contribution to the cross sections of the quasi-elastic charge-exchange reaction p+ 3 He→n p +(ppp) from the S and D components of the 3 He wave function is calculated at zero momentum transfer in the farmework of the impulse approximation taking into account the spin of the particles

  20. Polarization in K+n charge exchange scattering between 0.851 GeV/c and 1.351 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, S.J.; Bugg, D.V.; Carter, A.A.; Coupland, M.; Eisenhandler, E.; Gibson, W.R.; Kalmus, P.I.P.; Sandhu, H.; Astbury, A.; Grayer, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    The polarization parameter for K + n charge exchange scattering has been measured at five momenta between 0.851 GeV/c and 1.351 GeV/c for centre of mass angles -0.8 < cos theta* < 0.8. Results from a phase shift analysis incorporating these results are presented. No Z* resonances are onserved. (orig.)

  1. Impurity line emission due to thermal charge exchange in JET edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggi, C.F.; Horton, L.D.; Koenig, R.; Stamp, M.

    1994-01-01

    High n-shell emission from hydrogen-like carbon (C VI, n=8-7) has been routinely observed from the plasma edge of JET. By comparing the measured spectral line intensities with the signals predicted by advanced atomic physics modelling of carbon and hydrogen radiation, integrated with modelling of the divertor and edge plasma, it is concluded that charge transfer from excited state hydrogen donors into fully stripped carbon ions can account for the observed spectral emission, but that the hydrogen distribution and to a lesser extent the carbon distribution away from the strike zone predicted by the transport model are too low. Data presented are those of three upper X-point discharges, where the target material was carbon. 5 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  2. Impurity line emission due to thermal charge exchange in JET edge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggi, C.F.; Horton, L.D.; Koenig, R.; Stamp, M. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Summers, H.P. [Strathclyde Univ., Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1994-07-01

    High n-shell emission from hydrogen-like carbon (C VI, n=8-7) has been routinely observed from the plasma edge of JET. By comparing the measured spectral line intensities with the signals predicted by advanced atomic physics modelling of carbon and hydrogen radiation, integrated with modelling of the divertor and edge plasma, it is concluded that charge transfer from excited state hydrogen donors into fully stripped carbon ions can account for the observed spectral emission, but that the hydrogen distribution and to a lesser extent the carbon distribution away from the strike zone predicted by the transport model are too low. Data presented are those of three upper X-point discharges, where the target material was carbon. 5 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. Reaction Measurements with the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) Gas Jet Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, K. A.; Jensa Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The development of radioactive ion beams for reaction measurements was a major step forward in nuclear astrophysics, reactions, and structure. However, the move to inverse kinematics presented unique difficulties, in particular with regard to the targets used in such studies. Lower beam intensities may require thicker targets, but this negatively affects the experimental resolution and potential backgrounds. A recent development toward studies of nuclear reactions is the commissioning of the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas jet target. The JENSA system provides a pure, homogeneous, highly localized, dense, and robust gaseous target for radioactive ion beam studies. Charged-particle reactions measurements made with gas jet targets can be cleaner and display better resolution than with traditional targets. With the availability of pure and localized gas jet targets in combination with developments in exotic radioactive ion beams and next-generation detector and spectrometer systems, the range of reaction studies that are experimentally possible is vastly expanded. This talk will focus on the benefits of performing reaction measurements with a gas jet target, including discussion of several example cases using JENSA. Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy. This work was supported by DOE, NNSA, and NSF.

  4. Creation of Pure Frozen Gas Targets for Ion Acceleration using Short Pulse Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCary, Edward; Stehr, Florian; Jiao, Xuejing; Quevedo, Hernan; Franke, Philip; Agustsson, Ronald; Oshea, Finn; Berry, Robert; Chao, Dennis; Woods, Kayley; Gautier, Donald; Letzring, Sam; Hegelich, Bjorn

    2015-11-01

    A system for shooting interchangeable frozen gas targets was developed at the University of Texas and will be tested at Los Alamos National Lab. A target holder which can hold up to five substrates used for target growing was cryogenically cooled to temperatures below 14 K. The target substrates consist of holes with diameters ranging from 15 μm-500 μm and TEM grids with micron scale spacing, across which films of ice are frozen by releasing small amounts of pure gas molecules directly into the vacuum target chamber. Frozen gas targets comprised of simple molecules like methane and single element gasses like hydrogen and deuterium will provide novel target configuations that will be compared with laser plasma interaction simulations. The targets will be shot with the ultra-intense short-pulse Trident laser. Accelerated ion spectra will be characterized using a Thomson Parabola with magnetic field strength of 0.92T and electric field strength of 30kV. Hydrogen targets will be additionally characterized using stacks of copper which become activated upon exposure to energetic protons resulting in a beta decay signal which be imaged on electron sensitive imaging plates to provide an energy spectrum and spacial profile of the proton beam. Details of target creation and pre-shot characterization will be presented.

  5. Electric charge state changing collisions of hydrogen and helium with low-Z impurity particles. Part 1. Charge exchange processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstikhina, I.Yu.; Goncharov, P.R.; Ozaki, T.; Sudo, S.; Tamura, N.; Sergeev, V.Yu.

    2008-04-01

    This report contains a collection of practical approximating formulas for one-electron loss and one-electron capture cross-sections of ion-atom and ion-ion collisions of H 0 , H + , He 0 , He + and He 2+ particles with Li, Be, B, C and Ne neutral atoms and all of their positive ions. The report consists of two parts treating charge exchange and ion impact ionization collisions respectively. The results are mainly based on theoretical calculations by CAPTURE, CDW, and ARSENY numerical codes. Independent experimental and theoretical results were taken into account where available. The primary objective of this work is to provide the necessary background concerning atomic processes essential for localized fusion plasma diagnostics based on light impurity pellet injection. As for passive line-integral diagnostics of energetic proton and α-particle energy distribution, impurities contribute to both the source function and the attenuation rate of neutral atom fluxes escaping from the plasma. Impurities also play a significant role in the high energy neutral atom heating beam stopping in the plasma. The analytic cross-section fits for a wide energy range presented here may be useful in the numerical modeling and in the experimental data analysis. (author)

  6. Overview on R and D and design activities for the ITER core charge exchange spectroscopy diagnostic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biel, W., E-mail: w.biel@fz-juelich.de [Institut fuer Energieforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich Gmbh, Association EURATOM-FZJ, member of Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Baross, T. [KFKI RMKI, EURATOM Association, PO Box 49, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary); Bourauel, P. [Institut fuer Energieforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich Gmbh, Association EURATOM-FZJ, member of Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Dunai, D. [KFKI RMKI, EURATOM Association, PO Box 49, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary); Durkut, M. [TNO Science and Industry, Partner in ITER-NL, P.O. Box 155, 2600 AD Delft (Netherlands); Erdei, G. [BME, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary); Hawkes, N. [Association EURATOM/CCFE, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Hellermann, M. von [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster and ITER-NL, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Hogenbirk, A. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group V.o.F., Petten (Netherlands); Jaspers, R. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Kiss, G. [Institut fuer Energieforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich Gmbh, Association EURATOM-FZJ, member of Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Klinkhamer, F. [TNO Science and Industry, Partner in ITER-NL, P.O. Box 155, 2600 AD Delft (Netherlands); Koning, J.F. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster and ITER-NL, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Kotov, V.; Krasikov, Y.; Krimmer, A. [Institut fuer Energieforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich Gmbh, Association EURATOM-FZJ, member of Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    The ITER core charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (core CXRS) diagnostic system is designed to provide experimental access to various measurement quantities in the ITER core plasma such as ion densities, temperatures and velocities. The implementation of the approved CXRS diagnostic principle on ITER faces significant challenges: First, a comparatively low CXRS signal intensity is expected, together with a high noise level due to bremsstrahlung, while the requested measurement accuracy and stability for the core CXRS system go far beyond the level commonly achieved in present-day fusion experiments. Second, the lifetime of the first mirror surface is limited due to either erosion by fast particle bombardment or deposition of impurities. Finally, the hostile technical environment on ITER imposes challenging boundary conditions for the diagnostic integration and operation, including high neutron loads, electro-magnetic loads, seismic events and a limited access for maintenance. A brief overview on the R and D and design activities for the core CXRS system is presented here, while the details are described in parallel papers.

  7. Study of electric isovector giant nuclear resonances by the charge exchange reaction. Search for a monopole mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berat, C.

    1988-01-01

    Charge exchange reactions ( 13 C, 13 N) and ( 13 C, 13 B) at 50 MeV/n are studied with the purpose of investigating the electric isovector modes of giant nuclear resonances in 12 C, 40 Ca, 58 Ni, 60 Ni, 90 Zr, 120 Sn and 208 Pb, and especially the monopole mode. Measurements have been performed at GANIL, using the magnetic spectrometer SPEG. The main characteristics of giant nuclear resonances are reviewed, and the ability of the chosen reactions to excite electric isovector modes is examined. Experimental setup and data reduction are described. Results are commented and analyzed. The analog state of the dipole resonance is strongly excited in nuclei with A ≤ 60; excitation energies and widths are obtained with a good accuracy. For nuclei with A ≥ 60, a large peak is observed in the spectra. Its excitation energy is closed to the excitation energy of the giant isovector monopole resonance, measured with the (π - , π 0 ) reaction, except in 208 Pb. Experimental angular distributions do not quite show the features expected from DWBA calculations. The low-lying states of 12 N and 12 B are used to test the calculations and the reaction mechanisms [fr

  8. Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeberli, W.

    1992-02-01

    Polarized gas targets of atomic hydrogen and deuterium have significant advantages over conventional polarized targets, e.g. chemical and isotopic purity, large polarization including deuteron tensor polarization, absence of strong magnetic fields, rapid polarization reversal. While in principle the beam of polarized atoms from an atomic beam source (Stern-Gerlach spin separation) can be used as a polarized target, the target thickness achieved is too small for most applications. We propose to increase the target thickness by injecting the polarized atoms into a storage cell. Provided the atoms survive several hundred wall collisions without losing their polarization, it will be possible to achieve a target thickness of 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2} by injection of polarized atoms from an atomic-beam source into suitable cells. Such targets are very attractive as internal targets in storage rings.

  9. Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeberli, W.

    1992-02-01

    Polarized gas targets of atomic hydrogen and deuterium have significant advantages over conventional polarized targets, e.g. chemical and isotopic purity, large polarization including deuteron tensor polarization, absence of strong magnetic fields, rapid polarization reversal. While in principle the beam of polarized atoms from an atomic beam source (Stern-Gerlach spin separation) can be used as a polarized target, the target thickness achieved is too small for most applications. We propose to increase the target thickness by injecting the polarized atoms into a storage cell. Provided the atoms survive several hundred wall collisions without losing their polarization, it will be possible to achieve a target thickness of 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2} by injection of polarized atoms from an atomic-beam source into suitable cells. Such targets are very attractive as internal targets in storage rings.

  10. Fabrication and testing of gas filled targets for large scale plasma experiments on Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, G.F.; Spragge, M.; Wallace, R.J.; Rivers, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental campaign on the Nova laser was started in July 1993 to study one st of target conditions for the point design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The targets were specified to investigate the current NIF target conditions--a plasma of ∼3 keV electron temperature and an electron density of ∼1.0 E + 21 cm -3 . A gas cell target design was chosen to confine as gas of ∼0.01 cm 3 in volume at ∼ 1 atmosphere. This paper will describe the major steps and processes necessary in the fabrication, testing and delivery of these targets for shots on the Nova Laser at LLNL

  11. Development of a Ne gas target for {sup 22}Na production by proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Bidhan Ch., E-mail: mechbidhan@gmail.com; Pal, Gautam [Mechanical Engineering Group, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Barua, Luna; Das, Sujata Saha [Radiopharmaceuticals Laboratory, Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2016-03-15

    The article presents the design and development of a neon gas target for the production of {sup 22}Na using a proton beam from the room temperature cyclotron in Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata. The target design is made to handle a beam power of 85 W (17 MeV, 5 μA). The design is based on simulation using the computer code FLUKA for the beam dump and CFD-CFX for target cooling. The target has been successfully used for the production of {sup 22}Na in a 6 day long 17 MeV, 5 μA proton irradiation run.

  12. Injector design for liner-on-target gas-puff experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, J. C.; Krasheninnikov, I.; Conti, F.; Wessel, F.; Fadeev, V.; Narkis, J.; Ross, M. P.; Rahman, H. U.; Ruskov, E.; Beg, F. N.

    2017-11-01

    We present the design of a gas-puff injector for liner-on-target experiments. The injector is composed of an annular high atomic number (e.g., Ar and Kr) gas and an on-axis plasma gun that delivers an ionized deuterium target. The annular supersonic nozzle injector has been studied using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to produce a highly collimated (M > 5), ˜1 cm radius gas profile that satisfies the theoretical requirement for best performance on ˜1-MA current generators. The CFD simulations allowed us to study output density profiles as a function of the nozzle shape, gas pressure, and gas composition. We have performed line-integrated density measurements using a continuous wave (CW) He-Ne laser to characterize the liner gas density. The measurements agree well with the CFD values. We have used a simple snowplow model to study the plasma sheath acceleration in a coaxial plasma gun to help us properly design the target injector.

  13. Capture reactions at astrophysically relevant energies: extended gas target experiments and GEANT simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kölle, V; Braitmayer, S E; Mohr, P J; Wilmes, S; Staudt, G; Hammer, J W; Jäger, M; Knee, H; Kunz, R; Mayer, A

    1999-01-01

    Several resonances of the capture reaction sup 2 sup 0 Ne(alpha, gamma) sup 2 sup 4 Mg were measured using an extended windowless gas target system. Detailed GEANT simulations were performed to derive the strength and the total width of the resonances from the measured yield curve. The crucial experimental parameters, which are mainly the density profile in the gas target and the efficiency of the gamma-ray detector, were analyzed by a comparison between the measured data and the corresponding simulation calculations. The excellent agreement between the experimental data and the simulations gives detailed insight into these parameters. (author)

  14. High pressure deuterium-tritium gas target vessels for muon-catalyzed fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffrey, A.J.; Spaletta, H.W.; Ware, A.G.; Zabriskie, J.M.; Hardwick, D.A.; Maltrud, H.R.; Paciotti, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    In experimental studies of muon-catalyzed fusion, the density of the hydrogen gas mixture is an important parameter. Catalysis of up to 150 fusions per muon has been observed in deuterium-tritium gas mixtures at liquid hydrogen density; at room temperature, such densities require a target gas pressure of the order of 1000 atmospheres (100 MPa, 15,000 psi). We report here the design considerations for hydrogen gas target vessels for muon-catalyzed fusion experiments that operate at 1000 and 10,000 atmospheres. The 1000 atmosphere high pressure target vessels are fabricated of Type A-286 stainless steel and lined with oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OFHC) copper to provide a barrier to hydrogen permeation of the stainless steel. The 10,000 atmosphere ultrahigh pressure target vessels are made from 18Ni (200 grade) maraging steel and are lined with OFHC copper, again to prevent hydrogen permeation of the steel. In addition to target design features, operating requirements, fabrication procedures, and secondary containment are discussed. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  15. Space and time resolved measurements of ion temperature with the CVI 5292 A charge exchange recombination line after subtracting background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, K.; Hidekuma, S.

    1988-08-01

    An ion temperature profile has been obtained with the CVI 5292 A (n = 8 - 7) charge exchange recombination (CXR) line using a space and wave-length resolving visible spectrometer installed on the JIPP TII-U tokamak. Two sets of 50 channels optical fiber arrays: one viewing a fast neutral hydrogen beam (CXR channels) and the other viewing off the neutral beam line (background channels), is arranged on the entrance slit of the spectrometer. This spectrometer is coupled to an image intensifier and CCD detector at the focal plane and provides temperature profile every 1/60 second. An ion temperature is derived from the Doppler broadened line profile after subtracting the simultaneously measured cold component (background channels), which is due to electron-excitation and/or charge exchange recombination in the plasma periphery. Alternative approach to obtain the ion temperature profile without CXR is also demonstrated. This method is based on an Abel inversion technique for each wavelength separately. (author)

  16. Review of Langmuir-Wave-Caused Dips and Charge-Exchange-Caused Dips in Spectral Lines from Plasmas and their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Dalimier

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We review studies of two kinds of dips in spectral line profiles emitted by plasmas—dips that have been predicted theoretically and observed experimentally: Langmuir-wave-caused dips (L-dips and charge-exchange-caused dips (X-dips. There is a principal difference with respect to positions of L-dips and X-dips relative to the unperturbed wavelength of a spectral line: positions of L-dips scale with the electron density Ne roughly as Ne1/2, while positions of X-dips are almost independent of Ne (the dependence is much weaker than for L-dips. L-dips and X-dips phenomena are important, both fundamentally and practically. The fundamental importance is due to a rich physics behind each of these phenomena. L-dips are a multi-frequency resonance phenomenon caused by a single-frequency (monochromatic electric field. X-dips are due to charge exchange at anticrossings of terms of a diatomic quasi-molecule, whose nuclei have different charges. As for important practical applications, they are as follows: observations of L-dips constitute a very accurate method to measure the electron density in plasmas—a method that does not require knowledge of the electron temperature. L-dips also allow measuring the amplitude of the electric field of Langmuir waves—the only spectroscopic method available for this purpose. Observations of X-dips provide an opportunity to determine rate coefficient of charge exchange between multi-charged ions. This is an important reference data, virtually inaccessible by other experimental methods. The rate coefficients of charge exchange are important for magnetic fusion in Tokamaks, for population inversion in the soft x-ray and VUV ranges, for ion storage devices, as well as for astrophysics (e.g., for the solar plasma and for determining the physical state of planetary nebulae.

  17. Gas, Liquid and Molten Targets at Cyclotron Beams: Target Systems and Related Nuclear Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.

    2009-01-01

    In a systematic study our group worked on measurement of activation data of charged particle induced nuclear reaction possible involved in the production of radioisotopes for medical use. We have investigated the cross section and yield data of proton, deuteron helium-3 and alpha particle induced reactions on target materials for isotope productions relevant for medical applications as well as nuclear reactions on different structural material applied in construction of different target units. The acquired information are used or in the future can be used to determine the type of the construction materials optimal for building a certain target unit to be able to produce high specific activity and high quality radioactive isotope. In this work we have investigated different materials in activation point of view. Also several materials and reactions were studied for monitoring purposes. Use of thin metallic foils is a simple method to determine the parameters of the charged particle beams applied for isotope production. Using this method one can determine the energy and intensity of the bombarding beam and in certain cases the distribution or the profile of the bombarding beam. (author)

  18. Measurement of cell wall depolarization of polarized hydrogen gas targets in a weak magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.S.; Haeberli, W.

    1994-01-01

    Polarized gas targets using windowless storage cells are being developed for use as internal targets in medium and high energy particle storage rings. Tests were conducted to evaluate wall depolarization for different cell wall materials. Measurements of the target polarization were made on polarized vector H 0 gas targets in a weak magnetic field. Fifteen materials were tested in geometries corresponding to different average number of wall collisions, N 0 , from 40 to 380 collisions, for wall temperatures, T, from 20 K to 300 K. A method was developed to measure the polarization of a vector H 0 target in a 0.5 mT field: a beam of 50 keV D + picks up electrons from the target gas and the vector D 0 acquires a tensor polarization, p zz , which is measured by means of the 3 H( vector d, n) 4 He reaction. A simple model for depolarization at surfaces is proposed. Comparison to the data shows fair agreement, but the model is unrealistic in that it does not include the effects of the recombination of atoms on the surface to form molecules. ((orig.))

  19. Reaction measurements with the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas jet target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, K. A.

    2017-09-01

    Explosive stellar environments are sometimes driven by nuclear reactions on short-lived, radioactive nuclei. These reactions often drive the stellar explosion, alter the observable light curves produced, and dictate the final abundances of the isotopes created. Unfortunately, many reaction rates at stellar temperatures cannot be directly measured in the laboratory, due to the physical limitations of ultra-low cross sections and high background rates. An additional complication arises because many of the important reactions involve radioactive nuclei which have lifetimes too short to be made into a target. As such, direct reactions require very intense and pure beams of exotic nuclei. Indirect approaches with both stable and radioactive beams can, however, provide crucial information on the nuclei involved in these astrophysical reactions. A major development toward both direct and indirect studies of nuclear reactions rates is the commissioning of the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) supersonic gas jet target. The JENSA system provides a pure, homogeneous, highly localized, dense, and robust gaseous target for radioactive ion beam studies. Charged-particle reactions measurements made with gas jet targets can be cleaner and display better resolution than with traditional targets. With the availability of pure and localized gas jet targets in combination with developments in exotic radioactive ion beams and next-generation detector systems, the range of reaction studies that are experimentally possible is vastly expanded. Various representative cases will be discussed.

  20. $\\beta$- decay of $^{58}$Zn. A critical test for the charge-exchange reaction as a probe for the $\\beta$- decay strength distribution

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS353 \\\\ \\\\ Due to its importance in fundamental physics and astrophysics, a great effort both theoretically and experimentally is devoted to study Gamow Teller (GT)-strength. The GT-strength and its distribution play a key role in late stellar evolution. During the pre-supernova core-collapse of massive stars, the electron capture and nuclear $\\beta$ -decay determine the electron-to-baryon ratio, which influences the infall dynamics and the mass of the final core. The cross-section of the charge-exchange reaction at forward angles with energies above 100~MeV is expected to be proportional to the squares of Fermi and GT matrix elements. This proportionality should provide a Q-value free method to probe the weak interaction strength and renormalization effects in nuclei. Thus charge-exchange reactions are often used to determine the experimental GT-strength. However, the connection between the GT-strength and the cross-section of the charge-exchange reaction is partially model-dependent and the question aris...

  1. Investigations of astrophysically interesting nuclear reactions by the use of gas target techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, J.W. [Inst. fuer Strahlenphysik, Univ. Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    A brief review of the common properties of windowless and recirculating gas targets is presented. As example the Stuttgart gas target facility Rhinoceros in the extended and in the supersonic jet mode with its properties and techniques is explained, also with respect to gas purification techniques. Furthermore several typical experiments from the field of nuclear astrophysics with characteristic results are described (D({alpha},{gamma}){sup 6}Li, {sup 15}N({alpha},{gamma}){sup 19}F, {sup 16}O(p,{gamma}){sup 17}F, {sup 16}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 20}Ne, {sup 20}Ne({alpha},{gamma}){sup 24}Mg, {sup 21}Ne({alpha},n){sup 24}Mg, {sup 18}O({alpha},n){sup 21}Ne, {sup 17}O({alpha},n){sup 20}Ne). In several cases the experimental sensitivity could be raised by up to a factor of 10{sup 6}. (orig.)

  2. Measurement of spin observables using a storage ring with polarized beam and polarized internal gas target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.; Miller, M.A.; Smith, A.; Hansen, J.; Bloch, C.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; Bulten, H.J.; Ent, R.; Goodman, C.D.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jones, C.E.; Korsch, W.; Leuschner, M.; Lorenzon, W.; Marchlenski, D.; Meyer, H.O.; Milner, R.G.; Neal, J.S.; Pancella, P.V.; Pate, S.F.; Pitts, W.K.; von Przewoski, B.; Rinckel, T.; Sowinski, J.; Sperisen, F.; Sugarbaker, E.; Tschalaer, C.; Unal, O.; Zhou, Z.

    1993-01-01

    We report the first measurement of analyzing powers and spin correlation parameters using a storage ring with both beam and internal target polarized. Spin observables were measured for elastic scattering of 45 and 198 MeV protons from polarized 3 He nuclei in a new laser-pumped internal gas target at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility Cooler Ring. Scattered protons and recoil 3 He nuclei were detected in coincidence with large acceptance plastic scintillators and silicon detectors. The internal-target technique demonstrated in this experiment has broad applicability to the measurement of spin-dependent scattering in nuclear and particle physics

  3. Ion Acceleration from Pure Frozen Gas Targets using Short Pulse Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCary, Edward; Stehr, Florian; O'Shea, Finn; Jiao, Xuejing; Agustsson, Ronald; Berry, Robert; Chao, Dennis; Gautier, Donald; Letzring, Samuel; Quevedo, Hernan; Woods, Kaley; Hegelich, Bjorn

    2014-10-01

    A system for shooting interchangeable frozen gas ice targets was developed and tested on the Trident laser system at Los Alamos National Lab. A target holder which could hold up to five substrates used for target growing was cryogenically cooled to temperatures below 14 K. The target substrates consisted of holes with diameters ranging from 15 μm-500 μm and TEM grids with micron scale spacing, across which films of ice were frozen by releasing small amounts of pure gas molecules directly into the vacuum target chamber. The thickness of the ice targets was determined by using alpha spectroscopy. Accelerated ion spectra were characterized using a Thomson Parabola with magnetic field strength of 0.92 T and electric field strength of 30kV and radio-chromic film stacks. Hydrogen targets were additionally characterized using stacks of copper which became activated upon exposure to energetic protons resulting in a beta decay signal. The beta decay was imaged on electron sensitive imaging plates to provide an energy spectrum and spacial profile of the proton beam. Results of the interchangeable, laser-based ion accelerator will be presented. Work Supported by NIH grant.

  4. Bridging greenhouse gas emissions and renewable energy deployment target: Comparative assessment of China and India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, Shivika; Dai, Hancheng; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Masui, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • India and China’s latest renewable energy targets toward 2030 are assessed. • Carbon emission cap is in line with 2-degree target and governmental commitment. • The impacts of renewable energy on emissions and mitigation costs are quantified. - Abstract: Renewable energy has a critical role in limiting the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This paper assesses the implication of aligning renewable energy deployment target with national emission reduction target for mitigation cost. The assessment methodology uses Asia-Pacific Integrated Assessment/computable general equilibrium (AIM/CGE) model to determine the mitigation cost in terms of GDP and welfare loss under alternative renewable targets in different climate-constrained scenarios. A range of country-specific emission constraints is taken to address the uncertainties related to global emission pathway and emission entitlement scheme. Comparative results show that China needs to increase its share of non-fossil fuel significantly in the primary energy mix to achieve the stringent emission reduction target compared to India. The mitigation cost in terms of economic and welfare loss can be reduced by increasing the penetration of the renewable energy to achieve the same emission reduction target. The modeling results show that coordinated national climate and renewable energy policies help to achieve the GHG emission reduction target in an efficient and cost-effective manner.

  5. Control of electron beam by using high-Z gas target in the laser-plasma acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Michiaki

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the pointing stability and the divergence of a quasi-monoenergetic electron beam generated in a self-injected laser-plasma acceleration regime using high-Z gas-jet target. Gas-jet targets have been irradiated with focused 40 fs laser pulses at the 4-TW peak power. A pointing stability and a beam divergence of electron beam were improved using argon target. These values were about three times smaller than at the optimum condition using helium. This stabilization method is available for another gas material such as nitrogen. At nitrogen gas-jet target, the pointing stability is more improved to two times smaller than that in argon gas-jet target and the peak energy is increased to >30 MeV. These results prove that this method not only stabilizes the e-beam but also allows controlling the electron energy. (author)

  6. The HERMES polarized hydrogen and deuterium gas target in the HERA electron storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Amarian, M.; Andrus, A.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Augustyniak, W.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Avetissian, E.; Bailey, P.; Balin, D.; Baumgarten, C.; Beckmann, M.; Belostotski, S.; Bianchi, N.; Blok, H. P.; Böttcher, H.; Borissov, A.; Borysenko, A.; Bouwhuis, M.; Braun, B.; Brüll, A.; Bryzgalov, V.; Capitani, G. P.; Capiluppi, M.; Chen, T.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Court, G.; Dalpiaz, P. F.; De Leo, R.; Demey, M.; De Nardo, L.; De Sanctis, E.; Devitsin, E.; Di Nezza, P.; Düren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Elalaoui-Moulay, A.; Elbakian, G.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elschenbroich, U.; Fabbri, R.; Fantoni, A.; Fechtchenko, A.; Felawka, L.; Frullani, S.; Gapienko, G.; Gapienko, V.; Garibaldi, F.; Garrow, K.; Gavrilov, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Graw, G.; Grebeniouk, O.; Gregor, I. M.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haeberli, W.; Hafidi, K.; Hartig, M.; Hasch, D.; Heesbeen, D.; Henoch, M.; Hertenberger, R.; Hesselink, W. H. A.; Hillenbrand, A.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hommez, B.; Hristova, I.; Iarygin, G.; Ivanilov, A.; Izotov, A.; Jackson, H. E.; Jgoun, A.; Kaiser, R.; Kinney, E.; Kisselev, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, N.; Kolster, H.; Kopytin, M.; Korotkov, V.; Kozlov, V.; Krauss, B.; Krivokhijine, V. G.; Lagamba, L.; Lapikás, L.; Laziev, A.; Lenisa, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden-Levy, L. A.; Lorenzon, W.; Lu, H.; Lu, J.; Lu, S.; Ma, B.-Q.; Maiheu, B.; Makins, N. C. R.; Mao, Y.; Marianski, B.; Marukyan, H.; Mexner, V.; Meyners, N.; Mussa, R.; Mikloukho, O.; Miller, C. A.; Miyachi, Y.; Muccifora, V.; Nagaitsev, A.; Nappi, E.; Naryshkin, Y.; Nass, A.; Negodaev, M.; Nowak, W.-D.; Oganessyan, K.; Ohsuga, H.; Osborne, A.; Pickert, N.; Potterveld, D. H.; Raithel, M.; Reggiani, D.; Reimer, P. E.; Reischl, A.; Reolon, A. R.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, A.; Rubacek, L.; Rubin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Sanjiev, I.; Savin, I.; Schill, C.; Schnell, G.; Schüler, K. P.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seitz, B.; Shanidze, R.; Shearer, C.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shutov, V.; Sinram, K.; Sommer, W.; Stancari, M.; Statera, M.; Steffens, E.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Tait, P.; Tanaka, H.; Taroian, S.; Tchuiko, B.; Terkulov, A.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; van der Nat, P.; van der Steenhoven, G.; van Haarlem, Y.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vikhrov, V.; Vincter, M. G.; Vogel, C.; Volmer, J.; Wang, S.; Wendland, J.; Wilbert, J.; Wise, T.; Ybeles Smit, G.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yen, S.; Zihlmann, B.; Zupranski, P.

    2005-03-01

    The HERMES hydrogen and deuterium nuclear-polarized gas targets have been in use since 1996 with the polarized electron beam of HERA at DESY to study the spin structure of the nucleon. Polarized atoms from a Stern-Gerlach Atomic Beam Source are injected into a storage cell internal to the HERA electron ring. Atoms diffusing from the center of the storage cell into a side tube are analyzed to determine the atomic fraction and the atomic polarizations. The atoms have a nuclear polarization, the axis of which is defined by an external magnetic holding field. The holding field was longitudinal during 1996-2000, and was changed to transverse in 2001. The design of the target is described, the method for analyzing the target polarization is outlined, and the performance of the target in the various running periods is presented.

  7. Vanadium redox flow batteries to reach greenhouse gas emissions targets in an off-grid configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbabzadeh, Maryam; Johnson, Jeremiah X.; De Kleine, Robert; Keoleian, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We assess energy storage role in reaching emissions targets in an off-grid model. • The energy storage technology is vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). • We evaluate life cycle GHG emissions and total cost of delivered electricity. • Generation mixes are optimized to meet emissions targets at the minimum cost. • For this model, integrating VRFB is economical to reach very low emissions targets. - Abstract: Energy storage may serve as a solution to the integration challenges of high penetrations of wind, helping to reduce curtailment, provide system balancing services, and reduce emissions. This study determines the minimum cost configuration of vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFB), wind turbines, and natural gas reciprocating engines in an off-grid model. A life cycle assessment (LCA) model is developed to determine the system configuration needed to achieve a variety of CO 2 -eq emissions targets. The relationship between total system costs and life cycle emissions are used to optimize the generation mixes to achieve emissions targets at the least cost and determine when VRFBs are preferable over wind curtailment. Different greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions targets are defined for the off-grid system and the minimum cost resource configuration is determined to meet those targets. This approach determines when the use of VRFBs is more cost effective than wind curtailment in reaching GHG emissions targets. The research demonstrates that while incorporating energy storage consistently reduces life cycle carbon emissions, it is not cost effective to reduce curtailment except under very low emission targets (190 g of CO2-eq/kW h and less for the examined system). This suggests that “overbuilding” wind is a more viable option to reduce life cycle emissions for all but the most ambitious carbon mitigation targets. The findings show that adding VRFB as energy storage could be economically preferable only when wind curtailment exceeds 66% for the

  8. Chemiresistive and Gravimetric Dual-Mode Gas Sensor toward Target Recognition and Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Hao; Feng, Zhihong; Zhang, Hongxiang; Zhang, Rui; Yu, Yuanyuan; Tao, Jin; Zhao, Hongyuan; Guo, Wenlan; Pang, Wei; Duan, Xuexin; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Daihua

    2016-08-24

    We demonstrate a dual-mode gas sensor for simultaneous and independent acquisition of electrical and mechanical signals from the same gas adsorption event. The device integrates a graphene field-effect transistor (FET) with a piezoelectric resonator in a seamless manner by leveraging multiple structural and functional synergies. Dual signals resulting from independent physical processes, i.e., mass attachment and charge transfer can reflect intrinsic properties of gas molecules and potentially enable target recognition and quantification at the same time. Fabrication of the device is based on standard Integrated Circuit (IC) foundry processes and fully compatible with system-on-a-chip (SoC) integration to achieve extremely small form factors. In addition, the ability of simultaneous measurements of mass adsorption and charge transfer guides us to a more precise understanding of the interactions between graphene and various gas molecules. Besides its practical functions, the device serves as an effective tool to quantitatively investigate the physical processes and sensing mechanisms for a large library of sensing materials and target analytes.

