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Sample records for gamma-aminobutyric acidb responses

  1. The anticonvulsant gabapentin (neurontin) does not act through gamma-aminobutyric acid-B receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Mosbacher, Johannes; Elg, Susanne

    2002-01-01

    The actions of the anticonvulsant gabapentin [1-(aminomethyl)cyclohexaneacetic acid, Neurontin] have been somewhat enigmatic until recently, when it was claimed to be a gamma-aminobutyric acid-B (GABA(B)) receptor agonist acting exclusively at a heterodimeric complex containing the GABA(B(1a...... in vitro assays. In light of these results, we find it highly questionable that gabapentin is a GABA(B) receptor agonist. Hence, the anticonvulsive effects of the compound have to arise from GABA(B) receptor-independent mechanisms. This also implies that the first GABA(B) receptor splice variant...

  2. Increased brain uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid in a rabbit model of hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, M.L.; Mullen, K.D.; Scholz, B.; Fenstermacher, J.D.; Jones, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    Transfer of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid across the normal blood-brain barrier is minimal. One prerequisite for gamma-aminobutyric acid in plasma contributing to the neural inhibition of hepatic encephalopathy would be that increased transfer of gamma-aminobutyric acid across the blood-brain barrier occurs in liver failure. The aim of the present study was to determine if brain gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake is increased in rabbits with stage II-III (precoma) hepatic encephalopathy due to galactosamine-induced fulminant hepatic failure. A modification of the Oldendorf intracarotid artery-injection technique was applied. [3H] gamma-aminobutyric acid, [14C] butanol, and 113mIn-labeled serum protein (transferrin) were injected simultaneously 4 s before decapitation. The ipsilateral brain uptake index of gamma-aminobutyric acid was determined from measurements of the 3 isotopes in 5 brain regions. Uncorrected or simple brain uptake indices of [3H] gamma-aminobutyric acid and [113mIn] transferrin were calculated using [14C] butanol as the highly extracted reference compound. The [113mIn] transferrin data were also used to correct the brain uptake index of [3H] gamma-aminobutyric acid for intravascular retention of [3H] gamma-aminobutyric acid. The methodology adopted minimized problems attributable to rapid [3H] gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolism, and slow brain washout and recirculation of the radiolabeled tracers. Both the uncorrected and corrected brain uptake indices of gamma-aminobutyric acid as well as the simple brain uptake index of transferrin were significantly increased in both stage II and III hepatic encephalopathy in all brain regions studied. Moreover, these brain uptake indices were significantly greater in stage III hepatic encephalopathy than in stage II hepatic encephalopathy

  3. Detection of the in vivo conversion of 2-pyrrolidinone to gamma-aminobutyric acid in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callery, P S; Stogniew, M; Geelhaar, L A

    1979-01-01

    Labeled gamma-aminobutyric acid was detected in mouse brain following intravenous injections of deuterium labeled 2-pyrrolidinone. [2H6]Pyrrolidinone was prepared by the reduction of [2H4]succinimide with lithium aluminum deuteride. Quantification was accomplished by a gas chromatography mass spectrometry assay method. gamma-Aminobutyric acid and internal standard, 5-aminovaleric acid, were converted to volatile derivatives by treatment with N,N-dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal. Quantitative estimates were derived from peak area measurements obtained from monitoring the parent ions of the gamma-aminobutyric acid and internal standard derivatives by repetitive scanning during the GC run. The conversion of pyrrolidinone to gamma-aminobutyric acid may provide a method for labeling central gamma-aminobutyric acid pools.

  4. A functional assay to measure postsynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acidB responses in cultured spinal cord neurons: Heterologous regulation of the same K+ channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamatchi, G.L.; Ticku, M.K. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The stimulation of postsynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptors leads to slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials due to the influx of K(+)-ions. This was studied biochemically, in vitro in mammalian cultured spinal cord neurons by using 86Rb as a substitute for K+. (-)-Baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, produced a concentration-dependent increase in the 86Rb-influx. This effect was stereospecific and blocked by GABAB receptor antagonists like CGP 35 348 (3-aminopropyl-diethoxymethyl-phosphonic acid) and phaclofen. Apart from the GABAB receptors, both adenosine via adenosine1 receptors and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) via 5-HT1 alpha agonists also increased the 86Rb-influx. These agonists failed to show any additivity between them when they were combined in their maximal concentration. In addition, their effect was antagonized specifically by their respective antagonists without influencing the others. These findings suggest the presence of GABAB, adenosine1 and 5-HT1 alpha receptors in the cultured spinal cord neurons, which exhibit a heterologous regulation of the same K(+)-channel. The effect of these agonists were antagonized by phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, an activator of protein kinase C, and pretreatment with pertussis toxin. This suggests that these agonists by acting on their own receptors converge on the same K(+)-channel through the Gi/Go proteins. In summary, we have developed a biochemical functional assay for studying and characterizing GABAB synaptic pharmacology in vitro, using spinal cord neurons.

  5. Substrate-Na{sup +} complex formation: Coupling mechanism for {gamma}-aminobutyrate symporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallo, Anna; Simon, Agnes [Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary); Bencsura, Akos [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, Institute of Structural Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Heja, Laszlo [Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary); Kardos, Julianna, E-mail: jkardos@chemres.hu [Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary)

    2009-07-24

    Crystal structures of transmembrane transport proteins belonging to the important families of neurotransmitter-sodium symporters reveal how they transport neurotransmitters across membranes. Substrate-induced structural conformations of gated neurotransmitter-sodium symporters have been in the focus of research, however, a key question concerning the mechanism of Na{sup +} ion coupling remained unanswered. Homology models of human glial transporter subtypes of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter {gamma}-aminobutyric acid were built. In accordance with selectivity data for subtype 2 vs. 3, docking and molecular dynamics calculations suggest similar orthosteric substrate (inhibitor) conformations and binding crevices but distinguishable allosteric Zn{sup 2+} ion binding motifs. Considering the occluded conformational states of glial human {gamma}-aminobutyric acid transporter subtypes, we found major semi-extended and minor ring-like conformations of zwitterionic {gamma}-aminobutyric acid in complex with Na{sup +} ion. The existence of the minor ring-like conformation of {gamma}-aminobutyric acid in complex with Na{sup +} ion may be attributed to the strengthening of the intramolecular H-bond by the electrostatic effect of Na{sup +} ion. Coupling substrate uptake into cells with the thermodynamically favorable Na{sup +} ion movement through substrate-Na{sup +} ion complex formation may be a mechanistic principle featuring transmembrane neurotransmitter-sodium symporter proteins.

  6. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration is associated with physical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanky, Bhavana S.; Muhlert, Nils; Tur, Carmen; Edden, Richard A. E.; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A. M.; Miller, David H.; Thompson, Alan J.; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is thought to be the major cause of ongoing, irreversible disability in progressive stages of multiple sclerosis. Gamma-aminobutyric acid is the principle inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. The aims of this study were to investigate if gamma-aminobutyric acid levels (i) are abnormal in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis compared with healthy controls; and (ii) correlate with physical and cognitive performance in this patient population. Thirty patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and 17 healthy control subjects underwent single-voxel MEGA-PRESS (MEscher-GArwood Point RESolved Spectroscopy) magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T, to quantify gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the prefrontal cortex, right hippocampus and left sensorimotor cortex. All subjects were assessed clinically and underwent a cognitive assessment. Multiple linear regression models were used to compare differences in gamma-aminobutyric acid concentrations between patients and controls adjusting for age, gender and tissue fractions within each spectroscopic voxel. Regression was used to examine the relationships between the cognitive function and physical disability scores specific for these regions with gamma-aminobuytric acid levels, adjusting for age, gender, and total N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamine-glutamate complex levels. When compared with controls, patients performed significantly worse on all motor and sensory tests, and were cognitively impaired in processing speed and verbal memory. Patients had significantly lower gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the hippocampus (adjusted difference = −0.403 mM, 95% confidence intervals −0.792, −0.014, P = 0.043) and sensorimotor cortex (adjusted difference = −0.385 mM, 95% confidence intervals −0.667, −0.104, P = 0.009) compared with controls. In patients, reduced motor function in the right upper and lower limb was associated with lower gamma-aminobutyric acid

  7. Application of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A-benzodiazepine receptor imaging for study of neuropsychiatric disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Weiqi; Qiu Chun; Guan Yihui

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A-benzodiazepine receptors are heterogeneous polypeptide pentamers widely spread in the central nervous system on the neuron membrane. Different subunit combinations educe various neuro-inhibitory pharmacological effects such as sedative, hypnosis, anticonvulsion and anxiolysis. PET can be utilized to study the binding of the receptors in vivo. PET radioligands of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A-benzodiazepine receptors can be classified into 3 types: antagonists,agonists and reverse agonists, of which antagonist radiotracer 11 C-flumazenil is the most commonly applied in epilepsy, anxiety disorders, depression, vegetative state,addiction and other neuro-psychiatric disorders. (authors)

  8. Brain gamma-aminobutyric acid deficiency in dialysis encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, V P; Perry, T L; Price, J D; Reeve, C E; Godolphin, W J; Kish, S J

    1985-02-01

    We measured levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the CSF and in the autopsied brain of patients with dialysis encephalopathy. GABA concentrations were low in the CSF of three of five living patients. Mean GABA content was reduced by 30 to 50% in five brain regions (frontal, occipital, and cerebellar cortex, caudate nucleus, and medial dorsal thalamus) in five fatal cases. GABA content was normal in brain regions where GABA is characteristically reduced in Huntington's disease. Choline acetyltransferase activity was diminished (by 25 to 35%) in cerebral cortex of the dialysis encephalopathy patients.

  9. Antisera to gamma-aminobutyric acid. I. Production and characterization using a new model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, A J; Penke, B; Erdei, A; Chubb, I W; Somogyi, P

    1985-03-01

    Antisera to the amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) have been developed with the aim of immunohistochemical visualization of neurons that use it as a neurotransmitter. GABA bound to bovine serum albumin was the immunogen. The reactivities of the sera to GABA and a variety of structurally related compounds were tested by coupling these compounds to nitrocellulose paper activated with polylysine and glutaraldehyde and incubating the paper with the unlabeled antibody enzyme method, thus simulating immunohistochemistry of tissue sections. The antisera did not react with L-glutamate, L-aspartate, D-aspartate, glycine, taurine, L-glutamine, L-lysine, L-threonine, L-alanine, alpha-aminobutyrate, beta-aminobutyrate, putrescine, or delta-aminolevulinate. There was cross-reaction with gamma-amino-beta-hydroxybutyrate, 1-10%, and the homologues of GABA: beta-alanine, 1-10%, delta-aminovalerate, approximately 10%, and epsilon-amino-caproate, approximately 10%. The antisera reacted slightly with the dipeptide gamma-aminobutyrylleucine, but not carnosine or homocarnosine. Immunostaining of GABA was completely abolished by adsorption of the sera to GABA coupled to polyacrylamide beads by glutaraldehyde. The immunohistochemical model is simple, amino acids and peptides are bound in the same way as in aldehyde-fixed tissue and, in contrast to radioimmunoassay, it uses an immunohistochemical detection system. This method has enabled us to define the high specificity of anti-GABA sera and to use them in some novel ways. The model should prove useful in assessing the specificity of other antisera.

  10. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid on the Hering-Breuer inspiration-inhibiting reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, N P; Aleksandrov, V G; Ivanova, T G

    2010-02-01

    Acute experiments on rats were performed to study the effects of intraventricular microinjections of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the volume-time parameters of external respiration and the inspiration-inhibiting Hering-Breuer reflex. The state of this reflex before and after GABA administration was assessed in terms of the extent of changes in the duration and amplitude of inspiratory oscillations in intrathoracic pressure in response to end-expiratory occlusion of the trachea. Administration of 20 microM GABA into the lateral ventricles of the brain decreased the minute ventilation (due to reductions in the respiratory frequency and respiratory volume), weakened respiratory muscle contractions, and decreased the peak airflow rate on inspiration and expiration. The response to end-expiratory occlusion decreased significantly after administration of GABA, demonstrating the involvement of GABAergic mechanisms in mediating the inspiration-inhibiting Hering-Breuer reflex.

  11. GABAA [gamma-aminobutyric acid] type binding sites on membranes of spermatozoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdoe, S.L.; Wekerle, L.

    1990-01-01

    The binding of [ 3 H] gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to seminal membranes of swines and rams was examined. Specific, GABA binding was demonstrated in both species, which showed the features of GABA A type receptors. The affinity of binding was similar in both species, whereas the density of seminal GABA binding sites was 5 times higher in swine. Our findings suggest that GABA may have a direct effect on spermatozoa

  12. [Construction of a recombinant Escherichia coli BL21/ pET-28a-lpgad and the optimization of transformation conditions for the efficient production of gamma-aminobutyric acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lingzhi; Xu, Meijuan; Rao, Zhiming

    2012-01-01

    In order to enhance gamma-aminobutyric acid production from L-glutamate efficiently, we amplified the key enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) encoding gene lpgad from the strain Lactobacillus plantarum GB 01-21 which was obtained by way of multi-mutagenesis and overexpressed it in E. coli BL21. Then we purified GAD by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and characterized the enzyme to optimize the conditions of the whole-cell transformation. The results showed that the recombinant E. coli BL21 (pET-28a-lpgad) produced 8.53 U/mg GAD, which was increased by 3.24 fold compared with the GAD activity in L. plantarum. The optimum pH and temperature of the enzyme were pH 4.8 and 37 degrees C, respectively. At the same time, we found that Ca2+ and Mg2+ could increase the activity significantly. Based on this, we investigated gamma-aminobutyric acid transformation in 5 L fermentor under the optimum transformation conditions. Accordingly, the yield of gamma-aminobutyric acid was 204.5 g/L at 24 h when the 600 g L-glutamate was added and the mole conversion rate had reached 97.92%. The production of gamma-aminobutyric acid was improved by 42.5% compared with that under the unoptimized transformation conditions. This paved a way for the gamma-aminobutyric acid construction of the industrial applications.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of the Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid-Producing Strain Streptococcus thermophilus APC151.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M; Arboleya, Silvia; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine

    2017-04-27

    Here is presented the whole-genome sequence of Streptococcus thermophilus APC151, isolated from a marine fish. This bacterium produces gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in high yields and is biotechnologically suitable to produce naturally GABA-enriched biofunctional yogurt. Its complete genome comprises 2,097 genes and 1,839,134 nucleotides, with an average G+C content of 39.1%. Copyright © 2017 Linares et al.

  14. gamma-Aminobutyric acid stimulates ethylene biosynthesis in sunflower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathiresan, A.; Tung, P.; Chinnappa, C.C.; Reid, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), a nonprotein amino acid, is often accumulated in plants following environmental stimuli that can also cause ethylene production. We have investigated the relationship between GABA and ethylene production in excised sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) tissues. Exogenous GABA causes up to a 14-fold increase in the ethylene production rate after about 12 h. Cotyledons fed with [14C]GABA did not release substantial amounts of radioactive ethylene despite its chemical similarity to 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), indicating that GABA is not likely to be an alternative precursor for ethylene. GABA causes increases in ACC synthase mRNA accumulation, ACC levels, ACC oxidase mRNA levels, and in vitro ACC oxidase activity. In the presence of aminoethoxyvinylglycine or alpha-aminoisobutyric acid, GABA did not stimulate ethylene production. We therefore conclude that GABA stimulates ethylene biosynthesis mainly by promoting ACC synthase transcript abundance. Possible roles of GABA as a signal transducer are suggested

  15. Enrichment of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid in Bean Sprouts: Exploring Biosynthesis of Plant Metabolite Using Common Household Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanarata, Theerasak; Plianwong, Samarwadee; Opanasopit, Praneet; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait

    2018-01-01

    The enrichment of plant foods with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is currently an interesting issue in the field of nutraceuticals and can be used as an experiment for upper-division undergraduate students. Here, an interdisciplinary hands-on experiment to produce GABA-enriched mung bean sprouts using common household reagents is described. Based…

  16. Prefrontal gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor insertion controls cue-induced relapse to nicotine seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, Bart R; van Mourik, Yvar; Schetters, Dustin; Smit, August B; De Vries, Taco J; Spijker, Sabine

    2014-11-01

    Current smoking cessation therapies offer limited success, as relapse rates remain high. Nicotine, which is the major component of tobacco smoke, is thought to be primarily responsible for the addictive properties of tobacco. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying nicotine relapse, hampering development of more effective therapies. The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic receptors in controlling relapse to nicotine seeking. Using an intravenous self-administration model, we studied glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor regulation in the synaptic membrane fraction of the rat mPFC following extinction and cue-induced relapse to nicotine seeking. Subsequently, we locally intervened at the level of GABAergic signaling by using a mimetic peptide of the GABA receptor associated protein-interacting domain of GABA type A (GABAA) receptor subunit γ2 (TAT-GABAγ2) and muscimol, a GABAA receptor agonist. Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors were not regulated after the 30-min relapse test. However, GABAA receptor subunits α1 and γ2 were upregulated, and interference with GABAA receptor insertion in the cell membrane using the TAT-GABAγ2 peptide in the dorsal mPFC, but not the ventral mPFC, significantly increased responding during relapse. Increasing GABAA transmission with muscimol in the dorsal and ventral mPFC attenuated relapse. These data indicate that cue-induced relapse entails a GABAergic plasticity mechanism that limits nicotine seeking by restoring inhibitory control in the dorsal mPFC. GABAA receptor-mediated neurotransmission in the dorsal mPFC constitutes a possible future therapeutic target for maintaining smoking abstinence. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimizing soaking and germination conditions to improve gamma-aminobutyric acid content in japonica and indica germinated brown rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Q.; Xiang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, X.; Evers, J.B.; Werf, van der W.; Duan, L.

    2014-01-01

    Germinated brown rice is a well-known functional food due to its high content of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). This study was designed to test the difference of producing GABA in two domesticated rice genotypes (indica and japonica rice), and the effects of adding exogenous glutamic acid or

  18. Cortical Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid and Glutamate in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Their Relationships to Self-Reported Sleep Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerhoff, Dieter J.; Mon, Anderson; Metzler, Thomas; Neylan, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To test if posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with low brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels and if reduced GABA is mediated by poor sleep quality. Design: Laboratory study using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) and behavioral testing. Setting: VA Medical Center Research Service, Psychiatry and Radiology. Patients or Participants: Twenty-seven patients with PTSD (PTSD+) and 18 trauma-exposed controls without PTSD (PTSD−), recruited from United States Army reservists, Army National Guard, and mental health clinics. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: 1H MRS at 4 Tesla yielded spectra from three cortical brain regions. In parieto-occipital and temporal cortices, PTSD+ had lower GABA concentrations than PTSD−. As expected, PTSD+ had higher depressive and anxiety symptom scores and a higher Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) score. Higher ISI correlated with lower GABA and higher glutamate levels in parieto-occipital cortex and tended to correlate with lower GABA in the anterior cingulate. The relationship between parieto-occipital GABA and PTSD diagnosis was fully mediated through insomnia severity. Lower N-acetylaspartate and glutamate concentrations in the anterior cingulate cortex correlated with higher arousal scores, whereas depressive and anxiety symptoms did generally not influence metabolite concentrations. Conclusions: Low brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is consistent with most findings in panic and social anxiety disorders. Low GABA associated with poor sleep quality is consistent with the hyperarousal theory of both primary insomnia and PTSD. Our data demonstrate that poor sleep quality mediates low parieto-occipital GABA in PTSD. The findings have implications for PTSD treatment approaches. Citation: Meyerhoff DJ, Mon A, Metzler T, Neylan TC. Cortical gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate in posttraumatic stress disorder and

  19. [The interaction between gamma-aminobutyric acid and other related neurotransmitters in depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; An, Shu-Cheng; Li, Jiang-Na

    2014-06-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter of the central nervous system (CNS) in mammalian, which involved in several mood disorders such as anxiety, depression and schizophrenia. Nowadays, there are growing evidences showed that the depression is concerned with a deficiency in brain GABA. However, there are numerous studies based on the monoamine hypothesis and glutamatergic dysfunction, while the study on GABA is relatively less and scattered. Our aim is to discuss the relationship between depression and GABA by introducing the role of GABA receptors and the interaction between GABA and 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine and glutamic acid. It provides new ideas for further study on the pathogenesis and therapy of depression.

  20. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on synaptogenesis and synaptic function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Elster, L

    1998-01-01

    The correct establishment and function of synapses depend on a variety of factors, such as guidance of pre- and postsynaptic neurons as well as receptor development and localization. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) has a pronounced effect on these events and elicits differentiation of neurons......; that is, GABA acts as a trophic signal. Accordingly, activating preexisting GABA receptors, a trophic GABA signal enhances the growth rate of neuronal processes, facilitates synapse formation, and promotes synthesis of specific proteins. Transcription and de novo synthesis are initiated by the GABA signal......, but the intracellular link between GABA receptor activation and DNA transcription is largely unknown. GABA also controls the induction and development of functionally and pharmacologically different GABAA receptor subtypes. The induced receptors are likely to be inserted only into the synaptic membrane domain. However...

  1. Channel opening of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor from rat brain: molecular mechanisms of the receptor responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, D J; Subbarao, K

    1987-12-01

    The function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, which mediate transmembrane chloride flux, can be studied by use of 36Cl- isotope tracer with membrane from mammalian brain by quench-flow technique, with reaction times that allow resolution of the receptor desensitization rates from the ion flux rates. The rates of chloride exchange into the vesicles in the absence and presence of GABA were characterized with membrane from rat cerebral cortex. Unspecific 36Cl- influx was completed in three phases of ca. 3% (t 1/2 = 0.6 s), 56% (t 1/2 = 82 s), and 41% (t 1/2 = 23 min). GABA-mediated, specific chloride exchange occurred with 6.5% of the total vesicular internal volume. The GABA-dependent 36Cl- influx proceeded in two phases, each progressively slowed by desensitization. The measurements supported the presence of two distinguishable active GABA receptors on the same membrane mediating chloride exchange into the vesicles with initial first-order rate constants of 9.5 s-1 and 2.3 s-1 and desensitizing with first-order rate constants of 21 s-1 and 1.4 s-1, respectively, at saturation. The half-response concentrations were similar for both receptors, 150 microM and 114 microM GABA for desensitization and 105 microM and 82 microM for chloride exchange, for the faster and slower desensitizing receptors, respectively. The two receptors were present in the activity ratio of ca. 4/1, similar to the ratio of "low-affinity" to "high-affinity" GABA sites found in ligand binding experiments. The desensitization rates have a different dependence on GABA concentration than the channel-opening equilibria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Concentration is Reduced in Visual Cortex in Schizophrenia and Correlates with Orientation-Specific Surround Suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Jong H.; Maddock, Richard J.; Rokem, Ariel; Silver, Michael A.; Minzenberg, Michael J.; Ragland, J. Daniel; Carter, Cameron S.

    2010-01-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying cognitive deficits in schizophrenia remain largely unknown. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) hypothesis proposes that reduced neuronal GABA concentration and neurotransmission results in cognitive impairments in schizophrenia. However, few in vivo studies have directly examined this hypothesis. We employed magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at high field to measure visual cortical GABA levels in 13 subjects with schizophrenia and 13 demographically matche...

  3. 7T Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid, Glutamate, and Glutamine Reveals Altered Concentrations in Patients With Schizophrenia and Healthy Siblings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thakkar, Katharine N; Rösler, Lara; Wijnen, Jannie P; Boer, Vincent O.; Klomp, Dennis W J; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S; Neggers, Sebastiaan F W

    BACKGROUND: The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction model of schizophrenia predicts dysfunction in both glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) transmission. We addressed this hypothesis by measuring GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus glutamate

  4. Feeding rumen-protected gamma-aminobutyric acid enhances the immune response and antioxidant status of heat-stressed lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jianbo; Zheng, Nan; Sun, Xianzhi; Li, Songli; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhang, Yangdong

    2016-08-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of rumen-protected gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on immune function and antioxidant status in heat-stressed dairy cows. Sixty Holstein dairy cows were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments according to a completely randomized block design. The treatments consisted of 0 (control), 40, 80, or 120mg of GABA/kg DM from rumen-protected GABA. The trial lasted 10 weeks. The average temperature-humidity indices at 0700, 1400 and 2200h were 78.4, 80.2 and 78.7, respectively. Rectal temperatures decreased linearly at 0700, 1400, and 2200h with increasing GABA. As the GABA increased, the immunoglobulin (Ig) A and IgG contents and the proportions of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes increased linearly (Pheat-stressed dairy cows can improve their immune function and antioxidant activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-B receptor 1 in cerebellar cortex of essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, C; Rajput, A H; Robinson, C A; Rajput, A

    2012-06-01

    Some reports suggest cerebellar dysfunction as the basis of essential tremor (ET). Several drugs with the action of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are known to improve ET. Autopsy studies were performed on brains from nine former patients followed at the Movement Disorders Clinic Saskatchewan, Canada, and compared with five normal control brains. We aimed to measure the concentration of GABA B receptor 1 (GBR1) in the brains of patients who had had ET and to compare them to the GABA concentration in brains of controls. Western blot was used to determine the expression of GBR1 in cerebellar cortex tissue. We found that compared to the controls, the ET brains had three different patterns of GBR1 protein concentration--two with high, four comparable, and three with marginally low levels. There was no association between the age of onset, severity or duration of tremor, the response to alcohol or other drugs and GBR1 level. Thus, we conclude that our study does not support that GBR1 is involved in ET. Further studies are needed to verify these results. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Increased gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in mouse brain induce loss of righting reflex, but not immobility, in response to noxious stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Sohtaro; Irifune, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Nobuhito; Takarada, Tohru; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Endo, Chie; Takata, Takashi; Dohi, Toshihiro; Sato, Tomoaki; Kawahara, Michio

    2007-06-01

    The general anesthetic state comprises behavioral and perceptual components, including amnesia, unconsciousness, and immobility. gamma-Aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) inhibitory neurotransmission is an important target for anesthetic action at the in vitro cellular level. In vivo, however, the functional relevance of enhancing GABAergic neurotransmission in mediating essential components of the general anesthetic state is unknown. Gabaculine is a GABA-transaminase inhibitor that inhibits degradation of released GABA, and consequently increases endogenous GABA in the central nervous system. Here, we examined, behaviorally, the ability of increased GABA levels to produce components of the general anesthetic state. All drugs were administered systemically in adult male ddY mice. To assess the general anesthetic components, two end-points were used. One was loss of righting reflex (LORR; as a measure of unconsciousness); the other was loss of movement in response to tail-clamp stimulation (as a measure of immobility). Gabaculine induced LORR in a dose-dependent fashion with a 50% effective dose of 100 (75-134; 95% confidence limits) mg/kg. The behavioral and microdialysis studies revealed that the endogenous GABA-induced LORR occurred in a brain concentration-dependent manner. However, even larger doses of gabaculine (285-400 mg/kg) produced no loss of tail-clamp response. In contrast, all the tested volatile anesthetics concentration-dependently abolished both righting and tail-clamp response, supporting the evidence that volatile anesthetics act on a variety of molecular targets. These findings indicate that LORR is associated with enhanced GABAergic neurotransmission, but that immobility in response to noxious stimulation is not, suggesting that LORR and immobility are mediated through different neuronal pathways and/or regions in the central nervous system.

  7. Conformational basis for the Li(+)-induced leak current in the rat gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacAulay, Nanna; Zeuthen, Thomas; Gether, Ulrik

    2002-01-01

    The rat gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter-1 (GAT-1) was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and the substrate-independent Li(+)-induced leak current was examined using two-electrode voltage clamp. The leak current was not affected by the addition of GABA and was not due to H(+) permeation. The Li......(+)-bound conformation of the protein displayed a lower passive water permeability than that of the Na(+)- and choline (Ch(+))-bound conformations and the leak current did not saturate with increasing amounts of Li(+) in the test solution. The mechanism that gives rise to the leak current did not support active water...... transport in contrast to the mechanism responsible for GABA translocation (approximately 330 water molecules per charge). Altogether, these data support the distinct nature of the leak conductance in relation to the substrate translocation process. It was observed that the leak current was inhibited by low...

  8. Successful combination immunotherapy of anti-gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor antibody-positive encephalitis with extensive multifocal brain lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Yuki; Okada, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Mari; Yamaguchi, Keiji

    2017-08-31

    A 78-year old woman who presented with akinetic mutism was admitted to our hospital. Brain MRI showed multifocal increased T 2 /FLAIR signal with extensive cortical-subcortical involvement. We suspected autoimmune encephalitis and the patient received methylprednisolone pulse. Her conscious level gradually recovered, but later relapsed again and presented with refractory status epilepticus. We treated her with intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange and pulsed cyclophosphamide, with satisfactory response. A brain biopsy showed perivascular lymphocytic infiltrates and reactive gliosis. Anti-gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor antibodies test came back to be positive after her recovery, and the diagnosis of anti-GABA A receptor antibody-positive encephalitis was made. This is a very rare case where brain biopsies were performed in a patient with anti-GABA A receptor antibody-positive encephalitis.

  9. Autoradiographic localization of binding sites for (/sup 3/H). gamma. -aminobutyrate, (/sup 3/H) muscimol, (+) (/sup 3/H) bicuculline methiodide and (/sup 3/H) flunitrazepam in cultures of rat cerebellum and spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoesli, E; Hoesli, L [Basel Univ. (Switzerland); Moehler, H; Richards, J G [Hoffmann-La Roche (F.) and Co., Basel (Switzerland)

    1980-01-01

    Cultures of rat cerebellum and spinal cord were used to visualize sites for (/sup 3/H)..gamma..-aminobutyrate, (/sup 3/H)muscimol, (/sup 3/H)bicuculline methiodide and (/sup 3/H) flunitrazepam by autoradiography. In cerebellar cultures, many large neurons (presumably Purkinje cells) and interneurons were labelled. In spinal cord cultures, these compounds were mainly bound to small and medium-sized neurons, whereas the majority of large neurons were unlabelled. No binding sites for these radioligands were found on glial cells. Binding of (/sup 3/H)..gamma..-aminobutyrate, (/sup 3/H)muscimol and (/sup 3/H)bicuculline methiodide was markedly reduced or inhibited by adding unlabelled ..gamma..-aminobutyrate, muscimol and bicuculline (10/sup -3/M) respectively to the incubation medium. Addition of a thienobenzazepine markedly reduced binding with (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam. It is concluded that tissues cultures are an excellent tool to visualize the cellular localization of binding sites for neurotransmitters and drugs using autoradiography.

  10. Elevated gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in chronic schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongür, Dost; Prescot, Andrew P; McCarthy, Julie; Cohen, Bruce M; Renshaw, Perry F

    2010-10-01

    Despite widely replicated abnormalities of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons in schizophrenia postmortem, few studies have measured tissue GABA levels in vivo. We used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure tissue GABA levels in participants with schizophrenia and healthy control subjects in the anterior cingulate cortex and parieto-occipital cortex. Twenty-one schizophrenia participants effectively treated on a stable medication regimen (mean age 39.0, 14 male) and 19 healthy control subjects (mean age 36.3, 12 male) underwent a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy scan using GABA-selective editing at 4 Tesla after providing informed consent. Data were collected from two 16.7-mL voxels and analyzed using LCModel. We found elevations in GABA/creatine in the schizophrenia group compared with control subjects [F(1,65) = 4.149, p = .046] in both brain areas (15.5% elevation in anterior cingulate cortex, 11.9% in parieto-occipital cortex). We also found a positive correlation between GABA/creatine and glutamate/creatine, which was not accounted for by % GM or brain region. We found elevated GABA/creatinine in participants with chronically treated schizophrenia. Postmortem studies report evidence for dysfunctional GABAergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia. Elevated GABA levels, whether primary to illness or compensatory to another process, may be associated with dysfunctional GABAergic neurotransmission in chronic schizophrenia. Copyright © 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Postnatal changes in somatic gamma-aminobutyric acid signalling in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyzio, Roman; Minlebaev, Marat; Rheims, Sylvain; Ivanov, Anton; Jorquera, Isabelle; Holmes, Gregory L; Zilberter, Yuri; Ben-Ari, Yehezkiel; Khazipov, Rustem

    2008-05-01

    During postnatal development of the rat hippocampus, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) switches its action on CA3 pyramidal cells from excitatory to inhibitory. To characterize the underlying changes in the GABA reversal potential, we used somatic cell-attached recordings of GABA(A) and N-methyl-D-aspartate channels to monitor the GABA driving force and resting membrane potential, respectively. We found that the GABA driving force is strongly depolarizing during the first postnatal week. The strength of this depolarization rapidly declines with age, although GABA remains slightly depolarizing, by a few millivolts, even in adult neurons. Reduction in the depolarizing GABA driving force was due to a progressive negative shift of the reversal potential of GABA currents. Similar postnatal changes in GABA signalling were also observed using the superfused hippocampus preparation in vivo, and in the hippocampal interneurons in vitro. We also found that in adult pyramidal cells, somatic GABA reversal potential is maintained at a slightly depolarizing level by bicarbonate conductance, chloride-extrusion and chloride-loading systems. Thus, the postnatal excitatory-to-inhibitory switch in somatic GABA signalling is associated with a negative shift of the GABA reversal potential but without a hyperpolarizing switch in the polarity of GABA responses. These results also suggest that in adult CA3 pyramidal cells, somatic GABAergic inhibition takes place essentially through shunting rather than hyperpolarization. Apparent hyperpolarizing GABA responses previously reported in the soma of CA3 pyramidal cells are probably due to cell depolarization during intracellular or whole-cell recordings.

  12. Characterization of the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor system in human brain gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frattola, L.; Ferrarese, C.; Canal, N.; Gaini, S.M.; Galluso, R.; Piolti, R.; Trabucchi, M.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of [ 3 H]-gamma-aminobutyric acid [( 3 H]GABA) binding were studied in biopsied specimens from normal human brain and from 18 cases of human brain gliomas, made up of 6 astrocytomas, 6 glioblastomas, 3 oligodendrogliomas, and 3 medulloblastomas. In fresh membranes obtained from normal gray and white matter one population of Na+-dependent GABA receptors was observed, while in the frozen Triton X-100-treated membranes two distinct populations of Na+-independent binding sites were detected. Specific GABA binding sites in brain gliomas were shown only in frozen Triton X-100-treated membranes. As in normal tissue, these receptors are Na+-independent and bind [ 3 H]GABA with two distinct affinity components. The biochemical profiles of [ 3 H]GABA binding to membranes obtained from different tumors of glial origin are quite similar and cannot be related to the degree of malignancy of the neoplasia

  13. Effects of exogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid on α-amylase activity in the aleurone of barley seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Yidi; Xiao, Huiyuan; Guo, Chunli; Wu, Hong; Wang, Xiaojing

    2018-03-03

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a nonprotein amino acid, often accumulates in plants exposed to certain environmental stimuli. Previous studies indicated that a closed relationship existed between endogenous GABA and seed germination. However, there are few studies on the effect of exogenous GABA on seed germination. The objective of this study was to explore whether exogenous GABA affected α-amylase activity which the activation is an important stage in seed germination. The level of endogenous GABA in barley seeds rose gradually during germination, suggesting that endogenous GABA was involved in germination. We measured starch degradation under application of various concentration GABA and found that GABA promoted seed starch degradation with a dose-responsive effect. The relationship between GABA and α-amylase activity was investigated by treating barley aleurone with exogenous GABA. The result showed that α-amylase activity began to rise after about 24 h and reached a peak at 48 h. Molecular evidence suggested that GABA increased α-amylase gene expression. We explore the possible roles played by GABA in signal transduction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Measurement of gamma-aminobutyric acid in human cerebrospinal fluid: radioreceptor assay using [3H]muscimol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baraczka, K.; Sperk, G.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in human cerebrospinal fluid by modification of the radioreceptor assay utilizing [ 3 H]muscimol as labelled ligand. This method is compared with the radioreceptor assay using [ 3 H]GABA as labelled ligand. Although the [ 3 H]muscimol assay is less sensitive than the [ 3 H]GABA method, it offers the advantage of being more rapid due to the use of a filtration step instead of the usual, more time-consuming centrifugation of the samples. Samples of CSF of patients with various neurological or psychiatric disturbances were analysed. There was a satisfactory correlation between the GABA values obtained by the two assays. (Auth.)

  15. Food deprivation modulates gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors and peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizman, A; Bidder, M; Fares, F; Gavish, M

    1990-12-03

    The effect of 5 days of food deprivation followed by 5 days of refeeding on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, central benzodiazepine receptors (CBR), and peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites (PBzS) was studied in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Starvation induced a decrease in the density of PBzS in peripheral organs: adrenal (35%; P less than 0.001), kidney (33%; P less than 0.01), and heart (34%; P less than 0.001). Restoration of [3H]PK 11195 binding to normal values was observed in all three organs after 5 days of refeeding. The density of PBzS in the ovary, pituitary, and hypothalamus was not affected by starvation. Food deprivation resulted in a 35% decrease in cerebellar GABA receptors (P less than 0.01), while CBR in the hypothalamus and cerebral cortex remained unaltered. The changes in PBzS observed in the heart and kidney may be related to the long-term metabolic stress associated with starvation and to the functional changes occurring in these organs. The down-regulation of the adrenal PBzS is attributable to the suppressive effect of hypercortisolemia on pituitary ACTH release. The reduction in cerebellar GABA receptors may be an adaptive response to food deprivation stress and may be relevant to the proaggressive effect of hunger.

  16. Biochemical evidence for. gamma. -aminobutyrate containing fibres from the nucleus accumbens to the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walaas, I; Fonnum, F

    1980-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase activity, a specific marker for ..gamma..-aminobutyrate-containing neurons, has been analysed in microdissected samples from rat mesencephalon following unilateral electrocoagulations of the nucleus accumbens. This lesion resulted in a consistent decrease of 50% in the enzyme activity in the rostromedial substantia nigra, and a slight, but insignificant decrease (- 15%) in the medial parts of the caudal pars compacta of the substantia nigra. No change was found in the lateral pars compacta or the central pars reticulata. In the ventral tegmental area, the highest activity was found in the rostromedial part, adjacent to the mammillary body. At this level, a significant decrease of 20% was found in the ventral tegmental area on the lesioned side. In contrast, the activities in the medial accessory optic nucleus and the caudal ventral tegmental area adjacent to the interpenduncular nucleus were unchanged. The results indicate that the nucleus accumbens sends ..gamma..-aminobutyrate-containing fibres to the rostromedial substantia nigra and to the rostral ventral tegmental area. The caudal ventral tegmental area, the lateral pars compacta and the central pars reticulata do not receive measurable amounts of such fibres.

  17. Serotonin Transporter (5-HTT) and gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor Subunit beta3 (GABRB3) Gene Polymorphisms are not Associated with Autism in the IMGSA Families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maestrini, E.; Lai, C.; Marlow, A.

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene and the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit beta3 (GABRB3) gene, or other genes in the 15q11-q13 region, are possibly involved in susceptibility to autism. To test this hypothesis we performed an association study on...

  18. Cortical gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate in posttraumatic stress disorder and their relationships to self-reported sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerhoff, Dieter J; Mon, Anderson; Metzler, Thomas; Neylan, Thomas C

    2014-05-01

    To test if posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with low brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels and if reduced GABA is mediated by poor sleep quality. Laboratory study using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) and behavioral testing. VA Medical Center Research Service, Psychiatry and Radiology. Twenty-seven patients with PTSD (PTSD+) and 18 trauma-exposed controls without PTSD (PTSD-), recruited from United States Army reservists, Army National Guard, and mental health clinics. None. 1H MRS at 4 Tesla yielded spectra from three cortical brain regions. In parieto-occipital and temporal cortices, PTSD+ had lower GABA concentrations than PTSD-. As expected, PTSD+ had higher depressive and anxiety symptom scores and a higher Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) score. Higher ISI correlated with lower GABA and higher glutamate levels in parieto-occipital cortex and tended to correlate with lower GABA in the anterior cingulate. The relationship between parieto-occipital GABA and PTSD diagnosis was fully mediated through insomnia severity. Lower N-acetylaspartate and glutamate concentrations in the anterior cingulate cortex correlated with higher arousal scores, whereas depressive and anxiety symptoms did generally not influence metabolite concentrations. Low brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is consistent with most findings in panic and social anxiety disorders. Low GABA associated with poor sleep quality is consistent with the hyperarousal theory of both primary insomnia and PTSD. Our data demonstrate that poor sleep quality mediates low parieto-occipital GABA in PTSD. The findings have implications for PTSD treatment approaches.

  19. A gene duplication led to specialized gamma-aminobutyrate and beta-alanine aminotransferase in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Gorm; Andersen, Birgit; Dobritzsch, D.

    2007-01-01

    and related yeasts have two different genes/enzymes to apparently 'distinguish' between the two reactions in a single cell. It is likely that upon duplication similar to 200 million years ago, a specialized Uga1p evolved into a 'novel' transaminase enzyme with broader substrate specificity.......In humans, beta-alanine (BAL) and the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA) are transaminated by a single aminotransferase enzyme. Apparently, yeast originally also had a single enzyme, but the corresponding gene was duplicated in the Saccharomyces kluyveri lineage. SkUGA1 encodes a homologue...... to characterize the substrate specificity and kinetic parameters of the four enzymes. It was found that the cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is needed for enzymatic activity and alpha-ketoglutarate, and not pyruvate, as the amino group acceptor. SkPyd4p preferentially uses BAL as the amino group donor (V...

  20. Biotechnological advances and perspectives of gamma-aminobutyric acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Wei, Liang; Liu, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a four-carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed among various organisms. Since GABA has several well-known physiological functions, such as mediating neurotransmission and hypotensive activity, as well as having tranquilizer effects, it is commonly used as a bioactive compound in the food, pharmaceutical and feed industries. The major pathway of GABA biosynthesis is the irreversible decarboxylation of L-glutamate catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), which develops a safe, sustainable and environmentally friendly alternative in comparison with traditional chemical synthesis methods. To date, several microorganisms have been successfully engineered for high-level GABA biosynthesis by overexpressing exogenous GADs. However, the activity of almost all reported microbial GADs sharply decreases at physiological near-neutral pH, which in turn provokes negative effects on the application of these GADs in the recombinant strains for GABA production. Therefore, ongoing efforts in the molecular evolution of GADs, in combination with high-throughput screening and metabolic engineering of particular producer strains, offer fascinating new prospects for effective, environmentally friendly and economically viable GABA biosynthesis. In this review, we briefly introduce the applications in which GABA is used, and summarize the most important methods associated with GABA production. The major achievements and present challenges in the biotechnological synthesis of GABA, focusing on screening and enzyme engineering of GADs, as well as metabolic engineering strategy for one-step GABA biosynthesis, will be extensively discussed.

  1. EFFECT OF FOOD-MICROORGANISMS ON GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID PRODUCTION BY FERMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Hudec

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are nice targets in order to study γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA production that has been reported to be effective in order to reduce blood pressure in experimental animals and human beings. In this study, we aimed to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA production in aerobical and anaerobical conditions, using different sources of microorganisms. The highest selectivity of GABA from precursor L-monosodium glutamate (82.22% has been reported using of microorganisms from banana, and with addition of pyridoxal-5-phosphate (P-5-P. For augmentation of selectivity the application of the further stimulating factors of GABA biosynthesis is needed.

  2. gamma-Aminobutyric acid production in small and large intestine of normal and germ-free Wistar rats. Influence of food intake and intestinal flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berlo, C L; de Jonge, H R; van den Bogaard, A E; van Eijk, H M; Janssen, M A; Soeters, P B

    1987-09-01

    In recent hypotheses concerning the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is claimed to be produced by the colonic flora, although enzymes necessary to generate GABA have been reported to be present in intestinal mucosa. In this study, using normal and germ-free Wistar rats, we determined GABA levels and amino-grams of arterial blood and of venous effluent from small and large bowel. The data indicate that large and small intestinal mucosa significantly contribute to GABA production. In the fasted state GABA concentrations are greater in the venous effluent of the small bowel than in the venous effluent of the large bowel. Feeding increases the arterioportal differences, and uptake in the small bowel is still significantly higher than in the large bowel. This process is not, or can only be to a minor degree, bacterially mediated, because GABA production in the gut both in the fed and fasted state is of similar magnitude in germ-free and normal animals. gamma-Aminobutyric acid release correlates significantly with glutamine uptake in the small bowel of fasted rats. Only a small fraction of the glutamine taken up is needed to account for GABA release, so that conclusions concerning which amino acids may serve as precursors of GABA cannot be drawn. Further studies are needed to delineate the metabolic pathways leading to GABA synthesis.

  3. Embryonic cerebellar neurons accumulate [3H-gamma-aminobutyric acid: visualization of developing gamma-aminobutyric acid-utilizing neurons in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatten, M.E.; Francois, A.M.; Napolitano, E.; Roffler-Tarlov, S.

    1984-01-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the proposed neurotransmitter for four types of cerebellar neurons-Purkinje, Golgi, basket, and stellate neurons. With this investigation we have begun studies to establish when these neurons acquire their neurotransmitter ''identification''. Autoradiographic studies of both cultured embryonic (embryonic day 13) cerebellar cells and of intact embryonic cerebellum (embryonic day 13) were conducted with tritiated GABA. Two to 5% of the embryonic cerebellar cells accumulated [ 3 H]GABA in vitro. By morphological and immunocytochemical criteria, labeled cells were large neurons with either a thick, apical process, a multipolar shape, or were bipolar with longer processes. The identification of cells which accumulated [ 3 H]GABA as neuronal precursors was supported by the differential sensitivity to drugs that preferentially inhibit accumulation of [ 3 H]GABA by neurons and glia. The results of the in vitro experiments were confirmed and extended with in vivo experiments. When intact cerebellar tissue was removed at embryonic day 13, stripped of meninges and choroid plexus, exposed to low concentrations of [ 3 H]GABA, and processed for light microscopic autoradiography, heavily labeled cells were seen in the middle of the cerebellar anlage. Labeled cells were not seen in the ventricular zone of proliferating neuroblasts lining the fourth ventricle or in the external granular layer emerging at the lateral aspect of the pial surface. The accumulation of [ 3 H]GABA by these cells also showed the pharmacological characteristics of uptake by neurons. This study shows that among migrating, immature forms of the larger neurons of the embryonic cerebellum, there is a select group which accumulates [ 3 H]GABA and other classes of cells which do not. These results indicate very early acquisition of transmitter expression by cerebellar neurons, far in advance of their final positioning and establishment of synapses

  4. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulating drugs on working memory and brain function in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Lara; Ooi, Cinly; Kamath, Shri; Suckling, John; McKenna, Peter; Fletcher, Paul; Bullmore, Ed; Stephenson, Caroline

    2007-02-01

    Cognitive impairment causes morbidity in schizophrenia and could be due to abnormalities of cortical interneurons using the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). To test the predictions that cognitive and brain functional responses to GABA-modulating drugs are correlated and abnormal in schizophrenia. Pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging study of 2 groups, each undergoing scanning 3 times, using an N-back working memory task, after placebo, lorazepam, or flumazenil administration. Eleven patients with chronic schizophrenia were recruited from a rehabilitation service, and 11 healthy volunteers matched for age, sex, and premorbid IQ were recruited from the local community. Intervention Participants received 2 mg of oral lorazepam, a 0.9-mg intravenous flumazenil bolus followed by a flumazenil infusion of 0.0102 mg/min, or oral and intravenous placebo. Working memory performance was summarized by the target discrimination index at several levels of difficulty. Increasing (or decreasing) brain functional activation in response to increasing task difficulty was summarized by the positive (or negative) load response. Lorazepam impaired performance and flumazenil enhanced it; these cognitive effects were more salient in schizophrenic patients. Functional magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated positive load response in a frontoparietal system and negative load response in the temporal and posterior cingulate regions; activation of the frontoparietal cortex was positively correlated with deactivation of the temporocingulate cortex. After placebo administration, schizophrenic patients had abnormally attenuated activation of the frontoparietal cortex and deactivation of the temporocingulate cortex; this pattern was mimicked in healthy volunteers and exacerbated in schizophrenic patients by lorazepam. However, in schizophrenic patients, flumazenil enhanced deactivation of the temporocingulate and activation of the anterior cingulate

  5. Effects of inhibitors of protein synthesis and intracellular transport on the gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist-induced functional differentiation of cultured cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Meier, E

    1990-01-01

    The effect of inhibitors of protein synthesis (actinomycin D, cycloheximide), proteases (leupeptin), and intracellular transport (colchicine, monensin) on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist [4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP)]-induced changes in morphological...... an intracellular and a plasma membrane localization of the receptors. In all experiments cultures treated with THIP alone served as controls. The inhibitors of protein synthesis totally abolished the ability of THIP to induce low-affinity GABA receptors. In contrast, the inhibitors of intracellular transport...

  6. Hypergravity exposure decreases gamma-aminobutyric acid immunoreactivity in axon terminals contacting pyramidal cells in the rat somatosensory cortex: a quantitative immunocytochemical image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, F.; Wu, L. C.; Fox, R. A.; Daunton, N. G.; Corcoran, M. L.; Polyakov, I.

    1998-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of gamma-aminobutyric acid immunoreactivity (GABA-IR) in the hindlimb representation of the rat somatosensory cortex after 14 days of exposure to hypergravity (hyper-G) was conducted by using computer-assisted image processing. The area of GABA-IR axosomatic terminals apposed to pyramidal cells of cortical layer V was reduced in rats exposed to hyper-G compared with control rats, which were exposed either to rotation alone or to vivarium conditions. Based on previous immunocytochemical and behavioral studies, we suggest that this reduction is due to changes in sensory feedback information from muscle receptors. Consequently, priorities for muscle recruitment are altered at the cortical level, and a new pattern of muscle activity is thus generated. It is proposed that the reduction observed in GABA-IR of the terminal area around pyramidal neurons is the immunocytochemical expression of changes in the activity of GABAergic cells that participate in reprogramming motor outputs to achieve effective movement control in response to alterations in the afferent information.

  7. Specific gamma-hydroxybutyrate-binding sites but loss of pharmacological effects of gamma-hydroxybutyrate in GABA-B1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaupmann, Klemens; Cryan, John F; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2003-01-01

    gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB), a metabolite of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), is proposed to function as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. gamma-Hydroxybutyrate and its prodrug, gamma-butyrolactone (GBL), recently received increased public attention as they emerged as popular drugs of abuse. T...

  8. Gamma-aminobutyric acid aggravates nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peysepar, Elham; Soltani, Nepton; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Eshraghi-Jazi, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ardeshir

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin (CP) is a major antineoplastic drug for treatment of solid tumors. CP-induced nephrotoxicity may be gender-related. This is while gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system that has renoprotective impacts on acute renal injury. This study was designed to investigate the protective role of GABA against CP-induced nephrotoxicity in male and female rats. Sixty Wistar male and female rats were used in eight experimental groups. Both genders received GABA (50 μg/kg/day; i. p.) for 14 days and CP (2.5 mg/kg/day; i. p.) was added from day 8 to the end of the study, and they were compared with the control groups. At the end of the study, all animals were sacrificed and the serum levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), nitrite, malondialdehyde (MDA), and magnesium (Mg) were measured. The kidney tissue damage was also determined via staining. CP significantly increased the serum levels of Cr and BUN, kidney weight, and kidney tissue damage score in both genders (PGABA did not attenuate these markers in males; even these biomarkers were intensified in females. Serum level of Mg, and testis and uterus weights did not alter in the groups. However, the groups were significantly different in terms of nitrite and MDA levels. It seems that GABA did not improve nephrotoxicity induced by CP-treated rats, and it exacerbated renal damage in female rats.

  9. Anxiety in major depression and cerebrospinal fluid free gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, J John; Oquendo, Maria A; Watson, Kalycia Trishana; Boldrini, Maura; Malone, Kevin M; Ellis, Steven P; Sullivan, Gregory; Cooper, Thomas B; Xie, Shan; Currier, Dianne

    2014-10-01

    Low gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is implicated in both anxiety and depression pathophysiology. They are often comorbid, but most clinical studies have not examined these relationships separately. We investigated the relationship of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) free GABA to the anxiety and depression components of a major depressive episode (MDE) and to monoamine systems. Patients with a DSM-IV major depressive episode (N = 167: 130 major depressive disorder; 37 bipolar disorder) and healthy volunteers (N = 38) had CSF free GABA measured by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy. Monoamine metabolites were assayed by high performance liquid chromatography. Symptomatology was assessed by Hamilton depression rating scale. Psychic anxiety severity increased with age and correlated with lower CSF free GABA, controlling for age. CSF free GABA declined with age but was not related to depression severity. Other monoamine metabolites correlated positively with CSF GABA but not with psychic anxiety or depression severity. CSF free GABA was lower in MDD compared with bipolar disorder and healthy volunteers. GABA levels did not differ based on a suicide attempt history in mood disorders. Recent exposure to benzodiazepines, but not alcohol or past alcoholism, was associated with a statistical trend for more severe anxiety and lower CSF GABA. Lower CSF GABA may explain increasing severity of psychic anxiety in major depression with increasing age. This relationship is not seen with monoamine metabolites, suggesting treatments targeting the GABAergic system should be evaluated in treatment-resistant anxious major depression and in older patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Influence of cold stress on contents of soluble sugars, vitamin C and free amino acids including gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in spinach (Spinacia oleracea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young-Eun; Kuppusamy, Saranya; Cho, Kye Man; Kim, Pil Joo; Kwack, Yong-Bum; Lee, Yong Bok

    2017-01-15

    The contents of soluble sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, maltose and raffinose), vitamin C and free amino acids (34 compounds, essential and non-essential) were quantified in open-field and greenhouse-grown spinaches in response to cold stress using liquid chromatography. In general, greenhouse cultivation produced nutritionally high value spinach in a shorter growing period, where the soluble sugars, vitamin C and total amino acids concentrations, including essential were in larger amounts compared to those grown in open-field scenarios. Further, low temperature exposure of spinach during a shorter growth period resulted in the production of spinach with high sucrose, ascorbate, proline, gamma-aminobutyric acid, valine and leucine content, and these constitute the most important energy/nutrient sources. In conclusion, cultivation of spinach in greenhouse at a low temperature (4-7°C) and exposure for a shorter period (7-21days) before harvest is recommended. This strategy will produce a high quality product that people can eat. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Gamma aminobutyric acid transporter subtype 1 gene knockout mice: a new model for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Yang; Guoqiang Cai; Youqing Cai; Jian Fei; Guoxiang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterized by hyperactivity,impaired sustained attention,impulsivity,and is usually accompanied by varying degrees of learning difficulties and lack of motor coordination.However,the pathophysiology and etiology of ADHD remain inconclusive so far.Our previous studies have demonstrated that the gamma aminobutyric acid transporter subtype 1 (GAT1) gene knockout (ko) mouse (gat1-/-)is hyperactive and exhibited impaired memory performance in the Morris water maze.In the current study,we found that the gat1-/-mice showed low levels of attentional focusing and increased impulsivity.In addition,the gat1-/-mice displayed ataxia characterized by defects in motor coordination and balance skills.The hyperactivity in the ko mice was reduced by both methylphenidate and amphetamine.Collectively,these results suggest that GAT1 ko mouse is a new animal model for ADHD studying and GAT1 may be a new target to treat ADHD.

  12. A fluorescence-coupled assay for gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA reveals metabolic stress-induced modulation of GABA content in neuroendocrine cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E Ippolito

    Full Text Available Pathways involved in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA have been implicated in the pathogenesis of high grade neuroendocrine (NE neoplasms as well as neoplasms from a non-NE lineage. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas, overexpression of the GABA synthetic enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1, was found to be associated with decreased disease free-survival in prostate adenocarcinoma and decreased overall survival in clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Furthermore, GAD1 was found to be expressed in castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines, but not androgen-responsive cell lines. Using a novel fluorescence-coupled enzymatic microplate assay for GABA mediated through reduction of resazurin in a prostate neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC cell line, acid microenvironment-induced stress increased GABA levels while alkaline microenvironment-induced stress decreased GABA through modulation of GAD1 and glutamine synthetase (GLUL activities. Moreover, glutamine but not glucose deprivation decreased GABA through modulation of GLUL. Consistent with evidence in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms that GABA synthesis mediated through GAD1 may play a crucial role in surviving stress, GABA may be an important mediator of stress survival in neoplasms. These findings identify GABA synthesis and metabolism as a potentially important pathway for regulating cancer cell stress response as well as a potential target for therapeutic strategies.

  13. [Influence of exogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on GABA metabolism and amino acid contents in roots of melon seedling under hypoxia stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Li, Jing-Rui; Xia, Qing-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Gao, Hong-Bo

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigated the influence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on GABA metabolism and amino acid content under hypoxia stress by accurately controlling the level of dissolved oxygen in hydroponics, using the roots of melon 'Xiyu 1' seedlings as the test material. The results showed that compared with the control, the growth of roots was inhibited seriously under hypoxia stress. Meanwhile, the hypoxia-treated roots had significantly higher activities of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), glutamine synthetase (GS), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) as well as the contents of GABA, pyruvic acid, alanine (Ala) and aspartic acid (Asp). But the contents of glutamic acid (Glu) and alpha-keto glutaric acid in roots under hypoxia stress was obviously lower than those of the control. Exogenous treatment with GABA alleviated the inhibition effect of hypoxia stress on root growth, which was accompanied by an increase in the contents of endogenous GABA, Glu, alpha-keto glutaric acid and Asp. Furthermore, under hypoxia stress, the activities of GAD, GDH, GOGAT, GS, ALT, AST as well as the contents of pyruvic acid and Ala significantly decreased in roots treated with GABA. However, adding GABA and viny-gamma-aminobutyric acid (VGB) reduced the alleviation effect of GABA on melon seedlings under hypoxia stress. The results suggested that absorption of GABA by roots could alleviate the injury of hypoxia stress to melon seedlings. This meant that GABA treatment allows the normal physiological metabolism under hypoxia by inhibiting the GAD activity through feedback and maintaining higher Glu content as well as the bal- ance of carbon and nitrogen.

  14. Determination of gamma-aminobutyric acid in food matrices by isotope dilution hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazzeroni, Raniero; Homan, Andrew; Thain, Emma

    2009-08-01

    The estimation of the dietary intake of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is dependent upon the knowledge of its concentration values in food matrices. To this end, an isotope dilution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method has been developed employing the hydrophilic interaction chromatography technique for analyte separation. This approach enabled accurate quantification of GABA in apple, potato, soybeans, and orange juice without the need of a pre- or post-column derivatization reaction. A selective and precise analytical measurement has been obtained with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in multiple reaction monitoring using the method of standard additions and GABA-d(6) as an internal standard. The concentrations of GABA found in the matrices tested are 7 microg/g of apple, 342 microg/g of potatoes, 211 microg/g of soybeans, and 344 microg/mL of orange juice.

  15. ANXIETY IN MAJOR DEPRESSION AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID FREE GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, J. John; Oquendo, Maria A.; Watson, Kalycia Trishana; Boldrini, Maura; Malone, Kevin M.; Ellis, Steven P.; Sullivan, Gregory; Cooper, Thomas B.; Xie, Shan; Currier, Dianne

    2016-01-01

    Background Low gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is implicated in both anxiety and depression pathophysiology. They are often comorbid, but most clinical studies have not examined these relationships separately. We investigated the relationship of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) free GABA to the anxiety and depression components of a major depressive episode (MDE) and to monoamine systems. Methods and Materials Patients with a DSM-IV major depressive episode (N = 167: 130 major depressive disorder; 37 bipolar disorder) and healthy volunteers (N = 38) had CSF free GABA measured by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy. Monoamine metabolites were assayed by high performance liquid chromatography. Symptomatology was assessed by Hamilton depression rating scale. Results Psychic anxiety severity increased with age and correlated with lower CSF free GABA, controlling for age. CSF free GABA declined with age but was not related to depression severity. Other monoamine metabolites correlated positively with CSF GABA but not with psychic anxiety or depression severity. CSF free GABA was lower in MDD compared with bipolar disorder and healthy volunteers. GABA levels did not differ based on a suicide attempt history in mood disorders. Recent exposure to benzodiazepines, but not alcohol or past alcoholism, was associated with a statistical trend for more severe anxiety and lower CSF GABA. Conclusions Lower CSF GABA may explain increasing severity of psychic anxiety in major depression with increasing age. This relationship is not seen with monoamine metabolites, suggesting treatments targeting the GABAergic system should be evaluated in treatment-resistant anxious major depression and in older patients. PMID:24865448

  16. Design and Mechanism of Tetrahydrothiophene-Based γ-Aminobutyric Acid Aminotransferase Inactivators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Hoang V. [Departments; Hawker, Dustin D. [Departments; Wu, Rui [Department; Doud, Emma [Departments; Widom, Julia [Departments; Sanishvili, Ruslan [X-ray; Liu, Dali [Department; Kelleher, Neil L. [Departments; Silverman, Richard B. [Departments

    2015-03-25

    Low levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), one of two major neurotransmitters that regulate brain neuronal activity, are associated with many neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, Parkinsons disease, Alzheimers disease, Huntingtons disease, and cocaine addiction. One of the main methods to raise the GABA level in human brain is to use small molecules that cross the bloodbrain barrier and inhibit the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT), the enzyme that degrades GABA. We have designed a series of conformationally restricted tetrahydrothiophene-based GABA analogues with a properly positioned leaving group that could facilitate a ring-opening mechanism, leading to inactivation of GABA-AT. One compound in the series is 8 times more efficient an inactivator of GABA-AT than vigabatrin, the only FDA-approved inactivator of GABA-AT. Our mechanistic studies show that the compound inactivates GABA-AT by a new mechanism. The metabolite resulting from inactivation does not covalently bind to amino acid residues of GABA-AT but stays in the active site via H-bonding interactions with Arg-192, a pi-pi interaction with Phe-189, and a weak nonbonded (SO)-O-...=C interaction with Glu-270, thereby inactivating the enzyme.

  17. Reducing prefrontal gamma-aminobutyric acid activity induces cognitive, behavioral, and dopaminergic abnormalities that resemble schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Takeshi; Tse, Maric T; Floresco, Stan B

    2011-03-01

    Perturbations in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-related markers have been reported in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenic patients. However, a preclinical assessment of how suppression of prefrontal cortex GABA activity may reflect behavioral and cognitive pathologies observed in schizophrenia is forthcoming. We assessed the effects of pharmacologic blockade of prefrontal cortex GABA(A) receptors in rats on executive functions and other behaviors related to schizophrenia, as well as neural activity of midbrain dopamine neurons. Blockade of prefrontal cortex GABA(A) receptors with bicuculline (12.5-50 ng) did not affect working memory accuracy but did increase response latencies, resembling speed of processing deficits observed in schizophrenia. Prefrontal cortex GABA(A) blockade did not impede simple discrimination or reversal learning but did impair set-shifting in a manner dependent on when these treatments were given. Reducing GABA activity before the set-shift impaired the ability to acquire a novel strategy, whereas treatment before the initial discrimination increased perseveration during the shift. Latent inhibition was unaffected by bicuculline infusions before the preexposure/conditioning phases, suggesting that reduced prefrontal cortex GABA activity does not impair "learned irrelevance." GABA(A) blockade increased locomotor activity and showed synergic effects with a subthreshold dose of amphetamine. Furthermore, reducing medial prefrontal cortex GABA activity selectively increased phasic burst firing of ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons, without altering the their overall population activity. These results suggest that prefrontal cortex GABA hypofunction may be a key contributing factor to deficits in speed of processing, cognitive flexibility, and enhanced phasic dopamine activity observed in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2011 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Inhibitory actions of the gamma-aminobutyric acid in pediatric Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyzio, Roman; Khalilov, Ilgam; Represa, Alfonso; Crepel, Valerie; Zilberter, Yuri; Rheims, Sylvain; Aniksztejn, Laurent; Cossart, Rosa; Nardou, Romain; Mukhtarov, Marat; Minlebaev, Marat; Epsztein, Jérôme; Milh, Mathieu; Becq, Helene; Jorquera, Isabel; Bulteau, Christine; Fohlen, Martine; Oliver, Viviana; Dulac, Olivier; Dorfmüller, Georg; Delalande, Olivier; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Khazipov, Roustem

    2009-08-01

    The mechanisms of epileptogenesis in Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) are unknown. We explored the properties of neurons from human pediatric SWS cortex in vitro and tested in particular whether gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) excites neurons in SWS cortex, as has been suggested for various types of epilepsies. Patch-clamp and field potential recordings and dynamic biphoton imaging were used to analyze cortical tissue samples obtained from four 6- to 14-month-old pediatric SWS patients during surgery. Neurons in SWS cortex were characterized by a relatively depolarized resting membrane potential, as was estimated from cell-attached recordings of N-methyl-D-aspartate channels. Many cells spontaneously fired action potentials at a rate proportional to the level of neuronal depolarization. The reversal potential for GABA-activated currents, assessed by cell-attached single channel recordings, was close to the resting membrane potential. All spontaneously firing neurons recorded in cell-attached mode or imaged with biphoton microscopy were inhibited by GABA. Spontaneous epileptiform activity in the form of recurrent population bursts was suppressed by glutamate receptor antagonists, the GABA(A) receptor agonist isoguvacine, and the positive allosteric GABA(A) modulator diazepam. Blockade of GABA(A) receptors aggravated spontaneous epileptiform activity. The NKCC1 antagonist bumetanide had little effect on epileptiform activity. SWS cortical neurons have a relatively depolarized resting membrane potential and spontaneously fire action potentials that may contribute to increased network excitability. In contrast to previous data depicting excitatory and proconvulsive actions of GABA in certain pediatric and adult epilepsies, GABA plays mainly an inhibitory and anticonvulsive role in SWS pediatric cortex.

  19. Gamma aminobutyric acid radioreceptor assay: a confirmatory quantitative assay for toxaphene in environmental and biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, M.A.; Blancato, J.N.

