WorldWideScience

Sample records for gamma-ray attenuation technique

  1. Two-phase flow void fraction measurement using gamma ray attenuation technique

    Silva, R.D. da.

    1985-01-01

    The present work deals with experimental void fraction measurements in two-phase water-nitrogen flow, by using a gamma ray attenuation technique. Several upward two-phase flow regimes in a vertical tube were simulated. The water flow was varied from 0.13 to 0.44 m 3 /h while the nitrogen flow was varied between 0.01 and 0.1 m 3 /h. The mean volumetric void fraction was determined based on the measured linear void fraction for each flow condition. The results were compared with other authors data and showed a good agreement. (author) [pt

  2. Application of the gamma-ray attenuation technique to forest sciences in Brazil

    Rezende, Marcos Antonio de; Costa, Vladimir Eliodoro; Bruder, Edson Marcelo

    2005-01-01

    The study of the physical characteristics of wood is fundamental to its correct utilization by the industry and to an efficient exploitation of this raw material. The most important characteristics of wood are the specific gravity, the shrinkage and the porosity. Those traits are related one to each other and to mechanic resistance and hygroscopicity. The present work proposes the utilization of the gamma-ray attenuation technique, through a sealed source of the radioisotope 241 Am with an activity of 7.4 GBq and an energy of 60 keV, to the determination of physical characteristics of the wood of Pinus tecunumannii, Liquidambar styraciflua and Eucalyptus grandis from cultivated fields of Duratex S/A, in Agudos, Sao Paulo State, Brazil. This work presents the advantages and the facilities of the utilization of this technique in the qualitative and quantitative study of the wood from reforestation fields. This technique is employed to determine the specific gravity of a material through the attenuation of gamma-ray after crossing a sample of uniform thickness. Results revealed superior quality of wood to the species L. styraciflua, followed by E. grandis. Considerable variation in the physical properties of the sample of P. tecunumannii was observed along the radial sense, indicating that this species is highly responsive to climatic factors. The more uniform wood of E. grandis and L. styraciflua suggest that these species may be more adapted to the climatic conditions of the Sao Paulo State than P. tecunumannii. (author)

  3. Gamma-ray attenuation technique for determining density and water content of wood samples

    Ferraz, E.S.B.; Aguiar, O.

    1985-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of application of the Beer-Lambert law are discussed, with emphasis on the maximum theoretical error expected. A serie of measurements of moisture content within the range of 8g/cm 3 to 30g/cm 3 are made on samples of Pinus oocarpa by gamma-ray ( 241 Am) attenuation methods and by the conventional gravimetric method. The relative deviations (experimental errors) found in the determinations made by these two methods are compared with the theoretical errors calculated, showing the viability of the gamma-ray method. (M.A.C.) [pt

  4. Determination of moisture content gradient in wood by gamma-ray attenuation technique

    Aguiar, O.; Barros Ferraz, E.S. de

    1981-01-01

    A new methodology for determining water content gradients in wood was developed. It was based on the low energy gamma ray attenuation. Two equations were proposed for determining wood water content, below and above the fiber saturation point. A series of measurents of moisture content gradients in wood samples of Pinus oocarpa was made, during drying in an environment with controlled relative humidity and temperature. The water cntent gradients determination was quick, non-destructive and presented sensitivity and accuracy in moisture content range from 9% to 150%. Aspects of the application of this methodology in water diffusion and flow studies in wood are discussed. (Author) [pt

  5. Gamma-rays attenuation of zircons from Cambodia and South Africa at different energies: A new technique for identifying the origin of gemstone

    Limkitjaroenporn, P.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the gamma-rays interaction properties of zircons from Cambodia and South Africa have been studied. The densities of Cambodian and South African’s zircons are 4.6716±0.0040 g/cm 3 and 4.5505±0.0018 g/cm 3 , respectively. The mass attenuation coefficient and the effective atomic number of gemstones were measured with the gamma-ray in energies range 223–662 keV using the Compton scattering technique. The mass attenuation coefficients of both zircons decreased with the increasing of gamma-rays energies. The different mass attenuation coefficients between the two zircons observed at gamma-ray energies below 400 keV are attributed to the differences in the photoelectric interaction. The effective atomic number of zircons was decreased with the increasing of gamma-ray energies and showed totally different values between the Cambodia and South Africa sources. The origins of the two zircons could be successfully identified by the method based on gamma-rays interaction with matter with advantage of being a non-destructive testing. - Highlights: • Gamma-rays interaction of zircons from Cambodia and South Africa studied. • Measured energy is during 223–662 keV. • Different μ m between the two zircons observed at gamma-ray energies below 400 keV. • The origins the two zircons could be successfully identified

  6. Gamma-rays attenuation of zircons from Cambodia and South Africa at different energies: A new technique for identifying the origin of gemstone

    Limkitjaroenporn, P.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, the gamma-rays interaction properties of zircons from Cambodia and South Africa have been studied. The densities of Cambodian and South African's zircons are 4.6716±0.0040 g/cm3 and 4.5505±0.0018 g/cm3, respectively. The mass attenuation coefficient and the effective atomic number of gemstones were measured with the gamma-ray in energies range 223-662 keV using the Compton scattering technique. The mass attenuation coefficients of both zircons decreased with the increasing of gamma-rays energies. The different mass attenuation coefficients between the two zircons observed at gamma-ray energies below 400 keV are attributed to the differences in the photoelectric interaction. The effective atomic number of zircons was decreased with the increasing of gamma-ray energies and showed totally different values between the Cambodia and South Africa sources. The origins of the two zircons could be successfully identified by the method based on gamma-rays interaction with matter with advantage of being a non-destructive testing.

  7. Biomass of Eucalyptus grandis coffs harbour, by growth-ring identification using the gamma-ray attenuation technique

    Rezende, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of 13-year old Eucalyptus grandis were analysed using the gamma-ray attenuation technique. The density was obtained through the profile, and it was then possible to determine the mean density for each annual ring of the samples. The period from formation of two consecutive late-wood rings, i.e., two high density peaks, was considered as one year of tree life. An attempt was made to determine the annual increments at breast-heigh diameter, per height unit, based on volume, mass and energy, trying to estimate the cutting age for each of these elements and the relationship between them. Emphasis was also put on the importance with which density variations, and core to cork calorific value, should be considered when determining the cutting age. (M.A.C.) [pt

  8. Attenuation of the gamma rays in tissues

    Arcos P, A.; Rodriguez N, S.; Pinedo S, A.; Amador V, P.; Chacon R, A.; Vega C, H.R.

    2005-01-01

    The mass and lineal attenuation coefficient and of hepatic tissue, muscular, osseous and of brain before gamma rays of 10 -3 to 10 5 MeV were calculated. For the case of the osseous tissue the calculation was made for the cartilage, the cortical tissue and the bone marrow. During the calculations the elementary composition of the tissues of human origin was used. The calculations include by separate the Photoelectric effect, the Compton scattering and the Pair production, as well as the total. For to establish a comparison with the attenuation capacities, the coefficients of the water, the aluminum and the lead also were calculated. The study was complemented measuring the attenuation coefficient of hepatic tissue of bovine before gamma rays of 0.662 MeV of a source of 137 Cs. The measurement was made through of an experiment of photons transmission through samples frozen of hepatic tissue and with a Geiger-Mueller detector. (Author)

  9. Determination of mass attenuation coefficient in wood and leaves of typical trees by gamma-ray attenuation technique

    Miranda, Regina M. de; Pascholati, Elisabete M.

    1997-01-01

    Using an 241 Am source the mass attenuation coefficient of different woods and leaves of typical species of the Atlantic Forest were measured. The results for natural wood, dry wood and dry leaves indicate that the variation is very small among different species. However, woods present a higher attenuation than leaves, both depending on their water content. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  10. Principles and techniques of gamma ray tracers

    Claxton, K.T.

    1978-01-01

    Radioactive tracer techniques provide a very sensitive means of studying physical and chemical processes in a whole variety of different media. Some of the techniques and principles of radioactive tracers and their application to practical engineering systems are discussed. Information which has been found useful in the design of high temperature liquid sodium facilities employing radio-tracers, is presented. The report deals solely with the use of gamma-emitting species as the tracer. These find particular application for in-situ studies on engineering systems where the highly penetrating properties of gamma rays are needed for detection through strongly absorbent media such as stainless steel pepe walls. (author)

  11. Gamma ray attenuation coefficient measurement for neutron-absorbent materials

    Jalali, Majid; Mohammadi, Ali

    2008-01-01

    The compounds Na 2 B 4 O 7 , H 3 BO 3 , CdCl 2 and NaCl and their solutions attenuate gamma rays in addition to neutron absorption. These compounds are widely used in the shielding of neutron sources, reactor control and neutron converters. Mass attenuation coefficients of gamma related to the four compounds aforementioned, in energies 662, 778.9, 867.38, 964.1, 1085.9, 1173, 1212.9, 1299.1,1332 and 1408 keV, have been determined by the γ rays transmission method in a good geometry setup; also, these coefficients were calculated by MCNP code. A comparison between experiments, simulations and Xcom code has shown that the study has potential application for determining the attenuation coefficient of various compound materials. Experiment and computation show that H 3 BO 3 with the lowest average Z has the highest gamma ray attenuation coefficient among the aforementioned compounds

  12. Gamma ray attenuation coefficient measurement for neutron-absorbent materials

    Jalali, Majid [Isfahan Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRT), Reactor and Accelerators Research and Development School, Atomic Energy Organization (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: m_jalali@entc.org.ir; Mohammadi, Ali [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, University of Kashan, Km. 6, Ravand Road, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    The compounds Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}, H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}, CdCl{sub 2} and NaCl and their solutions attenuate gamma rays in addition to neutron absorption. These compounds are widely used in the shielding of neutron sources, reactor control and neutron converters. Mass attenuation coefficients of gamma related to the four compounds aforementioned, in energies 662, 778.9, 867.38, 964.1, 1085.9, 1173, 1212.9, 1299.1,1332 and 1408 keV, have been determined by the {gamma} rays transmission method in a good geometry setup; also, these coefficients were calculated by MCNP code. A comparison between experiments, simulations and Xcom code has shown that the study has potential application for determining the attenuation coefficient of various compound materials. Experiment and computation show that H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} with the lowest average Z has the highest gamma ray attenuation coefficient among the aforementioned compounds.

  13. A new processing technique for airborne gamma-ray data

    Hovgaard, Jens

    1997-01-01

    The mathematical-statistical background for at new technique for processing gamma-ray spectra is presented. The technique - Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition - decomposes at set of gamma-ray spectra into a few basic spectra - the spectral components. The spectral components can be proce...

  14. Gamma ray attenuation studies in concrete reinforced with coconut shells

    Vishnu, C.V.; Joseph, Antony

    2017-01-01

    Gamma ray absorption studies on wood in general is an area of interest. In Kerala, though coconut tree is a common plantation, a systematic study of gamma ray attenuation in coconut shell has not been reported. In the present study, we have made an attempt to carry out such measurements on coconut shells collected from Trichur district. Coconut shells in to the size of 4cm × 4cm was used in these studies and 662 KeV gamma ray counts were measured using 8K channel NaI(Tl) detector. Subsequently we extended these studies by reinforcing concrete with crushed coconut shells, arranged in a layer by layer fashion. Concrete is usually a choice for shielding nuclear radiations. The effect of reinforcing them with coconut shell is also an area of interest. We have carried out absorption studies by using two types of sand also in the concrete mixture. Common sand is not amply available and people use M-sand (Manufactured sand) instead. In the concrete blocks we selectively used common sand and m-sand and its effects on gamma absorption were also investigated. We have estimated both linear and mass attenuation coefficients and the half value layer (HVL) parameter was determined from them. We have noticed an increase in µ/ρ with increase in density of concrete, achieved through the reinforcement. (author)

  15. Observational techniques of gamma rays astronomy in low energy

    Costa, J.M. da.

    1982-02-01

    Due to the absorption of great part of the gamma-ray spectrum of cosmic origin, by the earth's atmosphere at heights above 20Km, gamma-ray astronomy achieved its full development only after the advent of the space age. Ballons and satellites are the space vehicles which have been used to transport gamma-ray telescopes to observational heights in the atmosphere, or out of it. The results of these experiments can determine the sources, the energy spectra and the intensities of the cosmic gamma-rays, and provide other important information of astrophysical interest. The detection of gamma-rays of cosmic origin is very difficult. The observational techniques used in gamma-ray astronomy are dependent on the energy range of the gamma-rays which one desires to detect. The most common telescopes of low energy gamma-ray astronomy (50KeV - 20MeV) use NaI(Tl) scintillators, or germanium diodes, as principal detectors, surrounded by an active shield (anticoincidence) of organic or inorganic scintillators. (Author) [pt

  16. Estimation of the self-attenuation correction factor for gamma rays emission from nuclear materials

    Badawy, A.; El-Gammal, W.A.

    2001-01-01

    This work presents an investigation of the self-attenuation of gamma-rays emission from nuclear materials (NMs) for measuring the U-235 enrichment, U-235 mass content and isotopic composition of NMs by non-destructive assay technique [NDA]. The measurements then would not need the use of suitable NM Standards which may not be available in many situations. The self-attenuation correction factor (F) may be estimated by the use of the linear attenuation factor of the assayed sample, the geometrical configuration of the assay set-up and the position of the assayed sample relative to the detector. A developed mathematical analysis makes use of specific parameters which affect the estimation of the self-attenuation of the source-detector system which emits passive gamma-rays at certain prominent signatures

  17. Study of the radioactive particle tracking technique using gamma-ray attenuation and MCNP-X code to evaluate industrial agitators

    Dam, Roos Sophia de F.; Salgado, César M., E-mail: rsophia.dam@gmail.com, E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Agitators or mixers are highly used in the chemical, food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. During the fabrication process, the equipment may fail and compromise the appropriate stirring or mixing procedure. Besides that, it is also important to determine the right point of homogeneity of the mixture. Thus, it is very important to have a diagnosis tool for these industrial units to assure the quality of the product and to keep the market competitiveness. The radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique is widely used in the nuclear field. In this paper, a method based on the principles of the RPT technique is presented. Counts obtained by an array of detectors properly positioned around the unit will be correlated to predict the instantaneous positions occupied by the radioactive particle by means of an appropriate mathematical search location algorithm. Detection geometry developed employs eight NaI(Tl) scintillator detectors and a Cs-137 (662 keV) source with isotropic emission of gamma-rays. The modeling of the detection system is performed using the Monte Carlo Method, by means of the MCNP-X code. In this work a methodology is presented to predict the position of a radioactive particle to evaluate the performance of agitators in industrial units by means of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN). (author)

  18. Gamma ray attenuation studies on concrete reinforced with coconut shells

    Vishnu, C.V.; Antony, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The fact that radiation could be harmful has led to the development of wide variety of shields to protect against it. For nuclear radiation shielding, a larger quantity of shielding material is required and therefore, the study of propagation of radiation flux in shielding materials is an essential requirement for shield design. Concrete has proven to be an excellent and versatile shielding material with well-established linear attenuation for neutrons and gamma rays. Coconut being naturally available, it can be used readily in concrete, still maintaining almost all the qualities of the original form of concrete. Concrete obtained using coconut shell as a coarse aggregate satisfies the requirements of concrete. Coconut shell aggregate possess acceptable strength which is required for structural concrete

  19. Detection and measurement of gamma-ray self-attenuation in plutonium residues

    Prettyman, T.H.; Foster, L.A.; Estep, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    A new method to correct for self-attenuation in gamma-ray assays of plutonium is presented. The underlying assumptions of the technique are based on a simple but accurate physical model of plutonium residues, particularly pyrochemical salts, in which it is assumed that the plutonium is divided into two portions, each of which can be treated separately from the standpoint of gamma-ray analysis: a portion that is in the form of plutonium metal shot; and a dilute portion that is mixed with the matrix. The performance of the technique is evaluated using assays of plutonium residues by tomographic gamma scanning at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The ability of the method to detect saturation conditions is examined

  20. Attenuation of neutrons and gamma-rays in homogeneous and multilayered shields

    Abdo, A.E.; Megahid, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements were carried-out to compare the attenuation properties of homogeneous shields and shields of two layers and three layers for fast neutrons and total gamma-rays. These were performed by measuring the fast neutron and total gamma-ray spectra behind homogeneous shields of magnetite-limonite, ilmenite-ilmenite and magnetite-magnetite concretes. The two layers assembly consists of iron and one of the above mentioned concretes, while the three layers shield consists of water, iron and one of the previously mentioned concretes. All measurements were carried-out using a neutron-gamma spectrometer with stilbene scintillator coupled to a fast photo multi player tube. Separation between pulses of recoil protons and recoil electrons was achieved by a pulse shape discrimination technique. 3 tabs., 10 figs., 13 refs

  1. Correction for gamma-ray self-attenuation in regular heterogeneous materials

    Parker, J.L.

    1981-09-01

    A procedure for determining the total correction factor for gamma-ray self-attenuation in regular heterogeneous materials is derived and discussed. The result of a practical application of the procedure to the passive gamma-ray assay of the 235 U content of high-temperature gas reactor fuel is presented

  2. Summary of existing information on gamma-ray and X-ray attenuation coefficients of solutions

    Singh, K.; Gerward, Leif

    2002-01-01

    Accurate values of X-ray and gamma-ray attenuation coefficients of different chemicals are required in spectrometry as well as in many other scientific, engineering and medical disciplines involving photon radiation. The current state of knowledge of experimental and theoretical gamma-ray and X-r......-ray attenuation coefficients in aqueous solutions of salts is presented and exemplified by recent work. The results presented provide a basis for studying X-ray and gamma-ray photon interactions with ions in solution (hydrated ions) rather than ion compounds in solid form....

  3. A dual energy gamma-ray transmission technique for gold alloy identification

    Sumi, Tetsuo; Shingu, Hiroyasu; Iwase, Hirotoshi

    1991-01-01

    An application of the dual energy gamma-ray transmission techniques to gold alloy identification is presented. The measurement by dual energy gamma-ray transmission is independent of thickness and density of a sample. Due to this advantage, golden accessories such as necklaces, earrings and rings can be assayed in spite of their various thicknesses and irregular sectional shapes. Choice of a gamma-ray energy pair suitable for the object is important. The authors chose 511 keV and 1275 keV gamma-rays from 22 Na. With this energy pair, R value (a ratio of mass attenuation coefficients for low and high energy gamma-rays) is predominantly related to the weight fraction of gold of the sample. Using a 370 kBq 22 Na small source and a 50 mm dia.x 50 mm thick NaI(Tl) scintillator for 1200 seconds, a resolution of 2% for the R value was obtained. This corresponds to approximately 5% of the weight fraction of gold. A better resolution can be obtained by increasing the source activity or measurement time. (author)

  4. Computational techniques in gamma-ray skyshine analysis

    George, D.L.

    1988-12-01

    Two computer codes were developed to analyze gamma-ray skyshine, the scattering of gamma photons by air molecules. A review of previous gamma-ray skyshine studies discusses several Monte Carlo codes, programs using a single-scatter model, and the MicroSkyshine program for microcomputers. A benchmark gamma-ray skyshine experiment performed at Kansas State University is also described. A single-scatter numerical model was presented which traces photons from the source to their first scatter, then applies a buildup factor along a direct path from the scattering point to a detector. The FORTRAN code SKY, developed with this model before the present study, was modified to use Gauss quadrature, recent photon attenuation data and a more accurate buildup approximation. The resulting code, SILOGP, computes response from a point photon source on the axis of a silo, with and without concrete shielding over the opening. Another program, WALLGP, was developed using the same model to compute response from a point gamma source behind a perfectly absorbing wall, with and without shielding overhead. 29 refs., 48 figs., 13 tabs

  5. Effective atomic numbers of blue topaz at different gamma-rays energies obtained from Compton scattering technique

    Tuschareon, S., E-mail: tuscharoen@hotmail.com; Limkitjaroenporn, P., E-mail: tuscharoen@hotmail.com; Kaewkhao, J., E-mail: tuscharoen@hotmail.com [Center of Excellence in Glass Technology and Materials Science (CEGM), Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, Nakhon Pathom, 73000, Thailand and Science Program, Faculty of Science and Technology, Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, Nakhon Pathom, 73000 (Thailand)

    2014-03-24

    Topaz occurs in a wide range of colors, including yellow, orange, brown, pink-to-violet and blue. All of these color differences are due to color centers. In order to improve the color of natural colorless topaz, the most commonly used is irradiated with x- or gamma-rays, indicated that attenuation parameters is important to enhancements by irradiation. In this work, the mass attenuation coefficients of blue topaz were measured at the different energy of γ-rays using the Compton scattering technique. The results show that, the experimental values of mass attenuation coefficient are in good agreement with the theoretical values. The mass attenuation coefficients increase with the decrease in gamma rays energies. This may be attributed to the higher photon interaction probability of blue topaz at lower energy. This result is a first report of mass attenuation coefficient of blue topaz at different gamma rays energies.

  6. Gamma-ray beam attenuation to assess the influence of soil texture on structure deformation

    Pires, L.F.; Bacchi, O.O.S.; Dias, N.M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-ray beam attenuation is a non-invasive technique that permits analysis of soil porosity without disturbing the region of interest of the core sample. The technique has as additional advantage to allow measurements point by point on a millimetric scale in contrast to other methodologies that are invasive and analyze the soil properties in the bulk sample volume. Soil porosity can be used as an important parameter to quantify soil structural damages, which affect soil aeration, water movement and retention. In this study, porosities of three soils different in texture were measured at various positions in order to analyze the impact of the sampling procedure on the structure of each particular soil texture. The gamma-ray attenuation system consisted of an 241 Am radioactive source having an activity of 3.7 GBq, collimated with cylindrical lead collimators of 2 mm diameter. The results obtained show the presence of dense regions near the edges of samples and that different soil textures can suffer distinct deformations at sampling. (author)

  7. Gamma-Ray Attenuation to Evaluate Soil Porosity: An Analysis of Methods

    Pires, Luiz F.; Pereira, André B.

    2014-01-01

    Soil porosity (ϕ) is of a great deal for environmental studies due to the fact that water infiltrates and suffers redistribution in the soil pore space. Many physical and biochemical processes related to environmental quality occur in the soil porous system. Representative determinations of ϕ are necessary due to the importance of this physical property in several fields of natural sciences. In the current work, two methods to evaluate ϕ were analyzed by means of gamma-ray attenuation technique. The first method uses the soil attenuation approach through dry soil and saturated samples, whereas the second one utilizes the same approach but taking into account dry soil samples to assess soil bulk density and soil particle density to determine ϕ. The results obtained point out a good correlation between both methods. However, when ϕ is obtained through soil water content at saturation and a 4 mm collimator is used to collimate the gamma-ray beam the first method also shows good correlations with the traditional one. PMID:24616640

  8. Gamma-ray self-attenuation corrections in environmental samples

    Robu, E.; Giovani, C.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-spectrometry is a commonly used technique in environmental radioactivity monitoring. Frequently the bulk samples that should be measured differ with respect to composition and density from the reference sample used for efficiency calibration. Correction factors should be applied in these cases for activity measurement. Linear attenuation coefficients and self-absorption correction factors have been evaluated for soil, grass and liquid sources with different densities and geometries.(authors)

  9. Dose Rate and Mass Attenuation Coefficients of Gamma Ray for Concretes

    Abdel-Latif, A A; Kansouh, W A; El-Sayed, F H

    2003-01-01

    This work is concerned with the study of the leakage gamma ray dose and mass attenuation coefficients for ordinary, basalt and dolomite concretes made from local ores. Concretes under investigation were constructed from gravel, basalt and dolomite ores, and then reconstructed with the addition of 3% steel fibers by weight. Measurements were carried out using a collimated beam from sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma ray source and sodium iodide (3x3) crystal with the genie 2000 gamma spectrometer. The obtained fluxes were transformed to gamma ray doses and displayed in the form of gamma ray dose rates distribution. The displayed curves were used to estimate the linear attenuation coefficients (mu), the relaxation lengths (lambda), half value layer (t sub 1 /2) and tenth value layer (t sub 1 /10). Also, The total mass attenuation coefficients of gamma ray have been calculated to the concerned concretes using XCOM (version 3.1) program and database elements cross sections from Z=1 to 100 at energies from 10 keV to 100 MeV. In...

  10. Gamma ray densitometry techniques for measuring of volume fractions

    Affonso, Renato Raoni Werneck; Silva, Ademir Xavier da; Salgado, Cesar Marques, E-mail: raoniwa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of the volume fraction in a multiphase flow is of key importance in predicting the performance of many systems and processes. It is therefore an important parameter to characterize such flows. In the context of nuclear techniques, the gamma ray densitometry is promising and this is due to its non-invasive characteristics and very reliable results. It is used in several applications for multiphase flows (water-oil-air), which are employed tools such as: computational fluid dynamics, artificial neural networks and statistical methods of radiation transport, such as the Monte Carlo method. Based on the gamma radiation techniques for measurements of volume fractions, the aim of this paper is to present several techniques developed for this purpose. (author)

  11. Gamma ray densitometry techniques for measuring of volume fractions

    Affonso, Renato Raoni Werneck; Silva, Ademir Xavier da; Salgado, Cesar Marques

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the volume fraction in a multiphase flow is of key importance in predicting the performance of many systems and processes. It is therefore an important parameter to characterize such flows. In the context of nuclear techniques, the gamma ray densitometry is promising and this is due to its non-invasive characteristics and very reliable results. It is used in several applications for multiphase flows (water-oil-air), which are employed tools such as: computational fluid dynamics, artificial neural networks and statistical methods of radiation transport, such as the Monte Carlo method. Based on the gamma radiation techniques for measurements of volume fractions, the aim of this paper is to present several techniques developed for this purpose. (author)

  12. On the attenuation of x-rays and gamma-rays in dilute solutions

    Gerward, Leif

    1996-01-01

    The theory of X-ray and gamma-ray attenuation in solutions is developed. The rule of mixture for the calculation of mass and linear attenuation coefficients is elaborated in the general case as well as in the limit of extreme dilution. The validity of the latter approximation is illustrated...... by the attenuation of 17.443 keV X-rays in aqueous solutions of NaCl. Copyright (C) 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd...

  13. Approximate techniques for calculating gamma ray dose rates in nuclear power plants

    Lahti, G.P.

    1986-01-01

    Although today's computers have made three-dimensional discrete ordinates transport codes a virtual reality, there is still a need for approximate techniques for estimating radiation environments. This paper discusses techniques for calculating gamma ray dose rates in nuclear power plants where Compton scattering is the dominant attenuation mechanism. The buildup factor method is reviewed; its use and misuse are discussed. Several useful rules-of-thumb are developed. The paper emphasizes the need for understanding the fundamental physics and draws heavily on the old, classic references

  14. Self-attenuation factors in gamma-ray spectrometry

    Korun, M.

    1999-01-01

    The relation between the self-attenuation factors and the distribution function describing the number of photons detected in the full-energy peaks, as a function of their path length in the sample is presented. The relations between the self-attenuation factor and the moments of the distribution function, the average path length and the variance are also presented. The use of these relations is illustrated by applying them to self-attenuation factors describing attenuation in cylindrical samples. The results of the calculations are compared with the measured average path lengths and discussed in terms of the properties of the distribution function. (author)

  15. Validation of gamma-ray detection techniques for safeguards monitoring at natural uranium conversion facilities

    Dewji, S.A., E-mail: dewjisa@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS-6335, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6335 (United States); Lee, D.L.; Croft, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS-6335, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6335 (United States); Hertel, N.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS-6335, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6335 (United States); Nuclear and Radiological Engineering Program, Georgia Institute of Technology, 770 State Street, Atlanta, GA 30332-0745 (United States); Chapman, J.A.; McElroy, R.D.; Cleveland, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS-6335, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6335 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Recent IAEA circulars and policy papers have sought to implement safeguards when any purified aqueous uranium solution or uranium oxides suitable for isotopic enrichment or fuel fabrication exists. Under the revised policy, IAEA Policy Paper 18, the starting point for nuclear material under safeguards was reinterpreted, suggesting that purified uranium compounds should be subject to safeguards procedures no later than the first point in the conversion process. In response to this technical need, a combination of simulation models and experimental measurements were employed to develop and validate concepts of nondestructive assay monitoring systems in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP). In particular, uranyl nitrate (UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}) solution exiting solvent extraction was identified as a key measurement point (KMP), where gamma-ray spectroscopy was selected as the process monitoring tool. The Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was employed to simulate the full-scale operating conditions of a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in an NUCP. Nondestructive assay techniques using gamma-ray spectroscopy were evaluated to determine their viability as a technical means for drawing safeguards conclusions at NUCPs, and if the IAEA detection requirements of 1 significant quantity (SQ) can be met in a timely way. This work investigated gamma-ray signatures of uranyl nitrate circulating in the UNCLE facility and evaluated various gamma-ray detector sensitivities to uranyl nitrate. These detector validation activities include assessing detector responses to the uranyl nitrate gamma-ray signatures for spectrometers based on sodium iodide, lanthanum bromide, and high-purity germanium detectors. The results of measurements under static and dynamic operating conditions at concentrations ranging from 10–90 g U/L of natural uranyl nitrate are presented. A range of

  16. Attenuation of Gamma Rays by Concrete . Lead Slag Composites

    Ismail, I.M.; Sweelam, M.H.; Zaghloul, Y.R.; Aly, H.F.

    2008-01-01

    Using of wastes and industrial by-products as concrete aggregate to be used as structural and radiation shielded material has increased in the recent years. Concrete was mixed with different amounts of lead slag extracted from recycling of the spent automotive batteries as fine aggregates. The lead slag was used as partial replacement of sand in the studied composites. The concrete composites obtained were characterized in terms of density, water absorption, porosity, compressive strength and attenuation of γ- rays with different energies. The attenuation coefficient and the half value thickness of the different matrices were calculated and discussed

  17. Attenuation of the gamma rays in tissues; Atenuacion de los rayos gamma en tejidos

    Arcos P, A.; Rodriguez N, S.; Pinedo S, A.; Amador V, P.; Chacon R, A.; Vega C, H.R. [Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The mass and lineal attenuation coefficient and of hepatic tissue, muscular, osseous and of brain before gamma rays of 10{sup -3} to 10{sup 5} MeV were calculated. For the case of the osseous tissue the calculation was made for the cartilage, the cortical tissue and the bone marrow. During the calculations the elementary composition of the tissues of human origin was used. The calculations include by separate the Photoelectric effect, the Compton scattering and the Pair production, as well as the total. For to establish a comparison with the attenuation capacities, the coefficients of the water, the aluminum and the lead also were calculated. The study was complemented measuring the attenuation coefficient of hepatic tissue of bovine before gamma rays of 0.662 MeV of a source of {sup 137} Cs. The measurement was made through of an experiment of photons transmission through samples frozen of hepatic tissue and with a Geiger-Mueller detector. (Author)

  18. Attenuation of VHE Gamma Rays by the Milky Way Interstellar Radiation Field

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; /Stanford U., HEPL; Porter, Troy A.; /Louisiana State U.; Strong, Andrew W.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2006-04-19

    The attenuation of very high energy gamma rays by pair production on the Galactic interstellar radiation field has long been thought of as negligible. However, a new calculation of the interstellar radiation field consistent with multi-wavelength observations by DIRBE and FIRAS indicates that the energy density of the Galactic interstellar radiation field is higher, particularly in the Galactic center, than previously thought. We have made a calculation of the attenuation of very high energy gamma rays in the Galaxy using this new interstellar radiation field which takes into account its nonuniform spatial and angular distributions. We find that the maximum attenuation occurs around 100 TeV at the level of about 25% for sources located at the Galactic center, and is important for both Galactic and extragalactic sources.

  19. On self-attenuation corrections in gamma-ray spectrometry

    Bolivar, J.P.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we discuss and justify the dependence on the sample density and gamma energy of the self-attenuation correction factor, f, in the transmission method for the full energy peak efficiency calibration of Ge detectors. It is suggested as a method for the direct computing of f in the case that the sample composition is known. (Author)

  20. Utilization of ilmenite/epoxy composite for neutrons and gamma rays attenuation

    El-Sayed Abdo, A. E-mail: attiaabdo11@hotmail.com; El-Sarraf, M.A.; Gaber, F.A

    2003-01-01

    This work deals with the study of ilmenite/epoxy composite as an injecting mortar for cracks developed in biological concrete shields, as well as, neutrons and gamma rays attenuation. Effects of the particle size on the mechanical strengths have been studied for epoxy resin filled with crushed ilmenite with different maximum particle sizes ranging from 32 to 500 {mu}m. Thermal neutrons and gamma rays attenuation in ilmenite/epoxy composites with 75 and 80 wt.% of ilmenite concentration have been investigated. The total mass attenuation coefficients {mu}/{rho} (cm{sup 2} g{sup -1}) of gamma ray for five ilmenite/epoxy composites have been calculated using the XCOM program (version 3.1) at energies from 10 keV to 100 MeV. Also, the total mass attenuation coefficients ({mu}/{rho}) have estimated based on the measured total linear attenuation coefficients ({mu}) and compared with the calculated results where, a reasonable agreement was found.

  1. Utilization of barite/cement composites for gamma rays attenuation

    Sakr, Khaled; Ramadan, Wageeh; Sayed, Magda; El-Zakla, Tarek; El-Desouqy, Mohamed; El-Faramawy, Nabil

    2018-04-01

    The present work is directed to investigate the contribution of adding barite aggregates to cement as a shielding material for radioactive wastes disposal facilities. The percentages of barite from 5% up to 20% mixed with cement with different grain sizes were examined. Mechanical and physical properties such as compressive strength, wet and dry densities, water absorption, and porosity have been investigated. The thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray diffraction were used to examine the thermal stability and the characterizations of studied samples, respectively. The linear attenuation coefficient, mean free path, half value layer, and transmission fraction were evaluated. All the nuclear shielding parameters revealed the uppermost values for cement mixed with 5% barite of size range 250-600 µm. The attenuation coefficient of the investigated samples displayed an increase by more than 125% than that of neat cement.

  2. Obtaining the mass attenuation coefficient of the wood to a beam of gamma-ray of 241Am

    Costa, Vladimir Eliodoro; Rezende, Marcos Antonio de

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The quality of wood produced in Brazil reforestation has been the subject of many discussions in the Forestry Sector. SeEKXing to produce a rapid growth and wood quality, the Forestry Sector, found in Applied Nuclear Physics, a precise method of determining the density of wood known as ad hoc technique of attenuation of gamma-ray. The radioisotope used in this technique is that it has a picture 241 Am peak of 59.6 keV gamma-ray. This work has the objective of determining the mass attenuation coefficient of wood of the genus Eucalyptus for 241 Am radioisotope. We used 324 samples of wood from six different treatments: a seminal of Eucalyptus grandis; two clones of E. grandis; three clones of the hybrid E. grandis x E. urophylla. The same assay was used for the six treatments. It was determined the basic density of the samples by the method of immersion in water and then the basic density was converted into apparent density in the moisture equilibrium and it was determined the attenuation coefficient of mass. Preliminary results showed that the attenuation coefficient of mass did not vary between treatments, and its average value 0.1822 ± 0.0015. It was to here that the attenuation coefficient of mass in the wood of the genus Eucalyptus in moisture equilibrium can be constant. (author)

  3. Self-attenuation of gamma rays during radioactivity concentration analysis of environmental samples

    Watson, D.; Dharmasiri, J.; Akber, R.

    2001-01-01

    Gamma spectroscopy using HPGe detector systems is a readily used technique for routine analysis of radioactivity in environmental samples. The systems are generally calibrated using standards of known radioactivity and composition. Radioactivity in environmental samples is generally distributed in the bulk of the material. When a sample of finite thickness is analysed through gamma spectroscopy, a proportion of the gamma rays emitted from the sample is either stopped or scattered from the sample material itself. These processes of self-absorption and self-attenuation depend upon the physical and elemental composition of the sample and the energy of the gamma radiation. Since environmental samples vary in composition, instrument calibration using a fixed matrix composition may not be valid for a diversity of samples. We selected and analysed five sample matrices to investigate the influence of self-absorption and self-attenuation in environmental samples. Our selection consisted of bentonite and kaolin representing clay, quartz representing silica, ash representing prepared biota, and analytical grade MnO 2 representing a co-precipitant used for extractive radioactivity from aqueous samples. Our findings show that within 5% of uncertainty the silica based standards can be used to cover the environmental samples of varying clay (silica content). The detection efficiency for ash and MnO 2 could be different particularly in the 30 - 100 keV energy range. The differences in sample behaviour can be explained on the basis of atomic number, mass number and density

  4. Improved soil particle-size analysis by gamma-ray attenuation

    Oliveira, J.C.M.; Vaz, C.M.P.; Reichardt, K.; Swartzendruber, D.

    1997-01-01

    The size distribution of particles is useful for physical characterization of soil. This study was conducted to determine whether a new method of soil particle-size analysis by gamma-ray attenuation could be further improved by changing the depth and time of measurement of the suspended particle concentration during sedimentation. In addition to the advantage of nondestructive, undisturbed measurement by gamma-ray attenuation, as compared with conventional pipette or hydrometer methods, the modifications here suggested and employed do substantially decrease the total time for analysis, and will also facilitate total automation and generalize the method for other sedimentation studies. Experimental results are presented for three different Brazilian soil materials, and illustrate the nature of the fine detail provided in the cumulative particle-size distribution as given by measurements obtained during the relatively short time period of 28 min

  5. Attenuation studies near K-absorption edges using Compton scattered 241Am gamma rays

    Abdullah, K.K.; Ramachandran, N.; Karunakaran Nair, K.; Babu, B.R.S.; Joseph, Antony; Thomas, Rajive; Varier, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    We have carried out photon attenuation measurements at several energies in the range from 49.38 keV to 57.96 keV around the K-absorption edges of the rare earth elements Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy and Er using 59.54 keV gamma rays from 241 Am source after Compton scattering from an aluminium target. Pellets of oxides of the rare earth elements were chosen as mixture absorbers in these investigations. A narrow beam good geometry set-up was used for the attenuation measurements. The scattered gamma rays were detected by an HPGe detector. The results are consistent with theoretical values derived from the XCOM package. (author)

  6. New technique for tissue-equivalent gamma ray dosimetry

    Squillante, M.R.; Stern, I.; Nagarkar, V.; Entine, G.

    1992-01-01

    The use of semiconductor sensors in dosimeters is attractive for a variety of reasons including potential low cost and high sensitivity. However, the accurate measurement of the radiation dose to tissue using solid state detectors is made difficult by the relatively high atomic number of semiconductor materials. This leads to an over response to gamma ray energies below 100 keV and an under response above that. If the energy spectrum is known, corrections can be applied to yield accurate dose. In real life situations, however, the energy spectrum is not always known and may be difficult to determine at high flux rates. Also, in some cases, the energy spectrum may change with time. This paper reports that, by operating a custom-designed CdTe sensor in the pulse mode and measuring the average energy deposited, a nearly-linear relationship between the tissue dose rate and the sensor signal was obtained. Based on this technique, a prototype detector and dosimeter system were developed

  7. Proton current measurements using the prompt gamma ray diagnostic technique

    Leeper, R.J.; Burns, E.J.T.; Johnson, D.J.; McMurtry, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    Prompt gamma ray signals from the nuclear reaction 7 Li(p,γ) 8 Be have been used to make time resolved proton current measurements. In these measurements, the proton beam was allowed to strike cylindrical thick lithium metal targets. The time integrated proton current was measured using gamma activation of copper via the reaction 63 Cu(γ,n) 62 Cu(β+). The positron activity of the copper sample was easily measured using coincidence counting techniques. The number of 62 Cu atoms produced per proton incident on a thick Li metal target was determined with separate calibration runs performed on the Sandia 2.5 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator. The time history of the prompt gamma production was measured using six EGG NPM-54 scintillator photomultiplier combinations shielded by 96.5 cm of concrete and 5.1 cm of Pb. The use of six scintillator photomultiplier combinations was necessary to increase the statistical precision of the data. The normalization of the prompt gamma time history data with the total time integrated proton-current measurement yielded the absolute time resolved proton current on target. Data from runs performed on the Sandia Proto I accelerator will be presented

  8. Gamma ray self-attenuation correction: a simple numerical approach and its validation

    Agarwal, Chhavi; Poi, Sanhita; Mhatre, Amol; Goswami, A.

    2009-03-01

    A hybrid Monte Carlo method for gamma ray attenuation correction has been developed. The method has been applied to some common counting geometries like cylinder, box, sphere and disc. The method has been validated theoretically and experimentally over a wide range of transmittance and sample-to-detector distances. The advantage of the approach is that it is common to all sample geometries and can be used at all sample-to detector distances. (author)

  9. On the attenuation of X-rays and gamma-rays for aqueous solutions of salts

    Teli, M T

    1998-01-01

    Disparities in the linear attenuation coefficients of X-rays and gamma rays for aqueous solutions of soluble salts arising from the nonequality of volume of the solution with the sum of volumes of its components are analysed and the mixture rule is reformulated. The disparities are illustrated for NaCl solution for concentrations c=0 to 1 gm/cm sup 3 which indicates that the mixture rule of Teli et al. works well within generally acceptable limits.

  10. Bone densitometry by gamma ray attenuation measurement. Development of an apparatus for use on medullary casualties

    Berard, E.J.-J.

    1975-01-01

    We proposed to follow changes in the bone mineral content of medullary damage cases by measuring the attenuation of a monoenergetic gamma ray according to the Cameron and Sorenson technique. Apart from their high cost, existing instruments are not designed for this bedside observation of patients. Our aim was therefore to design and develop an easily portable, inexpensive apparatus. The γ radiation is supplied by a sealed 125 I source fitted with a narrow collimator. The battery-operated scintillation detector is that used to detect post-operative phlebites after injection of radio-fibrinogen. The source-detector unit can move to allow a transverse bone mineral content measurement. Data from the detector are processed electronically and the results given: - either graphically on a tracing board which gives an area proportional to the bone mineral content, - or numerically by means of an integrator computing this area and supplying the linear bone density directly. Experiments carried out in vivo showed the apparatus to be sensitive and the measurements reproducible, the results obtained being comparable with those of other authors. Using pieces of embalmed bone moreover an excellent correlation was observed between the bone mineral content obtained after incineration and the results displayed by our apparatus, which can therefore be calibrated [fr

  11. Human soft tissue analysis using x-ray or gamma-ray techniques

    Theodorakou, C; Farquharson, M J

    2008-01-01

    This topical review is intended to describe the x-ray techniques used for human soft tissue analysis. X-ray techniques have been applied to human soft tissue characterization and interesting results have been presented over the last few decades. The motivation behind such studies is to provide improved patient outcome by using the data obtained to better understand a disease process and improve diagnosis. An overview of theoretical background as well as a complete set of references is presented. For each study, a brief summary of the methodology and results is given. The x-ray techniques include x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, Compton scattering, Compton to coherent scattering ratio and attenuation measurements. The soft tissues that have been classified using x-rays or gamma rays include brain, breast, colon, fat, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, prostate, skin, thyroid and uterus. (topical review)

  12. Measurements of uranium enrichment by four techniques of gamma-ray spectrometry

    Tojo, Takao

    1983-12-01

    Measurements of uranium enrichment with the uses of the LMRI (France) UO 2 standards have been made by four techniques of gamma-ray spectrometry, in order to examine measurement characteristics of each technique. The following results were obtained by the three techniques based on the direct determination of the peak area of the 186-keV gamma-rays from 235 U, when the standard sample of 6.297 a/o was used for measuring enrichments ranging from 1.4 a/o to 9.6 a/o ; (i) In a LEPS HP Ge gamma-ray spectrometry, standard deviation of the measured enrichments from the certified ones was 1.4 %, (ii) in a Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectrometry, the standard deviation was 2.0 %, (iii) in a NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectrometry, the standard deviation was 1.2 %. In the fourth technique, the method of multiple single-channel analyzers, enrichments of 1.4 - 9.6 a/o were measured in the standard deviation of 0.51 %, when the most suitable pairs of standard samples were used for each sample. A part of sources of systematic errors which were caused by each technique adopted was revealed throughout the measurements. And also, it was recognized that the LMRI's values of enrichment were certified precisely, and the UO 2 standards were very useful for enrichment measurements in the four techniques of gamma-ray spectrometry used here. (author)

  13. Effectiveness of Gamma Rays in Attenuating Rodent Malaria Parasites of Plasmodium berghei in Blood of Mice

    Syaifudin, M.; Darlina; Rahardjo, T.; Tetriana, D.; Nurhayati, S.; Surniyantoro, H.N.E.; Kisnanto, T.

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is a major public health problem in Indonesia. Therefore, an effective vaccine against this disease is actively being sought by using gamma rays to attenuate the parasites. However, the safety and efficacy of the resulting vaccine are dependent on the precise irradiation dose. The aim of this research was to determine the exact time when the parasites are attenuated by gamma ray exposure. Mice blood containing Plasmodium berghei of 5,0 X 10 7 parasites/ml was irradiated with gamma rays at doses of 0, 150, 175 and 200 Gy (doses rate of 380 Gy/h) and then was injected intraperitoneally to mice at 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 h post irradiation. The parasitemia (parasite density) in mouse blood was observed starting with day 2 and repeated every 2-4 days up to 28 days. The survival of the mice was also observed during the experiment. The results showed that the pre-patent period advanced with exposing infected blood to 150 and 175 Gy irradiations, suggesting some degree of attenuation. The amount of radiation required to render the parasites non-viable is about 175 Gy for an inoculum of a number of parasites, but a delay of 4 h resulted in the death of parasites. There was no difference in the infectivity of irradiated parasite injected 1 h and 2 h post irradiation in terms of parasitemia and the survival of mouse. For a dose of 200 Gy which was injected 2 h post irradiation, no parasitemia was found in the blood and animals which died after times varying from 1 to 4 weeks. We concluded that irradiated parasites should be injected into the host within 1 h after irradiation. (author)

  14. Studies of weak capture-gamma-ray resonances via coincidence techniques

    Rowland, C; Champagne, A E; Dummer, A K; Fitzgerald, R; Harley, E C T; Mosher, J; Runkle, R

    2002-01-01

    A method for measuring weak capture-gamma-ray resonances via gamma gamma-coincidence counting techniques is described. The coincidence apparatus consisted of a large-volume germanium detector and an annular NaI(Tl) crystal. The setup was tested by measuring the weak E sub R =227 keV resonance in sup 2 sup 6 Mg(p,gamma) sup 2 sup 7 Al. Absolute germanium and NaI(Tl) counting efficiencies for a range of gamma-ray energies and for different detector-target geometries are presented. Studies of the gamma-ray background in our spectra are described. Compared to previous work, our method improves the detection sensitivity for weak capture-gamma-ray resonances by a factor of approx 100. The usefulness of the present technique for investigations of interest to nuclear astrophysics is discussed.

  15. Inhomogeneity of neutron and gamma-ray attenuation in biological shields

    El-bakkoush, F A; El-Ghobary, A M; Megahid, R M [Reactor and Neutron physics Department, Nuclear Research Center, A.E.A., Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    Measurements have been carried-out to investigate the attenuation properties of some materials which are used as biological shields around nuclear radiation sources. Investigation was performed by measuring the transmitted fast neutron and gamma-spectra through cylindrical samples of magnetite- limonite, steel and cellulose shields. The neutron and gamma spectra were measured by a neutron-gamma spectrometer with stilbene scintillator. Discrimination between neutron and gamma pulses was achieved by a discrimination method. The obtained results are displayed in the form of neutron and gamma spectra and attenuation relations which are used to derive the total macroscopic cross-sections for neutrons and total linear attenuation coefficients for gamma-rays. The values of neutron and gamma relaxation lengths are also derived for the investigated materials. 10 figs., 1 tabs.

  16. Neutron and gamma ray attenuation of asphalt; Comparison with paraffin and water

    Abdul-Majid, S.; Kutbi, I.I.

    1996-01-01

    Asphalt is a low cost, readily available, easy-to-cast material which is rich in hydrogen and carbon, elements most effective for fast-neutron shielding. Unlike paraffin, the material can easily be mixed with boron containing compounds, an, element of high absorption cross-section for slow neutrons. The 241 Am-Be neutron and gamma attenuation characteristic of asphalt were studied. The source is having wide applications in industry and geophysics field work. Comparisons were made with paraffin and water. The source activity was 1.11 x 1,011 Bq (3 Ci) with a neutron emission rate of 6.6 x 106 n s -1 and a tolerance of +10%. The neutron dose-equivalent rate at 1 m was 66 mSv h -1 , while the associated gamma ray exposure was ∼1.9 mC kg -1 h -1 of the bare source. A neutron remmeter was used for the neutron dose-equivalent rate measurements, which produces an energy response that approximates human body dose equivalent over a wide range of neutron energy. An air filled ionization chamber was used for the exposure rate measurements. The slow neutrons were measured by a BF 3 gas filled detector. The shielding materials were confined in an aluminum cylinder of 1 mm wall thickness where the source was kept in the middle. The neutron dose rate, the gamma ray exposure rate, and the slow neutron count rate were measured at different shield radii and at different distances from its outer surface. The neutron doses of asphalt at the surface of cylindrical shields of 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 cm radii in mSv h -1 were 0.85, 0.4, 0.25, 0.13, and 0.06, respectively, while the gamma ray exposure mC kg -1 h -1 were 7, 4.4 2.5, 1.3, and 0.88, respectively. The neutron dose rate attenuation of asphalt was very close to that of water, but slightly lower than that of paraffin, while the gamma ray attenuation was close to that of water but higher than that of paraffin

  17. High-resolution gamma ray attenuation density measurements on mining exploration drill cores, including cut cores

    Ross, P.-S.; Bourke, A.

    2017-01-01

    Physical property measurements are increasingly important in mining exploration. For density determinations on rocks, one method applicable on exploration drill cores relies on gamma ray attenuation. This non-destructive method is ideal because each measurement takes only 10 s, making it suitable for high-resolution logging. However calibration has been problematic. In this paper we present new empirical, site-specific correction equations for whole NQ and BQ cores. The corrections force back the gamma densities to the "true" values established by the immersion method. For the NQ core caliber, the density range extends to high values (massive pyrite, 5 g/cm3) and the correction is thought to be very robust. We also present additional empirical correction factors for cut cores which take into account the missing material. These "cut core correction factors", which are not site-specific, were established by making gamma density measurements on truncated aluminum cylinders of various residual thicknesses. Finally we show two examples of application for the Abitibi Greenstone Belt in Canada. The gamma ray attenuation measurement system is part of a multi-sensor core logger which also determines magnetic susceptibility, geochemistry and mineralogy on rock cores, and performs line-scan imaging.

  18. Determination of gamma ray attenuation coefficient of archaeological ceramics from Parana State, Brazil

    Silva, Richard M.C.; Appoloni, Carlos R.; Parreira, Paulo S.; Coimbra, Melayne M.; Aragao, Pedro H.A.

    1997-01-01

    This work demonstrates an alternative methodology for the linear attenuation coefficient determination (μρ) of irregular form samples. This methodology aims the study of indigenous archaeological ceramics from the region of Londrina, North of Parana State, Brazil. These ceramics are from Padre Carlos Weiss Historic Museum, Londrina University and belong to the Kaingaing tradition. Firstly, μρ determination by two mean method was performed by the gamma ray beam attenuation of the immersed ceramics, by using two different means with well-known linear attenuation coefficient. Beyond, the deduction of the equation for the μρ determination by the two-means methods, was also realized. By the other side, μρ theoretical value was determined with the XCOM computer program. This program uses the ceramics chemistry composition and provides an energy versus mass attenuation coefficient table. To verify the two-means method efficiency, five ceramics sample of thickness 1.15 cm and 1.87 cm were prepared with homogeneous clay. Theses ceramics, we used for the μρ determination using the attenuation method, and two-means method. The results and the μρ obtained deviation were compared for these samples, for the two methods. With the obtained results, it was concluded that the two-means method is applicable for the mass attenuation coefficient determination for the archaeometry studies. (author). 6 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  19. Gamma-ray attenuation studies of PbO-BaO-B2O3 glass system

    Singh, Narveer; Singh, Kanwar Jit; Singh, Kulwant; Singh, Harvinder

    2006-01-01

    PbO-BaO-B 2 O 3 glass system has been investigated in terms of molar mass, mass attenuation coefficient and half value layer parameters by using gamma-ray at 511,662 and 1274keV photon energies. Gamma-ray attenuation coefficients of the prepared glass samples have been compared with tabulations based upon the results of XCOM. Good agreement has been observed between experimental and theoretical tabulations. Our results have uncertainty less than 3%. Radiation shielding properties of the glass system have been compared with some standard radiation shielding concretes

  20. Gamma-ray attenuation to measure water contents and/or bulk densities of porous materials

    Ferraz, E.S.B.