  9. Folding model study of the charge-exchange scattering to the isobaric analog state and implication for the nuclear symmetry energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoa, Dao T.; Thang, Dang Ngoc [VINATOM, Institute for Nuclear Science and Technique, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Loc, Bui Minh [VINATOM, Institute for Nuclear Science and Technique, Hanoi (Viet Nam); University of Pedagogy, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2014-02-15

    The Fermi transition (ΔL = ΔS = 0 and ΔT = 1) between the nuclear isobaric analog states (IAS), induced by the charge-exchange (p, n) or ({sup 3}He, t) reaction, can be considered as ''elastic'' scattering of proton or {sup 3}He by the isovector term of the optical potential (OP) that flips the projectile isospin. The accurately measured (p, n) or ({sup 3}He, t) scattering cross section to the IAS can be used, therefore, to probe the isospin dependence of the proton or {sup 3}He optical potential. Within the folding model, the isovector part of the OP is determined exclusively by the neutron-proton difference in the nuclear densities and the isospin dependence of the effective nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction. Because the isovector coupling explicitly links the isovector part of the proton or {sup 3}He optical potential to the cross section of the charge-exchange (p, n) or ({sup 3}He, t) scattering to the IAS, the isospin dependence of the effective (in-medium) NN interaction can be well tested in the folding model analysis of these charge-exchange reactions. On the other hand, the same isospin- and density-dependent NN interaction can also be used in a Hartree-Fock calculation of asymmetric nuclear matter, to estimate the nuclear matter energy and its asymmetry part (the nuclear symmetry energy). As a result, the fine-tuning of the isospin dependence of the effective NN interaction against the measured (p, n) or ({sup 3}He, t) cross sections should allow us to make some realistic prediction of the nuclear symmetry energy and its density dependence. (orig.)

  10. Folding model study of the charge-exchange scattering to the isobaric analog state and implication for the nuclear symmetry energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoa, Dao T.; Thang, Dang Ngoc; Loc, Bui Minh

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi transition (ΔL = ΔS = 0 and ΔT = 1) between the nuclear isobaric analog states (IAS), induced by the charge-exchange (p, n) or ( 3 He, t) reaction, can be considered as ''elastic'' scattering of proton or 3 He by the isovector term of the optical potential (OP) that flips the projectile isospin. The accurately measured (p, n) or ( 3 He, t) scattering cross section to the IAS can be used, therefore, to probe the isospin dependence of the proton or 3 He optical potential. Within the folding model, the isovector part of the OP is determined exclusively by the neutron-proton difference in the nuclear densities and the isospin dependence of the effective nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction. Because the isovector coupling explicitly links the isovector part of the proton or 3 He optical potential to the cross section of the charge-exchange (p, n) or ( 3 He, t) scattering to the IAS, the isospin dependence of the effective (in-medium) NN interaction can be well tested in the folding model analysis of these charge-exchange reactions. On the other hand, the same isospin- and density-dependent NN interaction can also be used in a Hartree-Fock calculation of asymmetric nuclear matter, to estimate the nuclear matter energy and its asymmetry part (the nuclear symmetry energy). As a result, the fine-tuning of the isospin dependence of the effective NN interaction against the measured (p, n) or ( 3 He, t) cross sections should allow us to make some realistic prediction of the nuclear symmetry energy and its density dependence. (orig.)

  11. Bounds on the g/sub K//sub N//sub Σ/ 2 coupling constant from positivity and charge-exchange data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antolin, J.

    1987-01-01

    Positivity of the imaginary part of the forward K - n elastic amplitude on the unphysical cut allows the calculation of bounds on the g/sub K//sub N//sub Σ/ 2 coupling constant using the forward differential cross sections of the charge-exchange reaction K - p→K-bar 0 n, the scarce K - n real-part data, and a Stieltjes parametrization of the K - p real-part data. The bounds on the coupling constant are 2.11 2 - n amplitude: (0.35 +- 0.05) +- (0.16 +- 0.04)i GeV/c

  12. Design of a Fast Neutral He Beam System for Feasibility Study of Charge-Exchange Alpha-Particle Diagnostics in a Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Shinto, Katsuhiro; Kitajima, Sumio; Kiyama, Satoru; Nishiura, Masaki; Sasao, Mamiko; Sugawara, Hiroshi; Takenaga, Mahoko; Takeuchi, Shu; Wada, Motoi

    2005-01-01

    For alpha-particle diagnostics in a thermonuclear fusion reactor, neutralization using a fast (~2 MeV) neutral He beam produced by the spontaneous electron detachment of a He- is considered most promising. However, the beam transport of produced fast neutral He has not been studied, because of difficulty for producing high-brightness He- beam. Double-charge-exchange He- sources and simple beam transport systems were developed and their results were reported in the PAC99* and other papers.** To accelerate an intense He- beam and verify the production of the fast neutral He beam, a new test stand has been designed. It consists of a multi-cusp He+

  13. DXL: A Sounding Rocket Mission for the Study of Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Hot Bubble X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, M.; Prasai, K.; Uprety, Y.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Koutroumpa, D.; Porter, F. S.; Snowden, S.; Cravens, T.; Robertson, I.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The Diffuse X-rays from the Local galaxy (DXL) mission is an approved sounding rocket project with a first launch scheduled around December 2012. Its goal is to identify and separate the X-ray emission generated by solar wind charge exchange from that of the local hot bubble to improve our understanding of both. With 1,000 square centimeters proportional counters and grasp of about 10 square centimeters sr both in the 1/4 and 3/4 keV bands, DXL will achieve in a 5-minute flight what cannot be achieved by current and future X-ray satellites.

  14. Intermediate energy nuclear physics (Task C) and charge exchange reactions (Task W). Technical progress report, October 1, 1985-October 1, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraushaar, J.J.

    1986-10-01

    This report describes the experimental work in intermediate energy research carried out over the past year at the University of Colorado. The experimental program is very broad in nature, ranging from investigations in pion-nucleus interactions, nucleon charge exchange, inelastic electron scattering, and nucleon transfer reactions. The experiments were largely carried out at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility, but important programs were conducted at the Tri-University Meson Facility at the University of British Columbia, the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility and Netherlands Institute for Nuclear Physics Research (NIKHEF-K)

  15. Measurement of Anomalously Strong Emission from the 1s-9p Transition in the Spectrum of H-like Phosphorus Following Charge Exchange with Molecular Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.

    2010-01-01

    We have measured K-shell x-ray spectra of highly ionized argon and phosphorus following charge exchange with molecular hydrogen at low collision energy in an electron beam ion trap using an x-ray calorimeter array with approx.6 eV resolution. We find that the emission at the high-end of the Lyman series is greater by a factor of two for phosphorus than for argon, even though the measurement was performed concurrently and the atomic numbers are similar. This does not agree with current theoretical models and deviates from the trend observed in previous measurements.

  16. Gas analysis within remote porous targets using LIDAR multi-scatter techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Z. G.; Lewander, M.; Grönlund, R.; Lundberg, H.; Svanberg, S.

    2008-11-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) experiments are normally pursued for range resolved atmospheric gas measurements or for analysis of solid target surfaces using fluorescence of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. In contrast, we now demonstrate the monitoring of free gas enclosed in pores of materials, subject to impinging laser radiation, employing the photons emerging back to the surface laterally of the injection point after penetrating the medium in heavy multiple scattering processes. The directly reflected light is blocked by a beam stop. The technique presented is a remote version of the newly introduced gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy (GASMAS) technique, which so far was pursued with the injection optics and the detector in close contact with the sample. Feasibility measurements of LIDAR-GASMAS on oxygen in polystyrene foam were performed at a distance of 6 m. Multiple-scattering induced delays of the order of 50 ns, which corresponds to 15 m optical path length, were observed. First extensions to a range of 60 m are discussed. Remote observation of gas composition anomalies in snow using differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) may find application in avalanche victim localization or for leak detection in snow-covered natural gas pipelines. Further, the techniques may be even more useful for short-range, non-intrusive GASMAS measurements, e.g., on packed food products.

  17. Gas-Filled Targets to Study Laser Backscatter on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, R. A.; Williams, E. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Moody, J. D.; Suter, L. J.

    2009-11-01

    To achieve indirect drive fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), laser beams must propagate through several millimeters of high-density plasma to reach the hohlraum walls. Stimulated Brillouin and Raman backscatter could create problems with energetics and/or symmetry. Laser backscatter at NIF will be diagnosed with full aperture backscatter systems (FABS) and near backscatter imagers (NBI). Several gas-filled targets (``gas pipes'') have been designed to provide backscatter sources to commission the diagnostics. The 7-mm long gas pipes are filled with various gases, including C5H12 and CO2, and are irradiated by a NIF quad with 16 kJ of energy in 2-4 ns pulses. We describe the design of the gas pipes using hydrodynamics and laser-plasma-interaction computer codes. The relationship between the design parameters (gas composition and density and laser pulse shape) and the character of the backscatter (Brillouin versus Raman and narrow versus broad angle) are discussed. Comparisons of predicted and measured backscatter distributions and levels are discussed.

  18. Some estimates of mirror plasma startup by neutral beam heating of pellet and gas cloud targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, J.W.; Willmann, P.A.

    1978-01-01

    Hot plasma buildup by neutral beam injection into an initially cold solid or gaseous target is found to be conceivable in large mirror machine experiments such as 2XIIB or MFTF. A simple analysis shows that existing neutral beam intensities are sufficient to ablate suitable targets to form a gas or vapor cloud. An approximate rate equation model is used to follow the subsequent processes of ionization, heating, and hot plasma formation. Solutions of these rate equations are obtained by means of the ''GEAR'' techniques for solving ''stiff'' systems of differential equations. These solutions are in rough agreement with the 2XIIB stream plasma buildup experiment. They also predict that buildup on a suitable nitrogen-like target will occur in the MFTF geometry. In 2XIIB the solutions are marginal; buildup may be possible, but is not certain

  19. A Gas Target Internal to the LHC for the Study of pp Single-Spin Asymmetries and Heavy Ion Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Barschel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the application of an open storage cell as gas target for a proposed LHC fixed-target experiment AFTER@LHC. The target provides a high areal density at minimum gas input, which may be polarized 1H, 2H, or 3He gas or heavy inert gases in a wide mass range. For the study of single-spin asymmetries in pp interaction, luminosities of nearly 1033/cm2 s can be produced with existing techniques.

  20. A new potential of π-nucleus scattering and its application to nuclear structure study using elastic scattering and charge exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Gerard.

    1974-01-01

    First the different theories used for studying pion-nucleus scattering and especially Glauber microscopic model and Kisslinger optical model are summarized. From the comparison of these two theories it was concluded that Kisslinger's was better for studying pion-nucleus scattering near the (3/2-3/2) resonance. The potential was developed, with a local corrective term, proposed by this author. This new term arises from taking into account correctly the Lorentz transformation from the pion-nucleon center of mass to the pion nucleus center of mass system. A coupled-channel formalism was developed allowing the study of pion-nucleus elastic scattering and also the study of single and double charge exchange reactions on nucleus with N>Z. The influence of the new term and the shape of nucleon densities on π- 12 C scattering was studied near 200MeV. It was found that at the nucleus surface the neutron density was larger than the proton density. On the other hand, a maximum of sensibility to the different nuclear parameters was found near 180MeV and for elastic scattering angles greater than 100 deg. The calculations of the total cross section for simple and double charge exchange for 13 C and 63 Cu yielded results simular to those of previous theories and showed the same discrepancy between theory and experiment in the resonance region [fr

  1. Measurement of Gas and Volatile Elements Production Cross Section in a Molten Lead-Bismuth Target

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    MEGAPIE is a project for a 1 MW liquid PbBi spallation source, to be built at the SINQ facility at the Paul Scherrer Institut, which will be an important step in the roadmap towards the demonstration of the ADS concept and high power molten metal targets in general. In the design and construction of such a challenging project it is extremely important to evaluate the amount and type of gas and volatile elements which will be produced, for a reliable and safe operation of the experiment. Both stable (H, $^{4}$He and other noble gases) and radioactive isotopes are of interest. Currently, different design options are under consideration to deal with the gas produced during operation. \\\\ For a correct estimation of the production cross sections, a measurement with a liquid PbBi target and a proton beam of energy close to the one of MEGAPIE (575 MeV) is necessary. We would like to use the ISOLDE facility, which offers the unique opportunity via its mass spectrometric analysis of the elements present in the gas pha...

  2. Design and evaluation of a carbon-11 gas target having auxiliary cooling fins in the target cavity for the stable production of carbon-11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Min Goo; Park, Jeung Hoon; Kim, In Jong; Yang, Seung Dae; Jeong, Cheol Ki; Lee, Goung Jin; Kim, Sang Wook

    2011-01-01

    The utilization of carbon-11 ( 11 C) has rapidly grown since the introduction of positron emission tomography (PET) in Korea in 1994. A 11 C gas target with auxiliary cooling fins has been designed, manufactured and evaluated to compare its performances to other targets. The target was assembled from individual fin disks. The fin disks were installed inside the cavity and the cooling jacket. Four targets of different designed have been tested using the KIRAMS-13 cyclotron (13 MeV P + ; KIRAMS, Korea). In this study, we report the comparative results for these types of 11 C targets.

  3. HD gas purification for polarized HDice targets production at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whisnant, Charles; D' Angelo, Annalisa; Colaneri, Luca; Devilbiss, J; Kageya, Tsuneo; Loving, D A; Lowry, Michael; Rizzo, Alessandro; Sandorfi, Andrew; Schaerf, Carlo; Storey, J D; Wallace, C M; Wei, Xiangdong; Zonta, Irene

    2014-06-01

    Solid, frozen-spin targets of molecular HD were rst developed for nuclear physics by a collaboration between Syracuse University and Brookhaven National Lab. They have been successfully used in measurements with photon beams, rst at the Laser-Electron-Gamma-Source [1] and most recently at Je erson Lab during the running of the E06-101 (g14) experiment [2]. Preparations are underway to utilize the targets in future electron experiments after the completion of the 12 GeV JLab upgrade [3]. HD is an attractive target since all of the material is polarizable, of low Z, and requires only modest holding elds. At the same time, the small contributions from the target cell can be subtracted from direct measurements. Reaching the frozen-spin state with both high polarization and a signi cant spin relaxation time requires careful control of H2 and D2 impurities. Commercially available HD contains 0.5 - 2% concentrations of H2 and D2. Low-temperature distillation is required to reduce these concentrations to the 104 level to enable useful target production. This distillation is done using a column lled with heli-pack C [4] to give good separation e ciency. Approximately 12 moles of commercial HD is condensed into the mechanically refrigerated system at the base temperature of 11K. The system is then isolated and the temperature stabilized at 18K producing liquid HD, which is boiled by a resistive heater. The circulation established by the boil-o condensing throughout the column then ltering back down produces a steady-state isotopic separation permitting the extraction of HD gas with very low H2 and D2 content. A residual gas analyzer initially monitors distillation. Once the H2 concentration falls below its useful operating range, samples are periodically collected for analysis using gas chromatography [5] and Raman scattering. Where the measurement techniques overlap, good agreement is obtained. The operation of the distillery and results of gas analysis will be discussed

  4. [Experimental investigation of laser plasma soft X-ray source with gas target].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qi-liang; Gong, Yan; Lin, Jing-quan; Chen, Bo; Cao, Jian-lin

    2003-02-01

    This paper describes a debris-free laser plasma soft X-ray source with a gas target, which has high operating frequency and can produce strong soft X-ray radiation. The valve of this light source is drived by a piezoelectrical ceramic whose operating frequency is up to 400 Hz. In comparison with laser plasma soft X-ray sources using metal target, the light source is debris-free. And it has higher operating frequency than gas target soft X-ray sources whose nozzle is controlled by a solenoid valve. A channel electron multiplier (CEM) operating in analog mode is used to detect the soft X-ray generated by the laser plasma source, and the CEM's output is fed to to a charge-sensitive preamplifier for further amplification purpose. Output charges from the CEM are proportional to the amplitude of the preamplifier's output voltage. Spectra of CO2, Xe and Kr at 8-14 nm wavelength which can be used for soft X-ray projection lithography are measured. The spectrum for CO2 consists of separate spectral lines originate mainly from the transitions in Li-like and Be-like ions. The Xe spectrum originating mainly from 4d-5f, 4d-4f, 4d-6p and 4d-5p transitions in multiply charged xenon ions. The spectrum for Kr consists of separate spectral lines and continuous broad spectra originating mainly from the transitions in Cu-, Ni-, Co- and Fe-like ions.

  5. MULTI-KEV X-Ray Yields From High-Z Gas Targets Fielded At Omega

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, J.O.; Fournier, K.B.; May, M.J.; Colvin, J.D.; Thomas, C.A.; Marrs, R.E.; Compton, S.M.; Moody, J.D.; Bond, E.J.; Davis, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report on modeling of x-ray yield from gas-filled targets shot at the OMEGA laser facility. The OMEGA targets were 1.8 mm long, 1.95 mm in diameter Be cans filled with either a 50:50 Ar:Xe mixture, pure Ar, pure Kr or pure Xe at ∼ 1 atm. The OMEGA experiments heated the gas with 20 kJ of 3ω (∼ 350 nm) laser energy delivered in a 1 ns square pulse. the emitted x-ray flux was monitored with the x-ray diode based DANTE instruments in the sub-keV range. Two-dimensional x-ray images (for energies 3-5 keV) of the targets were recorded with gated x-ray detectors. The x-ray spectra were recorded with the HENWAY crystal spectrometer at OMEGA. Predictions are 2D r-z cylindrical with DCA NLTE atomic physics. Models generally: (1) underpredict the Xe L-shell yields; (2) overpredict the Ar K-shell yields; (3) correctly predict the Xe thermal yields; and (4) greatly underpredict the Ar thermal yields. However, there are spreads within the data, e.g. the DMX Ar K-shell yields are correctly predicted. The predicted thermal yields show strong angular dependence.

  6. X-ray burst studies with the JENSA gas jet target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Konrad; Chipps, Kelly A.; Ahn, Sunghoon; Allen, Jacob M.; Ayoub, Sara; Bardayan, Daniel W.; Blackmon, Jeffrey C.; Blankstein, Drew; Browne, Justin; Cha, Soomi; Chae, Kyung YUK; Cizewski, Jolie; Deibel, Catherine M.; Deleeuw, Eric; Gomez, Orlando; Greife, Uwe; Hager, Ulrike; Hall, Matthew R.; Jones, Katherine L.; Kontos, Antonios; Kozub, Raymond L.; Lee, Eunji; Lepailleur, Alex; Linhardt, Laura E.; Matos, Milan; Meisel, Zach; Montes, Fernando; O'Malley, Patrick D.; Ong, Wei Jia; Pain, Steven D.; Sachs, Alison; Schatz, Hendrik; Schmitt, Kyle T.; Smith, Karl; Smith, Michael S.; Soares de Bem, Natã F.; Thompson, Paul J.; Toomey, Rebecca; Walter, David

    2018-01-01

    When a neutron star accretes hydrogen and helium from the outer layers of its companion star, thermonuclear burning enables the αp-process as a break out mechanism from the hot CNO cycle. Model calculations predict (α, p) reaction rates significantly affect both the light curves and elemental abundances in the burst ashes. The Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas jet target enables the direct measurement of previously inaccessible (α,p) reactions with radioactive beams provided by the rare isotope re-accelerator ReA3 at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), USA. JENSA is going to be the main target for the Recoil Separator for Capture Reactions (SECAR) at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). Commissioning of JENSA and first experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) showed a highly localized, pure gas target with a density of ˜1019 atoms per square centimeter. Preliminary results are presented from the first direct cross section measurement of the 34Ar(α, p)37 K reaction at NSCL.

  7. Achieving 80% greenhouse gas reduction target in Saudi Arabia under low and medium oil prices

    KAUST Repository

    Alshammari, Yousef Mohammad

    2016-11-10

    COP 21 led to a global agreement to limit the earth\\'s rising temperature to less than 2 °C. This will require countries to act upon climate change and achieve a significant reduction in their greenhouse gas emissions which will play a pivotal role in shaping future energy systems. Saudi Arabia is the World\\'s largest exporter of crude oil, and the 11th largest CO2 emitter. Understanding the Kingdom\\'s role in global greenhouse gas reduction is critical in shaping the future of fossil fuels. Hence, this work presents an optimisation study to understand how Saudi Arabia can meet the CO2 reduction targets to achieve the 80% reduction in the power generation sector. It is found that the implementation of energy efficiency measures is necessary to enable meeting the 80% target, and it would also lower costs of transition to low carbon energy system while maintaining cleaner use of hydrocarbons with CCS. Setting very deep GHG reduction targets may be economically uncompetitive in consideration of the energy supply requirements. In addition, we determine the breakeven price of crude oil needed to make CCS economically viable. Results show important dimension for pricing CO2 and the role of CCS compared with alternative sources of energy.

  8. X-ray burst studies with the JENSA gas jet target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Konrad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When a neutron star accretes hydrogen and helium from the outer layers of its companion star, thermonuclear burning enables the αp-process as a break out mechanism from the hot CNO cycle. Model calculations predict (α, p reaction rates significantly affect both the light curves and elemental abundances in the burst ashes. The Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA gas jet target enables the direct measurement of previously inaccessible (α,p reactions with radioactive beams provided by the rare isotope re-accelerator ReA3 at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL, USA. JENSA is going to be the main target for the Recoil Separator for Capture Reactions (SECAR at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB. Commissioning of JENSA and first experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL showed a highly localized, pure gas target with a density of ∼1019 atoms per square centimeter. Preliminary results are presented from the first direct cross section measurement of the 34Ar(α, p37 K reaction at NSCL.

  9. Production yields of noble-gas isotopes from ISOLDE UC$_{x}$/graphite targets

    CERN Document Server

    Bergmann, U C; Catherall, R; Cederkäll, J; Diget, C A; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Franchoo, S; Fynbo, H O U; Gausemel, H; Georg, U; Giles, T; Hagebø, E; Jeppesen, H B; Jonsson, O C; Köster, U; Lettry, Jacques; Nilsson, T; Peräjärvi, K; Ravn, H L; Riisager, K; Weissman, L; Äystö, J

    2003-01-01

    Yields of He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe isotopic chains were measured from UC$_{x}$/graphite and ThC$_{x}$/graphite targets at the PSB-ISOLDE facility at CERN using isobaric selectivity achieved by the combination of a plasma-discharge ion source with a water-cooled transfer line. %The measured half-lives allowed %to calculate the decay losses of neutron-rich isotopes in the %target and ion-source system, and thus to obtain information on the in-target %productions from the measured yields. The delay times measured for a UC$_x$/graphite target allow for an extrapolation to the expected yields of very neutron-rich noble gas isotopes, in particular for the ``NuPECC reference elements'' Ar and Kr, at the next-generation radioactive ion-beam facility EURISOL. \\end{abstract} \\begin{keyword} % keywords here, in the form: keyword \\sep keyword radioactive ion beams \\sep release \\sep ion yields \\sep ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) \\sep uranium and thorium carbide targets. % PACS codes here, in the form: \\PACS code \\sep code...

  10. Spatial characterization of the internal gas target at the ESR for the FOCAL experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassner, T.; Beyer, H. F.

    2015-11-01

    The FOCAL experiment involves a highly accurate twin crystal spectrometer, designed for the measurement of the ground state Lamb shift of stored highly charged ions, like hydrogen-like Au78+, via spectroscopy in the hard-x-ray regime with an accuracy down to the few-eV level where higher-order QED contributions become accessible. For this level of accuracy all geometrical parameters including the position of the x-ray source are of crucial importance. In this conference proceeding we present our efforts to characterize the internal gas target at the experiment storage ring at GSI Darmstadt where in 2012 the FOCAL experiment was conducted.

  11. Real-time target selection optimization to enhance alignment of gas chromatograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearing, Thomas I; Nadeau, Jeremy S; Rohrback, Brian G; Ramos, L Scott; Synovec, Robert E

    2011-01-15

    An improved method for real-time selection of the target for the alignment of gas chromatographic data is described. Further outlined is a simple method to determine the accuracy of the alignment procedure. The target selection method proposed uses a moving window of aligned chromatograms to generate a target, herein referred to as the window target method (WTM). The WTM was initially tested using a series of 100 simulated chromatograms, and additionally evaluated using a series of 55 diesel fuel gas chromatograms obtained with four fuel samples. The WTM was evaluated via a comparison to a related method (the nearest neighbor method (NNM)). The results using the WTM with simulated chromatograms showed a significant improvement in the correlation coefficient and the accuracy of alignment when compared to the alignments performed using the NNM. A significant improvement in real-time alignment accuracy, as assessed by a correlation coefficient metric, was achieved with the WTM (starting at ∼ 1.0 and declining to only ∼ 0.985 for the 100th sample), relative to the NNM (starting at ∼ 1.0 and declining to ∼ 0.4 for the 100th sample) for the simulated chromatogram study. The results determined when using the WTM with the diesel fuels also showed an improvement in correlation coefficient and accuracy of the within-class alignments as compared to the results obtained from the NNM. In practice, the WTM could be applied to the real-time analysis of process and feedstock industrial streams to enable real-time decision making from the more precisely aligned chromatographic data. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Greenhouse gas emission trends and projections in Europe 2011. Tracking progress towards Kyoto and 2020 targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busche, J.; Scheffler, M.; Graichen, V. (Umweltbundesamt, Vienna (Austria)) (and others)

    2011-10-15

    At the end of 2010, the EU-15 was on track to achieve its Kyoto target but three EU-15 Member States (Austria, Italy and Luxembourg) were not on track to meet their burden-sharing targets. These countries must therefore seriously consider further action to ensure compliance, in particular revising their plans on using flexible mechanisms. Among the EEA member countries outside the EU, Liechtenstein and Switzerland were not on track to achieve their Kyoto target at the end of 2009. All other European countries are on track to meet their targets, either based on domestic emissions only or with the assistance of Kyoto mechanisms. The economic recession had a significant impact on the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emission trends but a more limited effect on progress towards Kyoto targets. This is because emissions in the sectors covered by the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS), which were most affected by the crisis, do not affect Kyoto compliance once ETS caps have been set. With existing national measures, Member States do not project enough emission reductions for the EU to meet its unilateral 20 % reduction commitment in 2020. Additional measures currently planned by Member States will help further reduce emissions but will be insufficient to achieve the important emission cuts needed in the longer term. By 2020 Member States must enhance their efforts to reduce emissions in non-EU ETS sectors, such as the residential, transport or agriculture sectors, where legally binding national targets have been set under the EU's 2009 climate and energy package. (Author)

  13. New supersonic gas jet target for low energy nuclear reaction studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Favela

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A windowless supersonic gas jet target (SUGAR has been put in operation recently in Mexico. It is the first target of its kind in the country and the region. New research opportunities become available with this facility through the study of the direct beam-gas interaction: nuclear physics and astrophysics, atomic physics, interaction of radiation with matter and other interdisciplinary applications. A general description of the apparatus and its commissioning is given here. Air, nitrogen and argon jets were produced. Proton and deuteron beams were used to measure key parameters of the system to compare with theoretical estimates. In addition, as a first study case, we present data from the ^{14}N(d,α^{12}C reaction, at center of mass energies between 1.9 and 3.0 MeV with an E-ΔE telescope detector at 35°. Excitation functions for several excited states were constructed and an ^{16}O resonance at 22.72 MeV was confirmed.

  14. New supersonic gas jet target for low energy nuclear reaction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favela, F.; Acosta, L.; Andrade, E.; Araujo, V.; Huerta, A.; de Lucio, O. G.; Murillo, G.; Ortiz, M. E.; Policroniades, R.; Santa Rita, P.; Varela, A.; Chávez, E.

    2015-12-01

    A windowless supersonic gas jet target (SUGAR) has been put in operation recently in Mexico. It is the first target of its kind in the country and the region. New research opportunities become available with this facility through the study of the direct beam-gas interaction: nuclear physics and astrophysics, atomic physics, interaction of radiation with matter and other interdisciplinary applications. A general description of the apparatus and its commissioning is given here. Air, nitrogen and argon jets were produced. Proton and deuteron beams were used to measure key parameters of the system to compare with theoretical estimates. In addition, as a first study case, we present data from the 14N (d ,α )12C reaction, at center of mass energies between 1.9 and 3.0 MeV with an E-Δ E telescope detector at 35°. Excitation functions for several excited states were constructed and an 16O resonance at 22.72 MeV was confirmed.

  15. Spectral Modification of Shock Accelerated Ions Using a Hydrodynamically Shaped Gas Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresca, O.; Dover, N. P.; Cook, N.; Maharjan, C.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Najmudin, Z.; Shkolnikov, P.; Pogorelsky, I.

    2015-08-01

    We report on reproducible shock acceleration from irradiation of a λ =10 μ m CO2 laser on optically shaped H2 and He gas targets. A low energy laser prepulse (I ≲1014 W cm-2 ) is used to drive a blast wave inside the gas target, creating a steepened, variable density gradient. This is followed, after 25 ns, by a high intensity laser pulse (I >1016 W cm-2 ) that produces an electrostatic collisionless shock. Upstream ions are accelerated for a narrow range of prepulse energies. For long density gradients (≳40 μ m ), broadband beams of He+ and H+ are routinely produced, while for shorter gradients (≲20 μ m ), quasimonoenergetic acceleration of protons is observed. These measurements indicate that the properties of the accelerating shock and the resultant ion energy distribution, in particular the production of narrow energy spread beams, is highly dependent on the plasma density profile. These findings are corroborated by 2D particle-in-cell simulations.

  16. Achieving 80% greenhouse gas reduction target in Saudi Arabia under low and medium oil prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshammari, Yousef M.; Sarathy, S. Mani

    2017-01-01

    COP 21 led to a global agreement to limit the earth's rising temperature to less than 2 °C. This will require countries to act upon climate change and achieve a significant reduction in their greenhouse gas emissions which will play a pivotal role in shaping future energy systems. Saudi Arabia is the World's largest exporter of crude oil, and the 11th largest CO 2 emitter. Understanding the Kingdom's role in global greenhouse gas reduction is critical in shaping the future of fossil fuels. Hence, this work presents an optimisation study to understand how Saudi Arabia can meet the CO 2 reduction targets to achieve the 80% reduction in the power generation sector. It is found that the implementation of energy efficiency measures is necessary to enable meeting the 80% target, and it would also lower costs of transition to low carbon energy system while maintaining cleaner use of hydrocarbons with CCS. Setting very deep GHG reduction targets may be economically uncompetitive in consideration of the energy supply requirements. In addition, we determine the breakeven price of crude oil needed to make CCS economically viable. Results show important dimension for pricing CO 2 and the role of CCS compared with alternative sources of energy. - Highlights: • Energy efficiency measures are needed to achieve 80% reduction. • Nuclear appears as an important option to achieve deep cuts in CO 2 by 2050. • Technology improvement can enable using heavy fuel oil with CCS until 2050. • IGCC requires lower net CO 2 footprint in order to be competitive. • Nuclear power causes a sharp increase in the CO 2 avoidance costs.

  17. Excitation of the Δ(1232) isobar in deuteron charge exchange on hydrogen at 1.6, 1.8, and 2.3 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mchedlishvili, D. [High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi State University, GE-0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Centre for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Barsov, S. [High Energy Physics Department, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, RU-188350 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Carbonell, J. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Université Paris-Sud, IN2P3-CNRS, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Chiladze, D. [High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi State University, GE-0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Centre for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Dymov, S. [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Physikalisches Institut II, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Dzyuba, A. [High Energy Physics Department, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, RU-188350 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Engels, R.; Gebel, R. [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Centre for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Glagolev, V. [Laboratory of High Energies, JINR, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); and others

    2013-10-07

    The charge-exchange break-up of polarised deuterons d{sup →}p→{pp}{sub s}n, where the final {pp}{sub s} diproton system has a very low excitation energy and hence is mainly in the {sup 1}S{sub 0} state, is a powerful tool to probe the spin-flip terms in the proton–neutron charge-exchange scattering. Recent measurements with the ANKE spectrometer at the COSY storage ring at 1.6, 1.8, and 2.27 GeV have extended these studies into the pion-production regime in order to investigate the mechanism for the excitation of the Δ(1232) isobar in the d{sup →}p→{pp}{sub s}X reaction. Values of the differential cross section and two deuteron tensor analysing powers, A{sub xx} and A{sub yy}, have been extracted as functions of the momentum transfer to the diproton or the invariant mass M{sub X} of the unobserved system X. The unpolarised cross section in the high M{sub X} region is well described in a model that includes only direct excitation of the Δ isobar through undistorted one pion exchange. However, the cross section is grossly underestimated for low M{sub X}, even when Δ excitation in the projectile deuteron is included in the calculation. Furthermore, direct Δ production through one pion exchange only reproduces the angular dependence of the difference between the two tensor analysing powers.

  18. Nonadiabatic ionic--covalent transitions. Exponential-linear model for the charge exchange and neutralization reactions Na+H arrow-right-left Na/sup +/+H/sup -/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Mo, O.; Riera, A.

    1986-01-01

    A previous study of charge exchange processes taking place through ionic--covalent transitions is extended to the case of Na+H and Na/sup +/+H/sup -/ collisions. A five-state molecular expansion, with the inclusion of two-electron translation factors, is employed to calculate the charge exchange and neutralization cross sections. Transitions at the first two pseudocrossings between the energy curves, practically determine the cross sections in the energy range 0.16--5 keV amu/sup -1/. We also show that the widely used multichannel Landau--Zener theory is totally inadequate, to treat these transitions.

  19. Investigation of edge neutral flux on the ISX-B tokamak using a low-energy charge-exchange analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.M.

    1983-08-01

    To study the emission of D 0 from the periphery of a tokamak plasma, a low-energy neutral particle spectrometer optimized for (16 0 neutrals and a four-channel electrostatic analyzer to energy analyze the negative ions. The spectrometer was absolutely calibrated using D 0 beams formed by electron capture by positive ions in a gas cell and by photo-detachment of negative ions by a yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. For the observation region chosen on ISX-B (120 0 toroidally away from the limiter, near the gas puff), the neutral particle flux has a two-component nature. These data are well fit by two separate exponential distributions of equivalent temperatures 6 to 8 eV for particle energies below about 80 eV and 70 to 80 eV for particle energies above 80 eV. For ohmically heated discharges, the measured particle flux in the energy range 25 to 700 eV is approx. 2.5 x 10 15 cm - 2 .s - 1 ; the mean particle energy is approx. 70 eV, and the calculated flux at the wall is approx. 30 mW/cm 2 . The major effect of neutral beam heating is to increase the particle flux in the 25- to 700-eV range by a factor of 3

  20. Characterization of deuterium clusters mixed with helium gas for an application in beam-target-fusion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Dyer, G.; Ihn, Y. S.; Cortez, J.; Aymond, F.; Gaul, E.; Donovan, M. E.; Barbui, M.; Bonasera, A.; Natowitz, J. B.; Albright, B. J.; Fernández, J. C.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-12-01

    We measured the average deuterium cluster size within a mixture of deuterium clusters and helium gas by detecting Rayleigh scattering signals. The average cluster size from the gas mixture was comparable to that from a pure deuterium gas when the total backing pressure and temperature of the gas mixture were the same as those of the pure deuterium gas. According to these measurements, the average size of deuterium clusters depends on the total pressure and not the partial pressure of deuterium in the gas mixture. To characterize the cluster source size further, a Faraday cup was used to measure the average kinetic energy of the ions resulting from Coulomb explosion of deuterium clusters upon irradiation by an intense ultrashort pulse. The deuterium ions indeed acquired a similar amount of energy from the mixture target, corroborating our measurements of the average cluster size. As the addition of helium atoms did not reduce the resulting ion kinetic energies, the reported results confirm the utility of using a known cluster source for beam-target-fusion experiments by introducing a secondary target gas.