    1993-01-01

    Toxaphene is a complex mixture of polychlorinated monoterpenes, and was found to be acutely and chronically toxic to aquatic and wild life and posed a carcinogenic risk to humans before its ban in 1982. However, it is still found in the environment due to its relative persistence with an estimated half life time of about 10 years in soils. Toxaphenes neurotoxicity is attributed to a few isomers with a mode of action through binding to the chloride channel of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor ionophore complex. [ 35 S] tertiary butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) with specific activity higher than 60 Ci/mmole has a high binding affinity to the same sites and is now commercially available and can be used to label the GABA receptor for the development of radioreceptor assay technique. The GABA receptor was prepared by a sequence of ultra centrifugation and dialysis of mammalian (rats, cows, catfish and goats) brain homogenates. The receptor is then labeled with [ 35 S] TBPS and the assay was conducted by measuring the displacement of radioactivity following incubation with the sample containing the analytes. The assay is fast, sensitive and requires very little or no sample preparation prior to the analysis. (Author)

  20. A ketogenic diet modifies glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid and agmatine levels in the hippocampus of rats: A microdialysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Naima; Betancourt, Luis; Hernández, Luis; Rada, Pedro

    2017-03-06

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is acknowledged as an unconventional option in the treatment of epilepsy. Several lines of investigation point to a possible role of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as main contributors in this protective effect. Other biomolecules could also be involved in the beneficial consequence of the KD, for example, the diamine agmatine has been suggested to block imidazole and glutamate NMDA receptor and serves as an endogenous anticonvulsant in different animal models of epilepsy. In the present report, we have used microdialysis coupled to capillary electrophoresis to monitor microdialysate levels of GABA, glutamate and agmatine in the hippocampus of rats submitted to a KD for 15days compared to rats on a normal rat chow diet. A significant increase in GABA and agmatine levels while no change in glutamate levels was observed. These results support the notion that the KD modifies different transmitters favoring inhibitory over excitatory neurotransmitters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 7T Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid, Glutamate, and Glutamine Reveals Altered Concentrations in Patients With Schizophrenia and Healthy Siblings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakkar, Katharine N; Rösler, Lara; Wijnen, Jannie P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction model of schizophrenia predicts dysfunction in both glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) transmission. We addressed this hypothesis by measuring GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus glutamate...... concentrations in vivo in patients with schizophrenia using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7T, which allows separation of metabolites that would otherwise overlap at lower field strengths. In addition, we investigated whether altered levels of GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus...... glutamate reflect genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia by including healthy first-degree relatives. METHODS: Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7T was performed in 21 patients with chronic schizophrenia who were taking medication, 23 healthy first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia...

  2. Effects of yoga on the autonomic nervous system, gamma-aminobutyric-acid, and allostasis in epilepsy, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, C C; Gerbarg, P L; Saper, R B; Ciraulo, D A; Brown, R P

    2012-05-01

    A theory is proposed to explain the benefits of yoga practices in diverse, frequently comorbid medical conditions based on the concept that yoga practices reduce allostatic load in stress response systems such that optimal homeostasis is restored. It is hypothesized that stress induces (1) imbalance of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) with decreased parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) and increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity, (2) underactivity of the gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA) system, the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter system, and (3) increased allostatic load. It is further hypothesized that yoga-based practices (4) correct underactivity of the PNS and GABA systems in part through stimulation of the vagus nerves, the main peripheral pathway of the PNS, and (5) reduce allostatic load. Depression, epilepsy, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and chronic pain exemplify medical conditions that are exacerbated by stress, have low heart rate variability (HRV) and low GABAergic activity, respond to pharmacologic agents that increase activity of the GABA system, and show symptom improvement in response to yoga-based interventions. The observation that treatment resistant cases of epilepsy and depression respond to vagal nerve stimulation corroborates the need to correct PNS underactivity as part of a successful treatment plan in some cases. According to the proposed theory, the decreased PNS and GABAergic activity that underlies stress-related disorders can be corrected by yoga practices resulting in amelioration of disease symptoms. This has far-reaching implications for the integration of yoga-based practices in the treatment of a broad array of disorders exacerbated by stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of subcomponents of the gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor macromolecular complex in mammalian central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    Since the presence of endogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) may affect benzodiazepine binding to tissue sections in autoradiographic studies, a protocol designed to check for this influence has been investigated. [ 3 H]Flunitrazepam (1 nM) was used to label benzodiazepine receptors for autoradiographic localization. Bicuculline was added to the incubation medium of an additional set of tissue sections to antagonize any potential effect of endogenous GABA. Binding in these sections was compared to that occurring in another set in which excess GABA was added to create further GABA enhancement. Binding was also compared to adjacent sections which were treated similarly but also preincubated in distilled-deionized water to burst the cells by osmotic shock and eliminate endogenous GABA, thereby preventing any effect on benzodiazepine binding. The results indicated that endogenous GABA is indeed present in the slide-mounted tissue sections and is affecting benzodiazepine receptor binding differentially in various regions of the brain depending on the density of GABAergic innervation. Scatchard analysis of saturation data demonstrated that the alteration in BZ binding due to GABA was a result of a change in the affinity rather than number of receptors present

  4. The association of plasma gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration with postoperative delirium in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitaka, Shiho; Egi, Moritoki; Kanazawa, Tomoyuki; Toda, Yuichiro; Morita, Kiyoshi

    2014-12-01

    Delirium is a common complication in postoperative, critically ill patients. The mechanism of postoperative delirium is not well understood but many studies have shown significant associations between benzodiazepine use, alcohol withdrawal and cirrhosis, and an increased risk of delirium. We aimed to investigate a possible link with alterations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) activity. A prospective observational investigation of 40 patients > 20 years old who had undergone elective surgery with general anaesthesia and were expected to need postoperative intensive care for more than 48 hours. We assessed postoperative delirium using the confusion assessment method in the intensive care unit at 1 hour after the operation and on postoperative Day (POD) 1 and POD 2. We collected blood samples for measurement of plasma GABA concentrations before the operation and on POD 1 and 2. Postoperative delirium and perioperative plasma GABA concentrations in patients with and without delirium. Postoperative delirium occurred in 13 of the patients. Patients with delirium had significantly higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores than patients without delirium. The mean plasma GABA concentration on POD 2 was significantly lower in patients with delirium than in those without delirium. After adjustment of relevant variables, plasma GABA concentration on POD 2 was independently associated with postoperative delirium. Plasma GABA level on POD 2 has a significant independent association with postoperative delirium.

  5. Disruption of pknG enhances production of gamma-aminobutyric acid by Corynebacterium glutamicum expressing glutamate decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okai, Naoko; Takahashi, Chihiro; Hatada, Kazuki; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a building block of the biodegradable plastic polyamide 4, is synthesized from glucose by Corynebacterium glutamicum that expresses Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) B encoded by gadB. This strain was engineered to produce GABA more efficiently from biomass-derived sugars. To enhance GABA production further by increasing the intracellular concentration of its precursor glutamate, we focused on engineering pknG (encoding serine/threonine protein kinase G), which controls the activity of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (Odh) in the tricarboxylic acid cycle branch point leading to glutamate synthesis. We succeeded in expressing GadB in a C. glutamicum strain harboring a deletion of pknG. C. glutamicum strains GAD and GAD ∆pknG were cultured in GP2 medium containing 100 g L(-1) glucose and 0.1 mM pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. Strain GAD∆pknG produced 31.1 ± 0.41 g L(-1) (0.259 g L(-1) h(-1)) of GABA in 120 hours, representing a 2.29-fold higher level compared with GAD. The production yield of GABA from glucose by GAD∆pknG reached 0.893 mol mol(-1).

  6. Gamma-aminobutyric acid depletion affects stomata closure and drought tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Dereje Worku; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Ludewig, Frank

    2016-04-01

    A rapid accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) during biotic and abiotic stresses is well documented. However, the specificity of the response and the primary role of GABA under such stress conditions are hardly understood. To address these questions, we investigated the response of the GABA-depleted gad1/2 mutant to drought stress. GABA is primarily synthesized from the decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) which exists in five copies in the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana. However, only GAD1 and GAD2 are abundantly expressed, and knockout of these two copies dramatically reduced the GABA content. Phenotypic analysis revealed a reduced shoot growth of the gad1/2 mutant. Furthermore, the gad1/2 mutant was wilted earlier than the wild type following a prolonged drought stress treatment. The early-wilting phenotype was due to an increase in stomata aperture and a defect in stomata closure. The increase in stomata aperture contributed to higher stomatal conductance. The drought oversensitive phenotype of the gad1/2 mutant was reversed by functional complementation that increases GABA level in leaves. The functionally complemented gad1/2 x pop2 triple mutant contained more GABA than the wild type. Our findings suggest that GABA accumulation during drought is a stress-specific response and its accumulation induces the regulation of stomatal opening thereby prevents loss of water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and neuropeptides in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damelio, F.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid and the neuropeptides substance P and Met-enkephalin in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV), and lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Glutamic acid decarboxylase immunoreactive (GAD-IR) terminals and fibers were observed in the AP and particularly in the ASP. A gradual decrease in the density of terminals was seen towards the solitary complex. The DMNV revealed irregularly scattered GAD-IR terminals within the neuropil or closely surrounding neuronal cell bodies. The LVN, particularly the dorsal division, showed numerous axon terminals which were mostly localize around large neurons and their proximal dendrites. Substance P immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed high density in the solitary complex, in particular within the lateral division. The ASP showed medium to low density of SP-IR fibers and terminals. The AP exhibited a small number of fibers and terminals irregularly distributed. The DMNV revealed a high density of SP-IR terminals and fibers that were mainly concentrated in the periphery. Very few terminals were detected in the LVN. Met-enkephalin immunoreactive (Met-Enk-IR) fibers and terminals showed high density and uniform distribution in the DMNV. Scattered terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, and NTS (particularly the lateral division). The very few fibers were observed in the LVN surrounded the neuronal cell bodies. The present report is part of a study designed to investigate the interaction between neuropeptides and conventional neurotransmitters under conditions producing motion sickness and in the process of sensory-motor adaptation.

  8. Effect of “Jian-Pi-Zhi-Dong Decoction” on Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid in a Mouse Model of Tourette Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the positive effects of Jian-Pi-Zhi-Dong Decoction (JPZDD on Tourette syndrome (TS by investigating the expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA and its type A receptor (GABAAR in the striatum of a TS mice model. The model was induced by 3,3′-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN treatment; then mice were divided into 4 groups (n=22, each; control and IDPN groups were gavaged with saline and the remaining 2 groups were gavaged with tiapride and JPZDD. We recorded the stereotypic behaviors of TS mice and measured the content of GABA in striatum by HPLC and GABAAR expression by immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Our results showed that JPZDD inhibited the abnormal behaviors of TS model mice and decreased GABA levels and GABAAR protein and mRNA expression in the striatum of TS model mice. In brief, the mechanism by which JPZDD alleviates TS symptoms may be associated with GABAAR expression downregulation in striatum which may regulate GABA metabolism.

  9. Somatostatin-Positive Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Interneuron Deficits in Depression: Cortical Microcircuit and Therapeutic Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fee, Corey; Banasr, Mounira; Sibille, Etienne

    2017-10-15

    The functional integration of external and internal signals forms the basis of information processing and is essential for higher cognitive functions. This occurs in finely tuned cortical microcircuits whose functions are balanced at the cellular level by excitatory glutamatergic pyramidal neurons and inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) interneurons. The balance of excitation and inhibition, from cellular processes to neural network activity, is characteristically disrupted in multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, and schizophrenia. Specifically, nearly 3 decades of research demonstrate a role for reduced inhibitory GABA level and function across disorders. In MDD, recent evidence from human postmortem and animal studies suggests a selective vulnerability of GABAergic interneurons that coexpress the neuropeptide somatostatin (SST). Advances in cell type-specific molecular genetics have now helped to elucidate several important roles for SST interneurons in cortical processing (regulation of pyramidal cell excitatory input) and behavioral control (mood and cognition). Here, we review evidence for altered inhibitory function arising from GABAergic deficits across disorders and specifically in MDD. We then focus on properties of the cortical microcircuit, where SST-positive GABAergic interneuron deficits may disrupt functioning in several ways. Finally, we discuss the putative origins of SST cell deficits, as informed by recent research, and implications for therapeutic approaches. We conclude that deficits in SST interneurons represent a contributing cellular pathology and therefore a promising target for normalizing altered inhibitory function in MDD and other disorders with reduced SST cell and GABA functions. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nicotine stimulates pancreatic cancer xenografts by systemic increase in stress neurotransmitters and suppression of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wadei, Hussein A N; Plummer, Howard K; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2009-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a leading cause of cancer mortality in Western countries. We have shown previously that four representative human PDAC cell lines were regulated by beta-adrenoreceptors via cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent signaling. In the current study, we have tested the hypothesis that nicotine stimulates the growth of PDAC xenografts in nude mice by increasing the systemic levels of the stress neurotransmitters adrenaline and noradrenaline, which are the physiological agonists for beta-adrenoreceptors and that inhibition by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) of the adenylyl cyclase-dependent pathway downstream of adrenoreceptors blocks this effect. The size of xenografts from PDAC cell line Panc-1 was determined 30 days after inoculation of the cancer cells. Stress neurotransmitters in serum as well as cAMP in the cellular fraction of blood and in tumor tissue were assessed by immunoassays. Levels of GABA, its synthesizing enzymes GAD65 and GAD67 and beta-adrenergic signaling proteins in the tumor tissue were determined by western blotting. Nicotine significantly increased the systemic levels of adrenaline, noradrenaline and cAMP while increasing xenograft size and protein levels of cAMP, cyclic AMP response element-binding protein and p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in the tumor tissue. Nicotine additionally reduced the protein levels of both GAD isozymes and GABA in tumor tissue. Treatment with GABA abolished these responses to nicotine and blocked the development of xenografts in mice not exposed to nicotine. These findings suggest that the development and progression of PDAC is subject to significant modulation by stimulatory stress neurotransmitters and inhibitory GABA and that treatment with GABA may be useful for marker-guided cancer intervention of PDAC.

  11. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) stimulates pancreatic cancer growth through overexpressing GABAA receptor pi subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Akio; Hosokawa, Masayo; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Ohigashi, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Osamu; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2007-10-15

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) functions primarily as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature central nervous system, and GABA/GABA receptors are also present in nonneural tissues, including cancer, but their precise function in nonneuronal or cancerous cells has thus far been poorly defined. Through the genome-wide cDNA microarray analysis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells as well as subsequent reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blot analyses, we identified the overexpression of GABA receptor pi subunit (GABRP) in PDAC cells. We also found the expression of this peripheral type GABAA receptor subunit in few adult human organs. Knockdown of endogenous GABRP expression in PDAC cells by small interfering RNA attenuated PDAC cell growth, suggesting its essential role in PDAC cell viability. Notably, the addition of GABA into the cell culture medium promoted the proliferation of GABRP-expressing PDAC cells, but not GABRP-negative cells, and GABAA receptor antagonists inhibited this growth-promoting effect by GABA. The HEK293 cells constitutively expressing exogenous GABRP revealed the growth-promoting effect of GABA treatment. Furthermore, GABA treatment in GABRP-positive cells increased intracellular Ca2+ levels and activated the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/Erk) cascade. Clinical PDAC tissues contained a higher level of GABA than normal pancreas tissues due to the up-regulation of glutamate decarboxylase 1 expression, suggesting their autocrine/paracrine growth-promoting effect in PDACs. These findings imply that GABA and GABRP could play important roles in PDAC development and progression, and that this pathway can be a promising molecular target for the development of new therapeutic strategies for PDAC.

  12. Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Concentration is Reduced in Visual Cortex in Schizophrenia and Correlates with Orientation-Specific Surround Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jong H.; Maddock, Richard J.; Rokem, Ariel; Silver, Michael A.; Minzenberg, Michael J.; Ragland, J. Daniel; Carter, Cameron S.

    2010-01-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying cognitive deficits in schizophrenia remain largely unknown. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) hypothesis proposes that reduced neuronal GABA concentration and neurotransmission results in cognitive impairments in schizophrenia. However, few in vivo studies have directly examined this hypothesis. We employed magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at high field to measure visual cortical GABA levels in 13 subjects with schizophrenia and 13 demographically matched healthy control subjects. We found that the schizophrenia group had an approximately 10% reduction in GABA concentration. We further tested the GABA hypothesis by examining the relationship between visual cortical GABA levels and orientation-specific surround suppression (OSSS), a behavioral measure of visual inhibition thought to be dependent on GABAergic synaptic transmission. Previous work has shown that subjects with schizophrenia exhibit reduced OSSS of contrast discrimination (Yoon et al., 2009). For subjects with both MRS and OSSS data (n=16), we found a highly significant positive correlation (r=0.76) between these variables. GABA concentration was not correlated with overall contrast discrimination performance for stimuli without a surround (r=-0.10). These results suggest that a neocortical GABA deficit in subjects with schizophrenia leads to impaired cortical inhibition and that GABAergic synaptic transmission in visual cortex plays a critical role in OSSS. PMID:20220012

  13. The gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake inhibitor, tiagabine, is anticonvulsant in two animal models of reflex epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S E; Parvez, N S; Chapman, A G; Meldrum, B S

    1995-02-06

    The effects of i.p. administration of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) uptake inhibitors R(-)N-(4,4-di(3-methylthien-2-yl)-but-3-enyl) nipecotic acid hydrochloride (tiagabine; molecular weight 412.0), (1-(2-(((diphenylmethylene)-amino)oxy)ethyl)-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-3- pyridinecarboxylic acid hydrochloride (NNC-711; molecular weight 386.9), and (+/-)-nipecotic acid (molecular weight 128.2) are compared with those of carbamazepine (molecular weight 236.3) on sound-induced seizures and locomotor performance in genetically epilepsy-prone (GEP) rats. The ED50 value against clonic seizures (in mumol kg-1 at the time of maximal anticonvulsant effect) for tiagabine was 23 (0.5 h), and for NNC-711 was 72 (1 h), and for carbamazepine was 98 (2 h). (+/-)-Nipecotic acid (0.4-15.6 mmol kg-1) was not anticonvulsant. High doses of NNC-711 (207-310 mumol kg-1) and of (+/-)-nipecotic acid (39-78 mmol kg-1) induced ataxia and myoclonic seizures 0.25-1 h. Tiagabine and carbamazepine did not induce myoclonic seizures and had similar therapeutic indices (locomotor deficit ED50/anticonvulsant ED50) ranging from 0.4 to 1.9. In Papio papio, we observed a reduction in photically induced myoclonic seizures with tiagabine (2.4 mumol kg-1 i.v.) accompanied with neurological impairment. Tiagabine has comparable anticonvulsant action to carbamazepine in rats and has anticonvulsant effects in non-human primates supporting the potential use of inhibitors of GABA uptake as therapy for epilepsy.

  14. Prefrontal cortical gamma-aminobutyric acid transmission and cognitive function: drawing links to schizophrenia from preclinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Maric T; Piantadosi, Patrick T; Floresco, Stan B

    2015-06-01

    Cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia is one of the most pervasive and debilitating aspects of the disorder. Among the numerous neural abnormalities that may contribute to schizophrenia symptoms, perturbations in markers for the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), particularly within the frontal lobes, are some of the most reliable alterations observed at postmortem examination. However, how prefrontal GABA dysfunction contributes to cognitive impairment in schizophrenia remains unclear. We provide an overview of postmortem GABAergic perturbations in the brain affected by schizophrenia and describe circumstantial evidence linking these alterations to cognitive dysfunction. In addition, we conduct a survey of studies using neurodevelopmental, genetic, and pharmacologic rodent models that induce schizophrenia-like cognitive impairments, highlighting the convergence of these mechanistically distinct approaches to prefrontal GABAergic disruption. We review preclinical studies that have directly targeted prefrontal cortical GABAergic transmission using local application of GABAA receptor antagonists. These studies have provided an important link between GABA transmission and cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia because they show that reducing prefrontal inhibitory transmission induces various cognitive, emotional, and dopaminergic abnormalities that resemble aspects of the disorder. These converging clinical and preclinical findings provide strong support for the idea that perturbations in GABA signaling drive certain forms of cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. Future studies using this approach will yield information to refine further a putative "GABA hypothesis" of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Decreased Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) and Gamma Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) in Individuals with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Anthony J; Pietsch, Stefanie C

    2013-01-01

    There is support for the role of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the etiology of mood disorders. Recent research has shown that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) modulates GABAergic inhibition and seizure susceptibility. This study was designed to determine and correlate plasma levels of HGF and GABA as well as symptom severity in individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Plasma from 15 individuals with OCD (9 males, 6 females;, mean age 38.7 years) and 17 neurotypical controls (10 males, 7 females; mean age 35.2 years) was assessed for HGF, GABA, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) concentration using enzyme-linked immunosorbest assays ELISAs. Symptom severity was assessed in these OCD individuals and compared with HGF and GABA concentrations. In this preliminary study, individuals with OCD had significantly decreased HGF levels, decreased plasma levels of GABA and decreased uPA. We found that both uPA and uPAR levels correlate with HGF. Both low uPA and low uPAR levels correlate with high symptom severity in individuals with OCD. Low GABA levels in OCD individuals also correlate with high symptom severity. These results demonstrate a preliminary association between HGF, GABA, uPA levels, and OCD and suggest that plasma GABA and uPA levels are related to symptom severity in individuals with OCD.

  16. Vertical organization of gamma-aminobutyric acid-accumulating intrinsic neuronal systems in monkey cerebral cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeFelipe, J.; Jones, E.G.

    1985-01-01

    Light and electron microscopic methods were used to examine the neurons in the monkey cerebral cortex labeled autoradiographically following the uptake and transport of [ 3 H]-gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Nonpyramidal cell somata in the sensory-motor areas and primary visual area (area 17) were labeled close to the injection site and at distances of 1 to 1.5 mm beyond the injection site, indicating labeling by retrograde axoplasmic transport. This labeling occurred preferentially in the vertical dimension of the cortex. Prior injections of colchicine, an inhibitor of axoplasmic transport, abolished all labeling of somata except those within the injection site. In each area, injections of superficial layers (I to III) produced labeling of clusters of cell somata in layer V, and injections of the deep layers (V and VI) produced labeling of clusters of cell somata in layers II and III. In area 17, injections of the superficial layers produced dense retrograde cell labeling in three bands: in layers IVC, VA, and VI. Vertically oriented chains of silver grains linked the injection sites with the resulting labeled cell clusters. In all areas, the labeling of cells in the horizontal dimension was insignificant. Electron microscopic examination of labeled neurons confirms that the neurons labeled at a distance from an injection site are nonpyramidal neurons, many with somata so small that they would be mistaken for neuroglial cells light microscopically. They receive few axosomatic synapses, most of which have symmetric membrane thickenings. The vertical chains of silver grains overlie neuronal processes identifiable as both dendrites and myelinated axons, but unmyelinated axons may also be included. The clusters of [ 3 H]GABA-labeled cells are joined to one another and to adjacent unlabeled cells by junctional complexes, including puncta adherentia and multi-lamellar cisternal complexes

  17. Establishment of an efficient fermentation system of gamma-aminobutyric acid by a lactic acid bacterium, Enterococcus avium G-15, isolated from carrot leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Takayoshi; Noda, Masafumi; Ozaki, Moeko; Maruyama, Masafumi; Matoba, Yasuyuki; Kumagai, Takanori; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we successfully isolated a carrot leaf-derived lactic acid bacterium that produces gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from monosodium L-glutamate (L-MSG) at a hyper conversion rate. The GABA-producing bacterium, identified as Enterococcus (E.) avium G-15, produced 115.7±6.4 g/l GABA at a conversion rate of 86.0±5.0% from the added L-MSG under the optimum culture condition by a continuous L-MSG feeding method using a jar-fermentor, suggesting that the bacterium displays a great potential ability for the commercial-level fermentation production of GABA. Using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method, we analyzed the expression of genes for the GABA transporter and glutamate decarboxylase, designated gadT and gadG, respectively, which were cloned from the E. avium G-15 chromosome. Both genes were expressed even without the added L-MSG, but their expression was enhanced by the addition of L-MSG.

  18. The Role of Ventral Tegmental Area Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid in Chronic Neuropathic Pain after Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Moon Yi; Jang, Eun Young; Lee, June Yeon; Kim, Soo Phil; Whang, Sung Hun; Lee, Bong Hyo; Kim, Hee Young; Yang, Chae Ha; Cho, Hee Jung; Gwak, Young S

    2018-04-20

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) frequently results in chronic neuropathic pain (CNP). However, the understanding of brain neural circuits in CNP modulation is unclear. The present study examined the changes of ventral tegmental area (VTA) putative GABAergic and dopaminergic neuronal activity with CNP attenuation in rats. SCI was established by T10 clip compression injury (35 g, 1 min) in rats, and neuropathic pain behaviors, in vivo extracellular single-cell recording of putative VTA gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)/dopamine neurons, extracellular GABA level, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), and vesicular GABA transporters (VGATs) were measured in the VTA, respectively. The results revealed that extracellular GABA level was significantly increased in the CNP group (50.5 ± 18.9 nM) compared to the sham control group (10.2 ± 1.7 nM). In addition, expression of GAD 65/67 , c-Fos, and VGAT exhibited significant increases in the SCI groups compared to the sham control group. With regard to neuropathic pain behaviors, spontaneous pain measured by ultrasound vocalizations (USVs) and evoked pain measured by paw withdrawal thresholds showed significant alteration, which was reversed by intravenous (i.v.) administration of morphine (0.5-5.0 mg/kg). With regard to in vivo electrophysiology, VTA putative GABAergic neuronal activity (13.6 ± 1.7 spikes/sec) and putative dopaminergic neuronal activity (2.4 ± 0.8 spikes/sec) were increased and decreased, respectively, in the SCI group compared to the sham control group. These neuronal activities were reversed by i.v. administration of morphine. The present study suggests that chronic increase of GABAergic neuronal activity suppresses dopaminergic neuronal activity in the VTA and is responsible for negative emotion and motivation for attenuation of SCI-induced CNP.

  19. Molecular determinants of desensitization and assembly of the chimeric GABA(A) receptor subunits (alpha1/gamma2) and (gamma2/alpha1) in combinations with beta2 and gamma2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elster, L; Kristiansen, U; Pickering, D S

    2001-01-01

    Two gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) (GABA(A)) receptor chimeras were designed in order to elucidate the structural requirements for GABA(A) receptor desensitization and assembly. The (alpha1/gamma2) and (gamma2/alpha1) chimeric subunits representing the extracellular N-terminal domain of alpha1 or gamma......, as opposed to the staining of the (gamma2/alpha1)-containing receptors, which was only slightly higher than background. To explain this, the (alpha1/gamma2) and (gamma2/alpha1) chimeras may act like alpha1 and gamma2 subunits, respectively, indicating that the extracellular N-terminal segment is important...... for assembly. However, the (alpha1/gamma2) chimeric subunit had characteristics different from the alpha1 subunit, since the (alpha1/gamma2) chimera gave rise to no desensitization after GABA stimulation in whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, which was independent of whether the chimera was expressed...

  20. Probable gamma-aminobutyric acid involvement in bisphenol A effect at the hypothalamic level in adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Nancy; Pandolfi, Matías; Lavalle, Justina; Carbone, Silvia; Ponzo, Osvaldo; Scacchi, Pablo; Reynoso, Roxana

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of bisphenol A (BPA) on the neuroendocrine mechanism of control of the reproductive axis in adult male rats exposed to it during pre- and early postnatal periods. Wistar mated rats were treated with either 0.1% ethanol or BPA in their drinking water until their offspring were weaned at the age of 21 days. The estimated average dose of exposure to dams was approximately 2.5 mg/kg body weight per day of BPA. After 21 days, the pups were separated from the mother and sacrificed on 70 day of life. Gn-RH and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from hypothalamic fragments was measured. LH, FSH, and testosterone concentrations were determined, and histological and morphometrical studies of testis were performed. Gn-RH release decreased significantly, while GABA serum levels were markedly increased by treatment. LH serum levels showed no changes, and FSH and testosterone levels decreased significantly. Histological studies showed abnormalities in the tubular organization of the germinal epithelium. The cytoarchitecture of germinal cells was apparently normal, and a reduction of the nuclear area of Leydig cells but not their number was observed. Taken all together, these results provide evidence of the effect caused by BPA on the adult male reproductive axis when exposed during pre- and postnatal period. Moreover, our findings suggest a probable GABA involvement in its effect at the hypothalamic level.

  1. Bisensory stimulation increases gamma-responses over multiple cortical regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakowitz, O W; Quiroga, R Q; Schürmann, M; Başar, E

    2001-04-01

    In the framework of the discussion about gamma (approx. 40 Hz) oscillations as information carriers in the brain, we investigated the relationship between gamma responses in the EEG and intersensory association. Auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) and visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were compared with bisensory evoked potentials (BEPs; simultaneous auditory and visual stimulation) in 15 subjects. Gamma responses in AEPs, VEPs and BEPs were assessed by means of wavelet decomposition. Overall maximum gamma-components post-stimulus were highest in BEPs (P < 0.01). Bisensory evoked gamma-responses also showed significant central, parietal and occipital amplitude-increases (P < 0.001, P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively; prestimulus interval as baseline). These were of greater magnitude when compared with the unisensory responses. As a correlate of the marked gamma responses to bimodal stimulation we suggest a process of 'intersensory association', i.e. one of the steps between sensory transmission and perception. Our data may be interpreted as a further example of function-related gamma responses in the EEG.

  2. Time-course study and effects of drying method on concentrations of gamma-aminobutyric acid, flavonoids, anthocyanin, and 2''-hydroxynicotianamine in leaves of buckwheats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tatsuro; Watanabe, Masami; Iki, Makiko; Aoyagi, Yasuo; Kim, Sun-Ju; Mukasa, Yuji; Yokota, Satoshi; Takigawa, Shigenobu; Hashimoto, Naoto; Noda, Takahiro; Yamauchi, Hiroaki; Matsuura-Endo, Chie

    2009-01-14

    Concentrations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), rutin, minor flavonoids (such as orientin), anthocyanin, and 2''-hydroxynicotianamine (2HN) were quantified in the leaves of common and tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench and Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn., respectively), at 14, 28, and 42 days after sowing (DAS). GABA and rutin concentrations peaked at 42 DAS, whereas anthocyain, 2HN, and minor flavonoid concentrations declined with the age of the plants. However, at 42 DAS, anthocyanin concentrations in the leaves of tartary buckwheat Hokkai T10 leaves were at least 10-fold greater than in the other buckwheats tested. In addition, the effects on target compound concentrations and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity of three different drying methods (20 h at 40 degrees C, 7 h at 70 degrees C, or lyophilization) were investigated. In general, the drying method had no significant effect on the parameters tested. These results indicate that, in terms of GABA, rutin, and anthocyanin concentrations, leaf powder from 42 day old Hokkai T10 has the potential to be a useful food ingredient, such as Ao-jiru juice.

  3. Higher gamma-aminobutyric acid neuron density in the white matter of orbital frontal cortex in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Dipesh; Fung, Samantha J; Rothwell, Alice; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon

    2012-11-01

    In the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), reduced gray matter volume and reduced glutamic acid decarboxylase 67kDa isoform (GAD67) messenger (m)RNA are found in schizophrenia; however, how these alterations relate to developmental pathology of interneurons is unclear. The present study therefore aimed to determine if increased interstitial white matter neuron (IWMN) density exists in the OFC; whether gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neuron density in OFC white matter was altered; and how IWMN density may be related to an early-expressed inhibitory neuron marker, Dlx1, in OFC gray matter in schizophrenia. IWMN densities were determined (38 schizophrenia and 38 control subjects) for neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN+) and 65/67 kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase immunopositive (GAD65/67+) neurons. In situ hybridization was performed to determine Dlx1 and GAD67 mRNA expression in the OFC gray matter. NeuN and GAD65/67 immunopositive cell density was significantly increased in the superficial white matter in schizophrenia. Gray matter Dlx1 and GAD67 mRNA expression were reduced in schizophrenia. Dlx1 mRNA levels were negatively correlated with GAD65/67 IWMN density. Our study provides evidence that pathology of IWMNs in schizophrenia includes GABAergic interneurons and that increased IWMN density may be related to GABAergic deficits in the overlying gray matter. These findings provide evidence at the cellular level that the OFC is a site of pathology in schizophrenia and support the hypothesis that inappropriate migration of cortical inhibitory interneurons occurs in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. In Silico Prediction of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Type-A Receptors Using Novel Machine-Learning-Based SVM and GBDT Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Liao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors (GABAARs belong to multisubunit membrane spanning ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs which act as the principal mediators of rapid inhibitory synaptic transmission in the human brain. Therefore, the category prediction of GABAARs just from the protein amino acid sequence would be very helpful for the recognition and research of novel receptors. Based on the proteins’ physicochemical properties, amino acids composition and position, a GABAAR classifier was first constructed using a 188-dimensional (188D algorithm at 90% cd-hit identity and compared with pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC and ProtrWeb web-based algorithms for human GABAAR proteins. Then, four classifiers including gradient boosting decision tree (GBDT, random forest (RF, a library for support vector machine (libSVM, and k-nearest neighbor (k-NN were compared on the dataset at cd-hit 40% low identity. This work obtained the highest correctly classified rate at 96.8% and the highest specificity at 99.29%. But the values of sensitivity, accuracy, and Matthew’s correlation coefficient were a little lower than those of PseAAC and ProtrWeb; GBDT and libSVM can make a little better performance than RF and k-NN at the second dataset. In conclusion, a GABAAR classifier was successfully constructed using only the protein sequence information.

  5. In Vivo Dentate Nucleus Gamma-aminobutyric Acid Concentration in Essential Tremor vs. Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan D; Hernandez, Nora; Dyke, Jonathan P; Ma, Ruoyun E; Dydak, Ulrike

    2018-04-01

    Despite its high prevalence, essential tremor (ET) is among the most poorly understood neurological diseases. The presence and extent of Purkinje cell (PC) loss in ET is the subject of controversy. PCs are a major storehouse of central nervous system gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), releasing GABA at the level of the dentate nucleus. It is therefore conceivable that cerebellar dentate nucleus GABA concentration could be an in vivo marker of PC number. We used in vivo 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to quantify GABA concentrations in two cerebellar volumes of interest, left and right, which included the dentate nucleus, comparing 45 ET cases to 35 age-matched controls. 1 H MRS was performed using a 3.0-T Siemens Tim Trio scanner. The MEGA-PRESS J-editing sequence was used for GABA detection in two cerebellar volumes of interest (left and right) that included the dentate nucleus. The two groups did not differ with respect to our primary outcome of GABA concentration (given in institutional units). For the right dentate nucleus, [GABA] in ET cases = 2.01 ± 0.45 and [GABA] in controls = 1.86 ± 0.53, p = 0.17. For the left dentate nucleus, [GABA] in ET cases = 1.68 ± 0.49 and [GABA] controls = 1.80 ± 0.53, p = 0.33. The controls had similar dentate nucleus [GABA] in the right vs. left dentate nucleus (p = 0.52); however, in ET cases, the value on the right was considerably higher than that on the left (p = 0.001). We did not detect a reduction in dentate nucleus GABA concentration in ET cases vs. One interpretation of the finding is that it does not support the existence of PC loss in ET; however, an alternative interpretation is the observed pattern could be due to the effects of terminal sprouting in ET (i.e., collateral sprouting from surviving PCs making up for the loss of GABA-ergic terminals from PC degeneration). Further research is needed.

  6. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurement of gray-matter and white-matter gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration in sensorimotor cortex using a motion-controlled MEGA point-resolved spectroscopy sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Pallab K; Phillips, Micheal D; Stone, Lael A; Lowe, Mark J

    2011-04-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. Understanding the GABA concentration, in vivo, is important to understand normal brain function. Using MEGA point-resolved spectroscopy sequence with interleaved water scans to detect subject motion, GABA level of sensorimotor cortex was measured using a voxel identified from a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. The GABA level in a 20×20×20-mm(3) voxel consisting of 37%±7% gray matter, 52%±12% white matter and 11%±8% cerebrospinal fluid in the sensorimotor region was measured to be 1.43±0.48 mM. In addition, using linear regression analysis, GABA concentrations within gray and white matter were calculated to be 2.87±0.61 and 0.33±0.11 mM, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gama-aminobutyric acid accumulation in Elsholtzia splendens in response to copper toxicity*

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xiao-e; Peng, Hong-yun; Tian, Sheng-ke

    2005-01-01

    A solution with different Cu supply levels was cultured to investigate gama-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulation in Elsholtzia splendens, a native Chinese Cu-tolerant and accumulating plant species. Increasing Cu from 0.25 to 500 μmol/L significantly enhanced levels of GABA and histidine (His), but considerably decreased levels of aspartate (Asp) and glutamate (Glu) in the leaves. The leaf Asp level negatively correlated with leaf Cu level, while leaf GABA level positively correlated with le...

  8. Exposure of mother rats to chronic unpredictable stress before pregnancy alters the metabolism of gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate in the right hippocampus of offspring in early adolescence in a sexually dimorphic manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuejun; Shen, Zhiwei; Hu, Liu; Xia, Fang; Li, Yuewa; Zhuang, Jingwen; Chen, Peishan; Huang, Qingjun

    2016-12-30

    There is increasing evidence that mothers' exposure to stress before or during pregnancy is linked to an incidence of psychiatric disorders in offspring. However, a few studies have estimated the role of sex in the detrimental effects of pre-gestational stress on the offspring rats at early adolescence. Sex differences regarding the metabolism of gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate in the right hippocampus were investigated by MRS when the offspring rats reached 30 days. Additionally, the impact of pre-gestational stress exposed on an additional short-term acute stressor, such as forced swim, was examined in the male and female offspring rats. Our findings showed female offspring rats were more vulnerable to stressful conditions for either pre-gestational stress or acute stress in early adolescence, and had decreased GABA/Cr+PCr and Glu/Cr+PCr in the right hippocampus. Interestingly, in response to forced swim, male offspring rats whose mothers were exposed to pre-gestational stress were more affected by the short-term acute stressor and this was manifested by change of Glu/GABA and Glu/Gln in the right hippocampus. These data indicated that although female offspring rats were more vulnerable to pre-gestational stress from their mothers than males, in response to an additional acute stressor they showed better response. Therefore, both sexually dimorphic manner and combination of stressful procedures should be carefully considered in the study of stress-related psychiatric disorders in early adolescence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Failure of gamma-aminobutyrate acid-beta agonist baclofen to improve balance, gait, and postural control after vestibular schwannoma resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Valck, Claudia F J; Vereeck, Luc; Wuyts, Floris L; Van de Heyning, Paul H

    2009-04-01

    Incomplete postural control often occurs after vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery. Customized vestibular rehabilitation in man improves and speeds up this process. Animal experiments have shown an improved and faster vestibular compensation after administration of the gamma-aminobutyrate acid (GABA)-beta agonist baclofen. To examine whether medical treatment with baclofen provides an improvement of the compensation process after VS surgery. A time-series study with historical control. Tertiary referral center. Thirteen patients who underwent VS resection were included and compared with a matched group of patients. In addition to an individualized vestibular rehabilitation protocol, the study group received medical treatment with 30 mg baclofen (a GABA-beta agonist) daily during the first 6 weeks after surgery. Clinical gait and balance tests (Romberg maneuver, standing on foam, tandem Romberg, single-leg stance, Timed Up & Go test, tandem gait, Dynamic Gait Index) and Dizziness Handicap Inventory. Follow-up until 24 weeks after surgery. When examining the postoperative test results, the group treated with baclofen did not perform better when compared with the matched (historical control) group. Repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed no significant group effect, but a significant time effect for almost all balance tests during the acute recovery period was found. An interaction effect between time and intervention was seen concerning single-leg stance and Dizziness Handicap Inventory scores for the acute recovery period. Medical therapy with baclofen did not seem to be beneficial in the process of central vestibular compensation.

  10. Enhanced Production of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid by Optimizing Culture Conditions of Lactobacillus brevis HYE1 Isolated from Kimchi, a Korean Fermented Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hee Seon; Cha, In-Tae; Roh, Seong Woon; Shin, Hae-Hun; Seo, Myung-Ji

    2017-03-28

    This study evaluated the effects of culture conditions, including carbon and nitrogen sources, L-monosodium glutamate (MSG), and initial pH, on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production by Lactobacillus brevis HYE1 isolated from kimchi, a Korean traditional fermented food. L. brevis HYE1 was screened by the production analysis of GABA and genetic analysis of the glutamate decarboxylase gene, resulting in 14.64 mM GABA after 48 h of cultivation in MRS medium containing 1% (w/v) MSG. In order to increase GABA production by L. brevis HYE1, the effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on GABA production were preliminarily investigated via one-factor-at-a-time optimization strategy. As the results, 2% maltose and 3% tryptone were determined to produce 17.93 mM GABA in modified MRS medium with 1% (w/v) MSG. In addition, the optimal MSG concentration and initial pH were determined to be 1% and 5.0, respectively, resulting in production of 18.97 mM GABA. Thereafter, response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to determine the optimal conditions of the above four factors. The results indicate that pH was the most significant factor for GABA production. The optimal culture conditions for maximum GABA production were also determined to be 2.14% (w/v) maltose, 4.01% (w/v) tryptone, 2.38% (w/v) MSG, and an initial pH of 4.74. In these conditions, GABA production by L. brevis HYE1 was predicted to be 21.44 mM using the RSM model. The experiment was performed under these optimized conditions, resulting in GABA production of 18.76 mM. These results show that the predicted and experimental values of GABA production are in good agreement.

  11. Increased Cortical Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Precedes Incomplete Extinction of Conditioned Fear and Increased Hippocampal Excitatory Tone in a Mouse Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Brandy L; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Charlton, Jennifer L; Kohler, Robert J; Galloway, Matthew P; Perrine, Shane A; Conti, Alana C

    2016-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) contributes to development of affective disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Psychiatric symptoms typically emerge in a tardive fashion post-TBI, with negative effects on recovery. Patients with PTSD, as well as rodent models of PTSD, demonstrate structural and functional changes in brain regions mediating fear learning, including prefrontal cortex (PFC), amygdala (AMYG), and hippocampus (HC). These changes may reflect loss of top-down control by which PFC normally exhibits inhibitory influence over AMYG reactivity to fearful stimuli, with HC contribution. Considering the susceptibility of these regions to injury, we examined fear conditioning (FC) in the delayed post-injury period, using a mouse model of mTBI. Mice with mTBI displayed enhanced acquisition and delayed extinction of FC. Using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ex vivo, we examined PFC, AMYG, and HC levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate as surrogate measures of inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission, respectively. Eight days post-injury, GABA was increased in PFC, with no significant changes in AMYG. In animals receiving FC and mTBI, glutamate trended toward an increase and the GABA/glutamate ratio decreased in ventral HC at 25 days post-injury, whereas GABA decreased and GABA/glutamate decreased in dorsal HC. These neurochemical changes are consistent with early TBI-induced PFC hypoactivation facilitating the fear learning circuit and exacerbating behavioral fear responses. The latent emergence of overall increased excitatory tone in the HC, despite distinct plasticity in dorsal and ventral HC fields, may be associated with disordered memory function, manifested as incomplete extinction and enhanced FC recall.

  12. Glutamate decarboxylase and. gamma. -aminobutyric acid transaminase activity in brain structures during action of high concentrated sulfide gas on a background of hypo- and hypercalcemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadyrov, G.K.; Aliyev, A.M.

    Activity of the following enzymes was studied on the background of hypo- and hypercalcemia and exposure to high concentration of sulfide gas: glutamate decarboxylase (GDC) and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T). These enzymes regulate metabolism of GABA. The results showed that a 3.5 hr exposure to sulfide gas at a concentration of 0.3 mg/1 led to significantly increased activity of GDC in cerebral hemispheres, cerebellum and in brain stem. Activity of GABA-T dropped correspondingly. On the background of hypercalcemia induced by im. injection of 10% calcium gluconate (0.6 m1/200 g body weight of experimental rats) the negative effect caused by the exposure to sulfide gas was diminished. Under conditions of hypocalcemia (im. injection of 10 mg/200 g body weight of sodium oxalate), exposure to sulfide gas led to a significantly decreased activity of GDC and GABA-T in the hemispheres and in the brain stem, but in the cerebellum the activity of GDC increased sharply while that of GABA-T decreased correspondingly. 8 refs.

  13. The γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB) receptor agonist baclofen inhibits morphine sensitization by decreasing the dopamine level in rat nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhenyu; Yang, Hongfa; Xiao, Yuqiang; Zhao, Gang; Huang, Haiyan

    2012-07-10

    Repeated morphine exposure can induce behavioral sensitization. There are evidences have shown that central gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system is involved in morphine dependence. However, the effect of a GABAB receptor agonist baclofen on morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in rats is unclear. We used morphine-induced behavioral sensitization model in rat to investigate the effects of baclofen on behavioral sensitization. Moreover, dopamine release in the shell of the nucleus accumbens was evaluated using microdialysis assay in vivo. The present study demonstrated that morphine challenge (3 mg/kg, s.c.) obviously enhanced the locomotor activity following 4-day consecutive morphine administration and 3-day withdrawal period, which indicated the expression of morphine sensitization. In addition, chronic treatment with baclofen (2.5, 5 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the development of morphine sensitization. It was also found that morphine challenge 3 days after repeated morphine administration produced a significant increase of extracellular dopamine release in nucleus accumbens. Furthermore, chronic treatment with baclofen decreased the dopamine release induced by morphine challenge. Our results indicated that gamma-aminobutyric acid system plays an important role in the morphine sensitization in rat and suggested that behavioral sensitization is a promising model to study the mechanism underlying drug abuse.

  14. Phenibut (β-Phenyl-γ-aminobutyric Acid) Dependence and Management of Withdrawal: Emerging Nootropics of Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Tania; Mgbako, Ofole; Katzman, Caroline; Grossman, Allison

    2018-01-01

    This case report describes the development of withdrawal from phenibut, a gamma-aminobutyric acid-receptor type B agonist. Although phenibut is not an FDA-approved medication, it is available through online retailers as a nootropic supplement. There are reports of dependence in patients that misuse phenibut. We report a case in which a patient experienced withdrawal symptoms from phenibut and was successfully treated with a baclofen taper. This case report highlights the development of phenibut use disorder with coingestion of alcohol and potential management for phenibut withdrawal. We believe clinicians must be aware of how phenibut dependence may present and how to manage the withdrawal syndrome.

  15. Phenibut (β-Phenyl-γ-aminobutyric Acid Dependence and Management of Withdrawal: Emerging Nootropics of Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Ahuja

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the development of withdrawal from phenibut, a gamma-aminobutyric acid-receptor type B agonist. Although phenibut is not an FDA-approved medication, it is available through online retailers as a nootropic supplement. There are reports of dependence in patients that misuse phenibut. We report a case in which a patient experienced withdrawal symptoms from phenibut and was successfully treated with a baclofen taper. This case report highlights the development of phenibut use disorder with coingestion of alcohol and potential management for phenibut withdrawal. We believe clinicians must be aware of how phenibut dependence may present and how to manage the withdrawal syndrome.

  16. gamma-Aminobutyric acid- and benzodiazepine-induced modulation of [35S]-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate binding to cerebellar granule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallo, V.; Wise, B.C.; Vaccarino, F.; Guidotti, A.

    1985-01-01

    t-Butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) is a bicyclophosphate derivative with potent picrotoxin-like convulsant activity that binds with high affinity and specificity to a Cl- channel-modulatory site of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)/benzodiazepine receptor complex. Using intact cerebellar granule cells maintained in primary culture, the authors have studied the modifications induced by GABA and diazepam on the ion channel-modulatory binding site labeled by [ 35 S]TBPS. At 25 degrees C, and in a modified Locke solution, the [ 35 S]TBPS specific binding, determined by displacing the radioligand with an excess (10(-4) M) of picrotoxin, was approximately 70% of the total radioactivity bound to the cells. [ 35 S]TBPS specific binding was saturable with a Kd of approximately 100 nM, a Bmax of approximately 440 fmol/mg of protein, and a Hill coefficient of 1.18. Neither cerebellar astrocytes maintained in culture for 2 weeks nor a neuroblastoma cell line (NB-2A) exhibited any specific [ 35 S]TBPS binding. Muscimol (0.3 to 5 microM) enhanced and bicuculline (0.1 to 5 microM) inhibited [ 35 S]TBPS specific binding to intact cerebellar granule cells. The effect of muscimol and bicuculline on [ 35 S]TBPS binding was noncompetitive. Muscimol (0.1 to 5 microM) reversed bicuculline inhibition in a dose-dependent fashion but failed to reverse picrotoxin-induced inhibition. [ 35 S]TBPS binding was also modulated by benzodiazepine receptor ligands. The binding was increased by diazepam and decreased by 6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid methylester. Muscimol (0.05 microM) failed to reverse bicuculline inhibition in the absence of diazepam, but it became effective in the presence of 0.1 to 1 microM diazepam

  17. Delta Subunit-Containing Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid A Receptor Disinhibits Lateral Amygdala and Facilitates Fear Expression in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Peng; He, Qing-Hai; Pan, Han-Qing; Xu, Xiao-Bin; Chen, Wen-Bing; He, Ye; Zhou, Jin; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Zhang, Jun-Yu; Ying, Xiao-Ping; Han, Ren-Wen; Li, Bao-Ming; Gao, Tian-Ming; Pan, Bing-Xing

    2017-06-15

    Maintaining gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) inhibition in the amygdala within a physiological range is critical for the appropriate expression of emotions such as fear and anxiety. The synaptic GABA type A receptor (GABA A R) is generally known to mediate the primary component of amygdala inhibition and prevent inappropriate expression of fear. However, little is known about the contribution of the extrasynaptic GABA A R to amygdala inhibition and fear. By using mice expressing green fluorescent protein in interneurons (INs) and lacking the δ subunit-containing GABA A R (GABA A (δ)R), which is exclusively situated in the extrasynaptic membrane, we systematically investigated the role of GABA A (δ)R in regulating inhibition in the lateral amygdala (LA) and fear learning using the combined approaches of immunohistochemistry, electrophysiology, and behavior. In sharp contrast to the established role of synaptic GABA A R in mediating LA inhibition, we found that either pharmacological or physiological recruitment of GABA A (δ)R resulted in the weakening of GABAergic transmission onto projection neurons in LA while leaving the glutamatergic transmission unaltered, suggesting disinhibition by GABA A (δ)R. The disinhibition arose from IN-specific expression of GABA A (δ)R with its activation decreasing the input resistance of local INs and suppressing their activation. Genetic deletion of GABA A (δ)R attenuated its role in suppressing LA INs and disinhibiting LA. Importantly, the GABA A (δ)R facilitated long-term potentiation in sensory afferents to LA and permitted the expression of learned fear. Our findings suggest that GABA A (δ)R serves as a brake rather than a mediator of GABAergic inhibition in LA. The disinhibition by GABA A (δ)R may help to prevent excessive suppression of amygdala activity and thus ensure the expression of emotion. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An open-label tolerability study of BL-1020 antipsychotic: a novel gamma aminobutyric acid ester of perphenazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ravi; Geffen, Yona; Vasile, Daniel; Dan, Irina

    2010-01-01

    BL-1020, a novel gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) ester of perphenazine, is a new oral antipsychotic with a strong affinity for dopamine and serotonin receptors. Unlike first- and second-generation antipsychotics, it has agonist activity at GABA(A). This is the first study to examine tolerability and safety of BL-1020 in schizophrenia. This was a phase-II, open-label, multicenter, 6-week study treating patients (n = 36) with chronic schizophrenia. Dosing started at 20 mg/d and increased over 7 days to 40 mg/d. Weekly assessments were conducted. All but 1 patient was titrated to 30 mg/d at day 4; on day 7, 30 were titrated to 40 mg/d. Four patients discontinued the study prematurely. There was no clinically relevant increase in vital signs, sedation, dizziness, or other central nervous system effects or electrocardiogram or laboratory abnormalities and a small increase in weight. Ten patients experienced extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) requiring treatment with an anticholinergic; 4 patients were unable to reach maximum dose because of EPS. Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale did not indicate clinically significant changes in EPS. The most common adverse event was insomnia (6 patients); other frequent adverse effects (all n = 3) were extrapyramidal disorder, headache, parkinsonism, tremor, and hyperprolactinemia. There was improvement on Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Clinical Global Impression of Change with 22 patients showing at least 20% decrease by end point on Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and 31 patients showing at least minimal improvement on Clinical Global Impression of Change. These data suggest that 20 to 40 mg/d of BL-1020 is associated with clinically relevant improvement of psychosis with no worsening of EPS and support further testing in randomized controlled trials.

  19. Relationship of executive functioning deficits to N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in youth with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Rebekah S; Kondo, Douglas G; Shi, Xian-Feng; Prescot, Andrew P; Clark, Elaine; Renshaw, Perry F; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A

    2018-01-01

    Although cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder (BD) have been repeatedly observed, our understanding of these impairments at a mechanistic level remains limited. Few studies that investigated cognitive impairments in bipolar illness have examined the association with brain biochemistry. This pilot study utilized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) to evaluate the relationship between neurocognitive performance and brain metabolites in youth with BD. Thirty participants, twenty depressed BD participants and ten healthy comparison participants, ages 13-21, completed mood and executive function measures. 1 H-MRS data were also acquired from the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) using two-dimensional (2D) J-resolved 1 H-MRS sequence. Proton metabolites including N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were quantified for both groups. Participants with BD performed significantly lower on executive functioning measures than comparison participants. There were significant positive correlations between Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) performance and NAA (p NAA and GABA levels increased. Small sample size and lack of control for medications. These findings build on previous observations of biochemical alterations associated with BD and indicate that executive functioning deficits in bipolar youth are correlated with NAA and GABA. These results suggest that cognitive deficits occur early in the course of illness and may reflect risk factors associated with altered neurochemistry. Further investigation of the relationship between brain metabolites and cognition in BD may lead to important information for developing novel, targeted interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) production, antioxidant activity in some germinated dietary seeds and the effect of cooking on their GABA content

    OpenAIRE

    TIANSAWANG,Kasarin; LUANGPITUKSA,Pairoj; VARANYANOND,Warunee; HANSAWASDI,Chanida

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Germinated grains have been known as sources of Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) that provide beneficial effects for human health. This study was aimed to investigate GABA production, dietary fiber, antioxidant activity, and the effect of cooking on GABA loss in germinated legumes and sesame. The highest GABA content was found in germinated mung bean, (0.8068 g kg-1, 24 h incubation) followed by germinated soybean, germinated black bean and soaked sesame. Beside GABA, dietary fiber con...

  1. Altered Gradients of Glutamate and Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Transcripts in the Cortical Visuospatial Working Memory Network in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoftman, Gil D; Dienel, Samuel J; Bazmi, Holly H; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Kehui; Lewis, David A

    2018-04-15

    Visuospatial working memory (vsWM), which is impaired in schizophrenia, requires information transfer across multiple nodes in the cerebral cortex, including visual, posterior parietal, and dorsolateral prefrontal regions. Information is conveyed across these regions via the excitatory projections of glutamatergic pyramidal neurons located in layer 3, whose activity is modulated by local inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) neurons. Key properties of these neurons differ across these cortical regions. Consequently, in schizophrenia, alterations in the expression of gene products regulating these properties could disrupt vsWM function in different ways, depending on the region(s) affected. Here, we quantified the expression of markers of glutamate and GABA neurotransmission selectively in layer 3 of four cortical regions in the vsWM network from 20 matched pairs of schizophrenia and unaffected comparison subjects. In comparison subjects, levels of glutamate transcripts tended to increase, whereas GABA transcript levels tended to decrease, from caudal to rostral, across cortical regions of the vsWM network. Composite measures across all transcripts revealed a significant effect of region, with the glutamate measure lowest in the primary visual cortex and highest in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, whereas the GABA measure showed the opposite pattern. In schizophrenia subjects, the expression levels of many of these transcripts were altered. However, this disease effect differed across regions, such that the caudal-to-rostral increase in the glutamate measure was blunted and the caudal-to-rostral decline in the GABA measure was enhanced in the illness. Differential alterations in layer 3 glutamate and GABA neurotransmission across cortical regions may contribute to vsWM deficits in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Gamma-aminobutyric acid, a potential tumor suppressor for small airway-derived lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Hildegard M; Al-Wadei, Hussein A N; Majidi, Mourad

    2008-10-01

    Pulmonary adenocarcinoma (PAC) is the leading type of lung cancer in smokers and non-smokers that arises in most cases from small airway epithelial cells. PAC has a high mortality due to its aggressive behavior and resistance to cancer therapeutics. We have shown previously that the proliferation of human PAC cells NCI-H322 and immortalized human small airway epithelial cells HPL1D is stimulated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A-dependent phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding (CREB) protein and transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and that this pathway is activated by beta-1-adrenoreceptors (beta(1)-ARs) and the non-genomic estrogen receptor beta. Our current in vitro studies with HPL1D and NCI-H322 cells showed that signaling via the gamma-amino butyric acid receptor (GABA(B)R) strongly inhibited base level and isoproterenol-induced cAMP, p-CREB, cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-luciferase activity and p-extracellular regulated kinase-1 (ERK1)/2 and effectively blocked DNA synthesis and cell migration. The inhibitory effects of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) were disinhibited by the GABA(B)R antagonist CGP-35348 or GABA(B)R knockdown. Immunohistochemical investigation of hamster lungs showed significant underexpression of GABA in animals with small airway-derived PACs induced by the nicotine-derived carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK). These findings suggest that GABA may have tumor suppressor function in small airway epithelia and the PACs derived from them and that downregulation of GABA by NNK may contribute to the development of this cancer in smokers. Our findings suggest that marker-guided treatment with GABA or a GABA(B)R agonist of individuals with downregulated pulmonary GABA may provide a novel targeted approach for the prevention of PAC in smokers.

  3. Effects of electroacupuncture on the levels of retinal gamma-aminobutyric acid and its receptors in a guinea pig model of lens-induced myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, F; Ye, X; Zhao, W; Xu, C-L; Wang, L; Ding, M-H; Bi, A-L; Wu, J-F; Jiang, W-J; Guo, D-D; Guo, J-G; Bi, H-S

    2015-02-26

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter of the retina and affects myopic development. Electroacupuncture (EA) is widely utilized to treat myopia in clinical settings. However, there are few reports on whether EA affects the level of retinal GABA during myopic development. To study this issue, in the present study, we explored the changes of retinal GABA content and the expression of its receptor subtypes, and the effects of EA stimulation on them in a guinea pig model with lens-induced myopia (LIM). Our results showed that the content of GABA and the expression of GABAA and GABAC receptors of retina were up-regulated during the development of myopia, and this up-regulation was inhibited by applying EA to Hegu (LI4) and Taiyang (EX-HN5) acupoints. Moreover, these effects of EA show a positional specificity. While applying EA at a sham acupoint, no apparent change of myopic retinal GABA and its receptor subtypes was observed. Taken together, our findings suggest that LIM is effective to up-regulate the level of retinal GABA, GABAA and GABAC receptors in guinea pigs and the effect may be inhibited by EA stimulation at LI4 and EX-HN5 acupoints. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In SilicoModel-driven Assessment of the Effects of Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Deficiency on Glutamate and Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid: Implications for Understanding Schizophrenia Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Rimjhim; Kalmady, Sunil Vasu; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan

    2017-05-31

    Deficient brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is one of the important mechanisms underlying the neuroplasticity abnormalities in schizophrenia. Aberration in BDNF signaling pathways directly or circuitously influences neurotransmitters like glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). For the first time, this study attempts to construct and simulate the BDNF-neurotransmitter network in order to assess the effects of BDNF deficiency on glutamate and GABA. Using CellDesigner, we modeled BDNF interactions with calcium influx via N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)- Calmodulin activation; synthesis of GABA via cell cycle regulators protein kinase B, glycogen synthase kinase and β-catenin; transportation of glutamate and GABA. Steady state stability, perturbation time-course simulation and sensitivity analysis were performed in COPASI after assigning the kinetic functions, optimizing the unknown parameters using random search and genetic algorithm. Study observations suggest that increased glutamate in hippocampus, similar to that seen in schizophrenia, could potentially be contributed by indirect pathway originated from BDNF. Deficient BDNF could suppress Glutamate decarboxylase 67-mediated GABA synthesis. Further, deficient BDNF corresponded to impaired transport via vesicular glutamate transporter, thereby further increasing the intracellular glutamate in GABAergic and glutamatergic cells. BDNF also altered calcium dependent neuroplasticity via NMDAR modulation. Sensitivity analysis showed that Calmodulin, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and CREB regulated transcription coactivator-1 played significant role in this network. The study presents in silico quantitative model of biochemical network constituting the key signaling molecules implicated in schizophrenia pathogenesis. It provides mechanistic insights into putative contribution of deficient BNDF towards alterations in neurotransmitters and neuroplasticity that are consistent with current

  5. Affective and cognitive effects of global deletion of alpha3-containing gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorelli, Roberto; Rudolph, Uwe; Straub, Carolin J; Feldon, Joram; Yee, Benjamin K

    2008-09-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors characterized by the presence of the alpha3 subunit are the major GABAA receptor subtype expressed in brain stem monoaminergic nuclei. These alpha3-GABAA receptors are therefore in a unique position to regulate monoaminergic functions. To characterize the functional properties of alpha3-GABAA receptors, we present a preliminary assessment of the expression of affective and cognitive behaviour in male mice with a targeted deletion of the Gabra3 gene encoding the alpha3 subunit [alpha3 knockout (KO) mice] on a C57BL/6Jx129X1/SvJ F1 hybrid genetic background. The alpha3 KO mice did not exhibit any gross change of anxiety-like behaviour or spontaneous locomotor behaviour. In the Porsolt forced swim test for potential antidepressant activity, alpha3 KO mice exhibited reduced floating and enhanced swimming behaviour relative to wild-type controls. Performance on a two-choice sucrose preference test, however, revealed no evidence for an increase in sucrose preference in the alpha3 KO mice that would have substantiated a potential phenotype for depression-related behaviour. In contrast, a suggestion of an enhanced negative contrast effect was revealed in a one-bottle sucrose consumption test across different sucrose concentrations. These affective phenotypes were accompanied by alterations in the balance between conditioned responding to the discrete conditioned stimulus and to the context, and a suggestion of faster extinction, in the Pavlovian conditioned freezing paradigm. Spatial learning in the water maze reference memory test, however, was largely unchanged in the alpha3 KO mice, except for a trend of preservation during reversal learning. The novel phenotypes following global deletion of the GABAA receptor alpha3 subunit identified here provided relevant insights, in addition to our earlier study, into the potential behavioural relevance of this specific receptor subtypes in the modulation of both affective and cognitive

  6. The vapour pressures over saturated aqueous solutions of DL-2-aminobutyric acid, 4-aminobutyric acid, sodium-D-gluconate, sodium hippurate, and potassium magnesium-L-aspartate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apelblat, Alexander; Korin, Eli

    2008-01-01

    Vapour pressures of water over saturated solutions of DL-2-aminobutyric acid, 4-aminobutyric acid, sodium-D-gluconate, sodium hippurate, and potassium magnesium-L-aspartate were determined over the (278 to 322) K temperature range. The determined vapour pressures were used to obtain the water activities, the molar enthalpies of vaporization, and the osmotic coefficients of sodium-D-gluconate

  7. The vapour pressures over saturated aqueous solutions of DL-2-aminobutyric acid, 4-aminobutyric acid, sodium-D-gluconate, sodium hippurate, and potassium magnesium-L-aspartate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apelblat, Alexander [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)], E-mail: apelblat@bgu.ac.il; Korin, Eli [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2008-05-15

    Vapour pressures of water over saturated solutions of DL-2-aminobutyric acid, 4-aminobutyric acid, sodium-D-gluconate, sodium hippurate, and potassium magnesium-L-aspartate were determined over the (278 to 322) K temperature range. The determined vapour pressures were used to obtain the water activities, the molar enthalpies of vaporization, and the osmotic coefficients of sodium-D-gluconate.

  8. Structure-activity relationships in a new series of insecticidally active dioxatricycloalkenes derived by structural comparison of the GABA (. gamma. -aminobutyric acid) antagonists bicycloorthocarboxylates and endosulfan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Sawada, Yoshihiro; Mochida, Kazuo; Nakamura, Toshiie (Shimane Univ. (Japan)); Matsumura, Fumio (Univ. of California, Davis (USA))

    1990-05-01

    To study structural requirements for picrotoxinin-type GABA ({gamma}-aminobutyric acid) antagonists to interact with the receptor site, 5-substituted 4,6-dioxatricyclo(7.2.1.0{sup 2,8})dodec-10-enes and related compounds were prepared and examined for their insecticidal activity and potency in displacing ({sup 35}S)tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) binding. Compounds with high insecticidal activity possessed a phenyl group with an electron-withdrawing para substituent, a cycloalkyl group, or a C{sub 3}-C{sub 5} straight-chain alkyl group at the 5-position. The effect of the 5-substituents on insecticidal activity was very similar to that of the 1-substituents of the bicyloorthocarboxylate GABA antagonists. Representative dioxatricycloalkenes displaced the binding of the GABA antagonist ({sup 35}S)TBPS to housefly head membranes by 29-53% at 10 {mu}M. X-ray crystal structure analysis demonstrated that this class of compounds had structures superimposable on those of 4-tert-butylbicycloorthocarboxylates. These findings indicate that the dioxatricycloalkenes and some other analogues occupy the picrotoxinin binding site in such a way that the fourth interacting subsite of the receptor site accommodates the 5-substituent.

  9. A GC-ECD method for estimation of free and bound amino acids, gamma-aminobutyric acid, salicylic acid, and acetyl salicylic acid from Solanum lycopersicum (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Hari Charan; Gajbhiye, Vijay T; Singh, Ghanendra

    2011-01-01

    A gas chromatograph with electron capture detection method for estimation of selected metabolites--amino acids (free and bound), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), salicylic acid (SA), and acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) from tomato--is reported. The method is based on nitrophenylation of the metabolites by 1-fluoro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene under aqueous alkaline conditions to form dinitophenyl derivatives. The derivatives were stable under the operating conditions of GC. Analysis of bound amino acids comprised perchloric acid precipitation of protein, alkylation (carboxymethylation) with iodoacetic acid, vapor-phase hydrolysis, and derivatization with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene in that order. The metabolites were resolved in 35 min, using a temperature-programmed run. The method is rapid, sensitive, and precise. It easily measured the typical amino acids (aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, alanine, leucine, lysine, and phenylalanine) used for identification and quantification of a protein, resolved amino acids of the same mass (leucine and isoleucine), satisfactorily measured sulfur amino acid (methionine, cystine, and cysteine), and quantified GABA, SA, and ASA, as well. The developed method was validated for specificity, linearity, and precision. It has been applied and recommended for estimation of 25 metabolites from Solanum lycopersicum (L.).

  10. Interactive effects of glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid on growth performance and skeletal muscle amino acid metabolism of 22-42-day-old broilers exposed to hot environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hong; Bai, Xi; Shah, Assar Ali; Dai, Sifa; Wang, Like; Hua, Jinling; Che, Chuanyan; He, Shaojun; Wen, Aiyou; Jiang, Jinpeng

    2016-06-01

    The present experiment was conducted to investigate the interactive effects between dietary glutamine (Gln, 0 and 5 g/kg) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 0 and 100 mg/kg) on growth performance and amino acid (AA) metabolism of broilers under hot environment. A total of 360 22-day-old Arbor Acres male chickens were randomly assigned to five treatment groups under thermoneutral chamber (PC, 23 °C) and cyclic heat stress (HS, 30-34 °C cycling) conditions. Compared with the PC group, cyclic HS decreased ( P muscle at 28, 35, and 42 days, while it increased ( P muscle, the Gln supplementation increased ( P muscle Gln concentrations, glutaminase activities, GS activities at 28 and 35 days, and DWG, GABA concentrations, and GABA-T activities at 28, 35, and 42 days in broilers under cyclic HS. In conclusion, the present results indicated that the interactions of exogenous Gln and GABA could offer a potential nutritional strategy to prevent HS-related depression in skeletal muscle Gln and GABA metabolism of broilers.