    1983-01-01

    Attenuation of gamma radiation during transmission through soil and porous materials has been used for approximately three decades as a method for determining volumetric water content, theta, and bulk density, rho. This method is particularly suited for laboratory determinations of theta and rho in soil columns but it also has been used with success under field conditions. Measurements of attentuation of a collimated beam of monoernergetic gamma-rays has been used successfully by many investigators to provide rapid, non-destructive determinations for small volumes of soil. For stable soils, i.e. soils which do not swell upon wetting or shrink upon drying, rho may be assumed to remain constant during water flow through the soil, and thus changes in intensity or transmitted radiation may be attributed to changes in water content, theta. However, for unstable soils, the dry bulk density is subject to change with time during water flow through the soil and cannot be assumed to be a constant. Several investigators have utilized either a single beam of dual-energy gamma photons or two separate monoenergetic photon beams with greatly different energies to simultaneously determine theta and rho in these soils. A general review of gamma-ray attenuation methods for determining theta and rho in laboratory soil cores and in field soil profiles is reported in this paper. Theoretical equations for transmission and attenuation of gamma radiation in soils are presented for both single and double beams of gamma photons. Sensitivity, precision, accuracy, and experimental errors for the method are evaluated and discussed with respect to the theory. (author)

  1. Attenuation correction for the collimated gamma ray assay of cylindrical samples

    Patra, Sabyasachi; Agarwal, Chhavi; Goswami, A.; Gathibandhe, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) method developed earlier for attenuation correction of non-collimated samples [Agarwal et al., 2008, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 597, 198], has been extended to the segmented gamma ray assay of cylindrical samples. The method has been validated both experimentally and theoretically. For experimental validation, the results of HMC calculation have been compared with the experimentally obtained attenuation correction factors. The HMC attenuation correction factors have also been compared with the results obtained from literature available near-field and far-field formulae at two sample-to-detector distances (10.3 cm and 20.4 cm). The method has been found to be valid at all sample-to-detector distances over a wide range of transmittance. On the other hand, the literature available near-field and far-field formulae have been found to work over a limited range of sample-to detector distances and transmittances. The HMC method has been further extended to circular collimated geometries where analytical formula for attenuation correction does not exist. - Highlights: • Hybrid Monte Carlo method for attenuation correction developed for SGA system. • Method found to work for all sample-detector geometries for all transmittances. • The near-field formula applicable only after certain sample-detector distance. • The far-field formula applicable only for higher transmittances (>18%). • Hybrid Monte Carlo method further extended to circular collimated geometry

  2. Experimental determination of nuclear reaction rates (n,γ) by the gamma-rays capture spectrometry technique

    Lucatero, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    The technique of the gamma-rays capture spectrometry was used in the experimental determination of nuclear reaction rates of the type (n,γ). This technique consists in the incidence of a thermal neutrons collimated beam upon a sample, detecting the capture spectrum of gamma rays emitted at a solid fixed angle. In the determination of the efficiency curve intrinsic to the detection electronic system the reactions 199 Hg(n,γ) 200 Hg, 56 Fe(n,γ) 57 Fe and 63 Cu(n,γ) 64 Cu were used with the energy of the gamma rays capture of 5.976, 7.635 and 7.915 Mev respectively, through the irradiation of standard samples of Hg(175.3g), Fe(110.4g) and Cu(108.5g) of cylindrical geometry the two former and parallelepiped the latter. The problem concerning the corrections due to the thermal neutrons flux depression, the gammas auto-attenuation, and the geometric factor due to the cylindrical and parallelepiped geometry are involved in the data process. The experimental determination of the reaction 35 Cl(n,γ) 36 Cl rate was made through the observation of the gamma caputre of 6.111 Mev when a sample of CaCl 2 of cylindrical geometry was irradiated. This rate can be favorably compared with the reaction rate determined theoretically. (author)

  3. Detection Techniques of Microsecond Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Ground-based Telescopes

    Krennrich, F.; Le Bohec, S.; Weekes, T. C.

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray observations above 200 MeV are conventionally made by satellite-based detectors. The EGRET detector on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory has provided good sensitivity for the detection of bursts lasting for more than 200 ms. Theoretical predictions of high-energy gamma-ray bursts produced by quantum mechanical decay of primordial black holes (Hawking) suggest the emission of bursts on shorter timescales. The final stage of a primordial black hole results in a burst of gamma rays, peaking around 250 MeV and lasting for 1/10 of a microsecond or longer depending on particle physics. In this work we show that there is an observational window using ground-based imaging Cerenkov detectors to measure gamma-ray burst emission at energies E>200 MeV. This technique, with a sensitivity for bursts lasting nanoseconds to several microseconds, is based on the detection of multiphoton-initiated air showers. (c) (c) 2000. The American Astronomical Society

  4. Elementary representative sizes of soil attributes via attenuation of gamma rays and computerized tomography

    Borges, Jaqueline Aparecida Ribaski

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the Computed Tomography (CT) and gamma-ray attenuation (GRA) techniques were used in the investigation of representative sample sizes for attributes related to soil structure. First of all, the representative elementary length (REL) for experimental measurements of soil mass attenuation coefficient (μes), of samples from a sandy and a clayey soil, was analyzed. The study was conducted with two radioactive sources ( 241 Am and 137 Cs), three collimators (2 - 4 mm diameters), and 14 thickness (x) samples (2-5 cm). From these analyzes, it was possible to identify an ideal thickness range for each of the studied sources (2-4 cm and 12-15 cm for the sources of 241 Am and 137 Cs, respectively). The application of such results in representative elementary area evaluations, in clayey soil clods via CT, indicated that experimental soil mass attenuation coefficient average values obtained for x>4 cm and source 241 Am might induce the use of samples which are not large enough for soil bulk density evaluations. Subsequently, μCT images with a total volume of 39×39×33 mm 3 and spatial resolution of 60 μm were used for macroporous system morphological characterization of a Rhodic Ferralsol with clayey texture, under no-till (NT) and conventional till (CT) systems. Attributes as macroporosity (MAP), number of macropores (NMAP), tortuosity (τ) and connectivity (C) of the pores were assessed. The C degree was estimated based on the Euler-Poincare characteristic (EPC). Once 3D images enable the study of these attributes in different sample volumes, the proposed study is ideal for the analysis of representative elementary volume (REV). Usually, the selection of subvolumes for REV analysis occurs concentrically to a small volume or in adjacent positions. Here, we introduced a new method for selecting the positions of subvolumes, which are randomly chosen within the total image volume (random selection). It was observed that higher fluctuations in amplitude of each

  5. Theoretical-and experimental analysis of the errors involved in the wood moisture determination by gamma-ray attenuation

    Aguiar, O.

    1983-01-01

    The sources of errors in wood moisture determination by gamma-ray attenuation were sought. Equations were proposed for determining errors and for ideal sample thickness. A series of measurements of moisture content in wood samples of Pinus oocarpa was made and the experimental errors were compared with the theoretical errors. (Author) [pt

  6. Neutron/gamma-ray techniques for investigating the deterioration of historic buildings

    Evans, L.G.; Trombka, J.I.

    1986-01-01

    The degradation of building materials is a major problem for the preservation of historic structures. The presence of contaminants in the constituent materials is often a cause of the deterioration. Neutron-induced, prompt gamma-ray techniques for nondestructive elemental analysis are used to determine the distribution of contaminants in building walls. The application of these methods for the diagnosis of an 18th century historic building indicates that the distributions within the building walls of moisture, salt and bulk density can be obtained. The results of an analysis of the gamma-ray spectra are confirmed by independent measurements on two sample cores taken through one wall. (orig.)

  7. Attenuation of 60Co gamma rays by barium acrylic resin composite shields

    Abdulla, Riaz; Fidha, Mariyam; Sripathi Rao, B.H.; Kudkuli, Jagadish; Rekha, P.D.; Sharma, S.D.

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the sixth most common cancer reported globally, with an annual incidence of over 300,000 cases, of which 62% arise in developing countries. Radiation therapy is a treatment modality that uses ionizing radiation as a therapeutic agent. It is widely employed in the treatment of head and neck cancer, as a primary therapy coupled with surgical procedure and chemotherapy or as a palliative treatment for advanced tumors. However, radiotherapy can cause a series of complications such as xerostomia, mucositis, osteoradionecrosis, and radiation caries. Composite circular disc containing different ratios of acrylic and barium sulfate (BaSO 4 ) were made in-house. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the percentage attenuation from these composite shields in 60 Co gamma rays. A maximum of 8% radiation attenuation was achieved using 1:4 ratio of acrylic-BaSO 4 composite shields. The study proposes BaSO 4 as one of the compounds in combination with acrylic resin or any other thermoplastic substances for making biocompatible radiation attenuating devices. (author)

  8. Advanced techniques for high resolution spectroscopic observations of cosmic gamma-ray sources

    Matteson, J.L.; Pelling, M.R.; Peterson, L.E.

    1985-08-01

    We describe an advanced gamma-ray spectrometer that is currently in development. It will obtain a sensitivity of -4 ph/cm -2 -sec in a 6 hour balloon observation and uses innovative techniques for background reduction and source imaging

  9. Low-activity spectrometric gamma-ray logging technique for delineation of coal/rock interfaces in dry blast holes

    Asfahani, J.; Borsaru, M.

    2007-01-01

    A low-activity spectrometric gamma-ray logging technique is proposed in this paper as a sensitive tool for the delineation of coal/rock interfaces in dry blast holes. The advantages and superiority of this technique over traditional micro-density non-spectrometric gamma-ray tools are demonstrated

  10. Application of the gamma-ray attenuation on the study of Amianthus-Cement tile with different ages

    Marques, Leonardo C.; Simeao, David da Silva; Oliveira, Ricardo Mendes de; Rocha, Wilson Roberto Dejato da; Costa, Elizabeth Cristina Soares da; Portezan Filho, Otavio; Coimbra, Melayne Martins

    2005-01-01

    In the civil construction, concrete of different resistances are prepared to assist to the objectives of the projects. Concrete samples, prepared in laboratory,can be used in the measurements of the density profiles along the sample, as well as to accompany the space and temporary evolution of the humidity in the process of water infiltration. Other material quite used in the civil construction it is the amianthus-cement tiles, that has good resistance to the deformation. This work intends to evaluate the homogeneity of the amianthus-cement tiles through the gamma-ray attenuation technique, in order to verify the possible existence of fissures or defects in the material, due to the aging and the bad weather. The first tile used was produced in 2002, te second one in 1991 and the third in 1978. Its dimensions were: 130x50x0,4 cm. To manipulate the tiles with easiness, these were divided in samples with the following dimensions: 12x8x0,4 cm. For each sample the linear attenuation coefficient was measured for a horizontal line, totalizing 14 points with an interval of 0,5 cm among the points. The measurement table used has a Na (Tl) scintillation detector of 2 x 2 , with circular collimator of 2 mm (for source) and of 5 mm (for the detector) and a radioactive source of 241 Am (59,6 keV, 100 mCi). With the measured values of the linear attenuation coefficient as a function of the position in the sample, we can build the curves of the linear attenuation coefficient versus position, which represent the homogeneity profile of the sample . The graphs of the linear attenuation coefficient versus position will be presented for the measured tiles as well as the statistical analysis of the results. (author)

  11. Simultaneous measurement of unfrozen water content and ice content in frozen soil using gamma ray attenuation and TDR

    Zhou, Xiaohai; Zhou, Jian; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang; Stauffer, Fritz

    2014-12-01

    The freezing temperature of water in soil is not constant but varies over a range determined by soil texture. Consequently, the amounts of unfrozen water and ice change with temperature in frozen soil, which in turn affects hydraulic, thermal, and mechanical properties of frozen soil. In this paper, an Am-241 gamma ray source and time-domain reflectometry (TDR) were combined to measure unfrozen water content and ice content in frozen soil simultaneously. The gamma ray attenuation was used to determine total water content. The TDR was used to determine the dielectric constant of the frozen soil. Based on a four-phase mixing model, the amount of unfrozen water content in the frozen soil could be determined. The ice content was inferred by the difference between total water content and unfrozen water content. The gamma ray attenuation and the TDR were both calibrated by a gravimetric method. Water contents measured by gamma ray attenuation and TDR in an unfrozen silt column under infiltration were compared and showed that the two methods have the same accuracy and response to changes of water content. Unidirectional column freezing experiments were performed to apply the combined method of gamma ray attenuation and TDR for measuring unfrozen water content and ice content. The measurement error of the gamma ray attenuation and TDR was around 0.02 and 0.01 m3/m3, respectively. The overestimation of unfrozen water in frozen soil by TDR alone was quantified and found to depend on the amount of ice content. The higher the ice content, the larger the overestimation. The study confirmed that the combined method could accurately determine unfrozen water content and ice content in frozen soil. The results of soil column freezing experiments indicate that total water content distribution is affected by available pore space and the freezing front advance rate. It was found that there is similarity between the soil water characteristic and the soil freezing characteristic of

  12. Experimental techniques for the detection of the high energy gamma rays of cosmic origin

    Dumitrescu, Gh.; Angelescu, T.; Radu, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The observation of high energy gamma rays of cosmic origin in the early 90 by Volcano Ranch experiment opened a new direction of study in astrophysics. The very high energy and the very low flux of these gamma rays, posed numerous detection problems which in turn were the object of a very intense research activity. The present article tries to review the detection techniques for the high energy gamma rays of cosmic origin. In the 'Introduction' we summarize the specific problems involved in the detection of this type of radiation. 'Chapter 1' presents the classic technique based on the use of scintillation detectors. 'Chapter 2' includes the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique (IACT) and the sampling wavefront technique. 'Chapter 3' is dedicated to the detection of the atmospheric nitrogen. 'Chapter 4' describes issues related to the calibration of the detectors, the cross checking of the experimental data, the use of the Monte Carlo simulations and the use of the density observed at a distance of 600 m S(600), in order to estimate the primary energy. The characteristics of some future developments of the above presented techniques are included in the last chapter. (authors)

  13. Self-calibration techniques of underwater gamma ray spectrometers.

    Vlachos, D S

    2005-01-01

    In situ continuous monitoring of radioactivity in the water environment has many advantages compared to sampling and analysis techniques but a few shortcomings as well. Apart from the problems encountered in the assembly of the carrying autonomous systems, continuous operation some times alters the response function of the detectors. For example, the continuous operation of a photomultiplier tube results in a shift in the measured spectrum towards lower energies, making thus necessary the re-calibration of the detector. In this work, it is proved, that when measuring radioactivity in seawater, a photo peak around 50 keV will be always present in the measured spectrum. This peak is stable, depends only on the scattering rates of photons in seawater and, when it is detectable, can be used in conjunction with other peaks (40K and/or 208Tl) as a reference peak for the continuous calibration of the detector.

  14. Self-calibration techniques of underwater gamma ray spectrometers

    Vlachos, D.S.

    2005-01-01

    In situ continuous monitoring of radioactivity in the water environment has many advantages compared to sampling and analysis techniques but a few shortcomings as well. Apart from the problems encountered in the assembly of the carrying autonomous systems, continuous operation some times alters the response function of the detectors. For example, the continuous operation of a photomultiplier tube results in a shift in the measured spectrum towards lower energies, making thus necessary the re-calibration of the detector. In this work, it is proved, that when measuring radioactivity in seawater, a photo peak around 50 keV will be always present in the measured spectrum. This peak is stable, depends only on the scattering rates of photons in seawater and, when it is detectable, can be used in conjunction with other peaks ( 40 K and/or 208 Tl) as a reference peak for the continuous calibration of the detector

  15. Point source search techniques in ultra high energy gamma ray astronomy

    Alexandreas, D.E.; Biller, S.; Dion, G.M.; Lu, X.Q.; Yodh, G.B.; Berley, D.; Goodman, J.A.; Haines, T.J.; Hoffman, C.M.; Horch, E.; Sinnis, C.; Zhang, W.

    1993-01-01

    Searches for point astrophysical sources of ultra high energy (UHE) gamma rays are plagued by large numbers of background events from isotropic cosmic rays. Some of the methods that have been used to estimate the expected number of background events coming from the direction of a possible source are found to contain biases. Search techniques that avoid this problem are described. There is also a discussion of how to optimize the sensitivity of a search to emission from a point source. (orig.)

  16. The applications possibilities of the gamma-ray compton backscattering technique

    Flechas, David; Gonzalez, Natalia; Sarmiento, Luis G.; Fajardo, Eduardo; Garzon, Claudia; Munoz, Juansebastian; Cristancho, Fernando [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia). Dept. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: X-rays have been for already longer than a century the instrument of choice when producing images of opaque objects. One important characteristic of the use of X-rays as an imaging tool is the geometrical arrangement in which the object under study is placed between the photons source and the imaging material (film or electronic device). This set-up cannot be realized in a multitude of situations of industrial interest. In those cases the source and the imaging device are limited to be at the same side of the object rendering impossible the use of present day's possibilities of X-ray imaging. It is in these cases where the technique discussed exhibits most of its power and advantages. By using the back-to-back emitted gamma-rays of the positron-decay of {sup 22}Na, the Gamma-Ray Compton Backscattering (GRCB) technique is able of building images of an object placed in front of the gamma-rays source. The set-up includes two detectors connected in time coincidence, one of them, a pixelated position- detector in charge of building the image and the other just providing the gating condition. The talk explains the working principle, shows some first images of hidden objects in soil, and discusses some of the prospective areas of application like oil industry and explosive landmines localization. (author)

  17. Gamma-ray astronomy by the air shower technique: performance and perspectives

    Cronin, J.W. [Chicago, Univ. of Chicago (United States). Dept. of Phisycs and Enrico Fermi Inst.

    1996-11-01

    The techniques for {gamma}-ray astronomy at energies {>=}10 TeV using air shower detectors are discussed. The results, based on a number of large arrays, are negative, with no point sources being identified. While the contributions to {gamma}-ray astronomy so far have been only upper limits, these arrays in the future will make significant progress in the understanding of cosmic rays in the energy range 10{sup 13} eV to 10{sup 16} eV. Also, contributions to solar physics are being made by observations of shape and time dependence of the shadow of the Sun as observed in cosmic rays. For the advancement of {gamma}-ray astronomy a greater sensitivity is required in the energy region of 10 TeV. A number of promising techniques to accomplish a greater sensitivity are discussed. They include the enlargement of the Tibet array at 4300 meters altitude, the array of open photomultipliers at La Palma (AIROBICC), which views the shower by the Cherenkov photons produced in the atmosphere, and the instrumentation of a pond at Los Alamos with photomultipliers (Milagro).

  18. Population synthesis of radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsars using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques

    Gonthier, Peter L.; Koh, Yew-Meng; Kust Harding, Alice

    2016-04-01

    We present preliminary results of a new population synthesis of millisecond pulsars (MSP) from the Galactic disk using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques to better understand the model parameter space. We include empirical radio and gamma-ray luminosity models that are dependent on the pulsar period and period derivative with freely varying exponents. The magnitudes of the model luminosities are adjusted to reproduce the number of MSPs detected by a group of thirteen radio surveys as well as the MSP birth rate in the Galaxy and the number of MSPs detected by Fermi. We explore various high-energy emission geometries like the slot gap, outer gap, two pole caustic and pair starved polar cap models. The parameters associated with the birth distributions for the mass accretion rate, magnetic field, and period distributions are well constrained. With the set of four free parameters, we employ Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations to explore the model parameter space. We present preliminary comparisons of the simulated and detected distributions of radio and gamma-ray pulsar characteristics. We estimate the contribution of MSPs to the diffuse gamma-ray background with a special focus on the Galactic Center.We express our gratitude for the generous support of the National Science Foundation (RUI: AST-1009731), Fermi Guest Investigator Program and the NASA Astrophysics Theory and Fundamental Program (NNX09AQ71G).

  19. Measurement of structured purple soil porosity by using gamma ray transmission technique

    Costa, Elizabeth Cristina S. da; Rocha, Wilson Roberto Dejato da; Oliveira, Ricardo M. de; Silva, Luzeli Moreira da; Moreira, Anderson Camargo; Portezan, Otaio Portezan; Appoloni, Carlos Roberto; Coimbra, Melayne Martins

    2002-01-01

    The soil structure defines the particle arrangement which in turn largely determines the pore size distribution. In this work, we present the measurements of total, macro and microporosity for TRe soil with clayey texture. Soil samples were collected from a trench located at University of Londrina. The deformed and undeformed soil samples were collected from soil surface down to the depth of 0,50 m in 0,10 m intervals and separated into six aggregate size classes: 0.053; 0.125; 0.30; 0.71; 2 e 4 mm. We also prepared samples mixing different size classes, like as: (4+0.125), (2+0.125), (4+2+0.71), (4+2+0.30) e (4+0.30+0.125)mm. Measurements of particle density and aggregate bulk density using conventional method were performed to all depths. The linear soil attenuation coefficients and aggregate soil attenuation coefficients were measured with gamma-ray transmission system using an 241 Am (59,53 keV and 100 mCi) radiation source, a (2 x 2) in NaI scintillation detector, cylindric collimators (2 mm diameter to the source and 5 mm diameter to the detector) and gamma spectrometry standard electronics, connected to a multichannel. The obtained results for total, macro and microporosity are in a good agreement with the ones using the convention method, showing the applicability of the gamma-ray transmission method. (author)

  20. A COMPARISON OF MEASURED AND CALCULATED GAMMA RAY ATTENUATION FOR A COMMON COUNTING GEOMETRY

    Gaylord, R F

    2004-01-01

    In order to perform quantitative gamma spectroscopy, it is necessary to know the sample-specific detection efficiency for photons as a function of energy. The detection efficiency, along with the branching ratio for the isotope and gamma ray of interest, is used to convert observed counts/second to actual disintegrations/second, and, hence, has a large effect on the accuracy of the measurement. In cases where the geometry of the source is simple and reproducible, such as a point source, small vial of solid, or jar of liquid, geometry-specific standards may be counted to determine the detection efficiency. In cases where the samples are large, irregular, or unique, this method generally cannot be used. For example, it is impossible to obtain a NIST-traceable standard glovebox or 55-gallon drum. In these cases, a combination of measured absolute detector efficiency and calculated sample-specific correction factors is commonly used. The correction factors may be calculated via Monte Carlo simulation of the item (the method used by Canberra's ISOCS system), or via semi-empirical calculation of matrix and container attenuations based on the thickness and composition of the container and radioactive matrix (ISOTOPIC by EG and G Ortec uses this method). The accuracy of these correction factors for specific geometries is often of vital interest when assessing the quality of gamma spectroscopy data. During the Building 251 Risk-Reduction Project, over 100 samples of high activity actinides will be characterized via gamma spectroscopy, typically without removing the material from the current storage containers. Most of the radioactive materials in B-251 are stored in cylindrical stainless steel canisters (called USV containers, after the Underground Storage Vaults they are commonly stored in), 13 cm in diameter, by 28 cm high, with walls that are 1.8 mm thick. While the actual samples have a variety of configurations inside the USV container, a very common configuration is

  1. Use of calibration standards and the correction for sample self-attenuation in gamma-ray nondestructive assay

    Parker, J.L.

    1984-08-01

    The efficient use of appropriate calibration standards and the correction for the attenuation of the gamma rays within an assay sample by the sample itself are two important and closely related subjects in gamma-ray nondestructive assay. Much research relating to those subjects has been done in the Nuclear Safeguards Research and Development program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory since 1970. This report brings together most of the significant results of that research. Also discussed are the nature of appropriate calibration standards and the necessary conditions on the composition, size, and shape of the samples to allow accurate assays. Procedures for determining the correction for the sample self-attenuation are described at length including both general principles and several specific useful cases. The most useful concept is that knowing the linear attenuation coefficient of the sample (which can usually be determined) and the size and shape of the sample and its position relative to the detector permits the computation of the correction factor for the self-attenuation. A major objective of the report is to explain how the procedures for determining the self-attenuation correction factor can be applied so that calibration standards can be entirely appropriate without being particularly similar, either physically or chemically, to the items to be assayed. This permits minimization of the number of standards required to assay items with a wide range of size, shape, and chemical composition. 17 references, 18 figures, 2 tables

  2. The use of calibration standards and the correction for sample self-attenuation in gamma-ray nondestructive assay

    Parker, J.L.

    1986-11-01

    The efficient use of appropriate calibration standards and the correction for the attenuation of the gamma rays within an assay sample by the sample itself are two important and closely related subjects in gamma-ray nondestructive assay. Much research relating to those subjects has been done in the Nuclear Safeguards Research and Development program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory since 1970. This report brings together most of the significant results of that research. Also discussed are the nature of appropriate calibration standards and the necessary conditions on the composition, size, and shape of the samples to allow accurate assays. Procedures for determining the correction for the sample self-attenuation are described at length including both general principles and several specific useful cases. The most useful concept is that knowing the linear attenuation coefficient of the sample (which can usually be determined) and the size and shape of the sample and its position relative to the detector permits the computation of the correction factor for the self-attenuation. A major objective of the report is to explain how the procedures for determining the self-attenuation correction factor can be applied so that calibration standards can be entirely appropriate without being particularly similar, either physically or chemically, to the items to be assayed. This permits minimization of the number of standards required to assay items with a wide range of size, shape, and chemical composition

  3. ParShield: A computer program for calculating attenuation parameters of the gamma rays and the fast neutrons

    Elmahroug, Y.; Tellili, B.; Souga, C.; Manai, K.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Description of the theoretical method used by the ParShield program. • Description of the ParShield program. • Test and validation the ParShield program. - Abstract: This study aims to present a new computer program called ParShield which determines the neutron and gamma-ray shielding parameters. This program can calculate the total mass attenuation coefficients (μ t ), the effective atomic numbers (Z eff ) and the effective electron densities (N eff ) for gamma rays and it can also calculate the effective removal cross-sections (Σ R ) for fast neutrons for mixtures and compounds. The results obtained for the gamma rays by using ParShield were compared with the results calculated by the WinXcom program and the measured results. The obtained values of (Σ R ) were tested by comparing them with the measured results,the manually calculated results and with the results obtained by using MERCSFN program and an excellent agreement was found between them. The ParShield program can be used as a fast and effective tool to choose and compare the shielding materials, especially for the determination of (Z eff ) and (N eff ), there is no other programs in the literature which can calculate

  4. Quality-assurance techniques used with automated analysis of gamma-ray spectra

    Killian, E.W.; Koeppen, L.D.; Femec, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    In the course of developing gamma-ray spectrum analysis algorithms for use by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), several techniques have been developed that enhance and verify the quality of the analytical results. The use of these quality-assurance techniques is critical when gamma-ray analysis results from low-level environmental samples are used in risk assessment or site restoration and cleanup decisions. This paper describes four of the quality-assurance techniques that are in routine use at the laboratory. They are used for all types of samples, from reactor effluents to environmental samples. The techniques include: (1) the use of precision pulsers (with subsequent removal) to validate the correct operation of the spectrometer electronics for each and every spectrum acquired, (2) the use of naturally occurring and cosmically induced radionuclides in samples to help verify that the data acquisition and analysis were performed properly, (3) the use of an ambient background correction technique that involves superimposing (open-quotes mappingclose quotes) sample photopeak fitting parameters onto multiple background spectra for accurate and more consistent quantification of the background activities, (4) the use of interactive, computer-driven graphics to review the automated locating and fitting of photopeaks and to allow for manual fitting of photopeaks

  5. Pu abundances, concentrations, and isotopics by x- and gamma-ray spectrometry assay techniques

    Camp, D.C.; Gunnink, R.; Ruhter, W.D.; Prindle, A.L.; Gomes, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Two x- and gamma-ray systems were recently installed at-line in gloveboxes and will measure Pu solution concentrations from 5 to 105 g/L. These NDA technique, developed and refined over the past decade, are now used domestically and internationally for nuclear material process monitoring and accountability needs. In off- and at-line installations, they can measure solution concentrations to 0.2%. The K-XRFA systems use a transmission source to correct for solution density. The gamma-ray systems use peaks from 59- to 208-keV to determine solution concentrations and relative isotopics. A Pu check source monitors system stability. These two NDA techniques can be combined to form a new, NDA measurement methodology. With the instrument located outside of a glovebox, both relative Pu isotopics and absolute Pu abundances of a sample located inside a glovebox can be measured. The new technique works with either single or dual source excitation; the former for a detector 6 to 20 cm away with no geometric corrections needed; the latter requires geometric corrections or source movement if the sample cannot be measured at the calibration distance. 4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Gamma ray auto absorption correction evaluation methodology

    Gugiu, Daniela; Roth, Csaba; Ghinescu, Alecse

    2010-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a well established nuclear technique, suited to investigate the microstructural or elemental composition and can be applied to studies of a large variety of samples. The work with large samples involves, beside the development of large irradiation devices with well know neutron field characteristics, the knowledge of perturbing phenomena and adequate evaluation of correction factors like: neutron self shielding, extended source correction, gamma ray auto absorption. The objective of the works presented in this paper is to validate an appropriate methodology for gamma ray auto absorption correction evaluation for large inhomogeneous samples. For this purpose a benchmark experiment has been defined - a simple gamma ray transmission experiment, easy to be reproduced. The gamma ray attenuation in pottery samples has been measured and computed using MCNP5 code. The results show a good agreement between the computed and measured values, proving that the proposed methodology is able to evaluate the correction factors. (authors)

  7. Use of two monoenergetic gamma-ray attenuation method in wood samples

    Mortatti, J.; Nascimento Filho, V.F. do; Barros Ferraz, E.S. de

    1983-01-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients for 10 wood species were determined employing the gamma attenuation technique with a single beam comprising two monoenergetics gamma energies from 137 Cs/sup(137m) Ba and 141 Am (662 and 59,6 KeV, respectively). The absorbed radiation was simultaneously measured by means of a 3'' x 3'' Nal (T1) planar solid scintillator crystal connected to a two channel gamma spectrometer. The effect of the 137 Cs/ sup(137m) Ba compton radiation on the not 241 Am counting rates were corrected. Dead time effects were desregarded, as the counting rates were always below 10 5 cpm. (Author) [pt

  8. Gamma-ray mass attenuation coefficient and half value layer factor of some oxide glass shielding materials

    Waly, El-Sayed A.; Fusco, Michael A.; Bourham, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    The variation in dosimetric parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient, half value layer factor, exposure buildup factor, and the photon mean free path for different oxide glasses for the incident gamma energy range 0.015–15 MeV has been studied using MicroShield code. It has been inferred that the addition of PbO and Bi 2 O 3 improves the gamma ray shielding properties. Thus, the effect of chemical composition on these parameters is investigated in the form of six different glass compositions, which are compared with specialty concrete for nuclear radiation shielding. The composition termed ‘Glass 6’ in this paper has the highest mass attenuation and the smallest half value layer and may have potential applications in radiation shielding. An example dry storage cask utilizing an additional layer of Glass 6 as an intermediate shielding layer, simulated in MicroShield, is capable of reducing the exposure rate at the cask surface by over 20 orders of magnitude compared to the case without a glass layer. Based on this study, Glass 6 shows promise as a gamma-ray shielding material, particularly for dry cask storage.

  9. Effect of collimator size and absorber thickness on soil bulk density evaluation by gamma-ray attenuation

    Costa, J.C.; Borges, J.A.R.; Pires, L.F.

    2014-01-01

    Representative measurements of the soil bulk density (ρ s ) can be affected depending on the geometry selected for gamma-ray attenuation (GRA) measurements. In this study, the effect of collimator size (2–4 mm diameters) and absorber thickness (2–15 cm) on ρ s measurements of sandy and clayey soils was investigated. In summary, the results obtained for the 137 Cs show that ρ s remained fairly constant for values of thickness larger than 7 cm (both soils). The very same result was observed for collimator sizes 2–4 mm. Regarding the 241 Am source, ρ s values presented variations with the collimator size (both soils) for the different thicknesses. The best values of ρ s were obtained for samples smaller than 5 cm and also for the small collimator diameters. - Highlights: ► Representative measurements of the soil bulk density by gamma-ray attenuation. ► For 137 Cs the best bulk density values were obtained for samples larger than 7 cm. ► For 241 Am the best bulk density values were obtained for samples smaller than 5 cm

  10. Simulation study on the behavior of X-rays and gamma rays in an inhomogeneous medium using the Monte Carlo technique

    Murase, Kenya; Kataoka, Masaaki; Kawamura, Masashi; Tamada, Shuji; Hamamoto, Ken

    1989-01-01

    A computer program based on the Monte Carlo technique was developed for the analysis of the behavior of X-rays and gamma rays in an inhomogeneous medium. The statistical weight of a photon was introduced and the survival biasing method was used for reducing the statistical error. This computer program has the mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients for 69 tissues and organs as a database file, and can be applied to various cases of inhomogeneity. The simulation and experimental results of the central axis percent-depth dose in an inhomogeneous phantom were in good agreement. This computer program will be useful for analysis on the behavior of X-rays and gamma rays in an inhomogeneous medium consisting of various tissues and organs, not only in radiotherapy treatment planning but also in diagnostic radiology and in the field treating radiation protection. (author)

  11. Time stamp technique using a nuclear emulsion multi-stage shifter for gamma-ray telescope

    Takahashi, Satoru; Aoki, Shigeki; Rokujo, Hiroki; Hamada, Kaname; Komatsu, Masahiro; Morishima, Kunihiro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Nakano, Toshiyuki; Niwa, Kimio; Sato, Osamu; Yoshioka, Teppei; Kodama, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear emulsion has a potential use as a gamma-ray telescope with high angular resolution. For this application it is necessary to know the time when each track was recorded in the emulsion. In previous experiments using nuclear emulsion, various efforts were used to associate time to nuclear emulsion tracks and to improve the time resolution. Using a high speed readout system for nuclear emulsion together with a clock-based multi-stage emulsion shifter, we invented a technique to give a time-stamp to emulsion tracks and greatly improve the time resolution. A test experiment with a 2-stage shifter was used to demonstrate the principle of multi-stage shifting, and we achieved a time resolution 1.5 s for 12.1 h (about 1 part in 29 000) with the time stamp reliability 97% and the time stamp efficiency 98%. This multi-stage shifter can achieve the time resolution required for a gamma-ray telescope and can also be applied to another cosmic ray observations and accelerator experiments using nuclear emulsion.

  12. Gamma Ray Absorption Technique For Scannig Process Column In Up-IV Pertamina Cilacap

    Santoso, Sigit Budi; Kushartono; Bisana; Mulyanto, Eko; Adi, Soecipto

    2000-01-01

    A demonstration using gamma ray absorption technique was carried out to diagnose malfunction such as tray missing, flooding, and weeping occurred in 2 3C-5 Extraction Vacuum Flash Strip Tower . The scan was conducted from the bottom until the top of the orientation of the director-source are (122 o -308 o ) dan (122 o - 270 o ). The results indicate that the tray number 1 and 3 were missing while weeping occurred in the space between tray 4,5,6,and 7. The results show that this technique can be used to diagnose malfunction occurred in the column on-line so it can help maintenance personnel in planning, the time scheduled and spare part for shutdown. Beside of that this technique can be developed to help column personnel's in adjusting the operation parameter to achieve optimum operation

  13. Microstructural characterization of porous materials by X-ray microtomography and gamma ray transmission techniques

    Moreira, Anderson Camargo

    2006-01-01

    This work presents the application of the X-ray microtomography and gamma ray transmission techniques for the microstructure characterization of different kinds of materials. Total porosity, pore size distribution and the two point correlation functions were measured. The two point correlation function, which allows the reconstruction of 3D models, was carried out for two samples. Seven ceramic tablets of Alumina (Al 2 O 3 ), seven tablets of Boron Carbide (B 4 C), three samples of sedimentary rocks and one sample of Titanium foam were analyzed. The experimental set up for the Gamma Ray Transmission technique consisted of: a 2'' x 2'' crystal NaI(Tl) detector, an 241 Am radioactive source (59,53 keV, 100 mCi), an automatic micrometric table for the sample XZ movement and standard gamma spectrometry electronics. Two microtomography systems were used: a Fein Focus system, constituted by an X-ray tube, operated at 160 kV and 0.3 to 1.1 mA, a CCD camera and the movement sample system, and a Skyscan system, model 1072, with a X-ray tube operated at 100 kV and 100μA, and a CCD camera. The ceramic tablets, analyzed by the gamma ray transmission technique presented results for most of the porosities data with smaller confidence intervals and inside the intervals supplied by the tablets manufacturer. The Titanium porous sample was analyzed by the two techniques, its microtomography images achieved a resolution of 17μm, obtained employing the Fein Focus system. For both techniques, this sample showed high porosity, which allows its application for this purpose. The sandstones samples were analyzed by the Skyscan system, achieving resolutions of 19μm, 11μm and 3.8μm for each sample, respectively. The resolutions of 11μm and 3.8μm were the ones that generated better 2D sections for the respective samples and, consequently, more reliable porosities. The 3.8μm resolution was the one that best quantified the pore size distribution data, showing information not shown by

  14. Magnetic Pair Creation Attenuation Altitude Constraints in Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Baring, Matthew; Story, Sarah

    The Fermi gamma-ray pulsar database now exceeds 150 sources and has defined an important part of Fermi's science legacy, providing rich information for the interpretation of young energetic pulsars and old millisecond pulsars. Among the well established population characteristics is the common occurrence of exponential turnovers in the 1-10 GeV range. These turnovers are too gradual to arise from magnetic pair creation in the strong magnetic fields of pulsar inner magnetospheres, so their energy can be used to provide lower bounds to the typical altitude of GeV band emission. We explore such constraints due to single-photon pair creation transparency at and below the turnover energy. Our updated computations span both domains when general relativistic influences are important and locales where flat spacetime photon propagation is modified by rotational aberration effects. The altitude bounds, typically in the range of 2-5 stellar radii, provide key information on the emission altitude in radio quiet pulsars that do not possess double-peaked pulse profiles. However, the exceptional case of the Crab pulsar provides an altitude bound of around 20% of the light cylinder radius if pair transparency persists out to 350 GeV, the maximum energy detected by MAGIC. This is an impressive new physics-based constraint on the Crab's gamma-ray emission locale.

  15. An expert system for improving the gamma-ray scanning technique

    Laraki, K.; Alami, R.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Bensitel, A.; El Badri, L.

    2007-01-01

    The gamma-ray scanning technique is widely used in the diagnosis and identification of industrial installations, in general and, in particular, of distillation columns considered as the most critical components in petrochemical plants. It provides essential data to optimise the performance of columns and identify maintenance requirements. Due to the various difficulties that can arise while analysing a scanning profile and in order to benefit from the continuous advent of new technologies in the field of electronics and data processing, the team of the Division of Instrumentation and Industrial Applications of CNESTEN have conducted a project aiming the elaboration of an expert system for acquisition, processing and interpretation of the scanning results. This system consists of two main modules: the first one is devoted to the preparation and control of the scanning operation conditions, while the second module has been developed to carry out easily and effectively the automatic (on-line) analysis and interpretation of the scan profiles

  16. A Search Technique for Weak and Long-Duration Gamma-Ray Bursts from Background Model Residuals

    Skelton, R. T.; Mahoney, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    We report on a planned search technique for Gamma-Ray Bursts too weak to trigger the on-board threshold. The technique is to search residuals from a physically based background model used for analysis of point sources by the Earth occultation method.

  17. Measurement of the vertical infiltration parameters and water redistribution in LRd and LEa soils by gamma-ray transmission technique

    Souza, A.D.B. de; Saito, H.; Appoloni, C.R.; Coimbra, M.M.; Parreira, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of soil water diffusivity and soil hydraulic conductivity of two horizons (0-20 cm and 20-40 cm) from Latossolo Roxo distrofico (LRd) and Latossolo Vermelho escuro (LEa) soil samples, have been measured in laboratory through the vertical infiltration and redistribution of water in soil columns. The moisture profile as a function of time for each position in the soil column were obtained with the gamma-ray transmission technique, using a sup(241)Am gamma-ray source, a Na (I) T1 scintillation detector and gamma spectrometry standard electronic. (author)

  18. Assessing sample attenuation parameters for use in low-energy efficiency transfer in gamma-ray spectrometry

    Bruggeman, M.; Verheyen, L.; Vidmar, T.; Liu, B.

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical fitting method for transmission data that outputs an equivalent sample composition. This output is used as input to a generalised efficiency transfer model based on the EFFTRAN software integrated in a LIMS. The procedural concept allows choosing between efficiency transfer with a predefined sample composition or with an experimentally determined composition based on a transmission measurement. The method can be used for simultaneous quantification of low-energy gamma emitters like "2"1"0Pb, "2"4"1Am, "2"3"4Th in typical environmental samples. - Highlights: • New fitting method for experimentally determined attenuation coefficients. • Generalised efficiency transfer with EFFTRAN based on transmission measurements. • Method of generalized efficiency transfer integrated in LIMS. • Method applicable to gamma-ray spectrometry of environmental samples.

  19. Determination of soil parameters during the water horizontal infiltration and redistribution by gamma ray attenuation method and tensiometry

    Oliveira, J.C.M. de.

    1991-04-01

    The present work studies the water diffusivity and hydraulic conductivity in a Latossolo Roxo distrofico soil, during the water infiltration and redistribution processes. Variation water flow equations were utilized for the calculations. The data of wetting front positions and of soil water content profiles were obtained through the gamma ray attenuation from a 241-Am source, with 100 mCi activity detected by a standard electronic equipment of gamma spectrometry, with NaI CTD scintillation detector. From the soil water content data in function of space and time and from analytic models, the properties of soil water diffusivity and soil hydraulic conductivity were determined in the laboratory for the 0-10 cm and 10-25 soil layers. (author)

  20. Layer-splitting technique for testing the recursive scheme for multilayer shields gamma ray buildup factors

    Alkhatib, Sari F.; Park, Chang Je; Jeong, Hae Yong; Lee, Yongdeok

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A simple formalism is suggested for the recursive approach and then it is used to produce buildup factors for certain multilayer shields. • The newly layer-splitting technique is implemented on the studied cases for testing the suggested formalism performance. • The buildup factors are generated using cubic polynomial fitting functions that are produced based on previous well-acknowledge data. - Abstract: This study illustrates the implementation of the newly suggested layer-splitting testing technique. This technique is introduced in order to be implemented in examining suggested formalisms for the recursive scheme (or iterative scheme). The recursive scheme is a concept used in treating and producing the gamma ray buildup factors in the case of multilayer shields. The layer-splitting technique simply enforces the scheme to treat a single layer of one material as two separated layers with similar characteristics. Thus it subjects the scheme to an abnormal definition of the multilayer shield that will test its performance in treating the successive layers. Thus, it will act as a method of verification for the approximations and assumptions taken in consideration. A simple formalism was suggested for the recursive scheme then the splitting technique was implemented on it. The results of implementing both the suggested formalism and the splitting technique are then illustrated and discussed. Throughout this study, cubic polynomial fitting functions were used to generate the data of buildup factors for the basic single-media that constitute the multilayer shields understudy. This study is limited to the cases of multiple shields consisting of repeated consecutive thin layers of lead–water and iron–water shields for 1 MeV gamma rays. The produced results of the buildup factor values through the implementation of the suggested formalism showed good consistency with the Monte Carlo simulation results of Lin and Jiang work. In the implementation of

  1. The application of semianalytic method for calculating the thickness of biological shields of nuclear reactors. Part 2. Attenuation of gamma rays. An example of shield's thickness calculation

    Lukaszek, W.; Kucypera, S.

    1982-01-01

    The semianalytic method was used for calculating the attenuation of gamma rays and the thickness of biological shield of graphite moderated reactor. A short description of computer code as well as the exemplary results of calculations are given. (A.S.)

  2. Oesophagostomum columbianum : immunization of young lambs using gamma ray attenuated inefective larvae

    Sharma, R.L.; Dhar, D.N.

    1987-01-01

    Infective Oesophagostomum columbianum larvae were successfully attenuated by exposing them to a gamma radiation dose levels of either 40 or 50 Krad. Lambs receiving a single vaccination dose of 2000 infective larvae attenuated at 40 Krad developed partial protection, whereas those vaccinated with similar dose of infection with 50 Krad irradiated larvae failed to develop any protection. A double vaccination schedule comprising of 500 and 2000 gamma attenuated (40 Krad) infective larvae induced a significantly higher level of protection against the challenge dose. The possible use of radiation attenuated larvae as vaccine for immunoprophylaxis against ovine Oesophagostomiasis has been discussed. (author). 11 refs., 2 tables

  3. Evaluation of gamma-ray attenuation properties of bismuth borate glass systems using Monte Carlo method

    Tarim, Urkiye Akar; Ozmutlu, Emin N.; Yalcin, Sezai; Gundogdu, Ozcan; Bradley, D. A.; Gurler, Orhan

    2017-11-01

    A Monte Carlo method was developed to investigate radiation shielding properties of bismuth borate glass. The mass attenuation coefficients and half-value layer parameters were determined for different fractional amounts of Bi2O3 in the glass samples for the 356, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV photon energies. A comparison of the theoretical and experimental attenuation coefficients is presented.

  4. Evaluation of gamma-ray attenuation properties of bismuth borate glass systems using Monte Carlo method

    Tarim, Urkiye Akar; Ozmutlu, Emin N.; Yalcin, Sezai; Gundogdu, Ozcan; Bradley, D.A.; Gurler, Orhan

    2017-01-01

    A Monte Carlo method was developed to investigate radiation shielding properties of bismuth borate glass. The mass attenuation coefficients and half-value layer parameters were determined for different fractional amounts of Bi 2 O 3 in the glass samples for the 356, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV photon energies. A comparison of the theoretical and experimental attenuation coefficients is presented. - Highlights: • Radiation shielding properties of bismuth borate glass systems have been reported. • Mass attenuation coefficients increase linearly with increase in Bi concentration. • Half-value layer decreases with increasing concentration of Bi. • Half-value layer decreases with the increase in the sample density.

  5. Low background gamma ray spectrometer using the anticoincidence shield technique at KAERI

    Byun, Jong In; Choi, Yun Ho; Kwak, Seung Im; Hwang, Han Yull; Chung, Kun Ho; Choi, Geun Sik; Park, Doo Won; Lee, Chang Woo

    2002-01-01

    We develop a ultra-low background gamma ray spectrometer, using active and passive shielding technique at the same time. Cosmic ray induced background is suppressed by means of active shield devices consisting of plastic scintillating plates of 50 mm thick and anti-coincidence electronic system. The shield is made of 150 mm thick walls of very low activity lead, especially 20 mm with activity of -1 and 0.36 s -1 with and without active shield, respectively, on the regions from 50 keV to 3 MeV. The detection efficiency curve has been precisely measured for regions from 80 keV to 2 MeV with a 10 3 ml marinelli beaker sample, made with calibrated mixed-sources consists of 109 Cd, 57 Co, 139 Ce, 203 Hg, 113 Sn, 85 Sr, 137 Cs, 60 Co and 88 Y. The virtues of the method are demonstrated by applying on experiment that requires the lowest detection limit

  6. Prompt gamma-ray activation technique for in-situ analysis of mercury pollution in water

    Khouri, M.C.; Jayanthi, K.A.; Pascholati, P.R.

    1995-01-01

    Industrial and mining pollutants discharged into water are in general distributed homogeneously and we investigated a prompt neutron activation technique for the in-situ analysis, to start with of Hg content in water. The laboratory test employed a 252 Cf neutron source (of ∼ 3 x 10 6 n/s fluence) submerged in a test tank of water of ∼ 500 litres, and to monitor the gamma-ray emission a 4 x 4 NaI (Tl) detector system was employed. In 3000 is time interval trials, for a 46 ppm contamination level of Hg, we observed an excess of counts of ∼ 9.2 σ significance in the energy range of 4000-6500 keV, which can be attributed to the presence of mercury. This test system for a 10 hour monitoring can provide a minimum detectable sensitivity at 4.78 ppm. In the future experiments, we propose to replace the NaI(Tl) detector by a HPGe detector to facilitate simultaneous analyses of pollutants such as cadmium, chlorine, chromium etc for detection at few tenths to tens of ppm levels or better. (author). 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Simultaneous determination of exponential background and Gaussian peak functions in gamma ray scintillation spectrometers by maximum likelihood technique

    Eisler, P.; Youl, S.; Lwin, T.; Nelson, G.

    1983-01-01

    Simultaneous fitting of peaks and background functions from gamma-ray spectrometry using multichannel pulse height analysis is considered. The specific case of Gaussian peak and exponential background is treated in detail with respect to simultaneous estimation of both functions by using a technique which incorporates maximum likelihood method as well as a graphical method. Theoretical expressions for the standard errors of the estimates are also obtained. The technique is demonstrated for two experimental data sets. (orig.)

  8. Single-crystal filters for attenuating epithermal neutrons and gamma rays in reactor beams

    Rustad, B.M.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Bahnsen, A.

    1965-01-01

    Cross section of representative samples of bismuth and quartz were measured at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures over neutron energy range of 0.0007 to 2.0 ev to obtain data for design of single-crystal 32-cm bismuth filters for attenuating fast neutrons and γ-rays in reactor beams; filters may...

  9. De-excitation gamma-ray technique for improved resolution in intermediate energy photonuclear reactions

    Kuzin, A.; Thompson, M.N.; Rassool, R.; Adler, J.O.; Fissum, K.; Issaksson, L.; Ruijter, H.; Schroeder, B.; Annand, J.R.M.; McGeorge, J.C.; Crawford, G.I.; Gregel, J.

    1997-01-01

    The 12 C (γ,p) reaction was studied. The experiment was done at the MAX Laboratory of Lund University, using tagged photons with energy between 50 and 70 MeV and natural carbon targets. It has been possible to detect γ-ray emitted from the residual nucleus, in coincidence with photoprotons leading to the excited residual state. The 200 KeV gamma-ray resolution permitted the identification of the residual states and allowed off-line cuts to be made in order to identify the excitation region in 11 B from what particular de-excitation gamma-ray were seen. 9 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  10. Numerical study on determining formation porosity using a boron capture gamma ray technique and MCNP.

    Liu, Juntao; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Xinguang; Han, Fei; Yuan, Zhelong

    2014-12-01

    Formation porosity can be determined using the boron capture gamma ray counting ratio with a near to far detector in a pulsed neutron-gamma element logging tool. The thermal neutron distribution, boron capture gamma spectroscopy and porosity response for formations with different water salinity and wellbore diameter characteristics were simulated using the Monte Carlo method. We found that a boron lining improves the signal-to-noise ratio and that the boron capture gamma ray counting ratio has a higher sensitivity for determining porosity than total capture gamma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. CLASSIFICATION AND RANKING OF FERMI LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES FROM THE 3FGL CATALOG USING MACHINE LEARNING TECHNIQUES

    Saz Parkinson, P. M. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Xu, H.; Yu, P. L. H. [Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Salvetti, D.; Marelli, M. [INAF—Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133, Milano (Italy); Falcone, A. D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    We apply a number of statistical and machine learning techniques to classify and rank gamma-ray sources from the Third Fermi Large Area Telescope Source Catalog (3FGL), according to their likelihood of falling into the two major classes of gamma-ray emitters: pulsars (PSR) or active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Using 1904 3FGL sources that have been identified/associated with AGNs (1738) and PSR (166), we train (using 70% of our sample) and test (using 30%) our algorithms and find that the best overall accuracy (>96%) is obtained with the Random Forest (RF) technique, while using a logistic regression (LR) algorithm results in only marginally lower accuracy. We apply the same techniques on a subsample of 142 known gamma-ray pulsars to classify them into two major subcategories: young (YNG) and millisecond pulsars (MSP). Once more, the RF algorithm has the best overall accuracy (∼90%), while a boosted LR analysis comes a close second. We apply our two best models (RF and LR) to the entire 3FGL catalog, providing predictions on the likely nature of unassociated sources, including the likely type of pulsar (YNG or MSP). We also use our predictions to shed light on the possible nature of some gamma-ray sources with known associations (e.g., binaries, supernova remnants/pulsar wind nebulae). Finally, we provide a list of plausible X-ray counterparts for some pulsar candidates, obtained using Swift, Chandra, and XMM. The results of our study will be of interest both for in-depth follow-up searches (e.g., pulsar) at various wavelengths and for broader population studies.

  12. CLASSIFICATION AND RANKING OF FERMI LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES FROM THE 3FGL CATALOG USING MACHINE LEARNING TECHNIQUES

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Xu, H.; Yu, P. L. H.; Salvetti, D.; Marelli, M.; Falcone, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    We apply a number of statistical and machine learning techniques to classify and rank gamma-ray sources from the Third Fermi Large Area Telescope Source Catalog (3FGL), according to their likelihood of falling into the two major classes of gamma-ray emitters: pulsars (PSR) or active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Using 1904 3FGL sources that have been identified/associated with AGNs (1738) and PSR (166), we train (using 70% of our sample) and test (using 30%) our algorithms and find that the best overall accuracy (>96%) is obtained with the Random Forest (RF) technique, while using a logistic regression (LR) algorithm results in only marginally lower accuracy. We apply the same techniques on a subsample of 142 known gamma-ray pulsars to classify them into two major subcategories: young (YNG) and millisecond pulsars (MSP). Once more, the RF algorithm has the best overall accuracy (∼90%), while a boosted LR analysis comes a close second. We apply our two best models (RF and LR) to the entire 3FGL catalog, providing predictions on the likely nature of unassociated sources, including the likely type of pulsar (YNG or MSP). We also use our predictions to shed light on the possible nature of some gamma-ray sources with known associations (e.g., binaries, supernova remnants/pulsar wind nebulae). Finally, we provide a list of plausible X-ray counterparts for some pulsar candidates, obtained using Swift, Chandra, and XMM. The results of our study will be of interest both for in-depth follow-up searches (e.g., pulsar) at various wavelengths and for broader population studies

  13. Elemental analysis of water and soil environmental samples in Tabuk area by neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy techniques

    Al-Aseery, Sh.M.; Alamoudi, Z.; Hassan, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The prompt and delayed gamma-rays due to neutron capture in the nuclei of the constituent elements of three soil samples and one drinking water sample have been measured. The 252 Cf and 226 Ra/Be isotopic neutron sources are used for neutron irradiation. Also, the hyper pure germanium detection system is used. The soil samples were from Astra, Tadco and El-Gammaz farms, while the water sample was taken from Tabuk city. In case of prompt gamma-ray analysis, a total of 16 elements were identified and the concentration percentage values by weight were calculated for: C, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Cl,, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Zn, Sr ad Pb elements. A comparative study between the results obtained in this work and the results obtained by ICP-MS and EDX-Ray techniques for the same samples is given

  14. Measurement of exposure buildup factors: The influence of scattered photons on gamma-ray attenuation coefficients

    Mann, Kulwinder Singh

    2018-01-01

    Scattered photon's influence on measured values of attenuation coefficients (μm, cm2g-1) for six low-Z (effective atomic number) building materials, at three photon energies has been estimated. Narrow-beam transmission geometry has been used for the measurements. Samples of commonly used engineering materials (Cements, Clay, Lime-Stone, Plaster of Paris) have been selected for the present study. Standard radioactive sources Cs137 and Co60 have been used for obtaining γ-ray energies 661.66, 1173.24 and 1332.50 keV. The optical thickness (OT) of 0.5 mfp (mean free path) has been found the optimum optical thickness (OOT) for μm-measurement in the selected energy range (661.66-1332.50 keV). The aim of this investigation is to provide neglected information regarding subsistence of scattered photons in narrow beam geometry measurements for low-Z materials. The measurements have been performed for a wide range of sample-thickness (2-26 cm) such that their OT varies between 0.2-3.5 mfp in selected energy range. A computer program (GRIC2-toolkit) has been used for various theoretical computations required in this investigation. It has been concluded that in selected energy-range, good accuracy in μm-measurement of low-Z materials can be achieved by keeping their sample's OT below 0.5 mfp. The exposure buildup factors have been measured with the help of mathematical-model developed in this investigation.

