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Sample records for gamma knife treatment

  1. Gamma Knife

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    ... tested on a regular basis to ensure the safety of patients and medical staff. top of page This page ... Brain Tumor Treatment Introduction to Cancer Therapy (Radiation Oncology) Cerebral ... to Gamma Knife Sponsored by Please ...

  2. Gamma Knife Treatment of Brainstem Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halloran E. Peterson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The management of brainstem metastases is challenging. Surgical treatment is usually not an option, and chemotherapy is of limited utility. Stereotactic radiosurgery has emerged as a promising palliative treatment modality in these cases. The goal of this study is to assess our single institution experience treating brainstem metastases with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS. This retrospective chart review studied 41 patients with brainstem metastases treated with GKRS. The most common primary tumors were lung, breast, renal cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Median age at initial treatment was 59 years. Nineteen (46% of the patients received whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT prior to or concurrent with GKRS treatment. Thirty (73% of the patients had a single brainstem metastasis. The average GKRS dose was 17 Gy. Post-GKRS overall survival at six months was 42%, at 12 months was 22%, and at 24 months was 13%. Local tumor control was achieved in 91% of patients, and there was one patient who had a fatal brain hemorrhage after treatment. Karnofsky performance score (KPS >80 and the absence of prior WBRT were predictors for improved survival on multivariate analysis (HR 0.60 (p = 0.02, and HR 0.28 (p = 0.02, respectively. GKRS was an effective treatment for brainstem metastases, with excellent local tumor control.

  3. Gamma knife treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, Tatsuo; Yoshida, Mamoru; Watanabe, Shinichi; Takihana, Toshiki; Shouzuhara, Hidetaka; Yamamoto, Yoshisuke

    2003-01-01

    Effectiveness and limitations of Gamma Knife treatment for various kinds of trigeminal neuralgia (typical, atypical and mixed types) were analyzed from the data of 54 cases treated over the past 4 years. The mean patient age was 74 years (range 50 to 101 years). Forty five patients with typical trigeminal neuralgia, four patients with atypical facial pain and five patients with mixed type trigeminal neuralgia were evaluated. Isodose distribution determined with a 4 mm collimator was centered on the root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve in 35 cases and centered on the retro-Gasserian trigeminal nerve in 19 cases. The maximum dose range used was 70 to 80 Gy. Median follow-up after radiosurgery was 21.4 months (range 3 to 54 months). Typical trigeminal neuralgia treated at the root entry zone became pain free without medication in 53.6% (15/28), 78.6% (22/28) and 78.6% (22/28) of the patients after 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively, while, that treated at the retro-Gasserian nerve became pain free in 29.4% (5/17), 53.8% (7/13) and 70.0% (7/10) of the patients after 3, 6 and 8 months. No matter whether the target was the root entry zone or the retro-Gasserian nerve, 70 to 78% of patients became pain free without medication when examined at 8 to 12 months after radiosurgery. Facial hypesthesia including localized slight hypesthesia occurred in 13 to 20% of the patients at 12 to 24 months after radiosurgery, but no patients developed any other new neurological deficits or systemic complications. Patients with atypical trigeminal neuralgia did not respond well to this treatment. Further study is required to determine the optimal target and dose. Because of its noninvasive nature, radiosurgery is an attractive option for treatment of typical and mixed typed trigeminal pain, particularly in elderly patients and patients not amenable to the various surgical methods available for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. (author)

  4. Dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery

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    Luan Shuang; Swanson, Nathan; Chen Zhe [Department of Computer Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Ma Lijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States)], E-mail: sluan@cs.unm.edu, E-mail: nate@cs.unm.edu, E-mail: zchen@cs.unm.edu, E-mail: lijunma@radonc.ucsf.edu

    2009-03-21

    Gamma knife has been the treatment of choice for various brain tumors and functional disorders. Current gamma knife radiosurgery is planned in a 'ball-packing' approach and delivered in a 'step-and-shoot' manner, i.e. it aims to 'pack' the different sized spherical high-dose volumes (called 'shots') into a tumor volume. We have developed a dynamic scheme for gamma knife radiosurgery based on the concept of 'dose-painting' to take advantage of the new robotic patient positioning system on the latest Gamma Knife C(TM) and Perfexion(TM) units. In our scheme, the spherical high dose volume created by the gamma knife unit will be viewed as a 3D spherical 'paintbrush', and treatment planning reduces to finding the best route of this 'paintbrush' to 'paint' a 3D tumor volume. Under our dose-painting concept, gamma knife radiosurgery becomes dynamic, where the patient moves continuously under the robotic positioning system. We have implemented a fully automatic dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery treatment planning system, where the inverse planning problem is solved as a traveling salesman problem combined with constrained least-square optimizations. We have also carried out experimental studies of dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery and showed the following. (1) Dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery is ideally suited for fully automatic inverse planning, where high quality radiosurgery plans can be obtained in minutes of computation. (2) Dynamic radiosurgery plans are more conformal than step-and-shoot plans and can maintain a steep dose gradient (around 13% per mm) between the target tumor volume and the surrounding critical structures. (3) It is possible to prescribe multiple isodose lines with dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery, so that the treatment can cover the periphery of the target volume while escalating the dose for high tumor burden regions. (4) With dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery, one can

  5. Peripheral dose in ocular treatments with CyberKnife and Gamma Knife radiosurgery compared to proton radiotherapy

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    Zytkovicz, A; Daftari, I; Phillips, T L; Chuang, C F; Verhey, L; Petti, P L [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States)

    2007-09-21

    Peripheral radiation can have deleterious effects on normal tissues throughout the body, including secondary cancer induction and cataractogenesis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the peripheral dose received by various regions of the body after ocular treatment delivered with the Model C Gamma Knife, proton radiotherapy with a dedicated ocular beam employing no passive-scattering system, or a CyberKnife unit before and after supplemental shielding was introduced. TLDs were used for stray gamma and x-ray dosimetry, whereas CR-39 dosimeters were used to measure neutron contamination in the proton experiments. Doses to the contralateral eye, neck, thorax and abdomen were measured on our anthropomorphic phantom for a 56 Gy treatment to a 588 mm{sup 3} posterior ocular lesion. Gamma Knife (without collimator blocking) delivered the highest dose in the contralateral eye, with 402-2380 mSv, as compared with 118-234 mSv for CyberKnife pre-shielding, 46-255 mSv for CyberKnife post-shielding and 9-12 mSv for proton radiotherapy. Gamma Knife and post-shielding CyberKnife delivered comparable doses proximal to the treatment site, with 190 versus 196 mSv at the thyroid, whereas protons doses at these locations were less than 10 mSv. Gamma Knife doses decreased dramatically with distance from the treatment site, delivering only 13 mSv at the lower pelvis, comparable to the proton result of 4 to 7 mSv in this region. In contrast, CyberKnife delivered between 117 and 132 mSv to the lower pelvis. In conclusion, for ocular melanoma treatments, a proton beam employing no double scattering system delivers the lowest peripheral doses proximally to the contralateral eye and thyroid when compared to radiosurgery with the Model C Gamma Knife or CyberKnife. At distal locations in the pelvis, peripheral doses delivered with proton and Gamma Knife are of an order of magnitude smaller than those delivered with CyberKnife.

  6. Gamma knife radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Mori, Yohsimasa; Kida, Yoshihisa

    2003-01-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery has become a new treatment modality in the field of neurosurgery since the first gamma knife was brought into Japan in 1990. Advances in applications of new indications and long-term results have been continued to evolve during the past 12 years. Based on the experience of more than 4,500 cases treated by gamma knife at Komaki City Hospital, long-term results of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), metastatic brain tumors, acoustic neurinomas, meningiomas and trigeminal neuralgias are presented. Radiosurgery has become a novel treatment modality, especially for AVM, acoustic neurinoma and meningioma, which were once only treatable by conventional surgery, and shows a high cure rate in AVM cases and high control rate in benign tumors without major complications. The effects of radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumors have been thought to be superior to fractionated radiotherapy due to high response and control rates, and patients showed improved quality of life although no prolongation of the life span was obtained. Gamma knife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia has been shown to be effective and less invasive than microvascular decompression, and is useful for cases resistant to conventional therapies and as an initial treatment as well. (author)

  7. Gamma knife: an alternative treatment for acoustic neurinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamerer, D.B.; Lunsford, L.D.; Moller, M.