  11. Alterations of neurotransmitter norepinephrine and gamma-aminobutyric acid correlate with murine behavioral perturbations related to bisphenol A exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogi, Hiroshi; Itoh, Kyoko; Ikegaya, Hiroshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2015-09-01

    Humans are commonly exposed to endocrine-disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA), giving rise to concern over the psychobehavioral effects of BPA. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of prenatal and lactational BPA exposure on neurotransmitters, including norepinephrine (NE), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (Glu), and to assess the association with behavioral phenotypes. C57BL/6J mice were orally administered with BPA (500 μg/bwkg/day) or vehicle daily from embryonic day 0 to postnatal week 3 (P3W), through their dams. The IntelliCage behavioral experiments were conducted from P11W to P15W. At around P14-16W, NE, GABA and Glu levels in nine brain regions were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Furthermore, the associations between the neurotransmitter levels and the behavioral indices were statistically analyzed. In females exposed to BPA, the GABA and Glu levels in almost all regions, and the NE levels in the cortex, hypothalamus and thalamus were higher than those in the controls. In males exposed to BPA, the GABA levels in the amygdala and hippocampus showed lower values, while Glu levels were higher in some regions, compared with the controls. In regard to the associations, the number of "diurnal corner visits without drinking" was correlated with the NE levels in the cortex and thalamus in females. The "nocturnal corner visit duration without drinking" was correlated with the GABA level in the hippocampus in males. These results suggest that prenatal and lactational exposure to low doses of BPA might modulate the NE, GABA and Glu systems, resulting in behavioral alterations. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Wheat bran with enriched gamma-aminobutyric acid attenuates glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia induced by a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Wenting; Si, Xu; Zhou, Zhongkai; Strappe, Padraig; Blanchard, Chris

    2018-05-23

    In this study, the level of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in wheat bran was increased to be six times higher through the action of endogenous glutamate decarboxylase compared with untreated bran. The process of GABA formation in wheat bran also led to an increased level of phenolic compounds with enhanced antioxidant capacity 2 times higher than the untreated status. The interventional effect of a diet containing GABA-enriched bran on hyperinsulinemia induced by a high-fat diet (HFD) was investigated in a rat model. The results showed that, when compared with animals fed with HFD-containing untreated bran (NB group), the consumption of HFD-containing GABA-enriched bran (GB group) demonstrated a greater improvement of insulin resistance/sensitivity as revealed by the changes in the homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI). The expression of hepatic genes, cytochrome P450 family 7 subfamily A member 1 (Cyp7a1) and ubiquitin C (Ubc), which are involved in the adipogenesis-associated PPAR signalling pathway, was found to be significantly down-regulated in the GB group compared with the HFD group (P = 0.0055). Meanwhile, changes in the expression of a number of genes associated with lipid metabolism and gluconeogenesis were also noted in the GB group versus the HFD group, but not in the NB group, indicating different regulatory patterns between the two brans in a high-fat diet. More importantly, the analysis of key genes related to glucose metabolism further revealed that the expression of insulin-induced gene 1/2 (Insig-1/2) was increased following GB intervention with a corresponding reduction in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (Pepck) and glucose-6-phosphatase, catalytic subunit (G6pc) expression, suggesting that glucose homeostasis is greatly improved through the intervention of GABA-enriched bran in the context of a high-fat diet.

  13. The role of gamma-aminobutyric acid/glycinergic synaptic transmission in mediating bilirubin-induced hyperexcitation in developing auditory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin-Lu; Liang, Min; Shi, Hai-Bo; Wang, Lu-Yang; Li, Chun-Yan; Yin, Shan-Kai

    2016-01-05

    Hyperbilirubinemia is a common clinical phenomenon observed in human newborns. A high level of bilirubin can result in severe jaundice and bilirubin encephalopathy. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying bilirubin excitotoxicity are unclear. Our previous studies showed the action of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)/glycine switches from excitatory to inhibitory during development in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), one of the most sensitive auditory nuclei to bilirubin toxicity. In the present study, we investigated the roles of GABAA/glycine receptors in the induction of bilirubin hyperexcitation in early developing neurons. Using the patch clamp technique, GABAA/glycine receptor-mediated spontaneous inhibitory synaptic currents (sIPSCs) were recorded from bushy and stellate cells in acute brainstem slices from young mice (postnatal day 2-6). Bilirubin significantly increased the frequency of sIPSCs, and this effect was prevented by pretreatments of slices with either fast or slow Ca(2+) chelators BAPTA-AM and EGTA-AM suggesting that bilirubin can increase the release of GABA/glycine via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms. Using cell-attached recording configuration, we found that antagonists of GABAA and glycine receptors strongly attenuated spontaneous spiking firings in P2-6 neurons but produced opposite effect in P15-19 neurons. Furthermore, these antagonists reversed bilirubin-evoked hyperexcitability in P2-6 neurons, indicating that excitatory action of GABA/glycinergic transmission specifically contribute to bilirubin-induced hyperexcitability in the early stage of development. Our results suggest that bilirubin-induced enhancement of presynaptic release GABA/Glycine via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms may play a critical role in mediating neuronal hyperexcitation associated with jaundice, implicating potential new strategies for predicting, preventing, and treating bilirubin neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Optimization of culture conditions for gamma-aminobutyric acid production in fermented adzuki bean milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Yi Song

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA, a nonprotein amino acid, is widely distributed in nature and fulfills several physiological functions. In this study, various lactic acid strains commonly used to produce fermented milk products were inoculated into adzuki bean milk for producing GABA. The high GABA producing strain was selected in further experiment to improve the GABA production utilizing culture medium optimization. The results demonstrated that adzuki bean milk inoculated with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG increased GABA content from 0.05 mg/mL to 0.44 mg/mL after 36 hours of fermentation, which showed the greatest elevation in this study. Furthermore, the optimal cultural condition to adzuki bean milk inoculated with L. rhamnosus GG to improve the GABA content was performed using response surface methodology. The results showed that GABA content was dependent on the addition of galactose, monosodium glutamate, and pyridoxine with which the increasing ratios of GABA were 23–38%, 24–68%, and 8–36%, respectively. The optimal culture condition for GABA production of adzuki bean milk was found at the content of 1.44% galactose, 2.27% monosodium glutamate, and 0.20% pyridoxine. Under the optimal cultural condition, the amount of GABA produced in the fermented adzuki bean milk was 1.12 mg/mL, which was 22.4-fold higher than that of the unfermented adzuki bean milk (0.05 mg/100 mL. The results suggested that the optimized cultural condition of adzuki bean milk inoculated with L. rhamnosus GG can increase GABA content for consumers as a daily supplement as suggested.

  15. Comparison of the density of gamma-aminobutyric acid in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex of patients with first-episode psychosis and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhilei; Zhu, Yajing; Song, Zhenhua; Mei, Li; Zhang, Jianye; Chen, Tianyi; Wang, Yingchan; Xu, Yifeng; Jiang, Kaida; Li, Yao; Liu, Dengtang

    2015-12-25

    Abnormality in the concentration and functioning of gamma-aminobutyric acid (γ-aminobutyric acid, GABA) in the brain is not only an important hypothetical link to the cause of schizophrenia but it may also be correlated with the cognitive decline and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Studies utilizing high field magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) report abnormal density of GABA in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) of patients with chronic schizophrenia, but these results may be confounded by study participants' prior use of antipsychotic medications. Compare the density of GABA in the vmPFC of patients with first-episode psychosis to that in healthy controls and assess the relationship of GABA density in the vmPFC to the severity of psychotic symptoms. Single-voxel (1)H-MRS was used to assess the concentration of GABA and other metabolites in the vmPFC of 22 patients with first-episode psychosis (10 with schizophrenia and 12 with schizophreniform disorder) and 23 healthy controls. Thirteen of the 22 patients were drug-naïve and 9 had used antipsychotic medication for less than 3 days. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was used to evaluate the severity of psychotic symptoms in the patient group. The mean (sd) GABA density in the vmPFC was significantly higher in patients than in controls (2.28 [0.54] v. 1.93 [0.32] mM, t=2.62, p=0.012). The densities of other metabolites - including N-acetylaspartic acid (NAA), glutamic acid (GLU), and glutamine (GLN) - were not significantly different between patients and controls. Among the patients, GABA density in the vmPFC was not significantly correlated with PANSS total score or with any of the three PANSS subscale scores for positive symptoms, negative symptoms, and general psychopathology. GABA concentration was not associated with the duration of illness, but it was significantly correlated with patient age (r=0.47, p=0.026). Elevation of GABA density in the vmPFC of patients with first

  16. Prefrontal and Striatal Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Levels and the Effect of Antipsychotic Treatment in First-Episode Psychosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente-Sandoval, Camilo; Reyes-Madrigal, Francisco; Mao, Xiangling; León-Ortiz, Pablo; Rodríguez-Mayoral, Oscar; Jung-Cook, Helgi; Solís-Vivanco, Rodolfo; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel; Shungu, Dikoma C

    2018-03-15

    Abnormally elevated levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) have been reported in antipsychotic-free patients with schizophrenia. Whether such GABA elevations are also present in other brain regions and persist after antipsychotic treatment has not been previously investigated. Twenty-eight antipsychotic-naïve patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP) and 18 healthy control subjects completed the study. Following baseline proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy scans targeting the mPFC and a second region, the dorsal caudate, patients with FEP were treated with oral risperidone for 4 weeks at an initial dose of 1 mg/day that was titrated as necessary based on clinical judgment. After the 4-week treatment period, both groups were brought back to undergo outcome magnetic resonance spectroscopy scans, which were identical to the scans conducted at baseline. At baseline, higher GABA levels were found both in the mPFC and in the dorsal caudate of patients with FEP compared with healthy control subjects. Following 4 weeks of antipsychotic treatment, GABA levels in patients with FEP decreased relative to baseline in the mPFC, but decreased only at the trend level relative to baseline in the dorsal caudate. For either brain region, GABA levels at 4 weeks or posttreatment did not differ between patients with FEP and healthy control subjects. The results of the present study documented elevations of GABA levels both in the mPFC and, for the first time, in the dorsal caudate of antipsychotic-naïve patients with FEP, which normalized in both regions following 4 weeks of antipsychotic treatment. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cellular response to low Gamma-ray doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzanares A, E; Vega C, H R; Leon, L.C. de . [Unidades Academicas de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Rebolledo D, O; Radillo J, F [Facultad de Ciencias Biologicas y Agropecuarias de la Universidad de Colima, Colima (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    Lymphocytes, obtained from healthy donors, were exposed to a low strength gamma-ray field to determine heat shock protein expression in function of radiation dose. Protein identification was carried out using mAb raised against Hsp70 and Hsc70.Hsp70 protein was detected after lymphocyte irradiation. In all cases, an increasing trend of relative amounts of Hsp70 in function to irradiation time was observed. After 1.25 c Gy gamma-ray dose, lymphocytes expressed Hsp70 protein, indicating a threshold response to gamma rays. (Author)

  18. Cellular response to low Gamma-ray doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzanares A, E.; Vega C, H.R.; Leon, L.C. de; Rebolledo D, O.; Radillo J, F.

    2002-01-01

    Lymphocytes, obtained from healthy donors, were exposed to a low strength gamma-ray field to determine heat shock protein expression in function of radiation dose. Protein identification was carried out using mAb raised against Hsp70 and Hsc70.Hsp70 protein was detected after lymphocyte irradiation. In all cases, an increasing trend of relative amounts of Hsp70 in function to irradiation time was observed. After 1.25 c Gy gamma-ray dose, lymphocytes expressed Hsp70 protein, indicating a threshold response to gamma rays. (Author)

  19. Effects of Traumatic Stress Induced in the Juvenile Period on the Expression of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor Type A Subunits in Adult Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Yan Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have found that early traumatic experience significantly increases the risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA deficits were proposed to be implicated in development of PTSD, but the alterations of GABA receptor A (GABAAR subunits induced by early traumatic stress have not been fully elucidated. Furthermore, previous studies suggested that exercise could be more effective than medications in reducing severity of anxiety and depression but the mechanism is unclear. This study used inescapable foot-shock to induce PTSD in juvenile rats and examined their emotional changes using open-field test and elevated plus maze, memory changes using Morris water maze, and the expression of GABAAR subunits (γ2, α2, and α5 in subregions of the brain in the adulthood using western blotting and immunohistochemistry. We aimed to observe the role of GABAAR subunits changes induced by juvenile trauma in the pathogenesis of subsequent PTSD in adulthood. In addition, we investigated the protective effects of exercise for 6 weeks and benzodiazepine (clonazepam for 2 weeks. This study found that juvenile traumatic stress induced chronic anxiety and spatial memory loss and reduced expression of GABAAR subunits in the adult rat brains. Furthermore, exercise led to significant improvement as compared to short-term BZ treatment.

  20. Gamma-aminobutyric acid esters. 1. Synthesis, brain uptake, and pharmacological studies of aliphatic and steroid esters of gamma-aminobutyric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shashoua, V.E.; Jacob, J.N.; Ridge, R.; Campbell, A.; Baldessarini, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Labeled and unlabeled aliphatic and steroid esters of gamma-amino[U- 14 C]butyric acid (GABA) were synthesized and tested for their capacity to penetrate the blood-brain barrier and for evidence of central neuropharmacological activity in rodents. The uptake of the labeled 9,12,15-octadecatrienyl (linolenyl), 3-cholesteryl, 1-butyl, and the 9-fluoro-11 beta,17-dihydroxy-16 alpha-methyl-3,20-dioxopregna -1,4-dien-21-yl (dexamethasone) esters of GABA into mouse brain increased 2-, 25-, 74-, and 81-fold over GABA, respectively. The cholesteryl ester of GABA depressed the general motor activity of mice and rats in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the 1-butyl, linolenyl, and dexamethasone esters were inactive by this test. Studies of the rates of hydrolysis, GABA receptor binding capacity, and octanol/water partition coefficients indicated that pharmacological activity of the esters after entry into the central nervous system (CNS) was dependent on their capacity to release GABA by enzymatic hydrolysis and their lipid solubility

  1. cAMP and forskolin decrease γ-aminobutyric acid-gated chloride flux in rat brain synaptoneurosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuschneider, G.; Schwartz, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of the cyclic nucleotide cAMP on γ-aminobutyric acid-gated chloride channel function were investigated. The membrane-permeant cAMP analog N 6 , O 2' -dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate inhibited muscimol-induced 36 Cl - uptake into rat cerebral cortical synaptoneurosomes in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibition was due to a decrease in the maximal effect of muscimol, with no change in potency. Similar effects were observed with 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine. The effect of endogenous cAMP accumulation on the γ-aminobutyric acid-gated Cl - channel was studied with forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase. Under identical conditions, in the intact synaptoneurosomes, forskolin inhibited muscimol-induced 36 Cl - uptake and generated cAMP with similar potencies. Surprisingly, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, which does not activate adenylate cyclase, also inhibited the muscimol response, suggesting that forskolin and its lipophilic derivatives may interact with the Cl - channel directly. The data suggest that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA A ) receptor function in brain can be regulated by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation

  2. Gamma-aminobutyric acid fermentation with date residue by a lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Momoko; Yamane, Daisuke; Funato, Kouichi; Yoshida, Atsushi; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2018-03-01

    Dates are commercially consumed as semi-dried fruit or processed into juice and puree for further food production. However, the date residue after juice and puree production is not used, although it appears to be nutrient enriched. Here, date residue was fermented by a lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus brevis, which has been generally recognized as safe. Through degradation of sodium glutamate added to the residue during the fermentation, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which reduces neuronal excitability, was produced at the conversion rate of 80-90% from glutamate. In order to achieve this GABA production level, pretreatment of the date residue with carbohydrate-degrading enzymes, i.e., cellulase and pectinase, was necessary. All ingredients used for this GABA fermentation were known as being edible. These results provide us with a solution for the increasing commercial demand for GABA in food industry with the use of date residue that has been often discarded. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Matrix of response functions for xenon gamma-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shustov, A.E.; Vlasik, K.F.; Grachev, V.M.; Dmitrenko, V.V.; Novikov, A.S.; P'ya, S.N.; Ulin, S.E.; Uteshev, Z.M.; Chernysheva, I.V.

    2014-01-01

    An approach of creation of response matrix using simulation GEANT4 gamma-ray Monte-Carlo method has been described for gamma-ray spectrometer based on high pressure xenon impulse ionization chamber with a shielding grid [ru

  4. The modern view of the idea of gamma-aminobutyric acid and its metabolite use to restore the motor function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. G. Rodinskij

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The literature review is devoted to the idea of using gamma-aminobutyric acid and its metabolites as medicines in conditions of peripheral nervous system injury. We examined the modern problems of denervated muscles restoration and a wide range of GABA effects which could be useful in conditions of injury. GABA and its metabolites have elements of nootropic, antihypoxic, organoprotective and anabolic activity. It is obvious that traumas of peripheral nerves lead to degeneration of injured fibers and significant disorders of metabolism at a number of regulatory levels. Regeneration of the nerve and the rate of recovery of muscle activity depend significantly on the level of resistivity of the injured nerve tissue and on possibilities for supply of this tissue by additional energetic reserves. Under the above-mentioned conditions, disorders are determined, to a significant extent, by the development of hypoxia. This is why elucidation of the phenomenology and mechanisms of action of GABA and its metabolites (agent are having, as was mentioned above, protective and antihypoxic properties on the nerve/muscle apparatus and its links under conditions of traumatization of a large nerve is urgent. GABA and its metabolites have an antinociceptive activity which helps not only in inhibition of central and spinal neurons, but also helps to decrease pain sensitivity of patient after traumatic neuropathy to forming of motivation to recovery rehabilitation. Besides above mentioned, the ability of GABA to increase concentration of Ca2 + after injury was discussed. This ability may affect the expression of genes, the direction of the growth cone, and, perhaps, reduce cell death. Conclusion. This indicates that the GABA has a selectivity of action to the damaged structure and can be prospective agent for regenerative therapy.

  5. In vivo gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate levels in people with first-episode schizophrenia: A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, P W; Lui, Simon S Y; Hung, Karen S Y; Chan, Raymond C K; Chan, Queenie; Sham, P C; Cheung, Eric F C; Mak, Henry K F

    2018-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) dysfunction and its consequent imbalance are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Reduced GABA production would lead to a disinhibition of glutamatergic neurons and subsequently cause a disruption of the modulation between GABAergic interneurons and glutamatergic neurons. In this study, levels of GABA, Glx (summation of glutamate and glutamine), and other metabolites in the anterior cingulate cortex were measured and compared between first-episode schizophrenia subjects and healthy controls (HC). Diagnostic potential of GABA and Glx as upstream biomarkers for schizophrenia was explored. Nineteen first-episode schizophrenia subjects and fourteen HC participated in this study. Severity of clinical symptoms of patients was measured with Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Metabolites were measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and quantified using internal water as reference. First-episode schizophrenia subjects revealed reduced GABA and myo-inositol (mI), and increased Glx and choline (Cho), compared to HC. No significant correlation was found between metabolite levels and PANSS scores. Receiver operator characteristics analyses showed Glx had higher sensitivity and specificity (84.2%, 92.9%) compared to GABA (73.7%, 64.3%) for differentiating schizophrenia patients from HC. Combined model of both GABA and Glx revealed the best sensitivity and specificity (89.5%, 100%). This study simultaneously showed reduction in GABA and elevation in Glx in first-episode schizophrenia subjects, and this might provide insights on explaining the disruption of modulation between GABAergic interneurons and glutamatergic neurons. Elevated Cho might indicate increased membrane turnover; whereas reduced mI might reflect dysfunction of the signal transduction pathway. In vivo Glx and GABA revealed their diagnostic potential for schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Regulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Exocytosis and Gamma-Aminobutyric Acidergic Interneuron Synapse by the Schizophrenia Susceptibility Gene Dysbindin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qiang; Yang, Feng; Xiao, Yixin; Tan, Shawn; Husain, Nilofer; Ren, Ming; Hu, Zhonghua; Martinowich, Keri; Ng, Julia S; Kim, Paul J; Han, Weiping; Nagata, Koh-Ichi; Weinberger, Daniel R; Je, H Shawn

    2016-08-15

    Genetic variations in dystrobrevin binding protein 1 (DTNBP1 or dysbindin-1) have been implicated as risk factors in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The encoded protein dysbindin-1 functions in the regulation of synaptic activity and synapse development. Intriguingly, a loss of function mutation in Dtnbp1 in mice disrupted both glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acidergic transmission in the cerebral cortex; pyramidal neurons displayed enhanced excitability due to reductions in inhibitory synaptic inputs. However, the mechanism by which reduced dysbindin-1 activity causes inhibitory synaptic deficits remains unknown. We investigated the role of dysbindin-1 in the exocytosis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) from cortical excitatory neurons, organotypic brain slices, and acute slices from dysbindin-1 mutant mice and determined how this change in BDNF exocytosis transsynaptically affected the number of inhibitory synapses formed on excitatory neurons via whole-cell recordings, immunohistochemistry, and live-cell imaging using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. A decrease in dysbindin-1 reduces the exocytosis of BDNF from cortical excitatory neurons, and this reduction in BDNF exocytosis transsynaptically resulted in reduced inhibitory synapse numbers formed on excitatory neurons. Furthermore, application of exogenous BDNF rescued the inhibitory synaptic deficits caused by the reduced dysbindin-1 level in both cultured cortical neurons and slice cultures. Taken together, our results demonstrate that these two genes linked to risk for schizophrenia (BDNF and dysbindin-1) function together to regulate interneuron development and cortical network activity. This evidence supports the investigation of the association between dysbindin-1 and BDNF in humans with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Priming of plant innate immunity by rhizobacteria and β-aminobutyric acid: differences and similarities in regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ent, S. van der; Hulten, M.H.A. van; Pozo, Maria J.; Czechowski, Tomasz; Udvardi, Michael K.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Ton, J.

    Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS417r bacteria and β-aminobutyric acid can induce disease resistance in Arabidopsis, which is based on priming of defence. In this study, we examined the differences and similarities of WCS417r- and β-aminobutyric acid-induced priming. Both WCS417r and β-aminobutyric acid

  8. Gamma-aminobutyric acid agonists for antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabed, Samer; Latifeh, Youssef; Mohammad, Husam Aldeen; Bergman, Hanna

    2018-04-17

    Chronic antipsychotic drug treatment may cause tardive dyskinesia (TD), a long-term movement disorder. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist drugs, which have intense sedative properties and may exacerbate psychotic symptoms, have been used to treat TD. 1. Primary objectiveThe primary objective was to determine whether using non-benzodiazepine GABA agonist drugs for at least six weeks was clinically effective for the treatment of antipsychotic-induced TD in people with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or other chronic mental illnesses.2. Secondary objectivesThe secondary objectives were as follows.To examine whether any improvement occurred with short periods of intervention (less than six weeks) and, if this did occur, whether this effect was maintained at longer periods of follow-up.To examine whether there was a differential effect between the various compounds.To test the hypothesis that GABA agonist drugs are most effective for a younger age group (less than 40 years old). We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (last searched April 2017), inspected references of all identified studies for further trials, and, when necessary, contacted authors of trials for additional information. We included randomised controlled trials of non-benzodiazepine GABA agonist drugs in people with antipsychotic-induced TD and schizophrenia or other chronic mental illness. Two review authors independently selected and critically appraised studies, extracted and analysed data on an intention-to-treat basis. Where possible and appropriate we calculated risk ratios (RRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). For continuous data we calculated mean differences (MD). We assumed that people who left early had no improvement. We contacted investigators to obtain missing information. We assessed risk of bias for included studies and created a 'Summary of findings' table using GRADE. We included 11 studies that randomised 343 people. Overall, the risk of bias

  9. Gamma-ray response of NE-213 measured between 2 and 11.5 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, D.T.; Wehring, B.W.; Starr, R.D.

    1976-01-01

    Because of the capability to discriminate between neutrons and gamma rays, NE-213 scintillators are useful as both fast-neutron and gamma-ray spectrometers. However, measured NE-213 Compton-recoil spectra require unfolding to yield gamma-ray energy spectra which entails a detailed knowledge of the gamma-ray response of the NE-213 detector system. Absolute measurements of the gamma-ray response of an NE-213 scintillator in the energy range of 2 to 11.5 MeV were made. The measurements were made using the University of Illinois superconducting electron microtron equipped with a gamma-ray monochromator. The response measurements will be used to construct a gamma-ray response matrix for NE-213 to be used with the FORIST unfolding code

  10. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) treatment decreases the inflammatory response in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Hougen, H P; Rygaard, J

    1996-01-01

    In a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis (CF), we studied whether the inflammatory response could be altered by intraperitoneal treatment with recombinant rat interferon-gamma (rrIFN-gamma). Rats were treated either before or after intratracheal ch...

  11. Alternate cadmium exposure differentially affects the content of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine within the hypothalamus, median eminence, striatum and prefrontal cortex of male rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquifino, A.I. [Dept. de Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular III, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Seara, R.; Fernandez-Rey, E.; Lafuente, A. [Lab. de Toxicologia, Universidad de Vigo, Orense (Spain)

    2001-05-01

    This work examines changes of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine contents in the hypothalamus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of the rat after an alternate schedule of cadmium administration. Age-associated changes were also evaluated, of those before puberty and after adult age. In control rats GABA content decreased with age in the median eminence and in anterior, mediobasal and posterior hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex and the striatum. Taurine content showed similar results with the exception of mediobasal hypothalamus and striatum, where no changes were detected. In pubertal rats treated with cadmium from 30 to 60 days of life, GABA content significantly decreased in all brain regions except in the striatum. When cadmium was administered from day 60 to 90 of life, GABA content was significantly changed in prefrontal cortex only compared with the age matched controls. Taurine content showed similar results in pubertal rats, with the exception of the median eminence and the mediobasal hypothalamus, neither of which showed a change. However, when cadmium was administered to rats from day 60 to 90 of life, taurine content only changed in prefrontal cortex compared with the age matched controls. These results suggest that cadmium differentially affects GABA and taurine contents within the hypothalamus, median eminence, striatum and prefrontal cortex as a function of age. (orig.)

  12. Alternate cadmium exposure differentially affects the content of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine within the hypothalamus, median eminence, striatum and prefrontal cortex of male rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esquifino, A.I.; Seara, R.; Fernandez-Rey, E.; Lafuente, A.

    2001-01-01

    This work examines changes of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine contents in the hypothalamus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of the rat after an alternate schedule of cadmium administration. Age-associated changes were also evaluated, of those before puberty and after adult age. In control rats GABA content decreased with age in the median eminence and in anterior, mediobasal and posterior hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex and the striatum. Taurine content showed similar results with the exception of mediobasal hypothalamus and striatum, where no changes were detected. In pubertal rats treated with cadmium from 30 to 60 days of life, GABA content significantly decreased in all brain regions except in the striatum. When cadmium was administered from day 60 to 90 of life, GABA content was significantly changed in prefrontal cortex only compared with the age matched controls. Taurine content showed similar results in pubertal rats, with the exception of the median eminence and the mediobasal hypothalamus, neither of which showed a change. However, when cadmium was administered to rats from day 60 to 90 of life, taurine content only changed in prefrontal cortex compared with the age matched controls. These results suggest that cadmium differentially affects GABA and taurine contents within the hypothalamus, median eminence, striatum and prefrontal cortex as a function of age. (orig.)

  13. Modulation of the release of norepinephrine by gamma-aminobutyric acid and morphine in the frontal cerebral cortex of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peoples, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    Agents that enhance gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA, neurotransmission modulate certain effects of opioids, such as analgesia. Opioid analgesia is mediated in part by norepinephrine in the forebrain. In this study, the interactions between morphine and GABAergic agents on release of [ 3 H] norepinephrine from rat frontal cerebral cortical slices were examined. GABA, 5 x 10 -5 -10 -3 M, enhanced potassium stimulated [ 3 H] norepinephrine release and reversed the inhibitory effect of morphine in a noncompetitive manner. GABA did not enhance release of [ 3 H] norepinephrine stimulated by the calcium ionophore A23187. The effect of GABA was reduced by the GABA A receptor antagonists bicuculline methiodide or picrotoxin, and by the selective inhibitor of GABA uptake SKF 89976A, but was blocked completely only when bicuculline methiodide and SKF 89976A were used in combination. The GABA A agonist muscimol, 10 -4 M, mimicked the effect of GABA, but the GABA B agonist (±)baclofen, 10 -4 M, did not affect the release of [ 3 H] norepinephrine in the absence or the presence of morphine. Thus GABA appears to produce this effect by stimulating GABA uptake and GABA A , but not GABA B , receptors. In contrast to the results that would be predicted for an event involving GABA A receptors, however, the effect of GABA did not desensitize, and benzodiazepine agonists did not enhance the effect of GABA at any concentration tested between 10 -8 and 10 -4 M. Thus these receptors may constitute a subclass of GABA A receptors. These results support a role of GABA uptake and GABA A receptors in enhancing the release of norepinephrine and modulating its inhibition by opioids in the frontal cortex of the rat

  14. Modulation of the release of norepinephrine by gamma-aminobutyric acid and morphine in the frontal cerebral cortex of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peoples, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    Agents that enhance gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA, neurotransmission modulate certain effects of opioids, such as analgesia. Opioid analgesia is mediated in part by norepinephrine in the forebrain. In this study, the interactions between morphine and GABAergic agents on release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine from rat frontal cerebral cortical slices were examined. GABA, 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}-10{sup {minus}3} M, enhanced potassium stimulated ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine release and reversed the inhibitory effect of morphine in a noncompetitive manner. GABA did not enhance release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine stimulated by the calcium ionophore A23187. The effect of GABA was reduced by the GABA{sub A} receptor antagonists bicuculline methiodide or picrotoxin, and by the selective inhibitor of GABA uptake SKF 89976A, but was blocked completely only when bicuculline methiodide and SKF 89976A were used in combination. The GABA{sub A} agonist muscimol, 10{sup {minus}4} M, mimicked the effect of GABA, but the GABA{sub B} agonist ({plus minus})baclofen, 10{sup {minus}4} M, did not affect the release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine in the absence or the presence of morphine. Thus GABA appears to produce this effect by stimulating GABA uptake and GABA{sub A}, but not GABA{sub B}, receptors. In contrast to the results that would be predicted for an event involving GABA{sub A} receptors, however, the effect of GABA did not desensitize, and benzodiazepine agonists did not enhance the effect of GABA at any concentration tested between 10{sup {minus}8} and 10{sup {minus}4} M. Thus these receptors may constitute a subclass of GABA{sub A} receptors. These results support a role of GABA uptake and GABA{sub A} receptors in enhancing the release of norepinephrine and modulating its inhibition by opioids in the frontal cortex of the rat.

  15. Study on Processing Technology and Quality of Moringa oleifera leaves with y - Aminobutyric Acid

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    Wei Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain the high level of γ-aminobutyric acid Moringa oleifera leaves, Use 7% sodium glutamate solution to soak the fresh Moringa oleifera leaves, study effect of different treatment times and three different drying methods( hot air drying, vacuum freeze drying, shadow drying on the formation of y-aminobutyric acid and quality (total flavonoids, soluble sugar, amino acids, polyphenols, colorof dried Moringa oleifera leaves. The results indicated that shadow-dried Moringa oleifera leaves had the hightest retention of γ-aminobutyric acid, but its browning degree were not preferable, soluble sugar was damaged gravely, and its vulnerable to weather conditions. Vacuum freeze dried Moringa oleifera leaves had the hightest retention of flavonoids, polyphenols and amino acids. The y-aminobutyric acid content of Vacuum freeze dried and hot air dried Moringa oleifera leaves had no much difference. Hot air dried Moringa oleifera leaves browning degree were preferable, it’s had an moderate content of soluble sugar and amino acids, the short drying time is characteristics of this drying method.with the treatment time increased, the content of γ-aminobutyric acid and amino acids content first increased and then decreased. Flavonoids and polyphenols content first decreased and then increased. Soluble sugar content decreased. In summary, after soaking with 7% sodium glutamate solution for 10h, then dried by hot air drying(drying temperature of 60°C, was the most suitable way for industrial production of the high level of γ-aminobutyric acid Moringa oleifera leaves.

  16. Potentiation of gamma aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAAR by Ethanol: How are inhibitory receptors affected?

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    Benjamin eFörstera

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an increase in the understanding of ethanol actions on the type A -aminobutyric acid chloride channel (GABAAR, a member of the pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs. However, the mechanism by which ethanol potentiates the complex is still not fully understood and a number of publications have shown contradictory results. Thus many questions still remain unresolved requiring further studies for a better comprehension of this effect. The present review concentrates on the involvement of GABAAR in the acute actions of ethanol and specifically focuses on the immediate, direct or indirect, synaptic and extra-synaptic modulatory effects. To elaborate on the immediate, direct modulation of GABAAR by acute ethanol exposure, electrophysiological studies investigating the importance of different subunits, and data from receptor mutants will be examined. We will also discuss the nature of the putative binding sites for ethanol based on structural data obtained from other members of the pLGICs family. Finally, we will briefly highlight the glycine gated chloride channel (GlyR, another member of the pLGIC family, as a suitable target for the development of new pharmacological tools.

  17. Cloning and characterization of a functional human ¿-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter, human GAT-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Bolette; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Jensen, Anders A.

    2007-01-01

    Plasma membrane gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters act to terminate GABA neurotransmission in the mammalian brain. Intriguingly four distinct GABA transporters have been cloned from rat and mouse, whereas only three functional homologs of these transporters have been cloned from human....... The aim of this study therefore was to search for this fourth missing human transporter. Using a bioinformatics approach, we successfully identified and cloned the full-length cDNA of a so far uncharacterized human GABA transporter (GAT). The predicted protein displays high sequence similarity to rat GAT......-2 and mouse GAT3, and in accordance with the nomenclature for rat GABA transporters, we therefore refer to the transporter as human GAT-2. We used electrophysiological and cell-based methods to demonstrate that this protein is a functional transporter of GABA. The transport was saturable...

  18. Study on Process Parameters of Extraction of γ-aminobutyric Acid Instant Moringa oleifera Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiaokun, Fu; Suhui, Zhang; Neng, Liu; Jihua, Li; Shaodan, Peng; Changqing, Guo; Wei, Zhou

    2017-12-01

    To preliminary optimize the extraction of γ-aminobutyric acid instant tea powder from Moringa oleifera leaves,taking γ-aminobutyric acid Moringa oleifera leaves as raw material and pure water as extraction solvent and GABA content as the main evaluation index,the effects of extraction temperature, ratio of liquid to material and extraction time on biochemical components and sensory qualities of Moringa oleifera leaves extractor was studied by using one-factor-at-a-time experiment.The results showed shat the optimal extraction conditions for γ-aminobutyric acid instant tea powder were extraction temperature of 60 °C, material-to-water ration of 1:10 and extraction time of 40 min.

  19. Dual orexin receptor antagonists show distinct effects on locomotor performance, ethanol interaction and sleep architecture relative to gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres D. Ramirez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs are a potential treatment for insomnia that function by blocking both the orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors. The objective of the current study was to further confirm the impact of therapeutic mechanisms targeting insomnia on locomotor coordination and ethanol interaction using DORAs and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA-A receptor modulators of distinct chemical structure and pharmacologic properties in the context of sleep-promoting potential. The current study compared rat motor co-ordination after administration of DORAs, DORA-12 and almorexant, and GABA-A receptor modulators, zolpidem, eszopiclone and diazepam, alone or each in combination with ethanol. Motor performance was assessed by measuring time spent walking on a rotarod apparatus. Zolpidem, eszopiclone and diazepam (0.3–30 mg/kg administered orally [PO] impaired rotarod performance in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, all three GABA-A receptor modulators potentiated ethanol- (0.25–1.25 g/kg induced impairment on the rotarod. By contrast, neither DORA-12 (10–100 mg/kg, PO nor almorexant (30–300 mg/kg, PO impaired motor performance alone or in combination with ethanol. In addition, distinct differences in sleep architecture were observed between ethanol, GABA-A receptor modulators (zolpidem, eszopiclone and diazepam and DORA-12 in electroencephalogram studies in rats. These findings provide further evidence that orexin receptor antagonists have an improved motor side-effect profile compared with currently available sleep-promoting agents based on preclinical data and strengthen the rationale for further evaluation of these agents in clinical development.

  20. CHANGES IN SELECTIVITY OF GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID FORMATION EFFECTED BY FERMENTATION CONDITIONS AND MICROORGANISMS RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Kovalovská

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we observe the effect of fermentation conditions and resources of microorganisms for production of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA. The content of produced GABA depends on various conditions such as the amount of precursor, an addition of salt, enzyme and the effect of pH. The highest selectivity of GABA (74.0 % from the precursor (L-monosodium glutamate has been determinate in the follow conditions: in the presence of pre-cultured microorganisms from Encián cheese in amount 1.66 % (w/v the source of microorganisms/volume of the fermentation mixture, after the addition of 0.028 % (w/v of CaCl2/volume of the fermentation mixture, 100 μM of pyridoxal-5-phosphate (P-5-P and the GABA precursor concentration in the fermentation mixture 2.6 mg ml-1 in an atmosphere of gas nitrogen. Pure cultures of lactic acid bacteria increased the selectivity of GABA by an average of 20 % compared with bacteria from the path of Encián.

  1. Plasticity of gamma delta T cells: impact on the anti-tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie eLafont

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The tumor immune microenvironment contributes to tumor initiation, progression and response to therapy. Among the immune cell subsets that play a role in the tumor microenvironment, innate-like T cells that express T cell receptors composed of gamma and delta chains (gamma delta T cells are of particular interest. gamma delta T cells can contribute to the immune response against many tumor types (lymphoma, myeloma, melanoma, breast, colon, lung, ovary and prostate cancer directly through their cytotoxic activity and indirectly by stimulating or regulating the biological functions of other cell types required for the initiation and establishment of the anti-tumor immune response, such as dendritic cells and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. However, the notion that tumor-infiltrating gamma delta T cells are a good prognostic marker in cancer was recently challenged by studies showing that the presence of these cells in the tumor microenvironment was associated with poor prognosis in both breast and colon cancer. These findings suggest that gamma delta T cells may also display pro-tumor activities. Indeed, breast tumor-infiltrating gamma deltaT cells could exert an immunosuppressive activity by negatively regulating DC maturation. Furthermore, recent studies demonstrated that signals from the microenvironment, particularly cytokines, can confer some plasticity to gamma delta T cells and promote their differentiation into gamma delta T cells with regulatory functions. This review focuses on the current knowledge on the functional plasticity of gamma delta T cells and its effect on their anti-tumor activities. It also discusses the putative mechanisms underlying gamma delta T cell expansion, differentiation and recruitment in the tumor microenvironment.

  2. Perinatal exposure to germinated brown rice and its gamma amino-butyric acid-rich extract prevents high fat diet-induced insulin resistance in first generation rat offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadiza Altine Adamu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence suggests perinatal environments influence the risk of developing insulin resistance. Objective: The present study was aimed at determining the effects of intrauterine exposure to germinated brown rice (GBR and GBR-derived gammaaminobutyric acid (GABA extract on epigenetically mediated high fat diet–induced insulin resistance. Design: Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were fed high-fat diet (HFD, HFD+GBR, or HFD+GABA throughout pregnancy until 4 weeks postdelivery. The pups were weighed weekly and maintained on normal pellet until 8 weeks postdelivery. After sacrifice, biochemical markers of obesity and insulin resistance including oral glucose tolerance test, adiponectin, leptin, and retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4 were measured. Hepatic gene expression changes and the global methylation and histone acetylation levels were also evaluated. Results: Detailed analyses revealed that mothers given GBR and GABA extract, and their offspring had increased adiponectin levels and reduced insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, leptin, oxidative stress, and RBP4 levels, while their hepatic mRNA levels of GLUT2 and IPF1 were increased. Furthermore, GBR and GABA extract lowered global DNA methylation levels and modulated H3 and H4 acetylation levels. Conclusions: These results showed that intrauterine exposure to GBR-influenced metabolic outcomes in offspring of rats with underlying epigenetic changes and transcriptional implications that led to improved glucose homeostasis.

  3. Camel molar tooth enamel response to gamma rays using EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Faramawy, N A; El-Somany, I; Mansour, A; Maghraby, A M; Eissa, H; Wieser, A

    2018-03-01

    Tooth enamel samples from molar teeth of camel were prepared using a combined procedure of mechanical and chemical tooth treatment. Based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the dose response of tooth enamel samples was examined and compared to that of human enamel. The EPR dose response of the tooth enamel samples was obtained through irradiation to gamma doses from 1 Gy up to 100 kGy. It was found that the radiation-induced EPR signal increased linearly with gamma dose for all studied tooth enamel samples, up to about 15 kGy. At higher doses, the dose response curve leveled off. The results revealed that the location of the native signal of camel tooth enamel was similar to that of enamel from human molars at 2.00644, but different from that of enamel from cows and goats. In addition, the peak-to-peak width (ΔH pp ) for human and camel molar teeth was similar. It was also found that the response of camel enamel to gamma radiation was 36% lower than that of human enamel. In conclusion, the results indicate the suitability of camel teeth for retrospective gamma dosimetry.

  4. Camel molar tooth enamel response to gamma rays using EPR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Faramawy, N.A.; El-Somany, I. [Ain Shams University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo (Egypt); Mansour, A. [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Maghraby, A.M.; Eissa, H. [National Institute of Standards (NIS), Ionizing Radiation Metrology Laboratory, Giza (Egypt); Wieser, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Department of Radiation Sciences, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    Tooth enamel samples from molar teeth of camel were prepared using a combined procedure of mechanical and chemical tooth treatment. Based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the dose response of tooth enamel samples was examined and compared to that of human enamel. The EPR dose response of the tooth enamel samples was obtained through irradiation to gamma doses from 1 Gy up to 100 kGy. It was found that the radiation-induced EPR signal increased linearly with gamma dose for all studied tooth enamel samples, up to about 15 kGy. At higher doses, the dose response curve leveled off. The results revealed that the location of the native signal of camel tooth enamel was similar to that of enamel from human molars at 2.00644, but different from that of enamel from cows and goats. In addition, the peak-to-peak width (ΔH{sub pp}) for human and camel molar teeth was similar. It was also found that the response of camel enamel to gamma radiation was 36% lower than that of human enamel. In conclusion, the results indicate the suitability of camel teeth for retrospective gamma dosimetry. (orig.)

  5. Submerged fermentation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus YS9 for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production

    OpenAIRE

    Lin,Qian

    2013-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in central nervous system, and its application in drugs and functional foods has attracted great attention. To enhance production of y-aminobutyric acid, Lactobacillus rhamnosus YS9, a strain isolated from Chinese traditional fermented food pickled vegetable, was grown under submerged fermentation. Its cultivation conditions were investigated. When culture pH condition was adjusted to the optimal pH of glutamate decarboxyl...

  6. Neocortical gamma oscillations in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedek, Krisztina; Berenyi, Antal; Gombkoto, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Absence seizures in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) may in part be explained by a decrease in phasic GABAA (type-A c-aminobutyric acid) receptor function, but the mechanisms are only partly understood. Here we studied the relation between ictal and interictal spike......-wave discharges (SWDs) and electroencephalography (EEG) gamma oscillatory activity (30-60 Hz) in patients with IGE. Methods: EEG recordings were obtained of 14 children with IGE (mean age, 8.5 +/- 5 years) and 14 age-and sex-matched controls. Time-frequency analysis of each seizure and seizure-free control epochs...... was performed and cross-coherences of neocortical gamma oscillations were calculated to describe interictal and ictal characteristics of generalized seizures. Results: SWDs were characterized with an abrupt increase of oscillatory activity of 34 and 13-60 Hz, peaking at 3-4 and 30-60 Hz, and with a simultaneous...

  7. 7T Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid, Glutamate, and Glutamine Reveals Altered Concentrations in Patients With Schizophrenia and Healthy Siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Katharine N; Rösler, Lara; Wijnen, Jannie P; Boer, Vincent O; Klomp, Dennis W J; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S; Neggers, Sebastiaan F W

    2017-03-15

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction model of schizophrenia predicts dysfunction in both glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) transmission. We addressed this hypothesis by measuring GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus glutamate concentrations in vivo in patients with schizophrenia using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7T, which allows separation of metabolites that would otherwise overlap at lower field strengths. In addition, we investigated whether altered levels of GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus glutamate reflect genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia by including healthy first-degree relatives. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7T was performed in 21 patients with chronic schizophrenia who were taking medication, 23 healthy first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia, and 24 healthy nonrelatives. Glutamate, glutamine, and GABA were measured cortically and subcortically in bilateral basal ganglia and occipital cortex. Patients with schizophrenia had reduced cortical GABA compared with healthy relatives and the combined sample of healthy relatives and healthy nonrelatives, suggesting that altered GABAergic systems in schizophrenia are associated with either disease state or medication effects. Reduced cortical glutamine relative to healthy control subjects was observed in patients with schizophrenia and the combined sample of healthy relatives and patients with schizophrenia, suggesting that altered glutamatergic metabolite levels are associated with illness liability. No group differences were found in the basal ganglia. Taken together, these findings are consistent with alterations in GABAergic and glutamatergic systems in patients with schizophrenia and provide novel insights into these systems in healthy relatives. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ca2+ and aminoguanidine on γ-aminobutyric acid accumulation in germinating soybean under hypoxia–NaCl stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runqiang Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, a nonproteinous amino acid with some benefits on human health, is synthesized by GABA-shunt and the polyamine degradation pathway in plants. The regulation of Ca2+ and aminoguanidine on GABA accumulation in germinating soybean (Glycine max L. under hypoxia-NaCl stress was investigated in this study. Exogenous Ca2+ increased GABA content significantly by enhancing glutamate decarboxylase gene expression and its activity. Addition of ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid into the culture solution reduced GABA content greatly due to the inhibition of glutamate decarboxylase activity. Aminoguanidine reduced over 85% of diamine oxidase activity, and 33.28% and 36.35% of GABA content in cotyledon and embryo, respectively. Under hypoxia–NaCl stress, the polyamine degradation pathway contributed 31.61–39.43% of the GABA formation in germinating soybean.

  9. Dose-response of photographic emulsions under gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Dai Nghiep; Do Thi Nguyet Minh; Le Van Vinh

    2003-01-01

    Photographic emulsion is irradiated under gamma rays irradiation of 137 Cs in the IAEA/WHO secondary standard dosimetry laboratory. Dose-response of the film is established. The sensitivity of the film is determined. The dose-rate effect is studied. (author)

  10. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency alters levels of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid in brain tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M. Jadavji

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR is an enzyme key regulator in folate metabolism. Deficiencies in MTHFR result in increased levels of homocysteine, which leads to reduced levels of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM. In the brain, SAM donates methyl groups to catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT, which is involved in neurotransmitter analysis. Using the MTHFR-deficient mouse model the purpose of this study was to investigate levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and amino acid levels in brain tissue. MTHFR deficiency affected levels of both glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid in within the cerebellum and hippocampus. Mthfr−/− mice had reduced levels of glutamate in the amygdala and γ-aminobutyric acid in the thalamus. The excitatory mechanisms of homocysteine through activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor in brain tissue might alter levels of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid.

  11. Relationship of nocturnal concentrations of melatonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid and total antioxidants in peripheral blood with insomnia after stroke: study protocol for a prospective non-randomized controlled trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Fang Li; Tong Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Melatonin and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) have been shown to regulate sleep. The nocturnal concentrations of melatonin, GABA and total antioxidants may relate to insomnia in stroke patients. In this prospective single-center non-randomized controlled clinical trial performed in the China Rehabilitation Research Center, we analyzed the relationship of nocturnal concentrations of melatonin, GABA and total antioxidants with insomnia after stroke. Patients during rehabilitation of stroke were recruited and assigned to the insomnia group or non-insomnia group. Simultaneously, persons without stroke or insomnia served as normal controls. Each group contained 25 cases. The primary outcome was nocturnal concentrations of melatonin, GABA and total antioxidants in peripheral blood. The secondary outcomes were Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Insomnia Severity Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (Chinese version), and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. The relationship of nocturnal concentrations of melatonin, GABA and total antioxidants with insomnia after stroke was analyzed and showed that they were lower in the insomnia group than in the non-insomnia group. The severity of stroke was higher in the insomnia group than in the non-insomnia group. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the nocturnal concentrations of melatonin and GABA were associated with insomnia after stroke. This trial was regis-tered at ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT03202121.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of the scattered component of neutron capture prompt gamma-ray analyzer responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Y.; Verghese, K.; Gardner, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a major part of our efforts to simulate the entire spectral response of the neutron capture prompt gamma-ray analyzer for bulk media (or conveyor belt) samples by the Monte Carlo method. This would allow one to use such a model to augment or, in most cases, essentially replace experiments in the calibration and optimum design of these analyzers. In previous work, we simulated the unscattered gamma-ray intensities, but would like to simulate the entire spectral response as we did with the energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence analyzers. To accomplish this, one must account for the scattered gamma rays as well as the unscattered and one must have available the detector response function to translate the incident gamma-ray spectrum calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation into the detected pulse-height spectrum. We recently completed our work on the germanium detector response function, and the present paper describes our efforts to simulate the entire spectral response by using it with Monte Carlo predicted unscattered and scattered gamma rays

  13. Gamma prime precipitation modeling and strength responses in powder metallurgy superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jian

    Precipitation-hardened nickel-based superalloys have been widely used as high temperature structural materials in gas turbine engine applications for more than 50 years. Powder metallurgy (P/M) technology was introduced as an innovative manufacturing process to overcome severe segregation and poor workability of alloys with high alloying contents. The excellent mechanical properties of P/M superalloys also depend upon the characteristic microstructures, including grain size and size distribution of gamma' precipitates. Heat treatment is the most critical processing step that has ultimate influences on the microstructure, and hence, on the mechanical properties of the materials. The main objective of this research was to study the gamma ' precipitation kinetics in various cooling circumstances and also study the strength response to the cooling history in two model alloys, Rne88DT and U720LI. The research is summarized below: (1) An experimental method was developed to allow accurate simulation and control of any desired cooling profile. Two novel cooling methods were introduced: continuous cooling and interrupt cooling. Isothermal aging was also carried out. (2) The growth and coarsening kinetics of the cooling gamma' precipitates were experimentally studied under different cooling and aging conditions, and the empirical equations were established. It was found that the cooling gamma' precipitate versus the cooling rate follows a power law. The gamma' precipitate size versus aging time obeys the LSW cube law for coarsening. (3) The strengthening of the material responses to the cooling rate and the decreasing temperature during cooling was investigated in both alloys. The tensile strength increases with the cooling rate. In addition, the non-monotonic response of strength versus interrupt temperature is of great interest. (4) An energy-driven model integrated with the classic growth and coarsen theories was successfully embedded in a computer program developed to

  14. The immunomodulatory effects of interferon-gamma on mature B-lymphocyte responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, A; Carballido, J; Griffel, H; Hochkeppel, H K; Wetzel, G D

    1989-06-15

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) exerts a broad spectrum of activities which affect the responses of mature B-cells. It strongly inhibits B-cell activation, acts as a B-cell growth factor (BCGF), and also induces final differentiation to immunoglobulin (Ig) production. IFN-gamma is deeply involved in the differential control of isotype expression, as it enhances IgG2a production and suppresses both IgG1 and IgE production. Although it is now possible to draw a general scheme of the effects of IFN-gamma on B-cells, a number of paradoxical results still exist in the field. In this manuscript, different experimental systems are analyzed in an attempt to explain these apparent paradoxes.

  15. Thermoluminescent response of aluminium oxide thin films subject to gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrieta, A.; Escobar A, L.; Camps, E.; Villagran, E.; Gonzalez, P.R

    2006-07-01

    The thermoluminescent (TL) properties of amorphous aluminium oxide thin films (thicknesses as low as 0.3 {mu}m) subjected to gamma (Co-60) irradiation are reported. Aluminium oxide thin films were prepared by laser ablation from an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} target using a Nd: YAG laser with emission at the fundamental line. The films were exposed to gamma radiation (Co-60) in order to study their TL response. Thermoluminescence glow curves exhibited two peaks at 110 and 176 C. The high temperature peak shows good stability and 30% fading in the first 5 days after irradiation. A linear relationship between absorbed dose and the thermoluminescent response for doses span from 150 mGy to 100 Gy was observed. These results suggest that aluminium oxide thin films are suitable for detection and monitoring of gamma radiation. (Author)

  16. Brain Targeted Intranasal Zaleplon Nano-emulsion: In-Vitro Characterization and Assessment of Gamma Aminobutyric Acid Levels in rabbits' Brain and Plasma at low and high Doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elrasheed, Eman; El-Helaly, Sara Nageeb; El-Ashmoony, Manal M; Salah, Salwa

    2017-11-30

    Zaleplon is a pyrazolopyrimidin derivative hypnotic drug indicated for the short-term management of insomnia. Zaleplon belongs to Class II drugs, according to the biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS), showing poor solubility and high permeability. It undergoes extensive first-pass hepatic metabolism after oral absorption, with only 30% of Zaleplon being systemically available. It is available in tablet form which is unable to overcome the previous problems. The aim of this study is to enhance solubility and bioavailability via utilizing nanotechnology in the formulation of intranasal Zaleplon nano-emulsion (ZP-NE) to bypass the barriers and deliver an effective therapy to the brain. Screening studies were carried out wherein the solubility of zaleplon in various oils, surfactants(S) and co-surfactants(CoS) were estimated. Pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were constructed and various nano-emulsion formulations were prepared. These formulations were subjected to thermodynamic stability, in-vitro characterization, histopathological studies and assessment of the gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) level in plasma and brain in rabbits compared to the market product (Sleep aid®). Stable NEs were successfully developed with a particle size range of 44.57±3.351 to 136.90±1.62 nm. A NE composed of 10% Miglyol® 812, 40%Cremophor® RH40 40%Transcutol® HP and 10% water successfully enhanced the bioavailability and brain targeting in the rabbits, showing a three to four folds increase than the marketed product. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Effects of intraperitoneal administration of the GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulator 2,6-di tert-butyl-4-(2-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-propyl)-phenol (CGP7930) on food intake in non-deprived rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenezer, Ivor S

    2012-09-05

    γ-Aminobutyric acid-(B) (GABA(B)) receptor positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) act on an allosteric site on the GABA(B) receptor to potentiate the effects of GABA and GABA(B) receptor agonists. It has previously been demonstrated that the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen increases food intake in non-deprived rats. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the GABA(B) receptor PAM 2,6-di tert-butyl-4-(2-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-propyl)-phenol (CGP7930) would (i) increase food intake, and (ii) potentiate the hyperphagic effects of baclofen in rats. In Experiment 1, the effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of CGP7930 (1, 6 and 12 mg/kg) was investigated on food intake in non-deprived male Wistar rats. The 12 mg/kg dose of CGP7930 significantly increased cumulative food intake 30, 60 and 120 min (PGABA and GABA(B) receptor agonists by allosteric modulation of the GABA(B) receptor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A method for synthesizing response functions of NaI detectors to gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sie, S.H.

    1978-08-01

    A simple method of parametrizing the response function of NaI detectors to gamma rays is described, based on decomposition of the pulse-height spectrum into components associated with the actual detection processes. Smooth dependence of the derived parameters on the gamma-ray energy made it possible to generate a lineshape for any gamma-ray energy by suitable interpolation techniques. The method is applied in analysis of spectra measured with a 7.6 x 7.6 cm NaI detector in continuum gamma-ray study following (HI,xn) reaction

  19. Submerged fermentation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus YS9 for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in central nervous system, and its application in drugs and functional foods has attracted great attention. To enhance production of y-aminobutyric acid, Lactobacillus rhamnosus YS9, a strain isolated from Chinese traditional fermented food pickled vegetable, was grown under submerged fermentation. Its cultivation conditions were investigated. When culture pH condition was adjusted to the optimal pH of glutamate decarboxylase activity, culture of Lb. rhamnosus YS9 in medium supplemented with 200 mM of monosodium glutamate and 200 µM of pyridoxal phosphate (PLP, produced 187 mM of GABA.

  20. Submerged fermentation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus YS9 for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qian

    2013-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in central nervous system, and its application in drugs and functional foods has attracted great attention. To enhance production of γ-aminobutyric acid, Lactobacillus rhamnosus YS9, a strain isolated from Chinese traditional fermented food pickled vegetable, was grown under submerged fermentation. Its cultivation conditions were investigated. When culture pH condition was adjusted to the optimal pH of glutamate decarboxylase activity, culture of Lb. rhamnosus YS9 in medium supplemented with 200 mM of monosodium glutamate and 200 μM of pyridoxal phosphate (PLP), produced 187 mM of GABA. PMID:24159304

  1. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) signalling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Sunita A; Tyerman, Stephen D; Gilliham, Matthew; Xu, Bo

    2017-05-01

    The role of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as a signal in animals has been documented for over 60 years. In contrast, evidence that GABA is a signal in plants has only emerged in the last 15 years, and it was not until last year that a mechanism by which this could occur was identified-a plant 'GABA receptor' that inhibits anion passage through the aluminium-activated malate transporter family of proteins (ALMTs). ALMTs are multigenic, expressed in different organs and present on different membranes. We propose GABA regulation of ALMT activity could function as a signal that modulates plant growth, development, and stress response. In this review, we compare and contrast the plant 'GABA receptor' with mammalian GABA A receptors in terms of their molecular identity, predicted topology, mode of action, and signalling roles. We also explore the implications of the discovery that GABA modulates anion flux in plants, its role in signal transduction for the regulation of plant physiology, and predict the possibility that there are other GABA interaction sites in the N termini of ALMT proteins through in silico evolutionary coupling analysis; we also explore the potential interactions between GABA and other signalling molecules.

  2. Antagonistic properties of a natural product-Bicuculline with the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor: studied through electrostatic potential mapping, electronic and vibrational spectra using ab initio and density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Jain, Sudha; Asthana, B P

    2011-12-15

    (+)-Bicuculline (hereinafter referred to as bicuculline), a phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid is of current interest as an antagonist of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Its inhibitor properties have been studied through molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) mapping of this molecule and GABA receptor. The hot site on the potential surface of bicuculline, which is also isosteric with GABA receptor, has been used to interpret the inhibitor property. A systematic quantum chemical study of the possible conformations, their relative stabilities, FT-Raman, FT-IR and UV-vis spectroscopic analysis of bicuculline has been reported. The optimized geometries, wavenumber and intensity of the vibrational bands of all the conformers of bicuculline have been calculated using ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP functional and 6-311G(d,p) basis set. Mulliken atomic charges, HOMO-LUMO gap ΔE, ionization potential, dipole moments and total energy have also been obtained for the optimized geometries of both the molecules. TD-DFT method is used to calculate the electronic absorption parameters in gas phase as well as in solvent environment using integral equation formalism-polarizable continuum model (IEF-PCM) employing 6-31G basis set and the results thus obtained are compared with the UV absorption spectra. The combination of experimental and calculated results provides an insight into the structural and vibrational spectroscopic properties of bicuculline. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. SLC6A1 Mutation and Ketogenic Diet in Epilepsy With Myoclonic-Atonic Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Samantha; Towne, Meghan C; Pearl, Phillip L; Pelletier, Renee C; Genetti, Casie A; Shi, Jiahai; Beggs, Alan H; Agrawal, Pankaj B; Brownstein, Catherine A

    2016-11-01

    Epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures, also known as myoclonic-astatic epilepsy or Doose syndrome, has been recently linked to variants in the SLC6A1 gene. Epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures is often refractory to antiepileptic drugs, and the ketogenic diet is known for treating medically intractable seizures, although the mechanism of action is largely unknown. We report a novel SLC6A1 variant in a patient with epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures, analyze its effects, and suggest a mechanism of action for the ketogenic diet. We describe a ten-year-old girl with epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures and a de novo SLC6A1 mutation who responded well to the ketogenic diet. She carried a c.491G>A mutation predicted to cause p.Cys164Tyr amino acid change, which was identified using whole exome sequencing and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. High-resolution structural modeling was used to analyze the likely effects of the mutation. The SLC6A1 gene encodes a transporter that removes gamma-aminobutyric acid from the synaptic cleft. Mutations in SLC6A1 are known to disrupt the gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter protein 1, affecting gamma-aminobutyric acid levels and causing seizures. The p.Cys164Tyr variant found in our study has not been previously reported, expanding on the variants linked to epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures. A 10-year-old girl with a novel SLC6A1 mutation and epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures had an excellent clinical response to the ketogenic diet. An effect of the diet on gamma-aminobutyric acid reuptake mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter protein 1 is suggested. A personalized approach to epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures patients carrying SLC6A1 mutation and a relationship between epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures due to SLC6A1 mutations, GABAergic drugs, and the ketogenic diet warrants further exploration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Human α1β3γ2L gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors: High-level production and purification in a functional state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostalova, Zuzana; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Liu, Aiping; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Yinghui; Desai, Rooma; Forman, Stuart A; Miller, Keith W

    2014-02-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABA(A)Rs) are the most important inhibitory chloride ion channels in the central nervous system and are major targets for a wide variety of drugs. The subunit compositions of GABA(A)Rs determine their function and pharmacological profile. GABAA Rs are heteropentamers of subunits, and (α1)2 (β3)2 (γ2L)1 is a common subtype. Biochemical and biophysical studies of GABA(A)Rs require larger quantities of receptors of defined subunit composition than are currently available. We previously reported high-level production of active human α1β3 GABA(A)R using tetracycline-inducible stable HEK293 cells. Here we extend the strategy to receptors containing three different subunits. We constructed a stable tetracycline-inducible HEK293-TetR cell line expressing human (N)-FLAG-α1β3γ2L-(C)-(GGS)3 GK-1D4 GABA(A)R. These cells achieved expression levels of 70-90 pmol [(3)H]muscimol binding sites/15-cm plate at a specific activity of 15-30 pmol/mg of membrane protein. Incorporation of the γ2 subunit was confirmed by the ratio of [(3)H]flunitrazepam to [(3)H]muscimol binding sites and sensitivity of GABA-induced currents to benzodiazepines and zinc. The α1β3γ2L GABA(A)Rs were solubilized in dodecyl-D-maltoside, purified by anti-FLAG affinity chromatography and reconstituted in CHAPS/asolectin at an overall yield of ∼ 30%. Typical purifications yielded 1.0-1.5 nmoles of [(3)H]muscimol binding sites/60 plates. Receptors with similar properties could be purified by 1D4 affinity chromatography with lower overall yield. The composition of the purified, reconstituted receptors was confirmed by ligand binding, Western blot, and proteomics. Allosteric interactions between etomidate and [(3)H]muscimol binding were maintained in the purified state. © 2013 The Protein Society.

  5. Dose response of alanine and methyl alanine towards gamma and in-situ alpha irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohapatra, M.; Rajeswari, B.; Bhide, M.K.; Rane, Vinayak; Kadam, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    In situ alpha and external gamma dose response of two ESR (electron spin resonance) dosimetric materials namely alanine and methyl alanine were investigated. It was observed that alanine dosimeter had a better dose response in comparison to methyl alanine for the in-situ alpha irradiation by using 239 Pu powder. On the other hand, in case of gamma radiation, methyl alanine was found to have the sensitivity as twice that of alanine. (author)

  6. Modelling plastic scintillator response to gamma rays using light transport incorporated FLUKA code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjbar Kohan, M. [Physics Department, Tafresh University, Tafresh (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Etaati, G.R. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Physics, Amir Kabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghal-Eh, N., E-mail: ghal-eh@du.ac.ir [School of Physics, Damghan University, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Safari, M.J. [Department of Energy Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Afarideh, H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Physics, Amir Kabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asadi, E. [Department of Physics, Payam-e-Noor University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The response function of NE102 plastic scintillator to gamma rays has been simulated using a joint FLUKA+PHOTRACK Monte Carlo code. The multi-purpose particle transport code, FLUKA, has been responsible for gamma transport whilst the light transport code, PHOTRACK, has simulated the transport of scintillation photons through scintillator and lightguide. The simulation results of plastic scintillator with/without light guides of different surface coverings have been successfully verified with experiments. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A multi-purpose code (FLUKA) and a light transport code (PHOTRACK) have been linked. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hybrid code has been used to generate the response function of an NE102 scintillator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The simulated response functions exhibit a good agreement with experimental data.

  7. Regulation of immune responses in SJL and F1 hybrid mice by gamma-irradiated syngeneic lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, I.R.; Nagase, F.; Bell, M.K.; Ponzio, N.M.; Thorbecke, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    Syngeneic mixed lymphocyte-stimulating la+ lymphomas of SJL mice [reticulum cell sarcoma(s) (RCS)] were found to modulate immune responses in vivo. Simultaneous injection of 2 X 10(7) gamma-irradiated or glutaraldehyde-fixed RCS cells with the antigen sheep red blood cells (SRBC) or 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP)-Ficoll markedly suppressed the subsequent plaque-forming cell response in the spleen. The suppression of the anti-SRBC response was prevented by pretreatment of the mice with cyclophosphamide, whereas the suppression of the anti-TNP-Ficoll response was not affected. RCS injection induced high interferon serum titers within 24 hours after injection, which were not prevented by pretreatment with cyclophosphamide. Injection of gamma-irradiated RCS cells (gamma-RCS) or RCS cell extract 2 days prior to antigen enhanced the anti-SRBC but markedly suppressed the anti- TNP-Ficoll response. Injection of RCS both on day -2 and day 0 enhanced the anti-SRBC response. SJL mice 8-9 months of age showed much less or no suppression when gamma-RCS cells were injected on day 0. Certain F1 hybrids of SJL also showed the gamma-RCS-induced suppression of the anti-SRBC response. Suppression was seen in SJL X BALB.B but not in SJL X BALB/c mice and in SJL X A.TH but not in SJL X A.TL mice, suggesting an I-region effect. F1 hybrids of SJL by B10 background mice showed no significant suppression. Enhancement of the anti-SRBC response by prior injection of gamma-RCS was seen in all F1 hybrid mice examined

  8. Catalogue of response spectra for unfolding in situ gamma-ray pulse-height distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymke, N.

    1982-01-01

    To unfold in situ gamma-ray pulse-height distributions by means of a response matrix technique, the matrix must be in keeping with the measurement geometry, detector size, and energy range to be covered by the measurements. A methodology has been described for determination of standard gamma-ray spectra needed in deriving response matrices and a spectrum catalogue compiled containing graphs and data for the 0-3 MeV (4 x 4 in. NaI(Tl)) and 0-8 MeV (1.5 x 1.5 in. NaI(Tl)) ranges. (author)

  9. High gamma-aminobutyric acid level in cortical tubers in epileptic infants with tuberous sclerosis complex measured with the MEGA-editing J-difference method and a three-Tesla clinical MRI Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taki, Masako Minato; Harada, Masafumi; Mori, Kenji; Kubo, Hitoshi; Nose, Ayumi; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Nishitani, Hiromu

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate plus glutamine (Glx) concentrations in the cortical tubers of patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) using the MEGA-editing J-difference method and a stimulated echo-acquisition mode with a short echo time, and to determine which abnormality was more dominant between GABA and Glx in patients with TSC with epilepsy. This study included six patients with TSC (mean age, 4.3 years) and seven control subjects (mean age, 4.8 years). Measurements were obtained with a three-Tesla apparatus and postprocessing was conducted with an LCModel. The GABA level in the cortical gray matter (cgGABA) was calculated as a result of segmentation in voxels and from the literature values for gray and white matter ratios for GABA. Increased GABA and myo-inositol (mI) concentrations and a decreased N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) concentration were observed in the cortical tubers. The cgGABA level, and cgGABA/NAA and cgGABA/Glx ratios were also higher in patients with TSC than in control subjects. No significant difference was found in Glx concentration between patients with TSC and control subjects. Although the number of patients with TSC in this study was small, the increase in GABA and no significant change in Glx were consistent with previous neurochemical studies and support the hypothesis that brain GABA plays a key role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy during the process of neuronal development.