  15. Validation of mathematical models to describe fluid dynamics of a cold riser by gamma ray attenuation

    Melo, Ana Cristina Bezerra Azedo de

    2004-12-01

    The fluid dynamic behavior of a riser in a cold type FCC model was investigated by means of catalyst concentration distribution measured with gamma attenuation and simulated with a mathematical model. In the riser of the cold model, MEF, 0,032 m in diameter, 2,30 m in length the fluidized bed, whose components are air and FCC catalyst, circulates. The MEF is operated by automatic control and instruments for measuring fluid dynamic variables. An axial catalyst concentration distribution was measured using an Am-241 gamma source and a NaI detector coupled to a multichannel provided with a software for data acquisition and evaluation. The MEF was adapted for a fluid dynamic model validation which describes the flow in the riser, for example, by introducing an injector for controlling the solid flow in circulation. Mathematical models were selected from literature, analyzed and tested to simulate the fluid dynamic of the riser. A methodology for validating fluid dynamic models was studied and implemented. The stages of the work were developed according to the validation methodology, such as data planning experiments, study of the equations which describe the fluidodynamic, computational solvers application and comparison with experimental data. Operational sequences were carried out keeping the MEF conditions for measuring catalyst concentration and simultaneously measuring the fluid dynamic variables, velocity of the components and pressure drop in the riser. Following this, simulated and experimental values were compared and statistical data treatment done, aiming at the required precision to validate the fluid dynamic model. The comparison tests between experimental and simulated data were carried out under validation criteria. The fluid dynamic behavior of the riser was analyzed and the results and the agreement with literature were discussed. The adopt model was validated under the MEF operational conditions, for a 3 to 6 m/s gas velocity in the riser and a slip

  16. Development of a technique for the on line determination of uranium in solution by gamma ray spectroscopy

    Singh, Sarabjit; Ramaswami, A.; Gill, Jatinder Singh

    2005-02-01

    A technique based on gamma ray spectrometry has been developed for the continuous monitoring of uranium in the solution form. Simulated container and support system was designed and fabricated for the development of an efficiency calibration curve and to find the detection limit for the estimation of uranium using 185.7 keV ( 235 U) gamma ray. The system was calibrated for its counting efficiency using HPGe detector system, in a standard source mount to detector geometry. The sensitivity of the detection system and counting time for low-level estimation of uranium has also been established. The detection limit of the monitor is ∼10 mg of uranium per litre of the solution. In order to correct for the density variation of the solution experiment was carried to study the variation of count rate of 185.7 ke V gamma ray of 235 U as a function of the density of the solution. This report gives the details of the development of a continuous monitor for the determination of uranium in the solution streams. (author)

  17. Extragalactic background light from hierarchical galaxy formation. Gamma-ray attenuation up to the epoch of cosmic reionization and the first stars

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; Inoue, Susumu [Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Inst. for Cosmic Ray Research; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R. [Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan). Research Center for Space and Cosmic Evolution; Makiya, Ryu [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Astronomy; Niino, Yuu [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka (Tokyo). Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division; Totani, Tomonori [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Astronomy

    2013-04-26

    Here, we present a new model of the extragalactic background light (EBL) and corresponding γγ opacity for intergalactic gamma-ray absorption from z = 0 up to z = 10, based on a semi-analytical model of hierarchical galaxy formation that reproduces key observed properties of galaxies at various redshifts. Including the potential contribution from Population III stars and following the cosmic reionization history in a simplified way, the model is also broadly consistent with available data concerning reionization, particularly the Thomson scattering optical depth constraints from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). In comparison with previous EBL studies up to z ~ 3-5, our predicted γγ opacity is in general agreement for observed gamma-ray energy below 400/(1 + z) GeV, whereas it is a factor of ~2 lower above this energy because of a correspondingly lower cosmic star formation rate, even though the observed ultraviolet (UV) luminosity is well reproduced by virtue of our improved treatment of dust obscuration and direct estimation of star formation rate. Moreover, the horizon energy at which the gamma-ray opacity is unity does not evolve strongly beyond z ~ 4 and approaches ~20 GeV. The contribution of Population III stars is a minor fraction of the EBL at z = 0, and is also difficult to distinguish through gamma-ray absorption in high-z objects, even at the highest levels allowed by the WMAP constraints. Nevertheless, the attenuation due to Population II stars should be observable in high-z gamma-ray sources by telescopes such as Fermi or the Cherenkov Telescope Array and provide a valuable probe of the evolving EBL in the rest-frame UV. Our detailed results of our model are publicly available in numerical form at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/~yinoue/Download.html.

  18. The characterisation of Melanesian obsidian sources and artefacts using the proton induced gamma-ray emission (PIGME) technique

    Bird, J.R.; Ambrose, W.R.; Russell, L.H.; Scott, M.D.

    1981-09-01

    Proton induced gamma-ray emission (PIGME) has been used to determine F, Na and Al concentrations in obsidian from known locations in Melanesia and to relate artefacts from this region to such sources. The PIGME technique is a fast, non-destructive, and accurate method for determining these three elements with essentially no special sample preparation. The measuring technique is described and results are listed for sources, chiefly in the Papua New Guinea region. Their classification is discussed in terms of groups which are distinguishable by the PIGME method. Over 700 artefact results are listed; these show the occurrence of an additional group that is not geographically identified

  19. Gamma-ray spectrometry combined with acceptable knowledge (GSAK). A technique for characterization of certain remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes. Part 1. Methodology and techniques

    Hartwell, J.K.; McIlwain, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometry combined with acceptable knowledge (GSAK) is a technique for the characterization of certain remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes. GSAK uses gamma-ray spectrometry to quantify a portion of the fission product inventory of RH-TRU wastes. These fission product results are then coupled with calculated inventories derived from acceptable process knowledge to characterize the radionuclide content of the assayed wastes. GSAK has been evaluated and tested through several test exercises. GSAK approach is described, while test results are presented in Part II. (author)

  20. The measurement of moisture content and dry bulk-density of the top layer of agricultural soils, with minimum calibration, using a gamma-ray attenuation method

    Van der Westhuizen, M.; Van der Bank, D.J.; Meulke, M.

    1978-06-01

    Various methods of measuring moisture content and dry bulk-density of soil by means of gamma-ray attenuation are discussed. A new method is described in which the same parameters can be measured in consecutive determinations, but for which only one sample of unknown volume is needed for calibration. This method employs a radioactive source in a lead container in an aluminium tube in the soil. From the container the gamma rays follow a path at an angle upwards through the soil towards the detector. The method was tested in a number of experiments and the results are given in tables and graphs. The conclusion is that this method, which is fairly easy and quick to use, is accurate enough for most applications [af

  1. The GILDA mission: a new technique for a gamma-ray telescope in the energy range 20 MeV-100 GeV

    Barbiellini, G.; Candusso, M.; Pascale, M.P. de; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Vacchi, A.

    1995-01-01

    In this article a new technique for the realization of a high energy gamma-ray telescope is presented, based on the adoption of silicon strip detectors and lead scintillating fibers. The simulated performances of such an instrument (GILDA) are significatively better than those of EGRET, the last successful experiment of a high energy gamma-ray telescope, launched on the CGRO satellite, though having less volume and weight. ((orig.))

  2. BLINDAGE: A neutron and gamma-ray transport code for shieldings with the removal-diffusion technique coupled with the point-kernel technique

    Fanaro, L.C.C.B.

    1984-01-01

    It was developed the BLINDAGE computer code for the radiation transport (neutrons and gammas) calculation. The code uses the removal - diffusion method for neutron transport and point-kernel technique with buil-up factors for gamma-rays. The results obtained through BLINDAGE code are compared with those obtained with the ANISN and SABINE computer codes. (Author) [pt

  3. The application of computer technique in routine neutron activation analysis using high resolution gamma ray spectrometry

    Szopa, Z.; Plejewska, M.; Staszelis, J.

    1982-01-01

    A full system of four computer programs for routine - qualitative and quantitative - neutron activation analysis (NAA) using high resolution gamma ray-spectrometry had been elaborated. The structure and possibilities of the ''data flow'' programs i.e. programs DIDPDP and DIDCDC, dedicated for fast and reliable ''off line'' data transfer between the buffer memory of the spectrometric line (9-track magnetic tape) and the fast access memory (disc) of the used computers PDP-11/45 and CYBER-73 had been presented. The structure and organization of the ''data processing'' programs i.e. programs SAWAPS and MAZYG had been presented as well. The utility and reliability of these programs in the case of the large-scale, routine NAA, exampled by analysis of filters with air polutants, had been tested and discussed. Programs are written mainly in FORTRAN. (author)

  4. Study of variance and covariance terms in linear attenuation coefficient measurements of irregular samples through the two media method by gamma-ray transmission

    Kuramoto, R.Y.R.Renato Yoichi Ribeiro.; Appoloni, Carlos Roberto

    2002-01-01

    The two media method permits the application of Beer's law (Thesis (Master Degree), Universidade Estadual de Londrina, PR, Brazil, pp. 23) for the linear attenuation coefficient determination of irregular thickness samples by gamma-ray transmission. However, the use of this methodology introduces experimental complexity due to the great number of variables to be measured. As consequence of this complexity, the uncertainties associated with each of these variables may be correlated. In this paper, we examine the covariance terms in the uncertainty propagation, and quantify the correlation among the uncertainties of each of the variables in question

  5. Gamma ray generator

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  6. Neutron and gamma-ray transmission technique for the on-line determination of moisture in coal and coke

    Sowerby, B.D.; Millen, M.J.; Rafter, P.T.

    1985-01-01

    A fast neutron and gamma-ray transmission technique is being developed for the on-line analysis of moisture in coal and coke. The technique utilises 252 Cf and 137 Cs sources and 3 He and NaI(Tl) detectors. Laboratory measurements on single coal samples have shown that moisture can be determined to better than 1 wt% over the range 0 to 16 wt% moisture and 5 to 17cm thickness. Reduced errors were obtained for restricted ranges of moisture and thickness. Preliminary measurements on coke of thickness 30 to 50cm have shown that moisture can be determined to within 0.26 wt% over the range 1 to 16 wt% moisture

  7. A technique for combining neutron and gamma-ray data into a single assay value

    Pickrell, M.M.; Mercer, D.; Sharpe, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    The authors explored the potentials of using both neutron and gamma-ray measurements on a single item and combining these data into a single assay value. The purpose was to improve assay capability for sample matrices that are difficult to measure. They chose an empirical approach because they wanted to address difficult-to-measure items for which the assay problem is complex. They used the tomographic gamma scanner; a passive, high-efficiency neutron counter with add-a-source and multiplicity; and an active neutron, californium shuffler to obtain measurements. Twenty-four 200-L drums were measured with various matrices using all three machines. The matrices were chosen specifically to spain the difficult-to-measure assay problems for some or all of the instruments. For example, the authors measured a drum filled with concrete and another filled with metal. The data from these measurements were analyzed using the alternating conditional expectation algorithm, which is one of a class of generalized additive models. Other data fusion algorithms are also possible and are being explored. The intent was to find ways to combine the data that would reduce the matrix-induced measurement error

  8. Gamma-ray spectrometry combined with acceptable knowledge (GSAK). A technique for characterization of certain remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes. Part 2. Testing and results

    Hartwell, J.K.; McIlwain, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometry combined with acceptable knowledge (GSAK) is a technique for the characterization of certain remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes. GSAK uses gamma-ray spectrometry to quantify a portion of the fission product inventory of RH-TRU wastes. These fission product results are then coupled with calculated inventories derived from acceptable process knowledge to characterize the radionuclide content of the assayed wastes. GSAK has been evaluated and tested through several test exercises. These tests and their results are described; while the former paper in this issue presents the methodology, equipment and techniques. (author)

  9. Determination of plutonium isotopic abundances by gamma-ray spectrometry. Interim report on the status of methods and techniques developed by the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    Gunnink, R.

    1980-03-01

    This report presents an overview of methods and techniques developed by the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for determining plutonium isotopic abundances from gamma-ray spectra that have been measured with germanium detectors. The methodology of fitting the spectral features includes discussions of algorithms for gamma-ray and x-ray peak shape fitting and generation of response spectra profiles characteristic of specific isotopes. Applications of the techniques developed at government, commercial, and Japanese reprocessing plants are described. Current development of the methodology for the nondestructive analysis of samples containing nondescript solid materials is also presented

  10. Moisture profile measurements of concrete samples in vertical flow by gamma ray attenuation method. Medidas do perfil de umidade de amostras de concreto em infiltracao vertical, atraves da atenuacao de raios gama

    Appoloni, C R; Nardocci, A C; Obuti, M M [Universidade Estadual de Londrina, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    1988-04-01

    This work deals with the study of the water diffusion in concrete by the gamma ray attenuation method. The moisture profiles, [theta] (z,t), of the vertical water flow were determined in concrete samples of different trace and porosity. The data were taken with a vertical and horizontal measurement table, a [sup 60] Co gamma ray source, a NaI (T) scintillation detector and the standard gamma ray spectrometry electronic. The [theta] (z,t) data analysis is presented using a phenomenological model of the moisture profile temporal evolution in heterogeneous materials. Two other models, Cell and Sandwich, were also applied to determine the attenuation coefficient of a non-homogeneous media from the attenuation coefficients of the components, taking into account particles-size effects. (author).

  11. Use of the gamma-ray absorption technique as a quality control procedure in the manufacture of powder metal shaped charge liners

    Lawrie, JJ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of the gamma-ray absorption technique as a tool in evaluating the quality of manufactured powder metal liners was investigated. With powder metal liners, it is not only of interest to know whether the liner conforms geometrically...

  12. Precise Void Fraction Measurement in Two-phase Flows Independent of the Flow Regime Using Gamma-ray Attenuation

    E. Nazemi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Void fraction is an important parameter in the oil industry. This quantity is necessary for volume rate measurement in multiphase flows. In this study, the void fraction percentage was estimated precisely, independent of the flow regime in gas–liquid two-phase flows by using γ-ray attenuation and a multilayer perceptron neural network. In all previous studies that implemented a multibeam γ-ray attenuation technique to determine void fraction independent of the flow regime in two-phase flows, three or more detectors were used while in this study just two NaI detectors were used. Using fewer detectors is of advantage in industrial nuclear gauges because of reduced expense and improved simplicity. In this work, an artificial neural network is also implemented to predict the void fraction percentage independent of the flow regime. To do this, a multilayer perceptron neural network is used for developing the artificial neural network model in MATLAB. The required data for training and testing the network in three different regimes (annular, stratified, and bubbly were obtained using an experimental setup. Using the technique developed in this work, void fraction percentages were predicted with mean relative error of <1.4%.

  13. Neutron induced prompt gamma-ray technique for investigation the moisture and soluble salt problem in the historical building

    Lahasen Norman Shah Dahing; Ismail Mustapha; Jaafar Abdullah; Susan Maria Sipaun

    2006-01-01

    The degradation of some building materials such as brick and mortar is a major problem for the preservation of monuments or historic structures, especially where it is desirable to preserve the original fabric of the building. Such degradation often arises from the presence of contaminants in the constituent materials. In building materials, water is a major course of deterioration, both by acting as a solvent for various building materials components and by exerting stresses on the structure during thermal cycle. The soluble salts, notably chlorides, damage the structure either by periodically dissolving and recrystallising within the pores or by promoting corrosion. Knowledge of the presence and distribution of contaminants is needed for effective treatment and preservation. However, most of techniques have been use to evaluate the deterioration of historic building and structure is generally limited to visual observation and destructive tests of core samples. Some non-destructive testing (NDT) methods like electrical conductivity technique and ultrasonic testing, can identify cracks and voids, but cannot provide any information on the possible causes of these problems. To overcome this limitation, a new method, called n eutron-induced prompt gamma-ray technique (NIPGAT) has being developed at MINT for preservation of monuments and historic buildings. This method is useful for analytical techniques for identification both qualitative and quantitative multi-element analysis of major, minor and trace element of present in the sample. For many elements and applications, this technique offers high sensitivity, accuracy and reliability compare to other conventional method. (Author)

  14. The History of Ground-Based Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Astrophysics with the Atmospheric Air Cherenkov Telescope Technique

    Mirzoyan, Razmik

    2013-06-15

    In the recent two decades the ground-based technique of imaging atmosphericescopes has established itself as a powerful new discipline in science. As of today some ∼ 150 sources of gamma rays of very different types, of both galactic and extragalactic origin, have been discovered due to this technique. The study of these sources is providing clues to many basic questions in astrophysics, astro-particle physics, physics of cosmic rays and cosmology. The current generation of telescopes, despite the young age of the technique, offers a solid performance. The technique is still maturing, leading to the next generation large instrument known under the name Cherenkov Telescope Array. The latter's sensitivity will be an order of magnitude higher than that of the currently best instruments VERITAS, H.E.S.S. and MAGIC. This article is devoted to outlining the milestones in a long history that step-by-step have given shape to this technique and have brought about today's successful source marathon.

  15. Recent developments in airborne gamma ray surveying

    Grasty, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    Standardized procedures have been developed for converting airborne gamma ray measurements to ground concentrations of potassium, uranium and thorium. These procedures make use of an airborne calibration range whose ground concentrations should be measured with a calibrated portable spectrometer rather than by taking geochemical samples. Airborne sensitivities and height attenuation coefficients are normally determined from flights over the calibration range but may not be applicable in mountainous areas. Mathematical techniques have been now developed to reduce statistical noise in the airborne measurements by utilizing up to 256 channels of spectral information. (author)

  16. Rapid quality control for coal seams by gamma ray transmission technique

    Raja-Sekhar, N; Nageswara-Rao, A S

    1999-01-01

    The quality of coal expressed as useful heat value (UHV) depends on various parameters such as fixed carbon, volatiles, ash and moisture. These factors have been assessed and the detailed dependence of UHV on these parameters has been studied for samples of coal from a local mine. The samples were subjected to collimated low energy gamma beams and correlation was obtained between the attenuation coefficient and UHV. The method is reliable, fast and non-destructive and can be used in the field for estimating UHV.

  17. A correlation-based pulse detection technique for gamma-ray/neutron detectors

    Faisal, Muhammad; Schiffer, Randolph T.; Flaska, Marek; Pozzi, Sara A.; Wentzloff, David D.

    2011-01-01

    We present a correlation-based detection technique that significantly improves the probability of detection for low energy pulses. We propose performing a normalized cross-correlation of the incoming pulse data to a predefined pulse template, and using a threshold correlation value to trigger the detection of a pulse. This technique improves the detector sensitivity by amplifying the signal component of incoming pulse data and rejecting noise. Simulation results for various different templates are presented. Finally, the performance of the correlation-based detection technique is compared to the current state-of-the-art techniques.

  18. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometry

    Hovgaard, Jens

    A new method - Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition, NASVD - for processing gamma-ray spectra has been developed as part of a Ph.D. project. By using this technique one is able to decompose a large set of data - for example from airborne gamma-ray surveys - into a few spectral components....... By knowing the spectral components and their amplitudes in each of the measured spectra one is able to extract more information from the data than possible with the methods used otherwise....

  19. Gamma-ray Imaging Methods

    Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Valentine, J; Wright, D

    2006-10-05

    In this document we discuss specific implementations for gamma-ray imaging instruments including the principle of operation and describe systems which have been built and demonstrated as well as systems currently under development. There are several fundamentally different technologies each with specific operational requirements and performance trade offs. We provide an overview of the different gamma-ray imaging techniques and briefly discuss challenges and limitations associated with each modality (in the appendix we give detailed descriptions of specific implementations for many of these technologies). In Section 3 we summarize the performance and operational aspects in tabular form as an aid for comparing technologies and mapping technologies to potential applications.

  20. Gamma ray astronomy

    Fichtel, C.E.

    1975-01-01

    The first certain detection of celestial high energy gamma rays came from a satellite experiment flown on the third Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO-111). A Gamma ray spark chamber telescope with substantively greater sensitivity and angular resolution (a few degrees) flown on the second Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-II) has now provided a better picture of the gamma ray sky, and particularly the galactic plane and pulsars. This paper will summarize the present picture of gamma ray astronomy as it has developed at this conference from measurements made with experiments carried out on balloons, those remaining on the ground, and ones flown on satellites. (orig.) [de

  1. Effects of Shielding on Gamma Rays

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-13

    The interaction of gamma rays with matter results in an effect we call attenuation (i.e. ‘shielding’). Attenuation can dramatically alter the appearance of a spectrum. Attenuating materials may actually create features in a spectrum via x-ray fluorescence

  2. Effect of Steel Fiber Addition on Mechanical Properties and gamma-Ray Attenuation for Ordinary Concrete Used in El-Gabal El-Akhdar Area in Libya for Radiation Shielding Purposes

    Ikraiam, F.A.; Ali, J.M.; Abd El-Latif, A.; Abd ELazziz, A.

    2009-01-01

    This work deals with the study of ordinary concrete reinforced with steel fibers where the concrete was prepared from limestone ores as coarse aggregate, and sand as fine aggregate, in El-Gabal El-Akhdar in Libya in order to study some mechanical properties and gamma ray attenuation. For mechanical properties, compressive and tensile strengths have been studied, where tensile strength improved by a factor 1.189 at 3% steel fiber content in comparison with reference sample (0%), whereas the compressive strength improved by a factor of 1.012 at 1% steel fiber content. In relation to the concrete density, it is found that the optimum density was 2.217g/cm3 at 3% where the factor of improvement was 1.1. For gamma ray attenuation, the measurements have been obtained by a collimated beam of gamma ray from sources 60 Co, 22 Na and 137 Cs using a gamma ray spectrometer MCA cassy with inorganic scintillator Na(Tl). The total linear attenuation coefficient (μ cm - 1), mean free path length (λ), HVT (τ1/2) and TVT (τ1/10) are all evaluated in this study. The study reveals that concrete sample with 3% steel fiber content has the optimum values of all these nuclear parameters

  3. On-line nuclear ash gauge for coal based on gamma-ray transmission techniques

    Rizk, R.A.M.; El-Kateb, A.H.; Abdul-Kader, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Developments and applications of on-line nuclear gauges in the coal industry are highly requested. A nuclear ash gauge for coal, based on γ-ray transmission techniques is developed. Single and dual energy γ-ray beams are used to determine the ash content of coal. The percentage ash content as a function of the γ-ray intensities transmitted through coal samples is measured and sensitivity curves are obtained. An empirical formulation relating the ash content values to the γ-ray intensities is derived. Preliminary results show that both single and dual energy γ-ray transmission techniques can be used to give a rapid on-line estimation of the ash concentration values in coal with low cost and reasonable accuracy, but the dual one is much preferable. (author)

  4. Fast neutron and gamma-ray transmission technique in mixed samples. MCNP calculations

    Perez, N.; Padron, I.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the moisture in sand and also the sulfur content in toluene have been described by using the simultaneous fast neutron/gamma transmission technique (FNGT). Monte Carlo calculations show that it is possible to apply this technique with accelerator-based and isotopic neutron sources in the on-line analysis to perform the product quality control, specifically in the building materials industry and the petroleum one. It has been used particles from a 14MeV neutron generator and also from an Am-Be neutron source. The estimation of optimal system parameters like the efficiency, detection time, hazards and costs were performed in order to compare both neutron sources

  5. Characterization of Amylopectin irradiated by gamma rays using viscosity and radius gyration technique

    Ku Sarah Syahidah Ku Muhamad

    2012-01-01

    Food irradiation is one of the most applicable methods that have been used in food industry especially to preserve food. Besides preservation of food, irradiation can also reduce microorganism, inhibit budding and others. However, this method can be misused by some irresponsible organization or person such as irradiate the food over the dose limit value. Therefore, the detection method is important to detect any misused in irradiation method. The objective of this research is to identify any changes in the structure of amylopectin by using radius gyration technique. Besides that, the viscosity of the sample is also determined by using Rheometer. The last objective of this research is to find a relationship between radius gyration and irradiation dose can be determined. Amylopectin and cassava powder were the sample in this research. The samples were irradiated in the gamma-cell at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, and 10.0 kGy doses. 0 kGy were the controlled sample. The sample were made into gel to analysed using Rheometer and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). The viscosity of the sample were analysed by using Rheometer while the radius gyration of the sample were analysed by using SAXS. Hence, the result of this experiment is, the viscosity of amylopectin reduces as the doses increases. But, at 10 kGy, the viscosity of the cassava starch was increased significantly. For the SAXS analysis, it is shows that the graph for amylopectin were fluctuates. While, for cassava starch the radius gyration increases with doses. Hence, the rheometer technique is suitable to be develop as a detection method in food irradiation. Further research should be done to improve the detection technique in food irradiation. (author)

  6. An advanced technique of the search for the stimulated gamma-ray emission

    Strilchuk, N.V.; Kirischuk, V.I.

    1999-01-01

    An experiment which is not based on the assumption that the stimulating and stimulated photons are time-coincident, is proposed. The idea is to compare, for the source in the form of a long filament, the number of simple pulses, corresponding to the isomeric transition energy, counted in the axial direction with the number seen off-axis by the same detector. It is interesting that if the stimulating and stimulated photons are time-coincident, such techniques has essential advantages as well. (authors)

  7. Study of water permeability in concrete by neutron and gamma-ray techniques

    Abd El-Monem, A.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    water infiltration in various building materials , namely concrete used for buildings basement and underwater construction is the main concern of the studies performed in this thesis. The studies aim to develop a nuclear techniques for investigation a concrete mixes with different additives capable to decrease concrete porosity and intern resist water propagation inside concrete materials without any deterioration of concrete physical and mechanical properties . These issues were achieved through the preparation of ordinary concrete mixes with different percentages of silica fume. Concrete samples of different shape and geometries were made to study water diffusion when the concrete samples are submerged in water for different periods of time. The concrete samples were first sealed by molten asphalt from all sides expect two opposite faces to ensure water migration only along one direction. Water infiltration in concrete samples with different percentages of silica fume and submerged in tap and seawater for different periods of time was studied by neutrons and gamma techniques. Also, water propagation in mortar samples with different percentages of silica fume was studied by electrical methods based on measuring the variation in electrical conductivity of these samples.

  8. Gamma-ray astronomy by the air shower technique: performance and perspectives

    Cronin, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    The techniques for γ-ray astronomy at energies ≥10 TeV using air shower detectors are discussed. The results, based on a number of large arrays, are negative, with no point sources being identified. While the contributions to γ-ray astronomy so far have been only upper limits, these arrays in the future will make significant progress in the understanding of cosmic rays in the energy range 10 13 eV to 10 16 eV. Also, contributions to solar physics are being made by observations of shape and time dependence of the shadow of the Sun as observed in cosmic rays. For the advancement of γ-ray astronomy a greater sensitivity is required in the energy region of 10 TeV. A number of promising techniques to accomplish a greater sensitivity are discussed. They include the enlargement of the Tibet array at 4300 meters altitude, the array of open photomultipliers at La Palma (AIROBICC), which views the shower by the Cherenkov photons produced in the atmosphere, and the instrumentation of a pond at Los Alamos with photomultipliers (Milagro)

  9. Gamma-ray sources

    Hermsen, W.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented from an analysis of the celestial gamma-ray fine-scale structure based on over half of the data which may ultimately be available from the COS-B satellite. A catalogue consisting of 25 gamma-ray sources measured at energies above 100 MeV is presented. (Auth.)

  10. Gamma ray astronomy

    Hillier, R.

    1984-01-01

    The book reviews the development of gamma ray astronomy over the past twenty five years. A large section of the book is devoted to the problems of background radiation and the design of detectors. Gamma rays from the sun, the galactic disc, the galaxy, and extra galactic sources; are also discussed. (U.K.)

  11. Simultaneous determination of soil density and moisture by gamma ray attenuation from Cs137 and Am241

    Barros Ferraz, E.S. de.

    1974-09-01

    The method of simultaneous bulk density and soil moisture determination by attenuation of 241 Am and 137 Cs gamma-radiation is introduced and studied with details. Theoretical considerations are made about the attenuation process in the absorbers, the form of solving the problem of two unknowns; the sensitivity of the method; the influences of the resolution time of the electronic counting equipment, and of the compton scattering in the sample. From the methodological point of view studies are made about the influence of the geometry, adjustment of counting system, choice of radiation sources, attenuation coeficients and the manner of obtaining reliable measurements. It is also presented some applications of the method, its use in soil-water movement studies, in soil profile compaction studies, and specially in swelling soils

  12. Gamma-ray attenuation coefficients in some heavy metal oxide borate glasses at 662 keV

    Khanna, A.; Bhatti, S.S.; Singh, K.J.; Thind, K.S.

    1996-01-01

    The linear attenuation coefficient (μ) and mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of glasses in three systems: xPbO(1-x)B 2 O 3 , 0.25PbO.xCdO(0.75-x)B 2 O 3 and xBi 2 O 3 (1-x)B 2 O 3 were measured at 662 keV. Appreciable variations were noted in the attenuation coefficients due to changes in the chemical composition of glasses. In addition to this, absorption cross-sections per atom were also calculated. A comparison of shielding properties of these glasses with standar d shielding materials like lead, lead glass and concrete has proven that these glasses have a potential application as transparent radiation shielding. (orig.)

  13. Making of attenuation-correcting computation table for RIs and emitted gamma ray table using MS-Excel

    Miura, Shigeyuki; Takahashi, Mitsuyuki; Sato, Isamu

    1995-01-01

    In the technical workshop of National Institute for Fusion Science in the last year, report was made on the making of attenuation-correcting computation table for R/S by using the software Lotus 1-2-3 on MS-DOS. It was decided to use this table by applying Windows, and further, to partially add some functions to this table. Excel 5.0 was to be used as the software, since Excel seems to be the main of Windows. It was decided to make anew the γ-ray data table which is linked to the radioactivity data in the RI attenuation-correcting computation table. First work is to convert the RI attenuation-correcting computation table made as the file of Lotus 1-2-3 to the file of Excel 5.0 of Windows, and this is very simple. As the result of the file conversion, it was found that the data file became compact. Next work is the addition of functions to this table. The function being added this time is that for judging whether R/S are those which are stipulated in the laws or not from the values of radioactivity calculated by the attenuation correction. The concrete method of this addition of function is explained. The data table on the γ-ray for respective nuclides was made. The present state of the data base on radiation was investigated. (K.I.)

  14. Plutonium isotopic measurements by gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Haas, F.X.; Lemming, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    A nondestructive technique is described for calculating plutonium-238, plutonium-240, plutonium-241 and americium-241 relative to plutonium-239 from measured peak areas in the high resolution gamma-ray spectra of solid plutonium samples. Gamma-ray attenuation effects were minimized by selecting sets of neighboring peaks in the spectrum whose components are due to the different isotopes. Since the detector efficiencies are approximately the same for adjacent peaks, the accuracy of the isotopic ratios is dependent on the half-lives, branching intensities, and measured peak areas. The data presented describe the results obtained by analyzing gamma-ray spectra in the energy region from 120 to 700 keV. Most of the data analyzed were obtained from plutonium material containing 6 percent plutonium-240. Sample weights varied from 0.25 g to approximately 1.2 kg. The methods were also applied to plutonium samples containing up to 23 percent plutonium-240 with weights of 0.25 to 200 g. Results obtained by gamma-ray spectroscopy are compared to chemical analyses of aliquots taken from the bulk samples

  15. Application of full spectrum analysis technique for NaI(TI) based gamma ray spectral monitoring system

    Pant, Amar D.; Verma, Amit K.; Narayani, K.; Anilkumar, S.; Singh, Rajvir

    2016-01-01

    NaI(Tl) is commonly used for the gamma spectrometry analysis in laboratories. It continues to be the first choice for gamma spectrometry in many applications even today. Many gamma spectrometric methods are developed to experimentally determine activity of radionuclides in samples. Detectors used worldwide for gamma radiation monitoring are either GM based or scintillator based detector based on count rate. For radiation early warning systems radionuclide specific radiation monitoring methodology is required i.e. gamma ray spectrometry based environmental monitoring system. A computer program has been developed for gamma spectral monitoring by the use of full spectrum analysis (FSA). In this measured spectra are fitted using individual spectral components by least square fitting (LSF). The method is found very useful in situations, where radionuclide specific environmental radiation monitoring is required. The paper describes the details of the FSA procedure for the on line acquisition and analysis of gamma ray spectra from Nal(Tl) detectors

  16. Effect of sample thickness on the measured mass attenuation coefficients of some compounds and elements for 59.54, 661.6 and 1332.5 keV gamma-rays

    El-Rahman, M A; Abdel-Hady, Y L; Kamel, N

    2000-01-01

    Measurements have been made to determine gamma-rays attenuation coefficients very accurately by using an extremely narrow-collimated-beam transmission method. The effect of the sample thickness on the measured values of the mass attenuation coefficients (mu/rho) cm sup 2 /g of perspex, bakelite, paraffin, Al, Cu, Pb and Hg have been investigated at three different gamma-ray energies (59.54, 661.6 and 1332.5 keV). It is seen that for these chosen materials (mu/rho) remains constant in good agreement with the theoretical values up to 3 mean free paths and after that (mu/rho) values for Cu, Pb and Hg decrease with further increase in the absorber thickness. This result may be attributed to the increase in the number of coherent small-angle scattering photons which reach the detector.

  17. Comparison of Monte Carlo simulation of gamma ray attenuation coefficients of amino acids with XCOM program and experimental data

    Elbashir, B. O.; Dong, M. G.; Sayyed, M. I.; Issa, Shams A. M.; Matori, K. A.; Zaid, M. H. M.

    2018-06-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ), effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and electron densities (Ne) of some amino acids obtained experimentally by the other researchers have been calculated using MCNP5 simulations in the energy range 0.122-1.330 MeV. The simulated values of μ/ρ, Zeff, and Ne were compared with the previous experimental work for the amino acids samples and a good agreement was noticed. Moreover, the values of mean free path (MFP) for the samples were calculated using MCNP5 program and compared with the theoretical results obtained by XCOM. The investigation of μ/ρ, Zeff, Ne and MFP values of amino acids using MCNP5 simulations at various photon energies when compared with the XCOM values and previous experimental data for the amino acids samples revealed that MCNP5 code provides accurate photon interaction parameters for amino acids.

  18. 'Dip-sticks' calibration handles self-attenuation and coincidence effects in large-volume gamma-ray spectrometry

    Wolterbeek, H T

    2000-01-01

    Routine gamma-spectrometric analyses of samples with low-level activities (e.g. food, water, environmental and industrial samples) are often performed in large samples, placed close to the detector. In these geometries, detection sensitivity is improved but large errors are introduced due to self-attenuation and coincidence summing. Current approaches to these problems comprise computational methods and spiked standard materials. However, the first are often regarded as too complex for practical routine use, the latter never fully match real samples. In the present study, we introduce a dip-sticks calibration as a fast and easy practical solution to this quantification problem in a routine analytical setting. In the proposed set-up, calibrations are performed within the sample itself, thus making it a broadly accessible matching-reference approach, which is principally usable for all sample matrices.

  19. Evaluation of the particle size of aggregates used in high density micro-concretes on the gamma-ray linear attenuation coefficient

    Andrello, Avacir Casanova; Albuquerque, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Full text: When a component for protecting against ionizing radiation is designed, the main aim to be accomplished is to attenuate radiations to acceptable values, within tolerable limits. Several materials and arrangements can be utilized as protection, among which we can name concrete, steel, lead plates and mortars. Where low-energy radiations (some dozens of keVs) are involved, the main interaction between radiation and the material is the photoelectric effect, whose radiation absorption depends on the photon and specific atomic number of the absorbent. High-density concretes are made by mixing several materials, and the granulometric mixture and proportion of these will determine the physical and chemical features of the product. When the aim is to develop a concrete trace to be utilized as a protection against gamma and X-ray ionizing radiations in low energies, not only aspects of the structural behavior of the component or material must be evaluated, but also the behavior of the composing materials in face of radiation flow must be studied and known in order to develop a concrete with proper performance and that can meet application requirements; among such requirements we can mention the homogeneity of the applied concrete, which directly affects the effective linear attenuation rate of the component and can assure a good performance in face of demands. In this work, our aim was to evaluate what influence the particle size of the aggregates used for producing of assayed concretes has on the variation of the linear attenuation coefficient at different points of the same sample, results which can be used to obtain the inhomogeneity rate of each case of the analyzed concretes. The concrete samples were prepared with small thicknesses, ten millimeters (10 mm) and to perform the assays, a source of Americium-241 was used to transmit gamma-rays in order to determine the variation that existed in the linear attenuation coefficient of each sample. The following

  20. Airborne gamma ray spectrometer surveying

    1991-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in its role as collector and disseminator of information on nuclear techniques has long had an interest in gamma ray spectrometer methods and has published a number of Technical Reports on various aspects of the subject. At an Advisory Group Meeting held in Vienna in November 1986 to review appropriate activities the IAEA could take following the Chernobyl accident, it was recommended that preparation begin on a new Technical Report on airborne gamma ray spectrometer surveying, taking into account the use of the technique for environmental monitoring as well as for nuclear emergency response requirements. Shortly thereafter the IAEA became the lead organization in the Radioelement Geochemical Mapping section of the International Geological Correlation Programme/United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Project on International Geochemical Mapping. These two factors led to the preparation of the present Technical Report. 18 figs, 4 tabs

  1. Basics of Gamma Ray Detection

    Stinnett, Jacob [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Venkataraman, Ram [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-13

    The objective of this training is to explain the origin of x-rays and gamma rays, gamma ray interactions with matter, detectors and electronics used in gamma ray-spectrometry, and features of a gamma-ray spectrum for nuclear material that is safeguarded.

  2. Gamma ray shielding: a web based interactive program

    Subbaiah, K.V.; Senthi Kumar, C.; Sarangapani, R.

    2005-01-01

    A web based interactive computing program is developed using java for quick assessment of Gamma Ray shielding problems. The program addresses usually encountered source geometries like POINT, LINE, CYLINDRICAL, ANNULAR, SPHERICAL, BOX, followed by 'SLAB' shield configurations. The calculation is based on point kernel technique. The source points are randomly sampled within the source volume. From each source point, optical path traversed in the source and shield media up to the detector location is estimated to calculate geometrical and material attenuations, and then corresponding buildup factor is obtained, which accounts for scattered contribution. Finally, the dose rate for entire source is obtained by summing over all sampled points. The application allows the user to select one of the seven regular geometrical bodies and provision exist to give source details such as emission energies, intensities, physical dimensions and material composition. Similar provision is provided to specify shield slab details. To aid the user, atomic numbers, densities, standard build factor materials and isotope list with respective emission energies and intensity for ready reference are given in dropdown combo boxes. Typical results obtained from this program are validated against existing point kernel gamma ray shielding codes. Additional facility is provided to compute fission product gamma ray source strengths based on the fuel type, burn up and cooling time. Plots of Fission product gamma ray source strengths, Gamma ray cross-sections and buildup factors can be optionally obtained, which enable the user to draw inference on the computed results. It is expected that this tool will be handy to all health physicists and radiological safety officers as it will be available on the internet. (author)

  3. Comparison of laser fluorimetry, high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry and neutron activation analysis techniques for determination of uranium content in soil samples

    Ghods, A.; Asgharizadeh, F.; Salimi, B.; Abbasi, A.

    2004-01-01

    Much more concern is given nowadays for exposure of the world population to natural radiation especially to uranium since 57% of that exposure is due to radon-222, which is a member of uranium decay series. Most of the methods used for uranium determination is low concentration require either tedious separation and preconcentration or the accessibility to special instrumentation for detection of uranium at this low level. this study compares three techniques and methods for uranium analysis among different soil sample with variable uranium contents. Two of these techniques, neutron activation analysis and high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry , are non-destructive while the other, laser fluorimetry is done via chemical extraction of uranium. Analysis of standard materials is done also to control the quality and accuracy of the work. In spite of having quite variable ranges of detection limit, results obtained by high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry based on the assumption of having secular equilibrium between uranium and its daughters, which causes deviation whenever this condition was missed. For samples with reasonable uranium content, neutron activation analysis would be a rapid and reliable technique, while for low uranium content laser fluorimetry would be the most appropriate and accurate technique

  4. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239 Pu Fission

    Ullmann, John

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239 Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-ray multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution

  5. X-ray echoes from gamma-ray bursts

    Dermer, C.D.; Hurley, K.C.; Hartmann, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    The identification of an echo of reflected radiation in time histories of gamma-ray burst spectra can provide important information about the existence of binary companions or accretion disks in gamma-ray burst systems. Because of the nature of Compton scattering, the spectrum of the echo will be attenuated at gamma-ray energies compared with the spectrum of the primary burst emission. The expected temporal and spectral signatures of the echo and a search for such echoes are described, and implications for gamma-ray burst models are discussed. 35 refs

  6. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies With GLAST

    Thompson, D.J.; /NASA, Goddard

    2011-11-23

    Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

  7. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Pellizza, L. J.

    Gamma-ray bursts are the brightest transient sources in the gamma-ray sky. Since their discovery in the late 1960s, the investigation of the astrophysical sys- tems in which these phenomena take place, and the physical mechanisms that drive them, has become a vast and prolific area of modern astrophysics. In this work I will briefly describe the most relevant observations of these sources, and the models that describe their nature, emphasizing on the in- vestigations about the progenitor astrophysical systems. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  8. Gamma Ray Bursts

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  9. Analysis of marine samples by neutron-induced prompt gamma-ray technique and ICP-MS

    Yonezawa, C.; Matsue, H.; McKay, K.; Povinec, P.

    2001-01-01

    Multi-element and isotopic analyses of oils and marine environmental samples were carried out to estimate a contamination source using a 'finger printing' method. Elemental analyses were carried out using neutron-induced prompt gamma-ray analysis (PGA), instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) at the Japan Atomic Institute, Tokai-mura, Japan (JAERI) and ICP-MS in the IAEA Marine Environment Laboratory, Monaco (MEL). Fifteen elements including light elements, H, B, N, Si and Ca, which cannot be determined by INAA and ICP-MS, were determined by PGA. A total of 47 elements were determined in the present study. The potential of PGA for the determination of isotopic ratios was tested by measuring 34 S/ 32 S ratios in oils. The evaluation of historical records of marine environmental conditions using annual bands in coral samples was also investigated. (author)

  10. Modeling relaxation length and density of acacia mangium wood using gamma - ray attenuation technique

    Tamer A Tabet; Fauziah Abdul Aziz

    2009-01-01

    Wood density measurement is related to the several factors that influence wood quality. In this paper, density, relaxation length and half-thickness value of eight ages, 3, 5, 7, 10, 11, 13 and 15 year-old of Acacia mangium wood were determined using gamma radiation from 137 Cs source. Results show that Acacia mangium tree of age 3 year has the highest relaxation length of 83.33 cm and least density of 0.43 gcm -3 , while the tree of age 15 year has the least Relaxation length of 28.56 cm and highest density of 0.76 gcm -3 . Results also show that the 3 year-old Acacia mangium wood has the highest half thickness value of 57.75 cm and 15 year-old tree has the least half thickness value of 19.85 cm. Two mathematical models have been developed for the prediction of density, variation with relaxation length and half-thickness value of different age of tree. A good agreement (greater than 85% in most cases) was observed between the measured values and predicted ones. Very good linear correlation was found between measured density and the age of tree (R2 = 0.824), and between estimated density and Acacia mangium tree age (R2 = 0.952). (Author)

  11. Annual increments, specific gravity and energy of Eucalyptus grandis by gamma-ray attenuation technique

    Rezende, M.A.; Guerrini, I.A.; Ferraz, E.S.B.

    1990-01-01

    Specific gravity annual increments in volume, mass and energy of Eucalyptus grandis at thirteen years of age were made taking into account measurements of the calorific value for wood. It was observed that the calorific value for wood decrease slightly, while the specific gravity increase significantly with age. The so-called culmination age for the Annual Volume Increment was determined to be around fourth year of growth while for the Annual Mass and Energy Increment was around the eighty year. These results show that a tree in a particular age may not have a significant growth in volume, yet one is mass and energy. (author)

  12. Gamma ray astronomy

    Broomhead, Laurent.

    1980-01-01

    The nuclear gamma astronomy is presented, in particular the Gamma Ray Observatory, an enormous eight tonnes machine fitted with gamma telescopes, scheduled for launching around 1985. It is thereby hoped to study the natural nuclear reactions which occur when stars explode [fr

  13. Gamma ray calibration system

    Rosauer, P.J.; Flaherty, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    This invention is in the field of gamma ray inspection devices for tubular products and the like employing an improved calibrating block which prevents the sensing system from being overloaded when no tubular product is present, and also provides the operator with a means for visually detecting the presence of wall thicknesses which are less than a required minimum. (author)

  14. Computer model for calculating gamma-ray pulse-height spectra for logging applications

    Evans, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    A generalized computer model has been devised to simulate the emission, transport, and detection of natural gamma radiation from various logging environments. The model yields high-resolution gamma-ray pulse-height spectra that can be used to correct both gross gamma and spectral gamma-ray logs. The technique can help provide corrections to airborne and surface radiometric survey logs for the effects of varying altitude, formation composition, and overburden. Applied to borehole logging, the model can yield estimates of the effects of varying borehole fluid and casing attenuations, as well as varying formation porosity and saturation

  15. Determination of plutonium isotopic ratios and total concentration by gamma ray spectrometry

    Despres, Michele.

    1980-11-01

    A non-destructive method of analysis is being investigated for the control in situ of plutonium isotopic composition and total concentration in different matrix without preliminary calibration. The plutonium isotopic composition is determined by gamma-ray spectrometry using germanium detector systems. The same apparatus is used for direct measuring of the total plutonium concentration in solutions or solids by a differential attenuation technique based on two transmitted gamma rays with energies on both sides of the k shell absorption edge of plutonium [fr

  16. In-Situ Compositional Analysis and Provenance Study of the Historic Terengganu Stone (“Batu Bersurat Piagam Terengganu”) Using Neutron-Induced Prompt Gamma-Ray Techniques

    Abdullah, J.; Yahya, R.; Dahing, N. S.; Shaari, M. R.; Mahmood, A. A.; Hassan, H.; Jamaluddin, T. A.; Abdullah, M. Y.; Mahmud, N. A.; Mosorov, V.

    2018-01-01

    Terengganu inscribed stone is the oldest artifact with Jawi writing on it. It is a most treasured heritage for the history of Malaysian civilisation. The artifact proves that the Kingdom of Terengganu exist earlier than 1326 or 1386. It was accidentally discovered near Tersat River at Kampong Buluh, Kuala Berang, Terengganu, Malaysia by a gold & tin trader after a flash flood hit Kuala Berang in 1902.The inscription turned out to be a proclamation issued by the ''Sri Paduka Tuan'' of Terengganu. The significant is the date on the first face of the inscription, which is given as the year 1303 AD. This project focuses on the development of in-situ compositional analysis and provenance study of the Inscribed Terengganu Stone using Neutron-Induced Prompt Gamma-Ray Techniques (NIPGAT). To date, a lot of studies have been carried out by historians and archaeologists about the content of the inscription, but no scientific investigation about the material composition and its provenance has been performed. In this project, an instrumental analysis NIPGAT was designed as a portable non-destructive investigation tool employing an isotopic neutron source (Cf-252) and a gamma-ray spectroscopy system for in-situ investigation of the Inscribed Stone. (author)

  17. Upgrade of the JET gamma-ray cameras

    Soare, S.; Curuia, M.; Anghel, M.; Constantin, M.; David, E.; Craciunescu, T.; Falie, D.; Pantea, A.; Tiseanu, I.; Kiptily, V.; Prior, P.; Edlington, T.; Griph, S.; Krivchenkov, Y.; Loughlin, M.; Popovichev, S.; Riccardo, V; Syme, B.; Thompson, V.; Lengar, I.; Murari, A.; Bonheure, G.; Le Guern, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The JET gamma-ray camera diagnostics have already provided valuable information on the gamma-ray imaging of fast ion in JET plasmas. The applicability of gamma-ray imaging to high performance deuterium and deuterium-tritium JET discharges is strongly dependent on the fulfilment of rather strict requirements for the characterisation of the neutron and gamma-ray radiation fields. These requirements have to be satisfied within very stringent boundary conditions for the design, such as the requirement of minimum impact on the co-existing neutron camera diagnostics. The JET Gamma-Ray Cameras (GRC) upgrade project deals with these issues with particular emphasis on the design of appropriate neutron/gamma-ray filters ('neutron attenuators'). Several design versions have been developed and evaluated for the JET GRC neutron attenuators at the conceptual design level. The main design parameter was the neutron attenuation factor. The two design solutions, that have been finally chosen and developed at the level of scheme design, consist of: a) one quasi-crescent shaped neutron attenuator (for the horizontal camera) and b) two quasi-trapezoid shaped neutron attenuators (for the vertical one). The second design solution has different attenuation lengths: a short version, to be used together with the horizontal attenuator for deuterium discharges, and a long version to be used for high performance deuterium and DT discharges. Various neutron-attenuating materials have been considered (lithium hydride with natural isotopic composition and 6 Li enriched, light and heavy water, polyethylene). Pure light water was finally chosen as the attenuating material for the JET gamma-ray cameras. The neutron attenuators will be steered in and out of the detector line-of-sight by means of an electro-pneumatic steering and control system. The MCNP code was used for neutron and gamma ray transport in order to evaluate the effect of the neutron attenuators on the neutron field of the

  18. Spectral analysis and compositing techniques for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR Shoemaker), X-ray and Gamma-Ray Spectrometers (XGRS)

    McClanahan, T P; Nittler, L R; Boynton, W V; Bruckner, J; Squyres, S W; Evans, L G; Bhangoo, J S; Clark, P E; Floyd, S R; McCartney, E; Mikheeva, I; Starr, R D

    2001-01-01

    An X-ray and Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (XGRS) is on board the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft to determine the elemental composition of the surface of the asteroid 433 Eros. The Eros asteroid is highly oblate and irregular in shape. As a result, analysis methodologies are in many ways a divergence from comparable techniques. Complex temporal, spatial and instrument performance relationships must be accounted for during the analysis process. Field of view and asteroid surface geometry measurements must be modeled and then combined with real measurements of solar, spectral and instrument calibration information to derive scientific results. NEAR is currently orbiting 433 Eros and is in the initial phases of its primary data integration and mapping phases. Initial results have been obtained and bulk chemistry assessments have been obtained through specialized background assessment and data reduction techniques.

  19. Coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry

    Markovic, Nikola; Roos, Per; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    2017-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometry with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors is often the technique of choice in an environmental radioactivity laboratory. When measuring environmental samples associated activities are usually low so an important parameter that describes the performance of the spectrometer...... for a nuclide of interest is the minimum detectable activity (MDA). There are many ways for lowering the MDAs in gamma spectrometry. Recently, developments of fast and compact digital acquisition systems have led to growing number of multiple HPGe detector spectrometers. In these applications all detected...

  20. Data management and analysis techniques used in the near X-ray and gamma-ray spectrometer systems

    McClanahan, T.P.; Trombka, J.I.; Floyd, S.R.; Boynton, W.V.; Mikheeva, I.; Bailey, H.; Liewicki, C.; Bhangoo, J.; Starr, R.; Clark, P.E.; Evans, L.G.; Squyres, S.; McNutt, R.; Brueckner, J.

    1999-01-01

    The NEAR Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft will encounter the 433Eros asteroid for a one year orbital mission in December 1998. Its on-board remote sensing instrumentation includes X-ray and gamma-ray (XGRS) spectrometers. NEAR is an orbital mission and long integrations over spatially specific asteroid regions are generally not possible. A methodology for simulating longer integrations has been developed for XGRS and uses unique management, correlative and analytical ground systems to render mapping data products. Evaluation of the spatial environment is accomplished through virtual renderings of the asteroid surface giving incidence, emission and surface roughness factors. Extended computer plate modeling information is employed to optimize ground computer systems processing time. Interactive visualization systems have been developed to manage close to a million spectra that will be collected during the encounter. Feedback systems are employed to inspect, tag and calibrate spectral data products. Mission planning, systems development and managerial responsibilities have been distributed to cooperating science organizations at The Goddard Space Flight Center, The University of Arizona, Cornell University, The Applied Physics Laboratory and The Max Plank Institute

  1. Gamma-ray bursts

    Wijers, Ralph A M J; Woosley, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Cosmic gamma ray bursts (GRBs) have fascinated scientists and the public alike since their discovery in the late 1960s. Their story is told here by some of the scientists who participated in their discovery and, after many decades of false starts, solved the problem of their origin. Fourteen chapters by active researchers in the field present a detailed history of the discovery, a comprehensive theoretical description of GRB central engine and emission models, a discussion of GRB host galaxies and a guide to how GRBs can be used as cosmological tools. Observations are grouped into three sets from the satellites CGRO, BeppoSAX and Swift, and followed by a discussion of multi-wavelength observations. This is the first edited volume on GRB astrophysics that presents a fully comprehensive review of the subject. Utilizing the latest research, Gamma-ray Bursts is an essential desktop companion for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics.

  2. Gamma ray camera

    Wang, S.-H.; Robbins, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    An Anger gamma ray camera is improved by the substitution of a gamma ray sensitive, proximity type image intensifier tube for the scintillator screen in the Anger camera. The image intensifier tube has a negatively charged flat scintillator screen, a flat photocathode layer, and a grounded, flat output phosphor display screen, all of which have the same dimension to maintain unit image magnification; all components are contained within a grounded metallic tube, with a metallic, inwardly curved input window between the scintillator screen and a collimator. The display screen can be viewed by an array of photomultipliers or solid state detectors. There are two photocathodes and two phosphor screens to give a two stage intensification, the two stages being optically coupled by a light guide. (author)

  3. The Gamma-Ray Imager GRI

    Wunderer, Cornelia B.; GRI Collaboration

    2008-03-01

    Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles are accelerated to extreme relativistic energies by mechanisms which are still poorly understood, and nuclear reactions are synthesizing the basic constituents of our world. Cosmic accelerators and cosmic explosions are major science themes that are addressed in the gamma-ray regime. ESA's INTEGRAL observatory currently provides the astronomical community with a unique tool to investigate the sky up to MeV energies and hundreds of sources, new classes of objects, extraordinary views of antimatter annihilation in our Galaxy, and fingerprints of recent nucleosynthesis processes have been discovered. NASA's GLAST mission will similarly take the next step in surveying the high-energy ( GeV) sky, and NuSTAR will pioneer focusing observations at hard X-ray energies (to 80 keV). There will be clearly a growing need to perform deeper, more focused investigations of gamma-ray sources in the 100-keV to MeV regime. Recent technological advances in the domain of gamma-ray focusing using Laue diffraction and multilayer-coated mirror techniques have paved the way towards a gamma-ray mission, providing major improvements compared to past missions regarding sensitivity and angular resolution. Such a future Gamma-Ray Imager will allow the study of particle acceleration processes and explosion physics in unprecedented detail, providing essential clues on the innermost nature of the most violent and most energetic processes in the Universe.