  1. Schlieren diagnostics of the Los Alamos hypersonic gas target neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haasz, A.A.; Lever, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The gasdynamic behaviour of a planar model of the Los Alamos geometry hypersonic gas target neutron generator (GTNG) was investigated using Schlieren flow visualization photographs, static and total pressure and spill flow measurements. The model consisted of two symmetrical expansion nozzles with 220 μm throats producing a combined flow of about Mach 4 in the GTNG channel. Stagnation pressures of 100-800 kPa were used. Two basic flow configurations, spill line closed and spill line open, were studied in order to gain insight into the complex boundary layer development near the nozzle exit planes. Both flow configurations are discussed qualitatively, making use of the pressure measurements and theoretical analysis. (orig.)

  2. Examination of background contamination levels for gas counting and AMS target preparation in Trondheim

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulliksen, S.; Thomsen, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    conventional gas proportional counting (GPC) system. We have also studied contamination levels of our target preparation for C-14 accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) dating in Uppsala. A significant lower background is obtained for Icelandic double spar than for marbles, probably due to a crystal structure......The Radiological Dating Laboratory in Trondheim relatively often dates samples with ages >30 ka BP. Contaminated background materials are known to affect the accuracy of very old dates. We have found, by measurements of different materials, that such contamination is small when using our...... of the double spar that is more insensitive to contaminating processes. The background for combusted samples is at the same level as for samples of double spar, indicating that additional C-14 contamination due to combustion is negligible. Dates obtained on interstadial samples (T >30 ka BP) by both GPC and AMS...

  3. Investigation of edge neutral flux on the ISX-B tokamak using a low-energy charge-exchange analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, D. M.

    1983-08-01

    To study the emission of D/sup 0/ from the periphery of a tokamak plasma, a low-energy neutral particle spectrometer optimized for (16 < E < 500 eV) has been built and employed on the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak. The diagnostic utilizes a cesium vapor cell to form negative ions from the incident D/sup 0/ neutrals and a four-channel electrostatic analyzer to energy analyze the negative ions. The spectrometer was absolutely calibrated using D/sup 0/ beams formed by electron capture by positive ions in a gas cell and by photo-detachment of negative ions by a yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. For the observation region chosen on ISX-B (120/sup 0/ toroidally away from the limiter, near the gas puff), the neutral particle flux has a two-component nature. These data are well fit by two separate exponential distributions of equivalent temperatures 6 to 8 eV for particle energies below about 80 eV and 70 to 80 eV for particle energies above 80 eV. For ohmically heated discharges, the measured particle flux in the energy range 25 to 700 eV is approx. 2.5 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/.s/sup -1/; the mean particle energy is approx. 70 eV, and the calculated flux at the wall is approx. 30 mW/cm/sup 2/. The major effect of neutral beam heating is to increase the particle flux in the 25- to 700-eV range by a factor of 3.

  4. Demonstration of a neonlike argon soft-x-ray laser with a picosecond-laser-irradiated gas puff target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedorowicz, H; Bartnik, A; Dunn, J; Smith, R F; Hunter, J; Nilsen, J; Osterheld, A L; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2001-09-15

    We demonstrate a neonlike argon-ion x-ray laser, using a short-pulse laser-irradiated gas puff target. The gas puff target was formed by pulsed injection of gas from a high-pressure solenoid valve through a nozzle in the form of a narrow slit and irradiated with a combination of long, 600-ps and short, 6-ps high-power laser pulses with a total of 10 J of energy in a traveling-wave excitation scheme. Lasing was observed on the 3p (1)S(0)?3s (1)P(1) transition at 46.9 nm and the 3d (1)P(1)?3p (1)P(1) transition at 45.1 nm. A gain of 11 cm(-1) was measured on these transitions for targets up to 0.9 cm long.

  5. X-ray Emission Cross Sections following Charge Exchange by Multiply-Charged Ions of Astrophysical Interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otranto, Sebastian; Olson, Ronald; Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2006-05-01

    State selective nl-electron capture cross sections calculated using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) model are presented for highly charged ions with Z = 6-10 colliding with atoms and molecules. The energy dependence of the l-level populations is investigated. The calculated cross sections are compared with measurements made by Greenwood et al [1], using O^8+ and Ne^10+ on various targets at 3 keV/amu, and with recent x-ray emission cross sections measured with the EBIT machine at LLNL using O^8+ and Ne^9+,10+ on different targets at 10 eV/amu. We use the calculated cross sections to present an ab initio determination of the soft x-ray spectrum of comet C/Linear 1999 S4 that was observed on the Chandra X-ray Observatory [2]. [1] J. B. Greenwood, I. D. Williams, S. J. Smith and A. Chutjian, Phys. Rev. A 63, 062707 (2001). [2] C. M. Lisse, D. J. Christian, K. Dennerl, K. J. Meech, R. Petre, H. A. Weaver and S. J. Wolk, Science 292, 1343 (2001).

  6. Optimization of the key geological target parameters of shale-gas horizontal wells in the Changning Block, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, great progress has been made in geologic evaluation, engineering test and development optimization of the Lower Cambrian Wufeng Fm–Lower Silurian Longmaxi Fm shale gas in the Sichuan Basin, and the main shale gas exploitation technologies have been understood preliminarily. In addition, scale productivity construction has been completed in Jiaoshiba, Changning and Weiyuan blocks. In this paper, the Wufeng Fm–Longmaxi Fm shale gas wells in Changning Block were taken as the study object to provide technical reference for the development design of similar shale-gas horizontal wells. The technology combining geology with engineering, dynamic with static, and statistical analysis with simulation prediction was applied to quantify the main factors controlling shale-gas well productivity, develop the shale-gas well production prediction model, and optimize the key technical parameters of geologic target of shale-gas horizontal wells in the block (e.g. roadway orientation, location and spacing, horizontal section length and gas well production index. In order to realize high productivity of shale gas wells, it is necessary to maximize the included angle between the horizontal section orientation and the maximum major stress and fracture development direction, deploy horizontal-well roadway in top-quality shale layers, and drill the horizontal section in type I reservoirs over 1000 m long. It is concluded that high productivity of shale gas wells is guaranteed by the horizontal-well wellbore integrity and the optimized low-viscosity slickwater and ceramsite fracturing technology for complex fracture creation. Based on the research results, the technical policies for shale gas development of Changning Block are prepared and a guidance and reference are provided for the shale gas development and productivity construction in the block and the development design of similar shale-gas horizontal wells.

  7. Charge exchange, surface-induced dissociation and reactions of doubly charged molecular ions SF42+ upon impact on a stainless steel surface: A comparison with surface-induced dissociation of singly charged SF4+ molecular ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feketeová, L.; Grill, V.; Zappa, F.; Endstrasser, N.; Rasul, B.; Herman, Zdeněk; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 276, č. 1 (2008), s. 37-42 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : doubly charged ion * surface-induced dissociations * surface-induced reaction * charge exchange Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.445, year: 2008

  8. A survey of differentiation methods for national greenhouse gas reduction targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torvanger, Asbjoern; Godal, Odd

    1999-11-01

    The aim of the report is to contribute to exploring the potential differentiation methods for national greenhouse gas reduction targets. The Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) from 1997 established differentiation of targets among countries. A more systematic approach to differentiation would facilitate future negotiations. Three sources of methods or proposals are employed. The first are proposals from the Ad Hoc Group on the Berlin Mandate (AGBM) process from 1995 until the Kyoto Protocol was adopted in December 1997, in all 17 proposals were selected. The second source is the EU`s Triptique approach for differentiation of targets among its member states. The third source is recent academic literature where 8 contributions from the period 1992 to 1998 were included. The proposals are presented in a catalogue style. Based on 4 criteria on the usefulness of proposals or methods for future negotiations we have chosen 5 proposals, a Japanese, French, Norwegian, Brazilian in addition to the EU`s Triptique approach. Some numerical illustrations for the Baltic Sea region are presented. Given the joint Kyoto Protocol reduction target for the region we compare the burden sharing consequences for the proposals. For illustrations we employ the following fairness principles as differentiation methods: 1) The Sovereignty principle. 2) The Egalitarian principle. 3) The Ability to Pay principle. With the aim to evaluate the political feasibility of the various differentiation methods we compare the results across the countries in the Baltic Sea region and divide them into OECD and EIT countries. The outcome of the Kyoto Protocol is interpreted as an example of a politically feasible differentiation scheme. On the basis of the observations we find principles 1) and 2) less interesting. A ranking of the differentiation methods according to political feasibility is made and discussed. Among the countries in the Baltic Sea region

  9. Study of the elastic scattering and of the (p,n) charge exchange reaction with neutron-rich light exotic beams; Etude de la diffusion elastique et de la reaction d`echange de charge (p,n) avec des faisceaux exotiques legers riches en neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortina Gil, D.

    1996-07-05

    We have measured at GANIL, with the high resolution spectrometer SPEG, the elastic scattering of several neutron rich secondary beams ({sup 6}He, {sup 10}Be and {sup 11}Be) on a polypropylene target and the charge exchange reaction p({sup 6}He, {sup 6}Li)n. These exotic beams were produced by nuclear fragmentation and re-focalized with the SISSI device (superconducting solenoids). The signature of a halo structure in these nuclei has been analysed. Special attention has been paid to several aspects of the associated calculations namely, the proton and neutron density distributions and the small binding energy for the last nucleons in these exotic nuclei. Break-up mechanisms are seen to play an important role in these nuclei. 100 refs.

  10. A Concept for a Low Pressure Noble Gas Fill Intervention in the IFE Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Target Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, C. A.; Blanchard, W. R.; Kozub, T. A.; Aristova, M.; McGahan, C.; Natta, S.; Pagdon, K.; Zelenty, J.

    2010-01-14

    An engineering evaluation has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber. The employment of a low pressure noble gas in the target chamber to thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall could dramatically increase the useful life of the first wall in the FTF reactor1. For the purpose of providing flexibility, two target chamber configurations are addressed: a five meter radius sphere and a ten meter radius sphere. Experimental studies at Nike have indicated that a low pressure, ambient gas resident in the target chamber during laser pulsing does not appear to impair the ability of laser light from illuminating targets2. In addition, current investigations into delivering, maintaining, and processing low pressure gas appear to be viable with slight modification to current pumping and plasma exhaust processing technologies3,4. Employment of a gas fill solution for protecting the dry wall target chamber in the FTF may reduce, or possibly eliminate the need for other attenuating technologies designed for keeping He ions from implanting in first wall structures and components. The gas fill concept appears to provide an effective means of extending the life of the first wall while employing mostly commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies. Although a gas fill configuration may provide a methodology for attenuating damage inflicted on chamber surfaces, issues associated with target injection need to be further analyzed to ensure that the gas fill concept is viable in the integrated FTF design5. In the proposed system, the ambient noble gas is heated via the energetic helium ions produced by target detonation. The gas is subsequently cooled by the chamber wall to approximately 800oC, removed from the chamber, and processed by the chamber gas processing system (CGPS). In an optimized scenario of the above stated concept, the chamber

  11. Reprint of: Reaction measurements with the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas jet target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, K. A.

    2018-01-01

    Explosive stellar environments are sometimes driven by nuclear reactions on short-lived, radioactive nuclei. These reactions often drive the stellar explosion, alter the observable light curves produced, and dictate the final abundances of the isotopes created. Unfortunately, many reaction rates at stellar temperatures cannot be directly measured in the laboratory, due to the physical limitations of ultra-low cross sections and high background rates. An additional complication arises because many of the important reactions involve radioactive nuclei which have lifetimes too short to be made into a target. As such, direct reactions require very intense and pure beams of exotic nuclei. Indirect approaches with both stable and radioactive beams can, however, provide crucial information on the nuclei involved in these astrophysical reactions. A major development toward both direct and indirect studies of nuclear reactions rates is the commissioning of the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) supersonic gas jet target. The JENSA system provides a pure, homogeneous, highly localized, dense, and robust gaseous target for radioactive ion beam studies. Charged-particle reactions measurements made with gas jet targets can be cleaner and display better resolution than with traditional targets. With the availability of pure and localized gas jet targets in combination with developments in exotic radioactive ion beams and next-generation detector systems, the range of reaction studies that are experimentally possible is vastly expanded. Various representative cases will be discussed.

  12. Chemical gas-generating nanoparticles for tumor-targeted ultrasound imaging and ultrasound-triggered drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Hyun Su; Son, Sejin; You, Dong Gil; Lee, Tae Woong; Lee, Jangwook; Lee, Sangmin; Yhee, Ji Young; Lee, Jaeyoung; Han, Moon Hee; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Sun Hwa; Choi, Kuiwon; Park, Kinam; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan

    2016-11-01

    Although there is great versatility of ultrasound (US) technologies in the real clinical field, one main technical challenge is the compromising of high quality of echo properties and size engineering of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs); a high echo property is offset by reducing particle size. Herein, a new strategy for overcoming the dilemma by devising chemical gas (CO2) generating carbonate copolymer nanoparticles (Gas-NPs), which are clearly distinguished from the conventional gas-encapsulated micro-sized UCAs. More importantly, Gas-NPs could be readily engineered to strengthen the desirable in vivo physicochemical properties for nano-sized drug carriers with higher tumor targeting ability, as well as the high quality of echo properties for tumor-targeted US imaging. In tumor-bearing mice, anticancer drug-loaded Gas-NPs showed the desirable theranostic functions for US-triggered drug delivery, even after i.v. injection. In this regard, and as demonstrated in the aforementioned study, our technology could serve a highly effective platform in building theranostic UCAs with great sophistication and therapeutic applicability in tumor-targeted US imaging and US-triggered drug delivery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. On Lunar Exospheric Column Densities and Solar Wind Access Beyond the Terminator from ROSAT Soft X-Ray Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, S. L.; Sarantos, M.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T. E.; Farrell, W. M.; Fatemi, S.; Hills, H. Kent; Hodges, R. R.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the Rontgen satellite (ROSAT) position sensitive proportional counter soft X-ray image of the Moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the surface brightness in three wedges: two 19 deg wedges (one north and one south) 13-32 deg off the terminator toward the dark side and one wedge 38 deg wide centered on the antisolar direction. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show significant limb brightening that is absent in the 38 deg wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the soft X-ray intensity increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere based on lunar exospheric models and hybrid simulation results of solar wind access beyond the terminator. Soft X-ray imaging thus can independently infer the total lunar limb column density including all species, a property that before now has not been measured, and provide a large-scale picture of the solar wind-lunar interaction. Because the SWCX signal appears to be dominated by exospheric species arising from solar wind implantation, this technique can also determine how the exosphere varies with solar wind conditions. Now, along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the Moon represents another solar system body at which SWCX has been observed.

  14. Charge Exchange X-Ray Emission due to Highly Charged Ion Collisions with H, He, and H2: Line Ratios for Heliospheric and Interstellar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbee, R. S.; Mullen, P. D.; Lyons, D.; Shelton, R. L.; Fogle, M.; Schultz, D. R.; Stancil, P. C.

    2018-01-01

    The fundamental collisional process of charge exchange (CX) has been established as a primary source of X-ray emission from the heliosphere, planetary exospheres, and supernova remnants. In this process, X-ray emission results from the capture of an electron by a highly charged ion from a neutral atom or molecule, to form a highly excited, high-charge state ion. As the captured electron cascades down to the lowest energy level, photons are emitted, including X-rays. To provide reliable CX-induced X-ray spectral models to realistically simulate these environments, line ratios and spectra are computed using theoretical CX cross sections obtained with the multi-channel Landau-Zener, atomic-orbital close-coupling, molecular-orbital close-coupling, and classical trajectory Monte Carlo methods for various collisional velocities relevant to astrophysics. X-ray spectra were computed for collisions of bare and H-like C to Al ions with H, He, and H2 with results compared to available experimental data. Using these line ratios, XSPEC models of CX emission in the northeast rim of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant and the heliosphere are shown as examples with ion velocity dependence.

  15. Measurement of radial profiles of density ratio of helium to hydrogen ion using charge exchange spectroscopy with two-wavelength spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, K; Yoshinuma, M; Wieland, B; Goto, M; Nakamura, Y; Kobayashi, M; Murakami, I; Moon, C

    2015-12-01

    Radial profiles of density ratio of helium to hydrogen ions are measured using the charge exchange spectroscopy technique with the two-wavelength spectrometer system in the large helical device. The two-wavelength spectrometer system consists of a dichroic mirror box, a spectrometer with two grating and two camera lenses, and one CCD detector. The dichroic mirror box is used to divide the light of one fiber from the plasma to two fibers, one for HeII (λ = 468.6 nm) and the other for H(α) (λ = 656.3 nm), that are connected to the entrance slit of the spectrometer to eliminate the interference between the HeII and the H(α) spectra on the CCD. This system provides a simultaneous measurement of helium and hydrogen ion density ratio at 8 exact same locations (8 spatial channels) with a time resolution of >40 ms in the wide range of the density ratio of 0.05-5.

  16. Effect of Target Configuration on the Neutronic Performance of the Gas-Cooled ADS

    CERN Document Server

    Biss, K; Shetty, N; Nabbi, R

    2013-01-01

    With the utilization of nuclear energy transuranic elements like Pu, Am and Cm are produced causing high, long term radioactivity and radio toxicity, respectively. To reduce the radiological impact on the environment and to the repository Partitioning and Transmutation is considered as an efficient way. In this respect comprehensive research works are performed at different research institutes worldwide. The results show that the transmutation of TRU is achieved with fast neutrons due to the higher fission probability. Based on Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) those neutrons are used in a particular system, in which mainly liquid metal eutectic (lead bismuth) is used as coolant. The neutronic performance of an ADS system based on gas cooling was studied in this work by using the simulation tool MCNPX. The usage of the Monte-Carlo method in MCNPX allows the simulation of the physical processes in a 3D-model of the core. In dependence of the spallation target material and design several parameters like the mult...

  17. Heated uranium tetrafluoride target system to release non-rare gas fission products for the TRISTAN isotope separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, R.L.

    1977-10-01

    Off-line experiments indicated that fluorides of As, Se, Br, Kr, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Sb, Te, I and Xe could be volatilized, but except for Br, Kr, I and Xe, none of these elements were observed after mass separation in the on-line experiments. The results of the on-line experiments indicated a very low level of hydride contamination at ambient temperature and consequently, uranium tetrafluoride replaced uranyl stearate as the primary gaseous fission product target. Possible reasons for the failure of the heated target system to yield non-rare gas activities are discussed and suggestions for designing a new heated target system are presented

  18. Strong soft X-ray emission from a double-stream gas puff target irradiated with a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Rakowski, R.; Szczurek, M. [Military Univ. of Technology, Warsaw (Poland). Inst. of Optoelectronics; Daido, H.; Suzuki, M.; Yamagami, S.; Choi, I.W.; Tang, H.J. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

    2001-07-01

    Soft X-ray emission from a new double-stream gas puff target irradiated with a nanosecond, high-power Nd:YAG laser pulse has been studied. The target was formed by pulsed injection of gas into a hollow gas stream made from helium by using a double-nozzle setup. Strong X-ray emissions near 10 nm from the double-stream krypton/helium, near 11 nm from the xenon/helium, and at 13 nm from the oxygen/helium targets were observed. The emission from the double-stream gas puff target was several times higher as compared to the ordinary gas puff targets, and comparable to the emission from the solid targets irradiated in the same conditions. (orig.)

  19. Studies of the system 14N+14N with a jet gas target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isenbuegel, R.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis measurements with a jet gas target on the system 14 N+ 14 N for energies between 8 and 18 MeV (c.m.) are described. Spectroscoped were the channels p+ 27 Al( =173.4 0 ), α+ 24 Mg ( =174.6 0 and 89.3 0 ), 8 Be+ 20 Ne ( =1.6 0 and 11.0 0 ), and 12 C+ 16 O( 0 , 10.7 0 , and 90.6 0 ) with different low-lying excitation states of the residual nuclei. Only the excitation functions of the channels α+ 24 Mg ( =174.6 0 ) and 12 C+ 16 O( =10.7 0 ) were measured for the whole energy range. Contrarily to the studies on the system 12 C+ 16 O which leads also to the compound nucleus 28 Si the measurements of this thesis give no hints to resonance structures. The energy-averaged excitation functions of 14 N( 14 N,α) 24 Mg and 14 N( 14 N,p) 27 Al agree well with statistical model calculations. The energy-averaged excitation function of the 12 Csub(g.s.)+ 16 Osub(g.s.) channel can be sufficiently described by statistical model calculations. However calculations for the channels 12 Csup(*)+ 16 Osub(g.s.), 12 Csub(g.s.)+ 16 Osup(*), as well 8 Be+ 20 Ne yield considerably smaller cross sections compared with the experimental data. This discrepancy indicates direct contributions. The optical model parameters used in the Hauser-Feshbach formalism for the calculation of the transmission coefficients were obtained for the entrance channel 14 N+ 14 N by a fit to the elastic cross sections of other measurements. (orig./HSI) [de

  20. Repulsive interatomic potentials for noble gas bombardment of Cu and Ni targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karolewski, M.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Brunei Darussalam, Jalan Tungku Link, Gadong BE 1410 (Brunei Darussalam)]. E-mail: mkarol@fos.ubd.edu.bn

    2006-01-15

    Interatomic potentials that are relevant for noble gas bombardment of Cu and Ni targets have been calculated in the energy region below 10 keV. Potentials are calculated for the diatomic species: NeCu, ArCu, KrCu, Cu{sub 2}, ArNi, Ni{sub 2} and NiCu. The calculations primarily employ density functional theory (with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional). Potential curves derived from Hartree-Fock theory calculations are also discussed. Scalar relativistic effects have been included via the second-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH2) method. On the basis of a variational argument, it can be shown that the predicted potential curves represent an upper limit to the true potential curves. The potentials provide a basis for assessing corrections required to the ZBL and Moliere screened Coulombic potentials, which are typically found to be too repulsive below 1-2 keV. These corrections significantly improve the accuracy of the sputter yield predicted by molecular dynamics for Ni(1 0 0), whereas the sputter yield predicted for Cu(1 0 0) is negligibly affected. The validity of the pair potential approximation in the repulsive region of the potential is tested by direct calculation of the potentials arising from the interaction of either an Ar or Cu atom with a Cu{sub 3} cluster. The pairwise approximation represents the Ar-Cu{sub 3} potential energy function with an error <3 eV at all Ar-Cu{sub 3} separations. For Cu-Cu{sub 3}, the pairwise approximation underestimates the potential by ca. 10 eV when the interstitial atom is located near the centre of the cluster.

  1. Prediction of production of {sup 22}Na in a gas-cell target irradiated by protons using Monte Carlo tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslami, M., E-mail: mohammad.eslami25@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zanjan, Zengan (Zanjan) (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kakavand, T. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zanjan, Zengan (Zanjan) (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirzaii, M.; Rajabifar, S. [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, AEOI, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Angular distribution of the proton beam in a gaseous environment. • Particle energy distribution profile and proton flux within gas-cell target with MCNPX. • Detection of the residual nuclei during the nuclear reactions. • Estimation of production yield for {sup 22,nat}Ne(p,x){sup 22}Na reactions. - Abstract: The {sup 22}Ne(p,n){sup 22}Na is an optimal reaction for the cyclotron production of {sup 22}Na. This work tends to monitor the proton induced production of {sup 22}Na in a gas-cell target, containing natural and enriched neon gas, using Monte Carlo method. The excitation functions of reactions are calculated by both TALYS-1.6 and ALICE/ASH codes and then the optimum energy range of projectile for the high yield production is selected. A free gaseous environment of neon at a particular pressure and temperature is prearranged and the proton beam is transported within it using Monte Carlo codes MCNPX and SRIM. The beam monitoring performed by each of these codes indicates that the gas-cell has to be designed as conical frustum to reach desired interactions. The MCNPX is also employed to calculate the energy distribution of proton in the designed target and estimation of the residual nuclei during irradiation. The production yield of {sup 22}Na in {sup 22}Ne(p,n){sup 22}Na and {sup nat}Ne(p,x){sup 22}Na reactions are estimated and it shows a good agreement with the experimental results. The results demonstrate that Monte Carlo makes available a beneficial manner to design and optimize the gas targets as well as calibration of detectors, which can be used for the radionuclide production purposes.

  2. Characterization of a plasma produced using a high power laser with a gas puff target for x-ray laser experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Gac, K.; Parys, P.; Szczurek, M.; Tyl, J.

    1995-01-01

    A high temperature, high density plasma can be produced by using a nanosecond, high-power laser with a gas puff target. The gas puff target is formed by puffing a small amount of gas from a high-pressure reservoir through a nozzle into a vacuum chamber. In this paper we present the gas puff target specially designed for x-ray laser experiments. The solenoid valve with the nozzle in the form of a slit 0.3-mm wide and up to 40-mm long, allows to form an elongated gas puff suitable for the creation of an x-ray laser active medium by its perpendicular irradiation with the use of a laser beam focused to a line. Preliminary results of the experiments on the laser irradiation of the gas puff targets, produced by the new valve, show that hot plasma suitable for x-ray lasers is created

  3. Automatic gas-levitation system for vacuum deposition of laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, C.W.; Cameron, G.R.; Krenik, R.M.; Crane, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    An improved simple system has been developed to gas-levitate microspheres during vacuum-deposition processes. The automatic operation relies on two effects: a lateral stabilizing force provided by a centering-ring; and an automatically incremented gas metering system to offset weight increases during coating

  4. A method for calculating the gas volume proportions and inhalation temperature of inert gas mixtures allowing reaching normothermic or hypothermic target body temperature in the awake rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques H Abraini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The noble gases xenon (Xe and helium (He are known to possess neuroprotective properties. Xe is considered the golden standard neuroprotective gas. However, Xe has a higher molecular weight and lower thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, the main diluent of oxygen (O2 in air, conditions that could impair or at least reduce the intrinsic neuroprotective properties of Xe by increasing the critical care patient's respiratory workload and body temperature. In contrast, He has a lower molecular weight and higher thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, but is unfortunately far less potent than Xe at providing neuroprotection. Therefore, combining Xe with He could allow obtaining, depending on the gas inhalation temperature and composition, gas mixtures with neutral or hypothermic properties, the latter being advantageous in term of neuroprotection. However, calculating the thermal properties of a mixture, whatever the substances – gases, metals, rubbers, etc. – is not trivial. To answer this question, we provide a graphical method to assess the volume proportions of Xe, He and O2 that a gas mixture should contain, and the inhalation temperature to which it should be administered to allow a clinician to maintain the patient at a target body temperature.

  5. A method for calculating the gas volume proportions and inhalation temperature of inert gas mixtures allowing reaching normothermic or hypothermic target body temperature in the awake rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraini, Jacques H; David, Hélène N; Blatteau, Jean-Éric; Risso, Jean Jacques; Vallée, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    The noble gases xenon (Xe) and helium (He) are known to possess neuroprotective properties. Xe is considered the golden standard neuroprotective gas. However, Xe has a higher molecular weight and lower thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, the main diluent of oxygen (O2) in air, conditions that could impair or at least reduce the intrinsic neuroprotective properties of Xe by increasing the critical care patient's respiratory workload and body temperature. In contrast, He has a lower molecular weight and higher thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, but is unfortunately far less potent than Xe at providing neuroprotection. Therefore, combining Xe with He could allow obtaining, depending on the gas inhalation temperature and composition, gas mixtures with neutral or hypothermic properties, the latter being advantageous in term of neuroprotection. However, calculating the thermal properties of a mixture, whatever the substances - gases, metals, rubbers, etc . - is not trivial. To answer this question, we provide a graphical method to assess the volume proportions of Xe, He and O2 that a gas mixture should contain, and the inhalation temperature to which it should be administered to allow a clinician to maintain the patient at a target body temperature.

  6. [Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings]: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeberli, W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the following topics: the Wisconsin test facility for storage cells; results of target tests; the new UHV target test system; funding request for a new atomic beam system; and planning of storage ring experiments

  7. Scattering of low energy noble gas ions from a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luitjens, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    Reflection of low energy (0.1-10 keV) noble gas ions can be used to analyse a solid surface. To study charge exchange processes, the ion fractions of neon and of argon, scattered from a Cu(100) surface, have been determined. (Auth.)

  8. Collision Experiment of an Arched Plasma-Filled Flux Rope and a Target Cloud of Initially Neutral Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwaitayakornkul, Pakorn; Bellan, Paul; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai

    2016-10-01

    Shocks occur in the co-rotating interaction regions just beyond the solar corona, in the corona during CME events, and when the solar wind impacts Earth's magnetosphere. The Caltech solar loop experiment investigates shock physics by creating an arched plasma-filled flux rope that expands to collide with a pre-injected, initially-neutral gas. We focus the investigation on the situation of a heavy-gas plasma (Argon) impacting a much lighter neutral gas cloud (Hydrogen). The neutral gas target cloud ionizes immediately upon being impacted and plasma-induced shock waves propagate in the target cloud away from the impact region. Analysis of data from magnetic probes, Langmuir probes, a fast camera, and spectroscopic measurements will be presented. The measurements suggest that a thin, compressed, ionized layer of hydrogen is formed just downstream of the Argon plasma loop and that thin, supersonic shocks form further downstream and propagate obliquely away from the plasma loop. Numerical simulation of an ideal MHD plasma is underway to enable comparison of the measurements with the predictions of MHD theory.

  9. The preparation of accelerator targets by the evaporation of acetate-organic solutions in the presence of NH3 gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, S.Y.; Ghiorso, A.; Hoffman, D.C.

    1987-03-01

    The chemical methods described in this paper have been developed for preparation of isotopic targets for bombardment by accelerator-produced ions. Three systems are compared: nitrate-, chloride-, and acetate-organic solutions. The best method was found to be the metallic acetate-organic solution system, evaporated onto the substrate in the presence of ammonia gas. A detailed procedure is given for this method. The targets obtained by the acetate-organic solution system are uniform and adherent. The hydroxide forms fine crystals of good quality for target thicknesses from a few μg/cm 2 to several mg/cm 2 . Thicknesses up to 5 mg/cm 2 of Eu as the oxide were obtained by this method. The process is simple and fast. 18 refs., 1 tab

  10. Noncontact coating of spherical-shell ICF targets using gas-dynamic levitation and charged liquid cluster beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.; Feng, Q.; Ryu, C.K. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A novel gas-dynamic levitation (GDL) technique has been developed to facilitate noncontact coating of spherical ICF targets. Preliminary test has been performed on a novel coating method known as the Charged Liquid Cluster Beam (CLB) technique, which is compatible with the levitation scheme, to assess its feasibility as an ICF target coating technique. Using the GDL technique three metal balls 450 {micro}m, 650 {micro}m, and 950 {micro}m in diameter were levitated very stably for several hours, with the balls rotating continuously. The CLCB coating technique utilizes the flow-limited field-injection electrostatic spraying to produce a spray of charged nanodrops of the coating material which, in turn, is directed toward the levitated ICF target. The apparatus and preliminary data demonstrating the capability of the levitation scheme and the coating technique are presented.

  11. Noncontact coating of spherical-shell ICF targets using gas-dynamic levitation and charged liquid cluster beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.; Feng, Q.; Ryu, C.K.

    1995-01-01

    A novel gas-dynamic levitation (GDL) technique has been developed to facilitate noncontact coating of spherical ICF targets. Preliminary test has been performed on a novel coating method known as the Charged Liquid Cluster Beam (CLB) technique, which is compatible with the levitation scheme, to assess its feasibility as an ICF target coating technique. Using the GDL technique three metal balls 450 microm, 650 microm, and 950 microm in diameter were levitated very stably for several hours, with the balls rotating continuously. The CLCB coating technique utilizes the flow-limited field-injection electrostatic spraying to produce a spray of charged nanodrops of the coating material which, in turn, is directed toward the levitated ICF target. The apparatus and preliminary data demonstrating the capability of the levitation scheme and the coating technique are presented

  12. CO2 Laser acceleration of forward directed MeV proton beams in a gas target at critical plasma density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, F.; Tochitsky, S. Ya.; Haberberger, D. J.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.

    2012-08-01

    The generation of 1-5 MeV protons from the interaction of a 3 ps TW CO2 laser pulse with a gas target with a peak density around the critical plasma density has been studied by 2D particle-in-cell simulations. The proton acceleration in the preformed plasma with a symmetric, linearly ramped density distribution occurs via formation of sheath of the hot electrons on the back surface of the target. The maximum energy of the hot electrons and, hence, net acceleration of protons is mainly defined by Forward Raman scattering instability in the underdense part of the plasma. Forward directed ion beams from a debris free gaseous target can find an application as a high-brightness ion source-injector to a conventional accelerator operating up to kHz pulse repetition frequency.

  13. Pulsed X-ray radiography of a gas jet target for laser-matter interaction experiments with the use of a CCD detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakowski, R.; Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; MikoIajczyk, J.; Szczurek, A.; Szczurek, M.; Foeldes, I.B.; Toth, Zs.

    2005-01-01

    Characterization of gas jet targets has been carried out using pulsed X-ray radiography. A laser-plasma X-ray source was applied for backlighting of the targets to obtain X-ray shadowgraphs registered with a CCD detector. From the shadowgraphs, characteristics of the targets were determined

  14. Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The French government has decided to modify the conditions of extension of local natural gas authorities to neighbouring districts. The European Union is studying the conditions of internal gas market with the objective of more open markets although considering public service requirements

  15. Modern gas-target technology for the production of high quality radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtold, V.; Kernert, N.