  10. Responses of commercial broiler chicks to 60Co gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shebaita, M.K.; Kamar, G.A.R.; El-Barkouky, E.E.M.

    1981-01-01

    A total of 360 chicks of Nichols line at one-day old were used in this study. Within each sex, the chicks were divided into three exposure treatments (non-irradiated, 400 rads and 800 rads). The source of irradiation was 60 Co gamma-rays. The results can be summarized as follows: Of the 360 chicks used in this study, only 10 chicks died during the experimental period. Radiation induced a reduction in body weight in both sexes during the growth period. Gamma-rays reduce the feed intake in both sexes. Moreover, the feed conversion ratio for the irradiated chicks was higher than that the non-irradiated birds. While red blood cells and hemoglobin content were higher in the irradiated chicks, white blood cells count and especially lymphocytes did not affect by 60 Co gamma-rays. Gamma-rays had no effect on carcass, bone, meat and giblets as fractions of body weight in both sexes. Moreover, meat water content decreased and meat fat content increased in irradiated chicks. The total length and the total weight of the GI tract decreased due to 60 Co gamma-rays. The response of the different regions of the GI tract to this rays is different. Moreover, the effect of this radiation on the GI tract is dependent upon the body weight irrespective of the sex. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Theoretical studies on the inactivation mechanism of γ-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durak, A T; Gökcan, H; Konuklar, F A S

    2011-07-21

    The inactivation mechanism of γ-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT) in the presence of γ-vinyl-aminobutyric acid, an anti-epilepsy drug, has been studied by means of theoretical calculations. Density functional theory methods have been applied to compare the three experimentally proposed inactivation mechanisms (Silverman et al., J. Biol. Chem., 2004, 279, 363). All the calculations were performed at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. Single point solvent calculations were carried out in water, by means of an integral equation formalism-polarizable continuum model (IEFPCM) at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. The present calculations provide an insight into the mechanistic preferences of the inactivation reaction of GABA-AT. The results also allow us to elucidate the key factors behind the mechanistic preferences. The computations also confirm the importance of explicit water molecules around the reacting center in the proton transfer steps.

  12. Invasive ability of human renal cell carcinoma cell line Caki-2 is accelerated by gamma-aminobutyric acid, via sustained activation of ERK1/2 inducible matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamoto, Teruo; Azuma, Haruhito; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Kiyama, Satoshi; Ubai, Takanobu; Kotake, Yatsugu; Watanabe, Masahito; Katsuoka, Yoji

    2007-10-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was first discovered as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) and has been reported to have a variety of functions, including regulation of cell division, cell differentiation and maturation, and to be involved in the development of certain cancers outside the CNS. In the present study, using the human renal cell carcinoma cell line Caki-2, we demonstrated that GABA stimulation significantly increased the expression of MMP-2 and -9 and subsequently increased the invasive activity of the cancer cells. Because MAPK signaling is one of the key regulators of MMP expression, we further evaluated MAPK signaling after stimulation with GABA. It was found that GABA stimulation promoted the phosphorylation of MAPKs, including ERK1/2, JNK, and p38. ERK1/2 phosphorylation was sustained for up to 12 h, while phosphorylation of JNK and p38 returned to the endogenous level by 30 min. It was noteworthy that the ras/raf/MEK/ERK pathway inhibitor PD98059 attenuated GABA-induced MMP-9 expression and that both PD98059 and MMP inhibitors attenuated the GABA-induced invasive activity of Caki-2 cells. Moreover, data obtained by depletion of the MEK/ERK pathway using interfering RNA transfection of Caki-2 cells clearly corroborated the above results, as both MMP-9 expression and GABA-induced invasive ability were decreased significantly. We also demonstrated that the GABA-induced increase in invasive ability via ERK1/2 up-regulation was mediated mainly through the GABA-B receptor. These results indicate that GABA stimulation promotes cancer cell invasion and that the effect is partly due to ERK1/2-dependent up-regulation of MMPs.

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GACU-20-0000 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GACU-20-0000 emb|CAK04591.2| novel protein similar to vertebrate gamma-aminobu...tyric acid (GABA) B receptor, 2 (GABBR2) [Danio rerio] emb|CAN88500.1| novel protein similar to vertebrate g...amma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor, 2 (GABBR2) [Danio rerio] emb|CAN88045.1| novel protein similar to vertebrate...b|CAN88602.1| novel protein similar to vertebrate gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor, 2 (GABBR2) [Dan...io rerio] emb|CAK05338.2| novel protein similar to vertebrate gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor, 2 (GABBR2) [Danio rerio] CAK04591.2 1e-142 35% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TNIG-21-0000 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TNIG-21-0000 emb|CAK04591.2| novel protein similar to vertebrate gamma-aminobu...tyric acid (GABA) B receptor, 2 (GABBR2) [Danio rerio] emb|CAN88500.1| novel protein similar to vertebrate g...amma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor, 2 (GABBR2) [Danio rerio] emb|CAN88045.1| novel protein similar to vertebrate...b|CAN88602.1| novel protein similar to vertebrate gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor, 2 (GABBR2) [Dan...io rerio] emb|CAK05338.2| novel protein similar to vertebrate gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor, 2 (GABBR2) [Danio rerio] CAK04591.2 0.0 92% ...

  15. Highly Atom Economic Synthesis of d?2?Aminobutyric Acid through an In?Vitro Tri?enzymatic Catalytic System

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xi; Cui, Yunfeng; Cheng, Xinkuan; Feng, Jinhui; Wu, Qiaqing; Zhu, Dunming

    2017-01-01

    Abstract d?2?Aminobutyric acid is an unnatural amino acid serving as an important intermediate in pharmaceutical production. Developing a synthetic method that uses cheaper starting materials and produces less by?product is a pressing demand. A tri?enzymatic catalytic system, which is composed of l?threonine ammonia lyase (l?TAL), d?amino acid dehydrogenase (d?AADH), and formate dehydrogenase (FDH), has thus been developed for the synthesis of d?2?aminobutyric acid with high optical purity. I...

  16. From perception to action: phase-locked gamma oscillations correlate with reaction times in a speeded response task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Körner Ursula

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phase-locked gamma oscillations have so far mainly been described in relation to perceptual processes such as sensation, attention or memory matching. Due to its very short latency (≈90 ms such oscillations are a plausible candidate for very rapid integration of sensory and motor processes. Results We measured EEG in 13 healthy participants in a speeded reaction task. Participants had to press a button as fast as possible whenever a visual stimulus was presented. The stimulus was always identical and did not have to be discriminated from other possible stimuli. In trials in which the participants showed a fast response, a slow negative potential over central electrodes starting approximately 800 ms before the response and highly phase-locked gamma oscillations over central and posterior electrodes between 90 and 140 ms after the stimulus were observed. In trials in which the participants showed a slow response, no slow negative potential was observed and phase-locked gamma oscillations were significantly reduced. Furthermore, for slow response trials the phase-locked gamma oscillations were significantly delayed with respect to fast response trials. Conclusion These results indicate the relevance of phase-locked gamma oscillations for very fast (not necessarily detailed integration processes.

  17. Effect of Feeding High Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid-Containing Giant Embryo Black Sticky Rice (Oryza sativa L.) on Anxiety-Related Behavior of C57BL/6 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woo-Young; Kim, Sung-Gon; Lee, Jin-Seong; Kim, Hyeon-Kyeong; Son, Beung-Gu; Kim, Jong-Woo; Suh, Jae-Won

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of feeding high gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing black sticky rice giant embryo (BSRGE, Oryza sativa L.) on anxiety-related behavior of C57BL/6 mice. Experimental feedstuff (BSRGE with high GABA+AIN-76A) and control (AIN-76A) were provided to C57BL/6 mouse for 10 days. Antianxiety effects of BSRGE with high GABA were measured using an elevated plus maze. On day 8, the number of open arm entries by GABA and control groups were 1.10 ± 1.60 (mean ± SD) and 0.00 ± 0.00 (P = .030). On day 10, the number of open arm entries by the GABA group was 2.00 ± 1.89, which was significantly (P = .025) higher than that in the control group (0.40 ± 0.84). On day 8, the time the mice spent in open arm in the GABA group and control group was 3.60 ± 7.06 and 0.00 ± 0.00 sec (P = .068), respectively. On day 10, the time the mice in the GABA and control groups spent in open arm was 6.20 ± 5.35 sec and 1.80 ± 3.82 sec (P = .042), respectively. In repeated analysis of variance for the number of entries into open arm and time spent in open arm, significant differences were found between the two groups. Therefore, BSRGE with high GABA content might have an antianxiety effect. This study can serve as a preliminary study so that further antianxiety effects of BSRGE can be determined in more extended animal or clinical research studies in the future.

  18. Channel opening of γ-aminobutyric acid receptor from rat brain: molecular mechanisms of the receptor responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cash, D.J.; Subbarao, K.

    1987-01-01

    The function of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, which mediate transmembrane chloride flux, can be studied by use of 36 Cl - isotope tracer with membrane from mammalian brain by quench-flow technique, with reaction times that allow resolution of the receptor desensitization rates from the ion flux rates. The rates of chloride exchange into the vesicles in the absence and presence of GABA were characterized with membrane from rat cerebral cortex. Unspecific 36 Cl - influx was completed in three phases of ca. 3% (t/sub 1/2/ = 0.6 s), 56% (t/sub 1/2 = 82 s), and 41% (t/sub 1/2 = 23 min). GABA-mediated, specific chloride exchange occurred with 6.5% of the total vesicular internal volume. The GABA-dependent 36 Cl - influx proceeded in two phases, each progressively slowed by desensitization. The measurements supported the presence of two distinguishable active GABA receptors on the same membrane mediating chloride exchange into the vesicles. The half-response concentrations were similar for both receptors. The two receptors were present in the activity ratio of ca. 4/1, similar to the ratio of low affinity to high-affinity GABA sites found in ligand binding experiments. The desensitization rates have a different dependence on GABA concentration than the channel-opening equilibria. For both receptors, the measurements over a 2000-fold GABA concentration range required a minimal mechanism involving the occupation of both of the two GABA binding sites for significant channel opening; then the receptors were ca. 80% open. Similarly for both receptors, desensitization was mediated by a different pair of binding sites, although desensitization with only one ligand molecule bound could occur at a 20-fold slower rate

  19. Gamma-ray relative energy response of Ce: YAG crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianhua; Zhang Chuanfei; Hu Mengchun; Peng Taiping; Wang Zhentong; Tang Dengpan; Zhao Guangjun

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray relative energy response of Ce: YAG crystal, which is important for pulsed γ-ray measurement, was studied in this work.The Ce: YAG crystal, which was developed at Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, was aligned point by point with γ-rays scattered from an industrial 60 Co line source. The γ-ray relative energy response was calculated using the mass attenuation coefficient. The results show that the numerical calculation method of γ-ray relative energy response is reliable, and the experimental method with multi-energy point γ-ray by Compton scattering is also feasible, that can be used for checking up correctness of the numerical calculation results. (authors)

  20. Study on flavour volatiles of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) green tea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The volatile components of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) tea produced by two different kinds of technological process separately namely: vacuum and water immersion were studied. It was shown by the sensory evaluation that the color of the soup and the extracted leaves of GABA tea were similar to that of the oolong tea, ...

  1. Current trends in gamma radiation detection for radiological emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Guss, Paul; Maurer, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of inter-disciplinary research and development has taken place-techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation-the so-called second line of defense.

  2. Responses of commercial broiler chicks to /sup 60/Co gamma-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shebaita, M.K.; Kamar, G.A.R.; El-Barkouky, E.E.M.

    1981-12-01

    A total of 360 chicks of Nichols line at one-day old were used in this study. Within each sex, the chicks were divided into three exposure treatments (non-irradiated, 400 rads and 800 rads). The source of irradiation was /sup 60/Co gamma rays. The results can be summarized as follows: Of the 360 chicks used in this study, only 10 chicks died during the experimental period. Radiation induced a reduction in body weight in both sexes during the growth period. Gamma rays reduce the feed intake in both sexes. Moreover, the feed conversion ratio for the irradiated chicks was higher than that the non-irradiated birds. While red blood cells and hemoglobin content were higher in the irradiated chicks, white blood cells count and especially lymphocytes were not affected by /sup 60/Co gamma rays. Gamma rays had no effect on carcass, bone, meat and giblets as fractions of body weight in both sexes. Moreover, meat water content decreased and meat fat content increased in irradiated chicks. The total length and the total weight of the GI tract decreased due to /sup 60/Co gamma rays. The response of the different regions of the GI tract to these rays is different. Moreover, the effect of this radiation on the GI tract is dependent upon the body weight irrespective of the sex.

  3. Brain Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Concentration of the Prefrontal Lobe in Unmedicated Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Research of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zongfeng; Fan, Qing; Bai, Yanle; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Haiyin; Xiao, Zeping

    2016-10-25

    In recent years, a large number of neuroimaging studies found that the Cortico-Striato- Thalamo-Cortical circuit (CSTC), including the prefrontal lobe, a significant part of CSTC, has disturbance metabolically in patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Explore the correlation between the neuro-metabolic features and clinical characteristics of OCD patients using magnetic resonance spectroscopy technology. 88 patients with OCD who were not received medication and outpatient treatment for 8 weeks and 76 health controls were enrolled, there was no significant difference in gender, age or education level between the two groups. SIEMENS 3.0T MRI scanner was used to measure the spectral wave of Orbito Frontal Cortex (OFC) and Anterior Cingulate Cortex (ACC) of participants, setting mega-press sequences. Meanwhile, the concentrations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamine/glutamate complex (Glx) and N-Acetyl Aspartate (NAA) were measured relative to concentration of water, on the ACC and OFC of participants, for statistical analysis via LC model version 6.3 software. The concentration of metabolic substances of the OCD group compared to the healthy control group was analyzed using two sample t-test. The correlation between substance concentration and scores on the scales, including Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), Hamilton Anxiety scale (HAMA) and Hamilton Depression scale (HAMD) was carried out using the Pearson correlation method. Compared with healthy controls, the GABA/W and NAA/W concentration in individuals with OCD are significantly decreased ( p =0.031, t =2.193, p =0.002, t =3.223). Also, the concentration of GABA/W had a trend of decrease in the ACC. The GABA/W of the OFC had a negative correlation with Y-BOCS-O, Y-BOCS-C and Y-BOCS-T scores ( p =0.037, r =0.221; p =0.007, r =0.283; p =0.014, r =0.259). These results support that GABA concentration in the OFC area of patients with OCD is significantly decreased and the

  4. EPR response of sucrose and microcrystalline cellulose to measure high doses of gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torijano, E.; Cruz, L.; Gutierrez, G.; Azorin, J.; Aguirre, F.; Cruz Z, E.

    2015-10-01

    Solid dosimeters of sucrose and microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel Ph-102) were prepared, following the same process, in order to compare their EPR response against that of the l-alanine dosimeters considered as reference. All lots of dosimeters were irradiated with gamma radiation in Gamma beam irradiator with 8 kGy/h of the Nuclear Sciences Institute of UNAM. Doses ranged from 1 to 10 kGy respectively. We found that both the response of sucrose as microcrystalline cellulose were linear; however, the response intensity was, on average, twenty times more for sucrose. Comparing this against the EPR response of l-alanine in the range of doses, it was found that the response to sucrose is a third part; and microcrystalline cellulose is a sixtieth, approximately. The results agree with those found in the literature for sucrose, leaving open the possibility of investigating other dosage ranges for cellulose. (Author)

  5. Altered Evoked Gamma-Band Responses Reveal Impaired Early Visual Processing in ADHD Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Daniel; Krauel, Kerstin; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Schadow, Jeanette; Hinrichs, Hermann; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2010-01-01

    Neurophysiological studies yield contrary results whether attentional problems of patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are related to early visual processing deficits or not. Evoked gamma-band responses (GBRs), being among the first cortical responses occurring as early as 90 ms after visual stimulation in human EEG, have…

  6. Binding interactions of convulsant and anticonvulsant gamma-butyrolactones and gamma-thiobutyrolactones with the picrotoxin receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, K.D.; McKeon, A.C.; Covey, D.F.; Ferrendelli, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Alkyl-substituted gamma-butyrolactones (GBLs) and gamma-thiobutyrolactones (TBLs) are neuroactive chemicals. beta-Substituted compounds are convulsant, whereas alpha-alkyl substituted GBLs and TBLs are anticonvulsant. The structural similarities between beta-alkyl GBLs and the convulsant picrotoxinin suggested that alkyl substituted GBLs and TBLs act at the picrotoxin receptor. To test this hypothesis we examined the interactions of convulsant and anticonvulsant GBLs and TBLs with the picrotoxin, benzodiazepine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding sites of the GABA receptor complex. All of these convulsants and anticonvulsants studied competitively displaced 35S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (35S-TBPS), a ligand that binds to the picrotoxin receptor. This inhibition of 35S-TBPS binding was not blocked by the GABA antagonist bicuculline methobromide. The convulsant GBLs and TBLs also partially inhibited [3H]muscimol binding to the GABA site and [3H]flunitrazepam binding to the benzodiazepine site, but they did so at concentrations substantially greater than those that inhibited 35S-TBPS binding. The anticonvulsant GBLs and TBLs had no effect on either [3H]muscimol or [3H]flunitrazepam binding. In contrast to the GBLs and TBLs, pentobarbital inhibited TBPS binding in a manner that was blocked by bicuculline methobromide, and it enhanced both [3H]flunitrazepam and [3H]muscimol binding. Both ethosuximide and tetramethylsuccinimide, neuroactive compounds structurally similar to GBLs, competitively displaced 35S-TBPS from the picrotoxin receptor and both compounds were weak inhibitors of [3H] muscimol binding. In addition, ethosuximide also partially diminished [3H]flunitrazepam binding. These data demonstrate that the site of action of alkyl-substituted GBLs and TBLs is different from that of GABA, barbiturates and benzodiazepines

  7. Dose-response relationship of {gamma}-H2AX foci induction in human lymphocytes after X-rays exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandina, Tania [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Calle 20 No. 4113 e/41y 47 Miramar, AP 6195 C. Habana (Cuba); Roch-Lefevre, Sandrine H.; Voisin, Pascale [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DRPH, SRBE, LDB, BP17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Lamadrid, Ana I.; Romero, Ivonne [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Calle 20 No. 4113 e/41y 47 Miramar, AP 6195 C. Habana (Cuba); Garcia, Omar, E-mail: omar@cphr.edu.cu [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Calle 20 No. 4113 e/41y 47 Miramar, AP 6195 C. Habana (Cuba); Voisin, Philippe; Roy, Laurence [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DRPH, SRBE, LDB, BP17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2011-09-15

    Biological dosimeters are recommended for dose estimation in case of human overexposure to ionising radiation. Rapid measurement of {gamma}-H2AX foci as a marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) induction has been recently tested with this purpose. Here we reported a dose-response relationship after X-ray irradiation at different times post-exposure. Blood samples were obtained from several healthy donors and exposed to doses between 0 and 2 Gy. After irradiation, blood samples were incubated at 37 deg. C during 0.5 h, 5 h, and 8 h. Scoring of cells and {gamma}-H2AX foci was performed by software. The dose-response curves for different incubation times were as follows: Y{sub (0.5h)} = 11.66D + 0.15 (R{sup 2} = 0.99), Y{sub (5h)} = 2.44D + 0.15 (R{sup 2} = 0.99), Y{sub (8h)} = 1.57D + 0.22 (R{sup 2} = 0.99). At 0.5 h post-exposure, the dose-response relationship for X-irradiated lymphocytes was similar to the one obtained after gamma-irradiation using the same protocol. On the other hand, the results were not similar after 8 h due to different kinetics after gamma- and X-irradiation. Our results confirm the possibilities of using {gamma}-H2AX foci method for dose estimation in a period from 0.5 h up to 8 h post X-irradiation and support the hypothesis of differences in {gamma}-H2AX foci kinetics after gamma- and X-irradiation in vitro.

  8. Use of borated polyethylene to improve low energy response of a prompt gamma based neutron dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priyada, P.; Ashwini, U.; Sarkar, P.K., E-mail: pradip.sarkar@manipal.edu

    2016-05-21

    The feasibility of using a combined sample of borated polyethylene and normal polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent from measured prompt gamma emissions is investigated theoretically to demonstrate improvements in low energy neutron dose response compared to only polyethylene. Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out using the FLUKA code to calculate the response of boron, hydrogen and carbon prompt gamma emissions to mono energetic neutrons. The weighted least square method is employed to arrive at the best linear combination of these responses that approximates the ICRP fluence to dose conversion coefficients well in the energy range of 10{sup −8} MeV to 14 MeV. The configuration of the combined system is optimized through FLUKA simulations. The proposed method is validated theoretically with five different workplace neutron spectra with satisfactory outcome. - Highlights: • An improved method is proposed for estimating H⁎(10) using prompt gamma emissions. • A combination of BHDPE and HDPE cylinders is used as a sample. • Linear combination of prompt gamma intensities approximates ICRP-DCC closely. • Feasibility of the method was tested theoretically using workplace neutron spectra.

  9. Enhanced gamma interferon responses of mouse spleen cells following immunotherapy for tuberculosis relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Olga; Vilaplana, Cristina; Guirado, Evelyn; Díaz, Jorge; Cáceres, Neus; Singh, Mahavir; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2008-11-01

    Gamma interferon responses of spleen cells in mice were examined during postchemotherapy relapse of intraperitoneally induced latent tuberculous infection. The mycobacterial extract RUTI, which prevented the relapse, significantly enhanced the immune responses to secreted and structural recombinant mycobacterial antigens, suggesting that RUTI-mediated protection was mediated by activated T cells.

  10. Shock response of a gamma titanium aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Prakash, Vikas

    2008-01-01

    Potential use of γ-TiAl alloys in aerospace and other structural applications require knowledge of their impact behavior for better evaluation and modeling. In the present study plate impact experiments are conducted using a single-stage gas gun to better understand the shock behavior of the recently developed class of gamma titanium aluminide alloys--the Gamma-Met PX. The Gamma-Met PX showed superior shock properties when compared to the conventional titanium aluminide alloys. The spall strength of Gamma-Met PX is 1.8±0.09 GPa, which is four to six times higher than those reported for other gamma titanium aluminide alloys. Moreover, it has a Hugoniot elastic limit of 1.88 GPa at a target thickness of 3.86 mm, which drops to 1.15 GPa at target thickness of 15.8 mm. The decay in the elastic precursor is continuous without showing an asymptote to a constant level within the range of target thicknesses studied

  11. Dissecting the host response to a gamma-herpesvirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doherty, P C; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Belz, G T

    2001-01-01

    The murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) provides a unique experimental model for dissecting immunity to large DNA viruses that persist in B lymphocytes. The analysis is greatly facilitated by the availability of genetically disrupted (-/-) mice that lack key host-response elements, and by the fact...... cells, which is apparently MHC independent, could represent some sort of 'smoke screen' used by MHV-68 to subvert immunity. Although MHV-68 is neither Epstein-Barr virus nor human herpesvirus-8, the results generated from this system suggest possibilities that may usefully be addressed with these human...

  12. Effect of gamma irradiation on the hemocyte-mediated immune response of Aedes aegypti against microfilariae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, B.M.; Huff, B.M.; Li, J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the melanotic encapsulation response of Aedes aegypti black eye Liverpool strain against inoculated Dirofilaria immitis microfilariae (mff) was assessed at 1, 2, 3, and 6 days postinoculation (PI). Mosquitoes received 6000 rad from a 137Cs source (Shepard Mark I irradiator) at 3 days postemergence and were inoculated with 15-20 mff 24 hr later. These mosquitoes were compared to nonirradiated controls that also were inoculated with 15-20 mff at 3 days postemergence. The immune response was significantly reduced in irradiated mosquitoes as compared with controls at all days PI. Although the response was significantly inhibited compared with controls, irradiated mosquitoes were still capable of eliciting a response against 69% of recovered mff at 6 days PI. External gamma irradiation did not significantly affect the proliferation of hemocytes associated with the melanotic encapsulation response of A. aegypti. The number of circulating hemocytes increased in irradiated mosquitoes in response to inoculated mff in a manner similar to nonirradiated, inoculated controls. Hemocyte monophenol oxidase activity, however, was significantly reduced in gamma-irradiated mosquitoes at 12 hr PI as compared with controls. The reduced immunological capacity of irradiated mosquitoes might be related to an interference with gene activity required for the synthesis or activation of enzymes that are directly or indirectly involved in the biochemical processes associated with the production of melanotic substances that sequester mff

  13. Response function of NaI(Tl) detectors and multiple backscattering of gamma rays in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabharwal, Arvind D.; Singh, Manpreet; Singh, Bhajan; Sandhu, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    The response function, converting the observed pulse-height distribution of a NaI(Tl) detector to a true photon spectrum, is obtained experimentally with the help of an inverse matrix approach. The energy of gamma-ray photons continuously decreases as the number of scatterings increases in a sample having finite dimensions when one deals with the depth of the sample. The present experiments are undertaken to study the effect of target thickness on intensity distribution of gamma photons multiply backscattered from an aluminium target. A NaI(Tl) gamma-ray detector detects the photons backscattered from the aluminium target. The subtraction of analytically estimated singly scattered distribution from the observed intensity distribution (originating from interactions of primary gamma-ray photons with the target) results in multiply backscattered events. We observe that for each incident gamma photon energy, the number of multiply backscattered photons increases with increase in target thickness and then saturates at a particular target thickness called the saturation thickness (depth). Saturation thickness for multiply backscattering of gamma photons is found to decrease with increase in energy of incident gamma-ray photons

  14. Design and mechanism of tetrahydrothiophene-based γ-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase inactivators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hoang V; Hawker, Dustin D; Wu, Rui; Doud, Emma; Widom, Julia; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Liu, Dali; Kelleher, Neil L; Silverman, Richard B

    2015-04-08

    Low levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), one of two major neurotransmitters that regulate brain neuronal activity, are associated with many neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, and cocaine addiction. One of the main methods to raise the GABA level in human brain is to use small molecules that cross the blood-brain barrier and inhibit the activity of γ-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT), the enzyme that degrades GABA. We have designed a series of conformationally restricted tetrahydrothiophene-based GABA analogues with a properly positioned leaving group that could facilitate a ring-opening mechanism, leading to inactivation of GABA-AT. One compound in the series is 8 times more efficient an inactivator of GABA-AT than vigabatrin, the only FDA-approved inactivator of GABA-AT. Our mechanistic studies show that the compound inactivates GABA-AT by a new mechanism. The metabolite resulting from inactivation does not covalently bind to amino acid residues of GABA-AT but stays in the active site via H-bonding interactions with Arg-192, a π-π interaction with Phe-189, and a weak nonbonded S···O═C interaction with Glu-270, thereby inactivating the enzyme.

  15. Correction of the dynamic response of the ''Gamma thermometers'' using a digital filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquot, J.P.; Lobert, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    The ''gamma thermometer'' is a sensor used to measure on line the local power inside a PWR nuclear reactor. During transients, this sensor based on thermal exchanges, obes not give a fast response. This paper describes a microprocessor device that allows using a digital filtering technique, a correction of the dynamic response [fr

  16. Impact of Gamma Radiation on Sex Pheromone Gland of Female and Male Response of Ephestia calidella (Guen.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazaa, M.A.M.; Alm El-Din, M. M. S.; Mikhaiel, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    The sex pheromone gland of female oases date moth, Ephestia calidella is located inter segmentally between eight and nine abdominal segment. Effect of three sub sterilizing doses 75, 100 and 125 Gy of gamma radiation on pheromone production and on male response were studied. The results obtained revealed that gamma irradiation reduce the pheromone production by female and the responsiveness of male. The effect was increased by increasing the radiation dose. Histological studies of pheromone gland also, indicated that gamma irradiation disturb epithelial cells of the gland and becoming thin at certain parts. Also, gland hairs ruptured or completely disappeared at the highest dose of 125 Gy.

  17. Study of radiation detectors response in standard X, gamma and beta radiation standard beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonato, Fernanda Beatrice Conceicao

    2010-01-01

    The response of 76 Geiger-Mueller detectors, 4 semiconductor detectors and 34 ionization chambers were studied. Many of them were calibrated with gamma radiation beams ( 37 Cs and 60 Co), and some of them were tested in beta radiation ( 90 Sr+ 9' 0Y e 204 Tl) and X radiation (N-60, N-80, N-100, N-150) beams. For all three types of radiation, the calibration factors of the instruments were obtained, and the energy and angular dependences were studied. For beta and gamma radiation, the angular dependence was studied for incident radiation angles of 0 deg and +- 45 deg. The curves of the response of the instruments were obtained over an angle interval of 0 deg to +- 90 deg, for gamma, beta and X radiations. The calibration factors obtained for beta radiation were compared to those obtained for gamma radiation. For gamma radiation, 24 of the 66 tested Geiger-Mueller detectors presented results for the energy dependence according to international recommendation of ISO 4037-2 and 56 were in accordance with the Brazilian ABNT 10011 recommendation. The ionization chambers and semiconductors were in accordance to national and international recommendations. All instruments showed angular dependence less than 40%. For beta radiation, the instruments showed unsatisfactory results for the energy dependence and angular dependence. For X radiation, the ionization chambers presented results for energy dependence according to the national recommendation, and the angular dependence was less than 40%. (author)

  18. Physiological response of lovage (levisticum officinale, koch) plant to gamma radiation and organic fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, A.T.A.

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to study physiological response of lovage plant to gamma radiation and organic fertilizers.Two field experiments were conduct under conditions of newly reclaimed soil (sandy loam soil) during two successive seasons (2003/2004 and 2004/2005) in experimental farm , NRC,AEA Inshas. lovage fruits were irradiated before sowing with gamma rays at 0,20,40,60 and 80 Gy. Before planting farm yard manure (FYM) at rates of 0,20,30 and 40 m 3 /fed. Was applied to soil in combination with gamma doses in the first experiment, in the second one, chicken manure at 0,10,15 and 20 m 3 /fed. was added to soil before planting in combination with the same used gamma doses in first experiment. Growth of lovage plants was considerably stimulated by irradiating fruits before sowing with low gamma doses, in particularly at 60 Gy, which greatly increased plant height, number of branches/plant, stem thickness and dry matter yield of shoots. Similar trend was also observed with leaf chlorophyll content which increased due to low gamma doses . Low gamma doses markedly encouraged nutrients uptake by lovage plants which increased levels and total contents of N, P, K, Fe,Zn and Mn in plant shoots. Fruits yield, volatile oil % and oil yield and fruits index value were increased by low gamma doses particularly at 60 Gy.

  19. mRNA and Protein Levels for GABA[subscript A][alpha]4, [alpha]5, [beta]1 and GABA[subscript B]R1 Receptors are Altered in Brains from Subjects with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Rooney, Robert J.; Patel, Diven H.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    We have shown altered expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) and gamma-aminobutyric acid B (GABA[subscript B]) receptors in the brains of subjects with autism. In the current study, we sought to verify our western blotting data for GABBR1 via qRT-PCR and to expand our previous work to measure mRNA and protein levels of 3…

  20. Dependence on incident angle of solid state detector response to gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Yamaguchi, Satarou; Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Ueki, Kohtaro

    2002-01-01

    The shape and size of a NaI(Tl) scintillator that should maximize response variation with γ-ray incident angle was estimated by analytical model calculation. It proved that, even for gamma rays of energy exceeding 1 MeV, a slab detector measuring 50 cm x 50 cm x 5 cm thick should present a ratio of at least 4 between maximum and minimum responses against incidence at different angles. For a sample case of 60 keV gamma rays, estimation of the incident angle dependence by means of Monte Carlo simulation agreed well with experiment using a CZT detector. The counts from photo-electric peak varied with incident angle roughly along a sine curve. The foregoing finding served as basis for proposing a practical direction finder for γ-ray source operating on the principle of determining the source direction from variations in count with incident angle. (author)

  1. Dose-dependent hepatic transcriptional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to sublethal doses of gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, You, E-mail: you.song@niva.no [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349 Oslo (Norway); Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian; Heier, Lene Sørlie [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Rosseland, Bjørn Olav [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Tollefsen, Knut Erik [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349 Oslo (Norway)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • First study on early stress responses in salmon exposed to low-dose gamma radiation. • Dramatic dose-dependent transcriptional responses characterized. • Multiple modes of action proposed for gamma radiation. - Abstract: Due to the production of free radicals, gamma radiation may pose a hazard to living organisms. The high-dose radiation effects have been extensively studied, whereas the ecotoxicity data on low-dose gamma radiation is still limited. The present study was therefore performed using Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to characterize effects of low-dose (15, 70 and 280 mGy) gamma radiation after short-term (48 h) exposure. Global transcriptional changes were studied using a combination of high-density oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs; in this article the phrase gene expression is taken as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression can also be regulated, e.g., at protein stability and translational level) were determined and linked to their biological meanings predicted using both Gene Ontology (GO) and mammalian ortholog-based functional analyses. The plasma glucose level was also measured as a general stress biomarker at the organism level. Results from the microarray analysis revealed a dose-dependent pattern of global transcriptional responses, with 222, 495 and 909 DEGs regulated by 15, 70 and 280 mGy gamma radiation, respectively. Among these DEGs, only 34 were commonly regulated by all radiation doses, whereas the majority of differences were dose-specific. No GO functions were identified at low or medium doses, but repression of DEGs associated with GO functions such as DNA replication, cell cycle regulation and response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) were observed after 280 mGy gamma exposure. Ortholog-based toxicity pathway analysis further showed that 15 mGy radiation

  2. Immune responses in cattle vaccinated with gamma-irradiated Anaplasma marginale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.P.; Bansal, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    The infectivity and immunogenecity of gamma-irradiated Anaplasma marginale organisms were studied in bovine calves. The severity of Anaplasma infection based on per cent infected red blood cells, haematological values and mortality was more in animals immunized with blood exposed to 60 kR in comparison to those inoculated with blood irradiated at 70, 80 and 90 kR. The immunizing controls demonstrated a significantly high parasitaemia, marked anaemia and more deaths. Marked and prolonged cell-mediated and humoral immune responses detectable in the first 3 weeks of post-immunization may be responsible for conferring of protective immunity. (author)

  3. The effects of intense gamma-irradiation on the alpha-particle response of silicon carbide semiconductor radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, Frank H.; Seidel, John G.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) semiconductor radiation detectors are being developed for alpha-particle, X-ray and Gamma-ray, and fast-neutron energy spectrometry. SiC detectors have been operated at temperatures up to 306 deg. C and have also been found to be highly resistant to the radiation effects of fast-neutron and charged-particle bombardments. In the present work, the alpha-particle response of a SiC detector based on a Schottky diode design has been carefully monitored as a function of 137 Cs gamma-ray exposure. The changes in response have been found to be negligible for gamma exposures up to and including 5.4 MGy, and irradiations to higher doses are in progress

  4. Gamma response study of radiation sensitive MOSFETs for their use as gamma radiation sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Kumar, A. Vinod [Radiation Safety Systems Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Aggarwal, Bharti; Singh, Arvind; Topkar, Anita, E-mail: anita@barc.gov.in [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2016-05-23

    Continuous monitoring of gamma dose is important in various fields like radiation therapy, space-related research, nuclear energy programs and high energy physics experiment facilities. The present work is focused on utilization of radiation-sensitive Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs) to monitor gamma radiation doses. Static characterization of these detectors was performed to check their expected current-voltage relationship. Threshold voltage and transconductance per unit gate to source voltage (K factor) were calculated from the experimental data. The detector was exposed to gamma radiation in both, with and without gate bias voltage conditions, and change in threshold voltage was monitored at different gamma doses. The experimental data was fitted to obtain equation for dependence of threshold voltage on gamma dose. More than ten times increase in sensitivity was observed in biased condition (+3 V) compared to the unbiased case.

  5. Mutations in the GABA Transporter SLC6A1 Cause Epilepsy with Myoclonic-Atonic Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvill, Gemma L; McMahon, Jacinta M; Schneider, Amy

    2015-01-01

    GAT-1, encoded by SLC6A1, is one of the major gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters in the brain and is responsible for re-uptake of GABA from the synapse. In this study, targeted resequencing of 644 individuals with epileptic encephalopathies led to the identification of six SLC6A1 mutatio...

  6. Protective Therapies for Monomethylhydrazine: Comparison of Pyridoxine and Physical Restraint in the Monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-01

    Pharmaco1, Exp. Ther. 140:133. 14. Meldrum , B. S. (1975). Epilepsy and y-aminobutyric acid -mediated inhibition. Int. Rev. Neurobiol. 17:1-36. 15. Rougeul, A...within the context of established neurochemical influences of the hydrazines on synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter, gamma amino- butyric acid ...pyridoxal phosphate, a reaction which absorbs this coenzyme in the synthesis of glutamic acid decar- boxylase (GAD) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA

  7. Response of CZT drift-strip detector to X- and gamma rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Gerward, Leif

    2001-01-01

    The drift-strip method for improving the energy response of a CdZnTe (CZT) detector to hard X- and gamma rays is discussed. Results for a 10 x 10 x 3 mm(3) detector crystal demonstrate a remarkable improvement of the energy resolution. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) is 2.18 keV (3.6%), 2...

  8. Dual mechanisms regulating glutamate decarboxylases and accumulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid in tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves exposed to multiple stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xin; Chen, Yiyong; Zhang, Lingyun; Fu, Xiumin; Wei, Qing; Grierson, Don; Zhou, Ying; Huang, Yahui; Dong, Fang; Yang, Ziyin

    2016-03-29

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the major inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. It has multiple positive effects on mammalian physiology and is an important bioactive component of tea (Camellia sinensis). GABA generally occurs at a very low level in plants but GABA content increases substantially after exposure to a range of stresses, especially oxygen-deficiency. During processing of tea leaves, a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage are essential for the high accumulation of GABA. This is believed to be initiated by a change in glutamate decarboxylase activity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In the present study we characterized factors regulating the expression and activity of three tea glutamate decarboxylase genes (CsGAD1, 2, and 3), and their encoded enzymes. The results suggests that, unlike the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there are dual mechanisms regulating the accumulation of GABA in tea leaves exposed to multiple stresses, including activation of CsGAD1 enzymatic activity by calmodulin upon the onset of the stress and accumulation of high levels of CsGAD2 mRNA induced by a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage.

  9. An emergency response intercomparison exercise using a synthetically generated gamma-ray spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dowdall, M.; Selnæs, O.G.; Standring, W.J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Although high resolution gamma ray spectrometry serves as the primary analytical technique in emergency response situations, chances for laboratories to practice analysing the type of spectra that may be expected in the early phase of such a situation are limited. This problem is more acute for l...

  10. Plant perception of β-aminobutyric acid is mediated by an aspartyl-tRNA synthetase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luna, E.; Van Hulten, M.; Zhang, Y.; Berkowitz, O.; López, A.; Pétriacq, P.; Sellwood, M.A.; Chen, B.; Burrell, M.; Van de Meene, A.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Flors, V.; Ton, J.

    2014-01-01

    Specific chemicals can prime the plant immune system for augmented defense. β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) is a priming agent that provides broad-spectrum disease protection. However, BABA also suppresses plant growth when applied in high doses, which has hampered its application as a crop defense

  11. Plant perception of β-aminobutyric acid is mediated by an aspartyl-tRNA synthetase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luna, Estrella; van Hulten, Marieke; Zhang, Yuhua; Berkowitz, Oliver; López, Ana; Pétriacq, Pierre; Sellwood, Matthew A; Chen, Beining; Burrell, Mike; van de Meene, Allison; Pieterse, Corné M J; Flors, Victor; Ton, Jurriaan

    Specific chemicals can prime the plant immune system for augmented defense. β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) is a priming agent that provides broad-spectrum disease protection. However, BABA also suppresses plant growth when applied in high doses, which has hampered its application as a crop defense

  12. Antibody response in cattle, sheep and rats to infection with. gamma. -irradiated metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, D.L.; Doy, T.G. (Agricultural Research Council, Compton (UK). Inst. for Research on Animal Diseases); Hanna, R.E.B. (Queen' s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (UK))

    1982-05-01

    Cattle, sheep and rats were infected orally with ..gamma..-irradiated metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica, or with normal metacercariae. The antibody response was monitored in each host to metacercarial tegument (T0), juvenile tegument (T1), adult tegument (T2) and gut antigens. The response was examined at weekly intervals for cattle and sheep throughout 15 weeks of infection and four weeks after infection in rats, using an indirect fluorescent antibody labelling technique. It was found that the irradiated metacercariae engendered a normal humoral response to T0, T1 and gut antigens in all three hosts although the antibody levels were somewhat reduced due to early death or stunting of the flukes. T0 and T1 appeared to be antigenically similar. Antibodies against T2 appeared late in the animals infected with ..gamma..-irradiated metacercariae and the titres attained were considerably lower than in the controls. The T2 antigen stimulus in the animals given ..gamma..-irradiated metacercariae was probably provided by flukes which 'broke through' the developmental barrier imposed by irradiation and which were found alive at autopsy.

  13. Induction of sos response in Escherichia Coli cells by gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes Lorenzo, J.L.; Padron Soler, E.; Martin Hernandez, G.; Perez Tamayo, N.; del Sol Abascal, E.R.; Almeida Varela, E.

    1996-01-01

    The kinetics of sos response induction in Escherichia Coli cells was studied by means of the gene fusion SfiA:LacZ. In these cells, the specific beta galactosidase activity and the cellular growth rate showed an exponential behaviour. The sensitivity of the GC 2181 starin to gamma irradiation is equal to Do -1= 0.00088/Gy. The beta galactosidase activity

  14. Abnormal early gamma responses to emotional faces differentiate unipolar from bipolar disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T Y; Chen, Y S; Su, T P; Hsieh, J C; Chen, L F

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the cortical abnormalities of early emotion perception in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) using gamma oscillations. Twenty-three MDD patients, twenty-five BD patients, and twenty-four normal controls were enrolled and their event-related magnetoencephalographic responses were recorded during implicit emotional tasks. Our results demonstrated abnormal gamma activity within 100 ms in the emotion-related regions (amygdala, orbitofrontal (OFC) cortex, anterior insula (AI), and superior temporal pole) in the MDD patients, suggesting that these patients may have dysfunctions or negativity biases in perceptual binding of emotional features at very early stage. Decreased left superior medial frontal cortex (smFC) responses to happy faces in the MDD patients were correlated with their serious level of depression symptoms, indicating that decreased smFC activity perhaps underlies irregular positive emotion processing in depressed patients. In the BD patients, we showed abnormal activation in visual regions (inferior/middle occipital and middle temporal cortices) which responded to emotional faces within 100 ms, supporting that the BD patients may hyperactively respond to emotional features in perceptual binding. The discriminant function of gamma activation in the left smFC, right medial OFC, right AI/inferior OFC, and the right precentral cortex accurately classified 89.6% of patients as unipolar/bipolar disorders.

  15. EEG theta and gamma responses to semantic violations in online sentence processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hald, L.A.; Bastiaansen, M.C.M.; Hagoort, P.

    2006-01-01

    We explore the nature of the oscillatory dynamics in the EEG of subjects reading sentences that contain a semantic violation. More specifically, we examine whether increases in theta (≈3–7 Hz) and gamma (around 40 Hz) band power occur in response to sentences that were either semantically correct or

  16. GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid production, antioxidant activity in some germinated dietary seeds and the effect of cooking on their GABA content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasarin TIANSAWANG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Germinated grains have been known as sources of Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA that provide beneficial effects for human health. This study was aimed to investigate GABA production, dietary fiber, antioxidant activity, and the effect of cooking on GABA loss in germinated legumes and sesame. The highest GABA content was found in germinated mung bean, (0.8068 g kg-1, 24 h incubation followed by germinated soybean, germinated black bean and soaked sesame. Beside GABA, dietary fiber content also increased in all grains during germination where the insoluble dietary fiber fractions were always found in higher proportions to soluble dietary fiber fractions. Our results also confirmed that germinated mung bean is a rich source of GABA and dietary fibers. Microwave cooking resulted in the smallest loss of GABA in mung bean and sesame, while steaming led to the least GABA content loss in soybean and black bean. Therefore microwave cooking and steaming are the most recommended cooking processes to preserve GABA in germinated legumes and sesame.

  17. Flattening the Energy Response of a Scintillator Based Gamma Dose Rate Meter Coupled to SiPM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knafo, Y.; Manor, A.; Ginzburg, D.; Ellenbogen, M.; Osovizky, A.; Wengrowicz, U.; Ghelman, M.; Seif, R.; Mazor, T.; Kadmon, Y.; Cohen, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Among the newest emerging technologies that are used in the design of personal gamma radiation detection instruments, the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) light sensor is playing an important role. This type of photo sensor is characterized by low power consumption, small dimensions and high gain. These special characteristics present applicable alternatives for the replacement of traditional gamma sensors based on scintillator coupled to Photomultiplier tubes (PMT) or on Geiger-Muller(G.M.) sensors. For health physics applications, flat energy response is required for a wide range of radio-nuclides emitting gamma rays of different energies. Scintillation based radiation instrumentation provides count rate and amplitude of the measured pulses. These pulses can be split in different bins corresponding to the energy of the measured isotopes and their intensity. The count rate and the energy of the measured events are related to the dose rate. The conversion algorithm applys a different calibration factor for each energy bin in order to provide an accurate dose rate response for a wide range of gamma energies. This work describes the utilization of an innovative approach for dose rate conversion by using the abilities of newest 32-bit microcontroller based ARM core architecture

  18. Aspartame tablets-gamma dose response and usability for routine radiation processing dosimetry using spectrophotometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinde, S.H. [Radiation Safety Systems Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)]. E-mail: shs_barc@yahoo.com; Mukherjee, T. [Radiation Safety Systems Division, Chemistry Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2007-02-15

    Aspartame tablets were studied for gamma dose response, using spectrophotometric read-out method. The optimum concentration for ferrous ions was 2x10{sup -4}moldm{sup -3} and xylenol orange with 2.5x10{sup -1}moldm{sup -3} of sulphuric acid for the optimum acidity in FX solution. Wavelength of maximum absorbance is 548nm. Post-irradiation stability is appreciable i.e. for not less than one month. Dose response is non-linear with third order polynomial fit, in the dose range of 1000-10000Gy. This system of aspartame was further used for carrying out relative percentage dose profile measurement in Gamma Cell-220. Results obtained were inter-compared with that of a glutamine dosimeter, which showed that maximum difference between the values of aspartame and glutamine systems is within +/-10%.

  19. Aspartame tablets-gamma dose response and usability for routine radiation processing dosimetry using spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinde, S.H.; Mukherjee, T.

    2007-01-01

    Aspartame tablets were studied for gamma dose response, using spectrophotometric read-out method. The optimum concentration for ferrous ions was 2x10 -4 moldm -3 and xylenol orange with 2.5x10 -1 moldm -3 of sulphuric acid for the optimum acidity in FX solution. Wavelength of maximum absorbance is 548nm. Post-irradiation stability is appreciable i.e. for not less than one month. Dose response is non-linear with third order polynomial fit, in the dose range of 1000-10000Gy. This system of aspartame was further used for carrying out relative percentage dose profile measurement in Gamma Cell-220. Results obtained were inter-compared with that of a glutamine dosimeter, which showed that maximum difference between the values of aspartame and glutamine systems is within +/-10%

  20. Aminobutyric acid and formation of higher alcohols by Saccharomyces carlsbergenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babaeva, S A; Veselov, I Ya; Gracheva, I M

    1966-01-01

    Aminobutyric acid (1) added before the start of fermentation increased the formation of propyl-, isobutyl-, and isoamyl alcohols. With addition of I after 24, 28, or 72 hours of fermentation, the formation of the alcohols gradually decreased. Addition of I after 3 days of fermentation did not affect formation of the higher alcohols. I was not the source of formation of the higher alcohols, but affected the metabolism of carbohydrates and N in the cells. Formation of hexyl alcohols and high amounts of aldehydes was observed only during aerobic fermentation.

  1. Inflammation in the CNS and Th17 Responses Are Inhibited by IFN-{gamma}-Induced IL-18 Binding Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millward, Jason M; Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Wheeler, Rachel D

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory responses are essential for immune protection but may also cause pathology and must be regulated. Both Th1 and Th17 cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune inflammatory diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. We show in this study that IL-18-binding protein (IL-18bp......), the endogenous inhibitor of the Th1-promoting cytokine IL-18, is upregulated by IFN-gamma in resident microglial cells in the CNS during multiple sclerosis-like disease in mice. Test of function by overexpression of IL-18bp in the CNS using a viral vector led to marked reduction in Th17 responses and robust...... inhibition of incidence, severity, and histopathology of disease, independently of IFN-gamma. The disease-limiting action of IL-18bp included suppression of APC-derived Th17-polarizing cytokines. IL-18bp thus acts as a sensor for IFN-gamma and can regulate both Th1 and Th17 responses in the CNS....

  2. Pharmacotherapy of alcoholism - an update on approved and off-label medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyka, Michael; Müller, Christian A

    2017-08-01

    Only a few medications are available for the treatment of alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Areas covered: This paper discusses approved AUD medications, including the opioid antagonists naltrexone and nalmefene (the latter is licensed for reduction of alcohol consumption only), the putative glutamate receptor antagonist acamprosate and the aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor disulfiram. It also covers off-label medications of interest, including topiramate, gabapentin, ondansetron, varenicline, baclofen, sodium oxybate and antidepressants. Clinical implications, benefits and risks of treatment are discussed. Expert opinion: Acamprosate, naltrexone, nalmefene and disulfiram are the only approved 'alcohol-specific' drugs. Acamprosate and naltrexone have been evaluated in numerous clinical trials and represent evidence-based treatments in AUDs. Nalmefene use, however, is controversial. Supervised disulfiram is a second-line treatment approach. Compounds developed and licensed for different neuropsychiatric disorders are potential alternatives. Encouraging results have been reported for topiramate, gabapentin and also varenicline, which might be useful in patients with comorbid nicotine dependence. The GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-B receptor agonist baclofen has shown mixed results; it is currently licensed for the treatment of AUDs in France only. Gabapentin may be close to approval in the USA. Further studies of these novel treatment approaches in AUDs are needed.

  3. Increase in neutrophil Fc gamma receptor I expression following interferon gamma treatment in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, N J; Knight, S M; Godolphin, J L; Guyre, P M

    1992-04-01

    The therapeutic potential of interferon gamma (IFN gamma) in a number of disease states is still being explored, but progress is hampered by the lack of a suitable measure of in vivo biological activity. To assess the in vivo biological effects of recombinant human IFN gamma (rhIFN gamma), 14 patients were studied in a randomised, prospective, double blind, placebo controlled trial of this cytokine for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The levels of Fc gamma receptors on peripheral blood neutrophils were measured at baseline and after 21 days of once daily, subcutaneous injections of rhIFN gamma or placebo. An induction of neutrophil Fc gamma receptor type I (Fc gamma RI) was seen in the group of patients receiving recombinant human rhIFN gamma but not in those receiving placebo. No change in the expression of Fc gamma RII or Fc gamma RIII was detected. The amount of induction of Fc gamma RI detected on the neutrophils of patients receiving rhIFN gamma did not correlate with clinical measures of response at either 21 days or at the end of the study (24 weeks). No significant clinical responses were observed in the rhIFN gamma group at these times. These data confirm that the reported in vitro effect of IFN gamma on human neutrophil Fc receptor expression can be reproduced in vivo.

  4. Contrast adaptation in cat visual cortex is not mediated by GABA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruyn, E J; Bonds, A B

    1986-09-24

    The possible involvement of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in contrast adaptation in single cells in area 17 of the cat was investigated. Iontophoretic application of N-methyl bicuculline increased cell responses, but had no effect on the magnitude of adaptation. These results suggest that contrast adaptation is the result of inhibition through a parallel pathway, but that GABA does not mediate this process.

  5. The high intensity {gamma}-ray source (HI{gamma}S) and recent results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonchev, A.P. [Duke University and TUNL, Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 0308 (United States)]. E-mail: tonchev@tunl.duke.edu; Boswell, M. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and TUNL, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Howell, C.R. [Duke University and TUNL, Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 0308 (United States); Karwowski, H.J. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and TUNL, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Kelley, J.H. [North Carolina State University and TUNL, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Tornow, W. [Duke University and TUNL, Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 0308 (United States); Wu, Y.K. [Duke University and Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0319 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    The high intensity {gamma}-ray source (HI{gamma}S) utilizes intra-cavity backscattering of free electron laser photons from the Duke electron storage ring to produce a unique monoenergetic beam of high-flux {gamma}-rays with high polarization and selectable energy resolution. At present, {gamma}-ray beams with energies from 2 to 58 MeV are available with intensities as high as 10{sup 5}-5 x 10{sup 6} {gamma}/s, energy spreads of 3% or better, and nearly 100% linear polarization. The quality and intensity of the {gamma}-ray beams at HI{gamma}S are responsible for the unprecedented performance of this facility in a broad range of research programs in nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics and nuclear applications. Recent results from excitation of isomeric states in ({gamma}, n) reactions and parity assignments of dipole states determined via the ({gamma}, {gamma}') reaction are presented.

  6. Theory of thermoluminescence gamma dose response: The unified interaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, Y.S.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the development of a comprehensive theory of thermoluminescence (TL) dose response, the unified interaction model (UNIM). The UNIM is based on both radiation absorption stage and recombination stage mechanisms and can describe dose response for heavy charged particles (in the framework of the extended track interaction model - ETIM) as well as for isotropically ionising gamma rays and electrons (in the framework of the TC/LC geminate recombination model) in a unified and self-consistent conceptual and mathematical formalism. A theory of optical absorption dose response is also incorporated in the UNIM to describe the radiation absorption stage. The UNIM is applied to the dose response supralinearity characteristics of LiF:Mg,Ti and is especially and uniquely successful in explaining the ionisation density dependence of the supralinearity of composite peak 5 in TLD-100. The UNIM is demonstrated to be capable of explaining either qualitatively or quantitatively all of the major features of TL dose response with many of the variable parameters of the model strongly constrained by ancilliary optical absorption and sensitisation measurements

  7. Absence of c-Aminobutyric Acid-A Receptor Potentiation in Central Hypersomnolence Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Evangelista, Elisa; Lopez, Regis; Barateau, Lucie; Jaussent, Isabelle; Cens, Thierry; Rousset, Matthieu; Charnet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Objective: The pathophysiology of idiopathic hypersomnia (IH) remains unclear. Recently, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-induced enhancement of c-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-A receptor activity was found in patients with IH compared to controls. Methods: Fifteen unrelated patients (2 males and 13 females) affected with typical IH, 12 patients (9 males and 3 females) with narcolepsy type 1, and 15 controls (9 males and 6 females) with unspecified hypersomnolence (n 5 7) and misc...

  8. The phosphorylation state of CD3gamma influences T cell responsiveness and controls T cell receptor cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Bäckström, T; Lauritsen, J P

    1998-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) is internalized following activation of protein kinase C (PKC) via a leucine (Leu)-based motif in CD3gamma. Some studies have indicated that the TCR is recycled back to the cell surface following PKC-mediated internalization. The functional state of recycled TCR and the ......The T cell receptor (TCR) is internalized following activation of protein kinase C (PKC) via a leucine (Leu)-based motif in CD3gamma. Some studies have indicated that the TCR is recycled back to the cell surface following PKC-mediated internalization. The functional state of recycled TCR...... the phosphorylation state of CD3gamma and T cell responsiveness. Based on these observations a physiological role of CD3gamma and TCR cycling is proposed....

  9. The phosphorylation state of CD3gamma influences T cell responsiveness and controls T cell receptor cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Backstrom, T; Lauritsen, JP

    1998-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) is internalized following activation of protein kinase C (PKC) via a leucine (Leu)-based motif in CD3gamma. Some studies have indicated that the TCR is recycled back to the cell surface following PKC-mediated internalization. The functional state of recycled TCR...... the phosphorylation state of CD3gamma and T cell responsiveness. Based on these observations a physiological role of CD3gamma and TCR cycling is proposed....... and the mechanisms involved in the sorting events following PKC-induced internalization are not known. In this study, we demonstrated that following PKC-induced internalization, the TCR is recycled back to the cell surface in a functional state. TCR recycling was dependent on dephosphorylation of CD3gamma, probably...

  10. TLR2-dependent inhibition of macrophage responses to IFN-gamma is mediated by distinct, gene-specific mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Benson

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis uses multiple mechanisms to avoid elimination by the immune system. We have previously shown that M. tuberculosis can inhibit selected macrophage responses to IFN-gamma through TLR2-dependent and -independent mechanisms. To specifically address the role of TLR2 signaling in mediating this inhibition, we stimulated macrophages with the specific TLR2/1 ligand Pam(3CSK(4 and assayed responses to IFN-gamma. Pam(3CSK(4 stimulation prior to IFN-gamma inhibited transcription of the unrelated IFN-gamma-inducible genes, CIITA and CXCL11. Surface expression of MHC class II and secretion of CXCL11 were greatly reduced as well, indicating that the reduction in transcripts had downstream effects. Inhibition of both genes required new protein synthesis. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we found that TLR2 stimulation inhibited IFN-gamma-induced RNA polymerase II binding to the CIITA and CXCL11 promoters. Furthermore, TATA binding protein was unable to bind the TATA box of the CXCL11 promoter, suggesting that assembly of transcriptional machinery was disrupted. However, TLR2 stimulation affected chromatin modifications differently at each of the inhibited promoters. Histone H3 and H4 acetylation was reduced at the CIITA promoter but unaffected at the CXCL11 promoter. In addition, NF-kappaB signaling was required for inhibition of CXCL11 transcription, but not for inhibition of CIITA. Taken together, these results indicate that TLR2-dependent inhibition of IFN-gamma-induced gene expression is mediated by distinct, gene-specific mechanisms that disrupt binding of the transcriptional machinery to the promoters.

  11. Gamma-delta T cell responses in subclinical and clinical stages of Bovine Mycobacterium Avium Paratuberculosis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The early immune response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in cattle is characterized by a Th1-like immune response effective in controlling bacterial proliferation during the subclinical stage of infection. In young calves nearly 60% of circulating lymphocytes are gamma delta T ...

  12. On response operator in semiconductor gamma ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krnac, S [Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia); Povinec, P [International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco (Monaco). MEL; Ragan, R [Inst. of Preventive and Clinical Medicine, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    Some results of the scaling confirmation factor analysis (SCFA) application in semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometry presented in this contribution points out to a new ground for evaluation the gamma-ray spectra. This whole-spectrum processing approach considerably increases detection sensitivity, especially, if significant interferences being present in the measured spectrum. Precision of the SCFA method is determined by choice of a sufficient number of suitable calibration gamma-ray sources in the energy region of interest, by setting up an acceptable latent hypothesis and by chosen experimental quantification of spectra. The SCFA method is very advantageous to use, for instance, in ultra low-level gamma-spectrometry where counting rates in full energy peaks are extremely low as compared with background interferences. It enables to increase of the sensitivity by the 5-10 times in comparison with the traditional full energy peak net area method (J.K.). 1 fig., 2 tabs., 6 refs.

  13. On response operator in semiconductor gamma ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krnac, S.; Povinec, P.

    1995-01-01

    Some results of the scaling confirmation factor analysis (SCFA) application in semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometry presented in this contribution points out to a new ground for evaluation the gamma-ray spectra. This whole-spectrum processing approach considerably increases detection sensitivity, especially, if significant interferences being present in the measured spectrum. Precision of the SCFA method is determined by choice of a sufficient number of suitable calibration gamma-ray sources in the energy region of interest, by setting up an acceptable latent hypothesis and by chosen experimental quantification of spectra. The SCFA method is very advantageous to use, for instance, in ultra low-level gamma-spectrometry where counting rates in full energy peaks are extremely low as compared with background interferences. It enables to increase of the sensitivity by the 5-10 times in comparison with the traditional full energy peak net area method (J.K.). 1 fig., 2 tabs., 6 refs

  14. Response of STFZ diode as on-line gamma dosimeter in radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, Fabio de; Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Pascoalino, Kelly C.; Bueno, Carmen C.; Tuominen, Eija; Tuovinen, Esa; Haerkoenen, Jaakko

    2009-01-01

    In this work, it is presented the results obtained with this rad-hard STFZ silicon diode as a high-dose gamma dosimeter. This device is a p + /n/n + junction diode, made on FZ Si wafer manufactured by Okmetic Oyj., Vantaa, Finland and processed by the Microelectronics Center of Helsinki University of Technology. The results obtained about the photocurrent registered and total charge accumulated on the diode as a function of the total absorbed dose are presented. The diodes' response showed a significant saturation effect for total absorbed doses higher than approximately 15 kGy. To reduce this effect, some STFZ samples have been pre-irradiated with gamma rays at accumulated dose of 700 kGy in order to saturate the trap production in the diode's sensitive volume. (author)

  15. Quantitative dose-response of growth and development in Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to chronic gamma-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, K.; Thompson, K.H.

    1975-01-01

    The response of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (Cruciferae) to a gradient of chronic gamma-radiation was examined under field conditions. Plants that were initially introduced to the gamma field as dry seeds received exposures of 1.34 to 18 800R/20 hour day from the time of seed germination. Regression analysis demonstrated a significant, but non-linear, response for three variables, number of seedlings emerging, number of plants flowering, and plant volume; the response of a fourth variable, number of leaves per plant, was not related to daily exposure. LD 50 values ranged from 66R/20 hour day for plant volume to 1231R/20 hour day for seedling emergence. Flowering and plant volume were the most sensitive indicators of radiation exposure. The demonstration of a variable threshold at low levels of exposure indicates that in nature A. thaliana may be exposed to environmental radiation throughout its life-cycle without significant modification of growth or development. (author)

  16. EPR response of sucrose and microcrystalline cellulose to measure high doses of gamma radiation; Respuesta EPR de sacarosa y celulosa micro cristalina para medir altas dosis de radiacion gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torijano, E.; Cruz, L.; Gutierrez, G.; Azorin, J.; Aguirre, F. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Cruz Z, E., E-mail: eftc@xanum.uam.mx [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Solid dosimeters of sucrose and microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel Ph-102) were prepared, following the same process, in order to compare their EPR response against that of the l-alanine dosimeters considered as reference. All lots of dosimeters were irradiated with gamma radiation in Gamma beam irradiator with 8 kGy/h of the Nuclear Sciences Institute of UNAM. Doses ranged from 1 to 10 kGy respectively. We found that both the response of sucrose as microcrystalline cellulose were linear; however, the response intensity was, on average, twenty times more for sucrose. Comparing this against the EPR response of l-alanine in the range of doses, it was found that the response to sucrose is a third part; and microcrystalline cellulose is a sixtieth, approximately. The results agree with those found in the literature for sucrose, leaving open the possibility of investigating other dosage ranges for cellulose. (Author)

  17. Induction of a Radio-Adaptive Response by Low-dose Gamma Irradiation in Mouse Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westby, Christian M.; Seawright, John W.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    One of the most significant occupational hazards to an astronaut is the frequent exposure to radiation. Commonly associated with increased risk for cancer related morbidity and mortality, radiation is also known to increase the risk for cardiovascular related disorders including: pericarditis, hypertension, and heart failure. It is believed that these radiation-induced disorders are a result of abnormal tissue remodeling. It is unknown whether radiation exposure promotes remodeling through fibrotic changes alone or in combination with programmed cell death. Furthermore, it is not known whether it is possible to mitigate the hazardous effects of radiation exposure. As such, we assessed the expression and mechanisms of radiation-induced tissue remodeling and potential radio-adaptive responses of p53-mediated apoptosis and fibrosis pathways along with markers for oxidative stress and inflammation in mice myocardium. 7 week old, male, C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to 6Gy (H) or 5cGy followed 24hr later with 6Gy (LH) 137Cs gamma radiation. Mice were sacrificed and their hearts extirpated 4, 24, or 72hr after final irradiation. Real Time - Polymerase Chain Reaction was used to evaluate target genes. Apoptotic genes Bad and Bax, pro-cell survival genes Bcl2 and Bcl2l2, fibrosis gene Vegfa, and oxidative stress genes Sod2 and GPx4 showed a reduced fold regulation change (Bad,-6.18; Bax,-6.94; Bcl2,-5.09; Bcl2l2,-4.03; Vegfa, -11.84; Sod2,-5.97; GPx4*,-28.72; * = Bonferroni adjusted p-value present compared to 24hr control. These data suggest a general reduction in genetic expression 4hrs after a high dose of gamma radiation. However, pre-exposure to 5cGy gamma radiation appears to facilitate a radio-adaptive response that mitigates the reduction in genetic expression associated with single high-dose gamma radiation exposure. This radio-adaptive response may serve as a potential countermeasure to radiation-induced myocardial remodeling and preserve the cardiovascular health of

  18. Reactor gamma spectrometry: status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Kaiser, B.J.

    1979-01-01

    Current work is described for Compton Recoil Gamma-Ray Spectrometry including developments in experimental technique as well as recent reactor spectrometry measurements. The current status of the method is described concerning gamma spectromoetry probe design and response characteristics. Emphasis is given to gamma spectrometry work in US LWR and BR programs. Gamma spectrometry in BR environments are outlined by focussing on start-up plans for the Fast Test Reactor (FTR). Gamma spectrometry results are presented for a LWR pressure vessel mockup in the Poolside Critical Assembly (PCA) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  19. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K. (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.

  20. Response-surface models for deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {beta}/{gamma} -emitting sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    Individuals who work at nuclear reactor facilities can be at risk for deterministic effects in the skin from exposure to discrete {Beta}- and {gamma}-emitting ({Beta}{gamma}E) sources (e.g., {Beta}{gamma}E hot particles) on the skin or clothing. Deterministic effects are non-cancer effects that have a threshold and increase in severity as dose increases (e.g., ulcer in skin). Hot {Beta}{gamma}E particles are {sup 60}Co- or nuclear fuel-derived particles with diameters > 10 {mu}m and < 3 mm and contain at least 3.7 kBq (0.1 {mu}Ci) of radioactivity. For such {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin, it is the beta component of the dose that is most important. To develop exposure limitation systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for evaluating the risk of deterministic effects of localized {Beta} irradiation of the skin. The purpose of this study was to develop dose-rate and irradiated-area dependent, response-surface models for evaluating risks of significant deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources and to use modeling results to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure to such sources. The significance of the research results as follows: (1) response-surface models are now available for evaluating the risk of specific deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin; (2) modeling results have been used to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure of workers to {Beta} radiation from {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin or on clothing; and (3) the generic irradiated-volume, weighting-factor approach to limiting exposure can be applied to other organs including the eye, the ear, and organs of the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract and can be used for both deterministic and stochastic effects.