    1988-01-01

    Despite surgical advances and technologic means of better monitoring seventh and eighth nerve function intraoperatively, there remains a group of patients for whom alternative methods of treatment are desirable. These include the elderly, those with bilateral tumors or tumors in only hearing ears, individuals with medical contraindications to major surgery, and those who refuse surgical resection. The University of Pittsburgh became the fifth world center and the first in the United States to install the gamma knife for stereotactic radiosurgery. On the basis of the pioneering work done at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, acoustic tumor patients who fulfill the above criteria are being treated. A tumoricidal single treatment closed-skull radiation dose is given through 201 sharply focused cobalt 60 sources, minimizing the effects on surrounding brain or other tissues. Our early results are discussed and compared to those from more than 200 cases in Stockholm. Complications and expected long-term results are presented

  8. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for the Treatment of Cystic Cerebral Metastases

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    Ebinu, Julius O.; Lwu, Shelly; Monsalves, Eric; Arayee, Mandana [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chung, Caroline; Laperriere, Normand J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kulkarni, Abhaya V.; Goetz, Pablo [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zadeh, Gelareh, E-mail: gelareh.zadeh@uhn.on.ca [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) in the treatment of nonsurgical cystic brain metastasis, and to determine predictors of response to GKRS. Methods: We reviewed a prospectively maintained database of brain metastases patients treated at our institution between 2006 and 2010. All lesions with a cystic component were identified, and volumetric analysis was done to measure percentage of cystic volume on day of treatment and consecutive follow-up MRI scans. Clinical, radiologic, and dosimetry parameters were reviewed to establish the overall response of cystic metastases to GKRS as well as identify potential predictive factors of response. Results: A total of 111 lesions in 73 patients were analyzed; 57% of lesions received prior whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Lung carcinoma was the primary cancer in 51% of patients, 10% breast, 10% colorectal, 4% melanoma, and 26% other. Fifty-seven percent of the patients were recursive partitioning analysis class 1, the remainder class 2. Mean target volume was 3.3 mL (range, 0.1-23 mL). Median prescription dose was 21 Gy (range, 15-24 Gy). Local control rates were 91%, 63%, and 37% at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Local control was improved in lung primary and worse in patients with prior WBRT (univariate). Only lung primary predicted local control in multivariate analysis, whereas age and tumor volume did not. Lesions with a large cystic component did not show a poorer response compared with those with a small cystic component. Conclusions: This study supports the use of GKRS in the management of nonsurgical cystic metastases, despite a traditionally perceived poorer response. Our local control rates are comparable to a matched cohort of noncystic brain metastases, and therefore the presence of a large cystic component should not deter the use of GKRS. Predictors of response included tumor subtype. Prior WBRT decreased effectiveness of SRS for local control rates.

  9. Radiosurgery by Leksell gamma knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, Josef

    2008-01-01

    The learning objectives of the lecture were as follows: to learn basic principles of Leksell gamma knife (LGK) radiosurgery; to discuss imaging, treatment planning and optimization procedures; to discuss quality assurance for LGK treatments; and to present examples of diagnoses treated by LGK. The following topics were discussed: Radiosurgery - definition, components of selectivity, fundamentals; Leksell gamma knife - principles; Stereotactic target localization; Radiosurgery - imaging; Treatment planning; LGK treatment; Quality control - process tree, LGK, distortion of scanners, 3D phantom measurements; Physical and technical parameters; and Clinical applications. (P.A.)

  10. Gamma knife surgery for craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, D.; Steiner, M.; Steiner, L.

    1995-01-01

    We present our results of Gamma Knife surgery for craniopharyngioma in nine patients. The current status of surgery, radiation therapy, intracavitary instillation of radionuclides and Gamma Knife surgery in the management of craniopharyngiomas is discussed. (author)

  11. Comparative analyses of linac and Gamma Knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, L; Kwok, Y; Chin, L S; Yu, C; Regine, W F

    2005-01-01

    Dedicated linac-based radiosurgery has been reported for trigeminal neuralgia treatments. In this study, we investigated the dose fall-off characteristics and setup error tolerance of linac-based radiosurgery as compared with standard Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In order to minimize the errors from different treatment planning calculations, consistent imaging registration, dose calculation and dose volume analysis methods were developed and implemented for both Gamma Knife and linac-based treatments. Intra-arc setup errors were incorporated into the treatment planning process of linac-based deliveries. The effects of intra-arc setup errors with increasing number of arcs were studied and benchmarked against Gamma Knife deliveries with and without plugging patterns. Our studies found equivalent dose fall-off properties between Gamma Knife and linac-based radiosurgery given a sufficient number of arcs (>7) and small intra-arc errors (<0.5 mm) were satisfied for linac-based deliveries. Increasing the number of arcs significantly decreased the variations in the dose fall-off curve at the low isodose region (e.g. from 40% to 10%) and also improved dose uniformity at the high isodose region (e.g. from 70% to 90%). As the number of arcs increased, the effects of intra-arc setup errors on the dose fall-off curves decreased. Increasing the number of arcs also reduced the integral dose to the distal normal brain tissues. In conclusion, linac-based radiosurgery produces equivalent dose fall-off characteristics to Gamma Knife radiosurgery with a high number of arcs. However, one must note the increased treatment time for a large number of arcs and isocentre accuracies

  12. Treatment strategy for arteriovenous malformation; Combination of open surgery, embolization and gamma knife

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    Takahashi, Akira (Kohnan Hospital, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)); Jokura, Hidefumi; Takahashi, Kou; Yoshimoto, Takashi

    1992-09-01

    Gamma knife has recently become available in the treatment of brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM). In an effort to examine treatment strategy for AVM, retrospective review was made on 80 AVMs treated primarily by embolization using a newly developed liquid embolization method (estrogen-alcohol combined with polyvinyl acetate polymer) in a total of 76 patients aged from 3 to 57 years (mean 28). After the embolization, 11 lesions (13.8%) disappeared angiographically. The number of nidi 3 cm or larger in diameter was decreased from 45 (56.2%) to 7 (8.7%). As an adjunctive treatment, conventional neurosurgical resection was performed and the residual nidus was irradiated by conventional manner (30 Gy in 3 weeks) in each 9 patients. At an average follow-up of 17 months for 39 patients, angiography revealed no evidence of revascularization in embolized nidi in 6, reduction of irradiated nidi in size in 5, unchanged nidi in 21, and enlargement of nidi in 7 patients. Death and morbidity attributable to embolization were seen in one (1.3%) and 18 (23.5%) patients, respectively. Recently performed gamma knife surgery has achieved complete obliteraiton of nidus in 80%, irrespective of AVM site, with a low complication rate (4%). This favorable outcome has, however, contributed to smaller nidus. These findings lead to the following conclusions. Surgical removal should be considered in small cortical lesions. Embolization would be the treatment of choice for lesions larger than 3 cm or 10 ml, except for hemorrhagic cases in which acute surgical removal of hematoma is required. After embolization, lesions could be surgically removed or treated by gamma knife. For hemorrhagic lesions smaller than 3 cm, embolization should be considered if the feeders were easily catheterized without significant risk. For non-hemorrhagic lesions less than 3 cm, gamma knife would become the treatment of choice. (N.K.).

  13. Forward treatment planning techniques to reduce the normalization effect in Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hao-Wen; Lo, Wei-Lun; Kuo, Chun-Yuan; Su, Yu-Kai; Tsai, Jo-Ting; Lin, Jia-Wei; Wang, Yu-Jen; Pan, David Hung-Chi

    2017-11-01

    In Gamma Knife forward treatment planning, normalization effect may be observed when multiple shots are used for treating large lesions. This effect can reduce the proportion of coverage of high-value isodose lines within targets. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of forward treatment planning techniques using the Leksell Gamma Knife for the normalization effect reduction. We adjusted the shot positions and weightings to optimize the dose distribution and reduce the overlap of high-value isodose lines from each shot, thereby mitigating the normalization effect during treatment planning. The new collimation system, Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion, which contains eight movable sectors, provides an additional means to reduce the normalization effect by using composite shots. We propose different techniques in forward treatment planning that can reduce the normalization effect. Reducing the normalization effect increases the coverage proportion of higher isodose lines within targets, making the high-dose region within targets more uniform and increasing the mean dose to targets. Because of the increase in the mean dose to the target after reducing the normalization effect, we can set the prescribed marginal dose at a higher isodose level and reduce the maximum dose, thereby lowering the risk of complications. © 2017 Shuang Ho Hospital-Taipei Medical University. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. Verification of Gamma Knife extend system based fractionated treatment planning using EBT2 film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natanasabapathi, Gopishankar; Bisht, Raj Kishor

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents EBT2 film verification of fractionated treatment planning with the Gamma Knife (GK) extend system, a relocatable frame system for multiple-fraction or serial multiple-session radiosurgery.Methods: A human head shaped phantom simulated the verification process for fractionated Gamma Knife treatment. Phantom preparation for Extend Frame based treatment planning involved creating a dental impression, fitting the phantom to the frame system, and acquiring a stereotactic computed tomography (CT) scan. A CT scan (Siemens, Emotion 6) of the phantom was obtained with following parameters: Tube voltage—110 kV, tube current—280 mA, pixel size—0.5 × 0.5 and 1 mm slice thickness. A treatment plan with two 8 mm collimator shots and three sectors blocking in each shot was made. Dose prescription of 4 Gy at 100% was delivered for the first fraction out of the two fractions planned. Gafchromic EBT2 film (ISP Wayne, NJ) was used as 2D verification dosimeter in this process. Films were cut and placed inside the film insert of the phantom for treatment dose delivery. Meanwhile a set of films from the same batch were exposed from 0 to 12 Gy doses for calibration purposes. An EPSON (Expression 10000 XL) scanner was used for scanning the exposed films in transparency mode. Scanned films were analyzed with inhouse written MATLAB codes.Results: Gamma index analysis of film measurement in comparison with TPS calculated dose resulted in high pass rates >90% for tolerance criteria of 1%/1 mm. The isodose overlay and linear dose profiles of film measured and computed dose distribution on sagittal and coronal plane were in close agreement.Conclusions: Through this study, the authors propose treatment verification QA method for Extend frame based fractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery using EBT2 film

