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Sample records for garden pea pisum

  1. Assessment varieties garden pea (Pisum sativum L. in terms of quality green peas and seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. М. Стригун

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To obtain a high-quality source material for breeding new varieties of garden pea studied biochemical and technological properties of 450 sample grades collection. As a result, selected varieties, sources that had green peas in a high content of individual chemicals and combine incorporates several of these substances. These varieties have different duration of the growing season. Among them, identified those with green peas excessive ripeness not for a long time. Such quality varieties are especially important because provides over a longer period of receipt of a high quality green peas in a cannery. In addition, the collection highlighted garden pea varieties of high quality seed in biological maturity. The selected varieties were included in the selection process and, based on a number of new varieties garden pea, providing conveyor receipt green peas for processing plants.

  2. Age-dependent variation in membrane lipid synthesis in leaves of garden pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellgren, Lars; Sandelius, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    To study membrane lipid synthesis during the lifespan of a dicotyledon leaf, the second oldest leaf of 10-40-d-old plants of garden pea (Pisum sativum L.) was labelled with [1-C- 14]acetate and the distribution of radioactivity between the major membrane lipids was followed for 3 d....... In the expanding second oldest leaf of 10-d-old plants, acetate was primarily allocated into phosphatidylcholine (PC) during the first 4 h of labelling. During the following 3 d, labelling of PC decreased and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) became the most radioactive lipid. In the fully expanded second oldest...... leaf of older plants, acetate was predominantly allocated into phosphatidylglycerol (PG), which remained the major radiolabelled lipid during the 3 d studied. The proportion of radioactivity recovered in MGDG decreased with increasing plant age up to 20 d, suggesting that, in expanded leaves, MGDG...

  3. Replenishment of the plant variety market: garden pea (Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. І. Безручко

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available It is presented the description of garden pea new varieties which are included into the State Register of plant varieties, which are suitable for the dissemination in Ukraine in 2008 year, morphological features of the crop and its value, either food or dietetic plant.

  4. Use of gamma irradiation for prolonging shelf life of Garden pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, A.K.; Nair, Reena

    2008-01-01

    Garden pea pods of variety Arkel were irradiated with 5 doses of 60 Co gamma rays ranging from 0.5-3 kGy and stored at ambient temperature up to 9 days along with control to study the effect of radiation in prolonging shelf life of pea pods and stabilizing its market demand. Physiological weight loss percentage decrease as the doses of gamma radiation increased. Minimum weight loss was noted in pods treated with 3 kGy gamma radiation as compared to control. Decay loss percent showed inverse relation with dose of gamma radiation. The minimum decay loss was recorded in 3 kGy and the organisms identified for decay loss were Alternaria and Cladosporium species of fungi. With regard to sugar content, pea pods irradiated with 1 kGy gamma rays recorded maximum sugar content. Pods irradiated with 0.5 kGy and 1 kGy gamma rays retained their green colour for a long period (up to 9th day of storage). Based on 9 point's hedonic scale the overall acceptability for appearance, taste and texture was observed in 1 kGy treatment. (author)

  5. Effects of moderately enhanced levels of ozone on the acyl lipid composition and dynamical properties of plasma membranes isolated from garden pea (Pisum sativum)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellgren, Lars; Sellden, G.; Sandelius, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    lipids, as well as in PC and PE, The amount of free sterols per protein was unaltered, but the percentage of campesterol increased, concomitant with a decrease in stigmasterol, The dynamical properties of the isolated plasma membranes were assessed using Laurdan fluorescence spectroscopy, which monitors......Plasma membranes were isolated from leaves of 16-day-old garden pea, Pisum sativum L., that had been grown in the absence or presence of 65 nl l(-1) ozone for 4 days prior to membrane isolation, Plasma membranes from ozone-fumigated plants contained significantly more acyl lipids per protein than....../stigmasterol and lipid/protein ratios, and suggesting that ozone-fumigated pea plants may be more susceptible to freezing injuries....

  6. The influence of environmental factors on growing season length for garden pea (Pisum sativum L.

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    В. М. Стригун

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The results obtained during observations of the growing season of pea collection varieties in different years in terms of interphase periods are presented. The dependence of the growing season length for varieties of various maturity groups on the duration of certain phases of plant growth (seedling, flowering, ripening,  ambient environment (temperature, humidity, daylight hours, processing (seed preparation, line production maintenance and genetic factors (sequential node of the first inflorescence formation are shown. According to the study   results the varieties-sources of «growing season length» characteristic were specified that have been used as components for breeding in the selection process when creating new domestic varieties.

  7. 7 CFR 319.56-45 - Shelled garden peas from Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shelled garden peas from Kenya. 319.56-45 Section 319... Shelled garden peas from Kenya. Garden peas (Pisum sativum) may be imported into the continental United States from Kenya only under the following conditions and in accordance with all other applicable...

  8. Effect of Biochar Application on Growth of Garden Pea (Pisum sativum L. in Acidic Soils of Bule Woreda Gedeo Zone Southern Ethiopia

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    Tariku Berihun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this experiment was to study the effect of types and rates of biochar on growth, yield, and yield component of garden pea at Bule wereda, Southern Ethiopia. The treatments consist of two types of biochar (corncobs and Lantana camara and four rates of biochar (0, 6, 12, and 18 t ha−1. The experiment was laid out as a randomized complete block design in a factorial arrangement with three replications. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 0–30 cm and germination parameter and phonology of garden pea were recorded. The result showed that soil bulk density, porosity, pH, and exchangeable acidity were significantly (P<0.001 affected by biochar application. The result also showed that maximum germination percentage of garden pea seeds (95.23% was recorded at 18 t ha−1 of Lantana biochar. The shoot length was significantly (P<0.05 affected at 15 days and 30 days of biochar application. Moreover, fresh shoot weight and dry root biomass, number of seeds per pod, and grain yield of garden pea were significantly affected (P<0.05. Of the substrate and application rate applied, Lantana camara 12 t ha−1 and Lantana camara 18 t ha−1 significantly increased yield of garden pea. Thus, further studies on effect of different biochars and their specific role are suggested to increase crop production.

  9. [Regulatory genes of garden pea (Pisum sativum L.) controlling the development of nitrogen-fixing nodules and arbuscular mycorrhiza: a review of basic and applied aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borisov, A Iu; Vasil'chikov, A G; Voroshilova, V A

    2007-01-01

    . Progress in identifying and cloning symbiotic genes is adequately reflected. The feasibility of using double inoculation as a means of increasing the plant productivity is demonstrated, in which the potential of a tripartite symbiotic system (pea plants-root nodule bacteria-arbuscular mycorrhiza...

  10. Genotype x Environment Interaction for Yield in Field Pea ( Pisum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, sixteen genotypes of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) were tested over locations (Shambu and Arjo) for three years (2000-2002) and at Gedo (2002) with the objectives of identifying high yielding, stable and adaptable varieties for the Western highlands of Ethiopia. Regression and additive main and multiplication ...

  11. Suitability of some green pea (Pisum sativum L. varieties for processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokanović Marija R.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Green pea (Pisum sativum L. has a long tradition in Serbia and Montenegro as a processing crop. Short growing season, relatively simple production, pleasant taste and high nutritional value stimulate both production and consumption of peas. The objective of this paper is to present the main characteristics of two pea varieties, domestic cultivar Tamis and imported cultivar Jof and the influence of prolonged time between harvest and processing on the changes of main characteristics. Both cultivars have grains of very high quality that can be used for industrial processing as well as for garden growing (the green market. In the present paper the results of one-year study are shown: cultivar characteristics, growing season length, and physico-chemical (tenderometer value (TM, dry matter, alcohol insoluble solids (AIS, sugar and starch measurements for texture determination. According to the results, the optimal way of processing for each variety was recommended. .

  12. De Novo Assembly of the Pea (Pisum sativum L. Nodule Transcriptome

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    Vladimir A. Zhukov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The large size and complexity of the garden pea (Pisum sativum L. genome hamper its sequencing and the discovery of pea gene resources. Although transcriptome sequencing provides extensive information about expressed genes, some tissue-specific transcripts can only be identified from particular organs under appropriate conditions. In this study, we performed RNA sequencing of polyadenylated transcripts from young pea nodules and root tips on an Illumina GAIIx system, followed by de novo transcriptome assembly using the Trinity program. We obtained more than 58,000 and 37,000 contigs from “Nodules” and “Root Tips” assemblies, respectively. The quality of the assemblies was assessed by comparison with pea expressed sequence tags and transcriptome sequencing project data available from NCBI website. The “Nodules” assembly was compared with the “Root Tips” assembly and with pea transcriptome sequencing data from projects indicating tissue specificity. As a result, approximately 13,000 nodule-specific contigs were found and annotated by alignment to known plant protein-coding sequences and by Gene Ontology searching. Of these, 581 sequences were found to possess full CDSs and could thus be considered as novel nodule-specific transcripts of pea. The information about pea nodule-specific gene sequences can be applied for gene-based markers creation, polymorphism studies, and real-time PCR.

  13. Swimming of the pea crab (Pinnotheres pisum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteegh, C.P.C.; Muller, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic organisms have to deal with different hydrodynamic regimes, depending on their size and speed during locomotion. The pea crab swims by beating the third and fourth pereiopod on opposite sides as pairs. Using particle tracking velocimetry and high-speed video recording, we quantify the

  14. Pea (Pisum sativum L. in the Genomic Era

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    Robert J. Redden

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Pea (Pisum sativum L. was the original model organism used in Mendel’s discovery (1866 of the laws of inheritance, making it the foundation of modern plant genetics. However, subsequent progress in pea genomics has lagged behind many other plant species. Although the size and repetitive nature of the pea genome has so far restricted its sequencing, comprehensive genomic and post genomic resources already exist. These include BAC libraries, several types of molecular marker sets, both transcriptome and proteome datasets and mutant populations for reverse genetics. The availability of the full genome sequences of three legume species has offered significant opportunities for genome wide comparison revealing synteny and co-linearity to pea. A combination of a candidate gene and colinearity approach has successfully led to the identification of genes underlying agronomically important traits including virus resistances and plant architecture. Some of this knowledge has already been applied to marker assisted selection (MAS programs, increasing precision and shortening the breeding cycle. Yet, complete translation of marker discovery to pea breeding is still to be achieved. Molecular analysis of pea collections has shown that although substantial variation is present within the cultivated genepool, wild material offers the possibility to incorporate novel traits that may have been inadvertently eliminated. Association mapping analysis of diverse pea germplasm promises to identify genetic variation related to desirable agronomic traits, which are historically difficult to breed for in a traditional manner. The availability of high throughput ‘omics’ methodologies offers great promise for the development of novel, highly accurate selective breeding tools for improved pea genotypes that are sustainable under current and future climates and farming systems.

  15. Genetic improvement of field pea (Pisum sativum L. in Bulgaria

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    Kosev Valentin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Field pea attained greater importance as a cultivated plant in Bulgaria at the beginning of the 20th century. Until 1964, only breeding for forage was in use, with developed winter varieties №5 and Pleven 2. Recently, field pea achieved the greatest increase (283.3% in the sown areas, since the variety structure was updated annually. There are 10 registered varieties in total, with 7 spring and 3 winter ones. The composition of the Bulgarian Pisum collections is highly variable, with accessions of diverse status. The greatest efficiency is obtained in a combination of bulk method in the early generations and certain features of pedigree, single seed method, with possible modifications and inclusion of the mutational variability.

  16. Selenium and phosphorus interaction in pea (pisum sativum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Mahendra; Bhandari, D.K.

    1975-01-01

    The interaction of selenium and phosphorus on the dry matter yield and concentration and uptake of phosphorus, sulfur and selenium was studied in pea (Pisum sativnum) var. T 163. The fertilizer was tagged with P 32 . It was observed that increased concentration of applied selenium in soil decreased the dry matter yield and increased the concentration and uptake of total P, soil P and selenium in pea plants. Increased concentration of P alone increased dry matter yield, concentration and uptake of total, soil and fertilizer P and selenium which was beyond safe limits, and decreased concentration and uptake of sulphur. Selenium and phosphorus showed strong synergetic relationship by increasing the concentration of each other in plants while both showed antagonistic effect on the concentration of sulphur. Phosphorus compensated the toxic effect of selenium and improved the growth and dry matter yield of pea plants. The highest selenium concentration of 22.4 ppm was observed in 100 ppm phosphorus with 5 ppm selenium treated pots while lowest (0.10 ppm) in control. (author)

  17. Transient protein expression in three Pisum sativum (green pea) varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Brian J; Fujiki, Masaaki; Mett, Valentina; Kaczmarczyk, Jon; Shamloul, Moneim; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Underkoffler, Susan; Yusibov, Vidadi; Mett, Vadim

    2009-02-01

    The expression of proteins in plants both transiently and via permanently transformed lines has been demonstrated by a number of groups. Transient plant expression systems, due to high expression levels and speed of production, show greater promise for the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals when compared to permanent transformants. Expression vectors based on a tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are the most commonly utilized and the primary plant used, Nicotiana benthamiana, has demonstrated the ability to express a wide range of proteins at levels amenable to purification. N. benthamiana has two limitations for its use; one is its relatively slow growth, and the other is its low biomass. To address these limitations we screened a number of legumes for transient protein expression. Using the alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and the cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) vectors, delivered via Agrobacterium, we were able to identify three Pisum sativum varieties that demonstrated protein expression transiently. Expression levels of 420 +/- 26.24 mg GFP/kgFW in the green pea variety speckled pea were achieved. We were also able to express three therapeutic proteins indicating promise for this system in the production of biopharmaceuticals.

  18. Danish Rhizobium leguminosarum strains nodulating ‘Afghanistan’ pea (Pisum sativum)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Erik Steen; Sørensen, Lasse Holst; Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1986-01-01

    A wild pea (Pisum sativum L.) native to Afghanistan normally known to be resisant to nodulation with European strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum was nodulated early and effectively in field soil in Denmark. Isolates from nodules formed effective nodules abundantly on 'Afghanistan' on reinfection...... pattern with Rhizobium leguminosarum strains isolated from a modern pea variety cultivated in the same field....

  19. Danish Rhizobium leguminosarum strains nodulating ‘Afghanistan’ pea (Pisum sativum)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Erik Steen; Sørensen, Lasse Holst; Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1986-01-01

    A wild pea (Pisum sativum L.) native to Afghanistan normally known to be resisant to nodulation with European strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum was nodulated early and effectively in field soil in Denmark. Isolates from nodules formed effective nodules abundantly on 'Afghanistan' on reinfection ...... pattern with Rhizobium leguminosarum strains isolated from a modern pea variety cultivated in the same field.......A wild pea (Pisum sativum L.) native to Afghanistan normally known to be resisant to nodulation with European strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum was nodulated early and effectively in field soil in Denmark. Isolates from nodules formed effective nodules abundantly on 'Afghanistan' on reinfection...

  20. Fertility improvement in pea (Pisum sativum L.) autotetraploids -mutation breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, H.; Mercykuty, V.C.; Srivastava, C.P. [Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India). Dept. of Genetics and Plant Breeding

    1995-12-31

    C{sub 2} seeds of autotetraploids (colchicine-induced) of two diverse genotypes, T 163 and 5064-S, of pea (Pisum sativum L.) and their corresponding diploids were irradiated with 10 kR gamma-ray. Autotetraploids showed a high seed-sterility as compared to diploids. Seed fertility increased in M{sub 2} as compared to M{sub 1}. Both quadrivalent and bivalent frequencies decreased in the M{sub 1} generation of autotetraploids in relation to their respective controls. However, a positive shift in the mean bivalent formation was noted at the cost of other configurations in C{sub 3}-M{sub 2} with respect to C{sub 2}-M{sub 1} and varied with the genotype. In the M{sub 2} generation of autotetraploids, the variability was relatively higher for the number of pods per plant and seed yield per plant. Although the mean values for pods per plant, number of seeds per pod and seed yield per plant remained more or less parallel in autotetraploids in M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} generations, there was an increase in the upper range limit probably due to micromutation for these characters in M{sub 2}. (author). 15 refs, 2 tabs.

  1. Long-term iron deficiency: Tracing changes in the proteome of different pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisrimler, Claudia-Nicole; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Lyon, David; Geilfus, Christoph-Martin; Lüthje, Sabine

    2016-05-17

    Iron deficiency (-Fe) is one of the major problems in crop production. Dicots, like pea (Pisum sativum L.), are Strategy I plants, which induce a group of specific enzymes such as Fe(III)-chelate reductase (FRO), Fe responsive transporter (IRT) and H(+)-ATPase (HA) at the root plasma membrane under -Fe. Different species and cultivars have been shown to react diversely to -Fe. Furthermore, different kinds of experimental set-ups for -Fe have to be distinguished: i) short-term vs. long-term, ii) constant vs. acute alteration and iii) buffered vs. unbuffered systems. The presented work compares the effects of constant long-term -Fe in an unbuffered system on roots of four different pea cultivars in a timely manner (12, 19 and 25days). To differentiate the effects of -Fe and plant development, control plants (+Fe) were analyzed in comparison to -Fe plants. Besides physiological measurements, an integrative study was conducted using a comprehensive proteome analysis. Proteins, related to stress adaptation (e.g. HSP), reactive oxygen species related proteins and proteins of the mitochondrial electron transport were identified to be changed in their abundance. Regulations and possible functions of identified proteins are discussed. Pea (Pisum sativum L.) belongs to the legume family (Fabaceae) and is an important crop plant due to high Fe, starch and protein contents. According to FAOSTAT data (September 2015), world production of the garden pea quadrupled from 1970 to 2012. Since the initial studies by Gregor Mendel, the garden pea became the most-characterized legume and has been used in numerous investigations in plant biochemistry and physiology, but is not well represented in the "omics"-related fields. A major limitation in pea production is the Fe availability from soils. Adaption mechanisms to Fe deficiency vary between species, and even cultivars have been shown to react diversely. A label-free proteomic approach, in combination with physiological measurements

  2. STUDY ON QUANTITATIVE CHARACTERS OF ORGANIC SEEDS IN GARDEN PEA

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    S. Kalapchieva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted in the Maritsa Vegetable Crops Research Institute, Plovdiv during the period 2008-2009. Four garden pea varieties were grown in the conditions of organic and conventional production. The purpose of the experiment was to study the quantitative characters of seeds obtained in organic production. It was established that the organic garden pea seeds differ with lower absolute weight compared to the seeds obtained in conventional system but they kept high germination (89,5-96,5 close to the control variant. The late variety Vyatovo grown with organic fertilizers and biopesticides are with the lowest percentage of injuries by Bruchus pisi l.

  3. New Pea (Pisum sativum L. Accesions Obtained at V.R.D.S. Buzau

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    Costel Vinatoru

    2016-11-01

    • Wendy J. Dahl, Lauren M. Foster and Robert T. Tyler (2012. Review of the health benefits of peas (Pisum sativum L.. British Journal of Nutrition, 108, pp S3-S10. doi:10.1017/S0007114512000852. 13 December 2011

  4. [Allele polymorphism of microsatellite loci in pea Pisum sativum L. lines, varieties, and mutants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dribnokhodova, O P; Gostimskiĭ, S A

    2009-07-01

    Interlinear polymorphism at 23 microsatellite loci was studied in 40 Pisum sativum lines, varieties, and mutants and proved to be high, 61.6% on average. Varieties bred for different end uses substantially differed in the extent of polymorphism and allele composition. Polymorphism of microsatellite loci was shown to be suitable for developing passports of industrial pea varieties.

  5. Pea Marker Database (PMD) - A new online database combining known pea (Pisum sativum L.) gene-based markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulaeva, Olga A; Zhernakov, Aleksandr I; Afonin, Alexey M; Boikov, Sergei S; Sulima, Anton S; Tikhonovich, Igor A; Zhukov, Vladimir A

    2017-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is the oldest model object of plant genetics and one of the most agriculturally important legumes in the world. Since the pea genome has not been sequenced yet, identification of genes responsible for mutant phenotypes or desirable agricultural traits is usually performed via genetic mapping followed by candidate gene search. Such mapping is best carried out using gene-based molecular markers, as it opens the possibility for exploiting genome synteny between pea and its close relative Medicago truncatula Gaertn., possessing sequenced and annotated genome. In the last 5 years, a large number of pea gene-based molecular markers have been designed and mapped owing to the rapid evolution of "next-generation sequencing" technologies. However, the access to the complete set of markers designed worldwide is limited because the data are not uniformed and therefore hard to use. The Pea Marker Database was designed to combine the information about pea markers in a form of user-friendly and practical online tool. Version 1 (PMD1) comprises information about 2484 genic markers, including their locations in linkage groups, the sequences of corresponding pea transcripts and the names of related genes in M. truncatula. Version 2 (PMD2) is an updated version comprising 15944 pea markers in the same format with several advanced features. To test the performance of the PMD, fine mapping of pea symbiotic genes Sym13 and Sym27 in linkage groups VII and V, respectively, was carried out. The results of mapping allowed us to propose the Sen1 gene (a homologue of SEN1 gene of Lotus japonicus (Regel) K. Larsen) as the best candidate gene for Sym13, and to narrow the list of possible candidate genes for Sym27 to ten, thus proving PMD to be useful for pea gene mapping and cloning. All information contained in PMD1 and PMD2 is available at www.peamarker.arriam.ru.

  6. Response of pea (Pisum sativum L.) different morphotypes to the effect of ozone and UV-B radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Juozaitytė, Rima

    2010-01-01

    Work hypothesis: Different pea (Pisum sativum L.) morphotypes respond differently to various anthropogenic factors. This can be related with an alteration of plant metabolism and with changes of photosynthetic pigments and biochemical indexes. Work aim and the tasks: To investigate the effects of ozone and UV-B radiation on different pea (Pisum sativum L.) morphotypes under changing climatic conditions and to measure plant reaction to the effects of ozone and UV-B radiation. 1.To inve...

  7. Transient expression of acidic fibroblast growth factor in pea (Pisum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-15

    Mar 15, 2012 ... Nowadays, there are many therapeutic proteins produced in different host plants in transient easy to perform, short production cycle, efficient and inexpensive. In this study, the modified pea early browning virus (PEBV) vector containing GFP and acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) was introduced into pea ...

  8. Transient expression of acidic fibroblast growth factor in pea ( Pisum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nowadays, there are many therapeutic proteins produced in different host plants in transient easy to perform, short production cycle, efficient and inexpensive. In this study, the modified pea early browning virus (PEBV) vector containing GFP and acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) was introduced into pea plants by leave ...

  9. Genetic diversity in Ethiopian field pea ( Pisum sativum L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field pea is an ancient legume crop grown mainly for food in Ethiopia. Even though, there are over one thousand five hundred field pea collections, only a few studies has been conducted on the magnitude and pattern of genetic diversity at molecular level particularly with SSR markers. In this study, genetic diversity of 142 ...

  10. Abyssnian pea (Lathyrus schaeferi Kosterin pro Pisum abyssinicum A. Br. – a problematic taxon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Kosterin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This is an English translation of a paper published in Russian (but with proper Latin formulations at taxonomical novelties to make them validly published on March 15, 2017 in Vavilov Journal of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Vol. 22 (2: 158-169. The Abyssinian pea (Pisum abyssinicum A. Br., concerned in this review, is known from Ethiopia and Yemen, where it is cultivated along with the common pea (Pisum sativum L. subsp. sativum. The continuously reproduced notion of its possible spontaneous occurrence in the wild ascends to suppositions made in the XIX century and is not based on any actual data. P. abyssinicum is of practical interest owing to its extra early ripening and resistance to bacterial blight. Morphologically it is very similar to P. sativum but its crossability with it is bad as either seed or pollen parent. Traditionally this reproductive barrier was associated with karyological differences. The Abyssinian pea karyotype is variable as 1–2 reciprocal translocations were reported. At the same time there are accessions not differing from the standard karyotype of P. sativum with respect to reciprocal translocations, yet their crossability with the latter is very low and the pollen fertility of F1 and F2 hybrids is lowered. Data were reported on influence of the region of Linkage Group III, containing a gene known to participate in the conflict of nucleus and plastids in remote crosses of peas, on the pollen fertility of hybrids with abyssinian pea. With their karyological variability, the known accessions of the Abyssinian pea are very close to each other genetically, as they diverged just about 4 000 years ago. The presence of alleles of molecular markers common with Pisum fulvum Sibth. et Smith on the one hand and with P. sativum L. subsp. elatius (Bieb. Schmalh. on the other hand evidences in favour of an old hypotheses by L.I. Govorov that the Abyssinian pea originated from their spontaneous hybrid. This spontaneous cross may

  11. Effect of genotype and pre-sowing fertilization on yield of garden pea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dozet Gordana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During the two-year study on the influence of presowing fertilization on growth and development of garden pea (Pisum sativum L. in three different experimental setups, five genotypes of peas were used, two of Dutch origin and three that were created at the Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops. The aim of the study was to determine the extent to which different genotypes and complex NPK fertilizer influence the yield per plant. The average yield per plant for both years was 16.86 g. The influence of genotype on grain yield per plant was statistically significant (p<0.01. Tamish cultivar showed significantly lower yields during both study years, in comparison with other genotypes tested, except when compared with the Danube cultivar in year 2007. There was no regularity in the influence of pre-sowing fertilization on grain yield per plant. Regression analysis of the pea genotypes, revealed a slight reduction in yield per plant as a function of increased use of complex fertilizer. Grain yield per plant was in high positive correlation (p<0.01 with yield components, and with the length of the stem. The number of pods was in strong correlation with grain numbers and weight of pods. Number of grains and the absolute weight were in highly statistically significant correlation with the mass of pods.

  12. Respiratory metabolism of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemipetra: Aphididae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sláma, Karel; Jedlička, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 4 (2012), s. 491-502 ISSN 1210-5759 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP522/09/P382 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Hemiptera * Aphididae * Acyrthosiphon pisum Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.918, year: 2012 http://www.eje.cz/scripts/viewabstract.php?abstract=1734

  13. Physiological responses of PEA (Pisum sativum cv. meteor) to irrigation salinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.A.; Pervez, M.A.; Balal, R.M.; Azhar, N.; Shahzad, J.; Ubaidullah

    2008-01-01

    The effects of irrigation water or soil salinity on physiological aspects of pea (Pisum sativum cv.Meteor) were contrived. Ten weeks old pea plants were treated with NaCl at 0, 40, 90 and 140 mM in nutrient solution Plants were grown in controlled environment and harvested at each 3 days interval for decisiveness 0 physiological parameters. Photosynthetic rate, relative water content, stomatal conductance and chlorophyll contents reduced by increasing the NaCI concentration while CO/sub 2/ concentration and free proline content intensified. By experiment it was adumbrated that high salinity level along with prolonged accentuate duration is more drastic to pea plants physiology. Results also exhibited that pea plants could indulge 40 and 90 mM NaCl but are sensitive to 140 mM. (author)

  14. Genetic background and agronomic value of leaf types in pea (Pisum sativum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikić Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pea (Pisum sativum L. has a compound leaf like many other legume species. The 'semi-leafless' pea (afaf tltl, with all leaflets transformed into tendrils, is considered one of the most important achievements in pea breeding, due to a significantly enhanced standing ability and equally efficient dry matter production in comparison to normal-leafed genotypes (AFAF TLTL. 'Semi-leafless' cultivars provide high and stable grain yield and are dominant in the modern dry pea production worldwide. There are also 'semi-leafless' cultivars that are autumn-sown and those for forage production. The genotypes with all tendrils transformed into leaflets (afaf tltl, called 'acacia' or 'tendril-less', are extremely prone to lodging and may have importance in breeding for forage production. Little is known about the potential agronomic value of 'acacia-tendril-less' (afaf tltl genotypes.

  15. SSR genetic linkage map construction of pea (Pisum sativum L. based on Chinese native varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelian Sun

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Simple sequence repeat (SSR markers have previously been applied to linkage mapping of the pea (Pisum sativum L. genome. However, the transferability of existing loci to the molecularly distinct Chinese winter pea gene pool was limited. A novel set of pea SSR markers was accordingly developed. Together with existing SSR sequences, the genome of the G0003973 (winter hardy × G0005527 (cold sensitive cross was mapped using 190 F2 individuals. In total, 157 SSR markers were placed in 11 linkage groups with an average interval of 9.7 cM and total coverage of 1518 cM. The novel markers and genetic linkage map will be useful for marker-assisted pea breeding.

  16. Pea (Pisum sativum L.) in the Genomic Era

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smýkal, P.; Aubert, G.; Burstin, J.; Coyne, C.J.; Ellis, N.T.H.; Flavell, A.J.; Ford, R.; Hýbl, M.; Macas, Jiří; Neumann, Pavel; McPhee, K.E.; Redden, R.J.; Rubiales, D.; Weller, J.L.; Warkentin, T.D.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2012), s. 74-115 ISSN 2073-4395 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : breeding * germplasm * genetic diversity * pea Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  17. Shelf Life Extension of Maple pea (Pisum sativum var. arvense L. Spread Using Sous Vide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ķirse Asnate

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of sous vide packaging on the shelf life of maple pea (Pisum sativum var. arvense L. spread. Pea spreads were made of ground re-hydrated cooked maple peas ‘Bruno’ (Pisum sativum var. arvense L., to which salt, citric acid, oil, and spices were added. Pea spread was stored in polyamide/polyethylene (PA/PE film pouches, packaged in vacuum and hermetically sealed. Pea spread pouches were heat treated in a water bath, then rapidly cooled in ice-water and stored at 4.0 ± 0.5 °C. Sous vide was applied in three different heat regimens +(65.0; 80.0 and 100.0 ± 0.5 °C with cooking times 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min at a constant temperature. Total plate count was determined according to ISO 4833-1:2014 on Plate Count Agar and Enterobacteriaceae determination was performed in accordance with ISO 21528-2:2004 on Violet Red Bile Glucose Agar. Total plate count in pea spread without thermal treatment was 3.41 log10 CFU g−1, in all sous vide packaged pea spread samples microbial contamination was significantly lower (p < 0.05. Enterobacteriaceae were not detected in any samples. It is possible to extend the shelf life of sous vide maple pea spread up to 14 weeks when stored at 4.0 ± 0.5 °C.

  18. Market of Plant Varieties in Ukraine: Green Pea (Pisum sativum L partim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. В. Свинарчук

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The article reflects economical value of a valuable food crop, field pea used chiefly as a vegetable (Pisum sativum L partim, its origin and distribution both in the worldwide scale and in our country, establishment of its varietal resources. Exhausting description is provided to new varieties of pea used chiefly as a vegetable, which have been listed in the State Register of Varieties Suitable for Dissemination in Ukraine in 20010-2011 for the harvest in 2012, and for which official description is available.

  19. Drought response and genetic diversity in Pisum fulvum, a wild relative of domesticated pea

    OpenAIRE

    Naim-Feil, Erez; Toren, Maya; Aubert, Gregoire; Rubinstein, Mor; Rosen, Ada; Eshed, Ravit; Sherman, Amir; Ophir, Ron; Saranga, Yehoshua; Abbo, Shahal

    2017-01-01

    Productivity of grain crops in semi-arid environments is often affected by drought, which is likely to increase due to predicted climate changes. Wild pea (Pisum fulvum, Pf) accessions sampled across its ecological amplitude in Israel (350-850 mm annual precipitation) were used to assess the genetic diversity for drought responses. We hypothesized that native species evolving under east Mediterranean climate carry adaptive traits to cope with drought stress. Accessions were classified accordi...

  20. Drought response and genetic diversity in Pisum fulvum, a wild relative of domesticated pea

    OpenAIRE

    Naim-Feil, Erez; Toren, Maya; Aubert, Gregoire; Sherman, Amir; Ophir, Ron; Saranga, Yehoshuo; Abbo, Shahal

    2017-01-01

    Productivity of grain crops in semi-arid areas is often affected by drought, which is likely to increase due to climate changes. A collection of 160 wild pea (Pisum fulvum, Pf) accessions was assembled from across its ecological range in Israel (350-850 mm annual precipitation) and used to assess genetic diversity in this taxon. A range of penology and other morpho-physiological traits was documented. We hypothesized that native species evolving under east Mediterranean climate carry adaptive...

  1. Interaction of pea (Pisum sativum L.) lectins with rhizobial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, M; Soni, G; Singh, C K

    2001-01-01

    Lectins from two varieties (PG-3 and LFP-48) of pea have been purified by affinity chromatography on Sephadex G-50. The specific activity increased by 23 and 25 folds, respectively. These lectins from both the varieties were found to be specific for mannose. The purified fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labelled lectins showed binding reaction with homologous as well as heterologous strains of Rhizobium spp. The results revealed that pea lectins are not highly specific to their respective rhizobia. Moreover, these lectins showed a greater stimulatory effect on homologous Rhizobium leguminosarum strains.

  2. Photosynthetic responses of pea plants (Pisum sativum L. cv. Little ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... meteorological parameters, levels of solar radiation as influenced .... three times during vegetative, flowering and reproductive growth stages of pea plants on expanded leaves of the upper canopy under direct sun light. The Pn rates ..... Global Change Environment: The Importance of Different Plant Traits.

  3. Development of Pea (Pisum sativum L.) and Chickpea (Cicer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012r

    snack was found to have much higher fat content than the non-fried snacks: fried snack (27.94 % w/w, wet weight ..... have contributed to lower perceived intensity for “moist” texture among assessors, in contrast with the ... processing of green peas due to loss of chlorophylls is well established in the literature (Coultate, 2002 ...

  4. Determination of mycoflora of pea (Pisum sativum) seeds and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-06

    Jul 6, 2011 ... Mycoflora of pea seeds and the effectiveness of Rhizobium leguminosarum on important seed-borne pathogens were determined. Mycoflora were changed according to seed groups with or without surface sterilization. The most common isolated fungi were Fusarium spp., Alternaria spp., Macrophomina.

  5. Development of Pea (Pisum sativum L.) and Chickpea (Cicer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moisture content was determined by the air-oven drying method and fat content was quantified by the soxhlet extraction method. Quantitative Descriptive Analysis was performed by 7 experienced assessors of CFTRI using 15 cm line scales. The fried green pea snack obtained highest score for “crispy” and lowest score for ...

  6. Determination of mycoflora of pea ( Pisum sativum ) seeds and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mycoflora of pea seeds and the effectiveness of Rhizobium leguminosarum on important seed-borne pathogens were determined. Mycoflora were changed according to seed groups with or without surface sterilization. The most common isolated fungi were Fusarium spp., Alternaria spp., Macrophomina phaseolina, ...

  7. occurrence of the pea aphid, acyrthosiphon pisum (harris)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    alfalfa (Medicago sativa), clover (Trifolium sp.) and other leguminous crops ... holocyclic life cycle (i.e., it reproduces parthenogenetically ... Table 1. Plant species infested by pea aphid at Adet and. Wondata, Ethiopia, in 1999/2000. Host plant species. Total. Number of plants. Vetch Clover Lupine. Alfalfa. Infested plants.

  8. Sensitivity of two garden pea genotypes to physical and chemical mutagens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavka Kalapchieva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A study on the sensitivity of two breeding lines of garden pea to mutagenic agents was carried out in the Maritsa Vegetable Crops Research Institute, Plovdiv. The purpose was to evaluate the sensitivity of the Pisum sativum L. genotypes to physical and chemical mutagens. In the experiment, the pea seeds were irradiated single or combined with 60Co gamma rays (40, 80, 100, 200 and 400 Gy and Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.2 %. Visible morphological changes of the stems and leaves were observed in plant of M1 generation, such as shorter stems, double petiole, clover-shaped leaves and a couple of tendrils. Single treatments with 100 Gy 60Co induced the highest mutation frequency M.F. = 7.69 for line 88-7, and М.F. = 2.11 for line 97-3, reported in M2 generation. Higher doses or combined gamma rays and EMS treatments induced more efficiently mutations. Line 88-7 was selected for further mutagenic treatment due to the higher sensitivity assessed.

  9. Enhancing Neoplasm Expression in Field Pea (Pisum sativum via Intercropping and its Significance to Pea Weevil (Bruchus pisorum Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel eTeshome

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Neoplasm formation, a non-meristematic tissue growth on young field pea (Pisum sativum L. pods is triggered in the absence of UV light and/or in response to oviposition by pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum L.. This trait is expressed in some genotypes (Np genotypes of P. sativum and has the capacity to obstruct pea weevil larval entry into developing seeds. In the present study, 26% of the tested accessions depicted the trait when grown under greenhouse conditions. However, UV light inhibits full expression of this trait and subsequently it is inconspicuous at the field level. In order to investigate UV light impact on the expression of neoplasm, particular Np genotypes were subjected to UV lamp light exposure in the greenhouse and sunlight at the field level. Under these different growing conditions, the highest mean percentage of neoplastic pods was in the control chamber in the greenhouse (36% whereas in single and double UV lamp chambers, the percentage dropped to 10% and 15%, respectively. Furthermore, when the same Np genotypes were grown in the field, the percentage of neoplastic pods dropped significantly (7%. In order to enhance neoplastic expression at the field level, intercropping of Np genotypes with sorghum was investigated. As result, the percentage of neoplastic pods was threefold in intercropped Np genotypes as compared to those without intercropping. Therefore, intercropping neoplastic genotypes with other crops such as sorghum and maize can facilitate neoplasm formation, which in turn can minimize the success rate of pea weevil larvae entry into developing seeds. Greenhouse artificial infestation experiments showed that pea weevil damage in neoplastic genotypes is lower in comparison to wild type genotypes. Therefore, promoting neoplastic formation under field conditions via intercropping can serve as part of an integrated pea weevil management strategy especially for small scale farming systems.

  10. Distribution of fatty acids in triacylglycerols and phospholipids from peas (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiromi; Tomiyama, Yuka; Tanaka, Megumi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2007-11-01

    The fatty acid distribution of triacylglycerols (TAG) and major phospholipids (PL) obtained from four varieties of peas (Pisum sativum) was investigated. The total lipids extracted from the peas were separated by thin layer chromatography into seven fractions. The major lipid components were PL (52.2-61.3%) and TAG (31.2-40.3%), while hydrocarbons, steryl esters, free fatty acids and diacylglycerols (sn-1,3 and sn-1,2) were also present in minor proportions (5.6-9.2%). The main PL components isolated from the four varieties were phosphatidylcholine (42.3-49.2%), phosphatidylinositol (23.3-25.2%) and phosphatidylethanolamine (17.7-20.5%). Significant differences (P pea varieties. Phosphatidylinositol was unique in that it had the highest saturated fatty acid content among the three PL. However, the principal characteristics of the fatty acid distribution in the TAG and three PL were evident among the four varieties: unsaturated fatty acids were predominantly located in the sn-2 position while saturated fatty acids primarily occupied the sn-1 or sn-3 position in the oils of the peas. These results should be useful to both producers and consumers for the manufacture of pea foods in Japan. Copyright © 2007 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Genetic characterization of pea (Pisum sativum) germplasm from Turkey using morphological and SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikamiş, G; Yanmaz, R; Ermiş, S; Bakir, M; Yüksel, C

    2010-03-30

    The need for the conservation of plant genetic resources has been widely accepted. Germplasm characterization and evaluation yield information for more efficient utilization of these valuable resources. The aim of the present study was to characterize the pea germplasm conserved at the Aegean Agricultural Research Institute of Turkey using morphological and simple sequence repeat (SSR)-based molecular approaches. Genetic characterization of 30 pea genotypes collected from different regions of Turkey and 10 commercial pea cultivars was performed using the criteria of the International Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV) (TG 7/9 Pisum sativum), and with 10 SSR markers. We originally tested 15 SSR markers; 10 of these markers were selected on the basis of high polymorphism information content in the molecular assays. Sixty-one alleles were detected at the 10 loci. The number of alleles per SSR locus ranged from 3 (PVSBE2) to 12 (AB53), with a mean of 6.1 alleles. The most informative loci were AB53 (12 alleles), AA355 (9 alleles), AD270 (8 alleles), A9 (7 alleles), AD61 (7 alleles), and AB25 (6 alleles). The UPGMA dendrogram defined by SSR markers revealed genetic relatedness of the pea genotypes. These findings can be used to guide future breeding studies and germplasm management of these pea genotypes.

  12. Purification and characterization of ornithine transcarbamylase from pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, R. D.; Richardson, D. P.

    1991-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum) ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) was purified to homogeneity from leaf homogenates in a single-step procedure, using delta-N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-ornithine-Sepharose 6B affinity chromatography. The 1581-fold purified OTC enzyme exhibited a specific activity of 139 micromoles citrulline per minute per milligram of protein at 37 degrees C, pH 8.5. Pea OTC represents approximately 0.05% of the total soluble protein in the leaf. The molecular weight of the native enzyme was approximately 108,200, as estimated by Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration chromatography. The purified protein ran as a single molecular weight band of 36,500 in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results suggest that the pea OTC is a trimer of identical subunits. The overall amino acid composition of pea OTC is similar to that found in other eukaryotic and prokaryotic OTCs, but the number of arginine residues is approximately twofold higher. The increased number of arginine residues probably accounts for the observed isoelectric point of 7.6 for the pea enzyme, which is considerably more basic than isoelectric point values that have been reported for other OTCs.

  13. Induction of mutation in peas (Pisum sativum) in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Pando, L.; Torres Aranda, M.; Romero Loli, M.

    1984-01-01

    The production of peas, a staple food in Peru, can be increased by crop rotation with cereals in high lands (3000 m and above). Cultivation in high lands not only gives cultivar of higher proteic content but also improves the fertility of the soils. However, the low temperature (in the freezing region) in the high lands and the associated plant diseases are the major problems for this kind of cultivation. The present report describes the development of freezing and disease resistant mutants through mutagenesis with gamma radiation. Two varieties, Alderman and Amarilla, which had been adopted to high lands are selected for the present study. Two doses were used, 14 and 18 Krad, employing 4600 seeds/dose for the Alderman variety and 3600 seeds/dose for Amarilla. Preliminary results are presented

  14. Change in particle size of pectin reacted with pectinesterase isozymes from pea (Pisum sativum L.) sprout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, C M; Wu, M C; Chang, W H; Chang, H M

    2001-09-01

    Four pectinesterase (PE) isozymes were isolated by CM-Sepharose CL-6B chromatography from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) sprouts and then reacted with citrus pectin (degree of esterification = 68%, 30-100 kDa) to observe the change in pectin particle size using a laser particle size analyzer. After incubation of a pectin-PE mixture (pH 6.5) at 30 degrees C for 4 h, PE 1 was observed to catalyze the transacylation reaction most remarkably, increasing the particle size from approximately 50-70 to approximately 250-350 nm, followed by PE 3, PE 2, and PE 4.

  15. The effect of salinity on seed germination and growth parameters of field pea (Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić Dušica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Field pea (Pisum sativum L. seed contains a large amount of proteins, amino acids, sugars, carbohydrates, vitamins A and C, calcium and phosphorous, and hence it is widely used for many purposes. Although field pea has moderate requirements for its growth, it is sensitive to increased salt content in soil. This research included eight varieties (Javor, Jantar, Partner, Kristal, Pionir, Junior, Trezor, Dukat developed at Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops in Novi Sad. Sodium chloride solutions of various concentrations (0, 50, 100 and 150 mM were added in growing media to simulate saline conditions. The following were subsequently determined: seed germination, seedling length, fresh and dry weight of seedlings and 1000-seed weight. Among the analyzed varieties, variety Jantar expressed a high level of tolerance to increased salt content in growing media under laboratory conditions.

  16. Profile and Functional Properties of Seed Proteins from Six Pea (Pisum sativum Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Ristic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Extractability, extractable protein compositions, technological-functional properties of pea (Pisum sativum proteins from six genotypes grown in Serbia were investigated. Also, the relationship between these characteristics was presented. Investigated genotypes showed significant differences in storage protein content, composition and extractability. The ratio of vicilin:legumin concentrations, as well as the ratio of vicilin + convicilin: Legumin concentrations were positively correlated with extractability. Our data suggest that the higher level of vicilin and/or a lower level of legumin have a positive influence on protein extractability. The emulsion activity index (EAI was strongly and positively correlated with the solubility, while no significant correlation was found between emulsion stability (ESI and solubility, nor between foaming properties and solubility. No association was evident between ESI and EAI. A moderate positive correlation between emulsion stability and foam capacity was observed. Proteins from the investigated genotypes expressed significantly different emulsifying properties and foam capacity at different pH values, whereas low foam stability was detected. It appears that genotype has considerable influence on content, composition and technological-functional properties of pea bean proteins. This fact can be very useful for food scientists in efforts to improve the quality of peas and pea protein products.

  17. [Correlation between growth of callus and a number of nodule for pea Pisum sativum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Iu P

    2012-01-01

    The processes of nodulation and callusing were studied for pea Pisum sativum in a comparative aspect. Seven varieties of pea plants were used. The nodulation was characterized by the number of nodules and their mass per one plant. The frequency ratio of nodules of various weights was described by the Lorentz equation. The growth of callus was described using equation of the S-dependence. It has been shown that plants can produce maximal (optimum for nitrogen fixation) mass of nodules by an increase either in the nodules number or in the mass of each nodule. This feature is specific to the varieties of peas. It has been also found that the plants of the pea varieties, which have a large number of nodules, produce calluses of maximum size. Small calluses are characteristic of the varieties having plants with small amounts of large nodules. The data obtained has been interpreted on the assumption that the nodulation is underlined by both differentiation and proliferation, whereas the callusing is due only to the proliferation process.

  18. Agronomical factors influencing the legumin/vicilin ratio in pea (Pisum sativum L.) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Cécile; Dehon, Lydie; Bourgeois, Audrey; Verhaeghe-Cartrysse, Christine; Blecker, Christophe

    2012-06-01

    Many research studies have investigated the impact of agronomical factors on the protein content of pea (Pisum sativum). This study aimed to establish if a correlation exists between protein content and legumin/vicilin (L/V) ratio in pea seeds and to identify agronomical factors that have an impact on this ratio. The L/V ratio was positively correlated with protein content (r = 0.58, P ≤ 0.01), but no linear regression was applicable (adjusted R(2) = 0.31). Both variety and cultivation year had a highly significant effect on the ratio (P varieties being less sensitive to climatic conditions than others. Cultivation location had a highly significant effect (P pea varieties independently. Varieties with a stable L/V ratio can prove to be useful in the food industry. Other agronomical factors (soil type and seeding density) should be considered for the production of pea seeds with a specific L/V ratio. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Pea (Pisum sativum) seed production as an assay for reproductive effects due to herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszyk, David; Pfleeger, Thomas; Lee, E Henry; Plocher, Milton

    2009-09-01

    Even though herbicide drift can affect plant reproduction, current plant testing protocols emphasize effects on vegetative growth. In this study, we determined whether a short-growing season plant can indicate potential effects of herbicides on seed production. Pea (Pisum sativum cv. Dakota) plants were grown in mineral soil in pots under greenhouse conditions. Plants were treated with a variety of herbicides (dicamba, clopyralid, glufosinate, glyphosate, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid, primisulfuron, or sulfometuron) at below standard field application rates applied at a vegetative stage of growth (approximately 14 d after emergence) or at flowering (approximately 20 d after emergence). Pea seed production was greatly reduced by sulfometuron at the minimum concentration used (0.001 x field application rate), with an effective concentration producing a 25% reduction in seed dry weight of 0.00007 x field application rate. Primisulfuron and glyphosate had a 25% reduction in seed dry weight for seed dry weight of 0.0035 and 0.0096 x field application rate, respectively. Clopyralid and dicamba reduced pea seed dry weight at a 25% reduction in seed dry weight of approximately 0.07 x field application rate. Glufosinate only reduced pea seed weight in one experiment, with a 25% reduction in seed dry weight of 0.07 and 0.008 x field application rate at vegetative growth and flowering stages, respectively. Pea seed dry weight was not affected by 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid. Plant developmental stage had no consistent effect on herbicide responses. Reduced seed production occurred with some herbicides (especially acetolactate synthase inhibitors), which caused little or no reduction in plant height or shoot biomass and little visible injury. Thus, pea may be a model species to indicate seed reproductive responses to herbicides, with seed production obtained by extending plant growth for usually only 7 d longer than the period usually used in the vegetative vigor

  20. Large-scale evaluation of pea (Pisum sativum L.) germplasm for cold tolerance in the open field during winter in Qingdao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a cool season crop, pea (Pisum sativum L.) can tolerate frost at the vegetative stage but has yield loss when freezing stress occurs at reproductive stage. Cold tolerance improvement of pea varieties is important for the stable yield and the expansion of winter pea planting area. Under the natura...

  1. Boron, cobalt and molybdenum in the knottiness and production on pea (Pisum sativum L.) cv Bolero culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Junior, A.; Teixeira, N.T.; Maluf, C.E.; Campos, M.F. de

    1989-01-01

    The test carried out to study the effect of Boron, Cobalt and Molybdenum on the knottiness and production of the pea (Pisum sativum L.)cv Bolero culture, in controlled conditions. The results showed that Boron didn't affect the knottiness and it increased the production, while, Cobalt and Molybdenum promoted significant increase in the knottiness and productivity. (author) [pt

  2. INHERITANCE OF QUANTITATIVE TRAITS IN DRY PEA (Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranko Gantner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted with six parental genotypes: varieties Anno, Gold, Joel, Junior, PF-G1 and Shawnee with aim to improve the dry pea breeding for higher grain yield. Objectives of the research were to investigate: a the inheritance of grain yield per plant and its components; b to determination of the combining ability of parents and their cross-combinations; c the interrelationships among grain yield, its components and morphological traits; d choosing the primary selection criteria; e choosing the best cross-combinations in order to achieve the highest selection response of grain yield; f simple and digenic epistatic gene-effects in the chosen cross-combinations which determ the trait chosen as a primary selection criterion; g the genetic components of variation in the chosen cross-combinations of the trait chosen as a primary selection criterion; h the anticipation of genetic gain of grain yield per plant of the chosen cross-combinations. The research was conducted on experimental fields and laboratories of the Agricultural Institute Osijek. Parental lines were chosen in 2006, the first series of crossings in a diallel fashion were performed in 2007, and the second series in 2008, in a diallel fashion plus back-crossing. The obtained generation material (P1, P2, F1, F2, BC1 i BC2 of 15 biparental combinations was seeded in the field trial in 2009. Measurement of the yield, its components and morfological traits was done at the end of vegetation. The inheritance of investigated traits was estimated using Hayman’s approach to diallel analysis, combining abilities were determined using Griffing’s approach to diallel analysis, interrelationships among investigated traits were determined using correlation analysis, the primary selection criterion was chosen according to the inheritance of the investigated traits and their interrelationships, best cross-combinations were chosen upon Griffing’s analysis results and two principles: a

  3. Application of SNPs to improve yield of Pisum sativum L. (pea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Ansar; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2017-06-01

    Nanotechnology opens an enormous scope of novel application in the fields of biotechnology and agricultural industries, because nanoparticles (NPs) have unique physicochemical properties, i.e. high surface area, high reactivity, tunable pore size and particle morphology. Present study was carried out to determine the role of silver NPs (SNPs) to improve yield of Pisum sativum L. SNPs (10-100 nm) were synthesised by green method using extract of Berberis lycium Royle. Pea seeds were soaked and seedling were foliage sprayed by 0, 30, 60 and 90 ppm SNPs. The experiment was arranged as split-split plot randomised complete block design with three replicates. The application of SNPs enhanced significantly number of seeds pod -1 , number of pods plant -1 , hundred seed weight, biological yield and green pod yield over control. The highest yield was found when 60 ppm SNPs were applied. However, exposure to 90 ppm SNPs, the yield of the pea decreased significantly as compared with 30 and 60 ppm. This research shows that SNPs have definite ability to improve growth and yield of crops. Nevertheless, a comprehensive experimentation is needed to establish the most appropriate concentration, size and mode of application of SNPs for higher growth and maximum yield of pea.

  4. Large-scale evaluation of pea (Pisum sativum L. germplasm for cold tolerance in the field during winter in Qingdao

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As a cool-season crop, pea (Pisum sativum L. can tolerate frost at the vegetative stage but experiences yield loss when freezing stress occurs at the reproductive stage. Cold-tolerance improvement of pea varieties is important for stable yield and expansion of the winter pea planting area. Under natural low-temperature conditions during winter in Qingdao, Shandong, China, we evaluated the cold tolerance of 3672 pea germplasm accessions in the field and categorized them as displaying high resistance (214, moderate resistance (835, or susceptibility (2623. The highly and moderately resistant genotypes were validated in the following year. We found that genotypes from the winter production region showed higher cold tolerance than genotypes from the spring production region. The accessions identified as having high levels of cold tolerance are recommended as potential genetic resources in cold-tolerance breeding of pea.

  5. Phylogenetic reconstruction at the species and intraspecies levels in the genus Pisum (L.) (peas) using a histone H1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytseva, Olga O; Bogdanova, Vera S; Kosterin, Oleg E

    2012-08-10

    A phylogenetic analysis of the genus Pisum (peas), embracing diverse wild and cultivated forms, which evoke problems with species delimitation, was carried out based on a gene coding for histone H1, a protein that has a long and variable functional C-terminal domain. Phylogenetic trees were reconstructed on the basis of the coding sequence of the gene His5 of H1 subtype 5 in 65 pea accessions. Early separation of a clear-cut wild species Pisum fulvum is well supported, while cultivated species Pisum abyssinicum appears as a small branch within Pisum sativum. Another robust branch within P. sativum includes some wild and almost all cultivated representatives of P. sativum. Other wild representatives form diverse but rather subtle branches. In a subset of accessions, PsbA-trnH chloroplast intergenic spacer was also analysed and found less informative than His5. A number of accessions of cultivated peas from remote regions have a His5 allele of identical sequence, encoding an electrophoretically slow protein product, which earlier attracted attention as likely positively selected in harsh climate conditions. In PsbA-trnH, a 8bp deletion was found, which marks cultivated representatives of P. sativum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of temperature and cultivar on pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphididae) life history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, D; Walters, K F; Aegerter, J N

    2001-02-01

    Life history parameters of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum were studied at five constant temperatures on two cultivars of peas, Scout and Sancho. The development and mortality of juveniles and the life-span, age-specific fecundity and survivorship of adult aphids were recorded and used to construct life tables. The juvenile development period (from birth to adulthood) was longest at 11.9 degrees C (16.8 days on cv. Scout and 16.2 days on cv. Sancho) and shortest at 26.7 degrees C (8.5 days on cv. Scout and 8.8 days on cv. Sancho). At all temperatures, except 26.7 degrees C, juveniles developed faster on cv. Sancho than on cv. Scout. On both pea varieties juvenile mortality was highest at temperatures above 19.6 degrees C and lowest at 19.6 degrees C. Highest cumulative juvenile mortality was recorded on cv. Scout at 26.7 degrees C when only 9% of aphids survived from birth to reproductively mature adults. Fecundity rates were unaffected by temperature in the range tested on cv. Sancho but increased with increasing temperatures between 11.9 and 19.6 degrees C on cv. Scout. These differences in life history parameters were reflected in the population growth (rm) of aphids on both pea cultivars which increased with increasing temperatures between 11.9 and 23.1 degrees C on cv. Sancho and 11.9 and 19.6 degrees C on cv. Scout, declining thereafter. Population growth was consistently greater at all temperatures for aphids reared on cv. Sancho than those reared on cv. Scout.

  7. Effect of ethephon and UV irradiation on auxin destruction in Little Marvel dwarf pea (Pisum satirum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, E.W.; De Morrow, J.M.; Richard, L.B.; O'Connor, M.N.

    1979-01-01

    Treatment of 'Little Marvel' dwarf pea (Pisum sativum) seeds with 3 ppm ethephon was followed by subsequent exposure to: 1. complete darkness; 2. visible light; and 3. ultraviolet irradiation (UV). Cell free extracts of distal root, root tip, proximal stem, and leaf tissues (20-day-old) were assayed for IAA-I- 14 C destruction. Distal root and root tip tissue extracts of ethephon-treated seeds and subsequent exposure of the seedlings to UV showed marked IAA-I- 14 C destruction compared to proximal stem and leaf cell-free extracts. The present study suggests that IAA-I- 14 C destruction may be enzymic in nature and different in all four tissues (root tip, dorsal root, proximal stem, and leaf) depending upon the exposure treatment (dark, visible lights and UV), with or without ethephon pretreatment. (orig.) [de

  8. Cultivar and Rhizobium Strain Effects on the Symbiotic Performance of Pea (Pisum sativum)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøt, Leif

    1983-01-01

    The symbiotic performance of four pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivars in combination with each of four strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum was studied in growth chamber experiments in order to estimate the effects of cultivars, strains and cultivar × strain interaction on the variation in dry weight, N...... content and dry weight/N ratio. At harvest 63 days after planting, cultivars accounted for 75% of the variation in dry weight, while the Rhizobium strains accounted for 63% of the variation in N-content and 70% of the variation in dry weight/N ratio. Cultivar × strain interactions were statistically...... significant, but of minor quantitative importance, accounting for 5–15% of the total variation. Rhizobium strains also influenced the partitioning of N between reproductive and vegetative plant parts and between root and shoot biomass....

  9. Evaluation of genetic divergence and heritability in pea (Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Georgieva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An experiment on genetic evaluation of five genotypes of forage pea (Glyans, Svit, Kamerton, Modus, Pleven 4 was conducted during 2012-2014 period. Analysis of variance showed significant differences among genotypes for the traits pod width, seeds per plant, seed weight per plant and 1000 seed weight. The estimates of genetic parameters of five varieties of Pisum sativum L. indicated a good amount of genetic variation in the experimental materials under investigation. Moderate phenotypic and genotypic coefficients of variation were observed for most of traits except pod length and pod width. For the traits studied seeds per plant, seed weight per plant and plant height were found high heritability along with high genetic gain indicating preponderance of additive effects. Therefore, selection programme based on these characters would be more effective in improving yield parameters of forage pea. The seed yield was positively and significantly correlated with 1000 seed weight and pod stem, which suggested the possibilities of improving seed yield by simultaneous improvement of these traits.

  10. Organic meat quality of dual purpose young bulls supplemented with pea (Pisum sativum L.) or soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazzin, Mirco; Piasentier, Edi; Saccà, Elena; Bazzoli, Ilario; Bovolenta, Stefano

    2018-02-01

    One of the main constraints established by organic legislation that limits the development of the rearing of young bulls is the ban on the use of genetically modified organisms (GMO). Most of the worldwide cultivated soybean is GMO, therefore the use of alternative protein sources should be evaluated. In this study, the effect of dietary substitution of soybean with pea (Pisum sativum L.) on carcass characteristics and meat quality of dual purpose young bulls reared following the organic method was investigated. Twenty-four young bulls of Rendena breed were randomly assigned to two diet treatments differing in protein supplement (soybean (SB) or field pea (FP)). Carcass characteristics and meat chemical composition, colour, cooking loss and Warner-Bratzler shear force did not differ between groups. Regarding meat fatty acid composition, SB showed higher concentrations of C18:0 and C18:1 t and lower C16:1n-9c, C14:0, C17:1n-9c and C18:1n-9c than FP. In descriptive sensory analysis, trained judges were not able to differentiate meats from SB and FP, which also had similar overall liking expressed by consumers. The results of this study indicate that FP can replace SB in the diet of dual purpose young bulls with only a minor influence on fatty acid composition and no effect on carcass characteristics and meat quality. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Assessment of the feeding value of South Dakota-grown field peas (Pisum sativum l.) for growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, H H; Benzoni, G; Bohlke, R A; Peters, D N

    2004-09-01

    Four experiments were conducted to investigate the feeding value of South Dakota-grown field peas (Pisum sativum L.) for growing pigs. In Exp. 1, 96 pigs (initial BW = 22 +/- 3.35 kg) were allotted to four treatment groups (four pigs per pen, six replicate pens per treatment) and fed growing (0.95% Lys) and finishing (0.68% Lys) diets containing 0, 12, 24, or 36% field peas (as-fed basis). There were no differences among the treatment groups in ADG, ADFI, or G:F. Likewise, there were no differences in backfat thickness or lean meat percent among treatment groups, but pigs fed diets containing 12, 24, or 36% field peas had greater (P feed ingredients. Experiment 4 was an energy balance experiment conducted to measure the DE and ME concentrations in field peas and corn. Six growing pigs (initial BW = 85.5 +/- 6.5 kg) were placed in metabolism cages and fed diets based on field peas or corn and arranged in a two-period switch-back design. The DE values for field peas and corn (3,864 and 3,879 kcal/kg DM, respectively) were similar, but the ME of corn was higher (P Dakota-grown field peas are highly digestible by growing pigs. Therefore, such field peas may be included in diets for nursery pigs and growing-finishing pigs in amounts of at least 18 and 36%, respectively, without negatively affecting pig performance.

  12. Radioprotective effect of novel disubstituted thioureas on pea (Pisum sativum L.) development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehandjiev, A; Kosturkova, G; Vassilev, G; Noveva, S

    2002-01-01

    The review presents our research on the influence of novel thiourea compounds on the biological and genetic effect of gamma-rays using in vivo and in vitro systems of pea. Some novel disubstituted thioureas: o-allylthioureidobenzoic acid (ATB); o-phenylthioureidobenzoic acid (PTB); N-allyl-N'-2-pyridylthiourea (A-2-PTU); N-phenyl-N'-2-pyridylthiourea (P-2-PTU) and 1,4-allylthioureidosalicylic acid (ATUS) were examined. Pea (Pisum sativum L.) seeds from five varieties were used. Experiments in vivo and in vitro were carried under laboratory, greenhouse and field conditions. The data revealed the PTB radioprotective effect demonstrated by: reduction of chromosome aberrations by 2 folds; 50% increase of germinating and surviving plants in M1; twice higher frequency of induced mutations in M2 generation relative to irradiation without PTB treatment; decreasing the level of induced radiation suppression leading to favorable effect on the initial stem and root development of pea. ATB radioprotective effect was demonstrated in vitro by: 25-35% stimulation of organogenesis; by 20-50% increase in bud formation; by 25% stimulation of growth. The effect of A-2-PTU and P-2-PTU depended on the irradiation dose. The protective effect of A-2-PTU is more pronounced at lower irradiation dose, while the effect of P-2-PTU is more pronounced at higher irradiation dose. ATUS, opposite to the other compounds, revealed radiosensibilizing effect by: 16-27% increase in lethality caused by gamma-rays leading to lower number of germinating and surviving plants in M1; 50% decrease in the number of induced mutations in M2 generation; limiting the types of induced mutations at the higher irradiation dose. As a result of the experiments useful mutation forms were obtained, characterized with: earliness, lodging and disease resistance; higher productivity.

  13. [Comparative genome analysis in pea Pisum sativum L. varieties and lines with chromosomal and molecular markers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatadze, T E; Zelenina, D A; Shostak, N G; Volkov, A A; Popov, K V; Rachinskaia, O V; Borisov, A Iu; Tikhonovich, I A; Zelenin, A V; Muravenko, O V

    2008-12-01

    C banding, Ag-NOR staining, FISH with pTa71 (45S rDNA) and pTa794 (5S rDNA), and RAPD-PCR analysis were used to study the genome and chromosome polymorphism in four varieties (Frisson, Sparkle, Rondo, and Finale) and two genetic lines (Sprint-2 and SGE) of pea Pisum sativum L. A comparison of the C-banding patterns did not reveal any polymorphism within the varieties. The most significant between-variety differences were observed for the size of C bands on satellite chromosomes 4 and 7. All grain pea varieties (Frisson, Sparkle, and Rondo) had a large C band in the satellite of chromosome 4 and a medium C band in the region adjacent to the satellite thread on chromosome 7. C bands were almost of the same size in the genetic lines and vegetable variety Finale. In all accessions, 45S rDNA mapped to the secondary constriction regions of chromosomes 1, 3, and 5. The signal from chromosome 5 in the lines was more intense than in the varieties. Ag-NOR staining showed that the transcriptional activity of the 45S rRNA genes on chromosome 7 was higher than on chromosome 4 in all accessions. No more than four Ag-NOR-positive nucleoli were observed in interphase nuclei. Statistical analysis of the total area of Ag-NOR-stained nucleoli did not detect any significant difference between the accessions examined. RAPD-PCR analysis revealed high between-variety and low within-variety genomic polymorphism. Chromosomal and molecular markers proved to be promising for genome identification in pea varieties and lines.