    1992-01-01

    The Karlsruhe isotope production facility consists of a compact H - -cyclotron and several sophisticated target stations. The cyclotron is variable in energy between 15 MeV and 42 MeV. Extracted currents up to 120 μA can be produced reliably. This facility is dedicated to the production of isotopes for medical applications. Routine production of radioisotopes places high demands on target technology and chemistry, with regards to reliability, production efficiency and quality. The following topics will be discussed: automation, material problems and radiation damage in the target area, target window, cooling problems, safety philosophy, chemistry and quality control. Examples of targets for the production of I-123, Rb-81 and the Rb-81/Kr-81m generator system will be presented. (author)

  16. Experimental investigation of adiabatic compression and heating using collision of an MHD-driven jet with a gas target cloud for magnetized target fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Byonghoon; Li, Hui; Bellan, Paul

    2017-10-01

    We are studying magnetized target fusion using an experimental method where an imploding liner compressing a plasma is simulated by a high-speed MHD-driven plasma jet colliding with a gas target cloud. This has the advantage of being non-destructive so orders of magnitude more shots are possible. Since the actual density and temperature are much more modest than fusion-relevant values, the goal is to determine the scaling of the increase in density and temperature when an actual experimental plasma is adiabatically compressed. Two new-developed diagnostics are operating and providing data. The first new diagnostic is a fiber-coupled interferometer which measures line-integrated electron density not only as a function of time, but also as a function of position along the jet. The second new diagnostic is laser Thomson scattering which measures electron density and temperature at the location where the jet collides with the cloud. These diagnostics show that when the jet collides with a target cloud the jet slows down substantially and both the electron density and temperature increase. The experimental measurements are being compared with 3D MHD and hybrid kinetic numerical simulations that model the actual experimental geometry.

  17. Effects of fluidized gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum on non-target freshwater and sediment dwelling organims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluidized gas desulfurization gypsum is a popular agricultural soil amendment used to increase calcium and sulfur contents, and reduce aluminum toxicity. Due to its surface application in conservation tillage systems and high solubility, the soluble components of gypsum may be transferred with agri...

  18. National post-2020 greenhouse gas targets and diversity-aware leadership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinshausen, M.; Jeffery, Louise; Guetschow, Johannes; Hoehne, N.E.; Schaeffer, M.

    2015-01-01

    Achieving the collective goal of limiting warming to below 2 °C or 1.5 °C compared to pre-industrial levels requires a transition towards a fully decarbonized world. Annual greenhouse gas emissions on such a path in 2025 or 2030 can be allocated to individual countries using a variety of allocation

  19. Influenza A virus targets a cGAS-independent STING pathway that controls enveloped RNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holm, Christian K; Rahbek, Stine H; Gad, Hans Henrik; Bak, Rasmus O; Jakobsen, Martin R; Jiang, Zhaozaho; Hansen, Anne Louise; Jensen, Simon K; Sun, Chenglong; Thomsen, Martin K; Laustsen, Anders; Nielsen, Camilla G; Severinsen, Kasper; Xiong, Yingluo; Burdette, Dara L; Hornung, Veit; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Duch, Mogens; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Bahrami, Shervin; Mikkelsen, Jakob Giehm; Hartmann, Rune; Paludan, Søren R

    2016-01-01

    Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) is known be involved in control of DNA viruses but has an unexplored role in control of RNA viruses. During infection with DNA viruses STING is activated downstream of cGAMP synthase (cGAS) to induce type I interferon. Here we identify a STING-dependent,

  20. Target post-evaluation of China's “12th Five-Year” oil and gas exploration and development planning and its “13th Five-Year” target prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiping Pan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the turn of 12th and 13th “Five-Year Plan” of China, the global oil and gas market changes greatly. In this regard, the target post-evaluation of the “12th Five-Year” oil and gas exploration and development planning was conducted, which is of significant importance to scientifically and reasonably making the specific “13th Five-Year” oil and gas exploration and development target planning. The post-evaluation results indicate that, in the period of “12th Five-Year Plan”, the oil and gas exploration and development targets of China were satisfactorily completed, but some deficiencies still existed. For example, the target of oil production (2 × 108 t was overfulfilled, while the target of oil reserves (65 × 108 t remained 6.4% outstanding. The target of gas reserves (3.5 × 1012 m3 was overfulfilled, while the target of gas production (1385 × 108 m3 remained 6.2% outstanding. Moreover, the targets of unconventional gases were not satisfactorily completed-shale gas being better than coalbed methane (CBM. Failures to fulfill some targets in “12th Five-Year Plan” were primarily attributed to the slowdown of oil and gas consumption growth, sharp drop of oil price, downgrading of resources, and changes of statistic basis under the new normal. The forecast results suggest that, in the period of “13th Five-Year Plan”, given USD50–70/bbl of world oil price, China's annual average incremental conventional oil and gas in place will be 10.0 × 108–12.0 × 108 t and 6000 × 108–8000 × 108 m3 respectively, annual average incremental shale gas and CBM in place will be 1000 × 108–2000 × 108 m3 and 500 × 108–1000 × 108 m3 respectively, and annual oil production will be about 2.0 × 108 t. By 2020, China's annual gas production will approach 1800 × 108–2000 × 108 m3 (shale gas: 200 × 108 m3, and CBM: 150 × 108 m3.

  1. Quantitative study of the ionization-induced refraction of picosecond laser pulses in gas-jet targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackinnon, A.J.; Borghesi, M.; Iwase, A.; Jones, M.W.; Pert, G.J.; Rae, S.; Burnett, K.; Willi, O.

    1996-01-01

    A quantitative study of refractive whole beam defocusing and small scale breakup induced by optical ionization of subpicosecond and picosecond, 0.25 and 1 μm, laser pulses in gas-jet targets at densities above 1x10 19 cm -3 has been carried out. A significant reduction of the incident laser intensity was observed due to refraction from ionization-induced density gradients. The level of refraction measured with optical probing correlated well with the fraction of energy transmitted through the plasma. The numerical and analytical models were found to agree well with experimental observations. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  2. Development and optimization of a "water window" microscope based on a gas-puff target laser-produced plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, Alfio; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Węgrzyński, Łukasz; Fok, Tomasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2018-01-01

    A laser-plasma double stream gas-puff target source coupled with Fresnel zone plate (FZP) optics, operating at He-like nitrogen spectral line λ=2.88nm, is capable of acquire complementary information in respect to optical and electron microscopy, allowing to obtain high resolution imaging, compared to the traditional visible light microscopes, with an exposition time of a few seconds. The compact size and versatility of the microscope offers the possibility to perform imaging experiments in the university laboratories, previously restricted to large-scale photon facilities. Source and microscope optimization, and examples of applications will be presented and discussed.

  3. Greenhouse gas emission trends and projections in Europe 2012. Tracking progress towards Kyoto and 2020 targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gores, S.; Scheffler, M.; Graichen, V. [Oeko-Institut (Oeko), Freiburg (Germany)] [and others

    2012-10-15

    At the end of 2011, almost all European countries were on track towards their Kyoto targets for 2008-2012. The EU-15 also remained on track to achieve its Kyoto target. Italy, however, was not on track. Spain plans to acquire a large quantity of Kyoto units through the KP's flexible mechanisms to achieve its target. With emission caps already set for the economic sectors under the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS), emissions reductions during 2012 in the sectors outside the EU ETS together with reductions by carbon sinks will set the frame for how many Kyoto units Member States need to acquire to reach their individual targets. Hence, both the development and delivery of adequate plans to acquire enough Kyoto credits is becoming increasingly important. ETS emissions from 2008 to 2011 were on average 5 % below these caps, which results in an oversupply of allowances. The EU ETS is undergoing important changes in view of the third trading phase from 2013 to 2020. Most EU Member States project that in 2020, their emissions outside the EU ETS will be lower than their national targets set under the Climate and Energy Package. However, further efforts will be necessary to achieve longer term reductions. (Author)

  4. Observation of a meson X → 2γ, with mass 2.85 GeV/c2, produced in the charge-exchange reaction π-p→Xn at 40 Gev/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, W.D.; Augenstein, K.H.; Bertolucci, E.; Donskov, S.V.; Inyakin, A.V.; Kachanov, V.A.; Krasnokutsky, R.N.; Kruger, M.; Leder, G.; Lednev, A.A.; Mannelli, I.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Mueller, H.; Pierazzini, G.M.; Prokoshkin, Yu.D.; Quaglia, M.; Schneider, H.; Scribano, A.; Sergiampietri, F.; Shuvalov, R.S.; Sigurdsson, G.; Toropin, A.N.; Vincelli, M.L.

    1978-01-01

    The invariant mass spectrum of neutral final states produced in π - p charge-exchange scattering at 40 GeV/c has been studied, searching for heavy particles decaying into 2γ. A peak is observed around 2.85 GeV/c 2 . The cross section of the reaction π - p→X(2.85)+n, times the branching ratio of the X→2γ decay, is measured to be sigma X BR approximately =2X10 -34 cm 2 . (Auth.)

  5. Partial wave analysis of the low-mass Kππ systems produced diffractively and by charge-exchange in 4.2 GeV/c K-p interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergeest, J.S.M.

    1979-01-01

    In this thesis the author studies the (antiKππ) - system diffractively produced in the reactions K - p → K - π - π + p and K - p → anti K 0 π - π 0 p as well as the (anti Kππ) 0 system produced by charge-exchange: K - p → anti K 0 π + π - n. The data are obtained in a high statistics experiment with incident K - mesons at 4.2 GeV/c, using the CERN 2-metre hydrogen bubble chamber. (Auth.)

  6. Calculated photon spectra at several angles for 5- and 50-MeV electron beams striking solid and gas targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaughter, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    Coupled electron-photon transport calculations have been carried out to simulate the photon generation when a 5- or 50-MeV electron beam strikes a solid or gas target. Results indicate that a 5-MeV beam striking targets of tungsten wire, air, or air doped with Kr or Xe generates a photon spectrum sharply peaked in the forward direction and with approximately 1/E spectral intensity. At right angles to the beam the photon intensity is predominantly due to characteristic K x-rays. A 50-MeV beam striking the same targets generates substantially higher photon yield in the forward direction, but the yield normal to the beam is similar to that due to the 5-MeV beam. However, positron-electron annihilation radiation constitutes a significant part of the photon radiation normal to the beam, and is more intense than characteristic K x-rays when the target is more than about one-third of the electron range

  7. Research and Development of Non-Spectroscopic MEMS-Based Sensor Arrays for Targeted Gas Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loui, A; McCall, S K

    2011-10-24

    The ability to monitor the integrity of gas volumes is of interest to the stockpile surveillance community. Specifically, the leak detection of noble gases, at relevant concentration ranges and distinguished from other chemical species that may be simultaneously present, is particularly challenging. Aside from the laboratory-based method of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), where samples may be collected by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) or cryofocusing, the other major approaches for gas-phase detection employ lasers typically operating in the mid-infrared wavelength region. While mass spectrometry can readily detect noble gases - the helium leak detector is an obvious example - laser-based methods such as infrared (IR) or Raman spectroscopy are completely insensitive to them as their monatomic nature precludes a non-zero dipole moment or changes in polarizability upon excitation. Therefore, noble gases can only be detected by one of two methods: (1) atomic emission spectroscopies which require the generation of plasmas through laser-induced breakdown, electrical arcing, or similar means; (2) non-spectroscopic methods which measure one or more physical properties (e.g., mass, thermal conductivity, density). In this report, we present our progress during Fiscal Year 2011 (FY11) in the research and development of a non-spectroscopic method for noble gas detection. During Fiscal Year 2010 (FY10), we demonstrated via proof-of-concept experiments that the combination of thermal conductivity detection (TCD) and coating-free damped resonance detection (CFDRD) using micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) could provide selective sensing of these inert species. Since the MEMS-based TCD technology was directly adapted from a brassboard prototype commissioned by a previous chemical sensing project, FY11 efforts focused on advancing the state of the newer CFDRD method. This work, guided by observations previously reported in the open literature, has not only

  8. Migration of radionuclides in a gas cooled solid state spallation target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas; Severin, Gregory; Jensen, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    investigated the diffusion of (primarily) tritium in solid tungsten to see if a pulse driven short-term variation in temperature (temperature peaks separated by one turn of the wheel(2.36 s)) could possibly give rise to wave-like migration of the radionuclides, possibly accelerating the overall release....... In order to calculate the diffusion in the solid tungsten target two approaches have been used. One neglecting the time structure of the beam and thermal cycling of the target, and one numerical, discrete time step simulation to capture the effects of the thermal cycling on the diffusion behavior. We found...... that the time structure of the of the temperature has a negligible impact on the diffusion,and that the radioactive release at the surface can be calculated safely by solving the differential equation(Fick’s law) using an appropriate temperature to calculate the diffusion constant.© 2014 Elsevier B.V. All...

  9. Production and release of gas and volatile elements from sodium-based targets

    CERN Multimedia

    Plewinski, F; Wildner, E; Catherall, R

    Several large scale facilities being studied for Europe use sodium or a sodium-based alloy either as a target or as a coolant for heavier solid targets subjected to MW proton beams, such as the European Spallation Source (ESS) and $\\beta$-beam projects. ESS will be the neutron source in use from the year 2020 in Europe, providing high intensity neutron fluxes over large energy spectra ( from 10$^{-3}$ eV to 10$^{3}$ eV) to scientists, to explore materials from 10$^{-2}$m to 10$^{-16}$m scale. A sodium-cooled array of tungsten blocks is one of the potential solutions for the target that will convert protons from the 5 MW 2.5 GeV linac into neutrons. Sodium is a tried and tested coolant in fast nuclear reactors with associated technologies and design standards. Its application to a spallation environment however remains to be validated. The ISOLDE facility is well placed to perform detailed measurements of radioisotopes produced in sodium with a proton beam whose energy of 1.4 GeV is very close to the ESS base...

  10. Consistency of policy instruments. How the EU could move to a -30% greenhouse gas reduction target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, N.; Hagemann, M.; Moltmann, S.; Escalante, D. [Ecofys Germany, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    The report provides options for how to achieve a 30% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, in the EU, from 1990 to 2020. The EU has agreed a set of goals (objectives) and related instruments for 2020. The most significant objectives are the 20% or 30% reduction of greenhouse gases (all emissions, both within and outside the Emissions Trading System), the 20% improvement of energy efficiency and the 20% of renewable energy use by 2020. The stringency of the instruments used to reach these goals, must be set carefully to ensure overall consistency. Particularly after the economic crisis of 2008/2009, the Climate and Energy Package has to be 'tuned' again to be fully consistent, e.g. fast take up of renewable energy and fewer emissions due to the recession may cause an over-allocation in the EU-ETS.

  11. The challenge of meeting Canada's greenhouse gas reduction targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Larry; Chaudhry, Nikhil

    2010-09-15

    In 2007, Canada's federal government announced its medium and long-term greenhouse gas emissions reduction plan entitled 'Turning the Corner', which proposed emission cuts of 20% below 2006 levels by 2020 and 60% to 70% below 2006 levels by 2050. A government advisory organization, the National Round Table on Environment and Economy presented a set of 'fast and deep' pathways to emissions reduction through the large-scale electrification of the Canadian economy. This paper examines the likelihood of the 'fast and deep' pathways being met by considering the technical report's proposed energy systems, their associated energy sources, and the magnitude of the changes.

  12. The non-analog double charge exchange transition /sup 12/C(π/sup +/,π/sup -/)/sup 12/O/sub (g.s.)/ and /sup 16/O(π/sup +/,π/sup -/)/sup 16/Ne/sub (g.s.)/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei-hsing, M.; Si-wen, W.; Gao-you, Z.; Chung-Kuang, C.; Zhen-rong, Y.; Shu-ping, Z.

    1986-01-01

    We proposed six possible reason exchange current mechanism for pion induced non-analog double charge exchange transition on /sup 12/C(π/sup +/, π/sup -/)/sup 12/O(g.s.) and /sup 16/O(π/sup +/, π/sup -/)/sup 16/N/sub e/(g.s.). Under the model, the authors calculated 164 MeV angular distribution. The theoretical results are compared with the existed data and are in a good agreement with the experimental data available. It strongly indicates that the non-analog DCX process is basically a diffractive process through double isobar excitation on a single nucleon and the dominant contribution to the process comes from one of the six diagrams, that is a π/sup +/ collides with a neutron to excite this neutron into an isobar Δ(1232) with charge of one unit; subsequently, the Δ/sup +/ decays to give π/sup +/Δ/sup o/ and then produced π/sup +/ is absorbed by the second target neutron which will be then turned to a proton. Meanwhile the traveling Δ/sup o/ finally decays into π/sup -/P so that the course of the process under consideration here is ended

  13. SOLAR-WIND ION-DRIVEN X-RAY EMISSION FROM COMETARY AND PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES: MEASUREMENTS AND THEORETICAL PREDICTIONS OF CHARGE-EXCHANGE CROSS-SECTIONS AND EMISSION SPECTRA FOR O{sup 6+} + H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}, NO, N{sub 2}O, AND Ar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machacek, J. R. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 2601 (Australia); Mahapatra, D. P. [Department of Physics, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar 751004 (India); Schultz, D. R. [Department of Physics, Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Ralchenko, Yu. [Atomic Spectroscopy Group, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8422 (United States); Moradmand, A.; El Ghazaly, M. O. A.; Chutjian, A. [Astrophysics and Space Sciences Section, Jet Propulsion Laboratory/Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2015-08-10

    Relevant to modeling and understanding X-ray emission from cometary and planetary atmospheres, total cross-sections for 1.17 and 2.33 keV/u O{sup 6+} colliding with H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}, NO, N{sub 2}O, and Ar have been measured for the processes of single, double, and triple charge exchanges. Using these measurements as benchmarks, synthetic emission spectra spanning the X-ray, UV, and visible range have been calculated based on theoretical treatment of the transfer of between one and six electrons from the target neutrals to the projectile ion, followed by radiative and non-radiative decay of the highly excited states produced in these collisions. The results help add to the base of knowledge required to simulate ion-neutral processes in astrophysical environments; refine the present understanding of these fundamental atomic processes; and guide future observations, laboratory measurements, and theoretical predictions.

  14. Angular distributions of particles sputtered from multicomponent targets with gas cluster ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ieshkin, A.E. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ermakov, Yu.A., E-mail: yuriermak@yandex.ru [Skobeltsyn Nuclear Physics Research Institute, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Chernysh, V.S. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-01

    The experimental angular distributions of atoms sputtered from polycrystalline W, Cd and Ni based alloys with 10 keV Ar cluster ions are presented. RBS was used to analyze a material deposited on a collector. It has been found that the mechanism of sputtering, connected with elastic properties of materials, has a significant influence on the angular distributions of sputtered components. The effect of non-stoichiometric sputtering at different emission angles has been found for the alloys under cluster ion bombardment. Substantial smoothing of the surface relief was observed for all targets irradiated with cluster ions.

  15. Multi-target QSPR modeling for simultaneous prediction of multiple gas-phase kinetic rate constants of diverse chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basant, Nikita; Gupta, Shikha

    2018-03-01

    The reactions of molecular ozone (O3), hydroxyl (•OH) and nitrate (NO3) radicals are among the major pathways of removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmospheric environment. The gas-phase kinetic rate constants (kO3, kOH, kNO3) are thus, important in assessing the ultimate fate and exposure risk of atmospheric VOCs. Experimental data for rate constants are not available for many emerging VOCs and the computational methods reported so far address a single target modeling only. In this study, we have developed a multi-target (mt) QSPR model for simultaneous prediction of multiple kinetic rate constants (kO3, kOH, kNO3) of diverse organic chemicals considering an experimental data set of VOCs for which values of all the three rate constants are available. The mt-QSPR model identified and used five descriptors related to the molecular size, degree of saturation and electron density in a molecule, which were mechanistically interpretable. These descriptors successfully predicted three rate constants simultaneously. The model yielded high correlations (R2 = 0.874-0.924) between the experimental and simultaneously predicted endpoint rate constant (kO3, kOH, kNO3) values in test arrays for all the three systems. The model also passed all the stringent statistical validation tests for external predictivity. The proposed multi-target QSPR model can be successfully used for predicting reactivity of new VOCs simultaneously for their exposure risk assessment.

  16. O2(X3 Sigma- sub g) and O2(a1 Delta sub g) Charge Exchange with Simple Ions (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-03

    during reaction in Eq. (3), which is highly exother- mic. Second, the vapor pressure of the aqueous solution was lowered, minimizing water contamination...states of iodine molecule: Experimental and theoretical study of the I 2 ( f 0 g + ) collisions with rare gas atoms J. Chem. Phys. 122, 204318 (2005...concentration determined by measuring the total pressure in the cell. Multiplying the total gas flow rate by the fractional abundance then gave the O2(a1

  17. Impacts of Thai bio-ethanol policy target on land use and greenhouse gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silalertruksa, Thapat; Gheewala, Shabbir H.; Sagisaka, Masayuki

    2009-01-01

    The growing demand for biofuels has led to an increased demand for feedstocks which in turn is anticipated to induce changes in the cropping systems or land requirement for agriculture use. This study used consequential life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the environmental consequences of possible (future) changes in agricultural production systems and determine their effects on land use change (LUC) and greenhouse gas (GHG) implications when cassava demand in Thailand increases. Six different cropping systems to increase cassava production including converting unoccupied land to cropland, yield improvement, displacement of area currently under sugarcane cultivation and the other potential changes in cropping systems in Vietnam and Australia are modeled and assessed. The comparative results show that LUC is an important factor in overall GHG emissions of the first generation biofuels especially change in soil carbon stock contributing about 58-60% of the net GHG emissions. Increased cassava production by expanding cultivation area has a significantly larger effect on GHG emissions than increased productivity. The analysis shows that increasing productivity of both sugarcane and cassava are important ways to maximize benefits in using of certain area of Thailand to serve both the food and fuel industries.

  18. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Lu, Hongyou; Horvath, Arpad

    2010-05-21

    The 2006 California Global Warming Solutions Act calls for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Meeting this target will require action from all sectors of the California economy, including industry. The industrial sector consumes 25% of the energy used and emits 28% of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced in the state. Many countries around the world have national-level GHG reduction or energy-efficiency targets, and comprehensive programs focused on implementation of energy efficiency and GHG emissions mitigation measures in the industrial sector are essential for achieving their goals. A combination of targets and industry-focused supporting programs has led to significant investments in energy efficiency as well as reductions in GHG emissions within the industrial sectors in these countries. This project has identified program and policies that have effectively targeted the industrial sector in other countries to achieve real energy and CO{sub 2} savings. Programs in Ireland, France, The Netherlands, Denmark, and the UK were chosen for detailed review. Based on the international experience documented in this report, it is recommended that companies in California's industrial sector be engaged in a program to provide them with support to meet the requirements of AB32, The Global Warming Solution Act. As shown in this review, structured programs that engage industry, require members to evaluate their potential efficiency measures, plan how to meet efficiency or emissions reduction goals, and provide support in achieving the goals, can be quite effective at assisting companies to achieve energy efficiency levels beyond those that can be expected to be achieved autonomously.

  19. Cross section measurements using gas and solid targets for production of the positron-emitting radionuclide O-14

    CERN Document Server

    Kovács, Z; Tarkanyi, F; Coenen, H H; Qaim, S M

    2003-01-01

    Irradiation of nitrogen with protons leads to sup 1 sup 1 C (T sub 1 sub / sub 2 =20.4min) via the well-known sup 1 sup 4 N(p,alpha) reaction. However, sup 1 sup 4 O (T sub 1 sub / sub 2 =70.6s) and sup 1 sup 3 N (T sub 1 sub / sub 2 =10min) are also formed as side products via the sup 1 sup 4 N(p,n) and sup 1 sup 4 N(p,d+pn) reactions, respectively. In this work detailed cross section measurements were carried out for those two side reactions up to 19.2MeV using N sub 2 gas and nitrogen-containing solid targets. From the data, the thick-target yields and the exact level of radioactive impurities in sup 1 sup 1 C were calculated. In the case of sup 1 sup 4 O, the results also confirmed the possibility of producing this beta sup + emitting radionuclide in sufficient quantities for PET investigations.

  20. Report of the 3rd RCM on Improved High Current Liquid and Gas Targets for Cyclotron Produced Radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The overall objective of this CRP was the development of new accelerator targetry technology including several target systems but focusing on the reliable production of carbon-11 and fluorine-18 in various chemical forms with a view to increasing production yields, specific activity, improving the economics of production and the availability of the radiotracers. Significant advances have been made under this CRP in the development and standardization of high power gas and liquid targets. This CRP has resulted in the development of methods which can be used in high power targets to increase Carbon-11, Fluorine-18, Nitrogen-13, Iodine-123 and Krypton-81m, specific activities (a least a two fold increase), chemical purities as well as ensuring reliability of the production of the radiopharmaceuticals derived from these radionuclides. More importantly, these advances have minimized the unnecessarily operator exposure to radiation. In addition, knowledge of recovery and characterization of enriched H 2 18 O was also gained. Through this research the production capabilities with regard to [ 18 F]F - , [ 11 C]CO 2 and [ 11 C]CH 4 have increased 3 to 6 fold. A high current niobium target system has been designed, tested and put in service which could increase production capability of 18 FDG by a factor of 2.5. A survey of target maintenance procedures has been carried out and the results of this survey are reported in this CRP. It was determined that the tritium introduced by the inevitable nuclear reactions does not pose any health physics problems either during the tracer manufacturer or during potential water reclamation. It was further determined that radionuclides produced in the metal foil during irradiation are found in the target water at very low concentrations. These impurities can be essentially eliminated by using noble metal plated foils. The radionuclides can also be reduced by the separation technology typically used for fluorine extraction from the O-18

  1. High K-alpha X-ray Conversion Efficiency From Extended Source Gas Jet Targets Irradiated by Ultra Short Laser Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugland, N L; Constantin, C; Collette, A; Dewald, E; Froula, D; Glenzer, S H; Kritcher, A; Neumayer, P; Ross, J S; Niemann, C

    2007-11-01

    The absolute laser conversion efficiency to K{sub {alpha}}-like inner shell x-rays (integrated from K{sub {alpha}} to K{sub {beta}}) is observed to be an order of magnitude higher in argon gas jets than in solid targets due to enhanced emission from higher ionization stages following ultra short pulse laser irradiation. Excluding the higher ionization stages, the conversion efficiency to near-cold K{sub {alpha}} is the same in gas jets as in solid targets. These results demonstrate that gas jet targets are bright, high conversion efficiency, high repetition rate, debris-free multi-keV x-ray sources for spectrally resolved scattering and backlighting of rapidly evolving dense matter.

  2. Gas-fired power in the UK: Bridging supply gaps and implications of domestic shale gas exploitation for UK climate change targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Jeremy K; Reay, David S; Haszeldine, R Stuart

    2018-03-01

    There is a projected shortcoming in the fourth carbon budget of 7.5%. This shortfall may be increased if the UK pursues a domestic shale gas industry to offset projected decreases in traditional gas supply. Here we estimate that, if the project domestic gas supply gap for power generation were to be met by UK shale gas with low fugitive emissions (0.08%), an additional 20.4MtCO 2 e 1 would need to be accommodated during carbon budget periods 3-6. We find that a modest fugitive emissions rate (1%) for UK shale gas would increase global emissions compared to importing an equal quantity of Qatari liquefied natural gas. Additionally, we estimate that natural gas electricity generation would emit 420-466MtCO 2 e (460 central estimate) during the same time period within the traded EU emissions cap. We conclude that domestic shale gas production with even a modest 1% fugitive emissions rate would risk exceedance of UK carbon budgets. We also highlight that, under the current production-based greenhouse gas accounting system, the UK is incentivized to import natural gas rather than produce it domestically. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Measurement of Absolute Single and Double Charge Exchange Cross Sections for Si(7–10)+ at 0.88–2.50 KeV/u Impacting He and H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradmand, A.; El Ghazaly, M. O. A.; Mahaptra, D. P.; Chutjian, A.

    2018-01-01

    First measurements are reported for total, absolute, single, and double charge-exchange (CE) cross sections for Si(7–10)+ ions in the solar wind (SW), colliding with the prevalent astrophysical species H2 and He found in comets, the interplanetary medium, and planetary atmospheres. Measurements are in the energy range 0.88–2.50 keV/u, corresponding to the energies of the “fast” and “slow” ion components of the SW. Limited agreement is found with single-exchange results calculated in the classical over-the-barrier model. These CE data are useful for understanding, in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, photon emissions in the X-ray to visible energy range arising from resulting ion-stabilization steps.

  4. Saturation in the K-shell excitation of 120 MeV S{sup 14+} ions in interaction with gas targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, U.; Saha, A.K.; Dhal, B.B.; Tribedi, L.C.; Kurup, M.B.; Tandon, P.N. [Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Gulyas, L. [Inst. of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary)

    1999-07-01

    In contrast to the first Born approximation predicted quadratic enhancement, saturation has been observed in the excitation cross-sections of 120 MeV S{sup 14+} ions in interaction with gas targets. The measured cross-sections agree with the theoretical calculations in the framework of the Schwinger variational principle. The symmetric eikonal CDW approximation, however, underestimates the cross-sections with the heavier target atoms. (orig.)

  5. Development of a high-density gas-jet target for nuclear astrophysics and reaction studies with rare isotope beams. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uwe, Greife [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-08-12

    The purpose of this project was to develop a high-density gas jet target that will enable a new program of transfer reaction studies with rare isotope beams and targets of hydrogen and helium that is not currently possible and will have an important impact on our understanding of stellar explosions and of the evolution of nuclear shell structure away from stability. This is the final closeout report for the project.

  6. Development of a high-density gas-jet target for nuclear astrophysics and reaction studies with rare isotope beams. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwe, Greife

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a high-density gas jet target that will enable a new program of transfer reaction studies with rare isotope beams and targets of hydrogen and helium that is not currently possible and will have an important impact on our understanding of stellar explosions and of the evolution of nuclear shell structure away from stability. This is the final closeout report for the project.

  7. Active Stand-off Detection of Gas Leaks Using a Short Range Hard-target Backscatter Differential Optical Absorption System Based on a Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fugitive gas emissions from agricultural or industrial plants and gas pipelines are an important environmental concern as they can contribute to the global increase of greenhouse gas concentration. Moreover, they are also a security and safety concern because of possible risk of fire/explosion or toxicity. This study presents gas concentration measurements using a quantum cascade laser open path system (QCLOPS. The system retrieves the pathaveraged concentration of N2O and CH4 by collecting the backscattered light from a scattering target. The gas concentration measurements have a high temporal resolution (68 ms and are achieved at sufficient range (up to 40 m, ~ 130 feet with a detection limit of 2.6 ppm CH4 and 0.4 ppm for N2O. Given these characteristics, this system is promising for mobile/multidirectional remote detection and evaluation of gas leaks. The instrument is monostatic with a tunable QCL emitting at ~ 7.7 μm wavelength range. The backscattered radiation is collected by a Newtonian telescope and focused on an infrared light detector. Puffs of N2O and CH4 are released along the optical path to simulate a gas leak. The measured absorption spectrum is obtained using the thermal intra-pulse frequency chirped DFB QCL and is analyzed to obtain path averaged gas concentrations.

  8. What does Cassini ENA observations tell us about gas around Europa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Pontus; Mauk, Barry; Westlake, Joseph; Smith, Todd; Mitchell, Donald

    2015-04-01

    From about December 2000 to January 2001 the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA) imaged Jupiter in Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) from a distance of about 137-250 Jovian planetary radii (RJ) over an energy range from about 10 to 300 keV. A forward model is employed to derive column densities and assumes a neutral gas-plasma model and an energetic ion distribution based on Galileo in-situ measurements. We demonstrate that Jupiter observations by INCA are consistent with a column density peaking around Europa's orbit in the range from 2x1012 cm-2 to 7x1012 cm-2, assuming H2, and are consistent with the upper limits reported from the Cassini/UVIS observations. Most of the INCA observations are consistent with a roughly azimuthally symmetric gas distribution, but some appear consistent with an asymmetric gas distribution centred on Europa, which would directly imply that Europa is the source of the gas. Although our neutral gas model assumes a Europa source, we explore other explanations of the INCA observations including: (1) ENAs are produced by charge exchange between energetic ions and neutral hydrogen originating from charge-exchanged protons in the Io plasma torus. However, estimated densities by Cheng (1986) are about one order of magnitude too low to explain the INCA observations; (2) ENAs are produced by charge exchange between energetic ions and plasma ions such as O+ and S+ originating from Io. However, that would require O+ plasma densities higher than expected to compensate for the low charge-exchange cross section between protons and O+; (3) We re-examine the INCA Point-Spread Function (PSF) to determine if the ENA emissions in the vicinity of Europa's orbit could be explained by internal scattering of ENAs originating from Jupiter's high-latitude upper atmosphere. However, the PSF was well constrained by using Jupiter from distances where it could be considered a point source.

  9. A compact, quasi-monochromatic laser-plasma EUV source based on a double-stream gas-puff target at 13.8 nm wavelength

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wachulak, P.W.; Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Feigl, T.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Rudawski, P.; Sawicka, Magdalena; Szczurek, M.; Szczurek, A.; Zawadzki, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 3 (2010), 461-469 ISSN 0946-2171 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser-plasma * EUV source * gas puff target * elliptical multi- layer * mirror * table-top setup Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.239, year: 2010

  10. Targeted technology applications for infield reserve growth: A synopsis of the Secondary Natural Gas Recovery project, Gulf Coast Basin. Topical report, September 1988--April 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levey, R.A.; Finley, R.J.; Hardage, B.A.

    1994-06-01

    The Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR): Targeted Technology Applications for Infield Reserve Growth is a joint venture research project sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), the US Department of Energy (DOE), the State of Texas through the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, with the cofunding and cooperation of the natural gas industry. The SGR project is a field-based program using an integrated multidisciplinary approach that integrates geology, geophysics, engineering, and petrophysics. A major objective of this research project is to develop, test, and verify those technologies and methodologies that have near- to mid-term potential for maximizing recovery of gas from conventional reservoirs in known fields. Natural gas reservoirs in the Gulf Coast Basin are targeted as data-rich, field-based models for evaluating infield development. The SGR research program focuses on sandstone-dominated reservoirs in fluvial-deltaic plays within the onshore Gulf Coast Basin of Texas. The primary project research objectives are: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities cause, even in reservoirs of conventional permeability, reservoir compartmentalization and hence incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields.