  1. Enhanced Dendritic Cell-Mediated Antigen-Specific CD4+ T Cell Responses: IFN-Gamma Aids TLR Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Ching Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic maturation and T cell stimulation are two functional attributes of DCs critical for immune induction. The combination of antigens, including those from cancer, with Toll-like receptor (TLR ligands induces far superior cellular immune responses compared to antigen alone. In this study, IFN-gamma treatment of bone marrow-derived DC, followed by incubation with the TLR2, TLR4, or TLR9 agonists, enhanced DC activation compared to TLR ligation alone. Most notably, the upregulation of CD40 with LPS stimulation and CD86 with CpG stimulation was observed in in vitro cultures. Similarly, IFN-gamma coinjected with TLR ligands was able to promote DC activation in vivo, with DCs migrating from the site of immunization to the popliteal lymph nodes demonstrating increased expression of CD80 and CD86. The heightened DC activation translated to a drastic increase in T cell stimulatory capacity in both antigen independent and antigen dependent fashions. This is the first time that IFN-gamma has been shown to have a combined effect with TLR ligation to enhance DC activation and function. The results demonstrate the novel use of IFN-gamma together with TLR agonists to enhance antigen-specific T cell responses, for applications in the development of enhanced vaccines and drug targets against diseases including cancer.

  2. Sos - response induction by gamma radiation in Escherichia coli strains with different repair capacities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serment Guerrero, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    The Sos - response in Escherichia coli is formed by several genes involved in mechanisms of tolerance and/or repair, and only activates when a DNA - damage appears. It is controlled by recA and lexA genes. In normal circumstances, LexA protein is linked in every Sos operators, blocking the transcription. When a DNA damage occurs, a Sos signal is generated, Rec A protein changes its normal functions, starts acting as a protease and cleaves Lex A, allowing the transcription of all Sos genes. This response can be quantified by means of Sos Chromo test, performed by Quillardet and Ofnung (1985). In using the Chromo test, it has been observed that the DNA damage made by gamma radiation in Escherichia coli depends on both the doses and the doses rate. It has been shown that the exposure of Escherichia coli PQ37 strain (uvrA) to low doses at low dose rate appears to retard the response, suggesting the action of a repair mechanism. (Brena 1990). In this work, we compare the response in Escherichia coli strains deficient in different mechanisms of repair and/or tolerance. It is observed the importance of rec N gene in the repair of DNA damage produced by gamma radiation. (Author)

  3. Association between neurovascular contact on MRI and response to gamma knife radiosurgery in trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbay, Sami H.; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A.; Gupta, Punita; O'Callaghan, Mark; Yun, Eric; Oljeski, Steven; Riesenburger, Ron

    2006-01-01

    Treatment with gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) provides adequate short-term pain control in about 70% of the patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether the presence of neurovascular contact (NVC) at the root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve on pre-gamma knife MR imaging predicts an increased likelihood of an adequate response to GKRS.We studied 40 consecutive patients who underwent GKRS for treatment of intractable TN. Two neuroradiologists blinded to the side of symptoms analyzed pre-treatment constructive interference in steady state (CISS) images to determine the presence of NVC by consensus. An adequate response was defined as freedom from pain with or without reduced need for medical therapy. Adequate short-term response to GKRS was seen in 29 (72.5%) of 40 patients. NVC was seen in 30 of the 40 patients. Twenty-five (83.3%) of 30 patients with NVC had adequate short-term response to GKRS. Only four (40%) of the 10 patients without NVC had adequate response to GKRS (X 2 =7.06; P<0.01). Patients with NVC were seven times more likely to have an adequate response to GKRS than those without NVC (odds ratio =7.5).The presence of NVC on pre-treatment MR imaging predicts an increased likelihood of an adequate response to GKRS. (orig.)

  4. Response of human lymphocytes to low gamma ray doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega Carrillo, HR; Banuelos Valenzuela, R; Manzanares Acuna, E; Sanchez-Rodriguez, S.H

    2001-01-01

    Radiation and non-radiation workers lymphocytes were exposed to a low strength gamma-ray field to determine heat shock protein expression in function of radiation dose. Protein identification was carried out using mAb raised against Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90; from these, only Hsp70 protein was detected before and after lymphocyte irradiation. In all cases, an increasing trend of relative amounts of Hsp70 in function to irradiation time was observed. After 70.5 mGy gamma-ray dose, radiation worker's lymphocytes expressed more Hsp70 protein, than non-radiation workers' lymphocytes, indicating a larger tolerance to gamma rays (gamma tolerance), due to an adaptation process developed by their labor condition (Au)

  5. Characterization of thermoluminescent response of Al2O3:Tm/Teflon for gamma rays dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Junior, Alvaro B. de; Barros, Vinicius S.M. de; Elihimas, Diego Rafael M.; Khoury, Helen J.; Azevedo, Walter M. de

    2011-01-01

    In this work, α-Al 2 O 3 doped with Tm 3+ was prepared by combustion synthesis techniques for thermoluminescent (TL) ionizing radiation dosimetry applications. After this, Al 2 O 3 :Tm (0.1%) pellets were manufactured from a 2:1 homogeneous mixture of Al 2 O 3 :Tm (0.1%) and powdered Teflon (PTFE). Ten pellets were used to characterize the dosimetric properties. The dosimetric characterization was performed by analyses of the reproducibility, sensitivity of the TL response vs. dose between 1 and 10 Gy to 60 Co source and fading. The results showed a glow curve with a peak near to 225 deg C, a linear TL response with the gamma radiation dose in the range investigated and a reproducibility < 10%. These results indicate a potential use of these pellets for gamma radiation dosimetry. (author)

  6. Adaptive Response to ionizing Radiation Induced by Low Doses of Gamma Rays in Human Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jin Sil; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    1994-01-01

    When cells are exposed to low doses of a mutagenic or clastogenic agents, they often become less sensitive to the effects of a higher does administered subsequently. Such adaptive responses were first described in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells to low doses of an alkylating agent. Since most of the studies have been carried out with human lymphocytes, it is urgently necessary to study this effect in different cellular systems. Its relation with inherent cellular radiosensitivity and underlying mechanism also remain to be answered. In this study, adaptive response by 1 cGy of gamma rays was investigated in three human lymphoblastoid cell lines which were derived from ataxia telangiectasia homozygote, ataxia telangiectasia heterozygote, and normal individual. Experiments were carried out by delivering 1 cGy followed by 50 cGy of gamma radiation and chromatid breaks were scored as an endpoint. The results indicate that prior exposure to 1 cGy of gamma rays reduces the number of chromatid breaks induced by subsequent higher does (50 cGy). The expression of this adaptive response was similar among three cell lines despite of their different radiosensitivity. When 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, was added after 50 cGy, adaptive responses were abolished in all the tested cell lines. Therefore it is suggested that the adaptive response can be observed in human lymphoblastoid cell lines. Which was first documented through this study. The expression of adaptive response was similar among the cell lines regardless of their radiosensitivity. The elimination of the adaptive response by 3-aminobenzamide is consistent with the proposal that this adaptive response is the result of the induction of a certain chromosomal repair mechanism

  7. Comparative response of dogs and monkeys to sublethal acute and continuous low dose-rate gamma-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, J.F.; Holland, L.M.; Johnson, O.S.; LaBauve, P.M.; London, J.E.; Prine, J.R.; Vigil, E.A.

    1977-02-01

    Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and dogs (beagle) were given thirteen 100-rad gamma-ray doses at 28-day intervals. The comparative response (injury and recovery) of the hematopoietic system of the two species was observed at 7-day intervals during the exposure regime. At 84 days after the thirteenth gamma-ray dose, the 1300-rad conditioned and control dogs and monkeys were challenged continuously with 35 R/day until death to determine the amount of radiation-induced injury remaining in conditioned animals as a reduction in mean survival time. Dogs (50 percent) and monkeys (8 percent) died from injury incurred during the conditioning exposures. Thus, the comparative response of dogs and monkeys to dose protraction by acute dose fractionation was similar to what might be expected from a single acute dose. Mean survival times for nonconditioned dogs and monkeys during continuous exposure at 35 R/day were the same (approximately 1400 h). Thus, hematopoietic response of the two species by this method of dose protraction was not significantly different. Mean survival times of conditioned dogs and monkeys during the continuous 35 R/day gamma-ray challenge exposure were greater than for their control counterparts. Thus, the long-term radiation-induced injury was not measurable by this method. Conditioning doses of more than four times the acute LD 50 - 30 in dogs and approximately two times that of monkeys served only to increase both mean survival time and variance in a gamma-ray stress environment with a dose rate of 35 R/day

  8. Dose Response for Monokaryon mycelium of Pleurotus pulmonarius After Acute Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Safina Wan Abdul Razak; Azhar Mohamad; Nie, H.J.

    2016-01-01

    Pleurotus pulmonarius is locally known as Grey oyster. The species is popular and widely cultivated throughout the world mostly in Asia Europe as their simple and low cost production technology and higher biological efficiency. Mutation induction is an alternative ways for improving available commercial strain for better quality traits. Dose response is important in evaluating effects of mutagenesis via acute gamma radiation. Monokaryon mycelium of Pleurotus pulmonarius was exposed to acute gamma radiation ranged from 0 Gy, 0.1 kGy, 0.2 kGy, 0.3 kGy, 0.4 kGy, 0.5 kGy, 0.6 kGy, 0.7 kGy, 0.8 kGy, 0.9 kGy, 1.0 kGy, 1.5 Gy, 2.0 kGy, 3.0 kGy and 4.0 kGy at dose rate 0.013 kGy/ min. growth performance was measured at 2 days interval to get the LD_5_0. Increasing of the irradiation dose found to decrease the growth performance of the monokaryon mycelium. LD_5_0 was revealed at 1.56 kGy for mono karyon mycelium. Discoveries of the works are important for the improvement of Pleurotus species via acute gamma radiation and benefiting to growers and mushroom industries. (author)

  9. Dose-response calibration curves of {sup 137}Cs gamma rays for dicentric chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Wol Soon; Oh, Su Jung; Jeong, Soo Kyun; Yang, Kwang Mo [Dept. of Research center, Dong Nam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Min Ho [Dept. of Microbiology, Dong A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Recently, the increased threat of radiologically industrial accident such as radiation nondestructive inspection or destruction of nuclear accident by natural disaster such as Fukushima accident requires a greater capacity for cytogenetic biodosimetry, which is critical for clinical triage of potentially thousands of radiation-exposed individuals. Dicentric chromosome aberration analysis is the conventional means of assessing radiation exposure. Dose–response calibration curves for {sup 13}'7Cs gamma rays have been established for unstable chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in many laboratories of international biodosimetry network. In this study, therefore, we established dose– response calibration curves of our laboratory for {sup 137}Cs gamma raysaccording to the IAEA protocols for conducting the dicentric chromosome assay We established in vitro dose–response calibration curves for dicentric chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes for{sup 13}'7Cs gamma rays in the 0 to 5 Gy range, using the maximum likelihood linear-quadratic model, Y = c+αD+βD2. The estimated coefficients of the fitted curves were within the 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and the curve fitting of dose–effect relationship data indicated a good fit to the linear-quadratic model. Hence, meaningful dose estimation from unknown sample can be determined accurately by using our laboratory’s calibration curve according to standard protocol.

  10. Decomposition of continuum {gamma}-ray spectra using synthesized response matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandel, M.; Morhac, M.; Kliman, J.; Krupa, L.; Matousek, V. E-mail: vladislav.matousek@savba.sk; Hamilton, J.H.; Ramayya, A.V

    2004-01-01

    The efficient methods of decomposition of {gamma}-ray spectra, based on the Gold algorithm, are presented. They use a response matrix of Gammasphere, which was obtained by synthesis of simulated and interpolated response functions using a new developed interpolation algorithm. The decomposition method has been applied to the measured spectra of {sup 152}Eu and {sup 56}Co. The results show a very effective removal of the background counts and their concentration into the corresponding photopeaks. The peak-to-total ratio in the spectra achieved after applying the decomposition method is in the interval 0.95-0.99. In addition, a new advanced algorithm of the 'boosted' decomposition has been proposed. In the spectra obtained after applying the boosted decomposition to the measured spectra, very narrow photopeaks are observed with the counts concentrated to several channels.

  11. INDUCED EEG GAMMA OSCILLATION ALIGNMENT IMPROVES DIFFERENTIATION BETWEEN AUTISM AND ADHD GROUP RESPONSES IN A FACIAL CATEGORIZATION TASK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Eric; El-Baz, Ayman S; Sokhadze, Guela E; Sears, Lonnie; Casanova, Manuel F; Sokhadze, Estate M

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often lack the ability to recognize and properly respond to emotional stimuli. Emotional deficits also characterize children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), in addition to exhibiting limited attention span. These abnormalities may effect a difference in the induced EEG gamma wave burst (35-45 Hz) peaked approximately 300-400 milliseconds following an emotional stimulus. Because induced gamma oscillations are not fixed at a definite point in time post-stimulus, analysis of averaged EEG data with traditional methods may result in an attenuated gamma burst power. METHODS: We used a data alignment technique to improve the averaged data, making it a better representation of the individual induced EEG gamma oscillations. A study was designed to test the response of a subject to emotional stimuli, presented in the form of emotional facial expression images. In a four part experiment, the subjects were instructed to identify gender in the first two blocks of the test, followed by differentiating between basic emotions in the final two blocks (i.e. anger vs. disgust). EEG data was collected from ASD (n=10), ADHD (n=9), and control (n=11) subjects via a 128 channel EGI system, and processed through a continuous wavelet transform and bandpass filter to isolate the gamma frequencies. A custom MATLAB code was used to align the data from individual trials between 200-600 ms post-stimulus, EEG site, and condition by maximizing the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient between trials. The gamma power for the 400 ms window of maximum induced gamma burst was then calculated and compared between subject groups. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Condition (anger/disgust recognition, gender recognition) × Alignment × Group (ADHD, ASD, Controls) interaction was significant at most of parietal topographies (e.g., P3-P4, P7-P8). These interactions were better manifested in the aligned data set

  12. Comparison of X-ray and gamma-ray dose-response curves for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia clone 02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underbrink, A.G.; Kellerer, A.M.; Mills, R.E.; Sparrow, A.H.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, N.Y.

    1976-01-01

    Microdosimetric data indicate that the mean specific energy, xi, produced by individual charged particles from X rays and gamma rays is different for the two radiation qualities by nearly a factor of two. In order to test whether this influences the initial, linear component in the dose-effect relations, a comparison was made between dose-response curves for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia clone 02 stamen hairs following X and gamma irradiations. Absorbed doses ranged from 2.66 to 300 rad. The results are in agreement with predictions made on the basis of microdosimetric data. At low doses gamma rays are substantially less effective than X rays. The RBE of gamma rays vs. X rays at low doses was approximately 0.6, a value lower than those usually reported in other experimental systems. (orig.) [de

  13. Effect of "6"0Co-induced gamma radiation exposure and Jasmonic acid on antioxidant responses in Cowpea varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Pradeep Kumar; Bhagoji, Ravi; Ramteke, P.W.; Misra, Pragati; Maurice, Navodita

    2017-01-01

    Cowpea used to be the first crop harvested before the cereal crops are ready and therefore is referred to as 'hungry-season crop'. The gamma irradiation is known to increase nutritional values of food sources and also enhance and accelerate growth of certain vegetables Antioxidants are the metabolites, produced by the plant in response to different stress conditions e.g. radiation stress etc. Seeds of four cowpea varieties were treated with different doses of gamma radiation and effect of jasmonic acid (JA) on antioxidant response of cowpea was studied. The results showed that there was no linear correlation between application of JA and different antioxidant contents. (author)

  14. Scintillation response of CsI: Tl crystal under neutron, gamma, alpha particles and beta excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Maria da Conceicao Costa; Madi Filho, Tufic; Lopes, Valdir Maciel; Berretta, Jose Roberto; Cardenas, Jose Patricio Nahuel, E-mail: macoper@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Among the converters of X and gamma radiation in light photons, known as scintillators, the one which is the most efficient emits photons with a wavelength near 400 nm. Particularly, among them, the cesium iodine doped with thallium (CsI:Tl) crystal is that which matches better between the light emission spectrum (peak at 540 nm) and the quantum sensitivity curve of the photodiodes and CCD (Charge Coupled Device). This explains the renewed interest in using this crystal as scintillator. Although the CsI:Tl crystal is commercially available, its local development would give the possibility to obtain it in different geometric configurations and coupling. Moreover, there is a special interest in studying new conditions that will alter the properties of this crystal in order to achieve a optimal level of its functional characteristics. Having an efficient national scintillator with low cost is a strategic opportunity to study the response of a detector applied to different types of radiation. The crystal of cesium iodide activated with thallium (CsI:Tl) has a high gamma detection efficiency per unit volume. In this paper, the CsI:Tl crystal, grown by the vertical Bridgman technique in evacuated silica ampoules and with the purpose of use as radiation detectors, is described. To evaluate the scintillator, measures of the thallium distribution in the crystal volume were taken, with overall efficiency score. The scintillator response was studied through gamma radiation from sources of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 22}Na, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 131}I and {sup 99m}Tc; the beta radiation from source of {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y, alpha particles from {sup 241}Am source and the scintillator response to neutrons from Am/Be source. The energetic resolution for {sup 137}Cs gamma rays (662 keV) was 10%. The results showed the validity of using the CsI:Tl crystal developed in our laboratory, in many applications in the area of radiation detectors. (author)

  15. Gamma Splines and Wavelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannu Olkkonen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we introduce a new family of splines termed as gamma splines for continuous signal approximation and multiresolution analysis. The gamma splines are born by -times convolution of the exponential by itself. We study the properties of the discrete gamma splines in signal interpolation and approximation. We prove that the gamma splines obey the two-scale equation based on the polyphase decomposition. to introduce the shift invariant gamma spline wavelet transform for tree structured subscale analysis of asymmetric signal waveforms and for systems with asymmetric impulse response. Especially we consider the applications in biomedical signal analysis (EEG, ECG, and EMG. Finally, we discuss the suitability of the gamma spline signal processing in embedded VLSI environment.

  16. Optimization of γ-aminobutyric acid production by Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 from honeybees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajabadi, Naser; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Baradaran, Ali; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Mahyudin, Nor Ainy; Manap, Mohd Yazid Abdul; Bakar, Fatimah Abu; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-04-15

    Dominant strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from honey bees were evaluated for their γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing ability. Out of 24 strains, strain Taj-Apis362 showed the highest GABA-producing ability (1.76 mM) in MRS broth containing 50 mM initial glutamic acid cultured for 60 h. Effects of fermentation parameters, including initial glutamic acid level, culture temperature, initial pH and incubation time on GABA production were investigated via a single parameter optimization strategy. The optimal fermentation condition for GABA production was modeled using response surface methodology (RSM). The results showed that the culture temperature was the most significant factor for GABA production. The optimum conditions for maximum GABA production by Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 were an initial glutamic acid concentration of 497.97 mM, culture temperature of 36 °C, initial pH of 5.31 and incubation time of 60 h, which produced 7.15 mM of GABA. The value is comparable with the predicted value of 7.21 mM.

  17. Optimization of γ-Aminobutyric Acid Production by Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 from Honeybees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Tajabadi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dominant strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from honey bees were evaluated for their γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-producing ability. Out of 24 strains, strain Taj-Apis362 showed the highest GABA-producing ability (1.76 mM in MRS broth containing 50 mM initial glutamic acid cultured for 60 h. Effects of fermentation parameters, including initial glutamic acid level, culture temperature, initial pH and incubation time on GABA production were investigated via a single parameter optimization strategy. The optimal fermentation condition for GABA production was modeled using response surface methodology (RSM. The results showed that the culture temperature was the most significant factor for GABA production. The optimum conditions for maximum GABA production by Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 were an initial glutamic acid concentration of 497.97 mM, culture temperature of 36 °C, initial pH of 5.31 and incubation time of 60 h, which produced 7.15 mM of GABA. The value is comparable with the predicted value of 7.21 mM.

  18. Neural network consistent empirical physical formula construction for neutron–gamma discrimination in gamma ray tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildiz, Nihat; Akkoyun, Serkan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Detector responses in neutron–gamma discrimination were estimated by neural networks. ► Novel consistent neural network empirical physical formulas (EPFs) were constructed for detector responses. ► The EPFs are of explicit mathematical functional form. ► The EPFs can be used to derive various physical functions relevant to neutron–gamma discrimination in gamma ray tracking. -- Abstract: Gamma ray tracking is an efficient detection technique in studying exotic nuclei which lies far from beta stability line. To achieve very powerful and extraordinary resolution ability, new detectors based on gamma ray tracking are currently being developed. To reach this achievement, the neutron–gamma discrimination in these detectors is also an important task. In this paper, by suitable layered feedforward neural networks (LFNNs), we have constructed novel and consistent empirical physical formulas (EPFs) for some highly nonlinear detector counts measured in neutron–gamma discrimination. The detector counts data used in the discrimination was actually borrowed from our previous paper. The counts used here had been originally measured versus the following parameters: energy deposited in the first interaction points, difference in the incoming direction of initial gamma rays, and finally figure of merit values of the clusters determined by tracking. The LFNN–EPFs are of explicit mathematical functional form. Therefore, by various suitable operations of mathematical analysis, these LFNN–EPFs can be used to derivate further physical functions which might be potentially relevant to neutron–gamma discrimination performance of gamma ray tracking.

  19. Adaptive response of yeast cultures (Saccharomyces Cerevisiae) exposed to low dose of gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulcsar, Agnes; Savu, D.; Petcu, I.; Gherasim, Raluca

    2003-01-01

    The present study was planned as follows: (i) setting up of standard experimental conditions for investigation of radio-induced adaptive response in lower Eucaryotes; (ii) developing of procedures for synchronizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae X 310 D cell cultures and cell cycle stages monitoring; (iii) investigation of gamma (Co-60) and UV irradiation effects on the viability of synchronized and non-synchronized cell cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae; the effects were correlated with the cell density and cell cycle stage; (iv) study of the adaptive response induced by irradiation and setting up of the experimental conditions for which this response is optimized. The irradiations were performed by using a Co-60 with doses of 10 2 - 10 4 Gy and dose rates ranging from 2.2 x 10 2 Gy/h to 8.7 x 10 3 Gy/h. The study of radioinduced adaptive response was performed by applying a pre-irradiation treatment of 100-500 Gy, followed by challenge doses of 2-4 kGy delivered at different time intervals, ranging from 1 h to 4 h. The survival rate of synchronized and non-synchronized cultures as a function of exposure dose shows an exponential decay shape. No difference in viability of the cells occurred between synchronized and non-synchronized cultures. The pre-irradiation of cells with 100 and 200 Gy were most efficient to induce an adaptive response for the yeast cells. In this stage of work we proved the occurrence of the adaptive response in the case of synchronized yeast cultures exposed to gamma radiation. The results will be used in the future to investigate the dependence of this response on the cell cycle and the possibility to induce such a response by a low level electromagnetic field. (authors)

  20. Development of air equivalent gamma dose monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alex, Mary; Bhattacharya, Sadhana; Karpagam, R.; Prasad, D.N.; Jakati, R.K.; Mukhopadhyay, P.K.; Patil, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes design and development of air equivalent gamma absorbed dose monitor. The monitor has gamma sensitivity of 84 pA/R/h for 60 Co source. The characterization of the monitor has been done to get energy dependence on gamma sensitivity and response to gamma radiation field from 1 R/hr to 5000 R/hr. The gamma sensitivity in the energy range of 0.06 to 1.25MeV relative to 137 Cs nuclide was within 2.5%. The linearity of the monitor response as a function of gamma field from 10 R/h to 3.8 kR/h was within 6%. The monitor has been designed for its application in harsh environment. It has been successfully qualified to meet environmental requirements of shock. (author)

  1. DNA Methylation at the Neonatal State and at the Time of Diagnosis: Preliminary Support for an Association with the Estrogen Receptor 1, Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor 1, and Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein in Female Adolescent Patients with OCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Judith Becker; Hansen, Christine Søholm; Starnawska, Anna; Mattheisen, Manuel; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hollegaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder. Non-genetic factors and their interaction with genes have attracted increasing attention. Epigenetics is regarded an important interface between environmental signals and activation/repression of genomic responses. Epigenetic mechanisms have not previously been examined in OCD in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of selected genes in blood spots from neonates later diagnosed with OCD and in the same children/adolescents at the time of diagnosis compared with age- and sex-matched controls. Furthermore, we wanted to characterize the association of the differential methylation profiles with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome. Dried and new blood spot samples were obtained from 21 female children/adolescents with verified OCD and 12 female controls. The differential methylation was analyzed using a linear model and the correlation with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome was analyzed using the Pearson correlation. We evaluated selected Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip probes within and up to 100,000 bp up- and downstream of 14 genes previously associated with OCD (SLC1A1, SLC25A12, GABBR1, GAD1, DLGAP1, MOG, BDNF, OLIG2, NTRK2 and 3, ESR1, SL6A4, TPH2, and COMT). The study found no significantly differential methylation. However, preliminary support for a difference was found for the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor 1 (cg10234998, cg17099072) in blood samples at birth and for the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) (cg10939667), the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) (cg16650906), and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (cg14080521) in blood samples at the time of diagnosis. Preliminary support for an association was observed between the methylation profiles of GABBR1 and MOG and baseline severity, treatment effect, and responder status; and between the methylation profile of ESR1 and baseline

  2. Comparison of histopathology, cultivation of tissues and rectal contents, and interferon-gamma and serum antibody responses for the diagnosis of bovine paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huda, A.; Jensen, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    contents, and (3) examination of repeated blood samples for interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and antibody responses. Tissue samples were taken from the small and large intestine and corresponding mesenteric lymph nodes, and from the pharyngeal tonsil and other lymphoid nodes (retropharyngeal, mediastinal...

  3. Stereotactic gamma radiosurgery of pineal and related tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Mori, Yoshimasa; Yamada, Yasushi; Kida, Yoshihisa

    2001-01-01

    The role of gamma radiosurgery as an additional therapy after conventional treatments for pineal and related tumors was studied in 30 out of 33 cases with a mean follow-up of 23.3 months. Overall results showed that complete response (CR) was obtained in 8 cases (26.7%) and response rate was 73.3%. However, enlargement of the tumors was noted in 8 cases, of which 7 (23.3%) died of tumor progression (PG). Germinomas and pineocytomas showed higher response and control rates of 100%, and no tumor enlargement or death occurred after gamma knife treatment. In germinoma with STGC (syncytiotrophoblastic giant cell) which has been thought to have intermediate prognosis, two cases showed partial response (PR), but another died from progression of the disease. Malignant germ cell tumors and pineoblastomas showed unfavorable response and prognosis; the response and progression rates were 50%. However, complete response was obtained in 3 cases (25%) after gamma radiosurgery. Gamma knife was the initial treatment in three cases without pathological diagnosis in which one obtained CR and two showed partial response (PR). Stereotactic gamma radiosurgery is expected to be an effective and novel treatment for pineal and related tumors not only as an adjuvant, but also as an initial therapy. (author)

  4. Ionotropic GABA Receptors and Distal Retinal ON and OFF Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Popova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the vertebrate retina, visual signals are segregated into parallel ON and OFF pathways, which provide information for light increments and decrements. The segregation is first evident at the level of the ON and OFF bipolar cells in distal retina. The activity of large populations of ON and OFF bipolar cells is reflected in the b- and d-waves of the diffuse electroretinogram (ERG. The role of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, acting through ionotropic GABA receptors in shaping the ON and OFF responses in distal retina, is a matter of debate. This review summarized current knowledge about the types of the GABAergic neurons and ionotropic GABA receptors in the retina as well as the effects of GABA and specific GABAA and GABAC receptor antagonists on the activity of the ON and OFF bipolar cells in both nonmammalian and mammalian retina. Special emphasis is put on the effects on b- and d-waves of the ERG as a useful tool for assessment of the overall function of distal retinal ON and OFF channels. The role of GABAergic system in establishing the ON-OFF asymmetry concerning the time course and absolute and relative sensitivity of the ERG responses under different conditions of light adaptation in amphibian retina is also discussed.

  5. Widespread abnormality of the γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic system in Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagic, Anto; Simmons, Janine M.; Mari, Zoltan; Bonne, Omer; Xu, Ben; Kazuba, Diane; Herscovitch, Peter; Carson, Richard E.; Murphy, Dennis L.; Drevets, Wayne C.; Hallett, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunction of the γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic system in Tourette syndrome may conceivably underlie the symptoms of motor disinhibition presenting as tics and psychiatric manifestations, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive–compulsive disorder. The purpose of this study was to identify a possible dysfunction of the γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic system in Tourette patients, especially involving the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuits and the cerebellum. We studied 11 patients with Tourette syndrome and 11 healthy controls. Positron emission tomography procedure: after injection of 20 mCi of [11C]flumazenil, dynamic emission images of the brain were acquired. Structural magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained to provide an anatomical framework for the positron emission tomography data analysis. Images of binding potential were created using the two-step version of the simplified reference tissue model. The binding potential images then were spatially normalized, smoothed and compared between groups using statistical parametric mapping. We found decreased binding of GABAA receptors in Tourette patients bilaterally in the ventral striatum, globus pallidus, thalamus, amygdala and right insula. In addition, the GABAA receptor binding was increased in the bilateral substantia nigra, left periaqueductal grey, right posterior cingulate cortex and bilateral cerebellum. These results are consistent with the longstanding hypothesis that circuits involving the basal ganglia and thalamus are disinhibited in Tourette syndrome patients. In addition, the abnormalities in GABAA receptor binding in the insula and cerebellum appear particularly noteworthy based upon recent evidence implicating these structures in the generation of tics. PMID:22577221

  6. Evaluation of detector responses to natural environmental and fall-out gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvela, H.

    1988-01-01

    Instrument responses to the thorium, uranium and potassium components of the natural environmental as well as the fall-out radiation field were evaluated. The responses to the 137 Cs fall-out radiation field differ by less than 6% from the response at 0.662 MeV, except for that of the NaI scintillator. Differences of more than 30% were found in the responses of two energy compensated instruments to normal natural background radiation and to radiation from fresh fall-out. The best estimate of the terrestrial component of the dose rate measured was obtained by carrying out the following corrections of the measured readings: cosmic ray contribution and internal background subtraction with response correction, including 137 Cs calibration correction. After the Chernobyl accident the dose rate levels due to 137 Cs and 134 Cs fall-out were comparable to the natural background gamma radiation. The responses calculated as well as the results from measurements of the low level environmental exposure levels caused by the Chernobyl fall-out, confirmed the need to take into account the instrument response to natural as well as fall-out radiation fields. (author)

  7. Dosimetric response of united, commercially available CTA foils for 60Co gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peimel-Stuglik, Z.

    2001-01-01

    The usefulness of two kinds of untinted CTA foils: Fuji CTR-125 dosimetric foil and technical CTA-T foil, produced by 'Zaklady Chemiczne, 'Gorzow Wielkopolski' as support for light-sensitive layers of amateur photo-films, for 60 Co gamma ray dosimetry was investigated. In spite of rather bad physical parameters of the technical foil (spread of foil thickness, high and different initial absorbance) the dosimetric response of both foils for 60 Co gamma rays was similar. The CTA-T foil can be used for routine dosimetry providing that dosimetric signals have to be calculated exactly as recommended by the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) standard, i.e. as the difference of absorbance of irradiated and (the same) non-irradiated foil. Any other approach may lead to high errors of dose evaluation. The last is true also for other CTA foils, especially after long self-life. (author)

  8. Antibody-independent control of gamma-herpesvirus latency via B cell induction of anti-viral T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly B McClellan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available B cells can use antibody-dependent mechanisms to control latent viral infections. It is unknown whether this represents the sole function of B cells during chronic viral infection. We report here that hen egg lysozyme (HEL-specific B cells can contribute to the control of murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (gammaHV68 latency without producing anti-viral antibody. HEL-specific B cells normalized defects in T cell numbers and proliferation observed in B cell-/- mice during the early phase of gammaHV68 latency. HEL-specific B cells also reversed defects in CD8 and CD4 T cell cytokine production observed in B cell-/- mice, generating CD8 and CD4 T cells necessary for control of latency. Furthermore, HEL-specific B cells were able to present virally encoded antigen to CD8 T cells. Therefore, B cells have antibody independent functions, including antigen presentation, that are important for control of gamma-herpesvirus latency. Exploitation of this property of B cells may allow enhanced vaccine responses to chronic virus infection.

  9. Corn seed response to gamma radiation as a function of water content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viccini, Lyderson Facio; Saraiva, Luiz Sergio; Cruz, Cosme Damiao

    1997-01-01

    The study of the factors that affect the radiation efficiency is important, because it makes easier to get mutants that may be used as source of variability on improvement programs or as structural chromosomic aberrations for cytogenetics studies. The main of this research was to investigate the influence of corn seed water content on gamma radiation response. As a rule, the damage caused by irradiation was more evident on seeds with higher water content. Also, increased damages were observed with higher radiation doses. (author)

  10. Response of Fusarium semitectum conidia to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebaijuri, M.; Bahari, I.; Omar, M.; Bidin, Z.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports on studies carried out to investigate response of conidia from Fusarium semitectum irradiated with gamma-rays in air-, nitrogen- and oxygen-saturated 1/15 M phosphate buffer, and potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair of the conidia when incubated after irradiation up to 96 h at 30degC in the same buffer. Survival curves for conidia irradiated between 0 to 3. 0 kGy in air- and nitrogen-saturated buffer exhibited distinct patterns of initial concaves at the lower dose range (less than 1.0 kGy) and followed by linear portions at the higher dose range. Conidia irradiated in oxygen-saturated buffer exhibited a linear survival curve. The D 10 for conidia, i.e., the dose required to reduce the initial population by 1 log cycle determined at the linear portions of survival curves increased in the order of oxygen-, air- and nitrogen-saturated buffer. Unlike mammalian and some bacterial cells, F. semitectum conidia apparently lacked PLD repair mechanism. (author)

  11. Differential expression of interferon-gamma and interferon-gamma-inducing cytokines in Thai patients with scrub typhus or leptospirosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chierakul, Wirongrong; de Fost, Maaike; Suputtamongkol, Yupin; Limpaiboon, Roongreung; Dondorp, Arjen; White, Nicholas J.; van der Poll, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-gamma plays an important role in the induction of a type 1 immune response against intracellular pathogens. We compared the plasma levels of IFN-gamma and IFN-gamma-inducing cytokines in adult Thai patients with scrub typhus, caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Orientia

  12. Integral transport computation of gamma detector response with the CPM2 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.B.

    1989-12-01

    CPM-2 Version 3 is an enhanced version of the CPM-2 lattice physics computer code which supports the capabilities to (1) perform a two-dimensional gamma flux calculation and (2) perform Restart/Data file maintenance operations. The Gamma Calculation Module implemented in CPM-2 was first developed for EPRI in the CASMO-1 computer code by Studsvik Energiteknik under EPRI Agreement RP2352-01. The gamma transport calculation uses the CPM-HET code module to calculate the transport of gamma rays in two dimensions in a mixed cylindrical-rectangular geometry, where the basic fuel assembly and component regions are maintained in a rectangular geometry, but the fuel pins are represented as cylinders within a square pin cell mesh. Such a capability is needed to represent gamma transport in an essentially transparent medium containing spatially distributed ''black'' cylindrical pins. Under a subcontract to RP2352-01, RPI developed the gamma production and gamma interaction library used for gamma calculation. The CPM-2 gamma calculation was verified against reference results generated by Studsvik using the CASMO-1 program. The CPM-2 Restart/Data file maintenance capabilities provide the user with options to copy files between Restart/Data tapes and to purge files from the Restart/Data tapes

  13. Changes in responsiveness to serotonin on rat ventromedial hypothalamic neurons after food deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, F; Nishihara, M; Torii, K; Takahashi, M

    1996-07-01

    The effects of food deprivation on responsiveness of neurons in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) to serotonin (5-HT), norepinephrine (NE), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and neuropeptide Y (NPY) were investigated using brain slices in vitro along with behavioral changes in vivo during fasting. Adult male rats were fasted for 48 h starting at the beginning of the dark phase (lights on: 0700-1900 h). The animals showed a significant loss of body weight on the second day of fasting and an increase in food consumption on the first day of refeeding. During fasting, voluntary locomotor activity was significantly increased in the light phase but not during the dark phase. Plasma catecholamine levels were not affected by fasting. In vitro electrophysiological study showed that, in normally fed rats, 5-HT and NE induced both excitatory and inhibitory responses, while GABA and NPY intensively suppressed unit activity in the VMH. Food deprivation for 48 h significantly changed the responsiveness of VMH neurons to 5-HT, for instance, the ratio of neurons whose activity was facilitated by 5-HT was significantly decreased. The responsiveness of VMH neurons to NE, GABA, and NPY was not affected by food deprivation. These results suggest that food deprivation decreases the facilitatory response of VMH neurons to 5-HT, and that this change in responsiveness to 5-HT is at least partially involved in the increase in food intake motivation and locomotor activity during fasting.

  14. The level of PPD-specific IFN-gamma-producing CD4+ T cells in the blood predicts the in vivo response to PPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Marcia Valéria B S; Lima, Mônica Cristina B S; Duppre, Nadia C; Matos, Haroldo J; Spencer, John S; Brennan, Patrick J; Sarno, Euzenir N; Fonseca, Leila; Pereira, Geraldo M B; Pessolani, Maria Cristina V

    2007-05-01

    There are no reliable means for detecting subclinical mycobacterial infections. The recent sequencing of several mycobacterial genomes has now afforded new opportunities for the development of pathogen-specific diagnostic tests, critical in the context of leprosy and tuberculosis control. In the present study, we applied a multi-parametric flow cytometric analysis that allowed the investigation of T-cell functions in order to define immunological markers that measure previous exposure to mycobacteria. We compared the in vivo response to PPD, the gold standard skin test reagent for measuring previous exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with in vitro parameters of leukocyte activation in five PPD positive and five PPD negative healthy volunteers. PPD-stimulated peripheral leukocytes expressing CD4, CD69, cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA) and intracellular IFN-gamma were enumerated in whole blood and compared with the size of in vivo PPD-induced induration and IFN-gamma production levels as measured by ELISA in supernatants of PPD-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The reactivity to the tuberculin skin test (TST) was associated with markedly increased frequencies of PPD-responsive activated (CD69+) and IFN-gamma-producing CD4+T cells. Detection of PPD-specific IFN-gamma producing leukocytes was restricted to CD4+T cells and a subset of these cells was shown to express the skin homing molecule CLA. Multiple linear regression modeling of responses to PPD showed the highest association between skin test indurations and frequencies of PPD-responsive IFN-gamma-producing CD4+CD69+ T cells. Our data show that the in vitro enumeration of antigen-specific IFN-gamma-producing CD4+ T cells can provide an alternative to the in vivo tuberculin test for the detection of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Moreover, the measurement of these immunological parameters can be useful for the screening of new specific antigens defined by the genome

  15. Iterative reconstruction of SiPM light response functions in a square-shaped compact gamma camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A.; Alves, F.; Marcos, J.; Martins, R.; Pereira, L.; Solovov, V.; Chepel, V.

    2017-05-01

    Compact gamma cameras with a square-shaped monolithic scintillator crystal and an array of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are actively being developed for applications in areas such as small animal imaging, cancer diagnostics and radiotracer guided surgery. Statistical methods of position reconstruction, which are potentially superior to the traditional centroid method, require accurate knowledge of the spatial response of each photomultiplier. Using both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental data obtained with a camera prototype, we show that the spatial response of all photomultipliers (light response functions) can be parameterized with axially symmetric functions obtained iteratively from flood field irradiation data. The study was performed with a camera prototype equipped with a 30  ×  30  ×  2 mm3 LYSO crystal and an 8  ×  8 array of SiPMs for 140 keV gamma rays. The simulations demonstrate that the images, reconstructed with the maximum likelihood method using the response obtained with the iterative approach, exhibit only minor distortions: the average difference between the reconstructed and the true positions in X and Y directions does not exceed 0.2 mm in the central area of 22  ×  22 mm2 and 0.4 mm at the periphery of the camera. A similar level of image distortions is shown experimentally with the camera prototype.

  16. Absolute measurement of the responses of small lithium glass scintillators to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, A.W.

    1987-04-01

    The absolute scintillation efficiency and intrinsic resolution of lithium glass scintillators for electron excitation have been determined over a range of electron energies, lithium concentrations and lithium enrichments. Measurements of these response characteristics form part of a study on the possible use of such glasses for the determination of tritium breeding in fusion reactor blanket experiments. The measurements were undertaken to establish a basis for extracting the information relating to tritium production reactions from the background signals induced within the glass scintillators by the neutron/gamma fields of a fusion reactor blanket. Criteria for the selection of glasses most suitable for tritium breeding measurements are discussed in tems of their observed responses

  17. Gamma response characterizations of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) affects personal dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monthonwattana, S.; Esor, J.; Rungseesumran, T.; Intang, A.

    2017-06-01

    Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) is the current technique of personal dosimetry changed by Nuclear Technology Service Center instead of Thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) because OSL has more advantages, such as repeat reading and elimination of heating process. In this study, OSL was used to test the gamma response characterizations. Detailed OSL investigation on personal dosimetry was carried out in the dose range of 0.2 - 3.0 mSv. The batch homogeneity was 7.66%. R2 value of the linear regression was 0.9997. The difference ratio of angular dependence at ± 60° was 8.7%. Fading of the reading was about 3%.

  18. Chronic effects of dichloromethane on amino acids, glutathione and phosphoethanolamine in gerbil brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briving, C.; Hamberger, A.; Kjellstrand, P.; Rosengren, L.; Karlsson, J.E.; Haglid, K.G.

    1986-06-01

    Mongolian gerbils were exposed to dichloromethane for three months by continuous inhalation at 210 ppm. Total free tissue amino acids, glutathione, and phosphoethanolamine were determined in the vermis posterior of the cerebellum and the frontal cerebral cortex. These two brain areas were chosen because humans occupationally exposed to dichloromethane have shown abnormalities in the electroencephalogram of the frontal part of the cerebral cortex. This study showed that long-term exposure of gerbils to dichloromethane (210 ppm) for three months leads to decreased levels of glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and phosphoethanolamine in the frontal cerebral cortex, while glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid are elevated in the posterior cerebellar vermis.

  19. Studies of a Bulbospinal Pathway that Regulates Cardiovascular Function: Inhibition by GABA at the Ventral Medulla and Mediation by Spinal Cord Substance P

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-13

    rat. Neurosci. Abstr. 10:299. Meldrum , B.S. (1975) Epilepsy and gamma aminobutyric acid -mediated in- hibition. In: International Review of Neurobiology...Table 1 AGENTS THAT INDUCE CARDIOVASCULAR CHANGES WHEN TOPICALLY APPLIED TO OR MICROINJECTED NEAR THE VSMO acetylchol ine Y-aminobutyric acid ...va , 1981; Blessing and Reis, 1983; Keeler et _al_., 1984a Feldberg, 1976; Feldberg and Guertzenstein, 1976 Table 1 (continuation) kainic acid

  20. Kernel integration scatter model for parallel beam gamma camera and SPECT point source response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovic, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    Scatter correction is a prerequisite for quantitative single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In this paper a kernel integration scatter Scatter correction is a prerequisite for quantitative SPECT. In this paper a kernel integration scatter model for parallel beam gamma camera and SPECT point source response based on Klein-Nishina formula is proposed. This method models primary photon distribution as well as first Compton scattering. It also includes a correction for multiple scattering by applying a point isotropic single medium buildup factor for the path segment between the point of scatter an the point of detection. Gamma ray attenuation in the object of imaging, based on known μ-map distribution, is considered too. Intrinsic spatial resolution of the camera is approximated by a simple Gaussian function. Collimator is modeled simply using acceptance angles derived from the physical dimensions of the collimator. Any gamma rays satisfying this angle were passed through the collimator to the crystal. Septal penetration and scatter in the collimator were not included in the model. The method was validated by comparison with Monte Carlo MCNP-4a numerical phantom simulation and excellent results were obtained. The physical phantom experiments, to confirm this method, are planed to be done. (author)

  1. β-aminobutyric acid mediated drought stress alleviation in maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Arun K; Bhardwaj, Pardeep K; Ghosh, Supriya; Roy, Sankhajit; Saha, Suman; Sherpa, Ang R; Saha, Samir K; Hossain, Zahed

    2016-02-01

    The present study highlights the role of β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) in alleviating drought stress effects in maize (Zea mays L.). Chemical priming was imposed by pretreating 1-week-old plants with 600 μM BABA prior to applying drought stress. Specific activities of key antioxidant enzymes and metabolites (ascorbate and glutathione) levels of ascorbate-glutathione cycle were studied to unravel the priming-induced modulation of plant defense system. Furthermore, changes in endogenous ABA and JA concentrations as well as mRNA expressions of key genes involved in their respective biosynthesis pathways were monitored in BABA-primed (BABA+) and non-primed (BABA-) leaves of drought-challenged plants to better understand the mechanistic insights into the BABA-induced hormonal regulation of plant response to water-deficit stress. Accelerated stomatal closure, high relative water content, and less membrane damage were observed in BABA-primed leaves under water-deficit condition. Elevated APX and SOD activity in non-primed leaves found to be insufficient to scavenge all H2O2 and O2 (·-) resulting in oxidative burst as evident after histochemical staining with NBT and DAB. A higher proline accumulation in non-primed leaves also does not give much protection against drought stress. Increased GR activity supported with the enhanced mRNA and protein expressions might help the BABA-primed plants to maintain a high GSH pool essential for sustaining balanced redox status to counter drought-induced oxidative stress damages. Hormonal analysis suggests that in maize, BABA-potentiated drought tolerance is primarily mediated through JA-dependent pathway by the activation of antioxidant defense systems while ABA biosynthesis pathway also plays an important role in fine-tuning of drought stress response.

  2. Study on the optimal moisture adding rate of brown rice during germination by using segmented moisture conditioning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yinping; Jia, Fuguo; Han, Yanlong; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to find out the optimal moisture adding rate of brown rice during the process of germination. The process of water addition in brown rice could be divided into three stages according to different water absorption speeds in soaking process. Water was added with three different speeds in three stages to get the optimal water adding rate in the whole process of germination. Thus, the technology of segmented moisture conditioning which is a method of adding water gradually was put forward. Germinated brown rice was produced by using segmented moisture conditioning method to reduce the loss of water-soluble nutrients and was beneficial to the accumulation of gamma aminobutyric acid. The effects of once moisture adding amount in three stages on the gamma aminobutyric acid content in germinated brown rice and germination rate of brown rice were investigated by using response surface methodology. The optimum process parameters were obtained as follows: once moisture adding amount of stage I with 1.06 %/h, once moisture adding amount of stage II with 1.42 %/h and once moisture adding amount of stage III with 1.31 %/h. The germination rate under the optimum parameters was 91.33 %, which was 7.45 % higher than that of germinated brown rice produced by soaking method (84.97 %). The content of gamma aminobutyric acid in germinated brown rice under the optimum parameters was 29.03 mg/100 g, which was more than two times higher than that of germinated brown rice produced by soaking method (12.81 mg/100 g). The technology of segmented moisture conditioning has potential applications for studying many other cereals.

  3. Interferon gamma, interferon-gamma-induced-protein 10, and tuberculin responses of children at high risk of tuberculosis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrucci, Roberta; Abu Amer, Nabil; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children in contact with adults with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are at risk for infection and disease progression, and chemoprophylaxis may reduce this risk. The identification of infection is based on the tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) release assays...

  4. Gamma-ray irradiation and post-irradiation at room and elevated temperature response of pMOS dosimeters with thick gate oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejović Momčilo M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray irradiation and post-irradiation response at room and elevated temperature have been studied for radiation sensitive pMOS transistors with gate oxide thickness of 100 and 400 nm, respectively. Their response was followed based on the changes in the threshold voltage shift which was estimated on the basis of transfer characteristics in saturation. The presence of radiation-induced fixed oxide traps and switching traps - which lead to a change in the threshold voltage - was estimated from the sub-threshold I-V curves, using the midgap technique. It was shown that fixed oxide traps have a dominant influence on the change in the threshold voltage shift during gamma-ray irradiation and annealing.

  5. Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

    2008-07-01

    The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

  6. Interferon gamma, interferon-gamma-induced-protein 10, and tuberculin responses of children at high risk of tuberculosis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrucci, Roberta; Abu Amer, Nabil; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children in contact with adults with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are at risk for infection and disease progression, and chemoprophylaxis may reduce this risk. The identification of infection is based on the tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) release assays. Ot...

  7. Pilot study of whole-blood gamma interferon response to the Vibrio cholerae toxin B subunit and resistance to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-associated diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Jose; DuPont, Herbert L; Paredes-Paredes, Mercedes; Aguirre-Garcia, M Magdalena; Rojas, Araceli; Gonzalez, Alexei; Okhuysen, Pablo C

    2010-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), which produces heat-labile toxin (LT), is a common cause of travelers' diarrhea (TD). The B subunit of ETEC LT is immunologically related to the B subunit of Vibrio cholerae toxin (CT). In this pilot study we evaluated the whole-blood gamma interferon response to CT B in 17 U.S. adults traveling to Mexico. Only one of nine subjects who demonstrated a cellular immune response as determined by whole-blood gamma interferon production to CT B on arrival to Mexico developed diarrhea, whereas five of eight without a cellular response developed diarrhea. Markers of the cellular immune response to ETEC LT could help in identifying individuals immune to ETEC LT, and these markers deserve additional study.

  8. Expression quantitative trait loci and genetic regulatory network analysis reveals that Gabra2 is involved in stress responses in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiajuan; Wang, Xusheng; Chen, Ying; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhu, Jun; Lu, Lu

    2009-11-01

    Previous studies have revealed that the subunit alpha 2 (Gabra2) of the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor plays a critical role in the stress response. However, little is known about the gentetic regulatory network for Gabra2 and the stress response. We combined gene expression microarray analysis and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping to characterize the genetic regulatory network for Gabra2 expression in the hippocampus of BXD recombinant inbred (RI) mice. Our analysis found that the expression level of Gabra2 exhibited much variation in the hippocampus across the BXD RI strains and between the parental strains, C57BL/6J, and DBA/2J. Expression QTL (eQTL) mapping showed three microarray probe sets of Gabra2 to have highly significant linkage likelihood ratio statistic (LRS) scores. Gene co-regulatory network analysis showed that 10 genes, including Gria3, Chka, Drd3, Homer1, Grik2, Odz4, Prkag2, Grm5, Gabrb1, and Nlgn1 are directly or indirectly associated with stress responses. Eleven genes were implicated as Gabra2 downstream genes through mapping joint modulation. The genetical genomics approach demonstrates the importance and the potential power of the eQTL studies in identifying genetic regulatory networks that contribute to complex traits, such as stress responses.

  9. Sample dependent response of a LaCl{sub 3}:Ce detector in prompt gamma neutron activation analysis of bulk hydrocarbon samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, A.A., E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Al-Matouq, Faris A.; Khiari, F.Z. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Isab, A.A. [Department of Chemistry, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Khateeb-ur-Rehman,; Raashid, M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-08-11

    The response of a LaCl{sub 3}:Ce detector has been found to depend upon the hydrogen content of bulk samples in prompt gamma analysis using 14 MeV neutron inelastic scattering. The moderation of 14 MeV neutrons from hydrogen in the bulk sample produces thermal neutrons around the sample which ultimately excite chlorine capture gamma rays in the LaCl{sub 3}:Ce detector material. Interference of 6.11 MeV chlorine gamma rays from the detector itself with 6.13 MeV oxygen gamma rays from the bulk samples makes the intensity of the 6.13 MeV oxygen gamma ray peak relatively insensitive to variations in oxygen concentration. The strong dependence of the 1.95 MeV doublet chlorine gamma ray yield on hydrogen content of the bulk samples confirms fast neutron moderation from hydrogen in the bulk samples as a major source of production of thermal neutrons and chlorine gamma rays in the LaCl{sub 3}:Ce detector material. Despite their poor oxygen detection capabilities, these detectors have nonetheless excellent detection capabilities for hydrogen and carbon in benzene, butyl alcohol, propanol, propanic acid, and formic acid bulk samples using 14 MeV neutron inelastic scattering.

  10. An overview of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid: pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, toxic effects, addiction, analytical methods, and interpretation of results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, H; Aydin, B E; Mueller, A; Iwersen-Bergmann, S

    2011-09-01

    Abuse of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) has been known since the early 1990's, but is not as widespread as the consumption of other illegal drugs. However, the number of severe intoxications with fatal outcomes is comparatively high; not the least of which is brought about by the consumption of the currently legal precursor substances gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) and 1,4-butanediol (1,4-BD). In regards to previous assumptions, addiction to GHB or its analogues can occur with severe symptoms of withdrawal. Moreover, GHB can be used for drug-facilitated sexual assaults. Its pharmacological effects are generated mainly by interaction with both GABA(B) and GHB receptors, as well as its influence on other transmitter systems in the human brain. Numerous analytical methods for determining GHB using chromatographic techniques were published in recent years, and an enzymatic screening method was established. However, the short window of GHB detection in blood or urine due to its rapid metabolism is a challenge. Furthermore, despite several studies addressing this problem, evaluation of analytical results can be difficult: GHB is a metabolite of GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid); a differentiation between endogenous and exogenous concentrations has to be made. Apart from this, in samples with a longer storage interval and especially in postmortem specimens, higher levels can be measured due to GHB generation during this postmortem interval or storage time. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Calming effect of orally administered γ-aminobutyric acid in Shih Tzu dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetake, Katsuji; Okumoto, Ayano; Tani, Noriko; Goto, Akihiro; Tanaka, Toshio

    2012-12-01

    The calming effects of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by oral administration were investigated in four adult Shih Tzu dogs. Three dosage levels (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg body weight) and non-administration were tested by an increase and decrease method. Changes in activity (for 1.5 h) and urinary cortisol levels (pre-administration, 3 and 7 h later) of dogs were monitored after administration. Without reference to dosage level, the mean times spent standing (P = 0.06), sitting (P level was observed at 7 h after administration (P GABA exerts calming effects on dogs as well as humans. © 2012 The Authors. Animal Science Journal © 2012 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  12. Novel high-affinity and selective biaromatic 4-substituted ¿-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) analogues as GHB ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høg, Signe; Wellendorph, Petrine; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a metabolite of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and has been proposed to function as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. GHB is used in the treatment of narcolepsy and is a drug of abuse. GHB binds to both GABA(B) receptors and specific high-affinity GHB sites...

  13. Environmental monitoring with in-situ gamma spectrometer; Umweltueberwachung mit in-situ-Gamma-Spektrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, S. [ENVINET GmbH, Haar (Germany)

    2014-01-20

    The in-situ gamma spectroscopy allows large area and continuous monitoring of the radio nuclides and there composition in the environment. In comparison to the gamma dose rate measurement the additional spectral information gives the possibility for a quick and effective action in the case of a man-made radiation exposition in the environment. The knowledge respectively localization of the possible nuclides, which a responsible for the increased dose rate, supports responsible organization in the quick identification of the situation, definition of the actions and tracking of the temporal and local process of the radiation exposition. Due to dedicate actions the risk for people and environment is reduced.

  14. Comparison of gamma- and beta radiation stress responses on anti-oxidative defense system and DNA modifications in Lemna minor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoeck, Arne [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200 2400 Mol (Belgium); University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Horemans, Nele; Van Hees, May; Nauts, Robin; Vandenhove, Hildegarde [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200 2400 Mol (Belgium); Knapen, Dries; Blust, Ronny [University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    The biological effects and interactions of different radiation types in plants are still far from understood. Additional knowledge on the impact of various kinds of ionizing radiation in plants on individual, biochemical and molecular level is needed to unravel and compare the toxic mode of action. Among different radiation types, external gamma radiation treatments have been mostly studied both in lab and field studies to derive the biological impact of radiation toxicity in organisms. However, environmental relevant studies on chronic low-dose gamma exposures are scarce. The radio-ecologically relevant radionuclide {sup 90}Sr is a pure beta emitting isotope and originates from nuclear activities and accidents. Although this radionuclide is not essential for plant metabolism, it bears a chemical analogy with the essential plant macro-nutrient Ca{sup 2+} thereby taking advantage of Ca{sup 2+} transport systems to contaminate plant organs and tissues. Ones plants are exposed to radiation stress, ionization events can cause an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and can induce damage to biological material like DNA, lipids and structural proteins. The following work aimed at evaluating individual, biochemical and molecular endpoints to understand and to compare the mode of action of gamma- and beta radiation stress in plants. Having an equal relative biological effectiveness to non-human biota, it is still not clear in how plants differ or overlap in sensing and interpreting highly penetrating electromagnetic radiation with short-range particle radiation. The floating plant Lemna minor was chosen as model system. Following the OECD guidelines Lemna plants were being exposed separately to an external gamma radiation source or to a {sup 90}Sr-contaminated growth medium to obtain single-dose response curves for each type of radiation. In order to acquire accurate dose rate quantifications for beta radiation exposures, {sup 90}Sr uptake and accumulation of root and

  15. Calibration and energy response of the Bitt RM10/RS02 gamma radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, E. van; Aalbers, A.H.L.

    1990-03-01

    A radiation monitoring network with automatic warning capabilities (LMR) has been established in the Netherlands. For the detection of gamma radiation exposure-rate-meters manufactured by Bitt Technologies are used. These meters consist of a proportional counter tube (type RS 02) and a read-out unit (type RM 10E). The photon energy response of 6 counter tubes was tested at the National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection. The measurements were performed with heavy filtered X-rays in the range of 50-250 keV (ISO narrow spectrum series) and with gamma ray beams from cesium-137 (662 keV) and cobalt-60 (1,25 MeV). To determine the energy response, the detector reading was referred to air kerma by means of a transfer ionization chamber. This transfer chamber was directly calibrated against the standard for X-rays. By applying these measurement procedures of a set of calibration factors (N k ) as a function of photon energy was determined. These calibration factors, expressed as the ratio air kerma to reading were converted to ambient dose equivalent calibration factors using appropriate conversion factors taken from Grosswend et al., 1988. From the measurement data an average ambient dose equivalent calibration factor of 10.8 mSv.roentgen -1 was calculated. (author). 5 refs.; 6 figs.; 5 tabs

  16. Energy input and response from prompt and early optical afterglow emission in gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestrand, W T; Wren, J A; Wozniak, P R; Aptekar, R; Golentskii, S; Pal'shin, V; Sakamoto, T; White, R R; Evans, S; Casperson, D; Fenimore, E

    2006-07-13

    The taxonomy of optical emission detected during the critical first few minutes after the onset of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) defines two broad classes: prompt optical emission correlated with prompt gamma-ray emission, and early optical afterglow emission uncorrelated with the gamma-ray emission. The standard theoretical interpretation attributes prompt emission to internal shocks in the ultra-relativistic outflow generated by the internal engine; early afterglow emission is attributed to shocks generated by interaction with the surrounding medium. Here we report on observations of a bright GRB that, for the first time, clearly show the temporal relationship and relative strength of the two optical components. The observations indicate that early afterglow emission can be understood as reverberation of the energy input measured by prompt emission. Measurements of the early afterglow reverberations therefore probe the structure of the environment around the burst, whereas the subsequent response to late-time impulsive energy releases reveals how earlier flaring episodes have altered the jet and environment parameters. Many GRBs are generated by the death of massive stars that were born and died before the Universe was ten per cent of its current age, so GRB afterglow reverberations provide clues about the environments around some of the first stars.

  17. MR imaging response of cerebral metastases and peritumoral edema after Gamma Knife surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Qi; Wang Congyin; Zhang Xuening; Zheng Jingjing; Xu Desheng; Zhang Yipei

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluation the treatment response of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for the control of cerebral metastases and peritumoral edema using standard MRI. Method: 42 consecutive patients with 75 metastatic lesions were recruited in this study (28 men, 14 women; mean age 60±12 years). Gadolinium enhancement T 1 WI scans were performed on one day before and three months after GKS. Treatment response was evaluated by calculating the changes of tumor volume and edema index before and after GKS. Results: Mean tumor volumes on the baseline and post treatment were 7.0 cm 3 and 3.3 cm 3 respectively. Mean peritumoral edema indexes were 9.9 and 4.3 respectively. Tumor growth control rate and peritumoral edema control rate were 91% and 85% respectively. Conclusion: GKS is effective for both brain metastasis and peritumoral edema, and the tumor volume influences GKS efficacy. Conventional MRI provides useful information to predict treatment response of GKS for cerebral metastasis. (authors)

  18. Effect of temperature on the partial molar volume, isentropic compressibility and viscosity of DL-2-aminobutyric acid in water and in aqueous sodium chloride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Carmen M.; Rodríguez, Diana M.; Ribeiro, Ana C.F.; Esteso, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Apparent volumes, apparent compressibilities, viscosities of DL-2-aminobutyric acid. • Effect of temperature on the values for these properties. • Hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions and the effect of sodium chloride. - Abstract: Density, sound velocity and viscosity of DL-2-aminobutyric acid in water and in aqueous sodium chloride solutions have been measured at temperatures of (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15 and 313.15) K. The experimental results were used to determine the apparent molar volume and the apparent molar compressibility as a function of composition at these temperatures. The limiting values of both the partial molar volume and the partial molar adiabatic compressibility at infinite dilution of DL-2-aminobutyric acid in water and in aqueous sodium chloride solutions were determined at each temperature. The experimental viscosity values were adjusted by a least-squares method to a second order equation as proposed by Tsangaris-Martin to obtain the viscosity B coefficient which depends on the size, shape and charge of the solute molecule. The influence of the temperature on the behaviour of the selected properties is discussed in terms of both the solute hydration and the balance between hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between the acids and water, and the effect of the sodium chloride concentration.

  19. Q{sub {gamma}-H2AX}, an analysis method for partial-body radiation exposure using {gamma}-H2AX in non-human primate lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redon, Christophe E., E-mail: redonc@mail.nih.gov [NIH, NCI, CCR, Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Nakamura, Asako J.; Gouliaeva, Ksenia [NIH, NCI, CCR, Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Rahman, Arifur; Blakely, William F. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States); Bonner, William M. [NIH, NCI, CCR, Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    We previously used the {gamma}-H2AX assay as a biodosimeter for total-body irradiation (TBI) exposure ({gamma}-rays) in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) model. Utilizing peripheral blood lymphocytes and plucked hairs, we obtained statistically significant {gamma}-H2AX responses days after total-body exposure to 1-8.5 Gy ({sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays at 55 cGy min{sup -1}). Here, we introduce a partial-body exposure analysis method, Q{sub {gamma}-H2AX}, which is based on the number of {gamma}-H2AX foci per damaged cells as evident by having one or more {gamma}-H2AX foci per cell. Results from the rhesus monkey - TBI study were used to establish Q{sub {gamma}-H2AX} dose-response calibration curves to assess acute partial-body exposures. {gamma}-H2AX foci were detected in plucked hairs for several days after in vivo irradiation demonstrating this assay's utility for dose assessment in various body regions. The quantitation of {gamma}-H2AX may provide a robust biodosimeter for analyzing partial-body exposures to ionizing radiation in humans.

  20. Photopeak efficiency response function of an underwater gamma-ray NaI(Tl) detector using MCNP-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, William L.; Silva, Ademir X.; Salgado, Cesar M.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a study to calculate the response function of a 1.5″ x 1″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector when it is used in the marine environment in the energy range from 20 keV to 662 keV. The method takes into account both the scattering of photons in the water and the detection mechanism of the detector. In addition, the calculation of the response function of the whole system is essential for suppressing the background of the measurement and for estimating the concentration of the involved radionuclides, especially given the greater probability of primary gamma photons undergoing multiple scattering events before they interact with the detector. The experimental photopeak efficiency measurements for point sources were compared with the simulated results under the same conditions of the experimental setup to validate the simulation of the detector. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the MCNP-X code for the investigation of gamma-ray absorption in water in different brines. The energy resolution curve was used to improve the response of the mathematical simulation of the detector. The detector’s simulation was based on information obtained from the gammagraphy technique. Both dimensions and materials were used for the calculation with the MCNP-X code. The photopeak efficiency of a NaI(Tl) detector for different radionuclides in the aquatic environment with different salinities was calculated. (author)

  1. Involvement of mismatch repair proteins in adaptive responses induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine against {gamma}-induced genotoxicity in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Ayumi; Sakamoto, Yasuteru; Masumura, Kenichi; Honma, Masamitsu [Division of Genetics and Mutagenesis, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Nohmi, Takehiko, E-mail: nohmi@nihs.go.jp [Division of Genetics and Mutagenesis, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)

    2011-08-01

    Highlights: {yields} Health effects of radiation should be evaluated in combination with chemicals. {yields} Here, we show that MNNG suppresses radiation-induced genotoxicity in human cells. {yields} Mismatch repair proteins play critical roles in the apparent adaptive responses. {yields} Chemical exposure may modulate radiation-induced genotoxicity in humans. - Abstract: As humans are exposed to a variety of chemical agents as well as radiation, health effects of radiation should be evaluated in combination with chemicals. To explore combined genotoxic effects of radiation and chemicals, we examined modulating effects of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), a direct-acting methylating agent, against genotoxicity of {gamma}-radiation. Human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells and its mismatch-deficient derivative, i.e., MT1 cells, were treated with MNNG for 24 h before they were exposed to {gamma}-irradiation at a dose of 1.0 Gy, and the resulting genotoxicity was examined. In TK6 cells, the pretreatments with MNNG at low doses suppressed frequencies of the thymidine kinase (TK) gene mutation and micronucleus (MN) formation induced by {gamma}-irradiation and thus the dose responses of TK and MN assays were U-shaped along with the pretreatment doses of MNNG. In contrast, the genotoxic effects of MNNG and {gamma}-irradiation were additive in MT1 cells and the frequencies of TK mutations and MN induction increased along with the doses of MNNG. Apoptosis induced by {gamma}-radiation was suppressed by the pretreatments in TK6 cells, but not in MT1 cells. The expression of p53 was induced and cell cycle was delayed at G2/M phase in TK6, but not in MT1 cells, by the treatments with MNNG. These results suggest that pretreatments of MNNG at low doses suppress genotoxicity of {gamma}-radiation in human cells and also that mismatch repair proteins are involved in the apparent adaptive responses.