  15. Verification of Gamma Knife extend system based fractionated treatment planning using EBT2 film

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    Natanasabapathi, Gopishankar; Bisht, Raj Kishor [Gamma Knife Unit, Department of Neurosurgery, Neurosciences Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029 (India)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This paper presents EBT2 film verification of fractionated treatment planning with the Gamma Knife (GK) extend system, a relocatable frame system for multiple-fraction or serial multiple-session radiosurgery.Methods: A human head shaped phantom simulated the verification process for fractionated Gamma Knife treatment. Phantom preparation for Extend Frame based treatment planning involved creating a dental impression, fitting the phantom to the frame system, and acquiring a stereotactic computed tomography (CT) scan. A CT scan (Siemens, Emotion 6) of the phantom was obtained with following parameters: Tube voltage—110 kV, tube current—280 mA, pixel size—0.5 × 0.5 and 1 mm slice thickness. A treatment plan with two 8 mm collimator shots and three sectors blocking in each shot was made. Dose prescription of 4 Gy at 100% was delivered for the first fraction out of the two fractions planned. Gafchromic EBT2 film (ISP Wayne, NJ) was used as 2D verification dosimeter in this process. Films were cut and placed inside the film insert of the phantom for treatment dose delivery. Meanwhile a set of films from the same batch were exposed from 0 to 12 Gy doses for calibration purposes. An EPSON (Expression 10000 XL) scanner was used for scanning the exposed films in transparency mode. Scanned films were analyzed with inhouse written MATLAB codes.Results: Gamma index analysis of film measurement in comparison with TPS calculated dose resulted in high pass rates >90% for tolerance criteria of 1%/1 mm. The isodose overlay and linear dose profiles of film measured and computed dose distribution on sagittal and coronal plane were in close agreement.Conclusions: Through this study, the authors propose treatment verification QA method for Extend frame based fractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery using EBT2 film.

  16. The costs of radiosurgical treatment: Comparison between gamma knife and linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenigsmaier, H.; Pauli-Ferch, B. de; Hackl, A.; Pendl, G.

    1998-01-01

    Radiosurgical treatment can be carried out by means of a gamma knife or a linear accelerator. The linear accelerator may be either a single-purpose appliance, exclusively employed in radiosurgery, or an adapted appliance which is used primarily for fractioned radiotherapy, and only additionally for radiosurgical purposes. The first alternative will be referred to briefly as a 'dedicated Linac', the latter as an 'adapted Linac'. Cost accounting data for these alternatives will be discussed under three main categories: investment costs. operating costs, and finally staffing costs. Costs are only considered to the extent that this is necessary to facilitate a comprehensive cost comparison. Factors for which the costs remain the same or at least broadly the same will from the outset not be taken into consideration. These include, for instance, the costs of general or special administration, diagnosis, and image processing. The results and conclusions of this study therefore cannot be employed immediately in the evaluation of cost reimbursement schemes of the type carried out by agencies responsible for social insurance. Here, appropriate complete cost analyzes especially for this purpose are required. The final comprehensive cost comparison reveals that the adapted Linac is the most favourable alternative with small annual quantities of patients. With larger numbers of patients the Gamma Knife represents the most favourable from a cost accounting angle. The dedicated Linac accordingly does not have a cost advantage for any of the examined numbers of patients. Clearly the lowest treatment costs per patient can be achieved by employing a Gamma Knife and using it to capacity. (author)

  17. A case of neurofibromatosis developing facial paralysis following treatment with a gamma knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosomi, Yoshikazu

    2002-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis is generally classified into types I and II: the latter may be life-threatening when the acoustic nerve tumor becomes enlarged. The author reports on a patient with bilateral acoustic nerve tumors, as well as large tumors at the neck and sacral regions, who developed facial nerve paralysis following surgery in which a gamma knife was used. The patient, a 30-year-old woman with no family history of neurofibromatosis, had a prominent neurofibroma at the pharyngeal region surgically removed when she was about 23. The procedure left her with dysfunctions of the vocal cords and lingual movements. At the age of 30 (March 2001), a tumor originating at S1 of the sacral nerve plexus was removed, which caused her leg movements to be restricted. Later, an acoustic nerve tumor was found to have enlarged; and in July 2001, the left acoustic nerve tumor was extirpated by using a gamma knife. Starting in early 2002, her left facial movements appeared to be compromised but during the follow-up observation period, she regained the movements. Patients with neurofibromatosis are often plagued by the development of multiple tumors and surgical sequelae. One is reminded that it is necessary to plan treatment with sufficient consideration given to quality of life (QOL) (including the problem of an acoustic nerve tumor that may develop in future) as well as individual patients wishes. (author)

  18. The use of a Leksell-BRW adapter for linac radiosurgery as an adjunct to Gamma Knife treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekstrand, Kenneth E; Hinson, William H; Bourland, J Daniel; Guzman, Allan F de; Stieber, Volker W; Tatter, Steven B; Ellis, Thomas L

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the use of an adapter that permits the use of a Leksell coordinate frame with a linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery system based on the Brown-Robert-Wells (BRW) design. This device is useful when lesions that are planned for treatment on a Leksell Gamma Knife system are found to be inaccessible to the Gamma Knife. We have found that with this device objects within a head phantom can be targeted by the linear accelerator within an accuracy of approximately 1 mm

  19. Plan Quality and Treatment Efficiency for Radiosurgery to Multiple Brain Metastases: Non-Coplanar RapidArc vs Gamma Knife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haisong eLiu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study compares the dosimetry and efficiency of two modern radiosurgery (SRS modalities for multiple brain metastases (Gamma Knife and LINAC-based RapidArc/volumetric modulated arc therapy, with a special focus on the comparison of low dose spread.Methods: Six patients with three or four small brain metastases were used in this study. The size of targets varied from 0.1 ~ 10.5 cc. SRS doses were prescribed according to size of lesions. SRS plans were made using both Gamma Knife® Perfexion and a single-isocenter, multiple non-coplanar RapidArc®. Dosimetric parameters analyzed included RTOG conformity index (CI, gradient index (GI, 12 Gy isodose volume (V12Gy for each target, and the dose spread (Dspread for each plan. Dspread reflects SRS plan’s capability of confining radiation to within the local vicinity of the lesion and to not spread out to the surrounding normal brain tissues. Each plan has a dose (Dspread, such that once dose decreases below Dspread (on total tissue DVH, isodose volume starts increasing dramatically. Dspread is defined as that dose when volume increase first exceeds 20 cc per 0.1 Gy dose decrease. Results: RapidArc SRS has smaller CI (1.19 ±0.14 vs. 1.50 ± 0.16, p<0.001 and larger GI (4.77 ± 1.49 vs. 3.65 ± 0.98, p <0.01. V12Gy results were comparable (2.73 ± 1.38 cc vs. 3.06 ± 2.20 cc, p = 0.58. Moderate to lower dose spread, V6, V4.5, and V3, were also equivalent. Gamma Knife plans achieved better very low dose spread (≤3 Gy and also had slightly smaller Dspread, 1.9 Gy vs 2.5 Gy. Total treatment time for Gamma Knife is estimated between 60~100 min. Gamma Knife treatments are between 3~5 times longer compared to RapidArc treatment techniques.Conclusion: Dosimetric parameters reflecting prescription dose conformality (CI, dose fall off (GI, radiation necrosis indicator (V12Gy, and dose spread (Dspread were compared between Gamma Knife SRS and RapidArc SRS for multi-mets. RapidArc plans have

  20. Use of the Leksell Gamma Knife in the Treatment of Prolactinoma Patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježková, J.; Hána, V.; Kršek, M.; Weiss, V.; Vladyka, V.; Liščák, R.; Vymazal, J.; Pecen, Ladislav; Marek, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 5 (2009), s. 732-741 ISSN 0300-0664 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : prolactinoma * Leksell gamma knife * time to prolactin normalization analysis Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 3.201, year: 2009

  1. A fully automatic approach for multimodal PET and MR image segmentation in gamma knife treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundo, Leonardo; Stefano, Alessandro; Militello, Carmelo; Russo, Giorgio; Sabini, Maria Gabriella; D'Arrigo, Corrado; Marletta, Francesco; Ippolito, Massimo; Mauri, Giancarlo; Vitabile, Salvatore; Gilardi, Maria Carla

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays, clinical practice in Gamma Knife treatments is generally based on MRI anatomical information alone. However, the joint use of MRI and PET images can be useful for considering both anatomical and metabolic information about the lesion to be treated. In this paper we present a co-segmentation method to integrate the segmented Biological Target Volume (BTV), using [ 11 C]-Methionine-PET (MET-PET) images, and the segmented Gross Target Volume (GTV), on the respective co-registered MR images. The resulting volume gives enhanced brain tumor information to be used in stereotactic neuro-radiosurgery treatment planning. GTV often does not match entirely with BTV, which provides metabolic information about brain lesions. For this reason, PET imaging is valuable and it could be used to provide complementary information useful for treatment planning. In this way, BTV can be used to modify GTV, enhancing Clinical Target Volume (CTV) delineation. A novel fully automatic multimodal PET/MRI segmentation method for Leksell Gamma Knife ® treatments is proposed. This approach improves and combines two computer-assisted and operator-independent single modality methods, previously developed and validated, to segment BTV and GTV from PET and MR images, respectively. In addition, the GTV is utilized to combine the superior contrast of PET images with the higher spatial resolution of MRI, obtaining a new BTV, called BTV MRI . A total of 19 brain metastatic tumors, undergone stereotactic neuro-radiosurgery, were retrospectively analyzed. A framework for the evaluation of multimodal PET/MRI segmentation is also presented. Overlap-based and spatial distance-based metrics were considered to quantify similarity concerning PET and MRI segmentation approaches. Statistics was also included to measure correlation among the different segmentation processes. Since it is not possible to define a gold-standard CTV according to both MRI and PET images without treatment response assessment