  14. Variety discrimination in pea (Pisum sativum L.) by molecular, biochemical and morphological markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smykal, Peter; Horacek, Jiri; Dostalova, Radmila; Hybl, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    The distinctness, uniformity and stability (DUS) requirements involve expensive, space- and time-consuming measurements of morphological traits. Moreover, for a majority of traits, interactions between genotype and environment complicate the evaluation. Molecular markers have a potential to facilitate this procedure, increase the reliability of decisions, and substantially save the time and space needed for experiments. We chose 25 varieties of pea (Pisum sativum L.) from the list of recommended varieties for cultivation in the Czech Republic, and made both a standard classification by 12 morphological descriptors and a classification by biochemical-molecular markers. Two isozyme systems, 10 microsatellite loci, 2 retrotransposons for multilocus inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism (IRAP), and 12 retrotransposon-based insertion polymorphism (RBIP) DNA markers were analysed. The main objective of the study was to examine the potential of each method for discrimination between pea varieties. The results demonstrate a high potential and resolving power of DNA-based methods. Superior in terms of high information content and discrimination power were SSR markers, owing to high allelic variation, which was the only biochemical-molecular method allowing clear identification of all varieties. Retrotransposon markers in RBIP format proved to be the most robust and easy to score method, while multilocus IRAP produced informative fingerprint already in a single analysis. Isozyme analysis offered a fast and less expensive alternative. The results showed that molecular identification could be used to assess distinctness and complement morphological assessment, especially in cases where the time frame plays an important role. Currently developed pea marker systems might serve also for germplasm management and genetic diversity studies.

  15. Stimulation of nodulation in field peas (Pisum sativum) by low concentrations of ammonium in hydroponic culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterer, J. G.; Vessey, J. K.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Although the inhibitory effects of high concentrations of mineral N (> 1.0 mM) on nodule development and function have often been studied, the effects of low, static concentrations of NH4+ (hydroponic culture on nodule establishment and nitrogenase activity in field peas [Pisum sativum L. cv. Express (Svalof AB)] for the initial 28 days after planting (DAP). Peas grown in the presence of low concentrations of NH4+ had significantly greater nodule numbers (up to 4-fold) than plants grown without NH4+. Nodule dry weight per plant was significantly higher at 14, 21 and 28 DAP in plants grown in the presence of NH4+, but individual nodule mass was lower than in plants grown without NH4+. The nodulation pattern of the plants supplied with NH4+ was similar to that often reported for supernodulating mutants, however the plants did not express other growth habits associated with supernodulation. Estimates of N2 fixation indicate that the plus-NH4+ peas fixed as much or more N2 than the plants supplied with minus-NH4+ nutrient solution. There were no significant differences in nodule numbers, nodule mass or NH4+ uptake between the plants grown at the two concentrations of NH4+. Nodulation appeared to autoregulate by 14 DAP in the minus-NH4+ treatment. Plant growth and N accumulation in the minus-NH4+ plants lagged behind those of the plus-NH4+ treatments prior to N2 fixation becoming well established in the final week of the experiment. The plus-NH4+ treatments appeared not to elicit autoregulation and plants continued to initiate nodules throughout the experiment.

  16. The influence of rate and time of nitrate supply on nitrogen fixation and yield in pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Erik Steen

    1986-01-01

    The influence of nitrate N supply on dry matter production, N content and symbiotic nitrogen fixation in soil-grown pea (Pisum sativum L.) was studied in a pot experiment by means of15N fertilizer dilution. In pea receiving no fertilizer N symbiotic nitrogen fixation, soil and seed-borne N...... contributed with 82, 13 and 5% of total plant N, respectively. The supply of low rates of nitrate fertilizer at sowing (“starter N”) increased the vegetative dry matter production, but not the seed yield significantly. Nitrogen fixation was not significantly decreased by the lower rates of nitrate but higher...

  17. Repetitive DNA in the pea (Pisum sativum L. genome: comprehensive characterization using 454 sequencing and comparison to soybean and Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navrátilová Alice

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extraordinary size variation of higher plant nuclear genomes is in large part caused by differences in accumulation of repetitive DNA. This makes repetitive DNA of great interest for studying the molecular mechanisms shaping architecture and function of complex plant genomes. However, due to methodological constraints of conventional cloning and sequencing, a global description of repeat composition is available for only a very limited number of higher plants. In order to provide further data required for investigating evolutionary patterns of repeated DNA within and between species, we used a novel approach based on massive parallel sequencing which allowed a comprehensive repeat characterization in our model species, garden pea (Pisum sativum. Results Analysis of 33.3 Mb sequence data resulted in quantification and partial sequence reconstruction of major repeat families occurring in the pea genome with at least thousands of copies. Our results showed that the pea genome is dominated by LTR-retrotransposons, estimated at 140,000 copies/1C. Ty3/gypsy elements are less diverse and accumulated to higher copy numbers than Ty1/copia. This is in part due to a large population of Ogre-like retrotransposons which alone make up over 20% of the genome. In addition to numerous types of mobile elements, we have discovered a set of novel satellite repeats and two additional variants of telomeric sequences. Comparative genome analysis revealed that there are only a few repeat sequences conserved between pea and soybean genomes. On the other hand, all major families of pea mobile elements are well represented in M. truncatula. Conclusion We have demonstrated that even in a species with a relatively large genome like pea, where a single 454-sequencing run provided only 0.77% coverage, the generated sequences were sufficient to reconstruct and analyze major repeat families corresponding to a total of 35–48% of the genome. These data

  18. Orally Delivered Scorpion Antimicrobial Peptides Exhibit Activity against Pea Aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum and Its Bacterial Symbionts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Luna-Ramirez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aphids are severe agricultural pests that damage crops by feeding on phloem sap and vectoring plant pathogens. Chemical insecticides provide an important aphid control strategy, but alternative and sustainable control measures are required to avoid rapidly emerging resistance, environmental contamination, and the risk to humans and beneficial organisms. Aphids are dependent on bacterial symbionts, which enable them to survive on phloem sap lacking essential nutrients, as well as conferring environmental stress tolerance and resistance to parasites. The evolution of aphids has been accompanied by the loss of many immunity-related genes, such as those encoding antibacterial peptides, which are prevalent in other insects, probably because any harm to the bacterial symbionts would inevitably affect the aphids themselves. This suggests that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs could replace or at least complement conventional insecticides for aphid control. We fed the pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum with AMPs from the venom glands of scorpions. The AMPs reduced aphid survival, delayed their reproduction, displayed in vitro activity against aphid bacterial symbionts, and reduced the number of symbionts in vivo. Remarkably, we found that some of the scorpion AMPs compromised the aphid bacteriome, a specialized organ that harbours bacterial symbionts. Our data suggest that scorpion AMPs holds the potential to be developed as bio-insecticides, and are promising candidates for the engineering of aphid-resistant crops.

  19. Strategies used by two apterous strains of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum for passive dispersal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Wingless forms of aphids are relatively sedentary, and have a limited ability to migrate or disperse. However, they can drop off hosts or walk away if disturbed, or their food quality or quantity become deteriorated. Earlier, we found that the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris, 1776, could use differed strategies to escape danger and locate new host plants. To determine the mechanisms behind the different strategies, we undertook a series of studies including the aphids' host location, energy reserves under starvation, glycogenesis, sugar assimilation, olfactory and probing behaviors. We found that in our controlled laboratory conditions, one strain (local laboratory strain moved longer distances and dispersed wider ranges, and correspondingly these aphids assimilated more sugars, synthesized more glycogen, and moved faster than another strain (collected from Gansu Province, northwestern China. However, the latter strain could locate the host faster, probed leaves more frequently, and identified plant leaves more accurately than the former strain after they were starved. Our results explained how flightless or wingless insects adapt to fit biotic and abiotic challenges in the complex processes of natural selection.

  20. Alkali-soluble pectin is the primary target of Aluminum immobilization in root border cells of pea (Pisum sativum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Qu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the hypothesis that a discrepancy of Al binding in cell wall constituents determines Al mobility in root border cells (RBCs of pea (Pisum sativum, which provides protection for RBCs and root apices under Al toxicity. Plants of pea (Pisum sativum L. ‘Zhongwan no. 6’ were subjected to Al treatments under mist culture. The concentration of Al in RBCs was much higher than that in the root apex. The Al content in RBCs surrounding one root apex (104 RBCs was approximately 24.5 % of the total Al in the root apex (0–2.5 mm, indicating a shielding role of RBCs for the root apex under Al toxicity. Cell wall analysis showed that Al accumulated predominantly in alkali-soluble pectin (pectin 2 of RBCs. This could be attributed to a significant increase of uronic acids under Al toxicity, higher capacity of Al adsorption in alkali-soluble pectin (5.3-fold higher than that of chelate-soluble pectin, and lower ratio of Al desorption from alkali-soluble pectin (8.5% compared with chelate-soluble pectin (68.5%. These results indicate that alkali-soluble pectin is the primary target of Al immobilization in RBCs of pea, which impairs Al access to the intracellular space of RBCs and mobility to root apices, and therefore protects root apices and RBCs from Al toxicity.

  1. Control of Erysiphe pisi Causing Powdery Mildew of Pea (Pisum sativum) by Cashewnut (Anacardium occidentale) Shell Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Amar; Singh, U P; Singh, D P; Sarma, B K; Singh, K P; Singh, Amitabh; Aust, H J

    2008-03-01

    The effect of methanolic extract of cashewnut (Anacardium occidentale) shell extract was seen on conidial germination of Erysiphe pisi and powdery mildew development in pea (Pisum sativum). Maximum conidial germination inhibition of E. pisi on glass slides was observed at 300 ppm. Similar effect on floated pea leaves was observed after 48 h at the same concentration. Conidial germination on intact untreated pea leaves was also assessed on II and IV nodal leaves while IV and II nodal leaves were treated with the extract and vice versa. There was tremendous reduction in conidial germination on all the nodal leaves. The disease intensity of pea powdery mildew was significantly reduced by methanolic extract of cashewnut shells. Maximum reduction was observed with 200 ppm where 39% disease intensity was recorded in comparison to 96.53% in the control. The phenolic acid content of pea leaves following treatments with this extract varied and no definite pattern was observed. Out of several phenolic compounds, namely, gallic, ferulic, chlorogenic, and cinnamic acids, only gallic acid was found to be present consistently in all the treatments with varied amounts.

  2. PLATELET AGGREGATION AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY EFFECTS OF GARDEN PEA, DESI CHICKPEA AND KABULI CHICKPEA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    ZIA-UL-HAQ, M.; ALI KHAN, B.; Landa, Přemysl; Kutil, Zsófia; AHMED, S.; QAYUM, M.; Ahmad, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 4 (2012), s. 707-711 ISSN 0001-6837 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : platelet aggregation * Garden pea * Desi chickpea Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.665, year: 2012 http://home.ueb.cas.cz/publikace/2012_Haq_ACTA_POLONIAE_PHARMACEUTICA_707.pdf

  3. A proteomic approach to studying plant response to crenate broomrape (Orobanche crenata) in pea (Pisum sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeles Castillejo, M; Amiour, Nardjis; Dumas-Gaudot, Eliane; Rubiales, Diego; Jorrín, Jesús V

    2004-06-01

    Crenate broomrape (Orobanche crenata) is a parasitic plant that threatens legume production in Mediterranean areas. Pea (Pisum sativum) is severely affected, and only moderate levels of genetic resistance have so far been identified. In the present work we selected the most resistant accession available (Ps 624) and compared it with a susceptible (Messire) cultivar. Experiments were performed by using pot and Petri dish bioassays, showing little differences in the percentage of broomrape seed germination induced by both genotypes, but a significant hamper in the number of successfully installed tubercles and their developmental stage in the Ps 624 compared to Messire. The protein profile of healthy and infected P. sativum root tissue were analysed by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Approximately 500 individual protein spots could be detected on silver stained gels. At least 22 different protein spots differentiated control, non-infected, Messire and Ps 624 accessions. Some of them were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and database searching as cysteine proteinase, beta-1,3-glucanase, endochitinase, profucosidase, and ABA-responsive protein. Both qualitative and quantitative differences have been found among infected and non-infected root extracts. Thus, in the infected susceptible Messire genotype 34 spots were decreased, one increased and three newly detected, while in Ps 624, 15 spots were increased, three decreased and one newly detected. In response to the inoculation, proteins that correspond to enzymes of the carbohydrate metabolism (fructokinase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase), nitrogen metabolism (ferredoxin-NADP reductase) and mitochondrial electronic chain transport (alternative oxidase 2) decreased in the susceptible check, while proteins that correspond to enzymes of the nitrogen assimilation pathway (glutamine synthetase) or typical pathogen defence, PR proteins, including beta-1,3-glucanase and peroxidases, increased in Ps 624. Results are

  4. Estimation of pea (Pisum sativum L.) microsatellite mutation rate based on pedigree and single-seed descent analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslarová, Jaroslava; Hanáček, Pavel; Fialová, Eva; Hýbl, Miroslav; Smýkal, Petr

    2011-11-01

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are widespread class of repetitive DNA sequences, used in population genetics, genetic diversity and mapping studies. In spite of the SSR utility, the genetic and evolutionary mechanisms are not fully understood. We have investigated three microsatellite loci with different position in the pea (Pisum sativum L.) genome, the A9 locus residing in LTR region of abundant retrotransposon, AD270 as intergenic and AF016458 located in 5'untranslated region of expressed gene. Comparative analysis of a 35 pair samples from seven pea varieties propagated by single-seed descent for ten generations, revealed single 4 bp mutation in 10th generation sample at AD270 locus corresponding to stepwise increase in one additional ATCT repeat unit. The estimated mutation rate was 4.76 × 10(-3) per locus per generation, with a 95% confidence interval of 1.2 × 10(-4) to 2.7 × 10(-2). The comparison of cv. Bohatýr accessions retrieved from different collections, showed intra-, inter-accession variation and differences in flanking and repeat sequences. Fragment size and sequence alternations were also found in long term in vitro organogenic culture, established at 1983, indicative of somatic mutation process. The evidence of homoplasy was detected across of unrelated pea genotypes, which adversaly affects the reliability of diversity estimates not only for diverse germplasm but also highly bred material. The findings of this study have important implications for Pisum phylogeny studies, variety identification and registration process in pea breeding where mutation rate influences the genetic diversity and the effective population size estimates.

  5. Biostable multi-Aib analogs of tachykinin-related peptides demonstrate potent oral aphicidal activity in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The tachykinin-related peptides (TRPs) are multifunctional neuropeptides found in a variety of arthropod species, including the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae). Two novel biostable TRP analogs containing multiple, sterically-hindered Aib residues were synthesized and found to exhi...

  6. Comparative transcriptomic analyses of vegetable and grain pea (Pisum sativum L. seed development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na eLiu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating pea seed developmental process is extremely important for pea breeding. In this study, we used high-throughput RNA-Seq and bioinformatics analyses to examine the changes in gene expression during seed development in vegetable pea and grain pea, and compare the gene expression profiles of these two pea types. RNA-Seq generated 18.7 G of raw data, which were then de novo assembled into 77,273 unigenes with a mean length of 930 bp. Our results illustrate that transcriptional control during pea seed development is a highly coordinated process. There were 459 and 801 genes differentially expressed at early and late seed maturation stages between vegetable pea and grain pea, respectively. Soluble sugar and starch metabolism related genes were significantly activated during the development of pea seeds coinciding with the onset of accumulation of sugar and starch in the seeds. A comparative analysis of genes involved in sugar and starch biosynthesis in vegetable pea (high seed soluble sugar and low starch and grain pea (high seed starch and low soluble sugar revealed that differential expression of related genes at late development stages results in a negative correlation between soluble sugar and starch biosynthetic flux in vegetable and grain pea seeds. RNA-Seq data was validated by using real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis for 30 randomly selected genes. To our knowledge, this work represents the first report of seed development transcriptomics in pea. The obtained results provide a foundation to support future efforts to unravel the underlying mechanisms that control the developmental biology of pea seeds, and serve as a valuable resource for improving pea breeding.

  7. A brief review on the early distribution of pea (Pisum sativum L. in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljuština Marija

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pea was a part of the everyday diet of the European hunter-gatherers at the end of the last Ice Age. The major criteria to determine the domestication in pea are non-dehiscent pods, larger seed size and smooth seed testa. Pea seeds were found among the earliest findings of cultivated crops at the site of Tell El-Kerkh, Syria, from 10th millennium BP. Along with cereals and lentil, pea has definitely become associated with the start of the 'agricultural revolution' in the Old World. Pea entered Europe in its southeast regions and progressed into its interior via Danube. Its distribution was rapid, since the available evidence reveals its presence in remote places at similar periods. The linguistic evidence supports the fact that pea had been present in nearly all regions of Europe. Most of European peoples have their own words denoting pea, meaning that it preceded the diversification of their own proto-languages.

  8. Performance of fourteen improved pea lines (Pisum sativum L. in Challapata zone, Oruro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiza Benedicto

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In Challapata zone, cultivated pea varieties are low yielding and long cycle. The research objective was to determine the performance of fourteen pea lines developed by “Pairumani Fitoecogenetics Investigation Center” (CIFP in Challapata zone (Oruro. The 14 pea lines with local pea variety, were planted in row and column generalized experimental design with four replications in tree location randomly selection in Challapata zone (Oruro, between October 2011 and April 2012. The results indicate, that, in general, all the improved lines were superior in green pod yield to the local pea variety (3.69 t.ha-1, between 6.13 and 16.58 t.ha-1, (65.9 and 349.3% respectively. among the improved lines, Pea5_102-1, Pea5_102-6, Pea5_102-5, Pea5_102-2, Pea5_102-3 and Pea5_102-4, with high green pod yield (13.05 and 16.58 t.ha-1, large pod (8.49 to 9.25 cm, mayor number of grains for pod (5.27 to 7.20 grains and intermediate cycle (85 days to the floración, are the superior performance. The lines Pea5_102-14, Pea5_102-10 (Pairumani 3 and Pea5_102-13, because of their characteristics of high green pod yield, the longest pod, the mayor number of grains for pod, early maturity, preference and wide adaptability, and according to the farmer’s criteria, are the most recommend for their use in Challapata zone (Oruro.

  9. Efficient production of human acidic fibroblast growth factor in pea (Pisum sativum L. plants by agroinfection of germinated seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Meiying

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For efficient and large scale production of recombinant proteins in plants transient expression by agroinfection has a number of advantages over stable transformation. Simple manipulation, rapid analysis and high expression efficiency are possible. In pea, Pisum sativum, a Virus Induced Gene Silencing System using the pea early browning virus has been converted into an efficient agroinfection system by converting the two RNA genomes of the virus into binary expression vectors for Agrobacterium transformation. Results By vacuum infiltration (0.08 Mpa, 1 min of germinating pea seeds with 2-3 cm roots with Agrobacteria carrying the binary vectors, expression of the gene for Green Fluorescent Protein as marker and the gene for the human acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF was obtained in 80% of the infiltrated developing seedlings. Maximal production of the recombinant proteins was achieved 12-15 days after infiltration. Conclusions Compared to the leaf injection method vacuum infiltration of germinated seeds is highly efficient allowing large scale production of plants transiently expressing recombinant proteins. The production cycle of plants for harvesting the recombinant protein was shortened from 30 days for leaf injection to 15 days by applying vacuum infiltration. The synthesized aFGF was purified by heparin-affinity chromatography and its mitogenic activity on NIH 3T3 cells confirmed to be similar to a commercial product.

  10. Faba bean (Vicia faba minor and pea seeds (Pisum sativum as protein sources in lactating ewes’ diets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gatta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available 18 Massese lactating ewes, divided into 3 homogeneous groups for parity and milk yield, were used to evaluate the replacement effects of soybean meal by Faba bean (Vicia faba minor and Pea (Pisum sativum seeds. During a 70 days trial (beginning after weaning: 30±1.5 days after lambing animals were fed three isonitrogenous and isocaloric diets. Each diet was characterised by the presence of only one protein feed. The diets consisted of alfalfa hay (1.1 kg/head/d and a decreasing amount of mixed feed (from 1.1 to 0.7 kg/head/d to fit animals’ requirements. Milk yield, milk chemical composition, animals live weight and BCS, health state and hematochemical parameters were regularly monitored. No diets palatability problems were detected. No significant differences resulted for live weight, BCS, milk yield and milk chemical composition, except for milk protein: higher for faba bean (6.54% and soybean (6.39% respect pea (5.66% diets, P<0.05. No differences resulted for blood parameters too and no clinical signs of illness were observed. Therefore faba bean and pea seeds seem to be able to replace the soybean well.

  11. Relating physico-chemical properties of frozen green peas (Pisum sativum L.) to sensory quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nleya, Kathleen M; Minnaar, Amanda; de Kock, Henriëtte L

    2014-03-30

    The acceptability of frozen green peas depends on their sensory quality. There is a need to relate physico-chemical parameters to sensory quality. In this research, six brands of frozen green peas representing product sold for retail and caterer's markets were purchased and subjected to descriptive sensory evaluation and physico-chemical analyses (including dry matter content, alcohol insoluble solids content, starch content, °Brix, residual peroxidase activity, size sorting, hardness using texture analysis and colour measurements) to assess and explain product quality. The sensory quality of frozen green peas, particularly texture properties, were well explained using physico-chemical methods of analysis notably alcohol insoluble solids, starch content, hardness and °Brix. Generally, retail class peas were of superior sensory quality to caterer's class peas although one caterer's brand was comparable to the retail brands. Retail class peas were sweeter, smaller, greener, more moist and more tender than the caterer's peas. Retail class peas also had higher °Brix, a(*) , hue and chroma values; lower starch, alcohol insoluble solids, dry matter content and hardness measured. The sensory quality of frozen green peas can be partially predicted by measuring physico-chemical parameters particularly °Brix and to a lesser extent hardness by texture analyser, alcohol insoluble solids, dry matter and starch content. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Design of a ready-to-eat child food fortified with pea-based iron (Pisum sativum

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    Zulma Villaquirán

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Iron deficiency is one of the most prevalent nutritional problems at the global level which mainly affects the vulnerable population as children under 5 years of age. Fortified foods of child consumption are part of the intervention strategies, which are made from the mixture of ingredients such as cereals, fruits, legumes, among others. Pea is a legume that can be used in order to take advantage of its nutritional properties. Objective: To design a ready-to-eat child food with peas (Pisum sativum, fortified with iron and sanitized by pasteurization. Materials and methods: The appropriate percentage of peas in the food was selected by sensory analysis. The selection of iron salt was made by physicochemical and sensory analysis using ferrous sulphate and chelate iron. Subsequently, the growth of mesophilic microorganisms was evaluated in order to select the pasteurization heat treatment. The useful life evaluation was carried out through sensory tests. Finally, the physico-chemical, compositional and microbiological evaluation of the sanitized food was implemented. Results: The addition of peas in percentages not greater than 6.5% within the food formulation was acceptable for parents of children under 5. On the other hand, the selected salt to generate less changes on the color and acidity of the food during storage was chelate iron. The results of heat treatment showed that for reducing the initial concentration of mesophiles and obtaining a good quality food according to the Colombian regulations in force, it was necessary to submit the food to 85 °C for 13 minutes (0.45 D, which managed to maintain the initial quality of the food for 12 days under refrigeration. Conclusions: The developed food complies with the sensory and microbiological criteria demanded in the Colombian regulations in force and is suitable for consumption. Besides, it can be catalogued as high in iron and a good source of protein, contributing with 25% and

  13. Transgenic peas (Pisum sativum) expressing polygalacturonase inhibiting protein from raspberry (Rubus idaeus) and stilbene synthase from grape (Vitis vinifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A; Jacobsen, H-J; de Kathen, A; de Lorenzo, G; Briviba, K; Hain, R; Ramsay, G; Kiesecker, H

    2006-11-01

    The pea (Pisum sativum L.) varieties Baroness (United Kingdome) and Baccara (France) were transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer with pGPTV binary vectors containing the bar gene in combination with two different antifungal genes coding for polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) from raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) driven by a double 35S promoter, or the stilbene synthase (Vst1) from grape (Vitis vinifera L.) driven by its own elicitor-inducible promoter. Transgenic lines were established and transgenes combined via conventional crossing. Resveratrol, produced by Vst1 transgenic plants, was detected using HPLC and the PGIP expression was determined in functional inhibition assays against fungal polygalacturonases. Stable inheritance of the antifungal genes in the transgenic plants was demonstrated.

  14. Chemical Composition and Behavioral Effects of Five Plant Essential Oils on the Green Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) (Homoptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmi, Abir; Hammami, Majdi; Raoelison, Emmanuel G; Abderrabba, Manef; Bouajila, Jalloul; Ducamp, Christine

    2017-05-01

    Essential oils (EOs) from Schinus molle, Helichrysum gymnocephalum, Cedrelopsis grevei and Melaleuca viridiflora, four aromatic and medicinal plants, are commonly used in folk medicine. EOs were characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and quantified by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID); then evaluated for their behavioral effects on adults of the green pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) using a Perspex four-armed olfactometer in order to test the compatibility of their use as phytoinsecticides to control this insect pest. Our results showed that the EOs from the leaves of S. molle, M. viridiflora and C. grevei did not change aphids' behavior. However, S. molle fruits EO seemed to be attractive while H. gymnocephalum leaves EO exhibited repellency towards aphids at a dose of 10 μl. The major compounds in S. molle fruits EO were 6-epi-shyobunol (16.22%) and d-limonene (15.35%). While, in H. gymnocephalum leaves EO, 1,8-cineole was the main compound (47.4%). The difference in aphids' responses to these two EOs could be attributed to the differences in their compositions. Our findings suggest that these two EOs have potential applications for the integrated pest management of A. pisum (Harris). © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  15. Effect of exogenous flavonoids on nodulation of pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Karel; Chovanec, Pavel; Škrdleta, Vladimír; Kropáčová, M.; Lisá, Ludmila; Němcová, M.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 375 (2002), s. 1735-1745 ISSN 0022-0957 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/00/0937 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : flavonoids * nod gene * pisum Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.852, year: 2002

  16. Effect of antifungal genes expressed in transgenic pea (Pisum sativum L.) on root colonization with Glomus intraradices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Fathi; Noorian, Mojgan Sharifi; Jacobsen, Hans-Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi have always been a major problem in agriculture. One of the effective methods for controlling pathogen fungi to date is the introduction of resistance genes into the genome of crops. It is interesting to find out whether the induced resistance in crops will have a negative effect on non-target organisms such as root colonization with the AM fungi.   The objective of the present research was to study the influence of producing antifungal molecules by four transgenic pea (Pisum sativum L.) lines expressing PGIP gene from raspberry, VST-stilbene synthase from vine, a hybrid of PGIP/VST and bacterial Chitinase gene (Chit30) from Streptomyces olivaceoviridis respectively on the colonization potential of Glomus intraradices. Four different experiments were done in greenhouse and climate chamber, colonization was observed in all replications. The following parameters were used for evaluation: frequency of mycorrhization, the intensity of mycorrhization, the average presence of arbuscules within the colonized areas and the presence of arbuscules in the whole root system which showed insignificant difference between transgenic and non-transgenic plants. The root/shoot ratio exhibited different values according to the experiment condition. Compared with negative non-transgenic control all transgenic lines showed the ability to establish symbiosis and the different growth parameters had insignificant effect due to mycorrhization. The results of the present study proved that the introduced pathogen resistance genes did not affect the mycorrhization allocations in pea.

  17. Effects of ambient ozone on reactive oxygen species and antioxidant metabolites in leaves of pea (pisum sativum l.) plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, I.A.; Almeelbi, T.; Basahi, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    The differential response of two pea plants (Pisum sativum L. cultivars Little Marvel and Victory) to ambient O3 grown under open top chambers (OTCs) was analyzed and compared. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, antioxidant metabolites such as ascorbate/glutathione as well as a series of enzymes for scavenging ROS were analyzed, all aiming to reveal the differential behavior of two closely related plants when exposed to ambient O3.Antioxidant levels and activities of related enzymes in response to ambient were noticeably different among Little Marvel and Victory plants. However, the response was cultivar-specific. There was higher accumulation of ROS and relatively lower induction of antioxidants and more inhibition in photosynthetic rates in Victory than Little Marvel. There was a good correlation between tolerance to O3 and high endogenous levels of antioxidant metabolites such as ascorbate (As), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) in pea plants. These portrays a higher sensitivity of Victory to ambient O3.To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the very few studies attempted to describe the changes in contents of antioxidants and activities of related enzymes in leaves of two closely related cultivars to further ourunderstanding on the defense mechanism and strategies under ambient O3. The results highlighted the possible roles of antioxidants in O3 detoxification through activation an adaptive survival mechanism allowing the plant to complete its life cycle even under oxidative stressful conditions. (author)

  18. Accession to Ukraine’s market of pea (Pisum sativum L. sensu lato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. І. Безручко

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The article details economical value, directions of use for valuable legume crop, pea for grain production purposes, growth rates of its production during recent years worldwide and in our country, development of its varietal resources in Ukraine. A complete characterization has been provided for new pea varieties meant for grain production listed in the State Register of Varieties Suitable for Dissemination in Ukraine in 2012, for which descriptions are available.

  19. Discovery of a Novel er1 Allele Conferring Powdery Mildew Resistance in Chinese Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Landraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Suli; Fu, Haining; Wang, Zhongyi; Duan, Canxing; Zong, Xuxiao; Zhu, Zhendong

    2016-01-01

    Pea powdery mildew, caused by Erysiphe pisi D.C., is an important disease worldwide. Deployment of resistant varieties is the main way to control this disease. This study aimed to screen Chinese pea (Pisum sativum L.) landraces resistant to E. pisi, and to characterize the resistance gene(s) at the er1 locus in the resistant landraces, and to develop functional marker(s) specific to the novel er1 allele. The 322 landraces showed different resistance levels. Among them, 12 (3.73%), 4 (1.24%) and 17 (5.28%) landraces showed immunity, high resistance and resistance to E. pisi, respectively. The other landraces appeared susceptible or highly susceptible to E. pisi. Most of the immune and highly resistant landraces were collected from Yunnan province. To characterize the resistance gene at the er1 locus, cDNA sequences of PsMLO1 gene were determined in 12 immune and four highly resistant accessions. The cDNAs of PsMLO1 from the immune landrace G0005576 produced three distinct transcripts, characterized by a 129-bp deletion, and 155-bp and 220-bp insertions, which were consistent with those of er1-2 allele. The PsMLO1 cDNAs in the other 15 resistant landraces produced identical transcripts, which had a new point mutation (T→C) at position 1121 of PsMLO1, indicating a novel er1 allele, designated as er1-6. This mutation caused a leucine to proline change in the amino acid sequence. Subsequently, the resistance allele er1-6 in landrace G0001778 was confirmed by resistance inheritance analysis and genetic mapping on the region of the er1 locus using populations derived from G0001778 × Bawan 6. Finally, a functional marker specific to er1-6, SNP1121, was developed using the high-resolution melting technique, which could be used in pea breeding via marker-assisted selection. The results described here provide valuable genetic information for Chinese pea landraces and a powerful tool for pea breeders.

  20. Discovery of a Novel er1 Allele Conferring Powdery Mildew Resistance in Chinese Pea (Pisum sativum L. Landraces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suli Sun

    Full Text Available Pea powdery mildew, caused by Erysiphe pisi D.C., is an important disease worldwide. Deployment of resistant varieties is the main way to control this disease. This study aimed to screen Chinese pea (Pisum sativum L. landraces resistant to E. pisi, and to characterize the resistance gene(s at the er1 locus in the resistant landraces, and to develop functional marker(s specific to the novel er1 allele. The 322 landraces showed different resistance levels. Among them, 12 (3.73%, 4 (1.24% and 17 (5.28% landraces showed immunity, high resistance and resistance to E. pisi, respectively. The other landraces appeared susceptible or highly susceptible to E. pisi. Most of the immune and highly resistant landraces were collected from Yunnan province. To characterize the resistance gene at the er1 locus, cDNA sequences of PsMLO1 gene were determined in 12 immune and four highly resistant accessions. The cDNAs of PsMLO1 from the immune landrace G0005576 produced three distinct transcripts, characterized by a 129-bp deletion, and 155-bp and 220-bp insertions, which were consistent with those of er1-2 allele. The PsMLO1 cDNAs in the other 15 resistant landraces produced identical transcripts, which had a new point mutation (T→C at position 1121 of PsMLO1, indicating a novel er1 allele, designated as er1-6. This mutation caused a leucine to proline change in the amino acid sequence. Subsequently, the resistance allele er1-6 in landrace G0001778 was confirmed by resistance inheritance analysis and genetic mapping on the region of the er1 locus using populations derived from G0001778 × Bawan 6. Finally, a functional marker specific to er1-6, SNP1121, was developed using the high-resolution melting technique, which could be used in pea breeding via marker-assisted selection. The results described here provide valuable genetic information for Chinese pea landraces and a powerful tool for pea breeders.

  1. Use of semi-leafless peas (Pisum sativum L with enzyme addition in diets for broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erja Koivunen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to study the effects of dietary pea inclusion and the addition of Avizyme 1200 -enzyme cocktail on broiler performance, intestinal viscosity and organoleptic quality of meat. The experimental design was a 4 × 2 factorial, the factors being dietary pea inclusion (0, 150, 300 and 450 g kg-1 in the diets fed from day 9 to day 38 and the addition of Avizyme 1200 enzyme cocktail including amylase, protease and xylanase during the entire experiment. The growth of birds improved (p ≤ 0.018 with pea inclusion in a cubic manner. Feed conversion ratio (FCR of the birds fed on unsupplemented diets improved along pea inclusion, while pea inclusion impaired the FCR on the birds on enzyme cocktail supplemented diets (p ≤ 0.006. The use of the enzyme cocktail improved the body weight, body weight gain and FCR of the broilers and decreased intestinal viscosity (p 0.05. In conclusion, 450 g kg-1 peas can be used in the broiler grower diets without negative effects on the bird performance. The use of enzyme cocktail improves bird performance.

  2. Genome-wide SNP identification, linkage map construction and QTL mapping for seed mineral concentrations and contents in pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Yu; Coyne, Clarice J; Grusak, Michael A; Mazourek, Michael; Cheng, Peng; Main, Dorrie; McGee, Rebecca J

    2017-01-01

    Background Marker-assisted breeding is now routinely used in major crops to facilitate more efficient cultivar improvement. This has been significantly enabled by the use of next-generation sequencing technology to identify loci and markers associated with traits of interest. While rich in a range of nutritional components, such as protein, mineral nutrients, carbohydrates and several vitamins, pea (Pisum sativum L.), one of the oldest domesticated crops in the world, remains behind many othe...

  3. Raw, extruded and expanded pea (Pisum sativum in dairy cows diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Piva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to evaluate the nutritive value of raw, extruded or expanded peas relative to soybean meal in lactating dairy cows feeding. Twenty four Italian Holstein cows (8 primiparous and 16 pluriparous, 604 ± 109 kg body weight, 34.5 ± 2.5 kg/d milk yield, were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments in a 4x4 Latin square arrangement with periods of four weeks and washout period of seven days. Diets were fed ad libitum(5% orts. The bulk of the base diet on a dry matter basis was corn silage (31.2%, alfalfa hay (16.7%, grass hay (4.1%, protein supplement (10.3%, whole cotton seed (8.5%, corn and barley mix (24.9%, soybean meal (3.4% and calcium soap (0.9%. The pea (2.5 kg/cow/day partially replaced the soybean meal and totally replaced the barley meal of the base diet. The unprocessed or differently processed pea did not affect the dry matter intake. The extruded pea group had a 3.2% increase (P< 0.05 of the milk yield compared to the control group. When estimated as contrast analysis, the technological treatment (extruded or expanded on peas did not modify the milk yield and composition. Among pea diets, animal fed the extruded pea had the higher (P< 0.05 milk protein content, although not different than that of the control group. The rumen acetate was reduced (P< 0.05 and the butyrate and valerate were increased (P< 0.05 in animals fed extruded pea compared to the control. No differences were observed among feeding groups on blood parameters except for the cholesterol level higher (P< 0.05 in animals fed the expanded pea diet. There were no effects of diets on milk rennet coagulation characteris- tics. Results support the partial substitution of soybean meal and the total substitution of barley meal with peas in diets for lactating cows with no negative effects on milk yield and composition.

  4. Functional characterization of the adipokinetic hormone in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jedlička, Pavel; Steinbauerová, V.; Šimek, Petr; Zahradníčková, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 162, č. 1 (2012), s. 51-58 ISSN 1095-6433 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP522/09/P382 Grant - others:European Union FP7(CZ) MOBITAG, GA 229518 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone * Acyrthosiphon pisum * neuropeptide Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.167, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1095643312000256

  5. [Pea (Pisum sativum) genes, participating in symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. III. Study of the structure of the ENOD12 early nodulin gene for various types of peas using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozik, A V; Matvienko, M A; Men', A E; Zalenskiĭ, A O; Tikhonovich, I A

    1992-01-01

    We have determined the length of early noduline gene ENOD12 in various varieties and lines of pea (Pisum sativum) using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). It was demonstrated that promoter regions of ENOD12A and ENOD12B genes in line 2150 (Afghanistan) are longer than these in variety "Feltham first". The disparity is 14 bp. When studying these genes in 7 different lines and varieties of pea it was found that ENOD12A gene is more variable in size than the ENOD12B gene. We showed the possibility to analyze the heritage of ENOD12 gene's alleles by using the PCR method.

  6. Structure of allelic variants of subtype 5 of histone H1 in pea Pisum sativum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova, V S; Lester, D R; Berdnikov, V A; Andersson, I

    2005-06-01

    The pea genome contains seven histone H1 genes encoding different subtypes. Previously, the DNA sequence of only one gene, His1, coding for the subtype H1-1, had been identified. We isolated a histone H1 allele from a pea genomic DNA library. Data from the electrophoretic mobility of the pea H1 subtypes and their N-bromosuccinimide cleavage products indicated that the newly isolated gene corresponded to the H1-5 subtype encoded by His5. We confirmed this result by sequencing the gene from three pea lines with H1-5 allelic variants of altered electrophoretic mobility. The allele of the slow H1-5 variant differed from the standard allele by a nucleotide substitution that caused the replacement of the positively charged lysine with asparagine in the DNA-interacting domain of the histone molecule. A temperature-related occurrence had previously been demonstrated for this H1-5 variant in a study on a worldwide collection of pea germplasm. The variant tended to occur at higher frequencies in geographic regions with a cold climate. The fast allelic variant of H1-5 displayed a deletion resulting in the loss of a duplicated pentapeptide in the C-terminal domain.

  7. [Physiological and agrochemical properties of different symbiotic genotypes of pea (Pisum sativum L.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazariuk, V M; Sidorova, K K; Shumny, V K; Kallimullina, F R; Klenova M I

    2006-01-01

    Physiological characters of symbiotic mutants of pea were studied: nodulation, activities of nitrogenase and nitrate reductase, chlorophyll content in leaves and their water-holding capacity, biomass accumulation, and nitrogen forms. The parameters reflecting the genotype state of the macrosymbiont under soil conditions considerably varied. Supernodulation mutants stood out against symbiotic pea genotypes by high contents of chlorophyll and nonprotein nitrogen compounds, high nitrogenase activity, and low nitrate reductase activity. The efficiency of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis was largely mediated by the macrosymbiont genotype. The highest atmospheric nitrogen fixation (50-80%) was observed in the parental pea varieties. Despite the highest nitrogenase activity in the nodules, the supernodulation mutants were inferior to the parental varieties by the nitrogen fixation capacity (40-60%), which was due to their low productivity.

  8. Analysis of nodule senescence in pea (Pisum sativum L.) using laser microdissection, real-time PCR, and ACC immunolocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serova, Tatiana A; Tikhonovich, Igor A; Tsyganov, Viktor E

    2017-05-01

    A delay in the senescence of symbiotic nodules could prolong active nitrogen fixation, resulting in improved crop yield and a reduced need for chemical fertilizers. The molecular genetic mechanisms underlying nodule senescence have not been extensively studied with a view to breeding varieties with delayed nodule senescence. In such studies, plant mutants with the phenotype of premature degradation of symbiotic structures are useful models to elucidate the genetic basis of nodule senescence. Using a dataset from transcriptome analysis of Medicago truncatula Gaertn. nodules and previous studies on pea (Pisum sativum L.) nodules, we developed a set of molecular markers based on genes that are known to be activated during nodule senescence. These genes encode cysteine proteases, a thiol protease, a bZIP transcription factor, enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of ethylene (ACS2 for ACC synthase and ACO1 for ACC oxidase) and ABA (AO3 for aldehyde oxidase), and an enzyme involved in catabolism of gibberellins (GA 2-oxidase). We analyzed the transcript levels of these genes in the nodules of two pea wild-types (cv. Sparkle and line Sprint-2) and two mutant lines, one showing premature nodule senescence (E135F (sym13)) and one showing no morphological signs of symbiotic structure degradation (Sprint-2Fix - (sym31)). Real-time PCR analyses revealed that all of the selected genes showed increased transcript levels during nodule aging in all phenotypes. Remarkably, at 4 weeks after inoculation (WAI), the transcript levels of all analyzed genes were significantly higher in the early senescent nodules of the mutant line E135F (sym13) and in nodules of the mutant Sprint-2Fix - (sym31) than in the active nitrogen-fixing nodules of wild-types. In contrast, the transcript levels of the same genes of both wild-types were significantly increased only at 6 WAI. We evaluated the expression of selected markers in the different histological nodule zones of pea cv. Sparkle and its

  9. High-Throughput Development of SSR Markers from Pea (Pisum sativum L. Based on Next Generation Sequencing of a Purified Chinese Commercial Variety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yang

    Full Text Available Pea (Pisum sativum L. is an important food legume globally, and is the plant species that J.G. Mendel used to lay the foundation of modern genetics. However, genomics resources of pea are limited comparing to other crop species. Application of marker assisted selection (MAS in pea breeding has lagged behind many other crops. Development of a large number of novel and reliable SSR (simple sequence repeat or microsatellite markers will help both basic and applied genomics research of this crop. The Illumina HiSeq 2500 System was used to uncover 8,899 putative SSR containing sequences, and 3,275 non-redundant primers were designed to amplify these SSRs. Among the 1,644 SSRs that were randomly selected for primer validation, 841 yielded reliable amplifications of detectable polymorphisms among 24 genotypes of cultivated pea (Pisum sativum L. and wild relatives (P. fulvum Sm. originated from diverse geographical locations. The dataset indicated that the allele number per locus ranged from 2 to 10, and that the polymorphism information content (PIC ranged from 0.08 to 0.82 with an average of 0.38. These 1,644 novel SSR markers were also tested for polymorphism between genotypes G0003973 and G0005527. Finally, 33 polymorphic SSR markers were anchored on the genetic linkage map of G0003973 × G0005527 F2 population.

  10. Genotypic abundance of carotenoids and polyphenolics in the hull of field pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marles, M A Susan; Warkentin, Thomas D; Bett, Kirstin E

    2013-02-01

    Consumption of pulse crops, including field pea, is considered effective for a healthy diet. Hulls (seed coats) play an important role for protection of the cotyledon and embryo, but also as mediating positive effects on health outcomes. The biochemical attributes of field pea hulls were thus assessed to determine the occurrence of specific phytochemicals and their genotypic variability. Sequestered bioproducts in mature hulls predominantly consisted of trans-lutein and chlorophylls a and b. Trace amounts of other carotenoid and pheophytin metabolites were identified. In developing hulls, violaxanthin, neoxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin, chlorophylls a and b and β-carotene were detected. Genotypic differences in the accumulation of lutein and chlorophylls a and b were observed over years and locations. Polyphenolics and hydroxybenzoic acids were detected in the 'dun' and 'maple' field pea types-the only genotypes to have pigmented hulls. Unextractable patches of condensed tannin influenced the visual uniformity of the maple and dun genotypes, CDC Rocket and CDC Dundurn. Within the yellow and green market classes, carotenoid and chlorophyll accumulation was consistent. Green cotyledon varieties sequestered higher concentrations of lutein than the yellow cotyledon varieties. Maple and dun types were more variable, reflective of different selection criteria. The occurrence of flavonoid-related compounds was correlated only with pigmented seed coat genotypes. The dietary potential of the chlorophylls and carotenoids that accumulated in the hulls split from the green and yellow field pea types is discussed as a value-added prospect in food supplements. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. SEVERITY OF PROGENY SELECTION FROM DIALLEL CROSSING OF PEA (PISUM SATIVUML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Kaigorodova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The promising pea varieties for canning with an optimum combination of elements of yield production have been selected based on utilization of geographically dispersed and morphologically different forms in progeny of diallel crossing. A comparative evaluation of the severity selection in different hybrid generations is shown, from which conclusions are drawn about the breeding value of parental forms.

  12. Developing new SSR markers from ESTs of pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ya-ming; Xu, Sheng-chun; Mao, Wei-hua; Hu, Qi-zan; Zhang, Gu-wen; Ding, Ju; Li, Ya-dan

    2010-09-01

    The development of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from pea has provided a useful source for mining novel simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. In the present research, in order to find EST-derived SSR markers, 18 552 pea ESTs from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database were downloaded and assembled into 10 086 unigenes. A total of 586 microsatellites in 530 unigenes were identified, indicating that merely 5.25% of sequences contained SSRs. The most abundant SSRs within pea were tri-nucleotide repeat motifs, and among all the tri-nucleotide repeats, the motif GAA was the most abundant type. In total, 49 SSRs were used for primer design. EST-SSR loci were subsequently screened on 10 widely adapted varieties in China. Of these, nine loci showed polymorphic profiles that revealed two to three alleles per locus. The polymorphism information content value ranged from 0.18 to 0.58 with an average of 0.41. Furthermore, transferable analysis revealed that some of these loci showed transferability to faba bean. Because of their polymorphism and transferability, these nine novel EST-SSRs will be valuable tools for marker-assisted breeding and comparative mapping of pea in the future.

  13. Regeneration of Pea (Pisum sativum L.) by a cyclic organogenic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzitzikas, E.; Bergervoet-van Deelen, J.E.M.; Raemakers, C.J.J.M.; Vincken, J.P.; Lammeren, van A.A.M.; Visser, R.G.F.

    2004-01-01

    In a five-step procedure, plants were regenerated from meristematic tissue initiated from nodal tissue in four pea cultivars ('Espace', 'Classic', 'Solara', and 'Puget'). In step 1, stem tissue with one node (1-cm size) was subcultured on medium containing thidiazuron. As a result multiple shoots

  14. The Effects of Bean Leafroll Virus on Life History Traits and Host Selection Behavior of Specialized Pea Aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum, Hemiptera: Aphididae) Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T S; Wu, Y; Eigenbrode, S D

    2017-02-01

    Intraspecific specialization by insect herbivores on different host plant species contributes to the formation of genetically distinct "host races," but the effects of plant virus infection on interactions between specialized herbivores and their host plants have barely been investigated. Using three genetically and phenotypically divergent pea aphid clones (Acyrthosiphon pisum L.) adapted to either pea (Pisum sativum L.) or alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), we tested how infection of these hosts by an insect-borne phytovirus (Bean leafroll virus; BLRV) affects aphid performance and preference. Four important findings emerged: 1) mean aphid survival rate and intrinsic rate of population growth (Rm) were increased by 15% and 14%, respectively, for aphids feeding on plants infected with BLRV; 2) 34% of variance in survival rate was attributable to clone × host plant interactions; 3) a three-way aphid clone × host plant species × virus treatment significantly affected intrinsic rates of population growth; and 4) each clone exhibited a preference for either pea or alfalfa when choosing between noninfected host plants, but for two of the three clones tested these preferences were modestly reduced when selecting among virus-infected host plants. Our studies show that colonizing BLRV-infected hosts increased A. pisum survival and rates of population growth, confirming that the virus benefits A. pisum. BLRV transmission affected aphid discrimination of host plant species in a genotype-specific fashion, and we detected three unique "virus-association phenotypes," with potential consequences for patterns of host plant use by aphid populations and crop virus epidemiology. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Antifeedant activity and high mortality in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae) induced by biostable insect kinin analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smagghe, Guy; Mahdian, Kamran; Zubrzak, Pawel; Nachman, Ronald J

    2010-03-01

    The insect kinins are multifunctional neuropeptides found in a variety of arthropod species, including the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae). A series of biostable insect kinin analogs based on the shared C-terminal pentapeptide core region were fed in solutions of artificial diet to the pea aphid over a period of 3 days and evaluated for antifeedant and aphicidal activity. The analogs contained either alpha,alpha-disubstituted or beta-amino acids in key positions to enhance resistance to tissue-bound peptidases and retain activity in a number of insect kinin bioassays and/or on expressed receptors. Three of the biostable analogs demonstrated antifeedant activity, with a marked reduction in honeydew formation observed after 1 day, and very high mortality. In contrast, an unmodified, parent insect kinin and two other analogs containing some of the same structural components that promote biostability are inactive. The most active analog, double Aib analog K-Aib-1 ([Aib]FF[Aib]WGa), featured aphicidal activity calculated at an LC(50) of 0.063 nmol/microl (0.048 microg/microl) and an LT(50) of 1.68 days, matching the potency of some commercially available aphicides. The mechanism of this activity has yet to be established. The aphicidal activity of the biostable insect kinin analogs may result from different potential mechanisms as disruption of digestive processes by interfering with gut motility patterns, digestive enzyme release, and/or with fluid cycling in the gut, and also nutrient transport across the gut itself; all processes shown to be regulated by the insect kinins in other insects. However the mechanism(s) is(are) not yet known. The active insect kinin analogs represent potential leads in the development of selective, environmentally friendly pest aphid control agents. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular cloning of isoflavone reductase from pea (Pisum sativum L.): evidence for a 3R-isoflavanone intermediate in (+)-pisatin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, N L; Sun, Y; Dixon, R A; VanEtten, H D; Hrazdina, G

    1994-08-01

    Isoflavone reductase (IFR) reduces achiral isoflavones to chiral isoflavanones during the biosynthesis of chiral pterocarpan phytoalexins. A cDNA clone for IFR from pea (Pisum sativum) was isolated using the polymerase chain reaction and expressed in Escherichia coli. Analysis of circular dichroism (CD) spectra of the reduction product sophorol obtained using the recombinant enzyme indicated that the isoflavanone possessed the 3R stereochemistry, in contrast to previous reports indicating a 3S-isoflavanone as the product of the pea IFR. Analysis of CD spectra of sophorol produced using enzyme extracts of CuCl2-treated pea seedlings confirmed the 3R stereochemistry. Thus, the stereochemistry of the isoflavanone intermediate in (+)-pisatin biosynthesis in pea is the same as that in (-)-medicarpin biosynthesis in alfalfa, although the final pterocarpans have the opposite stereochemistry. At the amino acid level the pea IFR cDNA was 91.8 and 85.2% identical to the IFRs from alfalfa and chickpea, respectively. IFR appears to be encoded by a single gene in pea. Its transcripts are highly induced in CuCl2-treated seedlings, consistent with the appearance of IFR enzyme activity and pisatin accumulation.

  17. Molecular basis of processing-induced changes in protein structure in relation to intestinal digestion in yellow and green type pea (Pisum sativum L.): A molecular spectroscopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gloria Qingyu; Warkentin, Tom; Niu, Zhiyuan; Khan, Nazir A; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-12-05

    The objectives of this study were (1) to quantify the protein inherent molecular structural features of green cotyledon (CDC Striker) and yellow cotyledon (CDC Meadow) pea (Pisum sativum L.) seeds using molecular spectroscopic technique (FT/IR-ATR); (2) measure the denaturation of protein molecular makeup in the two types of pea during dry roasting (120°C for 60 min), autoclaving (120°C for 60 min) or microwaving (for 5 min); and (3) correlate the heat-induced changes in protein molecular makeup to the corresponding changes in protein digestibility determined using modified three-step in vitro procedure. Compared with yellow-type, the green-type peas had higher (Ppeas had lower (Ppea-types. However, across the pea types the correlation was not significant. Principal component and hierarchical cluster analyses on the entire spectral data from the amide region (ca. 1727-1480 cm(-1)) were able to visualize and discriminate the structural difference between pea varieties and processing treatments. This study shows that the molecular spectroscopy can be used as a rapid tool to screen the protein value of raw and heat-treated peas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Escherichia coli K-12 pathogenicity in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, reveals reduced antibacterial defense in aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altincicek, Boran; Ter Braak, Bas; Laughton, Alice M; Udekwu, Klas I; Gerardo, Nicole M

    2011-10-01

    To better understand the molecular basis underlying aphid immune tolerance to beneficial bacteria and immune defense to pathogenic bacteria, we characterized how the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum responds to Escherichia coli K-12 infections. E. coli bacteria, usually cleared in the hemolymph of other insect species, were capable of growing exponentially and killing aphids within a few days. Red fluorescence protein expressing E. coli K-12 laboratory strain multiplied in the aphid hemolymph as well as in the digestive tract, resulting in death of infected aphids. Selected gene deletion mutants of the E. coli K-12 predicted to have reduced virulence during systemic infections showed no difference in either replication or killing rate when compared to the wild type E. coli strain. Of note, however, the XL1-Blue E. coli K-12 strain exhibited a significant lag phase before multiplying and killing aphids. This bacterial strain has recently been shown to be more sensitive to oxidative stress than other E. coli K-12 strains, revealing a potential role for reactive oxygen species-mediated defenses in the otherwise reduced aphid immune system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Remote sensing study of the influence of herbicides on the spectral reflectance of pea plant leaves (Pisum sativum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezhova, D.; Alexieva, V.; Yanev, T.; Ivanov, S.

    Results from a remote sensing study of spectral reflectance of leaves of pea plants Pisum sativum L treated by the herbicides atrazine 2 4-D glyphosate fluridone and chlorsulfuron are reported According to the classification of the Herbicide Action Committee reflecting their mode of action they belong to different groups photosystem II bloker - C1 atrazine synthetic auxins - O 2 4-D inhibition of EPSP synthase - G glyphosate photobleaching - F1 fluridone and inhibition of acetoctate synthase - B chlorsulfuron The plants studied were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber in a nutritious medium to which every herbicide was added at three low concentrations 1 mu M 0 1 mu M and 0 01 mu M with respect to the field dose applied in the agricultural practice The spectral measurements of the leaf spectral reflectance were carried out in laboratory using a multichannel spectrometer in the visible and near infrared regions of the spectrum 480 div 810 nm Data was registered in 128 channels at a high spectral resolution of 2 6 nm halfwidth and a spatial resolution of 2 mm 2 The reflectance spectra were obtained from the leaf-reflected radiation referenced against a standard white screen To assess the changes arising in the leaf spectral reflectance under the herbicide action the developed by us approach based on discriminant analysis and other statistical methods was applied The spectral reflectance characteristics SRC were investigated in three spectral intervals 520 div 580 nm region of maximal

  20. Modification of Cry4Aa toward Improved Toxin Processing in the Gut of the Pea Aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Rausch

    Full Text Available Aphids are sap-sucking insects (order: Hemiptera that cause extensive damage to a wide range of agricultural crops. Our goal was to optimize a naturally occurring insecticidal crystalline (Cry toxins produced by the soil-dwelling bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis for use against the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. On the basis that activation of the Cry4Aa toxin is a rate-limiting factor contributing to the relatively low aphicidal activity of this toxin, we introduced cathepsin L and cathepsin B cleavage sites into Cry4Aa for rapid activation in the aphid gut environment. Incubation of modified Cry4Aa and aphid proteases in vitro demonstrated enhanced processing of the toxin into the active form for some of the modified constructs relative to non-modified Cry4Aa. Aphids fed artificial diet with toxin at a final concentration of 125 μg/ml showed enhanced mortality after two days for one of the four modified constructs. Although only modest toxin improvement was achieved by use of this strategy, such specific toxin modifications designed to overcome factors that limit aphid toxicity could be applied toward managing aphid populations via transgenic plant resistance.

  1. [Research progress on the cloning of Mendel's gene in pea (Pisum sativum L.) and its application in genetics teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng-Hua; Zhu, Bi-Yan; Gao, Feng; Li, Shao-Shan; Li, Niang-Hui

    2013-07-01

    One hundred and fifty years ago, Gregor Mendel investigated the segregation of seven traits in pea (Pisum sativum) and established the law of segregation and the law of independent assortment in genetics. After the two laws of genetics were rediscovered in 1900, the seven traits have been extensively investigated in the fields of plant physiology and biochemistry as well as in the cell and molecular levels. Recently, with the development of molecular technology in genetics, four genes for seed shape (R), stem length (Le), cotyledon colour (I), and flower colour (A) have been cloned and sequenced; and another three genes for immature pod colour (Gp), fasciation (Fa) and pod form (V) have been located in the linkage groups, respectively. The identification and cloning of the four Mendel's genes will help deeply understand the basic concept of gene in many respects: like the diversity of gene function, the different origins for gene mutation in molecular level, and the molecular nature of a dominant gene or a recessive gene. In teaching of genetics, the introduction of most recent research advancements of cloning of Mendel's genes to the students and the interpretation of the Mendel's laws in molecular level will help students promote their learning interests in genetics and help students grasp the whole content from classical genetics to molecular genetics and the developmental direction of this subject.

  2. Genetic diversity and population structure of pea (Pisum sativum L.) varieties derived from combined retrotransposon, microsatellite and morphological marker analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smýkal, Petr; Hýbl, Miroslav; Corander, Jukka; Jarkovský, Jirí; Flavell, Andrew J; Griga, Miroslav

    2008-08-01

    One hundred and sixty-four accessions representing Czech and Slovak pea (Pisum sativum L.) varieties bred over the last 50 years were evaluated for genetic diversity using morphological, simple sequence repeat (SSR) and retrotransposon-based insertion polymorphism (RBIP) markers. Polymorphic information content (PIC) values of 10 SSR loci and 31 RBIP markers were on average high at 0.89 and 0.73, respectively. The silhouette method after the Ward clustering produced the most probable cluster estimate, identifying nine clusters from molecular data and five to seven clusters from morphological characters. Principal component analysis of nine qualitative and eight quantitative morphological parameters explain over 90 and 93% of total variability, respectively, in the first three axes. Multidimensional scaling of molecular data revealed a continuous structure for the set. To enable integration and evaluation of all data types, a Bayesian method for clustering was applied. Three clusters identified using morphology data, with clear separation of fodder, dry seed and afila types, were resolved by DNA data into 17, 12 and five sub-clusters, respectively. A core collection of 34 samples was derived from the complete collection by BAPS Bayesian analysis. Values for average gene diversity and allelic richness for molecular marker loci and diversity indexes of phenotypic data were found to be similar between the two collections, showing that this is a useful approach for representative core selection.

  3. Unification of selection by quantitative characters in seed production of green pea (Pisum sativum L. partim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. М. Стригун

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the production of original, basic green pea seed it is critical to to single out (select basic plants. The marked (selected plants shall comply with their breeder’s description. Since seed breeding events are conducted with every new variety by various persons and in various agroecologic conditions, subjective factors, as well as environmental factors, may interfere with determining parameters of every characteristic considered there. As a consequence, identification and varietal characteristics and properties are subject to change and might not correspond to the breeder’s description; this, of course, affects the quality of variety. For the purpose of leveling the above factors, example of vegetable pea serves as a suggestion of a technique for exeminig parameters of variability of quantitative traits for specific population observing the rule of «golden section».

  4. Pea (Pisum sativum in dairy cow diet: effect on milk production and quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Scipioni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of alternative plant protein in place of soybean meal protein in diets for farmed animals aims to reduce the extra-EU soybean import and partially substitute GMO in the food chain. Among the possible alternatives, the heat-processed (flaked pea appears interesting in dairy cow diets. Two consecutive experiments were carried out to test flaked peas as a partial substitute for soybean meal in the diet of Reggiana breed dairy cows producing milk for Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese-making. In both experiments a “Control” concentrate (8.3% soybean meal was compared to a “Pea” concentrate (5% soybean meal and 15% flaked peas. Forages fed to animals included mixed grass hay and alfalfa hay in experiment 1, and hay (mixed grass and alfalfa plus mixed grass in experiment 2. Milk yield and quality, and the characteristics of grab faecal samples, examined to get some empirical indicators of digestibility, were similar between feeding groups. Compositional changes (crude protein and solubility in forages used as common base in the diets of both experiments had a slight effect on milk and plasma urea contents. There was a tendency for a higher milk urea content in the “Pea” group (32.3 vs 30.1mg/dl in experiment 1, P<0.1; 30.2 vs 28.0mg/dl in experiment 2, P<0.1. The plasma urea content was different only in experiment 2 (4.9 vs 5.6mmol/l, respectively for “Control” and “Pea” groups; P<0.05. The inclusion of the heatprocessed pea within the allowed limit of the Parmigiano-Reggiano Consortium for diet formulation could represent a feasible opportunity for a partial substitution of soybean meal.

  5. Removal of Methylene Blue from Aqueous Solution by Activated Carbon Prepared from Pea Shells (Pisum sativum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ünal Geçgel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An activated carbon was prepared from pea shells and used for the removal of methylene blue (MB from aqueous solutions. The influence of various factors such as adsorbent concentration, initial dye concentration, temperature, contact time, pH, and surfactant was studied. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption. The adsorption isotherm was found to follow the Langmuir model. The monolayer sorption capacity of activated carbon prepared from pea shell for MB was found to be 246.91 mg g−1 at 25 ∘C. Two simplified kinetic models including pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equation were selected to follow the adsorption processes. Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Various thermodynamic parameters such as , , and were evaluated. The results in this study indicated that activated carbon prepared from pea shell could be employed as an adsorbent for the removal of MB from aqueous solutions.

  6. Effects of genotype and mechanical damage during harvest on field pea (Pisum sativum L. seed quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karagić Đura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Three field pea genotypes (NS Junior, Jezero and Javor have been assessed for effects of genotype and mechanical damage during harvest on most important parameters of the physical quality of seed. Four harvest treatments were examined (hand harvest, mechanized harvest at 500, 650 and 800 rpm. After harvest, purity of harvested seed and percentages of seeds damaged by insects, seeds with cracked seed coat and broken seeds were analyzed. Highest contents of seeds with damaged seed coat (9.0% and broken seeds (11.3% were found in Javor, the genotype with largest seeds. After seed processing, seed vigor, germination, proportion of atypical seedlings and 1000-seed weight were determined. Lowest values of seed vigor and germination (79.8% and 84.9%, respectively and the largest proportion of atypical seedlings (11.4% were found in the genotype Javor. Highly significant correlations were found between seed vigor, germination and atypical seedlings on one side and 1000-seed weight on the other (r=-0.53, r=-0.51, and r=0.60, respectively. Damages that increase the portion of atypical seedlings have the largest impact on the quality of pea seeds. This characteristic is determined by the genotype, which should be kept in mind when defining objectives of field pea breeding programs.

  7. Fatty acid profiling of the seed oils of some varieties of field peas (Pisum sativum) by RP-LC/ESI-MS/MS: towards the development of an oilseed pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos Solis, Manuel Ivan; Patel, Anil; Orsat, Valérie; Singh, Jaswinder; Lefsrud, Mark

    2013-08-15

    Reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled to negative-ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (RP-LC/ESI-MS/MS) was used to study the fatty acid profile from the oil of harvested field pea (Pisum sativum) varieties as part of a research project to develop this legume as a commercial oilseed for Canada. The seed oils from pea samples contained palmitic and stearic acids as major saturated fatty acids. Oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids were the major unsaturated fatty acids found. Small percentages of other long chain fatty acids were also detected. This profile suggests that the species of field pea investigated might have the potential to be used as raw materials to develop a future new oilseed crop for the food industry. Fatty acid extracts did not require further manipulation before final analysis by RP-LC/ESI-MS/MS, indicating the utility and relative simplicity of this technique for future screening studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of early-flowering pea (Pisum Sativum L.) mutant lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidenova, N.; Vassilevska-Ivanova, R.