  2. The induced expression of heat shock proteins as a part of the early cellular response to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankova, K.; Ivanova, K.; Georgieva, R.; Rupova, I.; Boteva, R.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of stressful stimuli including gamma radiation can induce increase in the synthesis of heat shock proteins (Hsp). This family of molecular chaperones includes members with molecular masses ranging from 10 to 150 kDa and has been identified in all organisms from bacteria to humans. Hsp70 chaperones are very important. The present study aimed to characterize the radiation-induced changes in Hsp70 synthesis in human lymphocytes as a part of the early cellular response to gamma irradiation. The expression of Hsp70 was determined with Western blot and the radiation-induced apoptotic changes were registered by staining with fluorescent dyes. Part of the experiments were performed in the presence of the organic solvent DMSO. At low concentrations this reagent shows antioxidant activity and can reduce the level of the radiation-induced oxidant stress which determines the predominant biological effects of the ionizing radiation. Irradiation with 0.5 to 8 Gy caused statistically significant increase in the synthesis of Hsp70 which was strongest after irradiation with 4 Gy. In the range 0.5-2 Gy the enhancement of the radiation-induced synthesis of Hsp70 reached 60%. Our experimental results characterize changes in the Hsp70 synthesis after gamma irradiation as a part of the early cellular stress response in lymphocytes. (authors)

  3. Genetic manipulation of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt in rice: overexpression of truncated glutamate decarboxylase (GAD2) and knockdown of γ-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T) lead to sustained and high levels of GABA accumulation in rice kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimajiri, Yasuka; Oonishi, Takayuki; Ozaki, Kae; Kainou, Kumiko; Akama, Kazuhito

    2013-06-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid commonly present in all organisms. Because cellular levels of GABA in plants are mainly regulated by synthesis (glutamate decarboxylase, GAD) and catabolism (GABA-transaminase, GABA-T), we attempted seed-specific manipulation of the GABA shunt to achieve stable GABA accumulation in rice. A truncated GAD2 sequence, one of five GAD genes, controlled by the glutelin (GluB-1) or rice embryo globulin promoters (REG) and GABA-T-based trigger sequences in RNA interference (RNAi) cassettes controlled by one of these promoters as well, was introduced into rice (cv. Koshihikari) to establish stable transgenic lines under herbicide selection using pyriminobac. T₁ and T₂ generations of rice lines displayed high GABA concentrations (2-100 mg/100 g grain). In analyses of two selected lines from the T₃ generation, there was a strong correlation between GABA level and the expression of truncated GAD2, whereas the inhibitory effect of GABA-T expression was relatively weak. In these two lines both with two T-DNA copies, their starch, amylose, and protein levels were slightly lower than non-transformed cv. Koshihikari. Free amino acid analysis of mature kernels of these lines demonstrated elevated levels of GABA (75-350 mg/100 g polished rice) and also high levels of several amino acids, such as Ala, Ser, and Val. Because these lines of seeds could sustain their GABA content after harvest (up to 6 months), the strategy in this study could lead to the accumulation GABA and for these to be sustained in the edible parts. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Quantitative Autoradiography on [(35)S]TBPS Binding Sites of Gamma- Aminobutyric Acid(A) Receptors in Discrete Brain Regions of High- Alcohol-Drinking and Low-Alcohol- Drinking Rats Selectively Bred forHigh- and Low-Alcohol Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, B.H.; Kunkler, P.E.; Lumeng, L.

    1997-01-01

    It has been documented that ethanol can potentiate brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic function, and there is a close link between the GABA(A) receptor complex and effects of ethanol, including reinforcement of alcohol which is a fundamental element of alcohol preference. However, it is unknown in what discrete brain regions GABA(A) receptors might be associated with alcohol preference. In the present study, [(35)S]t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ([(35)S]TBPS) was used to localize GABA(A) receptors in high-alcohol-drinking (HAD) rats and low-alcohol-drinking (LAD) rats which were selectively bred for high and low alcohol preference, respectively. Initial qualitative observations indicated that [(35)S]TBPS binding sites were abundant in many brain areas including the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus and amygdala of HAD and LAD rats. Furthermore, the quantitative autoradiographic analysis revealed fewer [(35)S]TBPS binding sites of GABA(A) receptors in the amygdaloid complex, central medial thalamic nucleus, lateral hypothalamic nucleus and anterior hypothalamic nucleus of HAD rats than LAD rats. Collectively, this study has indicated that HAD rats selectively bred for high alcohol preference possess lower [(35)S]TBPS binding in the brain. Since lower TBPS binding has been proposed to reflect enhanced GABAergic function, as evidenced in rats with seizure or under alcohol withdrawal, the results from the present study suggest that HAD rats might have an enhanced GABAergic function. It is thus likely that enhanced GABAergic function in the brain might be related to high alcohol preference which is characteristic in HAD rats. In addition, the present result showing no difference of [(35)S]TBPS binding in the nucleus accumbens is also in agreement with a notion that [(35)S]TBPS binding may represent only a small spectrum of the GABA(A) receptor complex which is constituted of a sophisticated subunit combination whose functional compositions are still unknown. In

  5. The structure and diffusion behaviour of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in neutral aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigo, M.M.; Esteso, M.A.; Barros, M.F.; Verissimo, L.M.P.; Romero, C.M.; Suarez, A.F.; Ramos, M.L.; Valente, A.J.M.; Burrows, H.D.; Ribeiro, A.C.F.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Diffusion coefficients and densities of binary aqueous solutions of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). • Dependence on both shape and size of GABA on its diffusion. • Interactions intramolecular and the solute-water interactions in these systems. - Abstract: GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a non-protein amino acid with important physiological properties, and with considerable relevance to the food and pharmaceutical industries. Particular interest has focused on its role as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian cerebral cortex. In this paper, we report density and mutual diffusion coefficients of GABA in non-buffered aqueous solutions (0.001–0.100) mol·dm −3 at 298.15 K. Under these conditions, 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy and pH measurements show that it is present predominantly as a monomeric zwitterionic species. Diffusion coefficients have been computed assuming that this behaves as the binary system GABA/water. From density and intermolecular diffusion coefficients measurements, the molar volume, hydrodynamic radii, R h , diffusion coefficients at infinitesimal concentration, D 0 , activity coefficients and the thermodynamic factors, F T , have been estimated. Within experimental error, the hydrodynamic volume calculated from this is identical to the molar volume obtained from density measurements. From the NMR spectra and literature data, it is suggested that this amino acid diffuses in aqueous solution as a curved, coil-like hydrated zwitterionic entity.

  6. Experimental response function of NaI(Tl) scintillation detector for gamma photons and tomographic measurements for defect detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Amandeep; Singh, Karamjit; Singh, Bhajan; Sandhu, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    The response function of gamma detector is an important factor for spectrum analysis because some photons and secondary electrons may escape the detector volume before fully depositing their energy, of course destroys the ideal delta function response. An inverse matrix approach, for unfolding of observed pulse-height distribution to a true photon spectrum, is used for construction of experimental response function by formulating a 40 x 40 matrix with bin mesh (E 1/2 ) of 0.025 (MeV) 1/2 for the present measurements. A tomographic scanner system, operating in a non-destructive and non-invasive way, is also presented for inspection of density variation in any object. The incoherent scattered intensity of 662 keV gamma photons, obtained by unfolding (deconvolution) the experimental pulse-height distribution of NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, provides the desired information. The method is quite sensitive, for showing inclusion of medium Z (atomic number) material (iron) in low Z material (aluminium) and detecting a void of ∼2 mm in size for iron block, to investigate the inhomogeneities in the object. Also, the grey scale images (using 'MATLAB') are shown to visualise the presence of defects/inclusion in metal samples.

  7. Computational techniques in gamma-ray skyshine analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, D.L.

    1988-12-01

    Two computer codes were developed to analyze gamma-ray skyshine, the scattering of gamma photons by air molecules. A review of previous gamma-ray skyshine studies discusses several Monte Carlo codes, programs using a single-scatter model, and the MicroSkyshine program for microcomputers. A benchmark gamma-ray skyshine experiment performed at Kansas State University is also described. A single-scatter numerical model was presented which traces photons from the source to their first scatter, then applies a buildup factor along a direct path from the scattering point to a detector. The FORTRAN code SKY, developed with this model before the present study, was modified to use Gauss quadrature, recent photon attenuation data and a more accurate buildup approximation. The resulting code, SILOGP, computes response from a point photon source on the axis of a silo, with and without concrete shielding over the opening. Another program, WALLGP, was developed using the same model to compute response from a point gamma source behind a perfectly absorbing wall, with and without shielding overhead. 29 refs., 48 figs., 13 tabs

  8. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239 Pu Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmann, John

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239 Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-ray multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution

  9. Enhancing Contents of γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) and Other Micronutrients in Dehulled Rice during Germination under Normoxic and Hypoxic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Junzhou; Yang, Tewu; Feng, Hao; Dong, Mengyi; Slavin, Margaret; Xiong, Shanbai; Zhao, Siming

    2016-02-10

    Biofortification of staple grains with high contents of essential micronutrients is an important strategy to overcome micronutrient malnutrition. However, few attempts have targeted at γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a functional nutrient for aging populations. In this study, two rice cultivars, Heinuo and Xianhui 207, were used to investigate changes in GABA and other nutritional compounds of dehulled rice after germination under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Forty-one metabolites were identified in both cultivars treated by normoxic germination, whereas the germinated dehulled rice of Heinuo and Xianhui 207 under hypoxic treatment had 43 and 41 metabolites identified, respectively. GABA increased in dehulled rice after germination, especially under hypoxia. Meanwhile, a number of other health-beneficial and/or flavor-related compounds such as lysine and d-mannose increased after the hypoxic treatment. The accumulation of GABA exhibited genotype-specific modes in both normoxic and hypoxic treatments. With regard to GABA production, Xianhui 207 was more responsive to the germination process than Heinuo, whereas Heinuo was more responsive to hypoxia than Xianhui 207. This study provides a promising approach to biofortify dehulled rice with increased GABA and other nutrients through metabolomic-based regulation.

  10. The combined effect of uranium and gamma radiation on biological responses and oxidative stress induced in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhoudt, Nathalie; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Horemans, Nele; Wannijn, Jean; Van Hees, May; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Cuypers, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Uranium never occurs as a single pollutant in the environment, but always in combination with other stressors such as ionizing radiation. As effects induced by multiple contaminants can differ markedly from the effects induced by the individual stressors, this multiple pollution context should not be neglected. In this study, effects on growth, nutrient uptake and oxidative stress induced by the single stressors uranium and gamma radiation are compared with the effects induced by the combination of both stressors. By doing this, we aim to better understand the effects induced by the combined stressors but also to get more insight in stressor-specific response mechanisms. Eighteen-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings were exposed for 3 days to 10 μM uranium and 3.5 Gy gamma radiation. Gamma radiation interfered with uranium uptake, resulting in decreased uranium concentrations in the roots, but with higher transport to the leaves. This resulted in a better root growth but increased leaf lipid peroxidation. For the other endpoints studied, effects under combined exposure were mostly determined by uranium presence and only limited influenced by gamma presence. Furthermore, an important role is suggested for CAT1/2/3 gene expression under uranium and mixed stressor conditions in the leaves.

  11. The effect of amino acid backbone length on molecular packing: crystalline tartrates of glycine, β-alanine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and DL-α-aminobutyric acid (AABA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losev, Evgeniy; Boldyreva, Elena

    2018-02-01

    We report a novel 1:1 cocrystal of β-alanine with DL-tartaric acid, C 3 H 7 NO 2 ·C 4 H 6 O 6 , (II), and three new molecular salts of DL-tartaric acid with β-alanine {3-azaniumylpropanoic acid-3-azaniumylpropanoate DL-tartaric acid-DL-tartrate, [H(C 3 H 7 NO 2 ) 2 ] + ·[H(C 4 H 5 O 6 ) 2 ] - , (III)}, γ-aminobutyric acid [3-carboxypropanaminium DL-tartrate, C 4 H 10 NO 2 + ·C 4 H 5 O 6 - , (IV)] and DL-α-aminobutyric acid {DL-2-azaniumylbutanoic acid-DL-2-azaniumylbutanoate DL-tartaric acid-DL-tartrate, [H(C 4 H 9 NO 2 ) 2 ] + ·[H(C 4 H 5 O 6 ) 2 ] - , (V)}. The crystal structures of binary crystals of DL-tartaric acid with glycine, (I), β-alanine, (II) and (III), GABA, (IV), and DL-AABA, (V), have similar molecular packing and crystallographic motifs. The shortest amino acid (i.e. glycine) forms a cocrystal, (I), with DL-tartaric acid, whereas the larger amino acids form molecular salts, viz. (IV) and (V). β-Alanine is the only amino acid capable of forming both a cocrystal [i.e. (II)] and a molecular salt [i.e. (III)] with DL-tartaric acid. The cocrystals of glycine and β-alanine with DL-tartaric acid, i.e. (I) and (II), respectively, contain chains of amino acid zwitterions, similar to the structure of pure glycine. In the structures of the molecular salts of amino acids, the amino acid cations form isolated dimers [of β-alanine in (III), GABA in (IV) and DL-AABA in (V)], which are linked by strong O-H...O hydrogen bonds. Moreover, the three crystal structures comprise different types of dimeric cations, i.e. (A...A) + in (III) and (V), and A + ...A + in (IV). Molecular salts (IV) and (V) are the first examples of molecular salts of GABA and DL-AABA that contain dimers of amino acid cations. The geometry of each investigated amino acid (except DL-AABA) correlates with the melting point of its mixed crystal.

  12. Adaptive response to ionizing radiation induced by low doses of gamma rays in human cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jinsil; Chang, Ok Suh; Gwi, Eon Kim

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the adaptive response could be induced in human lymphoblastoid cell lines and human tumor cell lines. The time necessary for the expression of the adaptive response was also investigated. Materials and Methods: Three lymphoblastoid cell lines from ataxia telangiectasia (AT) homozygote (GM 1526), AT heterozygote (GM 3382), and normal individual (3402p) and two hepatoma cell lines, Hep G2 and Hep 3B, were used in this study. Experiments were carried out by delivering 0.01 Gy followed by 0.5 Gy of gamma radiation to the exponentially growing cells. The time necessary for the expression of the adaptive response was determined by varying the time interval between the two doses from 1 to 72 h. In some experiments, 3-aminobenzamide, a potent inhibitor of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, was added immediately after the 0.5 Gy exposure. The cultures were fixed 30 min (for the G 2 chromatid) and 6 h (for the S chromatid) after the 0.5 Gy exposure. Metaphase chromosome assay was carried out to score chromatid breaks as an end point. Results: A prior exposure to 0.01 Gy of gamma rays significantly reduced the number of chromatid breaks induced by subsequent higher doses (0.5 Gy) in all the tested cell lines. The magnitude of the adaptive response was similar among the cell lines despite their different radiosensitivities. In the G 2 chromatids, the adaptive response was observed both at short-time intervals, as early as 1 h, and at long-time intervals. In the S chromatids, however, the adaptive response was shown only at long-time intervals. When 3-aminobenzamide was added after the 0.5 Gy, the adaptive responses were abolished in all the experimental groups. Conclusion: The adaptive response was observed in human lymphoblastoid cell lines and hepatoma cell lines. The magnitude of the adaptive response did not seem to be related to the radiosensitivity of the cells. The elimination of the adaptive response with 3

  13. Response functions of NaI(Tl) detectors to terrestrial gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyurcsak, J.; Lenda, A.

    1978-01-01

    Computer programs, serving for calculation of detector efficiency and energy deposition spectrum for scintillation crystals irradiated by isotropic or half-isotropic gamma-ray fields were elaborated. The Monte-Carlo models used in calculations are valid for gamma-ray energies 2 π geometry by the 1.5'' x 2'' probe with experimental results is given. (author)

  14. Drilling azimuth gamma embedded design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yi Ren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Embedded drilling azimuth gamma design, the use of radioactive measuring principle embedded gamma measurement while drilling a short section analysis. Monte Carlo method, in response to the density of horizontal well logging numerical simulation of 16 orientation, the orientation of horizontal well analysed, calliper, bed boundary location, space, different formation density, formation thickness, and other factors inclined strata dip the impact by simulating 137Cs sources under different formation conditions of the gamma distribution, to determine the orientation of drilling density tool can detect window size and space, draw depth of the logging methods. The data 360° azimuth imaging, image processing method to obtain graph, display density of the formation, dip and strata thickness and other parameters, the logging methods obtain real-time geo-steering. To establish a theoretical basis for the orientation density logging while drilling method implementation and application of numerical simulation in-depth study of the MWD azimuth and density log response factors of horizontal wells.

  15. GABA concentration in superior temporal sulcus predicts gamma power and perception in the sound-induced flash illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balz, Johanna; Keil, Julian; Roa Romero, Yadira; Mekle, Ralf; Schubert, Florian; Aydin, Semiha; Ittermann, Bernd; Gallinat, Jürgen; Senkowski, Daniel

    2016-01-15

    In everyday life we are confronted with inputs of multisensory stimuli that need to be integrated across our senses. Individuals vary considerably in how they integrate multisensory information, yet the neurochemical foundations underlying this variability are not well understood. Neural oscillations, especially in the gamma band (>30Hz) play an important role in multisensory processing. Furthermore, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission contributes to the generation of gamma band oscillations (GBO), which can be sustained by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors. Hence, differences in the GABA and glutamate systems might contribute to individual differences in multisensory processing. In this combined magnetic resonance spectroscopy and electroencephalography study, we examined the relationships between GABA and glutamate concentrations in the superior temporal sulcus (STS), source localized GBO, and illusion rate in the sound-induced flash illusion (SIFI). In 39 human volunteers we found robust relationships between GABA concentration, GBO power, and the SIFI perception rate (r-values=0.44 to 0.53). The correlation between GBO power and SIFI perception rate was about twofold higher when the modulating influence of the GABA level was included in the analysis as compared to when it was excluded. No significant effects were obtained for glutamate concentration. Our study suggests that the GABA level shapes individual differences in audiovisual perception through its modulating influence on GBO. GABA neurotransmission could be a promising target for treatment interventions of multisensory processing deficits in clinical populations, such as schizophrenia or autism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Non-linear dose response of a few plant taxa to acute gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.T.; Patel, B.B.; Pius, J.; Narula, B.; Shankhadarwar, S.; Rane, V.A.; Venu-Babu, P.; Eapen, S.; Singhal, R.K.

    2014-01-01

    Micronuclei induction serves as an essential biomarker of radiation stress in a living system, and the simplicity of its detection technique has made it a widely used indicator of radiation damage. The present study was conducted to reveal the cytological dose-response of a few plant taxa, viz., Allium cepa var. aggregatum Linn., Allium sativum Linn., Chlorophytum comosum (Thunb.) Jacques and Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms, to low LET gamma radiation with special emphasis on the pattern of micronuclei induced across low and high dose regimes. A tri-phasic non-linear dose-response pattern was observed in the four taxa studied, characterized by a low dose linear segment, a plateau and a high dose linear segment. Despite a similar response trend, the critical doses where the phase transitions occurred varied amongst the plant taxa, giving an indication to their relative radiosensitivities. E. crassipes and A. sativum, with their lower critical doses for slope modifications of phase transitions, were concluded as being more radiosensitive as compared to C. comosum and A. cepa, which had relatively higher critical doses. (author)

  17. An autocrine γ-aminobutyric acid signaling system exists in pancreatic β-cell progenitors of fetal and postnatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mary M; Xiang, Yun-Yan; Wang, Shuanglian; Lu, Wei-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is produced and secreted by adult pancreatic β-cells, which also express GABA receptors mediating autocrine signaling and regulating β-cell proliferation. However, whether the autocrine GABA signaling involves in β-cell progenitor development or maturation remains uncertain. By means of immunohistochemistry we analyzed the expression profiles of the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the α1-subunit of type-A GABA receptor (GABAARα1) in the pancreas of mice at embryonic day 15.5 (E15.5), E18.5, postnatal day 1 (P1) and P7. Our data showed that at E15.5 the pancreatic and duodenum homeobox-1 (Pdx1) was expressed in the majority of cells in the developing pancreata. Notably, insulin immunoreactivity was identified in a subpopulation of pancreatic cells with a high level of Pdx1 expression. About 80% of the high-level Pdx-1 expressing cells in the pancreas expressed GAD and GABAARα1 at all pancreatic developmental stages. In contrast, only about 30% of the high-level Pdx-1 expressing cells in the E15.5 pancreas expressed insulin; i.e., a large number of GAD/GABAARα1-expressing cells did not express insulin at this early developmental stage. The expression level of GAD and GABAARα1 increased steadily, and progressively more GAD/GABAARα1-expressing cells expressed insulin in the course of pancreatic development. These results suggest that 1) GABA signaling proteins appear in β-cell progenitors prior to insulin expression; and 2) the increased expression of GABA signaling proteins may be involved in β-cell progenitor maturation.

  18. Pulser injection with subsequent removal for gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwell, J.K.; Goodwin, S.G.; Johnson, L.O.; Killian, E.W.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a module for use with a gamma-ray spectroscopy system. The system includes a gamma-ray detector for detecting gamma-ray events and producing a signal representing the gamma-ray events, a converter responsive to the detector and capable of converting the signal to a spectrum, a storage memory responsive to the converter and capable of storing the spectrum at address locations in memory, and a pulser capable of injecting pulses into the signal produced by the detector. The module comprises: means for generating a logic pulse for controlling the pulser, the controlling means adapted for coupling to the pulser; means for generating separation of events logic to isolate the components of a combined gamma-ray---pulse spectrum, the separation of events logic means adapted for coupling to the converter and the storage memory with the capability of storing pulses at address locations in the storage memory separate from the gamma-ray events; means for receiving an imitating signal from the converter to generate a plurality of operations by the module; means for tracking variations in a gamma-ray---pulse spectrum brought on by external parameter changes; and means for interfacing with commercially developed gamma-ray spectrometry equipment

  19. Gamma-irradiated influenza A virus can prime for a cross-reactive and cross-protective immune response against influenza A viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullbacher, A.; Ada, G.L.; Tha Hla, R.

    1988-01-01

    A-strain influenza virus A/JAP (H2N2) was tested for its ability to induce cytotoxic T cells (Tc) after being rendered non-infectious by either UV or gamma irradiation. Gamma-irradiated virus proved to be more efficient than UV-inactivated virus in priming for a memory Tc cell response or in boosting memory spleen cells in vitro. Most importantly, γ-inactivated, but not UV-inactivated, A/JAP immunized animals survived lethal challenge with heterologous (A/PC(H3N2), A/WSN(H1N1)) virus as effectively as mice primed with infectious virus

  20. Gamma-ray transients and related astrophysical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingenfelter, R.E.; Hudson, H.S.; Worrall, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The workshop covered the study of the explosive phenomena responsible for the various gamma ray transients. X-ray burster observations and theories were also reviewed with emphasis on their relationship to gamma ray bursts. Recent observational data, particularly from the SMM, HEAO, and VENERA satellites made the workshop especially timely. Major headings include: gamma-ray transients, x-ray bursts, solar transients, and instrumental concepts. Individual items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base

  1. Physiological response of soybean and wheat to gamma radiation and gibberellin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maghraby, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to study and evaluate physiological effects of gamma radiation and/or GA 3 on plant growth, nutritional status of plants, yield and some quality of seeds of soybean and wheat. Two field experiments were conducted under the condition of clay loam soil at kaliobia governorate during 1993 and 1994 and 1992/1993 and 1993/1994 for soybean and wheat, respectively. Growth of soybean and wheat plants was considerably stimulated by irradiation seeds before sowing with low gamma doses and/or concentration of Ga 3. Maximum growth of both plants was obtained by the combined treatment of 2 0 Gy x 25 ppm GA 3 and 1 0 Gy x 100 ppm GA 3 for soybean and wheat, respectively. On the contrary high gamma doses and/or high rates of GA 3 depressed growth of both plants. Low gamma doses and/or GA 3 at low concentration greatly encouraged nutrients uptake by soybean and wheat plants, i.e., N, Fe, Mn and Zn which seemed to be positively related to plant growth. Whereas, high doses and/or high concentrations of GA 3 reduced these nutrients in plant. 53 tabs., 5 figs., 91 refs

  2. Gamma knife radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Mori, Yohsimasa; Kida, Yoshihisa

    2003-01-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery has become a new treatment modality in the field of neurosurgery since the first gamma knife was brought into Japan in 1990. Advances in applications of new indications and long-term results have been continued to evolve during the past 12 years. Based on the experience of more than 4,500 cases treated by gamma knife at Komaki City Hospital, long-term results of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), metastatic brain tumors, acoustic neurinomas, meningiomas and trigeminal neuralgias are presented. Radiosurgery has become a novel treatment modality, especially for AVM, acoustic neurinoma and meningioma, which were once only treatable by conventional surgery, and shows a high cure rate in AVM cases and high control rate in benign tumors without major complications. The effects of radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumors have been thought to be superior to fractionated radiotherapy due to high response and control rates, and patients showed improved quality of life although no prolongation of the life span was obtained. Gamma knife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia has been shown to be effective and less invasive than microvascular decompression, and is useful for cases resistant to conventional therapies and as an initial treatment as well. (author)

  3. Response of reptilian live to external gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    Adult healthy specimens of Uromastix hardwickii were exposed to three doses (i.e. 2.25, 4.50 and 9.00 Gy) of gamma radiation from a 60 Co source (experimental group). Five animals were sacrificed at each post-irradiation intervals of 1, 2, 3, 7 and 14 days. The liver was fixed in Bouin's fluid and after processing in a routine way, it was examined histologically. Five sham-irradiated animals (control group) were also sacrificed to compare the results. Low dose (i.e. 2.25 Gy) did not produce any apparent radiolesions in the liver. Changes in the form of cytoplasmic degranulation, swollen hepatocytes, pycnosis, increases in bile pigmentation were noticed after 4.50 and 9.00 Gy gamma ray exposure. Hyperaemia, widening of sinusoids and cytoplasmic vacuolation were also noticed in 9.00 Gy group. The liver exhibited normal picture on day 14 after exposure to both the doses. The radiolesions were found dose dependent. (author)

  4. Evaluation of improved γ-aminobutyric acid production in yogurt using Lactobacillus plantarum NDC75017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Y; Man, C X; Han, X; Li, L; Guo, Y; Deng, Y; Li, T; Zhang, L W; Jiang, Y J

    2015-04-01

    Most γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), but the yield of GABA is limited in most of these GABA-producing strains. In this study, the production of GABA was carried out by using Lactobacillus plantarum NDC75017, a strain screened from traditional fermented dairy products in China. Concentrations of substrate (l-monosodium glutamate, L-MSG) and coenzyme (pyridoxal-5-phosphate, PLP) of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and culture temperature were investigated to evaluate their effects on GABA yield of Lb. plantarum NDC75017. The results indicated that GABA production was related to GAD activity and biomass of Lb. plantarum NDC75017. Response surface methodology was used to optimize conditions of GABA production. The optimal factors for GABA production were L-MSG at 80 mM, PLP at 18 μM, and a culture temperature of 36 °C. Under these conditions, production of GABA was maximized at 314.56 mg/100 g. Addition of Lb. plantarum NDC75017 to a commercial starter culture led to higher GABA production in fermented yogurt. Flavor and texture of the prepared yogurt and the control yogurt did not differ significantly. Thus, Lb. plantarum NDC75017 has good potential for manufacture of GABA-enriched fermented milk products. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Estimation of neutron energy distributions from prompt gamma emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkath, Priyada; Udupi, Ashwini; Sarkar, P. K.

    2017-11-01

    A technique of estimating the incident neutron energy distribution from emitted prompt gamma intensities from a system exposed to neutrons is presented. The emitted prompt gamma intensities or the measured photo peaks in a gamma detector are related to the incident neutron energy distribution through a convolution of the response of the system generating the prompt gammas to mono-energetic neutrons. Presently, the system studied is a cylinder of high density polyethylene (HDPE) placed inside another cylinder of borated HDPE (BHDPE) having an outer Pb-cover and exposed to neutrons. The emitted five prompt gamma peaks from hydrogen, boron, carbon and lead can be utilized to unfold the incident neutron energy distribution as an under-determined deconvolution problem. Such an under-determined set of equations are solved using the genetic algorithm based Monte Carlo de-convolution code GAMCD. Feasibility of the proposed technique is demonstrated theoretically using the Monte Carlo calculated response matrix and intensities of emitted prompt gammas from the Pb-covered BHDPE-HDPE system in the case of several incident neutron spectra spanning different energy ranges.

  6. Effect of gabazine on sensory stimulation train evoked response in mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Yan-Hua; Jin, Wen-Zhe; Sun, Lei; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2015-02-01

    Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) respond to sensory stimulation via climbing fiber and mossy fiber-granule cell pathways, and generate motor-related outputs according to internal rules of integration and computation. However, the dynamic properties of sensory information processed by PC in mouse cerebellar cortex are currently unclear. In the present study, we examined the effects of the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor A (GABA(A)) antagonist, gabazine, on the stimulation train on the simple spike firing of PCs by electrophysiological recordings method. Our data showed that the output of cerebellar PCs could be significantly affected by all pulses of the low-frequency (0.25 -2 Hz) sensory stimulation train, but only by the 1st and 2nd pulses of the high-frequency (≥ 4 Hz) sensory stimulation train. In the presence of gabazine (20 μM), each pulse of 1 Hz facial stimulation evoked simple spike firing in the PCs, but only the 1st and 2nd pulses of 4 Hz stimulation induced an increase in simple spike firing of the PCs. These results indicated that GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition did not significantly affect the frequency properties of sensory stimulation evoked responses in the mouse cerebellar PCs.

  7. $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$ and $\\gamma$-p events at high energies

    CERN Document Server

    Schuler, Gerhard A.; Gerhard A Schuler; Torbjorn Sjostrand

    1994-01-01

    A real photon has a complicated nature, whereby it may remain unresolved or fluctuate into a vector meson or a perturbative q-qbar pair. Based on this picture, we previously presented a model for gamma-p events that is based on the presence of three main event classes: direct, VMD and anomalous. In gamma-gamma events, a natural generalization gives three-by-three combinations of the nature of the two incoming photons, and thus six distinct event classes. The properties of these classes are constrained by the choices already made, in the gamma-p model, of cut-off procedures and other aspects. It is therefore possible to predict the energy-dependence of the cross section for each of the six components separately. The total cross section thus obtained is in good agreement with data, and also gives support to the idea that a simple factorized ansatz with a pomeron and a reggeon term can be a good approximation. Event properties undergo a logical evolution from p-p to gamma-p to gamma-gamma events, with larger cha...

  8. High gamma dose response of the electrical properties of polyethylene terephthalate thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radwan, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    Electrical properties of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), irradiated with gamma rays, have been investigated. The PET films were irradiated with high gamma dose levels in the range from 100 to 2000 kGy. The changes in the DC (σ DC ) and the ac (σ ac ) conductivities, with the dose, have been performed. The effect of gamma irradiation on the dielectric constant (ε') and loss (ε'') has been determined. Also, the dose dependence of the frequency exponent index (S), the resonance frequency (Fc) and the hopping frequency (ω P ) have been obtained. The obtained results show that increasing gamma dose leads to slight increase in σ DC , σ ac and ε', while no change was observed in ε'' value. Meanwhile, S, Fc and ω P are inversely proportional to the dose. Accordingly, the study suggests the possibility of using PET films in electronic components (capacitors, resistors, etc.), especially that operate at high gamma dose environments for the frequency independent applications

  9. Discovery of a family of γ-aminobutyrate ureas via rational derepression of a silent bacterial gene cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Sidda, John D.; Song, Lijiang; Poon, Vincent; Al Bassam, Mahmoud; Lazos, Orestis; Buttner, Mark J.; Challis, Gregory L.; Corre, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Gaburedins, a family of γ-aminobutyrate (GABA)-derived ureas, have been discovered by deletion of gbnR, an arpA-like putative transcriptional repressor in Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 10712. Comparison of metabolite profiles in the wild type and mutant strains revealed six metabolites in the mutant that are lacking from the wild type. The structure of gaburedin A was established by HRMS combined with 1- and 2-D NMR spectroscopy and was confirmed by total synthesis. The other metabolites were ...

  10. Effect of gamma-ray and electron irradiation on the response of solid-state track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Kyue

    1980-01-01

    Specimens of muscovite mica were first exposed to fission fragments and then to various gamma-ray fields from a 60 Co source ranging from 1.9 x 10 3 to 1.6 x 10 4 Mrad dose. The results show that the average etched width of fission-fragment tracks decreases with increasing gamma-ray dose. Shallow pits were observed in etched specimens when the gamma-ray dose exceeded 5 x 10 3 Mrad. Numerous shallow etch pits caused by the gamma-ray irradiation interfered with the observation of fission tracks in the specimens. No shallow etch pits were observed in the specimen annealed for 100 min at 600 0 C before the gamma-ray irradiation. Pre-annealing extends the ''safety limits'' of gamma background below which muscovite mica can be used to observe fission tracks without any gamma-ray interference. Gamma-ray and electron irradiation caused significant increase of the resistance to thermal decomposition of muscovite mica. The resistance increased markedly in the dose range from 5 x 10 3 to 8 x 10 3 Mrad. These phenomena suggest the use of mica to assess radiation doses of gamma rays and electrons up to several thousand megarads. (author)

  11. Anticonvulsant action of gamma-irradiated diazepam with correlation to certain brain amino acids and electrocorticogram activity in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, S.F.; Roushdy, H.M.; Hassan, S.H.M.; Elkashef, H.S.; Mahdy, A.M.; Elsayeh, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of sterilization by gamma irradiation (215 KGy) of diazepam on is anticonvulsant action, on norma and depleted cerebral gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), on glutamic acid, as well as electrocorticogram activity (ECOG) was determined in the experimental animals. For the evaluation of the anticonvulsant action of either diazepam (D) or irradiated diazepam (ID), pentyl ene tetrazole seizure test, was used and the protective dose 50 (PD50) was determined in adult male mice. GABA, the main central inhibitory transmitter which is implicated in the mechanism of the anticonvulsant action of D and its precursor glutamic acid, were electrophoretically separated and spectrophotometrical evaluated. Moreover, brain electrical activity was recorded using an electroencephalograph apparatus. Although the PD50 of ID as well the effect on normal brain cerebral GABA and glutamic acids did not differ significantly from that of D, yet there was certain variabilities. Thus, the effect of D was about 4 times more potent than the ID on elevating depleted cerebral GABA. Also, electrocorticogram records demonstrated that D produced a slight inhibition while ID induced a decrease in B rhythm with remarkable in the amplitude of ECOG waves. The same pattern of effects were obtained when D or ID were used in combination with INH (250 mg kg-1). 1 tab. 1 fig

  12. Investigation of thermoluminescent response of K2YF5:Dy3+ crystals for gamma and X radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, E.C.; Nogueira, M.S.; Faria, L.O.; Khaidukov, N.M.

    2005-01-01

    K 2 YF 5 crystals doped with rare earths have been synthesized with 0 to 100% of Dy 3+ ions optically active ions and an investigation was conducted to test its thermoluminescent (TL) response due to function of Dy 3+ concentration and their response in energy. After being irradiated with gamma and X-rays, it was observed that crystals doped with 1.0% of Dy 3+ feature the best response TL. The main dosimetric peak can be decomposed into three secondary TL peaks, centered in 96.4, 104.9 and 130.7 deg C, respectively, showing a good linearity and reproducibility of the dose measurements. The sensitization process seems to improve response TL and TL peak sensitivity increase to 130, 7 deg C at the expense of TL peak to 104, 9 deg C. The linear coefficient sign TL for K 2 Y 0.09 Dy 0.01 F5 is comparable to that of the dosemeter CaSO 4 : Mn, irradiated with gamma radiation source ( 137 Cs) under the same conditions. Energy dependence measurements show that the answer for X-rays with energy of 41.1 keV is more than 30 times the response to Cs-137, when exposed to the same dose. Due to the main peak in low temperature and the TL high reply to low energy fields, the results reported indicate that the K 2 YF 5 crystals doped with Dy 3+ present great potential for radiation dosimetry in X-rays therapy, clinical dosimetry and also for applications in digital thermoluminescent images

  13. Applications of Monte Carlo simulations of gamma-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    A short, convenient computer program based on the Monte Carlo method that was developed to generate simulated gamma-ray spectra has been found to have useful applications in research and teaching. In research, we use it to predict spectra in neutron activation analysis (NAA), particularly in prompt gamma-ray NAA (PGNAA). In teaching, it is used to illustrate the dependence of detector response functions on the nature of gamma-ray interactions, the incident gamma-ray energy, and detector geometry

  14. Precise measurement of {gamma}(K{yields}e {nu}({gamma}))/{gamma}(K{yields}{mu} {nu}({gamma})) and study of K{yields}e {nu} {gamma}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosino, F.; Massarotti, P.; Meola, S.; Napolitano, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell' Universita ' ' Federico II' ' , Napoli (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bloise, C.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Capussela, T.; Ciambrone, P.; De Lucia, E.; De Simone, P.; Dreucci, M.; Felici, G.; Gatti, C.; Giovannella, S.; Jacewicz, M.; Lanfranchi, G.; Miscetti, S.; Moulson, M.; Murtas, F.; Palutan, M.; Santangelo, P.; Sciascia, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Spadaro, T.; Venanzoni, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Archilli, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Beltrame, P.; Denig, A.; Mueller, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Bini, C.; De Santis, A.; De Zorzi, G.; Di Domenico, A.; Fiore, S.; Franzini, P.; Gauzzi, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Bocchetta, S.; Ceradini, F.; Di Micco, B.; Nguyen, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' ' Roma Tre' ' , Rome (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Rome (Italy); Branchini, P.; Graziani, E.; Passeri, A.; Tortora, L. [INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Rome (Italy); Capriotti, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' ' Roma Tre' ' , Rome (Italy); Di Donato, C. [INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Kulikov, V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lee-Franzini, J. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); State University of New York, Physics Department, Stony Brook (United States); Martini, M.; Patera, V.; Versaci, R. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica dell' Universita ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy); Valente, P. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    We present a precise measurement of the ratio R{sub K}={gamma}(K{yields}e{nu}({gamma}))/{gamma}(K{yields}{mu}{nu}({gamma})) and a study of the radiative process K{yields}e{nu}{gamma}, performed with the KLOE detector. The results are based on data collected at the Frascati e{sup +}e{sup -} collider DA {phi}NE for an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb{sup -1}. We find R{sub K}=(2.493{+-}0.025{sub stat}{+-}0.019{sub syst}) x 10{sup -5}, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation. This result is used to improve constraints on parameters of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with lepton flavor violation. We also measured the differential decay rate d {gamma}(K{yields}e{nu}{gamma})/dE{sub {gamma}} for photon energies 10gamma}}<250 MeV. Results are compared with predictions from theory. (orig.)

  15. Scintillation counter, maximum gamma aspect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thumim, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    A scintillation counter, particularly for counting gamma ray photons, includes a massive lead radiation shield surrounding a sample-receiving zone. The shield is disassembleable into a plurality of segments to allow facile installation and removal of a photomultiplier tube assembly, the segments being so constructed as to prevent straight-line access of external radiation through the shield into radiation-responsive areas. Provisions are made for accurately aligning the photomultiplier tube with respect to one or more sample-transmitting bores extending through the shield to the sample receiving zone. A sample elevator, used in transporting samples into the zone, is designed to provide a maximum gamma-receiving aspect to maximize the gamma detecting efficiency. (U.S.)

  16. Effects of dietary supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid or gamma-linolenic acid on neutrophil phospholipid fatty acid composition and activation responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, M P; Ziboh, V A

    1990-10-01

    Previous data that alimentation with fish oil rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:n-3) or vegetable oil rich in gamma-linolenic acid (GLA; 18:3n-6) can reduce symptoms of inflammatory skin disorders lead us to determine the effects of dietary supplements of oils rich in EPA or GLA on guinea pig (GP) neutrophil (PMN) membrane potential (delta gamma), secretion, and superoxide (O2-) responses. Weanling GPs were initially fed diets supplemented with olive oil (less than 0.1% EPA; less than 0.1% GLA) for 2 weeks, followed by a crossover by two sets of animals to diets supplemented with fish oil (19% EPA) or borage oil (25% GLA). At 4-week intervals, 12% sterile casein-elicited peritoneal neutrophils (PMN) were assessed for membrane polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) profiles and FMLP-, LTB4-, and PMA-stimulated delta gamma changes, changes in flow cytometrically measured forward scatter (FWD-SC) (shape change), 90 degrees scatter (90 degrees -SC) in cytochalasin B-pretreated-PMN (secretion response), and superoxide responses, GP incorporated EPA and GLA (as the elongation product, dihomo-GLA or DGLA) into their PMN phospholipids by 4 weeks. The peritoneal PMN of all groups demonstrated broad resting FWD-SC and poor activation-related FWD-SC increases, suggesting in vivo activation. While secretion was comparable in the three groups in response to FMLP, there was a trend toward inhibition of LTB4-stimulated 90 degrees -SC loss in both fish and borage oil groups. This was significant only with borage oil (21.7 +/- 2.1 vs 15.3 +/- 1.2% loss of baseline 90 degrees -SC, olive vs borage: P = 0.03). PMN from borage- and fish oil-fed GPs showed a progressively lower O2- response to FMLP than the olive oil group (73.9 +/- 3.9 and 42.9 +/- 6.8% of olive oil response for borage and fish oils, respectively; P less than 0.005 and P less than 0.01, respectively, at 12 weeks), while PMA-stimulated O2- was inhibited only in the fish oil-fed group and only at 12 weeks (62.0 +/- 2

  17. Dosimetric response of united, commercially available CTA foils for sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma rays

    CERN Document Server

    Peimel-Stuglik, Z

    2001-01-01

    The usefulness of two kinds of untinted CTA foils: Fuji CTR-125 dosimetric foil and technical CTA-T foil, produced by 'Zaklady Chemiczne, 'Gorzow Wielkopolski' as support for light-sensitive layers of amateur photo-films, for sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma ray dosimetry was investigated. In spite of rather bad physical parameters of the technical foil (spread of foil thickness, high and different initial absorbance) the dosimetric response of both foils for sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma rays was similar. The CTA-T foil can be used for routine dosimetry providing that dosimetric signals have to be calculated exactly as recommended by the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) standard, i.e. as the difference of absorbance of irradiated and (the same) non-irradiated foil. Any other approach may lead to high errors of dose evaluation. The last is true also for other CTA foils, especially after long self-life.

  18. T gamma/delta lymphocytes in renal transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raasveld, M. H.; Bloemena, E.; Surachno, S.; ten Berge, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    T gamma/delta lymphocytes are able to perform allospecific cytotoxicity and natural killer cytotoxicity in vitro. However, very little is known about their function in vivo. To investigate the possible involvement of T gamma/delta lymphocytes in the immune response to renal allografts, fine-needle

  19. Hepatic transcriptional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to gamma radiation and depleted uranium singly and in combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, You, E-mail: yso@niva.no [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349 Oslo (Norway); Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Evensen, Øystein [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Department of Basic Sciences and Aquatic Medicine, P.O. Box 8146 Dep., N-0033 Oslo (Norway); Lind, Ole Christian [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Rosseland, Bjørn Olav [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management (INA), P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); and others

    2016-08-15

    Radionuclides are a special group of substances posing both radiological and chemical hazards to organisms. As a preliminary approach to understand the combined effects of radionuclides, exposure studies were designed using gamma radiation (Gamma) and depleted uranium (DU) as stressors, representing a combination of radiological (radiation) and chemical (metal) exposure. Juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were exposed to 70 mGy external Gamma dose delivered over the first 5 h of a 48 h period (14 mGy/h), 0.25 mg/L DU were exposed continuously for 48 h and the combination of the two stressors (Combi). Water and tissue concentrations of U were determined to assess the exposure quality and DU bioaccumulation. Hepatic gene expression changes were determined using microarrays in combination with quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Effects at the higher physiological levels were determined as plasma glucose (general stress) and hepatic histological changes. The results show that bioaccumulation of DU was observed after both single DU and the combined exposure. Global transcriptional analysis showed that 3122, 2303 and 3460 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were significantly regulated by exposure to gamma, DU and Combi, respectively. Among these, 349 genes were commonly regulated by all treatments, while the majority was found to be treatment-specific. Functional analysis of DEGs revealed that the stressors displayed similar mode of action (MoA) across treatments such as induction of oxidative stress, DNA damage and disturbance of oxidative phosphorylation, but also stressor-specific mechanisms such as cellular stress and injury, metabolic disorder, programmed cell death, immune response. No changes in plasma glucose level as an indicator of general stress and hepatic histological changes were observed. Although no direct linkage was successfully established between molecular responses and adverse effects at the organism

  20. Hepatic transcriptional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to gamma radiation and depleted uranium singly and in combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, You; Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian; Evensen, Øystein; Lind, Ole Christian; Rosseland, Bjørn Olav

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclides are a special group of substances posing both radiological and chemical hazards to organisms. As a preliminary approach to understand the combined effects of radionuclides, exposure studies were designed using gamma radiation (Gamma) and depleted uranium (DU) as stressors, representing a combination of radiological (radiation) and chemical (metal) exposure. Juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were exposed to 70 mGy external Gamma dose delivered over the first 5 h of a 48 h period (14 mGy/h), 0.25 mg/L DU were exposed continuously for 48 h and the combination of the two stressors (Combi). Water and tissue concentrations of U were determined to assess the exposure quality and DU bioaccumulation. Hepatic gene expression changes were determined using microarrays in combination with quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Effects at the higher physiological levels were determined as plasma glucose (general stress) and hepatic histological changes. The results show that bioaccumulation of DU was observed after both single DU and the combined exposure. Global transcriptional analysis showed that 3122, 2303 and 3460 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were significantly regulated by exposure to gamma, DU and Combi, respectively. Among these, 349 genes were commonly regulated by all treatments, while the majority was found to be treatment-specific. Functional analysis of DEGs revealed that the stressors displayed similar mode of action (MoA) across treatments such as induction of oxidative stress, DNA damage and disturbance of oxidative phosphorylation, but also stressor-specific mechanisms such as cellular stress and injury, metabolic disorder, programmed cell death, immune response. No changes in plasma glucose level as an indicator of general stress and hepatic histological changes were observed. Although no direct linkage was successfully established between molecular responses and adverse effects at the organism

  1. Radiative decay of the eta-, eta'-mesons in the nonlocal quark model. [eta(eta'). --> gamma gamma. ; eta. -->. pi. /sup +/. pi. /sup -/. gamma. ; eta. -->. pi. /sup 0/2. gamma. ; eta'. -->. rho/sup 0/. gamma. ; eta'. -->. omega gamma. ;. pi. /sup 0/. -->. gamma. e/sup +/e/sup -/; eta(eta'). -->. gamma mu. /sup +/. mu. /sup -/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efimov, G V; Ivanov, M A; Nogovitsyn, E A [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (USSR)

    1981-07-01

    P..--> gamma gamma.. (P=..pi../sup 0/, eta, eta'), eta..--> pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/..gamma.., eta..--> pi../sup 0/..gamma gamma.., eta/sup 1/..-->..V..gamma.. (V=rho/sup 0/, ..omega..), p..--> gamma..l/sup +/l/sup -/ (p=..pi../sup 0/, eta, eta') radiation decays are studied for testing the applicability of the non-local quark model for description of the experimental data. The Feynman diagrams of these decays are presented, values of the widths of the Veta..--> gamma gamma.., eta..--> pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/..gamma.., eta..--> pi../sup 0/..gamma gamma.., eta'..--> gamma gamma.., eta'..-->..rho/sup 0/..gamma.., eta'..--> omega gamma.. decays are calculated and given in the form of a table. Calculations are carried out for two values of the eta eta'-crossing angle: THETA=-11 deg and -18 deg. Values of invariant amplitudes of these decays are determined for ..pi../sup 0/..--> gamma..e/sup +/e/sup -/, eta..--> gamma mu../sup +/..mu../sup -/, eta'..--> gamma mu../sup +/..mu../sup -/ decays at THETA=-11 deg and -18 deg. The best agreement with the experimental data is noted to take place at THETA=-11 deg, the determined width of the eta..--> pi../sup 0/..gamma gamma.. decays is underestimated as compared with the experimental one.

  2. Responses to gamma radiation of selected microorganisms in sterile water and bovine muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempster, J.F.; Halls, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    The responses to gamma-radiation of a number of food-associated microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Yersinia enterocolitica, Pseudomonas putrefaciens) were studied in sterile distilled water and sterile bovine muscle slurry. Surviving cells were grown aerobically at room temperature on yeast extract dextrose tryptone agar (PCA, Oxoid). The D 1 0 of the Pseudomonas sp. was 27 Gy in water and the D 1 0 of the Yersinia sp. in water was 32 Gy. In the slurry resistance increased markedly; the Pseudomonas sp. was ten times more resistant (D 1 0 260 Gy) and the Yersinia sp. was seven times more resistant (D 1 0226 Gy). The Staph. aureus was equally sensitive in both systems (author)

  3. Modulation of cardiopulmonary depressor reflex in nucleus ambiguus by electroacupuncture: roles of opioids and γ-aminobutyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Li, Peng; Li, Min; Longhurst, John C

    2012-04-01

    Stimulation of cardiopulmonary receptors with phenylbiguanide (PBG) elicits depressor cardiovascular reflex responses, including decreases in blood pressure and heart rate mediated in part by the brain stem parasympathetic cardiac neurons in the nucleus ambiguus (NAmb). The present study examined NAmb neurotransmitter mechanisms underlying the influence of electroacupuncture (EA) on the PBG-induced hypotension and bradycardia. We hypothesized that somatic stimulation during EA modulates PBG responses through opioid and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) modulation in the NAmb. Anesthetized and ventilated cats were studied during repeated stimulation with PBG or cardiac vagal afferents while low-frequency EA (2 Hz) was applied at P5-6 acupoints overlying the median nerve for 30 min and NAmb neuronal activity, heart rate, and blood pressure were recorded. Microinjection of kainic acid into the NAmb attenuated the PBG-induced bradycardia from -60 ± 11 to -36 ± 11 beats/min. Likewise, EA reduced the PBG-induced depressor and bradycardia reflex by 52 and 61%, respectively. Cardiac vagal afferent evoked preganglionic cellular activity in the NAmb was reduced by EA for about 60 min. Blockade of opioid or GABA(A) receptors using naloxone and gabazine reversed the EA-related modulation of the evoked cardiac vagal activity by 73 and 53%, respectively. Similarly, naloxone and gabazine reversed EA modulation of the negative chronotropic responses from -11 ± 5 to -23 ± 6 and -13 ± 4 to -24 ± 3 beats/min, respectively. Thus EA at P5-6 decreases PBG evoked hypotension and bradycardia as well as the NAmb PBG-sensitive preganglionic cardiac vagal outflow through opioid and GABA neurotransmitter systems.

  4. Extraordinary arousal from semi-comatose state on zolpidem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    propylene amine oxime (99mTc HMPAO) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECf) before and after administration of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist zolpidem. It was observed that 15 minutes after application ...

  5. Characterizing gamma fields using isomeric activation ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Ramkumar; Fleming, Ronald F.

    1994-12-01

    Isomeric activities were induced in indium by gamma irradiation in three different gamma fields, through the reactions 115In(γ, γ') 115mIn and 113In(γ, γ') 113mIn. The irradiation fields were (i) the 15 kCi 60Co source available in the University, (ii) the spent fuel gamma irradiator in the pool of the University's Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR) and (iii) south face of the core of the FNR during routine shut downs. Isomeric activation ratios can serve to characterize gamma fields, provided the response functions of the two (γ, γ') reactions sample different energy regimes of the gamma spectrum present in the irradiation fields. The response of an isomeric activation detector, in turn, depends on the number of activation energy levels of the nuclide and the probabilities with which the activation levels de-populate to the isomeric level. The reaction rate ratio RIn115m/ RIn113m was measured in the three gamma fields. The measured ratios were (i) 1.210 ± 0.011 in the 60Co source, (ii) 1.314 ± 0.060 in the spent fuel gamma irradiator and (iii) 1.298 ± 0.039 in a location alongside the FNR core during routine shut downs. The measured reaction rate ratios are not only close to each other, but close to unity as well. This indicates that the excitation functions for the reactions 115In(γ, γ') 115mIn and 113In(γ, γ') 113mIn have similar shapes and that for the nuclides 115In and 113In, the number of activation energy levels and the probabilities with which they populate the isomeric levels are very similar to each other. Thus, the ratio RIn115m/ RIn113m will not yield any information regarding the shape of gamma spectrum in the field of measurement. However by choosing (γ, γ') reactions with different shapes for the excitation functions one can measure a set of isomeric activation ratios that characterize a given gamma field.

  6. Evaluation of commercial soy sauce koji strains of Aspergillus oryzae for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab Kadir, Safuan; Wan-Mohtar, Wan Abd Al Qadr Imad; Mohammad, Rosfarizan; Abdul Halim Lim, Sarina; Sabo Mohammed, Abdulkarim; Saari, Nazamid

    2016-10-01

    In this study, four selected commercial strains of Aspergillus oryzae were collected from soy sauce koji. These A. oryzae strains designated as NSK, NSZ, NSJ and NST shared similar morphological characteristics with the reference strain (A. oryzae FRR 1675) which confirmed them as A. oryzae species. They were further evaluated for their ability to produce γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by cultivating the spore suspension in a broth medium containing 0.4 % (w/v) of glutamic acid as a substrate for GABA production. The results showed that these strains were capable of producing GABA; however, the concentrations differed significantly (P sauce production.

  7. A direct HPLC method for the resolution and quantitation of the R-(-)- and S-(+)-enantiomers of vigabatrin (gamma-vinyl-GABA) in pharmaceutical dosage forms using teicoplanin aglycone chiral stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Majed, Abdulrahman A

    2009-08-15

    A direct chiral high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed and validated for the resolution and quantification of antiepileptic drug enantiomers, R-(-)- and S-(+)-vigabatrin (gamma-vinyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid) in pharmaceutical products. The separation was optimized on a macrocyclic glycopeptide antibiotic chiral stationary phase (CSP) based on teicoplanin aglycone, chirobiotic (TAG), using a mobile phase system containing ethanol-water (80:20, v/v), at a flow rate of 0.4ml/min and UV detection set at 210nm. The stability of vigabatrin enantiomers under different degrees of temperature was also studied. The enantiomers of vigabatrin were separated from each other. The calibration curves were linear over a range of 100-1600microg/ml (r=0.999) for both enantiomers. The overall recoveries of R-(-)- and S-(+)-vigabatrin enantiomers from pharmaceutical products were in the range of 98.3-99.8% with %RSD ranged from 0.48 to 0.52%. The limit of quantification (LOQ) and limit of detection (LOD) for each enantiomer were 100 and 25microg/ml, respectively. No interferences were found from commonly co-formulated excipients.

  8. The novel isoxazoline ectoparasiticide lotilaner (Credelio™): a non-competitive antagonist specific to invertebrates γ-aminobutyric acid-gated chloride channels (GABACls)

    OpenAIRE

    Rufener, Lucien; Danelli, Vanessa; Bertrand, Daniel; Sager, Heinz

    2017-01-01

    Background The isoxazolines are a novel class of parasiticides that are potent inhibitors of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channels (GABACls) and, to a lesser extent, of inhibitory glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls). Lotilaner (Credelio™), a novel representative of this chemical class, is currently evaluated for its excellent ectoparasiticide properties. Methods In this study, we investigated the molecular mode of action and pharmacology of lotilaner. We report the success...

  9. Theoretical study of γ-aminobutyric acid conformers: Intramolecular interactions and ionization energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke-Dong; Wang, Mei-Ting; Meng, Ju

    2014-10-01

    Allowing for all combinations of internal single-bond rotamers, 1,296 unique trial structures of γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) are obtained. All of these structures are optimized at the M06-2X level of theory and a total of 68 local minimal conformers are found. The nine low-lying conformers are used for further studies. According to the calculated relative Gibbs free energies at M06-2X level of theory, we find that the dispersion is important for the relative energy of GABA. The intramolecular hydrogen bonds and hyperconjugative interaction and their effects on the conformational stability are studied. The results show that both of them have great influence on the conformers. The vertical ionization energies (VIE) are calculated and match the experimental data well. The results show that the neutral GABA in the gas phase is a multi-conformer system and at least four conformations exist.

  10. Pulmonary Immune-Compartment-Specific Interferon Gamma Responses in HIV-Infected Individuals with Active Tuberculosis (TB in an Area of High TB Prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Buldeo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of data on the pulmonary immune-compartment interferon gamma (IFNγ response to M. tuberculosis, particularly in settings of high tuberculosis (TB prevalence and in HIV-coinfected individuals. This data is necessary to understand the diagnostic potential of commercially available interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs in both the pulmonary immune-compartment and peripheral blood. We used intracellular cytokine staining by flow cytometry to assess the IFNγ response to purified protein derivative (PPD and early secretory antigen 6 (ESAT6 in induced sputa (ISp and blood samples from HIV-infected, smear-negative, TB suspects. We found that individuals with active TB disease produced significantly less IFNγ in response to PPD in their induced sputa samples than individuals with non-active TB (control group. This difference was not reflected in the peripheral blood, even within the CD27− CD4+ memory T lymphocyte population. These findings suggest that progression to active TB disease may be associated with the loss of IFNγ secretion at the site of primary infection. Our findings highlight the importance of studying pulmonary immune-compartment M. tuberculosis specific responses to elucidate IFNγ secretion across the spectrum of TB disease.

  11. Regulation of Neurotransmitter Responses in the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP J’-aminobutyric acid; yclic AM’P; neuromodulation ; brain 1ABTAT(Continue on reverse if necessary and...crucial enzyme for regulating neuromodulation in brain. Given the ultimate goal of developing novel pharmacological agents for N! manipulating...central nervous system function, the discovery of a biochemical response to a neuromodulator can be considered a major step in that direction. Thus, up to

  12. 1H NMR studies of substrate hydrogen exchange reactions catalyzed by L-methionine gamma-lyase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esaki, N.; Nakayama, T.; Sawada, S.; Tanaka, H.; Soda, K.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange reactions of various L-amino acids catalyzed by L-methionine gamma-lyase (EC 4.4.1.11) have been studied. The enzyme catalyzes the rapid exchange of the alpha- and beta-hydrogens of L-methionine and S-methyl-L-cysteine with deuterium from the solvent. The rate of alpha-hydrogen exchange was about 40 times faster than that of the enzymatic elimination reaction of the sulfur-containing amino acids. The enzyme also catalyzes the exchange reaction of alpha- and beta-hydrogens of the straight-chain L-amino acids which are not susceptible to elimination. The exchange rates of the alpha-hydrogen and the total beta-hydrogens of L-alanine and L-alpha-aminobutyrate with deuterium followed first-order kinetics. For L-norvaline, L-norleucine, S-methyl-L-cysteine, and L-methionine, the rate of alpha-hydrogen exchange followed first-order kinetics, but the rate of total beta-hydrogen exchange decreased due to a primary isotope effect at the alpha-position. L-Phenylalanine and L-tryptophan slowly underwent alpha-hydrogen exchange. The pro-R hydrogen of glycine was deuterated stereospecifically

  13. Effects of RO 15-1788 on a running response rewarded on continuous or partial reinforcement schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, M; Sinden, J; Martin, I; Gray, J A

    1988-01-01

    Two experiments were run in which rats were rewarded with food for running in a straight alley at one trial a day, followed by extinction of the running response. During acquisition of the response, reward was delivered either on a continuous reinforcement (CRF) or on a quasirandom 50% partial reinforcement (PRF) schedule. The groups given PRF were more resistant to extinction than those given CRF, the well-known partial reinforcement extinction effect. In Experiment 1 different groups of rats were injected during acquisition only with 1, 5 or 10 mg/kg of the benzodiazepine antagonist, RO 15-1788, or with placebo. In Experiment 2, 5 mg/kg RO 15-1788 or placebo were administered in a full cross-over design during acquisition, extinction or both. At the end of Experiment 2 only [3H]-flunitrazepam binding was measured in either the presence or absence of added gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA) in homogenates of hippocampi dissected from the animals that had received behavioural training. The drug affected running speeds during both acquisition and extinction in different ways depending upon the schedule of reinforcement (CRF or PRF) and also gave rise to enhanced GABA stimulation of [3H]-flunitrazepam binding. The results are discussed in relation to the hypothesis that the neurochemical pathways by which reinforcement schedules modify behaviour include a step influenced by benzodiazepine receptors.

  14. Dose-response curve for blood exposed to gamma-neutron mixed field by conventional cytogenetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing concern about airline crew members (about one million worldwide) are exposed to measurable neutrons doses. Historically, cytogenetic biodosimetry assays have been based on quantifying asymmetrical chromosome alterations (dicentrics, centric rings and acentric fragments) in mytogen-stimulated T-lymphocytes in their first mitosis after radiation exposure. Increased levels of chromosome damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes are a sensitive indicator of radiation exposure and they are routinely exploited for assessing radiation absorbed dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Since radiological accidents are not common, not all nations feel that it is economically justified to maintain biodosimetry competence. However, dependable access to biological dosimetry capabilities is completely critical in event of an accident. In this paper the dose-response curve was measured for the induction of chromosomal alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes after chronic exposure in vitro to neutron-gamma mixes field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to two neutron-gamma mixed field from sources 241 AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The evaluated absorbed doses were 0.2 Gy; 1.0 Gy and 2.5 Gy. The dicentric chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphase figures were analyzed for the presence of dicentrics by two experienced scorers after painted by giemsa 5%. Our preliminary results showed a linear dependence between radiations absorbed dose and dicentric chromosomes frequencies. Dose-response curve described in this paper will contribute to the construction of calibration curve that will be used in our laboratory for biological dosimetry. (author)

  15. Dose-response curve for blood exposed to gamma-neutron mixed field by conventional cytogenetic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F., E-mail: jodinilson@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: fflima@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: jasantos@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide, E-mail: santos_neide@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica

    2009-07-01

    There is increasing concern about airline crew members (about one million worldwide) are exposed to measurable neutrons doses. Historically, cytogenetic biodosimetry assays have been based on quantifying asymmetrical chromosome alterations (dicentrics, centric rings and acentric fragments) in mytogen-stimulated T-lymphocytes in their first mitosis after radiation exposure. Increased levels of chromosome damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes are a sensitive indicator of radiation exposure and they are routinely exploited for assessing radiation absorbed dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Since radiological accidents are not common, not all nations feel that it is economically justified to maintain biodosimetry competence. However, dependable access to biological dosimetry capabilities is completely critical in event of an accident. In this paper the dose-response curve was measured for the induction of chromosomal alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes after chronic exposure in vitro to neutron-gamma mixes field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to two neutron-gamma mixed field from sources {sup 241}AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The evaluated absorbed doses were 0.2 Gy; 1.0 Gy and 2.5 Gy. The dicentric chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphase figures were analyzed for the presence of dicentrics by two experienced scorers after painted by giemsa 5%. Our preliminary results showed a linear dependence between radiations absorbed dose and dicentric chromosomes frequencies. Dose-response curve described in this paper will contribute to the construction of calibration curve that will be used in our laboratory for biological dosimetry. (author)

  16. Pretreatment of liver grafts in vivo by γ-aminobutyric acid receptor regulation reduces cold ischemia/warm reperfusion injury in rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Tomohide; Gardner, Lindsay B.; Hata, Toshiyuki; Chen, Feng; Baine, Ann-Marie T.; Uemoto, Shinji; Nguyen, Justin H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is found throughout the body. The regulation of GABA receptor (GABAR) reduces oxidative stress (OS). Ischemia/reperfusion injury after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) causes OS-induced graft damage. The effects of GABAR regulation in donors in vivo were investigated. Material/Methods: Donor rats received saline, a GABAR agonist or GABAR antagonist 4 h before surgery. Recipient rats were divided into four groups according to the donor treatments: laparotomy, OLT with saline, OLT with GABAR agonist and OLT with GABAR antagonist. Histopathological, biochemical and immunohistological examinations were performed at 6, 12 and 24 h after OLT. Protein assays were performed at 6 h after OLT. The 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM), phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), Akt and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were assessed by western blot analysis. Results: In the univariate analysis, histopathological and biochemical profiles verified that the GABAR agonist reduced graft damage. Immunohistology revealed that the GABAR agonist prevented the induction of apoptosis. Measurement of 4-4-HNE levels confirmed OS-induced damage after OLT, and the GABAR agonist improved this damage. In the γH2AX, PI3K, Akt and antioxidant enzymes (SODs), ATM and H2AX were greatly increased after OLT, and were reduced by the GABAR agonist. In the multivariate analyses between multiple groups, histopathological assessment, aspartate aminotransferase level, immunohistological examinations for apoptotic induction and γH2AX showed statistical differences. Conclusions: A specific agonist demonstrated regulation of GABAR in vivo in the liver. This activation in vivo reduced OS after OLT via the ATM/H2AX pathway. PMID:23792534

  17. Possible relationship between the stress-induced synaptic response and metaplasticity in the hippocampal CA1 field of freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Riki; Matsumoto, Machiko; Judo, Chika; Yamaguchi, Taku; Izumi, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro; Togashi, Hiroko

    2009-07-01

    Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) is suppressed not only by stress paradigms but also by low frequency stimulation (LFS) prior to LTP-inducing high frequency stimulation (HFS; tetanus), termed metaplasticity. These synaptic responses are dependent on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, leading to speculations about the possible relationship between metaplasticity and stress-induced LTP impairment. However, the functional significance of metaplasticity has been unclear. The present study elucidated the electrophysiological and neurochemical profiles of metaplasticity in the hippocampal CA1 field, with a focus on the synaptic response induced by the emotional stress, contextual fear conditioning (CFC). The population spike amplitude in the CA1 field was decreased during exposure to CFC, and LTP induction was suppressed after CFC in conscious rats. The synaptic response induced by CFC was mimicked by LFS, i.e., LFS impaired the synaptic transmission and subsequent LTP. Plasma corticosterone levels were increased by both CFC and LFS. Extracellular levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), but not glutamate, in the hippocampus increased during exposure to CFC or LFS. Furthermore, electrical stimulation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), which caused decreases in freezing behavior during exposure to CFC, counteracted the LTP impairment induced by LFS. These findings suggest that metaplasticity in the rat hippocampal CA1 field is related to the neural basis of stress experience-dependent fear memory, and that hippocampal synaptic response associated stress-related processes is under mPFC regulation.

  18. Thermoluminescence response of a mixed ternary alkali halide crystals exposed to gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez M, R.; Perez S, R.; Vazquez P, G.; Riveros, H.; Gonzalez M, P.