  2. Gamma Knife Treatment of Growing Vestibular Schwannoma in Norway: A Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varughese, Jobin Kotakkathu; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Pedersen, Paal-Henning; Mahesparan, Ruby; Lund-Johansen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has been increasingly used in the treatment of vestibular schwannoma (VS). Very few studies relate tumor control and post-treatment growth rates to pretreatment growth rates. Methods and Materials: We prospectively included 45 consecutive VS patients who were initially treated conservatively and then received GKRS between 2000 and 2007 because of demonstrated tumor growth. Pretreatment and post-treatment tumor volumes were estimated. Patients underwent audiograms, reported their symptoms, and responded to the Short Form General Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire on each visit. Results: Volume doubling times before and after treatment were 1.36 years (95% confidence intervals, 1.14-1.68) and −13.1 years (95% confidence intervals, −111.0 to −6.94), respectively. Tumor control, defined as a post-GKRS growth rate ≤0, was achieved in 71.1% of patients, with highest odds for tumor control among older patients and those with larger tumors. The 5-year retreatment-free survival rate was 93.9% (95% confidence intervals, 76.5-98.5). None of the clinical endpoints investigated showed statistically significant changes after GKRS, but improvement was seen in a few SF-36 parameters. Conclusions: GKRS alters the natural course of the tumor by reducing growth. Mathematic models yield poorer tumor control rates than those found by clinical assessment. Symptoms were unaffected by treatment, but quality of life was improved.

  3. Gamma Knife Treatment of Growing Vestibular Schwannoma in Norway: A Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varughese, Jobin Kotakkathu, E-mail: jobinv@gmail.com [Institute of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Wentzel-Larsen, Tore [Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Eastern and Southern Norway, Oslo (Norway); Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Oslo (Norway); Pedersen, Paal-Henning [Institute of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Neurosurgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Mahesparan, Ruby [Department of Neurosurgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Lund-Johansen, Morten [Institute of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Neurosurgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has been increasingly used in the treatment of vestibular schwannoma (VS). Very few studies relate tumor control and post-treatment growth rates to pretreatment growth rates. Methods and Materials: We prospectively included 45 consecutive VS patients who were initially treated conservatively and then received GKRS between 2000 and 2007 because of demonstrated tumor growth. Pretreatment and post-treatment tumor volumes were estimated. Patients underwent audiograms, reported their symptoms, and responded to the Short Form General Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire on each visit. Results: Volume doubling times before and after treatment were 1.36 years (95% confidence intervals, 1.14-1.68) and -13.1 years (95% confidence intervals, -111.0 to -6.94), respectively. Tumor control, defined as a post-GKRS growth rate {<=}0, was achieved in 71.1% of patients, with highest odds for tumor control among older patients and those with larger tumors. The 5-year retreatment-free survival rate was 93.9% (95% confidence intervals, 76.5-98.5). None of the clinical endpoints investigated showed statistically significant changes after GKRS, but improvement was seen in a few SF-36 parameters. Conclusions: GKRS alters the natural course of the tumor by reducing growth. Mathematic models yield poorer tumor control rates than those found by clinical assessment. Symptoms were unaffected by treatment, but quality of life was improved.

  4. Role of the Gamma Knife in the treatment of large lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenowski, T K; Pothiawala, B

    1993-01-01

    A virtual reality dose planning system, DosePlan(R), has been devised to increase the speed and accuracy of multishot dose planning for larger lesions treated in the Leksell Gamma Knife. The accuracy of the dose-planning was sophisticated further by a number of additional quality assurance procedures during the radiological definition of the target. Some aspects of the experience in Chicago are described in respect to the first 600 patients treated in the Gamma Knife. Only 35.4% had a maximum diameter of 35 mm or less. The size of the lesions required multiple-shot dose plans, with an average of 8.9 shots per patient and a tendency to an increasing number of shots with increasing experience. Some specific cases are illustrated to show the effectiveness of the dose-planning methods described.

  5. Dosimetric calculations by Monte Carlo for treatments of radiosurgery with the Leksell Gamma Knife, homogeneous and non homogeneous cases; Calculos dosimetricos por Monte Carlo para tratamientos de radiocirugia con el Leksell Gamma Knife, casos homogeneo y no homogeneo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E.L. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Lallena R, A.M. [Universidad de Granada (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    In this work dose profiles are calculated that are obtained modeling treatments of radiosurgery with the Leksell Gamma Knife. This was made with the simulation code Monte Carlo Penelope for an homogeneous mannequin and one not homogeneous. Its were carried out calculations with the irradiation focus coinciding with the center of the mannequin as in near areas to the bone interface. Each one of the calculations one carries out for the 4 skull treatment that it includes the Gamma Knife and using a model simplified of their 201 sources of {sup 60} Co. It was found that the dose profiles differ of the order of 2% when the isocenter coincides with the center of the mannequin and they ascend to near 5% when the isocenter moves toward the skull. (Author)

  6. Gamma-knife subcaudate tractotomy for treatment-resistant depression and target characteristics: a case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Cheol; Lee, Jung Kyo; Kim, Chan-Hyung; Hong, Jin Pyo; Lee, Do Hee

    2017-01-01

    Stereotactic subcaudate tractotomy has previously been suggested to be an effective treatment for depression. This is the first study to report the use of gamma-knife subcaudate tractotomy for treatment-resistant depression. A 49-year-old woman with major depressive disorder had been treated for 30 years, with nine suicide attempts during that time. The right and left target maximum diameter was 11 mm within 50 % isodose lines. The target was located more posteriorly and inferiorly than the subgenual cingulate target typically used for deep-brain stimulation. The maximum radiation dose was 130 Gy. During the 4 months after surgery, the patient improved gradually from 23 to 4 according to the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and antidepressant medication was discontinued. Target-sized focal lesions were identified and no edema was seen postoperatively. No aggravation or neurologic deficit occurred during the 2.5 years of follow-up. Gamma-knife subcaudate tractotomy for depression is a minimally invasive technique. Investigations of the effectiveness and safety profile in a larger group are warranted.

  7. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: identification of predictors for continued tumor growth and the influence of documented tumor growth preceding radiation treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, F.C.A.; Mulder, J.J.S.; Hanssens, P.E.; Overbeeke, J.J. van; Donders, R.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Graamans, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has become an important treatment modality for vestibular schwannomas. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether tumor growth at the moment of GKRS has any correlation with the outcome. The secondary aim was to identify clinical

  8. SU-E-T-382: Evaluation of Clinical Application and Dosimetric Comparison for Treatment Plans of Gamma Knife and CyberKnife for Arteriovenous Malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical Univer, New Taipei City, Taiwan (R.O.C.) (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze and compare the characteristics of dose distributions between Gamma Knife (GK) and CyberKnife (CK), in treating arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and evaluate the influences on their clinical applications. Methods: Twenty four patients with AVMs treated with CK of prescribed dose (PD) of 16–25 Gy in single fraction were selected. Each patient’s CT images used for CK treatment planning with contours of targets and critical organs were exported and then loaded into the GK planning system. GK treatment plan with the same PD used in CK was generated for each patient. The metrics for dose comparison between GK and CK included conformity index (CI), gradient index (GI) of 75%, 50% and 25% of the PD, heterogeneity index (HI), volume of brain tissues covered by 10 Gy and 12 Gy, maximum dose to brainstem and beam-on time. Paired Samples t-test was used to analyze these metrics for significance (p value). Results: The CI were 0.744 ± 0.075 (GK) and 0.768 ± 0.086 (CK), p = 0.281. The GI75%, GI50%, and GI25% in GK and CK were 1.735 ± 0.100 and 2.439 ± 0.338 (p < 0.001), 3.169 ± 0.265 and 4.972 ± 0.852 (p < 0.001), and 8.650 ± 0.914 and 14.261 ± 2.476 (p < 0.001). The HI were 0.728 ± 0.072 (GK) and 0.313 ± 0.069 (CK), p < 0.001. There were significant differences both for volume of brain tissues covered by 10 Gy and 12 Gy in GK and CK (p < 0.001). GK had smaller maximum dose to brainstem. CK had shorter beam-on time. Conclusion: GK has similar dose conformity as CK, and has better normal tissue sparing but is less efficient than CK.