  11. Target identification of volatile metabolites to allow the differentiation of lactic acid bacteria by gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Janneth; Arce, Cristina; Jordano, Rafael; Arce, Lourdes; Medina, Luis M

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the potential of gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (GC-IMS) to differentiate lactic acid bacteria (LAB) through target identification and fingerprints of volatile metabolites. The LAB selected were used as reference strains for their influence in the flavour of cheese. The four strains of LAB can be distinguished by the fingerprints generated by the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted. 2-butanone, 2-pentanone, 2-heptanone and 3-methyl-1-butanol were identified as relevant VOCs for Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei. 2-Butanone and 3-methyl-1-butanol were identified in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Lactococcus cremoris subsp. cremoris. The IMS signals monitoring during a 24-30h period showed the growth of the LAB in vitro. The results demonstrated that GC-IMS is a useful technology for bacteria recognition and also for screening the aromatic potential of new isolates of LAB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dendritic cell-targeted lentiviral vector immunization uses pseudotransduction and DNA-mediated STING and cGAS activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jocelyn T; Liu, Yarong; Kulkarni, Rajan P; Lee, Kevin K; Dai, Bingbing; Lovely, Geoffrey; Ouyang, Yong; Wang, Pin; Yang, Lili; Baltimore, David

    2017-07-21

    Dendritic cell (DC) activation and antigen presentation are critical for efficient priming of T cell responses. Here, we study how lentiviral vectors (LVs) deliver antigen and activate DCs to generate T cell immunization in vivo. We report that antigenic proteins delivered in vector particles via pseudotransduction were sufficient to stimulate an antigen-specific immune response. The delivery of the viral genome encoding the antigen increased the magnitude of this response in vivo but was irrelevant in vitro. Activation of DCs by LVs was independent of MyD88, TRIF, and MAVS, ruling out an involvement of Toll-like receptor or RIG-I-like receptor signaling. Cellular DNA packaged in LV preparations induced DC activation by the host STING (stimulator of interferon genes) and cGAS (cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate synthase) pathway. Envelope-mediated viral fusion also activated DCs in a phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependent but STING-independent process. Pseudotransduction, transduction, viral fusion, and delivery of cellular DNA collaborate to make the DC-targeted LV preparation an effective immunogen. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  13. Secondary natural gas recovery: Targeted applications for infield reserve growth in midcontinent reservoirs, Boonsville Field, Fort Worth Basin, Texas. Topical report, May 1993--June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardage, B.A.; Carr, D.L.; Finley, R.J.; Tyler, N.; Lancaster, D.E.; Elphick, R.Y.; Ballard, J.R.

    1995-07-01

    The objectives of this project are to define undrained or incompletely drained reservoir compartments controlled primarily by depositional heterogeneity in a low-accommodation, cratonic Midcontinent depositional setting, and, afterwards, to develop and transfer to producers strategies for infield reserve growth of natural gas. Integrated geologic, geophysical, reservoir engineering, and petrophysical evaluations are described in complex difficult-to-characterize fluvial and deltaic reservoirs in Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate Gas) field, a large, mature gas field located in the Fort Worth Basin of North Texas. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate approaches to overcoming the reservoir complexity, targeting the gas resource, and doing so using state-of-the-art technologies being applied by a large cross section of Midcontinent operators.

  14. Measurements of the charge exchange and dissociation cross-sections of the H{sub 2}+ ion in a wide energy range; Mesures des sections efficaces d'echange de charge et de dissociation des ions H{sub 2}{sup +} dans une large gamme d'energie (25 - 250 keV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidini, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    The dissociation, ionisation, and charge exchange cross-sections of molecular hydrogen ions H{sub 2}{sup +} passing through various gases, have been measured as a function of the energy of the ions. The energy range studied was from 25 to 250 keV. The reaction products, analysed by a magnetic field according to their e/m ratio, are collected on scintillation detectors. Two methods have made it possible to separate the various reactions leading to the formation of particles having the same e/m ratio. The first separates the particles according to their energy, the other selects those arriving simultaneously on two different detectors. The results show a large variation in the charge exchange cross-section with the energy of the H{sub 2}{sup +} ions. The variations in the dissociation and ionisation cross-sections are less pronounced. For a given energy, the values of the cross-sections increase with the atomic weight of the target particles. These measurements have been extended to the case of H{sub 2}{sup +} ions passing through a target of charged particles. Preliminary results show an increase in the cross-sections as compared to the preceding case. Finally the scattering of the reaction products has been studied; this scattering is due to the fact that the molecules formed during a reaction are in an unstable state and the nuclei or atoms diverge from each other. (author) [French] Les sections efficaces de dissociation, d'ionisation et d'echange de charge d'ions hydrogene moleculaires H{sub 2}{sup +} traversant differents gaz, ont ete mesurees en fonction de l'energie des ions. La gamme d'energie exploree est comprise entre 25 et 250 keV. Les produits de reactions, analyses suivant leur rapport e/m par un champ magnetique, sont recus sur des detecteurs a scintillations. Deux methodes ont permis de separer les diverses reactions conduisant a la formation de particules ayant meme rapport e/m. L'une classe les particules secondaires en

  15. Around the laboratories: Dubna: Physics results and progress on bubble chamber techniques; Stanford (SLAC): Operation of a very rapid cycling bubble chamber; Daresbury: Photographs of visitors to the Laboratory; Argonne: Charge exchange injection tests into the ZGS in preparation for a proposed Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    Around the laboratories: Dubna: Physics results and progress on bubble chamber techniques; Stanford (SLAC): Operation of a very rapid cycling bubble chamber; Daresbury: Photographs of visitors to the Laboratory; Argonne: Charge exchange injection tests into the ZGS in preparation for a proposed Booster

  16. Energy efficiency improvement in oil refineries through flare gas recovery technique to meet the emission trading targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comodi, Gabriele; Renzi, Massimiliano; Rossi, Mosè

    2016-01-01

    Flare gas recovery is one of the most attractive methods to improve energy efficiency in oil refineries to decrease greenhouse gas emissions. The recovered gas is used to feed refinery processes, granting advantages in terms of fuel economy and flare stress. This paper presents the results obtained by a feasibility study of a flare gas recovery system in a real refinery; the work focused on: i) the choice and the design of the flare gas recovery system; ii) the gas treatment and reuse; iii) the economic feasibility, and the payback period. An experimental campaign has been performed to evaluate both the composition and the flow rate of the flare gas. Results showed that the flare gas had a strongly variable flow rate and composition due to the different gas species processed in refinery. A methodology for the system selection is presented: a 400 kg/h liquid ring compression device is chosen; its basic design is described as well as the chemical treatments of inert gases and hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S). The yearly energy recovery was estimated to be 2900 TOE, corresponding to 6600 tons of CDE (Carbon Dioxide Equivalent). Finally, an economic evaluation was carried out, showing a payback period of about 2.5 years. - Highlights: • A liquid ring compressor flare gas recovery system is applied to an oil refinery. • The composition of the flare gas and the design of the compressor are presented. • The system allows to recover 400 kg/h of flare gas with a LHV of 39,951 kJ/kg. • Cash flow derives from the spared energy and the emission trading allowances market. • The pay-back period of the presented flare gas recovery system is about 2 years.

  17. Trends in greenhouse gas emissions from consumption and production of animal food products - implications for long-term climate targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederberg, C; Hedenus, F; Wirsenius, S; Sonesson, U

    2013-02-01

    To analyse trends in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from production and consumption of animal products in Sweden, life cycle emissions were calculated for the average production of pork, chicken meat, beef, dairy and eggs in 1990 and 2005. The calculated average emissions were used together with food consumption statistics and literature data on imported products to estimate trends in per capita emissions from animal food consumption. Total life cycle emissions from the Swedish livestock production were around 8.5 Mt carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e) in 1990 and emissions decreased to 7.3 Mt CO2e in 2005 (14% reduction). Around two-thirds of the emission cut was explained by more efficient production (less GHG emission per product unit) and one-third was due to a reduced animal production. The average GHG emissions per product unit until the farm-gate were reduced by 20% for dairy, 15% for pork and 23% for chicken meat, unchanged for eggs and increased by 10% for beef. A larger share of the average beef was produced from suckler cows in cow-calf systems in 2005 due to the decreasing dairy cow herd, which explains the increased emissions for the average beef in 2005. The overall emission cuts from the livestock sector were a result of several measures taken in farm production, for example increased milk yield per cow, lowered use of synthetic nitrogen fertilisers in grasslands, reduced losses of ammonia from manure and a switch to biofuels for heating in chicken houses. In contrast to production, total GHG emissions from the Swedish consumption of animal products increased by around 22% between 1990 and 2005. This was explained by strong growth in meat consumption based mainly on imports, where growth in beef consumption especially was responsible for most emission increase over the 15-year period. Swedish GHG emissions caused by consumption of animal products reached around 1.1 t CO2e per capita in 2005. The emission cuts necessary for meeting a global temperature

  18. Coherent pion production in the 12C and 40Ca by the (3 He,tπ+) charge exchange reaction at 2 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhi, Laurent

    1997-01-01

    The coherent pion production process on nuclei is defined as the excitation of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta(1232) resonance, creating a delta-hole state. This state propagates through the nuclear medium and then decays in a single pion, living the target nuclei in its ground state. In the nuclei, the attractive interaction between delta-hole states in the spin-longitudinal channel shifts down the effective mass of the delta and induces a collective state of excitation. The nuclear response in the longitudinal channel of interaction can be studied experimentally through the resonance decay coherent process triggered by a probe coupling longitudinally with the delta and selected by the target form factor. The ( 3 He, t) probe at 2 GeV on nuclei and the experimental set-up SPES IV-Pi have been used to study this decay process. A simulation program using GEANT and including theoretical consideration, knowledge of previous experimental results and the experimental properties of the set-up, have demonstrated the capability of the experiment for this study. The setting of the PCOS-IV acquisition system of multiwire proportional chambers and of the development and use of programs for treatment and analysis of experimental data have been necessary steps to make the experiment at Laboratoire National SATURNE as well as to obtain physical parameters in order to exhibit the coherent process. Nevertheless, the angular distribution of coherent pions differ from the theoretical predictions. Several hypotheses involving the experimental set-up and physical processes have been investigated in order to account for such distributions. (author)

  19. Low fresh gas flow balanced anesthesia versus target controlled intravenous infusion anesthesia in laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a cost-minimization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanovic, Predrag D; Petrova, Guenka; Miljkovic, Branislava; Scepanovic, Radisav; Perunovic, Radoslav; Stojanovic, Dragos; Dobrasinovic, Janja

    2008-09-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is widely recognized as a well-tolerated and effective method for cholecystectomy. It is also considered cost saving because it has been associated with a decreased hospital length of stay. Variables that might lead to increased costs in laparoscopic surgery are the technique and drugs used in anesthesia. The goal of this study was to compare the costs of 2 anesthetic techniques used in laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC)--balanced versus IV anesthesia--from the standpoint of an outpatient surgical department, with a time horizon of 1 year. Patients scheduled to undergo elective LC were enrolled in this prospective case study. Patients were randomly allocated to receive balanced anesthesia, administered as low fresh gas flow (LFGF) with inhalational sevoflurane and IV sufentanil in a target controlled infusion (LFGF SS group), or IV anesthesia, administered as IV propofol/sufentanil in a target controlled infusion (TCI group). We used a microcosting procedure to measure health care resource utilization in individual patients to detect treatment differences. The costs of medications used for the induction and maintenance of anesthesia during surgery were considered for LFGF SS and TCI. Other end points included duration of anesthesia; mean times to early emergence, tracheal extubation, orientation, and postanesthesia discharge (PAD); pain intensity before first analgesia; number of analgesics required in the first 24 hours after surgery; and prevalences of nausea, vomiting, and agitation. A total of 60 patients were included in this analysis (male/female ratios in the LFGF SS and TCI groups: 11/19 and 12/18, respectively; mean [SD] ages, 48 [7.9] and 47 [8.6] years; and mean [SD] body mass indexes, 26 [2.0] and 26 [3.0] kg/m2). The costs of anesthetics were significantly lower with LFGF SS compared with TCI (euro17.40 [euro2.66] vs euro22.01 [euro2.50] [2006 euros]). Times to early emergence and tracheal extubation were significantly shorter with

  20. Charge-exchange products of BEVALAC projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.

    1982-11-01

    There is a substantial production of fragments of all masses lighter than the projectile, such fragments being centered in a narrow region of velocity space around the beam velocity. The exciting studies about anomalons deal with the curious enhanced reactivity of some of these secondary fragments. I direct attention here to the rather rare fragments of the same mass number as the projectile but differing in charge by one unit. We also keep track, as a frame of reference, of the products that have lost one neutron from the projectile

  1. Charge exchange between singly ionized helium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, B.H.; Poe, R.T.; Tang, K.T.

    1978-01-01

    The plane-wave Born approximation was used to evaluate the charge transfer cross sections for the reaction He + + He + → He ++ + He. The charge transfer cross section is graphed as a function of incident energy and compared with experimental measurements

  2. International Experience with Key Program Elements of IndustrialEnergy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-SettingPrograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-02-02

    Target-setting agreements, also known as voluntary ornegotiated agreements, have been used by a number of governments as amechanism for promoting energy efficiency within the industrial sector. Arecent survey of such target-setting agreement programs identified 23energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programsin 18 countries. International best practice related to target-settingagreement programs calls for establishment of a coordinated set ofpolicies that provide strong economic incentives as well as technical andfinancial support to participating industries. The key program elementsof a target-setting program are the target-setting process,identification of energy-saving technologies and measures usingenergy-energy efficiency guidebooks and benchmarking as well as byconducting energy-efficiency audits, development of an energy-savingsaction plan, development and implementation of energy managementprotocols, development of incentives and supporting policies, monitoringprogress toward targets, and program evaluation. This report firstprovides a description of three key target-setting agreement programs andthen describes international experience with the key program elementsthat comprise such programs using information from the three keytarget-setting programs as well as from other international programsrelated to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsreductions.

  3. Grazing incidence collisions of ions and atoms with surfaces: from charge exchange to atomic diffraction; Collisions rasantes d'ions ou d'atomes sur les surfaces: de l'echange de charge a la diffraction atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, P

    2006-09-15

    This thesis reports two studies about the interaction with insulating surfaces of keV ions or atoms under grazing incidence. The first part presents a study of charge exchange processes occurring during the interaction of singly charged ions with the surface of NaCl. In particular, by measuring the scattered charge fraction and the energy loss in coincidence with electron emission, the neutralization mechanism is determined for S{sup +}, C{sup +}, Xe{sup +}, H{sup +}, O{sup +}, Kr{sup +}, N{sup +}, Ar{sup +}, F{sup +}, Ne{sup +} and He{sup +}. These results show the importance of the double electron capture as neutralization process for ions having too much potential energy for resonant capture and not enough for Auger neutralization. We have also studied the ionisation of the projectile and of the surface, and the different Auger-like neutralization processes resulting in electron emission, population of conduction band or excited state. For oxygen scattering, we have measured an higher electron yield in coincidence with scattered negative ion than with scattered atom suggesting the transient formation above the surface of the oxygen doubly negative ion. The second study deals with the fast atom diffraction, a new phenomenon observed for the first time during this work. Due to the large parallel velocity, the surface appears as a corrugated wall where rows interfere. Similarly to the Thermal Atom Scattering the diffraction pattern corresponds to the surface potential and is sensitive to vibrations. We have study the H-NaCl and He-LiF atom-surface potentials in the 20 meV - 1 eV range. This new method offers interesting perspectives for surface characterisation. (author)

  4. On the possibility of using lithium-6 deuteride, irradiated with gas discharge plasma in a target with polarized nuclei of deuterium and lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunyatova, E.I.; Bubnov, N.N.; Solodovnikov, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    A target with polarized nuclei made on the basis of irradiated lithium-6 deuteride is of great interest for carrying out investigations in elementary particle physics. Up to now high-energy electrons have been used for generation of F-centers in 6 LiD. It is shown that one can, in principle, use ultraviolet irradiation and gas discharge plasma for generation of F-centers in 6 LiD. Both types of irradiation cause electron paramagnetic resonance signals from conductance electrons of lithium and form F-centers in 6 LiD. It seems possible to obtain the necessary samples by exposing 6 LiD to the gas discharge plasma. 9 refs.; 2 figs

  5. Measurement of neutron activation cross sections in the energy range between 2 and 7 MeV by using a Ti-deuteron target and a deuteron gas target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senga, T.; Sakane, H.; Shibata, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Kawade, K. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Kasugai, Yoshimi; Ikeda, Yujiro; Takeuchi, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    Using a Ti-deuteron target in the neutron energy range between 2 and 4.5 MeV and a deuteron gas target between 4.5 and 7 MeV, mono-energetic neutrons could be generated enough for activation cross section measurements. The KN-3750 Van de Grraff accelerator at Nagoya University and the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS) at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) were used. Preliminary results of activation cross sections were obtained for reactions of {sup 27}Al(n,p){sup 27}Mg, {sup 47}Ti(n,p){sup 47}Sc, {sup 58}Ni(n,p){sup 58}Co. The evaluation data of JENDL-3.2 showed reasonable agreement with our results. (author)

  6. Application of a high-density gas laser target to the physics of x-ray lasers and coronal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronko, J.G.; Kohler, D.

    1996-01-01

    An experiment has been proposed to investigate a photopumped x-ray laser approach using a novel, high-density, laser heated supersonic gas jet plasma to prepare the lasant plasma. The scheme uses the He- like sodium 1.10027 nm line to pump the He-like neon 1s-4p transition at 1.10003 nm with the lasing transitions between the n=4 to n=2,3 states and the n=3 to n=2 state at 5.8 nm, 23.0 nm, and 8.2 nm, respectively. The experiment had been proposed in 1990 and funding began Jan. 1991; however circumstances made it impossible to pursue the research over the past 5 years, and it was decided not to pursue the research any further

  7. Chaos in gas discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piel, A.

    1993-01-01

    Many gas discharges exhibit natural oscillations which undergo a transition from regular to chaotic behavior by changing an experimental parameter or by applying external modulation. Besides several isolated investigations, two classes of discharge phenomena have been studied in more detail: ionization waves in medium pressure discharges and potential relaxation oscillations in filament cathode discharges at very low pressure. The latter phenomenon will be discussed by comparing experimental results from different discharge arrangements with particle-in-cell simulations and with a model based on the van-der-Pol equation. The filament cathode discharge has two stable modes of operation: the low current anode-glow-mode and the high current temperature-limited-mode, which form the hysteresis curve in the I(U) characteristics. Close to the hysteresis point of the AGM periodic relaxation oscillations occur. The authors demonstrate that the AGM can be understood by ion production in the anode layer, stopping of ions by charge exchange, and trapping in the virtual cathode around the filament. The relaxation oscillations consist of a slow filling phase and a rapid phase that invokes formation of an unstable double-layer, current-spiking, and ion depletion from the cathodic plasma. The relaxation oscillations can be mode-locked by external modulation. Inside a mode-locked state, a period doubling cascade is observed at high modulation degree

  8. Neutronic and Thermal-Hydraulic Safety Analysis for the Optimization of the Uranium Foil Target in the RSG-GAS Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pinem

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The G. A. Siwabessy Multipurpose Reactor (Reaktor Serba Guna G.A. Siwabessy, RSG-GAS has an average thermal neutron flux of 2×1014 neutron/(cm2 sec at the nominal power of 30 MW. With such a high thermal neutron flux, the reactor is suitable for the production of Mo-99 which is widely used as a medical diagnostic radioisotope. This paper describes a safety analysis to determine the optimum LEU foil target by using a coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic code, MTR-DYN. The code has been developed based on the three-dimensional multigroup neutron diffusion theory. The best estimated results can be achieved by using a coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic code. The calculation results show that the optimum LEU foil target is 54 g corresponding to the reactivity change of less than the limit value of 500 pcm. From the safety analysis for the case when the primary flow rate decreased by 15% from its nominal value, it was found that the peak temperatures of the coolant and cladding are 69.5°C and 127.9°C, respectively. It can be concluded that the optimum LEU foil target can be irradiated safely without exceeding the limit value.

  9. Gas generation during waste treatment of acidic solutions from the dissolution of irradiated LEU targets for 99Mo production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakel, Allen J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Conner, Cliff [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Quigley, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program is to limit the use of high-enriched uranium (HEU) in research and test reactors by substituting low-enriched uranium (LEU) wherever possible. The work reported here documents our work to develop the calcining technologies and processes that will be needed for 99Mo production using LEU foil targets and the Modified Cintichem Process. The primary concern with the conversion to LEU from HEU targets is that it would result in a five- to six-fold increase in the total uranium. This increase results in more liquid waste from the process. We have been working to minimize the increase in liquid waste and to minimize the impact of any change in liquid waste. Direct calcination of uranium-rich nitric acid solutions generates NO2 gas and UO3 solid. We have proposed two processes for treating the liquid waste from a Modified Cintichem Process with a LEU foil. One is an optimized direct calcination process that is similar to the process currently in use. The other is a uranyl oxalate precipitation process. The specific goal of the work reported here was to characterize and compare the chemical reactions that occur during these two processes. In particular, the amounts and compositions of the gaseous and solid products were of interest. A series of experiments was carried out to show the effects of temperature and the redox potential of the reaction atmosphere. The primary products of the direct calcination process were mixtures of U3O8 and UO3 solids and NO2 gas. The primary products of the oxalate precipitation process were mixtures of U3O8 and UO2 solid and CO2 gas. Higher temperature and a reducing atmosphere tended to favor quadrivalent over hexavalent uranium in the solid product. These data will help producers to decide between the two processes. In addition, the data can be used

  10. Post-irradiation analysis of an ISOLDE lead-bismuth target: Stable and long-lived noble gas nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leya, I., E-mail: Ingo.Leya@space.unibe.ch [University of Bern, Space Science and Planetology, Bern (Switzerland); Grimberg, A. [University of Bern, Space Science and Planetology, Bern (Switzerland); Isotope Geochemistry, ETH Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); David, J.-C. [CEA/Saclay, Irfu/SPhN, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, Cedex (France); Schumann, D.; Neuhausen, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Zanini, L. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 117, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Noah, E. [University of Geneva, Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, Geneve (Switzerland)

    2016-07-15

    We measured the isotopic concentrations of long-lived and stable He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe isotopes in a sample from a lead-bismuth eutectic target irradiated with 1.0 and 1.4 GeV protons. Our data indicate for most noble gases nearly complete release with retention fractions in the range of percent or less. Higher retention fractions result from the decay of long-lived radioactive progenitors from groups 1, 2, or 7 of the periodic table. From the data we can calculate a retention fraction for {sup 3}H of 2–3%. For alkaline metals we find retention fractions of about 10%, 30%, and 50% for Na, Rb, and Cs, respectively. For the alkaline earth metal Ba we found complete retention. Finally, the measured Kr and Xe concentrations indicate that there was some release of the halogens Br and I during and/or after the irradiation.

  11. Narrow energy spread, 25MeV protons from the interaction of a time-structured CO2 laser pulse with a gas target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberberger, D.; Tochitsky, S.; Gong, C.; Pak, A.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Tsung, F.; Mori, W.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R.; Silva, L.

    2010-11-01

    Experimental results and 2D OSIRIS simulations of laser-driven proton acceleration from the interaction of a time-structured 10μm CO2 laser pulse train and a gaseous target are presented. The wavelength of a CO2 laser provides a unique opportunity to change the target density from 0.5 to 5ncr in a controlled manner by changing the H2 gas jet pressure. The CO2 laser pulses consist of a train of 3ps pulses separated by 18ps with a peak power of ˜4TW and a total energy of ˜50J. The initial results show the production of proton energies of up to 25MeV, which far exceeds that predicted by ponderomotive force scaling for an ao˜2. Furthermore, in the density range around 2ncr, these high energy protons are contained within a narrow energy spread of δE/E ˜ 10%. These results are attributed to the unique time structure of the CO2 laser pulses, underdense LPI's such as self-focusing due to large P/Pcr values, and profile steepening/hole boring.

  12. Combined untargeted and targeted fingerprinting by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography: revealing fructose-induced changes in mice urinary metabolic signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressanello, Davide; Liberto, Erica; Collino, Massimo; Chiazza, Fausto; Mastrocola, Raffaella; Reichenbach, Stephen E; Bicchi, Carlo; Cordero, Chiara

    2018-03-07

    This study exploits the information potential of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography configured with a parallel dual secondary column-dual detection by mass spectrometry and flame ionization (GC×2GC-MS/FID) to study changes in urinary metabolic signatures of mice subjected to high-fructose diets. Samples are taken from mice fed with normal or fructose-enriched diets provided either in aqueous solution or in solid form and analyzed at three stages of the dietary intervention (1, 6, and 12 weeks). Automated Untargeted and Targeted fingerprinting for 2D data elaboration is adopted for the most inclusive data mining of GC×GC patterns. The UT fingerprinting strategy performs a fully automated peak-region features fingerprinting and combines results from pre-targeted compounds and unknowns across the sample-set. The most informative metabolites, with statistically relevant differences between sample groups, are obtained by unsupervised multivariate analysis (MVA) and cross-validated by multi-factor analysis (MFA) with external standard quantitation by GC-MS. Results indicate coherent clustering of mice urine signatures according to dietary manipulation. Notably, the metabolite fingerprints of mice fed with liquid fructose exhibited greater derangement in fructose, glucose, citric, pyruvic, malic, malonic, gluconic, cis-aconitic, succinic and 2-keto glutaric acids, glycine acyl derivatives (N-carboxy glycine, N-butyrylglycine, N-isovaleroylglycine, N-phenylacetylglycine), and hippuric acid. Untargeted fingerprinting indicates some analytes which were not a priori pre-targeted which provide additional insights: N-acetyl glucosamine, N-acetyl glutamine, malonyl glycine, methyl malonyl glycine, and glutaric acid. Visual features fingerprinting is used to track individual variations during experiments, thereby extending the panorama of possible data elaboration tools. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  13. A phenomenological study of the {pi}{sup -} p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} n charge exchange reaction at high energy; Etude phenomenologique de la reaction d`echange de charge {pi}{sup -} p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} n a haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaud, Y.

    1995-09-21

    The aim of the study was to examine the behaviour of the proton-proton elastic scattering, for mass center energies around 10 GeV, and more especially to study the charge exchange reaction {pi}{sup -} p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} n for mass center energies between 3 and 20 GeV. A formalism based on the Glauber model has been used, and a Regge trajectory exchange term was introduced in the model in order to enable the description of the lower energy domain (inferior to 10 GeV) that is characterized by a large contribution of meson exchanges at the scattering amplitude. The Glauber model is then applied to the charge exchange reaction and the differential cross section is analyzed for a center mass energy comprised between 3 and 20 GeV, together with the polarization at 40 GeV/c. The approach is then validated through the study of the {pi}{sup -} p {yields} {eta} n reaction. The size of the kernel of proton and pion components implied in the {pi}{sup -} p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} n reaction, is also investigated. 90 refs., 48 figs., 4 tabs., 5 appends.

  14. A Novel UAS Rapid Deployment Platform for Targeted Gas Sampling and Meteorological Soundings at Altitudes up to 2,700 masl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rick M.; Greatwood, Colin; Richardson, Tom; Freer, Jim; MacKenzie, Rob; Brownlow, Rebecca; Lowry, David; Fisher, Rebecca E.; France, James; Nisbet, Euan G.

    2015-04-01

    This research project has developed Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) technologies for intelligent targeting and collection of atmospheric gas samples to investigate the so-called Southern Tropical Methane Anomaly, for which it is necessary to sample air below and above the trade-wind inversion. Air parcels above and below the South Atlantic trade-wind inversion can have markedly different trajectories and, hence, encounter very different methane source regions. The system is intelligent in that high resolution temperature and humidity sensors linked to the ground station characterise the atmospheric profile on the upward flight to ensure the platform targets the appropriate sample elevations on the downward trajectory. This capability has been proven to an altitude of 2,700 metres above sea level (masl; ca. 700 mb) at Ascension Island in the South Atlantic and shown that rapid and repeat deployment and sample collection is achievable. Three novel eight motor multirotor UAS (or octocopter) platforms were developed at Bristol Robotics Laboratory (BRL) using primarily off -the-shelf components with a custom-built main fuselage. Gas sampling and atmospheric sensor systems were designed by the University of Birmingham. Our paper explores the capability of this UAS and provides some initial results from the air sampling campaign conducted in September 2014. Thirty-eight sampling flights were conducted over 12 days and the resulting 47 samples analysed for their CH4 concentration using the high-precision Picarro Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer already installed at Ascension Island. A subset of samples were sent for δ13CCH4 analysis in Egham, UK. The flights were conducted up to an altitude of 2,700m with 2,000m being typical. There were no major incidents although variable zero and high wind situations above the trade wind inversion (typically at 1,800m) both presented unique challenges and required careful flight planning strategies and in flight trajectory changes. As a

  15. Automating data analysis for two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry non-targeted analysis of comparative samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titaley, Ivan A; Ogba, O Maduka; Chibwe, Leah; Hoh, Eunha; Cheong, Paul H-Y; Simonich, Staci L Massey

    2018-03-16

    Non-targeted analysis of environmental samples, using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC/ToF-MS), poses significant data analysis challenges due to the large number of possible analytes. Non-targeted data analysis of complex mixtures is prone to human bias and is laborious, particularly for comparative environmental samples such as contaminated soil pre- and post-bioremediation. To address this research bottleneck, we developed OCTpy, a Python™ script that acts as a data reduction filter to automate GC × GC/ToF-MS data analysis from LECO ® ChromaTOF ® software and facilitates selection of analytes of interest based on peak area comparison between comparative samples. We used data from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated soil, pre- and post-bioremediation, to assess the effectiveness of OCTpy in facilitating the selection of analytes that have formed or degraded following treatment. Using datasets from the soil extracts pre- and post-bioremediation, OCTpy selected, on average, 18% of the initial suggested analytes generated by the LECO ® ChromaTOF ® software Statistical Compare feature. Based on this list, 63-100% of the candidate analytes identified by a highly trained individual were also selected by OCTpy. This process was accomplished in several minutes per sample, whereas manual data analysis took several hours per sample. OCTpy automates the analysis of complex mixtures of comparative samples, reduces the potential for human error during heavy data handling and decreases data analysis time by at least tenfold. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Resolution-optimized headspace gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (HS-GC-IMS) for non-targeted olive oil profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Natalie; Birkenmeier, Markus; Sanders, Daniel; Rohn, Sascha; Weller, Philipp

    2017-06-01

    A prototype gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (GC-IMS) system, hyphenating temperature-ramped headspace GC to a modified drift time IMS cell, was evaluated and compared to a conventional, isothermal capillary column (CC)-IMS system on the example of the geographical differentiation of extra virgin olive oils (EVOO) from Spain and Italy. It allows orthogonal, 2D separation of complex samples and individual detection of compounds in robust and compact benchtop systems. The information from the high-resolution 3D fingerprints of volatile organic compound (VOC) fractions of EVOO samples were extracted by specifically developed chemometric MATLAB® routines to differentiate between the different olive oil provenances. A combination of unsupervised principal component analysis (PCA) with two supervised procedures, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and k-nearest neighbors (kNN), was applied to the experimental data. The results showed very good discrimination between oils of different geographical origins, featuring 98 and 92% overall correct classification rate for PCA-LDA and kNN classifier, respectively. Furthermore, the results showed that the higher resolved 3D fingerprints obtained from the GC-IMS system provide superior resolving power for non-targeted profiling of VOC fractions from highly complex samples such as olive oil. Graphical abstract Principle of the determination of geographic origins of olive oils by chemometric analysis of three-dimensional HS-GC-IMS fingerprints.

  17. Life in Ice: Microbial Growth Dynamics and Greenhouse Gas Production During Winter in a Thermokarst Bog Revealed by Stable Isotope Probing Targeted Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazewicz, S.; White, R. A., III; Tas, N.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Mcfarland, J. W.; Jansson, J.; Waldrop, M. P.

    2016-12-01

    Permafrost contains a reservoir of frozen C estimated to be twice the size of the current atmospheric C pool. In response to changing climate, permafrost is rapidly warming which could result in widespread seasonal thawing. When permafrost thaws, soils that are rich in ice and C often transform into thermokarst wetlands with anaerobic conditions and significant production of atmospheric CH4. While most C flux research in recently thawed permafrost concentrates on the few summer months when seasonal thaw has occurred, there is mounting evidence that sizeable portions of annual CO2 and CH4 efflux occurs over winter or during a rapid burst of emissions associated with seasonal thaw. A potential mechanism for such efflux patterns is microbial activity in frozen soils over winter where gasses produced are partially trapped within ice until spring thaw. In order to better understand microbial transformation of soil C to greenhouse gas over winter, we applied stable isotope probing (SIP) targeted metagenomics combined with process measurements and field flux data to reveal activities of microbial communities in `frozen' soil from an Alaskan thermokarst bog. Field studies revealed build-up of CO2 and CH4 in frozen soils suggesting that microbial activity persisted throughout the winter in soils poised just below the freezing point. Laboratory incubations designed to simulate in-situ winter conditions (-1.5 °C and anaerobic) revealed continuous CH4 and CO2 production. Strikingly, the quantity of CH4 produced in 6 months in frozen soil was equivalent to approximately 80% of CH4 emitted during the 3 month summer `active' season. Heavy water SIP targeted iTag sequencing revealed growing bacteria and archaea in the frozen anaerobic soil. Growth was primarily observed in two bacterial phyla, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, suggesting that fermentation was likely the major C mineralization pathway. SIP targeted metagenomics facilitated characterization of the primary metabolic

  18. Suspected-target pesticide screening using gas chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry with high resolution deconvolution and retention index/mass spectrum library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Wang, Haoyang; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Jing; Fan, Ruojing; Yu, Chongtian; Wang, Wenwen; Guo, Yinlong

    2014-10-01

    A strategy for suspected-target screening of pesticide residues in complicated matrices was exploited using gas chromatography in combination with hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-QTOF MS). The screening workflow followed three key steps of, initial detection, preliminary identification, and final confirmation. The initial detection of components in a matrix was done by a high resolution mass spectrum deconvolution; the preliminary identification of suspected pesticides was based on a special retention index/mass spectrum (RI/MS) library that contained both the first-stage mass spectra (MS(1) spectra) and retention indices; and the final confirmation was accomplished by accurate mass measurements of representative ions with their response ratios from the MS(1) spectra or representative product ions from the second-stage mass spectra (MS(2) spectra). To evaluate the applicability of the workflow in real samples, three matrices of apple, spinach, and scallion, each spiked with 165 test pesticides in a set of concentrations, were selected as the models. The results showed that the use of high-resolution TOF enabled effective extractions of spectra from noisy chromatograms, which was based on a narrow mass window (5 mDa) and suspected-target compounds identified by the similarity match of deconvoluted full mass spectra and filtering of linear RIs. On average, over 74% of pesticides at 50 ng/mL could be identified using deconvolution and the RI/MS library. Over 80% of pesticides at 5 ng/mL or lower concentrations could be confirmed in each matrix using at least two representative ions with their response ratios from the MS(1) spectra. In addition, the application of product ion spectra was capable of confirming suspected pesticides with specificity for some pesticides in complicated matrices. In conclusion, GC-QTOF MS combined with the RI/MS library seems to be one of the most efficient tools for the analysis of suspected-target pesticide residues

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR THE QUANTIFICATION OF THE CHEMICAL FORMS OF MERCURY AND OTHER TARGET POLLUTANTS IN COAL-FIRED BOILER FLUE GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terence J. McManus, Ph.D.