    2008-01-01

    Seven early-flowering mutant lines induced in the field pea cultivars Auralia, Borek and Neossipajustiisja are reported in this paper. Three phenotypic classes were recognized with regard to the node bearing the first flower. The induced mutations were controlled by three different recessive genes. Significant differences in studied characters were found among the lines. Environmental conditions had no effect on the values of nodes to the first flower. Productivity elements such as pods/plant, seeds/plant and seed weight/plant were influenced by climatic conditions. (authors)

  9. Breeding approaches for crenate broomrape (Orobanche crenata Forsk.) management in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubiales, Diego; Fernández-Aparicio, Monica; Pérez-de-Luque, Alejandro; Castillejo, Mari A; Prats, Elena; Sillero, Josefina C; Rispail, Nicolas; Fondevilla, Sara

    2009-05-01

    Pea cultivation is strongly hampered in Mediterranean and Middle East farming systems by the occurrence of Orobanche crenata Forsk. Strategies of control have been developed, but only marginal successes have been achieved. Most control methods are either unfeasible, uneconomical, hard to achieve or result in incomplete protection. The integration of several control measures is the most desirable strategy. [corrected] Recent developments in control are presented and re-evaluated in light of recent developments in crop breeding and molecular genetics. These developments are placed within a framework that is compatible with current agronomic practices. The current focus in applied breeding is leveraging biotechnological tools to develop more and better markers to speed up the delivery of improved cultivars to the farmer. To date, however, progress in marker development and delivery of useful markers has been slow. The application of knowledge gained from basic genomic research and genetic engineering will contribute to more rapid pea improvement for resistance against O. crenata and/or the herbicide.

  10. Genetic diversity and population structure among pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivars as revealed by simple sequence repeat and novel genic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shalu; Kumar, Ajay; Mamidi, Sujan; McPhee, Kevin

    2014-10-01

    Field pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important cool season legume crop widely grown around the world. This research provides a basis for selection of pea germplasm across geographical regions in current and future breeding and genetic mapping efforts for pea improvement. Eleven novel genic markers were developed from pea expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences having significant similarity with gene calls from Medicago truncatula spanning at least one intron. In this study, 96 cultivars widely grown or used in breeding programs in the USA and Canada were analyzed for genetic diversity using 31 microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 11 novel EST-derived genic markers. The polymorphic information content varied from 0.01-0.56 among SSR markers and 0.04-0.43 among genic markers. The results showed that SSR and EST-derived genic markers displayed one or more highly reproducible, multi-allelic, and easy to score loci ranging from 200 to 700 bp in size. Genetic diversity was assessed through unweighted neighbor-joining method, and 96 varieties were grouped into three main clusters based on the dissimilarity matrix. Four subpopulations were determined through STRUCTURE analysis with no significant geographic separation of the subpopulations. The findings of the present study can be used to select diverse genotypes to be used as parents of crosses aimed for breeding improved pea cultivars.

  11. Fatty acid composition of pea (Pisum sativum L., var. Citrina during seed growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rincón, F.

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available Crude oil content and fatty acid composition of four sizes of raw and canned pea were determined. In the seed growth period, considered (from 4.7 mm to 10.2 mm of diameter, crude oil content was not modified and its level showed a mean value of 2.52% on a dry weight basis. Generally, in raw pea the following fatty acid composition was obtained C18:2 > C18:1 > C16:0 > C18:3 > C18:0; however, during seed growth C18:2 increased and C18:3 decreased. These variations are discussed in relation to environmental temperature and cotyledon/testa ratio modifications during seed growth. A low oil content, which remains constant during seed growth, and a lower linolenic acid content in fine (FN size showed that when Citrina variety is used for processing, peas should be harvested when a FN size are predominant in crop. During canning, crude oil content is not modified in any size, but some differences in fatty acid composition occur between raw and canned peas because, in general, the degree of saturation decreases during canning.Se ha determinado el contenido lipídico y la composición en ácidos grasos de cuatro tamaños de guisantes crudos y enlatados. Durante el período de crecimiento considerado (4.7-10.2 mm de diámetro, el contenido lipídico no es modificado, y el contenido medio fue de 2.52% expresado en peso seco. En general, el predominio de los ácidos grasos en el guisante crudo se ajusta a la fórmula C18:2 > C18:1 > C16:C > C18:3 > C18:0; sin embargo, durante el crecimiento de la semilla incrementa C18:2 y decrecen C18:0 y C18:3. Estas variaciones son discutidas en relación a la temperatura ambiental y a la modificación del cociente cotiledón/testa durante el crecimiento de la semilla. Un bajo contenido lipídico, que permanece constante durante el crecimiento de la semilla, y el menor contenido de C18:3 en el tamaño FN (8.3-8.8 mm, ponen de manifiesto que cuando la variedad Citrina es utilizada para la elaboración de productos

  12. The structure of the endodermis during the development of pea (Pisum sativum L. roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kopcińska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown on the basis of cytological studies that during the development of the pea root endodermis, the following structures were formed (in order of appearance: proendodermis, Casparian strips, suberin lamellae and secondary cell walls. The proendodermis cells had, in addition to the commonly occurring cell components, small vacuoles filled with phenols. The Casparian strips developed in the radial walls and accounted for no more than 1/3 of their length. The suberin layer, found on all of the endodermis walls, was deposited last over the Casparian strips. The secondary cell wall was formed only in the cells located over the phloem bundles. Its thickness was uniform over the entire circumference of the cell.

  13. The role of phosphorus in nitrogen fixation by young pea plants (Pisum sativum)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iver

    1985-01-01

    The influence of P on N2 fixation and dry matter production of young pea (P. sativum L. cv. Bodil) plants grown in a soil-sand mixture was investigated in growth cabinet experiments. Nodule dry weight, specific C2H2 reduction and P concentration in shoots responded to P addition before any growth...... response could be observed. The P concentration in nodules responded only slightly to P addition. A supply of P to P-deficient plants increased both the nodule dry weight, specific C2H2 reduction and P concentration in shoots relatively faster than it increased shoot dry weight and P concentration...... in nodules. Combined N applied to plants when N2 fixation had commenced, increased shoot dry weight only at the highest P levels. The smaller plant growth at the low P levels did not result from N deficiency. The reduced nodulation and N2 fixation in P-deficient plants were apparently caused by impaired...

  14. Localization of acid phosphatase activity in the apoplast of root nodules of pea (Pisum sativum

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    Marzena Sujkowska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the activity of acid phosphatase (AcPase in the apoplast of pea root nodule were investigated. The activity was determined using lead and cerium methods. The results indicated a following sequence of AcPase activity appearance during the development of the infection thread: 1 low AcPase activity appears in the outer part of cells of symbiotic bacteria; 2 bacteria show increased AcPase activity, and the enzyme activity appears in the thread walls; 3 activity exhibits also matrix of the infection thread; 4 bacteria just before their release from the infection threads show high AcPase activity; 5 AcPase activity ceases after bacteria transformation into bacteroids. The increase in bacterial AcPase activity may reflect a higher demand for inorganic phosphorus necessary for propagation of the bacteria within the infection threads and/or involved in bacteria release from the infection threads.

  15. Root biomass accumulation in some varieties and hybrids of pea (Pisum sativum L.

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    VILIANA VASILEVA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Root biomass accumulation in spring and winter varieties and hybrids pea was recorded in field experiment in the Institute of Forage Crops, Pleven, Bulgaria (2011-2013. Spring (Shtambovyi and Pleven 4 and winter (Rosacrono and Pleven 10 varieties and their hybrids (Shtambovyi x Pleven 10 and Rosacrono х Pleven 4 (in first and second generation, F1 and F2 were investigated for fresh and dry root biomass accumulation at three phenological stages of plant development (budding, beginning of flowering and maturity. It was found that the tested varieties and hybrids pea accumulated different amount root biomass at the different stages of plant development. Pleven 10 (67.5 kg/da fresh and 11.28 kg/da dry root biomass and Rosacrono х Pleven 4 (F1 (68.7 kg/da fresh and 14.8 kg/da dry root biomass accumulated the greatest amount of root biomass at the budding stage. Winter variety Rosocrono accumulated the greatest amount of root biomass at the beginning of flowering (59.04 kg/da fresh and 16.20 kg/da dry root biomass. In this stage, hybrids Rosacrono х Pleven 4 formed significantly more root biomass in both generations, in F1 reached to 108.0 kg/da fresh and to 26.10 kg/da dry root biomass. At the maturity Pleven 10 formed 20.88 kg/da dry root biomass and the hybrid Shtambovyi х Pleven 10 (F1 - 24.96 kg/da, respectively. The genetical part in phenotypic expression for investigated traits in Pleven 10 х Shtambovyi was relative high and existed probability for selection of homozygous genotypes in F3 and F4 hybrid generations. The data for root biomass accumulation at different phenological stages could be used as parameters for characterization and differentiations of samples, hybrids and lines in this crop.

  16. Pisum sativum L.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... To assess the genetic relations in Pisum genus and to examine putative duplicate accessions, 20 pea varieties (Pisum sativum ..... Two accessions of ssp. asiaticum (No. 20 and 45) origin- nated from Tajikistan and Egypt, respectively, were assigned to the ssp. arven-se collection. Also, one acces- sion of ...

  17. Dickeya dadantii, a plant pathogenic bacterium producing Cyt-like entomotoxins, causes septicemia in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

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    Denis Costechareyre

    Full Text Available Dickeya dadantii (syn. Erwinia chrysanthemi is a plant pathogenic bacteria that harbours a cluster of four horizontally-transferred, insect-specific toxin genes. It was recently shown to be capable of causing an acute infection in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Insecta: Hemiptera. The infection route of the pathogen, and the role and in vivo expression pattern of these toxins, remain unknown. Using bacterial numeration and immunolocalization, we investigated the kinetics and the pattern of infection of this phytopathogenic bacterium within its insect host. We compared infection by the wild-type strain and by the Cyt toxin-deficient mutant. D. dadantii was found to form dense clusters in many luminal parts of the aphid intestinal tract, including the stomach, from which it invaded internal tissues as early as day 1 post-infection. Septicemia occurred soon after, with the fat body being the main infected tissue, together with numerous early infections of the embryonic chains showing embryonic gut and fat body as the target organs. Generalized septicemia led to insect death when the bacterial load reached about 10(8 cfu. Some individual aphids regularly escaped infection, indicating an effective partial immune response to this bacteria. Cyt-defective mutants killed insects more slowly but were capable of localisation in any type of tissue. Cyt toxin expression appeared to be restricted to the digestive tract where it probably assisted in crossing over the first cell barrier and, thus, accelerating bacterial diffusion into the aphid haemocel. Finally, the presence of bacteria on the surface of leaves hosting infected aphids indicated that the insects could be vectors of the bacteria.

  18. Boron Supply Enhances Aluminum Tolerance in Root Border Cells of Pea (Pisum sativum by Interacting with Cell Wall Pectins

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    Xue Wen Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al toxicity is the primary factor limiting crop growth in acidic soils. Boron (B alleviates Al toxicity in plants, which is mainly considered to be due to the formation of Rhamnogalacturonan II-B (RGII-B complexes, which helps to stabilize the cytoskeleton. It is unclear yet whether this is due to the increasing of net negative charges and/or further mechanisms. Kinetics of Al accumulation and adsorption were investigated using entire cells, cell wall and pectin of root border cells (RBCs of pea (Pisum sativum, to reveal the mechanism of B in interacting with alkali-soluble and chelator-soluble pectin for an increased Al tolerance in RBCs. The results show that B could rescue RBCs from Al-induced cell death by accumulating more Al in the cell wall, predominately in alkali-soluble pectin. Boron also promotes Al3+ adsorption and inhibits Al3+ desorption from alkali-soluble pectin. Thus, more Al3+ is immobilized within the alkali-soluble pectin fraction and less in the chelator-soluble pectin, rendering Al3+ less mobile. Boron induces an increase of RG-II (KDO,2-keto-3-deoxyoctonic acid content for forming more borate-RGII complexes, and the decrease of pectin methyl-esterification, thus creates more negative charges to immobilize Al3+ in cell wall pectin. The study provides evidence that abundant B supply enhances the immobilization of Al in alkali-soluble pectin, thus most likely reducing the entry of Al3+ into the symplast from the surroundings.

  19. Metabolism of inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate by a soluble enzyme fraction from pea (Pisum sativum) roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobak, B.K.; Watkins, P.A.C.; Roberts, K.; Chattaway, J.A.; Dawson, A.P.

    1991-01-01

    Metabolism of the putative messenger molecule D-myo-inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P 3 ] in plant cells has been studied using a soluble fraction from pea (pisum sativum) roots as enzyme source and [5- 32 P]Ins(1,4,5)P 3 and [2- 3 H]Ins(1,4,5)P 3 as tracers. Ins(1,4,5)P 3 was rapidly converted into both lower and higher inositol phosphates. The major dephosphorylation product was inositol (4,5) bisphosphate [Ins(4,5)P 2 ] whereas inositol(1,4)bisphosphate [Ins(1,4)P 2 ] was only present in very small quantities throughout a 15 minute incubation period. In addition to these compounds, small amounts of nine other metabolites were produced including inositol and inositol(1,4,5,X)P 4 . Dephosphorylation of Ins(1,4,5)P 3 to Ins(4,5)P 2 was dependent on Ins(1,4,5)P 3 concentration and was partially inhibited by the phosphohydrolase inhibitors 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, glucose 6-phosphate, and p-nitrophenylphosphate. Conversion of Ins(1,4,5)P 3 to Ins(4,5)P 2 and Ins(1,4,5,X)P 4 was inhibited by 55 micromolar Ca 2+ . This study demonstrates that enzymes are present in plant tissues which are capable of rapidly converting Ins(1,4,5)P 3 and that pathways of inositol phosphate metabolism exist which may prove to be unique to the plant kingdom

  20. Selenium content increasing in the seeds of garden pea after foliar biofortification

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    Alžbeta Hegedüsová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Selenium plays an important role as an antioxidant in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Content of selenium in the crops is constantly in the spotlight of professional public. Vegetables, as an important source of chemo protective substances, have irreplaceable position within the food of plant character. The aim of research work was to solve the Se content increasing in the seeds of garden pea (varieties Premium and Ambassador through the foliar biofortification of the plants (50 g Se / ha and 100 g Se / ha and to monitor its effect on production of photosynthetic pigments. In the seeds of fresh garden pea, the chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b content was determined by spectrophotometer depending on a variety and the doses of selenium. In lyophilized seeds there was measured content of selenium by ET-AAS methods. The statistically significant increase of selenium was confirmed with its increasing concentrations in case of both varieties. In the var. Ambassador there was increasing from 0.083 ±0.009 mg.kg-1 DM to 4.935 ±0.598 mg.kg-1 DM (60-fold and in a var. Premium the values increase from 0.067±0.007 mg.kg-1 DM to 3.248 ±0.289 mg.kg-1 DM (48-fold after application of 100 g Se / ha. After application of 50 g Se / ha in both varieties of peas there was reported 25-fold increasing in the selenium content in comparison with control. The content of photosynthetic pigments was also increased, or possibly left at level of un-fortificated variant (chla - Ambassador - 50 g Se / ha; chlb - Premium - 100 g Se / ha by foliar biofortification. Chlorophyll a content was high significantly increased according to used statistical methods in varieties Premium, from the content of 24.527 ±5.156 mg.kg-1 FM to 66.953 ±6.454 mg.kg-1 FM, likewise the content of chlorophyll b from the value of 19.708 ±5.977 mg.kg-1 FM to 37.488 ±6.146 mg.kg-1 FM (after 50 g / ha application.  Foliar biofortification of different vegetable species can provide large

  1. Effect of domestic processing and cooking methods on phytic acid and polyphenol contents of pea cultivars (Pisum sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishnoi, S; Khetarpaul, N; Yadav, R K

    1994-06-01

    All the pea varieties differed significantly (p pea cultivars had significantly (p pea varieties. All the domestic processing and cooking methods could reduce the contents of phytic acid and polyphenols but germination for 48 hours seemed to have a marked lowering effect on the levels of these antinutrients in peas.

  2. Regeneration of pea (Pisum sativum L.) by a cyclic organogenic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzitzikas, Emmanouil N; Bergervoet, Marjan; Raemakers, Krit; Vincken, Jean-Paul; van Lammeren, Andre; Visser, Richard G F

    2004-12-01

    In a five-step procedure, plants were regenerated from meristematic tissue initiated from nodal tissue in four pea cultivars ('Espace', 'Classic', 'Solara', and 'Puget'). In step 1, stem tissue with one node (1-cm size) was subcultured on medium containing thidiazuron. As a result multiple shoots were produced, appearing normal or swollen at their bases. The multiple shoots were subcultured in the same medium, resulting in the formation of a green hyperhydric tissue in the swollen bases of the multiple shoots, which is fully covered with small buds [bud-containing tissue (BCT)]. In step 2, BCT fragments were isolated and subcultured in the same medium and, as a result, they were able to reproduce themselves in a cyclic fashion. In step 3, subculture of BCT on medium supplemented with a combination of gibberelic acid, 6-benzyladenine and alpha-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), resulted in the formation of shoots, which were rooted in step 4 on medium supplemented with 0.5 mg/l NAA, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or indole-3-butyric acid. In step 5, in vitro plants were transferred to the greenhouse for acclimatisation and further development. The four varieties tested were all able to produce meristematic tissue, suggesting that its production is genotype independent.

  3. Studies on the control of ascochyta blight in field peas (Pisum sativum L. caused by Ascochyta pinodes in Zhejiang Province, China

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    Na eLiu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ascochyta blight, an infection caused by a complex of Ascochyta pinodes, Ascochyta pinodella, Ascochyta pisi, and/or Phoma koolunga, is a destructive disease in many field peas (Pisum sativum L.-growing regions, and it causes significant losses in grain yield. To understand the composition of fungi associated with this disease in Zhejiang Province, China, a total of 65 single-pycnidiospore fungal isolates were obtained from diseased pea samples collected from 5 locations in this region. These isolates were identified as Ascochyta pinodes by molecular techniques and their morphological and physiological characteristics. The mycelia of ZJ-1 could penetrate pea leaves across the stomas, and formed specific penetration structures and directly pierced leaves. The resistance level of 23 available pea cultivars was tested against their representative isolate A. pinodes ZJ-1 using the excised leaf-assay technique. The ZJ-1 mycelia could penetrate the leaves of all tested cultivars, and they developed typical symptoms, which suggested that all tested cultivars were susceptible to the fungus. Chemical fungicides and biological control agents were screened for management of this disease, and their efficacies were further determined. Most of the tested fungicides (11 out of 14 showed high activity towards ZJ-1 with EC50 < 5 μg/mL. Moreover, fungicides, including tebuconazole, boscalid, iprodione, carbendazim and fludioxonil, displayed more than 80% disease control efficacy under the recorded conditions. Three biocontrol strains of Bacillus sp. and one of Pantoea agglomerans were isolated from pea-related niches and significantly reduced the severity of disease under greenhouse and field conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first study on ascochyta blight in field peas, and results presented here will be useful for controlling the disease in this area.

  4. Oral activity of FMRFamide-related peptides on the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and degradation by enzymes from the aphid gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Down, Rachel E; Matthews, H June; Audsley, Neil

    2011-11-10

    Insect myosuppressins and myosuppressin analogues were tested for oral toxicity against the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) by incorporation into an artificial diet. Acyrthosiphon pisum myosuppressin (Acypi-MS) and leucomyosuppressin (LMS) had significant dose-dependent effects (0.1-0.5μg peptide/μl diet) on feeding suppression, mortality, reduced growth and fecundity compared with control insects, but Acypi-MS was more potent than LMS. One hundred percent of aphids had died after 10days of feeding on 0.5μg Acypi-MS/μl diet whereas 40% of aphids feeding on 0.5μg LMS/μl diet were still alive after 13days. Myosuppressins were degraded by aphid gut enzymes; degradation was most likely due to a carboxypeptidase-like protease, an aminopeptidase and a cathepsin L cysteine protease. The estimated half-life of Acypi-MS in a gut extract was 30min, whereas LMS was degraded more slowly (t½=54min). No toxicity was observed when the analogues δR(9) LMS and citrolline(9) Acypi-MS or FMRFamide were fed to the pea aphid. These findings not only help to better understand the biological effects of myosuppressins in aphids but also demonstrate the potential use of myosuppressins in a strategy to control aphid pests. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Triterpene saponins of Quillaja saponaria show strong aphicidal and deterrent activity against the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geyter, Ellen; Smagghe, Guy; Rahbé, Yvan; Geelen, Danny

    2012-02-01

    Saponins are a class of secondary plant metabolites consisting of a sugar moiety glycosidically linked to a hydrophobic aglycone (sapogenin) that often possess insecticidal activities. Four saponins were selected: two triterpene saponins, Q. saponaria saponins and aescin, and two steroidal saponins, digitonin and diosgenin. Their effects were investigated on an important pest species and a model piercing-sucking insect, the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. The triterpene Q. saponaria saponins bark saponin received special attention because of its high activity. Aphids were challenged by oral and contact exposure to demonstrate aphicidal activities, and in choice experiments to support use as a natural deterrent. When aphids were exposed to supplemented artificial diet for 3 days, a strong aphicidal activity was recorded for three of the four saponins, with an LC50 of 0.55 mg mL(-1) for Q. saponaria saponins, 0.62 mg mL(-1) for aescin and 0.45 mg mL(-1) for digitonin. The LT50 values ranged between 1 and 4 days, depending on the dose. For diosgenin, only low toxicity (14%) was scored for concentrations up to 5 mg mL(-1). In choice experiments with treated diet, a deterrence index of 0.97 was scored for Q. saponaria saponins at 1 mg mL(-1). In contrast, direct contact showed no repellent effect. Spraying of faba bean plants with Q. saponaria saponins resulted in an LC50 of 8.2 mg mL(-1). Finally, histological analysis in aphids fed with Q. saponaria saponins demonstrated strong aberrations of the aphid gut epithelium, and exposure of midgut CF-203 cell lines to Q. saponaria saponins in vitro confirmed the cytotoxic effect. The present insect experiments provide strong evidence that saponins, as tested here with triterpene Q. saponaria saponins, can be useful as natural aphicides and deterrents. Furthermore, the insect midgut epithelium is suggested to be a primary target of saponin activity. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. The genetic diversity and evolution of field pea (Pisum studied by high throughput retrotransposon based insertion polymorphism (RBIP marker analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smýkal Petr

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic diversity of crop species is the result of natural selection on the wild progenitor and human intervention by ancient and modern farmers and breeders. The genomes of modern cultivars, old cultivated landraces, ecotypes and wild relatives reflect the effects of these forces and provide insights into germplasm structural diversity, the geographical dimension to species diversity and the process of domestication of wild organisms. This issue is also of great practical importance for crop improvement because wild germplasm represents a rich potential source of useful under-exploited alleles or allele combinations. The aim of the present study was to analyse a major Pisum germplasm collection to gain a broad understanding of the diversity and evolution of Pisum and provide a new rational framework for designing germplasm core collections of the genus. Results 3020 Pisum germplasm samples from the John Innes Pisum germplasm collection were genotyped for 45 retrotransposon based insertion polymorphism (RBIP markers by the Tagged Array Marker (TAM method. The data set was stored in a purpose-built Germinate relational database and analysed by both principal coordinate analysis and a nested application of the Structure program which yielded substantially similar but complementary views of the diversity of the genus Pisum. Structure revealed three Groups (1-3 corresponding approximately to landrace, cultivar and wild Pisum respectively, which were resolved by nested Structure analysis into 14 Sub-Groups, many of which correlate with taxonomic sub-divisions of Pisum, domestication related phenotypic traits and/or restricted geographical locations. Genetic distances calculated between these Sub-Groups are broadly supported by principal coordinate analysis and these, together with the trait and geographical data, were used to infer a detailed model for the domestication of Pisum. Conclusions These data provide a clear picture

  7. Mapping of quantitative trait loci for partial resistance to Mycosphaerella pinodes in pea (Pisum sativum L.), at the seedling and adult plant stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prioul, S; Frankewitz, A; Deniot, G; Morin, G; Baranger, A

    2004-05-01

    The inheritance of resistance to Ascochyta blight, an economically important foliar disease of field pea ( Pisum sativum L.) worldwide, was investigated. Breeding resistant pea varieties to this disease, caused by Mycosphaerella pinodes, is difficult due to the availability of only partial resistance. We mapped and characterized quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for resistance to M. pinodes in pea. A population of 135 recombinant inbred lines (RILs), derived from the cross between DP (partially resistant) and JI296 (susceptible), was genotyped with morphological, RAPD, SSR and STS markers. A genetic map was elaborated, comprising 206 markers distributed over eight linkage groups and covering 1,061 cM. The RILs were assessed under growth chamber and field conditions at the seedling and adult plant stages, respectively. Six QTLs were detected at the seedling stage, which together explained up to 74% of the variance. Ten QTLs were identified at the adult plant stage in the field, and together these explained 56.6-67.1% of the variance, depending on the resistance criteria and the organ considered. Four QTLs were detected under both growth chamber and field conditions, suggesting they were not plant-stage dependent. Three QTLs for flowering date and three QTLs for plant height were also identified in the RIL population, some of which co-located with QTLs for resistance. The relationship between QTLs for resistance to M. pinodes, plant height and flowering date is discussed.

  8. Systemic Induction of the Defensin and Phytoalexin Pisatin Pathways in Pea (Pisum sativum against Aphanomyces euteiches by Acetylated and Nonacetylated Oligogalacturonides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh Selim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oligogalacturonides (OGs are known for their powerful ability to stimulate the plant immune system but little is known about their mode of action in pea (Pisum sativum. In the present study, we investigated the elicitor activity of two fractions of OGs, with polymerization degrees (DPs of 2–25, in pea against Aphanomyces euteiches. One fraction was nonacetylated (OGs − Ac whereas the second one was 30% acetylated (OGs + Ac. OGs were applied by injecting the upper two rachises of the plants at three- and/or four-weeks-old. Five-week-old roots were inoculated with 105 zoospores of A. euteiches. The root infection level was determined at 7, 10 and 14 days after inoculation using the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. Results showed significant root infection reductions namely 58, 45 and 48% in the plants treated with 80 µg OGs + Ac and 59, 56 and 65% with 200 µg of OGs − Ac. Gene expression results showed the upregulation of genes involved in the antifungal defensins, lignans and the phytoalexin pisatin pathways and a priming effect in the basal defense, SA and ROS gene markers as a response to OGs. The reduction of the efficient dose in OGs + Ac is suggesting that acetylation is necessary for some specific responses. Our work provides the first evidence for the potential of OGs in the defense induction in pea against Aphanomyces root rot.

  9. A single, plastic population of Mycosphaerella pinodes causes ascochyta blight on winter and spring peas (Pisum sativum) in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le May, Christophe; Guibert, Michèle; Leclerc, Aurélie; Andrivon, Didier; Tivoli, Bernard

    2012-12-01

    Plant diseases are caused by pathogen populations continuously subjected to evolutionary forces (genetic flow, selection, and recombination). Ascochyta blight, caused by Mycosphaerella pinodes, is one of the most damaging necrotrophic pathogens of field peas worldwide. In France, both winter and spring peas are cultivated. Although these crops overlap by about 4 months (March to June), primary Ascochyta blight infections are not synchronous on the two crops. This suggests that the disease could be due to two different M. pinodes populations, specialized on either winter or spring pea. To test this hypothesis, 144 pathogen isolates were collected in the field during the winter and spring growing seasons in Rennes (western France), and all the isolates were genotyped using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Furthermore, the pathogenicities of 33 isolates randomly chosen within the collection were tested on four pea genotypes (2 winter and 2 spring types) grown under three climatic regimes, simulating winter, late winter, and spring conditions. M. pinodes isolates from winter and spring peas were genetically polymorphic but not differentiated according to the type of cultivars. Isolates from winter pea were more pathogenic than isolates from spring pea on hosts raised under winter conditions, while isolates from spring pea were more pathogenic than those from winter pea on plants raised under spring conditions. These results show that disease developed on winter and spring peas was initiated by a single population of M. pinodes whose pathogenicity is a plastic trait modulated by the physiological status of the host plant.

  10. Effect of Processing on the in Vitro and in Vivo Protein Quality of Yellow and Green Split Peas (Pisum sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosworthy, Matthew G; Franczyk, Adam J; Medina, Gerardo; Neufeld, Jason; Appah, Paulyn; Utioh, Alphonsus; Frohlich, Peter; House, James D

    2017-09-06

    In order to determine the effect of extrusion, baking, and cooking on the protein quality of yellow and green split peas, a rodent bioassay was conducted and compared to an in vitro method of protein quality determination. The Protein Digestibility-Corrected Amino Acid Score (PDCAAS) of green split peas (71.4%) was higher than that of yellow split peas (67.8%), on average. Similarly, the average Digestible Indispensable Amino Acid Score (DIAAS) of green split peas (69%) was higher than that of yellow split peas (67%). Cooked green pea flour had lower PDCAAS and DIAAS values (69.19% and 67%) than either extruded (73.61%, 70%) or baked (75.22%, 70%). Conversely, cooked yellow split peas had the highest PDCCAS value (69.19%), while extruded yellow split peas had the highest DIAAS value (67%). Interestingly, a strong correlation was found between in vivo and in vitro analysis of protein quality (R 2 = 0.9745). This work highlights the differences between processing methods on pea protein quality and suggests that in vitro measurements of protein digestibility could be used as a surrogate for in vivo analysis.

  11. [Investigation of chromosomes in varieties and translocation lines of pea Pisum sativum L. by FISH, Ag-NOR, and differential DAPI staining].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatadze, T E; Muravenko, O M; Bol'sheva, N L; Amosova, A B; Gostimsckiĭ, S A; Zelenin, A V

    2005-12-01

    The DNA intercalator 9-aminoachridine was used for obtaining high-resolution DAPI patterns of chromosomes of Pisum sativum L. with more than 300 bands per haploid chromosome set. The karyotypes of three pea varieties, Viola, Capital, and Rosa Crown, and two translocation lines, L-108 (T(2-4s)) and M-10 (T(2-7s)), were examined. Based on the results of DAPI staining, we have identified chromosomes, constructed idiograms, and established breakpoints of chromosome translocations. Lines L-108 (T(2-4s)) and M-10 (T(2-7s)) were shown to appear as a result of respectively one translocation between chromosomes 2 and 4 and two translocations between chromosomes 2 and 7. All varieties and translocation lines of pea were examined using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with telomere repetition probes, 5S and 45S wheat DNA probes. Transcriptional activity of 45S rRNA was detected by Ag-NOR staining. Telomere repetitions were shown to be located only in telomeric chromosome regions. Using high-resolution DAPI staining allowed us to verify localization of 5S genes on pea chromosomes 1, 3, and 5. 45S rDNAs were localized in the secondary constriction regions on the satellite and the satellite thread of chromosome and on the satellite thread and in more proximal satellite heterochromatic region of chromosome 7. The size of 45S rDNA signal on chromosome 7 was larger and its transcriptional activity, higher than the corresponding parameters on chromosome 4 in most of the forms studied. A visual comparison of the results of FISH and Ag-NOR staining of normal and translocated pea chromosomes did not reveal any significant differences between them. The translocations of the satellite chromosomes apparently did not cause significant changes either in the amount of the ribosomal genes or in their transcriptional activity.

  12. Automated integrative high-throughput phenotyping of plant shoots: a case study of the cold-tolerance of pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humplík, Jan F; Lazár, Dušan; Fürst, Tomáš; Husičková, Alexandra; Hýbl, Miroslav; Spíchal, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Recently emerging approaches to high-throughput plant phenotyping have discovered their importance as tools in unravelling the complex questions of plant growth, development and response to the environment, both in basic and applied science. High-throughput methods have been also used to study plant responses to various types of biotic and abiotic stresses (drought, heat, salinity, nutrient-starving, UV light) but only rarely to cold tolerance. We present here an experimental procedure of integrative high-throughput in-house phenotyping of plant shoots employing automated simultaneous analyses of shoot biomass and photosystem II efficiency to study the cold tolerance of pea (Pisum sativum L.). For this purpose, we developed new software for automatic RGB image analysis, evaluated various parameters of chlorophyll fluorescence obtained from kinetic chlorophyll fluorescence imaging, and performed an experiment in which the growth and photosynthetic activity of two different pea cultivars were followed during cold acclimation. The data obtained from the automated RGB imaging were validated through correlation of pixel based shoot area with measurement of the shoot fresh weight. Further, data obtained from automated chlorophyll fluorescence imaging analysis were compared with chlorophyll fluorescence parameters measured by a non-imaging chlorophyll fluorometer. In both cases, high correlation was obtained, confirming the reliability of the procedure described. This study of the response of two pea cultivars to cold stress confirmed that our procedure may have important application, not only for selection of cold-sensitive/tolerant varieties of pea, but also for studies of plant cold-response strategies in general. The approach, provides a very broad tool for the morphological and physiological selection of parameters which correspond to shoot growth and the efficiency of photosystem II, and is thus applicable in studies of various plant species and crops.

  13. Rhythmical changes of a level nitric oxide (NO in roots etiolated seedlings of pea (Pisum sativum L. and influence of exogenous calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Glyan’ko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Studied time dynamics (during 60 mines a level oxide nitric (NO in cross cuts of roots 2 – day etiolated seedlings of pea sowing (Pisum sativum L. by use of fluorescent probe DAF-2DA and a fluorescent microscope depending on action exogenous calcium (Ca2+. During an exposition of seedlings on water, solution CaCl2 are shown fluctuation in level NO in roots – his increase and decrease that testifies to the certain rhythm in generation NO. Exogenous factors (Ca2+ change time dynamics of level NO in comparison with variant “water”. Ca2+chelate EGTA removes action exogenous calcium on rhythmical change of a level NO in roots. Results are discussed in aspect of close interference of signaling systems and molecules (Ca2+, NO, Н2О2.

  14. Effect of radiation processing on nutritional and sensory quality of minimally processed green gram and garden pea sprouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajare, Sachin N.; Saroj, Sunil D.; Dhokane, Varsha S.; Shashidhar, R.; Bandekar, Jayant R.

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, radiation processing of minimally processed green gram and garden pea sprouts was carried out at doses 1 and 2 kGy. The effect of this treatment on different quality parameters like vitamin C content, total carotenoids content, sensory quality, texture, and color was determined over a storage period of 12 days at two different temperatures, a 4 and 8 deg. C. It was observed that treatment of irradiation (1 and 2 kGy) and storage period did not have any significant effect on vitamin C content of control as well as irradiated sprout samples stored at 4 and 8 deg.C. Total carotenoids content of sprouts stored at 4, as well as at 8 deg. C, for 12 days remained almost unchanged after irradiation as well as during storage. Sensory evaluation studies showed that irradiation had no significant effect (p>0.05) on the ratings of any of the sensory attributes in green gram as well as garden pea sprouts and, thus, did not alter the overall acceptability of the irradiated sprouts. Textural studies revealed that there was no significant change (p>0.05) in the firmness of irradiated sprouts (1 and 2 kGy) as compared to control samples at both the temperatures. Storage period of 12 days also did not affect the firmness of sprouts significantly. Color measurement results indicated no drastic change in the color coordinates of the green gram samples except greenness of controls stored at both the temperatures, which showed insignificant decrease in the a * values. Thus, the nutritional as well as sensory quality of minimally processed green gram and garden pea sprouts did not alter significantly after gamma irradiation with a dose of 1 and 2 kGy

  15. Calcium-calmodulin signalling is involved in light-induced acidification by epidermal leaf cells of pea, Pisum sativum L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzenga, JTM; Staal, M; Prins, HBA

    1997-01-01

    Pathways of signal transduction of red and blue light-dependent acidification by leaf epidermal cells were studied using epidermal strips of the Argenteum mutant of Pisum sativum. In these preparations the contribution of guard cells to the acidification is minimal. The hydroxypyridine nifedipine, a

  16. Genetic diversity in European Pisum germplasm collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jing, R.; Ambrose, M.A.; Knox, M.R.; Smykal, P.; Hybl, M.; Ramos, A.; Caminero, C.; Burstin, J.; Duc, G.; Soest, van L.J.; Swiecicki, W.K.; Pereira, M.G.; Vishnyakova, M.; Davenport, G.F.; Flavell, A.J.; Ellis, T.

    2012-01-01

    The distinctness of, and overlap between, pea genotypes held in several Pisum germplasm collections has been used to determine their relatedness and to test previous ideas about the genetic diversity of Pisum. Our characterisation of genetic diversity among 4,538 Pisum accessions held in 7 European

  17. Discriminant Analysis of Defective and Non-Defective Field Pea (Pisum sativum L. into Broad Market Grades Based on Digital Image Features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda S McDonald

    Full Text Available Field peas (Pisum sativum L. are generally traded based on seed appearance, which subjectively defines broad market-grades. In this study, we developed an objective Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA model to classify market grades of field peas based on seed colour, shape and size traits extracted from digital images. Seeds were imaged in a high-throughput system consisting of a camera and laser positioned over a conveyor belt. Six colour intensity digital images were captured (under 405, 470, 530, 590, 660 and 850nm light for each seed, and surface height was measured at each pixel by laser. Colour, shape and size traits were compiled across all seed in each sample to determine the median trait values. Defective and non-defective seed samples were used to calibrate and validate the model. Colour components were sufficient to correctly classify all non-defective seed samples into correct market grades. Defective samples required a combination of colour, shape and size traits to achieve 87% and 77% accuracy in market grade classification of calibration and validation sample-sets respectively. Following these results, we used the same colour, shape and size traits to develop an LDA model which correctly classified over 97% of all validation samples as defective or non-defective.

  18. Gene Expression Analysis of Parthenogenetic Embryonic Development of the Pea Aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, Suggests That Aphid Parthenogenesis Evolved from Meiotic Oogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Dayalan G.; Abdelhady, Ahmed; Stern, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Aphids exhibit a form of phenotypic plasticity, called polyphenism, in which genetically identical females reproduce sexually during one part of the life cycle and asexually (via parthenogenesis) during the remainder of the life cycle. The molecular basis for aphid parthenogenesis is unknown. Cytological observations of aphid parthenogenesis suggest that asexual oogenesis evolved either through a modification of meiosis or from a mitotic process. As a test of these alternatives, we assessed the expression levels and expression patterns of canonical meiotic recombination and germline genes in the sexual and asexual ovaries of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. We observed expression of all meiosis genes in similar patterns in asexual and sexual ovaries, with the exception that some genes encoding Argonaute-family members were not expressed in sexual ovaries. In addition, we observed that asexual aphid tissues accumulated unspliced transcripts of Spo11, whereas sexual aphid tissues accumulated primarily spliced transcripts. In situ hybridization revealed Spo11 transcript in sexual germ cells and undetectable levels of Spo11 transcript in asexual germ cells. We also found that an obligately asexual strain of pea aphid produced little spliced Spo11 transcript. Together, these results suggest that parthenogenetic oogenesis evolved from a meiosis-like, and not a mitosis-like, process and that the aphid reproductive polyphenism may involve a modification of Spo11 gene activity. PMID:25501006

  19. Gene expression analysis of parthenogenetic embryonic development of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, suggests that aphid parthenogenesis evolved from meiotic oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Dayalan G; Abdelhady, Ahmed; Stern, David L

    2014-01-01

    Aphids exhibit a form of phenotypic plasticity, called polyphenism, in which genetically identical females reproduce sexually during one part of the life cycle and asexually (via parthenogenesis) during the remainder of the life cycle. The molecular basis for aphid parthenogenesis is unknown. Cytological observations of aphid parthenogenesis suggest that asexual oogenesis evolved either through a modification of meiosis or from a mitotic process. As a test of these alternatives, we assessed the expression levels and expression patterns of canonical meiotic recombination and germline genes in the sexual and asexual ovaries of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. We observed expression of all meiosis genes in similar patterns in asexual and sexual ovaries, with the exception that some genes encoding Argonaute-family members were not expressed in sexual ovaries. In addition, we observed that asexual aphid tissues accumulated unspliced transcripts of Spo11, whereas sexual aphid tissues accumulated primarily spliced transcripts. In situ hybridization revealed Spo11 transcript in sexual germ cells and undetectable levels of Spo11 transcript in asexual germ cells. We also found that an obligately asexual strain of pea aphid produced little spliced Spo11 transcript. Together, these results suggest that parthenogenetic oogenesis evolved from a meiosis-like, and not a mitosis-like, process and that the aphid reproductive polyphenism may involve a modification of Spo11 gene activity.

  20. Identification of Phenolic Compounds from Seed Coats of Differently Colored European Varieties of Pea (Pisum sativum L.) and Characterization of Their Antioxidant and In Vitro Anticancer Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanisavljević, Nemanja S; Ilić, Marija D; Matić, Ivana Z; Jovanović, Živko S; Čupić, Tihomir; Dabić, Dragana Č; Natić, Maja M; Tešić, Živoslav Lj

    2016-01-01

    To date little has been done on identification of major phenolic compounds responsible for anticancer and antioxidant properties of pea (Pisum sativum L.) seed coat extracts. In the present study, phenolic profile of the seed coat extracts from 10 differently colored European varieties has been determined using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-linear trap quadrupole orbitrap mass spectrometer technique. Extracts of dark colored varieties with high total phenolic content (up to 46.56 mg GAE/g) exhibited strong antioxidant activities (measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl or DPPH assay, and ferric ion reducing and ferrous ion chelating capacity assays) which could be attributed to presence of gallic acid, epigallocatechin, naringenin, and apigenin. The aqueous extracts of dark colored varieties exert concentration-dependent cytotoxic effects on all tested malignant cell lines (human colon adenocarcinoma LS174, human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-453, human lung carcinoma A594, and myelogenous leukemia K562). Correlation analysis revealed that intensities of cytotoxic activity of the extracts strongly correlated with contents of epigallocatechin and luteolin. Cell cycle analysis on LS174 cells in the presence of caspase-3 inhibitor points out that extracts may activate other cell death modalities besides caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. The study provides evidence that seed coat extracts of dark colored pea varieties might be used as potential cancer-chemopreventive and complementary agents in cancer therapy.

  1. Discriminant Analysis of Defective and Non-Defective Field Pea (Pisum sativum L.) into Broad Market Grades Based on Digital Image Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Linda S; Panozzo, Joseph F; Salisbury, Phillip A; Ford, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Field peas (Pisum sativum L.) are generally traded based on seed appearance, which subjectively defines broad market-grades. In this study, we developed an objective Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) model to classify market grades of field peas based on seed colour, shape and size traits extracted from digital images. Seeds were imaged in a high-throughput system consisting of a camera and laser positioned over a conveyor belt. Six colour intensity digital images were captured (under 405, 470, 530, 590, 660 and 850nm light) for each seed, and surface height was measured at each pixel by laser. Colour, shape and size traits were compiled across all seed in each sample to determine the median trait values. Defective and non-defective seed samples were used to calibrate and validate the model. Colour components were sufficient to correctly classify all non-defective seed samples into correct market grades. Defective samples required a combination of colour, shape and size traits to achieve 87% and 77% accuracy in market grade classification of calibration and validation sample-sets respectively. Following these results, we used the same colour, shape and size traits to develop an LDA model which correctly classified over 97% of all validation samples as defective or non-defective.

  2. Estudio de la adaptabilidad de cuatro genotipos de guisante (pisum setivum L. var. macrocarpon bajo dos densidades y en dos localidades Adaptabilidad study of varieties of edible pod pea Pisum sativum L. Var. macrocarpon under two densities and two locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilar Miguel

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó y comparó el comportamiento agronómico de cuatro variedades de guisante Pisum satim L. var. macrocarpon bajo dos densidades y en dos localidades
    mediante cultivos a libre exposición durante dos semestres. Se midieron variables de tipo morfofisiológico y reproductivo. Las cuatro variedades se adaptaron bien al medio ambiente ya que sus rendimientos fueron bastante aceptables. La variedad Super Mel Sugar logró los mejores puntajes
    en rendimiento y calidad además de la mayor capacidad de adaptación. La variedad Oregon Sugar Pod 11 con buenos rendimientos presentó problemas en el mercado por la deformación de sus vainas. La variedad Dwarf Grey Sugar produce vainas pequeñas cuya calidad se limita a
    mercados de congelación o industrialización pero con altos rendimientos. La variedad Mammouth Melting Sugar obtuvo los rendimientos más bajos, sin embargo su calidad y popularidad la colocan en los primeros lugares del mercado actualmente.
    Four experiments were set to evaluate and to compare the agronomical behavior of four varieties of edible pod pea (Pisum satívum L. var. macrocarpon under two den sities and, two locations during two semesters of 1989. Some of the
    morphophysiologic and reproductive variables showed highly significant differences for varieties and locations. The varieties also showed good adaptation to the environments used since their yield was quite good. Super Mel Sugar varlety had the best production and quality: Oregon Sugar Pod II, with high productions, had some problems of marketing because of the deformated pods; Dwarf Grey Sugar produced small pods no good for fresh market; Mammouth Melting Sugar had the lowest production, even though its quality, and popularity in the fresh markets.

  3. Phenotypical of correlation between quantitative signs at the early varieties of pea vegetable (Pisum sativum L. partim.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. М. Стригун

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Asa result of supervisions, estimation, description, and analysis of 13 morphological, biological, biometrycal and economic valuable signs 26 varietis of pea vegetable are set sizes of phenotypical coefficients of correlation between them.

  4. Assessment of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) grain yield, aerial biomass and flowering date stability in Mediterranean environments

    OpenAIRE

    Iglesias-García, Rebeca; Prats, Elena; Flores, Fernando; Amri, Moez; Mikić, Aleksandar; Rubiales, Diego

    2017-01-01

    Mediterranean environments are of most interest to study pea adaptability to terminal drought conditions especially in the current context of global climate change. In our work we have tested nine pea cultivars in five South European and North African locations, characterised by different agro climatic conditions within the Mediterranean climate. Data were processed through the additive main effects and multiplicative interaction analysis. Grain yield, aboveground biomass and flowering date w...

  5. Genome-wide SNP identification, linkage map construction and QTL mapping for seed mineral concentrations and contents in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yu; Coyne, Clarice J; Grusak, Michael A; Mazourek, Michael; Cheng, Peng; Main, Dorrie; McGee, Rebecca J

    2017-02-13

    Marker-assisted breeding is now routinely used in major crops to facilitate more efficient cultivar improvement. This has been significantly enabled by the use of next-generation sequencing technology to identify loci and markers associated with traits of interest. While rich in a range of nutritional components, such as protein, mineral nutrients, carbohydrates and several vitamins, pea (Pisum sativum L.), one of the oldest domesticated crops in the world, remains behind many other crops in the availability of genomic and genetic resources. To further improve mineral nutrient levels in pea seeds requires the development of genome-wide tools. The objectives of this research were to develop these tools by: identifying genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using genotyping by sequencing (GBS); constructing a high-density linkage map and comparative maps with other legumes, and identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL) for levels of boron, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, phosphorous, sulfur, and zinc in the seed, as well as for seed weight. In this study, 1609 high quality SNPs were found to be polymorphic between 'Kiflica' and 'Aragorn', two parents of an F 6 -derived recombinant inbred line (RIL) population. Mapping 1683 markers including 75 previously published markers and 1608 SNPs developed from the present study generated a linkage map of size 1310.1 cM. Comparative mapping with other legumes demonstrated that the highest level of synteny was observed between pea and the genome of Medicago truncatula. QTL analysis of the RIL population across two locations revealed at least one QTL for each of the mineral nutrient traits. In total, 46 seed mineral concentration QTLs, 37 seed mineral content QTLs, and 6 seed weight QTLs were discovered. The QTLs explained from 2.4% to 43.3% of the phenotypic variance. The genome-wide SNPs and the genetic linkage map developed in this study permitted QTL identification for pea seed mineral

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF VERMICOMPOST FROM KITCHEN WASTE ON THE YIELD-ENHANCING CHARACTERISTICS OF PEAS PISUM SATIVUM L. VAR. SACCHARATUM SER. BAJKA VARIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Pączka

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the possibility of using the vermicompost produced from kitchen waste (by Eisenia fetida earthworms to grow sugar peas. Its influence on the dynamics of sprouting of peas and their growth to 21st day was investigated in a pot experiment. Four combinations were realised (control – standard garden soil; (50W – its mixture with 50% of vermicompost; (25W and (10W – with 25% and 10% of vermicompost addition respectively (n=5. Vermicompost from kitchen waste turned out to be useful in the cultivation of peas. No significant differences in the impact of all the analysed substrates on the sprouting of this plant were found. A 10% vermicompost addition (10W was shown to be the most favourable substrate. Its positive influence was shown in the impact on the increase of total average mass (by 33%; p<0.001 and height of the plants (by 12%; p<0.05 and average mass (by 39%; p<0.001 and length (by 12%; p<0.05 of stems.

  7. Association mapping of starch chain length distribution and amylose content in pea (Pisum sativum L.) using carbohydrate metabolism candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Margaret A; Shaw, Martin; Cooper, Rebecca D; Frew, Tonya J; Butler, Ruth C; Murray, Sarah R; Moya, Leire; Coyne, Clarice J; Timmerman-Vaughan, Gail M

    2017-08-01

    Although starch consists of large macromolecules composed of glucose units linked by α-1,4-glycosidic linkages with α-1,6-glycosidic branchpoints, variation in starch structural and functional properties is found both within and between species. Interest in starch genetics is based on the importance of starch in food and industrial processes, with the potential of genetics to provide novel starches. The starch metabolic pathway is complex but has been characterized in diverse plant species, including pea. To understand how allelic variation in the pea starch metabolic pathway affects starch structure and percent amylose, partial sequences of 25 candidate genes were characterized for polymorphisms using a panel of 92 diverse pea lines. Variation in the percent amylose composition of extracted seed starch and (amylopectin) chain length distribution, one measure of starch structure, were characterized for these lines. Association mapping was undertaken to identify polymorphisms associated with the variation in starch chain length distribution and percent amylose, using a mixed linear model that incorporated population structure and kinship. Associations were found for polymorphisms in seven candidate genes plus Mendel's r locus (which conditions the round versus wrinkled seed phenotype). The genes with associated polymorphisms are involved in the substrate supply, chain elongation and branching stages of the pea carbohydrate and starch metabolic pathways. The association of polymorphisms in carbohydrate and starch metabolic genes with variation in amylopectin chain length distribution and percent amylose may help to guide manipulation of pea seed starch structural and functional properties through plant breeding.

  8. Application strategy for the chemical control of pea (Pisum sativum L. crops against Thrips tabaci Lindeman, 1889 (Thysanoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pobożniak Maria

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In Poland chemical control of thrips in pea crops currently relies on insecticides with several modes of action, including pyrethroids (deltamethrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and neonicotinoids. The first insecticide treatment is recommended to be applied during the full bloom of pea plants and the second two repeated at intervals of 7 days. Field experiments were carried out at the Experimental Station in Mydlniki (near Kraków, southern Poland over two years (2011 and 2012. Acetamiprid (neonicotinoid (trade name Mospilan 20 SP was used to control thrips on peas in the experiment. The results suggest that the conventional spray regime consisting of one weekly application of Mospilan 20 WP starting at full flowering can be replaced by one treatment at the beginning of flowering.

  9. Genetic diversity among varieties and wild species accessions of pea (Pisum sativum L.) based on molecular markers, and morphological and physiological characters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tar'an, B; Zhang, C; Warkentin, T; Tullu, A; Vandenberg, A

    2005-04-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA, simple sequence repeat, and inter-simple sequence repeat markers were used to estimate the genetic relations among 65 pea varieties (Pisum sativum L.) and 21 accessions from wild Pisum subspecies (subsp.) abyssinicum, asiaticum, elatius, transcaucasicum, and var. arvense. Fifty-one of these varieties are currently available for growers in western Canada. Nei and Li's genetic similarity (GS) estimates calculated using the marker data showed that pair-wise comparison values among the 65 varieties ranged from 0.34 to 1.00. GS analysis on varieties grouped according to their originating breeding programs demonstrated that different levels of diversity were maintained at different breeding programs. Unweighted pair-group method arithmetic average cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis on the marker-based GS grouped the cultivated varieties separately from the wild accessions. The majority of the food and feed varieties were grouped separately from the silage and specialty varieties, regardless of the originating breeding programs. The analysis also revealed some genetically distinct varieties such as Croma, CDC Handel, 1096M-8, and CDC Acer. The relations among the cultivated varieties, as revealed by molecular-marker-based GS, were not significantly correlated with those based on the agronomic characters, suggesting that the 2 systems give different estimates of genetic relations among the varieties. However, on a smaller scale, a consistent subcluster of genotypes was identified on the basis of agronomic characters and their marker-based GS. Furthermore, a number of variety-specific markers were identified in the current study, which could be useful for variety identification. Breeding strategies to maintain or enhance the genetic diversity of future varieties are proposed.

  10. Diversity of segetal weeds in pea (Pisum sativum L. depending on crops chosen for a crop rotation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta K. Kostrzewska

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study, lasting from 1999 to 2006, was conducted at the Research Station in Tomaszkowo, which belongs to the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn. The experiment was set up on brown rusty soil classified as good rye complex 5 in the Polish soil valuation system. The analysis comprised weeds in fields sown with pea cultivated in two four-field crop rotation systems with a different first crop: A. potato – spring barley – pea – spring barley; B. mixture of spring barley with pea – spring barley – pea – spring barley. Every year, at the 2–3 true leaf stage of pea, the species composition and density of individual weed species were determined; in addition, before harvesting the main crop, the dry matter of weeds was weighed. The results were used to analyze the constancy of weed taxa, species diversity, and the evenness and dominance indices, to determine the relationships between all biological indicators analyzed and weather conditions, and to calculate the indices of similarity, in terms of species composition, density and biomass of weeds, between the crop rotations compared. The species richness, density and biomass of weeds in fields with field pea were not differentiated by the choice of the initial crop in a given rotation system. In the spring, the total number of identified taxa was 28 and it increased to 36 before the harvest of pea plants. Chenopodium album and Echinochloa crus-galli were the most numerous. Chenopodium album, Echinochloa crus-galli, Sonchus arvensis, Fallopia convolvulus and Viola arvensis were constant in all treatments, regardless of what the first crop in rotation was or when the observations were made. The species diversity and the evenness and species dominance indices varied significantly between years and dates of observations. Species diversity calculated on the basis of the density of weed species was higher in the rotation with a mixture of cereals and legumes, while that calculated on

  11. A Combined Comparative Transcriptomic, Metabolomic, and Anatomical Analyses of Two Key Domestication Traits: Pod Dehiscence and Seed Dormancy in Pea (Pisum sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Smýkal

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The origin of the agriculture was one of the turning points in human history, and a central part of this was the evolution of new plant forms, domesticated crops. Seed dispersal and germination are two key traits which have been selected to facilitate cultivation and harvesting of crops. The objective of this study was to analyze anatomical structure of seed coat and pod, identify metabolic compounds associated with water-impermeable seed coat and differentially expressed genes involved in pea seed dormancy and pod dehiscence. Comparative anatomical, metabolomics, and transcriptomic analyses were carried out on wild dormant, dehiscent Pisum elatius (JI64, VIR320 and cultivated, indehiscent Pisum sativum non-dormant (JI92, Cameor and recombinant inbred lines (RILs. Considerable differences were found in texture of testa surface, length of macrosclereids, and seed coat thickness. Histochemical and biochemical analyses indicated genotype related variation in composition and heterogeneity of seed coat cell walls within macrosclereids. Liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry and Laser desorption/ionization–mass spectrometry of separated seed coats revealed significantly higher contents of proanthocyanidins (dimer and trimer of gallocatechin, quercetin, and myricetin rhamnosides and hydroxylated fatty acids in dormant compared to non-dormant genotypes. Bulk Segregant Analysis coupled to high throughput RNA sequencing resulted in identification of 770 and 148 differentially expressed genes between dormant and non-dormant seeds or dehiscent and indehiscent pods, respectively. The expression of 14 selected dormancy-related genes was studied by qRT-PCR. Of these, expression pattern of four genes: porin (MACE-S082, peroxisomal membrane PEX14-like protein (MACE-S108, 4-coumarate CoA ligase (MACE-S131, and UDP-glucosyl transferase (MACE-S139 was in agreement in all four genotypes with Massive analysis of cDNA Ends (MACE data. In

  12. Genetic structure of wild pea (Pisum sativum subsp. elatius) populations in the northern part of the Fertile Crescent reflects moderate cross-pollination and strong effect of geographic but not environmental distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smýkal, Petr; Trněný, Oldřich; Brus, Jan; Hanáček, Pavel; Rathore, Abhishek; Roma, Rani Das; Pechanec, Vilém; Duchoslav, Martin; Bhattacharyya, Debjyoti; Bariotakis, Michalis; Pirintsos, Stergios; Berger, Jens; Toker, Cengiz

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge of current genetic diversity and mating systems of crop wild relatives (CWR) in the Fertile Crescent is important in crop genetic improvement, because western agriculture began in the area after the cold-dry period known as Younger Dryas about 12,000 years ago and these species are also wild genepools of the world's most important food crops. Wild pea (Pisum sativum subsp. elatius) is an important source of genetic diversity for further pea crop improvement harbouring traits useful in climate change context. The genetic structure was assessed on 187 individuals of Pisum sativum subsp. elatius from fourteen populations collected in the northern part of the Fertile Crescent using 18,397 genome wide single nucleotide polymorphism DARTseq markers. AMOVA showed that 63% of the allelic variation was distributed between populations and 19% between individuals within populations. Four populations were found to contain admixed individuals. The observed heterozygosity ranged between 0.99 to 6.26% with estimated self-pollination rate between 47 to 90%. Genetic distances of wild pea populations were correlated with geographic but not environmental (climatic) distances and support a mixed mating system with predominant self-pollination. Niche modelling with future climatic projections showed a local decline in habitats suitable for wild pea, making a strong case for further collection and ex situ conservation.

  13. Comparison of the morphogenesis of three genotypes of pea (Pisum sativum) grown in pure stands and wheat-based intercrops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillot, Romain; Combes, Didier; Pineau, Sylvain; Huynh, Pierre; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Abraham J

    2014-01-01

    Cereal-legume intercrops represent a promising way of combining high productivity and agriculture sustainability. The benefits of cereal-legume mixtures are highly affected by species morphology and functioning, which determine the balance between competition and complementarity for resource acquisition. Studying species morphogenesis, which controls plant architecture, is therefore of major interest. The morphogenesis of cultivated species has been mainly described in mono-specific growing conditions, although morphogenetic plasticity can occur in multi-specific stands. The aim of the present study was therefore to characterize the variability of the morphogenesis of pea plants grown either in pure stands or mixed with wheat. This was achieved through a field experiment that included three pea cultivars with contrasting earliness (hr and HR type) and branching patterns. Results show that most of the assessed parameters of pea morphogenesis (phenology, branching, final number of vegetative organs and their kinetics of appearance) were mainly dependent on the considered genotype, which highlights the importance of the choice of cultivars in intercropping systems. There was however a low variability of pea morphogenesis between sole and mixed stands except for plant height and branching of the long-cycle cultivar. The information provided in the present study at stand and plant scale can be used to build up structural-functional models. These models can contribute to improving the understanding of the functioning of cereal-legume intercrops and also to the definition of plant ideotypes adapted to the growth in intercrops.

  14. Pea (Pisum sativum and faba beans (Vicia faba in dairy cow diet: effect on milk production and quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Moschini

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of alternative plant proteins in place of the soybean meal protein in diets for producing animals aims to reduce the extra-EU soybean import and partially substitute the GMO in the food chain. Among possible alternatives, the heat-processed legume grains seem interesting for dairy cow diets. Two consecutive experiments were carried out to evaluate flaked pea and faba beans as substitute for soybean meal in diets for Reggiana breed dairy cows producing milk for Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese-making. In both experiments a C concentrate (110 g/kg soybean meal, no pea and faba beans was compared to a PF concentrate (150 g/kg flaked pea, 100 g/kg flaked faba beans, no soybean meal. Forages fed to animals were hay (mixed grass and alfalfa in experiment 1 and hay plus mixed grass in experiment 2. Concentrate intake, milk yield and milk quality (rennet coagulation traits included were similar between feeding groups. Parameters on the grab faecal samples, as empirical indicators of digestibility, had a smaller (Pvs 3.1 and 2.3 vs 2.8%, respectively for PF and C in experiment 1 and 2. Some blood indicators of nitrogen metabolism (protein, albumin, urea were similar between the feeding groups. The inclusion of pea and faba beans, within the allowed limit of the Parmigiano-Reggiano Consortium for diet formulation, could represent a feasible opportunity for a total substitution of soybean meal.

  15. Identification and detection of genetic relatedness among important varieties of pea (Pisum sativum L.) grown in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, P Ray; Tanveer, Hasan; Dixit, G P

    2007-06-01

    Among the cool season legume crops grown in India and the Indian sub-continent, peas are very popular and preferred by the growers as well as consumers for various uses. The third largest area in pea cultivation is occupied by India after Canada and Russia. Among the important and popular varieties of peas that are grown in India, several are from exotic background. But very little work has been done to carry out the genetic diversity present in the widely adapted Indian pea varieties using DNA markers. Twenty-four most popular and widely adapted varieties were subjected to RAPD analysis to find out the genetic relatedness among them using 60 decamer primers. All the primers used in our study were found to be polymorphic and seven of them showed 100% polymorphism. Out of 579 amplified products, 433 showed polymorphism (74.8%). On an average, 9.65 bands were amplified per primer. Cluster analysis based on Jaccard's similarity coefficient using UPGMA grouped all the tall type varieties together, whereas, dwarf types formed two different clusters based upon their pedigree. The arithmetic mean heterozygosity (Hav) value and marker index (MI) was found to be 0.496 and 4.787, respectively, thus this indicated the efficiency of RAPD as a marker system. Moreover, the calculated value of probability of identical match by chance suggested that about 10(53) genotypes can be unambiguously distinguish by employing 60 RAPD primers.

  16. AGRONOMIC VALUE OF SPRING FIELD PEA BREEDING LINES AND VARIETIES FOR GREEN FORAGE PRODUCTION (Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Krizmanić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spring field pea is one of the most important coarse legumes. In most pea breeding programs, the selection process is focused on the development of high-yielding and top-quality varieties for grain and/or green forage production. Production of protein rich grain is mainly associated with spring varieties, while production of green mass rich in protein, minerals and vitamins is characteristic for winter varieties. Due to problems with planting in autumn (late harvest of previous crop, heavy rains during soil preparation and planting, business plan modifications, abundance of cattle etc., farmers often prefer spring pea varieties that can produce large green mass over shorter period of time, as well as ensure planting of the next crop in the same field. Objectives of this research were: agronomic value assessment of (spring and potentially winter varieties and new breeding lines of spring field pea over a two-year period (2012-2013, as well as the selection of lines with the most potential for further breeding process and/or registration of new spring field varieties for green forage production. The highest mean yields of green mass and dry matter, as well as favourable values of other assessed traits were obtained by breeding lines MBK-7, MBK-41, MBK-51, and varieties Dora and Poneka. These varieties represent valuable germplasm for further breeding process, while selected lines have high potential for the development of new varieties.