  9. SU-E-T-382: Evaluation of Clinical Application and Dosimetric Comparison for Treatment Plans of Gamma Knife and CyberKnife for Arteriovenous Malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze and compare the characteristics of dose distributions between Gamma Knife (GK) and CyberKnife (CK), in treating arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and evaluate the influences on their clinical applications. Methods: Twenty four patients with AVMs treated with CK of prescribed dose (PD) of 16–25 Gy in single fraction were selected. Each patient’s CT images used for CK treatment planning with contours of targets and critical organs were exported and then loaded into the GK planning system. GK treatment plan with the same PD used in CK was generated for each patient. The metrics for dose comparison between GK and CK included conformity index (CI), gradient index (GI) of 75%, 50% and 25% of the PD, heterogeneity index (HI), volume of brain tissues covered by 10 Gy and 12 Gy, maximum dose to brainstem and beam-on time. Paired Samples t-test was used to analyze these metrics for significance (p value). Results: The CI were 0.744 ± 0.075 (GK) and 0.768 ± 0.086 (CK), p = 0.281. The GI75%, GI50%, and GI25% in GK and CK were 1.735 ± 0.100 and 2.439 ± 0.338 (p < 0.001), 3.169 ± 0.265 and 4.972 ± 0.852 (p < 0.001), and 8.650 ± 0.914 and 14.261 ± 2.476 (p < 0.001). The HI were 0.728 ± 0.072 (GK) and 0.313 ± 0.069 (CK), p < 0.001. There were significant differences both for volume of brain tissues covered by 10 Gy and 12 Gy in GK and CK (p < 0.001). GK had smaller maximum dose to brainstem. CK had shorter beam-on time. Conclusion: GK has similar dose conformity as CK, and has better normal tissue sparing but is less efficient than CK

  10. Quantifying and improving the efficiency of Gamma Knife treatment plans for brain metastases: results of a 1-year audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Gavin; Hatfield, Paul; Loughrey, Carmel; Reiner, Beatrice; Bownes, Peter

    2014-12-01

    A method for quantifying the efficiency of Gamma Knife treatment plans for metastases was previously implemented by the authors to retrospectively identify the least efficient plans and has provided insights into improved planning strategies. The aim of the current work was to ascertain whether those insights led to improved treatment plans. Following completion of the initial study, a 1-year audit of metastasis plans created at St. James's Institute of Oncology was carried out. Audited recent plans were compared with the earlier plans of the initial study, in terms of their efficiency and dosimetric quality. The statistical significance of any differences between relevant plan parameters was quantified by Mann-Whitney U-tests. Comparisons were made between all plans and repeated for a reduced set of plans from which the smallest lesions treated with a single 4-mm shot were excluded. The plan parameters compared were a plan efficiency index (PEI), the number of shots, Paddick conformity index (PCI), gradient index (GI), and percent coverage (of the lesion by the prescription isodose). A total of 157 metastatic lesions were included in the audit and were compared with 241 in the initial study. In a comparison of all cases, the audited plans achieved a higher median PEI score than did the earlier plans from the initial study (1.08 vs 1.02), indicating improved efficiency of the audited plans. When the smallest lesions (for which there was little scope for varying plan strategy) were discounted, the improvement in median PEI score was greater (1.23 vs 1.03, p planning strategy yielding these efficiency improvements did not rely on the use of significantly fewer shots (median 11 vs 11 shots, p = 0.924), nor did it result in significant detriment to dosimetric quality (median coverage 99% vs 99%, median PCI 0.84 vs 0.83, p = 0.449, and median GI 2.72 vs 2.67, p = 0.701, audited plans vs initial plans, respectively). Choice of planning strategy can substantially affect

  11. SU-E-T-471: Improvement of Gamma Knife Treatment Planning Through Tumor Control Probability for Metastatic Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z; Feng, Y; Lo, S; Grecula, J; Mayr, N; Yuh, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The dose–volume histogram (DVH) has been normally accepted as a tool for treatment plan evaluation. However, spatial information is lacking in DVH. As a supplement to the DVH in three-dimensional treatment planning, the differential DVH (DDVH) provides the spatial variation, the size and magnitude of the different dose regions within a region of interest, which can be incorporated into tumor control probability model. This study was to provide a method in evaluating and improving Gamma Knife treatment planning. Methods: 10 patients with brain metastases from different primary tumors including melanoma (#1,#4,#5, #10), breast cancer (#2), prostate cancer (#3) and lung cancer (#6–9) were analyzed. By using Leksell GammaPlan software, two plans were prepared for each patient. Special attention was given to the DDVHs that were different for different plans and were used for a comparison between two plans. Dose distribution inside target and tumor control probability (TCP) based on DDVH were calculated, where cell density and radiobiological parameters were adopted from literature. The plans were compared based on DVH, DDVH and TCP. Results: Using DVH, the coverage and selectivity were the same between plans for 10 patients. DDVH were different between two plans for each patient. The paired t-test showed no significant difference in TCP between the two plans. For brain metastases from melanoma (#1, #4–5), breast cancer (#2) and lung cancer (#6–8), the difference in TCP was less than 5%. But the difference in TCP was about 6.5% for patient #3 with the metastasis from prostate cancer, 10.1% and 178.7% for two patients (#9–10) with metastasis from lung cancer. Conclusion: Although DVH provides average dose–volume information, DDVH provides differential dose– volume information with respect to different regions inside the tumor. TCP provides radiobiological information and adds additional information on improving treatment planning as well as adaptive

  12. SU-E-T-471: Improvement of Gamma Knife Treatment Planning Through Tumor Control Probability for Metastatic Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Z [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Feng, Y [East Carolina Univ, Rockville, MD (United States); Lo, S [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Grecula, J [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Mayr, N; Yuh, W [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The dose–volume histogram (DVH) has been normally accepted as a tool for treatment plan evaluation. However, spatial information is lacking in DVH. As a supplement to the DVH in three-dimensional treatment planning, the differential DVH (DDVH) provides the spatial variation, the size and magnitude of the different dose regions within a region of interest, which can be incorporated into tumor control probability model. This study was to provide a method in evaluating and improving Gamma Knife treatment planning. Methods: 10 patients with brain metastases from different primary tumors including melanoma (#1,#4,#5, #10), breast cancer (#2), prostate cancer (#3) and lung cancer (#6–9) were analyzed. By using Leksell GammaPlan software, two plans were prepared for each patient. Special attention was given to the DDVHs that were different for different plans and were used for a comparison between two plans. Dose distribution inside target and tumor control probability (TCP) based on DDVH were calculated, where cell density and radiobiological parameters were adopted from literature. The plans were compared based on DVH, DDVH and TCP. Results: Using DVH, the coverage and selectivity were the same between plans for 10 patients. DDVH were different between two plans for each patient. The paired t-test showed no significant difference in TCP between the two plans. For brain metastases from melanoma (#1, #4–5), breast cancer (#2) and lung cancer (#6–8), the difference in TCP was less than 5%. But the difference in TCP was about 6.5% for patient #3 with the metastasis from prostate cancer, 10.1% and 178.7% for two patients (#9–10) with metastasis from lung cancer. Conclusion: Although DVH provides average dose–volume information, DDVH provides differential dose– volume information with respect to different regions inside the tumor. TCP provides radiobiological information and adds additional information on improving treatment planning as well as adaptive

  13. Gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomida, Mihoko; Hayashi, Motohiro; Kawakami, Yoriko; Ishimaru, Jun-ichi

    2009-01-01

    Gamma knife surgery (GKS) has been employed for treating intractable pain such as trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and pain relief has been gained from the treatment, however, little is understood about the side effects of other sensitivities induced from GKS. We assessed ten patients (four men and six women; mean age 67 years) with TN who were investigated by questionnaire for symptoms and visual analog scale (VAS) of pain, and their threshold of touch sensation was examined using Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, cold sensation and allodynia before and after GKS. MR and CT images were obtained after a Leksell head frame was applied to the head parallel to the trigeminal nerve. These images were uploaded to a computer system and retro-Gasserian area planned the target was correctly marked on the images of a computer in which gamma planning software was installed. All patients were irradiated with a maximum dose of 90 Gy at retro-Gasserian using a 4 mm collimator. The mean±standard deviation (SD) of VAS of pain was 8.5±1.3 and 8 patients had facial paresthesia before GKS. All patients experienced a significant reduction in pain without side effects such as effect on the peripheral nerves without 6 month after GKS. Allodynia, facial paresthesia or cold sensation numbness occurred in the patients before GKS disappeared according to complete pain relief. These results suggest that GKS is a safe and effective treatment for TN. (author)

  14. Results of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in Acromegaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzin, Alberto; Spatola, Giorgio; Losa, Marco; Picozzi, Piero; Mortini, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Single-session radiosurgery with Gamma Knife (GK) may be a potential adjuvant treatment in acromegaly. We analyzed the safety and efficacy of GK in patients who had previously received maximal surgical debulking at our hospital. Methods. The study was a retrospective analysis of hormonal, radiological, and ophthalmologic data collected in a predefined protocol from 1994 to 2009. The mean age at treatment was 42.3 years (range 22–67 yy). 103 acromegalic patients participated in the study. The median follow-up was 71 months (IQ range 43–107). All patients were treated with GK for residual or recurrent GH-secreting adenoma. Results. Sixty-three patients (61.2%) reached the main outcome of the study. The rate of remission was 58.3% at 5 years (95% CI 47.6–69.0%). Other 15 patients (14.6%) were in remission after GK while on treatment with somatostatin analogues. No serious side effects occurred after GK. Eight patients (7.8%) experienced a new deficit of pituitary function. New cases of hypogonadism, hypothyroidism, and hypoadrenalism occurred in 4 of 77 patients (5.2%), 3 of 95 patients (3.2%), and 6 of 100 patients at risk (6.0%), respectively. Conclusion. In a highly selected group of acromegalic patients, GK treatment had good efficacy and safety. PMID:22518119

  15. Results of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Franzin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Single-session radiosurgery with Gamma Knife (GK may be a potential adjuvant treatment in acromegaly. We analyzed the safety and efficacy of GK in patients who had previously received maximal surgical debulking at our hospital. Methods. The study was a retrospective analysis of hormonal, radiological, and ophthalmologic data collected in a predefined protocol from 1994 to 2009. The mean age at treatment was 42.3 years (range 22–67 yy. 103 acromegalic patients participated in the study. The median follow-up was 71 months (IQ range 43–107. All patients were treated with GK for residual or recurrent GH-secreting adenoma. Results. Sixty-three patients (61.2% reached the main outcome of the study. The rate of remission was 58.3% at 5 years (95% CI 47.6–69.0%. Other 15 patients (14.6% were in remission after GK while on treatment with somatostatin analogues. No serious side effects occurred after GK. Eight patients (7.8% experienced a new deficit of pituitary function. New cases of hypogonadism, hypothyroidism, and hypoadrenalism occurred in 4 of 77 patients (5.2%, 3 of 95 patients (3.2%, and 6 of 100 patients at risk (6.0%, respectively. Conclusion. In a highly selected group of acromegalic patients, GK treatment had good efficacy and safety.