    2014-08-01

    Ionic crystals, mainly alkali halide crystals have been the subject of intense research for a better understanding of the luminescence properties of defects induced by ionizing radiation. The defects in crystals can be produced in appreciable concentration due to elastic stresses, radiation, and addition of impurities. These defects exhibit remarkable thermoluminescence properties. This work is concerned with the Tl properties of a ternary alkali halide crystal after being irradiated with gamma and beta rays. It has been found that the Tl glow peak of the crystal follows a rule of average associated to the Tl Temperatures of the components of the mixture, similarly to the response of europium doped binary mixed crystals KCl x KBr 1-x and KBr x RbBr 1-x . (Author)

  19. Survival patterns and hemopathological responses of dogs under continuous gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.M.; Fritz, T.E.; Tolle, D.V.; Poole, C.M.; Lombard, L.S.; Doyle, D.E.; Kaspar, L.V.; Cullen, S.M.; Carnes, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    Survival curves were constructed and analyzed relative to contributing hematopathological responses for groups of beagles exposed continuously for duration of life to low daily doses of whole body 60 Co gamma irradiation (27.3 rads/day to 4 rads/day). The survival curves versus time were progressively displaced toward longer survival as rates of exposure were reduced from the relatively high dose rate of 27.3 rads/day to the low dose rate of 4.0 rads/day. Average survival times increased from 57 days at 27.3 rads/day to 1830 days at 4.0 rads/day, representing fractional increased life-spans from 1.5% to 50.8%, respectively. Survival curves versus total dose were markedly displaced along the cumulative radiation dose axis at the extreme dose rates (i.e., 27.3 and 4.0 rads/day), but not at the intermediate dose rates (i.e., 13.4 and 7.9 rads/day) in which the upper linear portions of the survival curves are superimposed. From these dose-dependent survival curves, LD 50 values for whole body gamma irradiation, delivered chronically at 27.3, 13.4, 7.9, and 4.0 rads per day were estimated to be 1442, 2124, 2039, and 7161 rads, respectively. Both time- and dose-dependent survival curves for the intermediate dose rates, in contrast to the extreme dose rates, exhibited pronounced transitions in the lethality rate below the 50% survival level. These lethality rate transitions occurred at approx. 2500 rads of accumulated dose and were attributed to a shift in the spectrum of developing hematopathologies: namely, from a predominance of the acutely ablative radiation-induced lymphohematopoietic syndromes (i.e., septicemias and aplastic anemias) to a predominance of the late arising hematopoietic neoplasias (myelogenous leukemia and related myeloproliferative disorders)

  20. Mathematical simulation of gamma-radiation angle distribution measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batij, V.G.; Batij, E.V.; Egorov, V.V.; Fedorchenko, D.V.; Kochnev, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    We developed mathematical model of the facility for gamma-radiation angle distribution measurement and calculated response functions for gamma-radiation intensities. We developed special software for experimental data processing, the 'Shelter' object radiation spectra unfolding and Sphere detector (ShD) angle resolution estimation. Neuronet method using for detection of the radiation directions is given. We developed software based on the neuronet algorithm, that allows obtaining reliable distribution of gamma-sources that make impact on the facility detectors at the measurement point. 10 refs.; 15 figs.; 4 tab

  1. Functional response of white rats isolated heart to the stimulation of adrenergic receptors after gamma-irradiation in low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonenko, A.N.; Lobanok, L.M.

    1999-01-01

    It was investigated the effects of acute gamma-irradiation on bio mechanical activity of rats heart isolated by Langendorf's method in early and delayed terms after exposure to gamma-rays. Intra ventricle pressure and the rate of its growth, volumetric rate of coronal flow, frequency of heart contraction were registered. Stimulation of alpha-adrenergic receptors was conducted by means of specific agonist mesatone and stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors was made by means of isoprenaline. The study has shown that acute irradiation of rats caused the decrease of both contractile ability and relaxation of myocardium in a 10 days after exposure. In delayed period bio mechanical activity of isolated heart was restored. Functional response of heart to the stimulation of alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors was decreased in all terms of investigation

  2. Forebrain glutamatergic, but not GABAergic, neurons mediate anxiogenic effects of the glucocorticoid receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, J.; Dedic, N.; Pöhlmann, M.L.; Häusl, A.; Karst, H.; Engelhardt, C.; Westerholz, S.; Wagner, K.V.; Labermaier, C.; Hoeijmakers, L.; Kertokarijo, M.; Chen, A.; Joëls, M.; Deussing, J.M.; Schmidt, M.V.

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety disorders constitute a major disease and social burden worldwide; however, many questions concerning the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain open. Besides the involvement of the major excitatory (glutamate) and inhibitory (gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)) neurotransmitter circuits in

  3. Category-specific visual responses: an intracranial study comparing gamma, beta, alpha and ERP response selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan R Vidal

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The specificity of neural responses to visual objects is a major topic in visual neuroscience. In humans, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies have identified several regions of the occipital and temporal lobe that appear specific to faces, letter-strings, scenes, or tools. Direct electrophysiological recordings in the visual cortical areas of epileptic patients have largely confirmed this modular organization, using either single-neuron peri-stimulus time-histogram or intracerebral event-related potentials (iERP. In parallel, a new research stream has emerged using high-frequency gamma-band activity (50-150 Hz (GBR and low-frequency alpha/beta activity (8-24 Hz (ABR to map functional networks in humans. An obvious question is now whether the functional organization of the visual cortex revealed by fMRI, ERP, GBR, and ABR coincide. We used direct intracerebral recordings in 18 epileptic patients to directly compare GBR, ABR, and ERP elicited by the presentation of seven major visual object categories (faces, scenes, houses, consonants, pseudowords, tools, and animals, in relation to previous fMRI studies. Remarkably both GBR and iERP showed strong category-specificity that was in many cases sufficient to infer stimulus object category from the neural response at single-trial level. However, we also found a strong discrepancy between the selectivity of GBR, ABR, and ERP with less than 10% of spatial overlap between sites eliciting the same category-specificity. Overall, we found that selective neural responses to visual objects were broadly distributed in the brain with a prominent spatial cluster located in the posterior temporal cortex. Moreover, the different neural markers (GBR, ABR, and iERP that elicit selectivity towards specific visual object categories present little spatial overlap suggesting that the information content of each marker can uniquely characterize high-level visual information in the brain.

  4. Detection of Glutamate and γ-aminobutyric Acid in Vitreous of Patients with Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Deng; De-Zheng Wu; Rulong Gao

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To study the levels of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in vitreous of patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR) and to investigate their roles in retinal ischemia.Method: Vitreous samples were collected from 25 patients (27 eyes) with PDR and 14patients ( 14 eyes) with idiopathic macular hole. Glutamate and GABA detection were performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).Results: Patients with PDR had significantly higher concentrations of glutamate and GABA than the control group. The glutamate level has a significantly positive correlation with GABA level.Conclusion: Detection of glutamate and GABA in vitreous provides biochemical support for the mechanism and treatment of ischemic retinal damage in patients with PDR.

  5. Characterization of phospholipase C gamma enzymes with gain-of-function mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Katy L; Bunney, Tom D; Yoon, Youngdae; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando; Harris, Richard; Driscoll, Paul C; Abe, Koichiro; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Yu, Philipp; Cho, Wohnwa; Katan, Matilda

    2009-08-21

    Phospholipase C gamma isozymes (PLC gamma 1 and PLC gamma 2) have a crucial role in the regulation of a variety of cellular functions. Both enzymes have also been implicated in signaling events underlying aberrant cellular responses. Using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis, we have recently identified single point mutations in murine PLC gamma 2 that lead to spontaneous inflammation and autoimmunity. Here we describe further, mechanistic characterization of two gain-of-function mutations, D993G and Y495C, designated as ALI5 and ALI14. The residue Asp-993, mutated in ALI5, is a conserved residue in the catalytic domain of PLC enzymes. Analysis of PLC gamma 1 and PLC gamma 2 with point mutations of this residue showed that removal of the negative charge enhanced PLC activity in response to EGF stimulation or activation by Rac. Measurements of PLC activity in vitro and analysis of membrane binding have suggested that ALI5-type mutations facilitate membrane interactions without compromising substrate binding and hydrolysis. The residue mutated in ALI14 (Tyr-495) is within the spPH domain. Replacement of this residue had no effect on folding of the domain and enhanced Rac activation of PLC gamma 2 without increasing Rac binding. Importantly, the activation of the ALI14-PLC gamma 2 and corresponding PLC gamma 1 variants was enhanced in response to EGF stimulation and bypassed the requirement for phosphorylation of critical tyrosine residues. ALI5- and ALI14-type mutations affected basal activity only slightly; however, their combination resulted in a constitutively active PLC. Based on these data, we suggest that each mutation could compromise auto-inhibition in the inactive PLC, facilitating the activation process; in addition, ALI5-type mutations could enhance membrane interaction in the activated state.

  6. Role of Antineuronal Antibodies in Children with Encephalopathy and Febrile Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Lin Lin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus in childhood is more common, with a different range of causes and a lower risk of death, than convulsive status epilepticus in adults. Acute central nervous system infections appear to be markers for morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, central nervous infection is usually presumed in these conditions. Many aspects of the pathogenesis of acute encephalitis and acute febrile encephalopathy with status epilepticus have been clarified in the past decade. The pathogenesis is divided into direct pathogens invasion or immune-mediated mechanisms. Over the past few decades, the number of antineuronal antibodies to ion channels, receptors, and other synaptic proteins described in association with central nervous system disorders has increased dramatically, especially their role in pediatric encephalitis and status epilepticus. These antineuronal antibodies are divided according to the location of their respective antigens: (1 intracellular antigens, including glutamic acid decarboxylase and classical onconeural antigens such as Hu (antineuronal nuclear antibody 1, ANNA1, Ma2, Yo (Purkinje cell autoantibody, PCA1, Ri (antineuronal nuclear antibody 2, ANNA2, CV2/CRMP5, and amphiphysin; and (2 cell membrane ion channels or surface antigens including voltage-gated potassium channel receptor, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor, γ-aminobutyric acid(B receptor, leucine-rich glioma-inactivated protein 1, and contactin-associated protein-like 2. Identifying the mechanism of the disease may have important therapeutic implications.

  7. Interval for the expression of the adaptive response induced by gamma radiation in leucocytes of mouse In vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendiola C, M.T.; Morales R, P.

    2002-01-01

    The interval between the adaptive gamma radiation dose (0.01 Gy) and challenge (1.0 Gy) capable to induce the maximum expression of the adaptive response in lymphocytes of mouse In vivo. The animals were exposed to the mentioned doses with different intervals among both (1, 1.5, 5 or 18 hr). By means of the unicellular electrophoresis in gel technique, four damage parameters were analysed. The results showed that from the 1 hr interval an adaptive response was produced since in the pretreated organisms with 0.01 Gy the cells present lesser damage than in those not adapted. The maximum response was induced with the intervals between 2.5 and 5 hr and even though it persisted until 18 hr, the effect was reducing. (Author)

  8. Calcium Imaging Reveals Coordinated Simple Spike Pauses in Populations of Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E. Ramirez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain’s control of movement is thought to involve coordinated activity between cerebellar Purkinje cells. The results reported here demonstrate that somatic Ca2+ imaging is a faithful reporter of Na+-dependent “simple spike” pauses and enables us to optically record changes in firing rates in populations of Purkinje cells in brain slices and in vivo. This simultaneous calcium imaging of populations of Purkinje cells reveals a striking spatial organization of pauses in Purkinje cell activity between neighboring cells. The source of this organization is shown to be the presynaptic gamma-Aminobutyric acid producing (GABAergic network, and blocking ionotropic gamma-Aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAARs abolishes the synchrony. These data suggest that presynaptic interneurons synchronize (inactivity between neighboring Purkinje cells, and thereby maximize their effect on downstream targets in the deep cerebellar nuclei.

  9. Response of thyroid follicular cells to gamma irradiation compared to proton irradiation: II. The role of connexin 32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, L. M.; Tran, D. T.; Murray, D. K.; Rightnar, S. S.; Todd, S.; Nelson, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether connexin 32-type gap junctions contribute to the "contact effect" in follicular thyrocytes and whether the response is influenced by radiation quality. Our previous studies demonstrated that early-passage follicular cultures of Fischer rat thyroid cells express functional connexin 32 gap junctions, with later-passage cultures expressing a truncated nonfunctional form of the protein. This model allowed us to assess the role of connexin 32 in radiation responsiveness without relying solely on chemical manipulation of gap junctions. The survival curves generated after gamma irradiation revealed that early-passage follicular cultures had significantly lower values of alpha (0.04 Gy(-1)) than later-passage cultures (0.11 Gy(-1)) (P 0.1, n = 9). This strongly suggests that the presence of functional connexin 32-type gap junctions was contributing to radiation resistance in gamma-irradiated thyroid follicles. Survival curves from proton-irradiated cultures had alpha values that were not significantly different whether cells expressed functional connexin 32 (0.10 Gy(-1)), did not express connexin 32 (0.09 Gy(-1)), or were down-regulated (early-passage plus heptanol, 0.09 Gy(-1); late-passage plus heptanol, 0.12 Gy(-1)) (P > 0.1, n = 19). Thus, for proton irradiation, the presence of connexin 32-type gap junctional channels did not influence their radiosensitivity. Collectively, the data support the following conclusions. (1) The lower alpha values from the gamma-ray survival curves of the early-passage cultures suggest greater repair efficiency and/or enhanced resistance to radiation-induced damage, coincident with the expression of connexin 32-type gap junctions. (2) The increased sensitivity of FRTL-5 cells to proton irradiation was independent of their ability to communicate through connexin 32 gap junctions. (3) The fact that the beta components of the survival curves from both gamma rays and proton beams were

  10. Physiological response of marigold (calendula officinalis L.) plants to gamma radiation, gibberellic acid and kinetin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noby, M.F.A.

    2010-01-01

    This study was carried out during the two successive seasons of 2005/2006 and 2006/2007 at the Experimental Field of Plant Research Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority at Inshas in a newly reclaimed sandy loam soil. The aim of this work was to study the effect of gamma radiation, gibberellic acid or kinetin and their interaction on the growth, flowering and the productivity of pot-marigold (Calendula officinalis L.) plants. The experimental trials included two factorial experiments; the first one was to study the effect of gamma radiation and gibberellic acid and the interaction between them on pot-marigold plants. Another experiment was conducted to study the effect of gamma radiation and kinetin and the interaction between them on pot-marigold plants. Pot-marigold seeds were irradiated before sowing with gamma rays at 0, 50, 100, 150 or 200 Gray (Gy) of gamma rays. After planting, plants were sprayed with either gibberellic acid (at the concentrations of 0, 50, 100, 150 or 200 ppm) or kinetin (at the concentrations of 0, 10, 20, 30 or 40 ppm). Generally, gamma rays treatments (50, 100 and 150 Gy) increased plant height, branch number/plant, leaf area, vegetative growth and roots fresh and dry weights of pot-marigold plants. Also, the same gamma doses accelerated flowering and decreased the period from sowing until flowering while increased flower head diameter, flower number/plant and flowers fresh and dry weights per plant and per feddan. In addition, gamma rays (50 - 150 Gy) increased volatile oil yield in flowers, leaf chlorophyll content, carotenoids and beta carotene in flowers, total soluble sugars and NPK %. The best values were obtained by 50 Gy dose of gamma rays, whereas the dose of 200 Gy gave the lowest values.

  11. Modulation of the allergen-induced human IgE response in Hu-SCID mice: inhibitory effect of human recombinant IFN-gamma and allergen-derived lipopeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duez, C; Gras-Masse, H; Hammad, H; Akoum, H; Didierlaurent, A; André, C; Tonnel, A B; Pestel, J

    2001-01-01

    We have previously established a model to study the in vivo human IgE response using humanized SCID mice. Allergic SCID mice were obtained following intraperitoneal injection with mononuclear cells from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt)-sensitive patients, and sensitization by Dpt allergen intraperitoneal injection (immunization) or Dpt aerosol (inhalation). Human serum IgE was measured in allergic SCID mice after administration of human recombinant IFN-gamma or the lipopeptide LP 52-71 (derived from peptide p52-71 from Der p 1, Dpt major allergen, coupled to a lipophilic moiety), during the immunization or the inhalation phase. IFN-gamma inhibited human IgE production when given at the time of immunization, but not during inhalation. This effect was long-lasting as Dpt aerosol, given one month after immunization and IFN-gamma administration, failed to increase IgE levels. Unlike Dpt or p52-71, LP 52-71 failed to induce human IgE production at day 14 and 21 after its injection, but did inhibit the development of the IgE response after a secondary Dpt-challenge. Moreover, LP 52-71 administration 14 days after Dpt inhalation decreased IgE levels, in contrast to peptide 52-71, which increased IgE levels. Thus, taken together these results indicate that the development of the human IgE response in allergic SCID mice can be modulated by modified allergen and a Th1 cytokine.

  12. Poker-camp: a program for calculating detector responses and phantom organ doses in environmental gamma fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koblinger, L.

    1981-09-01

    A general description, user's manual and a sample problem are given in this report on the POKER-CAMP adjoint Monte Carlo photon transport program. Gamma fields of different environmental sources which are uniformly or exponentially distributed sources or plane sources in the air, in the soil or in an intermediate layer placed between them are simulated in the code. Calculations can be made on flux, kerma and spectra of photons at any point; and on responses of point-like, cylindrical, or spherical detectors; and on doses absorbed in anthropomorphic phantoms. (author)

  13. Production and characterization of guinea pig recombinant gamma interferon and its effect on macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevan, A; McFarland, C T; Yoshimura, T; Skwor, T; Cho, H; Lasco, T; McMurray, D N

    2006-01-01

    Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) plays a critical role in the protective immune responses against mycobacteria. We previously cloned a cDNA coding for guinea pig IFN-gamma (gpIFN-gamma) and reported that BCG vaccination induced a significant increase in the IFN-gamma mRNA expression in guinea pig cells in response to living mycobacteria and that the virulent H37Rv strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis stimulated less IFN-gamma mRNA than did the attenuated H37Ra strain. In this study, we successfully expressed and characterized recombinant gpIFN-gamma with a histidine tag at the N terminus (His-tagged rgpIFN-gamma) in Escherichia coli. rgpIFN-gamma was identified as an 18-kDa band in the insoluble fraction; therefore, the protein was purified under denaturing conditions and renatured. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the recombinant protein yielded the sequence corresponding to the N terminus of His-tagged gpIFN-gamma. The recombinant protein upregulated major histocompatibility complex class II expression in peritoneal macrophages. The antiviral activity of rgpIFN-gamma was demonstrated with a guinea pig fibroblast cell line (104C1) infected with encephalomyocarditis virus. Interestingly, peritoneal macrophages treated with rgpIFN-gamma did not produce any nitric oxide but did produce hydrogen peroxide and suppressed the intracellular growth of mycobacteria. Furthermore, rgpIFN-gamma induced morphological alterations in cultured macrophages. Thus, biologically active rgpIFN-gamma has been successfully produced and characterized in our laboratory. The study of rgpIFN-gamma will further increase our understanding of the cellular and molecular responses induced by BCG vaccination in the guinea pig model of pulmonary tuberculosis.

  14. Plastic Gamma Sensors: An Application in Detection of Radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2003-01-01

    A brief survey of plastic scintillators for various radiation measurement applications is presented here. The utility of plastic scintillators for practical applications such as gamma radiation monitoring, real-time radioisotope detection and screening is evaluated in laboratory and field measurements. This study also reports results of Monte Carlo-type predictive responses of common plastic scintillators in gamma and neutron radiation fields. Small-size plastic detectors are evaluated for static and dynamic gamma-ray detection sensitivity of selected radiation sources

  15. Effects of the insecticide fipronil on reproductive endocrinology in the fathead minnow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABA receptors play an important role in neuroendocrine regulation in fish. Disruption of the GABAergic system by environmental contaminants could interfere with normal regulation of the hypothalamic pituitary gonadal (HPG) axis, leading to imp...

  16. Screening and mutagenesis of lactobacillus brevis for biosynthesis of γ-aminobutyric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jiang; Mei Lehe; Huang Jun

    2006-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. In this study, a GABA-producing strain, hjxj-01, was isolated from the milk samples and identified as Lactobacillus brevis. In this GYP medium containing sodium glutamate, the highest GABA concentration accumulated by Lactobacillus brevis hjxj-01 is 7 g/L. The strain was treated with UV and 60 Co γ-rays. Based on high positive mutation rate, the final mutagenesis conditions were UV light 30 W, irradiation distance 45 cm, irradiation time 50 s, and 60 Co γ-rays irradiation of 500 Gy. The mutant strain, hjxj-08119, was bred by GABA resistance selection. Cultured for 12 generations continually, the GABA-producing capacity of hjxj-08119 maintained stably. The fermentation results indicate that compared with the origin strain hjxj-01, the average yield of GABA by hjij-08119 is 17 g/L, which is 142.9% of the origin strain. (authors)

  17. Relationship between the mechanisms of gamma rhythm generation and the magnitude of the macroscopic phase response function in a population of excitatory and inhibitory modified quadratic integrate-and-fire neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akao, Akihiko; Ogawa, Yutaro; Jimbo, Yasuhiko; Ermentrout, G. Bard; Kotani, Kiyoshi

    2018-01-01

    Gamma oscillations are thought to play an important role in brain function. Interneuron gamma (ING) and pyramidal interneuron gamma (PING) mechanisms have been proposed as generation mechanisms for these oscillations. However, the relation between the generation mechanisms and the dynamical properties of the gamma oscillation are still unclear. Among the dynamical properties of the gamma oscillation, the phase response function (PRF) is important because it encodes the response of the oscillation to inputs. Recently, the PRF for an inhibitory population of modified theta neurons that generate an ING rhythm was computed by the adjoint method applied to the associated Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) for the model. The modified theta model incorporates conductance-based synapses as well as the voltage and current dynamics. Here, we extended this previous work by creating an excitatory-inhibitory (E-I) network using the modified theta model and described the population dynamics with the corresponding FPE. We conducted a bifurcation analysis of the FPE to find parameter regions which generate gamma oscillations. In order to label the oscillatory parameter regions by their generation mechanisms, we defined ING- and PING-type gamma oscillation in a mathematically plausible way based on the driver of the inhibitory population. We labeled the oscillatory parameter regions by these generation mechanisms and derived PRFs via the adjoint method on the FPE in order to investigate the differences in the responses of each type of oscillation to inputs. PRFs for PING and ING mechanisms are derived and compared. We found the amplitude of the PRF for the excitatory population is larger in the PING case than in the ING case. Finally, the E-I population of the modified theta neuron enabled us to analyze the PRFs of PING-type gamma oscillation and the entrainment ability of E and I populations. We found a parameter region in which PRFs of E and I are both purely positive in the case of

  18. A matrix-inversion method for gamma-source mapping from gamma-count data - 59082

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, Richard K.; Adsley, Ian; Burgess, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Gamma ray counting is often used to survey the distribution of active waste material in various locations. Ideally the output from such surveys would be a map of the activity of the waste. In this paper a simple matrix-inversion method is presented. This allows an array of gamma-count data to be converted to an array of source activities. For each survey area the response matrix is computed using the gamma-shielding code Microshield [1]. This matrix links the activity array to the count array. The activity array is then obtained via matrix inversion. The method was tested on artificially-created arrays of count-data onto which statistical noise had been added. The method was able to reproduce, quite faithfully, the original activity distribution used to generate the dataset. The method has been applied to a number of practical cases, including the distribution of activated objects in a hot cell and to activated Nimonic springs amongst fuel-element debris in vaults at a nuclear plant. (authors)

  19. Neutron and gamma-ray toxicity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, E.J.

    1975-01-01

    The focus of the program is on late effects of neutron and gamma radiation and assessment of risk. Principal research activities are in two complementary areas: life-span experiments with large populations of laboratory mice to compare the effectiveness of single or protracted doses of neutron or gamma radiation for life shortening due to cancer and other debilitating noncancerous diseases; and basic research on cellular injury and recovery for the evaluation of potential contributions of latent injury in the mouse circulatory, immune, and hematopoietic systems to life shortening, and for the comparison of late radiation effects in proliferating tissues. The data are used to test existing models and to formulate new models for prediction of radiation hazards and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of fission neutrons, particularly at low radiation doses. The neutron dose-response curve is nonlinear, with the life shortening effect decreasing from 3-4 day/rad to 1 day/rad with increasing dose over the range of 20-240 rad. Clearly, linear extrapolations from high neutron doses to estimate life shortening at low doses would underestimate risk; the underestimation is even greater when the enhancement of life shortening produced by fractionated neutron exposure, described previously by us, is also considered. These results from single neutron doses deviate from predictions of total dose dependency based on the predictive model of Kellerer and Rossi. The shape of the gamma radiation dose-response curve is linear over the range of 90 to 788 rad; linear dose-response curves for gamma radiation have been described previously by others, but a quadratic function has been considered by some to be most applicable

  20. Melanoma cells treated with GGTI and IFN-gamma allow murine vaccination and enhance cytotoxic response against human melanoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Sarrabayrouse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Suboptimal activation of T lymphocytes by melanoma cells is often due to the defective expression of class I major histocompatibility antigens (MHC-I and costimulatory molecules. We have previously shown that geranylgeranyl transferase inhibition (done with GGTI-298 stimulates anti-melanoma immune response through MHC-I and costimulatory molecule expression in the B16F10 murine model [1]. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, it is shown that vaccination with mIFN-gand GGTI-298 pretreated B16F10 cells induces a protection against untreated tumor growth and pulmonary metastases implantation. Furthermore, using a human melanoma model (LB1319-MEL, we demonstrated that in vitro treatment with hIFN-gamma and GGTI-298 led to the up regulation of MHC-I and a costimulatory molecule CD86 and down regulation of an inhibitory molecule PD-1L. Co-culture experiments with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC revealed that modifications induced by hIFN-gamma and GGTI-298 on the selected melanoma cells, enables the stimulation of lymphocytes from HLA compatible healthy donors. Indeed, as compared with untreated melanoma cells, pretreatment with hIFN-gamma and GGTI-298 together rendered the melanoma cells more efficient at inducing the: i activation of CD8 T lymphocytes (CD8+/CD69+; ii proliferation of tumor-specific CD8 T cells (MelanA-MART1/TCR+; iii secretion of hIFN-gamma; and iv anti-melanoma specific cytotoxic cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that pharmacological treatment of melanoma cell lines with IFN-gamma and GGTI-298 stimulates their immunogenicity and could be a novel approach to produce tumor cells suitable for vaccination and for stimulation of anti-melanoma effector cells.

  1. Transcriptional dysregulation of γ-aminobutyric acid transporter in parvalbumin-containing inhibitory neurons in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitanihirwe, Byron K Y; Woo, Tsung-Ung W

    2014-12-30

    Parvalbumin (PV)-containing neurons are functionally compromised in schizophrenia. Using double in situ hybridization in postmortem human prefrontal cortex, we found that the messenger RNA (mRNA) for the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter GAT-1 was undetectable in 22-41% of PV neurons in layers 3-4 in schizophrenia. In the remaining PV neurons with detectable GAT-1 mRNA, transcript expression was decreased by 26% in layer 3. Hence, the dysfunction of PV neurons involves the molecular dysregulation of presynaptic GABA reuptake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Gamma factors of an ambulatory source; Factores gamma de una fuente ambulatoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcos P, A; Vega C, H R; Manzanares A, E; Salas L, M A; Hernandez D, V M [Unidades Academicas de Estudios Nucleares e Ingenieria Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, C. Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Barquero, R [Hospital Universitario del Rio Hortega, E-47010 Valladolid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Some of the procedures for diagnostic or treatment used in the medicine use radioactive materials as the I{sup 131}. By means of Monte Carlo methods were calculated the doses in the internal organs of a woman, with three months of pregnancy, due to the radioiodine captured by her thyroid, as well as to 1 meter of the gland. A three-dimensional mathematical model of the body of a woman was used and by means of Monte Carlo, the radioiodine photons were transported isotropically from the thyroid toward the whole body and was calculated the absorbed dose by their internal organs, also the Kerma in air (K) was determined and the environmental equivalent dose (H{sup *}(10)) at 1 m of the gland. Two activity factors at dose were determined, Gamma Factors that it allows to estimate the dose that the patient produces to people to its around. Of the gamma radiation that emits the I{sup 131} in the thyroid was found that the thymus receives the biggest dose while the uterus is the organ that smaller dose receives. The determined gamma factors were: {gamma}{sub KAire} = 56 {mu}Gy-m{sup 2}-h{sup -1}-GBq{sup -1}, and {gamma}{sub H}{sup *}{sub (10)} = 73 {mu}Sv-m{sup 2}-h{sup -1}-GBq{sup -1}. The distribution of the absorbed dose by the internal organs is attributed to the relative distance among the thyroid and the other organs, to the inter-organs shielding, its size and to its elementary composition. The {gamma}{sub KAire} and {gamma}{sub H}{sup *}{sub (10)} factors allow to estimate the exposure that the patient produces on the personnel to its around. With this, the nuclear medicus, the medical physicist or the one responsible of the radiological safety in the hospital can give more precise indications on the behavior of people around the patient. (Author)

  3. Application of the similitude principle to gamma-gamma density measurements; Application du principe de similitude a la mesure gamma-gamma de densite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czubek, J A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires. Departement d' Electronique Generale, Service d' Electronique Industrielle; Institut de Recherches Nucleaires, Dep. VI, Cracow (Poland)

    1966-07-01

    The work presented here deals with the problem of the application of the similitude principle to rock density measurements by the gamma-gamma method. A formula is presented which makes it possible to transform results of gamma-gamma measurements carried out on models in order to make them suitable for comparison with results obtained under actual field conditions. Both the space coordinates and the densities are transformed. This transformation makes it possible to obtain a calibration curve as a function of the density for a gamma-gamma probe using only a single model of given density. The influence has also been studied of the chemical composition on the results obtained from gamma-gamma measurements. A method has been developed for estimating the equivalent Z parameter of the medium; the possibility of completely eliminating the influence of the chemical composition of the medium on the measurement results has been studied. (author) [French] L'etude presentee ci-dessous traite le probleme de l'application du principe de similitude aux mesures de densite des roches par la methode gamma-gamma. Nous indiquons une formule qui permet de transformer les resultats des mesures gamma-gamma effectuees sur les modeles pour les comparer aux resultats obtenus dans les conditions reelles sur le terrain. On transforme les coordonnees spatiales ainsi que les densites. Cette transformation donne la possibilite d'obtenir une courbe d'etalonnage (en fonction de la densite) pour une sonde gamma-gamma en utilisant un seul modele de densite donnee. On a etudie aussi l'influence de la composition chimique sur les resultats obtenus des mesures gamma-gamma. On a etabli une methode d'estimation du parametre Z equivalent du milieu, ainsi que la possibilite d'eliminer completement l'influence de la composition chimique du milieu sur les resultats des mesures de densite. (auteur)

  4. Biological response of the cotton leaf worm, Spodoptera littoralis, towards combination of seed and leaf extracts from red gum Eucalyptus Camaldulensis and/or gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Shall, S.S.A.; Alm El Din, M.M.S.; Hazaa, M.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    The biological response of the F1 progeny of the cotton leaf worm, Spodoptera Littoralis (Bosid.), (from males irradiated as parental pupae with 75 and 125 Gy gamma radiation) to seed or leaf extracts of Eucalyptus Camaldulensis plant were studied. The fecundity, fertility, and mating potency of F1 adults were employed as assess for response. Analysis of variance indicated that, different treatments with gamma irradiation and/or plant extracts, at most mating crosses and most interactions between all of them, showed significant role in decreasing the fecundity and fertility of F1 adults. In general, the combined treatments of seed or leaf extracts with gamma irradiation. as dependent factors regardless other factors, decreased the emergence of adults compared to the control or single treatments of either seed extract or gamma irradiation. As well, combination treatments of radiation and seed extract decreased significantly the fecundity of moths compared to control or irradiation treatment alone. On the other hand, the combination treatments of either seed or leaf extracts did not have any significant difference in the number of mating per female, as compared to control, while irradiation treatments decreased the number of mating compared to vontrol. The effects of most possible probabilities of interaction between doses, crosses and treatments on reproduction were estimated and discussed and also the effects on development of F1 progeny were included

  5. Self-Powered Neutron and Gamma Detectors for In-Core Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strindehag, O.

    1971-11-01

    The performance of various types of self-powered neutron and gamma detectors intended for control and power distribution measurements in water cooled reactors is discussed. The self-powered detectors are compared with other types of in-core detectors and attention is paid to such properties as neutron and gamma sensitivity, high-temperature performance, burn-up rate and time of response. Also treated are the advantages and disadvantages of using gamma detector data for power distribution calculations instead of data from neutron detectors. With regard to neutron-sensitive detectors, results from several long-term experiments with vanadium and cobalt detectors are presented. The results include reliability and stability data for these two detector types and the Co build-up in cobalt detectors. Experimental results which reveal the fast response of cobalt detectors are presented, and the use of cobalt detectors in reactor safety systems is discussed. Experience of the design and installation of complete flux probes, electronic units and data processing systems for power reactors is reported. The investigation of gamma-sensitive detectors includes detectors with emitters of lead, zirconium, magnesium and Inconel. Measured gamma sensitivities from calibrations both in a reactor and in a gamma cell are given, and the signal levels of self-powered neutron and gamma detectors when applied to power reactors are compared

  6. Self-Powered Neutron and Gamma Detectors for In-Core Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strindehag, O

    1971-11-15

    The performance of various types of self-powered neutron and gamma detectors intended for control and power distribution measurements in water cooled reactors is discussed. The self-powered detectors are compared with other types of in-core detectors and attention is paid to such properties as neutron and gamma sensitivity, high-temperature performance, burn-up rate and time of response. Also treated are the advantages and disadvantages of using gamma detector data for power distribution calculations instead of data from neutron detectors. With regard to neutron-sensitive detectors, results from several long-term experiments with vanadium and cobalt detectors are presented. The results include reliability and stability data for these two detector types and the Co build-up in cobalt detectors. Experimental results which reveal the fast response of cobalt detectors are presented, and the use of cobalt detectors in reactor safety systems is discussed. Experience of the design and installation of complete flux probes, electronic units and data processing systems for power reactors is reported. The investigation of gamma-sensitive detectors includes detectors with emitters of lead, zirconium, magnesium and Inconel. Measured gamma sensitivities from calibrations both in a reactor and in a gamma cell are given, and the signal levels of self-powered neutron and gamma detectors when applied to power reactors are compared

  7. The LASL gamma-ray burst astronomy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klebesadel, R.W.; Evans, W.D.; Laros, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst observations performed by LASL began with the identification and initial report of the phenomenon from data acquired by the Vela satellites. The Vela instruments have recorded responses to 73 gamma-ray bursts over a ten-year interval, and are continuing to contribute toward these observations. Similar instrumentation was included aboard the NRL SOLRAD 11 spacecraft. These performed well but suffered an early demise. Recently, the LASL gamma-ray burst astronomy program has been enhanced through the implementation of experiments aboard the Pioneer Venus Orbiter and ISEF-C spacecraft. Both of these experiments are continuing to contribute data vital to trigonometric directional analyses. (orig.)

  8. Strength of Gamma Rhythm Depends on Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Supratim; Ni, Amy M.; Maunsell, John H. R.

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal assemblies often exhibit stimulus-induced rhythmic activity in the gamma range (30–80 Hz), whose magnitude depends on the attentional load. This has led to the suggestion that gamma rhythms form dynamic communication channels across cortical areas processing the features of behaviorally relevant stimuli. Recently, attention has been linked to a normalization mechanism, in which the response of a neuron is suppressed (normalized) by the overall activity of a large pool of neighboring neurons. In this model, attention increases the excitatory drive received by the neuron, which in turn also increases the strength of normalization, thereby changing the balance of excitation and inhibition. Recent studies have shown that gamma power also depends on such excitatory–inhibitory interactions. Could modulation in gamma power during an attention task be a reflection of the changes in the underlying excitation–inhibition interactions? By manipulating the normalization strength independent of attentional load in macaque monkeys, we show that gamma power increases with increasing normalization, even when the attentional load is fixed. Further, manipulations of attention that increase normalization increase gamma power, even when they decrease the firing rate. Thus, gamma rhythms could be a reflection of changes in the relative strengths of excitation and normalization rather than playing a functional role in communication or control. PMID:23393427

  9. Thermoluminescence response of a mixed ternary alkali halide crystals exposed to gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez M, R.; Perez S, R. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Apdo. Postal 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Vazquez P, G.; Riveros, H. [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Apdo. Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gonzalez M, P., E-mail: mijangos@cifus.uson.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    Ionic crystals, mainly alkali halide crystals have been the subject of intense research for a better understanding of the luminescence properties of defects induced by ionizing radiation. The defects in crystals can be produced in appreciable concentration due to elastic stresses, radiation, and addition of impurities. These defects exhibit remarkable thermoluminescence properties. This work is concerned with the Tl properties of a ternary alkali halide crystal after being irradiated with gamma and beta rays. It has been found that the Tl glow peak of the crystal follows a rule of average associated to the Tl Temperatures of the components of the mixture, similarly to the response of europium doped binary mixed crystals KCl{sub x}KBr{sub 1-x} and KBr{sub x}RbBr{sub 1-x}. (Author)

  10. Degradation of pyrimidines in Saccharomyces kluyveri: transamination of beta-alanine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnackerz, K D; Andersen, G; Dobritzsch, D

    2008-01-01

    Beta-alanine is an intermediate in the reductive degradation of uracil. Recently we have identified and characterized the Saccharomyces kluyveri PYD4 gene and the corresponding enzyme beta -alanine aminotransferase ((Sk)Pyd4p), highly homologous to eukaryotic gamma-aminobutyrate aminotransferase ...

  11. Molecular properties of adult mouse gastric and intestinal epithelial progenitors in their niches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannakis, Marios; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Mills, Jason C

    2006-01-01

    pathways. Wnt/beta-catenin, phosphoinositide-3/Akt kinase, insulin-like growth factor-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, integrin, and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor signaling cascades, plus glycerolipid, fatty acid, and amino acid metabolic pathways are among those prominently represented in adult...

  12. Brain GABA levels across psychiatric disorders : A systematic literature review and meta-analysis of 1H-MRS studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schür, Remmelt R.; Draisma, Luc W R; Wijnen, Jannie P.; Boks, Marco P.; Koevoets, Martijn G J C; Joëls, Marian; Klomp, Dennis W.; Kahn, René S.; Vinkers, Christiaan H.

    2016-01-01

    The inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system is involved in the etiology of most psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). It is therefore not surprising that proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) is

  13. Immunocytochemical indications for neuronal co-localization of GABA and aspartate in cultured neocortex explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, B. M.; Ruijter, J. M.; Buijs, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    The application of postembedding immunocytochemistry on serial semithin plastic sections, revealed the presence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-positive and aspartate-positive neurons in cultured neocortex explants. GABA-positive neurons were found in all layers of the cultured cortex, whereas

  14. Gamma- and electron dose response of the electrical conductivity of polyaniline based polymer blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevil, U.A.; Gueven, O.; Slezsak, I.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Conducting polymers, also known as 'synthetic metals' have been the subject of widespread investigations over the past decade due to their very promising characteristics. Polyaniline (PANI) holds a special position among conducting polymers in that its most highly conducting doped form can be reached by protonic acid doping or oxidative doping. It was published earlier, that the electrical conductivity of some polyaniline based polymer composites increases to a significant extent when irradiated to gamma, electron or UV radiation. The aim of the present study was to measure the high frequency conductivity of blended films of PANI with poly(vinylchloride), PVC, and chlorinated poly(propylene) irradiated in air to different doses. In order to find the most suitable composition od these composites the mass percentage of PANI within the PPCl and PVC matrix was changed between 5 - 30%. These samples were then gamma irradiated and the induced electrical conductivity was measured in the 1 kHz - 1 MHz frequency range to determine the most sensitive evaluation conditions. After selecting both the most suitable measuring conditions as well as the blend compositions the dose response of the chosen samples was determined in the dose range of 10 - 250 kGy. With respect to potential dosimetry application the effect of electron irradiation, the effect of irradiation temperature and the stability of the irradiated samples have also been investigated

  15. Consistency of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific Interferon-Gamma Responses in HIV-1-Infected Women during Pregnancy and Postpartum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasi R. Jonnalagadda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We determined the consistency of positive interferon-gamma (IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs to detect latent TB infection (LTBI over one-year postpartum in HIV-1-infected women. Methods. Women with positive IGRAs during pregnancy had four 3-monthly postpartum IGRAs. Postpartum change in magnitude of IFN-γ response was determined using linear mixed models. Results. Among 18 women with positive pregnancy IGRA, 15 (83% had a subsequent positive IGRA; 9 (50% were always positive, 3 (17% were always negative, and 6 (33% fluctuated between positive and negative IGRAs. Women with pregnancy IGRA IFN-γ >8 spot forming cells (SFCs/well were more likely to have consistent postpartum IGRA response (odds ratio: 10.0; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.9–117.0. Change in IFN-γ response over postpartum was 10.2 SFCs/well (95% CI: −1.5–21.8 SFCs/well. Conclusion. Pregnancy positive IGRAs were often maintained postpartum with increased consistency in women with higher baseline responses. There were modest increases in magnitude of IGRA responses postpartum.

  16. Analysis of portable gamma flaw detectors concerning radiation hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarova, T.V.

    1982-01-01

    Design and shields of gamma flaw detectors as one of the main factors responsible for personnel dose were studied. The analysis was conducted using the results of radiation hygienic surveys of gamma flaw detection laboratories functioning constantly in Estonia. It is shown that recently the replacement of GUP apparatuses by flaw detectors of RID and ''Gamma-RID'' (types which have design and shielding advantages is observed. However personnel doses have not reduced considerably for the last 10 years. This fact is attributed to design disadvantages of the RID and ''Gamma-RID'' apparatuses the removing of which will give the decreasing of annual personnel dose by 80 %

  17. Relationship among Glutamine, γ-Aminobutyric Acid, and Social Cognition in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikoglu, Elif M.; Hodge, Steven M.; Edden, Richard A.E.; Foley, Ann; Kennedy, David N.; Moore, Constance M.; Frazier, Jean A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: An imbalance of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been proposed. We compared glutamate (Glu), glutamine (Gln), and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of 13 males with ASD and 14 typically developing (TD) males (ages 13–17), and correlated these levels with intelligence quotient (IQ) and measures of social cognition. Methods: Social cognition was evaluated by administration of the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) and the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET). We acquired proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) data from the bilateral ACC using the single voxel point resolved spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) to quantify Glu and Gln, and Mescher–Garwood point-resolved spectroscopy sequence (MEGA-PRESS) to quantify GABA levels referenced to creatine (Cr). Results: There were higher Gln levels (p=0.04), and lower GABA/Cre levels (p=0.09) in the ASD group than in the TD group. There was no difference in Glu levels between groups. Gln was negatively correlated with RMET score (rho=−0.62, p=0.001) and IQ (rho=−0.56, p=0.003), and positively correlated with SRS scores (rho=0.53, p=0.007). GABA/Cre levels were positively correlated with RMET score (rho=0.34, p=0.09) and IQ (rho=0.36, p=0.07), and negatively correlated with SRS score (rho=−0.34, p=0.09). Conclusions: These data suggest an imbalance between glutamatergic neurotransmission and GABA-ergic neurotransmission in ASD. Higher Gln levels and lower GABA/Cre levels were associated with lower IQ and greater impairments in social cognition across groups. PMID:25919578

  18. Responses of a grassland arthropod community to chronic beta and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styron, C.E.; Dodson, G.J.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Miller, F.L. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A long-term project was initiated in 1968 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to assess effects of mixed beta and gamma radiation from simulated fallout on a grassland ecosystem. Beta and gamma radiation dose rates in microhabitats of the experimentally contaminated enclosure were measured with LiF thermoluminescent microdosimeters. Extensive statistical analyses of data on numbers of individuals collected for each of 76 arthropod and 2 molluscan taxa have identified no lasting significant changes in similarity or species diversity of experimental versus control communities as the result of the long-term irradiation at low dose rates. Natural fluctuations in community dynamics obscured any possible radiation effects. Thus, the apparent threshold for mixed beta and gamma radiation inducing changes in community structure must be above the exposure rate range of 2.3 to 13 rad/day delivered during the 5 yr of observation. Establishing such a threshold is of importance in assessing the impact of communities subjected to chronic, low level environmental exposure to ionizing radiation

  19. Thermoluminescence and dielectric response of LiKSO{sub 4}:Gd to {gamma}-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Kolaly, M.A.; Kassem, M.E.; Higazy, A.A.; Ismail, L.Z.; Al-Houty, L.I. [Qatar Univ., Doha (Qatar). Dept. of Physics

    1994-10-01

    The effect of {gamma}-radiation dose up to about 324 kGy on the thermoluminescence and dielectric properties of LiKSO{sub 4}:Gd was studied. All glow curves exhibited a single peak around 373 K. The activation energy of this peak was estimated to be about 0.82 eV. The variation of the TL intensity with {gamma}-dose is characterized by a maximum at 6.75 kGy. The dielectric dispersion was studied as a function of irradiation dose. In the low frequency range straight line behaviour was obtained for low dose (up to 12.3 kGy) while for higher {gamma}-dose, semicircles are obtained. The bulk conductivity was found to increase with dose up to 6.75 kGy. (author).

  20. Comparison of gamma, neutron and proton irradiations of multimode fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gingerich, M.E.; Dorsey, K.L.; Askins, C.G.; Friebele, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of pure gamma, pure proton, and mixed neutron-gamma irradiation fields on a set of both pure and doped silica core multimode fibers have been investigated. Only slight differences are found in the radiation response of pure and doped silica core fibers exposed to gamma or mixed neutron-gamma fields, indicating that Co-60 sources can be used to simulate the effects of the mixed field (except in the case of a pure neutron environment). Although it is noted that neither mix field nor gamma sources adequately simulate the effects of proton irradiation of doped silica core fibers, a good correspondence is found in the case of the pure silica core waveguide. 13 references

  1. Interferon-gamma response to the treatment of active pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, L; Shi, R; Liu, X; Yuan, X; Zheng, S; Zhang, G; Wang, W; Wang, J; England, K; Via, L E; Cai, Y; Goldfeder, L C; Dodd, L E; Barry, C E; Chen, R Y

    2017-10-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used to diagnose tuberculosis (TB) but not to measure treatment response. To measure IFN-γ response to active anti-tuberculosis treatment. Patients from the Henan Provincial Chest Hospital, Henan, China, with TB symptoms and/or signs were enrolled into this prospective, observational cohort study and followed for 6 months of treatment, with blood and sputum samples collected at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 16 and 24 weeks. The QuantiFERON® TB-Gold assay was run on collected blood samples. Participants received a follow-up telephone call at 24 months to determine relapse status. Of the 152 TB patients enrolled, 135 were eligible for this analysis: 118 pulmonary (PTB) and 17 extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB) patients. IFN-γ levels declined significantly over time among all patients (P = 0.002), with this decline driven by PTB patients (P = 0.001), largely during the initial 8 weeks of treatment (P = 0.019). IFN-γ levels did not change among EPTB patients over time or against baseline culture or drug resistance status. After 6 months of effective anti-tuberculosis treatment, IFN-γ levels decreased significantly in PTB patients, largely over the initial 8 weeks of treatment. IFN-γ concentrations may offer some value for monitoring anti-tuberculosis treatment response among PTB patients.

  2. Effects of γ-Aminobutyric acid transporter 1 inhibition by tiagabine on brain glutamate and γ-Aminobutyric acid metabolism in the anesthetized rat In vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anant B; de Graaf, Robin A; Rothman, Douglas L; Behar, Kevin L

    2015-07-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) clearance from the extracellular space after release from neurons involves reuptake into terminals and astrocytes through GABA transporters (GATs). The relative flows through these two pathways for GABA released from neurons remains unclear. This study determines the effect of tiagabine, a selective inhibitor of neuronal GAT-1, on the rates of glutamate (Glu) and GABA metabolism and GABA resynthesis via the GABA-glutamine (Gln) cycle. Halothane-anesthetized rats were administered tiagabine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) and 45 min later received an intravenous infusion of either [1,6-(13)C2]glucose (in vivo) or [2-(13)C]acetate (ex vivo). Nontreated rats served as controls. Metabolites and (13)C enrichments were measured with (1)H-[(13)C]-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and referenced to their corresponding endpoint values measured in extracts from in situ frozen brain. Metabolic flux estimates of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons were determined by fitting a metabolic model to the (13)C turnover data measured in vivo during [1,6-(13)C2]glucose infusion. Tiagabine-treated rats were indistinguishable (P > 0.05) from controls in tissue amino acid levels and in (13)C enrichments from [2-(13)C]acetate. Tiagabine reduced average rates of glucose oxidation and neurotransmitter cycling in both glutamatergic neurons (↓18%, CMR(glc(ox)Glu): control, 0.27 ± 0.05 vs. tiagabine, 0.22 ± 0.04 µmol/g/min; ↓11%, V(cyc(Glu-Gln)): control 0.23 ± 0.05 vs. tiagabine 0.21 ± 0.04 µmol/g/min and GABAergic neurons (↓18-25%, CMR(glc(ox)GABA): control 0.09 ± 0.02 vs. tiagabine 0.07 ± 0.03 µmol/g/min; V(cyc(GABA-Gln)): control 0.08 ± 0.02 vs. tiagabine 0.07 ± 0.03 µmol/g/min), but the changes in glutamatergic and GABAergic fluxes were not significant (P > 0.10). The results suggest that any reduction in GABA metabolism by tiagabine might be an indirect response to reduced glutamatergic drive rather than direct compensatory effects. © 2015 Wiley

  3. GABA release in the zona incerta of the sheep in response to the sight and ingestion of food and salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, K M; Hinton, M R; Baldwin, B A

    1991-05-31

    In order to establish which neurotransmitters may influence the activity of zona incerta neurones in the sheep which respond selectively to the sight or ingestion of food, we have measured the release of amino acid and monoamine neurotransmitters from this region using microdialysis sampling. Co-ordinates for the placement of microdialysis probes in regions of the zona incerta where cells respond to the sight or ingestion of food were first established by making single-unit extracellular recordings. When animals were food-deprived results showed that release of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was increased in response to the sight and ingestion of food but not of aspartate, glutamate, taurine, noradrenaline, dopamine or serotonin. This release of GABA was absent when the animals were shown non-food objects or saw or ingested salt solutions. When the same animals were physiologically sodium-depleted GABA release was evoked by the sight and ingestion of salt solutions and release following the sight and ingestion of food was significantly reduced. These results provide further evidence that GABA is an important neurotransmitter in neural circuits controlling the regulation of food intake.

  4. Equine interferon gamma synthesis in lymphocytes after in vivo infection and in vitro stimulation with EHV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillot, R; Daly, J M; Juillard, V; Minke, J M; Hannant, D; Kydd, J H

    2005-08-22

    Equine cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses to equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) are well characterised but little is known about the cytokine response after infection or vaccination. EHV-1 is common in horses and infects lymphocytes in vivo. This virus was used as a model to measure the synthesis of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) by equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) after in vivo infection and/or in vitro stimulation with EHV-1. Both flow cytometry and ELISPOT assays were used to quantify equine IFN-gamma using a mouse anti-bovine IFN-gamma monoclonal antibody (clone CC302; shown to cross-react with recombinant equine IFN-gamma) and a rabbit anti-canine IFN-gamma polyclonal antibody. The percentage of PBMC synthesising IFN-gamma after in vitro stimulation with EHV-1 increased with age. In yearlings infected experimentally with EHV-1, PBMC showed two peaks of IFN-gamma synthesis, 11 and 56 days after infection. The IFN-gamma synthesis was principally associated with CD8(+) cells. The patterns of IFN-gamma synthesis detected by intracellular IFN-gamma staining or ELISPOT were compared with CTL data and shown to be similar. These methods were also applied successfully to frozen samples of PBMC. Measurement of equine IFN-gamma using these simple techniques can now be applied to future studies on protective cellular immune responses following virus infection and/or vaccination of horses.

  5. Evaluation of effective dose equivalent from environmental gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Tsutsumi, M.; Moriuchi, S.; Petoussi, N.; Zankl, M.; Veit, R.; Jacob, P.; Drexler, G.

    1991-01-01

    Organ doses and effective dose equivalents for environmental gamma rays were calculated using human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods accounting rigorously the environmental gamma ray fields. It was suggested that body weight is the dominant factor to determine organ doses. The weight function expressing organ doses was introduced. Using this function, the variation in organ doses due to several physical factors were investigated. A detector having gamma-ray response similar to that of human bodies has been developed using a NaI(Tl) scintillator. (author)

  6. Novel fermented chickpea milk with enhanced level of γ-aminobutyric acid and neuroprotective effect on PC12 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, novel fermented chickpea milk with high γ -aminobutyric acid (GABA content and potential neuroprotective activity was developed. Fermentation starter that can produce GABA was selected from 377 strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional Chinese fermented foods. Among the screened strains, strain M-6 showed the highest GABA-producing capacity in De Man–Rogosa and Sharp (MRS broth and chickpea milk. M-6 was identified as Lactobacillus plantarum based on Gram staining, API carbohydrate fermentation pattern testing, and 16s rDNA sequencing. The complete gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase was cloned to confirm the presence of the gene in L. plantarum M-6. The fermentation condition was optimized by response surface methodology. Results demonstrated that L. plantarum M-6 produced the highest GABA content of 537.23 mg/L. The optimal condition included an inoculum concentration of 7%, presence of 0.2% (m/v monosodium glutamate and 55 µ M pyridoxal-5-phosphate, incubation temperature of 39 °C and fermentation time of 48 h . GABA-enriched chickpea milk exerted protective effects on PC12 cells against MnCl2 -induced injury. GABA-enriched chickpea milk improved cell viability and markedly attenuated the release of lactate dehydrogenase compared with the impaired cells.

  7. Novel fermented chickpea milk with enhanced level of γ-aminobutyric acid and neuroprotective effect on PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Wei, Mingming; Wu, Junjun; Rui, Xin; Dong, Mingsheng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, novel fermented chickpea milk with high γ -aminobutyric acid (GABA) content and potential neuroprotective activity was developed. Fermentation starter that can produce GABA was selected from 377 strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional Chinese fermented foods. Among the screened strains, strain M-6 showed the highest GABA-producing capacity in De Man-Rogosa and Sharp (MRS) broth and chickpea milk. M-6 was identified as Lactobacillus plantarum based on Gram staining, API carbohydrate fermentation pattern testing, and 16s rDNA sequencing. The complete gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase was cloned to confirm the presence of the gene in L. plantarum M-6. The fermentation condition was optimized by response surface methodology. Results demonstrated that L. plantarum M-6 produced the highest GABA content of 537.23 mg/L. The optimal condition included an inoculum concentration of 7%, presence of 0.2% (m/v) monosodium glutamate and 55 µ M pyridoxal-5-phosphate, incubation temperature of 39 °C and fermentation time of 48 h . GABA-enriched chickpea milk exerted protective effects on PC12 cells against MnCl2 -induced injury. GABA-enriched chickpea milk improved cell viability and markedly attenuated the release of lactate dehydrogenase compared with the impaired cells.

  8. Electrical stimulation of the substantia nigra reticulata : Detection of neuronal extracellular GABA in the ventromedial thalamus and its regulatory mechanism using microdialysis in awake rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, W; Westerink, B.H.C.

    A combination of electrical stimulation and microdialysis was used to study the nigrothalamic gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic system and its regulatory mechanisms in awake rats. Extracellular GABA levels in the ventromedial nucleus of the thalamus were detected in S-min fractions collected

  9. Amino acids and hexosamines as indicators of organic matter degradation state in North Sea sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dauwe, B.; Middelburg, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Sediment cores from six stations in the eastern North Sea were analyzed for protein amino acids, the nonprotein amino acids beta-alanine and gamma-aminobutyric acid and the hexosamines galactosamine and glucosamine, and bulk parameters (organic carbon, nitrogen, total hydrolyzable amino acids and

  10. Glutamate and GABA in schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman, A.

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by a loss of brain tissue, which may represent an ongoing pathophysiological process. Possible mechanisms that may be involved are the glutamatergic and GABAergic (gamma-aminobutyric acid) systems. Particularly hypofunction of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type of

  11. Effects of lesogaberan on reflux and lower esophageal sphincter function in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Beaumont, Hanneke; Mertens, Veerle; Denison, Hans; Ruth, Magnus; Adler, John; Silberg, Debra G.; Sifrim, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are a major mechanism behind reflux. This study assessed the effects of lesogaberan (AZD3355), a novel gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptor agonist, on reflux and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function when used as

  12. Linear optical absorption response of poly(vinylidene fluoride - trifluoroethylene) copolymers to high gamma dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, Adriana S.

    2009-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) [PVDF] is a semicrystalline linear homopolymer composed by the repetition of CH 2 - CF 2 monomers. The Poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] is a copolymer which is obtained with the random introduction of fluorinated CHF-CF 2 monomers in the PVDF main chain. PVDF, and also its copolymers with TrFE contents ranging from 18 to 63 wt. %, have long been studied for their striking ferroelectric properties and their applications in actuators, transducers and ferroelectric memory. Recent research work around the world have demonstrated that, for TrFE contents ranging from with 30 to 50 wt. %, the copolymer can have its ferroelectric properties modified by high doses of ionizing radiation, with the appearing of radio-induced relaxor ferroelectric features. These studies have lead us to investigate the possible use of these copolymers as high dose dosemeters, once the reported amount of induced C=C conjugated bonds after X-ray, UV and gamma irradiation seems to be a function of the delivered radiation dose. In a first investigation for doses ranging from 0.1 to 100 kGy we found out a linear relation between the gamma radiation dose and the absorption peak intensities in the UV region of the spectrum, i.e., at 223 and 274 nm. The absorption peak at 223 nm is the most sensitive to gamma rays and can be used for detecting gamma doses ranging from 0.3 to 75 kGy. Simultaneously, the absorption peak at 274 nm can be used for doses ranging from 1 to 100 kGy. Now, in the present work, we extended the investigation to gamma doses up to 3 MGy. Particularly, this study is focused in the optical absorption peak at 274 nm, corresponding to the radio-induction of triplets of conjugated C=C double bonds. The investigation revealed a linear correlation between the gamma dose and peak intensity at 274 nm for gamma doses ranging from 0.1 to more than 750 KGy, with a huge extension of the original usable dose range. Calorimetric data revealed a

  13. The role of interferon gamma release assays in the monitoring of response to anti-tuberculosis treatment in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Junaid; Pillay, Manormoney; Jeena, Prakash

    2014-09-01

    Successful control of childhood TB requires early diagnosis, effective chemotherapy and a method of evaluating the response to therapy. Identification of suitable biomarkers that predict the response to anti-TB therapy may allow the duration of treatment to be shortened. The majority of biomarker studies in paediatric TB have focused on the role of T cell-based interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) in the diagnosis of either latent or active disease. Little has been published on the role of IGRAs in the monitoring response to therapy in children. We reviewed the available literature to ascertain the value of IGRAs in the monitoring of response to anti-TB therapy in children. We explored the results of the few studies that have investigated the role of IGRAs as markers of response to anti-TB treatment in children. We conclude that the role of IGRAs as surrogate markers appears promising. Robust clinical trials are, however, needed to entrench the value of IGRAs as surrogate biomarkers of response to anti-TB therapy in children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Aspects of the immune response against proteic antigens submitted to the effects of 60Co gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Janaina Baptista.

    2004-01-01

    Considering the effects of gamma radiation on proteins and the capacity of the immune system to recognize modified macromolecules, we decided to evaluate some immunological aspects of B10.PL mice exposed to native or irradiated ovalbumin and bothrops toxin-1 (BthTx-1). In order to evaluate possible structural modifications of the molecules after being irradiated ( 60 Co gamma rays), bothrops toxin-1 was analysed by electrophoresis, while ovalbumin was submitted to analytical size exclusion chromatography. The toxin was also analysed by ESI-mass spectrometry. Our results indicate that radiation promoted modifications on both the molecules. Aiming to compare the toxicity of the native and irradiated forms of the toxin, an in vitro cytotoxicity assay, using CHO cells, was performed. According to our results, the modified toxin was 5 folds less toxic than its native counterpart. Sera of animals immunized with the native and irradiated proteins were analyzed in order to evaluate levels of IgG, as well as to quantify specific isotopes. While the native proteins induced a predominant Th2 response, the irradiated molecules apparently promoted a switch towards a Th1 pattern. We also performed a cell proliferation assay with splenocytes from mice immunized with either the native or the irradiated proteins, cultured in the presence of the antigens. Our results indicate that both the forms of the proteins induced a similar proliferative response. These data indicate a potential use of detoxified proteins as antigens for immunization. (author)

  15. Paclitaxel Causes Electrophysiological Changes in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex via Modulation of the γ-Aminobutyric Acid-ergic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashawi, Houda; Masocha, Willias; Edafiogho, Ivan O; Kombian, Samuel B

    The aim of this study was to elucidate any electrophysiological changes that may contribute to the development of neuropathic pain during treatment with the anticancer drug paclitaxel, particularly in the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system. One hundred and eight Sprague-Dawley rats were used (untreated control: 43; vehicle-treated: 21, and paclitaxel-treated: 44). Paclitaxel (8 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally on 2 alternate days to induce mechanical allodynia. The rats were sacrificed 7 days after treatment to obtain slices of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), a brain region involved in the central processing of pain. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were recorded in layer II/III of ACC slices, and stimulus-response curves were constructed. The observed effects were pharmacologically characterized by bath application of GABA and appropriate drugs to the slices. The paclitaxel-treated rats developed mechanical allodynia (i.e. reduced withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimuli). Slices from paclitaxel-treated rats produced a significantly higher maximal response (Emax) than those from untreated rats (p GABA (0.4 µM) reversed this effect and returned the excitability to a level similar to control. Pretreatment of the slices with the GABAB receptor blocker CGP 55845 (50 µM) increased Emax in slices from untreated rats (p GABA deficit in paclitaxel-treated rats compared to untreated ones. Such a deficit could contribute to the pathophysiology of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain (PINP). Thus, the GABAergic system might be a potential therapeutic target for managing PINP. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Fipronil insecticide: novel photochemical desulfinylation with retention of neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainzl, D.; Casida, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    Fipronil is an outstanding new insecticide for crop protection with good selectivity between insects and mammals. The insecticidal action involves blocking the gamma-aminobutyric acid-gated chloride channel with much greater sensitivity of this target in insects than in mammals. Fipronil contains a trifluoromethylsulfinyl moiety that is unique among the agrochemicals and therefore presumably important in its outstanding performance. We find that this substituent unexpectedly undergoes a novel and facile photoextrusion reaction on plants upon exposure to sunlight, yielding the corresponding trifluoromethylpyrazole, i.e., the desulfinyl derivative. The persistence of this photoproduct and its high neuroactivity, resulting from blocking the gamma-aminobutyric acid-gated chloride channel, suggest that it may be a significant contributor to the effectiveness of fipronil. In addition, desulfinylfipronil is not a metabolite in mammals, so the safety evaluations must take into account not only the parent compound but also this completely new environmental product

  17. Gamma flux responsive self-powered detector with a tubular emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, N.P.; Todt, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    A gamma-sensitive flux detector comprises tubular emitter, an insulating core within the emitter and an insulating layer about the emitter, and a tubular conductive collector electrode about the insulating layer. The emitter material may be platinum, lead, bismuth, tantalum, tungsten; platinum preferred

  18. Gamma irradiation response of RBC in presence of Aloe vera leaf extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rane, Charusheela C.; Patil, Shilpa M.; Kulkarni, Satish G.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The components from fleshy leaves of Aloe vera have wide range of utility in treating human aliments owing to their medicinal property including antioxidant characteristic. During gamma irradiation, attack by free radicals is the prominent cause of damage to cell membrane. This action is modified to varied extent by several components from plants. A radio modulation effect of different dilutions of Aloe vera leave extract against gamma radiation has been evaluated by measuring percent haemolysis. The result obtained will be discussed to narrate influencing role of various factors in modulation

  19. Production of gaba (γ - aminobutyric acid by microorganisms: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Dhakal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB, which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods.

  20. Subchronic toxicity evaluation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Kazuhito; Yamatsu, Atsushi; Yamashita, Yusuke; Watabe, Kazuya; Horie, Noriko; Masuda, Kazuyuki; Kim, Mujo

    2014-06-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an amino acid compound contained in vegetables such as tomatoes and also widely distributed in mammals. GABA acts as an inhibitory neurotransmitter and promotes parasympathetic activity to provide several beneficial effects, for instance, relaxation, anti-stress, and insomnia. GABA, produced via a fermentation process, has been available as a functional food ingredient. As part of a program to assess its safety, GABA was administered by oral gavage at doses of 500, 1250, and 2500mg/kg body weight to groups of 10 male and 10 female Sprague-Dawley rats for 13weeks. Treatment was not associated with the test substance-related mortality and appeared to be well tolerated. There were no toxicologically and statistically significant changes in urinalysis, hematology, clinical chemistry parameters, and in necropsy findings. A few statistically significant changes in food consumption and body weights were noted in the male groups while any significant changes were not noted in female groups. There was no effect of treatment on organ weights or on the results of the histopathological examinations. The results of toxicity evaluation support the safety use of GABA and the potential use as a functional food ingredient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Production of gaba (γ - Aminobutyric acid) by microorganisms: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Radhika; Bajpai, Vivek K; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods.

  2. Effect of ethanol on γ-aminobutyric acid in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassanova, M.; Tursky, T.; Homerova, D.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of acute and chronic ethanol administration on the level of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, aspartate, and glutamine was investigated using 14 C-labelled compounds. The level of GABA rose after both acute and chronic ethanol administration. In chronic experiments also the levels of glutamate, aspartate and glutamine were increased. In acute experiments the incorporation from glucose into the studied amino acids (neuronal compartment) increased, while in chronic experiments a decreasing trend was observed. In the glial compartment the incorporation increased only into glutamate and glutamine in acute experiments, while in chronic experiments a decreased incorporation into glutamine was recorded. The activities of three enzymes were studied in seven parts of the brain after acute ethanol administration. The activity of glutamic acid decarboxylase increased in the hypothalamus and brain cortex and decreased in the medulla oblongata. The activity of GABA transaminase did not change and the activity of glutamine synthetase decreased only in the hippocampus. In accordance with several other studies, the presented results show that ethanol interferes with the GABA system in the brain. It is suggested that the primary effect of ethanol is exerted on the cell membranes with preference for the regions connected with the GABA system. (author). 3 figs., 6 tabs., 18 refs

  3. Vanderbilt University Gamma Irradiation of Nano-modified Concrete (2017 Milestone Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deichert, Geoffrey G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Linton, Kory D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Selby, Aaron P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Reches, Yonathan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This document outlines the irradiation of concrete specimens in the Gamma Irradiation Facility in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Two gamma irradiation runs were performed in July of 2017 on 18 reference mortar bar specimens, 26 reference cement paste bar specimens, and 28 reference cement paste tab specimens to determine the dose and temperature response of the specimens in the gamma irradiation environment. Specimens from the first two gamma irradiations were surveyed and released to Vanderbilt University. The temperature and dose information obtained informs the test parameters of the final two gamma irradiations of nano-modified concrete planned for FY 2018.