  17. Anatomical and micromorphological characteristics of the seed coat of field pea (Pisum sativum L. genotypes in relation to cracks and damage of seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Jelena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the morphological characteristics of the seed and micromorphological, anatomical and chemical characteristics of the seed coat of pea (Pisum sativum L. genotypes, Jezero, Javor and NS Junior. Our aim was to investigate whether these genotypes can be differentiated based on seed coat morphoanatomical characteristics, depending on the harvest treatment. The observations and measurements of seed coat cross-sections were performed using light microscopy. The seed coat surface was observed using SEM. A tuberculate seed coat surface characterized all examined pea genotypes, and the average diameter of the tubercle was about 12 μm. Statistical and laboratory analyses revealed that major damage was the most frequent defect type as the result of mechanized harvest in all the examined genotypes. Genotype NS Junior had the shortest seed length (6.1 mm. Micromorphological analysis revealed that the seed surface was tuberculate in all genotypes. The genotype Jezero had the highest number of tubercle ribs (11.0 and a significantly higher proportion of parenchyma tissue (50.6%, while NS Junior was characterized by the greatest share of macrosclereids (49.8%. The highest number of osteosclereids (832/mm2 was counted in genotype Javor. In addition, genotype NS Junior stands out due to the highest percentage of crude fiber (62.75 g/100g in the seed coat. There was a marked difference among the studied genotypes with regard to the seed coat morphoanatomical characteristics, which is confirmed by the results of multivariate discriminant analysis (MDA. These results suggested that the morphological, micromorphological and anatomical characteristics of the seed might have an impact on the seed coat damage level at harvest. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 31024 and Grant no. 173002

  18. The influence of water stress on biomass and N accumulation, N partitioning between above and below ground parts and on N rhizodeposition during reproductive growth of pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahieu, S.; Germont, Florent; Aveline, A.

    2009-01-01

    rhizodeposition by a pea (Pisum sativum L.) when influenced by water stress. In a controlled environment, pea plants were exposed to a severe drought or not stressed, either at flowering or during pod filling. N rhizodeposition was measured using the split root method and plants were harvested at the end...... of flowering (59 days after sowing, DAS 59), at the end of the drought period applied during pod filling (DAS 74) and at maturity (DAS 101). Water stress strongly affected pea dry weight and N accumulation. In both stressed treatments, nodule biomass and N content were reduced by about 65% in the absence...... in rhizodeposits represented around 30% of the total BGN and increased to around 60% at maturity though BGN decreased from around 20 to 13% of the total plant N between DAS 74 and maturity. The results suggest that water stress has no specific effect on N partitioning between above and below ground parts....

  19. Radiosensitivity study in the germination and growth of the pea Pisum sativum L, with seeds exposed to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilguan, J.; Carrasco, J.; Marquez, V.

    2016-10-01

    Seeds of Pisum sativum L. were irradiated in a 60 Co irradiator belonging to the Subsecretaria de Control y Aplicaciones Nucleares del Ecuador (SCAN), the dose rate at the irradiation time was 4.86 Gy/min. The seeds were grouped in packs of 100 units and exposed at doses of 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, 140, 160, 180 and 200 Gy. The number of effective germinations, the days for germination, the main stem thickness, the number of branches and the size of the plant were evaluated. To validate the experimentation, the data were analyzed statistically by tests of homogeneity of variances, way ANOVA and Scheffe analysis to each variable. The number of effective germinations was given to 100% for 20 and 40 Gy then decreases to a higher dose reaching 20% to 200 Gy, being the average of the proof near to 90%. Increased germination stimulation at treatment at 20 Gy with an average of 5.0 days was evidenced. Treatment at doses of 20, 40 and 60 Gy generate a plant size greater than the proof whose mean is 68.30 cm. The mean number of branches of the proof is 5.3 with a standard deviation of 0.675, which is greater at doses of 20 and 40 Gy. In the study, is concluded that better results are obtained when irradiating seeds Pisum sativum L, between 20 and 60 Gy. (Author)

  20. Identification of the prothoracicotropic hormone (Ptth) coding gene and localization of its site of expression in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberà, M; Martínez-Torres, D

    2017-10-01

    Insect hormones control essential aspects of physiology, behaviour and development in insects. The majority of insect hormones are peptide hormones that perform a highly diverse catalogue of functions. Prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) is a brain neuropeptide hormone whose main function is to stimulate the secretion of ecdysone (the moulting hormone) by the prothoracic glands in insect larvae thus playing a key role in the control of moulting and metamorphosis. Moreover, both PTTH release or blockade have been reported to act as a switch to terminate or initiate larval and pupal diapauses. In insects, diapause is a prevalent response often regulated by the photoperiod. It has been shown that PTTH participates as an output of the circadian clock and a role in photoperiodic processes is suggested in some insect species. Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) reproduce by cyclical parthenogenesis with a sexual phase, induced by short photoperiods, that leads to the production of diapausing eggs. With the availability of the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) genome, efforts to identify and characterize genes relevant to essential aspects of aphid biology have multiplied. In spite of its relevance, several genomic and transcriptomic studies on aphid neuropeptides failed to detect aphid PTTH amongst them. Here we report on the first identification of the aphid PTTH coding gene and the neuroanatomical localization of its expression in the aphid brain. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  1. Analysis of Protein by Spectrophotometric and Computer Colour Based Intensity Method from Stem of Pea (Pisum sativum at Different Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsheen Mushtaque Shah

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study proteins were analyzed from pea plants at three different growth stages of stem by spectrophotometric i.e Lowry and Bradford quantitative methods and computer colour intensity based method. Though Spectrophotometric methods are regarded as classical methods, we report an alternate computer based method which gave comparable results. Computer software was developed the for protein analysis which is easier, time and money saving method as compared to the classical methods.

  2. Quantitative trait loci for lodging resistance, plant height and partial resistance to mycosphaerella blight in field pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tar'an, B; Warkentin, T; Somers, D J; Miranda, D; Vandenberg, A; Blade, S; Woods, S; Bing, D; Xue, A; DeKoeyer, D; Penner, G

    2003-11-01

    With the development of genetic maps and the identification of the most-likely positions of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on these maps, molecular markers for lodging resistance can be identified. Consequently, marker-assisted selection (MAS) has the potential to improve the efficiency of selection for lodging resistance in a breeding program. This study was conducted to identify genetic loci associated with lodging resistance, plant height and reaction to mycosphaerella blight in pea. A population consisting of 88 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was developed from a cross between Carneval and MP1401. The RILs were evaluated in 11 environments across the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, Canada in 1998, 1999 and 2000. One hundred and ninety two amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers, 13 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and one sequence tagged site (STS) marker were assigned to ten linkage groups (LGs) that covered 1,274 centi Morgans (cM) of the pea genome. Six of these LGs were aligned with the previous pea map. Two QTLs were identified for lodging resistance that collectively explained 58% of the total phenotypic variation in the mean environment. Three QTLs were identified each for plant height and resistance to mycosphaerella blight, which accounted for 65% and 36% of the total phenotypic variation, respectively, in the mean environment. These QTLs were relatively consistent across environments. The AFLP marker that was associated with the major locus for lodging resistance was converted into the sequence-characterized amplified-region (SCAR) marker. The presence or absence of the SCAR marker corresponded well with the lodging reaction of 50 commercial pea varieties.

  3. Responses of Pea (Pisum sativum Growth and Yield to Residual Effects of Organic and Urea Fertilizers from Previous Crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fallah

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Application of organic manure in organic farming and long-term mineralization may lead to residual effects on the succeeding crop. So, residual effects of combined cattle manure and urea fertilizer of previous crop (black cumin on growth and yield of pea were examined in a randomized complete block design. Treatments included of  cattle manure (CM, urea (U, three ratios of CM+U full dose application (2:1; 1:1; 1:2 and three ratios of CM+U split application (2:1; 1:1; 1:2, and unfertilized control to previous crop (black cumin in 2012. Pea planted without any fertilizer in 2013. There was no significant difference between control and residual of urea treatment for some parameters including dry matter in flowering stage, plant nitrogen and phosphorus concentration, plant height, yield components, grain yield and biological yield of pea. Biological and grain yields were greater under both residual of cattle manure treatment and integrated treatments compared to residual of urea treatment. The highest grain yield (4000 kg ha-1 was observed in residual of CM:U full dosed application treatment, to the extent that grain yield in this treatment indicated a 1.5-fold increase in comparison with residual of urea treatment. The highest biological yield (8325 kg ha-1 was obtained in residual of CM treatment, though it was not significant different from that of residual of CM:U (1:2 treatments. In general, although residual of urea fertilizer did not leave a notable effect on pea production, but production of this crop relying on residual of cattle manure deems effective to lowering of fertilization cost and ameliorating environmental contaminations.

  4. Effect Of Heavy Metals Stress On Enzyme Activities And Chlorophyll Content Of Pea (Pisum Sativum) And Tomato Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, B.M.; El Maghrabi, G.; Hashem, M.F.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of heavy metal stress on the chlorophyll in addition to catalase and peroxidase activities were studied in the leaves and roots of tomato and pea plants. Four groups were studied; the control group and other three groups treated with heavy metals. Group 1HM was treated with 1.0 mg CuSO 4 /l + 0.2 mg CdSO 4 /l + 0.1 mg ZnNO 3 /l every 10 days while in group 5 HM and group 10 HM, the doses were 5 and 10 folds the 1 HM, respectively. Leaves and roots of control and heavy metal-stressed plants were harvested after 10 weeks for chlorophyll determination. The chlorophyll content, especially chlo. b, was significantly decreased with the increase in heavy metals stress in both plants. In leaves of heavy metal-stressed plants, the peroxidase level in different stress levels was increased with increasing stress levels in tomato and pea while catalase was unchanged in leaves of tomato in comparison with the control. The activities of catalase and peroxidase in roots of heavy metal-stressed plants were increased in group 5 HM then decreased in case of group 10 HM. The increase in enzyme activities demonstrated that tomato is more tolerant to heavy metals than pea

  5. Accumulation of Phosphorus-Containing Compounds in Developing Seeds of Low-Phytate Pea (Pisum sativum L. Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun S.K. Shunmugam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Low phytic acid (lpa crops are low in phytic acid and high in inorganic phosphorus (Pi. In this study, two lpa pea genotypes, 1-150-81, 1-2347-144, and their progenitor CDC Bronco were grown in field trials for two years. The lpa genotypes were lower in IP6 and higher in Pi when compared to CDC Bronco. The total P concentration was similar in lpa genotypes and CDC Bronco throughout the seed development. The action of myo-inositol phosphate synthase (MIPS (EC 5.5.1.4 is the first and rate-limiting step in the phytic acid biosynthesis pathway. Aiming at understanding the genetic basis of the lpa mutation in the pea, a 1530 bp open reading frame of MIPS was amplified from CDC Bronco and the lpa genotypes. Sequencing results showed no difference in coding sequence in MIPS between CDC Bronco and lpa genotypes. Transcription levels of MIPS were relatively lower at 49 days after flowering (DAF than at 14 DAF for CDC Bronco and lpa lines. This study elucidated the rate and accumulation of phosphorus compounds in lpa genotypes. The data also demonstrated that mutation in MIPS was not responsible for the lpa trait in these pea lines.

  6. Antifungal genes expressed in transgenic pea (Pisum sativum L.) do not affect root colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlon, Jagroop Gill; Jacobsen, Hans-Jörg; Cahill, James F; Hall, Linda M

    2017-10-01

    Genetically modified crops have raised concerns about unintended consequences on non-target organisms including beneficial soil associates. Pea transformed with four antifungal genes 1-3 β glucanase, endochitinase, polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins, and stilbene synthase is currently under field-testing for efficacy against fungal diseases in Canada. Transgenes had lower expression in the roots than leaves in greenhouse experiment. To determine the impact of disease-tolerant pea or gene products on colonization by non-target arbuscular mycorrhizae and nodulation by rhizobium, a field trial was established. Transgene insertion, as single gene or stacked genes, did not alter root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus (AMF) or root nodulation by rhizobium inoculation in the field. We found no effect of transgenes on the plant growth and performance although, having a dual inoculant with both AMF and rhizobium yielded higher fresh weight shoot-to-root ratio in all the lines tested. This initial risk assessment of transgenic peas expressing antifungal genes showed no deleterious effect on non-target organisms.

  7. Response of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum l.) and pea (Pisum sativum l.) to salinity stress under changing climate conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Petraitytė, Skaistė

    2017-01-01

    Šio darbo tikslas buvo ištirti žieminio kviečio (Triticum aestivum cv. ʼAdaʼ) bei sėjamojo žirnio (Pisum sativum cv. ʼEarly onwardʼ) morfometrinių, fiziologinių ir biocheminių rodiklių atsaką į druskingumo stresą kintančio klimato sąlygomis bei įvertinti augalų atsparumą. Tiriamieji augalai buvo auginami fitokamerose, dabartinio ir atšilusio klimato sąlygomis bei veikiami skirtingo stiprumo druskingumo stresu. Dabartinio klimato sąlygos imituotos fitokameroje palaikant 21/14 OC temperatūrą be...

  8. Extruded pea (Pisum sativum as alternative to soybean protein for dairy cows feeding in organic Alpine farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaviana Gottardo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluated the use of extruded pea as an alternative to soybean in the protein feeding of dairy cattle raised in organic Alpine farms. The research was carried out in a commercial organic dairy farm located in the Province of Trento (Northern Italy and it considered two separate periods of cows’ lactation: early and late lactation. According to the traditional management practice of alpine dairy herds with the seasonal calving of the cows in early winter, the former period was carried out during the cold season when cows were housed indoors, while the latter period started after the transfer of the entire herd to an alpine pasture for the summer grazing. In both periods, 16 cows of Rendena breed were equally assigned to 2 experimental groups. The dietary forage (meadow hay in early lactation or pasture in late lactation was supplemented to one group of cows with a Control concentrate in which soybean expeller, sunflower expeller and wheat bran were the main protein feeds. Soybean proteins were replaced by extruded peas in the Soy-free concentrate given to the other group of cows. The daily amount of concentrate was adjusted to the individual milk yield on a weekly basis adopting ratios of 0.360 and 0.125 kg of DM per kg of milk in early and late lactation periods, respectively. Cows receiving Soy-free concentrate showed a higher milk yield than the Control cows in both lactation periods (18.7 vs 17.5 kg/d in early lactation and 9.3 vs 8.6 kg/d on pasture, respectively. Milk fat and protein were not affected by the diet at any stage of lactation, while a higher concentration of milk urea was observed in milk samples taken from Soy-free cows in both periods of the study. This result could have been promoted by the higher soluble fraction of extruded pea proteins in comparison to that of soybean expeller. Cows feeding behaviour was monitored only in the early lactation period and despite of the different amount of concentrate consumed by

  9. Effects of Manduca sexta allatostatin and an analog on the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and degradation by enzymes from the aphid gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Down, Rachel E; Matthews, H June; Audsley, Neil

    2010-03-01

    The C-type allatostatin, Manduca sexta allatostatin (Manse-AS) and the analog delta R(3)delta R(5)Manse-AS, where R residues were replaced by their d-isomers, were tested for oral toxicity against the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) by incorporation into an artificial diet. Both peptides had significant dose-dependent feeding suppression effects, resulting in mortality, reduced growth and fecundity compared with control insects. The delta R(3)delta R(5)Manse-AS analog had an estimated LC(50) of 0.18 microg/microl diet, and was more potent than Manse-AS. At a dose of 0.35 microg delta R(3)delta R(5)Manse-AS/microl diet, 98% of aphids were dead within 3 days, at a rate similar to those aphids that had been starved (no diet controls). On comparison, it required 13 days and three times the dose of Manse-AS fed to aphids to attain 96% mortality. It is possible that the feeding suppression effects of Manse-AS on aphids are due to the inhibition of gut motility. The estimated half-life of Manse-AS when incubated with a gut extract from A. pisum was 54 min. Degradation was most likely due to cathepsin L cysteine and/or trypsin-like proteases, by an unidentified glutamine-specific protease and by a carboxypeptidase-like enzyme. The d-isomers of R in the Manse-AS analog appeared to prevent hydrolysis by cathepsin L cysteine and trypsin-like enzymes, and enhance its half-life (145 min). However delta R(3)delta R(5)Manse-AS was cleaved by enzymes with carboxypeptidase-like and chymotrypsin-like activity. The increased stability of the Manse-AS analog may explain its enhanced feeding suppression effects when continually fed to aphids, and demonstrates the potential use of Manse-AS in a strategy to control aphid pests. (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Importance of fruit wall in seed yield of pea (Pisum Sativum L.) and mustard (Brassica campestris L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna-Chopra, R.; Sinha, S.K.

    1976-01-01

    Dry weight changes in fruit wall and seed during fruit development in the pea and mustard were suggestive of the importance of fruit wall during seed development. So the relative photosynthetic potential of leaves and reproductive parts in the above crops were studied. In addition, the translocation of current photosynthates to the developing seeds was also assessed when fruits and leaves were fed 14 CO 2 independently. Considerable amount of photosynthetic carboxylase activity was observed in the fruit wall of both pea and mustard on unit fresh weight, chlorophyll and organ basis. On unit chlorophyll basis fruit wall had several times more activity than leaves. Both fruit wall as well as leaves translocated current photosynthates to the developing fruits. In the early stages, translocation from the leaves was more efficient but in the later stages, more translocation occurred from the fruit wall as compared with the leaves. Above results are discussed in relation to the importance of reproductive organs in the developing seeds. (author)

  11. Evidence that the "waxy" protein of pea (Pisum sativum L.) is not the major starch-granule-bound starch synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A M

    1990-11-01

    The aim of this work was to identify the starch-granule-bound starch synthase of developing pea embryos. When starch-granule-bound proteins were solubilised by digestion of granules with α-amylase and fractionated on a Mono Q anion-exchange column, activity of starch synthase eluted as three peaks. The distribution of activity in fractions from the column coincided with that of a 77-kDa protein. An antibody to this protein inhibited starch-synthase activity both in solubilised, starch-granule-bound protein and on intact starch granules. Recoveries of activity through extraction, solubilisation and chromatography indicate that this protein is the major, if not the only, form of starch synthase on the starch granule. The major, 59-kDa protein of the pea starch granule is antigenically related to the product of thewaxy locus of potato, which has previously been identified as the starch-granule-bound starch synthase of the tuber. However, the distribution of the 59-kDa protein did not coincide with that of starch-synthase activity in fractions from the Mono Q column. An antibody to the 59-kDa protein did not inhibit starch-synthase activity. The results raise questions about the relationship between "waxy" proteins and starch-granule-bound starch synthases generally.

  12. Partner, Kristal and Dukat: A new generation of the Novi Sad spring protein pea (Pisum sativum cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailović Vojislav

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2007 and 2008, the trials of the Department of Variety Protection and Registration of the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Water Management of the Republic of Serbia were carried out on four locations, including three new Novi Sad spring pea line, L-536, L-537 and L-538, and the control cultivar Javor. In average, the grain yield of all three lines was higher in comparison to the control cultivar, with the highest average yield in Partner (2732 kg ha-1. All three cultivars have shown that in favourable years may give grain yields higher than 3500 kg ha-1. The crude protein content ranged from 278.3 g kg-1, in Javor, to 307.0 g kg-1, in Dukat. .

  13. Response of mitochondrial thioredoxin PsTrxo1, antioxidant enzymes, and respiration to salinity in pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camejo, Daymi; Ribas-Carbó, Miquel; Lázaro, Juan J.; Sevilla, Francisca; Jiménez, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria play an essential role in reactive oxygen species (ROS) signal transduction in plants. Redox regulation is an essential feature of mitochondrial function, with thioredoxin (Trx), involved in disulphide/dithiol interchange, playing a prominent role. To explore the participation of mitochondrial PsTrxo1, Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), peroxiredoxin (PsPrxII F), and alternative oxidase (AOX) under salt stress, their transcriptional and protein levels were analysed in pea plants growing under 150 mM NaCl for a short and a long period. The activities of mitochondrial Mn-SOD and Trx together with the in vivo activities of the alternative pathway (AP) and the cytochrome pathway (CP) were also determined, combined with the characterization of the plant physiological status as well as the mitochondrial oxidative indicators. The analysis of protein and mRNA levels and activities revealed the importance of the post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation of these proteins in the response to salt stress. Increases in AOX protein amount correlated with increases in AP capacity, whereas in vivo AP activity was maintained under salt stress. Similarly, Mn-SOD activity was also maintained. Under all the stress treatments, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and CP activity were decreased although the oxidative stress in leaves was only moderate. However, an increase in lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation was found in mitochondria isolated from leaves under the short-term salinity conditions. In addition, an increase in mitochondrial Trx activity was produced in response to the long-term NaCl treatment. The results support a role for PsTrxo1 as a component of the defence system induced by NaCl in pea mitochondria, providing the cell with a mechanism by which it can respond to changing environment protecting mitochondria from oxidative stress together with Mn-SOD, AOX, and PrxII F. PMID:21460385

  14. Gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence of pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants in response to ambient ozone at a rural site in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, I M; Basahi, J M; Hassan, I A

    2014-11-01

    Egyptian pea cultivars (Pisum sativum L. cultivars Little Marvel, Perfection and Victory) grown in open-top chambers were exposed to either charcoal-filtered (FA) or non-filtered air (NF) for five consecutive years (2009-2013) at a rural site in northern Egypt. Net photosynthetic rates (PN), stomatal conductance (gs), intercellular CO2 (Ci) and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured. Ozone (O3) was found to be the most prevalent pollutant common at the rural site and is suspected to be involved in the alteration of the physiological parameters measured in the present investigation. PN of different cultivars were found to respond similarly; decreases of 23, 29 and 39% were observed in the cultivars Perfection, Little Marvel and Victory, respectively (averaged over the five years) due to ambient O3. The maximum impairment in PN was recorded in the cultivar Victory (46%) in 2013 when the highest O3 levels were recorded (90 nL L(-1)). The average stomatal conductance decreased by 20 and 18% in the cultivars Little Marvel and Perfection, respectively, while the average stomatal conductance increased on average by 27% in the cultivar Victory. A significant correlation was found between PN and Ci, indicating the importance of non-stomatal limitations of photosynthesis, especially in the cultivar Victory. The PN vs. Ci curves were fitted to a non-rectangular hyperbolic model. The actual quantum yield (ΦPSII) and photochemical quenching coefficient (qP) were significantly decreased in the leaves of plants exposed to NF air. Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) was increased in all cultivars. Exposure to NF air caused reductions in chlorophyll (Chl a) of 19, 16 and 30% in the Little Marvel, Perfection and Victory cultivars, respectively. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Evaluation of damage caused by Bruchus pisorum L (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae on some parameters related to seed quality of pea forage cultivars (Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivelina Nikolova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It was evaluated the damage caused by Bruchus pisorum L (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae on the germination ability of pea farage varieties (Pisum sativum L.. Result of damage by Bruchus pisorum in seeds with parasitized larva was significant decrease of the germination by 16.4% percentage points, the length and weight of primary radicle by 16.8 and 24.5%, the length and weight of plumule by 12.3 and 14.1%, the vigor index of primary radicle and plumule by 32.5 and 32.8% as well as the germination index by 17.4%. The inhibitory effect was on average 17.8%. Essential significant changes in regard to the studied parameters were found for damaged seeds with bruchid emergence hole. In these seeds the gewrmination decrease by 58.3% percentage points, the length and weight of primary radicle by 34.1 and 36.2%, the length and weight of plumule by 31.8 and 34.3%, the vigor index of primary radicle and plumule by 81.1 and 82.1% as well as the germination index by 83.1%. The inhibitory effect was on average 58.3%. It was found that the damaged seeds with parasitoid emergence hole provided better possibility for growth and development of plants whereas the damaged seeds with bruchid emergence hole had significantly low germination, vigor and sowing characteristics. These seeds could not provide the establishment of well-garnished stand and stable yields. As tolerant to damage by Bruchus pisorum was distinguished Glyans variety for which the values of parameters related to germination and vigor of seeds were influenced in the lowest degree from the damage unlike the sensitive Pleven 4 variety. Dominant factor influencing germination ability of seeds for all analyzed parameters was the type of seeds compared to varietal appurtenance.

  16. EFFECT OF GAMMA RADIATION OF MACRO MUTATIONS, EFFECTIVENESS AND EFFICIENCY UNDER M2 GENERATION IN PEA (Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind KUMAR

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was undertaken to study the spectrum of macro mutants, effectiveness and efficiency of different doses of gamma rays in pea variety (Arkel. The seeds were treated with gamma rays viz., 00kR (dry control, 05kR, 10kR, 15kR, 20kR, 25kR, 30kR, 35kR, 40kR (dry seeds and presoaked seeds of the same was exposed to 00kR (wet control, 05kR, 10kR, 15kR, 20kR (kilo Roentgen biological damage was calculated in M1 and M2 generation based on lethality (L and pollen sterility. The irradiated seeds were sown in the M1 field their respective controls and harvested in bulk to raise the M2 generation in Randomized Block Design (RBD with three replications. The spectrum of macro mutants i.e., plant stature (tall, dwarf, small dwarf, maturity (early, late, pod shape (bold, long, short, seed colour (brown, light white, light green and seed shape (small, bold, wrinkled were observed in M2 generation. The usefulness of any mutagen in plant breeding depends not only on its effectiveness but also upon if efficiency. Mutagenic effectiveness is a measure of the frequency of mutations induced by unit mutagen dose, whereas mutagenic efficiency is measure of proportion of mutations in relation of undesirable changes like lethality and sterility are used for gamma rays. A result of the indicated positive relationship in M2 generation with macro mutation, effectiveness and efficiency was found to be highest at lowest doses.

  17. Variability, heritability and association of some morpho-agronomic traits in field pea (Pisum sativum L.) genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikreselassie, Million

    2012-04-15

    In order to best exploit the available genetic wealth in the crop, the information would have paramount important. Therefore, this study was conceived to examine the variability, heritabilities and determines the relative importance of primary and secondary traits as selection criteria to improve productivity. The field experiment was conducted at Haramaya University research field, Ethiopia during 2011 main cropping season. Twenty-five elite field pea genotypes along with two commercial varieties were arranged in randomized complete block design with three replications. The data were subjected to the analyses of variance using the SAS program software. The mean squares of the genotypes were highly significant for all of the characters. The genotypic coefficient of variation ranged from 11.19% for days to mature to 25.72% for number of seeds per plant. The estimated broad sense heritability ranged from 19.24% for stand count to 50.81% for days to flowering. Genetic gains that could be expected from selecting the top 5% of the genotypes varied from 11.45% for stand count to 33.08% for number of seeds per plant. The first five principal components accounted for more than 77% of the total variation. The first principal component accounted for about 43.75% of the variability due to Phenological traits. The materials were grouped into eight clusters based on Mahalanobis' D2 statistic. Seed yield per plant had significant associations with most of the traits. The path analysis at genotypic level revealed that harvest index and biomass yield contributed major positive direct effects on seed yield.

  18. Radiation genetic studies in garden pea. Part 2. Caffeine potentiation and chromosome damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, M.L.H.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of 1.5x10 -2 M caffeine post-treatments over the chromosome damage induced by 4kR X-ray 1.5x10 -2 M Maleic hydrazide (MH) and N-Nitroso-N-urethane (NMU) treatments in the root top cells of a normal and trigenic leaf mutant of Pisum sativum was studied. While MH and NMU produced S-dependent effects, X-rays induced non-delayed S-independent effects. These effects got potentiated by caffeine treatments. With MH, the potentiation occurred when the cells got exposed to caffeine during S-phase and with X-rays, it occurred when the irradiated cells are treated in G 2 or prophase stage. The caffeine potentiation of chromosome damage produced by MH was similar in the roots exposed to caffeine at 16 and 31degC but with NMU, the potentiation was lower at 31 than at 16degC. If the inhibitory effect of caffeine on gap filling process of the damaged DNA is the molecular mechanism responsible for caffeine potentiation of reproductive death it may be the mechanism responsible for the observed chromosome damage in MH treated cells exposed to caffeine during G 1 and S phase. But the X-irradiated cells are insensitive to caffeine at such phases. In these cells caffeine probably acts as an inhibitor of the photoreactivating enzymes for binding sites or with the substrate in the irradiated cells post-treated during G 2 and prophase. However, temperature independence of caffeine potentiation is not compatible with eithr of the above two views. Compared to the normal genotype, the trigenic mutant exhibited an increased chromosomal damage, but not the potentiation. Probably mutant genes reduce the resistance of a genome against mutagenic action, consequently enhance the suseptibility to chromosome damage. (author)

  19. Gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence of pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants in response to ambient ozone at a rural site in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, I.M.; Basahi, J.M. [Air Pollution Laboratory (APL), Centre of Excellence in Environmental Studies (CEES), King Abdulaziz University, P. O. Box 80216, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Hassan, I.A., E-mail: ihassan_eg@yahoo.com [Air Pollution Laboratory (APL), Centre of Excellence in Environmental Studies (CEES), King Abdulaziz University, P. O. Box 80216, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, 21526 El Shatby, Alexandria (Egypt)

    2014-11-01

    Egyptian pea cultivars (Pisum sativum L. cultivars Little Marvel, Perfection and Victory) grown in open-top chambers were exposed to either charcoal-filtered (FA) or non-filtered air (NF) for five consecutive years (2009–2013) at a rural site in northern Egypt. Net photosynthetic rates (P{sub N}), stomatal conductance (g{sub s}), intercellular CO{sub 2} (C{sub i}) and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured. Ozone (O{sub 3}) was found to be the most prevalent pollutant common at the rural site and is suspected to be involved in the alteration of the physiological parameters measured in the present investigation. P{sub N} of different cultivars were found to respond similarly; decreases of 23, 29 and 39% were observed in the cultivars Perfection, Little Marvel and Victory, respectively (averaged over the five years) due to ambient O{sub 3}. The maximum impairment in P{sub N} was recorded in the cultivar Victory (46%) in 2013 when the highest O{sub 3} levels were recorded (90 nL L{sup −1}). The average stomatal conductance decreased by 20 and 18% in the cultivars Little Marvel and Perfection, respectively, while the average stomatal conductance increased on average by 27% in the cultivar Victory. A significant correlation was found between P{sub N} and C{sub i}, indicating the importance of non-stomatal limitations of photosynthesis, especially in the cultivar Victory. The P{sub N} vs. Ci curves were fitted to a non-rectangular hyperbolic model. The actual quantum yield (Φ{sub PSII}) and photochemical quenching coefficient (qP) were significantly decreased in the leaves of plants exposed to NF air. Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) was increased in all cultivars. Exposure to NF air caused reductions in chlorophyll (Chl a) of 19, 16 and 30% in the Little Marvel, Perfection and Victory cultivars, respectively. - Highlights: • Ozone (O{sub 3}) concentrations recorded were within the ranges of phytotoxicity. • O{sub 3} has a clear influence on the physiological

  20. Raw Pea (Pisum sativum, raw Faba bean (Vicia faba var. minor and raw Lupin (Lupinus albus var. multitalia as alternative protein sources in broiler diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Piva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ban of the meat and bone meal for entering animal diets and the concern of transgenic feeds poses a challenge toanimal nutritionists in Europe. The challenge is to find homegrown protein-rich feedstuffs, making sure no antinutritionalfactors are present which could interfere in the animals’ performance. The raw Pea (Pisum sativum (RP, raw Fababean (Vicia faba, variety minor (RFb and raw Lupin (Lupinus albus, variety multitalia (RL were evaluated as alternativeprotein sources into broiler diets. Six hundred thirty 1d-old Ross male chicks, Marek vaccinated, were randomlyassigned to seven dietary treatments (5 pens per treatment/18 birds per pen. Chicks were floor housed, ad libitum fedisocaloric and isonitrogenous diets and had free access to water. Artificial light was provided 10 h/d. The bulk of the basediet (control diet was corn (48.7%, 56.6% and 57%, solvent-extracted soybean meal (42.8%, 37.3% and 33.4%, cornoil (4.4%, 5.2% and 6.3%, plus synthetic amino acids, minerals, trace minerals and vitamins, respectively for the 1-10d-old, 11-28d-old and 29 to 42d-old growing periods. The RP, RFb and RL entered diets in substitution of the soybeanand corn according to the cost optimization (P100, Fb100 and L100, respectively for RP, RFb and RL and at half of theoptimized quantity (RP50, RFb50 and RL50, respectively for RP, RFb and RL. The amount used as fed basis for the higherlevel of inclusion were: P100: 350 g/kg for all diets; Fb100: 480 g/kg (1-10d-old and 500 g/kg (11-42d-old; L100:360 g/kg (1-10d-old and 300 g/kg (11-42d-old. The average daily gain (ADG were lower (P compared to the control group. Over the whole period of growth, the RFb group had similar ADG compared to the controlgroup and for both levels of inclusion, whereas reduced (P (P growth. Birds performance was improved (P and breast and leg quarter cuts. The RFb and RL could represent valuable protein feeds in broilers diet formulation.

  1. Remote Sensing Study of the Influence of Different Herbicides on the Leaf Spectral Reflectance and Fluorescence of Pea Plants (Pisum sativum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezhova, Dora; Yanev, Tony; Iliev, Ilko; Alexieva, Vera; Tsaneva, Mariana

    The effective use of airborne and satellite-based remote sensor systems in resource management, agriculture, mineral exploration and environmental monitoring requires an understanding of the nature and limitations of the high-resolution remote sensing data and of various strategies for processing and interpreting it. In developing the necessary knowledge base, ground-based measurements are the expedient source of information. In this study, remote sensing techniques were applied in laboratory for detection of the influence of herbicides 2.4-D, glyphosate, fluridone and acifluorfen on the leaf spectral reflectance and fluorescence of pea plants (Pisum sativum L.). According to the classification of the Herbicide Resistance Action Committee with reference to their mode of action they belong to different groups: synthetic auxins - O (2.4-D), inhibition of EPSP synthase - G (glyphosate), photobleaching - F1 (fluridone), and inhibition of PPO - E (acifluorfen). During the last 40 years, these herbicides are among the ones used most widely in agriculture worldwide. The plants studied were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber in a nutritious medium to which every herbicide was added at two low concentrations (1 µM, 0.1 µM) with respect to the field dose applied in the agricultural practice. High-resolution spectral data for leaf spectral reflectance and fluorescence were collected from freshly detached leaves using three multichannel spectrometers. Spectral reflectance characteristics were obtained from the leaf reflectance referenced against a standard (white diffuse screen) in the visible and near infrared ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum (450÷850 nm). Fluorescence spectra were taken in the spectral range 650-850 nm. To assess the changes arising in leaf spectral reflectance under the herbicide action we developed and applied an analytical approach based on discriminant analysis and other statistical methods. The spectral characteristics were analyzed in

  2. Gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence of pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants in response to ambient ozone at a rural site in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, I.M.; Basahi, J.M.; Hassan, I.A.

    2014-01-01

    Egyptian pea cultivars (Pisum sativum L. cultivars Little Marvel, Perfection and Victory) grown in open-top chambers were exposed to either charcoal-filtered (FA) or non-filtered air (NF) for five consecutive years (2009–2013) at a rural site in northern Egypt. Net photosynthetic rates (P N ), stomatal conductance (g s ), intercellular CO 2 (C i ) and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured. Ozone (O 3 ) was found to be the most prevalent pollutant common at the rural site and is suspected to be involved in the alteration of the physiological parameters measured in the present investigation. P N of different cultivars were found to respond similarly; decreases of 23, 29 and 39% were observed in the cultivars Perfection, Little Marvel and Victory, respectively (averaged over the five years) due to ambient O 3 . The maximum impairment in P N was recorded in the cultivar Victory (46%) in 2013 when the highest O 3 levels were recorded (90 nL L −1 ). The average stomatal conductance decreased by 20 and 18% in the cultivars Little Marvel and Perfection, respectively, while the average stomatal conductance increased on average by 27% in the cultivar Victory. A significant correlation was found between P N and C i , indicating the importance of non-stomatal limitations of photosynthesis, especially in the cultivar Victory. The P N vs. Ci curves were fitted to a non-rectangular hyperbolic model. The actual quantum yield (Φ PSII ) and photochemical quenching coefficient (qP) were significantly decreased in the leaves of plants exposed to NF air. Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) was increased in all cultivars. Exposure to NF air caused reductions in chlorophyll (Chl a) of 19, 16 and 30% in the Little Marvel, Perfection and Victory cultivars, respectively. - Highlights: • Ozone (O 3 ) concentrations recorded were within the ranges of phytotoxicity. • O 3 has a clear influence on the physiological parameters. • O 3 decreased Photosynthetic rates, chlorophyll

  3. Pea seeds (Pisum sativum, faba beans (Vicia fabavar. minor and lupin seeds (Lupinus albus var. multitalia as protein sources in broiler diets: effect of extrusion on growth performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Piva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of extrusion of pea seeds (Pisum sativum (PS, faba bean (Vicia faba, variety minor (FB and lupin seeds (Lupinus albus, variety multitalia (LS on broiler performance were evaluated. Four hundred sixty two 1d-old Ross male chicks, Marek vaccinated, were randomly assigned to seven dietary treatments (3 pens per treatment/22 birds per pen. Chicks were floor housed, ad libitum fed isocaloric and isonitrogenous diets and had free access to water. Artificial light was provided 10 h/d. The bulk of the base diet (control diet was corn (48.8%, 53.7% and 57%, solvent-extracted soy- bean meal (42.8%, 37.3% and 33.4%, corn oil (4.4%, 5.2% and 6.3%, plus synthetic amino acids, minerals, trace minerals and vitamins, respectively for the 1-10d-old, 11-28d-old and 29 to 42d-old growing periods. The amounts of PS, FB and LS used on an as fed basis were: PS and extruded PS (EPS: 353 (1-10d-old, 356 (11-28d-old and 350 (29- 42d-old g/kg; FB and extruded FB (EFB: 479 (1-10d-old, 497 (11-28d-old and 500 (29-42d old g/kg; LS and extrud- ed LS (ELS: 360 (1-10d-old and 300 (11-42d-old g/kg. High levels of pea (350 g/kg and faba bean (500 g/kg did not show negative effects on body weight gain (BWG and bird feed intake compared to control. Lupin at the 300 g/kg level reduced (P< 0.05 the BWG during the finishing period (22 to 42 d, however the effect disappeared over the whole experimental period (1-42 d compared to the control group. The ELS group had a lower (P< 0.01 feed intake com- pared to the control group and to the LS group. The feed conversion rate (FCR was similar among groups for the whole experimental period; however during the grower period the FCR was higher (P< 0.05 for the PS, FB and EFB groups com- pared to the control group. Birds consuming the PS diet had a reduced (P< 0.05 eviscerated carcass yield compared to the control group. The breast meat percent yield was higher (P< 0.01 for birds consuming the FB and EFB diets compared to the control

  4. Effect of salinization, Rbizobium inoculation, genotypic variation and P-application on drymatter yield and utilization of P by pea (Pisum sativum L.) and lentil (Lens Culinaris Medic)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dravid, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    Irrigation with saline water significantly reduced the drymatter production and uptake of phosphorus in both pea and lentil crops. Between the two crops pea was found relativley more tolerant to a given level of salinity. Soil application of phosphate in association with rbizobium inoculated seeds enhanced drymatter production, total P uptake, P derived from fertilizer and its utilization in both the crops. Amongst the cultivars tested, KPSD-5 of pea and PL-639 of lentil extracted native soil phosphorus more efficiently while cultivar Pusa-10 of pea and cultivar PL-406 of lentil showed more affinity towards applied phosphorus. (author). 8 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Genetic variation in pea (Pisum sativum L.) demonstrates the importance of root but not shoot C/N ratios in the control of plant morphology and reveals a unique relationship between shoot length and nodulation intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludidi, Ndiko N; Pellny, Till K; Kiddle, Guy; Dutilleul, Christelle; Groten, Karin; VAN Heerden, Philippus D R; Dutt, Som; Powers, Stephen J; Römer, Peter; Foyer, Christine H

    2007-10-01

    Nodule numbers are regulated through systemic auto-regulatory signals produced by shoots and roots. The relative effects of shoot and root genotype on nodule numbers together with relationships to organ biomass, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) status, and related parameters were measured in pea (Pisum sativum) exploiting natural genetic variation in maturity and apparent nodulation intensity. Reciprocal grafting experiments between the early (Athos), intermediate (Phönix) and late (S00182) maturity phenotypes were performed and Pearson's correlation coefficients for the parameters were calculated. No significant correlations were found between shoot C/N ratios and plant morphology parameters, but the root C/N ratio showed a strong correlation with root fresh and dry weights as well as with shoot fresh weight with less significant interactions with leaf number. Hence, the root C/N ratio rather than shoot C/N had a predominant influence on plant morphology when pea plants are grown under conditions of symbiotic nitrogen supply. The only phenotypic characteristic that showed a statistically significant correlation with nodulation intensity was shoot length, which accounted for 68.5% of the variation. A strong linear relationship was demonstrated between shoot length and nodule numbers. Hence, pea nodule numbers are controlled by factors related to shoot extension, but not by shoot or root biomass accumulation, total C or total N. The relationship between shoot length and nodule numbers persisted under field conditions. These results suggest that stem height could be used as a breeding marker for the selection of pea cultivars with high nodule numbers and high seed N contents.

  6. Repetitive DNA in the pea (Pisum sativum L.) genome: comprehensive characterization using 454 sequencing and comparison to soybean and Medicago truncatula

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macas, Jiří; Neumann, Pavel; Navrátilová, Alice

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2007), s. 427 ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500960702; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : DNA * Pisum sativum L. Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.180, year: 2007

  7. Evaluación de nueve variedades de arveja (Pisum sativum L. para uso industrial, en la región de suba, Santafé de Bogotá Evaluation of 9 industrial pea varieties (Pisum sativum L. in Suba, Santafe de Bogotá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patiño O. William J.

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available En la localidad de Suba, Santafé de Bogotá, (Cundinamarca, se sembraron nueve variedades arbustivas de arveja (Pisum sativum L.: Aim, Alsweet, Flair, Kriter, Marifon, Payload, Pronto, Rondifon y Trend, a las cuales se les evaluaron algunas variables fenológicas y variables relacionadas con los componentes de rendimiento. Los materiales de mejor comportamiento fueron aquéllos de mayor precocidad y menor altura de planta (Payload, Marifon, Pronto y Rondifon, tendiendo a presentar mayor rendimiento. Las variables de mayor influencia sobre el rendimiento fueron: Número de granos por plantas y altura de planta.In Suba, Santafé de Bogotá, nine bush pea varieties (Pisum sativum L.: Aim, Alsweet, Flair, Kriter, Marifon, Payload, Pronto, Rondifon y Trend, were evaluated by number of days to flowering, to fructification and harvest, in addition to sorne yield components. The better varieties were more precocious and shorter (Payload, Marifon, Pronto, Rondifon also, their grain yield were high. The number of grain per plant and high of plant had the most influence over yield.

  8. Individual members of the light-harvesting complex II chlorophyll a/b-binding protein gene family in pea (Pisum sativum) show differential responses to ultraviolet-B radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackerness, A.H.S.; Liu, L.; Thomas, B.; Thompson, W.F.; Jordan, B.R.; White, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    In the present work, UV-B-repressible and UV-B-inducible genes were identified in the pea, Pisum sativum L., by rapid amplification of 3′ cDNA ends through use of the polymerase chain reaction. Of the UV-B-repressible clones, psUVRub and psUVDeh represent genes encoding Rubisco activase and dehydrin, respectively. A third clone, psUVZinc, did not correspond closely in overall nucleotide sequence to any gene registered in GenBank; however, a short deduced peptide shared similarity with the photosystem-II reaction center X protein of the chlorophyll a+c-containing alga, Odontella sinensis. The UV-B-inducible clones, psUVGluc, psUVAux and psUVRib, were related to genes encoding β-1, 3-glucanase, auxin-repressed protein, and a 40S ribosomal protein, respectively. The modulation of these pea genes indicates how UV-B, through its actions as a physical stressor, affects several important physiological processes in plants. (author)

  9. Relationship between proportion and composition of albumins, and in vitro protein digestibility of raw and cooked pea seeds (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sei Joon; Kim, Tae Wan; Baik, Byung-Kee

    2010-08-15

    Peas provide an excellent plant protein resource for human diets, but their proteins are less readily digestible than animal proteins. To identify the relationship between composition and in vitro digestibility of pea protein, eight pea varieties with a wide range of protein content (157.3-272.7 g kg(-1)) were determined for the proportion of albumins and globulins, their compositions using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and in vitro protein digestibility (IVPD) before and after heat treatment using a multi-enzyme (trypsin, chymotrypsin and peptidase) method. The proportion of albumins based on total seed protein content decreased from 229 to 147 g kg(-1) as seed protein content increased from 157.3 to 272.7 g kg(-1), while the proportion of globulins increased from 483 to 590 g kg(-1). The IVPDs of eight raw pea seeds were 79.9-83.5%, with significant varietal variations, and those were improved to 85.9-86.8% by cooking. Albumins, including (pea albumins 2) PA2, trypsin inhibitor, lectin and lipoxygenase, were identified as proteolytic resistant proteins. Globulins were mostly digested by protease treatment after heating. The quantitative ratio of albumins and globulins, and the quantitative variations of albumin protein components, including lipoxygenase, PA2, lectins and trypsin inhibitors, appear to influence the protein digestibility of both raw and cooked pea seeds. Copyright (c) 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Cloning and sequencing of a cDNA for the delta-subunit of photosynthetic ATP-synthase (EC 3.6.1.34) from pea (Pisum sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoesche, J A; Berzborn, R J

    1992-12-29

    lambda gt10 cDNA clones for the nuclear encoded subunit delta of chloroplast ATP-synthase from Pisum sativum have been isolated. The 5' end was completed by PCR. The sequenced cDNA codes for the import precursor. N-Terminal sequencing of the mature protein isolated from chloroplasts revealed that the processing sites of the transit peptide from Pisum sativum and Spinacea oleracea are similar. The overall homology of the deduced amino acid sequences of the mature delta proteins from higher plants is about 40%. The conservation among hydrophilic residues is higher than for hydrophobic ones, indicating that the surface of delta is important for its function within the ATP-synthase.

  11. Symbiotic effectiveness of pea-rhizobia associations and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    微软用户

    2011-05-02

    May 2, 2011 ... Interactions between pea (Pisum sativa L.) cultivars and Rhizobium strain affect the symbiotic relationship and ultimately both the nitrogen fixing capacity and the yield. Since Pisum sativum L. is poorly nodulated in the Loess Plateau of China where this crop is grown, the response of pea cultivars. Yannong ...

  12. Impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculants on subsequent arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonization in pot-cultured field pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hongyan; Germida, James J; Walley, Fran L

    2013-01-01

    The use of commercial inoculants containing non-resident arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) is an emerging technology in field crop production in Canada. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of AMF inoculants containing either a single species (Glomus irregulare) or mixed species (G. irregulare, Glomus mosseae, and Glomus clarum) on AMF root colonization and consequent plant growth parameters of field pea grown using pot cultures. Field pea was grown in both sterilized and non-sterile (i.e., natural) field-collected soil containing resident AMF and received three inoculation treatments: uninoculated control, G. irregulare only, and a mixture of AMF species of G. irregulare, G. mosseae, and G. clarum. After 42 days, the AMF community assembled in field pea roots was assessed by cloning and sequencing analysis on the LSU-ITS-SSU rDNA gene, together with a microscopic assessment of colonization, biomass production, nutrient uptake, and N(2) fixation. The identity of AMF inoculants had a significant effect on field pea performance. The mixed species AMF inoculant performed better than the single species G. irregulare alone by promoting mycorrhizal colonization, field pea biomass, N and P uptake, and N(2) fixation and did not result in a significant compositional change of the AMF community that subsequently assembled in field pea roots. In contrast, the single species G. irregulare inoculant did not significantly enhance field pea biomass, N and P uptake, and N(2) fixation, although a significant compositional change of the subsequent AMF community was observed. No significant interactions affecting these measurements were detected between the resident AMF and the introduced AMF inoculants. The observation that the mixed species AMF inoculant promoted plant growth parameters without necessarily affecting the subsequent AMF community may have important implications regarding the use of non-resident AMF inoculants in agricultural production.

  13. Radiosensitivity study in the germination and growth of the pea Pisum sativum L, with seeds exposed to gamma radiation; Estudio de radiosensibilidad en la germinacion y crecimiento de la arveja Pisum sativum L, con semillas expuestas a radiacion gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilguan, J.; Carrasco, J.; Marquez, V., E-mail: ilguanjanneth@gmail.com [Escuela Superior Politecnica de Chimborazo, Facultad de Ciencias, Panamericana Sur Km 1 1/2, ECO60155 Riobamba (Ecuador)

    2016-10-15

    Seeds of Pisum sativum L. were irradiated in a {sup 60}Co irradiator belonging to the Subsecretaria de Control y Aplicaciones Nucleares del Ecuador (SCAN), the dose rate at the irradiation time was 4.86 Gy/min. The seeds were grouped in packs of 100 units and exposed at doses of 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, 140, 160, 180 and 200 Gy. The number of effective germinations, the days for germination, the main stem thickness, the number of branches and the size of the plant were evaluated. To validate the experimentation, the data were analyzed statistically by tests of homogeneity of variances, way ANOVA and Scheffe analysis to each variable. The number of effective germinations was given to 100% for 20 and 40 Gy then decreases to a higher dose reaching 20% to 200 Gy, being the average of the proof near to 90%. Increased germination stimulation at treatment at 20 Gy with an average of 5.0 days was evidenced. Treatment at doses of 20, 40 and 60 Gy generate a plant size greater than the proof whose mean is 68.30 cm. The mean number of branches of the proof is 5.3 with a standard deviation of 0.675, which is greater at doses of 20 and 40 Gy. In the study, is concluded that better results are obtained when irradiating seeds Pisum sativum L, between 20 and 60 Gy. (Author)

  14. Effects of Nitrogen and Different Intercropping Arrangements of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. and Pea (Pisum sativum L. on Forage Yield and Competitive Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nakhzari Moghaddam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Intercropping, the agricultural practice of cultivating two or more crops in the same space at the same time, is an old and commonly used cropping practice which aims to match efficiently crop demands to the available growth resources (Agegnehu et al., 2006; Dhima et al., 2007. Intercropping of chickpea with linseed reduced the chickpea yield by 60.3%, although linseed occupied only 33% of the total area. The loss of chickpea yield was compensated by the additional yield of linseed, and thus the system productivity of chickpea + linseed intercropping was increased by 43.4% compared with sole chickpea (Ahlawat & Gangaiah, 2010. The objectives of the present study were to study the competition indices of barley and pea intercropping and effects of nitrogen and different intercropping arrangements on forage yield. Materials and methods In order to evaluate effects of nitrogen and different intercropping arrangements of barley and pea on yield and competitive indices, an experiment was conducted as factorial based on Randomized Complete Block Design with three replications on farm research on Gonbad Kavous University (37°26’N, 55°21’E, and 45m above sea level in 2011-2012. Different intercropping arrangement levels were a sole crop of barley, intercropping of one line barley and one line pea, intercropping of two lines of barley and two lines of pea, intercropping of three lines of barley and three lines of pea and sole crop of pea and nitrogen consumption was in four levels of none application of nitrogen and application of 25, 50 and 75 kg.ha-1. Seed planting was done during the first week of December 2011. Sowing was performed manually by planting twice more seeds of pea than the expected plant density. Sole barley (cv. Sahra planted at the rate of 160 kg.ha-1 and sole pea (cv. Sungro planted at the rate of 500000 plants.ha-1. Row spacing was 20 cm. The experimental plots for a sole crop of barley, a sole crop of pea and one

  15. DETERMINATION OF FLAVONOIDS CONTENT IN COLOURED PEAS (PISUM SATIVUM L. IN RELATION TO CULTIVAR’S DEPENDENCE AND STORAGE DURATION UNDER NATURAL CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Vollmannová

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available  Our attention is being given especially to four representative flavonoids: kaempherol, apigenin, genistein and daidzein. These flavonoids were studied in the seeds of colored varieties of dry pea. Isocratic HPLC analysis with DAD detection after acid hydrolysis of samples was performed. The differences of flavonoid contents in individual pea varieties were not significant. The determined values of  flavonoids in green peas were: daidzein 1,746-2,688 mg.kg-1, genistein  0,412-0,706 mg.kg-1, kaempherol 0,621-1,484 mg.kg-1, apigenin 0,261-0,479 mg.kg-1. Yellow varieties of pea contained between 0,375-0,779 mg.kg-1 daidzein, 0,115-0,158 mg.kg-1 genistein, kaempherol 0,742-1,314 mg.kg-1, apigenin  0,462-0,698 mg.kg-1. Also the changes in content of chosen flavonoids in pea in the dependence on variety in dried legumes stored under natural conditions were surveyed. From the results it came out that in interval 7 month the content of all observed flavonoids declined in dry material (in some cases even to non-detectable levels.  doi:10.5219/70 

  16. Digestive stability, micellarization, and uptake by Caco-2 human intestinal cell of chlorophyll derivatives from different preparations of pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-Guerrero, Lourdes; Gandul-Rojas, Beatriz; Mínguez-Mosquera, M Isabel

    2008-09-24

    The digestive stability, efficiency of micellarization, and cellular accumulation of the chlorophyll pigments of different preparations of pea were investigated, using an in vitro digestion procedure coupled with human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Fresh pea (FP), cooked fresh pea (CFP), frozen pea (FZP), cooked frozen pea (CFZP), and canned pea (CP) were subjected to simulated digestion. Although after digestion the pigment profile was modified for all samples, except CP, allomerization reactions and greater destruction of chlorophylls were observed in only FP, which should be due to enzymes in FP that were denaturalized in the rest of the test foods. A pigment extract of CFZP was also subjected to in vitro digestion, showing a positive effect of the food matrix on the pigment digestive stability. The transfer of the chlorophyll pigments from the digesta to the micellar fraction was significantly more efficient in CFZP (57%, p 0.05) different between CFP, FZP, and CP (28-35%), and lowest in FP (20%). Pheophorbide a stood out as the most-micellarized chlorophyll derivative in all of the samples, reaching levels of up to 98%. Incubation of Caco-2 cells with micellar fractions at the same concentration prepared from each test food showed that pigment absorption was considerably lower ( p < 0.006) in cells incubated with FP, whereas there were no differences among the rest of the preparations. Therefore, factors associated with the food matrix could inhibit or mediate the chlorophyll pigment absorption. These results demonstrated that the industrial preservation processes of peafreezing and canningas well as the cooking have a positive effect on the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of the chlorophyll pigments with respect to the FP sample, emphasizing CFZP with greater bioaccesibilty degree.

  17. Roots of symptom-free leguminous cover crop and living mulch species harbor diverse Fusarium communities that show highly variable aggressiveness on pea (Pisum sativum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baćanović-Šišić, Jelena; Karlovsky, Petr; Wittwer, Raphaël; Walder, Florian; Campiglia, Enio; Radicetti, Emanuele; Friberg, Hanna; Baresel, Jörg Peter; Finckh, Maria R.

    2018-01-01

    Leguminous cover crop and living mulch species show not only great potential for providing multiple beneficial services to agro-ecosystems, but may also present pathological risks for other crops in rotations through shared pathogens, especially those of the genus Fusarium. Disease severity on roots of subterranean clover, white clover, winter and summer vetch grown as cover crop and living mulch species across five European sites as well as the frequency, distribution and aggressiveness to pea of Fusarium spp. recovered from the roots were assessed in 2013 and 2014. Disease symptoms were very low at all sites. Nevertheless, out of 1480 asymptomatic roots, 670 isolates of 14 Fusarium spp. were recovered. The most frequently isolated species in both years from all hosts were F. oxysporum and F. avenaceum accounting for 69% of total isolation percentage. They were common at the Swiss, Italian and German sites, whereas at the Swedish site F. oxysporum dominated and F. avenaceum occurred only rarely. The agressiveness and effect on pea biomass were tested in greenhouse assays for 72 isolates of six Fusarium species. Isolates of F. avenaceum caused severe root rot symptoms with mean severity index (DI) of 82 and 74% mean biomass reduction compared to the non-inoculated control. Fusarium oxysporum and F. solani isolates were higly variable in agressiveness and their impact on pea biomass. DI varied between 15 and 50 and biomass changes relative to the non-inoculated control -40% to +10%. Isolates of F. tricinctum, F. acuminatum and F. equiseti were non to weakly agressive often enhancing pea biomass. This study shows that some of the major pea pathogens are characterized by high ecological plasticity and have the ability to endophytically colonize the hosts studied that thus may serve as inoculum reservoir for susceptible main legume grain crops such as pea. PMID:29444142

  18. Roots of symptom-free leguminous cover crop and living mulch species harbor diverse Fusarium communities that show highly variable aggressiveness on pea (Pisum sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šišić, Adnan; Baćanović-Šišić, Jelena; Karlovsky, Petr; Wittwer, Raphaël; Walder, Florian; Campiglia, Enio; Radicetti, Emanuele; Friberg, Hanna; Baresel, Jörg Peter; Finckh, Maria R

    2018-01-01

    Leguminous cover crop and living mulch species show not only great potential for providing multiple beneficial services to agro-ecosystems, but may also present pathological risks for other crops in rotations through shared pathogens, especially those of the genus Fusarium. Disease severity on roots of subterranean clover, white clover, winter and summer vetch grown as cover crop and living mulch species across five European sites as well as the frequency, distribution and aggressiveness to pea of Fusarium spp. recovered from the roots were assessed in 2013 and 2014. Disease symptoms were very low at all sites. Nevertheless, out of 1480 asymptomatic roots, 670 isolates of 14 Fusarium spp. were recovered. The most frequently isolated species in both years from all hosts were F. oxysporum and F. avenaceum accounting for 69% of total isolation percentage. They were common at the Swiss, Italian and German sites, whereas at the Swedish site F. oxysporum dominated and F. avenaceum occurred only rarely. The agressiveness and effect on pea biomass were tested in greenhouse assays for 72 isolates of six Fusarium species. Isolates of F. avenaceum caused severe root rot symptoms with mean severity index (DI) of 82 and 74% mean biomass reduction compared to the non-inoculated control. Fusarium oxysporum and F. solani isolates were higly variable in agressiveness and their impact on pea biomass. DI varied between 15 and 50 and biomass changes relative to the non-inoculated control -40% to +10%. Isolates of F. tricinctum, F. acuminatum and F. equiseti were non to weakly agressive often enhancing pea biomass. This study shows that some of the major pea pathogens are characterized by high ecological plasticity and have the ability to endophytically colonize the hosts studied that thus may serve as inoculum reservoir for susceptible main legume grain crops such as pea.

  19. Effects of biological insecticides NeemAzal T/S and Pyrethrum FS EC and their interaction with organic products in treatments of pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris (Hemiptera: Aphididae on Pisum sativum (L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivelina Nikolova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy and effects of two biological insecticides, NeemAzal T/S® and Pyrethrum FS EC, applied individually and in combination with Polyversum (a biological growth regulator and fungicide and Biofa (an organic foliar fertilizer, in controlling Acyrthosyphon pisum population density were studied. Nurelle D (a synthetic insecticide, applied alone and in combination with Flordimex 420 (a synthetic growth regulator, was used as a standard. The products were applied once (at budding stage or twice (at budding and flowering stages. Twenty-four variants were studied. The interaction of Pyrethrum with Biofa was the most efficient variant of the biological products, causing a reduction in aphid density that reached 48.2% after double treatment, while Pyrethrum+Polyversum (42.5% was the second most successful treatment. The combination of Pyrethrum with Biofa achieved the highest efficacy and synergism and their efficacy approached that of the synthetic insecticide.

  20. Accumulation of defence-related transcripts and cloning of a chitinase mRNA from pea leaves (Pisum sativum L.) inoculated with Ascochyta pisi Lib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vad, Knud; de Neergaard, Eigil; Madriz-Ordeñana, Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    ) and an enzyme of phytoalexin biosynthesis (chalcone synthase) were shown to accumulate more rapidly during the hypersensitive response than during lesion development in the compatible interaction. A full-length (1143 bp) cDNA sequence of a pea chitinase (EC 3.2.1.14) (coding for an approx. 34 500 Da protein...

  1. The mycorrhizal fungus (¤Glomus intraradices¤) affects microbial activity in the rhizosphere of pea plants (¤Pisum sativum¤)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wamberg, C.; Christensen, S.; Jakobsen, I.

    2003-01-01

    Pea plants were grown in gamma-irradiated soil in pots with and without addition of the AM fungus Glomus intraradices at sufficient N and limiting P. Depending on the growth phase of the plant presence of AM had negative or positive effect on rhizosphere activity. Before flowering during nutrient...

  2. Proteomics offers insight to the mechanism behind Pisum sativum L. response to pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černá, H.; Černý, M.; Habanová, H.; Šafářová, D.; Abushamsiya, K.; Navrátil, M.; Brzobohatý, Břetislav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 153, FEB2017 (2017), s. 78-88 ISSN 1874-3919 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Proteome * Pea seed-borne mosaic virus PSbMV * Potyvirus Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 3.914, year: 2016

  3. Genetic diversity and trait genomic prediction in a pea diversity panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstin, Judith; Salloignon, Pauline; Chabert-Martinello, Marianne; Magnin-Robert, Jean-Bernard; Siol, Mathieu; Jacquin, Françoise; Chauveau, Aurélie; Pont, Caroline; Aubert, Grégoire; Delaitre, Catherine; Truntzer, Caroline; Duc, Gérard

    2015-02-21

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.), a major pulse crop grown for its protein-rich seeds, is an important component of agroecological cropping systems in diverse regions of the world. New breeding challenges imposed by global climate change and new regulations urge pea breeders to undertake more efficient methods of selection and better take advantage of the large genetic diversity present in the Pisum sativum genepool. Diversity studies conducted so far in pea used Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) and Retrotransposon Based Insertion Polymorphism (RBIP) markers. Recently, SNP marker panels have been developed that will be useful for genetic diversity assessment and marker-assisted selection. A collection of diverse pea accessions, including landraces and cultivars of garden, field or fodder peas as well as wild peas was characterised at the molecular level using newly developed SNP markers, as well as SSR markers and RBIP markers. The three types of markers were used to describe the structure of the collection and revealed different pictures of the genetic diversity among the collection. SSR showed the fastest rate of evolution and RBIP the slowest rate of evolution, pointing to their contrasted mode of evolution. SNP markers were then used to predict phenotypes -the date of flowering (BegFlo), the number of seeds per plant (Nseed) and thousand seed weight (TSW)- that were recorded for the collection. Different statistical methods were tested including the LASSO (Least Absolute Shrinkage ans Selection Operator), PLS (Partial Least Squares), SPLS (Sparse Partial Least Squares), Bayes A, Bayes B and GBLUP (Genomic Best Linear Unbiased Prediction) methods and the structure of the collection was taken into account in the prediction. Despite a limited number of 331 markers used for prediction, TSW was reliably predicted. The development of marker assisted selection has not reached its full potential in pea until now. This paper shows that the high-throughput SNP arrays that are being

  4. The Influence of Soil Cultivation and Fertilization on the Yield and Protein Content in Seeds of Common PEA (Pisum Sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanáčková Eva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to assess the effect of different soil tillage in the interaction with fertilization and the use of post-harvest residues on yield and protein content in pea seeds, variety Dunaj. The field experiment was established in years 2009–2011 on Experimental Base of the Slovak University of Agriculture in Dolná Malanta. There were evaluated based upon three soil tillage methods (B1 – conventional tillage, B2 – reduced tillage, B3 – minimal tillage and three treatments of fertilization (0 – unfertilized control, MF – balance fertilization by mineral fertilizers based on soil analysis and planned pea yield (3 t/ha, PHR – balance fertilization by mineral fertilizers + incorporation of post-harvest residues. Significantly higher seed yield was achieved at reduced tillage (3.28 t/ha than conventional (3.12 t/ha and minimized tillage (3.08 t/ha; however, most significantly, higher protein content in average of treatments was determined in conventional tillage (23.38%. Most significantly, negative linear correlation (r = −0.948⊕⊕⊕ was determined between the yield and crude protein content in pea seeds. Fertilized treatments reached highly significant higher yields of common pea than unfertilized control. Compared with the control, average yield was higher by 10.3% – 15.1%. Significantly higher crude protein contents by 0.86% (PHR and 1.27% (MF were reached on unfertilized treatments than on fertilized one. The highest content of crude protein (24.14% and the highest production of it per hectare (759 kg/ha were determined in treatment with post harvest residues ploughed into soil. Over an average of 3 years, the highest profit (163.87 €/ha and return (30.7% was achieved from the pea grown using fertilizing treatments (FM and PHR at minimal soil tillage and systematic use of mineral fertilizers.