  4. Applications of some non destructive testing techniques to the characterization of calcareous rocks: ultrasounds, X and gamma-ray radiography, tomography, neutron radiography

    Sicardy, O.

    1986-02-01

    NUCLEART Laboratory has been developping various techniques of conservation of art objects made of wood or stone. It has, among others, achieved a technique of strengthening porous stone objects, by resin impregnation followed by polymerization under gamma rays. The good conduct of such operations implies the existence of characterization means, before and after treatment of the objects. Two means of rocks characterization have been studied: - ultrasound techniques, - radiography techniques. The first part consists in a general description of the calcareous rocks morphology and a presentation of the studied specimens. The second part deals with the application of ultrasound techniques to rocks. Experimentally, one pays particular attention to the specific aspects of ultrasounds propagation inside materials like porous rocks, and especially diffusion phenomena. Results were interpreted in terms of propagation medium structure. Practical interest for rocks control through such techniques has been underligned. The third part concerns the application of radiographic techniques to calcareous rocks. Experimental work consists in establishing exposure curves for a wide range of energy, and the images quality determination. Through a statistics approach, and using digitalization techniques, one has done an exhaustive study of the radiographic noise. Moreover two techniques close to conventional radiography were explored: neutron radiography and X-ray tomography. Their specificity and interest in the case of calcareous rocks have been shown [fr

  5. Gamma-ray spectroscopy on irradiated fuel rods

    Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac

    2009-01-01

    The recording of gamma-ray spectra along an irradiated fuel rod allows the fission products to be qualitatively and quantitatively examined. Among all nondestructive examinations performed on irradiated fuel rods by gamma-ray spectroscopy, the most comprehensive one is the average burnup measurement, which is quantitative. Moreover, burnup measurements by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy are less time-consuming and waste-generating than burnup measurements by radiochemical, destructive methods. This work presents the theoretical foundations and experimental techniques necessary to measure, using nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, the average burnup of irradiated fuel rods in a laboratory equipped with hot cells. (author)

  6. Prompt Gamma Ray Spectroscopy for process monitoring

    Zoller, W.H.; Holmes, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Prompt Gamma Ray Spectroscopy (PGRS) is a very powerful analytical technique able to measure many metallic, contamination problem elements. The technique involves measurement of gamma rays that are emitted by nuclei upon capturing a neutron. This method is sensitive not only to the target element but also to the particular isotope of that element. PGRS is capable of measuring dissolved metal ions in a flowing system. In the field, isotopic neutron sources are used to produce the desired neutron flux ( 252 Cf can produce neutron flux of the order of 10 8 neutrons/cm 2 --sec.). Due to high penetrating power of gamma radiation, high efficiency gamma ray detectors can be placed in an appropriate geometry to maximize sensitivity, providing real-time monitoring with low detection level capabilities

  7. Achieving Higher Accuracy in the Gamma-Ray Spectrocopic Assay of Holdup

    Russo, P.A.; Wenz, T.R.; Smith, S.E.; Harris, J.F.

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is an important technique for the measurement of quantities of nuclear material holdup in processing equipment. Because the equipment in large facilities dedicated to uranium isotopic enrichment, uranium/plutonium scrap recovery or various stages of fuel fabrication is extensive, the total holdup may be large by its distribution alone, even if deposit thicknesses are small. Good accountability practices require unbiased measurements with uncertainties that are as small as possible. This paper describes new procedures for use with traditional holdup analysis methods based on gamma-ray spectroscopy. The procedures address the two sources of bias inherent in traditional gamma-ray measurements of holdup. Holdup measurements are performed with collimated, shielded gamma-ray detectors. The measurement distance is chosen to simplify the deposit geometry to that of a point, line or area. The quantitative holdup result is based on the net count rate of a representative gamma ray. This rate is corrected for contributions from room background and for attenuation by the process equipment. Traditional holdup measurements assume that the width of the point or line deposit is very small compared to the measurement distance, and that the self-attenuation effects can be neglected. Because each point or line deposit has a finite width and because self-attenuation affects all measurements, bias is incurred in both assumptions. In both cases the bias is negative, explaining the systematically low results of gamma-ray holdup measurements. The new procedures correct for bias that arises from both the finite-source effects and the gamma-ray self-attenuation. The procedures used to correct for both of these effects apply to the generalized geometries. One common empirical parameter is used for both corrections. It self-consistently limits the total error incurred (from uncertain knowledge of this parameter) in the combined correction process, so that it is

  8. Very high energy gamma-ray astronomy

    Weekes, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    Current interest in gamma-ray astronomy at energies above 100 GeV comes from the identification of Cygnus X-3 and other X-ray binaries as sources. In addition there are reports of emission from radio pulsars and a variety of other objects. The statistical significance of many of the observations is not high and many reported effects await confirmation, but there are a sufficient number of independent reports that very high energy gamma-ray astronomy must now be considered to have an observational basis. The observations are summarized with particular emphasis on those reported since 1980. The techniques used - the detection of small air showers using the secondary photons and particles at ground level - are unusual and are described. Future prospects for the field are discussed in relation to new ground-based experiments, satellite gamma-ray studies and proposed neutrino astronomy experiments. (orig.) With 296 refs

  9. Lunar based gamma ray astronomy

    Haymes, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Gamma ray astronomy represents the study of the universe on the basis of the electromagnetic radiation with the highest energy. Gamma ray astronomy provides a crucial tool for the understanding of astronomical phenomena, taking into account nucleosynthesis in supernovae, black holes, active galaxies, quasars, the sources of cosmic rays, neutron stars, and matter-antimatter annihilation. Difficulties concerning the conduction of studies by gamma ray astronomy are related to the necessity to perform such studies far from earth because the atmosphere is a source of gamma rays. Studies involving the use of gamma ray instruments in earth orbit have been conducted, and more gamma ray astronomy observations are planned for the future. Imperfections of studies conducted in low earth orbit could be overcome by estalishing an observatory on the moon which represents a satellite orbiting at 60 earth radii. Details concerning such an observatory are discussed. 5 references

  10. Gamma ray beam transmutation

    Imasaki, K.; Li, D.; Miyamoto, S.; Amano, S.; Motizuki, T.

    2007-01-01

    We have proposed a new approach to nuclear transmutation by a gamma ray beam of Compton scattered laser photon. We obtained 20 MeV gamma ray in this way to obtain transmutation rates with the giant resonance of 1 97Au and 1 29Iodine. The rate of the transmutation agreed with the theoretical calculation. Experiments on energy spectrum of positron, electron and neutron from targets were performed for the energy balance and design of the system scheme. The reaction rate was about 1.5∼4% for appropriate photon energies and neutron production rate was up to 4% in the measurements. We had stored laser photon more than 5000 times in a small cavity which implied for a significant improvement of system efficiency. Using these technologies, we have designed an actual transmutation system for 1 29Iodine which has a 16 million year's activity. In my presentation, I will address the properties of this scheme, experiments results and transmutation system for iodine transmutation

  11. Gamma ray energy tracking in GRETINA

    Lee, I. Y.

    2011-10-01

    The next generation of stable and exotic beam accelerators will provide physics opportunities to study nuclei farther away from the line of stability. However, these experiments will be more demanding on instrumentation performance. These come from the lower production rate for more exotic beams, worse beam impurities, and large beam velocity from the fragmentation and inverse reactions. Gamma-ray spectroscopy will be one of the most effective tools to study exotic nuclei. However, to fully exploit the physics reach provided by these new facilities, better gamma-ray detector will be needed. In the last 10 years, a new concept, gamma-ray energy tracking array, was developed. Tracking arrays will increase the detection sensitivity by factors of several hundred compared to current arrays used in nuclear physics research. Particularly, the capability of reconstructing the position of the interaction with millimeters resolution is needed to correct the Doppler broadening of gamma rays emitted from high velocity nuclei. GRETINA is a gamma-ray tracking array which uses 28 Ge crystals, each with 36 segments, to cover ¼ of the 4 π of the 4 π solid angle. The gamma ray tracking technique requires detailed pulse shape information from each of the segments. These pulses are digitized using 14-bit 100 MHz flash ADCs, and digital signal analysis algorithms implemented in the on-board FPGAs provides energy, time and selection of pulse traces. A digital trigger system, provided flexible trigger functions including a fast trigger output, and also allows complicated trigger decisions to be made up to 20 microseconds. Further analyzed, carried out in a computer cluster, determine the energy, time, and three-dimensional positions of all gamma-ray interactions in the array. This information is then utilized, together with the characteristics of Compton scattering and pair-production processes, to track the scattering sequences of the gamma rays. GRETINA construction is completed in

  12. Gamma Ray Bursts - Observations

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    We are in an exciting period of discovery for gamma-ray bursts. The Swift observatory is detecting 100 bursts per year, providing arcsecond localizations and sensitive observations of the prompt and afterglow emission. The Fermi observatory is observing 250 bursts per year with its medium-energy GRB instrument and about 10 bursts per year with its high-energy LAT instrument. In addition, rapid-response telescopes on the ground are providing new capabilities to study optical emission during the prompt phase and spectral signatures of the host galaxies. The combined data set is enabling great advances in our understanding of GRBs including afterglow physics, short burst origin, and high energy emission.

  13. Imaging phase holdup distribution of three phase flow systems using dual source gamma ray tomography

    Varma, Rajneesh; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna; O'Sullivan, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Multiphase reaction and process systems are used in abundance in the chemical and biochemical industry. Tomography has been successfully employed to visualize the hydrodynamics of multiphase systems. Most of the tomography methods (gamma ray, x-ray and electrical capacitance and resistance) have been successfully implemented for two phase dynamic systems. However, a significant number of chemical and biochemical systems consists of dynamic three phases. Research effort directed towards the development of tomography techniques to image such dynamic system has met with partial successes for specific systems with applicability to limited operating conditions. A dual source tomography scanner has been developed that uses the 661 keV and 1332 keV photo peaks from the 137 Cs and 60 Co for imaging three phase systems. A new approach has been developed and applied that uses the polyenergetic Alternating Minimization (A-M) algorithm, developed by O'Sullivan and Benac (2007), for imaging the holdup distribution in three phases' dynamic systems. The new approach avoids the traditional post image processing approach used to determine the holdup distribution where the attenuation images of the mixed flow obtained from gamma ray photons of two different energies are used to determine the holdup of three phases. In this approach the holdup images are directly reconstructed from the gamma ray transmission data. The dual source gamma ray tomography scanner and the algorithm were validated using a three phase phantom. Based in the validation, three phase holdup studies we carried out in slurry bubble column containing gas liquid and solid phases in a dynamic state using the dual energy gamma ray tomography. The key results of the holdup distribution studies in the slurry bubble column along with the validation of the dual source gamma ray tomography system would be presented and discussed

  14. Gamma rays shielding parameters for white metal alloys

    Kaur, Taranjot; Sharma, Jeewan; Singh, Tejbir

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to check the feasibility of white metal alloys as gamma rays shielding materials. Different combinations of cadmium, lead, tin and zinc were used to prepare quaternary alloys Pb60Sn20ZnxCd20-x (where x = 5, 10, 15) using melt quench technique. These alloys were also known as white metal alloys because of its shining appearance. The density of prepared alloys has been measured using Archimedes Principle. Gamma rays shielding parameters viz. mass attenuation coefficient (µm), effective atomic number (Zeff), electron density (Nel), Mean free path (mfp), Half value layer (HVL) and Tenth value layer (TVL) has been evaluated for these alloys in the wide energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV. The WinXCom software has been used for obtaining mass attenuation coefficient values for the prepared alloys in the given energy range. The effective atomic number (Zeff) has been assigned to prepared alloys using atomic to electronic cross section ratio method. Further, the variation of various shielding parameters with photon energy has been investigated for the prepared white metal alloys.

  15. Gamma Ray Tomographic Scan Method for Large Scale Industrial Plants

    Moon, Jin Ho; Jung, Sung Hee; Kim, Jong Bum; Park, Jang Geun

    2011-01-01

    The gamma ray tomography systems have been used to investigate a chemical process for last decade. There have been many cases of gamma ray tomography for laboratory scale work but not many cases for industrial scale work. Non-tomographic equipment with gamma-ray sources is often used in process diagnosis. Gamma radiography, gamma column scanning and the radioisotope tracer technique are examples of gamma ray application in industries. In spite of many outdoor non-gamma ray tomographic equipment, the most of gamma ray tomographic systems still remained as indoor equipment. But, as the gamma tomography has developed, the demand on gamma tomography for real scale plants also increased. To develop the industrial scale system, we introduced the gamma-ray tomographic system with fixed detectors and rotating source. The general system configuration is similar to 4 th generation geometry. But the main effort has been made to actualize the instant installation of the system for real scale industrial plant. This work would be a first attempt to apply the 4th generation industrial gamma tomographic scanning by experimental method. The individual 0.5-inch NaI detector was used for gamma ray detection by configuring circular shape around industrial plant. This tomographic scan method can reduce mechanical complexity and require a much smaller space than a conventional CT. Those properties make it easy to get measurement data for a real scale plant

  16. Feasibility of applying gamma irradiation as disinfestation technique on date fruits in respect to nutritional value that is affected by disinfesting gamma ray doses

    Ahmed, El-Sayed S.

    1976-01-01

    Infested and non-infested dry date fruits (Phonex dactylifera), Abrimi variety (9.2% moisture), with Ephestia cautella Walker were irradiated for 0, 15, 20 and 40 Krad gamma ray doses emitted from Co-60 source with 1.36 x 10-rad/h. as a dose rate. Irradiated fruits were stored at room temperature, at 20-25 0 C and 85-95% R.H., in packages to avoid reinfestation. A dose of 20 Krad is 100 percent effective in preventing the emergency of eggs, larva, and pupae in fruits as reflected by zero per cent emergency count for live adults. Also, this dose was found to be lethal for adult stage of the insect. On the other hand, 2 Krad dose does not produce significant changes in the nutritional qualities of fruits, as measured by chemical analytical means for carbohydrates, protein and amino acids, directly after irradiation as well as at 2, 4 and 6 months storage. The triangular tests show that irradiation treatments even with 4 Krad exerted no determinal effect upon the sensory qualities of stored irradiated date fruits. These results point out the feasibility of applying gamma irradiation, 20 Krad, as disinfestation technique against Ephestia cautella Walker in dry date fruits without exerting any effect on the nutritional value

  17. Development of a numerical experiment technique to solve inverse gamma-ray transport problems with application to nondestructive assay of nuclear waste barrels

    Chang, C.J.; Anghaie, S.

    1998-01-01

    A numerical experimental technique is presented to find an optimum solution to an undetermined inverse gamma-ray transport problem involving the nondestructive assay of radionuclide inventory in a nuclear waste drum. The method introduced is an optimization scheme based on performing a large number of numerical simulations that account for the counting statistics, the nonuniformity of source distribution, and the heterogeneous density of the self-absorbing medium inside the waste drum. The simulation model uses forward projection and backward reconstruction algorithms. The forward projection algorithm uses randomly selected source distribution and a first-flight kernel method to calculate external detector responses. The backward reconstruction algorithm uses the conjugate gradient with nonnegative constraint or the maximum likelihood expectation maximum method to reconstruct the source distribution based on calculated detector responses. Total source activity is determined by summing the reconstructed activity of each computational grid. By conducting 10,000 numerical simulations, the error bound and the associated confidence level for the prediction of total source activity are determined. The accuracy and reliability of the simulation model are verified by performing a series of experiments in a 208-ell waste barrel. Density heterogeneity is simulated by using different materials distributed in 37 egg-crate-type compartments simulating a vertical segment of the barrel. Four orthogonal detector positions are used to measure the emerging radiation field from the distributed source. Results of the performed experiments are in full agreement with the estimated error and the confidence level, which are predicted by the simulation model

  18. Application of Lab View Software for Thinning Measurement of Steel Pipe Sample by Using Gamma Ray Techniques

    Wibisono; Sugiharto

    2004-01-01

    The computer program, namely scaling pipe has been constructed to support the work of radiation monitoring either utilizing of sealed or unsealed source as well. The paper describes the performance of that computer program which is able to display numerical data coming from rate-meter to become graphical data and its ability to store data in form of software file with text format. The stored file can be performed by other software therefore the data can be calculated and analyzed. This computer program has been applied to measure the thickness of steel pipe with diameter of 3 inch which is machined with the different of 0.1 mm for each 50 mm length of the pipe. In this research the gamma radiation originated from 200 mCi of 241 Am source has been passed through the center of the pipe and the dose rate at the opposite of the source is measured. The attenuation coefficient calculated from that measurement is 0.0944 mm -1 with the deviation factor of 44 cps/mm. (author)

  19. Estimation of genetic variability and heritability of wheat agronomic traits resulted from some gamma rays irradiation techniques

    Wijaya Murti Indriatama; Trikoesoemaningtyas; Syarifah Iis Aisyah; Soeranto Human

    2016-01-01

    Gamma irradiation techniques have significant effect on frequency and spectrum of macro-mutation but the study of its effect on micro-mutation that related to genetic variability on mutated population is very limited. The aim of this research was to study the effect of gamma irradiation techniques on genetic variability and heritability of wheat agronomic characters at M2 generation. This research was conducted from July to November 2014, at Cibadak experimental station, Indonesian Center for Agricultural Biotechnology and Genetic Resources Research and Development, Ministry of Agriculture. Three introduced wheat breeding lines (F-44, Kiran-95 & WL-711) were treated by 3 gamma irradiation techniques (acute, fractionated and intermittent). M1 generation of combination treatments were planted and harvested its spike individually per plants. As M2 generation, seeds of 75 M1 spike were planted at the field with one row one spike method and evaluated on the agronomic characters and its genetic components. The used of gamma irradiation techniques decreased mean but increased range values of agronomic traits in M2 populations. Fractionated irradiation induced higher mean and wider range on spike length and number of spike let per spike than other irradiation techniques. Fractionated and intermittent irradiation resulted greater variability of grain weight per plant than acute irradiation. The number of tillers, spike weight, grain weight per spike and grain weight per plant on M2 population resulted from induction of three gamma irradiation techniques have high estimated heritability and broad sense of genetic variability coefficient values. The three gamma irradiation techniques increased genetic variability of agronomic traits on M2 populations, except plant height. (author)

  20. Apparatus for gamma ray radiography

    Kobayashi, Masatoshi; Enomoto, Shigemasa; Oga, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    This is the standard of Japan Non-Destructive Inspection Society, NDIS 1101-79, which stipulates on the design, construction and testing method of the apparatuses for gamma ray radiography used for taking industrial radiograms. The gamma ray apparatuses stipulated in this standard are those containing sealed radioactive isotopes exceeding 100 μCi, which emit gamma ray. The gamma ray apparatuses are classified into three groups according to their movability. The general design conditions, the irradiation dose rate and the sealed radiation sources for the gamma ray apparatuses are stipulated. The construction of the gamma ray apparatuses must be in accordance with the notification No. 52 of the Ministry of Labor, and safety devices and collimators must be equipped. The main bodies of the gamma ray apparatuses must pass the vibration test, penetration test, impact test and shielding efficiency test. The method of each test is described. The attached equipments must be also tested. The tests according to this standard are carried out by the makers of the apparatuses. The test records must be made when the apparatuses have passed the tests, and the test certificates are attached. The limit of guarantee by the endurance test must be clearly shown. The items to be shown on the apparatuses are stipulated. (Kako, I.)

  1. Specific gamma-ray dose constants for nuclides important to dosimetry and radiological assessment

    Unger, L.M.; Trubey, D.K.

    1982-05-01

    Tables of specific gamma-ray dose constants (the unshielded gamma-ray dose equivalent rate at 1 m from a point source) have been computed for approximately 500 nuclides important to dosimetry and radiological assessment. The half life, the mean attenuation coefficient, and thickness for a lead shield providing 95% dose equivalent attenuation are also listed

  2. Applied gamma-ray spectrometry

    Dams, R; Crouthamel, Carl E

    1970-01-01

    Applied Gamma-Ray Spectrometry covers real life application of the gamma-ray and the devices used in their experimental studies. This book is organized into 9 chapters, and starts with discussions of the various decay processes, the possible interaction mechanisms of gamma radiation with matter, and the intrinsic and extrinsic variables, which affect the observed gamma-ray and X-ray spectra. The subsequent chapters deal with the properties and fabrication of scintillation detectors, semiconductor detectors, and proportional gas counters. These chapters present some of the most widely utilized

  3. Elementary representative sizes of soil attributes via attenuation of gamma rays and computerized tomography; Tamanhos elementares representativos de atributos do solo via atenuacao de raios gama e tomografia computadorizada

    Borges, Jaqueline Aparecida Ribaski

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the Computed Tomography (CT) and gamma-ray attenuation (GRA) techniques were used in the investigation of representative sample sizes for attributes related to soil structure. First of all, the representative elementary length (REL) for experimental measurements of soil mass attenuation coefficient (μes), of samples from a sandy and a clayey soil, was analyzed. The study was conducted with two radioactive sources ({sup 241}Am and {sup 137}Cs), three collimators (2 - 4 mm diameters), and 14 thickness (x) samples (2-5 cm). From these analyzes, it was possible to identify an ideal thickness range for each of the studied sources (2-4 cm and 12-15 cm for the sources of {sup 241}Am and {sup 137}Cs, respectively). The application of such results in representative elementary area evaluations, in clayey soil clods via CT, indicated that experimental soil mass attenuation coefficient average values obtained for x>4 cm and source {sup 241}Am might induce the use of samples which are not large enough for soil bulk density evaluations. Subsequently, μCT images with a total volume of 39×39×33 mm{sup 3} and spatial resolution of 60 μm were used for macroporous system morphological characterization of a Rhodic Ferralsol with clayey texture, under no-till (NT) and conventional till (CT) systems. Attributes as macroporosity (MAP), number of macropores (NMAP), tortuosity (τ) and connectivity (C) of the pores were assessed. The C degree was estimated based on the Euler-Poincare characteristic (EPC). Once 3D images enable the study of these attributes in different sample volumes, the proposed study is ideal for the analysis of representative elementary volume (REV). Usually, the selection of subvolumes for REV analysis occurs concentrically to a small volume or in adjacent positions. Here, we introduced a new method for selecting the positions of subvolumes, which are randomly chosen within the total image volume (random selection). It was observed that higher

  4. Technical Aspect on Procedure of Gamma-Ray Pipeline Inspection

    Rasif Mohd Zain; Ainul Mardhiah Terry; Norman Shah Dahing

    2015-01-01

    The main problems happen in industrial pipelines are deposit build-up, blockage, corrosion and erosion. These effects will give a constraint in transporting refined products to process or production points and cause a major problem in production. One of the techniques to inspect the problem is using gamma-ray pipe scans. The principle of the technique is gamma-ray absorption technique. In this paper describes on the technical aspect to perform the pipe inspection in laboratory work. (author)

  5. The robustness of two tomography reconstructing techniques with heavily noisy dynamical experimental data from a high speed gamma-ray tomograph

    Vasconcelos, Geovane Vitor; Melo, Silvio de Barros; Dantas, Carlos Costa; Moreira, Icaro Malta; Johansen, Geira; Maad, Rachid

    2013-01-01

    The PSIRT (Particle Systems Iterative Reconstructive Technique) is, just like the ART method, an iterative tomographic reconstruction technique with the recommended use in the reconstruction of catalytic density distribution in the refining process of oil in the FCC-type riser. The PSIRT is based upon computer graphics' particle systems, where the reconstructing material is initially represented as composed of particles subject to a force field emanating from the beams, whose intensities are parameterized by the differences between the experimental readings of a given beam trajectory, and the values corresponding to the current amount of particles landed in this trajectory. A dynamical process is set as the beams fields of attracting forces dispute the particles. At the end, with the equilibrium established, the particles are replaced by the corresponding regions of pixels. The High Speed Gamma-ray Tomograph is a 5-source-fan-beam device with a 17-detector deck per source, capable of producing up to a thousand complete sinograms per second. Around 70.000 experimental sinograms from this tomograph were produced simulating the move of gas bubbles in different angular speeds immersed in oil within the vessel, through the use of a two-hole-polypropylene phantom. The sinogram frames were set with several different detector integration times. This article studies and compares the robustness of both ART and PSIRT methods in this heavily noisy scenario, where this noise comes not only from limitations in the dynamical sampling, but also from to the underlying apparatus that produces the counting in the tomograph. These experiments suggest that PSIRT is a more robust method than ART for noisy data. Visual inspection on the resulting images suggests that PSIRT is a more robust method than ART for noisy data, since it almost never presents globally scattered noise. (author)

  6. Gamma rays at airplane altitudes

    Iwai, J.; Koss, T.; Lord, J.; Strausz, S.; Wilkes, J.; Woosley, J.

    1990-01-01

    An examination of the gamma ray flux above 1 TeV in the atmosphere is needed to better understand the anomalous showers from point sources. Suggestions are made for future experiments on board airplanes

  7. Gamma-Ray Pulsars Models and Predictions

    Harding, A K

    2001-01-01

    Pulsed emission from gamma-ray pulsars originates inside the magnetosphere, from radiation by charged particles accelerated near the magnetic poles or in the outer gaps. In polar cap models, the high energy spectrum is cut off by magnetic pair production above an energy that is dependent on the local magnetic field strength. While most young pulsars with surface fields in the range B = 10^{12} - 10^{13} G are expected to have high energy cutoffs around several GeV, the gamma-ray spectra of old pulsars having lower surface fields may extend to 50 GeV. Although the gamma-ray emission of older pulsars is weaker, detecting pulsed emission at high energies from nearby sources would be an important confirmation of polar cap models. Outer gap models predict more gradual high-energy turnovers at around 10 GeV, but also predict an inverse Compton component extending to TeV energies. Detection of pulsed TeV emission, which would not survive attenuation at the polar caps, is thus an important test of outer gap models. N...

  8. About cosmic gamma ray lines

    Diehl, Roland

    2017-06-01

    Gamma ray lines from cosmic sources convey the action of nuclear reactions in cosmic sites and their impacts on astrophysical objects. Gamma rays at characteristic energies result from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. The gamma-ray line from the annihilation of positrons at 511 keV falls into the same energy window, although of different origin. We present here the concepts of cosmic gamma ray spectrometry and the corresponding instruments and missions, followed by a discussion of recent results and the challenges and open issues for the future. Among the lessons learned are the diffuse radioactive afterglow of massive-star nucleosynthesis in 26Al and 60Fe gamma rays, which is now being exploited towards the cycle of matter driven by massive stars and their supernovae; large interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised to be of key importance here. Also, constraints on the complex processes making stars explode as either thermonuclear or core-collapse supernovae are being illuminated by gamma-ray lines, in this case from shortlived radioactivities from 56Ni and 44Ti decays. In particular, the three-dimensionality and asphericities that have recently been recognised as important are enlightened in different ways through such gamma-ray line spectroscopy. Finally, the distribution of positron annihilation gamma ray emission with its puzzling bulge-dominated intensity disctribution is measured through spatially-resolved spectra, which indicate that annihilation conditions may differ in different parts of our Galaxy. But it is now understood that a variety of sources may feed positrons into the interstellar medium, and their characteristics largely get lost during slowing down and propagation of positrons before annihilation; a recent microquasar flare was caught as an opportunity to see positrons annihilate at a source.

  9. Planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy: the effects of hydrogen absorption cross-section of the gamma-ray spectrum

    Lapides, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectroscopy of planet surfaces is one of several possible methods that are useful in determining the elemental composition of planet surfaces from orbiting spacecraft. This has been demonstrated on the Apollos 15 and 16 missions as well as the Soviet Mars-5 mission. Planetary gamma-ray emission is primarily the result of natural radioactive decay and cosmic-ray and solar-flare-induced nuclear reactions. Secondary neutron reactions play a large role in the more intense gamma-ray emission. The technique provides information on the elemental composition of the top few tens of centimeters of the planet surface. Varying concentrations of hydrogen and compositional variations that alter the macroscopic thermal-neutron absorption cross section have a significant effect on the neutron flux in the planet surface and therefore also on the gamma-ray emission from the surface. These effects have been systematically studied for a wide range of possible planetary compositions that include Mercury, the moon, Mars, the comets, and the asteroids. The problem of the Martian atmosphere was also investigated. The results of these calculations, in which both surface neutron fluxes and gamma-ray emission fluxes were determined, were used to develop general procedures for obtaining planet compositions from the gamma-ray spectrum. Several changes have been suggested for reanalyzing the Apollos 15 and 16 gamma-ray results. In addition, procedures have been suggested that can be applied to neutron-gamma techniques in mineral and oil exploration

  10. Method and apparatus for neutron induced gamma ray logging for lithology identification

    Oliver, D.W.; Culver, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The patent describes a neutron-gamma well logging technique which can distinguish between sandstone and limestone formations irrespective of water salinity in the formation. The formation surrounding a borehole is irradiated by fast neutrons and the resulting gamma rays are counted. The gamma rays are converted to electrical signals in three distinct steps; the first two signals result from gamma rays associated with calcium content of the formation and the third signal from gamma rays associated with silicon content. Gamma rays resulting from irradiation of calcium are counted at two non-contiguous energy bands. (O.T.)

  11. Cosmic gamma-ray burst

    Yamagami, Takamasa

    1985-01-01

    Ballon experiments for searching gamma-ray burst were carried out by employing rotating-cross modulation collimators. From a very long observation of total 315 hours during 1975 to 1979, three gamma-ray intensity anomalies were observed which were speculated as a gamma-ray burst. As for the first gamma-ray intensity anomaly observed in 1975, the burst source could be located precisely but the source, heavenly body, could not be specified. Gamma-ray burst source estimation was made by analyzing distribution of burst source in the celestial sphere, burst size distribution, and burst peak. Using the above-mentioned data together with previously published ones, apparent inconsistency was found between the observed results and the adopted theory that the source was in the Galaxy, and this inconsistency was found due to the different time profiles of the burst observed with instruments of different efficiency. It was concluded by these analysis results that employment of logN - logP (relation between burst frequency and burst count) was better than that of logN - logS (burst size) in the examination of gamma-ray burst because the former was less uncertain than the latter. Analyzing the author's observed gamma-ray burst data and the related published data, it was clarified that the burst distribution was almost P -312 for the burst peak value larger than 10 -6 erg/cm 2 .sec. The author could indicate that the calculated celestial distribution of burst source was consistent with the observed results by the derivation using the logN - logP relationship and that the burst larger than 10 -6 erg/cm 2 .sec happens about one thousand times a year, about ten times of the previous value. (Takagi, S.)

  12. Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory

    1991-01-01

    This photograph shows the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO) being deployed by the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the STS-37 mission in April 1991. The GRO reentered Earth atmosphere and ended its successful mission in June 2000. For nearly 9 years, the GRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), kept an unblinking watch on the universe to alert scientists to the invisible, mysterious gamma-ray bursts that had puzzled them for decades. By studying gamma-rays from objects like black holes, pulsars, quasars, neutron stars, and other exotic objects, scientists could discover clues to the birth, evolution, and death of stars, galaxies, and the universe. The gamma-ray instrument was one of four major science instruments aboard the Compton. It consisted of eight detectors, or modules, located at each corner of the rectangular satellite to simultaneously scan the entire universe for bursts of gamma-rays ranging in duration from fractions of a second to minutes. In January 1999, the instrument, via the Internet, cued a computer-controlled telescope at Las Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, within 20 seconds of registering a burst. With this capability, the gamma-ray experiment came to serve as a gamma-ray burst alert for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and major gound-based observatories around the world. Thirty-seven universities, observatories, and NASA centers in 19 states, and 11 more institutions in Europe and Russia, participated in the BATSE science program.

  13. The Extragalactic Background Light and the Gamma-ray Opacity of the Universe

    Dwek, Eli; Krennrich, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The extragalactic background light (EBL) is one of the fundamental observational quantities in cosmology. All energy releases from resolved and unresolved extragalactic sources, and the light from any truly diffuse background, excluding the cosmic microwave background (CMB), contribute to its intensity and spectral energy distribution. It therefore plays a crucial role in cosmological tests for the formation and evolution of stellar objects and galaxies, and for setting limits on exotic energy releases in the universe. The EBL also plays an important role in the propagation of very high energy gamma-rays which are attenuated en route to Earth by pair producing gamma-gamma interactions with the EBL and CMB. The EBL affects the spectrum of the sources, predominantly blazars, in the approx 10 GeV to 10 TeV energy regime. Knowledge of the EBL intensity and spectrum will allow the determination of the intrinsic blazar spectrum in a crucial energy regime that can be used to test particle acceleration mechanisms and VHE gamma-ray production models. Conversely, knowledge of the intrinsic gamma-ray spectrum and the detection of blazars at increasingly higher redshifts will set strong limits on the EBL and its evolution. This paper reviews the latest developments in the determination of the EBL and its impact on the current understanding of the origin and production mechanisms of gamma-rays in blazars, and on energy releases in the universe. The review concludes with a summary and future directions in Cherenkov Telescope Array techniques and in infrared ground-based and space observatories that will greatly improve our knowledge of the EBL and the origin and production of very high energy gamma-rays.

  14. Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Astrophysics

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    During the last decades, various classes of radio-loud active galactic nuclei have been established as sources of high-energy radiation extending over a very broad range from soft gamma-rays (photon energies E~MeV) up to very-high-energy gamma-rays (E>100 GeV). These include blazars of different types, as well as young and evolved radio galaxies. The observed gamma-ray emission from such implies efficient particle acceleration processes taking place in highly magnetized and relativistic jets produced by supermassive black holes, processes that have yet to be identified and properly understood. In addition, nearby starforming and starburst galaxies, some of which host radio-quiet Seyfert-type nuclei, have been detected in the gamma-ray range as well. In their cases, the observed gamma-ray emission is due to non-thermal activity in the interstellar medium, possibly including also a contribution from accretion disks and nuclear outflows. Finally, the high-energy emission from clusters of galaxies remains elusive...

  15. Collimatorless imaging of gamma rays with help of gamma-ray tracking

    Marel, J V D

    2001-01-01

    In many gamma-ray detector systems that are built for imaging purposes Compton scattered photons are suppressed as much as possible. However, the information from photons that scattered inside a detector system can be used to reconstruct the tracks of the photons with help of gamma-ray tracking. Estimates of the incident directions of the photons can be made and an image can be created. Examples of potential applications for this technique are the use as a gamma-camera in medical imaging (e.g. SPECT) or as a detector for PET. Due to the omission of collimators, much higher detection efficiencies can be achieved, reducing the doses required for an image. A gamma-ray tracking method, called backtracking, has been developed for nuclear spectroscopy. The method tracks gamma-rays originating from a point source in the center of a spherical detector system consisting of position-sensitive germanium detectors. This method can also be used as a tracking technique for imaging of an unknown source distribution. With he...

  16. Single-experiment simultaneous-measurement of elemental mass-attenuation coefficients of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen for 0.123-1.33 MeV gamma rays

    Teli, M.T.; Nathuram, R.; Mahajan, C.S.

    2000-01-01

    As it is inconvenient to use elements like hydrogen, carbon and oxygen in pure forms for measurement of their gamma mass-attenuation coefficients, the measurements are to be done indirectly, by using compounds of the elements or a mixture of them. We give here a simple method of measuring the total mass-attenuation coefficients μ/ρ of the elements in a compound simultaneously and in a single experiment through the measurements of the μ/ρ values of the concerned compounds and using the mixture rule. The method is applied for the measurement of μ/ρ of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen by using acetone, ethanol and 1-propanol. Our results (for E γ =0.123-1.33 MeV) are seen to be in better agreement with the theoretical values of Hubbell and Seltzer (1995) [Hubbell J.H. and Seltzer S.M. (1995). Tables of X-ray mass attenuation coefficients and mass energy-absorption coefficients 1 keV to 20 MeV for elements Z=1 to 92 and 48 additional substances of dosimetric interest. NISTIR 5632] as compared to the results of El-Kateb and Abdul-Hamid (1991) [El-Kateb, A.H., Abdul-Hamid, A.S., 1991. Photon attenuation coefficient study of some materials containing hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen. Appl. Rad. Isot. 42, 303-307

  17. Passive Gamma-Ray Emission for Soil-Disturbance Detection

    2016-08-01

    technical reports published by ERDC, visit the ERDC online library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. ERDC/CRREL TR-16-10 August 2016...area should be relatively constant if landform and provenance are known and con- trolled . As the soil dries out, the gamma-ray spectra should change...attenuation-pathway con- trolled (Figure 3). The attenuation is a function of the mass attenuation coefficients of the soil constituents (i.e., soil, water

  18. Perfecting of shielding calculation technique against the gamma rays arising from a Tokamak with the TFR experience. Application to the conceptual design Tokamak TORE 2 SUPRA

    Diop, Cheikh M'Backe.

    1980-09-01

    The conception of the necessary shielding around a conceptual design Tokamak requires to execute an estimated calculation of the doses due to the different radiation sources arising from the machine: the thermonuclear neutron source and the gamma ray source emitted during the interaction of the runaway electrons with the diaphragm. In this study, we propose a theorical method to calculate this gamma source. We tackle also the shielding problem of the conceptual design Tokamak: TORE 2 SUPRA [fr

  19. Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    Marisaldi, Martino; Fuschino, Fabio; Labanti, Claudio; Tavani, Marco; Argan, Andrea; Del Monte, Ettore; Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido; Giuliani, Andrea; Trois, Alessio; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Gianotti, Fulvio; Trifoglio, Massimo

    2013-08-01

    Lightning and thunderstorm systems in general have been recently recognized as powerful particle accelerators, capable of producing electrons, positrons, gamma-rays and neutrons with energies as high as several tens of MeV. In fact, these natural systems turn out to be the highest energy and most efficient natural particle accelerators on Earth. Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are millisecond long, very intense bursts of gamma-rays and are one of the most intriguing manifestation of these natural accelerators. Only three currently operative missions are capable of detecting TGFs from space: the RHESSI, Fermi and AGILE satellites. In this paper we review the characteristics of TGFs, including energy spectrum, timing structure, beam geometry and correlation with lightning, and the basic principles of the associated production models. Then we focus on the recent AGILE discoveries concerning the high energy extension of the TGF spectrum up to 100 MeV, which is difficult to reconcile with current theoretical models.

  20. Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    Marisaldi, Martino; Fuschino, Fabio; Labanti, Claudio; Tavani, Marco; Argan, Andrea; Del Monte, Ettore; Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido; Giuliani, Andrea; Trois, Alessio; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Gianotti, Fulvio; Trifoglio, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Lightning and thunderstorm systems in general have been recently recognized as powerful particle accelerators, capable of producing electrons, positrons, gamma-rays and neutrons with energies as high as several tens of MeV. In fact, these natural systems turn out to be the highest energy and most efficient natural particle accelerators on Earth. Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are millisecond long, very intense bursts of gamma-rays and are one of the most intriguing manifestation of these natural accelerators. Only three currently operative missions are capable of detecting TGFs from space: the RHESSI, Fermi and AGILE satellites. In this paper we review the characteristics of TGFs, including energy spectrum, timing structure, beam geometry and correlation with lightning, and the basic principles of the associated production models. Then we focus on the recent AGILE discoveries concerning the high energy extension of the TGF spectrum up to 100 MeV, which is difficult to reconcile with current theoretical models

  1. The noise analysis and optimum filtering techniques for a two-dimensional position sensitive orthogonal strip gamma ray detector employing resistive charge division

    Gerber, M.S.; Muller, D.W.

    1976-01-01

    The analysis of an orthogonal strip, two-dimensional position sensitive high purity germanium gamma ray detector is discussed. Position sensitivity is obtained by connecting each electrode strip on the detector to a resistor network. Charge, entering the network, divides in relation to the resistance between its entry point and the virtual earth points of the charge sensitive preamplifiers located at the end of each resistor network. The difference of the voltage pulses at the output of each preamplifier is proportional to the position at which the charge entered the resistor network and the sum of the pulse is proportional to the energy of the detected gamma ray. The analysis and spatial noise resolution is presented for this type of position sensitive detector. The results of the analysis show that the position resolution is proportional to the square root of the filter amplifier's output pulse time constant and that for energy measurement the resolution is maximized at the filter amplifier's noise corner time constant. The design of the electronic noise filtering system for the prototype gamma ray camera was based on the mathematical energy and spatial resolution equations. For the spatial channel a Gaussian trapezoidal filtering system was developed. Gaussian filtering was used for the energy channel. The detector noise model was verified by taking rms noise measurements of the filtered energy and spatial pulses from resistive readout charge dividing detectors. These measurements were within 10% of theory. (Auth.)

  2. Application for plasma diagnostics with D(α, γ)6Li gamma-ray

    Ochiai, Kentaro; Kubota, Naoyoshi; Nishitani, Takeo; Taniike, Akira; Kitamura, Akira

    2006-01-01

    The gamma ray measurement from fusion plasma is one of the important techniques to clarify fast ion properties in plasma. Some observation of the gamma-ray in JET plasma was reported. 12 C(d, pγ) 13 C and 9 Be(α, nγ) 12 C reactions on the JET observation are mainly recommended as the actual prospective nuclear reaction on the gamma-ray measurement. However, it is thought that the gamma-ray observation by means of these reactions significantly depends on the conditioning (i.e. densities of the beryllium and carbon in plasma). Therefore, it is also important to examine the availabilities concerning the methods of gamma ray. We have tried to measure the 2.18 MeV gamma ray of D(α, γ) 6 Li reaction and the properties of the another gamma ray emission by MeV-He ++ beam irradiation experiment. (author)

  3. The Gamma-ray Sky with Fermi

    Thompson, David

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays reveal extreme, nonthermal conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been exploring the gamma-ray sky for more than four years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge gamma-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

  4. Gamma-ray emission profile measurements during JET ICRH discharges

    Jarvis, O N; Marcus, F B; Sadler, G; Van Belle, P [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Howarth, P J.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Adams, J M; Bond, D S [UKAEA Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Div.

    1994-07-01

    Gamma-ray emission from plasma-impurity reactions caused by minority ICRH accelerating fuel ions to MeV energies has been measured using the JET neutron profile monitor. A successful data analysis technique has been used to isolate the RF-induced gamma-ray emission that was detected, enabling profiles of gamma-ray emission to be obtained. The 2-d gamma-ray emission profiles show that virtually all the radiation originates from the low field side of the RF resonance layer, as expected from RF-induced pitch angle diffusion. The emission profiles indicate the presence of a small population of resonant {sup 3}He ions that possess orbits lying near the passing-trapped boundary. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  5. High energy astrophysics with ground-based gamma ray detectors

    Aharonian, F; Buckley, J; Kifune, T; Sinnis, G

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in ground-based gamma ray astronomy have led to the discovery of more than 70 sources of very high energy (E γ ≥ 100 GeV) gamma rays, falling into a number of source populations including pulsar wind nebulae, shell type supernova remnants, Wolf-Rayet stars, giant molecular clouds, binary systems, the Galactic Center, active galactic nuclei and 'dark' (yet unidentified) galactic objects. We summarize the history of TeV gamma ray astronomy up to the current status of the field including a description of experimental techniques and highlight recent astrophysical results. We also discuss the potential of ground-based gamma ray astronomy for future discoveries and describe possible directions for future instrumental developments

  6. A new computationally-efficient computer program for simulating spectral gamma-ray logs

    Conaway, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    Several techniques to improve the accuracy of radionuclide concentration estimates as a function of depth from gamma-ray logs have appeared in the literature. Much of that work was driven by interest in uranium as an economic mineral. More recently, the problem of mapping and monitoring artificial gamma-emitting contaminants in the ground has rekindled interest in improving the accuracy of radioelement concentration estimates from gamma-ray logs. We are looking at new approaches to accomplishing such improvements. The first step in this effort has been to develop a new computational model of a spectral gamma-ray logging sonde in a borehole environment. The model supports attenuation in any combination of materials arranged in 2-D cylindrical geometry, including any combination of attenuating materials in the borehole, formation, and logging sonde. The model can also handle any distribution of sources in the formation. The model considers unscattered radiation only, as represented by the background-corrected area under a given spectral photopeak as a function of depth. Benchmark calculations using the standard Monte Carlo model MCNP show excellent agreement with total gamma flux estimates with a computation time of about 0.01% of the time required for the MCNP calculations. This model lacks the flexibility of MCNP, although for this application a great deal can be accomplished without that flexibility

  7. Gamma-ray shielding effect of Gd3+ doped lead barium borate glasses

    Kummathi, Harshitha; Naveen Kumar, P.; Vedavathi T., C.; Abhiram, J.; Rajaramakrishna, R.

    2018-05-01

    The glasses of the batch xPbO: 10BaO: (90-x)B2O3: 0.2Gd2O3 (x = 40,45,50 mol %) were prepared by melt-quench technique. The work emphasizes on gamma ray shielding effect on doped lead glasses. The role of Boron is significant as it acts as better neutron attenuator as compared with any other materials, as the thermal neutron cross-sections are high for Gadolinium, 0.2 mol% is chosen as the optimum concentration for this matrix, as higher the concentration may lead to further increase as it produces secondary γ rays due to inelastic neutron scattering. Shielding effects were studied using Sodium Iodide (NaI) - Scintillation Gamma ray spectrometer. It was found that at higher concentration of lead oxide (PbO) in the matrix, higher the attenuation which can be co-related with density. Infra-red (I.R.) spectra reveals that the conversion of Lose triangles to tight tetrahedral structure results in enhancement of shielding properties. The Differential Scanning Calorimeter (D.S.C.) study also reveals that the increase in glass forming range increases the stability which in-turn results in inter-conversion of BO3 to BO4 units such that the density of glass increases with increase in PbO content, resulting in much stable and efficient gamma ray shielding glasses.

  8. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    Teegarden, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events

  9. Optical observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Fynbo, J.P.U.

    2004-01-01

    We briefly review the status and recent progress in the field of optical observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows. We will focus on the fundamental observational evidence for the relationship between gamma-ray bursts and the final evolutionary phases of massive stars. In particular, we will address (i) gamma-ray burst host galaxies, (ii) optically dark gamma-ray burst afterglows, (iii) the gamma-ray burst-supernova connection, and (iv) the relation between X-ray flashes, gamma-ray bursts, and supernovae

  10. Equipment for x- and gamma ray radiography

    Abd Nasir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail

    2004-01-01

    The following topics related to the equipment for x - and gamma ray radiography are discussed in this chapter. The topics are x-ray source for Industrial Radiography: properties of x-ray, generation of x-ray, mechanism of x-ray production, x-ray equipment, power supply, distribution of x-ray intensity along the tube: gamma ray source for Industrial Radiography: properties of gamma rays, gamma ray sources, gamma ray projectors on cameras, source changing. Care of Radiographic Equipments: Merits and Demerits of x and Gamma Rays

  11. Physics and astrophysics with gamma-ray telescopes

    Vandenbroucke, J. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    In the past few years gamma-ray astronomy has entered a golden age. A modern suite of telescopes is now scanning the sky over both hemispheres and over six orders of magnitude in energy. At {approx}TeV energies, only a handful of sources were known a decade ago, but the current generation of ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS) has increased this number to nearly one hundred. With a large field of view and duty cycle, the Tibet and Milagro air shower detectors have demonstrated the promise of the direct particle detection technique for TeV gamma rays. At {approx}GeV energies, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has increased the number of known sources by nearly an order of magnitude in its first year of operation. New classes of sources that were previously theorized to be gamma-ray emitters have now been confirmed observationally. Moreover, there have been surprise discoveries of GeV gamma-ray emission from source classes for which no theory predicted it was possible. In addition to elucidating the processes of high-energy astrophysics, gamma-ray telescopes are making essential contributions to fundamental physics topics including quantum gravity, gravitational waves, and dark matter. I summarize the current census of astrophysical gamma-ray sources, highlight some recent discoveries relevant to fundamental physics, and describe the synergetic connections between gamma-ray and neutrino astronomy. This is a brief overview intended in particular for particle physicists and neutrino astronomers, based on a presentation at the Neutrino 2010 conference in Athens, Greece. I focus in particular on results from Fermi (which was launched soon after Neutrino 2008), and conclude with a description of the next generation of instruments, namely HAWC and the Cherenkov Telescope Array.

  12. SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer System software design description

    Femec, D.A.; Killian, E.W.

    1994-08-01

    To assist in the characterization of the radiological contents of contract-handled waste containers at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP), the SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) System has been developed by the Radiation Measurements and Development Unit of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SGRS system software controls turntable and detector system activities. In addition to determining the concentrations of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, this software also calculates attenuation-corrected isotopic mass ratios of-specific interest. This document describes the software design for the data acquisition and analysis software associated with the SGRS system

  13. SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer System software design description

    Femec, D.A.; Killian, E.W.

    1994-08-01

    To assist in the characterization of the radiological contents of contract-handled waste containers at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP), the SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) System has been developed by the Radiation Measurements and Development Unit of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SGRS system software controls turntable and detector system activities. In addition to determining the concentrations of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, this software also calculates attenuation-corrected isotopic mass ratios of-specific interest. This document describes the software design for the data acquisition and analysis software associated with the SGRS system.

  14. SWEPP gamma-ray spectrometer system software user's guide

    Femec, D.A.

    1994-08-01

    The SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) System has been developed by the Radiation Measurement and Development Unit of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to assist in the characterization of the radiological contents of contact-handled waste containers at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP). In addition to determining the concentrations of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, the software also calculates attenuation-corrected isotopic mass ratios of specific interest, and provides controls for SGRS hardware as required. This document serves as a user's guide for the data acquisition and analysis software associated with the SGRS system

  15. New analytical methods for materials characterization using the techniques of nuclear activation reactions induced by thermal neutrons and accelerated ion beams, coupled to gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Cincu, Emanuela

    1999-01-01

    data from nuclear activation reactions. In the theoretical part of the thesis (Chapter 2) an explanation for the 'critical' phenomena discussed in the CPAA literature was advanced. In Chapters 3-4, new analytical formulae were derived, based on new nuclear parameters (z 0 , z), which are similar to the known (k 0 , k) parameters for the NAA field. A new, absolute standardization method, without any reference standard was also described. Chapter 5 presents new, original applications for determining the energy of the accelerated ion beams and thickness of thin materials, while the Chapter 6 describes two practical methods for optimizing the experiments: the Unitary (CPAA-NAA) analytical method based on the new parameters (z 0 , z), and the Optographic Method based on the specific evolution of each radionuclide. A new concept of the software for processing the experimental data from nuclear activation was developed for CPAA and NAA, and a database of the specific nuclear data was constructed (Chapter 7) by using the 'Fox-Pro' operating system. The experimental CPAA setup (Chapter 8) was a newly constructed reaction vacuum chamber based on the author's design, which allowed an accurate control of the electrical charge transferred to the target and reproducibility of irradiation; the analysis of the gamma-ray spectra from both types of irradiation was carried out by a spectrometer with a high resolution HPGe detector. In conclusion (Chapter 9) this thesis is significant for the field of analysis by nuclear activation (CPAA, and NAA) due to the original contributions to the theoretical, methodological, experimental and specific software and calculation methods. (author)

  16. The Gamma-ray Universe through Fermi

    Thompson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays, the most powerful form of light, reveal extreme conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and its smaller cousin AGILE have been exploring the gamma-ray sky for several years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge ga.nuna-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

  17. Applicability study of using in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry technique for 137Cs and 210Pbex inventories measurement in grassland environments

    Li Junjie; Li Yong; Wang Yanglin; Wu Jiansheng

    2010-01-01

    In-situ measurement of fallout radionuclides 137 Cs and 210 Pb ex has the potential to assess soil erosion and sedimentation rapidly. In this study, inventories of 137 Cs and 210 Pb ex in the soil of Inner Mongolia grassland were measured using an In-situ Object Counting System (ISOCS). The results from the field study indicate that in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry has the following advantages over traditional laboratory measurements: no extra time is required for sample collection, no reference inventories are required, more economic, prompt availability of the results, the ability to average radionuclide inventory over a large area, and high precision.

  18. Repeated 0.5 Gy gamma-ray irradiation attenuates autoimmune disease in MRL-lpr/lpr mice with up-regulation of regulatory T cells

    Mitsutoshi Tsukimoto; Fumitoshi Tago; Hiroko Nakatsukasa; Shuji Kojima

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. MRL-lpr/lpr mice present a single gene mutation on the Fas (CD95) gene that leads to reduced signaling for apoptosis. With aging, these mice spontaneously develop autoimmune disease and are used as a model of systemic lupus erythematosus. We previously reported attenuation of autoimmune disease in MRL-lpr/lpr mice by repeated γ-ray irradiation (0.5 Gy each time). In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of this attenuation focusing the highly activated CD3 + CD4 - CD8 - B220 + T cells, which are characteristically involved in autoimmune pathology in these mice. We measured the weight of the spleen and the population of CD3 + CD4 - CD8 - B220 + T cells. Splenomegaly and increase in percentage of CD3 + CD4 - CD8 - B220 + T cells, which occur with aging in non-irradiated mice, were suppressed in irradiated mice. To investigate the function of CD3 + CD4 - CD8 - B220 + T cells, we isolated these cells from splenocytes by magnetic cell sorting. Isolated CD3 + CD4 - CD8 - B220 + T cells were more resistant to irradiation-induced cell death than isolated CD4 + T cells. Although high proliferation rate and IL-6 production were observed in isolated CD3 + CD4 - CD8 - B220 + T cells, the proliferation rate and IL-6 production were lower in the cells isolated from the irradiated mice. Moreover, the production of autoantibodies (anti-collagen antibody and anti-single strand DNA antibody) was also lowered by irradiation. These results indicate that activation of CD3 + CD4 - CD8 - B220 + T cells and progression of pathology would be suppressed by repeated 0.5 Gy γ-ray irradiation. To uncover the mechanism of the immune suppression, we analyzed population of regulatory T cells (CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + ), which suppress activated T cells and excessive autoimmune responses. Intriguingly, significant increase of the percentage of regulatory T cells was observed in irradiated mice. In conclusion, we found that repeated 0.5 Gy γ-ray irradiation

  19. Demonstration of a collimated in situ method for determining depth distributions using gamma-ray spectrometry

    Benke, R R

    2002-01-01

    In situ gamma-ray spectrometry uses a portable detector to quantify radionuclides in materials. The main shortcoming of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry has been its inability to determine radionuclide depth distributions. Novel collimator designs were paired with a commercial in situ gamma-ray spectrometry system to overcome this limitation for large area sources. Positioned with their axes normal to the material surface, the cylindrically symmetric collimators limited the detection of un attenuated gamma-rays from a selected range of polar angles (measured off the detector axis). Although this approach does not alleviate the need for some knowledge of the gamma-ray attenuation characteristics of the materials being measured, the collimation method presented in this paper represents an absolute method that determines the depth distribution as a histogram, while other in situ methods require a priori knowledge of the depth distribution shape. Other advantages over previous in situ methods are that this method d...