  16. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Choroidal Hemangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yun Taek; Kang, Se Woong; Lee, Jung-Il

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with choroidal hemangioma (CH), a benign ocular hamartoma, frequently presents with visual disturbance as a result of exudative retinal detachment (RD), which originates in subretinal fluid accumulation. We report our experience using the Leksell Gamma Knife in the management of symptomatic CH. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with symptomatic CH (circumscribed form in 3 patients and diffuse form in 4) were treated with the Leksell Gamma Knife at our institution during a 7-year period. All patients presented with exudative RD involving the macula that resulted in severe visual deterioration. The prescription dose to the target margin was 10 Gy in all cases. The mean tumor volume receiving the prescription dose was 536 mm 3 (range, 151–1,057). The clinical data were analyzed in a retrospective fashion after a mean follow-up of 34.4 months (range, 9–76). Results: The resolution of exudative RD was achieved within 6 months, and the visual acuity of the affected eye had improved at the latest follow-up examination (p = .018) in all patients. No recurrence of exudative RD occurred. Thinning of the CHs was observed in most patients; however, symptomatic radiation toxicity had not developed in any of the patients. Conclusion: Symptomatic CHs can be safely and effectively managed with Gamma Knife radiosurgery using a marginal dose of 10 Gy.

  17. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Choroidal Hemangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yun Taek; Kang, Se Woong [Department of Ophthalmology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Il, E-mail: jilee@skku.edu [Department of Neurosurgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Patients with choroidal hemangioma (CH), a benign ocular hamartoma, frequently presents with visual disturbance as a result of exudative retinal detachment (RD), which originates in subretinal fluid accumulation. We report our experience using the Leksell Gamma Knife in the management of symptomatic CH. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with symptomatic CH (circumscribed form in 3 patients and diffuse form in 4) were treated with the Leksell Gamma Knife at our institution during a 7-year period. All patients presented with exudative RD involving the macula that resulted in severe visual deterioration. The prescription dose to the target margin was 10 Gy in all cases. The mean tumor volume receiving the prescription dose was 536 mm{sup 3} (range, 151-1,057). The clinical data were analyzed in a retrospective fashion after a mean follow-up of 34.4 months (range, 9-76). Results: The resolution of exudative RD was achieved within 6 months, and the visual acuity of the affected eye had improved at the latest follow-up examination (p = .018) in all patients. No recurrence of exudative RD occurred. Thinning of the CHs was observed in most patients; however, symptomatic radiation toxicity had not developed in any of the patients. Conclusion: Symptomatic CHs can be safely and effectively managed with Gamma Knife radiosurgery using a marginal dose of 10 Gy.

  18. Toxicity of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in the Treatment of Intracranial Tumors in Patients With Collagen Vascular Diseases or Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowell, Dot [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Bourland, J. Daniel; Guzman, Allan F. de; Ekstrand, Kenneth E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Ellis, Thomas L. [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lovato, James F. [Division of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Shaw, Edward G.; Urbanic, James J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Chan, Michael D., E-mail: mchan@wfubmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess toxicity in patients with either a collagen vascular disease (CVD) or multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with intracranial radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Between January 2004 and April 2009, 6 patients with MS and 14 patients with a CVD were treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for intracranial tumors. Treated lesions included 15 total brain metastases in 7 patients, 11 benign brain tumors, 1 low grade glioma, and 1 cavernous malformation. Toxicities were graded by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute/Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. 'Rare toxicities' were characterized as those reported in the scientific literature at an incidence of <5%. Results: Median follow-up time was 16 months. Median dose to the tumor margin was 13.0 Gy (range, 12-21 Gy). Median size of tumor was 5.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.14-7.8 cm{sup 3}). Of the 14 patients with CVD, none experienced a Grade 3 or 4 toxicity or a toxicity characterized as rare. Of the 6 patients with MS, 3 experienced rare toxicities, and two of these were Grade 3 toxicities. Rare complications included a patient experiencing both communicating hydrocephalus and facial nerve palsy, as well as 2 additional patients with motor cranial nerve palsy. High-grade toxicities included the patient with an acoustic neuroma requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement for obstructive hydrocephalus, and 1 patient with a facial nerve schwannoma who experienced permanent facial nerve palsy. Interval between radiosurgery and high-grade toxicities ranged from 1 week to 4 months. Conclusions: Our series suggests that patients with MS who receive GKRS may be at increased risk of rare and high-grade treatment-related toxicity. Given the time course of toxicity, treatment-related edema or demyelination represent potential mechanisms.

  19. A formalism for independent checking of Gamma Knife dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai Jensan; Engler, Mark J.; Rivard, Mark J.; Mahajan, Anita; Borden, Jonathan A.; Zheng Zhen

    2001-01-01

    For stereotactic radiosurgery using the Leksell Gamma Knife system, it is important to perform a pre-treatment verification of the maximum dose calculated with the Leksell GammaPlan[reg] (D LGP ) stereotactic radiosurgery system. This verification can be incorporated as part of a routine quality assurance (QA) procedure to minimize the chance of a hazardous overdose. To implement this procedure, a formalism has been developed to calculate the dose D CAL (X,Y,Z,d av ,t) using the following parameters: average target depth (d av ), coordinates (X,Y,Z) of the maximum dose location or any other dose point(s) to be verified, 3-dimensional (3-dim) beam profiles or off-center-ratios (OCR) of the four helmets, helmet size i, output factor O i , plug factor P i , each shot j coordinates (x,y,z) i,j , and shot treatment time (t i,j ). The average depth of the target d av was obtained either from MRI/CT images or ruler measurements of the Gamma Knife Bubble Head Frame. D CAL and D LGP were then compared to evaluate the accuracy of this independent calculation. The proposed calculation for an independent check of D LGP has been demonstrated to be accurate and reliable, and thus serves as a QA tool for Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery

  20. Principles and practice of gamma knife radiosurgery: a review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data sources: A retrospective MEDLINE search was used to find all gamma knife radiosurgery studies published from 1967 to 12th March 2005 and strict inclusion criteria were applied. Study selection: Limited to the review articles in the human study with the key word of gamma knife radiosurgery. Data extraction: In each ...

  1. Gamma knife radiosurgery of acoustic neurinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertalanffy, A.; Dietrich, W.; Aichholzer, M.; Kitz, K.; Heimberger, K.; Brix, R.

    2001-01-01

    The authors report on their series of 40 patients with 41 acoustic neurinomas (ACNs), including one patient with bilateral acoustic neurinomas suffering from neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF II) who were treated with the gamma knife unit at their institution between August 1992 and October 1995. Of these 41 tumours, 21 ACNs had been operated on before (l to 4 times), 20 ACNs were exclusively treated by gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS). The maximal axial tumour diameter ranged from 6 to 33 mm (median: 25 mm), the maximal transverse tumour diameter ranged from 7 mm to 36 mm (median: 16 mm). The dose distributed to the tumour margin was 10 to 17 Gy (median: 12 Gy) by enclosing the tumour with the 40 % to 95 % isodose line (median: 50 % isodose line) and using 1 to 12 isocenters (median: 5 isocenters). Central loss of contrast enhancement was observed in 78 % of the patients within six to 12 months after radiosurgery. Thirty-two patients were observed over a minimum follow up period of at least 36 months, 9 patients were lost to follow up as they died of unrelated causes or refused further check-ups. Within the follow up period of up to seven years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) control scans revealed the tumour diameter stable or decreased in 29 cases and increased in three tumours. Of 14 patients with useful hearing before treatment, 9 patients were examined in addition to pure tone audiogramm by measurement of brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) one to four years after radiosurgery. None of three patients showed a postoperative loss of the cochlea function. According to slight alterations of the cochlea function (cochlea summating action potential), pure tone audiometry of those patients revealed only slight changes of the hearing level (HL) within a maximum range of ±15 Decibel (dB). The hearing threshold improved in two, was stable in four and deteriorated in three patients, respectively. We observed postradiosurgical aggravation of a pre-existing facial