  5. Influence of gibberellic acid on the growth and flowering initiation of two types of peas (Pisum sativum L. differing in photoperiod response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Łukasik

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It was found that GA3 (0.03 mg per one plant caused significant delay of the flowering of two different genotypes of peas under conditions of an increasing natural day length (March - May. It was expressed both in a greater number of vegetative nodes and in a greater number of days to the first flower. Under conditions of a decreasing day length (August - November most of G type plants treated with GA3 reacted with complete inhibition of the flowering. In K type pea, GA3 treatment in the discussed conditions affected only the number of days from the sowing time to the appearence of the first flower. This stage was greater in treated plants in comparison with the control ones.

  6. Spatial variation of N-2-fixation in field pea (Pisum sativum L.) at the field scale determined by the N-15 natural abundance method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Holdensen, Lars; Wulfsohn, D.

    2010-01-01

    variability could be explained by the variability in selected abiotic soil properties. All measured soil variables showed substantial variability across the field and the pea dry matter production ranged between 4.9 and 13.8 Mg ha−1 at maturity. The percent of total N derived from the atmosphere (%Ndfa...... pea dry matter production and humus content, potassium content (collinear with humus) and total N in the 0–25 cm topsoil. No correlation was found between any individual soil property and %Ndfa or kg N fixed ha−1. It was not possible to create a satisfactory global multi-regression model for the field...... dry matter production and N2-fixation. A number of other models were tested, but the best was only able to explain less than 40% of the variance in %Ndfa using seven soil properties. Together with the use of interpolated soil data, high spatial variation of soil 15N natural abundance, a mean increase...

  7. Response Of Pea Pisum Sativum L. To Organic And Inorganic N-Fertilization With Or Without Benzofurantriol Using 15N Stable Isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Sherbieny, A.A.E.; Dahdouh, S.M.; Soliman, S.M.; Ahmed, A.F.

    2012-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted on sandy soil at Inshas, Sharkia Governorate-Egypt under drip irrigation system for evaluating the response of pea crop to different combination of organic and inorganic fertilizer with or without bio-fertilizers. The results indicated that organic compost added solely or in combination with mineral fertilizer was useful as increased growth parameter (fresh weight) of pea plant this effect was more pronounced when combined with bio-fertilizers. N-uptake in hay under Rhizobium bio-fertilization caused marked increased under all condition of N-fertilization or no N-fertilization. Also, the results showed that nitrogen derived from fertilizer (Ndff) in hay was the highest with application of 100% mineral fertilizer without using bio-fertilizer

  8. Comparing effects of low levels of herbicides on greenhouse- and field-grown potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), soybeans (Glycine max L.), and peas (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleeger, Thomas; Olszyk, David; Lee, E Henry; Plocher, Milton

    2011-02-01

    Although laboratory toxicology tests are generally easy to perform, cost effective, and readily interpreted, they have been questioned for their environmental relevance. In contrast, field tests are considered realistic while producing results that are difficult to interpret and expensive to obtain. Toxicology tests were conducted on potatoes, peas, and soybeans grown in a native soil in pots in the greenhouse and were compared to plants grown outside under natural environmental conditions to determine toxicological differences between environments, whether different plant developmental stages were more sensitive to herbicides, and whether these species were good candidates for plant reproductive tests. The reproductive and vegetative endpoints of the greenhouse plants and field-grown plants were also compared. The herbicides bromoxynil, glyphosate, MCPA ([4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy] acetic acid), and sulfometuron-methyl were applied at below field application rates to potato plants at two developmental stages. Peas and soybeans were exposed to sulfometuron-methyl at similar rates at three developmental stages. The effective herbicide concentrations producing a 25% reduction in a given measure differed between experimental conditions but were generally within a single order of magnitude within a species, even though there were differences in plant morphology. This study demonstrated that potatoes, peas, and soybeans grown in pots in a greenhouse produce phytotoxicity results similar to those grown outside in pots; that reproductive endpoints in many cases were more sensitive than vegetative ones; and that potato and pea plants are reasonable candidates for asexual and sexual reproductive phytotoxicity tests, respectively. Plants grown in pots in a greenhouse and outside varied little in toxicity. However, extrapolating those toxicity results to native plant communities in the field is basically unknown and in need of research. © 2010 SETAC.

  9. The value of different vegetative indices (NDVI, GAI for the assessment of yield potential of pea (Pisum sativum L. at different growth stages and under varying management practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Klimek-Kopyra

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This research evaluated the NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index and GAI (green area index in order to indicate the productivity and developmental effects of Rhizobium inoculants and microelement foliar fertilizer on pea crops. Two inoculants, Nitragina (a commercial inoculant and IUNG (a noncommercial inoculant gel and a foliar fertilizer (Photrel were studied over a 4-year period, 2009–2012. The cultivars chosen for the studies were characterized by different foliage types, namely a semileafless pea ‘Tarchalska’ and one with regular foliage, ‘Klif’. Foliar fertilizer significantly increased the length of the generative shoots and the number of fruiting nodes in comparison to the control, which in turn had a negative impact on the harvest index. Pea seed yield was highly dependent on the interaction between the years of growth and the microbial inoculant, and was greater for ‘Tarchalska’ (4.33 t ha−1. Presowing inoculation of seeds and foliar fertilization resulted in a significantly higher value of GAI at the flowering (3.91 and 3.81, respectively and maturity stages (4.82 and 4.77, respectively, whereas the value of NDVI was higher for these treatments only at the maturity stage (0.67 and 0.79, respectively. A significantly greater yield (5.0–5.4 t ha−1 was obtained after inoculation with IUNG during the dry years.

  10. Development and production response of edible and forage varieties of pea (Pisum sativum L. to temporary soil drought under different levels of phosphorus application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Klimek-Kopyra

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The change in weather conditions in Central Europe has led to the need to review current standards for fertilization of pulse crops. Physiologists claim that phosphorus may play a significant role in raising tolerance to a temporary lack of water in the soil. The objective of the 2-year field study (2011–2012 was to assess the effect of phosphorus application on characteristics of the aerial and underground plant parts of different varieties of pea and elements of their yield structure. The study showed that a higher phosphorus application rate led to significant intensification of photosynthesis and thus to more rapid vegetative development in the plants, manifested as a greater number of leaves and greater leaf area. The higher rate of phosphorus application significantly influenced the flowering process of pea during soil drought. The number of flowering nodes increased significantly as phosphorus application increased. The plants fertilized with the higher level of phosphorus produced a greater weight of root nodules with more Rhizobium bacterial colonies. Increased phosphorus fertilization had a significant role during the year of permanent semi-drought, 2012, resulting in a significantly greater number and weight of pods as well as a greater number and weight of seeds per plant, and thus a larger final yield.

  11. faba bean and field pea seed proportion for intercropping system

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Intercropping of Faba bean (Vicia fabae) and field pea (Pisum sativum) is an important cropping system in the. Horro highlands of ... productivity of the Faba bean/field pea was obtained from intercropping system. Growing Faba bean both as a .... as per the available research recommendation for. Faba bean and field pea ...

  12. Adaptation of Pea to contrasted French regions : simulation of pea varieties with the AZODYN-Pea crop

    OpenAIRE

    Benezit, Maud; Larmure, Annabelle; Munier-Jolain, Nathalie; Jeuffroy, Marie-Helene

    2016-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is a particularly sensitive crop regarding abiotic stress throughout its cycle (Schneider and Huyghe 2015). Climate change results in the increase of the unpredictability of both the frequency and the intensity of these stresses (Stocker et al. 2013). To avoid abiotic stress, breeders have been developing, for the last fifteen years, winter pea varieties sown during autumn, more resistant to frost with an earlier flowering date than spring pea, as well as varieties call...

  13. Viabilidade técnica e econômica da produção de ervilha (Pisum sativum L. cultivada sob diferentes lâminas de irrigação Technical and economical feasibility of pea (Pisum sativum L. production cultivated under different irrigation depth levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo C. Oliveira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se, com o presente trabalho, uma avaliação técnica e econômica da produção de ervilha (Pisum satiums L. em função de lâminas de irrigação. O experimento foi instalado em casa de vegetação, com delineamento inteiramente casualizado (DIC, com cinco tratamentos de reposição de água no solo (50; 75; 100; 125 e 150% da capacidade de campo e quatro repetições. O momento de irrigar foi definido quando a tensão média da água no solo, obtida nos tensiômetros instalados na parcela com 100% de reposição de água, atingiu 15 kPa. Concluiu-se que a produção da cultura e o número de vagens por planta foram afetados pelo déficit e pelo excesso hídrico aplicados pelos tratamentos. A máxima produtividade obtida foi igual a 4.197 kg ha-1 com a aplicação de 188,4 mm de água, e a lâmina ótima econômica foi estimada em 187,4 mm; a eficiência no uso da água máxima foi de 27,23 kg ha¹ mm-1, para uma lâmina de 86,25 mm.This work had the aim to verify the technical and economic feasibility of pea (Pisum satiums L. yield under different irrigation depth levels, cultivated in greenhouse. It was used a completely randomized design (CRD, with five levels of replacement of water irrigation (50%, 75%, 100%, 125% and 150% of field capacity with four replications. The crop was drip irrigated when the average soil water tension obtained from the tensiometers installed in the treatment of 100% was equivalent to 15 kPa. The results were affected by drought and water excess for total production of the plant and for number of beans for plant. The maximum productivity obtained was equal to 4,197 kg ha-1 for a water depth of 188.4 mm and the economic great irrigation depth was 187.4 mm; the greatest water use efficiency was 27.23 kg ha¹ mm-1 for a water depth of 86.25 mm.

  14. Sustainable control of pea bacterial blight : approaches for durable genetic resistance and biocontrol by endophytic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elvira-Recuenco, M.

    2000-01-01

    Key-words: bacterial blight, biological control, biodiversity, endophytic bacteria, L-form, pea, PDRl retrotransposon, Pisum sativum, Pisum abyssinicum, Pseudomonas syringae pv. pisi, race specific resistance, race non-specific resistance, Spanish landraces.

    Pea bacterial blight

  15. Generation of pea mutants for resistance to Ascochyta blight and powdery mildew and their characterization using isozyme markers [Pisum sativum L.; India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.; Kant, A.; Kaushal, R.P.

    2004-01-01

    To induce resistance in pea against Ascochyta blight and powdery mildew through mutagenesis, two locally grown cultivars Lincoln and Palam Priya were subjected to three doses each of gamma rays (10, 15 and 20 kR) and chemical mutagen ethylmethane sulfonate (0.1, 0.2 and 0.3%). Reduced germination was observed in response to mutagen treatment in both cultivars. Phenotypic changes were observed in M1 and M2 generations of both the cultivars. In M2 generation twenty-seven mutants of Lincoln and sixteen of Palam Priya were found resistant to Ascochyta blight under natural epiphytotic conditions. High level of resistance in M2 generation against powdery mildew could not be achieved. Plant progenies in the M3 generation were also evaluated for resistance to Ascochyta pinodes as well as Erysiphe pisi through detached leaf technique. Six mutants of Lincoln and only one of Palam Priya were found resistant to A. pinodes. One mutant of Palam Priya (P15-3) showed resistance to both the pathogens. Increased phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity was observed in all the resistant mutants. New isoforms of peroxidase could be detected in the mutant P15-3 (Palam Priya) and also in L0.2-1 (Lincoln). However, not much variation for esterase could be observed [it

  16. Analysis of genetic effects of major genes on yield traits of a pea (Pisum sativum L. cross between the Santa Isabel x WSU 31 varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo E Gómez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Generation means and heritability analyses were conducted to estimate dominance, additive, maternal and gene interaction effects controlling eleven agronomic characteristics related with production in the pea. Ten generations (P1, P2, F1, F2, RC1, RC2 and each reciprocal generation from a cross between the Santa Isabel and WSU 31 varieties were sown in two different environments for the present study. Eleven characteristics were evaluated: the time between sowing and flowering (I, the time between sowing and pod formation in the first reproductive node (FPod and the height of the first reproductive node (H1RN, which were used as earliness indicators; as components of yield, the number of pods per plant (PxP, number of seeds per plant (SxP, number of seeds per pods (SxPod and 100-seed weight (W100 were evaluated; and as variables associated to the yield, the pod width (PW, pod length (PL, lateral branch number (LBN and plant height (PH were evaluated. The results did not show maternal gene effects for the evaluated traits; environmental effects were found in PxP, SxP, SxPod, SFl, FPod and PL; genotype x environment effects were found in PW and W100. All characteristics except SxP and PxP had additive gene effects. The results showed that W100, PW and PL were the characteristics with the highest values for selection

  17. Location and effects of long-term NaCl stress on superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase isoenzymes of pea (Pisum sativum cv. Puget) chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, J M; Jimenez, A; Olmos, E; Sevilla, F

    2004-01-01

    The present work describes the intrachloroplast localization and the changes that took place in the thylakoid and stroma-located superoxide dismutases (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) and ascorbate peroxidases (APX, EC 1.11.1.11), in response to long-term NaCl stress in Pisum sativum L. cv. Puget plants. Native PAGE using high chloroplast protein concentrations pointed to the presence of the two main Fe-SODs, together with CuZn-SODs, both in thylakoids and in the stroma. Western blot and immunogold labelling using the antibodies against chloroplastic Fe-SOD from Nuphar luteum also confirmed the chloroplastic localization of a Fe-SOD. Thylakoidal Fe-SOD activity was induced by a NaCl concentration as low as 70 mM, while CuZn-SOD was induced at 90 mM, although in severe stress conditions (110 mM) both activities were similar to the levels at 90 mM NaCl. NaCl stress also induced stromatic Fe-SOD and CuZn-SOD activities, although these inductions only started at higher NaCl concentration (90 mM) and were significant at 110 mM NaCl. The increase in activity of both Fe-SODs was matched by an increase in Fe-SOD protein. Chloroplastic APX isoenzymes behaved differently in thylakoids and stroma in response to NaCl. A significant increase of stromal APX occurred at 70 mM, whereas the thylakoidal APX activity was significantly and progressively lost in response to NaCl stress (70-110 mM). A significant increase in the H2O2 content of chloroplasts during stress and a reduction in the ascorbate level at 90 mM NaCl also took place, although the oxidized ascorbate pool at the highest NaCl concentration did not show significant changes. These results suggest that the loss of thylakoidal APX may be an important factor in the increase in chloroplastic H2O2, which also results from the increased thylakoid and stroma-located Fe-SOD and CuZn-SOD activities. This H2O2 may be involved in the induction of stromal APX. The up-regulation of the above enzymes in the described stress conditions would

  18. Effects of a concentrate of pea antinutritional factors on pea protein digestibility in piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guen, M.P. Le; Huisman, J.; Guéguen, J.; Beelen, G.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    1995-01-01

    Four experiments were designed to investigate the apparent ileal digestibility of raw pea (Pisum sativum) and two of its components - an isolate of its proteins and a concentrate of its proteinaceous antinutritional factors (ANFs). Three varieties of peas were used: spring varieties Finale and

  19. Physicochemical, thermal and functional characterisation of protein isolates from Kabuli and Desi chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.): a comparative study with soy (Glycine max) and pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withana-Gamage, Thushan S; Wanasundara, Janitha P D; Pietrasik, Zeb; Shand, Phyllis J

    2011-04-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) seeds are a good source of protein that has potential applications in new product formulation and fortification. The main objectives of this study were to analyse the physicochemical, thermal and functional properties of chickpea protein isolates (CPIs) and compare them with those of soy (SPI) and pea (PPI) protein isolates. Extracted CPIs had mean protein contents of 728-853 g kg(-1) (dry weight basis). Analysis of their deconvoluted Fourier transform infrared spectra gave secondary structure estimates of 25.6-32.7% α-helices, 32.5-40.4% β-sheets, 13.8-18.9% turns and 16.3-19.2% disordered structures. CPIs from CDC Xena, among Kabuli varieties, and Myles, among Desi varieties, as well as SPI had the highest water-holding and oil absorption capacities. The emulsifying properties of Kabuli CPIs were superior to those of PPI and Desi CPIs and as good as those of SPI. The heat-induced gelation properties of CPIs showed a minimum protein concentration required to form a gel structure ranging from 100 to 140 g L(-1) . Denaturation temperatures and enthalpies of CPIs ranged from 89.0 to 92.0 °C and from 2.4 to 4.0 J g(-1) respectively. The results suggest that most physicochemical, thermal and functional properties of CPIs compare favourably with those of SPI and are better than those of PPI. Hence CPI may be suitable as a high-quality substitute for SPI in food applications. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Genetic diversity and trait genomic prediction in a pea diversity panel

    OpenAIRE

    Burstin, Judith; Salloignon, Pauline; Chabert Martinello, Marianne; Magnin Robert, Jean-Bernard; Siol, Mathieu; Jacquin, Françoise; Chauveau, Aurelie; Pont, Caroline; Aubert, Gregoire; Delaitre, Catherine; Truntzer, Caroline; Duc, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Background Pea (Pisum sativum L.), a major pulse crop grown for its protein-rich seeds, is an important component of agroecological cropping systems in diverse regions of the world. New breeding challenges imposed by global climate change and new regulations urge pea breeders to undertake more efficient methods of selection and better take advantage of the large genetic diversity present in the Pisum sativum genepool. Diversity studies conducted so far in pea used Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR)...

  1. Dry fractionation for production of functional pea protein concentrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrom, P.J.M.; Vissers, A.M.; Boom, R.M.; Schutyser, M.A.I.

    2013-01-01

    Dry milling in combination with air classification was evaluated as an alternative to conventional wet extraction of protein from yellow field peas (Pisum sativum). Major advantages of dry fractionation are retention of native functionality of proteins and its lower energy and water use. Peas were

  2. Gamma-ray induced mutations in Pisum arvense (L.s.s.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaranowski, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    The subject of the studies was the progeny of seven lines of field pea, treated with gamma rays (at the doses of 1, 6, 12, 15, 50 kR) in the generations M 2 - M 4 . Of the total number of analysed 15630 plants 249 mutants have been isolated which constituted 1.59% of the total population. The mutation frequency was significantly different depending on the line under study and on the radiation dose. In the mutation spectrum lethal and semilethal mutations were prevalent. The cause of these phenomena were either chlorophyll aberrations or disturbances in the development, growth and morphology of plants. These mutations died in different periods of vegetation or did not come to flowering and died. A number of morphologic-developmental mutations have been isolated; their genotypes have been established, cytologically examined and characterized. Some of the isolated fertile mutations are similar to those obtained at other research centres (e.g., cirrhifolialis, viciaefolialis, fasciata), others seem to be original (eg. pumilio, celeriter crescens, gynaecei, multiplicis). It is necessary, however, to perform identification tests to introduce these mutations into the Pisum Genebank, the more so, as most of papers on mutations concerned edible and garden peas (P. sativum L.), and in our work we considered field forms (P. arvense L.s.s.). (author)

  3. Differential responses to pea bacterial blight in stems, leaves and pods under glasshouse and field conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elvira-Recuenco, M.; Bevan, J.R.; Taylor, J.D.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to pea bacterial blight (Pseudomonas syringae pv. pisi) in different plant parts was assessed in 19 Pisum sativum cultivars and landraces, carrying race-specific resistance genes (R-genes) and two Pisum abyssinicum accessions carrying race-nonspecific resistance. Stems, leaves and pods

  4. Study of Pea Accessions for Development of an Oilseed Pea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Khodapanahi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Global interest in stable energy resources coupled with growing demand for bio-oils in various conventional and arising industries has renewed the importance of vegetable oil production. To address this global interest, oilseed production has been increased in recent decades by different approaches, such as extending the cultivation area of oil crops, or breeding and growing genetically modified plants. In this study, pea (Pisum sativum L. accessions were screened for lipid content using a rapid extraction method. This method quantifies lipid concentration in pea seeds and was developed by assessing and comparing the results of existing extraction methods used for canola and soybean, the top two Canadian oilseeds. Seeds of 151 field pea accessions were grown to maturity in 2009 and 2010 at McGill University (Quebec, Canada. Overall, lipid concentration in pea seeds ranged from 0.9 to 5.0%. Among several seed characteristics, only seed shape (wrinkled verses round had a significant effect on the total lipid production in the seeds. Peas are a valuable source of protein and starch, but the lipid concentration in their seeds has been undervalued. This research supports the idea of developing a novel dual-purpose oilseed pea that emulates the protein and oil production in soybean seeds while being conveniently adapted to a colder climate.

  5. Exploring variation in pea protein composition by natural selection and genetic transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzitzikas, E.

    2005-01-01

    Pea (Pisumsativum L.) seeds are a rich and valuable source of proteins, which can have potential for food industrial applications. Pea storage proteins are classified into two major classes: the salt-soluble globulins, and the water-soluble

  6. Avaliação da composição química e da digestibilidade in vitro da mistura aveia IAPAR 61 (Avena strigosa Schreb + ervilha forrageira (Pisum arvense L. em diferentes alturas sob pastejo Evaluation of chemical composition and in vitro digestibility of mixture of oat IAPAR 61 (Avena strigosa Schreb cv IAPAR 61 + field pea (Pisum arvense L. under grazing in different sward heights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Mascarenhas Grise

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar o efeito das alturas (8,9; 10,0; 11,2; 11,8; 13,3; 13,6; 14,6; 18,2 cm de pastos consorciados de aveia IAPAR 61 (Avena strigosa Schreb cv IAPAR 61 com ervilha forrageira (Pisum arvense L. sob pastejo sobre a relação folha/colmo (F/C, os teores de proteína bruta (PB, fibra em detergente neutro (FDN e fibra em detergente ácido (FDA e a digestibilidade in vitro da matéria seca (DIVMS e da matéria orgânica (DIVMO. O delineamento experimental usado foi o inteiramente casualizado, com duas repetições. A relação F/C não foi influenciada pela altura do pasto, porém apresentou comportamento quadrático com o avanço na maturidade do pasto. Os teores de PB apresentaram comportamento quadrático ao longo do período experimental, devido à interação entre altura do pasto e o tempo. Os teores de FDN e FDA mostraram um comportamento quadrático ao longo do período experimental, ocorrendo uma diminuição dos mesmos quando as plantas se apresentavam mais baixas e, uma elevação, quando as plantas estavam mais altas, isto ocorreu em função da interação das variáveis tempo e altura. A DIVMS e a DIVMO tiveram incrementos lineares em função do aumento da altura do pasto, porém com comportamento quadrático no tempo (dias em todas as alturas, sendo mais elevadas nas alturas intermediárias do pasto.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of different sward heights (8.9, 10.0, 11.2, 11.8; 13.3; 13.6; 14.6; 18.2 cm in the mixture of black oat IAPAR 61 (Avena strigosa Schreb cv IAPAR 61 + field pea (Pisum arvense L., under grazing, on leaf/stem ratio (L/S, crude protein (CP, neutral detergent fiber (NDF and acid detergent fiber (ADF contents and dry matter (DMIVD and of organic matter (OMIVD in vitro digestibility. A completely randomized experimental design with two replicates was used. L/S ratio was not influenced by sward height, although it presented quadratic behavior with the progress of

  7. Effects of auxin transport inhibitors on gibberellins in pea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of the auxin transport inhibitors 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), 9-hydroxyfluorene-9-carboxylic acid (HFCA), and 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) on gibberellins (GAs) in the garden pea (Pisum sativum L.) were studied. Application of these compounds to elongating internodes of intact wild type plants reduced markedly the endogenous level of the bioactive gibberellin A1. (GA1) below the application site. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels were also reduced, as was internode elongation. The auxin transport inhibitors did not affect the level of endogenous GA1 above the application site markedly, nor that of GA1 precursors above or below it. When plants were treated with [13C,3H]GA20, TIBA reduced dramatically the level of [13C,3H]GA1 recovered below the TIBA application site. The internodes treated with auxin transport inhibitors appeared to be still in the phase where endogenous GA1 affects elongation, as indicated by the strong response to applied GA1 by internodes of a GA1-deficient line at the same stage of expansion. On the basis of the present results it is suggested that caution be exercised when attributing the developmental effects of auxin transport inhibitors to changes in IAA level alone

  8. The tropic response of plant roots to oxygen: oxytropism in Pisum sativum L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porterfield, D. M.; Musgrave, M. E.

    1998-01-01

    Plant roots are known to orient growth through the soil by gravitropism, hydrotropism, and thigmotropism. Recent observations of plant roots that developed in a microgravity environment in space suggested that plant roots may also orient their growth toward oxygen (oxytropism). Using garden pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Weibul's Apollo) and an agravitropic mutant (cv. Ageotropum), root oxytropism was studied in the controlled environment of a microrhizotron. A series of channels in the microrhizotron allowed establishment of an oxygen gradient of 0.8 mmol mol-1 mm-1. Curvature of seedling roots was determined prior to freezing the roots for subsequent spectrophotometric determinations of alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Oxytropic curvature was observed all along the gradient in both cultivars of pea. The normal gravitropic cultivar showed a maximal curvature of 45 degrees after 48 h, while the agravitropic mutant curved to 90 degrees. In each cultivar, the amount of curvature declined as the oxygen concentration decreased, and was linearly related to the root elongation rate. Since oxytropic curvature occurred in roots exposed to oxygen concentrations that were not low enough to induce the hypoxically responsive protein alcohol dehydrogenase, we suspect that the oxygen sensor associated with oxytropism does not control the induction of hypoxic metabolism. Our results indicate that oxygen can play a critical role in determining root orientation as well as impacting root metabolic status. Oxytropism allows roots to avoid oxygen-deprived soil strata and may also be the basis of an auto-avoidance mechanism, decreasing the competition between roots for water and nutrients as well as oxygen.

  9. Identification of a complete set of functional markers for the selection of er1 powdery mildew resistance in Pisum sativum L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavan, S.N.C.; Schiavulli, A.; Appiano, M.; Miacola, C.; Visser, R.G.F.; Bai, Y.; Lotti, C.; Ricciardi, L.

    2013-01-01

    Powdery mildew is the most widespread disease of pea (Pisum sativum L.) and causes severe economic losses worldwide. Recessively inherited er1 powdery mildew resistance, successfully used for decades in pea breeding programs, has recently been shown to originate from the loss of function of the

  10. Symbiotic effectiveness of pea-rhizobia associations and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Selected strains were isolated from the root nodules of pea (Pisum sativum L.), broad bean (Vicia faba L.) and lentil (Lens culinaris L.) plants in the Loess Plateau of China. Analyses focused on the nodule number, nodule dry weight, plant dry weight, nitrogenase activity, total N accumulation of per plant and seed yield.

  11. Performance of active Photosystem II centers in photoinhibited pea leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schansker, G.; Rensen, van J.J.S.

    1999-01-01

    Effects of photoinhibition on photosynthesis in pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaves were investigated by studying the relationship between the severity of a photoinhibitory treatment (measured as F_v/F_m) and several photoacoustic and chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters. Because of the observed linear

  12. Short Communication: Occurrence of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) (Homoptera: Aphididae), on wild annual and perennial leguminous plants was studied at two locations (Adet and Wondata) in West Gojam, Ethiopia in 1999/2000 seasons. Annual and perennial leguminous wild or volunteer plants encountered in the study areas ...

  13. Role of LLD, a new locus for leaflet/pinna morphogenesis in Pisum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Properties of a mutant at the LLD (LEAF-LET DEVELOPMENT) locus in pea Pisum sativum L. are reported in this paper. Plants homozygous for the Mendelian recessive mutation lld bear leaves in which a few to many leaflets are incompletely developed. Opposite pinnae of rachis nodes often formed fused incompletely ...

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Novel EST-Derived Genic Markers in Pisum sativum (Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalu Jain

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Novel markers were developed for pea (Pisum sativum from pea expressed sequence tags (ESTs having significant homology to Medicago truncatula gene sequences to investigate genetic diversity, linkage mapping, and cross-species transferability. Methods and Results: Seventy-seven EST-derived genic markers were developed through comparative mapping between M. truncatula and P. sativum in which 75 markers produced PCR products and 33 were polymorphic among 16 pea genotypes. Conclusions: The novel markers described here will be useful for future genetic studies of P. sativum; their amplification in lentil (Lens culinaris demonstrates their potential for use in closely related species.

  15. Response of Pea Varieties to Damage Degree of Pea Weevil, Bruchus pisorum L.

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolova, Ivelina Mitkova

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the response of five pea varieties (Pisum sativum L.) to damage degree of Bruchus pisorum: Glyans, Modus, Kamerton, and Svit (Ukrainian cultivars) and Pleven 4 (Bulgarian cultivar). The seeds were classified into three types: healthy seeds (type 1), damaged seeds with parasitoid emergence hole (type 2), and damaged seeds with bruchid emergence hole (type 3) and they were sown. It was found that the weight of 1000 seeds did not affect the field germination of...

  16. Therapeutic Gardening

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Phyllis; Fox, Laurie; Parkhurst, James A. (James Albert)

    2013-01-01

    Gardening can be therapeutic for anyone and has been used as therapy for those with physical, emotional and social disabilities, for children, and for those who are elderly. Through careful adaptations to the garden, the gardener and the plants, almost anyone can benefit from the activity of gardening

  17. Calcium effect on the content of DNA and NYS-stained nuclear, nucleolar and cytoplasmic proteins in cortex cells of pea (Pisum sativum L. roots treated with heavy metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Stecka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Using cytophotometric procedures, following Feulgen-NYS staining, the measurements of DNA and nuclear, nucleolar and cytoplasmic protein contents in cortex cells of pea roots growing for 144 h in calcium and/or heavy metals (Cd2+, Cr3+, Pb2+ presence were made. All tested metals treatment reduced the number of nuclei in 4C DNA class and induced appearance of nuclei with DNA amount below 2C, that was expressed in diminished DNA content. The level of NYS proteins in cells underwent also reduction. In lead presence protein content diminished in nucleus. On the other hand, increased amount of nuclear, nucleolar and cytoplasmic proteins was observed in material treated with cadmium while only of nucleolar protein content in chromium presence. In root cells treated with tested metals protein content in nucleus was related with ploidy level, disturbances in this relation appeared in nucleolus and mostly in cytoplasm. Calcium added to chromium and mostly to lead solutions diminished the toxic effect of these metals that was demonstrated by an increase in DNA content, although calcium alone reduced DNA amount in nucleus due to lower number of 4C nuclei accompanied by appearance of 1C and 1-2C DNA classes. Calcium in different ways affected protein content changed by metal treatment. Present in cadmium solution it caused a further reduction in protein content in nucleus, nucleolus and cytoplasm but increased nuclear and cytoplasmic protein when added to lead, and nucleolar proteins - in chromium solution. Moreover, calcium ions presence in metal solutions did not restore the relationship between ploidy level and nucleolar and cytoplasmic NYS stained proteins and it did not disturbe the relation existing in nucleus.

  18. Mutant genes in pea breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiecicki, W.K.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutations of genes Dpo (dehiscing pods) and A (anthocyanin synthesis) played a role in pea domestication. A number of other genes were important in cultivar development for 3 types of usage (dry seeds, green vegetable types, fodder), e.g. fn, fna, le, p, v, fas and af. New genes (induced and spontaneous), are important for present ideotypes and are registered by the Pisum Genetics Association (PGA). Comparison of a pea variety ideotype with the variation available in gene banks shows that breeders need 'new' features. In mutation induction experiments, genotype, mutagen and method of treatment (e.g. combined or fractionated doses) are varied for broadening the mutation spectrum and selecting more genes of agronomic value. New genes are genetically analysed. In Poland, some mutant varieties with the gene afila were registered, controlling lodging by a shorter stem and a higher number of internodes. Really non-lodging pea varieties could strongly increase seed yield. But the probability of detecting a major gene for lodging resistance is low. Therefore, mutant genes with smaller influence on plant architecture are sought, to combine their effect by crossing. Promising seem to be the genes rogue, reductus and arthritic as well as a number of mutant genes not yet genetically identified. The gene det for terminal inflorescence - similarly to Vicia faba - changes plant development. Utilisation of assimilates and ripening should be better. Improvement of harvest index should give higher seed yield. A number of genes controlling disease resistance are well known (eg. Fw, Fnw, En, mo and sbm). Important in mass screening of resistance are closely linked gene markers. Pea gene banks collect respective lines, but mutants induced in highly productive cultivars would be better. Inducing gene markers sometimes seems to be easier than transfer by crossing. Mutation induction in pea breeding is probably more important because a high number of monogenic features are

  19. Genomic tools in pea breeding programs: status and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadim eTAYEH

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pea (Pisum sativum L. is an annual cool-season legume and one of the oldest domesticated crops. Dry pea seeds contain 22-25 percent protein, complex starch and fibre constituents and a rich array of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals which make them a valuable source for human consumption and livestock feed. Dry pea ranks third to common bean and chickpea as the most widely grown pulse in the world with more than 11 million tonnes produced in 2013. Pea breeding has achieved great success since the time of Mendel’s experiments in the mid-1800s. However, several traits still require significant improvement for better yield stability in a larger growing area. Key breeding objectives in pea include improving biotic and abiotic stress resistance and enhancing yield components and seed quality. Taking advantage of the diversity present in the pea genepool, many mapping populations have been constructed in the last decades and efforts have been deployed to identify loci involved in the control of target traits and further introgress them into elite breeding materials. Pea now benefits from next-generation sequencing and high-throughput genotyping technologies that are paving the way for genome-wide association studies and genomic selection approaches. This review covers the significant development and deployment of genomic tools for pea breeding in recent years. Future prospects are discussed especially in light of current progress towards deciphering the pea genome.

  20. Garden Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a gardener, you have the potential to contribute to nutrient pollution, but you also have the power to help prevent it. There are several easy things you can do to reduce nutrient pollution from your yards and gardens.

  1. CLASIFICACIÓN DE 42 LÍNEAS MEJORADAS DE ARVEJA (PISUM SATIVUM L. POR CARACTERES MORFOLÓGICOS Y COMPORTAMIENTO AGRONÓMICO CLASSIFICATION OF 42 GENOTYPES OF PEA (PISUM SATIVUM L. ACCORDING TO THE MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERS AND AGRONOMIC BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Andrés Pacheco Ch.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El estudio se realizó en la Sabana de Bogotá (Colombia, bajo condiciones de invernadero, durante dos ciclos de cultivo. En el primero se evaluaron las variables morfológicas y agronómicas, relacionadas con: componentes de rendimiento, precocidad, altura y hábito de crecimiento, cantidad de ramas, tipo de hoja; tamaño de hoja, tipo y grado de curvatura de la vaina, tamaño de pedúnculo, número de vainas por racimo, color de flor y características morfológicas del grano. En el segundo ciclo se evaluó la enfermedad “ascochyta” causada por Ascochyta spp. y Mycosphaerella spp. El objetivo de esta investigación fue: identificar líneas genéticas promisorias para continuar el programa de fitomejoramiento en arveja. El Análisis Factorial de Datos Mixtos AFDM, permitió agrupar las 42 líneas de mejora genética en 4 clases de variación cualitativa y cuantitativa, como también seleccionar a los genotipos M-049, M-078, M-080 y M-082 como sobresalientes por caracteres agronómicos.The study was carried out in the Bogotá plateau (Colombia, under greenhouse conditions during two crop cycles. During the first cycle the morphological and agronomical variables associated with yield components, such us precocity, growth habit, number of branches, leaf type, leaf size, type and degree of curvature of pod, size of peduncle, number of pods per cluster, flower color and grain morphological characteristics were evaluated. In the second cycle, the disease “ascochyta” caused by Ascochyta spp. and Mycosphaerella spp was evaluated. The objective of this research was to identify pea lines prospective for plant breeding. The factorial analysis of mixed data (FAMD, allowed clustering 42 genotypes into 4 groups of qualitative and quantitative variation and also selecting the materials M-049, M-078, M-080 and M-082 as the best genotypes according to their agronomical characters.

  2. Organic fertilization alters the community composition of root associated fungi in Pisum sativum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, L.; Nicolaisen, M.; Ravnskov, S.

    2013-01-01

    of the present study was to examine the response of communities of root associated fungi in Pisum sativum to Protamylasse, an organic fertilizer used in pea production. Plants were grown in pots with field soil amended with four different levels of Protamylasse. 454 pyrosequencing was employed to examine...

  3. Induced mutants in beans and peas resistant to rust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadl, F.A.M.

    1983-01-01

    Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and peas (Pisum sativum) are important leguminous vegetable crops in Egypt. The area planted with beans is about 40,000 acres and peas 22,000 acres. These crops suffer from several diseases, particularly rusts, (Uromyces phaseoli/Uromyces pisi), which are mainly spread in northern Egypt. In our mutation induction programme we used 60 Co gamma rays and ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS). Bean and pea seeds were soaked in water for two hours before exposure to 8, 10 and 12 krad. For chemical treatments, bean and pea seeds were soaked in water for eight hours and then treated with 0.5 and 1.5% EMS for four hours. The M 1 was cultivated in 1978

  4. The role of sulfur nutrition in the pea response to water deficit

    OpenAIRE

    Henriet, Charlotte; Zivy, Michel; Vernoud, Vanessa; Gallardo, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) produces seeds rich in proteins for human and animal nutrition and its cultivation enriches the soils in nitrogen, thus decreasing the need for nitrogen fertilization. Increasing pea cultivation and productivity is an agroecological challenge which requires to improve its tolerance to environmental stresses. Water deficit and the lack of sulfur in soils are two abiotic stresses that interact in the current context of climate change and low-input practices. Sulfur metabo...

  5. Molecular aspects of the nitrogen fixing system in pea root nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisseling, T.

    1980-01-01

    The author considers symbiotic nitrogen fixation of Pisum sativum and Rhizobium leguminosarum. Some general aspects of nodule formation and the regulation of the proteins nitrogenase and leghemoglobin (Lb) have been studied. Synthesis of these proteins was studied by 35 SO 4 labelling of intact pea plants. The sequence of appearance of the proteins was determined with specific radioimmunoassays for each protein. (Auth.)

  6. Identification of Ononitol and O-methyl-scyllo-inositol in Pea Root Nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøt, Leif; Egsgaard, Helge

    1984-01-01

    Ononitol (4-O-methyl-myo-inositol) and O-methyl-scyllo-inositol were identified in pea (Pisum sativum L.) root nodules formed by twoRhizobium leguminosarum strains. Ononitol was the major soluble carbohydrate in nodules formed by strain 1045 while O-methyl-scyllo-inositol and two unidentified com...

  7. Root rot peas in the Netherlands : fungal pathogens, inoculum potential and soil receptivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oyarzun, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Fungi associated to pea (Pisum sativum L.) root rot were studied. Fusarium and Oomycetes were most common. Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi, Fsp, was widely distributed and the most frequent

  8. Study of the boron distribution in pea and alfalfa plants using SSNTD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianming; Inst. for Application of Atomic Energy)" data-affiliation=" (Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, BJ (China)> Inst. for Application of Atomic Energy)" >Deng Hongmin

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of boron in pea (Pisum sativum L.) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) was determined by using SSNTD. The results show that boron concentrations in leaves are highest, furthermore boron concentrations of the base leaves are higher than those of the top leaves. Among flower tissues, calyx has the highest boron concentration

  9. Structure of the developing pea seed coat and the post-phloem transport pathway of nutrients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongen, van J.T.; Ammerlaan, A.M.H.; Wouterlood, M.; Aelst, van A.C.; Borstlap, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    An important function of the seed coat is to deliver nutrients to the embryo. To relate this function to anatomical characteristics, the developing seed coat of pea (Pisum sativum L.) was examined by light- and cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) from the late pre-storage phase until the

  10. Nitrogen acquisition by pea and barley and the effect of their crop residues on available nitrogen for subsequent crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Nitrogen acquisition by field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) grown on a sandy loam soil and availability of N in three subsequent sequences of a cropping system were studied in an outdoor pot experiment. The effect of crop residues on the N availability was evaluated....... The uptake of soil-derived N by a test crop (N catch crop) of white mustard (Sinapis alba L.) grown in the autumn was higher after pea than after barley. The N uptake in the test crop was reduced by 27% and 34% after pea and barley residue incorporation, respectively, probably due to N immobilization....... The dry matter production and total N uptake of a spring barley crop following pea or barley, with a period of unplanted soil in the autumn/winter, were significantly higher after pea than after barley. The barley crop following pea and barley recovered 11% of the pea and 8% of the barley residue N...

  11. Response of Pea Varieties to Damage Degree of Pea Weevil, Bruchus pisorum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova, Ivelina Mitkova

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the response of five pea varieties (Pisum sativum L.) to damage degree of Bruchus pisorum: Glyans, Modus, Kamerton, and Svit (Ukrainian cultivars) and Pleven 4 (Bulgarian cultivar). The seeds were classified into three types: healthy seeds (type 1), damaged seeds with parasitoid emergence hole (type 2), and damaged seeds with bruchid emergence hole (type 3) and they were sown. It was found that the weight of 1000 seeds did not affect the field germination of the pea varieties. Healthy and damaged seeds with parasitoid emergence holes (first and second seed types) provide a very good opportunity for growth and development while plants from damaged seeds with bruchid emergence holes had poor germination and vigor and low productivity. These seeds cannot provide the creation of well-garnished seeding and stable crop yields. Among tested varieties, the Ukrainian variety Glyans had considerably higher seed weight, field germination, and index germination and weak egg-laying activity of B. pisorum compared to others. Use of spring pea cultivars that are weakly preferred by the pea weevil in breeding programs would reduce losses due to pea weevil and provide an environmentally safer option to its control.

  12. Response of Pea Varieties to Damage Degree of Pea Weevil, Bruchus pisorum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivelina Mitkova Nikolova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the response of five pea varieties (Pisum sativum L. to damage degree of Bruchus pisorum: Glyans, Modus, Kamerton, and Svit (Ukrainian cultivars and Pleven 4 (Bulgarian cultivar. The seeds were classified into three types: healthy seeds (type 1, damaged seeds with parasitoid emergence hole (type 2, and damaged seeds with bruchid emergence hole (type 3 and they were sown. It was found that the weight of 1000 seeds did not affect the field germination of the pea varieties. Healthy and damaged seeds with parasitoid emergence holes (first and second seed types provide a very good opportunity for growth and development while plants from damaged seeds with bruchid emergence holes had poor germination and vigor and low productivity. These seeds cannot provide the creation of well-garnished seeding and stable crop yields. Among tested varieties, the Ukrainian variety Glyans had considerably higher seed weight, field germination, and index germination and weak egg-laying activity of B. pisorum compared to others. Use of spring pea cultivars that are weakly preferred by the pea weevil in breeding programs would reduce losses due to pea weevil and provide an environmentally safer option to its control.

  13. Wrinkled Peas and White-Eyed Fruit Flies: The Molecular Basis of Two Classical Genetic Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoile, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on bridging the gap between classical and molecular genetics for two traits: wrinkled seeds in garden peas and white eye color in fruit flies. Discusses the molecular details of the underlying basis of these traits. Contains 15 references. (JRH)

  14. Photosynthetic responses of pea plants ( Pisum sativum L. cv. Little ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    season in three pots arranged at four localities in Riyadh city, KSA. Photosynthetic rates (Pn) were measured three times during vegetative and reproductive stages with portable gas exchange system (LI-COR 6400). In general, Pn rates were highly ...

  15. Genetic Diversity in Ethiopian Field Pea (Pisum sativum L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Distance Matrix clustered the collections into seven distinct groups. There were 20 collections in Cluster I, 11 in Cluster II, 5 in Cluster III, 41 in Cluster IV, 17 in. Cluster V, 18 in Cluster VI and 30 in Cluster VII. The first, second and third principal components accounted for variation of 76.85%, 6.89% and 6.06%, respectively.

  16. Genome sequence of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richards, S.; Gibbs, R. A.; Gerardo, N. M.

    2010-01-01

    highlight findings from whole genome analysis that may be related to these unusual biological features. These findings include discovery of extensive gene duplication in more than 2000 gene families as well as loss of evolutionarily conserved genes. Gene family expansions relative to other published genomes...

  17. Genetic Diversity in Ethiopian Field Pea (Pisum sativum L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    የተሇያዩ እጅቦች ወስጥ ተመድበዋል፡፡ ሃያ በአንዯኛው ምድብ ውስጥ፣ 11 በሁሇተኛው፣ 5 በሦስተኛው፣ 41. በአራተኛው፣ 17 በአምስተኛው፣ 18 ..... F: GCCGAGGTACAAAAGAAGT. R: CTGGAAACCAAGAAAAGTG. 323. PM2. 32544169-1;. 32542559. (aac)6. F: CAATGATGGGTGGAAGATG. R: AGGCAGTGATTCAGACGGT. 337. PM3.

  18. Gene-based SNP discovery and genetic mapping in pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhu, Anoop; Ramsay, Larissa; Sanderson, Lacey-Anne; Stonehouse, Robert; Li, Rong; Condie, Janet; Shunmugam, Arun S K; Liu, Yong; Jha, Ambuj B; Diapari, Marwan; Burstin, Judith; Aubert, Gregoire; Tar'an, Bunyamin; Bett, Kirstin E; Warkentin, Thomas D; Sharpe, Andrew G

    2014-10-01

    Gene-based SNPs were identified and mapped in pea using five recombinant inbred line populations segregating for traits of agronomic importance. Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is one of the world's oldest domesticated crops and has been a model system in plant biology and genetics since the work of Gregor Mendel. Pea is the second most widely grown pulse crop in the world following common bean. The importance of pea as a food crop is growing due to its combination of moderate protein concentration, slowly digestible starch, high dietary fiber concentration, and its richness in micronutrients; however, pea has lagged behind other major crops in harnessing recent advances in molecular biology, genomics and bioinformatics, partly due to its large genome size with a large proportion of repetitive sequence, and to the relatively limited investment in research in this crop globally. The objective of this research was the development of a genome-wide transcriptome-based pea single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker platform using next-generation sequencing technology. A total of 1,536 polymorphic SNP loci selected from over 20,000 non-redundant SNPs identified using deep transcriptome sequencing of eight diverse Pisum accessions were used for genotyping in five RIL populations using an Illumina GoldenGate assay. The first high-density pea SNP map defining all seven linkage groups was generated by integrating with previously published anchor markers. Syntenic relationships of this map with the model legume Medicago truncatula and lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) maps were established. The genic SNP map establishes a foundation for future molecular breeding efforts by enabling both the identification and tracking of introgression of genomic regions harbouring QTLs related to agronomic and seed quality traits.

  19. Ileal digestibility of sunfl ower meal, pea, rapeseed cake, and lupine in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jan Værum; Fernández, José Adalberto; Jørgensen, Henry

    2012-01-01

    .05) for soybean meal and pea compared to sunfl ower meal, rapeseed cake, and lupine. The SID of Lys and His were lowest (P soybean meal and pea to be a high-digestible protein source relative to sunfl ower......The standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of CP and AA was evaluated in soybean (Glycine max) meal, sunfl ower (Helianthus annuus) meal, rapeseed cake, and fi eld pea (Pisum sativum) using 10 pigs and in lupine (Lupinus angustifolius) using 7 pigs. Pigs were fi tted with either a T...

  20. Frost stress evolution and winter pea ideotype in the context of climate warming at a regional scale

    OpenAIRE

    Castel Thierry; Lecomte Christophe; Richard Yves; Lejeune-Hénaut Isabelle; Larmure Annabelle

    2017-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important crop in temperate regions for its high seed protein concentration that is particularly sensitive to abiotic stresses. The abrupt temperature increase known as the “1987/1988 temperature regime shift” that occurs over Europe is questioning how winter pea will perform in the changing climate. This study assessed the winter frost damage evolution along from 1961 to 2015 in Burgundy-Franche-Comté by using: (1) daily observed and gridded regional temperature ...

  1. The Influence of Lead on Generation of Signalling Molecules and Accumulation of Flavonoids in Pea Seedlings in Response to Pea Aphid Infestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Woźniak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an abiotic factor, i.e., lead at various concentrations (low causing a hormesis effect and causing high toxicity effects, on the generation of signalling molecules in pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Cysterski seedlings and then during infestation by the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris. The second objective was to verify whether the presence of lead in pea seedling organs and induction of signalling pathways dependent on the concentration of this metal trigger defense responses to A. pisum. Therefore, the profile of flavonoids and expression levels of genes encoding enzymes of the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway (phenylalanine ammonialyase and chalcone synthase were determined. A significant accumulation of total salicylic acid (TSA and abscisic acid (ABA was recorded in the roots and leaves of pea seedlings growing on lead-supplemented medium and next during infestation by aphids. Increased generation of these phytohormones strongly enhanced the biosynthesis of flavonoids, including a phytoalexin, pisatin. This research provides insights into the cross-talk between the abiotic (lead and biotic factor (aphid infestation on the level of the generation of signalling molecules and their role in the induction of flavonoid biosynthesis.

  2. The Influence of Lead on Generation of Signalling Molecules and Accumulation of Flavonoids in Pea Seedlings in Response to Pea Aphid Infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Agnieszka; Drzewiecka, Kinga; Kęsy, Jacek; Marczak, Łukasz; Narożna, Dorota; Grobela, Marcin; Motała, Rafał; Bocianowski, Jan; Morkunas, Iwona

    2017-08-24

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an abiotic factor, i.e., lead at various concentrations (low causing a hormesis effect and causing high toxicity effects), on the generation of signalling molecules in pea ( Pisum sativum L. cv. Cysterski) seedlings and then during infestation by the pea aphid ( Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris). The second objective was to verify whether the presence of lead in pea seedling organs and induction of signalling pathways dependent on the concentration of this metal trigger defense responses to A. pisum . Therefore, the profile of flavonoids and expression levels of genes encoding enzymes of the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway (phenylalanine ammonialyase and chalcone synthase) were determined. A significant accumulation of total salicylic acid (TSA) and abscisic acid (ABA) was recorded in the roots and leaves of pea seedlings growing on lead-supplemented medium and next during infestation by aphids. Increased generation of these phytohormones strongly enhanced the biosynthesis of flavonoids, including a phytoalexin, pisatin. This research provides insights into the cross-talk between the abiotic (lead) and biotic factor (aphid infestation) on the level of the generation of signalling molecules and their role in the induction of flavonoid biosynthesis.

  3. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation and nitrate uptake by the pea crop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1986-08-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation and nitrate uptake by pea plants (Pisum sativum L.) were studied in field and pot experiments using the 15 N isotope dilution technique and spring barley as a non-fixing reference crop. Barley, although not ideal, seemed to be a suitable reference for pea in the 15 N-technique. Maximum N 2 fixation activity of 10 kg N fixed per ha per day was reached around the flat pod growth stage, and the activity decreased rapidly during pod-filling. The pea crop fixed between 100 and 250 kg N ha -1 , corresponding to from 45 to 80 per cent of total crop N. The amount of symbiotically fixed N 2 depended on the climatic conditions in the experimental year, the level of soil mineral N and the pea cultivar. Field-grown pea took up 60 to 70 per cent of the N-fertilizer supplied. The supply of 50 kg NO 3 -N ha -1 inhibited the N 2 fixation approximately 15 per cent. Small amounts of fertilizer N, supplied at sowing (starter-N), slightly stimulated the vegetative growth of pea, but the yields of seed dry matter and protein were not significantly influenced. In the present field experiments the environmental conditions, especially the distribution of rainfall during the growth season, seemed to be more important in determining the protein and dry matter yield of the dry pea crop, than the ability of pea to fix nitrogen symbiotically. However, fertilizer N supplied to pot-grown pea plants at the flat pod growth stage or as split applications significantly increased the yield of seed dry matter and protein. (author)

  4. Effect of pre-emergence herbicides on growth parameters of green pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wágner, G; Nádasy, E

    2006-01-01

    Green pea (Pisum sativum L.), is one of the important vegetable crop in Hungary. Chemical weed control has an important role in pea growing. Pre-emergence herbicides are used most frequently in a green pea culture because they eliminate competition between crop plant and weeds even at the critical early growth stage. Preemergence treatment combined with mechanical methods makes unnecessary the post-emergence protection. Herbicides with different mode of action can influence the growth of pea and cause phytotoxic symptoms. Sensitivity of plant varieties against herbicides is different in the first place due to the thickness ofleave's wax layer. The aim of our experience was to study the effect of five pre-emergence herbicides with different mode of action on the fresh and dry matter production and growing of a green pea variety (Pisum sativum cv. Petit Provencal). The examined herbicides were Pivot (imazethapyr), Proponit 840 EC (propisochlor), Sencor 70 WG (metribuzin), Stomp 330 (pendimethalin), and Afalon Dispersion (linuron). Pot experiments were carried out under greenhouse conditions in four replications. Herbicides were applied in the suggested and double doses. Four weeks after sowing the length, fresh- and dry weight of the shoots and the roots of pea were determined. It was an interesting observation that Pivot raised fresh weight significantly. Sencor 70 WG caused the most dramatic fresh mass reduction. We have got similar tendencies in dry matter production of green pea samples. Double rate of Stomp 330 and Sencor 70 WG decreased length of shoots and roots significantly. We established that examined pre-emergence herbicides could influence growth parameters to a different extent. Sencor 70 WG strongly inhibited growth of pea and caused severe phytotoxic symptoms. Double dose of Proponit 840 EC and Stomp 330 also damaged the pea but to a lesser extent. Afalon Dispersion and Pivot proved to be the most suitable herbicides; pea wasn't sensitive to these

  5. Development and Characterization of 37 Novel EST-SSR Markers in Pisum sativum (Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Zhuang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Simple sequence repeat markers were developed based on expressed sequence tags (EST-SSR and screened for polymorphism among 23 Pisum sativum individuals to assist development and refinement of pea linkage maps. In particular, the SSR markers were developed to assist in mapping of white mold disease resistance quantitative trait loci. Methods and Results: Primer pairs were designed for 46 SSRs identified in EST contiguous sequences assembled from a 454 pyrosequenced transcriptome of the pea cultivar, ‘LIFTER’. Thirty-seven SSR markers amplified PCR products, of which 11 (30% SSR markers produced polymorphism in 23 individuals, including parents of recombinant inbred lines, with two to four alleles. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0 to 0.43 and from 0.31 to 0.83, respectively. Conclusions: These EST-SSR markers for pea will be useful for refinement of pea linkage maps, and will likely be useful for comparative mapping of pea and as tools for marker-based pea breeding.

  6. Growth under UV-B radiation increases tolerance to high-light stress in pea and bean plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolink, EM; van Schalkwijk, [No Value; Posthumus, F; van Hasselt, PR

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants were exposed to enhanced levels of UV-B radiation in a growth chamber. Leaf discs of UV-B treated and control plants were exposed to high-light (HL) stress (PAR: 1200 mu mol m(-2) s(-1)) to study whether pre-treatment with UV-B affected

  7. Genetic diversity and population structure of Pisum sativum accessions for marker-trait association of lipid content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Ahmad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Field pea (Pisum sativum L. is an important protein-rich pulse crop produced globally. Increasing the lipid content of Pisum seeds through conventional and contemporary molecular breeding tools may bring added value to the crop. However, knowledge about genetic diversity and lipid content in field pea is limited. An understanding of genetic diversity and population structure in diverse germplasm is important and a prerequisite for genetic dissection of complex characteristics and marker-trait associations. Fifty polymorphic microsatellite markers detecting a total of 207 alleles were used to obtain information on genetic diversity, population structure and marker-trait associations. Cluster analysis was performed using UPGMA to construct a dendrogram from a pairwise similarity matrix. Pea genotypes were divided into five major clusters. A model-based population structure analysis divided the pea accessions into four groups. Percentage lipid content in 35 diverse pea accessions was used to find potential associations with the SSR markers. Markers AD73, D21, and AA5 were significantly associated with lipid content using a mixed linear model (MLM taking population structure (Q and relative kinship (K into account. The results of this preliminary study suggested that the population could be used for marker-trait association mapping studies.

  8. The Garden

    OpenAIRE

    de Souza, Claudia; Andrade, Paula Simas de

    2014-01-01

    Following the motto “community and government, a partnership for success”, Sheila Souza dos Santos, 34, a secretary, transformed a community garden project into a true space for the exercise of citizenship. The revival of a community-based project for the production of garden vegetables in Itapoã – a city located in the outskirts of Brasília, Brazil’s national capital – resulted not only in access to healthier food by the local community, school and families engaged in the project, but also i...

  9. [Hydrogen peroxide content and catalase activity at inoculation with root tubercle bacteria of pea seedlings with the various nodulation ability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, G G; Glian'ko, A K; Mironova, N V

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content and catalase activity were studied in pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings with normal (cultivar Marat) and disrupted (pea mutants) process of nodulation, which were inoculated with the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum strain CIAM 1026. Differences in hydrogen peroxide content and catalase activity in pea seedlings with different ability for nodulation, which were inoculated with rhizobia, were found. It was assumed that H2O2 and catalase are involved in defensive and regulatory mechanisms in the host plant.

  10. Kitchen gardens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilton, Annette; Hilton, Geoff; Dole, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    Numeracy is the practical application of mathematics in context. In schools, contexts such as kitchen gardens can provide a real world and exciting environment for engaging students in mathematical thinking and discussion associated with situations of proportion. This article presents examples fr...

  11. Hydroponic Gardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julinor, Helmut

    1976-01-01

    In addition to being an actual source of foodstuffs in inhospitable climates and a potential source of a large portion of the world's food supply, hydroponic gardening is a useful technique in the classroom for illustrating the role of plant life in the world's food chain. (MB)

  12. Nitrogen immobilization and mineralization during initial decomposition of 15N-labelled pea and barley residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1997-01-01

    The immobilization and mineralization of N following plant residue incorporation were studied in a sandy loam soil using N-15-labelled field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) straw. Both crop residues caused a net immobilization of soil-derived inorganic N during...... the complete incubation period of 84 days. The maximum rate of N immobilization was found to 12 and 18 mg soil-derived N g(-1) added C after incorporation of pea and barley residues, respectively. After 7 days of incubation, 21% of the pea and 17% of the barley residue N were assimilated by the soil microbial...... the decomposition of the barley residue. The net mineralization of residue-derived N was 2% in the barley and 22% in the pea residue treatment after 84 days of incubation. The results demonstrated that even if crop residues have a relative low C/N ratio (15), transient immobilization of soil N in the microbial...

  13. Impact of the semi-leafless field pea on dry matter yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tihomir CUPIC

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The field pea breeding at the Agricultural Institute Osijek has primarily been aimed at continued development of new cultivar types with high yield, potential early group maturity and resistance to lodging. Letin is a new semi-leafless -winter field pea (Pisum sativum with purple flowers and a mottled light brown seed coat. Semi- leafless and leafed genotypes were evaluated for plant height, lodging, maturity, forage yield and quality in two locations. The forage yield of pea genotypes has an average of 32.21 t*ha-1. Higher yield was obtained from semi-leafless genotype (34.48 t*ha-1 . The leafed genotype has achieved better nutritive characteristics. The obtained results point to a need for new tests and the possible introduction of semi- leafless cultivars in the production as a pea-cereal mixture or as pure crops to be utilized by cutting.

  14. OLIGOSACCHARIDE LEVELS IN IMMATURE AND NATURE SEEDS FROM SEVERAL VARIETIES OF PIGEON PEAS (Cajanus cajan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAIRO OSVALDO CAZETTA

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available

    ABSTRACT: Oligosaccharide level were evaluated in immature and nature seeds from different varieties of pigeon peas (Cajanus cajan and compared to those of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris and peas (Pisum sativum: The effect of seed processing by soaking and cooking was also determined. Immature pigeon peas seeds presented low oligosaccharide levels when compared to mature pigeon pea seeds or to pea seeds, thus representing a good alternative for human consumption. The mature pigeon pea seeds of the “Kaki” variety had oligosaccharide levels closest to those of common beans, whereas seeds of the “Paraíba” and “Fava-larga” varieties had higher levels. Soaking and cooking promoted a reduction of the oligosaccharide levels present in unprocessed mature seeds, with large amounts of these sugars being detected in the cooking water. This reduction was much more pronounced in immature seeds but the oligosaccharide levels present in their cooking water. This reduction was much more pronounced in immature seeds but the oligosaccharide levels present in their cooking water were also low, indicating that processing induced oligosaccharide degradation in immature seeds. KEYWORDS: Oligosaccharides & cooking; pigeon peas; common beans; peas.

  15. Further characterization of ribosome binding to thylakoid membranes. [Pisum sativum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurewitz, J.; Jagendorf, A.T.

    1987-05-01

    Previous work indicated more polysomes bound to pea (Pisum sativum cv Progress No. 9) thylakoids in light than in the dark, in vivo. With isolated intact chloroplasts incubated in darkness, addition of MgATP had no effect but 24 to 74% more RNA was thylakoid-bound at pH 8.3 than at pH 7. Thus, the major effect of light on ribosome-binding in vivo may be due to higher stroma pH. In isolated pea chloroplasts, initiation inhibitors (pactamycin and kanamycin) decreased the extent of RNA binding, and elongation inhibitors (lincomycin and streptomycin) increased it. Thus, cycling of ribosomes is controlled by translation, initiation, and termination. Bound RNA accounted for 19 to 24% of the total chloroplast RNA and the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)leucine into thylakoids was proportional to the amount of this bound RNA. These data support the concept that stroma ribosomes are recruited into thylakoid polysomes, which are active in synthesizing thylakoid proteins.

  16. Evaluation of yielding of mixtures of Pisum sativum L. with Triticum aestivum L. grown in organic farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Księżak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the productivity and quality of feed obtained from the mixtures of field pea (Pisum sativum L. with spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L., depending on the pea cultivar and its percentage in the weight of sown seeds under the conditions of organic farming. A field experiment was carried out in the years 2011–2013 in a randomized split-plot design with four replications. The first factor was a pea ‘Wiato’ or ‘Tarchalska’. The secondary factor was density of a pea mixture sown: 40, 60, and 80%. The yield of mixture seeds as well as the yield and structure of individual components were evaluated. The contents of crude protein and crude fiber, fat, ash, phosphorus, and potassium were determined in cereal grain and pea seeds. The examined factors and weather conditions during the growing season had a significant impact on the growth and yield of pea–spring wheat mixtures. The seed yields of the mixtures with the semi-leafless ‘Tarchalska’ were lower than with ‘Wiato’ (with bipinnate leaves. Increasing the pea percentage in seed material resulted in lower mixture yields. The percentage of pea seeds (regardless of foliage type in the mixture yields was significantly lower than the weight of sown seeds. Increasing the pea percentage in the mixture yield positively influenced the contents of protein, fat, and ash but it caused a decrease in the content of fiber. The pea percentage at sowing had little influence on the content of phosphorus in the mixture seed yields, but it slightly increased the content of potassium, regardless of the pea cultivar. The mixtures with the ‘Wiato’ and ‘Tarchalska’ cultivars contained a similar amount of protein, fiber, and fat, while the mixtures with ‘Tarchalska’ accumulated more ash.

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: pea aphid [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sum_NL.png Acyrthosiphon_pisum_S.png Acyrthosiphon_pisum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.c...gi?i=Acyrthosiphon+pisum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acyrthosiphon+pisum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxono...my_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acyrthosiphon+pisum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acyrthosiphon+pisum&t=NS ...

  18. [Active oxygen species in pea seedlings during the interactions with symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, G G; Glian'ko, A K; Mironova, N V; Putilina, T E; Luzova, G B

    2007-01-01

    The level of active oxygen species (AOS)--superoxide anion radical (O2*-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)--in pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivar Marat seedlings was studied upon their inoculation with symbiotic (Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae strain CIAM 1026) and pathogenic (Pseudomonas syringae pv. pisi Sackett) microorganisms. Different patterns of the changes in AOS in pea seedlings during the interactions with the symbiont and the phytopathogen were recorded. It is assumed that O2*- and H2O2 are involved in the defense and regulatory mechanisms of the host plant.