    1999-06-30

    Since approximately 55% of the electrical power produced in the U. S. is generated by coal-based power utility plants, there is serious concern about the massive amounts of coal combustion products emitted into the atmosphere annually. Furthermore, Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) requires the measurement and inventory of a possible 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from any stationary source producing more than 10 tons per year of any one pollutant or more than 25 tons per year of total pollutants. Although power utilities are not presently included on the list of source categories, the CAAA requires the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency to carry out a study of emissions from electricity generation using fossil fuels. Since many of these HAPs are known to be present in coal derived flue gas, coal-fired electric power utilities may be subject to regulation following these studies if Congress considers it necessary. In a cooperative effort with the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) through its Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) initiated such a study in 1991. DOE-FETC commissioned five primary contractors to conduct emission studies at eight different coal-fired electric utilities. The eight sites represented a cross section of feed coal type, boiler designs, and particulate and gaseous pollutant control technologies. The major goal of these studies was to determine the sampling and analytical methodologies that could be used efficiently to perform these emission tests while producing representative and reliable emission data. The successful methodology could then be recommended to the EPA for use in compliance testing in the event the regulation of air toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants is implemented. A secondary purpose of the testing was to determine the effectiveness of the control technologies in reducing target hazardous air pollutants. Advanced Technology Systems, Inc

  20. Integrated vacuum absorption steam cycle gas separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiaguo [Champaign, IL; Lu, Yonggi [Urbana, IL; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud [Champaign, IL

    2011-11-22

    Methods and systems for separating a targeted gas from a gas stream emitted from a power plant. The gas stream is brought into contact with an absorption solution to preferentially absorb the targeted gas to be separated from the gas stream so that an absorbed gas is present within the absorption solution. This provides a gas-rich solution, which is introduced into a stripper. Low pressure exhaust steam from a low pressure steam turbine of the power plant is injected into the stripper with the gas-rich solution. The absorbed gas from the gas-rich solution is stripped in the stripper using the injected low pressure steam to provide a gas stream containing the targeted gas. The stripper is at or near vacuum. Water vapor in a gas stream from the stripper is condensed in a condenser operating at a pressure lower than the stripper to concentrate the targeted gas. Condensed water is separated from the concentrated targeted gas.

  1. British Gas plans global gas unit expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vielvoye, R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on developing a global gas business, a British Gas plc's strategy for evolving a state owned U.K. gas company to a privatized worldwide oil and gas giant. By 2000, BG's global gas business is expected to provide 20% of its revenues, compared with 40% each from its exploration and production operations and its U.K. gas business. The global gas unit (GGU) plans to meet its targets mainly through acquiring holdings in gas transmission and distribution companies around the world. In the 12 months since GGU was established, it has made two such major acquisitions in this area. BG acquired Consumers Gas Co., Ltd., Ontario, Canada's biggest natural gas distribution company, for $943.5 million. It also took a 10% stake in Catalana de Gas SA, Barcelona, the largest privately owned gas utility in Spain and in terms of number of customers, the fourth largest in western Europe. BG also is targeting additional revenues from developing gas fired cogeneration systems in developing countries with gas reserves but no established transmission and distribution systems

  2. Measurements of gas and volatile element production rates from an irradiated molten lead and lead-bismuth spallation target with proton beams of 1 and 1.4 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tall, Y.

    2008-03-01

    The integrated project EUROTRANS (European Research Programme for the Transmutation of High Level Nuclear Waste in an Accelerator Driven System) of the 6. EURATOM Framework Programme aims to demonstrate the transmutation of radioactive waste in ADS (Accelerator Driven Sub-critical system). It will carry out a first advanced design of an experimental facility to demonstrate the technical feasibility of transmutation, and will produce a conceptual design of an industrial facility dedicated to transmutation. An ADS consists of three fundamental elements: the accelerator of protons, the sub-critical core and the spallation target. SUBATECH (physique Sub-Atomique et des Technologies associees) laboratory is involved to the study of the chosen liquid lead-bismuth as a spallation ADS target. The irradiation of liquid lead-bismuth target with energetic proton beam generates in addition to neutrons, volatile and radioactive residues. In order to determine experimentally the production rates of gas and volatile elements following a spallation reaction in a lead-bismuth target, the experiment IS419 was performed at the ISOLDE facility at CERN (Centre Europeen de la Recherche Nucleaire). This experiment constitutes the frame of the thesis whose main objective is to assess and study the production and release rates of many gas and volatile element from the irradiated lead-bismuth target with an energetic proton beam. The obtained data are compared to Monte Carlo simulation code (MCNPX) results in order to test the intranuclear cascade model of Bertini and of Cugnon, and the evaporation options of Dresner and Schmidt. (author)

  3. THERMAL NEUTRON FLUX MAPPING ON A TARGET CAPSULE AT RABBIT FACILITY OF RSG-GAS REACTOR FOR USE IN k0-INAA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutisna Sutisna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Instrumental neutron activation analysis based on the k0 method (k0-INAA requires the availability of the accurate reactor parameter data, in particular a thermal neutron flux that interact with a targets inside the target capsule. This research aims to determine and map the thermal neutron flux inside the capsule and irradiation channels used for the elemental quantification using the k0-AANI. Mapping of the thermal neutron flux (фth on two type of irradiation capsule have been done for RS01 and RS02 facilities of RSG-GAS reactor. Thermal neutron flux determined using Al-0,1%Au alloy through 197Au(n,g 198Au nuclear reaction, while the flux mapping done using statistics R. Thermal neutron flux are calculated using k0-IAEA software provided by IAEA. The results showed the average thermal neutron flux is (5.6±0.3×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1; (5.6±0.4×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1; (5.2±0.4×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1 and (5.3±0.4×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1 for Polyethylene capsule of 1st , 2nd, 3rd and 4th layer respectively. In the case of Aluminum capsule, the thermal neutron flux was lower compared to that on Polyethylene capsule. There were (3.0±0.2×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1; (2.8±0.1×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1; (3.2±0.3×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1 for 1st, 2nd and 3rd layers respectively. For each layer in the capsule, the thermal neutron flux is not uniform and it was no degradation flux in the axial direction, both for polyethylene and aluminum capsules. Contour map of eight layer on polyethylene capsule and six layers on aluminum capsule for RS01 and RS02 irradiation channels had a similar pattern with a small diversity for all type of the irradiation capsule. Keywords: thermal neutron, flux, capsule, NAA   Analisis aktivasi neutron instrumental berbasis metode k0 (k0-AANI memerlukan ketersediaan data parameter reaktor yang akurat, khususnya data fluks neutron termal yang berinteraksi dengan inti sasaran di dalam kapsul target. Penelitian ini bertujuan menentukan dan memetakan fluks neutron termal

  4. Gas and Gas Pains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to produce gas. Often, relatively simple changes in eating habits can lessen bothersome gas. Certain digestive system disorders, ... such as soda and beer, increase stomach gas. Eating habits, such as eating too quickly, drinking through a ...

  5. On the significance of natural gas with regard to tomorrow's customer target group; Zur Bedeutung von Erdgas in der Kundenzielgruppe von morgen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halstrup, Dominik [Hochschule Osnabrueck (Germany). Professur fuer BWL und Strategisches Management; Groeblinghoff, Sebastian [EVU, Essen (Germany); Walsh, Gianfranco [Koblenz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Management

    2011-10-15

    Competition between the energy carriers in Germany's heating market has become harsher over the past years and is expected to grow still further. Successful customer acquisition and long-term customer retention will become increasingly important for natural gas supply companies. For this reason decision makers at public utilities that have a significant share of natural gas in their sales portfolio should have the foresight to ask themselves what sentiment tomorrow's home and house owners will have towards natural gas as an energy product as well as towards their company.

  6. Natural gas; Gas Natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Carlos A.; Moraes, Claudia C.D. [Eletricidade de Sao Paulo S.A. (ELETROPAULO), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Carlos H.F. [Centrais Eletricas de Santa Catarina S.A., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Silva, Clecio Fabricio da; Alves, Ricardo P. [Companhia Paranaense de Energia (COPEL), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Sposito, Edivaldo Soares; Hulle, Lutero [Espirito Santo Centrais Eletricas S.A. (ESCELSA), Vitoria, ES (Brazil); S. Martins, Icaro da [Centrais Eletricas do Norte do Brasil S.A. (ELETRONORTE), Belem, PA (Brazil); Vilhena, Joao Luiz S. de [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Fagundes, Zaluar Aquino [Companhia Estadual de Energia Eletrica do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    1996-12-31

    An increase in the consumption of natural gas in Brazil is an expected fact in what concerns energetic planning. This work presents the existing situation in what concerns natural gas utilization in the main world economies, as well as an analysis of the participation of this fuel among the energy final consumption per sources. The Brazilian consumption of natural gas is also analysed as well as the international agreement between Brazil and Bolivia for natural gas commercialization. Some legal, institutional and political aspects related to natural gas commercialization are also discussed. Finally, several benefits to be brought by the utilization of natural gas are presented 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  7. Gas and Gas Pains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gas and gas pains Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  8. Non-targeted volatile profiles for the classification of the botanical origin of Chinese honey by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Jin, Linghe; Fan, Chunlin; Wang, Wenwen

    2017-11-01

    A potential method for the discrimination and prediction of honey samples of various botanical origins was developed based on the non-targeted volatile profiles obtained by solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry combined with chemometrics. The blind analysis of non-targeted volatile profiles was carried out using solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry for 87 authentic honey samples from four botanical origins (acacia, linden, vitex, and rape). The number of variables was reduced from 2734 to 70 by using a series of filters. Based on the optimized 70 variables, 79.12% of the variance was explained by the first four principal components. Partial least squares discriminant analysis, naïve Bayes analysis, and back-propagation artificial neural network were used to develop the classification and prediction models. The 100% accuracy revealed a perfect classification of the botanical origins. In addition, the reliability and practicability of the models were validated by an independent set of additional 20 authentic honey samples. All 20 samples were accurately classified. The confidence measures indicated that the performance of the naïve Bayes model was better than the other two models. Finally, the characteristic volatile compounds of linden honey were tentatively identified. The proposed method is reliable and accurate for the classification of honey of various botanical origins. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Charge exchange between low energy Si ions and Cs adatoms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chen, X.; Šroubek, Zdeněk; Yarmoff, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 602, č. 2 (2008), s. 620-629 ISSN 0039-6028 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1067401; GA MŠk MEB060715 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : ion-surface impact * scattering * silicon * alkali metals Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.731, year: 2008

  10. Track structure for low energy ions including charge exchange processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, S.; Nikjoo, H.

    2002-01-01

    The model and development is described of a new generation of Monte Carlo track structure codes. The code LEAHIST simulates full slowing down of low-energy proton history tracks in the range 1 keV-1 MeV and the code LEAHIST simulates low-energy alpha particle history tracks in the range 1 keV-8 MeV in water. All primary ion interactions are followed down to 1 keV and all electrons to 1 eV. Tracks of secondary electrons ejected by ions were traced using the electron code KURBUC. Microdosimetric parameters derived by analysis of generated tracks are presented. (author)

  11. Gas conference Paris 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2013-01-01

    This special issue of Gaz d'Aujourd'hui journal contains the proceedings of the 2013 edition of the annual French gas conference. These proceedings comprise 7 talks, 5 round-tables and 9 workshops: 1 - Opening talk (H. Malherbe); 2 - Defending the natural gas position in the energy mix (G. Mestralet); 3 - The new youth of natural gas (P. Sauquet); 4 - Round-table No.1: the natural gas market perspectives; 5 - Round-table No.2: natural gas in France's energy transition; 6 - Answering the energy transition challenges (B. Lescoeur); 7 - Round-table No.3: towards an integrated European market in 2014?; 8 - Building up the European gas market (P. de Ladoucette); 9 - Workshop No.1: the big client's strategies in the gas market; 10 - Workshop No.2: the fuel gas perspectives in terrestrial mobility; 11 - Workshop No.3: gas innovations; 12 - The 2030 and 2050 strategy of the European Union policy (B. Devlin); 13 - Round-table No.4: Decentralized production and local development; 14 - Workshop No.4: Gas and maritime transport; 15 - Workshop No.5: bio-methane, vector of the energy transition; 16 - Workshop No.6: Evolution of the storage activity; 17 - Workshop No.7: Dwellings renovation and natural gas development; 18 - Workshop No.8: Is the target model of gas a reality?; 19 - Workshop No.9: Non-conventional gases in the world; 20 - Round-table No.5: Actors' strategy; 21 - Closing talk (J. Ferrier)

  12. Target vs spectral fingerprint data analysis of Iberian ham samples for avoiding labelling fraud using headspace - gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Manzanares, Natalia; Martín-Gómez, Andrés; Jurado-Campos, Natividad; Garrido-Delgado, Rocío; Arce, Cristina; Arce, Lourdes

    2018-04-25

    The data obtained with a polar or non-polar gas chromatography (GC) column coupled to ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been explored to classify Iberian ham, to detect possible frauds in their labelling. GC-IMS was used to detect the volatile compound profile of dry-cured Iberian ham from pigs fattened on acorn and pasture or on feed. Due to the two-dimensional nature of GC-IMS measurements, great quantities of data are obtained and an exhaustive chemometric processing is required. A first approach was based on the processing of the complete spectral fingerprint, while the second consisted of the selection of individual markers that appeared throughout the spectra. A classification rate of 90% was obtained with the first strategy, and the second approach correctly classified all Iberian ham samples according to the pigs' diet (classification rate of 100%). No significant differences were found between the GC columns tested in terms of classification rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A cylindrical multiwire high-pressure gas proportional chamber surrounding a gaseous $_{2} target with a mylar separation foil $6 \\mu m thick

    CERN Document Server

    Gastaldi, Ugo; Averdung, H; Bailey, J; Beer, G A; Dreher, B; Erdman, K L; Klempt, E; Merle, K; Neubecker, K; Sabev, C; Schwenk, H; Wendling, R D; White, B L; Wodrich, R

    1978-01-01

    The characteristics and performances of a cylindrical multiwire proportional chamber built and used at CERN in experiment S142 for the study of the pp atom spectroscopy are presented. The chamber surrounds a high-pressure gaseous H/sub 2/ target, from which it is separated by a very thin window (6 mu m mylar foil). The active volume (90 cm long; 2 cm thick, internal diameter=30 cm) is divided into 36 equal and independent cells each covering 10 degrees in azimuth. At 4 abs. atm the detection efficiency for X-rays is higher than 20% in the whole energy range 1.5-15 keV. Typical resolutions are 35% fwhm for the 3 ke V Ar fluorescence line and 25% fwhm for the 5.5 keV /sup 54/Mn line. Working pressures from 0.5 to 16 abs. atm have been used. (8 refs).

  14. CD11c-targeted Delivery of DNA to Dendritic Cells Leads to cGAS- and STING-dependent Maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Marlene F.; Christensen, Esben; Degn, Laura L.T.

    2018-01-01

    derived from the tumor cells. Doublestranded DNA play a particularly important role in the activation of the dendritic cells, through engagement of intracellular DNAsensors, and signaling through the adaptor protein STING. In the present study, we have investigated the maturational response of human...... with boosting the existing tumor-specific T-cell response. One way to achieve this could be by increasing the level of maturation of dendritic cells locally and in the draining lymph nodes. When exposed to cancer cells, dendritic cells may spontaneously mature because of dangerassociated molecular patterns...... found that dendritic cells can mature after exposure to cytoplasmic double-stranded DNA delivered through CD11c-mediated endocytosis. Moreover, we show that THP-1 cells matured using IL-4, GM-CSF, and ionomycin upregulate DC-maturation markers after CD11c-targeted delivery of double-stranded DNA...

  15. Non-target evaluation of contaminants in honey bees and pollen samples by gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakme, E; Lozano, A; Gómez-Ramos, M M; Hernando, M D; Fernández-Alba, A R

    2017-10-01

    This work presents a non-targeted screening approach for the detection and quantitation of contaminants in bees and pollen, collected from the same hive, by GC-EI-ToF-MS. It consists of a spectral library datasets search using a compound database followed by a manual investigation and analytical standard confirmation together with semi-quantitation purposes. Over 20% of the compounds found automatically by the library search could not be confirmed manually. This number of false positive detections was mainly a consequence of an inadequate ion ratio criterion (±30%), not considered in the automatic searching procedure. Eight compounds were detected in bees and pollen. They include insecticides/acaricides (chlorpyrifos, coumaphos, fluvalinate-tau, chlorfenvinphos, pyridaben, and propyl cresol) at a concentration range of 1-1207 μg kg -1 , herbicides (oxyfluorfen) at a concentration range of 212-1773 μg kg -1 and a growth regulator hormone (methoprene). Some compounds were detected only in pollen; such as herbicides (clomazone), insecticides/acaricides and fungicides used to control Varroa mites as benzylbenzoate, bufencarb, allethrin, permethrin, eugenol and cyprodinil. Additional compounds were detected only in bees: flamprop-methyl, 2-methylphenol (2-49 μg kg -1 ) and naphthalene (1-23 μg kg -1 ). The proposed method presents important advantages as it can avoid the use of an unachievable number of analytical standards considered target compounds "a priori" but not present in the analyzed samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The next step in Europe's climate action. Setting targets for 2030. Reviving the EU emissions trading system and bringing EU greenhouse gas emissions on a 2C track. Policy brief

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, N.; Gilbert, A.; Hagemann, M.; Fekete, H.; Lam, Long; De Vos, R. [Ecofys, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    This paper explains how setting 2030 targets will reinvigorate the ETS and will put EU emissions on track to limit global temperature increase below two degrees Celsius (2C). This paper describes four key findings for EU policymakers engaged in preparing EU energy and climate measures for 2030 and for the longer term. The European Commission estimates that by 2020, the companies participating in the ETS will have accumulated a surplus of 1.5 to 2.3 billion allowances, which may be banked and used beyond 2020. This is about the same size as the annual emissions budget of ETS companies (just below 2 billion tonnes). Applying equity principles to the global distribution of efforts in reaching the 2C goal, an indicative 'fair' EU contribution would be a reduction of EU greenhouse gas emissions by around 49% (median of a full range from 39 to 79%) by 2030 compared to 1990 levels. The 2030 targets can be set in a way to also accommodate the surplus expected until 2020. If the entire surplus of allowances from the ETS were to be used after 2020, the 2030 target has to become around 7 percentage points more stringent to compensate for that. Alternatively, the trajectory of the target from 2021 to 2030 could be set to compensate for the surplus. In addition, a more ambitious trajectory towards 2030 would cast its shadow on the mitigation in the period 2013-2020. It would strengthen the ETS, in conjunction with any other ETS recalibration options such as shifting the auctioning ('backloading') or cancelling allowances before 2020.

  17. Nanocomposite thin films of gold nanoparticles embedded in yttria-stabilized zirconia for plasmonic-based harsh environment gas detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Phillip H.

    Increased health concerns due to the emission of gases linked to the production of tropospheric ozone by petroleum based fuel burning engines has resulted in the codification of more stringent emissions regulations domestically. Emissions regulations on commercial jetliners are one of the areas to be met with stricter standards. Currently there is not a sensing technology that can detect the emissions gases in the exhaust stream of a jet turbine engine with lower detection limits that meet these standards. The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of noble metal nanoparticles embedded in dielectric matrices is an optical response that can be extremely sensitive to many environmental parameters. Nanocomposites of Au nanoparticles embedded in yttria-stabilized zirconia (Au-YSZ) are an ideal case study for these plasmonic materials. Using a metal oxide matrix with oxygen ion vacancies, such as YSZ, allows one to finely tune the local environmental charge of the embedded metal nanoparticles upon varying the oxygen and hydrogen content of the gas exposure mixture. After gas exposure data is collected in the form of optical absorption spectra, the LSPR spectra due to the Au nanoparticles embedded in the YSZ matrix undergo automated Lorentzian and Drude model fitting for calculating fundamental charge exchange and plasmonic dampening effects versus gas exposure concentration. These titration experiments have been performed for Au-YSZ nanocomposites exposed to O2, H2, NO 2, and CO in N2 backgrounds at 500°C and equilibrium data has been acquired for both the average charge per Au nanoparticle and the scattering frequency of the plasmons over a variety of exposure conditions. One paramount result made possible by this plasmonic based gas detection by Au-YSZ nanocomposite thin films was a repeatable 5 ppm lower detection limit towards NO2 in air at 500°C. In comparing the charge exchange observed using both the fitted exposure data and an electrochemical model

  18. Target analysis of tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives of nerve agent hydrolysis products by selectable one-dimensional or two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Yasuo; Tachikawa, Masumi; Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Ochiai, Nobuo

    2017-06-09

    A target analysis method for the sensitive and discriminative determination of the nerve agent hydrolysis products alkyl methylphosphonic acids as their tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) derivatives was developed using a combination of selectable one- and two-dimensional ( 1 D/ 2 D) GC-MS, and applied to the analysis of samples with significant interfering matrices. After sample drying, the alkylmethylphosphonic acids and methylphosphonic acid (MPA) were converted to TBDMS derivatives by addition of N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide with heating, and subjected to 1 D/ 2 D GC-MS. The apparatus consisted of an initial low thermal mass DB-5 column and a second DB-17 column together with an electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer, offering simple and flexible switching between one- and two-dimensional GC-MS analysis in a single GC-MS system. Using 1 D/ 2 D GC-MS, analytes that do not co-elute with matrix components can be separated using 1 D GC mode alone. Only those parts of the chromatogram that are negatively affected by the co-elution of matrix components need to be transferred and separated with 2 D GC. Quantitation can be performed by a combination of both separations and mass spectrometric detection. The TBDMS derivatives of ethyl-, isopropyl-, isobutyl-, pinacolyl-, and cyclohexyl-MPA (cHMPA) and MPA itself were well separated within 3min and determined in 1 D GC-MS mode with detection limits of around 10ng/ml of reaction mixture (except for the cHMPA derivative, whose mass spectrum contained noisy background peaks). In 2 D-GC-MS mode, where each 0.04min elution window from the 1 D GC was subjected to heart-cut (H/C) and transferred to the second column after back-flushing the first column, the peak for the cHMPA TBDMS derivative was isolated and afforded a clean mass spectrum within 6min. The recoveries of all the derivatives on 2 D GC from 1 D GC were estimated to be over 66%, and the detection limits were around 10ng/ml of

  19. Fast, sensitive, and selective gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for the target analysis of chemical secretions from femoral glands in lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáiz, Jorge; García-Roa, Roberto; Martín, José; Gómara, Belén

    2017-09-08

    Chemical signaling is a widespread mode of communication among living organisms that is used to establish social organization, territoriality and/or for mate choice. In lizards, femoral and precloacal glands are important sources of chemical signals. These glands protrude chemical secretions used to mark territories and also, to provide valuable information from the bearer to other individuals. Ecologists have studied these chemical secretions for decades in order to increase the knowledge of chemical communication in lizards. Although several studies have focused on the chemical analysis of these secretions, there is a lack of faster, more sensitive and more selective analytical methodologies for their study. In this work a new GC coupled to tandem triple quadrupole MS (GC-QqQ (MS/MS)) methodology is developed and proposed for the target study of 12 relevant compounds often found in lizard secretions (i.e. 1-hexadecanol, palmitic acid, 1-octadecanol, oleic acid, stearic acid, 1-tetracosanol, squalene, cholesta-3,5-diene, α-tocopherol, cholesterol, ergosterol and campesterol). The method baseline-separated the analytes in less than 7min, with instrumental limits of detection ranging from 0.04 to 6.0ng/mL. It was possible to identify differences in the composition of the samples from the lizards analyzed, which depended on the species, the habitat occupied and the diet of the individuals. Moreover, α-tocopherol has been determined for the first time in a lizard species, which was thought to lack its expression in chemical secretions. Globally, the methodology has been proven to be a valuable alternative to other published methods with important improvements in terms of analysis time, sensitivity, and selectivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Long-term optimization of the transport sector to address greenhouse gas reduction targets under rapid growth. Application of an energy system model for Gauteng province, South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomaschek, Jan

    2013-12-11

    The transport sector is seen as one of the key factors for driving future energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Especially in developing countries, significant growth in transport demand is expected. Gauteng province, as the economic centre of South Africa and transport hub for the whole of southern Africa, is one emerging urban region that faces rapid growth. However, the province is on its way to playing a leading role for supporting ways to adapt to climate change and mitigate GHG emissions. Conversely, there is a lack of scientific research on the promising measures for GHG mitigation in the transport sector. For the rapidly growing transport sector of the province in particular, research is focused primarily on extending and structuring the road infrastructure. Moreover, it is important that the transport sector is considered as part of the whole energy system, as significant contributions to GHG emissions and the associated costs arise from energy supply, provision and conversion. This research is the first application of an integrated energy system model (i.e. the TIMES-GEECO model) for the optimization of the transport sector of Gauteng. Optimizing energy system models allows finding least-cost measures for various scenarios, by considering dependencies and interlinkages in the energy system as well as environmental constraints. To do so, the transport sector and the energy supply sector had to be incorporated into the model application in terms of the characteristics of a developing urban region, which includes all relevant transport modes, vehicle technologies, fuel options, vehicle-to-grid energy storage, the consideration of road types as well as explicit expansions of the public transport system and income-dependent travel demand modelling. Additionally, GHG mitigation options outside the provincial boundaries were incorporated to allow for mitigation at least cost and to consider regional resource availability. Moreover, in TIMES

  1. Long-term optimization of the transport sector to address greenhouse gas reduction targets under rapid growth. Application of an energy system model for Gauteng province, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomaschek, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The transport sector is seen as one of the key factors for driving future energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Especially in developing countries, significant growth in transport demand is expected. Gauteng province, as the economic centre of South Africa and transport hub for the whole of southern Africa, is one emerging urban region that faces rapid growth. However, the province is on its way to playing a leading role for supporting ways to adapt to climate change and mitigate GHG emissions. Conversely, there is a lack of scientific research on the promising measures for GHG mitigation in the transport sector. For the rapidly growing transport sector of the province in particular, research is focused primarily on extending and structuring the road infrastructure. Moreover, it is important that the transport sector is considered as part of the whole energy system, as significant contributions to GHG emissions and the associated costs arise from energy supply, provision and conversion. This research is the first application of an integrated energy system model (i.e. the TIMES-GEECO model) for the optimization of the transport sector of Gauteng. Optimizing energy system models allows finding least-cost measures for various scenarios, by considering dependencies and interlinkages in the energy system as well as environmental constraints. To do so, the transport sector and the energy supply sector had to be incorporated into the model application in terms of the characteristics of a developing urban region, which includes all relevant transport modes, vehicle technologies, fuel options, vehicle-to-grid energy storage, the consideration of road types as well as explicit expansions of the public transport system and income-dependent travel demand modelling. Additionally, GHG mitigation options outside the provincial boundaries were incorporated to allow for mitigation at least cost and to consider regional resource availability. Moreover, in TIMES

  2. STANFORD: Internal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riordan, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Of burgeoning interest to many nuclear and particle physicists is a storage ring technique for fixed target experiments. It hinges on the use of gas-jet targets, shooting a narrow stream of atoms through a circulating beam of electrons or protons. Pioneered at CERN and the Soviet Novosibirsk Laboratory, more such 'internal targets' are being built or contemplated for storage rings in Europe, the Soviet Union, and the United States. From 9-12 January, physicists from around the world met at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to discuss prospects and problems in this expanding field

  3. Gas Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Luebke, Ryan

    2015-01-22

    A gas sensor using a metal organic framework material can be fully integrated with related circuitry on a single substrate. In an on-chip application, the gas sensor can result in an area-efficient fully integrated gas sensor solution. In one aspect, a gas sensor can include a first gas sensing region including a first pair of electrodes, and a first gas sensitive material proximate to the first pair of electrodes, wherein the first gas sensitive material includes a first metal organic framework material.

  4. Target Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — [Part of the ATLAS user facility.] The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces targets and foils of various thickness and substrates,...

  5. Polarized few-nucleon targets: new developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusser, O.

    1992-09-01

    We discuss recent improvements in producing polarized few-nucleon targets for nuclear and particle physics experiments. The emphasis is on progress with polarized gas targets intended for experiments at electron and proton storage rings. (author) 54 refs., 1 tab

  6. Detection of cold gas releases in space via low energy neutral atom imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McComas, D.J.; Funsten, H.O.; Moore, K.R.; Scime, E.E.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1993-01-01

    Low energy neutral atoms (LENAs) are produced in space plasmas by charge exchange between the ambient magnetospheric plasma ions and cold neutral atoms. Under normal conditions these cold neutrals come from the terrestrial geocorona, a shroud of few-eV hydrogen atoms surrounding the Earth. As a consequence of this charge exchange, it has become possible to remotely image many regions of the magnetosphere for the first time utilizing recently developed LENA imaging technology. In addition to the natural hydrogen geocorona, conventional explosions and maneuvering thruster firings can also introduce large amounts of cold gas into the space environment. In this paper the authors examine whether such potentially clandestine activities could also be remotely observed for the first time via LENA imaging. First, they examine the fluxes of LENAs produced in the space environment from a conventional explosion. Then they review the present state of the art in the emerging field of LENA detection and imaging. Recent work has shown that LENAs can be imaged by first converting the neutrals to ions with ultra-thin (10s of angstrom) foils and then electrostatically analyzing these newly created ions to reject the large (> 10 10 cm -2 s -1 ) UV background to which the low energy detectors are sensitive. They conclude that the sensitivities for present LENA imager designs may be just adequate for detecting some man-made releases. With additional improvements in LENA detection capabilities, this technique could become an important new method for monitoring for conventional explosions, as well as other man-made neutral releases, in the space environment

  7. Ultra-Low-Power MEMS Selective Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetter, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a system for gas sensing that includes an ultra-low-power MEMS (microelectromechanical system) gas sensor, combined with unique electronic circuitry and a proprietary algorithm for operating the sensor. The electronics were created from scratch, and represent a novel design capable of low-power operation of the proprietary MEMS gas sensor platform. The algorithm is used to identify a specific target gas in a gas mixture, making the sensor selective to that target gas.

  8. Gas gangrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissue infection - Clostridial; Gangrene - gas; Myonecrosis; Clostridial infection of tissues; Necrotizing soft tissue infection ... Gas gangrene is most often caused by bacteria called Clostridium perfringens. It also can be caused by ...

  9. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  10. Gas separating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollan, Arye Z.

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  11. Ruslands Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Elkjær, Jonas Bondegaard

    2008-01-01

    This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to obtain some political power. Russia owns 32,1 % of the world gas reserves, and The European Union is getting 50 % of its gas import from Russia. I will use John Mearsheimer’s theory ”The Tragedy of Great Power Politics” to explain how Russia can use its big reserves of gas on The European Union to get political influence. This paper is about Ru...

  12. Ruslands Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Elkjær, Jonas Bondegaard

    2008-01-01

    This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to obtain some political power. Russia owns 32,1 % of the world gas reserves, and The European Union is getting 50 % of its gas import from Russia. I will use John Mearsheimer’s theory ”The Tragedy of Great Power Politics” to explain how Russia can use its big reserves of gas on The European Union to get political influence.

  13. Harnessing gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Nigeria produces almost two million barrels of oil a day from its oil fields in the Niger Delta area. Most of the oil comes from reservoirs containing gas, which is produced with the oil. This associated gas is separated from the oil at flow stations and more than 95 per cent of it is flared-currently a total of some two billion standard cubic feet per day (scf/d), which is estimated to be about a quarter of the gas the world flares and vents. The energy available from Nigeria's flared gas is prodigious, equivalent to one quarter of France's gas requirements. The company recognises that flaring wastes a valuable resource and is environmentally damaging. It aims to stop necessary flaring as soon as possible through a series of projects to harness or conserve this gas. Several gas gathering and conservation projects are already underway in response to emerging markets while other plans await new markets. The company is committed to reduce gas flaring as soon as is feasible to the minimum needed to maintain safe operations. But why are solutions being found only now? why has Nigeria been flaring gas for so long? These question lie at the crux of the debate about Nigeria and gas flaring and the answers, which continue to have a major impact on associated gas development today, are rooted in history, economics and geography

  14. GAS BEARING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1960-09-01

    A gas lubricated bearing for a rotating shaft is described. The assembly comprises a stationary collar having an annular member resiliently supported thereon. The collar and annular member are provided with cooperating gas passages arranged for admission of pressurized gas which supports and lubricates a bearing block fixed to the rotatable shaft. The resilient means for the annular member support the latter against movement away from the bearing block when the assembly is in operation.

  15. Requirements for gas quality and gas appliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levinsky, Howard; Gersen, Sander; Kiewiet, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The gas transmission network in the Netherlands transports two different qualities of gas, low-calorific gas known as G-gas or L-gas and, high calorific gas (H-gas). These two gas qualities are transported in separate networks, and are connected by means of five blending and conversion

  16. Gas separating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollan, A.

    1988-03-29

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  17. Landfill gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartnell, Gaynor

    2000-01-01

    Following the UK Government's initiative for stimulating renewable energy through the Non-Fossil Fuel Obligation (NFFO), the UK landfill gas industry has more than trebled in size in just 4 years. As a result, UK companies are now in a strong position to offer their skills and services overseas. Ireland, Greece and Spain also resort heavily to disposal to landfill. Particularly rapid growth of the landfill gas market is expected in the OECD-Pacific and NAFTA areas. The article explains that landfill gas is a methane-rich mixture produced by anaerobic decomposition of organic wastes in landfills: under optimum conditions, up to 500 cubic meters of gas can be obtained from 1 tonne of biodegradable waste. Data on the number and capacity of sites in the UK are given. The Landfill Gas Association runs courses to counteract the skills shortage in the UK, and tailored courses for overseas visitors are planned

  18. Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector Gas System

    OpenAIRE

    Band, H. R.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M-C.; Heeger, K. M.; Kwok, M. W.; Shih, K.; Wise, T.; Xiao, Q.

    2012-01-01

    The Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector gas system is designed to protect the liquid scintillator targets of the antineutrino detectors against degradation and contamination from exposure to ambient laboratory air. The gas system is also used to monitor the leak tightness of the antineutrino detector assembly. The cover gas system constantly flushes the gas volumes above the liquid scintillator with dry nitrogen to minimize oxidation of the scintillator over the five year lifetime of the experimen...