  2. SU-D-BRB-04: Plan Quality Comparison of Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) for Gamma Knife and VMAT Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeling, V; Algan, O; Ahmad, S; Hossain, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare treatment plan quality of intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for VMAT (RapidArc) and Gamma Knife (GK) systems. Methods: Ten patients with 24 tumors (seven with 1–2 and three with 4–6 lesions), previously treated with GK 4C (prescription doses ranging from 14–23 Gy) were re-planned for RapidArc. Identical contour sets were kept on MRI images for both plans with tissues assigned a CT number of zero. RapidArc plans were performed using 6 MV flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams with dose rate of 1400 MU/minute using two to eight arcs with the following combinations: 2 full coplanar arcs and the rest non-coplanar half arcs. Beam selection was based on target depth. Areas that penetrated more than 10 cm of tissue were avoided by creating smaller arcs or using avoidance sectors in optimization. Plans were optimized with jaw tracking and a high weighting to the normal-brain-tissue and Normal-Tissue-Objective without compromising PTV coverage. Plans were calculated on a 1 mm grid size using AAA algorithm and then normalized so that 99% of each target volume received the prescription dose. Plan quality was assessed by target coverage using Paddick Conformity Index (PCI), sparing of normal-brain-tissue through analysis of V4, V8, and V12 Gy, and integral dose. Results: In all cases critical structure dose criteria were met. RapidArc had a higher PCI than GK plans for 23 out of 24 lesions. The average PCI was 0.76±0.21 for RapidArc and 0.46±0.20 for GK plans (p≤0.001), respectively. Integral dose and normal-brain-tissue doses for all criteria were lower for RapidArc in nearly all patients. The average ratio of GK to RapidArc plans was 1.28±0.27 (p=0.018), 1.31±0.25 (p=0.017), 1.81±0.43 (p=0.005), and 1.50±0.61 (p=0.006) for V4, V8, and V12 Gy, and integral dose, respectively. Conclusion: VMAT was capable of producing higher quality treatment plans than GK when using optimal beam geometries and proper optimization techniques.

  3. The Importance of the Conformality, Heterogeneity, and Gradient Indices in Evaluating Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Treatment Plans for Intracranial Meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balagamwala, Ehsan H. [Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Suh, John H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rosa Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Barnett, Gene H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Rosa Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Khan, Mohammad K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Neyman, Gennady [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cai, Rong S. [Children' s Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Vogelbaum, Michael A. [Department of Neurosurgery, Rosa Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Novak, Eric [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chao, Samuel T., E-mail: chaos@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rosa Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between the conformality index (CIn), heterogeneity index (HIn), and gradient index (GIn) and the development of toxicity in patients treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for intracranial meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Treatment records of patients treated from 1997 to 2009 with at least 6 months of follow-up were reviewed. The following parameters were collected: CIn, HIn, GIn (ratio of the volume receiving half the prescription isodose to the volume receiving the full prescription isodose), brainstem (BS) maximum dose (MD), BS volume receiving {>=}12 Gy (V12), optic apparatus (OA) MD, OA V8 Gy, OA V10, number of isocenters, number of isocenters outside target volume, and the occurrence of six toxicities. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression modeling were used for analysis. Results: This study included 145 patients (148 meningiomas) with a median follow-up time of 27 months (range, 6-113.9 months). The majority of meningiomas were located in the skull base (53%). The median prescription dose was 13 Gy (range, 10-24 Gy) to the 51.50% (range, 50-92%) isodose. A lower HIn was correlated with a higher GIn (p = 0.007). CIn was not associated with any toxicity. Higher HIn was associated with the development of dizziness (odds ratio [OR] 1.9; p = 0.02), whereas a lower GIn was associated with motor deficits (OR 0.38; p = 0.04) and auditory changes (OR 0.59; p = 0.04). The OA MD, V8, and V12 were not associated with visual changes, but visual changes were associated with a higher number of isocenters outside the target volume (OR 1.93; p = 0.07). BS V12 was correlated with the development of auditory changes (OR 1.05; p = 0.05), whereas patients with higher BS MD tended to have increased toxicity. Conclusions: Close attention must be paid to all three indices (CIn, HIn, GIn) when optimal treatment plans are determined. We recommend that the target CIn should be {<=}2.0, the HIn {<=}2.0, and the GIn {>=}3

  4. Predictive Nomogram for the Durability of Pain Relief From Gamma Knife Radiation Surgery in the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, John T.; Nida, Adrian M.; Isom, Scott; Marshall, Kopriva; Bourland, John D.; Laxton, Adrian W.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Chan, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine factors associated with the durability of stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2008, 446 of 777 patients with TN underwent SRS and had evaluable follow-up in our electronic medical records and phone interview records. The median follow-up was 21.2 months. The Barrow Neurologic Institute (BNI) pain scale was used to determine pre- and post-SRS pain. Dose-volume anatomical measurements, Burchiel pain subtype, pain quality, prior procedures, and medication usage were included in this retrospective cohort to identify factors impacting the time to BNI 4-5 pain relapse by using Cox proportional hazard regression. An internet-based nomogram was constructed based on predictive factors of durable relief pre- and posttreatment at 6-month intervals. Results: Rates of freedom from BNI 4-5 failure at 1, 3, and 5 years were 84.5%, 70.4%, and 46.9%, respectively. Pain relief was BNI 1-3 at 1, 3, and 5 years in 86.1%, 74.3%, and 51.3% of type 1 patients; 79.3%, 46.2%, and 29.3% of type 2 patients; and 62.7%, 50.2%, and 25% of atypical facial pain patients. BNI type 1 pain score was achieved at 1, 3, and 5 years in 62.9%, 43.5%, and 22.0% of patients with type 1 pain and in 47.5%, 25.2%, and 9.2% of type 2 patients, respectively. Only 13% of patients with atypical facial pain achieved BNI 1 response; 42% of patients developed post-Gamma Knife radiation surgery (GKRS) trigeminal dysfunction. Multivariate analysis revealed that post-SRS numbness (hazard ratio [HR], 0.47; P<.0001), type 1 (vs type 2) TN (HR, 0.6; P=.02), and improved post-SRS BNI score at 6 months (HR, 0.009; P<.0001) were predictive of a durable pain response. Conclusions: The durability of SRS for TN depends on the presenting Burchiel pain type, the post-SRS BNI score, and the presence of post-SRS facial numbness. The durability of pain relief can be estimated pre- and posttreatment by using our

  5. Recent treatment strategies for arteriovenous malformations in children and adolescents. Long-term results of gamma knife radiosurgery and recent noninvasive radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hiroshi K

    2006-01-01

    Although pediatric intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) presenting as intracerebral hematomas are usually treated with microsurgery, radiosurgery is indicated for AVMs in eloquent areas. Long-term results of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) and recent noninvasive treatment are reported. Twenty-four patients aged 10 to 19 years (14 male and 10 female) were treated from 1991 through 1997. The mean follow-up period was 10 years and 3 months. Most patients presented with bleeding and had AVMs in functional areas or deep within the brain. Before GKRS, embolization was performed in 7 patients and microsurgical extirpation was performed in 2 patients. The AVM volume was 0.07 to 22.4 ml at the time of radiosurgery. Complete angiographic obliteration of the AVM was achieved in 88.8% of patients. Two patients underwent GKRS a second time to treat residual nidi. One of 6 patients who did not undergo imaging examinations had bleeding; however, the others patients were healthy and working or attending college. Paralysis due to damage of the internal capsule developed after the first treatment of a grade 5 AVM and after the second treatment of a grade 6 AVM. Late or delayed complications, such as necrosis, cyst formation, bleeding after obliteration, and radiation-induced tumors, did not occur. These results suggest that GKRS is a safe and effective treatment for children with AVMs in eloquent areas. Frameless radiosurgery (CyberKnife) and recent imaging techniques enabled noninvasive treatment of pediatric AVMs. (author)

  6. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations in children/adolescents and adults. Part II: Differences in obliteration rates, treatment-obliteration intervals, and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolato, Antonio; Lupidi, Francesco; Sandri, Marco F. Dr. Econom.; Foroni, Roberto; Zampieri, Piergiuseppe; Mazza, Carlo; Pasqualin, Alberto; Beltramello, Alberto; Gerosa, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare obliteration rates (OBRs) and treatment-obliteration intervals (TOIs) for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (cAVMs) treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery in children/adolescents and adults; and to determine factors predicting the OBR and TOI in these two populations. Methods and Materials: This study concerned 62 children/adolescents and 193 adults observed for ≥3 years. Fisher exact two-tailed and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests, multiple logistics, and Cox proportional hazard models were used for statistical analysis. Results: The overall OBR was 85.5% in children/adolescents and 87.6% in adults (p 0.671), but children/adolescents showed higher 36-month actuarial OBRs (69.35%) and shorter median TOIs (25.7 months) than adults (66.84% and 28.2 months; p 0.006 and p = 0.017, respectively). In children/adolescents, lower Spetzler-Martin grades (p = 0.043) and younger age (p = 0.019) correlated significantly with OBRs, and lower Spetzler-Martin grades (p 0.024) and noneloquent cAVM locations (p = 0.046) with TOIs. In adults, low flow through the cAVM and 3 volume were associated with both OBR and TOI (p 0.012 and p = 0.002, respectively). Conclusions: The differences in OBRs within 3 years and TOIs, although slight, seem to show that pediatric cAVMs behave differently from those in adults after Gamma Knife radiosurgery