  20. Multifrequency Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst

    Greiner, J.

    1995-01-01

    Neither a flaring nor a quiescent counterpart to a gamma-ray burst has yet been convincingly identified at any wavelength region. The present status of the search for counterparts of classical gamma-ray bursts is given. Particular emphasis is put on the search for flaring counterparts, i.e. emission during or shortly after the gamma-ray emission.

  1. Stellar Sources of Gamma-ray Bursts

    Luchkov, B. I.

    2011-01-01

    Correlation analysis of Swift gamma-ray burst coordinates and nearby star locations (catalog Gliese) reveals 4 coincidences with good angular accuracy. The random probability is 4\\times 10^{-5}, so evidencing that coincident stars are indeed gamma-ray burst sources. Some additional search of stellar gamma-ray bursts is discussed.

  2. Gamma-rays from deep inelastic collisions

    Stephens, F.S.

    1981-01-01

    My objective in this talk is to consider the question: 'What can be learned about deep inelastic collisions (DIC) from studying the associated gamma-rays'. First, I discuss the origin and nature of the gamma-rays from DIC, then the kinds of information gamma-ray spectra contain, and finally come to the combination of these two subjects. (orig./HSI)

  3. Very high energy gamma-ray astronomy

    Weekes, T.C.

    1989-01-01

    It is apparent that very high gamma-ray astronomy, at the very end of the electromagnetic spectrum, is just at the threshold of becoming an important channel of astronomical information. The author discusses how, to fully develop, it requires telescopes with improved minimum flux sensitivity; development of techniques that characterize the nature of the primary; more overlapping observations to remove any question of the reality of the detected phenomenon; more consistency in the application of statistics among experimenters and more openness about methods used; development of models that will predict the phenomenon to be expected rather than explain what has been observed; and more accurate calibrations to determine absolute fluxes and energies

  4. Production cross section measurement of discrete gammas-ray at 90 degree for interactions of 14. 9 MeV neutrons with carbon and niobium

    Zhou Hongyu; Yan Yiming; Tang lin; Wen Chenlin; Zhang Shenji; Hua Ming; Han Chongzhan; Ding Xiaoji; Lan Liqiao; Fan Guoying; Yan Hua; Wang Xingfu; Wang Qi; Sun Suxu; Rong Yaning; Liu Shuzhen (Institute of Low Energy Nuclear Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing (CN))

    1989-05-01

    The cross sections of discrete gamma-ray produced by interactions of 14.9 MeV neutrons with carbon and niobium were investigated. A pulsed {ital T}({ital d},{ital n}){sup 4} He neutron source was used in the measurement. Neutron flux incident upon the sample was determined with the associated particle method. Technique of time-of-flight was used for reducing the background. A new method to calculate neutron flux attenuation in large cylindrical sample was proposed. The split of 4.439 MeV gamma-ray line from {sup 12}C({ital n},{ital n}{prime}{gamma}){sup 12}C reactions was confirmed. 79 discrete gamma-ray lines and their production cross sections for the interactions of 14.9 MeV neutrons with niobium were obtained for the first time.

  5. Two gamma-ray detectors method for examination of fuel elements

    Kristof, E.; Pregl, G.

    1979-01-01

    Th initial experiment and method for the nondestructive determination of a fuel element burnup is given. The method eliminates the error which originates from the unknown local dependency of the attenuation coefficient for gamma rays in fuel. (author)

  6. Compton suppression gamma ray spectrometry

    Landsberger, S.; Iskander, F.Y.; Niset, M.; Heydorn, K.

    2002-01-01

    In the past decade there have been many studies to use Compton suppression methods in routine neutron activation analysis as well as in the traditional role of low level gamma ray counting of environmental samples. On a separate path there have been many new PC based software packages that have been developed to enhance photopeak fitting. Although the newer PC based algorithms have had significant improvements, they still suffer from being effectively used in weak gamma ray lines in natural samples or in neutron activated samples that have very high Compton backgrounds. We have completed a series of experiments to show the usefulness of Compton suppression. As well we have shown the pitfalls when using Compton suppression methods for high counting deadtimes as in the case of neutron activated samples. We have also investigated if counting statistics are the same both suppressed and normal modes. Results are presented in four separate experiments. (author)

  7. Use of gamma ray attenuation technique in the study on Pinus oocarpa specific mass variation of 24-years old

    Rezende, Marcos Antonio de; Guerrini, Ivan Amaral; Ducatti, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    The work studies the physical properties of the wood, evidencing the use of the 241 Am, as gamma radiation source. The results showed that most of the trees of Pinus oocarpa presented a pick of high specific mass in the beginning of the growth, followed by a decrease near by the 5 year-old age. Starting from that age, there was gradual increment of the specific mass to the cut age, made to the 24 years. (author)

  8. Inverse Compton gamma-rays from pulsars

    Morini, M.

    1983-01-01

    A model is proposed for pulsar optical and gamma-ray emission where relativistic electrons beams: (i) scatter the blackbody photons from the polar cap surface giving inverse Compton gamma-rays and (ii) produce synchrotron optical photons in the light cylinder region which are then inverse Compton scattered giving other gamma-rays. The model is applied to the Vela pulsar, explaining the first gamma-ray pulse by inverse Compton scattering of synchrotron photons near the light cylinder and the second gamma-ray pulse partly by inverse Compton scattering of synchrotron photons and partly by inverse Compton scattering of the thermal blackbody photons near the star surface. (author)

  9. Investigation of the effect of barium content on the structural and gamma-ray shielding properties of bismuth borate glasses

    Parminder Kaur; Singh, K.J.; Kulwinder Kaur; Anand, Vikas; Dogra, Mridula

    2017-01-01

    Glasses doped with heavy metal oxides have been proposed to shield the hazardous gamma rays originating from nuclear reactors as alternative to the conventional concretes. In this work, transparent glasses with composition 65Bi_2O_3-xBaO-(35-x) B_2O_3 (with x =0, 4, 8 wt %) have been prepared by using melt quenching technique in the laboratory. XRD and FTIR studies have been undertaken to explore the structural properties. The amorphous nature of the prepared samples is confirmed by XRD studies. Structural changes in the system have been explored by FTIR studies. The FTIR results reveal the conversion of (BO_3) triangular units to (BO_4) tetrahedral units with the addition of barium oxide along with the creation of non-bridging oxygen in the prepared glass system. Gamma-ray shielding properties have been explored with the help of WinXCom software developed by National Institute Standards and Technology at photon energy 662 keV. Gamma ray shielding properties in terms of mass attenuation coefficient, half value layer, tenth value layer and mean free path have been found to be superior as compared to the ordinary as well as barite concrete. Therefore, it is speculated that our prepared glass samples can serve as better gamma ray shielding materials. (author)

  10. Imaging of heterogeneous materials by prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis

    Staples, Parrish; Prettyman, Tom; Lestone, John

    1999-01-01

    We have used a Tomographic Gamma Scanner (TGS) to produce tomographic Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Imaging of heterogeneous matrices [T.H. Prettyman, R.J. Estep, G.A. Sheppard, Trans. Am. Nucl. Soc. 69 (1993) 183-184]. The TGS was modified by the addition of graphite reflectors that contain isotopic neutron sources for sample interrogation. We are in the process of developing the analysis methodology necessary for a quantitative assay of large containers of heterogeneous material. This nondestructive analysis technique can be used for material characterization and the determination of neutron assay correction factors. The most difficult question to be answered is the determination of the source to sample coupling term. To assist in the determination of the coupling term we have obtained images for a range of samples that are very well characterized; such as, homogenous pseudo one-dimensional samples to three-dimensional heterogeneous samples. We then compare the measurements to Monte Carlo N-particle calculations. For an accurate quantitative measurement it is also necessary to determine the sample gamma-ray self attenuation at higher gamma-ray energies, namely pair production should be incorporated into the analysis codes

  11. Imaging of heterogeneous materials by prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis

    Staples, P.; Prettyman, T.; Lestone, J.

    1998-01-01

    The authors have used a tomographic gamma scanner (TGS) to produce tomographic prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis imaging (PGNAA) of heterogeneous matrices. The TGS was modified by the addition of graphite reflectors that contain isotopic neutron sources for sample interrogation. The authors are in the process of developing the analysis methodology necessary for a quantitative assay of large containers of heterogeneous material. This nondestructive analysis (NDA) technique can be used for material characterization and the determination of neutron assay correction factors. The most difficult question to be answered is the determination of the source-to-sample coupling term. To assist in the determination of the coupling term, the authors have obtained images for a range of sample that are very well characterized, such as, homogenous pseudo one-dimensional samples to three-dimensional heterogeneous samples. They then compare the measurements to MCNP calculations. For an accurate quantitative measurement, it is also necessary to determine the sample gamma-ray self attenuation at higher gamma-ray energies, namely pair production should be incorporated into the analysis codes

  12. CAMAC gamma ray scanning system

    Moss, C.E.; Pratt, J.C.; Shunk, E.R.

    1981-01-01

    A flexible gamma-ray scanning system, based on a LeCroy 3500 multichannel analyzer and CAMAC modules, is described. The system is designed for making simultaneous passive and active scans of objects of interest to nuclear safeguards. The scanner is a stepping-motor-driven carriage; the detectors, a bismuth-germanate scintillator and a high-purity germanium detector. A total of sixteen peaks in the two detector-produced spectra can be integrated simultaneously, and any scan can be viewed during data acquisition. For active scanning, the 2615-keV gamma-ray line from a 232 U source and the 4439-keV gamma-ray line from 9 Be(α,n) 12 C were selected. The system can be easily reconfigured to accommodate up to seven detectors because it is based on CAMAC modules and FORTRAN. The system is designed for field use and is easily transported. Examples of passive and active scans are presented

  13. Analysis of concrete material through gamma ray computerized tomography

    Oliveira Junior, J.M. de

    2004-01-01

    Computerized Tomography (CT) refers to the cross sectional imaging of an object from both transmission or reflection data collected by illuminating the object from many different directions. The most important contribution of CT is to greatly improve abilities to distinguish regions with different gamma ray transmittance and to separate over-lying structures. The mathematical problem of the CT imaging is that of estimating an image from its projections. These projections can represent, for example, the linear attenuation coefficient of γ-rays along the path of the ray. In this work we will present some new results obtained by using tomographic techniques to analyze column samples of concrete to check the distribution of various materials and structural problems. These concrete samples were made using different proportions of stone, sand and cement. Another set of samples with different proportions of sand and cement were also used to verify the outcome from the CT analysis and the differences between them. Those samples were prepared at the Material Laboratory of Faculdade de Engenharia de Sorocaba, following the same procedures used in real case of concrete tests. The projections used in this work was obtained by Mini Computerized Tomograph of Uniso (MTCU), located at the Experimental Nuclear Physics Laboratory at University of Sorocaba. This tomograph operates with a gamma ray source of 241 Am (photons of 60 keV and 100 mCi of intensity) and a NaI(Tl) solid state detector. The system features translation and rotation scanning modes, a 100 mm effective field of view, and 1 mm spatial resolution. The image reconstruction problem is solved using Discrete Filtered Backprojection (FBP). (author)

  14. Gamma ray and neutron shielding properties of some concrete materials

    Yilmaz, E.; Baltas, H.; Kiris, E.; Ustabas, I.; Cevik, U.; El-Khayatt, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This study sheds light on the shielding properties of gamma-rays and neutrons for some concrete samples. → The experimental mass attenuation coefficients values were compared with theoretical values obtained using WinXCom. → Moreover, neutron shielding has been treated in terms of macroscopic removal cross-section (Σ R , cm -1 ) concept. → The NXcom program was employed to calculate the attenuation coefficients values of neutrons. → These values showed a change with energy and composition of the concrete samples. - Abstract: Shielding of gamma-rays and neutrons by 12 concrete samples with and without mineral additives has been studied. The total mass attenuation and linear attenuation coefficients, half-value thicknesses, effective atomic numbers, effective electron densities and atomic cross-sections at photons energies of 59.5 and 661 keV have been measured and calculated. The measured and calculated values were compared and a reasonable agreement has been observed. Also the recorded values showed a change with energy and composition of the concrete samples. In addition, neutron shielding has been treated in terms of macroscopic removal cross-section (Σ R , cm -1 ) concept. The WinXCom and NXcom programs were employed to calculate the attenuation coefficients of gamma-rays and neutrons, respectively.

  15. Assessment of measurement result uncertainty in determination of 210Pb with the focus on matrix composition effect in gamma-ray spectrometry

    Iurian, A.R.; Pitois, A.; Kis-Benedek, G.; Migliori, A.; Padilla-Alvarez, R.; Ceccatelli, A.

    2016-01-01

    Reference materials were used to assess measurement result uncertainty in determination of 210 Pb by gamma-ray spectrometry, liquid scintillation counting, or indirectly by alpha-particle spectrometry, using its daughter 210 Po in radioactive equilibrium. Combined standard uncertainties of 210 Pb massic activities obtained by liquid scintillation counting are in the range 2–12%, depending on matrices and massic activity values. They are in the range 1–3% for the measurement of its daughter 210 Po using alpha-particle spectrometry. Three approaches (direct computation of counting efficiency and efficiency transfer approaches based on the computation and, respectively, experimental determination of the efficiency transfer factors) were applied for the evaluation of 210 Pb using gamma-ray spectrometry. Combined standard uncertainties of gamma-ray spectrometry results were found in the range 2–17%. The effect of matrix composition on self-attenuation was investigated and a detailed assessment of uncertainty components was performed. - Highlights: • Confirmed 210 Pb certified values by LSC and alpha-particle spectrometry ( 210 Po). • Assessed 210 Po measurement result uncertainty by alpha-particle spectrometry. • Matrix composition effect on gamma-ray spectrometry measurement result uncertainty. • Assessment of 210 Pb measurement result uncertainty by gamma-ray spectrometry. • Comparison of techniques and approaches: ‘fit-for-purpose’ considerations.

  16. A method for synthesizing response functions of NaI detectors to gamma rays

    Sie, S.H.

    1978-08-01

    A simple method of parametrizing the response function of NaI detectors to gamma rays is described, based on decomposition of the pulse-height spectrum into components associated with the actual detection processes. Smooth dependence of the derived parameters on the gamma-ray energy made it possible to generate a lineshape for any gamma-ray energy by suitable interpolation techniques. The method is applied in analysis of spectra measured with a 7.6 x 7.6 cm NaI detector in continuum gamma-ray study following (HI,xn) reaction

  17. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    Lamb, R.C.; Lewis, D.A.

    1990-02-01

    Our scientific goal is to discover and study by means of gamma-ray astronomy those regions of the universe where particles are accelerated to extreme energies. The atmospheric Cherenkov technique provides a unique and potentially sensitive window in the region of 10 11 to approximately 10 14 eV for this purpose. The Whipple Observatory Collaboration is currently engaged in the development of a Cherenkov camera which has the ultimate capability of distinguishing gamma-ray showers from the numerous cosmic-ray background showers by imaging the Cherenkov light from each shower. We have recently demonstrated the potential of the imaging technique with our 18 sigma detection of TeV photons from the Crab Nebula using a camera of 10 elements, pixel spacing 0.25 degrees. This detection represents a factor of 10 improvement in sensitivity compared to a non-imaging detector. The next step in the development of the detector is to obtain a second large reflector, similar to the present 10 meter instrument, for stereoscopic viewing of showers. This project, named GRANITE, is now approved by DOE. With GRANITE it should be possible to probe more deeply in space by a factor of 7, and to fully investigate the possibility of new physics which has been suggested by reports of anomalous radiation from Hercules X-1. 18 refs

  18. Comparison of in-situ gamma ray spectrometry measurements with conventional methods in determination natural and artificial nuclides in soil

    Al-Masri, M. S.; Doubal, A. W.

    2010-12-01

    Two nuclear analytical techniques (In-Situ Gamma ray spectrometry and laboratory gamma ray spectrometry) for determination of natural and artificial radionuclides in soil have been validated. The first technique depends on determination of radioactivity content of representative samples of the studied soil after laboratory preparation, while the second technique is based on direct determination of radioactivity content of soil using in-situ gamma-ray spectrometer. Analytical validation parameter such as detection limits, repeatability, reproducibility in addition to measurement uncertainties were estimated and compared for both techniques. Comparison results have shown that the determination of radioactivity in soil should apply the two techniques together where each of techniques is characterized by its low detection limit and uncertainty suitable for defined application of measurement. Radioactive isotopes in various locations were determined using the two methods by measuring 40 k, 238 U,and 137 Cs. The results showed that there are differences in attenuation factors due to soil moisture content differences; wet weight corrections should be applied when the two techniques are compared. (author)

  19. Space instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy

    Teegarden, B.J

    1999-02-11

    The decade of the 1990s has witnessed a renaissance in the field of gamma-ray astronomy. The seminal event was the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) in April 1991. There have been a flood of major discoveries from CGRO including breakthroughs in gamma-ray bursts, annihilation radiation, and blazars. The Italian SAX satellite was launched in April 1996. Although not primarily a gamma-ray mission, it has added a new dimension to our understanding of gamma-ray bursts. Along with these new discoveries a firm groundwork has been laid for missions and new technology development that should maintain a healthy and vigorous field throughout most of the next decade. These include the ESA INTEGRAL mission (INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, to be launched in mid-2001) and the NASA GLAST mission (Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope) with a likely launch in the middle of the next decade. These two missions will extend the observational capabilities well beyond those of CGRO. New technologies (to gamma-ray astronomy), such as cooled germanium detectors, silicon strip detectors, and CdTe detectors are planned for these new missions. Additional promising new technologies such as CdZnTe strip detectors, scintillator fibers, and a gamma-ray lens for future gamma-ray astronomy missions are under development in laboratories around the world.

  20. Space instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy

    Teegarden, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    The decade of the 1990s has witnessed a renaissance in the field of gamma-ray astronomy. The seminal event was the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) in April 1991. There have been a flood of major discoveries from CGRO including breakthroughs in gamma-ray bursts, annihilation radiation, and blazars. The Italian SAX satellite was launched in April 1996. Although not primarily a gamma-ray mission, it has added a new dimension to our understanding of gamma-ray bursts. Along with these new discoveries a firm groundwork has been laid for missions and new technology development that should maintain a healthy and vigorous field throughout most of the next decade. These include the ESA INTEGRAL mission (INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, to be launched in mid-2001) and the NASA GLAST mission (Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope) with a likely launch in the middle of the next decade. These two missions will extend the observational capabilities well beyond those of CGRO. New technologies (to gamma-ray astronomy), such as cooled germanium detectors, silicon strip detectors, and CdTe detectors are planned for these new missions. Additional promising new technologies such as CdZnTe strip detectors, scintillator fibers, and a gamma-ray lens for future gamma-ray astronomy missions are under development in laboratories around the world

  1. Continued Development of a Soft Gamma-Ray Concentrator

    Bloser, Peter

    We propose to continue our development of a concept for a soft gamma-ray (E > 100 keV) concentrator using thin-film multilayer structures. Alternating layers of low- and high-density materials will channel soft gamma-ray photons via total external reflection. A suitable arrangement of bent structures will then concentrate the incident radiation to a point. Gamma-ray optics made in this way offer the potential for soft gamma-ray telescopes with focal lengths of less than 10 m, removing the need for formation flying spacecraft and opening the field up to balloon-borne instruments. Under previous APRA funding we have been investigating methods for efficiently producing such multilayer structures and modeling their performance. We now propose to pursue magnetron sputtering (MS) techniques to quickly produce structures with the required smoothness and thickness, to measure their channeling efficiency and compare with calculations, and to design a "lens" with optimized bandpass and throughput and predict its scientific performance. If successful, this work will confirm that this innovative optics concept is suitable for a balloon-born soft gamma-ray telescope with unprecedented sensitivity.

  2. Microstructural characterization of porous materials by X-ray microtomography and gamma ray transmission techniques; Caracterizacao da microestrutura de materiais porosos por microtomografia de raios X e transmissao de raios gama

    Moreira, Anderson Camargo

    2006-07-01

    This work presents the application of the X-ray microtomography and gamma ray transmission techniques for the microstructure characterization of different kinds of materials. Total porosity, pore size distribution and the two point correlation functions were measured. The two point correlation function, which allows the reconstruction of 3D models, was carried out for two samples. Seven ceramic tablets of Alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), seven tablets of Boron Carbide (B{sub 4}C), three samples of sedimentary rocks and one sample of Titanium foam were analyzed. The experimental set up for the Gamma Ray Transmission technique consisted of: a 2'' x 2'' crystal NaI(Tl) detector, an {sup 241} Am radioactive source (59,53 keV, 100 mCi), an automatic micrometric table for the sample XZ movement and standard gamma spectrometry electronics. Two microtomography systems were used: a Fein Focus system, constituted by an X-ray tube, operated at 160 kV and 0.3 to 1.1 mA, a CCD camera and the movement sample system, and a Skyscan system, model 1072, with a X-ray tube operated at 100 kV and 100{mu}A, and a CCD camera. The ceramic tablets, analyzed by the gamma ray transmission technique presented results for most of the porosities data with smaller confidence intervals and inside the intervals supplied by the tablets manufacturer. The Titanium porous sample was analyzed by the two techniques, its microtomography images achieved a resolution of 17{mu}m, obtained employing the Fein Focus system. For both techniques, this sample showed high porosity, which allows its application for this purpose. The sandstones samples were analyzed by the Skyscan system, achieving resolutions of 19{mu}m, 11{mu}m and 3.8{mu}m for each sample, respectively. The resolutions of 11{mu}m and 3.8{mu}m were the ones that generated better 2D sections for the respective samples and, consequently, more reliable porosities. The 3.8{mu}m resolution was the one that best quantified the pore size

  3. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts

    Hurley, K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the essential aspects of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomenon, with emphasis on the more recent results. GRBs are introduced by their time histories, which provide some evidence for a compact object origin. The energy spectra of bursts are presented and they are seen to demonstrate practically unambiguously that the origin of some GRBs involves neutron stars. Counterpart searches are reviewed briefly and the statistical properties of bursters treated. This paper presents a review of the three known repeating bursters (the Soft Gamma Repeaters). Extragalactic and galactic models are discussed and future prospects are assessed

  4. Gamma-ray induced doppler broadening

    Robinson, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The ultra high resolving power of the GAMS4 double-flat crystal spectrometer (M.S. Dewey et al Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 284 (1989) 151.) has been used to observe the Doppler broadening of gamma-rays emitted by nuclei recoiling at speeds as low as 10 -6 c. Such recoils may be induced by the previous emission of gamma-radiation following thermal neutron capture. If the population mechanism of an excited state is known (or can be approximated) and the slowing down mechanism can be modeled, then this technique can be used to extract the lifetime of excited nuclear states. The combination of this technique and the neutron capture reaction allows the study of states which cannot necessarily be accessed by other means. This has allowed the resolution of a number of long standing questions in low-spin nuclear structure. The basis of the technique is discussed and a number of examples given

  5. Gamma ray polarimetry using a position sensitive germanium detector

    Kroeger, R A; Kurfess, J D; Phlips, B F

    1999-01-01

    Imaging gamma-ray detectors make sensitive polarimeters in the Compton energy regime by measuring the scatter direction of gamma rays. The principle is to capitalize on the angular dependence of the Compton scattering cross section to polarized gamma rays and measure the distribution of scatter directions within the detector. This technique is effective in a double-sided germanium detector between roughly 50 keV and 1 MeV. This paper reviews device characteristics important to the optimization of a Compton polarimeter, and summarizes measurements we have made using a device with a 5x5 cm active area, 1 cm thickness, and strip-electrodes on a 2 mm pitch.

  6. Monte Carlo simulations of plutonium gamma-ray spectra

    Koenig, Z.M.; Carlson, J.B.; Wang, Tzu-Fang; Ruhter, W.D.

    1993-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were investigated as a means of simulating the gamma-ray spectra of Pu. These simulated spectra will be used to develop and evaluate gamma-ray analysis techniques for various nondestructive measurements. Simulated spectra of calculational standards can be used for code intercomparisons, to understand systematic biases and to estimate minimum detection levels of existing and proposed nondestructive analysis instruments. The capability to simulate gamma-ray spectra from HPGe detectors could significantly reduce the costs of preparing large numbers of real reference materials. MCNP was used for the Monte Carlo transport of the photons. Results from the MCNP calculations were folded in with a detector response function for a realistic spectrum. Plutonium spectrum peaks were produced with Lorentzian shapes, for the x-rays, and Gaussian distributions. The MGA code determined the Pu isotopes and specific power of this calculated spectrum and compared it to a similar analysis on a measured spectrum

  7. Gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP)

    Mihara, Tatehiro; Murakami, Toshio; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Gunji, Shuichi; Kubo, Shin

    2013-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP: GAmma-ray burst Polarimeter), which had been almost handcrafted by scientists, has succeeded in working normally in interplanetary space, and in detecting the polarization of the gamma-ray from a mysterious astronomical object 'gamma-ray burst'. It is the first result of the detectors in the world exclusively aiming at detecting gamma-ray polarization. We mainly describe the hardware of our GAP equipment and show the method of preparing equipment to work in the cosmic space with a tight budget. The mechanical structure, the electronic circuits, the software on the equipment, the data analysis on the earth, and the scientific results gained by the observation just over one year, are presented after explaining the principle of gamma-ray polarization detection. Our design to protect equipment against mechanical shock and cosmic radiation may provide useful information for future preparation of compact satellite. (J.P.N.)

  8. High energy gamma-ray production in nuclear reactions

    Pinston, J.A.; Nifenecker, H.; Nifenecker, H.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental techniques used to study high energy gamma-ray production in nuclear reactions are reviewed. High energy photon production in nucleus-nucleus collisions is discussed. Semi-classical descriptions of the nucleus-nucleus gamma reactions are introduced. Nucleon-nucleon gamma cross sections are considered, including theoretical aspects and experimental data. High energy gamma ray production in proton-nucleus reactions is explained. Theoretical explanations of photon emission in nucleus-nucleus collisions are treated. The contribution of charged pion currents to photon production is mentioned

  9. Gamma-Ray Astronomy Technology Needs

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades gamma-ray observations have become a valuable tool for studying the universe. Progress made in diverse 8re1lS such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), nucleosynthesis, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has complimented and enriched our astrophysical understanding in many ways. We present an overview of current and future planned space y-ray missions and discussion technology needs for- the next generation of space gamma-ray instruments.

  10. A Comparison Of GADRAS Simulated And Measured Gamma Ray Spectra

    Jeffcoat, R.; Salaymeh, S.

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray radiation detection systems are continuously being developed and improved for detecting the presence of radioactive material and for identifying isotopes present. Gamma-ray spectra, from many different isotopes and in different types and thicknesses of attenuation material and matrixes, are needed to evaluate the performance of these devices. Recently, a test and evaluation exercise was performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory that required a large number of gamma-ray spectra. Simulated spectra were used for a major portion of the testing in order to provide a pool of data large enough for the results to be statistically significant. The test data set was comprised of two types of data, measured and simulated. The measured data were acquired with a hand-held Radioisotope Identification Device (RIID) and simulated spectra were created using Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS, Mitchell and Mattingly, Sandia National Laboratory). GADRAS uses a one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculation to simulate gamma-ray spectra. The measured and simulated spectra have been analyzed and compared. This paper will discuss the results of the comparison and offer explanations for spectral differences.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of gamma ray tomography for image reconstruction

    Guedes, Karlos A.N.; Moura, Alex; Dantas, Carlos; Melo, Silvio; Lima, Emerson, E-mail: karlosguedes@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Meric, Ilker [University of Bergen (Norway)

    2015-07-01

    The Monte Carlo simulations of known density and shape object was validate with Gamma Ray Tomography in static experiments. An aluminum half-moon piece placed inside a steel pipe was the MC simulation test object that was also measured by means of gamma ray transmission. Wall effect of the steel pipe due to irradiation geometry in a single pair source-detector tomography was evaluated by comparison with theoretical data. MCNPX code requires a defined geometry to each photon trajectory which practically prevents this usage for tomography reconstruction simulation. The solution was found by writing a program in Delphi language to create input files automation code. Simulations of tomography data by automated MNCPX code were carried out and validated by experimental data. Working in this sequence the produced data needed a databank to be stored. Experimental setup used a Cesium-137 isotopic radioactive source (7.4 × 109 Bq), and NaI(Tl) scintillation detector of (51 × 51) × 10−3 m crystal size coupled to a multichannel analyzer. A stainless steel tubes of 0,154 m internal diameter, 0.014 m thickness wall. The results show that the MCNPX simulation code adapted to automated input file is useful for generating a matrix data M(θ,t), of a computerized gamma ray tomography for any known density and regular shape object. Experimental validation used RMSE from gamma ray paths and from attenuation coefficient data. (author)

  12. Population Synthesis of Radio & Gamma-Ray Millisecond Pulsars

    Frederick, Sara; Gonthier, P. L.; Harding, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the number of known gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in the Galactic disk has risen substantially thanks to confirmed detections by Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). We have developed a new population synthesis of gamma-ray and radio MSPs in the galaxy which uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques to explore the large and small worlds of the model parameter space and allows for comparisons of the simulated and detected MSP distributions. The simulation employs empirical radio and gamma-ray luminosity models that are dependent upon the pulsar period and period derivative with freely varying exponents. Parameters associated with the birth distributions are also free to vary. The computer code adjusts the magnitudes of the model luminosities to reproduce the number of MSPs detected by a group of ten radio surveys, thus normalizing the simulation and predicting the MSP birth rates in the Galaxy. Computing many Markov chains leads to preferred sets of model parameters that are further explored through two statistical methods. Marginalized plots define confidence regions in the model parameter space using maximum likelihood methods. A secondary set of confidence regions is determined in parallel using Kuiper statistics calculated from comparisons of cumulative distributions. These two techniques provide feedback to affirm the results and to check for consistency. Radio flux and dispersion measure constraints have been imposed on the simulated gamma-ray distributions in order to reproduce realistic detection conditions. The simulated and detected distributions agree well for both sets of radio and gamma-ray pulsar characteristics, as evidenced by our various comparisons.

  13. Gamma-ray burst models.

    King, Andrew

    2007-05-15

    I consider various possibilities for making gamma-ray bursts, particularly from close binaries. In addition to the much-studied neutron star+neutron star and black hole+neutron star cases usually considered good candidates for short-duration bursts, there are also other possibilities. In particular, neutron star+massive white dwarf has several desirable features. These systems are likely to produce long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), in some cases definitely without an accompanying supernova, as observed recently. This class of burst would have a strong correlation with star formation and occur close to the host galaxy. However, rare members of the class need not be near star-forming regions and could have any type of host galaxy. Thus, a long-duration burst far from any star-forming region would also be a signature of this class. Estimates based on the existence of a known progenitor suggest that this type of GRB may be quite common, in agreement with the fact that the absence of a supernova can only be established in nearby bursts.

  14. Gamma ray emission from pulsars

    Salvati, M.; Massaro, E.

    1978-01-01

    A model for the production of gamma rays in a pulsar environment is presented, together with numerical computations fitted to the observations of PSR 0833-45. It is assumed that the primary particles are accelerated close to the star surface and then injected along the open field lines, which cause them to emit curvature radiation. The equation describing the particles' braking is integrated exactly up to the first order in the pulsar rotational frequency, and the transfer problem for the curvature photons is solved with the aberration, the Doppler shif, and the pair production absorption being taken into account. The latter effect is due not only to the transverse component of the magnetic field, but also to the electric field induced by the rotation. The synchrotron radiation emitted by the secondary particles is also included, subject to the 'on-the-spot' approximation. It is found that the observed gamma rays originate in the innermost regions of the magnetosphere, where the open lines' bundle is narrow and the geometrical beaming is effective. As shown by the computed pulse profiles, the duty cycle turns out to be equal to a few percent, comparable to the one of PSR 0833-45. The averaged spectra indicate that a substantial fraction of the primary photons do outlive the interaction with the magnetisphere; furthermore, the agreement in shape with the observational curves suggests that the acceleration output is fiarly close to a monoenergetic beam of particles. (orig.) [de

  15. Dark gamma-ray bursts

    Brdar, Vedran; Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia

    2017-03-01

    Many theories of dark matter (DM) predict that DM particles can be captured by stars via scattering on ordinary matter. They subsequently condense into a DM core close to the center of the star and eventually annihilate. In this work, we trace DM capture and annihilation rates throughout the life of a massive star and show that this evolution culminates in an intense annihilation burst coincident with the death of the star in a core collapse supernova. The reason is that, along with the stellar interior, also its DM core heats up and contracts, so that the DM density increases rapidly during the final stages of stellar evolution. We argue that, counterintuitively, the annihilation burst is more intense if DM annihilation is a p -wave process than for s -wave annihilation because in the former case, more DM particles survive until the supernova. If among the DM annihilation products are particles like dark photons that can escape the exploding star and decay to standard model particles later, the annihilation burst results in a flash of gamma rays accompanying the supernova. For a galactic supernova, this "dark gamma-ray burst" may be observable in the Čerenkov Telescope Array.

  16. Relativistic motion in gamma-ray bursts

    Krolik, J.H.; Pier, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three fundamental problems affect models of gamma-ray bursts, i.e., the energy source, the ability of high-energy photons to escape the radiation region, and the comparative weakness of X-ray emission. It is indicated that relativistic bulk motion of the gamma-ray-emitting plasma generically provides a solution to all three of these problems. Results show that, if the plasma that produces gamma-ray bursts has a bulk relativistic velocity with Lorentz factor gamma of about 10, several of the most troubling problems having to do with gamma-ray bursts are solved. 42 refs

  17. Radio Observations of Gamma-ray Novae

    Linford, Justin D.; Chomiuk, L.; Ribeiro, V.; project, E.-Nova

    2014-01-01

    Recent detection of gamma-ray emission from classical novae by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope surprised many in the astronomical community. We present results from radio observations, obtained using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), of three gamma-ray novae: Mon2012, Sco2012, and Del2013. Radio observations allow for the calculation of ejecta masses, place limits on the distances, and provide information about the gamma-ray emission mechanism for these sources.

  18. Materials testing by computerized tomography with neutrons and gamma-rays

    El-Ghobary, A M; Bakkoush, F A; Megahid, R M [Reactor and Neutron Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center, A.E.A., Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    The method of computerized tomography by fast neutrons and gamma-rays are used for inspecting and testing of materials by non-destructive technique. The transmission technique was applied using narrow collimated beams of reactor neutrons and gamma-ray. The neutron and gamma-rays transmitted through the object inspection were measured by means of a neutron gamma detector with Ne - 213 liquid organic scintillator. The undesired pulses of neutrons or gamma-rays are rejected from the transmitted beam by a discrimination technique based on the difference in the decay part of light pulse produced by recoil electrons or recoil protons. The transmitted neutrons or gamma-rays for different projections used to get the image of the section through the object investigated using the method of filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. 8 figs.

  19. New lithology compensated capture gamma ray system

    Peatross, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    The results of the HYDROCARBON* log after a series of field tests in which gamma rays resulting from thermal neutron capture were measured utilizing an energy analyzer and a scintillation counter of unique construction are reported. A brief discussion covers the nuclear physics required for an understanding of gamma spectral logging. Included in the explanation will be the effects of different atoms on neutrons and photons. The HYDROCARBON log utilizes these nuclear principles to record cased hole measurements and quantitatively distinguish possible productive zones from non-productive zones. Different field examples are illustrated showing the response to shaly sands, porosity and water salinity. Interpretation techniques are discussed both qualitatively and quantitatively. The HYDROCARBON log has proven to be a reliable device in the determination of water saturation in sands behind casing even when shale content and porosity are not well known. This technique is also valuable in the location of the present position of gas--oil contacts and water levels

  20. Are 0.1%-accurate gamma-ray assays possible for 235U solutions

    Parker, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    The factors influencing the accuracy of passive gamma-ray assay of uniform, homogeneous solution samples have been studied in some detail, particularly for the assay of 235 U in uranium solutions. Factors considered are the overall long-term electronic stability, the information losses caused by the rate-related electronic processes of pulse pileup and dead-time, and the self-attenuation of gamma rays within the samples. Both experimental and computational studies indicate that gamma-ray assay procedures for solution samples of moderate size (from approx. 10 to perhaps a few hundred milliliters) are now capable of accuracies approaching 0.1% in many practical cases

  1. Standard test method for nondestructive assay of special nuclear material in low density scrap and waste by segmented passive gamma-Ray scanning

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the transmission-corrected nondestructive assay (NDA) of gamma-ray emitting special nuclear materials (SNMs), most commonly 235U, 239Pu, and 241Am, in low-density scrap or waste, packaged in cylindrical containers. The method can also be applied to NDA of other gamma-emitting nuclides including fission products. High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is used to detect and measure the nuclides of interest and to measure and correct for gamma-ray attenuation in a series of horizontal segments (collimated gamma detector views) of the container. Corrections are also made for counting losses occasioned by signal processing limitations (1-3). 1.2 There are currently several systems in use or under development for determining the attenuation corrections for NDA of radioisotopic materials (4-8). A related technique, tomographic gamma-ray scanning (TGS), is not included in this test method (9, 10, 11). 1.2.1 This test method will cover two implementations of the Segmented Gamma Scanning ...

  2. Reducing Statistical Noise in Airborne Gamma-Ray Data

    Hovgaard, Jens; Grasty, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    By using the Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition (NASVD) technique it is possible to reconstruct the measured airborne gamma-ray spectra with a noise content that is significant smaller than the noise contained in the original measured spectra. The method can be used for improving the out...... the output of the data processing for example mapping of Th, U, and K distribution....

  3. Estimation of americium in cemented waste block using gamma ray spectrometry

    Singh, Sarbjit; Mhatre, Amol; Sagar, Veena

    2012-05-01

    A method was developed for the estimation of 241 Am present in the cemented waste block which was cylindrical in shape. In such large sample, the attenuation of gamma rays increases with size of the sample and density of the material present. Attenuation correction was incorporated using linear attenuation coefficients of 59.54 keV gamma ray of 241 Am. Also in such large samples, error due to the distribution of activity is more. Estimation of 241 Am in the cemented sample was carried out by applying corrections for attenuation and for the sample geometry. (author)

  4. Gravitational Waves versus X and Gamma Ray Emission in a Short Gamma-Ray Burst

    Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2012-01-01

    The recent progress in the understanding the physical nature of neutron star equilibrium configurations and the first observational evidence of a genuinely short gamma-ray burst, GRB 090227B, allows to give an estimate of the gravitational waves versus the X and Gamma-ray emission in a short gamma-ray burst.

  5. Developments in gamma-ray spectrometry: systems, software, and methods-I. 5. Nuclear Spectral Analysis with Nonlinear Robust Fitting Techniques

    Lasche, G.P.; Coldwell, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    A new approach to nuclear spectral analysis based on nonlinear robust fitting techniques has been recently developed into a package suitable for public use. The methodology behind this approach was originally made available to the public as the RobFit command-line code, but it was extremely slow and difficult to use. Recent advances in microprocessor power and the development of a graphical user interface to make its use more intuitive have made this approach, which is quite computationally intensive, feasible for more routine applications. A brief description of some of the fundamental differences in the approach used by RobFit from the more common methods of nuclear spectral analysis involving local peak searches is presented here. Popular nuclear spectral analysis applications generally perform a peak search at their heart. The continuum in the neighborhood of each peak is estimated from local data and is subtracted from the data to yield the area and the energy of the peak. These are matched to a user-selected library of radionuclides containing the energies and areas of the most significant peaks, after accounting for the effects of detector efficiency and attenuation. With these codes, the energy-to-channel calibration, the peak width as a function of energy (or 'resolution calibration'), the detector intrinsic efficiency, and attenuation effects must usually be predetermined and provided as static input for the analysis. Most of these codes focus on regions of interest that represent many small pieces of the sample spectrum. In contrast, the RobFit approach works with an entire continuous spectrum to simultaneously determine the coefficients of all of the user-selected free variables that yield the best fit to the data. Peak searches are generally used only in interim steps to help suggest new radionuclides to include in the search library. Rather than first concentrate on the location of peaks, RobFit first concentrates on the determination of the continuum

  6. New possibilities in prompt gamma ray spectrometry

    Borderie, B; Barrandon, J N [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France). Lab. du cyclotron; Pinault, J L [Bureau de Recherches Geologiques et Minieres (BRGM), 45 - Orleans (France)

    1977-01-01

    Prompt gamma ray spectrometry has been used as an analytical tool for many years. The high level of background noise does, however, remain a major problem with this technique. From simple theoretical consideration, conditions (particle, energy) were determined to reduce significantly the background noise under irradiation. Alpha particles of 3.5 MeV were chosen. Some fifty elements were studied, of which 24 gave interesting results. The detection limits obtained for a sample of niobium were as follows: approximately 1 ppm (10/sup -6/g/g) for the light elements Li, B, F and Na, and between 50 ppm and 1% for the others. Numerous applications may be envisaged in the geo- and cosmo-sciences.

  7. Handbook on Mobile Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    2003-01-01

    Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing......Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing...

  8. Gamma-Ray Interactions for Reachback Analysts

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, Steven Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-02

    This presentation is a part of the DHS LSS spectroscopy training course and presents an overview of the following concepts: identification and measurement of gamma rays; use of gamma counts and energies in research. Understanding the basic physics of how gamma rays interact with matter can clarify how certain features in a spectrum were produced.

  9. Gamma ray astronomy from satellites and balloons

    Schoenfelder, V.

    1986-01-01

    A survey is given of gamma ray astronomy topics presented at the Cosmic Ray Conference. The major conclusions at the Cosmic Ray Conference in the field of gamma ray astronomy are given. (1) MeV-emission of gamma-ray bursts is a common feature. Variations in duration and energy spectra from burst to burst may explain the discrepancy between the measured log N - log S dependence and the observed isotropy of bursts. (2) The gamma-ray line at 1.809 MeV from Al(26) is the first detected line from a radioactive nucleosynthesis product. In order to understand its origin it will be necessary to measure its longitude distribution in the Milky Way. (3) The indications of a gamma-ray excess found from the direction of Loop I is consistent with the picture that the bulk of cosmic rays below 100 GeV is produced in galactic supernova remnants. (4) The interpretation of the large scale distribution of gamma rays in the Milky Way is controversial. At present an extragalactic origin of the cosmic ray nuclei in the GeV-range cannot be excluded from the gamma ray data. (5) The detection of MeV-emission from Cen A is a promising step towards the interesting field of extragalactic gamma ray astronomy

  10. Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA)

    Kern, J [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique

    1996-11-01

    The paper deals with a brief description of the principles of prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA), with the detection of gamma-rays, the PGAA project at SINQ and with the expected performances. 8 figs., 3 tabs., 10 refs.

  11. Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA)

    Kern, J.

    1996-01-01

    The paper deals with a brief description of the principles of prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA), with the detection of gamma-rays, the PGAA project at SINQ and with the expected performances. 8 figs., 3 tabs., 10 refs

  12. A high energy gamma ray astronomy experiment

    Hofstadter, R.

    1988-01-01

    The author describes work involving NASA's Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). GRO exemplifies the near zero principle because it investigates new gamma ray phenomena by relying on the space program to take us into the region of zero interference above the earth's atmosphere. In its present form GRO has four experiments

  13. Intercomparison of gamma ray analysis software packages

    1998-04-01

    The IAEA undertook an intercomparison exercise to review available software for gamma ray spectra analysis. This document describes the methods used in the intercomparison exercise, characterizes the software packages reviewed and presents the results obtained. Only direct results are given without any recommendation for a particular software or method for gamma ray spectra analysis

  14. Very high-energy gamma rays from gamma-ray bursts.

    Chadwick, Paula M

    2007-05-15

    Very high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy has undergone a transformation in the last few years, with telescopes of unprecedented sensitivity having greatly expanded the source catalogue. Such progress makes the detection of a gamma-ray burst at the highest energies much more likely than previously. This paper describes the facilities currently operating and their chances for detecting gamma-ray bursts, and reviews predictions for VHE gamma-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts. Results to date are summarized.

  15. Observations of the highest energy gamma-rays from gamma-ray bursts

    Dingus, Brenda L.

    2001-01-01

    EGRET has extended the highest energy observations of gamma-ray bursts to GeV gamma rays. Such high energies imply the fireball that is radiating the gamma-rays has a bulk Lorentz factor of several hundred. However, EGRET only detected a few gamma-ray bursts. GLAST will likely detect several hundred bursts and may extend the maximum energy to a few 100 GeV. Meanwhile new ground based detectors with sensitivity to gamma-ray bursts are beginning operation, and one recently reported evidence for TeV emission from a burst

  16. Gamma-ray spectra from the age of the dinosaurs

    Johnson, M.W.

    1994-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy has been tested as a technique for assisting in the excavation of paleontological sites in the Morrison Formation of western New Mexico. Excavation of these sites is difficult, owing to remoteness and to environmental concerns that militate against wholesale removal of overburden. Various researchers have used remote-sensing techniques to attempt to locate sub-surface bone near known, exposed fossils, thereby to confine excavation to areas where success in finding bone is most likely. Bones accumulate uranium from surrounding rock during fossilization; accordingly, in-situ gamma-ray spectroscopy might serve to locate bone, by detecting the 609- and 1764-keV gamma rays from uranium daughters. Because of the high uranium content of fossils in the Morrison Formation, calculations suggest the feasibility of locating bone despite the presence of several cm of rock and soil overburden. Investigations at several sites with fossils of large sauropods have revealed increased count rates for the key gamma rays near exposed bone, possibly implying the presence of additional fossils beneath the surface of the ground. However, attempts to use spectroscopy inside shafts drilled into possible fossil-bearing rock have been less successful. Results are presented and prospects for additional work discussed

  17. GEANT4 simulation study of a gamma-ray detector for neutron resonance densitometry

    Tsuchiya, Harufumi; Harada, Hideo; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Kitatani, Fumito; Takamine, Jun; Kureta, Masatoshi; Iimura, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    A design study of a gamma-ray detector for neutron resonance densitometry was made with GEANT4. The neutron resonance densitometry, combining neutron resonance transmission analysis and neutron resonance capture analysis, is a non-destructive technique to measure amounts of nuclear materials in melted fuels of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants. In order to effectively quantify impurities in the melted fuels via prompt gamma-ray measurements, a gamma-ray detector for the neutron resonance densitometry consists of cylindrical and well type LaBr 3 scintillators. The present simulation showed that the proposed gamma-ray detector suffices to clearly detect the gamma rays emitted by 10 B(n, αγ) reaction in a high environmental background due to 137 Cs radioactivity with its Compton edge suppressed at a considerably small level. (author)

  18. Determination of gamma ray shielding parameters of rocks and concrete

    Obaid, Shamsan S.; Gaikwad, Dhammajyot K.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2018-03-01

    Gamma shielding parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic number (Zeff) and electron density (Neff) have been measured and calculated for rocks and concrete in the energy range 122-1330 keV. The measurements have been carried out at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275, 1330 keV gamma ray energies using a gamma spectrometer includes a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector and MCA card. The atomic and electronic cross sections have also been investigated. Experimental and calculated (WinXCom) values were compared, and good agreement has been observed within the experimental error. The obtained results showed that feldspathic basalt, compact basalt, volcanic rock, dolerite and pink granite are more efficient than the sandstone and concrete for gamma ray shielding applications.

  19. Development of the neutron filters for JET gamma-ray cameras

    Soare, S.; Curuia, M.; Anghel, M.; Constantin, M.; David, E.; Kiptily, V.; Prior, P.; Edlington, T.; Griph, S.; Krivchenkov, Y.; Popovichev, S.; Riccardo, V.; Syme, B; Thompson, V.; Murari, A.; Zoita, V.; Bonheure, G.; Le Guern

    2007-01-01

    The JET gamma-ray camera diagnostics have already provided valuable information on the gamma-ray imaging of fast ion evaluation in JET plasmas. The JET Gamma-Ray Cameras (GRC) upgrade project deals with the design of appropriate neutron/gamma-ray filters ('neutron attenuaters').The main design parameter was the neutron attenuation factor. The two design solutions, that have been finally chosen and developed at the level of scheme design, consist of: a) one quasi-crescent shaped neutron attenuator (for the horizontal camera) and b) two quasi-trapezoid shaped neutron attenuators (for the vertical one). Various neutron-attenuating materials have been considered (lithium hydride with natural isotopic composition and 6 Li enriched, light and heavy water, polyethylene). Pure light water was finally chosen as the attenuating material for the JET gamma-ray cameras. FEA methods used to evaluate the behaviour of the filter casings under the loadings (internal hydrostatic pressure, torques) have proven the stability of the structure. (authors)

  20. Nuclear models and data for gamma-ray production

    Young, P.G.

    1975-01-01

    The current Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B, Version IV) contains information on prompt gamma-ray production from neutron-induced reactions for some 38 nuclides. In addition, there is a mass of fission product yield, capture, and radioactive decay data from which certain time-dependent gamma-ray results can be calculated. These data are needed in such applications as gamma-ray heating calculations for reactors, estimates of radiation levels near nuclear facilities and weapons, shielding design calculations, and materials damage estimates. The prompt results are comprised of production cross sections, multiplicities, angular distributions, and energy spectra for secondary gamma-rays from a variety of reactions up to an incident neutron energy of 20 MeV. These data are based in many instances on experimental measurements, but nuclear model calculations, generally of a statistical nature, are also frequently used to smooth data, to interpolate between measurements, and to calculate data in unmeasured regions. The techniques and data used in determining the ENDF/B evaluations are reviewed, and comparisons of model-code calculations and ENDF data with recent experimental results are given. 11 figures

  1. A study of gamma-ray bursts and a new detector for gamma-ray astronomy

    Carter, J.N.

    1979-09-01

    Three gamma-ray experiments flown on balloons between August 1975 and August 1976 are described in detail. The successful Transatlantic balloon flight enabled a rate of 3 bursts year -1 with energies > 7 x 10 -7 ergs cm -2 to be established. This result is discussed in the light of other work. The choice of γ-ray detector for optimum sensitivity is presented. In addition various techniques for determining the arrival direction of gamma-ray bursts are compared. A new balloon borne γ-ray burst telescope is proposed. The design, testing and results of the beam calibration of a new drift chamber detector system for high energy (> 50 MeV) γ-rays are presented. A projected angular resolution of 0.8 0 was obtained at 300 MeV. Techniques for the measurement of γ-ray energies are discussed in relation to this instrument. Finally the use of drift chambers in an integrated free flying satellite is illustrated, and the expected performance is presented. (author)

  2. Future prospects for. gamma. -ray astronomy

    Fichtel, C [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (USA). Goddard Space Flight Center

    1981-06-30

    As ..gamma..-ray astronomy moves from the discovery to the exploratory phase, the promise of ..gamma..-ray astrophysics noted by theorists in the late 1940s and 1950s is beginning to be realized. In the future, satellites should carry instruments that will have over an order of magnitude greater sensitivity than those flown thus far, and, for at least some portions of the ..gamma..-ray energy range, these detectors will also have substantially improved energy and angular resolution. The information to be obtained from these experiments should greatly enhance our knowledge of several astrophysical phenomena including the very energetic and nuclear processes associated with compact objects, astrophysical nucleosynthesis, solar particle acceleration, the chemical composition of the planets and other bodies of the Solar System, the structure of our Galaxy, the origin and dynamic pressure effects of the cosmic rays, high energy particles and energetic processes in other galaxies especially active ones, and the degree of matter-antimatter symmetry of the Universe. The ..gamma..-ray results of the forthcoming programs such as Gamma-I, the Gamma Ray Observatory, the ..gamma..-ray burst network, Solar Polar, and very high energy ..gamma..-ray telescopes on the ground will almost certainly provide justification for more sophisticated telescopes. These advanced instruments might be placed on the Space Platform currently under study by N.A.S.A.

  3. On Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Ruffini, Remo; Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Caito, Letizia; Chardonnet, Pascal; Cherubini, Christian; Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Fraschetti, Federico; Geralico, Andrea; Guida, Roberto; Patricelli, Barbara; Rotondo, Michael; Hernandez, Jorge Armando Rueda; Vereshchagin, Gregory; Xue, She-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    (Shortened) We show by example how the uncoding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) offers unprecedented possibilities to foster new knowledge in fundamental physics and in astrophysics. After recalling some of the classic work on vacuum polarization in uniform electric fields by Klein, Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, we summarize some of the efforts to observe these effects in heavy ions and high energy ion collisions. We then turn to the theory of vacuum polarization around a Kerr-Newman black hole, leading to the extraction of the blackholic energy, to the concept of dyadosphere and dyadotorus, and to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma. We then present a new theoretical approach encompassing the physics of neutron stars and heavy nuclei. It is shown that configurations of nuclear matter in bulk with global charge neutrality can exist on macroscopic scales and with electric fields close to the critical value near their surfaces. These configurations may represent an initial condition for the...