  4. A Review on Microbial Mutagenesis through Gamma Irradiation for Agricultural Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoe, P.C.K.; Khairuddin Abdul Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Gamma irradiation is widely used in sterilization and mutagenesis, especially for plant breeding and crop protection. Microbial mutagenesis through gamma irradiation is mainly applied in fermentation industry. In agriculture, gamma irradiation is mostly applied in crop improvement. Microbial mutagenesis is mainly applied against fungus and spore-forming bacteria, which are resistant to gamma irradiation. Response of microbes to gamma irradiation varies and depends on various factors. Review of previous works on gamma irradiation for microbial mutagenesis in agriculture may provide some information for the use of this method. The general view on gamma irradiation, its application, and mutagenesis are discussed in this paper. Further investigation on microbial mutagenesis should consider molecular changes, information on which is lacking in previous works. Moreover, studies on microbial mutagenesis are still lacking in Malaysia despite having several gamma irradiation facilities. Therefore, further studies on microbial mutagenesis should be conducted. (author)

  5. Crystal growth and thermoluminescence response of NaZr2(PO4)3 at high gamma radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordóñez-Regil, E.; Contreras-Ramírez, A.; Fernández-Valverde, S.M.; González-Martínez, P.R.; Carrasco-Ábrego, H.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •NaZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 exposed to gamma doses of 10, 30 and 50 MGy. •Gamma radiation produced growth of the crystal size of the NZP. •Morphology changes were reversible by heating. •Linear relationship between the thermoluminescence and the applied gamma dose. •This property could be useful for high-level gamma dosimetry. -- Abstract: This work describes the synthesis and characterization of NaZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 . The stability of this material under high doses of gamma radiation was investigated in the range of 10–50 MGy. Samples of unaltered and gamma irradiated NaZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and thermoluminescence. The results showed that while functional groups were not affected by the gamma irradiation, morphology changes were observed with increasing doses of gamma irradiation. The morphology of the non-irradiated compound is agglomerated flakes; however, irradiation at 10 MGy splits the flakes inducing the formation of well-defined cubes. Gamma irradiation induced the crystal size of the NaZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 to grow. The heat treatment (973 K) of samples irradiated at 50 MGy resulted in the recovery of the original morphology. Furthermore, the thermoluminescence analysis of the irradiated compound is reported

  6. A novel method for quantitative geosteering using azimuthal gamma-ray logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Chao; Zhou, Cancan; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Song; Li, Chaoliu

    2015-01-01

    A novel method for quantitative geosteering by using azimuthal gamma-ray logging is proposed. Real-time up and bottom gamma-ray logs when a logging tool travels through a boundary surface with different relative dip angles are simulated with the Monte Carlo method. Study results show that response points of up and bottom gamma-ray logs when the logging tool moves towards a highly radioactive formation can be used to predict the relative dip angle, and then the distance from the drilling bit to the boundary surface is calculated. - Highlights: • A new method is proposed for geosteering by using azimuthal gamma-ray logging. • The new method can quantitatively determine the distance from the drilling bit to the boundary surface while the traditional geosteering method can only qualitatively guide the drilling bit in reservoirs. • The response points of real-time upper and lower gamma line when the logging tool meets high radioactive formation are used to predict the relative dip angles, and then the distance from the drilling bit to the boundary surface is calculated

  7. Lyoluminescence of tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane in gamma dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin, J.; Gutierrez, A.; Guadarrama, L.

    1986-01-01

    Gamma dosimetry using lyoluminescence (LL) has advantages over other conventional systems because of its low cost and simplicity of use. Results of the investigation of the LL properties of tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane irradiated with 60 Co gamma radiation are presented and compared with the results of the LL of mannose and sucrose. Tris on dissolution in luminol shows a higher LL response than that of mannose and lower than that of sucrose, and has the highest stability of the three systems. The LL response of tris was linear in the range 5 Gy to 1kGy and showed no fading during one week. A comparison with the results of other authors as well as with measurements by ESR techniques are also reported. From these results we conclude that tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane on dissolution in luminol provides a LL dosimetric system useful for gamma dosimetry in the radiation processing of foods. (author)

  8. Temporal Gene Expression of the Cyanobacterium Arthrospira in Response to Gamma Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Hanène; Monsieurs, Pieter; Coninx, Ilse; Nauts, Robin; Wattiez, Ruddy; Leys, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    The edible cyanobacterium Arthrospira is resistant to ionising radiation. The cellular mechanisms underlying this radiation resistance are, however, still largely unknown. Therefore, additional molecular analysis was performed to investigate how these cells can escape from, protect against, or repair the radiation damage. Arthrospira cells were shortly exposed to different doses of 60Co gamma rays and the dynamic response was investigated by monitoring its gene expression and cell physiology at different time points after irradiation. The results revealed a fast switch from an active growth state to a kind of 'survival modus' during which the cells put photosynthesis, carbon and nitrogen assimilation on hold and activate pathways for cellular protection, detoxification, and repair. The higher the radiation dose, the more pronounced this global emergency response is expressed. Genes repressed during early response, suggested a reduction of photosystem II and I activity and reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA) and Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycles, combined with an activation of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). For reactive oxygen species detoxification and restoration of the redox balance in Arthrospira cells, the results suggested a powerful contribution of the antioxidant molecule glutathione. The repair mechanisms of Arthrospira cells that were immediately switched on, involve mainly proteases for damaged protein removal, single strand DNA repair and restriction modification systems, while recA was not induced. Additionally, the exposed cells showed significant increased expression of arh genes, coding for a novel group of protein of unknown function, also seen in our previous irradiation studies. This observation confirms our hypothesis that arh genes are key elements in radiation resistance of Arthrospira, requiring further investigation. This study provides new insights into phasic response and the cellular pathways involved in the radiation resistance of

  9. Temporal Gene Expression of the Cyanobacterium Arthrospira in Response to Gamma Rays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanène Badri

    Full Text Available The edible cyanobacterium Arthrospira is resistant to ionising radiation. The cellular mechanisms underlying this radiation resistance are, however, still largely unknown. Therefore, additional molecular analysis was performed to investigate how these cells can escape from, protect against, or repair the radiation damage. Arthrospira cells were shortly exposed to different doses of 60Co gamma rays and the dynamic response was investigated by monitoring its gene expression and cell physiology at different time points after irradiation. The results revealed a fast switch from an active growth state to a kind of 'survival modus' during which the cells put photosynthesis, carbon and nitrogen assimilation on hold and activate pathways for cellular protection, detoxification, and repair. The higher the radiation dose, the more pronounced this global emergency response is expressed. Genes repressed during early response, suggested a reduction of photosystem II and I activity and reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA and Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB cycles, combined with an activation of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP. For reactive oxygen species detoxification and restoration of the redox balance in Arthrospira cells, the results suggested a powerful contribution of the antioxidant molecule glutathione. The repair mechanisms of Arthrospira cells that were immediately switched on, involve mainly proteases for damaged protein removal, single strand DNA repair and restriction modification systems, while recA was not induced. Additionally, the exposed cells showed significant increased expression of arh genes, coding for a novel group of protein of unknown function, also seen in our previous irradiation studies. This observation confirms our hypothesis that arh genes are key elements in radiation resistance of Arthrospira, requiring further investigation. This study provides new insights into phasic response and the cellular pathways involved in the radiation

  10. LOFT gamma densitometer background fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimesey, R.A.; McCracken, R.T.

    1978-01-01

    Background gamma-ray fluxes were calculated at the location of the γ densitometers without integral shielding at both the hot-leg and cold-leg primary piping locations. The principal sources for background radiation at the γ densitometers are 16 N activity from the primary piping H 2 O and γ radiation from reactor internal sources. The background radiation was calculated by the point-kernel codes QAD-BSA and QAD-P5A. Reasonable assumptions were required to convert the response functions calculated by point-kernel procedures into the gamma-ray spectrum from reactor internal sources. A brief summary of point-kernel equations and theory is included

  11. The importance of stimulated gamma release from isomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, H.

    1997-01-01

    The potential applications of the gamma-ray laser are discussed to illustrate the potential benefit of the development of this field of nuclear science, as well as the risks and responsibilities associated with isomer development beyond their current status as nuclear curiosities. The similarities and differences between the development of a gamma-ray laser based on nuclear isomers and the initial development of nuclear science and engineering are compared

  12. Dose-rate and humidity effects upon the gamma-radiation response of nylon-based radiachromic film dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehringer, P.; Eschweiler, H.; Proksch, E.

    1979-10-01

    At dose-rates typical for 60 Co gamma irradiation sources, the radiation response of hexahydroxyethyl pararosaniline cyanide/ 50μm nylon radiachromic films is dependent upon dose-rate as well as upon the moisture content of the films, or the relative humidity of the surrounding atmosphere, respectively. Under equilibrium moisture conditions, the response measured at 606 nm 24 hours after end of irradiation shows its highest dose-rate dependence at about 32 % r.h. A decrease in dose-rate from 2.8 to 0.039 Gy.s -1 results in a decrease in response by 17%. At higher humidities, the sensitivity of the film as well as the rate dependence decreases and at 86% r.h. no discernible dose-rate effect could be found. At lower humidities than 32% a flat maximum in response follows. At nominal 0% r.h. a second absorption band at 412 nm appears which is converted completely to an additional 606 nm absorption by exposure to a humid atmosphere. After that procedure the resultant response is somewhat lower than but shows almost the same dose-rate dependence as at 32% r.h. or else to eliminate the dose-rate effect by an extrapolation procedure based on the fact that the rate dependence vanishes at zero dose. (author)

  13. Hippocampal gamma-band Synchrony and pupillary responses index memory during visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montefusco-Siegmund, Rodrigo; Leonard, Timothy K; Hoffman, Kari L

    2017-04-01

    Memory for scenes is supported by the hippocampus, among other interconnected structures, but the neural mechanisms related to this process are not well understood. To assess the role of the hippocampus in memory-guided scene search, we recorded local field potentials and multiunit activity from the hippocampus of macaques as they performed goal-directed search tasks using natural scenes. We additionally measured pupil size during scene presentation, which in humans is modulated by recognition memory. We found that both pupil dilation and search efficiency accompanied scene repetition, thereby indicating memory for scenes. Neural correlates included a brief increase in hippocampal multiunit activity and a sustained synchronization of unit activity to gamma band oscillations (50-70 Hz). The repetition effects on hippocampal gamma synchronization occurred when pupils were most dilated, suggesting an interaction between aroused, attentive processing and hippocampal correlates of recognition memory. These results suggest that the hippocampus may support memory-guided visual search through enhanced local gamma synchrony. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Gamma camera computer system quality control for conventional and tomographic use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laird, E.E.; Allan, W.; Williams, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    The proposition that some of the proposed measurements of gamma camera performance parameters for routine quality control are redundant and that only the uniformity requires daily monitoring was examined. To test this proposition, measurements of gamma camera performance were carried out under normal operating conditions and also with the introduction of faults (offset window, offset PM tube). Results for the uniform flood field are presented for non-uniformity, intrinsic spatial resolution, linearity and relative system sensitivity. The response to introduced faults revealed that while the non-uniformity response pattern of the gamma camera was clearly affected, both measurements and qualitative indications of the other performance parameters did not necessarily show any deterioration. (U.K.)

  15. Dose Response Model of Biological Reaction to Low Dose Rate Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, J.; Furikawa, C.; Hoshi, Y.; Kawakami, Y.; Ogata, H.

    2004-01-01

    It is necessary to use reproducible and stable indicators to evaluate biological responses to long term irradiation at low dose-rate. They should be simple and quantitative enough to produce the results statistically accurate, because we have to analyze the subtle changes of biological responses around background level at low dose. For these purposes we chose micronucleus formation of U2OS, a human osteosarcoma cell line, as indicators of biological responses. Cells were exposed to gamma ray in irradiation rom bearing 50,000 Ci 60Co. After irradiation, they were cultured for 24 h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, and cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and prospidium iodide, respectively. the number of binuclear cells bearing micronuclei was counted under a fluorescence microscope. Dose rate in the irradiation room was measured with PLD. Dose response of PLD is linear between 1 mGy to 10 Gy, and standard deviation of triplicate count was several percent of mean value. We fitted statistically dose response curves to the data, and they were plotted on the coordinate of linearly scale response and dose. The results followed to the straight line passing through the origin of the coordinate axes between 0.1-5 Gy, and dose and does rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) was less than 2 when cells were irradiated for 1-10 min. Difference of the percent binuclear cells bearing micronucleus between irradiated cells and control cells was not statistically significant at the dose above 0.1 Gy when 5,000 binuclear cells were analyzed. In contrast, dose response curves never followed LNT, when cells were irradiated for 7 to 124 days. Difference of the percent binuclear cells bearing micronucleus between irradiated cells and control cells was not statistically significant at the dose below 6 Gy, when cells were continuously irradiated for 124 days. These results suggest that dose response curve of biological reaction is remarkably affected by exposure

  16. Neurotransmitters as food supplements: the effects of GABA on brain and behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, E.; Kleijn, R.; Colzato, L.S.; Alkemade, A.; Forstmann, B.U.; Nieuwenhuis, S.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the human cortex. The food supplement version of GABA is widely available online. Although many consumers claim that they experience benefits from the use of these products, it is unclear whether these supplements confer

  17. (1) H-MRS processing parameters affect metabolite quantification: The urgent need for uniform and transparent standardization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhogal, A.A.; Schur, R.R.; Houtepen, L.C.; Bank, B.L. van de; Boer, V.O.; Marsman, A.; Barker, P.B.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Wijnen, J.P.; Vinkers, C.H.; Klomp, D.W.J.

    2017-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H-MRS) can be used to quantify in vivo metabolite levels, such as lactate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (Glu). However, there are considerable analysis choices which can alter the accuracy or precision of (1) H-MRS metabolite

  18. Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118, a GABA-Producing Strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Letícia C; Saraiva, Tessália D L; Soares, Siomar C

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118 is a nondairy lactic acid bacterium, a xylose fermenter, and a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producer isolated from frozen peas. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of L. lactis NCDO 2118, a strain with probiotic potential activity....

  19. Study of the $e^+ e^- \\to Z\\gamma\\gamma \\to q\\overline{q}\\gamma\\gamma$ Process at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Angelescu, T.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, L.; Balandras, A.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Buffini, A.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chaturvedi, U.K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; de la Cruz, B.; Csilling, A.; Cucciarelli, S.; Dai, T.S.; van Dalen, J.A.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Dufournaud, D.; Duinker, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Erne, F.C.; Ewers, A.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gau, S.S.; Gentile, S.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hasan, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hidas, P.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Holzner, G.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Iashvili, I.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Khan, R.A.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Kopp, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, H.J.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, David; Lugnier, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Maity, M.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Mans, J.; Marian, G.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; von der Mey, M.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Oulianov, A.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Park, H.K.; Park, I.H.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofiev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Rodin, J.; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Roux, B.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Seganti, A.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Smith, B.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stone, A.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Sztaricskai, T.; Tang, X.W.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Uchida, Y.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobov, A.A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, A.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wu, S.X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Ye, J.B.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2001-01-01

    The process e^+e^- -> Z gamma gamma -> q q~ gamma gamma$ is studied in 0.5\\,fb-1$ of data collected with the L3 detector at centre-of-mass energies between 130.1 GeV and 201.7 GeV. Cross sections are measured and found to be consistent with the Standard Model expectations. The study of the least energetic photon constrains the quartic gauge boson couplings to -0.008 GeV-2 < a_0/\\Lambda^2 < 0.005 GeV-2 and -0.007 GeV-2 < a_c/\\Lambda^2 < 0.011 GeV-2, at 95% confidence level.

  20. Differential response to gamma radiation of human stomach cancer cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, V.K.; Barranco, S.C.; Townsend, C.M. Jr.; Perry, R.R.; Ives, K.L.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro effects of radiation were studied in two permanent cell lines (AGS and SII) from two patients with stomach adenocarcinoma and three permanent sublines from each cell line. Radiation survival parameters for AGS and SII parent cell lines and sublines were determined after in vitro irradiation with 0.5 to 10 Gy of 60 Co gamma rays. AGS and SII cell lines had different growth properties. DNA contents and radiation survival curves. Surviving fractions of SII parent cells (76 chromosomes) after 2.0 and 10 Gy were 1.22 and 17.8 times greater, respectively, than values for AGS parent cells (47 chromosomes). Sensitivities (D 0 ) were 1.08 and 1.45 Gy for AGS and SII parent lines, respectively. D 0 values for AGS parent cells and sublines were similar (1.01 to 1.08 Gy), but SII parent cells and sublines had D 0 values of 1.45, 1.36, 1.37 and 1.12 Gy (for SII-A). The SII parent cells had survival fractions after 2.0 and 10 Gy that were 1.3 and 11.3 times greater, respectively, than values for the SII-A cells. These data show differences in radiation responses among stomach cancer cell lines and sublines that may relate to DNA content, but there was no consistent correlation between radiation response and a particular cell characteristic. (author)

  1. System for gamma-gamma formation density logging while drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paske, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    The patent relates to a system for logging subterranean formations for the determination of formation density by using gamma radiation. Gamma ray source and detection means are disposed within a housing adapted for positioning within a borehole for the emission and detection of gamma rays propagating through earth formations and borehole drilling fluid. The gamma ray detection means comprises first and second gamma radiation sensors geometrically disposed within the housing, the same longitudinal distance from the gamma ray source and diametrically opposed in a common plane. A formation matrix density output signal is produced in proportion to the output signal from each of the gamma ray sensors and in conjunction with certain constants established by the geometrical configuration of the sensors relative to the gamma ray source and the borehole diameter. Formation density is determined without regard to the radial position of the logging probe within the borehole in a measuring while drilling mode. 6 figs

  2. Placebo neural systems: nitric oxide, morphine and the dopamine brain reward and motivation circuitries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricchione, Gregory; Stefano, George B

    2005-05-01

    Evidence suggests that the placebo response is related to the tonic effects of constitutive nitric oxide in neural, vascular and immune tissues. Constitutive nitric oxide levels play a role in the modulation of dopamine outflow in the nigrostriatal movement and the mesolimbic and mesocortical reward and motivation circuitries. Endogenous morphine, which stimulates constitutive nitric oxide, may be an important signal molecule working at mu receptors on gamma aminobutyric acid B interneurons to disinhibit nigral and tegmental dopamine output. We surmise that placebo induced belief will activate the prefrontal cortex with downstream stimulatory effects on these dopamine systems as well as on periaqueductal grey opioid output neurons. Placebo responses in Parkinson's disease, depression and pain disorder may result. In addition, mesolimbic/mesocortical control of the stress response systems may provide a way for the placebo response to benefit other medical conditions.

  3. Very high-energy gamma rays from gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Paula M

    2007-05-15

    Very high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy has undergone a transformation in the last few years, with telescopes of unprecedented sensitivity having greatly expanded the source catalogue. Such progress makes the detection of a gamma-ray burst at the highest energies much more likely than previously. This paper describes the facilities currently operating and their chances for detecting gamma-ray bursts, and reviews predictions for VHE gamma-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts. Results to date are summarized.

  4. Gamma radiation sensitivity in tomato tree and response of plants proceeding from salinity irradiated seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colaco, Waldeciro; Bidjeke, Raoul; Fleming, Peter M.

    2000-01-01

    Preliminary experiments were conducted to evaluate the radiosensitivity of tomato {Lycopersicon esculentum L. cultivars IPA-6, IPA-8, and Lycopersicum hirsutum glabratum - } to gamma rays from a 60 Co source, considering future induced mutation studies aiming at the improvement of plant salinity tolerance. Sets of dry seeds were exposed to gamma radiation doses (300 - 600 Gy and 100-400 Gy) and compared to a control without irradiation (0 Gy) under greenhouse conditions. The radiosensitivity was initially evaluated through germination of irradiated dry seeds determined at 13 and 30 days after irradiation and also through seedling survival. Seed germination was delayed by gamma irradiation and especially reduced at higher doses (300- 600 Gy). Survival of tomato plants was decreased with increased dose of radiation and was reduced by < 16% at the 300-600 Gy doses. Growth of plants was enhanced at low doses of gamma rays; higher doses reduced plant size. Gamma irradiation had significant effects on tomato plants generated from dry seed and submitted to different levels of salinity. It is recommended a dose range of 100-200 Gy for mutation breeding purpose using the varieties tested. (author)

  5. Quantitative relations between beta-gamma mixed-field dosimeter responses and dose-equivalent conversion factors according to the testing standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, V.P.

    1982-08-01

    The conventional two-element personnel dosimeters, usually having two thick TLD (thermoluminescent dosimetry) ribbons, are used extensively for radiation protection dosimetry. Many of these dosimeters are used for the measurement of beta and gamma radiation doses received in mixed beta-gamma fields. Severe limitations exist, however, on the relative magnitudes and energies of these fields that may be measured simultaneously. Moreover, due to a well-known energy dependence of these dosimeters, particularly for the beta-radiations, systematic errors will occur whenever the differences in workplaces and calibration radiation energies exist. A simple mathematical approach is presented to estimate the deep and shallow dose equivalent values at different energies for such dosimeters. The formulae correlate the dosimeter responses and dose equivalent conversion factors at different energies by taking into account the guidelines of the adopted ANSI Standard N13.11 and the dosimetry practices followed by most dosimeter processors. This standard is to be used in a mandatory testing program in the United States

  6. Measurement of collision integral cross-sections of double-photon Compton effect using a single gamma ray detector: A response matrix approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saddi, M.B.; Singh, Bhajan; Sandhu, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    The collision integral cross-sections of double-photon Compton process are measured experimentally for 662 keV incident gamma photons. The measurements are successfully carried out using a single gamma ray detector, and do not require the complicated slow-fast coincidence technique used till now for observing this higher order quantum electrodynamics (QED) process. The energy spectra of one of the two final photons, originating in this process, in direction of the gamma ray detector are observed as a long tail to the single-photon Compton line on lower side of the full energy peak in the observed spectra. An inverse response matrix converts the observed pulse-height distribution of a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector to a true photon spectrum. This also results in extraction of events originating from double-photon Compton interactions. The present measured values of collision integral cross-section, although of same magnitude, deviate from the corresponding values obtained from the theory. In view of the magnitude of deviations, in addition to small value of probability of occurrence of this process, the agreement of measured values with theory is reasonably acceptable

  7. Different effects of pentobarbital on two γ-aminobutyrate receptors from rat brain: channel opening, desensitization, and an additional conformational change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cash, D.J.; Subbarao, K.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of pentobarbital on the responses of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor from rat brain was studied in quantitative measurements of GABA-mediated chloride-exchange rates (reflecting channel-opening equilibrium) and receptor desensitization rates by using 36 Cl - tracer ion with negative membrane vesicles. Pentobarbital effected the two phases of 36 Cl - influx in different ways, supporting previous evidence that these are mediated by two different receptors. Both the chloride-exchange rate and the desensitization rate of the faster desensitizing receptor were increased by pentobarbital at concentrations above 20 μM by an allosteric effect shifting the response curve to lower GABA concentrations. A similar enhancement of the responses of the slower desensitizing receptor occurred up to 200 μM pentobarbital. Two pentobarbital effector sites were involved in the allosteric mechanism. Above 500 μM pentobarbital, both the initial chloride-exchange rate and the desensitization rate of the slower desensitizing receptor were decreased. This inhibition, which was immediate, occurred with saturating as well as low GABA concentrations and therefore was not attributed to decreased GABA binding but to inhibitory sites for pentobarbital, different from the allosteric activating sites and the GABA binding sites. The chloride ion exchange activity was seen to recover with time, at concentrations above 1000 μM pentobarbital, in a process with a very steep dependence on pentobarbital concentration. This reactivation was attributed to the conversion of an initial form of the receptor to a final form that was less inhibited by pentobarbital. Comparisons of the effects of pentobarbital on desensitization and on high-affinity ligand binding measurements suggest that increased GABA binding at equilibrium reflects an increased conversion to the desensitized state

  8. The γ-Aminobutyrate Permease GabP Serves as the Third Proline Transporter of Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaprasis, Adrienne; Hoffmann, Tamara; Stannek, Lorena; Gunka, Katrin; Commichau, Fabian M.

    2014-01-01

    PutP and OpuE serve as proline transporters when this imino acid is used by Bacillus subtilis as a nutrient or as an osmostress protectant, respectively. The simultaneous inactivation of the PutP and OpuE systems still allows the utilization of proline as a nutrient. This growth phenotype pointed to the presence of a third proline transport system in B. subtilis. We took advantage of the sensitivity of a putP opuE double mutant to the toxic proline analog 3,4-dehydro-dl-proline (DHP) to identify this additional proline uptake system. DHP-resistant mutants were selected and found to be defective in the use of proline as a nutrient. Whole-genome resequencing of one of these strains provided the lead that the inactivation of the γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) transporter GabP was responsible for these phenotypes. DNA sequencing of the gabP gene in 14 additionally analyzed DHP-resistant strains confirmed this finding. Consistently, each of the DHP-resistant mutants was defective not only in the use of proline as a nutrient but also in the use of GABA as a nitrogen source. The same phenotype resulted from the targeted deletion of the gabP gene in a putP opuE mutant strain. Hence, the GabP carrier not only serves as an uptake system for GABA but also functions as the third proline transporter of B. subtilis. Uptake studies with radiolabeled GABA and proline confirmed this conclusion and provided information on the kinetic parameters of the GabP carrier for both of these substrates. PMID:24142252

  9. Alteration of Transcripts of Stress-Protective Genes and Transcriptional Factors by γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA Associated with Improved Heat and Drought Tolerance in Creeping Bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA may play a positive role in regulating plant tolerance to drought or heat stress. The objectives of this study were to investigate the physiological effects of GABA on tolerance of creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera to heat and drought stress and to determine whether enhanced heat and drought tolerance due to GABA treatment was associated with the up-regulation of selected genes and transcriptional factors involved in stress protection. Creeping bentgrass (cultivar “Penncross” plants were treated with 0.5 mM GABA or water (untreated control as a foliar spray and were subsequently exposed to heat stress (35/30 °C, day/night, drought stress by withholding irrigation, or non-stress conditions in controlled-environment growth chambers. Exogenous application of GABA significantly improved plant tolerance to heat and drought stress, as reflected by increased leaf water content, cell membrane stability, and chlorophyll content. The analysis of gene transcript level revealed that exogenous GABA up-regulated the expression of ABF3, POD, APX, HSP90, DHN3, and MT1 during heat stress and the expression of CDPK26, MAPK1, ABF3, WRKY75, MYB13, HSP70, MT1, 14-3-3, and genes (SOD, CAT, POD, APX, MDHAR, DHAR, and GR encoding antioxidant enzymes during drought stress. The up-regulation of the aforementioned stress-protective genes and transcriptional factors could contribute to improved heat and drought tolerance in creeping bentgrass.

  10. Alteration of Transcripts of Stress-Protective Genes and Transcriptional Factors by γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Associated with Improved Heat and Drought Tolerance in Creeping Bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhou; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2018-05-31

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) may play a positive role in regulating plant tolerance to drought or heat stress. The objectives of this study were to investigate the physiological effects of GABA on tolerance of creeping bentgrass ( Agrostis stolonifera ) to heat and drought stress and to determine whether enhanced heat and drought tolerance due to GABA treatment was associated with the up-regulation of selected genes and transcriptional factors involved in stress protection. Creeping bentgrass (cultivar "Penncross") plants were treated with 0.5 mM GABA or water (untreated control) as a foliar spray and were subsequently exposed to heat stress (35/30 °C, day/night), drought stress by withholding irrigation, or non-stress conditions in controlled-environment growth chambers. Exogenous application of GABA significantly improved plant tolerance to heat and drought stress, as reflected by increased leaf water content, cell membrane stability, and chlorophyll content. The analysis of gene transcript level revealed that exogenous GABA up-regulated the expression of ABF3 , POD , APX , HSP90 , DHN3 , and MT1 during heat stress and the expression of CDPK26 , MAPK1 , ABF3 , WRKY75 , MYB13 , HSP70 , MT1 , 14-3-3 , and genes ( SOD , CAT , POD , APX , MDHAR , DHAR , and GR ) encoding antioxidant enzymes during drought stress. The up-regulation of the aforementioned stress-protective genes and transcriptional factors could contribute to improved heat and drought tolerance in creeping bentgrass.

  11. Beta/gamma test problems for ITS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, G.T.

    1993-01-01

    The Integrated Tiger Series of Coupled Electron/Photon Monte Carlo Transport Codes (ITS 3.0, PC Version) was used at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to compare with and extend the experimental findings of the beta/gamma response of selected health physics instruments. In order to assure that ITS gives correct results, several beta/gamma problems have been tested. ITS was used to simulate these problems numerically, and results for each were compared to the problem's experimental or analytical results. ITS successfully predicted the experimental or analytical results of all tested problems within the statistical uncertainty inherent in the Monte Carlo method

  12. Dairy Streptococcus thermophilus improves cell viability of Lactobacillus brevis NPS-QW-145 and its γ-aminobutyric acid biosynthesis ability in milk

    OpenAIRE

    Qinglong Wu; Yee-Song Law; Nagendra P. Shah

    2015-01-01

    Most high ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producers are Lactobacillus brevis of plant origin, which may be not able to ferment milk well due to its poor proteolytic nature as evidenced by the absence of genes encoding extracellular proteinases in its genome. In the present study, two glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) genes, gadA and gadB, were found in high GABA-producing L. brevis NPS-QW-145. Co-culturing of this organism with conventional dairy starters was carried out to manufacture GABA-rich f...

  13. Sodium fast reactor power monitoring using gamma spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulon, R.; Normand, S.; Barbot, L.; Domenech, T.; Kondrasovs, V.; Corre, G.; Frelin, A.M. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, CEA - Saclay DRT/LIST/DETECS/SSTM, Batiment 516 - P.C. no 72, Gif sur Yvette, F-91191 (France); Montagu, T.; Dautremer, T.; Barat, E. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Processus Stochastiques et Spectres (France); Ban, G. [ENSICAEN (France)

    2009-06-15

    This work deals with the use of high flux gamma spectrometry to monitor the fourth generation of sodium fast reactor (SFR) power. The simulation study part of this work has shown that power monitoring in a short time response and with a good accuracy is possible. An experimental test is under preparation at the French SFR Phenix experimental reactor to validate simulation studies. First, physical calculations have been done to correlate gamma activity to the released thermal power. Gamma emitter production rate in the reactor core was calculated with technical and nuclear data as the sodium velocity, the atomic densities, Phenix neutron spectrum and incident neutron cross-sections of reactions producing gamma emitters. A thermal hydraulic transfer function was used for modeling primary sodium flow in our calculations. For the power monitoring problematic, use of a short decay period gamma emitter will allow to have a very fast response system without cumulative effect. We have determined that the best tagging agent is 20F which emits 1634 keV energy photons with a decay period of 11 s. The gamma spectrum was determined by flux point and a pulse high tally MCNP5.1.40 simulation and shown the possibility to measure the signal of this radionuclide. The experiment will be set during the reactor 'end life testing'. The Delayed Neutron Detection (DND) room has been chosen as the best available location on Phenix reactor to measure this kind of radionuclide due to a short transit time from reactor core to measurement sample. This location is optimum for global power measurement because homogenized sampling in the reactor hot pool. The main spectrometer is composed of a coaxial high purity germanium diode (HPGe) coupled with a transistor reset preamplifier. The HPGe diode signal will be processed by the Adonis digital signal processing due to high flux and fast activity measurement. Post-processing softwares will be used to limit statistical problems of the

  14. No changes in serum concentrations of interleukin 10 (IL-10) and interferon gamma (IF-gamma) before and after treatment of the thyroid eye disease (TED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laban-Guceva, Nevenka; Antova, Magdalena; Bogoev, Milco

    2007-11-01

    TED is a severe eye disease leading in rare cases to decrease of sight, optic nerve compression and blindness. Recently, significant progresses in understanding the disease have been done. Nevertheless, the treatment of the disease, especially in its severe form remains challenging. Glucocorticoids (GC) have been the basis of the treatment for a long time. Orbital irradiation (OI) and optical decompression (OD) are also used in managing the severe forms of TED. Somatostatin, intravenous immunoglobulin have been also used, with conflicting results. Regarding the potential for the treatment of TED with cytokine antagonists, controlled clinical studies are not available. Since cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of the TED, they seemed to be logical choice for modern TED treatment. It has been shown that both Th1 (interleukin-2, tumor necrosis factor gamma, interleukin gamma) and Th2 (interleukin -4, -5, -10) profile T cells are activated in the TED. We therefore measured interleukin-gamma, IF-gamma and interleukin -10 (IL-10)(Th1 and Th2 pattern) to assess its relationship to the course of the disease. This paper shows that both Th1 (IL-2) and Th2 (IF-gamma) pathways represented by those two cytokines are not involved (IL-10 before 2.29+/-5.23 and after treatment 3.77+/-8.44; IF gamma before 0.50+/-0.24 and after treatment 0.35+/-0.19). No relationship to the response to treatment was found. GC resulted in positive response in 8/22 patients, OI (12 patients) given after CS therapy, resulted in a response in all patients. Increase in proptosis, loss of visual acuity is spite of CS treatment prompted OD in two patients, who both recovered visual acuity and proptosis fell under 25 mm Hertel.

  15. Gamma band oscillations: a key to understanding schizophrenia symptoms and neural circuit abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, James M; McCarley, Robert W

    2016-05-01

    We review our current understanding of abnormal γ band oscillations in schizophrenia, their association with symptoms and the underlying cortical circuit abnormality, with a particular focus on the role of fast-spiking parvalbumin gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons in the disease state. Clinical electrophysiological studies of schizophrenia patients and pharmacological models of the disorder show an increase in spontaneous γ band activity (not stimulus-evoked) measures. These findings provide a crucial link between preclinical and clinical work examining the role of γ band activity in schizophrenia. MRI-based experiments measuring cortical GABA provides evidence supporting impaired GABAergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia patients, which is correlated with γ band activity level. Several studies suggest that stimulation of the cortical circuitry, directly or via subcortical structures, has the potential to modulate cortical γ activity, and improve cognitive function. Abnormal γ band activity is observed in patients with schizophrenia and disease models in animals, and is suggested to underlie the psychosis and cognitive/perceptual deficits. Convergent evidence from both clinical and preclinical studies suggest the central factor in γ band abnormalities is impaired GABAergic neurotransmission, particularly in a subclass of neurons which express parvalbumin. Rescue of γ band abnormalities presents an intriguing option for therapeutic intervention.

  16. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lummis, S.C.R.; Johnston, G.A.R.; Nicoletti, G.; Holan, G.

    1991-01-01

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial [ 3 H]diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli [ 3 H]diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing [ 3 H]benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed

  17. Glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in transgenic mouse septum: an anti-GFP immunofluorescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verimli, Ural; Sehirli, Umit S

    2016-09-01

    The septum is a basal forebrain region located between the lateral ventricles in rodents. It consists of lateral and medial divisions. Medial septal projections regulate hippocampal theta rhythm whereas lateral septal projections are involved in processes such as affective functions, memory formation, and behavioral responses. Gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons of the septal region possess the 65 and 67 isoforms of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase. Although data on the glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in the septal region generally appears to indicate glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 dominance, different studies have given inconsistent results in this regard. The aim of this study was therefore to obtain information on the distributions of both of these glutamic acid decarboxylase isoforms in the septal region in transgenic mice. Two animal groups of glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein knock-in transgenic mice were utilized in the experiment. Brain sections from the region were taken for anti-green fluorescent protein immunohistochemistry in order to obtain estimated quantitative data on the number of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons. Following the immunohistochemical procedures, the mean numbers of labeled cells in the lateral and medial septal nuclei were obtained for the two isoform groups. Statistical analysis yielded significant results which indicated that the 65 isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase predominates in both lateral and medial septal nuclei (unpaired two-tailed t-test p glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform 65 in the septal region in glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice.

  18. Genetic polymorphisms related to delirium tremens: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Munster, Barbara C.; Korevaar, Johanna C.; de Rooij, Sophia E.; Levi, Marcel; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Delirium tremens (DT) is one of the more severe complications of alcohol withdrawal (AW), with a 5 to 10% lifetime risk for alcohol-dependent patients. The 2 most important neurosystems involved in AW are gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate. It is unknown whether these neurosystems are

  19. GABA(A) receptor- and GABA transporter polymorphisms and risk for essential tremor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thier, S; Kuhlenbäumer, G; Lorenz, D

    2011-01-01

    Background:  Clinical features and animal models of essential tremor (ET) suggest gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABA(A) R) subunits and GABA transporters as putative candidate genes. Methods:  A total of 503 ET cases and 818 controls were investigated for an association between polymorphisms...

  20. Neurochemical Correlates of Autistic Disorder: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Kristen S. L.; Aman, Michael G.; Arnold, L. Eugene

    2006-01-01

    Review of neurochemical investigations in autistic disorder revealed that a wide array of transmitter systems have been studied, including serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, acetylcholine, oxytocin, endogenous opioids, cortisol, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). These studies have been complicated by the fact that autism is a very…

  1. The Memory-Impairing Effects of Septal GABA Receptor Activation Involve GABAergic Septo-Hippocampal Projection Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L.; Wheeler, Marina G.; Parent, Marise B.

    2007-01-01

    Septal infusions of the [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA)[subscript A] agonist muscimol impair memory, and the effect likely involves the hippocampus. GABA[subscript A] receptors are present on the perikarya of cholinergic and GABAergic septo-hippocampal (SH) projections. The current experiments determined whether GABAergic SH projections are…

  2. GABA, a natural immunomodulator of T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjurstöm, Helen; Wang, Junyang; Ericsson, Ida

    2008-01-01

    gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main neuroinhibitory transmitter in the brain. Here we show that GABA in the extracellular space may affect the fate of pathogenic T lymphocytes entering the brain. We examined in encephalitogenic T cells if they expressed functional GABA channels that could...

  3. Field Deployable Gamma Radiation Detectors for DHS Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2007-08-01

    Recently, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has integrated all nuclear detection research, development, testing, evaluation, acquisition, and operational support into a single office: the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The DNDO has specific requirements set for all commercial off-the-shelf and government off-the-shelf radiation detection equipment and data acquisition systems. This article would investigate several recent developments in field deployable gamma radiation detectors that are attempting to meet the DNDO specifications. Commercially available, transportable, handheld radio isotope identification devices (RIID) are inadequate for DHS requirements in terms of sensitivity, resolution, response time, and reach-back capability. The leading commercial vendor manufacturing handheld gamma spectrometer in the United States is Thermo Electron Corporation. Thermo Electron's identiFINDER{trademark}, which primarily uses sodium iodide crystals (3.18 x 2.54cm cylinders) as gamma detectors, has a Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum energy resolution of 7 percent at 662 keV. Thermo Electron has just recently come up with a reach-back capability patented as RadReachBack{trademark} that enables emergency personnel to obtain real-time technical analysis of radiation samples they find in the field. The current project has the goal to build a prototype handheld gamma spectrometer, equipped with a digital camera and an embedded cell phone to be used as an RIID with higher sensitivity, better resolution, and faster response time (able to detect the presence of gamma-emitting radio isotopes within 5 seconds of approach), which will make it useful as a field deployable tool. The handheld equipment continuously monitors the ambient gamma radiation, and, if it comes across any radiation anomalies with higher than normal gamma gross counts, it sets an alarm condition. When a substantial alarm level is reached, the system automatically triggers the saving of relevant

  4. Field Deployable Gamma Radiation Detectors for DHS Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has integrated all nuclear detection research, development, testing, evaluation, acquisition, and operational support into a single office: the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The DNDO has specific requirements set for all commercial off-the-shelf and government off-the-shelf radiation detection equipment and data acquisition systems. This article would investigate several recent developments in field deployable gamma radiation detectors that are attempting to meet the DNDO specifications. Commercially available, transportable, handheld radio isotope identification devices (RIID) are inadequate for DHS requirements in terms of sensitivity, resolution, response time, and reach-back capability. The leading commercial vendor manufacturing handheld gamma spectrometer in the United States is Thermo Electron Corporation. Thermo Electron's identiFINDER(trademark), which primarily uses sodium iodide crystals (3.18 x 2.54cm cylinders) as gamma detectors, has a Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum energy resolution of 7 percent at 662 keV. Thermo Electron has just recently come up with a reach-back capability patented as RadReachBack(trademark) that enables emergency personnel to obtain real-time technical analysis of radiation samples they find in the field. The current project has the goal to build a prototype handheld gamma spectrometer, equipped with a digital camera and an embedded cell phone to be used as an RIID with higher sensitivity, better resolution, and faster response time (able to detect the presence of gamma-emitting radio isotopes within 5 seconds of approach), which will make it useful as a field deployable tool. The handheld equipment continuously monitors the ambient gamma radiation, and, if it comes across any radiation anomalies with higher than normal gamma gross counts, it sets an alarm condition. When a substantial alarm level is reached, the system automatically triggers the saving of relevant

  5. Gamma surgery for hemangiopericytomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, B.R.; Prasad, D.; Steiner, M.; Steiner, L.

    2000-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of 12 patients with 15 intracranial hemangiopericytomas treated at the University of Virginia using gamma surgery is presented. Clinical and radiographic follow up of 3 to 56 months is available for 10 patients with 12 tumors. There was one tumor present at the time of initial gamma surgery in each patient. Two new tumors occurred in patients previously treated. Nine of the tumors decreased in volume and three remained stable. Four of the nine tumors that shrank later progressed at an average of 22 months after treatment. Of the tumors that decreased in volume and have not progressed, the response has been for an average of 11 months. The follow-up for two tumors that remained unchanged was 10 and 34 months (average 22 months). A third tumor was unchanged at 42 months but the patient died of new disease adjacent to the treated area in the anterior skull base. There were no complications and the quality of life following the procedure was maintained or improved in every case. Gamma surgery is effective in palliating the patients by decreasing tumor volume and delaying recurrence. (author)

  6. Comparison of gamma densitometer detectors used in loss of coolant studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipp, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Ionization chamber type gamma detectors are used in water-steam density measurements in loss of coolant studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Ionization chambers have replaced current-mode scintillation detectors to obtain stability and freedom from magnetic field interference. However, this change results in some loss of fast transient response. Results of studies comparing the transient response of ionization chamber detectors, plastic scintillation detectors, and sodium iodide (NaI) detectors to rapid changes in gamma intensity demonstrate that plastic scintillation detectors have the fastest response and most closely reproduce the transient; ionization chambers have an initial fast response followed by a slower response, which may produce errors in fast transient measurements; and NaI scintillation detectors have a moderately fast initial response followed by an extremely slow response, which produces errors in even slow transient measurements

  7. Cross-Section of Hadron Production in $\\gamma\\gamma$ Collisions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    The reaction $\\mathrm{e}^{+} \\mathrm{e}^{-} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{e}^{+} \\mathrm{e}^{-} \\gamma ^{*} \\gamma ^{*} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{e}^{+} \\mathrm{e}^{-} $ {\\sl hadrons} is analysed using data collected by the L3 detector during the LEP runs at $\\sqrt {s}$ = 130-140 GeV and $\\sqrt {s}$ = 161 GeV. The cross sections $\\sigma(\\mathrm{e}^{+} \\mathrm{e}^{-} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{e}^{+} \\mathrm{e}^{-} $ {\\sl hadrons}) and $\\sigma (\\gamma\\gamma \\rightarrow $ {\\sl hadrons}) are measured in the interval 5 $\\leq W_{\\gamma\\gamma} \\leq$ 75 GeV. The energy dependence of the $\\sigma (\\gamma\\gamma \\rightarrow $ {\\sl hadrons}) cross section is consistent with the universal Regge behaviour of total hadronic cross sections. %\\end{abstract}

  8. Evaluation of gamma and neutron irradiation effects on the properties of mica film capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Rajesh; Pandya, Arun

    2005-01-01

    We present an investigation of gamma and neutron radiation effects on mica film capacitors from an electrical point of view. We have studied quantitatively the effects of gamma and neutron irradiation on mica film capacitors of thickness, 20 and 40 μm (0.7874 and 1.5748 mil) with two different areas, 01 and 04 cm 2 . The capacitance has been measured at room temperature in the frequency range 100 Hz-10 MHz. Negligible change in the capacitance due to high gamma dose of 60 Co, 15 kGy at dose rate 0.25 kGy/h, has been observed. However, appreciable change in the capacitance has been observed due to low doses of fast neutrons (cumulative dose, 115 cGy) with flux ∼ 9.925 X 10 7 neutrons/cm 2 h from 252 Cf neutron source of fluence, 2.5 x 10 7 neutrons/s. We have also observed that the impact of gamma and neutron irradiation is more at frequencies higher than 10 kHz, These results show that the mica capacitors do not show any radiation response below 10 kHz. The study shows the radiation response of mica film capacitors to gamma and fast neutron radiations. Mica capacitors show low gamma radiation response in comparison to fast neutron radiation, because a total dose of kGy order has been given by gamma source and only few cGy dose has been given by fast neutron source. (author)

  9. Application of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry in soil/regolith mapping and applied geomorphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilford, J.R.; Bierwirth, P.N.; Craig, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometric surveys are an important source of information for soil, regolith and geomorphological studies, as demonstrated by the interpretation of airborne surveys in Western Australia, central New South Wales and north Queensland. Gamma-rays emitted from the ground surface relate to the primary mineralogy and geochemistry of the bedrock, and the secondary weathered materials. Weathering modifies the distribution and concentration of radioelements from the original bedrock source. Once the radioelement response of bedrock and weathered materials is understood, the gamma-ray data can provide information on geomorphic processes and soil/regolith properties, including their mineralogy, texture, chemistry and style of weathering. This information can contribute significantly to an understanding of the weathering and geomorphic history of a region and, therefore, has the potential to be used in developing more effective land-management strategies and refining geochemical models in support of mineral exploration. Gamma-ray imagery is enhanced when combined with Landsat TM bands and digital elevation models (DEM). This synergy enables geochemical information derived from the gamma-ray data to be interpreted within a geomorphic framework. Draping gamma-ray images over DEMs as 3D landscape perspective views aids interpretation and allows the interpreter to visualise complex relationships between the gamma-ray response and landform features. 44 refs.,1 tab., 11 figs

  10. Performance assessment of gamma cameras. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliot, A.T.; Short, M.D.; Potter, D.C.; Barnes, K.J.

    1980-11-01

    The Dept. of Health and Social Security and the Scottish Home and Health Dept. has sponsored a programme of measurements of the important performance characteristics of 15 leading types of gamma cameras providing a routine radionuclide imaging service in hospitals throughout the UK. Measurements have been made of intrinsic resolution, system resolution, non-uniformity, spatial distortion, count rate performance, sensitivity, energy resolution and shield leakage. The main aim of this performance assessment was to provide sound information to the NHS to ease the task of those responsible for the purchase of gamma cameras. (U.K.)

  11. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) affects pollen tube growth via modulating putative Ca2+-permeable membrane channels and is coupled to negative regulation on glutamate decarboxylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guang-Hui; Zou, Jie; Feng, Jing; Peng, Xiong-Bo; Wu, Ju-You; Wu, Ying-Liang; Palanivelu, Ravishankar; Sun, Meng-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is implicated in pollen tube growth, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms that it mediates are largely unknown. Here, it is shown that exogenous GABA modulates putative Ca2+-permeable channels on the plasma membranes of tobacco pollen grains and pollen tubes. Whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments and non-invasive micromeasurement technology (NMT) revealed that the influx of Ca2+ increases in pollen tubes in response to exogenous GABA. It is also demonstrated that glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), the rate-limiting enzyme of GABA biosynthesis, is involved in feedback controls of Ca2+-permeable channels to fluctuate intracellular GABA levels and thus modulate pollen tube growth. The findings suggest that GAD activity linked with Ca2+-permeable channels relays an extracellular GABA signal and integrates multiple signal pathways to modulate tobacco pollen tube growth. Thus, the data explain how GABA mediates the communication between the style and the growing pollen tubes. PMID:24799560

  12. Enhanced stimulus-induced gamma activity in humans during propofol-induced sedation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Saxena

    Full Text Available Stimulus-induced gamma oscillations in the 30-80 Hz range have been implicated in a wide number of functions including visual processing, memory and attention. While occipital gamma-band oscillations can be pharmacologically modified in animal preparations, pharmacological modulation of stimulus-induced visual gamma oscillations has yet to be demonstrated in non-invasive human recordings. Here, in fifteen healthy humans volunteers, we probed the effects of the GABAA agonist and sedative propofol on stimulus-related gamma activity recorded with magnetoencephalography, using a simple visual grating stimulus designed to elicit gamma oscillations in the primary visual cortex. During propofol sedation as compared to the normal awake state, a significant 60% increase in stimulus-induced gamma amplitude was seen together with a 94% enhancement of stimulus-induced alpha suppression and a simultaneous reduction in the amplitude of the pattern-onset evoked response. These data demonstrate, that propofol-induced sedation is accompanied by increased stimulus-induced gamma activity providing a potential window into mechanisms of gamma-oscillation generation in humans.

  13. Gamma Knife

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Gamma Knife Gamma Knife® is a radiation therapy that uses computerized ... If you're scheduled for radiation therapy using Gamma Knife®, a treatment team consisting of a radiation ...

  14. Formulation of the relationship between indices of neutron-gamma and gamma-gamma method and the percentrage of iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majorowicz, J.

    1973-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the possibility of a complex utilization of radiometric logging methods, neutron-gamma profiling and gamma-gamma density logging for determining percentage of iron and establishing geophysical possibilities of identifying zones of economically profitable ores in borehole profiles. Figures present the correlations between indices of neutron-gamma and gamma-gamma logging methods and the percentage of iron, as well as the correlation of neutron-gamma and gamma-gamma indices for zones minerallized with iron ores. The article presents the correlational analyses of the results: the correlational coefficients are given as well as total error in determining iron content on the basis of each of the methods described. Next, a multidimensional statistical analysis is carried out on the results obtained. On the basis of the two-dimensional correlational coefficients calculated and the average standard deviation, an equation of linear regression was formulated, simultaneously involving three parameters - the indices of neutron-gamma and gamma-gamma logging and the percentage of iron. The multiple correlational coefficient obtained markedly exceeds the two-dimentional correlation coefficient (r=0.974>rsub(xz)>rsub(yz)>rsub(xy)). The given method of utilizing multidimensional statistics in borehole geophysics for identifying iron ores is an efficient one. On the basis of several relationships among independent variables which are less obvious (smaller values of correlational coefficient), it is possible to obtain a single distinct relationship involving all variables simultaneously. (author)

  15. Use of prompt gamma emissions from polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priyada, P.; Sarkar, P.K., E-mail: pradip.sarkar@manipal.edu

    2015-06-11

    The possibility of using measured prompt gamma emissions from polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent is explored theoretically. Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out using the FLUKA code to calculate the response of a high density polyethylene cylinder to emit prompt gammas from interaction of neutrons with the nuclei of hydrogen and carbon present in polyethylene. The neutron energy dependent responses of hydrogen and carbon nuclei are combined appropriately to match the energy dependent neutron fluence to ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients. The proposed method is tested initially with simulated spectra and then validated using experimental measurements with an Am–Be neutron source. Experimental measurements and theoretical simulations have established the feasibility of estimating neutron ambient dose equivalent using measured neutron induced prompt gammas emitted from polyethylene with an overestimation of neutron dose at very low energies. - Highlights: • A new method for estimating H{sup ⁎}(10) using prompt gamma emissions from HDPE. • Linear combination of 2.2 MeV and 4.4 MeV gamma intensities approximates DCC (ICRP). • Feasibility of the method was established theoretically and experimentally. • The response of the present technique is very similar to that of the rem meters.

  16. Development of amphiphilic gamma-PGA-nanoparticle based tumor vaccine: potential of the nanoparticulate cytosolic protein delivery carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Okada, Naoki; Oda, Atsushi; Matsuo, Kazuhiko; Matsuo, Keisuke; Mukai, Yohei; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Akagi, Takami; Akashi, Mitsuru; Nakagawa, Shinsaku

    2008-02-08

    Nanoscopic therapeutic systems that incorporate biomacromolecules, such as protein and peptides, are emerging as the next generation of nanomedicine aimed at improving the therapeutic efficacy of biomacromolecular drugs. In this study, we report that poly(gamma-glutamic acid)-based nanoparticles (gamma-PGA NPs) are excellent protein delivery carriers for tumor vaccines that delivered antigenic proteins to antigen-presenting cells and elicited potent immune responses. Importantly, gamma-PGA NPs efficiently delivered entrapped antigenic proteins through cytosolic translocation from the endosomes, which is a key process of gamma-PGA NP-mediated anti-tumor immune responses. Our findings suggest that the gamma-PGA NP system is suitable for the intracellular delivery of protein-based drugs as well as tumor vaccines.

  17. Spontaneous Gamma Activity in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yoji; Oribe, Naoya; Kanba, Shigenobu; Onitsuka, Toshiaki; Nestor, Paul G; Spencer, Kevin M

    2015-08-01

    A major goal of translational neuroscience is to identify neural circuit abnormalities in neuropsychiatric disorders that can be studied in animal models to facilitate the development of new treatments. Oscillations in the gamma band (30-100 Hz) of the electroencephalogram have received considerable interest as the basic mechanisms underlying these oscillations are understood, and gamma abnormalities have been found in schizophrenia (SZ). Animal models of SZ based on hypofunction of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) demonstrate increased spontaneous broadband gamma power, but this phenomenon has not been identified clearly in patients with SZ. To examine spontaneous gamma power and its relationship to evoked gamma oscillations in the auditory cortex of patients with SZ. We performed a cross-sectional study including 24 patients with chronic SZ and 24 matched healthy control participants at the Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System from January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2012. Electroencephalograms were obtained during auditory steady-state stimulation at multiple frequencies (20, 30, and 40 Hz) and during a resting state in 18 participants in each group. Electroencephalographic activity in the auditory cortex was estimated using dipole source localization. Auditory steady-state response (ASSR) measures included the phase-locking factor and evoked power. Spontaneous gamma power was measured as induced (non-phase-locked) gamma power in the ASSR data and as total gamma power in the resting-state data. The ASSR phase-locking factor was reduced significantly in patients with SZ compared with controls for the 40-Hz stimulation (mean [SD], 0.075 [0.028] vs 0.113 [0.065]; F1,46 = 6.79 [P = .012]) but not the 20- or the 30-Hz stimulation (0.042 [0.038] vs 0.043 [0.034]; F1,46 = 0.006 [P = .938] and 0.084 [0.040] vs 0.098 [0.050]; F1,46 = 1.605 [P = .212], respectively), repeating previous findings. The mean [SD] broadband-induced (30

  18. Study of radiation detectors response in standard X, gamma and beta radiation standard beams; Estudo da resposta de monitores de radioprotecao em feixes padronizados de radiacao X, gama e beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonato, Fernanda Beatrice Conceicao

    2010-07-01

    The response of 76 Geiger-Mueller detectors, 4 semiconductor detectors and 34 ionization chambers were studied. Many of them were calibrated with gamma radiation beams ({sup 37}Cs and {sup 60}Co), and some of them were tested in beta radiation ({sup 90}Sr+{sup 9'}0Y e {sup 204}Tl) and X radiation (N-60, N-80, N-100, N-150) beams. For all three types of radiation, the calibration factors of the instruments were obtained, and the energy and angular dependences were studied. For beta and gamma radiation, the angular dependence was studied for incident radiation angles of 0 deg and +- 45 deg. The curves of the response of the instruments were obtained over an angle interval of 0 deg to +- 90 deg, for gamma, beta and X radiations. The calibration factors obtained for beta radiation were compared to those obtained for gamma radiation. For gamma radiation, 24 of the 66 tested Geiger-Mueller detectors presented results for the energy dependence according to international recommendation of ISO 4037-2 and 56 were in accordance with the Brazilian ABNT 10011 recommendation. The ionization chambers and semiconductors were in accordance to national and international recommendations. All instruments showed angular dependence less than 40%. For beta radiation, the instruments showed unsatisfactory results for the energy dependence and angular dependence. For X radiation, the ionization chambers presented results for energy dependence according to the national recommendation, and the angular dependence was less than 40%. (author)

  19. Study of radiation detectors response in standard X, gamma and beta radiation standard beams; Estudo da resposta de monitores de radioprotecao em feixes padronizados de radiacao X, gama e beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonato, Fernanda Beatrice Conceicao

    2010-07-01

    The response of 76 Geiger-Mueller detectors, 4 semiconductor detectors and 34 ionization chambers were studied. Many of them were calibrated with gamma radiation beams ({sup 37}Cs and {sup 60}Co), and some of them were tested in beta radiation ({sup 90}Sr+{sup 9'}0Y e {sup 204}Tl) and X radiation (N-60, N-80, N-100, N-150) beams. For all three types of radiation, the calibration factors of the instruments were obtained, and the energy and angular dependences were studied. For beta and gamma radiation, the angular dependence was studied for incident radiation angles of 0 deg and +- 45 deg. The curves of the response of the instruments were obtained over an angle interval of 0 deg to +- 90 deg, for gamma, beta and X radiations. The calibration factors obtained for beta radiation were compared to those obtained for gamma radiation. For gamma radiation, 24 of the 66 tested Geiger-Mueller detectors presented results for the energy dependence according to international recommendation of ISO 4037-2 and 56 were in accordance with the Brazilian ABNT 10011 recommendation. The ionization chambers and semiconductors were in accordance to national and international recommendations. All instruments showed angular dependence less than 40%. For beta radiation, the instruments showed unsatisfactory results for the energy dependence and angular dependence. For X radiation, the ionization chambers presented results for energy dependence according to the national recommendation, and the angular dependence was less than 40%. (author)

  20. Response change in winter-wheat types to the pathogen complex under chronic gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budanov, V.E.; Lysenkov, V.I.; Shcherbakov, V.K.

    1975-01-01

    Disease reactions in plants that have been gamma-irradiated are discussed. Damage to different types of soft winter wheat, due to pathogenic fungi, is evaluated. The Mironovski Jubilee variety showed high resistance to the leaf form of powdery mildew, along with the opposite phenomenon of a high susceptibility to the stem form of this disease. Chronic gamma irradiation of plants of this variety increased the susceptibility to this disease

  1. Production of γ-aminobutyric acid by microorganisms from different food sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudec, Jozef; Kobida, Ľubomír; Čanigová, Margita; Lacko-Bartošová, Magdaléna; Ložek, Otto; Chlebo, Peter; Mrázová, Jana; Ducsay, Ladislav; Bystrická, Judita

    2015-04-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a potentially bioactive component of foods and pharmaceuticals. The aim of this study was screen lactic acid bacteria belonging to the Czech Collection of Microorganisms, and microorganisms (yeast and bacteria) from 10 different food sources for GABA production by fermentation in broth or plant and animal products. Under an aerobic atmosphere, very low selectivity of GABA production (from 0.8% to 1.3%) was obtained using yeast and filamentous fungi, while higher selectivity (from 6.5% to 21.0%) was obtained with bacteria. The use of anaerobic conditions, combined with the addition of coenzyme (pyridoxal-5-phosphate) and salts (CaCl2 , NaCl), led to the detection of a low concentration of GABA precursor. Simultaneously, using an optimal temperature of 33 °C, a pH of 6.5 and bacteria from banana (Pseudomonadaceae and Enterobacteriaceae families), surprisingly, a high selectivity of GABA was obtained. A positive impact of fenugreek sprouts on the proteolytic process and GABA production from plant material as a source of GABA precursor was identified. Lactic acid bacteria for the production of new plant and animal GABA-rich products from different natural sources containing GABA precursor can be used. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Production of gaba (γ – Aminobutyric acid) by microorganisms: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Radhika; Bajpai, Vivek K.; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods. PMID:24031948

  3. Identification of ɤ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA in Loloh as A Potential Drink as Antihipertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ayu Wita Kusumawati

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Loloh sembung (Blumea balsamifera is a functional drink that is widely consumed by Balinesse people and exhibit health-promoting effect. The purpose of this study was to identify GABA of loloh sembung which has physiological effect as antihypertensive. Proximate analysis was performed to determine nutritional value content of loloh sembung. Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometric (AAS method was employed to determine potassium and sodium content, and identificatio of ɤ-aminobutyric acid (GABA using Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC method. In this study, water content of loloh sembung was 99.2324%, ash 0.0117. Fresh sembung leaves have water content 83.8112%, ash content 2.0617%, protein 0.9659%, fat 2.850%, and carbohydrate 10.3109%. Loloh sembung contained sodium, 51.65 mg/L and potassium 1353.10 mg/L. Subsequently, fresh sembung leaves contained sodium 579.72 mg/L and pottasium 1353.19 mg/L respectively. In this study, GABA was detected in loloh sembung and has promising prospect as antihypertensive-functional drink.

  4. Utilization of barley or wheat bran to bioconvert glutamate to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wen-Jie; Kim, Min-Ju; Kim, Keun-Sung

    2013-09-01

    This study deals with the utilization of agro-industrial wastes created by barley and wheat bran in the production of a value-added product, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The simple and eco-friendly reaction requires no pretreatment or microbial fermentation steps but uses barley or wheat bran as an enzyme source, glutamate as a substrate, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) as a cofactor. The optimal reaction conditions were determined on the basis of the temperatures and times used for the decarboxylation reactions and the initial concentrations of barley or wheat bran, glutamate, and PLP. The optimal reactions produced 9.2 mM of GABA from 10 mM glutamate, yielding a 92% GABA conversion rate, when barley bran was used and 6.0 mM of GABA from 10 mM glutamate, yielding a 60% GABA conversion rate, when wheat bran was used. The results imply that barley bran is more efficient than wheat bran in the production of GABA. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  5. Study of {gamma}'s in Naiade; Etude des gamma de Naiade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millot, J P; Rastoin, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Following a study of the gamma sources, the flux of gamma of different energies in the swimming pool is investigated. The biological dose can thus be obtained by calculation, and compared with the results given by photographic plates. The influence of photoneutrons is estimated by calculation, and research is being carried out on their influence on the thermal neutron flux curve on the axis of the uranium plate, with the plate emitting neutrons and with the plate protected by boral. (author) [French] Apres l'etude des sources de gamma, l'on etudie le flux de gamma de differentes energies dans la piscine. La dose biologique peut etre obtenue ainsi par le calcul et comparee avec les resultats donnes par les plaques photographiques. L'influence des photoneutrons est estimee par le calcul et l'on recherche leur influence sur la courbe de flux de neutrons thermiques sur l'axe de la plaque d'uranium, la plaque emettant des neutrons et la plaque protegee par du boral. (auteur)

  6. Measurement of K{sup {+-}}{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}{gamma}{gamma} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales Morales, Cristina

    2009-07-21

    The goal of this thesis was an experimental test of an effective theory of strong interactions at low energy, called Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT). Weak decays of kaon mesons provide such a test. In particular, K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{gamma}{gamma} decays are interesting because there is no tree-level O(p{sup 2}) contribution in ChPT, and the leading contributions start at O(p{sup 4}). At this order, these decays include one undetermined coupling constant, c. Both the branching ratio and the spectrum shape of K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{gamma}{gamma} decays are sensitive to this parameter. O(p{sup 6}) contributions to K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{gamma}{gamma} ChPT predict a 30-40% increase in the branching ratio. From the measurement of the branching ratio and spectrum shape of K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{gamma}{gamma} decays, it is possible to determine a model dependent value of c and also to examine whether the O(p{sup 6}) corrections are necessary and enough to explain the rate. About 40% of the data collected in the year 2003 by the NA48/2 experiment have been analyzed and 908 K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{gamma}{gamma} candidates with about 8% background contamination have been selected in the region with z=m{sup 2}{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}/m{sub K}{sup 2}{>=}0.2. Using 5,750,121 selected K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0} decays as normalization channel, a model independent differential branching ratio of K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{gamma}{gamma} has been measured to be: BR(K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{gamma}{gamma}, z{>=}0.2)=(1.018{+-}0.038{sub stat}{+-}0.039{sub syst}{+-}0.004{sub ext}).10{sup -6}. From the fit to the O(p{sup 6}) ChPT prediction of the measured branching ratio and the shape of the z-spectrum, a value of c=1.54{+-}0.15{sub stat}{+-}0.18{sub syst} has been extracted. Using the measured c value and the O(p{sup 6}) ChPT prediction, the branching ratio for z=m{sup 2}{sub

  7. Cloning of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) ρ1 cDNA: A GABA receptor subunit highly expressed in the retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutting, G.R.; Lu, Luo; Kasch, L.M.; Montrose-Rafizadeh, C.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Guggino, W.B.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr.; O'Hara, B.F.; Donovan, D.M.; Shimada, Shoichi; Uhl, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    Type A γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA A ) receptors are a family of ligand-gated chloride channels that are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the nervous system. Molecular cloning has revealed diversity in the subunits that compose this heterooligomeric receptor, but each previously elucidated subunit displays amino acid similarity in conserved structural elements. The authors have used these highly conserved regions to identify additional members of this family by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One PCR product was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a human retina cDNA library. The mature protein predicted from this cDNA sequence is 458 amino acids long and displays between 30 and 38% amino acid similarity to the previously identified GABA A subunits. This gene is expressed primarily in the retina but transcripts are also detected in the brain, lung, and thymus. Injection of Xenopus oocytes with RNA transcribed in vitro produces a GABA-responsive chloride conductance and expression of the cDNA in COS cells yields GABA-displaceable muscimol binding. These features are consistent with our identification of a GABA subunit, GABA ρ 1 , with prominent retinal expression that increases the diversity and tissue specificity of this ligand-gated ion-channel receptor family

  8. General description and first results with the ORIS-LMRI 4 {pi} {gamma} metering chamber; Descripcion general y primeros resultados con la camara 4 {pi} {gamma} metrologica ORIS-LMRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejera R, A; Becerril V, A; Cortes P, A

    1990-04-15

    A problem that present the ionization chambers is that the response for the radiation is global, that is to say that it cannot discriminate against selectively the relating responses at different energies, if these impact simultaneously in the active volume. This is a reason to calibrate the chambers, if is possible, with gamma monoenergetic emitting and by average calculations to complete the response curve with gamma emitting of well-known yields. To obtain the calibration coefficients and may used them, it is necessary that so much the standardized radioisotopes as the solutions by calibrating, are contained in vessels with the same geometry and the same quantity. In the exposed case, pattern solutions of 5 ml were used contained in glass cruets of 10 ml. The problem solutions are contained in same cruets to those of the patterns. The first results obtained with the ORIS-LMRI 4 {pi} {gamma} metering chamber are presented. (Author)

  9. Impaired theta-gamma coupling during working memory performance in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Mera S; Rajji, Tarek K; Zomorrodi, Reza; Radhu, Natasha; George, Tony P; Blumberger, Daniel M; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2017-11-01

    Working memory deficits represent a core feature of schizophrenia. These deficits have been associated with dysfunctional dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) cortical oscillations. Theta-gamma coupling describes the modulation of gamma oscillations by theta phasic activity that has been directly associated with the ordering of information during working memory performance. Evaluating theta-gamma coupling may provide greater insight into the neural mechanisms mediating working memory deficits in this disorder. Thirty-eight patients diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 38 healthy controls performed the verbal N-Back task administered at 4 levels, while EEG was recorded. Theta (4-7Hz)-gamma (30-50Hz) coupling was calculated for target and non-target correct trials for each working memory load. The relationship between theta-gamma coupling and accuracy was determined. Theta-gamma coupling was significantly and selectively impaired during correct responses to target letters among schizophrenia patients compared to healthy controls. A significant and positive relationship was found between theta-gamma coupling and 3-Back accuracy in controls, while this relationship was not observed in patients. These findings suggest that impaired theta-gamma coupling contribute to working memory dysfunction in schizophrenia. Future work is needed to evaluate the predictive utility of theta-gamma coupling as a neurophysiological marker for functional outcomes in this disorder. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. The chang