  19. Determination of the optimum irradiation dose for shelf-life of peas and cherry tomatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaman, M. B.; Hayumbu, P.; Siwale, J.; Mutale, C.; Kabwe, L.

    1991-01-01

    Green peas (Pisum Sativum), cultivar (mangetout) and yellow cherry tomatoes (lycoperscum esculantum), cultivar (cerasiforme) were irradiated for different absorbed doses, and their physical characteristics observed under cold storage conditions, in order to extend their shelf lives. Results suggest that 580 Gy is the maximum optimum dose. At this dose the shelf life of cherry tomatoes is shown to be extended. No beneficial effect was recorded on the storage life of green peas. A good correlation was found between the degradation of chlorophill and the spread of spotting disease for this product. (author)., 19 refs., 2 tab

  20. Nitrogen transfer in the interface between the symbionts in pea root nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, L.; Mouritzen, P.; Rudbeck, A.

    2001-01-01

    Transport mechanisms for transfer of nitrogen from the bacteroid side across the symbiosome membrane of pea (Pisum sativum L.) root nodules were identified by the use of energised bacteroid side-out symbiosome membrane vesicles. Such membrane vesicles were used to study a mechanism with high...... was not observed. The ammonium transporter has been identified as a voltage-driven channel whereas the symbiosome membrane aspartate transporter appears to be a H+/aspartate symport. The results suggest that nitrogen transfer between the symbionts in pea root nodules involves transfer of amino acids as well...

  1. Role of Pectinesterase in pH-Dependent Interactions between Pea Cell Wall Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressey, R

    1984-10-01

    Extracts of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) shoots converted soluble pectin from the seedlings to a trichloroacetic acid-insoluble form. This activity coincided with pectinesterase peaks separated from the extracts by gel filtration and ion exchange. The conversion of pectin to the trichloroacetic acid-insoluble form and pectinesterase exhibited identical responses to pH, with activity only above pH 6. The formation of trichloroacetic acid-insoluble pectin in pea cell walls and their extracts is due to de-esterification of the pectin by pectinesterase and not to binding between pectin and a protein, as reported in the literature.

  2. Effect of Rhizobium inoculation of seeds and foliar fertilization on productivity of Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Zając

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Pea (Pisum sativum L. is the second most important grain legume crop in the world which has a wide array of uses for human food and fodder. One of the major factors that determines the use of field pea is the yield potential of cultivars. Presently, pre-sowing inoculation of pea seeds and foliar application of microelement fertilizers are prospective solutions and may be reasonable agrotechnical options. This research was undertaken because of the potentially high productivity of the 'afila' morphotype in good wheat complex soils. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of vaccination with Rhizobium and foliar micronutrient fertilization on yield of the afila pea variety. The research was based on a two-year (2009–2010 controlled field experiment, conducted in four replicates and carried out on the experimental field of the Bayer company located in Modzurów, Silesian region. experimental field soil was Umbrisol – slightly degraded chernozem, formed from loess. Nitragina inoculant, as a source of symbiotic bacteria, was applied before sowing seeds. Green area index (GAI of the canopy, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI were determined at characteristic growth stages. The presented results of this study on symbiotic nitrogen fixation by leguminous plants show that the combined application of Nitragina and Photrel was the best combination for productivity. Remote measurements of the pea canopy indexes indicated the formation of the optimum leaf area which effectively used photosynthetically active radiation. The use of Nitragina as a donor of effective Rhizobium for pea plants resulted in slightly higher GAI values and the optimization of PAR and NDVI. It is not recommended to use foliar fertilizers or Nitragina separately due to the slowing of pea productivity.

  3. The Phytopathogen Dickeya dadantii (Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937) Is a Pathogen of the Pea Aphid†

    OpenAIRE

    Grenier, Anne-Marie; Duport, Gabrielle; Pagès, Sylvie; Condemine, Guy; Rahbé, Yvan

    2006-01-01

    Dickeya dadantii (Erwinia chrysanthemi) is a phytopathogenic bacterium causing soft rot diseases on many crops. The sequencing of its genome identified four genes encoding homologues of the Cyt family of insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis, which are not present in the close relative Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. atrosepticum. The pathogenicity of D. dadantii was tested on the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, and the bacterium was shown to be highly virulent for this insect, eit...

  4. Genetically Modified alpha-Amylase Inhibitor Peas Are Not Specifically Allergenic in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Rui-Yun; Reiner, Daniela; Dekan, Gerhard; Moore, Andrew E.; Higgins, T. J. V.; Epstein, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    Weevils can devastate food legumes in developing countries, but genetically modified peas (Pisum sativum), chickpeas and cowpeas expressing the gene for alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 (αAI) from the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) are completely protected from weevil destruction. αAI is seed-specific, accumulated at high levels and undergoes post-translational modification as it traverses the seed endomembrane system. This modification was thought to be responsible for the reported allergenicity ...

  5. Intercropping of wheat and pea as influenced by nitrogen fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghaley, B.B.; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Jensen, Henning Høgh

    2005-01-01

    The effect of sole and intercropping of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) on crop yield, fertilizer and soil nitrogen (N) use was tested on a sandy loam soil at three levels of urea fertilizer N (0, 4 and 8 g N m−2) applied at sowing. The 15N enrichment and natu...... with lower soil N levels, and vice versa for wheat, paving way for future option to reduce N inputs and negative environmental impacts of agricultural crop production......., grain N concentration, the proportion of N derived from symbiotic N2 fixation, and soil N accumulation. With increasing fertilizer N supply, intercropped and sole cropped wheat responded with increased yield, grain N yield and soil N accumulation, whereas the opposite was the case for pea. Fertilizer N...

  6. Allergy-Friendly Gardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Allergy Library ▸ Allergy-friendly gardening Share | Allergy-Friendly Gardening This article has been reviewed by Thanai Pongdee, ... rhinitis (hay fever), getting hands dirty in the garden has consequences. Sneezing, itchy eyes, congestion and other ...

  7. Gardening from a Wheelchair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Paralysis > Health > Staying active > Gardening from a wheelchair Gardening from a wheelchair ☷ ▾ Page contents Tips from community ... resources Tips from community members to start your garden Being able to plant your favorite flowers, pick ...

  8. Identification of a transport mechanism for NH4+ in the symbiosome membrane of pea root nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritzen, P.; Rosendahl, L.

    1997-01-01

    Symbiosome membrane vesicles, facing bacteroid-side-out, were purified from pea (Pisum sativum L.) root nodules and used to study NH4+ transport across the membrane by recording vesicle uptake of the NH4+ analog [C-14]methylamine (MA). Membrane potentials (Delta psi) were imposed on the vesicles ...

  9. Durable broad-spectrum powdery mildew resistance in pea er1 plants is conferred by natural loss-of-function mutations in PsMLO1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humphry, M.; Reinstädler, A.; Ivanov, S.; Bisseling, T.; Panstruga, R.

    2011-01-01

    Loss-of-function alleles of plant-specific MLO (Mildew Resistance Locus O) genes confer broad-spectrum powdery mildew resistance in monocot (barley) and dicot (Arabidopsis thaliana, tomato) plants. Recessively inherited powdery mildew resistance in pea (Pisum sativum) er1 plants is, in many aspects,

  10. Measuring your Garden Footprint

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Gareth; Schmutz, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    The work reports on a Garden Organic (working name of Henry Doubleday Research Association, Coventry UK) members experiment in 2007. Garden Organic members were surveyed with a detailed paper questionnaire to calculate an average gardening footprint of committed (self-selected) organic gardeners in the UK. This was used to develop a garden footprinting methodology and to create a benchmark of committed organic gardening in the UK. This was then compared to commerical orangic growing and to ot...

  11. Models and tools for studying drought stress responses in peas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar-Tábori, Katalin; Mendler-Drienyovszki, Nóra; Dobránszki, Judit

    2011-12-01

    The pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important pulse crop but the growing area is limited because of its relatively low yield stability. In many parts of the world the most important abiotic factor limiting the survival and yield of plants is the restricted water supply, and the crop productivity can only be increased by improving drought tolerance. Development of pea cultivars well adapted to dry conditions has been one of the major tasks in breeding programs. Conventional breeding of new cultivars for dry conditions required extensive selection and testing for yield performance over diverse environments using various biometrical approaches. Several morphological and biochemical traits have been proven to be related to drought resistance, and methods based on physiological attributes can also be used in development of better varieties. Osmoregulation plays a role in the maintenance of turgor pressure under water stress conditions, and information on the behaviour of genotypes under osmotic stress can help selection for drought resistance. Biotechnological approaches including in vitro test, genetic transformation, and the use of molecular markers and mutants could be useful tools in breeding of pea. In this minireview we summarized the present status of different approaches related to drought stress improvement in the pea.

  12. Rapid transcriptome characterization and parsing of sequences in a non-model host-pathogen interaction; pea-Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Xiaofeng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background White mold, caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, is one of the most important diseases of pea (Pisum sativum L., however, little is known about the genetics and biochemistry of this interaction. Identification of genes underlying resistance in the host or pathogenicity and virulence factors in the pathogen will increase our knowledge of the pea-S. sclerotiorum interaction and facilitate the introgression of new resistance genes into commercial pea varieties. Although the S. sclerotiorum genome sequence is available, no pea genome is available, due in part to its large genome size (~3500 Mb and extensive repeated motifs. Here we present an EST data set specific to the interaction between S. sclerotiorum and pea, and a method to distinguish pathogen and host sequences without a species-specific reference genome. Results 10,158 contigs were obtained by de novo assembly of 128,720 high-quality reads generated by 454 pyrosequencing of the pea-S. sclerotiorum interactome. A method based on the tBLASTx program was modified to distinguish pea and S. sclerotiorum ESTs. To test this strategy, a mixture of known ESTs (18,490 pea and 17,198 S. sclerotiorum ESTs from public databases were pooled and parsed; the tBLASTx method successfully separated 90.1% of the artificial EST mix with 99.9% accuracy. The tBLASTx method successfully parsed 89.4% of the 454-derived EST contigs, as validated by PCR, into pea (6,299 contigs and S. sclerotiorum (2,780 contigs categories. Two thousand eight hundred and forty pea ESTs and 996 S. sclerotiorum ESTs were predicted to be expressed specifically during the pea-S. sclerotiorum interaction as determined by homology search against 81,449 pea ESTs (from flowers, leaves, cotyledons, epi- and hypocotyl, and etiolated and light treated etiolated seedlings and 57,751 S. sclerotiorum ESTs (from mycelia at neutral pH, developing apothecia and developing sclerotia. Among those ESTs specifically expressed

  13. Rapid transcriptome characterization and parsing of sequences in a non-model host-pathogen interaction; pea-Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiaofeng; McPhee, Kevin E; Coram, Tristan E; Peever, Tobin L; Chilvers, Martin I

    2012-11-26

    White mold, caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, is one of the most important diseases of pea (Pisum sativum L.), however, little is known about the genetics and biochemistry of this interaction. Identification of genes underlying resistance in the host or pathogenicity and virulence factors in the pathogen will increase our knowledge of the pea-S. sclerotiorum interaction and facilitate the introgression of new resistance genes into commercial pea varieties. Although the S. sclerotiorum genome sequence is available, no pea genome is available, due in part to its large genome size (~3500 Mb) and extensive repeated motifs. Here we present an EST data set specific to the interaction between S. sclerotiorum and pea, and a method to distinguish pathogen and host sequences without a species-specific reference genome. 10,158 contigs were obtained by de novo assembly of 128,720 high-quality reads generated by 454 pyrosequencing of the pea-S. sclerotiorum interactome. A method based on the tBLASTx program was modified to distinguish pea and S. sclerotiorum ESTs. To test this strategy, a mixture of known ESTs (18,490 pea and 17,198 S. sclerotiorum ESTs) from public databases were pooled and parsed; the tBLASTx method successfully separated 90.1% of the artificial EST mix with 99.9% accuracy. The tBLASTx method successfully parsed 89.4% of the 454-derived EST contigs, as validated by PCR, into pea (6,299 contigs) and S. sclerotiorum (2,780 contigs) categories. Two thousand eight hundred and forty pea ESTs and 996 S. sclerotiorum ESTs were predicted to be expressed specifically during the pea-S. sclerotiorum interaction as determined by homology search against 81,449 pea ESTs (from flowers, leaves, cotyledons, epi- and hypocotyl, and etiolated and light treated etiolated seedlings) and 57,751 S. sclerotiorum ESTs (from mycelia at neutral pH, developing apothecia and developing sclerotia). Among those ESTs specifically expressed, 277 (9.8%) pea ESTs were predicted to be

  14. Rhizodeposition of N by pea and barley and its effect on soil N dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Rhizodeposition of N during plant growth influences the microbial activity in the rhizosphere and constitutes a source of labile organic N, but has not been quantified to the same degree as the rhizodeposition of C. The rhizodeposition of N, defined as root-derived N present in the soil after...... removal of visible roots and root fragments, was determined during field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) growth in a sandy soil at a low concentration of mineral N using a continuous split-root N-15-labelling technique. The N rhizodeposition constituted 15 and 48......% of the below-ground N in pea when determined 7 and 14 (maturity) wk after planting (WAP), respectively. In barley 32 and 71% of the below-ground N were present in rhizodeposits at the two samplings. At maturity the rhizodeposition of N amounted to 19 mg N plant(-1) (7% of total plant N) for pea and 17 mg N...

  15. Mutation breeding in peas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaranowski, J.; Micke, A.

    1985-01-01

    The pea as an ancient crop plant still today has wide uses and is an import source of food protein. It is also an important object for genetic studies and as such has been widely used in mutation induction experiments. However, in comparison with cereals this ancient crop plant (like several other grain legumes) has gained relatively little from advances in breeding. The review focuses on the prospects of genetic improvement of pea by induced mutations, discusses principles and gives methodological information. (author)

  16. Importance of new winter pea genotyp in production of the milk on family farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Županac

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Forage pea (Pisum sativum L. is becoming more represented gorage leguminoza on the fields Republic of Croatia. Three year field trials (2003-2005 were carried out to determine the effect of seed winter pea inoculation and nitrogen top-dressing on productivity of new winter pea genotype G3 in production of milk on family farms. Just before sowing the inoculation of pea seed was performed by the variety of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 1001 which is part of the microbiological collection of the Department of Microbiology at the Faculty of Agriculture University of Zagreb. The results of the research showed that the highest total nodule number on pea root (39.7 nodule/plant as well as nodule dry matter weight (0.203 g/plant was determined on the inoculated variant. Average highest yield of winter pea dry matter was, once more, determined on the inoculated variant (4.33 t ha-1. Total dry matter yield of winter pea and wheat mixture were ranging from 8.92 t ha-1 (control up to 10.64 t ha-1 (nitrogen top-dressing. Average highest yield of winter pea crude protein was, once more, determined on the inoculated variant (266 kg ha-1 in 2003, (672 kg ha-1 in 2004 and (853 kg ha-1 in 2005. The conclusion of this research is that the highest dry matter yield (4.33 t ha-1 and crude protein yield was obtained with the inoculation of new genotype winter pea G3.

  17. Transcriptome sequencing of field pea and faba bean for discovery and validation of SSR genetic markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur Sukhjiwan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Field pea (Pisum sativum L. and faba bean (Vicia faba L. are cool-season grain legume species that provide rich sources of food for humans and fodder for livestock. To date, both species have been relative 'genomic orphans' due to limited availability of genetic and genomic information. A significant enrichment of genomic resources is consequently required in order to understand the genetic architecture of important agronomic traits, and to support germplasm enhancement, genetic diversity, population structure and demographic studies. Results cDNA samples obtained from various tissue types of specific field pea and faba bean genotypes were sequenced using 454 Roche GS FLX Titanium technology. A total of 720,324 and 304,680 reads for field pea and faba bean, respectively, were de novo assembled to generate sets of 70,682 and 60,440 unigenes. Consensus sequences were compared against the genome of the model legume species Medicago truncatula Gaertn., as well as that of the more distantly related, but better-characterised genome of Arabidopsis thaliana L.. In comparison to M. truncatula coding sequences, 11,737 and 10,179 unique hits were obtained from field pea and faba bean. Totals of 22,057 field pea and 18,052 faba bean unigenes were subsequently annotated from GenBank. Comparison to the genome of soybean (Glycine max L. resulted in 19,451 unique hits for field pea and 16,497 unique hits for faba bean, corresponding to c. 35% and 30% of the known gene space, respectively. Simple sequence repeat (SSR-containing expressed sequence tags (ESTs were identified from consensus sequences, and totals of 2,397 and 802 primer pairs were designed for field pea and faba bean. Subsets of 96 EST-SSR markers were screened for validation across modest panels of field pea and faba bean cultivars, as well as related non-domesticated species. For field pea, 86 primer pairs successfully obtained amplification products from one or more template

  18. Evaluation of SRAP markers for mapping of Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Fernanda Guindon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Linkage maps have become important tools for genetic studies. With the aim of evaluating the SRAP (sequence-related amplified polymorphism technique for linkage mapping in Pisum sativum L., a F2 mapping population derived from an initial cross between cvs. DDR11 and Zav25 was generated. A total of 25 SRAP primer combinations were evaluated in 45 F2 plants and both parental lines, generating 208 polymorphic bands/markers. The markers were analyzed by the chi-square goodness-of-fit test to check the expected Mendelian segregation ratio. The resulting linkage map consists of 112 genetic markers distributed in 7 linkage groups (LGs, covering a total of 528.8 cM. The length of the LGs ranged from 47.6 to 144.3 cM (mean 75.54 cM, with 9 to 34 markers. The linkage map developed in this study indicates that the SRAP marker system could be applied to mapping studies of pea.

  19. Co-inoculation of a Pea Core-Collection with Diverse Rhizobial Strains Shows Competitiveness for Nodulation and Efficiency of Nitrogen Fixation Are Distinct traits in the Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourion, Virginie; Heulin-Gotty, Karine; Aubert, Véronique; Tisseyre, Pierre; Chabert-Martinello, Marianne; Pervent, Marjorie; Delaitre, Catherine; Vile, Denis; Siol, Mathieu; Duc, Gérard; Brunel, Brigitte; Burstin, Judith; Lepetit, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Pea forms symbiotic nodules with Rhizobium leguminosarum sv. viciae (Rlv). In the field, pea roots can be exposed to multiple compatible Rlv strains. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying the competitiveness for nodulation of Rlv strains and the ability of pea to choose between diverse compatible Rlv strains. The variability of pea-Rlv partner choice was investigated by co-inoculation with a mixture of five diverse Rlv strains of a 104-pea collection representative of the variability encountered in the genus Pisum . The nitrogen fixation efficiency conferred by each strain was determined in additional mono-inoculation experiments on a subset of 18 pea lines displaying contrasted Rlv choice. Differences in Rlv choice were observed within the pea collection according to their genetic or geographical diversities. The competitiveness for nodulation of a given pea-Rlv association evaluated in the multi-inoculated experiment was poorly correlated with its nitrogen fixation efficiency determined in mono-inoculation. Both plant and bacterial genetic determinants contribute to pea-Rlv partner choice. No evidence was found for co-selection of competitiveness for nodulation and nitrogen fixation efficiency. Plant and inoculant for an improved symbiotic association in the field must be selected not only on nitrogen fixation efficiency but also for competitiveness for nodulation.

  20. Composition and in vitro digestibility of raw versus cooked white- and colour-flowered peas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuszewska, Barbara; Vitjazkova, Maija; Swiech, Ewa; Taciak, Marcin

    2004-06-01

    Ten pea cultivars (four white-flowered, Pisum sativum ssp. hortense, and six colour-flowered, Pisum sativum ssp. arvense) grown in Latvia were analyzed and tested in in vitro experiments, as raw and cooked seeds. The colour-flowered (CF) had a greater proportion of hulls and a higher acid detergent fibre (ADF) content than white-flowered (WF) pea seeds (10.7 vs. 8.2% and 92.2 vs. 84.5 g/kg dry matter (DM), respectively). Three out of six CF varieties had a significantly greater amount of protein bound to neutral detergent fibre (NDF) than WF peas. The tannin content was higher in CF than in WF peas (8.46 vs. 0.37 g/kg DM). In vitro protein and amino acid digestibility was about 8% higher in WF than in CF varieties. Cooking decreased the tannin content in CF peas (8.46 vs. 5.51 g/kg DM) but had no effect on in vitro protein digestibility. Heat treatment reduced significantly trypsin inhibitor activity and amount of protein bound to NDF in CF and WF varieties (from 6.50 to 0.52 and from 6.54 to 0.46 trypsin inhibitor units (TIU)/mg DM; from 1.250 to 0.831 and 0.761 to 0.209 g N/100 g NDF, respectively). However, the protein bound to NDF content in pea DM increased in CF and decreased in WF varieties (from 1.525 to 2.145 and from 0.913 to 0.502 g N/kg DM, respectively). Cooking resulted in an increased NDF content over two times in both CF and WF pea seeds (from 122 to 259 and from 120 to 262 g/kg DM, respectively). The results suggest that colour-flowered pea may be considered as an interesting dietary alternative to white-flowered pea since cooking removes trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA), decreases tannins, and increases dietary fibre contents.

  1. Importance of winter pea cv. Maksimirski rani in milk production on family farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darko Uher

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Forage pea (Pisum sativum L. is gaining importance as a forage legume in the Republic of Croatia. Pea seed contains 20-30 percent of protein, it is utilized without thermal treatment in feeding different types and categories of livestock, and with stable yield it provides an appreciable income per hectare. Two-year field trials (2005-2006 were carried out to determine the effect of winter pea seed inoculation and nitrogen top-dressing on the number and mass (g/plant-1 of root nodules and also on the yield and quality of winter pea cv. Maksimirski rani in a mixture with wheat cv. Sana. Just before sowing, pea seeds were inoculated with the strain Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 1001 from the microbial collection of the Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Zagreb. The highest number of root nodules (43 nodules/plant, as well as the highest nodule mass (0.219 g/plant-1 were determined in the inoculated variant. The highest number of pods (19.0 and seeds per plant (60 were determined in the inoculated variant as well. The highest 1000-seed mass (132 g and seed mass per plant (7.93 g were also determined in the inoculated variant. Average pea seed yield ranged from 2949 kg ha-1 (control up to 3353 kg ha-1 (inoculation. The conclusion of this research is that the highest seed (3353 kg ha-1 and crude protein yields (833 kg ha-1 were obtained with inoculated forage winter pea cv. Maksimirski rani. Seed inoculation of the studied pea cultivar Maksimirski rani with the strain Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 1001 influenced also higher milk production per hectare compared to the control and the nitrogen top-dressed variant.

  2. School gardens in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyg, Pernille Malberg

    2016-01-01

    Studies show that school gardening helps children enhance their understanding of science and promotes their interaction with the environment gaining historical, cultural and ecological understandings (Dyg 2014; Chenhall 2010; Green 2013; Johnson 2012; Sloan 2013; McCarty 2010; Hess & Trexler 2011......). School gardens are sprouting in rural and urban areas across Denmark. This case study research sheds new light on various school garden models under the Gardens for Bellies program in Denmark, including school-, community-based and central school gardens. This study aims to document the organization...... of school gardens, which is not studied in international research. It also analyses immediate effects according to pupils and other stakeholders. The research is based on five explorative case studies, involving observations and interviews. The findings show that school gardens open up opportunities...

  3. Eliminating anti-nutritional plant food proteins: the case of seed protease inhibitors in pea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Clemente

    Full Text Available Several classes of seed proteins limit the utilisation of plant proteins in human and farm animal diets, while plant foods have much to offer to the sustainable intensification of food/feed production and to human health. Reduction or removal of these proteins could greatly enhance seed protein quality and various strategies have been used to try to achieve this with limited success. We investigated whether seed protease inhibitor mutations could be exploited to enhance seed quality, availing of induced mutant and natural Pisum germplasm collections to identify mutants, whilst acquiring an understanding of the impact of mutations on activity. A mutant (TILLING resource developed in Pisum sativum L. (pea and a large germplasm collection representing Pisum diversity were investigated as sources of mutations that reduce or abolish the activity of the major protease inhibitor (Bowman-Birk class of seed protein. Of three missense mutations, predicted to affect activity of the mature trypsin / chymotrypsin inhibitor TI1 protein, a C77Y substitution in the mature mutant inhibitor abolished inhibitor activity, consistent with an absolute requirement for the disulphide bond C77-C92 for function in the native inhibitor. Two further classes of mutation (S85F, E109K resulted in less dramatic changes to isoform or overall inhibitory activity. The alternative strategy to reduce anti-nutrients, by targeted screening of Pisum germplasm, successfully identified a single accession (Pisum elatius as a double null mutant for the two closely linked genes encoding the TI1 and TI2 seed protease inhibitors. The P. elatius mutant has extremely low seed protease inhibitory activity and introgression of the mutation into cultivated germplasm has been achieved. The study provides new insights into structure-function relationships for protease inhibitors which impact on pea seed quality. The induced and natural germplasm variants identified provide immediate potential for

  4. Thiamine treatments alleviate aphid infestations in barley and pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Afaf M; Jonsson, Lisbeth M V

    2013-10-01

    Treatment of plants with thiamine (Vitamin B1) has before been shown to activate plant defence against microorganisms. Here, we have studied the effects of thiamine treatments of plants on aphid reproduction and behaviour. The work was mainly carried out with bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L.) on barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Aphid population growth and aphid acceptance on plants grown from seeds soaked in a 150μM thiamine solution were reduced to ca. 60% of that on control plants. R. padi life span and the total number of offspring were reduced on barley plants treated with thiamine. Healthy aphids and aphids infected with the R. padi virus were similarly affected. Spraying or addition of thiamine at 150μM to nutrient solutions likewise resulted in reduced aphid population growth to ca. 60%, as did plant exposure to thiamine odour at 4mM. Thiamine treatments resulted in reduced aphid population growth also when tested with grain aphid (Sitobion avenae F.) on barley and pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum H.) on pea (Pisum sativum L.). There was no direct effect of thiamine on aphid reproduction or thiamine odour on aphid behaviour, as evaluated using artificial diets and by olfactometer tests, respectively. Two gene sequences regulated by salicylic acid showed higher transcript abundance and one gene sequence regulated by methyl jasmonate showed lower transcript abundance in thiamine-treated plants but not in control plants after aphid infestation. These results suggest that the aphid antibiosis and antixenosis effects may be related to priming of defence, but more studies are needed to explain the effects against aphids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Law enforcement fick and peleg model for study of water uptake in navel cargamanto yellow (phaseolus vulgaris l. and peas seca (pisan sativa during rehydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Fernando Agudelo Ospina

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This research validated Fick’s Law and Peleg’s model applicability for modeling water sorption of yellow navel cargamanto bean (Phaseolus Vulgaris L. and dry pea (Pisum sativum, using five different water temperatures 25, 35, 40, 47 y 55 ºC, to soak the analyzed materials; for bean an optimal mathematical expression was obtained to make estimations, opposite case was the observed thing for pea; the diffusion coefficient calculated were all of the order of 1.91 x 10-9 m2/s for bean and 3.51 x 10-10 for dry pea; the activation energies were 41.464 KJ/mol for bean and 56.246 KJ/mol for dry pea

  6. A comparison of the kinetics of in vitro starch digestion in smooth and wrinkled peas by porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Cathrina H; Maillot, Marie; Parker, Roger; Warren, Frederick J

    2018-04-01

    This study describes the impact of crop genetics and processing in two pea lines (Pisum sativum L.) on starch digestion kinetics. Mutation at the rugosus (r) locus leads to wrinkled pea seeds, a reduction in starch content and a lower extent of in vitro starch digestibility. The Logarithm of Slope (LOS) kinetic model was used to analyse digestion curves obtained using porcine pancreatic α-amylase for a range of particle size fractions. Changes in starch structure induced by the r mutation led to clear differences in starch digestion kinetics for purified starches and pea flours. Larger particle size fractions showed slower starch digestion relative to the purified starch, but significant differences still existed between r and wild type pea lines. It is expected that this work will help inform the design of future studies where both starch structure and food structure are important determinants of digestion behaviour. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Precision assessment of some supervised and unsupervised algorithms for genotype discrimination in the genus Pisum using SSR molecular data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Jaber; Naghavi, Mohammad Reza; Kayvanjoo, Amir Hossein; Nasiri, Mojtaba; Ebrahimi, Mansour

    2015-03-07

    For the first time, prediction accuracies of some supervised and unsupervised algorithms were evaluated in an SSR-based DNA fingerprinting study of a pea collection containing 20 cultivars and 57 wild samples. In general, according to the 10 attribute weighting models, the SSR alleles of PEAPHTAP-2 and PSBLOX13.2-1 were the two most important attributes to generate discrimination among eight different species and subspecies of genus Pisum. In addition, K-Medoids unsupervised clustering run on Chi squared dataset exhibited the best prediction accuracy (83.12%), while the lowest accuracy (25.97%) gained as K-Means model ran on FCdb database. Irrespective of some fluctuations, the overall accuracies of tree induction models were significantly high for many algorithms, and the attributes PSBLOX13.2-3 and PEAPHTAP could successfully detach Pisum fulvum accessions and cultivars from the others when two selected decision trees were taken into account. Meanwhile, the other used supervised algorithms exhibited overall reliable accuracies, even though in some rare cases, they gave us low amounts of accuracies. Our results, altogether, demonstrate promising applications of both supervised and unsupervised algorithms to provide suitable data mining tools regarding accurate fingerprinting of different species and subspecies of genus Pisum, as a fundamental priority task in breeding programs of the crop. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Local and landscape drivers of predation services in urban gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Stacy M; Bichier, Peter

    2017-04-01

    In agroecosystems, local and landscape features, as well as natural enemy abundance and richness, are significant predictors of predation services that may result in biological control of pests. Despite the increasing importance of urban gardening for provisioning of food to urban populations, most urban gardeners suffer from high pest problems, and have little knowledge about how to manage their plots to increase biological control services. We examined the influence of local, garden scale (i.e., herbaceous and arboreal vegetation abundance and diversity, ground cover) and landscape (i.e., landscape diversity and surrounding land use types) characteristics on predation services provided by naturally occurring predators in 19 urban gardens in the California central coast. We introduced sentinel pests (moth eggs and larvae and pea aphids) onto greenhouse-raised plants taken to gardens and assigned to open or bagged (predator exclosure) treatments. We found high predation rates with between 40% and 90% of prey items removed in open treatments. Predation services varied with local and landscape factors, but significant predictors differed by prey species. Predation of eggs and aphids increased with vegetation complexity in gardens, but larvae predation declined with vegetation complexity. Smaller gardens experienced higher predation services, likely due to increases in predator abundance in smaller gardens. Several ground cover features influenced predation services. In contrast to patterns in rural agricultural landscapes, predation on aphids declined with increases in landscape diversity. In sum, we report the relationships between several local management factors, as well as landscape surroundings, and implications for garden management. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  9. Availability of nitrogen in 15N-labelled mature pea residues to subsequent crops in the field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    The availability of N in N-15-labelled mature pea (Pisum sativum L.) residues to subsequent autumn-sown or spring-sown crops was studied in two experiments in field microplots. The residues were incorporated in the soil in August or September. Winter barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and winter oilseed...... incorporation of the residues. At maturity, the pea residue N constituted soil did not significantly influence the amount of non-labelled soil (+ fertilizer) N accumulated by crops. The recovery of pea residue N in successive autumn-sown crops of barley......, oilseed rape and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was 14, 3 and 2% respectively; spring-sown barley, oilseed rape and wheat recovered only 6, 2 and 2% respectively. Similarly, the amount of non-labelled soil N accumulated was almost twice as high in autumn-sown crops as compared to spring-sown crops...

  10. Diversity of Pea-Associated F. proliferatum and F. verticillioides Populations Revealed by FUM1 Sequence Analysis and Fumonisin Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Kachlicki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium proliferatum and F. verticillioides are considered as minor pathogens of pea (Pisum sativum L.. Both species can survive in seed material without visible disease symptoms, but still contaminating it with fumonisins. Two populations of pea-derived F. proliferatum and F. verticillioides strains were subjected to FUM1 sequence divergence analysis, forming a distinct group when compared to the collection strains originating from different host species. Furthermore, the mycotoxigenic abilities of those strains were evaluated on the basis of in planta and in vitro fumonisin biosynthesis. No differences were observed in fumonisin B (FB levels measured in pea seeds (maximum level reached 1.5 μg g−1; however, in rice cultures, the majority of F. proliferatum genotypes produced higher amounts of FB1–FB3 than F. verticillioides strains.

  11. Genetic Variation Controlling Wrinkled Seed Phenotypes in Pisum: How Lucky Was Mendel?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey Rayner

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the traits studied by Mendel in pea (Pisum sativum L. was the wrinkled-seeded phenotype, and the molecular basis for a mutation underlying this phenotype was discovered in the 1990s. Although the starch-branching enzyme gene mutation identified at the genetic locus r is most likely to be that in seeds available to Mendel in the mid-1800s, it has remained an open question as to whether or not additional natural mutations in this gene exist within Pisum germplasm collections. Here, we explore this question and show that all but two wrinkled-seeded variants in one such collection correspond to either the mutant allele described previously for the r locus or a mutation at a second genetic locus, rb, affecting the gene encoding the large subunit of Adenosine diphosphoglucose (ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase; the molecular basis for the rb mutation is described here. The genetic basis for the phenotype of one (JI 2110 of the two lines which are neither r nor rb has been studied in crosses with a round-seeded variant (JI 281; for which extensive genetic marker data were expected. In marked contrast to the trait studied by Mendel and the rb phenotype; the data suggest that the wrinkled-seeded phenotype in JI 2110 is maternally determined, controlled by two genetic loci, and the extent to which it is manifested is very sensitive to the environment. Metabolite analysis of the cotyledons of JI 2110 revealed a profile for sucrose and sucrose-derived compounds that was more similar to that of wild-type round-seeded, than that of wrinkled-seeded r, pea lines. However, the metabolite profile of the seed coat (testa of JI 2110 was distinct from that of other round-seeded genotypes tested which, together with analysis of recombinant inbred progeny lines, suggests an explanation for the seed phenotype.

  12. Phytochrome-regulated expression of the genes encoding the small GTP-binding proteins in peas.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, K; Nagano, Y; Murai, N; Sasaki, Y

    1993-01-01

    We examined the effect of light on the mRNA levels of 11 genes (pra1-pra9A, pra9B, and pra9C) encoding the small GTP-binding proteins that belong to the ras superfamily in Pisum sativum. When the dark-grown seedlings were exposed to continuous white light for 24 hr, the levels of several pra mRNAs in the pea buds decreased: pra2 and pra3 mRNAs decreased markedly; pra4, pra6, and pra9A mRNAs decreased slightly; the other 6 pra mRNAs did not decrease. We studied the kinetics of mRNA accumulatio...

  13. Batch Scale Removal of an Organic Pollutant Amaranth Dye from Aqueous Solution using Pisum sativum Peels and Arachis hypogaea Shells as Adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, R.; Afzal, A.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to utilize low cost and environmentally friendly adsorbents for batch scale removal of Amaranth dye from aqueous medium. Peels of Pisum sativum (Pea) and Arachis hypogaea (Peanut) were utilized to investigate their dye removing capacity. The optimized adsorption conditions for Pisum sativum (P.S.P) and Arachis hypogaea (A.H.S) were: adsorbent dose; 0.6 and 0.4 g, contact time; 45 and 10 minutes, pH; 2.0 for both, agitation speed; 150 and 100 rpm and temperature; 60 and 50 degree C for P.S.P and A.H.S respectively. The adsorption data well suited to Langmuir isotherm. Maximum adsorption capacities were found to be 144.93 and 10.53 mg/g for P.S.P and A.H.S respectively. Feasibility of the process was indicated by negative values of thermodynamic parameters delta G/sup 0/ for both adsorbents. Kinetic studies indicated that adsorption of Amaranth dye from aqueous medium by Pisum sativum peels and Arachis hypogaea shells followed pseudo-seconder order kinetics. It was concluded that Pisum sativum peels are more effective adsorbent for removal of Amaranth from aqueous solution as compared to Arachis hypogaea shells. (author)

  14. Pea detection in food and feed samples by a real-time PCR method based on a specific legumin gene that allows diversity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Gómez, Sonia; López-Enríquez, Lorena; Caminero, Constantino; Hernández, Marta

    2008-12-10

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction is currently being used for the identification and quantification of plant and animal species as well as microorganisms in food or feed samples based on the amplification of specific sequences of low copy genes. We report here the development of a new real-time PCR method for the detection and quantification of the pea (Pisum sativum) based on the amplification of a specific region of the legS gene. The specificity was evaluated in a wide range of plant species (51 varieties of Pisum sp., and 32 other plant species and varieties taxonomically related or nonrelated). The method allows the detection and quantification of as low as 21.6 pg of DNA, which corresponds to 5 haploid genome copies. The system has been shown to be sensitive, reproducible and 100% specific for the rapid detection and quantification of pea DNA in processed food and feed samples, being therefore suitable for high-throughput analysis.

  15. Validation of molecular markers associated with boron tolerance, powdery mildew resistance and salinity tolerance in field peas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad eJavid

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Field pea (Pisum sativum L. is an important grain legume consumed both as human food and animal feed. However, productivity in low rainfall regions can be significantly reduced by inferior soils containing high levels of boron and/or salinity. Furthermore, powdery mildew (Erysiphe pisi disease also causes significant yield loss in warmer regions. Breeding for tolerance to these abiotic and biotic stresses are major aims for pea breeding programs and the application of molecular markers for these traits could greatly assist in developing improved germplasm at a faster rate. The current study reports the evaluation of a near diagnostic marker, PsMlo, associated with powdery mildew (PM resistance and boron (B tolerance as well as linked markers associated with salinity tolerance across a diverse set of pea germplasm. The PsMlo1 marker predicted the PM and B phenotypic responses with high levels of accuracy (>80% across a wide range of field pea genotypes, hence offers the potential to be widely adapted in pea breeding programs. In contrast, linked markers for salinity tolerance were population specific, therefore, application of these markers would be suitable to relevant crosses within the program. Our results also suggest that there are possible new sources of salt tolerance present in field pea germplasm that could be further exploited.

  16. Resistance of Faba Bean and Pea Germplasm to Callosobruchus chinensis (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) and Its Relationship With Quality Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Can-Xing; Zhu, Zhen-Dong; Ren, Gui-Xing; Wang, Xiao-Ming; Li, Dan-Dan

    2014-10-01

    In total, 339 faba bean (Vicia faba L.) and 100 pea (Pisum sativum L.) accessions were screened for their ability to resist Callosobruchus chinensis L. in free choice laboratory tests. Four, 15, and 43 faba bean varieties were highly resistant, resistant, and moderately resistant to C. chinensis, respectively. Three immune, three highly resistant, and six resistant accessions were discovered among the pea germplasm. The faba bean and pea varieties presented a hundred-kernel weight reduction varied from 0.18 to 35.36% for faba bean varieties and 0 to 56.53% for pea varieties. Varieties with brown and black seed color had significantly fewer wormholes and higher C. chinensis resistance than varieties with light-color seeds. Resistance to C. chinensis showed a significant, positive correlation with catechin, total polyphenol, and γ-aminobutyric acid contents, but a significant, negative correlation with oligosaccharide content. Correlation coefficients (r) between infestation rate of faba bean and total phenol, catechin, and oligosaccharide contents were -0.9723, -0.8071, and 0.7631, respectively. The values of r for pea resistance and total phenol, catechin, and oligosaccharide content were -0.8846, -0.7666, and 0.8308, respectively. The results suggest that quality components in faba bean and pea have a great role in resistance against C. chinensis. © 2014 Entomological Society of America.

  17. Magnetic treatment of irrigation water and snow pea and chickpea seeds enhances early growth and nutrient contents of seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Harsharn S; Maheshwari, Basant L

    2011-01-01

    The effects of magnetic treatment of irrigation water and snow pea (Pisum sativum L var. macrocarpon) and Kabuli chickpea (Cicer arietinum L) seeds on the emergence, early growth and nutrient contents of seedlings were investigated under glasshouse conditions. The treatments included (i) magnetic treatment of irrigation water (MTW), (ii) magnetic treatment of seeds (MTS), (iii) magnetic treatment of irrigation water and seeds (MTWS) and (iv) no magnetic treatment of irrigation water or seeds as control treatment. A magnetic treatment device with two permanent magnets (magnetic induction: 3.5-136 mT) was used for the above treatments. Seeds were sown in washed sand and seedlings were harvested at 20 days. The results showed that MTW led to a significant (P pea and 51% for chickpea), shoot dry weight (25% for snow pea and 20% for chickpea) and contents of N, K, Ca, Mg, S, Na, Zn, Fe and Mn in both seedling varieties compared to control seedlings. Likewise, there were significant increases in ERI (33% for snow peas and 37% for chickpea), shoot dry weight (11% for snow pea and 4% for chickpea) and some nutrients of snow pea and chickpea seedlings with MTS in comparison with the controls. The results of this study suggest that both MTW and MTS have the potential to improve the early seedling growth and nutrient contents of seedlings. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Effect of replacing a soy diet with Vicia faba and Pisum sativum on performance, meat and fat traits of Cinta Senese pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Sirtori

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of diets containing genetically modified organism-free legumes as a replacement of soybean on the basis of performance, carcass composition and quality of local pig meat (Cinta Senese. Twenty-four Cinta Senese barrows were divided into 3 dietary groups and were each fed with a diet containing different protein sources: soybean meal (SOY, Vicia faba (FABA and Pisum sativum (PEA (8 pigs for each group. The diets were isonitrogenous and isocaloric and contained approximately 14.5% crude protein and 14.8 MJ/kg of digestible energy (on dry matter. Each group was reared outdoors in a paddock of 3500 m2. In vivo performances were not different among groups. At slaughter, differences in subcutaneous fat thickness appeared only in the outer layer, at the last thoracic vertebra level, which was lowest in the PEA group. No differences were found in the sample joint composition. With regard to the chemico-physical traits of meat and fat, the FABA group had the highest values of redness in lean and backfat, while the PEA group showed higher moisture and lower fat content in meat compared to the SOY group. Differences in the fatty acid profile of backfat were found only for the C16:1 percentage that was higher in FABA than SOY pigs. In conclusion, Vicia faba and Pisum sativum could be a good alternative to soybean in the growing-fattening of Cinta Senese pigs.

  19. [Non-thermal effect of GSM electromagnetic radiation on quality of pea seeds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselova, T V; Veselovskiĭ, V A; Deev, L I; Baĭzhumanov, A A

    2012-01-01

    The seeds with low level of room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) were selected from a lot of air-dry peas (Pisum sativum) with 62% germination. These strong seeds (95-97% germination percentage) in air-dry, imbibed or emerged states were exposed to 905 MHz GSM-band electromagnetic radiation (EMR). The following effects of EMR were observed. Fraction II with higher RTP level appeared in the air-dry seeds. The germination rate decreased 2-3 fold in the air-dry, swollen and sprouting seeds due to an increase in the ratio of the seedlings with morphological defects (from 3 to 38%) and suffocated seeds (from 1 to 15%). We suggest tentative mechanisms to account for the decreased fitness of peas under GSM-band EMR (905 MHz); also discussed is the role of non-enzymatic hydrolysis of carbohydrates and amino-carbonyl reaction in this process.

  20. Modulation of Legume Defense Signaling Pathways by Native and Non-native Pea Aphid Clones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Arcos, Carlos; Reichelt, Michael; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Kunert, Grit

    2016-01-01

    The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) is a complex of at least 15 genetically different host races that are native to specific legume plants, but can all develop on the universal host plant Vicia faba. Despite much research, it is still unclear why pea aphid host races (biotypes) are able to colonize their native hosts while other host races are not. All aphids penetrate the plant and salivate into plant cells when they test plant suitability. Thus plants might react differently to the various pea aphid host races. To find out whether legume species vary in their defense responses to different pea aphid host races, we measured the amounts of salicylic acid (SA), the jasmonic acid-isoleucine conjugate (JA-Ile), other jasmonate precursors and derivatives, and abscisic acid (ABA) in four different species (Medicago sativa, Trifolium pratense, Pisum sativum, V. faba) after infestation by native and non-native pea aphid clones of various host races. Additionally, we assessed the performance of the clones on the four plant species. On M. sativa and T. pratense, non-native clones that were barely able to survive or reproduce, triggered a strong SA and JA-Ile response, whereas infestation with native clones led to lower levels of both phytohormones. On P. sativum, non-native clones, which survived or reproduced to a certain extent, induced fluctuating SA and JA-Ile levels, whereas the native clone triggered only a weak SA and JA-Ile response. On the universal host V. faba all aphid clones triggered only low SA levels initially, but induced clone-specific patterns of SA and JA-Ile later on. The levels of the active JA-Ile conjugate and of the other JA-pathway metabolites measured showed in many cases similar patterns, suggesting that the reduction in JA signaling was due to an effect upstream of OPDA. ABA levels were downregulated in all aphid clone-plant combinations and were therefore probably not decisive factors for aphid-plant compatibility. Our results suggest that A

  1. Bioactivity of flours of seeds of leguminous crops Pisum sativum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioactivity of flours of seeds of leguminous crops Pisum sativum, Phaseolus vulgaris and Glycine max used as botanical insecticides against Sitophilus oryzae Linnaeus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on sorghum grains.

  2. The Garden of Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a garden that grows more than vegetables. The grounds of McKinley Elementary School in San Diego, California, was a neglected area for years, until recently when an organic garden was planted to revive and brighten the dreary area behind the school's bungalow classrooms. Each grade now has its own wood-bordered plot where a…

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Bracteole differentiation; COCHLEATA gene; garden pea; leaf differentiation; LEAFY ortholog; leaf size; Pisum sativum; secondary inflorescence; stub histology; UNIFOLIATA gene; UNIFOLIATA repression; UNIFOLIATA-TENDRILLED ACACIA gene ...

  4. GARDENING IN OTTOMAN TURKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yıldız AKSOY

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Within this study, the art of gardening in Ottoman Turks has been examined in four periods: 1. The period starting with the establishment of the Ottoman Empire till the conquest of the Byzantine capital of Constantinople by the Turks (1300-1453 2. The period starting with the conquest of Istanbul till the Tulip Era (1706 3. The Tulip Era (1703-1730 4. The period starting with the Tulip Era (1730 till the establishment of the Republic (1923 In the first period, Ottoman Turks remained under the influence of Seljuk art and were partly in contact with the Byzantine works. When miniatures showing the palace life are examined, often the importance given to the atrium garden could be seen. A significant development in the art of gardening was experienced during the period starting with the conquest of Istanbul till the Tulip Era. The Tulip Era has been a very productive period in terms of fine art in Ottoman history. Major improvements and innovations in poetry, literature, music, civil architecture and especially in the art of gardening has emerged. Till the Tulip Era, the unique natural landscape of Istanbul was equipped with the top works of art of Ottoman Turks. The art of gardening in Ottoman Turks has entered a new period with the end of the Tulip Era in 1730. This period, has been the period in which foreign influence started to affect Ottoman gardens. The most important works of the second period; the Topkapı Palace Garden and the Yıldız Palace garden, which was mostly established in a natural layout and has been the latest example of Ottoman palace gardening, were examined within this study. The structuring of the Ottoman gardens has changed and developed during the historical process depending on various effects such as life styles of the period and the artistic-cultural structure of the period.

  5. Phytochrome regulation of gibberellin metabolism in shoots of dwarf Pisum sativum L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campell, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    To study the effect of light on the recessive dwarfing allele, le, of Pisum sativum L., etiolated, paclobutrazol treated LeLe (cv. Alaska) and lele (cv. Progress) pea seedlings were transferred to different light regimes. The growth response of both genotypes to applications of GA/sub 1/, GA/sub 20/, and steviol was measured over 48 hours using position transducers. Both genotypes responded to GA/sub 1/ under red irradiation and in darkness. The LeLe plants grew in response to steviol and GA/sub 20/ under red irradiation and in darkness. The lele plants responded to steviol and GA/sub 20/ in darkness, but showed a much smaller response when red irradiated. The red effect on lele plants was reversible by far-red irradiation. (/sup 3/H)GA/sub 20/ was applied to nana pea seedlings, homozygous for le, grown under different light regimes. Radioactive metabolites were later extracted from the shoots of the treated plants. Both the free acid and conjugate pools were analyzed by reversed phase HPLC, and some radioactive metabolites were tentatively identified by comparing their retention times to those of authentic (/sup 3/H)GAs.

  6. Comportement agronomique d'une collection de pois (Pisum sativum L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouslama, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Agronomical Behaviour of a Pea Collection (Pisum sativum L.. This experience was achieved under greenhouse conditions. Twelve genotypes of pea were used (Asgrow, Jumbo, Lincoln, Merveille de Kelvedon, Purser, Rajai Torpe, Snajor Kosep, Korai,Wando, Rondo, local genotype, Major Kosep Korai and Surgevil. They were cultivated on peat during 5.5 months (from October to April. Some agronomical parameters were studied: resistance to diseases, (Powdery-mildew, mildew, top yellow virus, anthracnose, browning, fresh matter, number of branches/plant, number of flowers/plant, number of pods/ plant and the yield of grains /plant. Results showed that only the genotype Purser is resistant to all diseases and Surgevil is sensitive only to the Top Yellow virus. The local genotype is sensitive to three frequent diseases (Powdery-mildew, mildew and Anthracnose. With regard to vegetative growth, the highest yield of fresh matter do not contribute towards a high fertility rate. In fact, only the genotypes having a weak yield of fresh matter (Snajor Kosep Korai, Asgrow, Major Kosep Korai, Rajai Torpe and Purser have the most important rate of fertility (> 30%. Within this group, the most important yield (> 9 g/plant is a result of high: number of pods/plant (7.5 to 21.6 and of grains/pod (2.8 to 4.92. Finally, genotype Purser should be retained for farmers and programs of genetic amelioration for its resistance to diseases and agronomical performances.

  7. ( Voandze subterranean ) and pigeon pea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Formulation and evaluation of complementary food based on bambara nut ( Voandze subterranean ) and pigeon pea ( Cajanus cajan ) ... Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences ... Objectives: The study formulated and evaluated complementary food made from composites of maize, bambara nut and pigeon pea. Materials ...

  8. Stamina pistilloida, the Pea ortholog of Fim and UFO, is required for normal development of flowers, inflorescences, and leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S; Hofer, J; Murfet, I

    2001-01-01

    Isolation and characterization of two severe alleles at the Stamina pistilloida (Stp) locus reveals that Stp is involved in a wide range of developmental processes in the garden pea. The most severe allele, stp-4, results in flowers consisting almost entirely of sepals and carpels. Production of ectopic secondary flowers in stp-4 plants suggests that Stp is involved in specifying floral meristem identity in pea. The stp mutations also reduce the complexity of the compound pea leaf, and primary inflorescences often terminate prematurely in an aberrant sepaloid flower. In addition, stp mutants were shorter than their wild-type siblings due to a reduction in cell number in their internodes. Fewer cells were also found in the epidermis of the leaf rachis of stp mutants. Examination of the effects of stp-4 in double mutant combinations with af, tl, det, and veg2-2-mutations known to influence leaf, inflorescence, and flower development in pea-suggests that Stp function is independent of these genes. A synergistic interaction between weak mutant alleles at Stp and Uni indicated that these two genes act together, possibly to regulate primordial growth. Molecular analysis revealed that Stp is the pea homolog of the Antirrhinum gene Fimbriata (Fim) and of UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) from Arabidopsis. Differences between Fim/UFO and Stp mutant phenotypes and expression patterns suggest that expansion of Stp activity into the leaf was an important step during evolution of the compound leaf in the garden pea.

  9. Numerical Solution and it's Analysis during Solar Drying of Green Peas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godireddy, Arunsandeep; Lingayat, Abhay; Naik, Razat Kumar; Chandramohan, V. P.; Raju, V. Rajesh Kanan

    2017-08-01

    A mathematical model is developed for solar drying of green peas (Botanical name: Pisum Sativum). The problem is solved assuming the shape of the green peas is spherical. The governing transient mass transfer equation is discretized into finite difference scheme. The time marching is performed by implicit scheme. The governing equations and boundary conditions are non-dimensionalized to get generic results. The product in the chamber is in contact with air which is heated by solar energy, so the boundary conditions of third kind (convective boundary conditions) are considered. By space and time discretization a set of algebraic equations are generated and these algebraic equations are solved by tridiagonal matrix algorithm. A computer code is developed in MATLAB in order to compute the transient moisture content distribution inside the product. Center point, boundary and mean moisture of green peas are estimated at different temperatures and drying time. Present numerical result is compared with experimental result from literature and it was found that there is a good agreement of results. The drying time is predicted for how quickly the mean moisture of green peas is reached to 50, 40, 30, 20 and 10% of its initial moisture corresponding to different temperatures.

  10. Identification of genes differentially expressed in a resistant reaction to Mycosphaerella pinodes in pea using microarray technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cubero José I

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ascochyta blight, caused by Mycosphaerella pinodes is one of the most important pea pathogens. However, little is known about the genes and mechanisms of resistance acting against M. pinodes in pea. Resistance identified so far to this pathogen is incomplete, polygenic and scarce in pea, being most common in Pisum relatives. The identification of the genes underlying resistance would increase our knowledge about M. pinodes-pea interaction and would facilitate the introgression of resistance into pea varieties. In the present study differentially expressed genes in the resistant P. sativum ssp. syriacum accession P665 comparing to the susceptible pea cv. Messire after inoculation with M. pinodes have been identified using a M. truncatula microarray. Results Of the 16,470 sequences analysed, 346 were differentially regulated. Differentially regulated genes belonged to almost all functional categories and included genes involved in defense such as genes involved in cell wall reinforcement, phenylpropanoid and phytoalexins metabolism, pathogenesis- related (PR proteins and detoxification processes. Genes associated with jasmonic acid (JA and ethylene signal transduction pathways were induced suggesting that the response to M. pinodes in pea is regulated via JA and ET pathways. Expression levels of ten differentially regulated genes were validated in inoculated and control plants using qRT-PCR showing that the P665 accession shows constitutively an increased expression of the defense related genes as peroxidases, disease resistance response protein 39 (DRR230-b, glutathione S-transferase (GST and 6a-hydroxymaackiain methyltransferase. Conclusions Through this study a global view of genes expressed during resistance to M. pinodes has been obtained, giving relevant information about the mechanisms and pathways conferring resistance to this important disease. In addition, the M. truncatula microarray represents an efficient tool to

  11. Identification of genes differentially expressed in a resistant reaction to Mycosphaerella pinodes in pea using microarray technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondevilla, Sara; Küster, Helge; Krajinski, Franziska; Cubero, José I; Rubiales, Diego

    2011-01-13

    Ascochyta blight, caused by Mycosphaerella pinodes is one of the most important pea pathogens. However, little is known about the genes and mechanisms of resistance acting against M. pinodes in pea. Resistance identified so far to this pathogen is incomplete, polygenic and scarce in pea, being most common in Pisum relatives. The identification of the genes underlying resistance would increase our knowledge about M. pinodes-pea interaction and would facilitate the introgression of resistance into pea varieties. In the present study differentially expressed genes in the resistant P. sativum ssp. syriacum accession P665 comparing to the susceptible pea cv. Messire after inoculation with M. pinodes have been identified using a M. truncatula microarray. Of the 16,470 sequences analysed, 346 were differentially regulated. Differentially regulated genes belonged to almost all functional categories and included genes involved in defense such as genes involved in cell wall reinforcement, phenylpropanoid and phytoalexins metabolism, pathogenesis- related (PR) proteins and detoxification processes. Genes associated with jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene signal transduction pathways were induced suggesting that the response to M. pinodes in pea is regulated via JA and ET pathways. Expression levels of ten differentially regulated genes were validated in inoculated and control plants using qRT-PCR showing that the P665 accession shows constitutively an increased expression of the defense related genes as peroxidases, disease resistance response protein 39 (DRR230-b), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and 6a-hydroxymaackiain methyltransferase. Through this study a global view of genes expressed during resistance to M. pinodes has been obtained, giving relevant information about the mechanisms and pathways conferring resistance to this important disease. In addition, the M. truncatula microarray represents an efficient tool to identify candidate genes controlling resistance to M

  12. Oviposition preference of pea weevil, Bruchus pisorum L. among host and non-host plants and its implication for pest management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esayas Mendesil eAmosa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pea weevil, Bruchus pisorum L. is a major insect pest of field pea, Pisum sativum L. worldwide and current control practices mainly depend on the use of chemical insecticides that can cause adverse effects on environment and human health. Insecticides are also unaffordable by many small-scale farmers in developing countries, which highlights the need for investigating plant resistance traits and to develop alternative pest management strategies. The aim of this study was to determine oviposition preference of pea weevil among P. sativum genotypes with different level of resistance (Adet, 32410-1 and 235899-1 and the non-host leguminous plants wild pea (Pisum fulvum Sibth. et Sm. and grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L., in no-choice and dual-choice tests. Pod thickness and micromorphological traits of the pods were also examined. In the no-choice tests significantly more eggs were laid on the susceptible genotype Adet than on the other genotypes. Very few eggs were laid on P. fulvum and L. sativus. In the dual-choice experiments Adet was preferred by the females for oviposition. Furthermore, combinations of Adet with either 235899-1 or non-host plants significantly reduced the total number of eggs laid by the weevil in the dual-choice tests. Female pea weevils were also found to discriminate between host and non-host plants during oviposition. The neoplasm (Np formation on 235899-1 pods was negatively correlated with oviposition by pea weevil. Pod wall thickness and trichomes might have influenced oviposition preference of the weevils. These results on oviposition behavior the weevils can be used in developing alternative pest management strategies such as trap cropping using highly attractive genotype and intercropping with the non-host plants.

  13. Pengaruh Pemanasan Biji Kacang Pisum Sativum L Var. "Belinda" dengan Sinar Infra Merah terhadap Nilai Daya Cerna dan Energi Metabolisme Nitrogen Terkoreksi Paca Ayam

    OpenAIRE

    Siagian, Patuan L.P

    1998-01-01

    Legume seed of peas (Pisum sativum) was radiated by infrared of 2450 MHz for 0, 80 and 100 seconds in a gas-type experimental radiator. Three levels of initial seed moisture content (13%, 17%, and 21%) was regulated by the moistening double-spiral mixer. The apparent digestibility of the nutrients of the treated seeds was evaluated using 96 five-week old male chicks of LSL-Brown in a full automatically adjustable climate conditioned room.The results of this experiment showed a Significant inc...

  14. The response of photosynthetic parameters of Triticum aestivum L. and Pisum sativum L. to different levels of salinity stress at different climate conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Januskaitiene, Irena; Petraitytė, Skaistė

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the response of physiological parameters of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. ʾAdaʾ) and pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. ’Early onward’) to different levels of salinity stress under changing climate conditions. Experimental plants were grown in growth chambers under the conditions of current climate (400 µmol mol-1 CO2 and day/night temperatures of 21/14 °C) and warmed climate (800 µmol mol-1 CO2 and day/night temperatures of 25/18 °C). Under both climat...

  15. Organic cultivation of field pea by use of products with different action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgieva, N.; Nikolova, I.; Delchev, G.

    2015-07-01

    The possibilities for increasing the productivity and control of the pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum L.) in field pea (Pisum sativum L.) organic cultivation by the use of following bioproducts NeemAzal T/S and Pyrethrum FS-EC (insecticides), applied individually and in combination with Polyversum (growth regulator and fungicide) and Biofa (foliar fertilizer), as well as to evaluate the stability of the used mixtures were studied. Synthetic products Nurelle D and Flordimex 420 (alone and in combination) were used as a standard. The products were applied once (at budding stage) or twice (at budding and flowering stages). The results showed that forage pea productivity was influenced positively by the application of all organic products. The plants treated with the organic combinations formed an average yield of 3190.2 kg/ha, which was only 4.7% lower than that for the synthetic combination of Flordimex+Nurelle D. The highest yield was produced under application of two mixtures: Biofa+Pyrethrum and Polyversum+Pyrethrum at budding and flowering stages (22.0 and 21.8% above untreated control, respectively). These combinations were also distinguished for their most pronounced protective effect against the attack of the pea weevil and decrease in its numbers of 37.0 and 38.5%, respectively. Pyrethrum was distinguished for a lower degree of damaged seeds and a toxic effect against the pea weevil in comparison with NeemAzal. Technologically the most valuable variant, which united high stability, productivity and protection against pea weevil, was the combination of Biofa+Pyrethrum applied twice. Further investigations are indispensible to expand the range of products (bioinsectides, biofertilizers and growth regulators), which provides good insect control and high prod. (Author)

  16. Education Function of Botanical Gardens

    OpenAIRE

    Ruhugül Özge Ocak; Banu Öztürk Kurtaslan

    2015-01-01

    Botanical gardens are very significant organizations which protect the environment against the increasing environmental problems, provide environmental education for people, offer recreation possibilities, etc. This article describes botanical gardens and their functions. The most important function of botanical garden is to provide environmental education for people and improve environmental awareness. Considering this function, some botanical gardens were examined and o...

  17. Fostering Children's Interests in Gardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekies, Kristi S.; Sheavly, Marcia Eames

    2007-01-01

    Despite the rapidly growing interest in children's gardens and attention to the positive benefits of gardening for children, little is known about the ways in which young people actually form interests in gardening. Using a sample of 9- and 10-year-old children at a school garden site in New York State, this study examined the ways in which…

  18. Long-Term Fungal Inhibition by Pisum sativum Flour Hydrolysate during Storage of Wheat Flour Bread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavecchia, Anna; Gramaglia, Valerio; Gobbetti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify antifungal compounds from natural sources to be used as ingredients in the bakery industry, water/salt-soluble extracts (WSE) from different legume flour hydrolysates obtained by the use of a fungal protease were assayed against Penicillium roqueforti DPPMAF1. The agar diffusion assays allowed the selection of the pea (Pisum sativum) hydrolysate as the most active. As shown by the hyphal radial growth rate, the WSE had inhibitory activity towards several fungi isolated from bakeries. The MIC of the WSE was 9.0 mg/ml. Fungal inhibition was slightly affected by heating and variations in pH. The antifungal activity was attributed to three native proteins (pea defensins 1 and 2 and a nonspecific lipid transfer protein [nsLTP]) and a mixture of peptides released during hydrolysis. The three proteins have been reported previously as components of the defense system of the plant. Five peptides were purified from WSE and were identified as sequences encrypted in leginsulin A, vicilin, provicilin, and the nsLTP. To confirm antifungal activity, the peptides were chemically synthesized and tested. Freeze-dried WSE were used as ingredients in leavened baked goods. In particular, breads made by the addition of 1.6% (wt/wt) of the extract and fermented by baker's yeast or sourdough were characterized for their main chemical, structural, and sensory features, packed in polyethylene bags, stored at room temperature, and compared to controls prepared without pea hydrolysate. Artificially inoculated slices of a bread containing the WSE did not show contamination by fungi until at least 21 days of storage and behaved like the bread prepared with calcium propionate (0.3%, wt/wt). PMID:25862230

  19. Garden of cosmic speculation

    CERN Document Server

    Jencks, Charles

    2005-01-01

    This book tells the story of one of the most important gardens in Europe, created by the architectural critic and designer Charles Jencks and his late wife, the landscape architect and author Maggie Keswick. The Garden of Cosmic Speculation is a landscape that celebrates the new sciences of complexity and chaos theory and consists of a series of metaphors exploring the origins, the destiny and the substance of the Universe. The book is illustrated with year-round photography, bringing the garden's many dimensions vividly to life.