  4. CENTRAL ENGINE MEMORY OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND SOFT GAMMA-RAY REPEATERS

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Zhang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bursts of γ-rays generated from relativistic jets launched from catastrophic events such as massive star core collapse or binary compact star coalescence. Previous studies suggested that GRB emission is erratic, with no noticeable memory in the central engine. Here we report a discovery that similar light curve patterns exist within individual bursts for at least some GRBs. Applying the Dynamic Time Warping method, we show that similarity of light curve patterns between pulses of a single burst or between the light curves of a GRB and its X-ray flare can be identified. This suggests that the central engine of at least some GRBs carries “memory” of its activities. We also show that the same technique can identify memory-like emission episodes in the flaring emission in soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), which are believed to be Galactic, highly magnetized neutron stars named magnetars. Such a phenomenon challenges the standard black hole central engine models for GRBs, and suggest a common physical mechanism behind GRBs and SGRs, which points toward a magnetar central engine of GRBs

  5. Prompt gamma-ray imaging for small animals

    Xu, Libai

    Small animal imaging is recognized as a powerful discovery tool for small animal modeling of human diseases, which is providing an important clue to complete understanding of disease mechanisms and is helping researchers develop and test new treatments. The current small animal imaging techniques include positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound (US). A new imaging modality called prompt gamma-ray imaging (PGI) has been identified and investigated primarily by Monte Carlo simulation. Currently it is suggested for use on small animals. This new technique could greatly enhance and extend the present capabilities of PET and SPECT imaging from ingested radioisotopes to the imaging of selected non-radioactive elements, such as Gd, Cd, Hg, and B, and has the great potential to be used in Neutron Cancer Therapy to monitor neutron distribution and neutron-capture agent distribution. This approach consists of irradiating small animals in the thermal neutron beam of a nuclear reactor to produce prompt gamma rays from the elements in the sample by the radiative capture (n, gamma) reaction. These prompt gamma rays are emitted in energies that are characteristic of each element and they are also produced in characteristic coincident chains. After measuring these prompt gamma rays by surrounding spectrometry array, the distribution of each element of interest in the sample is reconstructed from the mapping of each detected signature gamma ray by either electronic collimations or mechanical collimations. In addition, the transmitted neutrons from the beam can be simultaneously used for very sensitive anatomical imaging, which provides the registration for the elemental distributions obtained from PGI. The primary approach is to use Monte Carlo simulation methods either with the specific purpose code CEARCPG, developed at NC State University or with the general purpose

  6. Studying the shielding properties of lead glass composites using neutrons and gamma rays

    Osman, A.M.; El-Sarraf, M.A.; Abdel-Monem, A.M.; El-Sayed Abdo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Samples of sodalime silica glass loaded with different ratios of PbO were prepared. • Leaded glass composites were investigated for radiation shielding. • Experimental and theoretical attenuation parameters were studied. • Experimental and theoretical (MCNP5) results were in good agreement. - Abstract: The present work deals with the shielding properties of lead glass composites to find out its integrity for practical shielding applications and radiological safety. Composites of different lead oxide ratios (x = 0, 5, 10, 15 and 25 wt.%) have been prepared by the Nasser Glass and Crystal Company (Egypt). Attenuation measurements have been carried out using a collimated emitted beam from a fission 252 Cf (100 μg) neutron source, and the neutron–gamma spectrometer with stilbene scintillator. The pulse shape discriminating (P.S.D.) technique based on the zero cross-over method was used to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray pulses. Thermal neutron fluxes were measured using the BF3 detector and thermal neutron detection system. The attenuation relations were used to evaluate fast neutron macroscopic effective removal cross-section Σ R-Meas (cm −1 ), gamma rays total attenuation coefficient μ (cm −1 ) and thermal neutron macroscopic cross-section Σ Meas (cm −1 ). Theoretical calculations have been achieved using MCNP5 code to calculate the same two parameters. Also, MERCSF-N program was used to calculate fast neutron macroscopic removal cross-section Σ R-MER (cm −1 ). Measured and MCNP5 calculated results have been compared and were found to be in reasonable agreement

  7. Neutron detection gamma ray sensitivity criteria

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Mace, Emily K.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2011-01-01

    The shortage of 3 He has triggered the search for effective alternative neutron detection technologies for national security and safeguards applications. Any new detection technology must satisfy two basic criteria: (1) it must meet a neutron detection efficiency requirement, and (2) it must be insensitive to gamma-ray interference at a prescribed level, while still meeting the neutron detection requirement. It is the purpose of this paper to define measureable gamma ray sensitivity criteria for neutron detectors. Quantitative requirements are specified for: intrinsic gamma ray detection efficiency and gamma ray absolute rejection. The gamma absolute rejection ratio for neutrons (GARRn) is defined, and it is proposed that the requirement for neutron detection be 0.9 3 He based neutron detector is provided showing that this technology can meet the stated requirements. Results from tests of some alternative technologies are also reported.

  8. Processing of gamma-ray spectrometric logs

    Umiastowski, K.; Dumesnil, P.

    1984-10-01

    CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) has developped a gamma-ray spectrometric tool, containing an analog-to-digital converter. This new tool permits to perform very precise uranium logs (natural gamma-ray spectrometry), neutron activation logs and litho-density logs (gamma-gamma spectrometric logs). Specific processing methods were developped to treate the particular problems of down-hole gamma-ray spectrometry. Extraction of the characteristic gamma-ray peak, even if they are superposed on the background radiation of very high intensity, is possible. This processing methode enables also to obtain geological informations contained in the continuous background of the spectrum. Computer programs are written in high level language for SIRIUS (VICTOR) and APOLLO computers. Exemples of uranium and neutron activation logs treatment are presented [fr

  9. Gamma ray astronomy with COS-B

    Swanenburg, B.N.

    1981-01-01

    Observational results in the field of gamma-ray astronomy that have been obtained to date with the COS-B satellite are discussed and questions raised by these observations are summarized. Following a brief review of the instrumental characteristics of COS-B and the extent of COS-B gamma-ray coverage of the sky, particular attention is given to the questions raised by the discovery of many unidentified gamma-ray sources with no apparent optical, X-ray or radio counterparts and the detection of high-energy gamma radiation from the quasar 3C 273, which suggests the role of gamma-ray emission in the creation of other radiation

  10. Thermal neutron capture gamma-rays

    Tuli, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    The energy and intensity of gamma rays as seen in thermal neutron capture are presented. Only those (n,α), E = thermal, reactions for which the residual nucleus mass number is greater than or equal to 45 are included. These correspond to evaluations published in Nuclear Data Sheets. The publication source data are contained in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The data presented here do not involve any additional evaluation. Appendix I lists all the residual nuclides for which the data are included here. Appendix II gives a cumulated index to A-chain evaluations including the year of publication. The capture gamma ray data are given in two tables - the Table 1 is the list of all gamma rays seen in (n,#betta#) reaction given in the order of increasing energy; the Table II lists the gamma rays according to the nuclide

  11. Observations of gamma-ray bursts

    Strong, I.B.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Evans, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    Observational data on gamma-ray bursts are reviewed. Information is grouped into temporal properties, energy fluxes and spectral properties, and directions and distributions of the sources in space. (BJG)

  12. Gamma-rays from decaying dark matter

    Bertone, G. [Paris-6 Univ., 75 (France). Inst. d' Astrophysique; Buchmueller, W.; Covi, L.; Ibarra, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    We study the prospects for detecting gamma-rays from decaying Dark Matter (DM), focusing in particular on gravitino DM in R-parity breaking vacua. Given the substantially different angular distribution of the predicted gamma-ray signal with respect to the case of annihilating DM, and the relatively poor (of order 0.1 ) angular resolution of gamma-ray detectors, the best strategy for detection is in this case to look for an exotic contribution to the gamma-ray flux at high galactic latitudes, where the decaying DM contribution would resemble an astrophysical extragalactic component, similar to the one inferred by EGRET observations. Upcoming experiments such as GLAST and AMS-02 may identify this exotic contribution and discriminate it from astrophysical sources, or place significant constraints on the mass and lifetime of DM particles. (orig.)

  13. Orbital Normalization of MESSENGER Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Data

    Rhodes, E. A.; Peplowski, P. N.; Evans, L. G.; Hamara, D. K.; Boynton, W. V.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    The MESSENGER Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) measures energy spectra of gamma rays emanating from the surface of Mercury. Analysis of these spectra provides elemental abundances of surface material. The MESSENGER mission necessarily provides some data normalization challenges for GRS analysis. So as to keep the spacecraft cool while orbiting the dayside of the planet, the orbits are highly eccentric, with altitudes varying from 200-500 km to ~ 15,000 km. A small fraction of time is spent at the low altitudes where gamma-ray signals are largest, requiring a large number of orbits to yield sufficient counting statistics for elemental analysis. Also, the sunshade must always shield the spacecraft from the Sun, which causes the orientation of the GRS often to be far from nadir-pointing, so the detector efficiency and attenuation of gamma rays from the planet must be known for a wide range of off-nadir orientations. An efficiency/attenuation map for the expected ranges of orientations and energies was constructed in a ground calibration experiment for a limited range of orientations using a nuclear reactor and radioisotope sources, and those results were extended to other orientations by radiation transport computations using as input a computer-aided design model of the spacecraft and its composition. This normalization has allowed abundance determinations of elements K, Th, and U from radioisotopes of these elements in the Mercury regolith during the first quarter of the year-long mission. These results provide constraints on models of Mercury's chemical and thermal evolution. The normalization of gamma-ray spectra for surface elements not having radioisotopes is considerably more complex; these gamma rays come from neutron inelastic-scatter and capture reactions in the regolith, where the neutrons are generated by cosmic ray impact onto the planet. A radiation transport computation was performed to generate the expected count rates in the neutron-generated gamma-ray

  14. Possible galactic origin of. gamma. -ray bursts

    Manchanda, R K; Ramsden, D [Southampton Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics

    1977-03-31

    It is stated that extragalactic models for the origin of non-solar ..gamma..-ray bursts include supernova bursts in remote galaxies, and the collapse of the cores of active stars, whilst galactic models are based on flare stars, thermonuclear explosions in neutron stars and the sudden accretion of cometary gas on to neutron stars. The acceptability of any of these models may be tested by the observed size spectrum of the ..gamma..-ray bursts. The extragalactic models predict a power law spectrum with number index -1.5, whilst for the galactic models the number index will be -1. Experimental data on ..gamma..-ray bursts is, however, still meagre, and so far only 44 confirmed events have been recorded by satellite-borne instruments. The number spectrum of the observed ..gamma..-ray bursts indicates that the observed distribution for events with an energy < 10/sup -4/ erg/cm/sup 2/ is flat; this makes the choice of any model completely arbitrary. An analysis of the observed ..gamma..-ray events is here presented that suggests very interesting possibilities for their origin. There appears to be a preferred mean energy for ..gamma..-ray bursts; some 90% of the recorded events show a mean energy between 5 x 10/sup -5/ and 5 x 10/sup -4/ erg/cm/sup 2/, contrary to the predicted characteristics of the number spectrum of various models. A remarkable similarity is found between the distribution of ..gamma..-ray bursts and that of supernova remnants, suggesting a genetic relationship between the two and the galactic origin of the ..gamma..-ray bursts, and the burst source could be identified with completely run down neutron stars, formed during supernova explosions.

  15. Magic gamma rays, extra-atmospheric source

    Bolufer, P.

    2010-01-01

    Without the atmospheric layer, the cosmos radiation would kill every living, our planet would be like the moon. The cosmic gamma ray to collide with gases in land cover, as it is disintegrated. They are harmless, they form a cone of light that points to the cosmic source comes from. On April 25, 2009 was born on the island of Palma Magic II and Magic I the best observer of atmospheric gamma rays of low intensity. (Author)

  16. Alpha/beta(gamma ray) discrimination and spillover quantification with a BaF2 scintillator

    DeVol, T.A.; Fjeld, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    A simple pulse shape discrimination technique was used to separate alpha and beta(gamma ray) interactions in a BaF 2 scintillator. The separation was not ideal, resulting in a 5.1% spillover of alpha interactions into the beta(gamma ray) channel and 11.9% spillover of beta(gamma ray) interactions into the alpha channel for a set pulse shape discriminator. The misclassification of events was reduced by post-processing the data using either a simple analytical technique or a more complex linear least squares technique. Both techniques typically reduced the difference between the expected and calculated interaction rates to <10% when the ratio of beta(gamma ray) to alpha count rate was less than 100 : 1. ((orig.))

  17. The neutron and gamma-ray dose characterization using the Monte Carlo method to study the feasibility of the Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis technique at IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor in Brazil

    Guerra, Bruno T.; Soares, Alexandre L.; Grynberg, Suely E.; Menezes, Maria Angela B.C., E-mail: brunoteixeiraguerra@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: menezes@cdtn.br, E-mail: asleal@cdtn.br, E-mail: seg@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The IPR-R1 is a reactor type TRIGA, Mark-I model, manufactured by the General Atomic Company and installed at Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN) of Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. It is a light water moderated and cooled, graphite-reflected, open-pool type research reactor. IPR-R1 works at 100 kW but it will be briefly licensed to operate at 250 kW. It presents low power, low pressure, for application in research, training and radioisotopes production. The fuel is an alloy of zirconium hydride and uranium enriched at 20% in {sup 235}U. The Implementation of the PGNAA (Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis) Technical at the TRIGA IPR-R1 research reactor of the CDTN will significantly increase in the types of matrices analyzable. A project is underway in order to implement this technique in CDTN. In order of verified the feasibility of the PGNAA at the TRIGA reactor, the MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) method is used to theoretical calculations. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study of the neutron and gamma-ray dose in the room where the reactor is located, in case of implementation of this technique in the IPR-R1. (author)

  18. The neutron and gamma-ray dose characterization using the Monte Carlo method to study the feasibility of the Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis technique at IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor in Brazil

    Guerra, Bruno T.; Soares, Alexandre L.; Grynberg, Suely E.; Menezes, Maria Angela B.C.

    2013-01-01

    The IPR-R1 is a reactor type TRIGA, Mark-I model, manufactured by the General Atomic Company and installed at Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN) of Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. It is a light water moderated and cooled, graphite-reflected, open-pool type research reactor. IPR-R1 works at 100 kW but it will be briefly licensed to operate at 250 kW. It presents low power, low pressure, for application in research, training and radioisotopes production. The fuel is an alloy of zirconium hydride and uranium enriched at 20% in 235 U. The Implementation of the PGNAA (Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis) Technical at the TRIGA IPR-R1 research reactor of the CDTN will significantly increase in the types of matrices analyzable. A project is underway in order to implement this technique in CDTN. In order of verified the feasibility of the PGNAA at the TRIGA reactor, the MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) method is used to theoretical calculations. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study of the neutron and gamma-ray dose in the room where the reactor is located, in case of implementation of this technique in the IPR-R1. (author)

  19. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometry and computer data processing

    Raghuwanshi, S.S.; Bhishma Kumar; Tewari, S.G.

    1993-01-01

    The physical basis for the measurement of radioelemental concentrations of U, Th, and K on the surface of the earth by airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (AGRS) are described in this paper. The yield of an infinite radioactive plane source for a particular gamma energy helps to know the sampled volume in AGRS, the ground coverage, the ground resolution, the effective planning of the survey, flight line spacing, and sampling time. The infinite source-yield enables the determination of the attenuation coefficients in actual surveys and lays down the criteria for a standard test strip. Scattering of gamma-rays in matter is discussed in order to study its influence in the measurements from air. The theoretical gamma-ray spectrum from terrestrial U, Th, and K are discussed in contrast to its realistic picture which poses problems for their direct use for measurements. The criterion of FWHM (full width at half maximum) and inter-energy distance with their yields is described which finally helps to select the energy windows for (window and MCA) AGRS system. Factors which affect the measurements of radioelemental concentration in AGRS surveys include both correctable and non-correctable ones. Correctable factors are : (a) non-terrestrial sources of gamma-rays aircraft, cosmic, and airborne background (H) (B); (b) interference due to gamma-scattering inter channel effects (l); (c) height variations (H) due to navigation and topography; (d) temperature (T) of ambient air; and (e) pressure (P) of air at flying altitude. For removal of background effects, measurements over test strip and calibration pads are necessary for making the corrections in the order - BIH. These methods are described in the paper. The non-correctable factors include effects, due to terrain moisture, vegetation, and others. The possible ways to eliminate these effects are also briefly described. (author). 17 refs., 13 figs

  20. Gamma Ray Bursts-Afterglows and Counterparts

    Fishman, Gerald J

    1998-01-01

    Several breakthrough discoveries were made last year of x-ray, optical and radio afterglows and counterparts to gamma-ray bursts, and a redshift has been associated with at least one of these. These discoveries were made possible by the fast, accurate gamma-ray burst locations of the BeppoSAX satellite. It is now generally believed that the burst sources are at cosmological distances and that they represent the most powerful explosions in the Universe. These observations also open new possibilities for the study of early star formation, the physics of extreme conditions and perhaps even cosmology. This session will concentrate on recent x-ray, optical and radio afterglow observations of gamma-ray bursts, associated redshift measurements, and counterpart observations. Several review and theory talks will also be presented, along with a summary of the astrophysical implications of the observations. There will be additional poster contributions on observations of gamma-ray burst source locations at wavelengths other than gamma rays. Posters are also solicited that describe new observational capabilities for rapid follow-up observations of gamma-ray bursts.

  1. Determination of protein content in grains by radioactive thermal neutron capture prompt gamma rays analysis

    Carbonari, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    The radioactive thermal neutron capture prompt gamma rays technique can be used to determinate the nitrogen content in grains without chemical destruction, with good precision and relative rapidity. This determination is based on the detection of prompt gamma rays emitted by the 14 N(n,γ) 15 N reaction product. The samples has been irradiated the tanGencial tube of the IEA-R1 research reator and a pair spectrometer has been used for the detection of the prompt gamma rays. The nitrogen content is determinated in several samples of soybean, commonbean, peas and rice, and the results is compared with typical nitrogen content for each grain. (Autor) [pt

  2. Computer-controlled gamma-ray scanner for irradiated reactor fuel

    Mandler, J.W.; Coates, R.A.; Killian, E.W.

    1979-01-01

    Gamma-ray scanning of irradiated fuel is an important nondestructive technique used in the thermal fuels behavior program currently under way at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This paper is concerned with the computer-controlled isotopic gamma-ray-scanning system developed for postirradiation examination of fuel and includes a brief discussion of some scan results obtained from fuel rods irradiated in the Power-Burst Facility to illustrate gamma-ray spectrometry for this application. Both burnup profiles and information concerning fission-product migration in irradiated fuel are routinely obtained with the computer-controlled system

  3. ICF burn-history measurments using 17-MeV fusion gamma rays

    Lerche, R.A.; Cable, M.D.; Dendooven, P.G.

    1995-01-01

    Fusion reaction rate for inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the Nova Laser Facility is measured with 30-ps resolution using a high-speed neutron detector. We are investigating a measurement technique based on the 16.7-MeV gamma rays that are released in deuterium-tritium fusion. Our concept is to convert gamma-ray energy into a fast burst of Cerenkov light that can be recorded with a high-speed optical detector. We have detected fusion gamma rays in preliminary experiments conducted at Nova where we used a tungsten/aerogel converter to generate Cerenkov light and an optical streak camera to record the signal

  4. Development of fitting methods using geometric progression formulae of gamma-ray buildup factors

    Yoshida, Yoshitaka

    2006-01-01

    The gamma ray buildup factors are represented by an approximation method to speed up calculation using the point attenuation kernel method. The fitting parameters obtained by the GP formula and Taylor's formula are compiled in ANSI/ANS 6.4.3, available without any limitation. The GP formula featured high accuracy but required a high-level fitting technique. Thus the GP formula was divided into a curved line and a part representing the base values and used to develop the a fitting method and X k fitting method. As a result, this methodology showed that (1) when the fitting ranges were identical, there was no change in standard deviation when the unit penetration depth was varied; (2) even with fitting up to 300 mfp, the average standard deviation of 26 materials was 2.9% and acceptable GP parameters were extracted; (3) when the same end points of the fitting were selected and the starting points of fitting were identical with the unit penetration depth, the deviation became smaller with increasing unit penetration depth; and (4) even with the deviation adjusted to the positive side from 0.5 mfp to 300 mfp, the average standard deviation of 26 materials was 5.6%, which was an acceptable value. However, the GP parameters obtained by this methodology cannot be used for direct interpolation using gamma ray energy or materials. (author)

  5. BOW TIES IN THE SKY. I. THE ANGULAR STRUCTURE OF INVERSE COMPTON GAMMA-RAY HALOS IN THE FERMI SKY

    Broderick, Avery E.; Shalaby, Mohamad [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Tiede, Paul [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline Street North, Waterloo, ON, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Pfrommer, Christoph [Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Puchwein, Ewald [Institute of Astronomy and Kavli Institute for Cosmology, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Chang, Philip [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 1900 E. Kenwood Boulevard, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Lamberts, Astrid [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Extended inverse Compton halos are generally anticipated around extragalactic sources of gamma rays with energies above 100 GeV. These result from inverse Compton scattered cosmic microwave background photons by a population of high-energy electron/positron pairs produced by the annihilation of the high-energy gamma rays on the infrared background. Despite the observed attenuation of the high-energy gamma rays, the halo emission has yet to be directly detected. Here, we demonstrate that in most cases these halos are expected to be highly anisotropic, distributing the upscattered gamma rays along axes defined either by the radio jets of the sources or oriented perpendicular to a global magnetic field. We present a pedagogical derivation of the angular structure in the inverse Compton halo and provide an analytic formalism that facilitates the generation of mock images. We discuss exploiting this fact for the purpose of detecting gamma-ray halos in a set of companion papers.

  6. Search for very-high-energy emission from Gamma-ray Bursts using the first 18 months of data from the HAWC Gamma-ray Observatory

    The HAWC collaboration; Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Rojas, D. Avila; Solares, H. A. Ayala; Barber, A. S.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; Becerril, A.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Bernal, A.; Braun, J.

    2017-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-ray Observatory is an extensive air shower detector operating in central Mexico, which has recently completed its first two years of full operations. If for a burst like GRB 130427A at a redshift of 0.34 and a high-energy component following a power law with index -1.66, the high-energy component is extended to higher energies with no cut-off other than from extragalactic background light attenuation, HAWC would observe gamma rays with a peak ene...

  7. Time-of-flight discrimination between gamma-rays and neutrons by using artificial neural networks

    Akkoyun, S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Time-of-flight (tof) is an obvious method for separation between gamma and neutron particles. ► tof distributions are obtained by neural networks. ► Neural network method is consistent with the experimental results. ► Neural networks can classify different events for discrimination. - Abstract: In gamma-ray spectroscopy, a number of neutrons are emitted from the nuclei together with the gamma-rays. These neutrons influence gamma-ray spectra. An obvious method for discrimination between neutrons and gamma-rays is based on the time-of-flight (tof) technique. In this work, the tof distributions of gamma-rays and neutrons were obtained both experimentally and by using artificial neural networks (ANNs). It was shown that, ANN can correctly classify gamma-ray and neutron events. Also, for highly nonlinear detector response for tof, we have constructed consistent empirical physical formulas (EPFs) by appropriate ANNs. These ANN–EPFs can be used to derive further physical functions which could be relevant to discrimination between gamma-rays and neutrons

  8. NASVD and MNF techniques and your application noise reduction in gamma-ray spectrometric data; As tecnicas NASVD e MNF e sua aplicacao na reducao de ruidos em dados gamaespectrometricos

    Cavallaro, Francisco de Assis, E-mail: assisfc@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: assis@agp-la.org [Departamento de Geologia Sedimentar e Ambiental, DGSA, Instituto de Geociencias, IG, Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); AGPLA, AeroGeoPhysica Latinoamerica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Portugal, Rodrigo S.; Bizuti, Ariathemis M., E-mail: portugal@ige.unicamp.br, E-mail: ambizuti@ige.unicamp.br [Departamento de Geologia e Recursos Naturais, DGRN, Instituto de Geociencias, IG, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Silva, Adalene M., E-mail: adalene@unb.br [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Geoquimica e Recursos Minerais (GRM)

    2009-04-15

    The radioactive decay is a random process, and the measurement precision is ruled by statistical laws. The counting ratios of the profiles are always noisy when analyzed for short periods, such as one second per measurement. Corrections made at the end of conventional processing in the airborne gamma-ray spectrometric method data are not enough to remove and minimize, or even reduce considerably, the spectrum's originated noise. Two statistic methods that act locally in collected data, in the spectrum domain, have been suggested by literature to remove such remaining noises, the Noise-Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition - NASVD and Maximum Noise Fraction - MNF. These methods produce a significantly noise reduction. In this work both methods were applied in an area comprehended by two blocks, I and II, of the airborne survey that covers the west area of Mineral Province of Tapajos between Para and Amazon states. The filtered and non-filtered data with the NASVD and MNF techniques were processed with the Lasa's parameters. The comparison of results between maps and profiles shows that both methods are valuable, since there was resolution gain in these products. (author)

  9. Calculation of gamma ray exposure rates from uranium ore bodies

    Thomson, J.E.; Wilson, O.J.

    1980-02-01

    The planning of operations associated with uranium mines often requires that estimates be made of the exposure rates from various ore bodies. A straight-forward method of calculating the exposure rate from an arbitrarily shaped body is presented. Parameters for the calculation are evaluated under the assumption of secular equilibrium of uranium with its daughters and that the uranium is uniformly distributed throughout an average soil mixture. The spectral distribution of the emitted gamma rays and the effect of air attenuation are discussed. Worked examples are given of typical situations encountered in uranium mines

  10. Stereographic images acquired with gamma rays and thermal neutron radiography

    Souza, Maria Ines Silvani; Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Furieri, Rosanne C.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The inner structure of an object, which should not be submitted to an invasive assay, can only be perceived by using a suitable technique in order to render it transparent. A widely employed technique for this purpose involves the using of a radiation capable to pass through the object, collecting the transmitted radiation by a proper device, which furnishes a radiographic attenuation map of the object. This map, however, does not display the spatial distribution of the inner components of the object, but a convoluted view for each specific attitude of the object with regard to the set beam-detector. A 3D tomographic approach would show that distribution but it would demand a large number of projections requiring special equipment and software, not always available or affordable. In some circumstances however, a 3D tomography can be replaced by a stereographic view of the object under inspection, as done in this work, where instead of tens of radiographic projections, only two of them taken at suitable object attitudes are employed. Once acquired, these projections are properly processed and observed through a red and green eyeglass. For monochromatic images, this methodology requires the transformation of the black and white radiographs into red and white and green and white ones, which are afterwards merged to yield a single image. All the process is carried out with the software Image J . In this work, the Argonauta reactor at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear in Rio de Janeiro has been used as a source of thermal neutrons to acquire the neutron radiographic images, as well as to produce 198 Au sources employed in the acquisition of gamma-ray radiographic ones. X-ray or neutron-sensitive imaging plates have been used as detector, which after exposure were developed by a reader using a 0.5μm-diameter laser beam. (author)

  11. Fast-neutron and gamma-ray transmission technique for the on-line determination of moisture in coal and coke

    Sowerby, B.D.; Millen, M.J.; Rafter, P.T.

    1988-01-01

    A fast neutron and γ-ray transmission technique is being developed for the on-line analysis of moisture. Calculations show that the technique is capable of determining coke moisture to better than 0.2 wt% over a wide range of coke thicknesses. The favoured technique uses a thick Li-glass detector surrounded by a neutron moderator to determine simultaneously the fast neutron and γ-ray intensities. Laboratory measurements on single coke samples showed that moisture can be determined to within 0.2 wt% over the range 3-13 wt% moisture and 300-500 mm thickness. Measurements on a range of coke samples showed that the increase in r.m.s. error due to bound H variations is less than about 0.4 wt% moisture. Applications of the technique, to moisture determination in black and brown coal are also investigated, both by calculation and experiment. Further potential applications of the technique are discussed, including the determination of C in steel. (author)

  12. Measurement of 235U Enrichment Using the Semi-Peak-Ratio Technique with CdZnTe Gamma-Ray Detector

    Ha, J. H.; Ko, W. I.; Lee, S. Y.; Song, D. Y.; Kim, H. D.; Yang, M. S.

    2001-01-01

    In uranium enrichment plants and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities, exact measurement of fissile isotope enrichment of Uranium is required for material accounting in international safeguards inspection as well as process quality control. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple measurement system which can portably be used at nuclear fuel fabrication plants especially dealing with low enriched uranium. For this purpose, a small size CZT (CdZnTe) detector was used, and the detector performance in low uranium gamma/X-rays energy range was investigated by use of various enriched uranium oxide samples. New enrichment measurement technique and analysis method for low enriched uranium oxide, so-called, 'semi-peak ratio technique' was developed. The newly developed method was considered as an alternative technique for the low enrichment and would be useful to account nuclear material in safeguarding activity at nuclear fuel fabrication facility

  13. A technique to identify annual growth rings in Eucalyptus grandis using annual measurements of diameter at breast height and gamma ray densitometry

    Naidoo, Sasha

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A technique was developed to identify annual growth rings in E. grandis using a combination of annual measurements of diameter at breast height (DBH) from permanent sample plot (PSP) datasets and bark-pith density profiles. By assessing the pattern...

  14. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M.S.; Goldstein, A.; Meegan, C.A.; Paciesas, W.S.; Preece, R.D.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.; Gibby, M.H.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R.M.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Yu, H-F.; Bhat, P.N.; Burgess, J.M.; Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Giles, M.M.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A.J.; von Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Tierney, D.; Zhang, B..B.

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the

  15. Gamma-Ray Lenses for Astrophysics-and the Gamma-Ray Imager Mission GRI

    Wunderer, C. B.; Ballmoos, P. V.; Barriere, N.

    2009-01-01

    Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles are acc...

  16. Further development of IDGS: Isotope dilution gamma-ray spectrometry

    Li, T.K.; Parker, J.L.; Kuno, Y.; Sato, S.; Kamata, M.; Akiyama, T.

    1991-01-01

    The isotope dilution gamma-ray spectrometry (IDGS) technique for determining the plutonium concentration and isotopic composition of highly radioactive spent-fuel dissolver solutions has been further developed. Both the sample preparation and the analysis have been improved. The plutonium isotopic analysis is based on high-resolution, low-energy gamma-ray spectrometry. The plutonium concentration in the dissolver solutions then is calculated from the measured isotopic differences among the spike, the dissolver solution, and the spiked dissolver solution. Plutonium concentrations and isotopic compositions of dissolver solutions analyzed from this study agree well with those obtained by traditional isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) and are consistent with the first IDGS experimental result. With the current detector efficiency, sample size, and a 100-min count time, the estimated precision is ∼0.5% for 239 Pu and 240 Pu isotopic analyses and ∼1% for the plutonium concentration analysis. 5 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs

  17. Detector calibration for in-situ gamma ray spectrometry

    Balea, G

    2002-01-01

    The power in the technique of in-situ spectrometry lies in the fact that a detector placed on ground measures gamma radiation from sources situated over an area of several hundred square meters. The 'field of view' for the detector would be larger for high energy radiation sources and for sources closer to the soil surface. In contrast, a soil sample would represent an area of a few tens of hundreds of square centimeters. In practice, an effective characterization of a site would involve in-situ gamma ray spectrometry in conjunction with soil sampling. As part of an overall program, in-situ gamma ray spectrometry provides a means to assess the degree of contamination in areas during the course of operations in the field, thus guiding the investigator on where to collect samples. It can also substantially reduce the number of samples need to be collected and subsequently analyzed. (author)

  18. Porosity measurement of amorphous materials by gamma ray transmission

    Poettker, Walmir Eno

    2000-01-01

    In this work it is presented the measurement of the total porosity of TRe soil, Sandstone Berea rocks and porous ceramics samples. For the determination of the total porosity, the Arquimedes method (conventional) and the gamma ray transmission methodology were employed. The porosity measurement using the gamma methodology has a significant advantage respect to the conventional method due to the fast and non-destructive determination, and also for supplying results with a greater characterization in small scales, in relation to the heterogeneity of the porosity. The conventional methodology presents good results only for homogeneous samples. The experimental set up for the gamma ray transmission technique consisted of a 241 Am source (59,53 keV), a NaI (Tl) scintillation detector, collimators, a XYZ, micrometric table and standard gamma spectrometry electronics connected to a multichannel analyser. (author)

  19. The measurement of gamma ray induced heating in a mixed neutron and gamma ray environment

    Chiu, H.K.

    1991-10-01

    The problem of measuring the gamma heating in a mixed DT neutron and gamma ray environment was explored. A new detector technique was developed to make this measurement. Gamma heating measurements were made in a low-Z assembly irradiated with 14-Mev neutrons and (n, n') gammas produced by a Texas Nuclear Model 9400 neutron generator. Heating measurements were made in the mid-line of the lattice using a proportional counter operating in the Continuously-varied Bias-voltage Acquisition mode. The neutron-induced signal was separated from the gamma-induced signal by exploiting the signal rise-time differences inherent to radiations of different linear energy transfer coefficient, which are observable in a proportional counter. The operating limits of this measurement technique were explored by varying the counter position in the low-Z lattice, hence changing the irradiation spectrum observed. The experiment was modelled numerically to help interpret the measured results. The transport of neutrons and gamma rays in the assembly was modelled using the one- dimensional radiation transport code ANISN/PC. The cross-section set used for these calculations was derived from the ENDF/B-V library using the code MC 2 -2 for the case of DT neutrons slowing down in a low-Z material. The calculated neutron and gamma spectra in the slab and the relevant mass-stopping powers were used to construct weighting factors which relate the energy deposition in the counter fill-gas to that in the counter wall and in the surrounding material. The gamma energy deposition at various positions in the lattice is estimated by applying these weighting factors to the measured gamma energy deposition in the counter at those locations

  20. On The Utilization of (1-X)Cu-X Pb) Alloys for Gamma-Rays Shielding

    Abd El-Latif, A.A.; Saeid, Kh.S.; Abd El-Latif, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The present work deals with the study of the attenuation properties of gamma rays for [(1-X) Cu -X Pb] alloys where, x=10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% Pb waste by weight. Investigation has been performed by measuring the transmitted gamma ray spectra behind cylindrical samples of [(1-X) Cu - X Pb] alloys of different thicknesses. A collimated beam of gamma ray measured by using γ - ray spectrometer NaI(Tl) Scintillation detector with multichannel analyzer (MCA) cassy. Total mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of γ-ray have been evaluated and calculated using measured results and XCOM code respectively . Comparison between measured and calculated results shows a reasonable divergence at 0.511 MeV ,and 0.662 MeV γ-ray energies, in addition there is a convergence at 1.17 MeV, 1.274 MeV, and 1.3 MeV γ-ray energies

  1. Porosity measurement of solid pharmaceutical dosage forms by gamma-ray transmission

    Martins de Oliveira, Jose; Andreo Filho, Newton; Vinicius Chaud, Marco; Angiolucci, Tatiana; Aranha, Norberto; Germano Martins, Antonio Cesar

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present work is the determination of porosity in tablets by using the gamma-ray transmission technique. Tablet dissolution depends on some inherent characteristics of the manufacturing process, such as compression force, tablet volume, density and porosity, nature of excipients, preparation methods and its physical-chemical properties. Porosity is a measure of empty spaces in a material and can be determined by various techniques. In this paper, we propose the use of a gamma-ray transmission technique to obtain the porosity of experimental formulation of tablets. The results of porosity were compared with those obtained by using conventional methodology (density and mercury intrusion). The experimental setup for gamma-ray transmission consists of a gamma-ray source of 241 Am (photons of 59.6 keV and an activity of 3.7x10 9 Bq), an NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, collimators and a standard gamma-ray spectrometry electronics. Our results suggest that the gamma-ray transmission technique is a powerful tool for non-destructive porosity quantification of solid pharmaceutical forms and presents smaller errors than those obtained with conventional methodologies.

  2. Applications of outcrop gamma-ray logging to field development and exploration

    Jordan, D.W.; Slatt, R.M.; Gillespie, R.H.; D'Agostino, A.E.; Scheihing, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    Gamma-ray logs of outcrops have been generated using two techniques. These techniques demonstrate the applicability of outcrop logging to better understand reservoir facies architecture and exploration type problems. The first logging technique employs the use of a standard logging truck and gamma-ray sonde. The truck is positioned near the top of the cliff face and the sonde is lowered to the bottom of the cliff. Gamma-ray counts are recorded as the sonde is raised at a constant rate. The second logging technique employs the use of a commercially available, hand-held, gamma-ray scintillometer. The tool measures total radiation at the outcrop. Equally-spaced measurements are made along the section and are displayed as a function of depth below a reference point. In this paper examples of gamma-ray logging experiments conducted on turbidities of the Jackfork Group (Pennsylvanian) in central and southern Arkansas are discussed, as are application of outcrop gamma-ray logging in the Long Beach Unit of Wilmington Oil Field, California, and Point Mugu (Santa Barbara Channel), California

  3. An Imaging Camera for Biomedical Application Based on Compton Scattering of Gamma Rays

    Fontana, Cristiano Lino

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we present the R&D of a Compton Camera (CC) for small object imaging. The CC concept requires two detectors to obtain the incoming direction of the gamma ray. This approach, sometimes named ``Electronic Collimation,'' differs from the usual technique that employs collimators for physically selecting gamma-rays of a given direction. This solution offers the advantage of much greater sensitivity and hence smaller doses. We propose a novel design, which uses two simila...

  4. Applying a low energy HPGe detector gamma ray spectrometric technique for the evaluation of Pu/Am ratio in biological samples.

    Singh, I S; Mishra, Lokpati; Yadav, J R; Nadar, M Y; Rao, D D; Pradeepkumar, K S

    2015-10-01

    The estimation of Pu/(241)Am ratio in the biological samples is an important input for the assessment of internal dose received by the workers. The radiochemical separation of Pu isotopes and (241)Am in a sample followed by alpha spectrometry is a widely used technique for the determination of Pu/(241)Am ratio. However, this method is time consuming and many times quick estimation is required. In this work, Pu/(241)Am ratio in the biological sample was estimated with HPGe detector based measurements using gamma/X-rays emitted by these radionuclides. These results were compared with those obtained from alpha spectroscopy of sample after radiochemical analysis and found to be in good agreement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fuzzy correlations of gamma-ray bursts

    Hartmann, D.H.; Linder, E.V.; Blumenthal, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    The origin of gamma-ray bursts is not known, both in the sense of the nature of the source emitting the radiation and literally, the position of the burst on the sky. Lacking unambiguously identified counterparts in any wavelength band studied to date, statistical approaches are required to determine the burster distance scale. Angular correlation analysis is one of the most powerful tools in this regard. However, poor detector resolution gives large localization errors, effectively beam smearing the positions. The resulting fuzzy angular correlation function is investigated and the generic isotropization that smearing induces on any intrinsic clustering is discussed. In particular, the extent to which gamma-ray burst observations by the BATSE detector aboard the Gamma-Ray Observatory might recover an intrinsic source correlation is investigated. 16 refs

  6. Librarian driven analysis of gamma ray spectra

    Kondrashov, V.; Petersone, I.

    2002-01-01

    For a set of a priori given radionuclides extracted from a general nuclide data library, the authors use median estimates of the gamma-peak areas and estimates of their errors to produce a list of possible radionuclides matching gamma ray line(s). The identification of a given radionuclide is obtained by searching for a match with the energy information of a database. This procedure is performed in an interactive graphic mode by markers that superimpose, on the spectral data, the energy information and yields provided by a general gamma ray data library. This library of experimental data includes approximately 17,000 gamma ray energy lines related to 756 known gamma emitter radionuclides listed by the ICRP. (author)

  7. Technology Needs for Gamma Ray Astronomy

    Gehrels, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Gamma ray astronomy is currently in an exciting period of multiple missions and a wealth of data. Results from INTEGRAL, Fermi, AGILE, Suzaku and Swift are making large contributions to our knowledge of high energy processes in the universe. The advances are due to new detector and imaging technologies. The steps to date have been from scintillators to solid state detectors for sensors and from light buckets to coded aperture masks and pair telescopes for imagers. A key direction for the future is toward focusing telescopes pushing into the hard X-ray regime and Compton telescopes and pair telescopes with fine spatial resolution for medium and high energy gamma rays. These technologies will provide finer imaging of gamma-ray sources. Importantly, they will also enable large steps forward in sensitivity by reducing background.

  8. Evaluation of gamma-ray intensities

    Yoshizawa, Yasukazu; Inoue, Hikaru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwata, Yosei.

    1980-04-01

    Relative intensities and intensities per decay of gamma rays were evaluated for 16 nuclides, 22 Na, 24 Na, 46 Sc, 54 Mn, 60 Co, 85 Sr, 88 Y, 95 Nb, sup(108m)Ag, 134 Cs, 133 Ba, 139 Ce, sup(180m)Hf, 198 Au, 203 Hg and 207 Bi. For most of these nuclides disintegration rates can be determined by means of β-γ or X-γ coincidence method. Since decay schemes of these nuclides are established, intensities per decay of strong gamma rays were accurately evaluated by using weak beta-ray branching ratios, relative gamma-ray intensities and internal conversion coefficients. Half-lives of the nuclides were also evaluated. Use of the nuclides, therefore, are recommended for precision intensity calibration of the detectors. (author)

  9. gamma. -ray. Present status and problems

    Okudaira, K [Rikkyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1975-01-01

    As ..gamma..-ray advances straightly through space, the study on cosmic ..gamma..-ray will give the information concerning the origin directly. However, the intensity is weak, and the avoidance of background is a serious problem. The wide-spread components were studied by OSO-3. The intensity of the galactic disc component around 100 MeV was reported as (3.4+-1.0)x10/sup -5/ photons (cm/sup 2/, radian, sec)/sup -1/ by OSO-3 and 0.2x10/sup -4/ photons (cm/sup 2/, radian sec)/sup -1/ by SAS-2, and corresponds to the calculated ..gamma.. yield from ..pi../sup 0/. The strong disc component, so-called galactic center region, has been observed, and is due to the mixture of ..gamma..-ray from ..pi../sup 0/ and inverse Compton ..gamma..-ray. A peak at 476+-24 KeV was found as well as the continuous component. Special care must be taken for the observation of isotropic component, since it is hardly distinguished from the background. It is considered that the isotropic component is due to the inverse Compton scattering of 3/sup 0/K radiation in super-galactic space and the contribution from outer galaxy. The nearest point source of ..gamma..-ray is the sun. Among the other point sources, the crab nebula is the most reliable one. The energy flux of pulse component showed the spectrum of E/sup -1/. ..gamma..-ray bursts were observed by man-made satellites Vela-5 and 6. Theoretical explanation is still incomplete regarding the bursts. (Kato, T.).

  10. Computer programs for data reduction and interpretation in plutonium and uranium analysis by gamma ray spectrometry

    Singh, R.K.; Moorthy, A.D.; Babbar, R.K.; Udagatti, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    Non destructive gamma ray have been developed for analysis of isotopic abundances and concentrations of plutonium and uranium in the respective product solutions of a reprocessing plant. The method involves analysis of gamma rays emitted from the sample and uses a multichannel analyser system. Data reduction and interpretation of these techniques are tedious and time consuming. In order to make it possible to use them in routine analysis, computer programs have been developed in HP-BASIC language which can be used in HP-9845B desktop computer. A set of programs, for plutonium estimation by high resolution gamma ray spectrometry and for on-line measurement of uranium by gamma ray spectrometry are described in this report. (author) 4 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs

  11. Gamma-ray tracking: Characterisation of the AGATA symmetric prototype detectors

    Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cresswell, J.R.; Dimmock, M.R.; Nelson, L.; Nolan, P.J.; Rigby, S.; Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J.; Medina, P.; Santos, C.; Parisel, C.

    2007-01-01

    Each major technical advance in gamma-ray detection devices has resulted in significant new insights into the structure of atomic nuclei. The next major step in gamma-ray spectroscopy involves achieving the goal of a 4pi ball of Germanium detectors by using the technique of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented Germanium crystals. The resulting spectrometer will have an unparalleled level of detection power for nuclear electromagnetic radiation. Collaborations have been established in Europe (AGATA) [J. Simpson, Acta Phys. Pol. B 36 (2005) 1383. ] and the USA (GRETA/GRETINA) to build gamma-ray tracking spectrometers. This paper discusses the performance of the AGATA (Advanced Gamma Tracking Array) symmetric prototype detectors that have been tested at University of Liverpool. The use of a fully digital data acquisition system has allowed detector charge pulse shapes from a selection of well defined photon interaction positions to be analysed, yielding important information on the position sensitivity of the detector

  12. Gamma-ray tracking: Characterisation of the AGATA symmetric prototype detectors

    Boston, A.J. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: ajboston@liv.ac.uk; Boston, H.C. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Cresswell, J.R. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Dimmock, M.R. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Nelson, L. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Nolan, P.J. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Rigby, S. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Medina, P. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, Strasbourg BP28 67037 (France); Santos, C. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, Strasbourg BP28 67037 (France); Parisel, C. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, Strasbourg BP28 67037 (France)

    2007-08-15

    Each major technical advance in gamma-ray detection devices has resulted in significant new insights into the structure of atomic nuclei. The next major step in gamma-ray spectroscopy involves achieving the goal of a 4pi ball of Germanium detectors by using the technique of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented Germanium crystals. The resulting spectrometer will have an unparalleled level of detection power for nuclear electromagnetic radiation. Collaborations have been established in Europe (AGATA) [J. Simpson, Acta Phys. Pol. B 36 (2005) 1383. ] and the USA (GRETA/GRETINA) to build gamma-ray tracking spectrometers. This paper discusses the performance of the AGATA (Advanced Gamma Tracking Array) symmetric prototype detectors that have been tested at University of Liverpool. The use of a fully digital data acquisition system has allowed detector charge pulse shapes from a selection of well defined photon interaction positions to be analysed, yielding important information on the position sensitivity of the detector.

  13. A gamma-ray spectrometer system for fusion applications

    Esposito, B; Kaschuck, Y A; Martin-Solis, J R; Portnov, D V

    2002-01-01

    A NaI scintillator spectrometer system for the measurement of gamma-ray spectra in tokamak discharges has been developed and installed on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade. Two NaI scintillators are viewing the plasma at two different angles with respect to the equatorial plane. The main features of the spectrometer system (energy range: 0.3-23 MeV) and of the unfolding technique used to restore physical spectra from the pulse-height distributions are described: a method of solution with regularisation for matrix equations of large size, allowing to process count distributions with significant statistical noise, has been developed. A dedicated software, portable to any platform, has been written both for the acquisition and the analysis of the spectra. The typical gamma-ray spectra recorded in hydrogen and deuterium discharges, also with additional heating, are presented and discussed; two components have been observed: (a) thick-target Bremsstrahlung gamma-rays produced by runaway electrons hitting the Inconel po...

  14. Gamma rays from fast neutron capture in silicon and sulphur

    Lindholm, A.; Nilsson, L.; Bergqvist, I.

    1975-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectra from neutron capture in natural samples of silicon and sulphur have been recorded at eight neutron energies between 4 and 15 MeV. Time-of-flight techniques were used to improve the signal-to-background ratio and the gamma radiation was detected by a large NaI(Tl) scintillator. Cross sections have been determined for transitions to individual (or groups of) levels in the final nucleus. Calculations based on the direct-semidirect model show that this model gives a reasonable description of the shapes of the gamma-ray spectra, but fails to account for observed excitation functions. The inclusion of the compound-nucleus capture process gives a conclusive improvement in the description of the excitation functions, in particular at low neutron energies. The ability of the compound-nucleus model to account for the shapes of the gamma-ray spectra is as good as that of the direct-semidirect model. At higher neutron energies, an improvement is obtained for transitions to the region of weakly bound levels, where the single-particle structure is poorly known. (Auth.)

  15. Accounting for segment correlations in segmented gamma-ray scans

    Sheppard, G.A.; Prettyman, T.H.; Piquette, E.C.

    1994-01-01

    In a typical segmented gamma-ray scanner (SGS), the detector's field of view is collimated so that a complete horizontal slice or segment of the desired thickness is visible. Ordinarily, the collimator is not deep enough to exclude gamma rays emitted from sample volumes above and below the segment aligned with the collimator. This can lead to assay biases, particularly for certain radioactive-material distributions. Another consequence of the collimator's low aspect ratio is that segment assays at the top and bottom of the sample are biased low because the detector's field of view is not filled. This effect is ordinarily countered by placing the sample on a low-Z pedestal and scanning one or more segment thicknesses below and above the sample. This takes extra time, however, We have investigated a number of techniques that both account for correlated segments and correct for end effects in SGS assays. Also, we have developed an algorithm that facilitates estimates of assay precision. Six calculation methods have been compared by evaluating the results of thousands of simulated, assays for three types of gamma-ray source distribution and ten masses. We will report on these computational studies and their experimental verification

  16. Correlation of gamma ray shielding and structural properties of PbO–BaO–P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass system

    Kaur, Kulwinder; Singh, K.J., E-mail: kanwarjitsingh@yahoo.com; Anand, Vikas

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Transparent glass samples of the system 55PbO{sub x}BaO(45 − x)P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (x = 1 up to 5) have been prepared in the laboratory. • Gamma ray shielding properties improve with the addition of BaO. • Number of non-bridging oxygens decrease with the increase in the content of BaO. • Investigated glass system can be potential candidate as an alternate to conventional radiation shielding ‘concrete’. - Abstract: The presented work has been undertaken to evaluate the applicability of BaO doped PbO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass system as gamma ray shielding material in terms of mass attenuation coefficient and half value layer at photon energies 662, 1173 and1332 keV. A meaningful comparison of their radiation shielding properties has been made in terms of their mass attenuation coefficient and HVL parameters with standard radiation shielding concrete ‘barite’. The density, molar volume, XRD, FTIR, Raman and UV–visible techniques and mechanical properties (by Yamane and Mackenzie's procedure) have been used to study the structural properties of the prepared glass system in order to check the possibility of their commercial utility as alternate to conventional concrete for gamma ray shielding applications.

  17. Gamma-ray standards for detector calibration

    Lorenz, A.

    1985-10-01

    The proceeedings are reported of a Consultants' Meeting on Gamma-ray Standards for Detector Calibration, held at the CEN, Grenoble in France, from 30-31 May 1985. The meeting provided a forum to assess the requirements for a suitable file to be used internationally for the calibration of X- and gamma-ray detectors. A provisional list of nuclides was drawn up, and an initial assessment of the status of the required data was agreed to be performed by the participants before the end of 1985. (author)

  18. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    Lamb, R.C.; Lewis, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Whipple Observatory High Resolution Camera will be used in a vigorous program of observations to search for new sources of very-high-energy gamma rays. In addition, a search for antimatter using the moon-earth system as an ion spectrometer will be begun. The first phase of GRANITE, the new 37-element 11-m camera, will be concluded with first light scheduled for September, 1991. The two cameras will operate in support of the Gamma Ray Observatory mission in the winter of 1991/2

  19. Gamma ray spectroscopy monitoring method and apparatus

    Stagg, William R; Policke, Timothy A

    2017-05-16

    The present invention relates generally to the field of gamma ray spectroscopy monitoring and a system for accomplishing same to monitor one or more aspects of various isotope production processes. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a monitoring system, and method of utilizing same, for monitoring one or more aspects of an isotope production process where the monitoring system comprises: (A) at least one sample cell; (B) at least one measuring port; (C) at least one adjustable collimator device; (D) at least one shutter; and (E) at least one high resolution gamma ray spectrometer.

  20. VHE Gamma-ray Supernova Remnants

    Funk, Stefan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-01-22

    Increasing observational evidence gathered especially in X-rays and {gamma}-rays during the course of the last few years support the notion that Supernova remnants (SNRs) are Galactic particle accelerators up to energies close to the ''knee'' in the energy spectrum of Cosmic rays. This review summarizes the current status of {gamma}-ray observations of SNRs. Shell-type as well as plerionic type SNRs are addressed and prospect for observations of these two source classes with the upcoming GLAST satellite in the energy regime above 100 MeV are given.

  1. Gamma-ray lasers or grasers

    Wilson, G.V.H.; George, E.P.; Hora, H.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for controlling the emission and direction of gamma rays from excited nuclei contained in a sample source of suitable geometry having its major axis parallel to the proposed direction of gamma ray emission, comprising subjecting said sample source to thermal or dynamic polarization at temperatures approaching absolute zero in the presence of a strong magnetic field, and when a pulse of coherent gamma radiation is required along said major axis rotating the active nuclei through 90 0 by employing a short pulse of radio frequency oscillations in an auxilliary coil around the sample source

  2. Nuclear Forensics using Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    Norman E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Much of George Dracoulis’s research career was devoted to utilising gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the last several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  3. Gamma-ray surveys in uranium exploration

    1979-01-01

    This report is intended to provide newcomers to uranium exploration with an up-to-date statement of the principal factors to be considered in planning and using gamma-ray surveys. Since the report incorporates the results of recent research, and since its preparation was influenced by the cumulative experience of its contributors, it should also be useful to those who already have some knowledge of radioactivity surveys and methods. The intention is that the information and explanations given in the report will make it possible for gamma-ray surveys to be used in the most efficient way for a given exploration task

  4. Gamma-ray measurements for uranium enrichment standards

    Reilly, T.D.

    1979-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectroscopic measurement of uranium enrichment is one of the most widely used nondestructive analysis techniques. A study has been started of the precision and accuracy achievable with this technique and the physical parameters which affect it. The study was prompted by questions raised during the ongoing ESARDA-NBS experiment to produce uranium oxide reference counting materials for the technique. Results reported using a high-quality Ge(Li) spectrometer system show reproducibility comparable to that attainable with mass spectrometry

  5. ICIT contribution to JET gamma-ray diagnostics enhancement

    Soare, S.; Curuia, M.; Zoita, V.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Gamma-ray emission of tokamak plasmas is the result of the interaction of fast ions (fusion reaction products, including alpha particles, NBI ions, ICRH-accelerated ions) with main plasma impurities (e.g., carbon, beryllium). Gamma-ray diagnostics involve both gamma-ray imaging (cameras) and gamma-ray spectrometry (spectrometers). For the JET tokamak, gamma-ray diagnostics have been used to provide information on the characteristics of the fast ion population in plasmas. Two gamma-ray diagnostics enhancements project have been launched by JET and the MEdC/EURATOM Association has agreed to lead both of them with ICIT as projects leader. (authors)

  6. Potency of Gamma ray, Electric Current and Elicitor Application, as a Novel Practical Technique, to Improve Biomass Production and Glycoside Quality for Digitalis purpurea L. Grown in Sandy Soil Irrigated with Brackish Water

    Bosila, H.A.; Afifi, L.M.A.; Ahmed, T.E.S.

    2012-01-01

    Digitalis purpurea L seeds were treated before sowing with gamma ray (G:0, 2.5, 5, 7.5 KR, and electric current (E:O, 100, 150, 200 mA) then grown in sandy soil irrigated with brackish water (900 ppm) , in splite-splite plot design for 3 replicat (R) at two subsequent seasons , through surface drip irrigation system. Plants at 4- month old and monthly until before flowering were foliar sprayed with MnSO 4 as abiotic elicitor (M :O, 3 ppm). Biomass/ Feddan, percentage of total glycosides and percentage of bioactive glycosides, digitoxin and gitoxin were quantitated. Statistical analysis for the obtained data revealed that G, E and M achieved significant in biomass yield and its quality traits. Moreover, interactions ; GE, GM, EM and GEM achieved synergistic and significant increment for this traits. At such G dose the trait was increased by increasing E dose and M concentration. Hence, G 2.5, 5,7.5 KR E200 mA M3 ppm achieved significant increment, as percent over that of control, in biomass production / Feddan by 22, 29, 32%, total glycoside by 27, 40, 30%, digitoxin 27, 40, 30% for both first and second seasons, respectively. Whereas, increment for gitoxin were 27, 41, 30% at first season and 26, 38, 30% at second season, respectively. Overall, these finding strongly confirm the reliability of GEM as a novel practical technique for overproduction biomass/Fed. and quality improvement bioactive cardiac glycosides, digitoxin and gitoxin in Digitalis purpurea L.