  19. Antiproton Target

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Antiproton target used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). The first type of antiproton production target used from 1980 to 1982 comprised a rod of copper 3mm diameter and 120mm long embedded in a graphite cylinder that was itself pressed into a finned aluminium container. This assembly was air-cooled and it was used in conjunction with the Van der Meer magnetic horn. In 1983 Fermilab provided us with lithium lenses to replace the horn with a view to increasing the antiproton yield by about 30%. These lenses needed a much shorter target made of heavy metal - iridium was chosen for this purpose. The 50 mm iridium rod was housed in an extension to the original finned target container so that it could be brought very close to the entrance to the lithium lens. Picture 1 shows this target assembly and Picture 2 shows it mounted together with the lithium lens. These target containers had a short lifetime due to a combination of beam heating and radiation damage. This led to the design of the water-cooled target in...

  20. Asian gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, T.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on natural gas which now appears ready to take a leading role on the world energy stage. Demand for natural gas, and specifically LNG, will be strong throughout the world, particularly in Asia. Indonesia and Malaysia will become much more dependent on natural gas in the Asian market. In Thailand, where remarkable economic growth has been fueled by imported oil and domestically produced natural gas, LNG may soon have to be imported from neighboring countries. The author sees Thailand's imports of natural gas increasing from 1.5 to 4.5 million tons annually. Similarly, Korea's imports of LNG will rise from 2 to 8 million tons between 1987 and 2000. In Japan, energy demand is expected to increase at an even faster rate in the 1990s. Given the opposition to nuclear power generation and growing concern about the greenhouse effect, it is likely that LNG will satisfy a major portion of Japan's increasing demand for energy. Japanese gas companies are studying the possibility of establishing a national pipeline network to move gas beyond metropolitan areas

  1. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueebler, W.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  2. Gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahan, E.; Eudaly, J.P.

    1978-10-01

    This evaluation provides performance and cost data for commercially available simple- and regenerative-cycle gas turbines. Intercooled, reheat, and compound cycles are discussed from theoretical basis only, because actual units are not currently available, except on a special-order basis. Performance characteristics investigated include unit efficiency at full-load and off-design conditions, and at rated capacity. Costs are tabulated for both simple- and regenerative-cycle gas turbines. The output capacity of the gas turbines investigated ranges from 80 to 134,000 hp for simple units and from 12,000 to 50,000 hp for regenerative units.

  3. Oxide Fiber Targets at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Köster, U; Carminati, D; Catherall, R; Cederkäll, J; Correia, J G; Crepieux, B; Dietrich, M; Elder, K; Fedosseev, V; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Franchoo, S; Fynbo, H O U; Georg, U; Giles, T; Joinet, A; Jonsson, O C; Kirchner, R; Lau, C; Lettry, Jacques; Maier, H J; Mishin, V I; Oinonen, M; Peräjärvi, K; Ravn, H L; Rinaldi, T; Santana-Leitner, M; Wahl, U; Weissman, L

    2003-01-01

    Many elements are rapidly released from oxide matrices. Some oxide powder targets show a fast sintering, thus losing their favorable release characteristics. Loosely packed oxyde fiber targets are less critical since they may maintain their open structure even when starting to fuse together at some contact points. The experience with various oxyde fiber targets (titania, zirconia, ceria and thoria) used in the last years at ISOLDE is reviewed. For short-lived isotopes of Cu, Ga and Xe the zirconia and ceria targets respectively provided significantly higher yields than any other target (metal foils, oxide powders, etc.) tested before. Titania fibers, which were not commercially available, were produced in a relic process by impregnation of a rayon felt in a titanium chloride solution and subsequent calcination by heating the dried felt in air. Thoria fibers were obtained either by the same process or by burning commercial gas lantern mantle cloth. In the future a beryllia fiber target could be used to produce...

  4. Gas Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, Stuart P.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Selects fundamental developments in theory, methodology, and instrumentation in gas chromatography (GC). A special section reviews GC in the People's Republic of China. Over 1,000 references are cited. (CS)

  5. Comparison of measured and modeled gas-puff emissions on Alcator C-Mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung-Gyou; Terry, J. L.; Stotler, D. P.; Labombard, B. L.; Brunner, D. F.

    2017-10-01

    Understanding neutral transport in tokamak boundary plasmas is important because of its possible effects on the pedestal and scrape-off layer (SOL). On Alcator C-Mod, measured neutral line emissions from externally-puffed deuterium and helium gases are compared with the synthetic results of a neutral transport code, DEGAS 2. The injected gas flow rate and the camera response are absolutely calibrated. Time-averaged SOL density and temperature profiles are input to a steady-state simulation. An updated helium atomic model is employed in DEGAS2. Good agreement is found for the D α peak brightness and profile shape. However, the measured helium I line brightness is found to be lower than that in the simulation results by a roughly a factor of three over a wide range of density particularly in the far SOL region. Two possible causes for this discrepancy are reviewed. First, local cooling due to gas puff may suppress the line emission. Second, time-dependent turbulence effect may impact the helium neutral transport. Unlike deuterium atoms that gain energy from charge exchange and dissociation processes, helium neutrals remain cold and have a relatively short mean free path, known to make them prone to turbulence based on the Kubo number criterion. Supported by USDoE awards: DE-FC02-99ER54512, DE-SC0014251, and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. Tomorrow, gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Icart, Laura; Jean, Pascale; Georget, Cyrille; Schmill, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    This document contains 12 articles notably addressing the importance of natural gas production and supplies in Europe. The themes of the articles are: the advantages of natural gas in the context of energy and environmental policies, energy diversification, energy supply in the local territories, etc.; the position of GrDF, one of the main French natural gas supplier; LPG (butane, propane), a solution which popularity grows in remote areas; the Gaya project (production of renewable gas from dry biomass); a panorama of gas supply routes in Europe; the situation of gas in Europe's energy supply and consumption; the promotion of LNG fuel for maritime and fluvial ships; why the small scale LNG could be the next revolution; presentation of the new 'Honfleur' ferry (using LNG fuel) that will cross the English Channel by 2019; carbon market and the role of ETS for the energy policy in Europe facing the climatic change challenge; presentation of the French 'Climate Plan' that aims to engage France into a carbon neutrality by 2050; presentation of the French policy against air pollution; economic growth, energy, climate: how to square this circle?

  7. Current progress in NIF target concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobby, P.L.; Foreman, L.R.; Thoma, D.J.; Jacobson, L.A.; Hollis, R.V.; Barrera, J.; Mitchell, M.A.; Salazar, M.A.; Salzer, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    Target concepts for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require progress in the art and science of target fabrication. Three distinct issues are addressed: beryllium fuel capsules, foam-buffered direct drive, and high-density gas-filled hohlraums. In all cases experiments on the existing Nova laser at LLNL are either in progress or planned for the near future to test the various concepts. Consequently, target fabrication must be able to deliver targets appropriate for each

  8. Economics of natural gas upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackworth, J.H.; Koch, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Natural gas could be an important alternative energy source in meeting some of the market demand presently met by liquid products from crude oil. This study was initiated to analyze three energy markets to determine if greater use could be made of natural gas or natural gas derived products and if those products could be provided on an economically competitive basis. The three markets targeted for possible increases in gas use were motor fuels, power generation, and the chemical feedstocks market. The economics of processes to convert natural gas to transportation fuels, chemical products, and power were analyzed. The economic analysis was accomplished by drawing on a variety of detailed economic studies, updating them and bringing the results to a common basis. The processes analyzed included production of methanol, MTBE, higher alcohols, gasoline, CNG, and LNG for the transportation market. Production and use of methanol and ammonia in the chemical feedstock market and use of natural gas for power generation were also assessed. Use of both high and low quality gas as a process feed stream was evaluated. The analysis also explored the impact of various gas price growth rates and process facility locations, including remote gas areas. In assessing the transportation fuels market the analysis examined production and use of both conventional and new alternative motor fuels

  9. Targeted Learning

    CERN Document Server

    van der Laan, Mark J

    2011-01-01

    The statistics profession is at a unique point in history. The need for valid statistical tools is greater than ever; data sets are massive, often measuring hundreds of thousands of measurements for a single subject. The field is ready to move towards clear objective benchmarks under which tools can be evaluated. Targeted learning allows (1) the full generalization and utilization of cross-validation as an estimator selection tool so that the subjective choices made by humans are now made by the machine, and (2) targeting the fitting of the probability distribution of the data toward the targe

  10. Visualizing Energy on Target: Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    from the increased number of intermolecular interactions at the higher mass densities . This may also be why the size of the hot spot increases with...of energy deposition by a shocked diatomic gas into a stationary target is studied as a function of multiple variables including gas density , impact...into the vibrational channels of the gas is a function of the density . 15. SUBJECT TERMS molecular dynamics, energy deposition, rovibrational

  11. Mass Producing Targets for Nuclear Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Kendall, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Metal-encapsulating technique advances prospects of controlling nuclear fusion. Prefilled fusion targets form at nozzle as molten metal such as tin flows through outer channel and pressurized deuterium/tritium gas flows through inner channel. Molten metal completely encloses gas charge as it drops off nozzle.

  12. Nuclear spin polarization of targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Happer, W.

    1990-01-01

    Lasers can be used to produce milligrams to grams of noble gas nuclei with spin polarizations in excess of 50%. These quantities are sufficient to be very useful targets in nuclear physics experiments. Alkali-metal atoms are used to capture the angular momentum of circularly polarized laser photons, and the alkali-metal atoms transfer their angular momentum to noble gas atoms in binary or three-body collisions. Non-radiative collisions between the excited alkali atoms and molecular quenching gases are essential to avoid radiation trapping. The spin exchange can involve gas-phase van der Waals molecules, consisting of a noble gas atom and an alkali metal atom. Surface chemistry is also of great importance in determining the wall-induced relaxation rates of the noble gases

  13. A perspective on Canadian shale gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Mike; Davidson, Jim; Mortensen, Paul

    2010-09-15

    In a relatively new development over just the past few years, shale formations are being targeted for natural gas production. Based on initial results, there may be significant potential for shale gas in various regions of Canada, not only in traditional areas of conventional production but also non-traditional areas. However, there is much uncertainty because most Canadian shale gas production is currently in experimental or early developmental stages. Thus, its full potential will not be known for some time. If exploitation proves to be successful, Canadian shale gas may partially offset projected long-term declines in Canadian conventional natural gas production.

  14. What future for gas in Europe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lescoeur, Bruno; Noilhan, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    In 2009 the fundamentals of the European gas industry were challenged by the break-through of shale gas in the United-States and a drop in gas demand in Europe. De-correlation of gas markets and oil indexed long term contracts prices challenged the historical means to finance needed infrastructures. In the years to come, gas will play in increasing role in electricity generation, driven by CO 2 emission reduction targets and the need for renewables intermittency backup. The gas industry has to re-invent tools to allow infrastructures development. Among those, indexing long term gas contracts to de-carbonised electricity production could more accurately reflect the final market of such gas as well as maintain the long term producer/customer relationships

  15. Cowdung gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A basic guide for the design and construction of a small biogas plant is presented. The gas holder consists of a battery of seven used oil drums bound together with interconnected via plastic piping. Most other components, with the exception of metal valves and joints, are made of wood, stone or cement.

  16. Gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  17. Moeller polarimetry with atomic hydrogen targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudakov, E.; Luppov, V.

    2005-01-01

    A novel proposal of using polarized atomic hydrogen gas, stored in an ultra-cold magnetic trap, as the target for electron beam polarimetry based on Moeller scattering is discussed. Such a target of practically 100% polarized electrons could provide a superb systematic accuracy of about 0.5% for beam polarization measurements. Feasibility studies for the CEBAF electron beam have been performed. (orig.)

  18. Accelerator target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlyer, David J.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Koehler, Conrad

    1999-01-01

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression.

  19. Effects of neutral gas collisions on the power transmission factor at the divertor sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futch, A.H.; Matthews, G.F.; Buchenauer, D.; Hill, D.N.; Jong, R.A.; Porter, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    We show that charge-exchange and other ion-neutral collision can reduce the power transmission factor of the plasma sheath, thereby lowering the ion impact energy and target plate sputtering. The power transmission factor relates the heat flux reaching the divertor target to the plasma density and temperature just in front of the surface: δ=Q surf /J ew k T e . Experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak suggests that δ could be as low as 2-3 near the region of peak divertor particle flux, instead of the 7-8 expected from usual sheath theory. Several effects combine to allow ion-neutral interactions to be important in the divertor plasma sheath. The shallow angle of incidence of the magnetic field (1-3deg in DIII-D) leads to the spatial extension of the sheath from approximately ρ i ∝1 mm normal to the plate to several centimeters along the field lines. Ionization reduces the sheath potential, and collisions reduce the ion impact energy. (orig.)

  20. Volcanic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  1. Potential impacts of OCS oil and gas activities on fisheries. Volume 1. Annotated bibliography and database descriptions for target-species distribution and abundance studies. Section 1, Part 2. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tear, L.M.

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of the volume is to present an annotated bibliography of unpublished and grey literature related to the distribution and abundance of select species of finfish and shellfish along the coasts of the United States. The volume also includes descriptions of databases that contain information related to target species' distribution and abundance. An index is provided at the end of each section to help the reader locate studies or databases related to a particular species

  2. Gas shale/oil shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, N.S.; Bereskin, S.R.; Bowker, K.A.; Cardott, B.J.; Chidsey, T.C.; Dubiel, R.F.; Enomoto, C.B.; Harrison, W.B.; Jarvie, D.M.; Jenkins, C.L.; LeFever, J.A.; Li, Peng; McCracken, J.N.; Morgan, C.D.; Nordeng, S.H.; Nyahay, R.E.; Schamel, Steven; Sumner, R.L.; Wray, L.L.

    2011-01-01

    The production of natural gas from shales continues to increase in North America, and shale gas exploration is on the rise in other parts of the world since the previous report by this committee was published by American Association of Petroleum Geologists, Energy Minerals Division (2009). For the United States, the volume of proved reserves of natural gas increased 11% from 2008 to 2009, the increase driven largely by shale gas development (Energy Information Administration 2010c). Furthermore, shales have increasingly become targets of exploration for oil and condensate as well as gas, which has served to greatly expand their significance as ‘‘unconventional’’ petroleum reservoirs.This report provides information about specific shales across North America and Europe from which gas (biogenic or thermogenic), oil, or natural gas liquids are produced or is actively being explored. The intent is to reflect the recently expanded mission of the Energy Minerals Division (EMD) Gas Shales Committee to serve as a single point of access to technical information on shales regardless of the type of hydrocarbon produced from them. The contents of this report were drawn largely from contributions by numerous members of the EMD Gas Shales Advisory Committee, with much of the data being available from public websites such as state or provincial geological surveys or other public institutions. Shales from which gas or oil is being produced in the United States are listed in alphabetical order by shale name. Information for Canada is presented by province, whereas for Europe, it is presented by country.

  3. Development of SSUBPIC code for modeling the neutral gas depletion effect in helicon discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollasch, Jeffrey; Sovenic, Carl; Schmitz, Oliver

    2017-10-01

    The SSUBPIC (steady-state unstructured-boundary particle-in-cell) code is being developed to model helicon plasma devices. The envisioned modeling framework incorporates (1) a kinetic neutral particle model, (2) a kinetic ion model, (3) a fluid electron model, and (4) an RF power deposition model. The models are loosely coupled and iterated until convergence to steady-state. Of the four required solvers, the kinetic ion and neutral particle simulation can now be done within the SSUBPIC code. Recent SSUBPIC modifications include implementation and testing of a Coulomb collision model (Lemons et al., JCP, 228(5), pp. 1391-1403) allowing efficient coupling of kineticly-treated ions to fluid electrons, and implementation of a neutral particle tracking mode with charge-exchange and electron impact ionization physics. These new simulation capabilities are demonstrated working independently and coupled to ``dummy'' profiles for RF power deposition to converge on steady-state plasma and neutral profiles. The geometry and conditions considered are similar to those of the MARIA experiment at UW-Madison. Initial results qualitatively show the expected neutral gas depletion effect in which neutrals in the plasma core are not replenished at a sufficient rate to sustain a higher plasma density. This work is funded by the NSF CAREER award PHY-1455210 and NSF Grant PHY-1206421.

  4. Determination of Anisotropic Ion Velocity Distribution Function in Intrinsic Gas Plasma. Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaev, A.; Grabovskiy, A.; Murillo, O.; Soukhomlinov, V.

    2018-02-01

    The first seven coefficients of the expansion of the energy and angular distribution functions in Legendre polynomials for Hg+ ions in Hg vapor plasma with the parameter E/P ≈ 400 V/(cm Torr) are measured for the first time using a planar one-sided probe. The analytic solution to the Boltzmann kinetic equation for ions in the plasma of their parent gas is obtained in the conditions when the resonant charge exchange is the predominant process, and ions acquire on their mean free path a velocity much higher than the characteristic velocity of thermal motion of atoms. The presence of an ambipolar field of an arbitrary strength is taken into account. It is shown that the ion velocity distribution function is determined by two parameters and differs substantially from the Maxwellian distribution. Comparison of the results of calculation of the drift velocity of He+ ions in He, Ar+ in Ar, and Hg+ in Hg with the available experimental data shows their conformity. The results of the calculation of the ion distribution function correctly describe the experimental data obtained from its measurement. Analysis of the result shows that in spite of the presence of the strong field, the ion velocity distribution functions are isotropic for ion velocities lower than the average thermal velocity of atoms. With increasing ion velocity, the distribution becomes more and more extended in the direction of the electric field.

  5. Anaesthesia Gas Supply: Gas Cylinders

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava, Uma

    2013-01-01

    Invention of oxygen cylinder was one of the most important developments in the field of medical practice. Oxygen and other gases were compressed and stored at high pressure in seamless containers constructed from hand-forged steel in1880. Materials technology has continued to evolve and now medical gas cylinders are generally made of steel alloys or aluminum. The filling pressure as well as capacity has increased considerably while at the same time the weight of cylinders has reduced. Today o...

  6. Coherent pion production in the {sup 12}C and {sup 40}Ca by the (3 He,t{pi}{sup +}) charge exchange reaction at 2 GeV; Production coherente de pions dans les noyaux {sup 12}C, {sup 40}Ca, par reaction d`echange de charge ({sup 3}He, t{pi}{sup +}) a 2 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhi, Laurent [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1997-10-13

    The coherent pion production process on nuclei is defined as the excitation of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta(1232) resonance, creating a delta-hole state. This state propagates through the nuclear medium and then decays in a single pion, living the target nuclei in its ground state. In the nuclei, the attractive interaction between delta-hole states in the spin-longitudinal channel shifts down the effective mass of the delta and induces a collective state of excitation. The nuclear response in the longitudinal channel of interaction can be studied experimentally through the resonance decay coherent process triggered by a probe coupling longitudinally with the delta and selected by the target form factor. The ({sup 3}He, t) probe at 2 GeV on nuclei and the experimental set-up SPES IV-Pi have been used to study this decay process. A simulation program using GEANT and including theoretical consideration, knowledge of previous experimental results and the experimental properties of the set-up, have demonstrated the capability of the experiment for this study. The setting of the PCOS-IV acquisition system of multiwire proportional chambers and of the development and use of programs for treatment and analysis of experimental data have been necessary steps to make the experiment at Laboratoire National SATURNE as well as to obtain physical parameters in order to exhibit the coherent process. Nevertheless, the angular distribution of coherent pions differ from the theoretical predictions. Several hypotheses involving the experimental set-up and physical processes have been investigated in order to account for such distributions. (author) 44 refs., 68 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Natural gas marketing II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This book covers all aspects of gas marketing, from the basic regulatory structure to the latest developments in negotiating agreements and locating markets. Topics include: Federal regulation of the gas industry; Fundamentals of gas marketing contracts; FERC actions encouraging competitive markets; Marketing conditions from the pipelines' perspective; State non-utility regulation of natural gas production, transportation, and marketing; Natural gas wellhead agreements and tariffs; Natural gas processing agreements; Effective management of producer's natural gas contracts; Producer-pipeline litigation; Natural gas purchasing from the perspective of industrial gas users; Gas marketing by co-owners: problems of disproportionate sales, gas balancing, and accounting to royalty owners; Alternatives and new directions in marketing

  8. Target continuum distorted-wave theory for collisions of fast protons with atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crothers, D.S.F.; Dunseath, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    By considering the target continuum distorted-wave (TCDW) theory as the high-energy limit of the half-way house variational continuum distorted-wave theory, it is shown not only that there is no intermediate elastic divergence but also that the second-order amplitude based on a purely elastic intermediate state is of order υ -6 and is thus negligible. The residual inelastic TCDW theory is developed to second-order at high velocities. It is used to describe charge exchange during collisions of fast protons with atomic hydrogen. Using an on-shell peaking approximation and considering 1s-1s capture it is shown that the residual purely second-order transition amplitude comprises two terms, one real term of order υ -6 and one purely imaginary term of order υ -7 ln υ. At 5 MeV laboratory energy, it is shown that these are negligible. It is also shown that the υ -5 first-order term gives a differential cross section in very good agreement with an experiment at all angles including forward, interference minimum, Thomas maximum and large angles, particularly having folded our theory over experimental resolution. (author)

  9. Gas sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, J.N.; Atwood, E.S.

    1987-04-21

    A method is described for detecting SO/sub 2/ gas in a gaseous or liquid sample, the method comprising testing the sample in an electrochemical cell comprising a body and within the body a detection electrode, a reference electrode, a liquid electrolyte connecting the electrodes. And a membrane permeable to the gas is in close proximity to the detection electrode and arranged to separate the electrodes and the electrolyte from the sample, the liquid electrolyte being an aqueous buffer solution buffered to a pH value of between 6.0 and 7.2 and being initially essentially free of any salt capable of dissociating to form in the electrolyte HSO/sub 3/ or SO/sub 3/. The electrolyte contains at least 25% v/v of a water miscible solvent having a dielectric constant of at least 10 and being non-interfering with the detection and reference electrodes. The testing comprises measuring a change in potential between the reference electrode and the detection electrode.

  10. Measurements of gas and volatile element production rates from an irradiated molten lead and lead-bismuth spallation target with proton beams of 1 and 1.4 GeV; Mesures de taux de production d'elements gazeux et volatiles lors de reactions induites par des protons de 1 et 1,4 GeV sur des cibles epaisses de plomb et plomb-bismuth liquides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tall, Y

    2008-03-15

    The integrated project EUROTRANS (European Research Programme for the Transmutation of High Level Nuclear Waste in an Accelerator Driven System) of the 6. EURATOM Framework Programme aims to demonstrate the transmutation of radioactive waste in ADS (Accelerator Driven Sub-critical system). It will carry out a first advanced design of an experimental facility to demonstrate the technical feasibility of transmutation, and will produce a conceptual design of an industrial facility dedicated to transmutation. An ADS consists of three fundamental elements: the accelerator of protons, the sub-critical core and the spallation target. SUBATECH (physique Sub-Atomique et des Technologies associees) laboratory is involved to the study of the chosen liquid lead-bismuth as a spallation ADS target. The irradiation of liquid lead-bismuth target with energetic proton beam generates in addition to neutrons, volatile and radioactive residues. In order to determine experimentally the production rates of gas and volatile elements following a spallation reaction in a lead-bismuth target, the experiment IS419 was performed at the ISOLDE facility at CERN (Centre Europeen de la Recherche Nucleaire). This experiment constitutes the frame of the thesis whose main objective is to assess and study the production and release rates of many gas and volatile element from the irradiated lead-bismuth target with an energetic proton beam. The obtained data are compared to Monte Carlo simulation code (MCNPX) results in order to test the intranuclear cascade model of Bertini and of Cugnon, and the evaporation options of Dresner and Schmidt. (author)

  11. Emission quantification using the tracer gas dispersion method: The influence of instrument, tracer gas species and source simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delre, Antonio; Mønster, Jacob; Samuelsson, Jerker

    2018-01-01

    The tracer gas dispersion method (TDM) is a remote sensing method used for quantifying fugitive emissions by relying on the controlled release of a tracer gas at the source, combined with concentration measurements of the tracer and target gas plumes. The TDM was tested at a wastewater treatment...

  12. Corporate renewal in the natural gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, B.

    1994-01-01

    The changes occurring at the gas-related operating companies of Nova Corporation of Alberta are reviewed. These companies include Nova Gas Transmission, Alberta's major gas pipeline company, which moved 3.8 trillion ft 3 of gas in 1993; Nova Gas Services, a provider of gas management services to customers in Canada, USA, and Mexico; and Novacorp International, a joint venture investor in gas pipeline developments and consulting. The changes were made in response to increased competition in the gas transport industry following the deregulation process that started in the mid-1980s. A strategic direction based on growth rather than cost-cutting was chosen in order to make the Nova companies dominant players in North American gas supply. Nova's confidence in being able to implement such a strategy is based on four factors: abundant supply of gas and high potential for growth in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin; steadily growing demand for gas; the development of a market-responsive industry; and the emergence of a truly North American market that includes Mexico. Business transformation teams were established with the task of finding out the right business design to meet customer needs and to provide exceptional service. Detailed plans for implementing the transformation are being completed, and a performance measurement system with clear targets has been developed to measure the success of the transformation

  13. Addressing uncertainties in estimates of recoverable gas for underexplored Shale gas Basins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heege, J.H. ter; Zijp, M.H.A.A.; Bruin, G. de; Veen, J.H. ten

    2014-01-01

    Uncertainties in upfront predictions of hydraulic fracturing and gas production of underexplored shale gas targets are important as often large potential resources are deduced based on limited available data. In this paper, uncertainties are quantified by using normal distributions of different

  14. Gas, gas, gas... discoveries and developments booming worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, F.

    2000-01-01

    Deep water exploration is yielding more than billion barrel oil fields. Unocal's 3 May discovery of 2-3 Tcf of gas in its Kutei block of Indonesia marks the first major discovery of natural gas in the deep water frontier: Wildcats Gula and Gada were drilled in over 1800 m of water as part of an aggressive search for gas instigated by Unocal last year. The author makes a survey of gas exploration and development throughout the world. (author)

  15. Ionized gas at the edge of the central molecular zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, W. D.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Pineda, J. L.; Velusamy, T.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Wiesemeyer, H.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The edge of the central molecular zone (CMZ) is the location where massive dense molecular clouds with large internal velocity dispersions transition to the surrounding more quiescent and lower CO emissivity region of the Galaxy. Little is known about the ionized gas surrounding the molecular clouds and in the transition region. Aims: We determine the properties of the ionized gas at the edge of the CMZ near Sgr E using observations of N+ and C+. Methods: We observed a small portion of the edge of the CMZ near Sgr E with spectrally resolved [C ii] 158 μm and [N ii] 205 μm fine structure lines at six positions with the GREAT instrument on SOFIA and in [C ii] using Herschel HIFI on-the-fly strip maps. We use the [N ii] spectra along with a radiative transfer model to calculate the electron density of the gas and the [C ii] maps to illuminate the morphology of the ionized gas and model the column density of CO-dark H2. Results: We detect two [C ii] and [N ii] velocity components, one along the line of sight to a CO molecular cloud at - 207 km s-1 associated with Sgr E and the other at -174 km s-1 outside the edge of another CO cloud. From the [N ii] emission we find that the average electron density is in the range of ~5 to 21 cm-3 for these features. This electron density is much higher than that of the disk's warm ionized medium, but is consistent with densities determined for bright diffuse H ii nebula. The column density of the CO-dark H2 layer in the -207 km s-1 cloud is ~1-2 × 1021 cm-2 in agreement with theoretical models. The CMZ extends further out in Galactic radius by ~7 to 14 pc in ionized gas than it does in molecular gas traced by CO. Conclusions: The edge of the CMZ likely contains dense hot ionized gas surrounding the neutral molecular material. The high fractional abundance of N+ and high electron density require an intense EUV field with a photon flux of order 106 to 107 photons cm-2 s-1, and/or efficient proton charge exchange with

  16. Gas sensor with attenuated drift characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ing-Shin [Danbury, CT; Chen, Philip S. H. [Bethel, CT; Neuner, Jeffrey W [Bethel, CT; Welch, James [Fairfield, CT; Hendrix, Bryan [Danbury, CT; Dimeo, Jr., Frank [Danbury, CT

    2008-05-13

    A sensor with an attenuated drift characteristic, including a layer structure in which a sensing layer has a layer of diffusional barrier material on at least one of its faces. The sensor may for example be constituted as a hydrogen gas sensor including a palladium/yttrium layer structure formed on a micro-hotplate base, with a chromium barrier layer between the yttrium layer and the micro-hotplate, and with a tantalum barrier layer between the yttrium layer and an overlying palladium protective layer. The gas sensor is useful for detection of a target gas in environments susceptible to generation or incursion of such gas, and achieves substantial (e.g., >90%) reduction of signal drift from the gas sensor in extended operation, relative to a corresponding gas sensor lacking the diffusional barrier structure of the invention

  17. Tritium and ignition target management at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draggoo, Vaughn

    2013-06-01

    Isotopic mixtures of hydrogen constitute the basic fuel for fusion targets of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A typical NIF fusion target shot requires approximately 0.5 mmoles of hydrogen gas and as much as 750 GBq (20 Ci) of 3H. Isotopic mix ratios are specified according to the experimental shot/test plan and the associated test objectives. The hydrogen isotopic concentrations, absolute amounts, gas purity, configuration of the target, and the physical configuration of the NIF facility are all parameters and conditions that must be managed to ensure the quality and safety of operations. An essential and key step in the preparation of an ignition target is the formation of a ~60 μm thick hydrogen "ice" layer on the inner surface of the target capsule. The Cryogenic Target Positioning System (Cryo-Tarpos) provides gas handling, cyro-cooling, x-ray imaging systems, and related instrumentation to control the volumes and temperatures of the multiphase (solid, liquid, and gas) hydrogen as the gas is condensed to liquid, admitted to the capsule, and frozen as a single spherical crystal of hydrogen in the capsule. The hydrogen fuel gas is prepared in discrete 1.7 cc aliquots in the LLNL Tritium Facility for each ignition shot. Post-shot hydrogen gas is recovered in the NIF Tritium Processing System (TPS). Gas handling systems, instrumentation and analytic equipment, material accounting information systems, and the shot planning systems must work together to ensure that operational and safety requirements are met.

  18. Chemical characterization of the acid alteration of diesel fuel: Non-targeted analysis by two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry with tile-based Fisher ratio and combinatorial threshold determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Brendon A; Pinkerton, David K; Wright, Bob W; Synovec, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    The illicit chemical alteration of petroleum fuels is of keen interest, particularly to regulatory agencies that set fuel specifications, or taxes/credits based on those specifications. One type of alteration is the reaction of diesel fuel with concentrated sulfuric acid. Such reactions are known to subtly alter the chemical composition of the fuel, particularly the aromatic species native to the fuel. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) is well suited for the analysis of diesel fuel, but may provide the analyst with an overwhelming amount of data, particularly in sample-class comparison experiments comprised of many samples. Tile-based Fisher-ratio (F-ratio) analysis reduces the abundance of data in a GC×GC-TOFMS experiment to only the peaks which significantly distinguish the unaltered and acid altered sample classes. Three samples of diesel fuel from differently branded filling stations were each altered to discover chemical features, i.e., analyte peaks, which were consistently changed by the acid reaction. Using different fuels prioritizes the discovery of features likely to be robust to the variation present between fuel samples and may consequently be useful in determining whether an unknown sample has been acid altered. The subsequent analysis confirmed that aromatic species are removed by the acid alteration, with the degree of removal consistent with predicted reactivity toward electrophilic aromatic sulfonation. Additionally, we observed that alkenes and alkynes were also removed from the fuel, and that sulfur dioxide or compounds that degrade to sulfur dioxide are generated by the acid alteration. In addition to applying the previously reported tile-based F-ratio method, this report also expands null distribution analysis to algorithmically determine an F-ratio threshold to confidently select only the features which are sufficiently class-distinguishing. When applied to the acid

  19. Chemical characterization of the acid alteration of diesel fuel: Non-targeted analysis by two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry with tile-based Fisher ratio and combinatorial threshold determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, Brendon A.; Pinkerton, David K.; Wright, Bob W.; Synovec, Robert E.

    2016-04-01

    The illicit chemical alteration of petroleum fuels is of scientific interest, particularly to regulatory agencies which set fuel specifications, or excises based on those specifications. One type of alteration is the reaction of diesel fuel with concentrated sulfuric acid. Such reactions are known to subtly alter the chemical composition of the fuel, particularly the aromatic species native to the fuel. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC–TOFMS) is ideally suited for the analysis of diesel fuel, but may provide the analyst with an overwhelming amount of data, particularly in sample-class comparison experiments comprised of many samples. The tile-based Fisher-ratio (F-ratio) method reduces the abundance of data in a GC × GC–TOFMS experiment to only the peaks which significantly distinguish the unaltered and acid altered sample classes. Three samples of diesel fuel from different filling stations were each altered to discover chemical features, i.e., analyte peaks, which were consistently changed by the acid reaction. Using different fuels prioritizes the discovery of features which are likely to be robust to the variation present between fuel samples and which will consequently be useful in determining whether an unknown sample has been acid altered. The subsequent analysis confirmed that aromatic species are removed by the acid alteration, with the degree of removal consistent with predicted reactivity toward electrophilic aromatic sulfonation. Additionally, we observed that alkenes and alkynes were also removed from the fuel, and that sulfur dioxide or compounds that degrade to sulfur dioxide are generated by the acid alteration. In addition to applying the previously reported tile-based F-ratio method, this report also expands null distribution analysis to algorithmically determine an F-ratio threshold to confidently select only the features which are sufficiently class-distinguishing. When

  20. The Spanish gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The spanish gas industry has become one of the major actors in the gas sector of the European Economic Community. This paper pictures the spanish gas industry on the basis of a study by Sedigas, the spanish member of the International Gas Union (IGU). The main subjects described are structure of gas companies, natural gas supply, transport and storage, natural gas distribution networks, statistical data on natural gas consumption, manufactured gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gases (LPG) production-consumption in Spain. 7 figs., 10 tabs

  1. Price regulation to remove EE-DSM disincentives and pressure for increased energy sales in monopoly segments of restructured electricity and gas markets: the multiple drivers target (MDT) tariff scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagliano, L.; Alari, P.; Ruggieri, G.; Irrek, W.; Thomas, S.; Leprich, U.