  20. Highly-multiplexed SNP genotyping for genetic mapping and germplasm diversity studies in pea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deulvot Chrystel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs can be used as genetic markers for applications such as genetic diversity studies or genetic mapping. New technologies now allow genotyping hundreds to thousands of SNPs in a single reaction. In order to evaluate the potential of these technologies in pea, we selected a custom 384-SNP set using SNPs discovered in Pisum through the resequencing of gene fragments in different genotypes and by compiling genomic sequence data present in databases. We then designed an Illumina GoldenGate assay to genotype both a Pisum germplasm collection and a genetic mapping population with the SNP set. Results We obtained clear allelic data for more than 92% of the SNPs (356 out of 384. Interestingly, the technique was successful for all the genotypes present in the germplasm collection, including those from species or subspecies different from the P. sativum ssp sativum used to generate sequences. By genotyping the mapping population with the SNP set, we obtained a genetic map and map positions for 37 new gene markers. Conclusion Our results show that the Illumina GoldenGate assay can be used successfully for high-throughput SNP genotyping of diverse germplasm in pea. This genotyping approach will simplify genotyping procedures for association mapping or diversity studies purposes and open new perspectives in legume genomics.

  1. Lawn and Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    The most effective strategy for controlling pests in your lawn and garden may be to combine methods in an approach known as Integrated Pest Management. See videos and find tips for implementing IPM at your residence.

  2. The Slate Garden

    CERN Multimedia

    Alexandre Pelletier and Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    On the patio of the Main Building, a new garden has been unveiled. Inspired by physicists themselves, the garden uses a clever combination of flower arrangements and slate slabs to create the shape of the CMS particle tracker.   Scribbling, crossing out, and writing over it again. In an age of digital "tablets", scientists have remained faithful to the traditional blackboard... the inspiration for the Slate Garden. Completed just a few days ago on the Main Building patio (Building 500), the garden was designed by landscape architect Laurent Essig – who also created the InGRID installation outside Building 33 – and is the perfect combination of organic and mineral materials. Composed of 100 pieces of slate laid across three concentric circles, the work recalls the elegant lines of the CMS particle tracker. The project was completed thanks to the collaboration of a number of CERN technical services, in particular the Green Spaces Service, the Transport Serv...

  3. Symbiosis of selected Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae strains with diverse pea genotypes: effects on biological nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Bueckert, Rosalind; Schoenau, Jeff; Diederichsen, Axel; Zakeri, Hossein; Warkentin, Tom

    2017-11-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) can be improved by optimizing the interaction between the rhizobial inoculant and pea (Pisum sativum L.), leading to increased productivity and reduced nitrogen (N) fertilizer use. Eight Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae strains were used to inoculate the super-nodulating pea mutant Rondo-nod3 (fix+), the hyper-nodulating pea mutant Frisson P88 Sym29, CDC Meadow commercial control, and the non-nodulating mutant Frisson P56 (nod-) to evaluate BNF in a greenhouse assay. Significant differences in strain × cultivar interactions were detected for shoot and root dry masses, which ranged from 1.8 to 4.7 g and from 0.27 to 0.73 g per plant, respectively; for nodule number on lateral roots, which ranged from 25 to 430 per plant; for amount of fixed N 2 , which ranged from 15 to 67 mg and from 4 to 15 mg per plant for shoot and root tissues, respectively; and for percentage of N derived from atmosphere (%Ndfa), which ranged from 37% to 61% and from 35% to 65% for shoot and root tissue, respectively. Strain × cultivar interactions in this study could contribute to identification of superior strains and pea breeding lines with genetic superiority in BNF. Nodule production in pea plants was not necessarily correlated with the amount of fixed N 2 , suggesting nodule activity is more important to BNF than is nodule number.

  4. Metabolism of Tritiated Gibberellin A9 by Shoots of Dark-grown Dwarf Pea, cv. Meteor 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Railton, Ian D.; Durley, Richard C.; Pharis, Richard P.

    1974-01-01

    Tritium-labeled gibberellin A9 (3H-GA9) was metabolized by etiolated shoots of dwarf pea (Pisum sativum cv. Meteor) to GA20, GA10, 2,3-dihydro-GA31, and a number of highly polar, acidic GA-like substances. Identifications were made by gasliquid radiochromatography and combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Kinetic studies showed that GA30 and 2,3-dihydro-GA31 were produced within 5 hours following 3H-GA9 application to pea shoots. The polar GA-like substances were produced between 5 and 10 hours after 3H-GA9 application. Levels of GA10 increased with time, and since no GA10 was produced during the purification procedures, GA10 was, in all probability, produced from 3H-GA9 within the plant tissue. The radioactive interconversion products produced by pea from 3H-GA9 have chromatographic properties similar to biologically active GA-like substances present in etiolated shoots of dwarf pea. Large scale applications of 3H-GA9 with very low specific activity to etiolated pea shoots showed that the radioactivity of the interconversion products was correlated exactly with biological activity as assayed by dwarf rice (Oryza sativa cv. Tan-ginbozu). PMID:16658838

  5. Effects of infection of common root rot on protein content, cooking quality and other characters in pea varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engqvist, L G

    2001-10-01

    Pea varieties are known to show a considerable variability in seed yield, protein content, cooking quality and other characters over years and locations. Common root rot, a wide spread soil borne disease of peas in Europe and elsewhere, is a contributing factor in the observed variation in pea yields and pea quality characteristics such as protein content and cooking quality. It interacts with the weather and these factors together constitute important reasons for the variations observed within a single variety in the mentioned characters. The common root rot is, however, in seasons with more moderate deviations from the mean in terms of temperature and precipitation, itself able to constitute the most important source of variation in characteristics of the harvested crop. During the 1980ies and the 1990ies investigations were carried out to study the interactions between common root rot (Aphanomyces euteiches) and peas (Pisum sativum). Seed yield, protein content, cooking quality, hectolitre weight, thousand kernel weight, growing time, duration of flowering time and stem length were all significantly influenced by the fungus.

  6. Cultivating the Glocal Garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthijs Hisschemoller

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the question under which conditions small-scale urban agriculture (UA initiatives can accelerate a sustainability transition of the global food system. It develops the notion of a glocal garden, a large number of likeminded local initiatives with a global impact and forms of worldwide collaboration. Taking a transition perspective, the glocal garden, producing vegetables and fruits, is a niche that has to overcome barriers to compete with the dominant food regime. Since a sustainability transition restructures (policy sectors, institutional domains including knowledge systems, the paper explores which innovations are needed for the glocal garden to succeed. It discusses the glocal garden as an environmental, a social, an economic and a global project. As an environmental project, the glocal garden will link sustainable production of food with renewable energy production. As a social project, it will be organized into a consumers’ cooperative. As an economic project, it will strive for profit, increasing the yield in a sustainable manner. As a global project, it will enhance collaboration between local cooperatives in the North and the South, as well as with rural agriculture. Under these conditions, the glocal garden can develop into a power, able to resist a possible future food regime that splits societies, in terms of quality standards and food products, into haves and have-nots.

  7. Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) (Homoptera: Aphididae) infestation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant height, plant density per 0.25 m2, number of pea aphids and parasitoids per plant, ladybird beetles per plot, and finally grain yield per plot were recorded. Based on the results of the ANOVA, plant height was significantly different between treated and untreated plots especially after the vegetative stage. The density of ...

  8. Line X tester analysis in pea (Pisum sativum L.): Identification of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-18

    Aug 18, 2008 ... parents together with the information regarding nature and magnitude of gene effects controlling quantitative traits (Basbag et al., 2007). GCA and SCA which identify the hybrids with high yield are the most important criteria in breeding programs (Ceyhan, 2003). High GCA and. SCA for seed yield and yield ...

  9. Breeding potential of the field pea (Pisum sativum L. cultivars and their progenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Kosev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The inheritance and gene effects structure were investigated for ten quantitative traits in field cultivars by a full diallel model of four parents – the cultivars Kerpo, Pleven 10, Mir and EFB33. Overdominance was prevalent for most of the traits in both hybrid generations (F1 and F2 except for 1000-seed weigth. A non-additive gene action appeared to be more predominant for the inheritance of most traits studied. The fraction of h2/H2 indicated that at least one group of genes controlled dominance for all the traits, namely for seed weight per plant (6, seeds per pod (3. The Н2/4Н1 ratio was close to the expected value of 0.25 for seeds per plant and seed weight per plant, indicating a symmetrical distribution of dominant and recessive genes. Dominant alleles were more frequent in parental forms for the inheritance of most traits except seeds per pod in F1. In the case of seeds per pod (F1 and 1000-seed weight (F1 and F2 a comparatively low difference was established between the coefficient of heritability in narrow and broad sense, indicating that the selection in early generations may be effective. The genotypes with exhibited dominant alleles were EFB33 for plant height, first pod height, internode distance and fertile nodes per plant, Mir for pods per plant, nodes per plant and 1000-seed weight and Pleven 10 for seeds per plant and seed weight per plant. Kerpo had recessive alleles for all the tested traits except seeds per pod.

  10. Line X tester analysis in pea ( Pisum sativum L.): Identification of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    effects for all studied traits. While PS9830S329 (female) and H (male) were the best general combiners among the parents, PS9830S329 x B12 was the best cross for seed yield. Hybrids generally showed greater yield potential than their parental genotypes. Heterosis was observed in some hybrids for each trait studied.

  11. Assessing the Breeding Value of Nine Spring Field Pea (Pisum Sativum L. Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosev Valentin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was performed during the period 2007-2009 in the second experimental field of institute of Forage Crops, Pleven. Were studies follow varieties: Kristal, Picardi, Amitie, Druzba, Kerpo, Usatii 90, Rezonator, Harkovskii atalon. The variety Pleven 4 was used as a standard. According to the obtained experimental data the varieties could be classified to different groups on earliness. Early are Picardi, Amitie and Harkovskii atalonn with earliness coefficient 1.00, mid - early is Kerpo 1.38 - 1.57 and late varieties Kristal, Druzba, Pleven 4, Usatii 90, Rezonator. Harkovskii atalon is characterized with high lodging resistance only 28.61% from plants are lodging susceptible and it could be including in the future hybridization as donor of essential characters. With highest seed yield are Harkovskii atalonn (207.17 kg x da−1, Kerpo (206.08 kg x da−1 and Usatii 90 (203.33 kg x da−1 what opportunity to be included in breeding programs for high yield varieties.

  12. Genetic analysis on some yield traits of pea (Pisum sativum L. crosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VALENTIN KOSEV

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The trial was carried during 2011-2013 on the second experimental field of the Institute of Forage Crops – Pleven, Bulgaria. Eight generations (P1, P2, F1, F2, RC1 and each reciprocal generation from a cross between the Shtambovii and Pleven 10 varieties were sown in this study. Five traits were evaluated: number of pods and seeds per plant, seed weight per plant, plant weight and number of fertile nodes per plant were used as components of yield. Positive true heterosis for the investigated traits was found in all hybrids of F1 generations. At F1BC - Shtamboviii х Pleven 10 was observed negative heterosis effects for number of pods and seeds per plant and seed weight per plant, and F1BC - Pleven 10 х Shtambovii for plant weight and number of fertile nodes per plant. In F2 the plants from Shtamboviii х Pleven 10 had the strongest depression for number of seeds per plant and from Pleven 10 х Shtambovii for plant weight. High level on the indices of transgression was found for all traits. All traits except plant weight and number of fertile nodes per plant had epistatic gene effects. The results showed that for plant weight selection will be more effective if it starts in later hybrid generations. Traits number of fertile nodes and seeds per plant were the characteristics with the highest values for selection.

  13. Temporal and spatial distribution of roots and competition for nitrogen in pea-barley intercrops - a field study employing P-32 technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, H.; Ambus, P.; Jensen, E.S.

    2001-01-01

    Root system dynamics, productivity and N use were studied in inter- and sole crops of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) on a temperate sandy loam. A P-32 tracer placed at a depth of 12.5, 37.5, 62.5 or 87.5 cm was employed to determine root system dynamics...... of that of the pea root system in root depth and lateral root distribution. More than 90% of the P uptake by the pea root system was confined to the top 12.5 cm of soil, whereas barley had about 25-30% of tracer P uptake in the 12.5 - 62.5 cm soil layer. Judging from this P uptake, intercropping caused the barley...

  14. Quality Control of Canned Peas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucica Nistor

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Vegetables are food of vegetable origin which has an important place in human nutrition because of their complex chemical composition. With the discovery of causes that cause alteration of food (the vital action of microorganisms, the problem of food conservation began to be substantiated in terms scientific, in that way that the present conservation means not only to avoid microbial spoilage of food, but also keeping most of the nutritional and organoleptic properties of the product under conservation. The paper is structured in six chapters that have followed all the stages of pea to preserve the finished product-peas canned, and changes occurring in the process of preservation by analyzing four different kinds of peas. In this paper work is has been showed fat content determination, determination of sodium chloride and microbiological control of canned peas.

  15. The same allele of translation initiation factor 4E mediates resistance against two Potyvirus spp. in Pisum sativum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Rasmussen, M.; Møller, I.S.; Tulinius, G.

    2007-01-01

    was overcome, and virus from these plants had a codon change causing an Arg to His change at position 116 of the predicted viral genome-linked protein (VPg). Accordingly, plants carrying the wlv resistance gene were infected upon inoculation with BYMV-W derived from cDNA with a His codon at position 116......Pathogenicity of two sequenced isolates of Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) was established on genotypes of Pisum sativum L. reported to carry resistance genes to BYMV and other potyviruses. Resistance to the white lupin strain of BYMV (BYMV-W) is inherited as a recessive gene named wlv that maps...... to linkage group VI together with other Potyvirus resistances. One of these, sbm1, confers resistance to strains of Pea seedborne mosaic virus and previously has been identified as a mutant allele of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E gene (eIF4E). Sequence comparison of eIF4E from BYMV...

  16. The Effects of Light and Temperature on Biotin Synthesis in Pea Sprouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, Shin; Ohnuki, Risa; Moriki, Aoi; Abe, Megumi; Ishiguro, Mariko; Sone, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Biotin is an essential micronutrient, and is a cofactor for several carboxylases that are involved in the metabolism of glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids. Because plant cells can synthesize their own biotin, a wide variety of plant-based foods contains significant amounts of biotin; however, the influence of environmental conditions on the biotin content in plants remains largely unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of different cultivation conditions on the biotin content and biotin synthesis in pea sprouts (Pisum sativum). In the experiment, the pea sprouts were removed from their cotyledons and cultivated by hydroponics under five different lighting and temperature conditions (control [25ºC, 12-h light/12-h dark cycle], low light [25ºC, 4-h light/20-h dark cycle], dark [25ºC, 24 h dark], low temperature [12ºC, 12-h light/12-h dark cycle], and cold [6ºC, 12-h light/12-h dark cycle]) for 10 d. Compared to the biotin content of pea sprouts under the control conditions, the biotin contents of pea sprouts under the low-light, dark, and cold conditions had significantly decreased. The dark group showed the lowest biotin content among the groups. Expression of the biotin synthase gene (bio2) was also significantly decreased under the dark and cold conditions compared to the control condition, in a manner similar to that observed for the biotin content. No significant differences in the adenosine triphosphate content were observed among the groups. These results indicate that environmental conditions such as light and temperature modulate the biotin content of pea plant tissues by regulating the expression of biotin synthase.

  17. The epidermis of the pea epicotyl is not a unique target tissue for auxin-induced growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayle, D. L.; Nowbar, S.; Cleland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that the epidermis of dicotyledonous stems is the primary site of auxin action in elongation growth. We show for pea (Pisum sativum L.) epicotyl sections that this hypothesis is incorrect. In buffer (pH 6.5), sections from which the outer cell layers were removed (peeled) elongated slowly and to the same extent as intact sections. Addition of 10 micromolar indoleacetic acid to this incubation medium caused peeled sections to grow to the same extent and with the same kinetics as auxin-treated nonpeeled sections. This indicates that both epidermis and cortical tissues have the ability to respond rapidly to auxin and that the epidermis is not the sole site of auxin action in dicotyledonous stems. Previous reports that peeled pea sections respond poorly to auxin may have resulted from an acid extension of these sections due to the use of distilled water as the incubation medium.

  18. Biological nitrogen fixation by faba bean, pea and vetch, using isotopic techniques (N-15) and two reference crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvache, Marcelo; Bernal, Gustavo

    1991-01-01

    A field experiment was carried out on a Typic Dystrandept soil at Santa Catalina Experimental Station, Cutuglagua, Pichincha, Ecuador. The objectives were to quantify faba bean (Vicia faba) pea (Pisum sativum) and vetch (Vicia sativa) biological nitrogen fixation using N-15 isotopic technique and to evaluate suitability of reference crops for such quantification. Higher values of biological nitrogen fixation were obtained using maize (Zea mays L.) than using wheat (Triticum vurgare) as reference crops. The average values were 85 and 81 per cent for vetch; 73 and 69 per cent for faba bean; and 34 and 18 per cent for pea, respectively. It was assumed that nitrogen use efficiency should be the same for fixing and no fixing crop, but it was observed that a reference crop with low nitrogen use efficiency underestimates legume biological nitrogen fixation. Results suggest that greater caution is needed when selecting reference crops for legumes with low nitrogen fixation

  19. Consumer Statistics: Who Gardens? Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ivan

    1995-01-01

    According to a recent study, gardening is America's most popular outdoor leisure-time activity. Examines this trend and identifies growth areas in the gardening market and consumer spending habits. (LZ)

  20. Seed set, pollen morphology and pollen surface composition response to heat stress in field pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunfei; Lahlali, Rachid; Karunakaran, Chithra; Kumar, Saroj; Davis, Arthur R; Bueckert, Rosalind A

    2015-11-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is a major legume crop grown in a semi-arid climate in Western Canada, where heat stress affects pollination, seed set and yield. Seed set and pod growth characteristics, along with in vitro percentage pollen germination, pollen tube growth and pollen surface composition, were measured in two pea cultivars (CDC Golden and CDC Sage) subjected to five maximum temperature regimes ranging from 24 to 36 °C. Heat stress reduced percentage pollen germination, pollen tube length, pod length, seed number per pod, and the seed-ovule ratio. Percentage pollen germination of CDC Sage was greater than CDC Golden at 36 °C. No visible morphological differences in pollen grains or the pollen surface were observed between the heat and control-treated pea. However, pollen wall (intine) thickness increased due to heat stress. Mid-infrared attenuated total reflectance (MIR-ATR) spectra revealed that the chemical composition (lipid, proteins and carbohydrates) of each cultivar's pollen grains responded differently to heat stress. The lipid region of the pollen coat and exine of CDC Sage was more stable compared with CDC Golden at 36 °C. Secondary derivatives of ATR spectra indicated the presence of two lipid types, with different amounts present in pollen grains from each cultivar. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Influence of the Regimen of Ultraviolet Irradiation on the Development of Soybean and Pea Seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kacharava, N.; Chkhubianishvili, E.; Kobakhidze, L.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of different doses of ultraviolet irradiation (UV) on seedlings of legume plants: soybean (Glycine hispida (Moench) Max.) and pea (Pisum sativum L.) has been investigated by means of modeling experiments. The short wave section of the irradiation source (lamp DPT-400) was separated by means of glass filter (UFS-2). The effect of total spectrum of irradiation has been also studied. Differences in sensitivity towards irradiation were established not only between species but among the plant organs too. 15' irradiation abated all growth parameters in soybean seedlings, while 60' irradiation appeared to be stimulating. In pea seedlings stimulation induced by 15' irradiation changed to a negative effect with the increase of radiation dose. High sensitivity of roots and resistance of cotyledons to inhibiting doses of UV irradiation was revealed (for soybean 90' and for pea - 120'). Neutralization of the inhibitory effect of high doses of UV irradiation by using the integrated irradiation spectrum may be induced by long wave radiation. The supposition on neutralization of the negative effect of the UV irradiation and increasing the ranges of tolerance by switching on the ''stress-defending'' mechanisms is presented. (author)

  2. [Enhanced Resistance of Pea Plants to Oxidative: Stress Caused by Paraquat during Colonization by Aerobic Methylobacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, N V; Doronina, N Y; Trotsenko, Yu A

    2016-01-01

    The influence of colonization of the pea (Pisum sativum L.) by aerobic methylobacteria of five different species (Methylophilus flavus Ship, Methylobacterium extorquens G10, Methylobacillus arboreus Iva, Methylopila musalis MUSA, Methylopila turkiensis Sidel) on plant resistance to paraquat-induced stresses has been studied. The normal conditions of pea colonization by methylobacteria were characterized by a decrease in the activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidases) and in the concentrations of endogenous H2O2, proline, and malonic dialdehyde, which is a product of lipid peroxidation and indicator of damage to plant cell membranes, and an increase in the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus (the content of chlorophylls a, b and carotenoids). In the presence of paraquat, the colonized plants had higher activities of antioxidant enzymes, stable photosynthetic indices, and a less intensive accumulation of the products of lipid peroxidation as compared to noncolonized plants. Thus, colonization by methylobacteria considerably increased the adaptive protection of pea plants to the paraquat-induced oxidative stress.

  3. Xyloglucan galactosyl- and fucosyltransferase activity from pea epicotyl microsomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faik, A.; Chileshe, C.; Sterling, J.; Maclachlan, G.

    1997-01-01

    Microsomal membranes from growing tissue of pea (Pisum sativum L.) epicotyls were incubated with the substrate UDP-[14C]galactose (Gal) with or without tamarind seed xyloglucan (XG) as a potential galactosyl acceptor. Added tamarind seed XG enhanced incorporation of [14C]Gal into high-molecular-weight products (eluted from columns of Sepharose CL-6B in the void volume) that were trichloroacetic acid-soluble but insoluble in 67% ethanol. These products were hydrolyzed by cellulase to fragments comparable in size to XG subunit oligosaccharides. XG-dependent galactosyltransferase activity could be solubilized, along with XG fucosyltransferase, by the detergent 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio]-1 propanesulfonate. When this enzyme was incubated with tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) seed XG or nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus L.) seed XG that had been partially degalactosylated with an XG-specific beta-galactosidase, the rates of Gal transfer increased and fucose transfer decreased compared with controls with native XG. The reaction products were hydrolyzed by cellulase to 14C fragments that were analyzed by gel-filtration and high-performance liquid chromatography fractionation with pulsed amperometric detection. The major components were XG subunits, namely one of the two possible monogalactosyl octasaccharides (-XXLG-) and digalactosyl nonasaccharide (-XLLG-), whether the predominant octasaccharide in the acceptor was XXLG (as in tamarind seed XG) or XLXG (as in nasturtium seed XG). It is concluded that the first xylosylglucose from the reducing end of the subunits was the Gal acceptor locus preferred by the solubilized pea transferase. These observations are incorporated into a model for the biosynthesis of cell wall XGs

  4. Pythagoras' Garden, Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhart, Frank R.; Price, H. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Mack and Czernezkyj (2010) have given an interesting account of primitive Pythagorean triples (PPTs) from a geometrical perspective. In this article, the authors wish to enlarge on the role of the equicircles (incircle and three excircles), and show there is yet another family tree in Pythagoras' garden. Where Mack and Czernezkyj (2010) begin with…

  5. Gardening with Greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Rusty

    2010-01-01

    Greenhouses come in all shapes, sizes, and price ranges: from simple hand-built plastic-covered frames to dazzling geodesic domes. Some child care centers install greenhouses as a part of their outdoor garden space. Other centers have incorporated a greenhouse into the building itself. Greenhouses provide a great opportunity for children to grow…

  6. School Gardens and Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiemensma, Britt Due

    2015-01-01

    they are not only regarded as a source of health and fresh food for the students and their families, but also as an alternative arena for learning to cope with issues like sustainability, innovation and democracy. The success of school gardening was always based on dedicated teachers who saw the added value...

  7. Herbaria, gardens, organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1995-01-01

    Herbarium, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKMB) — 25,569 accessions are computerized on Dbase 3/Foxpro; about 12,000 more are expected to be added in 1995. An International Meeting sponsored by the Wye College, University of London, the Linnean Society of London, and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew,

  8. Herbaria, gardens, organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1985-01-01

    Herbarium Bogoriense. A fourth floor has been added to the building. Bogor Botanic Gardens. Two heavy storms occurred, one in October, which uprooted 161 trees, among which some of the famous kalong trees, and another one in November, 1984, which blew down or so damaged about 130 trees that they had

  9. Divergence and population traits in evolution of the genus Pisum L. as reconstructed using genes of two histone H1 subtypes showing different phylogenetic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytseva, Olga O; Gunbin, Konstantin V; Mglinets, Anatoliy V; Kosterin, Oleg E

    2015-02-10

    Two histone H1 subtype genes, His7 and His5, were sequenced in a set of 56 pea accessions. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on concatenated His5 and His7 sequences had three main clades. First clade corresponded to Pisum fulvum, the next divergence separated a clade inside Pisum sativum in the broad sense that did not correspond strictly to any proposed taxonomical subdivisions. According to our estimations, the earliest divergence separating P. fulvum occurred 1.7±0.4MYA. The other divergence with high bootstrap support that separated two P. sativum groups took place approximately 1.3±0.3MYA. Thus, the main divergences in the genus took place either in late Pliocene or in early Pleistocene, the time of onset of the profound climate cooling in the northern hemisphere. The ω=K(a)/K(s) ratio was 2.5 times higher for His5 sequences than for His7. Thus, His7 gene, coding for a unique subtype specific for actively growing tissues, might have evolved under stricter evolutionary constraints than His5, that codes for a minor H1 subtype with less specific expression pattern. For this reason phylogenetic reconstructions separately obtained from His5 sequences resolved tree topology much better than those obtained from His7 sequences. Computational estimation of population dynamic parameters in the genus Pisum L. from His5-His7 sequences using IMa2 software revealed a decrease of effective population size on the early stage of Pisum evolution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Fluoride and Bentonite on Biochemical Aspects of Oxidative Stress in Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyna Śnioszek

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride is regarded as one of the strongest oxidants, which causes oxidative changes in cells of living organisms. It may both increase the content of reactive oxygen species and inhibit the activity of antioxidative enzyme. In recent years, many researchers successfully used the properties of clay minerals in the sorption of fluoride ion from water. This raises the question of the possibility of limiting the effect of fluorine on the negative changes in plants by adding bentonite to soil. A two-year pot experiment was carried out in the Greenhouse of West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, on loamy sand and sandy loam. Each sample of soil was mixed with three different concentrations of bentonite – 1, 5, 10% of dry weight (DW of the soil and then treated with 30 mmol of F- per 1 kg of dry weight of the soil in a form of NaF solution. A control series was prepared for each soil, to which no additives were added. The medium prepared in such way was transferred to plastic pots (3 kg each and seeded with 16 pea seeds of Pisum sativum. In three phases of pea development (4 leaves unfolded, flowering and development of fruit, fresh leaf samples were collected and the concentrations of ascorbic acid, reduced glutathione, total flavonoids and total polyphenols were measured. Sodium fluoride introduced to the soil changed the level of antioxidant parameters in the plant, which may suggest that fluoride is involved in the formation of reactive oxygen species, resulting in oxidative stress. Bentonite in a dosage of 10% reduced the toxic effects of fluoride on the oxidative balance and morphological changes in the plant, which was observed especially for loamy sand, naturally poor in clay minerals.

  11. Indicators to assess temporal genetic diversity in the French Catalogue: no losses for maize and peas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Clerc, V; Cadot, V; Canadas, M; Lallemand, J; Guèrin, D; Boulineau, F

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study, led by the GEVES (Research and Control Group for Varieties and Seeds), was to suggest indicators to assess the diversity available to farmers since the French Official Catalogue for Plant Varieties and Species was initiated. The largest datasets of 1990 inbred maize lines and 578 pea lines from the last 50 years were analysed using morphological and enzymatic parameters. Lines were grouped into three to five periods. Genetic diversity was estimated in each period from morphological and enzymatic markers by computing numerous indices, such as the number of classes of scores for each characteristic, allelic richness or genetic diversity index (H ( e )). Population differentiation parameters (G(ST), G(ST)', F(ST), Q(ST)) were also estimated between periods. While genetic diversity computed from distinction, uniformity, stability traits was more marked for maize (0.66) than for garden peas (0.35) or feed peas (0.29), the opposite trend was observed with enzymes, resulting in a genetic diversity of 0.43, 0.35 and 0.22 for garden peas, feed peas and maize, respectively. However, no significant changes in genetic diversity were observed over time, and genetic differentiation was slight between periods. All our results demonstrated that no significant reduction in the diversity available to farmers had been observed since initiation of the French Catalogue. The H ( e ) was a good indicator providing a quantitative estimate of genetic diversity, but it should be interpreted alongside a more precise indicator such as allelic richness or the number of classes for morphological characteristics.

  12. Evaluation of Semiochemical-Baited Traps for Monitoring the Pea Leaf Weevil, Sitona lineatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Field Pea Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Onge, Amanda; Cárcamo, Héctor A; Evenden, Maya L

    2018-02-08

    The pea leaf weevil (PLW), Sitona lineatus L., is a pest of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and faba bean (Vicia faba L.) that recently invaded the Canadian Prairie Provinces. Although most damage is done by larvae that feed on root nodules, adults are easier to monitor than larvae. Both male and female weevils respond to a male-produced aggregation pheromone and to volatiles released by host plants. The current study tests the attractiveness of synthetic aggregation pheromone, 4-methyl-3,5-heptanedione, and host plant volatiles linalool, (Z)-3-hexenol, and (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate to PLWs in spring when weevils are reproductively active and in fall when weevils seek overwintering sites. Different combinations of semiochemical lures at various doses, released from a variety of devices were tested in pitfall traps. Semiochemical-baited traps captured both male and female weevils in both seasons but the sex ratio varied with season. Weevils did not respond in a dose-dependent manner to pheromone, as all pheromone lures were equally attractive. Pheromone release rate was determined by the release device and not the pheromone dose in the lure. The addition of plant volatiles sometimes increased weevil captures but plant volatiles alone were not attractive to PLW adults. An additional study tested the effect of trap type on weevil capture. Of the 12 different trap types tested, pheromone-baited pitfall traps were most successful in attracting and retaining weevils. Bycatch of other Sitona species was limited to a few specimens of the sweet clover weevil, Sitona cylindricollis Fahraeus. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Identification of seed coat phenolic compounds from differently colored pea varieties and characterization of their antioxidant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisavljević Nemanja S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenolic composition of seed coats in four differently colored pea varieties (Pisum sativum L. was investigated using UHPLC-LTQ OrbiTrap MS. The obtained findings revealed that the seed coats of the examined pea genotypes possess a unique phenolic composition compared to previously studied European cultivars. In total, 41 phenolic compounds have been identified. The seed coats of the studied cultivars contained certain amounts of rosmarinic acid, rutin, galangin, morin, naringin, hesperetin and pinocembrin as well as ten flavonol glycosides that had not been reported previously. Additionally, the total phenolic content, antioxidant activity and metal chelating capacity of extracts was determined using Folin-Ciocalteu’s method, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assay, ferric ion-reducing capacity and ferrous ion-chelating capacity assay, respectively. Dark colored genotypes MBK 168 and MBK 173 possessed the highest total phenolic contents as well the strongest antioxidant activities. On the other hand, bright colored genotypes MBK 88 and MBK 90 exhibited the strongest metal-chelating capacities. The examined pea seed coats may be considered as important potential contributors to human health due to the presence of bioactive phenolic constituents. In addition, our results could be used as a guideline for breeding new pea cultivars with high antioxidant activities applicable in the formulation of functional food products. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173005 i br. 172017

  14. [Healing garden: Primary concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringuey-Criou, F

    2015-10-01

    Since ancient times the relationship between mankind and plants occupies medicine and philosophy. From the first tablets of herbal medicine to Asclepius gardens, those of cloisters and bimaristans to cosmological gardens in Asia, from the largest public park to asylum institutions of the nineteenth century, the garden is proposed as a place of care, a promoter of restoration of the human being. If the advent of technology and drugs have for a time relegated it to the level of empirical care, results in neuroscience ultimately provide it on a scientific basis. The early evolutionary theories, the Savanah theory from Orians, the biophilia hypothesis from Wilson, are relayed by the famous Ulrich' study showing the positive influence of a view of nature through the window on the recovery of in patients. Mechanisms leading stress regulation, level of attention and organisation, focus and fascination, are recognized at the origin of restoration processes. Human capacities to respond to the recuperating function of a natural environment connect to grounded behaviour for adaptation to natural selection process and survival. The mechanisms of our immune system are essential to maintain our vitality. Phyto-resonance, felt or unconsciously perceived in appearance, according to Shepard is an emotion that structures well beyond the archaic behaviour. Recovery, in terms of phenomenological experience of the presence, is a philosophical demonstration of the environmental i.e. multisensory, spatial and temporal approach. Its emotional and affective experience connects to the vitality and creativity. The phyto-resonance hypothesis according to the Konrad Neuberger's point of view induces strategies catering to all levels of the organisation of the human being. It confirms the multidisciplinary nature of hortitherapy and places the mechanism of relationships between man and plant at the centre of discipline. It is also a source of inspiration and inexhaustible work for caregivers

  15. Micromycetes on Pisum sativum var. arvense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Marcinkowska

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Seeds of 11 Austrian winter pea genotypes, harvested at Radzików (CEP in 1993 and 1994, were evaluated for fungi occurrence on Coon's agar medium in Petri plates. Number of species isolated depended on the genotype and year of collection. Alternaria alternata, Stemphylium botryosum were found on all the tested samples and Phoma pinodella and Fusarium poae were also common while Botrytis cinerea, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Mycosphaerella pinodes appeared to be common only in 1993. Three species occurred only once. The mycoflora was richer in 1993. The common seed inhabitants usually transmitted higher percentage of fungi than species occuring more seldom.

  16. NADH induces the generation of superoxide radicals in leaf peroxisomes. [Pisum sativum L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    del Rio, L.A.; Sandalio, L.M.; Palma, J.M. (Unidad de Bioquimica Vegetal, Granada (Spain)); Fernandez, V.M.; Ruperez, F.L. (Instituto de Catalisis, Madrid (Spain))

    1989-03-01

    In peroxisomes isolated from pea leaves (Pisum sativum L.) the production of superoxide free radicals (O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) by xanthine and NADH was investigated. In peroxisomal membranes, 100 micromolar NADH induced the production of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} radicals. In the soluble fractions of peroxisomes, no generation of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} radicals was observed by incubation with either NADH or xanthine, although xanthine oxidase was found located predominantly in the matrix of peroxisomes. The failure of xanthine to induce superoxide generation was probably due to the inability to fully suppress the endogenous Mn-superoxide dismutase activity by inhibitors which were inactive against xanthine oxidase. The generation of superoxide radicals in leaf peroxisomes together with the recently described production of these oxygen radicals in glyoxysomes suggests that O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} generation could be a common metabolic property of peroxisomes and further supports the existence of active oxygen-related roles for peroxisomes in cellular metabolism.

  17. Isolation of lectin and albumin from Pisum sativum var. macrocarpon ser. cv. sugar snap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, X; Ng, T B

    2001-01-01

    A mannose- and glucose-binding lectin bearing considerable sequence similarity to other legume lectins was isolated using a simple procedure, from legumes of the sugar snap Pisum sativum var. macrocarpon. The lectin was unadsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and Q-Sepharose in 10 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.2) and adsorbed on SP-Toyopearl in 50 mM NaOAc buffer (pH 5). An albumin could also be purified at the same time. It was unadsorbed on Affi-gel Blue gel, adsorbed on Q-Sepharose and unadsorbed on SP-Toyopearl under the aforementioned chromatographic conditions. The lectin was almost identical in N-terminal sequences of its alpha- and beta-subunit to lectin from P. sativum L. var. Feltham First except for the 19th N-terminal residue of the beta-subunit. The lectin was devoid of antifungal activity. Out of the 15 N-terminal amino acids examined in pea albumin, three were different between the two varieties of P. sativum.

  18. A Garden of Possibilities

    CERN Multimedia

    Carolyn Lee

    2010-01-01

    Renowned landscape architect and designer Charles Jencks recently visited CERN along with the architect of the Globe, Hervé Dessimoz, to investigate the possibility of creating a cosmic-inspired garden at the entrance to the Laboratory.   Left to right: Charles Jencks, Peter Higgs, Rolf Heuer in the garden of cosmic speculation. Photo credit: University of Edinburgh/Maverick photo agency Charles Jencks is a master at designing whimsical, intriguing outdoor spaces that hold a much deeper meaning than just an interesting view. His Garden of Cosmic Speculation at his home in Scotland uses designs recalling cosmic forces, DNA, organic cells, spirals of time, black holes and the Universe, made with landform, plants, sculpture and water to re-shape the natural landscape. One of the possible symbols for CERN that came to his mind was the cosmic uroborus, an ancient Egyptian symbol of a snake eating its own tail dating back to 1600 BC. “Many scientists have discussed this as a poss...

  19. Optimization of Neutral Comet Assay for studying DNA double-strand breaks in pea and wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivelina Nikolova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes an adaptation of the Comet assay under neutral conditions for mono- and dicotyledonous plants pea (Pisum sativum L. and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. Modifications concern lysis and electrophoresis steps, respectively. Electrophoresis was carried out varying the intensity of the electric field. A linear relationship between the percentages of DNA in the tail from control background with alteration of intensity was found. Trypan blue dye exclusion test was used in order to determine the intactness of nuclear membrane of the isolated nuclei from both plant model systems. Assessment was conducted on non-irradiated and irradiated nuclei on a monolayer with three doses of UVC. It was found that the share of intact nuclei (trypan blue negative ones is about 95% in controls. Gradual dose-related increase of damaged nuclei was observed in both species, reaching statistical significance only at the higher dose applied.

  20. The Cellular Immune Response of the Pea Aphid to Foreign Intrusion and Symbiotic Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Antonin; Anselme, Caroline; Ravallec, Marc; Rebuf, Christian; Simon, Jean-Christophe; Gatti, Jean-Luc; Poirié, Marylène

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) has low immune defenses. However, its immune components are largely undescribed, and notably, extensive characterization of circulating cells has been missing. Here, we report characterization of five cell categories in hemolymph of adults of the LL01 pea aphid clone, devoid of secondary symbionts (SS): prohemocytes, plasmatocytes, granulocytes, spherulocytes and wax cells. Circulating lipid-filed wax cells are rare; they otherwise localize at the basis of the cornicles. Spherulocytes, that are likely sub-cuticular sessile cells, are involved in the coagulation process. Prohemocytes have features of precursor cells. Plasmatocytes and granulocytes, the only adherent cells, can form a layer in vivo around inserted foreign objects and phagocytize latex beads or Escherichia coli bacteria injected into aphid hemolymph. Using digital image analysis, we estimated that the hemolymph from one LL01 aphid contains about 600 adherent cells, 35% being granulocytes. Among aphid YR2 lines differing only in their SS content, similar results to LL01 were observed for YR2-Amp (without SS) and YR2-Ss (with Serratia symbiotica), while YR2-Hd (with Hamiltonella defensa) and YR2(Ri) (with Regiella insecticola) had strikingly lower adherent hemocyte numbers and granulocyte proportions. The effect of the presence of SS on A. pisum cellular immunity is thus symbiont-dependent. Interestingly, Buchnera aphidicola (the aphid primary symbiont) and all SS, whether naturally present, released during hemolymph collection, or artificially injected, were internalized by adherent hemocytes. Inside hemocytes, SS were observed in phagocytic vesicles, most often in phagolysosomes. Our results thus raise the question whether aphid symbionts in hemolymph are taken up and destroyed by hemocytes, or actively promote their own internalization, for instance as a way of being transmitted to the next generation. Altogether, we demonstrate here a

  1. Pea p68, a DEAD-box helicase, provides salinity stress tolerance in transgenic tobacco by reducing oxidative stress and improving photosynthesis machinery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Tuteja

    Full Text Available The DEAD-box helicases are required mostly in all aspects of RNA and DNA metabolism and they play a significant role in various abiotic stresses, including salinity. The p68 is an important member of the DEAD-box proteins family and, in animal system, it is involved in RNA metabolism including pre-RNA processing and splicing. In plant system, it has not been well characterized. Here we report the cloning and characterization of p68 from pea (Pisum sativum and its novel function in salinity stress tolerance in plant.The pea p68 protein self-interacts and is localized in the cytosol as well as the surrounding of cell nucleus. The transcript of pea p68 is upregulated in response to high salinity stress in pea. Overexpression of p68 driven by constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus-35S promoter in tobacco transgenic plants confers enhanced tolerances to salinity stress by improving the growth, photosynthesis and antioxidant machinery. Under stress treatment, pea p68 overexpressing tobacco accumulated higher K+ and lower Na+ level than the wild-type plants. Reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation was remarkably regulated by the overexpression of pea p68 under salinity stress conditions, as shown from TBARS content, electrolyte leakage, hydrogen peroxide accumulation and 8-OHdG content and antioxidant enzyme activities.To the best of our knowledge this is the first direct report, which provides the novel function of pea p68 helicase in salinity stress tolerance. The results suggest that p68 can also be exploited for engineering abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants of economic importance.

  2. Climate Museum and Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Jay; Bille, Dorthe

    2017-04-01

    The Climate Museum and Garden is conceived as a cross-disciplinary experience, where the arts and sciences link together to increase understanding of the Earth's climate and its relevance to our fate as a species. This would be a place of inspiration. The Climate Museum and Garden would merge concepts of modern art museums and modern science museums, with exhibitions, live music and theater performances, visitor interaction, unique discoveries and reflection. It would be a place where visitors are immersed in experiences, lingering indoors and out in quiet consideration and gratitude for our planet's atmosphere. The story of climate change is compelling in its own right; theories of the greenhouse effect go back over century and climate policy has stretched back a few decades. Whereas scientific researchers have been contributing to understanding the mechanisms and impacts of climate change for many decades; whereas researchers have participated in climate summits and informed policy makers; whereas researchers have taught classes of gifted students; in all of this, the public has mostly missed out. This public relations gap has been unfortunately filled by those that would seek to politicize and mislead the public, leading to an engagement gap among the general public. Now we stand on a precipice. Therefore we see a ripe opportunity to reach out and inspire the population. We build off of current pedagogic research that shows that experienced-based learning is more impactful when it engages the senses and elicits an emotional response. People understand what they experience, what they feel, and this serves as the basis for personal reflection. In this sense the visitor experience is generative, in that it promotes further personal investigation and interaction. The Climate Museum and Garden would be a start. In the future, we envisage a future network of climate museums in all major cities. It would be a flagship attraction for any city, along with their art

  3. THE GARDEN AND THE MACHINE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore how the concepts of garden and machine might inform our understanding of the complex relationship between infrastructure and nature. The garden is introduced as a third nature and used to shed a critical light on the promotion of landscape as infrastructure...

  4. The Garden and the Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore how the concepts of garden and machine might inform our understanding of the complex relationship between infrastructure and nature. The garden is introduced as a third nature and used to shed a critical light on the promotion of landscape ‘as’ infrastructure...

  5. Rain Gardens: Stormwater Infiltrating Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hydrological dynamics and changes in stormwater nutrient concentrations within rain gardens were studied by introducing captured stormwater runoff to rain gardens at EPA’s Urban Water Research Facility in Edison, New Jersey. The runoff used in these experiments was collected...

  6. [The eternal gardener].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Veit

    2009-01-01

    The German master gardener Georg Meister (1653-1713) is one of the main characters responsible for a change in the European perception of Japan in the late 17th and early 18th century. Meister gained direct personal experience of the country during two short stays in the 1680s at the Dejima Island in Nagasaki while being employed by the Dutch VOC. Whilst an impression of Meister's earlier years can be gained, in part, from his masterpiece "Der orientalisch-indianische Kunst- und Lust-Gärtner" of 1692, this information is of only relatively small assistance in the further development of an understanding of Meister's later life in the Saxon city of Dresden, where he was employed as a gardener at the "Grosse Garten" after his return to Europe in 1689. In 1973 it was Friedemann Berger who first paid attention to the importance of Meister's later period. In his short biography are some valuable sources mentioned but unfortunately not quoted. This current paper documents some of the main sources relating to Georg Meister and his life in Dresden, including facts on his work and research, housing and death.

  7. Further identification of endogenous gibberellins in the shoots of pea, line G2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halinska, A.; Davies, P.J.; Lee, J.W.; Zhu, Yuxian

    1989-01-01

    To interpret the metabolism of radiolabeled gibberellins A 12 -aldehyde and A 12 in shoots of pea (Pisum sativum L.), the identity of the radiolabeled peaks has to be determined and the endogenous presence of the gibberellins demonstrated. High specific activity [ 14 C]GA 12 and [ 14 C]GA 12 -aldehyde were synthesized using a pumpkin endosperm enzyme preparation, and purified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). [ 14 C]GA 12 was supplied to upper shoots of pea, line G2, to produce radiolabeled metabolites on the 13-OH pathway. Endogenous compounds copurifying with the [ 14 C]GAs on HPLC were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The endogenous presence of GA 53 , GA 44 , GA 19 and GA 20 was demonstrated and their HPLC peak identity ascertained. The 14 C was progressively diluted in GAs further down the pathway, proportional to the levels found in the tissue and inversely proportional to the speed of metabolism, ranging from 63% in GA 53 to 4% in GA 20 . Calculated levels of GA 20 , GA 19 , GA 44 , and GA 53 were 42, 8, 10, and 0.5 nanograms/gram, respectively

  8. Halloween genes and nuclear receptors in ecdysteroid biosynthesis and signalling in the pea aphid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiaens, O; Iga, M; Velarde, R A; Rougé, P; Smagghe, G

    2010-03-01

    The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) is the first whole genome sequenced insect with a hemimetabolic development and an emerging model organism for studies in ecology, evolution and development. The insect steroid moulting hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) controls and coordinates development in insects, especially the moulting/metamorphosis process. We, therefore present here a comprehensive characterization of the Halloween genes phantom, disembodied, shadow, shade, spook and spookiest, coding for the P450 enzymes that control the biosynthesis of 20E. Regarding the presence of nuclear receptors in the pea aphid genome, we found 19 genes, representing all of the seven known subfamilies. The annotation and phylogenetic analysis revealed a strong conservation in the class of Insecta. But compared with other sequenced insect genomes, three orthologues are missing in the Acyrthosiphon genome, namely HR96, PNR-like and Knirps. We also cloned the EcR, Usp, E75 and HR3. Finally, 3D-modelling of the ligand-binding domain of Ap-EcR exhibited the typical canonical structural scaffold with 12 alpha-helices associated with a short hairpin of two antiparallel beta-strands. Upon docking, 20E was located in the hormone-binding groove, supporting the hypothesis that EcR has a role in 20E signalling.

  9. Identification and characterization of novel NBS-LRR resistance gene analogues from the pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djebbi, S; Bouktila, D; Makni, H; Makni, M; Mezghani-Khemakhem, M

    2015-06-11

    Pea (Pisum sativum) is one of the most cultivated le-gumes in the world, and its yield and seed quality are affected by a variety of pathogens. In plants, NBS-LRR (nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat) is the main class of disease resistance genes. Using degenerate primers deduced from conserved motifs in the NBS domain of known resistance genes, we identified 10 NBS sequences in three varieties of P. sativum. The deduced amino acid sequences of the iden-tified resistance gene analogues (RGAs) exhibited the typical motifs of the NBS domain (P-loop, kinase-2, kinase-3a, and the hydrophobic domain, GLPL) present in the majority of plant proteins belonging to the NBS-LRR class. Phylogenetic analysis showed that seven RGAs belonged to the non-TIR-NBS-LRR subclass and three to the TIR-NBS-LRR subclass. The results of this study provide insights into the structure of this class of resistance genes in the pea, and their evolution-ary relationships with those of other plant species.

  10. Partial purification and characterization of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase from pea nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Almost all the Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase activity in nuclei purified from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum, L.) plumules is present in a single enzyme that can be extracted from chromatin by 0.3 molar NaCl. This protein kinase can be further purified 80,000-fold by salt fractionation and high performance liquid chromatography, after which it has a high specific activity of about 100 picomoles per minute per microgram in the presence of Ca2+ and reaches half-maximal activation at about 3 x 10(-7) molar free Ca2+, without calmodulin. It is a monomer with a molecular weight near 90,000. It can efficiently use histone III-S, ribosomal S6 protein, and casein as artificial substrates, but it phosphorylates phosvitin only weakly. Its Ca(2+)-dependent kinase activity is half-maximally inhibited by 0.1 millimolar chlorpromazine, by 35 nanomolar K-252a and by 7 nanomolar staurosporine. It is insensitive to sphingosine, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, and to basic polypeptides that block other Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases. It is not stimulated by exogenous phospholipids or fatty acids. In intact isolated pea nuclei it preferentially phosphorylates several chromatin-associated proteins, with the most phosphorylated protein band being near the same molecular weight (43,000) as a nuclear protein substrate whose phosphorylation has been reported to be stimulated by phytochrome in a calcium-dependent fashion.

  11. Purification and immunolocalization of an annexin-like protein in pea seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, G. B.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    As part of a study to identify potential targets of calcium action in plant cells, a 35-kDa, annexin-like protein was purified from pea (Pisum sativum L.) plumules by a method used to purify animal annexins. This protein, called p35, binds to a phosphatidylserine affinity column in a calcium-dependent manner and binds 45Ca2+ in a dot-blot assay. Preliminary sequence data confirm a relationship for p35 with the annexin family of proteins. Polyclonal antibodies have been raised which recognize p35 in Western and dot blots. Immunofluorescence and immunogold techniques were used to study the distribution and subcellular localization of p35 in pea plumules and roots. The highest levels of immunostain were found in young developing vascular cells producing wall thickenings and in peripheral root-cap cells releasing slime. This localization in cells which are actively involved in secretion is of interest because one function suggested for the animal annexins is involvement in the mediation of exocytosis.

  12. Frost stress evolution and winter pea ideotype in the context of climate warming at a regional scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castel Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pea (Pisum sativum L. is an important crop in temperate regions for its high seed protein concentration that is particularly sensitive to abiotic stresses. The abrupt temperature increase known as the “1987/1988 temperature regime shift” that occurs over Europe is questioning how winter pea will perform in the changing climate. This study assessed the winter frost damage evolution along from 1961 to 2015 in Burgundy-Franche-Comté by using: (1 daily observed and gridded regional temperature data and (2 a validated crop winter frost stress model calibrated for pea. This study shows a global decrease of the frost stress nevertheless resulting from a subtle balance between the decrease in its intensity and the increase of the number of events. The frost stress evolution patterns with warming depend on both plant frost resistance level and acclimation rate and are still sensitive to winter climate fluctuations. This study provides relevant information for breeding performant winter crop ideotypes able to moderate detrimental effects of climate change and offering new cropping opportunities in temperate regions.

  13. Rhizobium Impacts on Seed Productivity, Quality, and Protection of Pisum sativum upon Disease Stress Caused by Didymella pinodes: Phenotypic, Proteomic, and Metabolomic Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar Sistani, Nima; Kaul, Hans-Peter; Desalegn, Getinet; Wienkoop, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    In field peas, ascochyta blight is one of the most common fungal diseases caused by Didymella pinodes. Despite the high diversity of pea cultivars, only little resistance has been developed until to date, still leading to significant losses in grain yield. Rhizobia as plant growth promoting endosymbionts are the main partners for establishment of symbiosis with pea plants. The key role of Rhizobium as an effective nitrogen source for legumes seed quality and quantity improvement is in line with sustainable agriculture and food security programs. Besides these growth promoting effects, Rhizobium symbiosis has been shown to have a priming impact on the plants immune system that enhances resistance against environmental perturbations. This is the first integrative study that investigates the effect of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae (Rlv) on phenotypic seed quality, quantity and fungal disease in pot grown pea (Pisum sativum) cultivars with two different resistance levels against D. pinodes through metabolomics and proteomics analyses. In addition, the pathogen effects on seed quantity components and quality are assessed at morphological and molecular level. Rhizobium inoculation decreased disease severity by significant reduction of seed infection level. Rhizobium symbiont enhanced yield through increased seed fresh and dry weights based on better seed filling. Rhizobium inoculation also induced changes in seed proteome and metabolome involved in enhanced P. sativum resistance level against D. pinodes. Besides increased redox and cell wall adjustments light is shed on the role of late embryogenesis abundant proteins and metabolites such as the seed triterpenoid Soyasapogenol. The results of this study open new insights into the significance of symbiotic Rhizobium interactions for crop yield, health and seed quality enhancement and reveal new metabolite candidates involved in pathogen resistance. PMID:29204150

  14. Transfer of Nickel from Polluted Soil to Pisum sativum L. and Raphanus sativus L. under Composted Green Amendment and Native Soil Microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafady Nivien Allam

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of compost, inoculation with native soil microbes and their residual effects on bioavailability of nickel by peas (Pisum sativum L. and radish (Raphanus sativus L. grown on polluted soil were investigated in pot experiments. Plants were amendment with different compost levels (0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6% of soil dry weight and inoculated with different native soil microbes (4 fungal species, one bacterial species, 4 species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi isolated from the polluted soil under study. Significant increases in the biomass of pea and radish plants were observed as a result of amendment application and their residual effects. The mycorrhizal dependency (MD of pea plants was lower than of radish plants. The highest reductions of Ni levels in both plants were observed by the simultaneous applications of compost with microbes or mycorrhizal fungi to polluted soils. Soil pH increased significantly (p < 0.05 as a result of applying native microbes especially with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF alone or combined with compost. The DTPA extractability of soil Ni was significantly decreased with increasing soil pH (p < 0.05. The minimum transfer factor of Ni from polluted soil were 0.067 and 0.089 for pea and radish plants, respectively which were attained as a result of applying compost (0.6% of soil weight inoculated with mycorrhizal fungi. From the results, we can conclude that the use of compost and native soil microbes as a soil remediate could be an effective strategy for soil remediation.

  15. Gardens of paradise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Wille, S

    2001-06-01

    Two hundred and fifty years ago, the Swedish naturalist Carolus Linnaeus (1707-1778) published his Philosophia botanica. This textbook in botanical science was widely read well into the 19th century. Today it is remembered mainly for two things: the introduction of binomial nomenclature and the formulation of a fixist and creationist species concept. While the former achievement is seen as a practical tool, still applicable for purposes of identification and information retrieval, the latter is usually deemed to have been one of the main obstacles to scientific progress in biology. That both achievements were not independent of each other, but interlocked theoretically and grounded in a specific scientific practice still thriving today--the collection of plant specimens in botanical gardens--is usually overlooked. The following article tries to uncover these connections and to demonstrate the significance that Linnaeus' achievements had for modern biology.

  16. The Child in the Garden: An Evaluative Review of the Benefits of School Gardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Dorothy

    2009-01-01

    Although educators widely use school gardens for experiential education, researchers have not systematically examined the evaluative literature on school-gardening outcomes. The author reviewed the U.S. literature on children's gardening, taking into account potential effects, school-gardening outcomes, teacher evaluations of gardens as learning…

  17. Pea amyloplast DNA is qualitatively similar to pea chloroplast DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Amyloplast DNA (apDNA), when subjected to digestion with restriction endonucleases, yields patterns nearly identical to that of DNA from mature pea chloroplasts (ctDNA). Southern transfers of apDNA and ctDNA, probed with the large subunit (LS) gene of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), shows hybridization to the expected restriction fragments for both apDNA and ctDNA. However, Northern transfers of total RNA from chloroplasts and amyloplasts, probed again with the LS gene of Rubisco, shows that no detectable LS meggage is found in amyloplasts although LS expression in mature chloroplasts is high. Likewise, two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of etiolated gravisensitive pea tissue shows that both large and small subunits of Rubisco are conspicuously absent; however, in greening tissue these two constitute the major soluble proteins. These findings suggest that although the informational content of these two organelle types is equivalent, gene expression is quite different and is presumably under nuclear control.

  18. Social aggregation in pea aphids: experiment and random walk modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Christa; Paige, John; Warner, Olivia; Mayhew, Benjamin; Sutley, Ryan; Lam, Matthew; Bernoff, Andrew J; Topaz, Chad M

    2013-01-01

    From bird flocks to fish schools and ungulate herds to insect swarms, social biological aggregations are found across the natural world. An ongoing challenge in the mathematical modeling of aggregations is to strengthen the connection between models and biological data by quantifying the rules that individuals follow. We model aggregation of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. Specifically, we conduct experiments to track the motion of aphids walking in a featureless circular arena in order to deduce individual-level rules. We observe that each aphid transitions stochastically between a moving and a stationary state. Moving aphids follow a correlated random walk. The probabilities of motion state transitions, as well as the random walk parameters, depend strongly on distance to an aphid's nearest neighbor. For large nearest neighbor distances, when an aphid is essentially isolated, its motion is ballistic with aphids moving faster, turning less, and being less likely to stop. In contrast, for short nearest neighbor distances, aphids move more slowly, turn more, and are more likely to become stationary; this behavior constitutes an aggregation mechanism. From the experimental data, we estimate the state transition probabilities and correlated random walk parameters as a function of nearest neighbor distance. With the individual-level model established, we assess whether it reproduces the macroscopic patterns of movement at the group level. To do so, we consider three distributions, namely distance to nearest neighbor, angle to nearest neighbor, and percentage of population moving at any given time. For each of these three distributions, we compare our experimental data to the output of numerical simulations of our nearest neighbor model, and of a control model in which aphids do not interact socially. Our stochastic, social nearest neighbor model reproduces salient features of the experimental data that are not captured by the control.

  19. Fine Mapping of QTLs for Ascochyta Blight Resistance in Pea Using Heterogeneous Inbred Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambuj B. Jha

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ascochyta blight (AB is an important disease of pea which can cause severe grain yield loss under wet conditions. In our previous study, we identified two quantitative trait loci (QTLs abIII-1 and abI-IV-2 for AB resistance and these QTLs were consistent across locations and/or years in an inter-specific pea population (PR-19 developed from a cross between Alfetta (Pisum sativum and P651 (P. fulvum. The objectives of this study were to fine map the abIII-1 and abI-IV-2 QTLs using a high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-based genetic linkage map and analyze identified markers in heterogeneous inbred family (HIF populations. Selective genotyping of 51 PR-19 recombinant inbred lines was performed using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS and the resulting high density genetic linkage map was used to identify eight new SNP markers within the abI-IV-2 QTL, whereas no additional SNPs were identified within the abIII-1 QTL. Two HIF populations HIF-224 (143 lines and HIF-173 (126 lines were developed from F6 RILs PR-19-224 and PR-19-173, respectively. The HIF populations evaluated under field conditions in 2015 and 2016 showed a wide range of variation for reaction to AB resistance. Lodging score had significant positive (P < 0.001 correlation with AB scores. HIFs were genotyped using SNP markers within targeted QTLs. The genotypic and phenotypic data of the HIFs were used to identify two new QTLs, abI-IV-2.1 and abI-IV-2.2 for AB resistance within the abI-IV-2 QTL. These QTLs individually explained 5.5 to 14% of the total phenotypic variation. Resistance to lodging was also associated with these two QTLs. Identified SNP markers will be useful in marker assisted selection for development of pea cultivars with improved AB resistance.

  20. Neonicotinoid binding, toxicity and expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliane Taillebois

    Full Text Available Neonicotinoid insecticides act on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and are particularly effective against sucking pests. They are widely used in crops protection to fight against aphids, which cause severe damage. In the present study we evaluated the susceptibility of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum to the commonly used neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid (IMI, thiamethoxam (TMX and clothianidin (CLT. Binding studies on aphid membrane preparations revealed the existence of high and low-affinity binding sites for [3H]-IMI (Kd of 0.16 ± 0.04 nM and 41.7 ± 5.9 nM and for the nicotinic antagonist [125I]-α-bungarotoxin (Kd of 0.008 ± 0.002 nM and 1.135 ± 0.213 nM. Competitive binding experiments demonstrated that TMX displayed a higher affinity than IMI for [125I]-α-bungarotoxin binding sites while CLT affinity was similar for both [125I]-α-bungarotoxin and [3H]-IMI binding sites. Interestingly, toxicological studies revealed that at 48 h, IMI (LC50 = 0.038 µg/ml and TMX (LC50 = 0.034 µg/ml were more toxic than CLT (LC50 = 0.118 µg/ml. The effect of TMX could be associated to its metabolite CLT as demonstrated by HPLC/MS analysis. In addition, we found that aphid larvae treated either with IMI, TMX or CLT showed a strong variation of nAChR subunit expression. Using semi-quantitative PCR experiments, we detected for all insecticides an increase of Apisumα10 and Apisumβ1 expressions levels, whereas Apisumβ2 expression decreased. Moreover, some other receptor subunits seemed to be differently regulated according to the insecticide used. Finally, we also demonstrated that nAChR subunit expression differed during pea aphid development. Altogether these results highlight species specificity that should be taken into account in pest management strategies.

  1. Neonicotinoid Binding, Toxicity and Expression of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subunits in the Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillebois, Emiliane; Beloula, Abdelhamid; Quinchard, Sophie; Jaubert-Possamai, Stéphanie; Daguin, Antoine; Servent, Denis; Tagu, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides act on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and are particularly effective against sucking pests. They are widely used in crops protection to fight against aphids, which cause severe damage. In the present study we evaluated the susceptibility of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum to the commonly used neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid (IMI), thiamethoxam (TMX) and clothianidin (CLT). Binding studies on aphid membrane preparations revealed the existence of high and low-affinity binding sites for [3H]-IMI (Kd of 0.16±0.04 nM and 41.7±5.9 nM) and for the nicotinic antagonist [125I]-α-bungarotoxin (Kd of 0.008±0.002 nM and 1.135±0.213 nM). Competitive binding experiments demonstrated that TMX displayed a higher affinity than IMI for [125I]-α-bungarotoxin binding sites while CLT affinity was similar for both [125I]-α-bungarotoxin and [3H]-IMI binding sites. Interestingly, toxicological studies revealed that at 48 h, IMI (LC50 = 0.038 µg/ml) and TMX (LC50 = 0.034 µg/ml) were more toxic than CLT (LC50 = 0.118 µg/ml). The effect of TMX could be associated to its metabolite CLT as demonstrated by HPLC/MS analysis. In addition, we found that aphid larvae treated either with IMI, TMX or CLT showed a strong variation of nAChR subunit expression. Using semi-quantitative PCR experiments, we detected for all insecticides an increase of Apisumα10 and Apisumβ1 expressions levels, whereas Apisumβ2 expression decreased. Moreover, some other receptor subunits seemed to be differently regulated according to the insecticide used. Finally, we also demonstrated that nAChR subunit expression differed during pea aphid development. Altogether these results highlight species specificity that should be taken into account in pest management strategies. PMID:24801634

  2. Garden of Eden – Paradise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiten, Jacques van; Collins/ John J.,; Harlow/Daniel C.,

    2010-01-01

    Jacques van Ruiten, “Garden of Eden – Paradise,” in The Eerdmans Dictionary of Early Judaism (ed. John J. Collins and Daniel C. Harlow; Grand Rapids, Mich., and Cambridge: Eerdmans, 2010), 658-661.

  3. EPA Helps Botanic Garden Blossom

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the keys to the continued transformation of abandoned mine lands into a world-class botanic garden near Pittsburgh is an innovative rainwater system financed by EPA’s Clean Water State Revolving Fund.

  4. The graveyard and the Garden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek, Ulla; Bildsøe, Helle Schulz

    2017-01-01

    and conflate into one overarching web that is the metropolis: there is a systemic network of control materialized in Montparnasse graveyard and an organic network out of control manifested in a community garden where people congregate to tell stories. Indeed, Dasgupta revisits Benjaminian storytelling...... as a global networking practice which, while locally contextualized in an impromptu garden in Paris, hints at an awareness of worldwide connectivity....

  5. 21 CFR 155.172 - Canned dry peas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned dry peas. 155.172 Section 155.172 Food and... peas. (a) Identity. Canned dry peas conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label declaration of ingredients, prescribed for canned peas by § 155.170(a...