  7. Found: A Galaxy's Missing Gamma Rays

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Recent reanalysis of data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has resulted in the first detection of high-energy gamma rays emitted from a nearby galaxy. This discovery reveals more about how supernovae interact with their environments.Colliding Supernova RemnantAfter a stellar explosion, the supernovas ejecta expand, eventually encountering the ambient interstellar medium. According to models, this generates a strong shock, and a fraction of the kinetic energy of the ejecta is transferred into cosmic rays high-energy radiation composed primarily of protons and atomic nuclei. Much is still unknown about this process, however. One open question is: what fraction of the supernovas explosion power goes into accelerating these cosmic rays?In theory, one way to answer this is by looking for gamma rays. In a starburst galaxy, the collision of the supernova-accelerated cosmic rays with the dense interstellar medium is predicted to produce high-energy gamma rays. That radiation should then escape the galaxy and be visible to us.Pass 8 to the RescueObservational tests of this model, however, have beenstumped by Arp 220. This nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy is the product of a galaxy merger ~700 million years ago that fueled a frenzy of starbirth. Due to its dusty interior and extreme levels of star formation, Arp 220 has long been predicted to emit the gamma rays produced by supernova-accelerated cosmic rays. But though weve looked, gamma-ray emission has never been detected from this galaxy until now.In a recent study, a team of scientists led by Fang-Kun Peng (Nanjing University) reprocessed 7.5 years of Fermi observations using the new Pass 8 analysis software. The resulting increase in resolution revealed the first detection of GeV emission from Arp 220!Acceleration EfficiencyGamma-ray luminosity vs. total infrared luminosity for LAT-detected star-forming galaxies and Seyferts. Arp 220s luminosities are consistent with the scaling relation. [Peng et al. 2016

  8. Selective Beta and Gamma-ray Discrimination by CdWO{sub 4} and PlasticScintillator

    Bae, Jun Woo; Kim, Hee Reyoung [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Radiation monitoring technique has been used for monitoring of decommissioning site of nuclear facility, radioactive waste disposal site, or in case of radioactivity accident. For rapid measurement of gamma-ray and beta-ray, many portable radiation detectors were developed but they are sensitive to specific radiation type. For example, portable detectors using NaI(Tl) or high purity germanium (HPGe) are suitable to detect gamma-ray. Otherwise, Geiger-müller (GM) tube or ionization chamber are suitable to detect all-types of radiation but it is hard to determine which particle is detected in the detector. In this reason, phoswich detectors for discrimination of beta-ray and gamma-ray were developed by using pulse shape discrimination. In this study, another approach to discriminate the beta-ray and gamma-ray is carried out. Two scintillators are used, cadmium tungstate (CdWO{sub 4}) and plastic scintillator. They have huge difference in their effective atomic number and mass density, thus they have huge difference in their gamma-ray sensitivity while the sensitivity of beta-ray is similar. The characterization of beta-ray and gamma-ray discrimination by using this characteristics is include. A technique of discrimination between beta-ray and gamma-ray was suggested. The method was verified by Monte Carlo simulation and experiment. This work showed feasibility on in field measurement of radiation with discrimination of beta-ray and gamma-ray.

  9. Natural gamma ray spectrum analysis technique

    Chevalier, P.; Seeman, B.

    1976-01-01

    In accordance with an illustrative embodiment of the present invention, a method and apparatus is disclosed for determining the presence of a selected number of naturally radioactive materials in an earth formation from the spectrum of natural gamma radiation emitted by the materials in the formation by deriving representations of portions of the detected gamma radiation spectrum and combining the representations to determine therefrom the presence of the selected materials

  10. Flash photoionization of gamma-ray burst environments

    Band, David L.; Hartmann, Dieter H.

    1992-01-01

    The H-alpha line emission that a flash-photoionized region emits is calculated. Archival transients, as well as various theoretical predictions, suggest that there may be significant ionizing flux. The limits on the line flux which might be observable indicate that the density must be fairly high for the recombination radiation to be observable. The intense burst radiation is insufficient to melt the dust which will be present in such a dense medium. This dust may attenuate the observable line emission, but does not attenuate the ionizing radiation before it ionizes the neutral medium surrounding the burst source. The dust can also produce a light echo. If there are indeed gamma-ray bursts in dense clouds, then it is possible that the burst was triggered by Bondi-Hoyle accretion from the dense medium, although it is unlikely on statistical grounds that all bursts occur in clouds.

  11. Gamma ray absorption of cylindrical fissile material with dual shields

    Wu Chenyan; Cheng Yiying; Huang Yongyi; Lu Fuquan; Yang Fujia

    2005-01-01

    This work analyzed the gamma ray attenuation effect from the self-absorption and shield attenuation perspectively. An exact mathematical equation was given for the geometric factor of the cylindrical fissile material with dual shields. In addition, several approximation approaches suitable for real situation were discussed, especially in the radial and axial directions of the cylinders, since the G-factors have simple forms. Then the space distribution patterns of the G-factor were analyzed based on numerical result and effective ways to solved the geometric information of the cylindrical fissile material, the radii and the heights, were deduced. This method was checked and verified by numerical calculation. Because of the efficiency of the method, it is ideal for application in real situations, such as nuclear safeguards, which demands speed of detection and accuracy of geometric analysis. (authors)

  12. Gamma ray observations of the solar system

    1981-01-01

    Two general categories are discussed concerning the evolution of the solar system: the dualistic view, the planetesimal approach and the monistic view, the nebular hypothesis. The major points of each view are given and the models that are developed from these views are described. Possible applications of gamma ray astronomical observations to the question of the dynamic evolution of the solar system are discussed

  13. Gamma ray observations of the solar system

    1981-01-01

    Two general categories are discussed concerning the evolution of the solar system: the dualistic view, the planetesimal approach and the monistic view, the nebular hypothesis. The major points of each view are given and the models that are developed from these views are described. Possible applications of gamma ray astronomical observations to the question of the dynamic evolution of the solar system are discussed.

  14. Gamma ray observations of the solar system

    1981-01-01

    Two general categories are discussed concerning the evolution of the solar system: the dualistic view, the planetesimal approach; and the monistic view, the nebular hypothesis. The major points of each view are given and the models that are developed from these views are described. Possible applications of gamma ray astronomical observations to the question of the dynamic evolution of the solar system are discussed.

  15. Black Hole Accretion in Gamma Ray Bursts

    Agnieszka Janiuk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the structure and evolution of the hyperaccreting disks and outflows in the gamma ray bursts central engines. The torus around a stellar mass black hole is composed of free nucleons, Helium, electron-positron pairs, and is cooled by neutrino emission. Accretion of matter powers the relativistic jets, responsible for the gamma ray prompt emission. The significant number density of neutrons in the disk and outflowing material will cause subsequent formation of heavier nuclei. We study the process of nucleosynthesis and its possible observational consequences. We also apply our scenario to the recent observation of the gravitational wave signal, detected on 14 September 2015 by the two Advanced LIGO detectors, and related to an inspiral and merger of a binary black hole system. A gamma ray burst that could possibly be related with the GW150914 event was observed by the Fermi satellite. It had a duration of about 1 s and appeared about 0.4 s after the gravitational-wave signal. We propose that a collapsing massive star and a black hole in a close binary could lead to the event. The gamma ray burst was powered by a weak neutrino flux produced in the star remnant’s matter. Low spin and kick velocity of the merged black hole are reproduced in our simulations. Coincident gravitational-wave emission originates from the merger of the collapsed core and the companion black hole.

  16. Swift: A gamma ray burst MIDEX

    Barthelmy, Scott

    2001-01-01

    Swift is a first of its kind multiwavelength transient observatory for gamma-ray burst astronomy. It has the optimum capabilities for the next breakthroughs in determining the origin of gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows as well as using bursts to probe the early Universe. Swift will also perform the first sensitive hard X-ray survey of the sky. The mission is being developed by an international collaboration and consists of three instruments, the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), the X-ray Telescope (XRT), and the Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT). The BAT, a wide-field gamma-ray detector, will detect ∼1 gamma-ray burst per day with a sensitivity 5 times that of BATSE. The sensitive narrow-field XRT and UVOT will be autonomously slewed to the burst location in 20 to 70 seconds to determine 0.3-5.0 arcsec positions and perform optical, UV, and X-ray spectrophotometry. On-board measurements of redshift will also be done for hundreds of bursts. Swift will incorporate superb, low-cost instruments using existing flight-spare hardware and designs. Strong education/public outreach and follow-up programs will help to engage the public and astronomical community. Swift has been selected by NASA for development and launch in late 2003

  17. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive

  18. Coakial gamma ray detector and method therefor

    Harchol, M.

    1977-01-01

    A coaxial gamma ray detector is fabricated using intrinsic Ge semiconductor material in a geometry whereby full depletion of electrical carriers is prevented within a small region proximate the point of electrical contact thereby allowing greater biasing potentials across the detector and, consequently, providing reduced electronic noise and increased energy resolution

  19. Developments in mercuric iodide gamma ray imaging

    Patt, B E; Beyerle, A G; Dolin, R C; Ortale, C [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (USA). Santa Barbara Operations

    1989-11-01

    A mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) gamma ray imaging array and camera system previously described have been characterized for spatial and energy resolution. Based on these data a new camera is being developed to more fully exploit the potential of the array. Characterization results and design criteria for the new camera will be presented. (orig.).

  20. Current segmented gamma-ray scanner technology

    Bjork, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    A new generation of segmented gamma-ray scanners has been developed at Los Alamos for scrap and waste measurements at the Savannah River Plant and the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The new designs are highly automated and exhibit special features such as good segmentation and thorough shielding to improve performance

  1. Gamma-Ray Telescope and Uncertainty Principle

    Shivalingaswamy, T.; Kagali, B. A.

    2012-01-01

    Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle is one of the important basic principles of quantum mechanics. In most of the books on quantum mechanics, this uncertainty principle is generally illustrated with the help of a gamma ray microscope, wherein neither the image formation criterion nor the lens properties are taken into account. Thus a better…

  2. Gamma-ray astronomy: A historical perspective

    Lingenfelter, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    This is a brief review of the course theoretical gamma-ray astronomy has taken over the past thirty years. An examination is given of what the theoretical expectations were; to what extent they were realized; how well they anticipated new directions of research; and alternatively, how often were new directions unexpected

  3. Gamma-ray Emission from Globular Clusters

    Pak-Hin T. Tam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, the data obtained using the Large Area Telescope (LAT aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided new insights on high-energy processes in globular clusters, particularly those involving compact objects such as MilliSecond Pulsars (MSPs. Gamma-ray emission in the 100 MeV to 10 GeV range has been detected from more than a dozen globular clusters in our galaxy, including 47 Tucanae and Terzan 5. Based on a sample of known gammaray globular clusters, the empirical relations between gamma-ray luminosity and properties of globular clusters such as their stellar encounter rate, metallicity, and possible optical and infrared photon energy densities, have been derived. The measured gamma-ray spectra are generally described by a power law with a cut-off at a few gigaelectronvolts. Together with the detection of pulsed γ-rays from two MSPs in two different globular clusters, such spectral signature lends support to the hypothesis that γ-rays from globular clusters represent collective curvature emission from magnetospheres of MSPs in the clusters. Alternative models, involving Inverse-Compton (IC emission of relativistic electrons that are accelerated close to MSPs or pulsar wind nebula shocks, have also been suggested. Observations at >100 GeV by using Fermi/LAT and atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S.-II, MAGIC-II, VERITAS, and CTA will help to settle some questions unanswered by current data.

  4. SWEPP gamma-ray spectrometer system software test plan and report

    Femec, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    The SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) System has been developed by the Radiation Measurements and Development Unit of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to assist in the characterization of the radiological contents of contact-handled waste containers at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP). In addition to determining the concentrations of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, the software also calculates attenuation-corrected isotopic mass ratios of specific interest, and provides controls for SGRS hardware as required. This document presents the test plan and report for the data acquisition and analysis software associated with the SGRS system

  5. Measurements of neutron and gamma ray streaming through a duct, (2), (3)

    Hashikura, Hiroyuki; Fukumoto, Hideshi; Akiyama, Masatsugu; Oka, Yoshiaki; An, Shigehiro

    1982-03-01

    Measurements of neutron and gamma ray streaming through a duct measurements of and a cavity in concrete shields were measured in the fast neutron source reactor YAYOI of the University of Tokyo. The neutron spectra measured by a NE213 scintillator and proton recoil counters were compared with the calculations using Monte Carlo code, MORSE-CG. The agreements between the experiments and the calculations were generally satisfactory. The attenuations of neutron and gamma ray in the cavity and the duct were studied in the three experimental configurations. (author)

  6. High-energy Emission from Nonrelativistic Radiative Shocks: Application to Gamma-Ray Novae

    Vurm, Indrek; Metzger, Brian D.

    2018-01-01

    The observation of GeV gamma-rays from novae by Fermi/LAT demonstrates that the nonrelativistic radiative shocks in these systems can accelerate particles to energies of at least ∼10 GeV. The low-energy extension of the same nonthermal particle distribution inevitably gives rise to emission in the hard X-ray band. Above ≳ 10 {keV}, this radiation can escape the system without significant absorption/attenuation, and can potentially be detected by NuSTAR. We present theoretical models for hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission from radiative shocks in both leptonic and hadronic scenarios, accounting for the rapid evolution of the downstream properties due to the fast cooling of thermal plasma. We find that due to strong Coulomb losses, only a fraction of {10}-4{--}{10}-3 of the gamma-ray luminosity is radiated in the NuSTAR band; nevertheless, this emission could be detectable simultaneously with the LAT emission in bright gamma-ray novae with a ∼50 ks exposure. The spectral slope in hard X-rays is α ≈ 0 for typical nova parameters, thus serving as a testable prediction of the model. Our work demonstrates how combined hard X-ray and gamma-ray observations can be used to constrain properties of the nova outflow (velocity, density, and mass outflow rate) and particle acceleration at the shock. A very low X-ray to gamma-ray luminosity ratio ({L}{{X}}/{L}γ ≲ 5× {10}-4) would disfavor leptonic models for the gamma-ray emission. Our model can also be applied to other astrophysical environments with radiative shocks, including SNe IIn and colliding winds in massive star binaries.

  7. Displacement damage caused by gamma-rays and neutrons on Au and Se.

    Doyle, Barney Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-11-01

    This report documents theoretical calculations of displacement damage produced by gamma rays and neutrons on various materials. The average energy of the gamma rays was 1.24 MeV and 1.0 MeV for the neutrons. The fluence of the gamma rays was 1.2e14 γ/cm2 , for the neutrons it was 1.0e12 n/cm2. The initial materials of interest were Au and Se. The total doses of the gamma ray exposures were in the 100 kRad range for both elements. An equivalent electron fluence was approximated to be the same as the gamma ray fluence over one gamma ray attenuation length in both materials and at the same 1.24 MeV energy. The maximum recoil energy of the Au and Se for these electrons was calculated relativisticaly to be 29 and 72 eV respectively. The relativisitic McKinley and Feshbach theory for the atomic recoil cross sections produced by the electrons were in the 10s of mbarn range and an upper limit for the concentration of Frenkel pairs for the gamma ray exposures for both elements was in the ppb range. The Robinson Energy Partioning Theory for non-ionizing energy loss (NIEL) of ions in solids was used to calculate the concentration of Frenkel pairs produced by the 1 MeV neutrons, and this concentration was also in the ppb range for both Au and Se. Low damage levels like this can have effects on minority carrier recombination in semiconductors, but are not expected to have any effect on metals like Au, or metalloids such as Se.

  8. Neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy: simulations for chemical mapping of planetary surfaces

    Brueckner, J.; Waenke, H.; Reedy, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmic rays interact with the surface of a planetary body and produce a cascade of secondary particles, such as neutrons. Neutron-induced scattering and capture reactions play an important role in the production of discrete gamma-ray lines that can be measured by a gamma-ray spectrometer on board of an orbiting spacecraft. These data can be used to determine the concentration of many elements in the surface of a planetary body, which provides clues to its bulk composition and in turn to its origin and evolution. To investigate the gamma rays made by neutron interactions, thin targets were irradiated with neutrons having energies from 14 MeV to 0.025 eV. By means of foil activation technique the ratio of epithermal to thermal neutrons was determined to be similar to that in the Moon. Gamma rays emitted by the targets and the surrounding material were detected by a high-resolution germanium detector in the energy range of 0.1 to 8 MeV. Most of the gamma-ray lines that are expected to be used for planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy were found in the recorded spectra and the principal lines in these spectra are presented. 58 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs

  9. Gamma ray bursts of black hole universe

    Zhang, T. X.

    2015-07-01

    Slightly modifying the standard big bang theory, Zhang recently developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which has only a single postulate but is consistent with Mach's principle, governed by Einstein's general theory of relativity, and able to explain existing observations of the universe. In the previous studies, we have explained the origin, structure, evolution, expansion, cosmic microwave background radiation, quasar, and acceleration of black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. This study investigates gamma ray bursts of black hole universe and provides an alternative explanation for the energy and spectrum measurements of gamma ray bursts according to the black hole universe model. The results indicate that gamma ray bursts can be understood as emissions of dynamic star-like black holes. A black hole, when it accretes its star or merges with another black hole, becomes dynamic. A dynamic black hole has a broken event horizon and thus cannot hold the inside hot (or high-frequency) blackbody radiation, which flows or leaks out and produces a GRB. A star when it collapses into its core black hole produces a long GRB and releases the gravitational potential energy of the star as gamma rays. A black hole that merges with another black hole produces a short GRB and releases a part of their blackbody radiation as gamma rays. The amount of energy obtained from the emissions of dynamic star-like black holes are consistent with the measurements of energy from GRBs. The GRB energy spectra derived from this new emission mechanism are also consistent with the measurements.

  10. Matrix of response functions for xenon gamma-ray detector

    Shustov, A.E.; Vlasik, K.F.; Grachev, V.M.; Dmitrenko, V.V.; Novikov, A.S.; P'ya, S.N.; Ulin, S.E.; Uteshev, Z.M.; Chernysheva, I.V.

    2014-01-01

    An approach of creation of response matrix using simulation GEANT4 gamma-ray Monte-Carlo method has been described for gamma-ray spectrometer based on high pressure xenon impulse ionization chamber with a shielding grid [ru

  11. Cosmic gamma-ray background radiation. Current understandings and problems

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    The cosmic gamma-ray background radiation is one of the most fundamental observables in the gamma-ray band. Although the origin of the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation has been a mystery for a long time, the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope has recently measured it at 0.1-820 GeV and revealed that the cosmic GeV gamma-ray background is composed of blazars, radio galaxies, and star-forming galaxies. However, Fermi still leaves the following questions. Those are dark matter contribution, origins of the cosmic MeV gamma-ray background, and the connection to the IceCube TeV-PeV neutrino events. In this proceeding, I will review the current understandings of the cosmic gamma-ray background and discuss future prospects of cosmic gamma-ray background radiation studies. (author)

  12. Evaluation of skyshine dose due to gamma-rays from a cobalt-60 irradiation facility

    Kanazawa, Tamotsu; Okamoto, Shinichi; Ohnishi, Tokuhiro; Tsujii, Yukio

    1991-01-01

    We attempted to evaluate skyshine dose due to gamma-rays from a cobalt-60 irradiation facility. As the first step, the results of measurements and calculations were compared of the skyshine dose due to gamma-rays from the cobalt-60 source of 1.45 PBq set in the No.4 irradiation room of our laboratory. Distances of measuring points from the cobalt source were in the range from 17 m to about 100 m in the site of our office. Calculation was carried out with simplified single scattering method. The calculated values of the skyshine dose were higher than the measured values. For more precise evaluation of the skyshine dose, the following factors are to be considered; the dose rate distribution on the roof above the source and the attenuation of gamma-rays by air. (author)

  13. Method and apparatus for measuring incombustible content of coal mine dust using gamma-ray backscatter

    Armstrong, F.E.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring incombustible content of particulate material, particularly coal mine dust, include placing a sample of the particulate material in a container to define a pair of angularly oriented surfaces of the sample, directing an incident gamma-ray beam from a radiation source at one surface of the sample and detecting gamma-ray backscatter from the other surface of the sample with a radiation detector having an output operating a display to indicate incombustible content of the sample. The positioning of the source and detector along different surfaces of the sample permits the depth of the scattering volume defined by intersection of the incident beam and a detection cone from the detector to be selected such that variations in scattered radiation produced by variations in density of the sample are compensated by variations in the attenuation of the incident beam and the gamma-ray backscatter. 17 claims 5 figures

  14. Utilizing experimentally derived multi-channel gamma-ray spectra for the analysis of airborne data

    Grasty, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectra derived from measurements on radioactive concrete calibration pads using plywood sheets to simulate the attenuation effect of air have been successfully tested on airbone data. Cesium-137 at 662 keV, from atomic weapons tests was found to contribute significantly to the airborne spectrum. By fitting the experimental spectra, above the cesium energy, to airborne data, significant increases in accuracy were obtained for the measurement of uranium and thorium, compared to the standard 3-window method. By including a cesium spectrum is the analysis of gamma-ray data from a survey carried out in Saskatchewan, it was found that background radiation due to atmospheric bismuth-214 could be measured more reliably than by using a constant over-water background. Similar results were obtained by monitoring low energy lead-214 gamma-rays at 352 keV

  15. Gamma ray NDA assay system for total plutonium and isotopics in plutonium product solutions

    Cowder, L.R.; Hsue, S.T.; Johnson, S.S.; Parker, J.L.; Russo, P.A.; Sprinkle, J.K.; Asakura, Y.; Fukuda, T.; Kondo, I.

    1979-01-01

    A LASL-designed gamma-ray NDA instrument for assay of total plutonium and isotopics of product solutions at Tokai-Mura is currently installed and operating. The instrument is, optimally, a densitometer that uses radioisotopic sources for total plutonium measurements at the K absorption edge. The measured transmissions of additional gamma-ray lines from the same radioisotopic sources are used to correct for self-attenuation of passive gamma rays from plutonium. The corrected passive data give the plutonium isotopic content of freshly separated to moderately aged solutions. This off-line instrument is fully automated under computer control, with the exception of sample positioning, and operates routinely in a mode designed for measurement control. A one-half percent precision in total plutonium concentration is achieved with a 15-minute measurement

  16. Applications of Monte Carlo simulations of gamma-ray spectra

    Clark, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    A short, convenient computer program based on the Monte Carlo method that was developed to generate simulated gamma-ray spectra has been found to have useful applications in research and teaching. In research, we use it to predict spectra in neutron activation analysis (NAA), particularly in prompt gamma-ray NAA (PGNAA). In teaching, it is used to illustrate the dependence of detector response functions on the nature of gamma-ray interactions, the incident gamma-ray energy, and detector geometry

  17. Interstellar medium structure and content and gamma ray astronomy

    Lebrun, F.

    1982-05-01

    A general description of gamma-ray astronomy is presented with special emphasis on the study of diffuse gamma-ray emission. This is followed by a collection of reflections and observations on the structure and the gas and dust content of the local interstellar medium. Results of gamma-ray observations on the local interstellar medium are given. The last part is devoted to the whole of the galactic gamma-ray emission and its interpretation [fr

  18. Gamma-ray burst observations: the present situation

    Vedrenne, G.

    1984-01-01

    Recent results in gamma ray burst investigations concerning the spectral variability on a short time scale, precise locations, and the discovery of optical flashes in gamma ray burst positions on archival plates are presented. The implications of optical and X-ray observations of gamma ray burst error boxes are also discussed. 72 references

  19. Egret observations of the extragalactic gamma-ray emission

    Sreekumar, P.; Bertsch, D.L.; Dingus, B.L.

    1998-01-01

    The all-sky survey in high-energy gamma rays (E > 30 MeV) carried out by EGRET aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory provides a unique opportunity to examine in detail the diffuse gamma-ray emission. The observed diffuse emission has a Galactic component arising from cosmic-ray interactions wi...

  20. Natural background gamma-ray spectrum. List of gamma-rays ordered in energy from natural radionuclides

    Ichimiya, Tsutomu [Japan Radioisotope Association, Tokyo (Japan); Narita, Tsutomu; Kitao, Kensuke

    1998-03-01

    A quick index to {gamma}-rays and X-rays from natural radionuclides is presented. In the list, {gamma}-rays are arranged in order of increasing energy. The list also contains {gamma}-rays from radioactive nuclides produced in a germanium detector and its surrounding materials by interaction with cosmic neutrons, as well as direct {gamma}-rays from interaction with the neutrons. Artificial radioactive nuclides emitting {gamma}-rays with same or near energy value as that of the natural {gamma}-rays and X-rays are also listed. In appendix, {gamma}-ray spectra from a rock, uranium ore, thorium, monazite and uraninite and also background spectra obtained with germanium detectors placed in iron or lead shield have been given. The list is designed for use in {gamma}-ray spectroscopy under the conditions of highly natural background, such as in-situ environmental radiation monitoring or low-level activity measurements, with a germanium detector. (author)

  1. Optimum filter-based discrimination of neutrons and gamma rays

    Amiri, Moslem; Prenosil, Vaclav; Cvachovec, Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    An optimum filter-based method for discrimination of neutrons and gamma-rays in a mixed radiation field is presented. The existing filter-based implementations of discriminators require sample pulse responses in advance of the experiment run to build the filter coefficients, which makes them less practical. Our novel technique creates the coefficients during the experiment and improves their quality gradually. Applied to several sets of mixed neutron and photon signals obtained through different digitizers using stilbene scintillator, this approach is analyzed and its discrimination quality is measured. (authors)

  2. Gamma-ray streaming in straight pipes and bent ducts

    Eid, M.; Diop, C.M.; Nimal, J.C.

    1985-04-01

    An important shielding problem is the gamma-ray streaming through voids. These problems are encountered in the reactors and reprocessing plants. A Monte Carlo method has been choosed as one of the most powerful technics to solve this kind of problems. Here in that frame, a biasing system which is adapted for two types of geometries is proposed: straight pipes and bent ducts. A code has been written applying this technique. The numerical results obained show the efficiency and the very good economy of the method proposed. It is hoped to extend the method to deal with more complex geometries and polykinetic situation as well

  3. Compton scattering of gamma rays in nondestructive testing

    Anjos, M.J. dos; Lopes, R.T.

    1988-01-01

    A system constituted of a Cesium 137 source with activity of 7,4 x 10 10 Bq, whose gamma rays energy is 662 KeV and a NaI (Tl) of 50 x 50 mm as surface inspection techniques is presented. The physical basic principle is the gamma radiation interaction with matter, where the predominant interaction is the comption scattering. The scattering angle chose is 90 0 . Aluminium blocks, are used as sample with defects in surfaces of several diameters. Defects with measurements higher than 1,6 mm, were detected. (C.M.) [pt

  4. An automated background estimation procedure for gamma ray spectra

    Tervo, R.J.; Kennett, T.J.; Prestwich, W.V.

    1983-01-01

    An objective and simple method has been developed to estimate the background continuum in Ge gamma ray spectra. Requiring no special procedures, the method is readily automated. Based upon the inherent statistical properties of the experimental data itself, nodes, which reflect background samples are located and used to produce an estimate of the continuum. A simple procedure to interpolate between nodes is reported and a range of rather typical experimental data is presented. All information necessary to implemented this technique is given including the relevant properties of various factors involved in its development. (orig.)

  5. Observe gamma rays to find out how the universe works

    Tapia, R.

    2015-01-01

    Each hemisphere of the Earth will host one of the two venues of the future network of telescopes Cherenkov (cta, Cherenkov telescope array) designed with the aim of covering all outer space and in stereo, a technique that allows us to reconstruct efficiently the properties of spatial events. Thanks to telescopes with which will be equipped with - greater sensitivity than the current - will be possible to study in detail one of the most powerful radiation of the Universe, gamma rays. Spain has been chosen to host the North Observatory on roque of the boys, on the island of Palma, facilities that will be form das by 20 telescopes. (Author)

  6. Relativistic effects in gamma-ray bursts

    Eriksen, Erik; Groen, Oeyvind

    1999-01-01

    According to recent models of the sources of gamma-ray bursts the extremely energetic emission is caused by shells expanding with ultrarelativistic velocity. With the recent identification of optical sources at the positions of some gamma-ray bursts these ''fireball'' models have acquired an actuality that invites to use them as a motivating application when teaching special relativity. We demonstrate several relativistic effects associated with these models which are very pronounced due to the great velocity of the shell. For example a burst lasting for a month in the rest frame of an element of the shell lasts for a few seconds only, in the rest frame of our detector. It is shown how the observed properties of a burst are modified by aberration and the Doppler effect. The apparent luminosity as a function of time is calculated. Modifications due to the motion of the star away from the observer are calculated. (Author)

  7. Fissile interrogation using gamma rays from oxygen

    Smith, Donald; Micklich, Bradley J.; Fessler, Andreas

    2004-04-20

    The subject apparatus provides a means to identify the presence of fissionable material or other nuclear material contained within an item to be tested. The system employs a portable accelerator to accelerate and direct protons to a fluorine-compound target. The interaction of the protons with the fluorine-compound target produces gamma rays which are directed at the item to be tested. If the item to be tested contains either a fissionable material or other nuclear material the interaction of the gamma rays with the material contained within the test item with result in the production of neutrons. A system of neutron detectors is positioned to intercept any neutrons generated by the test item. The results from the neutron detectors are analyzed to determine the presence of a fissionable material or other nuclear material.

  8. Environmental Effects of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Martin, Osmel; Zarauza, Dario; Cardenas, Rolando

    2007-01-01

    Gamma rays bursts, coming from very massive stars, are the most powerful explosions in our Universe. Some authors have linked them to some of the climatic changes and consequent biological mass extinctions of the Phanerozoic eon. However, the consequences of their direct impact on primitive Earth, is today a hot topic of debate. On the other hand, it is usually assumed that they were more common in earlier stages of our galaxy. So it is important to evaluate its potential effects on terrestrial paleoenvironments. We outline some simple models to estimate their influence mainly on the primordial atmospheric chemistry of Earth and on the climate in general. To do that, we consider different scenarios where the atmospheric composition diverges substantially from the atmosphere today, and compute the evolution of principal chemical species under the intense radiational stress of a gamma ray burst. Furthermore, the possible impact on the isotopic composition, geochemistry and the biosphere are mentioned in general way

  9. TeV gamma-ray astronomy

    Cui Wei

    2009-01-01

    The field of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has enjoyed rapid growth in recent years. As an increasing number of sources are detected at TeV energies, the field has matured and become a viable branch of modern astronomy. Lying at the uppermost end of the electromagnetic rainbow, TeV photons are always preciously few in number but carry essential information about the particle acceleration and radiative processes involved in extreme astronomical settings. Together with observations at longer wavelengths, TeV gamma-ray observations have drastically improved our view of the universe. In this review, we briefly describe recent progress in the field. We will conclude by providing a personal perspective on the future of the field, in particular, on the significant roles that China could play in advancing this young but exciting field. (invited reviews)

  10. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    Rowland, Mark [Alamo, CA; Gosnell, Tom B [Moraga, CA; Ham, Cheryl [Livermore, CA; Perkins, Dwight [Livermore, CA; Wong, James [Dublin, CA

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  11. The Future of Gamma Ray Astrophysics

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, gamma ray astrophysics has entered the astrophysical mainstream. Extremely successful space-borne (GeV) and ground-based (TeV) detectors, combined with a multitude of partner telescopes, have revealed a fascinating “astroscape" of active galactic nuclei, pulsars, gamma ray bursts, supernova remnants, binary stars, star-forming galaxies, novae much more, exhibiting major pathways along which large energy releases can flow. From  a basic physics perspective, exquisitely sensitive measurements have constrained the nature of dark matter, the cosmological origin of magnetic field and the properties of black holes. These advances have motivated the development of new facilities, including HAWC, DAMPE, CTA and SVOM, which will further our understanding of the high energy universe. Topics that will receive special attention include merging neutron star binaries, clusters of galaxies, galactic cosmic rays and putative, TeV dark matter.

  12. Comparative study of gamma ray shielding and some properties of PbO–SiO2–Al2O3 and Bi2O3–SiO2–Al2O3 glass systems

    Singh, K.J.; Kaur, Sandeep; Kaundal, R.S.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-ray shielding properties have been estimated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient, half value layer and mean free path values, whereas, structural studies have been performed in terms of density, optical band gap, glass transition temperature and longitudinal ultrasonic velocity parameters. X-ray diffraction, UV–visible, DSC and ultrasonic techniques have been used to explore the structural properties of PbO–SiO 2 –Al 2 O 3 and Bi 2 O 3 –SiO 2 –Al 2 O 3 glass systems. - Highlights: • Bi 2 O 3 –SiO 2 –Al 2 O 3 and PbO–SiO 2 –Al 2 O 3 glasses can replace conventional concretes as gamma-ray shielding materials. • Gamma-ray shielding properties improve with the addition of heavy metals. • Rigidity deteriorates with the increase in the content of heavy metals. • Bi 2 O 3 –SiO 2 –Al 2 O 3 glass system is better than PbO–SiO 2 –Al 2 O 3 glass system in terms of gamma-ray shielding as well as structural properties

  13. Advances in gamma-ray burst astronomy

    Cline, T.L.; Desai, U.D.

    1976-01-01

    Work at Goddard is presently being carried out in three major areas of gamma-ray burst research: (1) A pair of simultaneously operating 0.8-m 2 burst detectors were successfully balloon-borne at locations 800 miles apart on 9 May, 1975, each to atmospheric depths of 3 to 4 g cm -2 , for a 20-h period of coincident data coverage. This experiment investigates the size spectrum of bursts in the 10 -7 to 10 -6 erg cm -2 size region where dozens of events per day are expected on a -1.5 index integral power-law extrapolation. Considerable separation in latitude was used to avoid possible atmospheric and auroral secondary effects. Its results are not yet available. (2) A deep-space burst detector, the first spacecraft instrument built specifically for gamma-ray burst studies, was recently successfully integrated into the Helios-B space probe. Its use at distances of up to 2 AU will make possible the first high-resolution directional study of gamma-ray burst source locations. Similar modifications to several other space vehicles are also being prepared. (3) The gamma-ray instrument on the IMP-7 satellite is presently the most sensitive burst detector still operating in orbit. Its results have shown that all measured event-average energy spectra are consistent with being alike. Using this characteristic spectrum to select IMP-7 candidate events of smaller size than those detected using other spacecraft in coincidence, a size spectrum is constructed which fits the -1.5 index power law down to 2.5 x 10 -5 erg cm -2 per event, at an occurrence rate of about once per month. (Auth.)

  14. Nature of gamma-ray burst sources

    Ventura, J.

    1983-01-01

    Observational evidence suggests that gamma ray bursts have a local galactic origin involving neutron stars. In this light we make a critical review of physics of the thermonuclear runaway model placing emphasis on self-consistency. We further show that some of the proposed models can be observationally excluded in the light of existing data from the Einstein Observatory. The possibility of gamma bursts arising in low mass binaries is finally discussed in the light of evolutionary scenarios leading to low luminosity systems

  15. Evaluation of gamma-ray intensities

    Yoshizawa, Yasukazu; Inoue, Hikaru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwata, Yosei.

    1978-03-01

    Results of literature survey and evaluation of relative intensities and intensities per decay of gamma rays are presented. Evaluations were made for 22 Na, 24 Na, 46 Sc, 48 Sc, 48 V, 54 Mn, 57 Co, 60 Co, 85 Sr, 88 Y, 95 Nb, 95 Zr, sup(108m)Ag, 134 Cs, 137 Cs, 144 Ce, 144 Pr, 203 Hg, and 207 Bi. For eight of the nuclides, the half-lives were also evaluated. (auth.)

  16. Gamma-ray standards for detector calibration

    Christmas, P.; Nichols, A.L.; Lorenz, A.

    1987-09-01

    The first official meeting of the IAEA Coordinated Research Programme on the Measurement and Evaluation of X- and Gamma-ray Standards for Detector Calibration was held in Rome from 11 to 13 June 1987. Work undertaken by the CRP members was reviewed in detail: specific problems in the evaluations were identified and actions placed on the participants to resolve these issues. (author). 3 tabs

  17. Gamma-ray bursts - a critical review

    Tudose, Valeriu; Biermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    We present a short general introduction into the field of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) research, summarizing the past and the present status. We give an general view of the GRBs observations to date, both in the prompt emission phase as well as in the afterglow phase, and a brief primer into the theory, mainly in the frame-work of the fireball model. (authors)

  18. Balloon observation of gamma-ray burst

    Nishimura, Jun; Fujii, Masami; Yamagami, Takamasa; Oda, Minoru; Ogawara, Yoshiaki

    1978-01-01

    Cosmic gamma-ray burst is an interesting high energy astrophysical phenomenon, but the burst mechanism has not been well understood. Since 1975, long duration balloon flight has been conducted to search for gamma-ray bursts and to determine the source locations. A rotating cross-modulation collimator was employed to determine the locations of sources, and four NaI(Tl) scintillation counters were employed to detect hard X-ray with energy from 20 to 200 keV. The balloon light was performed at altitude of 8.3 mb from September 28, 1977, and the observation time of 79 hours was achieved. In this experiment, the monitor counter was not mounted. The count increase was observed at 16 h 22 m 31 s JST on October 1, 1977. The event disappeared after 1 sec. The total flux is estimated to be 1.6 x 10 -6 erg/cm 2 sec at the top of the atmosphere. When this event was observed, the solar-terrestrial environment was also quiet. Thus, this event was attributed to a small gamma-ray burst. Unfortunately, the duration of the burst was so short that the position of the burst source was not able to be determined. (Yoshimori, M.)

  19. Prompt Gamma Ray Analysis of Soil Samples

    Naqvi, A.A.; Khiari, F.Z.; Haseeb, S.M.A.; Hussein, Tanvir; Khateeb-ur-Rehman [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Isab, A.H. [Department of Chemistry, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-07-01

    Neutron moderation effects were measured in bulk soil samples through prompt gamma ray measurements from water and benzene contaminated soil samples using 14 MeV neutron inelastic scattering. The prompt gamma rays were measured using a cylindrical 76 mm x 76 mm (diameter x height) LaBr{sub 3}:Ce detector. Since neutron moderation effects strongly depend upon hydrogen concentration of the sample, for comparison purposes, moderation effects were studied from samples containing different hydrogen concentrations. The soil samples with different hydrogen concentration were prepared by mixing soil with water as well as benzene in different weight proportions. Then, the effects of increasing water and benzene concentrations on the yields of hydrogen, carbon and silicon prompt gamma rays were measured. Moderation effects are more pronounced in soil samples mixed with water as compared to those from soil samples mixed with benzene. This is due to the fact that benzene contaminated soil samples have about 30% less hydrogen concentration by weight than the water contaminated soil samples. Results of the study will be presented. (authors)

  20. AGILE: A gamma-ray mission

    Tavani, M.; Caraveo, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Perotti, F.; Vercellone, S.; Barbiellini, G.; Budini, G.; Longo, F.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.; Cocco, V.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Pittori, C.; Costa, E.; Feroci, M.; Lapshov, I.; Morelli, E.; Rubini, A.; Soffitta, P.

    2000-01-01

    AGILE is an innovative, cost-effective gamma-ray mission selected by the Italian Space Agency for a Program of Small Scientific Missions. The AGILE gamma-ray imaging detector (GRID, made of a Silicon tracker and CsI Mini-Calorimeter) is designed to detect and image photons in the 30 MeV-50 GeV energy band with good sensitivity and very large field of view (FOV ∼3 sr). The X-ray detector, Super-AGILE, sensitive in the 10-40 keV band and integrated on top of the GRID gamma-ray tracker will provide imaging (1-3 arcmin) and moderate spectroscopy. For selected sky areas, AGILE might achieve a flux sensitivity (above 100 MeV) better than 5x10 -8 ph cm 2 s -1 at the completion of its scientific program. AGILE will operate as an Observatory open to the international community and is planned to be operational during the year 2002 for a nominal 2-year mission. It will be an ideal 'bridge' between EGRET and GLAST, and the only mission entirely dedicated to high-energy astrophysics above 30 MeV during that period

  1. Gamma ray irradiation characteristics of SM fibers

    Ito, Ryuichi; Okano, Hiroaki; Hashiba, Keichi; Nakai, Hisanori

    1987-01-01

    1.3 μm range single mode (SM) optical fibers have been used for wide application of mainly long distance communication. At present, in order to realize the larger capacity and longer distance between relay points, the development of 1.5 μm range SM fibers of low dispersion and small loss has been actively promoted. As for the radiation withstanding property of SM fibers, report is scarce. The authors reported on the gamma ray irradiation characteristics of 1.3 μm range SM fibers, but since 1.5 μm range SM fibers are designed with the different structure from that of 1.3 μm fibers, it is necessary to evaluate from new viewpoint. In this report, mainly on the structure having triangular distribution, the effect that the manufacturing condition and the structural defects of glass exert on the gamma ray irradiation characteristics is described. The specimens were mainly dispersion shift type fibers (DSF), and for comparison, single window, double window and 1.3 μm SM fibers were examined. Co-60 gamma ray was irradiated, and the optical loss and electron spin resonance were measured. By low temperature and low speed drawing, the good result in the optical loss was obtained. The presence of oxygen at the time of sintering materials had no effect. The dependence of the ESR on the drawing condition was not very remarkable. (Kako, I.)

  2. A gamma-ray discriminating neutron scintillator

    Eschbach, P.A.; Miller, S.D.; Cole, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    A neutron scintillator has been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory which responds directly to as little as 10 mrem/hour dose equivalent rate fast neutron fields. The scintillator is composed of CaF 2 :Eu or of NaI grains within a silicone rubber or polystyrene matrix, respectively. Neutrons colliding with the plastic matrix provide knockon protons, which in turn deposit energy within the grains of phosphor to produce pulses of light. Neutron interactions are discriminated from gamma-ray events on the basis of pulse height. Unlike NE-213 liquid scintillators, this solid scintillator requires no pulseshape discrimination and therefore requires less hardware. Neutron events are anywhere from two to three times larger than the gamma-ray exposures are compared to 0.7 MeV gamma-ray exposures. The CaF 2 :Eu/silicone rubber scintillator is nearly optically transparent, and can be made into a very sizable detector (4 cm x 1.5 cm) without degrading pulse height. This CaF 2 :Eu scintillator has been observed to have an absolute efficiency of 0.1% when exposed to 5-MeV accelerator-generated neutrons (where the absolute efficiency is the ratio of observed neutron events divided by the number of fast neutrons striking the detector)

  3. Radio Flares from Gamma-ray Bursts

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J.; Harrison, R.; Japelj, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.; Gomboc, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1-1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  4. RADIO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J.; Harrison, R.; Japelj, J.; Gomboc, A.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1–1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time

  5. Gamma rays from the interstellar medium

    Bloemen, J.B.G.M.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis describes new gamma-ray views on cosmic rays and the interstellar medium. The author describes the COS-B data base and the pre-launch and in-flight calibration data used for all analyses. Diffuse galactic gamma radiation (> 50 MeV) may be either a result of cosmic-ray-matter interactions, or of the cosmic-ray electrons with the interstellar radiation field (mainly at optical and infrared wavelengths), through the inverse-Compton process. A detailed comparison between the gamma-ray observations of the large complex of interstellar clouds in Orion and Monoceros and the CO and HI surveys of this region is given. It gives insight into the cloud penetration of cosmic rays and in the relation between CO detections and molecular hydrogen column densities. Next, the radial distribution of gamma rays in the Galaxy is studied, as well as the galactic centre (more precisely, the central 400 pc), which contains a large concentration of CO molecules. The H 2 /CO abundance and the cosmic-ray density in the galactic centre are discussed and compared to the findings for the galactic disk. In various analyses in this thesis a likelihood-ratio method is applied for parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. A general description of this method is added as an appendix. (Auth.)

  6. Continuum gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Diamond, R.M.

    1981-06-01

    When angular momentum is added to a nucleus, it is, of course, carried by the individual nucleons, but two limiting types of behavior may be distinguished: (1) a small number of high-j particles align with the rotation axis and (2) the nucleus is deformed and rotates as a whole. At high spin all nuclei seem to show a compromise utilizing both motions. The excited nuclei left as products of (HI,xn) reactions have so many pathways down that none of the γ-ray transitions have enough intensity to be seen individually until the population gathers near the yrast line. This occurs usually between spin 20 to 40 h-bar. All our information on the higher states comes from their continuum spectra. With the new techniques that are developing, including the use of multiplicity filters, total-energy spectrometers, energy correlation studies, crystal balls, and observation of giant dipole resonances in the continuum spectra, there is hope to learn much about the nature of the high-spin states

  7. Catalog of gamma-rays unplaced in radioactive decay schemes

    Narita, Tsutomu; Kitao, Kensuke.

    1991-03-01

    A catalog is made for gamma-rays emitted in decay of radioactive nuclides but not placed in their decay schemes. It consists of two tables. In Table 1, the number of these unplaced gamma-ray components by a nuclide is given together with the fraction of total intensity of these gamma-rays to that of all observed gamma-rays. In Table 2, the unplaced gamma-rays are arranged in order of increasing energy. Each line of this table contains the gamma-ray energy, intensity, nuclide identification, and energies and intensities of the most prominent gamma-rays from the decay of the radionuclides. This catalog is a compilation from Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) maintained by National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory, of at February 1990. (author)

  8. Lunar occultations for gamma-ray source measurements

    Koch, David G.; Hughes, E. B.; Nolan, Patrick L.

    1990-01-01

    The unambiguous association of discrete gamma-ray sources with objects radiating at other wavelengths, the separation of discrete sources from the extended emission within the Galaxy, the mapping of gamma-ray emission from nearby galaxies and the measurement of structure within a discrete source cannot presently be accomplished at gamma-ray energies. In the past, the detection processes used in high-energy gamma-ray astronomy have not allowed for good angular resolution. This problem can be overcome by placing gamma-ray detectors on the moon and using the horizon as an occulting edge to achieve arcsec resolution. For purposes of discussion, this concept is examined for gamma rays above 100 MeV for which pair production dominates the detection process and locally-generated nuclear gamma rays do not contribute to the background.

  9. Physical constraints on models of gamma-ray bursters

    Epstein, R.I.

    1985-01-01

    This report deals with the constraints that can be placed on models of gamma-ray burst sources based on only the well-established observational facts and physical principles. The premise is developed that the very hard x-ray and gamma-ray continua spectra are well-established aspects of gamma-ray bursts. Recent theoretical work on gamma-ray bursts are summarized with emphasis on the geometrical properties of the models. Constraints on the source models which are implied by the x-ray and gamma-ray spectra are described. The allowed ranges for the luminosity and characteristic dimension for gamma-ray burst sources are shown. Some of the deductions and inferences about the nature of the gamma-ray burst sources are summarized. 67 refs., 3 figs

  10. Skyshine spectra of gamma rays

    Swarup, Janardan

    1980-01-01

    A study of the spectra of gamma photons back-scattered in vertical direction by infinite air above ground (skyshine) is presented. The source for these measurements is a 650 Ci Cobalt-60 point-source and the skyshine spectra are reported for distances from 150 m to 325 m from the source, measured with a 5 cm x 5 cm NaI(Tl) detector collimated with collimators of 12 mm and 20 mm diameter and 5 cm length. These continuous spectra are unfolded with Gold's iterative technique. The photon-spectra so obtained have a distinct line at 72 keV due to multiply-scattered photons. This is an energy where photoelectric and Compton cross-sections for multiply-scattered photons balance each other. The intensity of the line(I) decreases exponentially with distance (d) from the source obeying a relation of the type I = Isub(o)esup(-μd) where μ is called as ''Multiply-Scatter Coefficient'', a constant of the medium which is air in these measurements. This relationship is explained in terms of a halo around the source comprising of multiply-scattered gamma photons, Isub(0) being the intensity of these scattered photons at the location of cobalt-source. A fraction called as ''Back-scattered Fraction'', the ratio of Isub(0) to the number of original photons from the cobalt-source entering the infinite air, is also calculated. It is shown that with a properly calibrated detector system, this fraction can be used to determine the strength of a large gamma source, viz. a nuclear explosion in air, and for mineral prospecting. These conclusions are general and can be applied to any other infinite medium. Some forward-scatter (transmission) spectra of cobalt-60 source through 10 cm of Pb and 2.5 cm of Al are also reported. (auth.)

  11. A link between prompt optical and prompt gamma-ray emission in gamma-ray bursts.

    Vestrand, W T; Wozniak, P R; Wren, J A; Fenimore, E E; Sakamoto, T; White, R R; Casperson, D; Davis, H; Evans, S; Galassi, M; McGowan, K E; Schier, J A; Asa, J W; Barthelmy, S D; Cummings, J R; Gehrels, N; Hullinger, D; Krimm, H A; Markwardt, C B; McLean, K; Palmer, D; Parsons, A; Tueller, J

    2005-05-12

    The prompt optical emission that arrives with the gamma-rays from a cosmic gamma-ray burst (GRB) is a signature of the engine powering the burst, the properties of the ultra-relativistic ejecta of the explosion, and the ejecta's interactions with the surroundings. Until now, only GRB 990123 had been detected at optical wavelengths during the burst phase. Its prompt optical emission was variable and uncorrelated with the prompt gamma-ray emission, suggesting that the optical emission was generated by a reverse shock arising from the ejecta's collision with surrounding material. Here we report prompt optical emission from GRB 041219a. It is variable and correlated with the prompt gamma-rays, indicating a common origin for the optical light and the gamma-rays. Within the context of the standard fireball model of GRBs, we attribute this new optical component to internal shocks driven into the burst ejecta by variations of the inner engine. The correlated optical emission is a direct probe of the jet isolated from the medium. The timing of the uncorrelated optical emission is strongly dependent on the nature of the medium.

  12. Gamma-ray relative energy response of Ce: YAG crystal

    Zhang Jianhua; Zhang Chuanfei; Hu Mengchun; Peng Taiping; Wang Zhentong; Tang Dengpan; Zhao Guangjun

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray relative energy response of Ce: YAG crystal, which is important for pulsed γ-ray measurement, was studied in this work.The Ce: YAG crystal, which was developed at Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, was aligned point by point with γ-rays scattered from an industrial 60 Co line source. The γ-ray relative energy response was calculated using the mass attenuation coefficient. The results show that the numerical calculation method of γ-ray relative energy response is reliable, and the experimental method with multi-energy point γ-ray by Compton scattering is also feasible, that can be used for checking up correctness of the numerical calculation results. (authors)

  13. Gamma-ray imaging of the Quinby sources

    Gregor, J.; Hensley, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    The Quinby sources are alumina cylinders 7 inches in diameter and 8 inches high doped with weapons grade plutonium. We describe a computer tomography system for reconstructing three-dimensional images of these sources. Each reconstruction maps the spatial distribution of the internal [sup 241]Am gamma ray activity and is computed using an iterative, expectation-maximization algorithm with detection efficiencies based both on geometric model of the experimental setup and attenuation corrections. Constructed about a decade ago, the Quinby sources were to contain uniformly distributed material. However, for some of the sources we have found regions where the plutonium solution, tends to be concentrated. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide the basis for self-shielding corrections when analyzing differential dieaway neutron measurements

  14. CONSTRAINTS ON THE EMISSION GEOMETRIES AND SPIN EVOLUTION OF GAMMA-RAY MILLISECOND PULSARS

    Johnson, T. J. [National Research Council Research Associate, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Venter, C. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Private Bag X6001, 2520 Potchefstroom (South Africa); Harding, A. K.; Çelik, Ö.; Ferrara, E. C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Guillemot, L. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l' Environnement, LPCE UMR 6115 CNRS, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 02 (France); Smith, D. A.; Hou, X. [Centre d' Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, IN2P3/CNRS, Université Bordeaux 1, BP120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Den Hartog, P. R. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lande, J. [Twitter Inc., 1355 Market Street 900, San Francisco, CA 94103 (United States); Ray, P. S., E-mail: tyrel.j.johnson@gmail.com, E-mail: Christo.Venter@nwu.ac.za, E-mail: ahardingx@yahoo.com [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are a growing class of gamma-ray emitters. Pulsed gamma-ray signals have been detected from more than 40 MSPs with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The wider radio beams and more compact magnetospheres of MSPs enable studies of emission geometries over a broader range of phase space than non-recycled radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. We have modeled the gamma-ray light curves of 40 LAT-detected MSPs using geometric emission models assuming a vacuum retarded-dipole magnetic field. We modeled the radio profiles using a single-altitude hollow-cone beam, with a core component when indicated by polarimetry; however, for MSPs with gamma-ray and radio light curve peaks occurring at nearly the same rotational phase, we assume that the radio emission is co-located with the gamma rays and caustic in nature. The best-fit parameters and confidence intervals are determined using a maximum likelihood technique. We divide the light curves into three model classes, with gamma-ray peaks trailing (Class I), aligned (Class II), or leading (Class III) the radio peaks. Outer gap and slot gap (two-pole caustic) models best fit roughly equal numbers of Class I and II, while Class III are exclusively fit with pair-starved polar cap models. Distinguishing between the model classes based on typical derived parameters is difficult. We explore the evolution of the magnetic inclination angle with period and spin-down power, finding possible correlations. While the presence of significant off-peak emission can often be used as a discriminator between outer gap and slot gap models, a hybrid model may be needed.

  15. CONSTRAINTS ON THE EMISSION GEOMETRIES AND SPIN EVOLUTION OF GAMMA-RAY MILLISECOND PULSARS

    Johnson, T. J.; Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.; Çelik, Ö.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guillemot, L.; Smith, D. A.; Hou, X.; Kramer, M.; Den Hartog, P. R.; Lande, J.; Ray, P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are a growing class of gamma-ray emitters. Pulsed gamma-ray signals have been detected from more than 40 MSPs with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The wider radio beams and more compact magnetospheres of MSPs enable studies of emission geometries over a broader range of phase space than non-recycled radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. We have modeled the gamma-ray light curves of 40 LAT-detected MSPs using geometric emission models assuming a vacuum retarded-dipole magnetic field. We modeled the radio profiles using a single-altitude hollow-cone beam, with a core component when indicated by polarimetry; however, for MSPs with gamma-ray and radio light curve peaks occurring at nearly the same rotational phase, we assume that the radio emission is co-located with the gamma rays and caustic in nature. The best-fit parameters and confidence intervals are determined using a maximum likelihood technique. We divide the light curves into three model classes, with gamma-ray peaks trailing (Class I), aligned (Class II), or leading (Class III) the radio peaks. Outer gap and slot gap (two-pole caustic) models best fit roughly equal numbers of Class I and II, while Class III are exclusively fit with pair-starved polar cap models. Distinguishing between the model classes based on typical derived parameters is difficult. We explore the evolution of the magnetic inclination angle with period and spin-down power, finding possible correlations. While the presence of significant off-peak emission can often be used as a discriminator between outer gap and slot gap models, a hybrid model may be needed

  16. The beginning of gamma-ray astronomy with Fermi

    Paneque, D.