    2002-01-01

    Even in restructured markets a part of the energy business remains a monopoly and should be correctly regulated. We present an analysis which reveals common structures in schemes enacted in UK, Norway, Portugal and recently (on the basis of this study) in Italy. The identified structure, which we named Multiple Driver Target (MDT) regulation is a performance-based regulation scheme, which provides incentives for greater economic efficiency, without creating biases against environmental efficiency. The method relies on a statistical analysis of the correlation of utility costs and a few 'cost drivers' (e.g. number of customers served, grid length, sold or transported energy). We discuss how MDT can be used to set price levels and price changes in the regulatory period in such a way to correctly match the evolution of costs and avoid awarding unwanted signals to utilities. At the opposite, pure Price Cap regulation provides artificial incentives to utilities to increase energy sales (even if this is not economic for the customers nor for society ) beyond the predicted levels foreseen in the price fixing Rate Cases. We show that Under MDT regulation the reduction in profits due to reduced sales as a consequence of DSM is minimised. In so doing this procedure removes the most important disincentive for utilities to implement DSM programmes since lost profits due to reduced sales can be substantially higher than direct costs of DSM programmes; once MDT regulation is in place, also these direct costs can be recovered through a small part of the tariff. We also discuss how MDT can be implemented with a moderate effort by regulatory authorities. (author)

  2. Natural gas trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.

    1991-01-01

    This book provides data on many facets of the natural gas industry. Topics include: Canadian, Mexican; US natural gas reserves and production; Mexican and US natural gas consumption; market conditions for natural gas in the US; and Canadian natural gas exports

  3. THE ORIGIN OF THE HOT GAS IN THE GALACTIC HALO: CONFRONTING MODELS WITH XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L.; Kwak, Kyujin; Joung, M. Ryan; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2010-01-01

    We compare the predictions of three physical models for the origin of the hot halo gas with the observed halo X-ray emission, derived from 26 high-latitude XMM-Newton observations of the soft X-ray background between l = 120 0 and l = 240 0 . These observations were chosen from a much larger set of observations as they are expected to be the least contaminated by solar wind charge exchange emission. We characterize the halo emission in the XMM-Newton band with a single-temperature plasma model. We find that the observed halo temperature is fairly constant across the sky (∼(1.8-2.4) x 10 6 K), whereas the halo emission measure varies by an order of magnitude (∼0.0005-0.006 cm -6 pc). When we compare our observations with the model predictions, we find that most of the hot gas observed with XMM-Newton does not reside in isolated extraplanar supernova (SN) remnants-this model predicts emission an order of magnitude too faint. A model of an SN-driven interstellar medium, including the flow of hot gas from the disk into the halo in a galactic fountain, gives good agreement with the observed 0.4-2.0 keV surface brightness. This model overpredicts the halo X-ray temperature by a factor of ∼2, but there are a several possible explanations for this discrepancy. We therefore conclude that a major (possibly dominant) contributor to the halo X-ray emission observed with XMM-Newton is a fountain of hot gas driven into the halo by disk SNe. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that the extended hot halo of accreted material predicted by disk galaxy formation models also contributes to the emission.

  4. Inertial fusion energy target injection, tracking, and beam pointing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petzoldt, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Several cryogenic targets must be injected each second into a reaction chamber. Required target speed is about 100 m/s. Required accuracy of the driver beams on target is a few hundred micrometers. Fuel strength is calculated to allow acceleration in excess of 10,000 m/s 2 if the fuel temperature is less than 17 K. A 0.1 μm thick dual membrane will allow nearly 2,000 m/s 2 acceleration. Acceleration is gradually increased and decreased over a few membrane oscillation periods (a few ms), to avoid added stress from vibrations which could otherwise cause a factor of two decrease in allowed acceleration. Movable shielding allows multiple targets to be in flight toward the reaction chamber at once while minimizing neutron heating of subsequent targets. The use of multiple injectors is recommended for redundancy which increases availability and allows a higher pulse rate. Gas gun, rail gun, induction accelerator, and electrostatic accelerator target injection devices are studied, and compared. A gas gun is the preferred device for indirect-drive targets due to its simplicity and proven reliability. With the gas gun, the amount of gas required for each target (about 10 to 100 mg) is acceptable. A revolver loading mechanism is recommended with a cam operated poppet valve to control the gas flow. Cutting vents near the muzzle of the gas gun barrel is recommended to improve accuracy and aid gas pumping. If a railgun is used, we recommend an externally applied magnetic field to reduce required current by an order of magnitude. Optical target tracking is recommended. Up/down counters are suggested to predict target arrival time. Target steering is shown to be feasible and would avoid the need to actively point the beams. Calculations show that induced tumble from electrostatically steering the target is not excessive

  5. Gas-generating reactions for point-of-care testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Tian, Tian; Chen, Xiaofeng; Lei, Zhichao; Song, Yanling; Shi, Yuanzhi; Ji, Tianhai; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Liu; Yang, Chaoyong

    2018-03-12

    Gas generation-based measurement is an attractive alternative approach for POC (Point-of-care) testing, which relies on the amount of generated gas to detect the corresponding target concentrations. In gas generation-based POC testing, the integration of a target recognition component and a catalyzed gas-generating reaction initiated by the target introduction can lead to greatly amplified signals, which can be highly sensitive measured via distance readout or simple hand-held devices. More importantly, numerous gas-generating reactions are environment-friendly since their products such as oxygen and nitrogen are nontoxic and odourless, which makes gas generation-based POC testing safe and secure for inexperienced staff. Researchers have demonstrated that gas generation-based measurements enable the rapid and highly sensitive POC detection of a variety of analytes. In this review, we focus on the recent developments in gas generation-based POC testing systems. The common types of gas-generating reactions are first listed and the translation of gas signals to different signal readouts for POC testing are then summarized, including distance readouts and hand-held devices. Moreover, we introduce gas bubbles as actuators to power microfluidic devices. We finally provide the applications and future perspective of gas generation-based POC testing systems.

  6. Gas in Andean countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos Pinzon, Rafael

    2000-01-01

    The paper explores aspects of gas integration among Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador and Peru. A comparison of the GDP is made, gas reserves are provided and the existent nets of gas-pipe are included in Colombia and Venezuela

  7. Anaesthesia gas supply: gas cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Uma

    2013-09-01

    Invention of oxygen cylinder was one of the most important developments in the field of medical practice. Oxygen and other gases were compressed and stored at high pressure in seamless containers constructed from hand-forged steel in1880. Materials technology has continued to evolve and now medical gas cylinders are generally made of steel alloys or aluminum. The filling pressure as well as capacity has increased considerably while at the same time the weight of cylinders has reduced. Today oxygen cylinder of equivalent size holds a third more oxygen but weighs about 20 kg less. The cylinders are of varying sizes and are color coded. They are tested at regular intervals by the manufacturer using hydraulic, impact, and tensile tests. The top end of the cylinder is fitted with a valve with a variety of number and markings stamped on it. Common valve types include: Pin index valve, bull nose, hand wheel and integral valve. The type of valve varies with cylinder size. Small cylinders have a pin index valve while large have a bull nose type. Safety features in the cylinder are: Color coding, pin index, pressure relief device, Bodok seal, and label attached etc., Safety rules and guidelines must be followed during storage, installation and use of cylinders to ensure safety of patients, hospital personnel and the environment.

  8. Anaesthesia gas supply: Gas cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Invention of oxygen cylinder was one of the most important developments in the field of medical practice. Oxygen and other gases were compressed and stored at high pressure in seamless containers constructed from hand-forged steel in1880. Materials technology has continued to evolve and now medical gas cylinders are generally made of steel alloys or aluminum. The filling pressure as well as capacity has increased considerably while at the same time the weight of cylinders has reduced. Today oxygen cylinder of equivalent size holds a third more oxygen but weighs about 20 kg less. The cylinders are of varying sizes and are color coded. They are tested at regular intervals by the manufacturer using hydraulic, impact, and tensile tests. The top end of the cylinder is fitted with a valve with a variety of number and markings stamped on it. Common valve types include: Pin index valve, bull nose, hand wheel and integral valve. The type of valve varies with cylinder size. Small cylinders have a pin index valve while large have a bull nose type. Safety features in the cylinder are: Color coding, pin index, pressure relief device, Bodok seal, and label attached etc., Safety rules and guidelines must be followed during storage, installation and use of cylinders to ensure safety of patients, hospital personnel and the environment.

  9. Coalbed gas development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This book includes: Overview of coalbed gas development; Coalbed gas development in the West Coalbed gas development on Indian lands; Multi-mineral development conflicts; Statutory solutions to ownership disputes; State and local regulation; Environmental regulations; Status of the section 29 tax credit extension; Using the section 29 credit; Leasing coalbed gas prospects; Coalbed gas joint operating agreements and Purchase and sale agreements for coalbed gas properties

  10. CONTINUOUS GAS ANALYZER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, S.; Weber, C.W.

    1960-02-16

    A reagent gas and a sample gas are chemically combined on a continuous basis in a reaction zone maintained at a selected temperature. The reagent gas and the sample gas are introduced to the reaction zone at preselected. constant molar rates of flow. The reagent gas and the selected gas in the sample mixture combine in the reaction zone to form a product gas having a different number of moles from the sum of the moles of the reactants. The difference in the total molar rates of flow into and out of the reaction zone is measured and indicated to determine the concentration of the selected gas.

  11. Investigation of plasma behavior during noble gas injection in the end-cell of GAMMA 10/PDX by using the multi-fluid code ‘LINDA’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. S.; Nakashima, Y.; Hatayama, A.

    2017-12-01

    The linear divertor analysis with fluid model (LINDA) code has been developed in order to simulate plasma behavior in the end-cell of linear fusion device GAMMA 10/PDX. This paper presents the basic structure and simulated results of the LINDA code. The atomic processes of hydrogen and impurities have been included in the present model in order to investigate energy loss processes and mechanism of plasma detachment. A comparison among Ar, Kr and Xe shows that Xe is the most effective gas on the reduction of electron and ion temperature. Xe injection leads to strong reduction in the temperature of electron and ion. The energy loss terms for both the electron and the ion are enhanced significantly during Xe injection. It is shown that the major energy loss channels for ion and electron are charge-exchange loss and radiative power loss of the radiator gas, respectively. These outcomes indicate that Xe injection in the plasma edge region is effective for reducing plasma energy and generating detached plasma in linear device GAMMA 10/PDX.

  12. A NEW NETWORK FOR HIGHER-TEMPERATURE GAS-PHASE CHEMISTRY. I. A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF ACCRETION DISKS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Nanase; Herbst, Eric; Wakelam, Valentine

    2010-01-01

    We present a new interstellar chemical gas-phase reaction network for time-dependent kinetics that can be used for modeling high-temperature sources up to ∼800 K. This network contains an extended set of reactions based on the Ohio State University (OSU) gas-phase chemical network. The additional reactions include processes with significant activation energies, reverse reactions, proton exchange reactions, charge exchange reactions, and collisional dissociation. Rate coefficients already in the OSU network are modified for H 2 formation on grains, ion-neutral dipole reactions, and some radiative association reactions. The abundance of H 2 O is enhanced at high temperature by hydrogenation of atomic O. Much of the elemental oxygen is in the form of water at T ≥ 300 K, leading to effective carbon-rich conditions, which can efficiently produce carbon-chain species such as C 2 H 2 . At higher temperatures, HCN and NH 3 are also produced much more efficiently. We have applied the extended network to a simplified model of the accretion disk of an active galactic nucleus.

  13. Initial investigations of (np)-scattering with a polarized deuterium target at ANKE-COSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Boxing

    2015-07-01

    The understanding of the forces among nucleons is fundamental to the whole of nuclear and hadronic physics. The nucleon-nucleon (NN) scattering is the ideal probe to study the nuclear forces. The scattering amplitudes for the complete description of the NN interactions can be reconstructed from phase-shift analyses (PSA), which requires measurements with polarized experiments. The existing data allow to extract unambiguous proton-proton (pp) amplitudes below 2 GeV. However, there is very little known about the neutron-proton (np) system above 800 MeV nucleon energy. THE ANKE-COSY collaboration has embarked on a systematic program which aims to extract the np scattering amplitudes through the deuteron-proton charge-exchange process dp→{pp}{sub s}n. First part of the program via polarized deuteron beam and hydrogen target allowed successful measurement of np amplitudes up to 1.135 GeV nucleon energy, which is the maximum nucleon energy that can be accessed with deuteron beam at COSY. Via inverse kinematics, i.e. using a proton beam incident on a polarized deuterium target will allow to enhance the np study up to 2.8 GeV, the highest energy available at COSY. The method of inverse kinematics has to be validated prior to the production experiment. As the proof-of-principle (POP) experiment, the initial research has been conducted at proton energy T{sub p}=600 MeV using a polarized deuterium target. The projectiles were measured by two silicon tracking telescopes (STT) placed closed to the target and by the ANKE sub-detection systems. Four polarization modes of the deuterium target were employed. In order to increase the effective target thickness, polarized deuterium atoms produced by the atomic beam source (ABS) was filled into a storage cell, where the circulating COSY beam collides with the target. The target polarizations were measured using the proton-deuteron elastic reaction. The vector and tensor analyzing powers A{sub y} and A{sub yy} of pvector d

  14. Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector gas system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, H. R.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M.-C.; Heeger, K. M.; Kwok, M. W.; Shih, K.; Wise, T.; Xiao, Q.

    2012-11-01

    The Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector gas system is designed to protect the liquid scintillator targets of the antineutrino detectors against degradation and contamination from exposure to ambient laboratory air. The gas system is also used to monitor the leak tightness of the antineutrino detector assembly. The cover gas system constantly flushes the gas volumes above the liquid scintillator with dry nitrogen to minimize oxidation of the scintillator over the five year lifetime of the experiment. This constant flush also prevents the infiltration of radon or other contaminants into these detecting liquids keeping the internal backgrounds low. Since the Daya Bay antineutrino detectors are immersed in the large water pools of the muon veto system, other gas volumes are needed to protect vital detector cables or gas lines. These volumes are also purged with dry gas. Return gas is monitored for oxygen content and humidity to provide early warning of potentially damaging leaks. The design and performance of the Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector gas system is described.

  15. General Motors natural gas vehicle initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, J.; Koplow, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    General Motors (GM) has a number of natural gas vehicle (NGV) programs in progress that address various marketing, technical, and production planning issues that lean on the introduction of NGVs from GM. The initial target is light and medium duty trucks sold in non-attainment air quality regions. GM has also embarked on a longer term program that encompasses vehicle and systems development, gas supply and infrastructure development, and customer and market development. The major long-term issues are gas quality, supplier participation, and infrastructure

  16. The Noble Gas Fingerprint in a UK Unconventional Gas Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKavney, Rory; Gilfillan, Stuart; Györe, Domokos; Stuart, Fin

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, there has been an unprecedented expansion in the development of unconventional hydrocarbon resources. Concerns have arisen about the effect of this new industry on groundwater quality, particularly focussing on hydraulic fracturing, the technique used to increase the permeability of the targeted tight shale formations. Methane contamination of groundwater has been documented in areas of gas production1 but conclusively linking this to fugitive emissions from unconventional hydrocarbon production has been controversial2. A lack of baseline measurements taken before drilling, and the equivocal interpretation of geochemical data hamper the determination of possible contamination. Common techniques for "fingerprinting" gas from discrete sources rely on gas composition and isotopic ratios of elements within hydrocarbons (e.g. δ13CCH4), but the original signatures can be masked by biological and gas transport processes. The noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) are inert and controlled only by their physical properties. They exist in trace quantities in natural gases and are sourced from 3 isotopically distinct environments (atmosphere, crust and mantle)3. They are decoupled from the biosphere, and provide a separate toolbox to investigate the numerous sources and migration pathways of natural gases, and have found recent utility in the CCS4 and unconventional gas5 industries. Here we present a brief overview of noble gas data obtained from a new coal bed methane (CBM) field, Central Scotland. We show that the high concentration of helium is an ideal fingerprint for tracing fugitive gas migration to a shallow groundwater. The wells show variation in the noble gas signatures that can be attributed to differences in formation water pumping from the coal seams as the field has been explored for future commercial development. Dewatering the seams alters the gas/water ratio and the degree to which noble gases degas from the formation water. Additionally the

  17. Charge exchange studies with Gold ions at the Brookhaven Booster and AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrens, L.A.; Hseuh, H.C.; Roser, T.

    1994-01-01

    Efficient acceleration of Gold ions to ll GeV/nucleon places strong constraints on the vacuum and also on the choice of thickness and material of the necessary stripping foils. Results of a number of detailed experimental studies performed with the Gold beam at the Brookhaven Booster and AGS to determine the relevant electron stripping and pick-up probabilities are presented. Of particular interest is the lifetime of the relatively low energy, partially stripped Gold beam in the Booster and the stripping efficiency to Helium-like AU +77 for injection into the AGS

  18. Δ33 resonance in pion nucleus elastic, single, and double charge exchange scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    The Δ 33 resonance is strongly excited in pion-nucleon scattering, but there is clearly only a limited amount of information that can be learned in scattering the pion from an isolated nucleon. One learns that there is a resonance of mass 1232 MeV, width 115 MeV, and, if one is willing to introduce a dynamical model, something about the off-shell extension of the amplitude. One stands to learn much more from pion-nucleus scattering because in this case the Δ 33 resonance has an opportunity to scatter from nucleons, and how this occurs is not well understood. What do we know about the Δ-N interaction for pion-nucleus scattering. The isobar-hole model was invented to deal directly with the Δ 33 -nucleus dynamics, and a phenomenological determination of the isobar shell-model potential was attempted. The unknown dynamics deltaU/sub Δ/ is contained in a central isoscalar spreading potential of strength W 0 and a spin orbit potential deltaU 0 = W 0 rho + spin-orbit. The real part of W 0 rho is measured relative to the nucleon-nucleus potential. From a more theoretical point of view, one would like to be able to calculate deltaU/sub Δ/, including its isospin dependence, from an underlying dynamical model which is formulated in terms of the basic effective meson-baryon couplings. Some salient properties of these couplings can be determined from models of quark-bag structure, which raises the exciting possibility of learning about these fundamental issues from pion scattering. Attempts at Los Alamos to build a theoretical framework to deal with these and other issues are described

  19. pi-N charge exchange and pi(+)-pi(0) scattering at low energies

    OpenAIRE

    Pocanic, D.; Frlez, E.

    1997-01-01

    pi-N and pi-pi interactions near threshold are uniquely sensitive to the chiral symmetry breaking part of the strong interaction. The pi-N sigma-term value with its implications for nucleon quark structure and the recent controversy concerning the size of the scalar quark condensate have renewed the experimental interest in these two fundamental systems. We report new differential cross sections for the reaction $pi^-p \\to \\pi^0n$ at 27.5 MeV pion incident kinetic energy, measured between $\\t...

  20. Intermediate energy charge-exchange reactions induced by polarized 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B.T.

    1998-01-01

    Spin polarization transfer is proven to be very useful in obtaining detailed information of the continuum nuclear responses. The data, taken for the (vector p,vector n) reactions, have enabled us to separate the response into the spin longitudinal and transverse components. These partial nuclear responses have been successfully used to make critical tests of nuclear structure models. In the present paper, we first summarize the results of the data and the theoretical analyses made so far. We then discuss information obtainable from the ( 3 vector He,vector t) reaction, emphasizing on the differences and similarities in comparison with the (vector p,vector n) reaction. The results of numerical calculations made for ( 3 vector He,vector t) reactions based on the microscopic distorted wave impulse approximation will also be reported. (orig.)

  1. The First Wide-field X-ray Imaging Telescope for Observations of Charge Exchange

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Soft x-ray emission from the interaction of solar wind with the earth's exosphere provides a very significant foreground to all soft x-ray observations. It is...

  2. Development of polarized negative hydrogen ion source with resonant charge-exchange plasma ionizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, A. S.; Esin, S. K.; Netchaeva, L. P.; Turbabin, A. V.; Vasil'Ev, G. A.

    2001-06-01

    Polarized negative hydrogen ion beam with peak current of 2.5 mA has been obtained from an atomic beam-type polarized ion source of Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow. The intensity improvement has been achieved due to increase of efficiency of conversion of polarized hydrogen atoms into polarized negative ions. New converter for production of deuterium plasma with high density of unpolarized negative ions is described. Limitations of the method and possible improvements are discussed. .

  3. Charge exchange and fine structure excitation in O-H+ collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambaud, G.; Levy, B.; Millie, P.; Tran Minh, F.; Launay, J.M.; Roueff, E.

    1980-01-01

    The authors re-examine the charge-transfer reaction between protons and oxygen atoms including the fine-structure excitation process, basing the analysis on a careful description of the different potential curves arising from the O-H + and O + -H systems and on the evaluation of the coupling responsible for the transitions. (Auth.)

  4. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Contribution To The ROSAT Sky Survey Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uprety, Y.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Galeazzi, M.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lallement, R.; Lepri, S. T.; Liu, W.; hide

    2016-01-01

    DXL (Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy) is a sounding rocket mission designed to estimate the contribution of solar wind charge eXchange (SWCX) to the diffuse X-ray background and to help determine the properties of the Local Hot Bubble. The detectors are large area thin-window proportional counters with a spectral response that is similar to that of the PSPC (Position Sensitive Proportional Counters) used in the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS). A direct comparison of DXL and RASS data for the same part of the sky viewed from quite different vantage points in the solar system, and the assumption of approximate isotropy for the solar wind, allowed us to quantify the SWCX contribution to all six RASS bands (R1-R7, excluding R3). We find that the SWCX contribution at l = 140 degrees, b = 0 degrees, where the DXL path crosses the Galactic plane, is 33 percent plus or minus 6 percent (statistical) plus or minus 12 percent (systematic) for R1, 44 percent plus or minus 6 percent plus or minus 5 percent for R2, 18 percent plus or minus 12 percent plus or minus 11 percent for R4, 14 percent plus or minus 11 percent plus or minus 9 percent for R5, and negligible for the R6 and R7 bands. Reliable models for the distribution of neutral H and He in the solar system permit estimation of the contribution of interplanetary SWCX emission over the the whole sky and correction of the RASS maps. We find that the average SWCX contribution in the whole sky is 26 percent plus or minus 6 percent plus or minus 13 percent for R1, 30 percent plus or minus 4 percent plus or minus 4 percent for R2, 8 percent plus or minus 5 percent plus or minus 5 percent for R4, 6 percent plus or minus 4 percent plus or minus 4 percent for R5, and negligible for R6 and R7.

  5. CXSFIT Code Application to Process Charge-Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy Data at the T-10 Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serov, S. V.; Tugarinov, S. N.; Klyuchnikov, L. A.; Krupin, V. A.; von Hellermann, M.

    2017-12-01

    The applicability of the CXSFIT code to process experimental data from Charge-eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostics at the T-10 tokamak is studied with a view to its further use for processing experimental data at the ITER facility. The design and operating principle of the CXRS diagnostics are described. The main methods for processing the CXRS spectra of the 5291-Å line of C5+ ions at the T-10 tokamak (with and without subtraction of parasitic emission from the edge plasma) are analyzed. The method of averaging the CXRS spectra over several shots, which is used at the T-10 tokamak to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, is described. The approximation of the spectrum by a set of Gaussian components is used to identify the active CXRS line in the measured spectrum. Using the CXSFIT code, the ion temperature in ohmic discharges and discharges with auxiliary electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) at the T-10 tokamak is calculated from the CXRS spectra of the 5291-Å line. The time behavior of the ion temperature profile in different ohmic heating modes is studied. The temperature profile dependence on the ECRH power is measured, and the dynamics of ECR removal of carbon nuclei from the T-10 plasma is described. Experimental data from the CXRS diagnostics at T-10 substantially contribute to the implementation of physical programs of studies on heat and particle transport in tokamak plasmas and investigation of geodesic acoustic mode properties.

  6. Time-of-flight analysis of charge-exchange neutral particles from the TORTUR II plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocken, H.J.B.M.

    1981-10-01

    A disc chopper for time-of-flight analysis of fast neutral particles was constructed for the determination of the ion energy spectrum at lower energies than can be obtained by conventional electro-magnetic analyzers. The method has been applied to the TORTUR II tokamak. The chopper and detection system are described and the measurements are presented. For the interpretation of the results of the measurements a data analysis procedure was developed. The influence of reflections of neutrals at the liner wall showed to be important in the calculations of the neutral density profile at the plasma edge. The neutral energy spectrum in the lower energy range is strongly pronounced by this effect

  7. Charge exchange transition probability for collisions between unlike ions and atoms within the adiabatic approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, John W.

    1989-01-01

    A simple formula for the transition probability for electron exchange between unlike ions and atoms is established within the adiabatic approximation by employing the Linear Combination of Atomic Orbitals (LCAO) method. The formula also involves an adiabatic parameter, introduced by Massey, and thus the difficulties arising from the internal energy defect and the adiabatic approximation are avoided. Specific reactions Li(+++) + H to Li(++) + H(+) and Be(4+) + H to Be(3+) + H(+) are considered as examples. The calculated capture cross section results of the present work are compared with the experimental data and with the calculation of other authors over the velocity range of 10(7) cm/sec to 10(8) cm/sec.

  8. High-energy-ion depletion in the charge exchange spectrum of Alcator C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    A three-dimensional, guiding center, Monte Carlo code is developed to study ion orbits in Alcator C. The highly peaked ripple of the magnetic field of Alcator is represented by an analytical expression for the vector potential. The analytical ripple field is compared to the resulting magnetic field generated by a current model of the toroidal plates; agreement is excellent. Ion-Ion scattering is simulated by a pitch angle and an energy scattering operator. The equations of motion are integrated with a variable time step, extrapolating integrator. The code produces collisionless banana and ripple trapped loss cones which agree well with present theory. Global energy distributions have been calculated and show a slight depletion above 8.5 keV. Particles which are ripple trapped and lost are at energies below where depletion is observed. It is found that ions pitch angle scatter less as energy is increased. The result is that, when viewed in velocity space, ions form probability lobes the shape of mouse ears which are fat near the thermal energy. Therefore, particles enter the loss cone at low energies near the bottom of the core. Recommendations for future work include improving the analytic model of the ripple field, testing the effect of del . B not equal to 0 on ion orbits, and improving the efficiency of the code by either using a spline fit for the magnetic fields or by creating a vectorized Monte Carlo code

  9. Pion-nucleon charge-exchange polarization by Gribov Reggeon calculus and the derivative rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardill, R.W.B.; Koehler, P.; Moriarty, K.J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The phenomenological consequences of the Gribov Reggeon calculus for the reaction πsup(-)+p→πdeg+n at 6 GeV/c are investigated and the polarization is obtained. The derivative rules is used to calculate the helicity flip amplitude. The results are very encouraging and would seem to indicate that the Gribov Reggeon calculus can be considered a more satisfactory approach to two-body phenomenology than the absorption model

  10. Cometary X-rays : solar wind charge exchange in cometary atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with the planets and the interstellar medium is of key importance for the evolution of our solar system. The interaction with Earth's atmosphere is best known for the northern light. In case of Mars, the interaction with the solar wind might have lead to the erosion

  11. High-speed correction factor to the O+-O resonance charge exchange collision frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Omidvar

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available The high-speed correction factor to the O+-O collision frequency, resulting from drift velocities between ions and neutrals, is calculated by solving the integral expression in this factor both numerically and analytically. Although the analytic solution is valid for either small or large drift velocities between ions and neutrals, for temperatures of interest and all drift velocities considered, agreement is found between analytic and detailed numerical integration results within less than 1% error. Let Tr designate the average of the ion and neutral temperatures in K, and u=vd/α, where vd is the relative drift velocity in cm s-1, and α=4.56×103√Tr cm s-1 is the thermal velocity of the O+-O system. Then, as u ranges from 0 to 2, the correction factor multiplying the collision frequency increases monotonically from 1 to about 1.5. An interesting result emerging from this calculation is that the correction factor for temperatures of aeronomical interest is to a good approximation independent of the temperature, depending only on the scaled velocity u.

  12. Pion double charge exchange above the Δ3/2,3/2 resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.L.

    1991-11-01

    The first exclusive measurements of (π + π - ) reactions on several nuclei for incident pion energies from 300 to 550 MeV are reported. The measurements were made with the Large Acceptance Spectrometer at the P 3 channel of the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. A description of the experimental setup is given which includes a discussion of modifications to the spectrometer and channel implemented specifically for these measurements. Forward angle excitation functions for transitions to the double isobaric analog state (DIAS) are found to be relatively flat for these energies. This energy dependence is reproduced by optical and Glauber calculations, but not by a six-quark bag prediction. The mass dependence of the DIAS was found to qualitatively agree with the predicted mass dependence from optical calculations. One angular distribution was measured for 5 degrees ≤ Θ lab ≤ 35 degrees for 18 O(π + π - ) 18 Ne. The DIAS cross section falls by more than one order of magnitude over this range, as predicted by both Glauber and optical model calculations. Data for f 7/2 -shell nuclei were examined with a two-amplitude model based on seniority-zero shell model wavefunctions which features expressions for cross sections for DIAS transitions and transitions to nonanalog ground-states. The cross sections for T = 1 nuclei are found to be inconsistent with the predictions of the model. One excitation function for nonanalog transitions was measured and is relatively flat with energy. The continuum of nonanalog states near threshold was found to decrease with energy

  13. Shape of the Hα emission line in non resonant charge exchange in hydrogen plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susino Bueno, A.; Zurro Hernandez, B.

    1977-01-01

    The Hα line shape emitted from a maxwellian hydrogen plasma and produced by non resonant change exchange has been calculated. Its explicit shape depends on the ion temperature, on background neutral energy and on the relative shape of the collision cross section. A comparison between theoretical and experimental shapes of the Hα line is carried out to check the model and to deduce the ion plasma temperature. (author) [es

  14. Wide-view charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic for Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, W. L.; Bespamyatnov, I. O.; Granetz, R. S.

    2008-10-01

    This diagnostic measures temperature, density, and rotation for the fully stripped boron ion between the pedestal top and the plasma core with resolution consistent with the profile gradients. The diagnostic neutral beam used for the measurements generates a 50 keV, 6 A hydrogen beam. The optical systems provide views in both poloidal and toroidal directions. The imaging spectrometer is optimized to simultaneously accept 45 views as input with minimum cross-talk. In situ calibration techniques are applied for spatial location, spectral intensity, and wavelength. In the analysis, measured spectra are fitted to a model constructed from a detailed description of the emission physics. Methods for removal of interfering spectra are included. Applications include impurity and thermal transport.

  15. unconventional natural gas reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa G, Tomas F; Osorio, Nelson; Restrepo R, Dora P

    2009-01-01

    This work is an exploration about different unconventional gas reservoirs worldwide: coal bed methane, tight gas, shale gas and gas hydrate? describing aspects such as definition, reserves, production methods, environmental issues and economics. The overview also mentioned preliminary studies about these sources in Colombia.

  16. Super liquid density target designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Y.L.; Bailey, D.S.

    1976-01-01

    The success of laser fusion depends on obtaining near isentropic compression of fuel to very high densities and igniting this fuel. To date, the results of laser fusion experiments have been based mainly on the exploding pusher implosion of fusion capsules consisting of thin glass microballoons (wall thickness of less than 1 micron) filled with low density DT gas (initial density of a few mg/cc). Maximum DT densities of a few tenths of g/cc and temperatures of a few keV have been achieved in these experiments. We will discuss the results of LASNEX target design calculations for targets which: (a) can compress fuel to much higher densities using the capabilities of existing Nd-glass systems at LLL; (b) allow experimental measurement of the peak fuel density achieved

  17. Natural gas supply-demand situation and prospect in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Kang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the 21st century, the reserves of conventional natural gas as well as tight gas in China have been decreasing and their annual production growth rates have been generally reduced from double-digit to one-digit number of percentage. It is predicted that natural gas production will possibly reach up to 134 billion m3 in 2015; and if the marketable rate is 90%, the gas supply volume will probably be 120.6 billion m3 in 2015. Since shale gas development just has started currently, about 0.6 billion m3 of the marketable shale gas will be added to gas supply in 2015. The CBM gas production especially such gas consumption has long been lagged behind the expected targets, and what's more, flaws exist in their statistics; on this basis, it is assumed that the marketable CBM gas will be 4 billion Nm 3 in 2015. With so many achievements made in the coal gas exploitation, it is forecasted that about 5.5 billion m3 coal gas will be added to gas supply in 2015. In total, the domestic fuel gas supply is roughly estimated to be 131 billion m3 in 2015; if the gas consumption in the year is presumably 231 billion m3, about 100 billion m3 gas will then be imported in 2015. From the presumable actual imports of piped gas and LNG terminals, there is still a gap of 27–30 billion m3 in 2015. Therefore, it is suggested that more LNG receiving terminals be put into production in advance and the increment of import gas be needed from Middle Asia. Also, it is proposed that the statistics be completed on the practical marketable fuel gas quantity in the fundamental study of energy planning in the National 13th Five-Year Plan. In conclusion, the economic system reform process is the key to the further development of oil and gas industry in China.

  18. Future of gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbes, A.; Widdershoven, C.; Nicola, S.; Cragg, C.

    2009-01-01

    Two articles and two columns in this section on the future of natural gas. In the first article attention is paid to the possibility that large natural gas producers are setting up a cartel a la OPEC. Most experts argue that the structure of gas markets makes the gas business much less amenable to cartelisation than the oil business. If that is true, why are so many people in the gas industry afraid of a gas cartel? The second article focuses on the future role of North Africa in the supply of natural gas

  19. Natural gas supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-10-01

    This article comments data about the share of natural gas in the energy demand in Europe, about the uses of natural gas by different sectors (housing and office buildings, electricity production, and industry) in Europe, and about gas European imports and about gas supply origins. Graphs are displaying the evolution of energy demand in some European countries between 1990 and 2006 and for different energy sources (natural gas, coal, oil, primary energy, and renewable energies), the evolution of gas production and consumption in different countries of the European Union between 1990 and 2006, and gas import origins in the European Union in 2006. Gas pipeline projects between gas producing countries and Europe are briefly presented, and the development of liquefied natural gas is briefly commented and outlined as a contribution to supply diversification

  20. Natural gas supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    After having briefly commented the share of natural gas in the primary consumed energy in Europe and in France, and the reasons for its evolution, this document highlights that gas is mainly used for heating, electricity production and industrial purposes, that Europe possesses limited gas resources and must therefore rely on importations. It comments the diversification of supply sources, evokes new gas-pipeline projects between Europe and producer countries (mainly Russia), and briefly comments the development of liquefied natural gas