  6. No Panacea Garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigmund Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available NEW!  Postscript (pp. 17-19 Three of the seven distinguished researchers whose autobiographical chapters (Berliner, 2016; Sternberg, 2016; Sweller, 2016 I edited, and one that is in process (Gordon, in press, indicate that they were poor or indifferent students early in their academic careers. That is also true of me; so five of the first seven scholars in the Acquired Wisdom series were poor students. I did not explicitly mention my studying difficulties in this chapter because they had already been described in my memoir about how my family found safe haven from the Holocaust in Shanghai, China, during World War II (Tobias, 2009. It may be useful to examine my difficulties and how they relate to educational practice and concepts in the contemporary educational psychology literature. Essay Excerpt The late Dick Snow, a friend and colleague at Stanford, once commented that research on instructional innovations seemed to him like a random walk through the panacea garden. I have become sceptical of any instructional development, theory, or instructional method that is expected to improve learning for all students in all subjects. I have lived through prior panaceas like programmed and computer assisted instruction, multimedia education, computer games, and educational movements such as progressive, competency based, open corridor, and inquiry education, and the current panacea - constructivist instruction - from all of which I learned something. There are no panaceas that will easily improve learning for everyone, because good instruction is hard work and difficult to do. [Download the PDF

  7. Effect of 2 MHz ultrasound irradiation on Pisum sativum roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.W.; Voorhees, S.M.; Carstensen, E.L.; Kaufman, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of 2 MHz ultrasound at intensity levels from 2.5 to 22 W/cm 2 on the growth rate and mitotic index of Pisum sativum roots was studied. The ultrasound produced an immediate reduction in the growth rate on the first postexposure day, followed by a gradual recovery to the control value. Ultrasound reduced the root meristem mitotic index. Intensity- and time-dependent relations were found for the growth rate and mitotic index reductions

  8. Internode length in Pisum. Gene na may block gibberellin synthesis between ent-7. cap alpha. -hydroxykaurenoic acid and biggerellin A/sub 12/-aldehyde. [Pisum sativum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingram, T.J.; Reid, J.B.

    1987-04-01

    The elongation response of the gibberellin (GA) deficient genotypes na, ls, and lh of peas (Pisum sativum L.) to a range of GA-precursors was examined. Plants possessing gene na did not respond to precursors in the GA biosynthetic pathway prior to GA/sub 12/-aldehyde. In contrast, plants possessing lh and ls responded as well as wild-type plants (dwarfed with AMO-1618) to these compounds. The results suggest that GA biosynthesis is blocked prior to ent-kaurene in the lh and ls mutants and between ent-7..cap alpha..-hydroxykaurenoic acid and GA/sub 12/-aldehyde in the na mutant. Feeds of ent(/sup 3/H)kaurenoic acid and (/sup 2/H)GA/sub 12/-aldehyde to a range of genotypes supported the above conclusions. The na line WL1766 was shown by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to metabolize(/sup 2/H)GA/sub 12/-aldehyde to a number of (/sup 2/H)C/sub 19/-GAs including GA/sub 1/. However, there was no indication in na genotypes for the metabolism of ent-(/sup 3/H)kaurenoic acid to these GAs. In contrast, the expanding shoot tissue of all Na genotypes examined metabolized ent-(/sup 3/H)kaurenoic acid to radioactive compounds that co-chromatographed with GA/sub 1/, GA/sub 8/, GA/sub 20/, and GA/sub 29/. However, insufficient material was present for unequivocal identification of the metabolites. The radioactive profiles from HPLC of extracts of the node treated with ent-(/sup 3/H)kaurenoic acid were similar for both Na and na plants and contained ent-16..cap alpha..,17-dihydroxykaurenoic acid and ent-6..cap alpha..,7..cap alpha..,16..beta..,17-tetrahydroxykaurenoic acid (both characterized by GC-MS), suggesting that the metabolites arose from side branches of the main GA-biosynthetic pathway. Thus, both Na and na plants appear capable of ent-7..cap alpha..-hydroxylation.

  9. The aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum exhibits a greater survival after a heat shock when parasitized by the wasp Aphidius ervi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Vincenzo; Forlano, Pierluigi; Falabella, Patrizia; Battaglia, Donatella; Fanti, Paolo

    2018-02-01

    The pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum is a common pest of many species of legumes and its parasitoid Aphidius ervi is regarded as a successful biocontrol agent. In this study, we report a greater survival rate of parasitized aphids compared with unparasitized ones, after exposure to a very high temperature (39°C for 30min). After the heat shock, the survival of unparasitized aphids decreases according to their age at the heat shock treatment, suggesting a different adaptation of the aphid life stage to the different microclimatic conditions they experience. Survival of parasitized aphids does not change according to the time of the heat shock treatment, but it is always significantly higher compared with the unparasitized ones. Parasitized aphids are very quickly subjected to a wide range of physiological modifications and the observed increased survival could be a consequence of these modifications before the heat shock treatment. The possible explanations as well as the possible adaptive nature of the observed phenomenon are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of non-LTR retrotransposable TRAS elements in the aphids Acyrthosiphon pisum and Myzus persicae (Aphididae, Hemiptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Valentina; Serafini, Chiara; Manicardi, Gian Carlo; Mandrioli, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    A non-LTR TRAS retrotransposon (identified as TRASAp1) has been amplified in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum and its presence has been assessed also in the peach potato aphid Myzus persicae. This TRAS element possesses 2 overlapping ORFs (a gag-ORF1 and a pol-ORF2 containing the reverse transcriptase and the endonuclease domains) that show a similarity ranging from 40% to 48% to proteins coded by other TRAS elements identified in insects (including the beetle Tribolium castaneum and the moth Bombyx mori). The study of the TRAS chromosomal insertion sites, performed by standard fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and fiber FISH, showed that TRAS elements were located in a subtelomeric position, just before the telomeric (TTAGG) n repeats. In both the aphid species, TRAS elements were present at all termini of autosomes, but the 2 X chromosome telomeres show a clear-cut structural difference. Indeed, cromomycin A3 staining, together with FISH using a TRAS probe, revealed that TRAS signals only occur at the telomere opposite to the NOR-bearing one. Lastly, the analysis of the distribution of TRAS retrotransposons in a M. persicae strain possessing spontaneous fragmentations of the X chromosomes assessed that TRAS elements were not involved in the healing of de novo telomeres.

  11. Sucrose Loading in Isolated Veins of Pisum sativum: Regulation by Abscisic Acid, Gibberellic Acid, and Cell Turgor 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, Juan José; Peretó, Juli G.; Vercher, Yolanda; Beltrán, José Pío

    1989-01-01

    Enzymatically isolated vein networks from mature pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) leaves were employed to investigate the properties of sucrose loading and the effect of phytohormones and cell turgor on this process. The sucrose uptake showed two components: a saturable and a first-order kinetics system. The high affinity system (Km, 3.3 millimolar) was located at the plasmalemma (p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and orthovanadate sensitivity). Further characterization of this system, including pH dependence and effects of energy metabolism inhibitors, supported the H+-sugar symport concept for sucrose loading. Within a physiological range (0.1-100 micromolar) and after 90 min, abscisic acid (ABA) inhibited and gibberellic acid (GA3) promoted 1 millimolar sucrose uptake. These responses were partially (ABA) or totally (GA3) turgor-dependent. In experiments of combined hormonal treatments, ABA counteracted the GA3 positive effects on sucrose uptake. The abolishment of these responses by p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and experiments on proton flux suggest that both factors (cell turgor and hormones) are modulating the H+ ATPase plasmalemma activity. The results are discussed in terms of their physiological relevance. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667007

  12. MOLECULAR MARKERS FOR VEGETABLE PEA SAMPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Anokhina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research on the presence in genomes of pea hybrid materials of the DNA regions complementary to the primers that are associated with the biochemical characteristics and resistance to powdery mildew.

  13. Use of school gardens in academic instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Heather; Beall, Deborah Lane; Lussier, Mary; McLaughlin, Peggy; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

    2005-01-01

    To determine the status of gardens in California schools. A self-administered Internet and mailed survey was sent to all California principals (N = 9805). 4194 California school principals. School garden practices, attitudes associated with the use of gardens in schools, and perceptions of barriers to having and using school gardens in academic instruction. Descriptive statistics and chi-square; P garden was for enhancement of academic instruction. Gardens were most commonly used for teaching science, environmental studies, and nutrition. Principals strongly agreed that resources such as curriculum materials linked to academic instruction and lessons on teaching nutrition in the garden would assist in the school garden being used for academic instruction. Principals deemed the garden as being not to slightly effective at enhancing the school meal program. School gardens appear to be predominantly used by most schools to enhance academic instruction. There is a need for curriculum materials and teacher training for gardening and nutrition. The link between the garden and the school meal program is an area that clearly requires attention. School lunch would be a logical setting for provision of edible produce, in addition to taste-testing of fresh produce in the garden or classroom setting.

  14. The phytopathogen Dickeya dadantii (Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937) is a pathogen of the pea aphid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Anne-Marie; Duport, Gabrielle; Pagès, Sylvie; Condemine, Guy; Rahbé, Yvan

    2006-03-01

    Dickeya dadantii (Erwinia chrysanthemi) is a phytopathogenic bacterium causing soft rot diseases on many crops. The sequencing of its genome identified four genes encoding homologues of the Cyt family of insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis, which are not present in the close relative Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. atrosepticum. The pathogenicity of D. dadantii was tested on the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, and the bacterium was shown to be highly virulent for this insect, either by septic injury or by oral infection. The lethal inoculum dose was calculated to be as low as 10 ingested bacterial cells. A D. dadantii mutant with the four cytotoxin genes deleted showed a reduced per os virulence for A. pisum, highlighting the potential role of at least one of these genes in pathogenicity. Since only one bacterial pathogen of aphids has been previously described (Erwinia aphidicola), other species from the same bacterial group were tested. The pathogenic trait for aphids was shown to be widespread, albeit variable, within the phytopathogens, with no link to phylogenetic positioning in the Enterobacteriaceae. Previously characterized gut symbionts from thrips (Erwinia/Pantoea group) were also highly pathogenic to the aphid, whereas the potent entomopathogen Photorhabdus luminescens was not. D. dadantii is not a generalist insect pathogen, since it has low pathogenicity for three other insect species (Drosophila melanogaster, Sitophilus oryzae, and Spodoptera littoralis). D. dadantii was one of the most virulent aphid pathogens in our screening, and it was active on most aphid instars, except for the first one, probably due to anatomical filtering. The observed difference in virulence toward apterous and winged aphids may have an ecological impact, and this deserves specific attention in future research.

  15. The benefits of a therapeutic garden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Can an indoor garden room reduce patients' physical and verbal aggression? Elaine Cole, writing in Nursing Older People, discusses how an indoor sensory garden (and a coloured toilet door) led to a reduction in incidents of verbal aggression by 59%.

  16. Natural variation for Fe-efficiency is associated with upregulation of Strategy I mechanisms and enhanced citrate and ethylene synthesis in Pisum sativum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Ahmad H; Paltridge, Nicholas G; Able, Amanda J; Paull, Jeffrey G; Stangoulis, James C R

    2012-06-01

    Iron (Fe)-deficiency is a common abiotic stress in Pisum sativum L. grown in many parts of the world. The aim of the study was to investigate variation in tolerance to Fe deficiency in two pea genotypes, Santi (Fe-efficient) and Parafield (Fe-inefficient). Fe deficiency caused greater declines in chlorophyll score, leaf Fe concentration and root-shoot development in Parafield compared to Santi, suggesting greater Fe-efficiency in Santi. Fe chelate reductase activity and ethylene production were increased in the roots of Santi and to a lesser extent in Parafield under Fe deficiency, while proton extrusion was only occurred in Santi. Moreover, expression of the Fe chelate reductase gene, FRO1, and Fe transporter, RIT1 were upregulated in Fe-deficient roots of Santi. Expression of HA1 (proton extrusion) was also significantly higher in Santi when compared to Parafield grown in Fe-deficient conditions. Furthermore, the application of the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor, 1-aminoisobutyric acid reduced the Fe chelate reductase activity, supporting a direct role for ethylene in its induction. A significant increase in root citrate was only observed in Santi under Fe deficiency indicating a role for citrate in the Fe-efficiency mechanism. Taken together, our physiological and molecular data indicate that genotypic variation in tolerance to Fe deficiency in Santi and Parafield plants is a result of variation in a number of Strategy I mechanisms and also suggest a direct role for ethylene in Fe reductase activity. The pea cultivar, Santi provides a new source of Fe-efficiency that can be exploited to breed more Fe-efficient peas.

  17. Receptor-Like Kinase LYK9 in Pisum sativum L. Is the CERK1-Like Receptor that Controls Both Plant Immunity and AM Symbiosis Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppyanen, Irina V; Shakhnazarova, Vlada Y; Shtark, Oksana Y; Vishnevskaya, Nadezhda A; Tikhonovich, Igor A; Dolgikh, Elena A

    2017-12-21

    Plants are able to discriminate and respond to structurally related chitooligosaccharide (CO) signals from pathogenic and symbiotic fungi. In model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa LysM-receptor like kinases (LysM-RLK) AtCERK1 and OsCERK1 (chitin elicitor receptor kinase 1) were shown to be involved in response to CO signals. Based on phylogenetic analysis, the pea Pisum sativum L. LysM-RLK PsLYK9 was chosen as a possible candidate given its role on the CERK1-like receptor. The knockdown regulation of the PsLyk9 gene by RNA interference led to increased susceptibility to fungal pathogen Fusarium culmorum . Transcript levels of PsPAL2 , PsPR10 defense-response genes were significantly reduced in PsLyk9 RNAi roots. PsLYK9's involvement in recognizing short-chain COs as most numerous signals of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, was also evaluated. In transgenic roots with PsLyk9 knockdown treated with short-chain CO5, downregulation of AM symbiosis marker genes ( PsDELLA3 , PsNSP2 , PsDWARF27 ) was observed. These results clearly indicate that PsLYK9 appears to be involved in the perception of COs and subsequent signal transduction in pea roots. It allows us to conclude that PsLYK9 is the most likely CERK1-like receptor in pea to be involved in the control of plant immunity and AM symbiosis formation.

  18. Gardens on the Arid Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eka Saputra, Weldy

    2017-12-01

    Bahrain is located in the climate of the arid zone which rainfall is low and irregular. This paper discusses the approaches which response to the local context that has been implemented by the government of Bahrain to sustain the quality of the public garden in the arid climate, turning to green. Generally, the approach is an improvement in the central treatment of waste water system plant that used to irrigate the landscaping, agriculture as well as for industry use. These approaches are not the only technologically, but also involves the participation of community to achieve sustainable garden in this country.

  19. The Garden and the Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore how the concepts of garden and machine might inform our understanding of the complex relationship between infrastructure and nature. The garden is introduced as a third nature and used to shed a critical light on the promotion of landscape ‘as’ infrastructure......, which has been developed within the current discourses on landscape urbanism and ecological urbanism. It will be argued that the emphasis of performance, functionality and horizontality, which seems to follow the promotion of landscape as infrastructure, in some cases could be counterproductive...

  20. Free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) reduces the inhibitory effect of soil nitrate on N2 fixation of Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterly, Clayton R; Armstrong, Roger; Chen, Deli; Tang, Caixian

    2016-01-01

    Additional carbohydrate supply resulting from enhanced photosynthesis under predicted future elevated CO2 is likely to increase symbiotic nitrogen (N) fixation in legumes. This study examined the interactive effects of atmospheric CO2 and nitrate (NO3(-)) concentration on the growth, nodulation and N fixation of field pea (Pisum sativum) in a semi-arid cropping system. Field pea was grown for 15 weeks in a Vertosol containing 5, 25, 50 or 90 mg NO3(-)-N kg(-1) under either ambient CO2 (aCO2; 390 ppm) or elevated CO2 (eCO2; 550 ppm) using free-air CO2 enrichment (SoilFACE). Under aCO2, field pea biomass was significantly lower at 5 mg NO3(-)-N kg(-1) than at 90 mg NO3(-)-N kg(-1) soil. However, increasing the soil N level significantly reduced nodulation of lateral roots but not the primary root, and nodules were significantly smaller, with 85% less nodule mass in the 90 NO3(-)-N kg(-1) than in the 5 mg NO3(-)-N kg(-1) treatment, highlighting the inhibitory effects of NO3(-). Field pea grown under eCO2 had greater biomass (approx. 30%) than those grown under aCO2, and was not affected by N level. Overall, the inhibitory effects of NO3(-) on nodulation and nodule mass appeared to be reduced under eCO2 compared with aCO2, although the effects of CO2 on root growth were not significant. Elevated CO2 alleviated the inhibitory effect of soil NO3(-) on nodulation and N2 fixation and is likely to lead to greater total N content of field pea growing under future elevated CO2 environments. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Metropolitan gardens : Gardens in the interstices of the metropolitan tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wit, S.I.

    2013-01-01

    The heterogeneity of the contemporary metropolitan landscape has led to a multiplicity of intermediate spaces, in between and within the different tissues of the metropolitan landscape. These interstices can provide favourable conditions to be transformed into gardens. What design instruments can be

  2. Penstemons are for Great Basin gardens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidi Kratsch

    2013-01-01

    Penstemons are flowering perennials much loved by the gardening public. Gardeners appreciate their diversity of flower colors that are at peak bloom in June and July, their many shapes and sizes, and their attractiveness to hummingbirds and other native pollinators. You may even have planted some in your own garden. Most people don't realize there are about 280...

  3. Rain garden guidelines for southwest Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rain gardens are a unique and practical landscape feature that can enhance the beauty of home gardens. When properly installed, they are one method of limiting the negative effects of rainfall runoff in urban areas. Indeed, rain gardens turn a "negative" into a "positive" by capt...

  4. Wellbeing and Social Relations in School Gardens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen; Dyg, Pernille Malberg

    2017-01-01

    garden program promotes students’ wellbeing through their positive emotions about being outside in the outdoor environment. Garden activities and their relations with peers, garden educators, and teachers seemed to positively affect the students’ self-esteem. Over and above the positive social...

  5. Our Friendship Gardens: Healing Our Mother, Ourselves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Madhu Suri

    2015-01-01

    Embracing the best ideals of Victory Gardens, this essay celebrates Friendship Gardens. The latter go further: collapsing the dualisms separating victors from losers. Friendships that transcend differences and honor diversity are among the many fruits and organic gifts harvested and shared in the commons created by Friendship Gardens. This essay…

  6. What's Cooking in America's Schoolyard Gardens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses what's cooking in America's schoolyard gardens. From First Lady Michelle Obama's world-famous Kitchen Garden, to Alice Waters' groundbreaking Edible Schoolyard in Berkeley, California, to a nationally recognized elementary school learning garden in the small Midwestern town of Ashland, Missouri, school children are planting…

  7. Antifeedant Activity and High Mortality in the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae) Induced by Biostable Insect Kinin Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    modulate digestive enzyme release [13,14,20,33,28,41], and inter- estingly they can also inhibit weight gain in larvae of the tobacco budworm (Heliothis...modern insecticides, making a search for alternative strategies urgent [7]. Furthermore aphids are not sensitive to the toxins from the bacterium Bacillus ...Life Sci 2003;17:61–4. [14] Harshini S, Nachman RJ, Sreekumar S. Inhibition of digestive enzyme release by neuropeptides in larvae of Opisinia

  8. Characterisation by proteomics of peribacteroid space and peribacteroid membrane preparations from peaPisum sativum¤) symbiosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saalbach, G.; Erik, P.; Wienkoop, S.

    2002-01-01

    The legume Rhizobium symbiosis leads to the formation of a new compartment in the plant cell, the symbiosome. This compartment harbours the bacteroids surrounded by a peribacteroid membrane (PBM) originating from the plant plasma membrane. The PBM and the space between the PBM and the bacteroid...

  9. Peas in a Pod: Environment and Ionization in Green Pea Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Heather; Jaskot, Anne; Drew, Patrick; Pare, Dylan; Griffin, Jon; Petersen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Green Peas are extreme, highly ionized, starburst galaxies with strong [OIII] 5007 emission. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we present statistics on the environment of Green Peas and investigate its effects on their ionized gas properties. Although most dwarf starburst galaxies are in low-density environments, we identify a sample of Green Peas in dense environments. Emission line observations with the WIYN 0.9-meter telescope at Kitt Peak reveal that one cluster Green Pea is more highly ionized in the direction of the cluster center. Ram pressure stripping likely generates this ionization gradient. We explore the role of the environment in enhancing star formation rates and ionization, and we compare the nebular properties of Green Peas in high-density environments to those in low-density environments.

  10. Urban domestic gardens: the effects of human interventions on garden composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loram, Alison; Warren, Philip; Thompson, Ken; Gaston, Kevin

    2011-10-01

    Private domestic gardens contribute substantially to the biodiversity of urban areas and benefit human health and well-being. We previously reported a study of 267 gardens across five cities in the United Kingdom in which variation in geographical and climatic factors had little bearing on the richness, diversity and composition of plant species. We therefore hypothesise that garden management is an important factor in determining garden characteristics. Here, from the same sample of gardens, we investigate potential associations between the uses to which people put their gardens, the types of management activities they undertake, and the characteristics of those gardens. Householders (n = 265) completed a questionnaire detailing various aspects of garden use and management activities. The majority of respondents used their gardens chiefly for relaxation, recreation, and eating. Fewer than one fifth included "gardening" amongst their garden uses even though all performed some garden management, suggesting that not all management activity resulted from an interest in gardening. Garden-watering and lawn-mowing were the most prevalent activities and were predictors of other types of management including weeding, vegetation-cutting, leaf-collection, and dead-heading flowers. A number of these activities were associated with one another, the richness and composition of plant species, and the number of land uses in gardens. However, relationships between management activities and the amount of tall vegetation were less consistent, and garden management appeared to be independent of garden area. More species of amphibians, birds, and mammals were observed in gardens with ponds and in which efforts were made to attract wildlife, particularly by providing drinking water. This study supports the hypothesis that garden use and management is associated with garden characteristics.

  11. Effect of Pigeon pea and Cow pea on the performance and gut immunity of broiler chicks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagoub, Yagoub Magboul

    1998-03-01

    two experiments were conducted to examine the effect of pigeon pea and cow pea on the performance and gut immunity of broiler chicks. In experiment 1, 3 experimental diets were formulated containing graded levels of cow pea were maintained. Diets were prepared containing 18.21, 18.25 and 18.25% crude protein and 3076.41, 3062 Kel/Kg metabolizable energy for experiment 1, while diets of experiment 11 were prepared containing 18.21, 18.22, and 18.22% crude protein and 3076.41, 3080.5 and 3055.89 KEl/Kg metabolized energy. 120 Loghmann broiler chicks were equally allocated into 15 pens (8 chicks/pen). Then the experimental diets were randomly assigned to the pens. feed and water were provided ad libitum in both experiments. In experiment 1, the results showed no significant difference were found in chick performance at day 45. The feed conversation ratio increased with the level of pigeon pea used. The pancreas mass was increased as the level of pigeon pea increase. In experiment 2 the results showed significant decrease in the body weight and feed intake at day 45, while the pancreas mass tend to increase with increasing level of cow pea in the diet. Histological examination of small intestine slides showed no histopathological differences between the control and chicks fed cow pea and/or pigeon pea. Immunological test of the serum and mucous samples using ELISA techniques revealed no significant difference between the control and chicks given cow pea and / or pigeon pea

  12. An Experience in Froebel's Garden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Elizabeth S.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the activities of a classroom teacher and her students at Addison Gardens British Nursery School in London, England, which was influenced by, and incorporated the tenets of, Friedrich Froebel's educational philosophy of children's learning. Discusses the application of Froebel's principles to art education. (BB)

  13. Biosecurity protocols for heritage gardens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ian Wright; David Slawson

    2010-01-01

    This project aims to protect The National Trust (NT) from the increasing number of harmful plant pests and diseases that slip though official controls and threaten our gardens, plant collections and landscapes. During 2008, the National Trust (NT) with the seconded help of Dr. David Slawson, Head of Pest and Disease Identification Programme, Food and Environment...

  14. Dropping behaviour of pea aphid nymphs increases their development time and reduces their reproductive capacity as adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Agabiti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many aphid species, including the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, exhibit a behaviour where they drop or fall from their host plant, a commonly used strategy to avoid predation, parasitism or physical disturbance. We hypothesised that there was a physiological non-consumptive cost due to such dropping behaviour because aphids would expend energy re-establishing themselves on a host plant and also lose feeding time. Methods. We evaluated this non-consumptive cost by determining the development time and reproductive potential of pea aphids that whilst developing as nymphs had regularly dropped to the ground following dislodgment from their host plant. Using a microcosm approach, in a replicated and balanced laboratory experiment, we caused aphid dropping behaviour by tapping the plants on which they were feeding. Results. The results demonstrated that disturbance by dropping behaviour increased nymphal development time and reduced their subsequent reproductive capacity as adults. Discussion. We conclude that dropping behaviour had a strong negative effect on the development of nymphs and their subsequent reproductive capacity. This implies that the physiological cost of such a behaviour choice is substantial, and that such avoidance strategies require a trade-off which reduces the capacity of a population to increase.

  15. Physical and Chemical Barriers in Root Tissues Contribute to Quantitative Resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi in Pea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa Bani

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi (Fop is one of the most destructive diseases of pea worldwide. Control of this disease is difficult and it is mainly based on the use of resistant cultivars. While monogenic resistance has been successfully used in the field, it is at risk of breakdown by the constant evolution of the pathogen. New sources of quantitative resistance have been recently identified from a wild relative Pisum spp. collection. Here, we characterize histologically the resistance mechanisms occurring in these sources of quantitative resistance. Detailed comparison, of the reaction at cellular level, of eight pea accessions with differential responses to Fop race 2, showed that resistant accessions established several barriers at the epidermis, exodermis, cortex, endodermis and vascular stele efficiently impeding fungal progression. The main components of these different barriers were carbohydrates and phenolic compounds including lignin. We found that these barriers were mainly based on three defense mechanisms including cell wall strengthening, formation of papilla-like structures at penetration sites and accumulation of different substances within and between cells. These defense reactions varied in intensity and localization between resistant accessions. Our results also clarify some steps of the infection process of F. oxysporum in plant and support the important role of cell wall-degrading enzymes in F. oxysporum pathogenicity.

  16. Insulin-related peptide 5 is involved in regulating embryo development and biochemical composition in pea aphid with wing polyphenism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Shan eGuo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In aphids there is a fecundity-dispersal trade-off between wingless and winged morphs. Recent research on the molecular mechanism of wing morphs associated with dispersal reveals that insulin receptors in the insulin signaling (IS pathway regulate alteration of wing morphs in planthoppers. However, little is known about whether genes in the IS pathway are involved in developmental regulation in aphid nymphs with different wing morphs. In this study, we show that expression of the insulin-related peptide 5 gene (Apirp5 affects biochemical composition and embryo development of wingless pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum. After comparing expression levels of major genes in the IS pathway between third instar winged and wingless nymphs, we found that Apirp5 showed higher expression in head and thorax of the wingless nymphs than in the winged nymphs. Although microinjection treatment affects physical performance in aphids, nymphs with RNA interference of Apirp5 had less weight, smaller embryo size and higher carbohydrate and protein contents compared to control group. Comparison between winged and wingless nymphs showed a similar trend. These results indicate that Apirp5 is involved in embryo development and metabolic regulation in wing dimorphic pea aphid.

  17. To feed or not to feed: plant factors located in the epidermis, mesophyll, and sieve elements influence pea aphid's ability to feed on legume species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzkopf, Alexander; Rosenberger, Daniel; Niebergall, Martin; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Kunert, Grit

    2013-01-01

    The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris), a legume specialist, encompasses at least 11 genetically distinct sympatric host races. Each host race shows a preference for a certain legume species. Six pea aphid clones from three host races were used to localize plant factors influencing aphid probing and feeding behavior on four legume species. Aphid performance was tested by measuring survival and growth. The location of plant factors influencing aphid probing and feeding was determined using the electrical penetration graph (EPG) technique. Every aphid clone performed best on the plant species from which it was originally collected, as well as on Vicia faba. On other plant species, clones showed intermediate or poor performance. The most important plant factors influencing aphid probing and feeding behavior were localized in the epidermis and sieve elements. Repetitive puncturing of sieve elements might be relevant for establishing phloem feeding, since feeding periods appear nearly exclusively after these repetitive sieve element punctures. A combination of plant factors influences the behavior of pea aphid host races on different legume species and likely contributes to the maintenance of these races.

  18. Identification of LATE BLOOMER2 as a CYCLING DOF FACTOR Homolog Reveals Conserved and Divergent Features of the Flowering Response to Photoperiod in Pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, Stephen; Sussmilch, Frances C; Hecht, Valérie; Vander Schoor, Jacqueline K; Lee, Robyn; Aubert, Gregoire; Burstin, Judith; Macknight, Richard C; Weller, James L

    2016-10-01

    The molecular pathways responsible for the flowering response to photoperiod have been extensively studied in Arabidopsis thaliana and cereals but remain poorly understood in other major plant groups. Here, we describe a dominant mutant at the LATE BLOOMER2 (LATE2) locus in pea (Pisum sativum) that is late-flowering with a reduced response to photoperiod. LATE2 acts downstream of light signaling and the circadian clock to control expression of the main photoperiod-regulated FT gene, FTb2, implying that it plays a primary role in photoperiod measurement. Mapping identified the CYCLING DOF FACTOR gene CDFc1 as a strong candidate for LATE2, and the late2-1D mutant was found to carry a missense mutation in CDFc1 that impairs its capacity to bind to the blue-light photoreceptor FKF1 in yeast two-hybrid assays and delays flowering in Arabidopsis when overexpressed. Arabidopsis CDF genes are important negative regulators of CONSTANS (CO) transcription, but we found no effect of LATE2 on the transcription of pea CO-LIKE genes, nor on genes in any other families previously implicated in the activation of FT in Arabidopsis. Our results reveal an important component of the pea photoperiod response pathway and support the view that regulation of FTb2 expression by photoperiod occurs via a CO-independent mechanism. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  19. Historic Gardens Chorbog In The Islamic Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustayev Bahrom Bahodirovich

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In principle any garden reminds us of beauty and unity of nature. But there exist gardens arranged in accordance with the traditional principles of the Islamic Chorbog or architecturally -organized a Four-sides garden which possesses as it seems to me considerably more potential than the gardens planned without such principles. At the present paper an attempt has been made to prove it and it is noted that the Koran is sacred for Moslem people and its references to nature as well as the description of paradise gardens deserves the careful study when considering the meaning of the Islamic gardens. Types and peculiarities of the Islamic countries gardens are also considered in the given paper.

  20. Edinburgh doctors and their physic gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, D

    2008-12-01

    Edinburgh has had eight physic gardens on different sites since its first one was created by the Incorporation of Barbers and Surgeons in 1656. As the gardens grew in size, they evolved from herb gardens to botanic gardens with small herbaria for the supply of medical herbs. They were intended for the instruction of medical, surgical and apothecary students and, in the case of the physicians, to demonstrate the need for a physicians' college and a pharmacopoeia. Some of the doctors in charge of them were equally famous and influential in botany as in medicine, and while Edinburgh Town Council enjoyed the fame the gardens brought to the city it was parsimonious and slow to support its botanical pioneers. The gardens are celebrated today in the Sibbald Garden within the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh.

  1. Uptake of auxins into membrane vesicles isolated from pea stems: an in vitro auxin transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slone, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research was to test the applicability of the chemiosmotic theory of auxin transport to a subcellular system. Membrane vesicles were isolated from the basal portion of the third internode of etiolated pea plants (Pisum sativum L. var. Alaska) by differential centrifugation. Uptake of auxin was determined by adding 14 C-labeled indoleacetic acid (IAA) to vesicles. Nigericin, a monovalent cation ionophore, and the electrogenic protonophore, carbonyl-cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), at micromolar concentrations abolished saturable uptake. Bursting vesicles by sonication, osmotic shock and freeze/thawing also eliminated saturable uptake. As the temperature increased from 0 to 30 0 C, saturable uptake decreased markedly. Nonsaturable auxin uptake was less affected by these treatments. The pH gradient-dependent uptake of auxin appeared to be a transmembrane uptake of auxin into the vesicles rather than surface binding. Unlabeled IAA, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) at low concentrations reduced the saturable accumulation of [ 14 C]IAA in vesicles, while phenylacetic acid, benzoic acid, and 1-NAA were effective only at high concentrations. Kinetic analysis revealed two types of sites: a high affinity site with an uptake capacity of 25 to 40 pmoles/g tissue, and a low affinity site with an uptake capacity of 260 to 600 pmole/g tissue, fresh wt. In conclusion, several principal elements of an auxin transport system, as specific by the chemiosmotic theory of polar auxin transport, were present in membrane vesicles isolated from relatively mature pea stem tissue. However, one important aspect of the theory was not demonstrated in this in vitro system - a TIBA/NPA-sensitive auxin efflux. The kinetics and specificity of auxin uptake strongly suggested that this system was physiologically significant

  2. Purification and characterization of a casein kinase 2-type protein kinase from pea nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Almost all the polyamine-stimulated protein kinase activity associated with the chromatin fraction of nuclei purified from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) plumules is present in a single enzyme that can be extracted from chromatin by 0.35 molar NaCl. This protein kinase can be further purified over 2000-fold by salt fractionation and anion-exchange and casein-agarose column chromatography, after which it is more than 90% pure. The purified kinase has a specific activity of about 650 nanomoles per minute per milligram protein in the absence of polyamines, with either ATP or GTP as phosphoryl donor. Spermidine can stimulate its activity fourfold, with half-maximal activation at about 2 millimolar. Spermine and putrescine also stimulate activity, although somewhat less effectively. This kinase has a tetrameric alpha 2 beta 2 structure with a native molecular weight of 130,000, and subunit molecular weights of 36,000 for the catalytic subunit (alpha) and 29,000 for the regulatory subunit (beta). In western blot analyses, only the alpha subunit reacts strongly with polyclonal antibodies to a Drosophila casein kinase II. The pea kinase can use casein and phosvitin as artificial substrates, phosphorylating both the serine and threonine residues of casein. It has a pH optimum near 8.0, a Vmax of 1.5 micromoles per minute per milligram protein, and a Km for ATP of approximately 75 micromolar. Its activity can be almost completely inhibited by heparin at 5 micrograms per milliliter, but is relatively insensitive to concentrations of staurosporine, K252a, and chlorpromazine that strongly antagonize Ca(2+) -regulated protein kinases. These results are discussed in relation to recent findings that casein kinase 2-type kinases may phosphorylate trans-acting factors that bind to light-regulated promoters in plants.

  3. Effects of Graded Levels of Pigeon Pea Meal on Growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The birds were fed on 0, 50, 75 and 100% dietary inclusions of toasted pigeon pea as replacement for soybean in a 28 day feeding trial. Significant interaction between dietary levels of pigeon pea and soybean were observed on feed efficiency and weight gain (p<0.05). Increase in dietary levels of pigeon pea reduced feed ...

  4. Possible causes of dry pea synergy to corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry pea improves corn yield and tolerance to weed interference compared with soybean, spring wheat, or canola as preceding crops. To understand this synergy between dry pea and corn, we examined growth and nutrient concentration of corn following dry pea or soybean in sequence. Each corn plot was ...

  5. Number and Effectiveness of Pea Rhizobia in Danish Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Most of 44 Danish soils tested contain between 1000 and 10 000 pea rhizobia (Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viceae) per gram. Pea rhizobia were not detected in acid moor and forest soils. Only one case of failed nodulation in peas in the field has been noted, in spots in a reclaimed sandy heath...

  6. 7 CFR 457.140 - Dry pea crop insurance provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... varieties of contract seed peas, and deliver the production from those varieties to the processor/seed... contract seed pea variety by its respective production guarantee; (5) Multiplying each result of section 13... indemnity payment. (c) The value of contract seed pea production to count for each variety in the unit will...

  7. In vitro Regeneration of pigeon pea using leaf explants | Asande ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pigeon pea production in countries like Kenya is faced with a number of challenges, particularly lack of high quality seeds. The objective of this study was to develop an in vitro regeneration system for pigeon pea varieties grown in Kenya, that is amenable to genetic transformation. In vitro regeneration of pigeon pea ...

  8. London's historic ''pea-soupers''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbinato, D.

    1994-01-01

    Americans may think smog was invented in Los Angeles. Not so. In fact, a Londoner coined the term ''smog'' in 1905 to describe the city's insidious combination of natural fog and coal smoke. By then, the phenomenon was part of London history, and dirty, acrid smoke-filled ''pea-soupers'' were as familiar to Londoners as Big Ben and Westminster Abby. Smog in London predates Shakespeare by four centuries. Until the 12th century, most Londoners burned wood for fuel. But as the city grew and the forests shrank, wood became scarce and increasingly expensive. Large deposits of ''sea-coal'' off the northeast coast provided a cheap alternative. Soon, Londoners were burning the soft, bituminous coal to heat their homes and fuel their factories. Sea-coal was plentiful, but it didn't burn efficiently. A lot of its energy was spent making smoke, not heat. Coal smoke drifting through thousands of London chimneys combined with clean natural fog to make smog. If the weather conditions were right, it would last for days. Early on, no one had the scientific tools to correlate smog with adverse health effects, but complaints about the smoky air as an annoyance date back to at least 1272, when King Edward I, on the urging of important noblemen and clerics, banned the burning of sea-coal. Anyone caught burning or selling the stuff was to be tortured or executed. The first offender caught was summarily put to death. This deterred nobody. Of necessity, citizens continued to burn sea-coal in violation of the law, which required the burning of wood few could afford

  9. Analysis of apical hook formation in Alaska pea with a 3-D clinostat and agravitropic mutant ageotropum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensuke eMiyamoto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the apical hook in dicotyledonous seedlings is believed to be effected by gravity in the dark. However, this notion is mostly based on experiments with the hook formed on the hypocotyl, and no detailed studies are available with the developmental manners of the hook, particularly of the epicotyl hook. The present study aims at clarifying the dynamics of hook formation including the possible involvement of gravity. Time-course studies with normal Alaska pea (Pisum sativum L., cv. Alaska and an agravitropic pea mutant, ageotropum, under the 1-g conditions and on a 3-D clinostat revealed that 1 the apical hook of the epicotyl forms by the development of the arc-shaped plumule of the embryo existing in the non-germinated seed. The process of formation consists of two stages: development and partial opening, which are controlled by some intrinsic property of the plumule, but not gravity. Approximately when the epicotyl emerges from the seed coat, the hook is established in both pea varieties. In Alaska the established hook is sustained or enhanced by gravity, resulting in a delay of hook opening compared with on a clinostat, which might give an incorrect idea that gravity causes hook formation. 2 During the hook development and opening processes the original plumular arc holds its orientation unchanged to be an established hook, which, therefore, is at the same side of the epicotyl axis as the cotyledons. This is true for both Alaska and ageotropum under 1-g conditions as well as on the clinostat, supporting finding (1. 3 Application of auxin polar transport inhibitors, hydroxyfluorenecarboxylic acid, naphthylphthalamic acid, and triiodobenzoic acid, suppressed the curvature of hook by equal extents in Alaska as well as ageotropum, suggesting that the hook development involves auxin polar transport probably asymmetrically distributed across the plumular axis by some intrinsic property of the plumule not directly related with gravity

  10. Analysis of apical hook formation in Alaska pea with a 3-D clinostat and agravitropic mutant ageotropum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Kensuke; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Uheda, Eiji; Ueda, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    The formation of the apical hook in dicotyledonous seedlings is believed to be effected by gravity in the dark. However, this notion is mostly based on experiments with the hook formed on the hypocotyl, and no detailed studies are available with the developmental manners of the hook, particularly of the epicotyl hook. The present study aims at clarifying the dynamics of hook formation including the possible involvement of gravity. Time-course studies with normal Alaska pea (Pisum sativum L., cv. Alaska) and an agravitropic pea mutant, ageotropum, under the 1-g conditions and on a 3-D clinostat revealed that (1) the apical hook of the epicotyl forms by the development of the arc-shaped plumule of the embryo existing in the non-germinated seed. The process of formation consists of two stages: development and partial opening, which are controlled by some intrinsic property of the plumule, but not gravity. Approximately when the epicotyl emerges from the seed coat, the hook is established in both pea varieties. In Alaska the established hook is sustained or enhanced by gravity, resulting in a delay of hook opening compared with on a clinostat, which might give an incorrect idea that gravity causes hook formation. (2) During the hook development and opening processes the original plumular arc holds its orientation unchanged to be an established hook, which, therefore, is at the same side of the epicotyl axis as the cotyledons. This is true for both Alaska and ageotropum under 1-g conditions as well as on the clinostat, supporting finding (1). (3) Application of auxin polar transport inhibitors, hydroxyfluorenecarboxylic acid, naphthylphthalamic acid, and triiodobenzoic acid, suppressed the curvature of hook by equal extents in Alaska as well as ageotropum, suggesting that the hook development involves auxin polar transport probably asymmetrically distributed across the plumular axis by some intrinsic property of the plumule not directly related with gravity action.

  11. Monoculture of leafcutter ant gardens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich G Mueller

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Leafcutter ants depend on the cultivation of symbiotic Attamyces fungi for food, which are thought to be grown by the ants in single-strain, clonal monoculture throughout the hundreds to thousands of gardens within a leafcutter nest. Monoculture eliminates cultivar-cultivar competition that would select for competitive fungal traits that are detrimental to the ants, whereas polyculture of several fungi could increase nutritional diversity and disease resistance of genetically variable gardens.Using three experimental approaches, we assessed cultivar diversity within nests of Atta leafcutter ants, which are most likely among all fungus-growing ants to cultivate distinct cultivar genotypes per nest because of the nests' enormous sizes (up to 5000 gardens and extended lifespans (10-20 years. In Atta texana and in A. cephalotes, we resampled nests over a 5-year period to test for persistence of resident cultivar genotypes within each nest, and we tested for genetic differences between fungi from different nest sectors accessed through excavation. In A. texana, we also determined the number of Attamyces cells carried as a starter inoculum by a dispersing queens (minimally several thousand Attamyces cells, and we tested for genetic differences between Attamyces carried by sister queens dispersing from the same nest. Except for mutational variation arising during clonal Attamyces propagation, DNA fingerprinting revealed no evidence for fungal polyculture and no genotype turnover during the 5-year surveys.Atta leafcutter ants can achieve stable, fungal monoculture over many years. Mutational variation emerging within an Attamyces monoculture could provide genetic diversity for symbiont choice (gardening biases of the ants favoring specific mutational variants, an analog of artificial selection.

  12. PERSIAN GARDENS IN COLD AND DRY CLIMATE: A CASE STUDY OF TABRIZ’S HISTORICAL GARDENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahad Nejad Ebrahimi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Throughout history, gardens and garden designing has been in the attention of Persian architects who had special expertise in the construction of gardens. The appearance of Islam and allegories of paradise taken from that in Koran and Saints’ sayings gave spirituality to garden construction. Climate conditions have also had an important role in this respect but little research has been done about it and most of the investigations have referred to spiritual aspects and forms of garden. The cold and dry climate that has enveloped parts of West and North West of Iran has many gardens with different forms and functions, which have not been paid much attention to by studies done so far. The aim of this paper is to identify the features and specifications of cold and dry climate gardens with an emphasis on Tabriz’s Gardens.  Due to its natural and strategic situation, Tabriz has always been in the attention of governments throughout history; travellers and tourists have mentioned Tabriz as a city that has beautiful gardens. But, the earthquakes and wars have left no remains of those beautiful gardens. This investigation, by a comparative study of the climates in Iran and the effect of those climates on the formation of gardens and garden design, tries to identify the features and characteristics of gardens in cold and dry climate. The method of study is interpretive-historical on the basis of written documents and historic features and field study of existing gardens in this climate. The results show that, with respect to natural substrate, vegetation, the form of water supply, and the general form of the garden; gardens in dry and cold climate are different from gardens in other climates.

  13. Dropping Behavior in the Pea Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae): How Does Environmental Context Affect Antipredator Responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Katharine V; Preisser, Evan L

    2016-01-01

    The pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum : Harris (Hemiptera: Aphididae) is a phloem-feeding insect whose antipredator defenses include kicking, walking away, and dropping from the plant. Aphid dropping, a risky and energetically costly antipredator behavior, can be increased by the release of aphid alarm pheromone; there is also evidence that insect density and plant health can affect the likelihood of aphids engaging in this behavior. We investigated whether interactions between alarm cues, insect density, and plant health can alter the dropping behavior of aphids in response to an artificial disturbance. The presence of the alarm pheromone E-β-farnesene resulted in a nearly 15-fold increase in aphid dropping behavior; the other two factors, however, did not affect dropping and none of the two- or three-way interactions were significant. This was surprising because aphids affected plant health: production of new plant biomass after 5 d of exposure to high aphid densities was 50% lower than in the control treatment. This research adds to our understanding of the factors affecting aphid antipredator behavior; the fact that neither aphid density nor feeding period impacted dropping may reflect the high energetic costs of this activity and an unwillingness to use it in any but the riskiest situations. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  14. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of seasonal photoperiodism in the pea aphid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauthier J-P

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aphid adaptation to harsh winter conditions is illustrated by an alternation of their reproductive mode. Aphids detect photoperiod shortening by sensing the length of the night and switch from viviparous parthenogenesis in spring and summer, to oviparous sexual reproduction in autumn. The photoperiodic signal is transduced from the head to the reproductive tract to change the fate of the future oocytes from mitotic diploid embryogenesis to haploid formation of gametes. This process takes place in three consecutive generations due to viviparous parthenogenesis. To understand the molecular basis of the switch in the reproductive mode, transcriptomic and proteomic approaches were used to detect significantly regulated transcripts and polypeptides in the heads of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Results The transcriptomic profiles of the heads of the first generation were slightly affected by photoperiod shortening. This suggests that trans-generation signalling between the grand-mothers and the viviparous embryos they contain is not essential. By analogy, many of the genes and some of the proteins regulated in the heads of the second generation are implicated in visual functions, photoreception and cuticle structure. The modification of the cuticle could be accompanied by a down-regulation of the N-β-alanyldopamine pathway and desclerotization. In Drosophila, modification of the insulin pathway could cause a decrease of juvenile hormones in short-day reared aphids. Conclusion This work led to the construction of hypotheses for photoperiodic regulation of the switch of the reproductive mode in aphids.

  15. Developmental changes in aspartate-family amino acid biosynthesis in pea chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.R.; Cato, L.W.; Stephens, B.W.; Reeves, M.

    1990-01-01

    Isolated chloroplasts are known to synthesize the asp-derived amino acids (ile, hse, lys and thr) from [ 14 C]asp (Mills et al, 1980, Plant Physiol. 65, 1166). Now, we have studied the influence of tissue age on essential amino acid biosynthesis in pea (Pisum sativum) plastids. Chloroplasts from the younger (third and fourth) leaves of 12 day old plants, were 2-3 times more active in synthesizing lys and thr from [ 14 C]asp than those from older (first or second) leaves. We also examined two key pathway enzymes (aspartate kinase and homoserine dehydrogenase); with each enzyme,a activity in younger leaves was about 2 times that in plastids from older tissue. Both lys- and thr-sensitive forms of aspartate kinase are known in plants; in agreement with earlier work, we found that lys-sensitive activity was about 4 times higher in the younger tissues, while the thr-sensitive activity changed little during development (Davies and Miflin, 1977, Plant Sci. Lett. 9, 323). Recently the role of aspartate kinase and homoserine dehydrogenase in controlling asp-family amino acid synthesis has been questioned (Giovanelli et al, 1989, Plant Physiol. 90, 1584); we hope that measurements of amino acid levels in chloroplasts as well as further enzyme studies will help us to better understand the regulation of asp-family amino acid synthesis

  16. Dynamics of mature pea residue nitrogen turnover in unplanted soil under field conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamics of N-15-labelled mature, pea (Pisum sativum L.) residue turnover in soil were studied in two 3 yr experiments, using residue sizes of soil in the field. During the initial 10 days of decomposition there was a sharp decline in the amount of N-15 in organic...... in the biomass N, indicating that unlabelled soil N was immobilized in the biomass in the second experiment, despite the high residue N concentration. The total residual organic N-15 and the N-15 in the biomass declined with average decay constants of 0.44 and 0.65 yr-1, respectively, for the 10 d to 1 yr period...... mineralizable after 2 yr of decomposition, indicating that the remaining residue N-15 was present in rather recalcitrant soil organic matter. After 90 days of decomposition N-15 unaccounted for corresponded to 10% of the input, increasing to 20-30% after 2-3 yr of decomposition. The main part of the N...

  17. 14C2H4: distribution of 14C-labeled tissue metabolites in pea seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaquinta, R.; Beyer, E. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The 14 C-metabolite distribution pattern following 14 C 2 H 4 metabolism in intact pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L.) was determined under various conditions. After a 24 hr exposure to 14 C 2 H 4 , the majority of 14 C-metabolites were water-soluble (60-70%) with lesser amounts in the protein (10-15%), lipid (1%), and insoluble (1-2%) fractions. Ion exchange chromatography of the water-soluble components into basic, neutral, and acidic fractions revealed a 50:40:10 distribution, respectively. Chromatography of the neutral fraction revealed two regions of radioactivity (Rf=0.38) and 0.63 which did not cochromatograph with twenty-two known sugars or neutral metabolites. Chromatograms of the basic fraction contained 3 regions of radioactivity. Similar distribution patterns were noted when 14 C 2 H 4 exposure was followed by a 6 hr air chase or when 5% CO 2 , an antagonist of ethylene action, was present during the exposure. Marked differences in the 14 C-metabolite distribution patterns were obtained when 14 CO 2 was substituted for 14 C 2 H 4 . These results indicate that the metabolic pathway involved in ethylene metabolism is different from that involved in intermediately carbon metabolism. (auth.)

  18. Interactions between ethylene, gibberellins, and brassinosteroids in the development of rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbioses of pea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Eloise; McAdam, Erin L.; Weller, James L.; Reid, James B.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of arbuscular mycorrhizal development and nodulation involves complex interactions between the plant and its microbial symbionts. In this study, we use the recently identified ethylene-insensitive ein2 mutant in pea (Pisum sativum L.) to explore the role of ethylene in the development of these symbioses. We show that ethylene acts as a strong negative regulator of nodulation, confirming reports in other legumes. Minor changes in gibberellin1 and indole-3-acetic acid levels in ein2 roots appear insufficient to explain the differences in nodulation. Double mutants produced by crosses between ein2 and the severely gibberellin-deficient na and brassinosteroid-deficient lk mutants showed increased nodule numbers and reduced nodule spacing compared with the na and lk single mutants, but nodule numbers and spacing were typical of ein2 plants, suggesting that the reduced number of nodules in na and lk plants is largely due to the elevated ethylene levels previously reported in these mutants. We show that ethylene can also negatively regulate mycorrhizae development when ethylene levels are elevated above basal levels, consistent with a role for ethylene in reducing symbiotic development under stressful conditions. In contrast to the hormone interactions in nodulation, ein2 does not override the effect of lk or na on the development of arbuscular mycorrhizae, suggesting that brassinosteroids and gibberellins influence this process largely independently of ethylene. PMID:26889005

  19. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain: Primary Epiploic Appendagitis (PEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulbanu Erkan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary epiploic appendagitis (PEA is a rare disease caused by torsion or spontaneous thrombosis of the central vein that drains epiploic appendages (EA. Primary Epiploic Appendagitis (PEA is an ischemic infarction. Although PEA is a self-limiting disease and does not require surgical intervention in most cases, it may mimic diseases that require surgical intervention or aggressive medical therapy, such as appendicitis, diverticulitis, or cholecystitis. In order to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention, PEA should be kept in mind when patients present with acute abdominal pain. In this report, we present a PEA case admitted with abdominal pain.

  20. Selection Signatures in the First Exon of Paralogous Receptor Kinase Genes from the Sym2 Region of the Pisum sativum L. Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton S. Sulima

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available During the initial step of the symbiosis between legumes (Fabaceae and nitrogen-fixing bacteria (rhizobia, the bacterial signal molecule known as the Nod factor (nodulation factor is recognized by plant LysM motif-containing receptor-like kinases (LysM-RLKs. The fifth chromosome of barrel medic (Medicago truncatula Gaertn. contains a cluster of paralogous LysM-RLK genes, one of which is known to participate in symbiosis. In the syntenic region of the pea (Pisum sativum L. genome, three genes have been identified: PsK1 and PsSym37, two symbiosis-related LysM-RLK genes with known sequences, and the unsequenced PsSym2 gene which presumably encodes a LysM-RLK and is associated with increased selectivity to certain Nod factors. In this work, we identified a new gene encoding a LysM-RLK, designated as PsLykX, within the Sym2 genomic region. We sequenced the first exons (corresponding to the protein receptor domain of PsSym37, PsK1, and PsLykX from a large set of pea genotypes of diverse origin. The nucleotide diversity of these fragments was estimated and groups of haplotypes for each gene were revealed. Footprints of selection pressure were detected via comparative analyses of SNP distribution across the first exons of these genes and their homologs MtLYK2, MtLYK3, and MtLYK4 from M. truncatula retrieved from the Medicago Hapmap project. Despite the remarkable similarity among all the studied genes, they exhibited contrasting selection signatures, possibly pointing to diversification of their functions. Signatures of balancing selection were found in LysM1-encoding parts of PsSym37 and PsK1, suggesting that the diversity of these parts may be important for pea LysM-RLKs. The first exons of PsSym37 and PsK1 displayed signatures of purifying selection, as well as MtLYK2 of M. truncatula. Evidence of positive selection affecting primarily LysM domains was found in all three investigated M. truncatula genes, as well as in the pea gene PsLykX. The data

  1. The changing role of botanic gardens and the experience from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopia is trying to establish botanic gardens with the first one in place being the recently inaugurated Gullele Botanic Garden in Addis Abeba. In order to develop this newly established garden as well as any other future botanic garden, Ethiopia needs to gather information from the experience of other botanic gardens that ...

  2. PeaMUST, a large multidisciplinary project dedicated to pea improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Burstin, Judith; Pilet Nayel, Marie-Laure; Rameau, Catherine; Thompson, Richard; Carrouée, Benoit; Rivière, N.; Brochot, Anne-Lise; Chaillet, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Legume use in arable rotations provides several significant ecological services that can help to meet the challenge of delivering high-quality food and feed in an economically and environmentally sustainable manner. Nevertheless, grain legumes are underused by European farmers mainly because of yield inconsistency. PeaMUST overall objective is to develop novel pea varieties and optimize plant-symbiotic interactions for seed yield and quality regularity, in the conte...

  3. Pea Streak Virus Recorded in Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sarkisova, Tatiana; Bečková, M.; Fránová, Jana; Petrzik, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2016), s. 164-166 ISSN 1212-2580 R&D Projects: GA MZe QH71145 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Pea streak virus * alfalfa * carlavirus * partial sequence Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016

  4. Multicultural School Gardens: Creating Engaging Garden Spaces in Learning about Language, Culture, and Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter-Mackenzie, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Children's gardening programs have enjoyed increasing popularity in recent years. An Australian environmental education non-profit organization implemented a program, entitled Multicultural Schools Gardens, in disadvantaged (low-income) schools that used food gardening as a focus for implementing a culturally-focused environmental education…

  5. The Force of Gardening: Investigating Children's Learning in a Food Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Monica; Duhn, Iris

    2015-01-01

    School gardens are becoming increasingly recognised as important sites for learning and for bringing children into relationship with food. Despite the well-known educational and health benefits of gardening, children's interactions with the non-human entities and forces within garden surroundings are less understood and examined in the wider…

  6. Introducing a longitudinal study of community gardeners and gardens in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erika S. Svendsen; Lindsay K. Campbell; Nancy Falxa-Raymond; Jessica Northridge; Edie. Stone

    2012-01-01

    For almost a decade, the NYC Department of Parks and Recreation GreenThumb program has collected data about hundreds of New York City community gardens citywide to understand how these gardens function. Building on a data set that includes surveys and interviews conducted periodically with garden representatives since 2003, GreenThumb and USDA Forest Service...

  7. Characterisation, analysis of expression and localisation of circadian clock genes from the perspective of photoperiodism in the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberà, Miquel; Collantes-Alegre, Jorge Mariano; Martínez-Torres, David

    2017-04-01

    Aphids are typical photoperiodic insects that switch from viviparous parthenogenetic reproduction typical of long day seasons to oviparous sexual reproduction triggered by the shortening of photoperiod in autumn yielding an overwintering egg in which an embryonic diapause takes place. While the involvement of the circadian clock genes in photoperiodism in mammals is well established, there is still some controversy on their participation in insects. The availability of the genome of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum places this species as an excellent model to investigate the involvement of the circadian system in the aphid seasonal response. In the present report, we have advanced in the characterisation of the circadian clock genes and showed that these genes display extensive alternative splicing. Moreover, the expression of circadian clock genes, analysed at different moments of the day, showed a robust cycling of central clock genes period and timeless. Furthermore, the rhythmic expression of these genes was shown to be rapidly dampened under DD (continuous darkness conditions), thus supporting the model of a seasonal response based on a heavily dampened circadian oscillator. Additionally, increased expression of some of the circadian clock genes under short-day conditions suggest their involvement in the induction of the aphid seasonal response. Finally, in situ localisation of transcripts of genes period and timeless in the aphid brain revealed the site of clock neurons for the first time in aphids. Two groups of clock cells were identified: the Dorsal Neurons (DN) and the Lateral Neurons (LN), both in the protocerebrum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A High-Density Integrated DArTseq SNP-Based Genetic Map of Pisum fulvum and Identification of QTLs Controlling Rust Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Barilli

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Pisum fulvum, a wild relative of pea is an important source of allelic diversity to improve the genetic resistance of cultivated species against fungal diseases of economic importance like the pea rust caused by Uromyces pisi. To unravel the genetic control underlying resistance to this fungal disease, a recombinant inbred line (RIL population was generated from a cross between two P. fulvum accessions, IFPI3260 and IFPI3251, and genotyped using Diversity Arrays Technology. A total of 9,569 high-quality DArT-Seq and 8,514 SNPs markers were generated. Finally, a total of 12,058 markers were assembled into seven linkage groups, equivalent to the number of haploid chromosomes of P. fulvum and P. sativum. The newly constructed integrated genetic linkage map of P. fulvum covered an accumulated distance of 1,877.45 cM, an average density of 1.19 markers cM−1 and an average distance between adjacent markers of 1.85 cM. The composite interval mapping revealed three QTLs distributed over two linkage groups that were associated with the percentage of rust disease severity (DS%. QTLs UpDSII and UpDSIV were located in the LGs II and IV respectively and were consistently identified both in adult plants over 3 years at the field (Córdoba, Spain and in seedling plants under controlled conditions. Whenever they were detected, their contribution to the total phenotypic variance varied between 19.8 and 29.2. A third QTL (UpDSIV.2 was also located in the LGIVand was environmentally specific as was only detected for DS % in seedlings under controlled conditions. It accounted more than 14% of the phenotypic variation studied. Taking together the data obtained in the study, it could be concluded that the expression of resistance to fungal diseases in P. fulvum originates from the resistant parent IFPI3260.

  9. Designed Natural Spaces: Informal Gardens Are Perceived to Be More Restorative than Formal Gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twedt, Elyssa; Rainey, Reuben M; Proffitt, Dennis R

    2016-01-01

    Experimental research shows that there are perceived and actual benefits to spending time in natural spaces compared to urban spaces, such as reduced cognitive fatigue, improved mood, and reduced stress. Whereas past research has focused primarily on distinguishing between distinct categories of spaces (i.e., nature vs. urban), less is known about variability in perceived restorative potential of environments within a particular category of outdoor spaces, such as gardens. Conceptually, gardens are often considered to be restorative spaces and to contain an abundance of natural elements, though there is great variability in how gardens are designed that might impact their restorative potential. One common practice for classifying gardens is along a spectrum ranging from "formal or geometric" to "informal or naturalistic," which often corresponds to the degree to which built or natural elements are present, respectively. In the current study, we tested whether participants use design informality as a cue to predict perceived restorative potential of different gardens. Participants viewed a set of gardens and rated each on design informality, perceived restorative potential, naturalness, and visual appeal. Participants perceived informal gardens to have greater restorative potential than formal gardens. In addition, gardens that were more visually appealing and more natural-looking were perceived to have greater restorative potential than less visually appealing and less natural gardens. These perceptions and precedents are highly relevant for the design of gardens and other similar green spaces intended to provide relief from stress and to foster cognitive restoration.

  10. Integrate the Arts. Monet's Garden Pops Up!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Mary

    1996-01-01

    This article outlines the steps in an art activity on the elements of landscapes and touches on the topic of perspective. In the activity students create three-dimensional secret gardens of their own out of construction paper. The activity is based on Claude Monet's painting and his garden in Giverny (Normandy, France). (SM)

  11. "The Secret Garden": A Literary Journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1998-01-01

    Outlines the life of Frances Hodgson Burnett, author of "The Secret Garden." Argues that it not only tells an enthralling tale, but takes readers on a journey through the history of English literature. Discusses the gothic tradition and romanticism of "The Secret Garden." Lists classic elements in the book and offers five ideas…

  12. Growing Healing One Garden at a Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashman, Julann

    2016-01-01

    Evidence exists regarding the effect of horticultural therapy on improving human well-being, including promotion of overall health and quality of life, physical strength, and cardiac function. This article shares how a nurse created a healing garden at Lourdes Hospital, where she works. Resource information about therapeutic gardens is included.

  13. School Food Gardens: Fertile Ground for Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beery, Moira; Adatia, Rachel; Segantin, Orsola; Skaer, Chantal-Fleur

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to respond to food insecurity and environmental sustainability through school food gardens in Johannesburg, South Africa. Design/Methodology/Approach: Permaculture is a method of organic agriculture where the garden design maintains a stable and productive ecosystem, mimicking natural processes and thereby…

  14. Roots and Research in Urban School Gardens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylie, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    This book explores the urban school garden as a bridge between environmental action and thought. As a small-scale response to global issues around access to food and land, urban school gardens promote practical knowledge of farming as well as help renew cultural ideals of shared space and mutual support for the organic, built environment. Through…

  15. Havens tider / The Times of the Garden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Bilingual text (English and Danish) for exhibition catalogue. ARoS Triennal: The Garden - End of Times, Beginning of Times.......Bilingual text (English and Danish) for exhibition catalogue. ARoS Triennal: The Garden - End of Times, Beginning of Times....

  16. Invasive plants often emanate from southern gardens

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.H. Miller; A. Miller

    2009-01-01

    Did you know that heavenly bamboo, thorny olive, English ivy, Boston fern, privets and many garden favorites are invading forests to their and thus our detriment? Garden clubs should band together to protect our natural vegetation against invasive plants that take over the habitat of the native flora. Often called non-native, exotic, or noxious weeds, they...

  17. BIBLICAL METAPHOR: THE COSMIC GARDEN HERITAGE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    garden estate, found throughout biblical texts – and trust learning can be transferred. Pentateuchal .... agents are appointed to wreak devastation, and the dwelling place becomes bereft of fruitfulness and joy. .... ourselves living – on commodity real estate or in the cosmic garden – and it will affect our behavior. The role of ...

  18. Creating a Schoolyard Mini-Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ruiz, Francisca

    2009-01-01

    The creation of schoolyard gardens is a growing movement in the United States and around the world (Ballard, Tong, and Usher 1998; Pope 1998; Lewis 2004). It brings together all of the features of authentic hands-on science: Students can collect data on plant growth, observe the plant and animal interactions in the garden, and acquire a sense of…

  19. A century of genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Fairbanks

    2001-01-01

    In 1866, Gregor Mendel published his experiments on heredity in the garden pea (Pisum sativum). The fundamental principles of inheritance derived from his work apply to nearly all eukaryotic species and are now known as Mendelian principles. Since 1900, Mendel has been recognized as the founder of genetics. In 1900, three botanists, Carl Correns, Hugo De Vries, and...

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Arvind Kumar. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 6 December 2012 pp 1041-1059 Articles. COCHLEATA controls leaf size and secondary inflorescence architecture via negative regulation of UNIFOLIATA (LEAFY ortholog) gene in garden pea Pisum sativum.