    2008-01-01

    The Fermi observatory is designed to perform gamma-ray astronomy in the energy range 20 MeV to 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 10 keV to 30 MeV. Fermi was successfully launched on June 11 (2008) from the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral. The main instrument of Fermi is the Large Area Telescope (LAT), which provides break-through high-energy measurements using techniques typically used in particle detectors for collider experiments. The LAT consists of 16 identical towers in a four-by-four grid, each one containing a pair conversion tracker and a hodoscopic crystal calorimeter, all covered by a segmented plastic scintillator anti-coincidence shield. The LAT is currently monitoring the GeV gamma-ray sky with rather uniform exposure (covering 20% of the sky at any instant and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours) and a sensitivity ∼ 30 times better than its predecessor, EGRET. The large performance improvement of LAT opens a new and important window on a wide variety of high-energy astrophysical phenomena, as well as potential to discover/study non-conventional physics. In the talk I will report the instrument performance, the mission status and science opportunities and will present some results derived from the first months of operation, which includes astronomical telegrams on AGN flares, 2 GCN circulars on LAT-detected GRBs and the monitoring of some selected sources (22 blazars and 1 high mass X-ray Binary). (author)

  17. Standard guide for high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of soil samples

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers the identification and quantitative determination of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides in soil samples by means of gamma-ray spectrometry. It is applicable to nuclides emitting gamma rays with an approximate energy range of 20 to 2000 keV. For typical gamma-ray spectrometry systems and sample types, activity levels of about 5 Bq (135 pCi) are measured easily for most nuclides, and activity levels as low as 0.1 Bq (2.7 pCi) can be measured for many nuclides. It is not applicable to radionuclides that emit no gamma rays such as the pure beta-emitting radionuclides hydrogen-3, carbon-14, strontium-90, and becquerel quantities of most transuranics. This guide does not address the in situ measurement techniques, where soil is analyzed in place without sampling. Guidance for in situ techniques can be found in Ref (1) and (2). This guide also does not discuss methods for determining lower limits of detection. Such discussions can be found in Refs (3), (4), (5), and (6). 1.2 This guide can be us...

  18. Local gamma ray events as tests of the antimatter theory of gamma ray bursts

    Sofia, S.; Wilson, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Nearby examples of the antimatter 'chunks' postulated by Sofia and Van Horn to explain the cosmic gamma ray bursts may produce detectable gamma ray events when struck by solar system meteoroids. These events would have a much shorter time scale and higher energy spectrum than the bursts already observed. In order to have a reasonably high event rate, the local meteoroid population must extend to a distance from the Sun of the order of 0.1 pc, but the required distance could become much lower if the instrumental threshold is improved. The expected gamma ray flux for interaction of the antimatter bodies with the solar wind is also examined, and found to be far below present instrumental capabilities. (Auth.)

  19. Towards gamma-ray astronomy with timing arrays

    Tluczykont, M; Epimakhov, S; Astapov, I; Barbashina, N; Beregnev, S; Eremin, T; Bogdanov, A; Bogorodskii, D; Budnev, N; Chvalaev, O; Dyachok, A; Gafarov, A; Gress, O; Gress, T; Boreyko, V; Gorbunov, N; Grebenyuk, V; Grinyuk, A; Brückner, M; Chiavassa, A

    2015-01-01

    The gamma-ray energy regime beyond 10 TeV is crucial for the search for the most energetic Galactic accelerators. The energy spectra of most known gamma-ray emitters only reach up to few 10s of TeV, with 80 TeV from the Crab Nebula being the highest energy so far observed significantly. Uncovering their spectral shape up to few 100 TeV could answer the question whether some of these objects are cosmic ray Pevatrons, i.e. Galactic PeV accelerators.Sensitive observations in this energy range and beyond require very large effective detector areas of several 10s to 100 square-km. While imaging air Cherenkov telescopes have proven to be the instruments of choice in the GeV to TeV energy range, very large area telescope arrays are limited by the number of required readout channels per instrumented square-km (due to the large number of channels per telescope). Alternatively, the shower-front sampling technique allows to instrument large effective areas and also naturally provides large viewing angles of the instrument. Solely measuring the shower front light density and timing (hence timing- arrays), the primary particle properties are reconstructed on the basis of the measured lateral density function and the shower front arrival times. This presentation gives an overview of the technique, its goals, and future perspective. (paper)

  20. Quantitative comparison between experimental and simulated gamma-ray spectra induced by 14 MeV tagged neutrons

    Perot, B., E-mail: bertrand.perot@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); El Kanawati, W.; Carasco, C.; Eleon, C. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Valkovic, V. [A.C.T.d.o.o., Prilesje 4, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c. 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Sannie, G. [CEA, LIST, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-07-15

    Fast neutron interrogation with the associated particle technique can be used to identify explosives in cargo containers (EURITRACK FP6 project) and unexploded ordnance on the seabed (UNCOSS FP7 project), by detecting gamma radiations induced by 14 MeV neutrons produced in the {sup 2}H({sup 3}H,{alpha})n reaction. The origin of the gamma rays can be determined in 3D by the detection of the alpha particle, which provides the direction of the opposite neutron and its time-of-flight. Gamma spectroscopy provides the relative counts of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which are converted to chemical fractions to differentiate explosives from other organic substances. To this aim, Monte Carlo calculations are used to take into account neutron moderation and gamma attenuation in cargo materials or seawater. This paper presents an experimental verification that C, N, and O counts are correctly reproduced by numerical simulation. A quantitative comparison is also reported for silicon, iron, lead, and aluminium. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gamma-ray spectra produced by 14 MeV neutrons in C, N, O, Si, Al, Fe, and Pb elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantitative comparison with MCNPX simulations using the ENDF/B-VII.0 library. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C, N, and O counts correctly reproduced and chemical proportions recovered using calculation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Application to the detection of explosives or illicit drugs in cargo containers.

  1. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 μm) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  2. The gamma-ray radiation preservation technology for files and books

    Fan Chengfa; Tian Kaizen; Zhang Yunlu; Gan Saohan; Wang Zhengfu; Xiang Jiafang

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, a radiation appliance using CO-60 Gamma-ray to preserve the files and books is introduced. The lump and transport radiation techniques for processing files and books with this radiation appliance is described. The cost of preserving files and books with this method has been estimated. Comparison of this method with other processing techniques has been taken. (author)

  3. Neural network consistent empirical physical formula construction for neutron–gamma discrimination in gamma ray tracking

    Yildiz, Nihat; Akkoyun, Serkan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Detector responses in neutron–gamma discrimination were estimated by neural networks. ► Novel consistent neural network empirical physical formulas (EPFs) were constructed for detector responses. ► The EPFs are of explicit mathematical functional form. ► The EPFs can be used to derive various physical functions relevant to neutron–gamma discrimination in gamma ray tracking. -- Abstract: Gamma ray tracking is an efficient detection technique in studying exotic nuclei which lies far from beta stability line. To achieve very powerful and extraordinary resolution ability, new detectors based on gamma ray tracking are currently being developed. To reach this achievement, the neutron–gamma discrimination in these detectors is also an important task. In this paper, by suitable layered feedforward neural networks (LFNNs), we have constructed novel and consistent empirical physical formulas (EPFs) for some highly nonlinear detector counts measured in neutron–gamma discrimination. The detector counts data used in the discrimination was actually borrowed from our previous paper. The counts used here had been originally measured versus the following parameters: energy deposited in the first interaction points, difference in the incoming direction of initial gamma rays, and finally figure of merit values of the clusters determined by tracking. The LFNN–EPFs are of explicit mathematical functional form. Therefore, by various suitable operations of mathematical analysis, these LFNN–EPFs can be used to derivate further physical functions which might be potentially relevant to neutron–gamma discrimination performance of gamma ray tracking.

  4. Measurement of prompt fission gamma-ray spectra in fast neutron-induced fission

    Laborie, J.M.; Belier, G.; Taieb, J.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of prompt fission gamma-ray emission has been of major interest in reactor physics for a few years. Since very few experimental spectra were ever published until now, new measurements would be also valuable to improve our understanding of the fission process. An experimental method is currently being developed to measure the prompt fission gamma-ray spectrum from some tens keV up to 10 MeV at least. The mean multiplicity and total energy could be deduced. In this method, the gamma-rays are measured with a bismuth germanate (BGO) detector which has the advantage to present a high P/T ratio and a high efficiency compared to other gamma-ray detectors. The prompt fission neutrons are rejected by the time of flight technique between the BGO detector and a fission trigger given by a fission chamber or a scintillating active target. Energy and efficiency calibration of the BGO detector were carried out up to 10.76 MeV by means of the Al-27(p, gamma) reaction. First prompt fission gamma-ray spectrum measurements performed for the spontaneous fission of Cf-252 and for 1.7 and 15.6 MeV neutron-induced fission of U-238 at the CEA, DAM, DIF Van de Graaff accelerator, will be presented. (authors)

  5. Gamma ray scanner systems for nondestructive assay of heterogeneous waste barrels

    Martz, H.E.; Decman, B.J.; Roberson, G.P.; Levai, F.

    1997-01-01

    Traditional gamma safeguards measurements have usually been performed using a segmented gamma scanning (SGS) system. The accuracy of this technique relies on the assumption that the sample matrix and the activity are both uniform for a segment. Waste barrels are often highly heterogeneous, span a wide range of composition and matrix type. The primary sources of error are all directly or indirectly related to a non-uniform measurement response associated with unknown radioactive source spatial distribution and heterogeneity of the matrix. These errors can be significantly reduced by some imaging techniques that measure exact spatial locations of sources and attenuation maps. In this paper we describe a joint R ampersand D effort between the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Institute of Nuclear Techniques (INT) of the Technical University, Budapest, to compare results obtained by two different gamma-ray nondestructive assay (NDA) systems used for imaging waste barrels. The basic principles are the same, but the approaches are different. Key factors to judge the adequacy of a method are the detection limit and the accuracy. Test drums representing waste to be measured are used to determine basic parameters of these techniques

  6. Specialized software utilities for gamma ray spectrometry. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1996-2000

    2002-03-01

    A Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Software Utilities for Gamma Ray Spectrometry was initiated by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 1996 for a three year period. In the CRP several basic applications of nuclear data handling were assayed which also dealt with the development of PC computer codes for various spectrometric purposes. The CRP produced several software packages: for the analysis of low level NaI spectra; user controlled analysis of gamma ray spectra from HPGe detectors; a set of routines for the definition of the detector resolution function and for the unfolding of experimental annihilation spectra; a program for the generation of gamma ray libraries for specific applications; a program to calculate true coincidence corrections; a program to calculate full-energy peak efficiency calibration curve for homogenous cylindrical sample geometries including self-attenuation correction; and a program for the library driven analysis of gamma ray spectra and for the quantification of radionuclide content in samples. In addition, the CRP addressed problems of the analysis of naturally occurring radioactive soil material gamma ray spectra, questions of quality assurance and quality control in gamma ray spectrometry, and verification of the expert system SHAMAN for the analysis of air filter spectra obtained within the framework of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. This TECDOC contains 10 presentations delivered at the meeting with the description of the software developed. Each of the papers has been indexed separately

  7. Common Gamma-ray Glows above Thunderclouds

    Kelley, Nicole; Smith, David; Dwyer, Joseph; Hazelton, Bryna; Grefenstette, Brian; Lowell, Alex; Splitt, Michael; Lazarus, Steven; Rassoul, Hamid

    2013-04-01

    Gamma-ray glows are continuous, long duration gamma- and x-ray emission seen coming from thunderclouds. The Airborne for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) observed 12 gamma-ray glows during its summer 2009 flight campaign over the areas of Colorado and Florida in the United States. For these glows we shall present their spectra, relationship to lightning activity and how their duration and size changes as a function of distance. Gamma-ray glows follow the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) spectrum and have been previously measured from the ground and inside the cloud. ADELE measured most glows as it flew above the screening layer of the cloud. During the brightest glow on August 21, 2009, we can show that we are flying directly into a downward facing relativistic runaway avalanche, indicative of flying between the upper positive and negative screening layer of the cloud. In order to explain the brightness of this glow, RREA with an electric field approaching the limit for relativistic feedback must be occurring. Using all 12 glows, we show that lightning activity diminishes during the onset of the glow. Using this along with the fact that glows occur as the field approaches the level necessary for feedback, we attempt to distinguish between two possibilities: that glows are evidence that RREA with feedback, rather than lightning, is sometimes the primary channel for discharging the cloud, or else that the overall discharging is still controlled by lightning, with glows simply appearing during times when a subsidence of lightning allows the field to rise above the threshold for RREA.

  8. Variable code gamma ray imaging system

    Macovski, A.; Rosenfeld, D.

    1979-01-01

    A gamma-ray source distribution in the body is imaged onto a detector using an array of apertures. The transmission of each aperture is modulated using a code such that the individual views of the source through each aperture can be decoded and separated. The codes are chosen to maximize the signal to noise ratio for each source distribution. These codes determine the photon collection efficiency of the aperture array. Planar arrays are used for volumetric reconstructions and circular arrays for cross-sectional reconstructions. 14 claims

  9. Detection circuit for gamma-ray burst

    Murakami, Hiroyuki; Yamagami, Takamasa; Mori, Kunishiro; Uchiyama, Sadayuki.

    1982-01-01

    A new gamma-ray burst detection system is described. The system was developed as an environmental monitor of an accelerator, and can be used as the burst detection system. The system detects the arrival time of burst. The difference between the arrival times detected at different places will give information on the burst source. The frequency of detecting false burst was estimated, and the detection limit under the estimated frequency of false burst was also calculated. Decision whether the signal is false or true burst was made by the statistical treatment. (Kato, T.)

  10. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    Lamb, R.C.; Lewis, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Whipple Observatory's atmospheric Cerenkov camera has detected TeV radiation from four galactic sources: the Crab Nebula, Cygnus X-3, Hercules X-1, and 4U0115+63. Recent simulations encourage the view that unwanted cosmic-ray background showers may be suppressed by a large factor. Emphasis in the coming year will be on determining optimum selection criteria for enhancing gamma-ray signals and in developing a prototype camera with finer angular resolution as a first step towards implementation of the HERCULES concept

  11. Gamma ray induced decomposition of lanthanide nitrates

    Joshi, N.G.; Garg, A.N.

    1992-01-01

    Gamma ray induced decomposition of the lanthanide nitrates, Ln(NO 3 ) 3 .xH 2 O where Ln=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Tm and Yb has been studied at different absorbed doses up to 600 kGy. G(NO 2 - ) values depend on the absorbed dose and the nature of the outer cation. It has been observed that those lanthanides which exhibit variable valency (Ce and Eu) show lower G-values. An attempt has been made to correlate thermal and radiolytic decomposition processes. (author). 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  12. Gamma-Ray Spectrum Analysis Software GDA

    Wanabongse, P.

    1998-01-01

    The developmental work on computer software for gamma-ray spectrum analysis has been completed as a software package version 1.02 named GDA, which is an acronym for Gamma-spectrum Deconvolution and Analysis. The software package consists of three 3.5-inch diskettes for setup and a user's manual. GDA software can be installed for using on a personal computer with Windows 95 or Windows NT 4.0 operating system. A computer maybe the type of 80486 CPU with 8 megabytes of memory

  13. Gamma ray bursts from extragalactic sources

    Hoyle, Fred; Burbidge, Geoffrey

    1992-01-01

    The properties of gamma ray bursts of classical type are found to be explicable in terms of high speed collisions between stars. A model is proposed in which the frequency of such collisions can be calculated. The model is then applied to the nuclei of galaxies in general on the basis that galaxies, or at least some fraction of them, originate in the expulsion of stars from creation centers. Evidence that low level activity of this kind is also taking place at the center of our own Galaxy is discussed. The implications for galactic evolution are discussed and a negative view of black holes is taken.

  14. Gamma ray thermometrical facility for nuclear reactor

    Smith, R.D.; Regazzoni, Pierre.

    1981-01-01

    This invention concerns a gamma ray thermometer for nuclear reactors, fitted with a thermal bridge for use as a centring device. In accordance with the invention, an elastic device fills all the annular space between the gamma thermometer and the orifice through which the thermometer is introduced. This elastic device has the two-fold role of providing a thermal bridge at the gamma thermometer location suitable as a heat well, and of acting as a device for centring the thermometer in the orifice into which it has been introduced [fr

  15. Gamma ray constraints on decaying dark matter

    Cirelli, M.; Moulin, E.; Panci, P.

    2012-01-01

    We derive new bounds on decaying dark matter from the gamma ray measurements of (i) the isotropic residual (extragalactic) background by Fermi and (ii) the Fornax galaxy cluster by H.E.S.S. We find that those from (i) are among the most stringent constraints currently available, for a large range...... of dark matter masses and a variety of decay modes, excluding half-lives up to similar to 10(26) to few 10(27) seconds. In particular, they rule out the interpretation in terms of decaying dark matter of the e(+/-) spectral features in PAMELA, Fermi and H.E.S.S., unless very conservative choices...

  16. Gamma ray spectroscopy with Arduino UNO

    Lavelle, C. M.

    2018-05-01

    We review a simple gamma ray spectrometer constructed on a solderless breadboard. The spectrometer's detector consists of a CsI(Tl) scintillator and silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) and its readout is facilitated by an Arduino UNO. The system is low cost and utilizes a minimum of components while still achieving satisfactory charge linearity and noise levels. This instrument can be used in instructional laboratories to introduce both radiation detection and analog signal processing concepts. We also expect it will be of interest to those seeking to introduce gamma spectroscopy to the expanding ecosystem of Arduino hardware.

  17. Comptonization of gamma rays by cold electrons

    Xu, Yueming; Ross, R.R.; Mccray, R.

    1991-01-01

    An analytic method is developed for calculating the emergent spectrum of gamma-rays and X-rays scattered in a homogeneous medium with low-temperature electrons. The Klein-Nishina corrections of the scattering cross section and absorption processes are taken in account. The wavelength relaxation and the spatial diffusion problems are solved separately, and the emergent spectrum is calculated by convolving the evolution function of the spectrum in an infinite medium with the photon luminosity resulting from the spatial diffusion in a finite sphere. The analytic results are compared with that of Monte Carlo calculations and it is concluded that the analytic result is quite accurate. 9 refs

  18. Fundamentals of gamma-ray measurements and radiometric analyses

    Hochel, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    There are four primary modes of radioactive decay. All can be measured using various types of detectors and are the basis of many analytical techniques and much of what we know about the nucleus and its structure. Alpha particle emission occurs mostly in heavy nuclei of atomic number, Z, greater than 82 like Po, Ra, Th, and U, etc. Beta particles are simply electrons. They are emitted from the nucleus with a distribution of energies ranging from 0--3 MeV. Gamma-rays are photons with energies ranging from a few keV to 10 MeV or more. They usually follow alpha or beta decay, and depending on their energy, can have considerable range in matter. Neutrons are emitted in fission processes and also from a few of the highly excited fission product nuclei. Fission neutrons typically have energies of 1--2 MeV. Like gamma-rays, they have long ranges. The energies involved in nuclear decay processes are much higher than anything encountered in, say, chemical reactions. They are at the very top of the electromagnetic spectrum -- about a million times more energetic than visible light. As a result, these particles always produce ionization, either directly or indirectly, as they pass through matter. It is this ionization which is the basis of all radiation detectors

  19. Some aspects of ultra high energy gamma ray astronomy

    De Jager, O.C.

    1983-11-01

    A short review of ultra high energy (UHE) gamma ray astronomy (10 11 14 eV) as well as a description of a planned experiment to be erected at Potchefstroom is given in the introduction. This experiment will be the first and only one in the Southern Hemisphere and as such may play an important role in this new field of astronomy and astrophysics. In the first part the necessary infrastructure for astronomical observations of known celestial objects is developed. This embodies the special physical, mechanical and astronomical constraints in this type of astronomy, such as the definition of the various astronomical coordinate systems and transformations between them, the effect of precession and nutation on the source position etc. This leads to automatic observation schedules for the various applicable techniques of observation. In the second part the various effects which may influence the arrival time of a gamma ray at the telescope is investigated. It is found that dispersion and relativistic effects are negligible, given the special type of analysis used in this low counting rate system. The classic Doppler effect due to the motion of Earth as well as the configuration of the telescope does have a major effect and must be taken into consideration when analysing the data. A simple method, depending only on the movement of Earth around the sun, is developed to simplify the identification of pulsars at the planned observatory where computing facilities are limited

  20. Determination of radon concentration in soil gas by gamma-ray spectrometry of olive oil

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of radon concentration in soil gas have been carried out using a bubbling system in which the soil gas is drawn through an active pumping to bubble a liquid absorber (olive oil) for the deposition of the soil gas in it. After the bubbling process, the absorber is then taken for gamma-ray measurements. Gamma-ray photopeaks from the 214 Pb and the 214 Bi radon progeny are considered for the detection of the 222 Rn gas to study the concentration levels for radon soil gas. Results for some field measurements were obtained and compared with results obtained using AlphaGuard radon gas monitor. The technique provides a possible approach for the measurements of radon soil gas with gamma-ray spectrometry

  1. Determination of protein content in seeds by prompt gamma-ray spectrometry

    Carbonari, A.W.; Pecequilo, B.R.S.

    1984-01-01

    The protein level in seeds can be directly calculated through the determination of the nitrogen content in grains. The authors show here that the radioactive thermal neutron capture prompt gamma-rays technique can be used to determine the nitrogen content in grains without chemical destruction, with good precision and relative rapidity, by detecting the prompt gamma rays emitted by the 14 N(n,γ) 15 N reaction product. The samples were irradiated in the tangential tube of the IEA-R1 research reactor, in Sao Paulo, and a pair spectrometer was used for the detection of the prompt gamma-rays. The nitrogen content was determined in several samples of soybean, common bean, peas and rice and the results compared with typical nitrogen content values for each grain. 33 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  2. Livestock wastewater treatment by zeolite ion exchange and gamma-ray irradiation

    Lee, Sang Ryul; Kim, Tak Hyun; Lee, Myun Joo

    2008-01-01

    Livestock wastewater containing high concentrations of organic matters and ammonia-nitrogen has been known as one of the recalcitrant wastewater. It is difficult to treat by conventional wastewater treatment techniques. This study was carried out to evaluate the feasibility of zeolite ion exchange and gamma-ray irradiation treatment of livestock wastewater. The removal efficiencies of SCOD Cr and NH3-N were significantly enhanced by gamma-ray irradiation after zeolite ion exchange as a pre-treatment. However, the effects of zeolite particle size on the SCOD Cr and NH 3 -N removal efficiencies were insignificant. These results indicate that the combined process of zeolite ion exchange and gamma-ray irradiation has potential for the treatment of livestock wastewater

  3. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of culverts containing transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.

    1990-01-01

    A number of concrete culverts used to retrievably store drummed, dry, radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS), were suspected of containing ambiguous quantities of transuranic (TRU) nuclides. These culverts were assayed in place for Pu-239 content using thermal and fast neutron counting techniques. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy on 17 culverts, having neutron emission rates several times higher than expected, showed characteristic gamma-ray signatures of neutron emitters other than Pu-239 (e.g., Pu-238, Pu/Be, or Am/Be neutron sources). This study confirmed the Pu-239 content of the culverts with anomalous neutron rates and established limits on the Pu-239 mass in each of the 17 suspect culverts by in-field, non-intrusive gamma-ray measurements

  4. Large-area atmospheric Cherenkov detectors for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy

    Ong, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the development of new ground-based gamma-ray detectors to explore the energy region between 20 and 200 GeV. This region in energy is interesting because it is currently unexplored by any experiment. The proposed detectors use the atmospheric Cherenkov technique, in which Cherenkov radiation produced in the gamma-ray air showers is detected using mirrors and light-sensitive devices. The important feature of the proposed experiments is the use of large mirror collection areas, which should allow for a significant improvement (i.e. reduction) in energy threshold over existing experiments. Large mirror areas are available for relatively low cost at central tower solar power plants, and there are two groups developing gamma-ray experiments using solar heliostat arrays. This paper summarizes the progress in the design of experiments using this novel approach

  5. Natural radioelement mapping by carborne and ground gamma-ray spectrometry in the Philippines

    Reyes, Rolando Y.; Petrache, Christina A.; Tabora, Estrellita U.; Garcia, Teofilo Y.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past years, the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute has been conducting a program aimed at mapping the abundance and distribution of the naturally occurring radioactive elements (radioelements) potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th) through the use of carborne and ground gamma-ray spectrometric survey techniques. This program was initiated with assistance from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) through a technical cooperation project entitled ''Gamma Ray Spectrometric Survey of the Philippines'', in which the carborne and ground gamma-ray spectrometric systems were acquired. The objectives of this project were to generate radioelement maps for geological studies and mineral resource assessment, and establish baseline information on the natural radioactivity of the country for environmental studies and monitoring. The pilot survey for this project, conducted over Marinduque Island, Philippines, is presented in this paper. (author)

  6. Determination of radionuclides for river sediment CRM with HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer

    Tan Jinbo; Hao Runlong; Tang Zhenxin

    1994-01-01

    The authors described the method and results for determination of seven radionuclides: 238 U, 235 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K, 60 Co and 137 Cs in the river sediment Certified Reference Material (CRM) using a HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer. The accuracy and reliability of measurement results were improved through varieties of techniques, which include: precise calibration of the gamma-ray spectrometer, coincidence summing correction and interference peak correction, two kinds of peak analysis methods (TPA and function fit), and utilization of as many as possible characteristic gamma-rays. Present measurement results for the seven radionuclides were in agreement with the verification results of the CRM with 1 σ or 2σ uncertainty, and its relative deviation were in the range of +1.0%--6.5%

  7. Contribution to gamma ray transport calculation in heterogeneous media

    Bourdet, L.

    1985-04-01

    This thesis presents the development of gamma transport calculation codes in three dimension heterogeneous geometries. These codes allow us to define the protection against gamma-rays or verify their efficiency. The laws that govern the interactions of gamma-rays with matters are briefly revised. A library with the all necessary constants for these codes is created. TRIPOLI-2, a code that treats in exact way the neutron transport in matters using Monte-Carlo method, has been adapted to deal with the transport of gamma-rays in matters as well. TRINISHI, a code which considers only one collision, has been realized to treat heterogeneous geometries containing voids. Elaborating a formula that calculates the albedo for gamma-ray reflection (the code ALBANE) allows us to solve the problem of gamma-ray reflection on plane surfaces. NARCISSE-2 deals with gamma-rays that suffer only one reflection on the inner walls of any closed volume (rooms, halls...) [fr

  8. Review of GRANAT observations of gamma-ray bursts

    Terekhov, O.; Denissenko, D.; Sunyaev, R.

    1995-01-01

    The GRANAT observatory was launched into a high apogee orbit on 1 December, 1989. Three instruments onboard GRANAT - PHEBUS, WATCH and SIGMA are able to detect gamma-ray bursts in a very broad energy range from 6 keV up to 100 MeV. Over 250 gamma-ray bursts were detected. We discuss the results...... of the observations of the time histories and spectral evolution of the detected events provided by the different instruments in different energy ranges. Short Gamma-Ray Bursts ( 2 s) events. Evidence of the existence...... of four differently behaving componenents in gamma-ray burst spectra is discussed. Statistical properties of the gamma-ray burst sources based on the 5 years of observations with (∼ 10−6 erg/cm2) sensitivity as well as the results of high sensitivity (∼ 10−8 erg/cm2) search for Gamma-Ray Bursts within...

  9. Highlights of GeV Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Thompson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Because high-energy gamma rays are primarily produced by high-energy particle interactions, the gamma-ray survey of the sky by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope offers a view of sites of cosmic ray production and interactions. Gamma-ray bursts, pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, binary sources, and Active Galactic Nuclei are all phenomena that reveal particle acceleration through their gamma-ray emission. Diffuse Galactic gamma radiation, Solar System gamma-ray sources, and energetic radiation from supernova remnants are likely tracers of high-energy particle interactions with matter and photon fields. This paper will present a broad overview of the constantly changing sky seen with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi spacecraft.

  10. Microwave-gamma ray water in crude monitor

    Paap, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    A microwave-gamma ray water-in-crude monitoring system measures the percent quantity of fresh water or salt water in crude oil flowing in a pipe line. The system includes a measuring cell arranged with the pipe line so that the crude oil flows through the measuring cell. A microwave transmitter subsystem and a gamma ray source are arranged with the measuring cell so that microwave energy and gamma rays are transmitted through the measuring cell. A microwave receiving subsystem and a gamma ray detector provide signals corresponding to received microwave energy and to the received gamma rays, respectively. Apparatus connected to the microwave receiver and to the gamma ray detector provides an indication of the percentage of water in the crude oil

  11. The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    Grenier, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

  12. SYSTEMATIC STUDY OF GAMMA-RAY-BRIGHT BLAZARS WITH OPTICAL POLARIZATION AND GAMMA-RAY VARIABILITY

    Itoh, Ryosuke; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Kanda, Yuka; Shiki, Kensei; Kawabata, Miho; Nakaoka, Tatsuya; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Takata, Koji; Ui, Takahiro [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Madejski, Greg M. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road M/S 29, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Uemura, Makoto; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Kawabata, Koji S.; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Ohsugi, Takashi [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Schinzel, Frank K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Moritani, Yuki [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Sasada, Mahito [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Yamanaka, Masayuki, E-mail: itoh@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: itoh@hp.phys.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); and others

    2016-12-10

    Blazars are highly variable active galactic nuclei that emit radiation at all wavelengths from radio to gamma rays. Polarized radiation from blazars is one key piece of evidence for synchrotron radiation at low energies, and it also varies dramatically. The polarization of blazars is of interest for understanding the origin, confinement, and propagation of jets. However, even though numerous measurements have been performed, the mechanisms behind jet creation, composition, and variability are still debated. We performed simultaneous gamma-ray and optical photopolarimetry observations of 45 blazars between 2008 July and 2014 December to investigate the mechanisms of variability and search for a basic relation between the several subclasses of blazars. We identify a correlation between the maximum degree of optical linear polarization and the gamma-ray luminosity or the ratio of gamma-ray to optical fluxes. Since the maximum polarization degree depends on the condition of the magnetic field (chaotic or ordered), this result implies a systematic difference in the intrinsic alignment of magnetic fields in parsec-scale relativistic jets between different types of blazars (flat-spectrum radio quasars vs. BL Lacs) and consequently between different types of radio galaxies (FR I versus FR II).

  13. Gamma-ray burst observations with the Compton/Ulysses/Pioneer-Venus network

    Cline, T.L.; Hurley, K.C.; Sommer, M.; Boer, M.; Niel, M.; Fishman, G.J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C.A.; Paciesas, W.S.; Wilson, R.B.; Fenimore, E.E.; Laros, J.G.; Klebesadel, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    The third and latest interplanetary network for the precise directional analysis of gamma ray bursts consists of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment in Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and instruments on Pioneer-Venus Orbiter and the deep-space mission Ulysses. The unsurpassed resolution of the BATSE instrument, the use of refined analysis techniques, and Ulysses' distance of up to 6 AU all contribute to a potential for greater precision than had been achieved with former networks. Also, the departure of Ulysses from the ecliptic plane in 1992 avoids any positional alignment of the three instruments that would lessen the source directional accuracy

  14. Principles and applications of gamma-ray imaging for arms control

    Ziock, K. P.

    2018-01-01

    The ability of gamma-rays to penetrate matter makes them an excellent signature for the detection of nuclear materials-except that this very ability makes their detection difficult. This is particularly true if one wishes to make images, since general-purpose focusing optics do not exist. Various indirect imaging techniques have been successfully applied to obtain gamma-ray images, including Compton and coded-aperture imaging. This paper reviews the different approaches, and discusses their advantages and disadvantages as illustrated with results obtained from different instruments designed for use in nuclear security applications.

  15. Measurements of gamma-ray energy deposition in a heterogeneous reactor experimental configuration and their analysis

    Calamand, D.; Wouters, R. de; Knipe, A.D.; Menil, R.

    1984-10-01

    An important contribution to the power output of a fast reactor is provided by the energy deposition from gamma-rays, and is particularly significant in the inner fertile zones of heterogeneous breeder reactor designs. To establish the validity of calculational methods and data for such systems an extensive series of measurements was performed in the zero power reactor Masurca, as part of the RACINE programme. The experimental study involved four European laboratories and the measurement techniques covered a range of thermoluminescent dosemeters and an ionization chamber. The present paper describes and compares the gamma-ray energy deposition measurements and analysis

  16. Catalogue of response spectra for unfolding in situ gamma-ray pulse-height distributions

    Dymke, N.

    1982-01-01

    To unfold in situ gamma-ray pulse-height distributions by means of a response matrix technique, the matrix must be in keeping with the measurement geometry, detector size, and energy range to be covered by the measurements. A methodology has been described for determination of standard gamma-ray spectra needed in deriving response matrices and a spectrum catalogue compiled containing graphs and data for the 0-3 MeV (4 x 4 in. NaI(Tl)) and 0-8 MeV (1.5 x 1.5 in. NaI(Tl)) ranges. (author)

  17. Near stellar sources of gamma-ray bursts

    Luchkov, B. I.; Markin, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Correlation analysis of gamma-ray burst coordinates and nearby stars, registered on 2008-2011, revealed 5 coincidences with angular accuracy better than 0.1 degree. The random probability is $7\\times 10^{-7}$, so evidencing that coincident stars are indeed gamma-ray burst sources. The proposed method should be continued in order to provide their share in common balance of cosmic gamma-ray bursts.

  18. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Kippen, R. M.; vonKienlin, A.; Dwyer, J. R.; hide

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation explores the relationship between Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGF) and lightning. Using data from the World-Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), and the gamma ray observations from Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), the study reviews any causal relationship between TGFs and lightning. The conclusion of the study is that the TGF and lightning are simultaneous with out a causal relationship.

  19. Sensitivity of Gamma-Ray Detectors to Polarization

    Yadigaroglu, I. -A.

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the largest gamma-ray detector to date, EGRET, does not have useful polarization sensitivity. We have explored here some improved approaches to analyzing gamma-ray pair production events, leading to important gains in sensitivity to polarization. The performance of the next generation gamma-ray instrument GLAST is investigated using a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the complete detector.

  20. Gamma-ray transients and related astrophysical phenomena

    Lingenfelter, R.E.; Hudson, H.S.; Worrall, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The workshop covered the study of the explosive phenomena responsible for the various gamma ray transients. X-ray burster observations and theories were also reviewed with emphasis on their relationship to gamma ray bursts. Recent observational data, particularly from the SMM, HEAO, and VENERA satellites made the workshop especially timely. Major headings include: gamma-ray transients, x-ray bursts, solar transients, and instrumental concepts. Individual items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base

  1. Specialised software utilities for gamma-ray spectrometry. Computer codes to IAEA-TECDOC-1275

    2002-03-01

    A Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Software Utilities for Gamma-Ray Spectrometry' was initiated by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 1996. In the CRP several basic applications of nuclear data handling were assayed which also dealt with the development of PC computer codes for various spectrometric purposes. This CD-ROM contains the following computer codes, produced under the CRP: ANGES, a program for the user controlled analysis of gamma-ray spectra from HPGe detectors; NUCL M AN, a program for the generation of gamma-ray libraries (using new, evaluated data) for specific applications; TRUE C OINC, a program to calculate true coincidence corrections; VOLUME, a program to calculate the full-energy peak efficiency calibration curve for homogeneous cylindrical sample geometries including self-attenuation correction; WINDIMEN, a program for the library driven analysis of gamma-ray spectra and for the quantification of radionuclide contents in the sample. RESFIT and DPPUNFOL, a set of programs for the definition of the detector resolution function and for unfolding of experimental annihilation spectra; MLMTEST, a program for the analysis of low-level NaI-spectra together with an extensive library of example reference spectra as well as a spectrum synthesizer

  2. A new method for detecting hemoglobin directly in whole blood using photon attenuation techniques

    Medhat, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the proposed work is focused on measuring iron concentration directly in whole blood as tool for estimating hemoglobin and anemic conditions in patients across the world. The investigated method depends on theory of photon attenuation through transmission of low energy in whole blood sample. The mathematical expressions for calculating hemoglobin and iron deficit on blood using photon attenuation are derived. Calculations are carried out for estimating concentration of iron in blood samples taken from children, adults and old patients and therefore measuring their hemoglobin and iron deficit from normal values. Theoretical mass attenuation coefficient values were obtained using the XCOM program. A high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry based on high purity germanium detector was employed to measure attenuation of strongly collimated monoenergetic gamma beam through blood samples. (author)

  3. Gamma-ray production cross sections for 0.9 to 20 MeV neutron interactions with 10B

    Bywater, R.L. Jr.

    1986-09-01

    Gamma-ray spectral data previously obtained at the 20-meter station of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator flight-path 8 were studied to determine cross sections for 0.9- to 20-MeV neutron interactions with 10 B. Data reduction techniques, including those for determination of incident neutron fluences as well as those to compensate for Doppler-broadened gamma-ray-detection responses, are given in some detail in this report. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Gamma rays from pulsar outer gaps

    Chiang, J.; Romani, R.W.; Cheng Ho

    1993-01-01

    We describe a gamma ray pulsar code which computes the high energy photon emissivities from vacuum gaps in the outer magnetosphere, after the model outlined by Cheng, Ho and Ruderman (1986) and Ho (1989). Pair-production due to photon-photon interactions and radiation processes including curvature, synchrotron and inverse Compton processes are computed with an iterative scheme which converges to self-consistent photon and particle distributions for a sampling of locations in the outer magnetosphere. We follow the photons from these distributions as they propagate through the pulsar magnetosphere toward a distant observer. We include the effects of relativistic aberration, time-of-flight delays and reabsorption by photon-photon pair-production to determine an intensity map of the high energy pulsar emission on the sky. Using data from radio and optical observations to constrain the geometry of the magnetosphere as well as the possible observer viewing angles, we derive light curves and phase dependent spectra which can be directly compared to data from the Compton Observatory. Observations for Crab, Vela and the recently identified gamma ray pulsars Geminga, PSR1706-44 aNd PSR 1509-58 will provide important tests of our model calculations, help us to improve our picture of the relevant physics at work in pulsar magnetospheres and allow us to comment on the implications for future pulsar discoveries

  5. Spectra of {gamma} rays feeding superdeformed bands

    Lauritsen, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Henry, R.G. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The spectrum of {gamma}rays coincident with SD transitions contains the transitions which populate the SD band. This spectrum can provide information on the feeding mechanism and on the properties (moment of inertia, collectivity) of excited SD states. We used a model we developed to explain the feeding of SD bands, to calculate the spectrum of feeding {gamma}rays. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the trigger conditions present in our Eurogam experiment. Both experimental and theoretical spectra contain a statistical component and a broad E2 peak (from transitions occurring between excited states in the SD well). There is good resemblance between the measured and calculated spectra although the calculated multiplicity of an E2 bump is low by {approximately}30%. Work is continuing to improve the quality of the fits, which will result in a better understanding of excited SD states. In addition, a model for the last steps, which cool the {gamma} cascade into the SD yrast line, needs to be developed. A strong M1/E2 low-energy component, which we believe is responsible for this cooling, was observed.

  6. Observation of gamma-ray bursts with GINGA

    Murakami, Toshio; Fujii, Masami; Nishimura, Jun

    1989-01-01

    Gamma-ray Burst Detector System (GBD) on board the scientific satellite 'GINGA' which was launched on Feb. 5, 1987, was realized as an international cooperation between ISAS and LANL. It has recorded more than 40 Gamma-Ray Burst candidates during 20 months observation. Although many observational evidences were accumulated in past 20 years after the discovery of gamma-ray burst by LANL scientists, there are not enough evidence to determine the origin and the production mechanism of the gamma-ray burst. GBD consists of a proportional counter and a NaI scintillation counter so that it became possible to observe energy spectrum of the gamma-ray burst with high energy resolution over wide range of energy (1.5-380 keV) together with high time resolution. As the result of observation, the following facts are obtained: (1) A large fraction of observed gamma-ray bursts has a long X-ray tail after the harder part of gamma-ray emission has terminated. (2) Clear spectral absorption features with harmonic in energy was observed in some of the energy spectrum of gamma-ray bursts. These evidences support the hypothesis that the strongly magnetized neutron star is the origin of gamma-ray burst. (author)

  7. GRAP, Gamma-Ray Level-Scheme Assignment

    Franklyn, C.B.

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: An interactive program for allocating gamma-rays to an energy level scheme. Procedure allows for searching for new candidate levels of the form: 1) L1 + G(A) + G(B) = L2; 2) G(A) + G(B) = G(C); 3) G(A) + G(B) = C (C is a user defined number); 4) L1 + G(A) + G(B) + G(C) = L2. Procedure indicates intensity balance of feed and decay of each energy level. Provides for optimization of a level energy (and associated error). Overall procedure allows for pre-defining of certain gamma-rays as belonging to particular regions of the level scheme, for example, high energy transition levels, or due to beta- decay. 2 - Method of solution: Search for cases in which the energy difference between two energy levels is equal to a gamma-ray energy within user-defined limits. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maximum number of gamma-rays: 999; Maximum gamma ray energy: 32000 units; Minimum gamma ray energy: 10 units; Maximum gamma-ray intensity: 32000 units; Minimum gamma-ray intensity: 0.001 units; Maximum number of levels: 255; Maximum level energy: 32000 units; Minimum level energy: 10 units; Maximum error on energy, intensity: 32 units; Minimum error on energy, intensity: 0.001 units; Maximum number of combinations: 6400 (ca); Maximum number of gamma-ray types : 127

  8. High-energy gamma-ray emission in compact binaries

    Cerutti, Benoit

    2010-01-01

    Four gamma-ray sources have been associated with binary systems in our Galaxy: the micro-quasar Cygnus X-3 and the gamma-ray binaries LS I +61 degrees 303, LS 5039 and PSR B1259-63. These systems are composed of a massive companion star and a compact object of unknown nature, except in PSR B1259-63 where there is a young pulsar. I propose a comprehensive theoretical model for the high-energy gamma-ray emission and variability in gamma-ray emitting binaries. In this model, the high-energy radiation is produced by inverse Compton scattering of stellar photons on ultra-relativistic electron-positron pairs injected by a young pulsar in gamma-ray binaries and in a relativistic jet in micro-quasars. Considering anisotropic inverse Compton scattering, pair production and pair cascade emission, the TeV gamma-ray emission is well explained in LS 5039. Nevertheless, this model cannot account for the gamma-ray emission in LS I +61 degrees 303 and PSR B1259-63. Other processes should dominate in these complex systems. In Cygnus X-3, the gamma-ray radiation is convincingly reproduced by Doppler-boosted Compton emission of pairs in a relativistic jet. Gamma-ray binaries and micro-quasars provide a novel environment for the study of pulsar winds and relativistic jets at very small spatial scales. (author)

  9. Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-ray Source List

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Ajello, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Band, D.L.; /NASA, Goddard /NASA, Goddard; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bignami, G.F.; /Pavia U.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Pavia U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /NASA, Goddard; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the {gamma}-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than {approx}10{sigma}) {gamma}-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) {gamma}-ray sources in the early mission data.

  10. Saturation and porosity measurements of different soil samples by gamma ray transmission

    Akbal, S.; Filiz Baytas, A.

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray transmission methods have been used accurately for the study of the properties of soil samples. In this study, the soil samples were collected from various regions of Turkey and a Nal (TI) detector measured the attenuation of strongly collimated monoenergetic gamma beam (from Cs-137) through soil samples. The water saturation and porosity were therefore calculated from the transmission measurements for each soil sample. (authors)

  11. An emergency response intercomparison exercise using a synthetically generated gamma-ray spectrum

    Dowdall, M.; Selnæs, O.G.; Standring, W.J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Although high resolution gamma ray spectrometry serves as the primary analytical technique in emergency response situations, chances for laboratories to practice analysing the type of spectra that may be expected in the early phase of such a situation are limited. This problem is more acute for l...

  12. International spring school observing the X-and gamma-ray sky

    Paul, J; Longair, M; Von Ballmoos, P; Daigne, F; Baring, M; Gudel, M; King, A; Dotani, T; Arnaud, M; Gudel, M; Malzac, J; Servillat, M; Soldi, S; Corbel, S; Beckmann, V; Rodriguez, J; Erlund, M; Bodaghee, A; Graham, J; Ruiz, A; Corbel, S; Fabian, A; Tagger, M; Grenier, I; Bernard, R; Jackson, N; Eckart, A; Grenier, I; Belloni, T; Stella, L; Vink, J; KnodLseder, J; Hermsen, W; Ferrando, Ph; Ibragimov, A

    2006-07-01

    This school, dedicated to young researchers, will clarify our present knowledge of the X-ray sky and give the opportunity to learn about the observatories and tools which are available. The contributions have been organized into 3 issues: -) fundamental physics, -) X-ray and Gamma-ray instruments and analysis techniques, and -) astrophysical objects. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations.

  13. International spring school observing the X-and gamma-ray sky

    Paul, J.; Longair, M.; Von Ballmoos, P.; Daigne, F.; Baring, M.; Gudel, M.; King, A.; Dotani, T.; Arnaud, M.; Gudel, M.; Malzac, J.; Servillat, M.; Soldi, S.; Corbel, S.; Beckmann, V.; Rodriguez, J.; Erlund, M.; Bodaghee, A.; Graham, J.; Ruiz, A.; Corbel, S.; Fabian, A.; Tagger, M.; Grenier, I.; Bernard, R.; Jackson, N.; Eckart, A.; Grenier, I.; Belloni, T.; Stella, L.; Vink, J.; KnodLseder, J.; Hermsen, W.; Ferrando, Ph.; Ibragimov, A.

    2006-01-01

    This school, dedicated to young researchers, will clarify our present knowledge of the X-ray sky and give the opportunity to learn about the observatories and tools which are available. The contributions have been organized into 3 issues: -) fundamental physics, -) X-ray and Gamma-ray instruments and analysis techniques, and -) astrophysical objects. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations

  14. Nuclear equipment to determine soil and water mass attenuation coefficients

    Zucchi, O.L.A.D.; Nascimento Filho, V.F. do

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of substituting the monochannel gamma spectrometer, traditionally used in the gamma ray attenuation technique, for a less sophisticated and less expensive system of integral counting is studied. The proposed system can be operated by a non-specialized person. Three detection systems were used in the determination of the mass attenuation coefficients for different types of soil and for water. (M.A.C.) [pt

  15. Validation of mathematical models to describe fluid dynamics of a cold riser by gamma ray attenuation; Validacao de modelos matematicos para descrever a fluidodinamica de um riser utilizando atenuacao gama

    Melo, Ana Cristina Bezerra Azedo de

    2004-12-15

    The fluid dynamic behavior of a riser in a cold type FCC model was investigated by means of catalyst concentration distribution measured with gamma attenuation and simulated with a mathematical model. In the riser of the cold model, MEF, 0,032 m in diameter, 2,30 m in length the fluidized bed, whose components are air and FCC catalyst, circulates. The MEF is operated by automatic control and instruments for measuring fluid dynamic variables. An axial catalyst concentration distribution was measured using an Am-241 gamma source and a NaI detector coupled to a multichannel provided with a software for data acquisition and evaluation. The MEF was adapted for a fluid dynamic model validation which describes the flow in the riser, for example, by introducing an injector for controlling the solid flow in circulation. Mathematical models were selected from literature, analyzed and tested to simulate the fluid dynamic of the riser. A methodology for validating fluid dynamic models was studied and implemented. The stages of the work were developed according to the validation methodology, such as data planning experiments, study of the equations which describe the fluidodynamic, computational solvers application and comparison with experimental data. Operational sequences were carried out keeping the MEF conditions for measuring catalyst concentration and simultaneously measuring the fluid dynamic variables, velocity of the components and pressure drop in the riser. Following this, simulated and experimental values were compared and statistical data treatment done, aiming at the required precision to validate the fluid dynamic model. The comparison tests between experimental and simulated data were carried out under validation criteria. The fluid dynamic behavior of the riser was analyzed and the results and the agreement with literature were discussed. The adopt model was validated under the MEF operational conditions, for a 3 to 6 m/s gas velocity in the riser and a slip

  16. Observation of solar gamma-ray by Hinotori

    Yoshimori, Masato; Okudaira, Kiyoaki; Hirashima, Yo; Kondo, Ichiro.

    1982-01-01

    The solar gamma-ray emitted by solar flare was observed. The gamma-ray is the electromagnetic radiation with the energy more than 300 keV. The line gamma-ray intensity and the time profile were observed. The gamma-ray detector CsI (Tl) was loaded on Hinotori, and the observed gamma-ray was analyzed by a multi-channel analyzer. The observed line gamma-ray was the radiation from Fe-56 and Ne-20. The line gamma-ray from C-12 and O-16 was also seen. These gamma-ray is the direct evidence of the nuclear reaction on the sun. The observed spectrum suggested the existence of the lines from Mg-24 and Si-28. The intensity of the 2.22 MeV gamma-line was small. This fact showed that the origin of this line was different from other nuclear gamma-ray. Two kinds of hard X-ray bursts were detected. The one was impulsive burst, and the other was gradual burst. There was no time difference between the hard X-ray and the gamma-ray of the impulsive burst. The impulsive burst may be explained by the beam model. The delay of time profile in the high energy gamma-ray of the gradual burst was observed. This means that the time when accelerated electrons cause bremsstrahlung depends on the electron energy. The long trapping of electrons at the top of magnetic loop is suggested. (Kato, T.)

  17. Application of gamma-ray absorptiometry in the hydraulic transport of solids

    Fanger, H.U.; Michaelis, W.; Pepelnik, R.; The, H.L.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the development and application of advanced γ-ray absorptiometry techniques that may successfully be applied for the non-contact determination of medium density, local space concentrations, particle drift speeds and mass flows in transport systems. This improves the accuracy of density analysis and allows the measurement of the individual solid fraction contents in three-component flows, such as coal and rock or sediment and brine in water. Likewise, solid-air-water mixtures in air-lift systems may be analysed. Sufficient differences in the attenuation coefficients (i.e. mass density and/or chemical Z number) are requisites of this technique. The chemical composition of the components should be constant, more or less, and has to be known. The particle size does not affect the measurement up to a critical value which depends strongly on the material composition and the γ-ray energies used. For measuring the mean drift velocity of particles, a γ-ray transmission device with two equivalent radioactive sources and detectors is utilized. Both gamma-ray gates are arranged in a properly chosen distance, one after the other in the direction of flow. By using cross-correlation analysis, phase shift and mean velocity can be deduced from the dc-current modulations at the detector outputs. At the same time this measuring principle delivers the mean particle size and the size distribution in conveyor flows. Combination of space concentration and drift velocity yields the mass transport per unit time. (HP) [de

  18. GROSS- GAMMA RAY OBSERVATORY ATTITUDE DYNAMICS SIMULATOR

    Garrick, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) spacecraft will constitute a major advance in gamma ray astronomy by offering the first opportunity for comprehensive observations in the range of 0.1 to 30,000 megaelectronvolts (MeV). The Gamma Ray Observatory Attitude Dynamics Simulator, GROSS, is designed to simulate this mission. The GRO Dynamics Simulator consists of three separate programs: the Standalone Profile Program; the Simulator Program, which contains the Simulation Control Input/Output (SCIO) Subsystem, the Truth Model (TM) Subsystem, and the Onboard Computer (OBC) Subsystem; and the Postprocessor Program. The Standalone Profile Program models the environment of the spacecraft and generates a profile data set for use by the simulator. This data set contains items such as individual external torques; GRO spacecraft, Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS), and solar and lunar ephemerides; and star data. The Standalone Profile Program is run before a simulation. The SCIO subsystem is the executive driver for the simulator. It accepts user input, initializes parameters, controls simulation, and generates output data files and simulation status display. The TM subsystem models the spacecraft dynamics, sensors, and actuators. It accepts ephemerides, star data, and environmental torques from the Standalone Profile Program. With these and actuator commands from the OBC subsystem, the TM subsystem propagates the current state of the spacecraft and generates sensor data for use by the OBC and SCIO subsystems. The OBC subsystem uses sensor data from the TM subsystem, a Kalman filter (for attitude determination), and control laws to compute actuator commands to the TM subsystem. The OBC subsystem also provides output data to the SCIO subsystem for output to the analysts. The Postprocessor Program is run after simulation is completed. It generates printer and CRT plots and tabular reports of the simulated data at the direction of the user. GROSS is written in FORTRAN 77 and

  19. Studies on the effect of gamma-rays irradiation on the virulence and immunogenicity of Eimeria tenella oocysts

    Hayat, Birjees

    1976-01-01

    Complete attenuation of the infective oocysts of Eimeria tanella was obtained with a gamma ray dose of 15000r. Above this dose, pathogenicity and the sensitivity of the disease decreased. There was no difference in the level of immunity induced with irradiated and non-irradiated oocysts, but the mortality with the irradiated oocysts was much lower. (ARA)

  20. Operating experience with gamma ray irradiators

    Fraser, F.M.; Ouwerkerk, T.

    1980-01-01

    The experience of Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL) with radioisotopes dates back to the mid-1940s when radium was marketed for medical purposes. Cobalt-60 came on the scene in 1949 and within a few years a thriving business in cancer teletherapy machines and research irradiators was developed. AECL's first full-scale cobalt-60 gamma ray sterilizer for medical products was installed in 1964. AECL now has over 50 plants and 30 million curies in service around the world. Sixteen years of design experience in cobalt-60 sources, radiation shielding, safety interlock systems, and source pass mechanisms have made gamma irradiators safe, reliable, and easy to operate. This proven technology is being applied in promising new fields such as sludge treatment and food preservation. Cesium-137 is expected to be extensively utilized as the gamma radiation source for these applications