  7. SU-E-T-563: Multi-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery with Extend System of Gamma Knife: Treatment Verification Using Indigenously Designed Patient Simulating Multipurpose Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisht, R; Kale, S; Gopishankar, N; Rath, G; Julka, P; Agarwal, D; Singh, M; Garg, A; Kumar, P; Thulkar, S; Sharma, B [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Aim of the study is to evaluate mechanical and radiological accuracy of multi-fraction regimen and validate Gamma knife based fractionation using newly developed patient simulating multipurpose phantom. Methods: A patient simulating phantom was designed to verify fractionated treatments with extend system (ES) of Gamma Knife however it could be used to validate other radiotherapy procedures as well. The phantom has options to insert various density material plugs and mini CT/MR distortion phantoms to analyze the quality of stereotactic imaging. An additional thorax part designed to predict surface doses at various organ sites. The phantom was positioned using vacuum head cushion and patient control unit for imaging and treatment. The repositioning check tool (RCT) was used to predict phantom positioning under ES assembly. The phantom with special inserts for film in axial, coronal and sagittal plane were scanned with X-Ray CT and the acquired images were transferred to treatment planning system (LGP 10.1). The focal precession test was performed with 4mm collimator and an experimental plan of four 16mm collimator shots was prepared for treatment verification of multi-fraction regimen. The prescription dose of 5Gy per fraction was delivered in four fractions. Each fraction was analyzed using EBT3 films scanned with EPSON 10000XL Scanner. Results: The measurement of 38 RCT points showed an overall positional accuracy of 0.28mm. The mean deviation of 0.28% and 0.31 % were calculated as CT and MR image distortion respectively. The radiological focus accuracy test showed its deviation from mechanical center point of 0.22mm. The profile measurement showed close agreement between TPS planned and film measured dose. At tolerance criteria of 1%/1mm gamma index analysis showed a pass rate of > 95%. Conclusion: Our results show that the newly developed multipurpose patient simulating phantom is highly suitable for the verification of fractionated stereotactic

  8. Glycerol rhizotomy versus gamma knife radiosurgery for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia: An analysis of patients treated at one institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henson, Clarissa Febles; Goldman, H. Warren; Rosenwasser, Robert H.; Downes, M. Beverly; Bednarz, Greg; Pequignot, Edward C.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Curran, Walter J.; Andrews, David W.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia (TN) has been treated with a variety of minimally invasive techniques, all of which have been compared with microvascular decompression. For patients not considered good surgical candidates, percutaneous retrogasserian glycerol rhizotomy (GR) and gamma knife (GK) radiosurgery are two minimally invasive techniques in common practice worldwide and used routinely at Jefferson Hospital for Neuroscience. Using a common pain scale outcomes questionnaire, we sought to analyze efficacies and morbidities of both treatments. Methods and Materials: Between June 1994 and December 2002, 79 patients were treated with GR and 109 patients underwent GK for the treatment of TN. GR was performed with fluoroscopic guidance as an overnight inpatient procedure. GK was performed using a single 4-mm shot positioned at the root exit zone of the trigeminal nerve. Radiation doses of 70-90 Gy prescribed to the 100% isodose line were used. Treatment outcomes including pain response, pain recurrence, treatment failure, treatment-related side effects, and overall patient satisfaction with GK and GR were compared using a common outcomes scale. Using the Barrow Neurologic Institute pain scale, patients were asked to define their level of pain both before and after treatment: I, no pain and no pain medication required; I, occasional pain not requiring medication; IIIa, no pain and pain medication used; IIIb, some pain adequately controlled with medication; IV, some pain not adequately controlled with medication; and V, severe pain with no relief with medication. We used posttreatment scores of I, II, IIIa, and IIIb to identify treatment success, whereas scores of IV and V were considered treatment failure. Results were compiled from respondents and analyzed using SAS software. Statistical comparisons used log-rank test, univariate and multivariate logistic regression, Fisher's exact test, and Wilcoxon test with significance established at p < 0

  9. Role of gamma knife radiosurgery in neurosurgery. Past and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Tomoyuki; Shin, Masahiro; Saito, Nobuhito

    2010-01-01

    The gamma knife was the first radiosurgical device developed at the Karolinska Institute in 1967. Stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife has been widely accepted in clinical practice and has contributed to the development of neurosurgery. More than 500,000 patients have been treated by gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery so far, and the method is now an indispensable neurosurgical tool. Here we review long-term outcomes and development of stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife and discuss its future perspectives. The primary role of stereotactic radiosurgery is to control small well-demarcated lesions such as metastatic brain tumors, meningiomas, schwannomas, and pituitary adenomas while preserving the function of surrounding brain tissue. The gamma knife has been used as a primary treatment or in combination with surgery, and some applications have been accepted as standard treatment in the field of neurosurgery. Treatment of cerebral arteriovenous malformations has also been drastically changed after emergence of this technology. Controlling functional disorders is another role of stereotactic radiosurgery. There is a risk of radiation-induced adverse events, which are usually mild and less frequent. However, especially in large or invasive lesions, those risks are not negligible and pose limitations. Advancement of irradiation technology and dose planning software have enabled more sophisticated and safer treatment, and further progress will contribute to better treatment outcomes not only for brain lesions but also for cervical lesions with less invasive treatment. (author)

  10. Gamma knife radiosurgery for brainstem arteriovenous malformations: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massager, N; Régis, J; Kondziolka, D; Njee, T; Levivier, M

    2000-12-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) for the treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) located within the brainstem. The results of GKS performed in 87 patients with brainstem AVMs at two centers with experienced physicians are reviewed. The mean patient age was 37 years and the population included 19 children. The male/female ratio was 56:31. The malformation was located in the upper brainstem in 52 patients. Seventy-four percent of the patients had suffered a hemorrhage before GKS. For 70% of the patients no other treatment had been proposed before GKS. The mean AVM volume was 1.3 cm3. The lesions were treated with one to eight isocenters, with a margin dose ranging between 11.5 Gy and 30 Gy. The mean clinical follow-up period was 3.2 years. Ninety-five percent of the patients improved or remained neurologically stable. Rebleeding occurred in three patients at 3, 6, and 16 months, respectively, after GKS. Two patients in whom rebleeding occured recovered, and one died. The AVM obliteration rate was 63% at 2 years and 73% at 3 years after GKS. A second GKS was performed in six patients in whom only partial obliteration was demonstrated on angiography 3 years after the first procedure. Gamma knife radiosurgery may be a valuable first-choice therapy for the treatment of AVMs located within the brainstem.

  11. Research about combination of Gamma Knife and cobalt-60 radiation therapy to treat hypophysoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Yueming; Zhao Xinping; Song Xiang; Wu Wei; Huang Bai

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To probe the therapeutic effectiveness of combination of Gamma Knife and cobalt-60 radiotherapy. Methods: 80 Hypophysoma patients who have been randomly grouped into two groups. Combination of Gamma Knife and cobalt-60 radiotherapy group and single Gamma knife group. Results: The therapeutic effectiveness of combination of Gamma Knife and cobalt-60 radiation therapy group was higher than that of single Gamma Knife group. Conclusion: The hospital that treat Hypophysoma with single Gamma Knife should add cobalt-60 radiotherapy in order to increase the local Hypophysoma dose

  12. SU-E-T-213: Comparison of Treatment Efficiency of Gamma Knife SRS Plans for Brain Metastases with Different Planning Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Y; Huang, Z; Lo, S; Mayr, N; Yuh, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To improve Gamma Knife SRS treatment efficiency for brain metastases and compare the differences of treatment time and radiobiological effects between two different planning methods of automatic filling and manual placement of shots with inverse planning. Methods: T1-weighted MRI images with gadolinium contrast from five patients with a single brain metastatic-lesion were used in this retrospective study. Among them, two were from primary breast cancer, two from primary melanoma cancer and one from primary prostate cancer. For each patient, two plans were generated in Leksell GammaPlan10.1.1 for radiosurgical treatment with a Leksell GammaKnife Perfexion machine: one with automatic filling, automatic sector configuration and inverse optimization (Method1); and the other with manual placement of shots, manual setup of collimator sizes, manual setup of sector blocking and inverse optimization (Method2). Dosimetric quality of the plans was evaluated with parameters of Coverage, Selectivity, Gradient-Index and DVH. Beam-on Time, Number-of-Shots and Tumor Control Probability(TCP) were compared for the two plans while keeping their dosimetric quality very similar. Relative reduction of Beam-on Time and Number-of-Shots were calculated as the ratios among the two plans and used for quantitative analysis. Results: With very similar dosimetric and radiobiological plan quality, plans created with Method 2 had significantly reduced treatment time. Relative reduction of Beam-on Time ranged from 20% to 51 % (median:29%,p=0.001), and reduction of Number-of-Shots ranged from 5% to 67% (median:40%,p=0.0002), respectively. Time of plan creation for Method1 and Method2 was similar, approximately 20 minutes, excluding the time for tumor delineation. TCP calculated for the tumors from differential DVHs did not show significant difference between the two plans (p=0.35). Conclusion: The method of manual setup combined with inverse optimization in LGP for treatment of brain

  13. SU-E-T-213: Comparison of Treatment Efficiency of Gamma Knife SRS Plans for Brain Metastases with Different Planning Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Y [East Carolina Univ, Greenville, NC (United States); Huang, Z [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Lo, S [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Mayr, N; Yuh, W [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To improve Gamma Knife SRS treatment efficiency for brain metastases and compare the differences of treatment time and radiobiological effects between two different planning methods of automatic filling and manual placement of shots with inverse planning. Methods: T1-weighted MRI images with gadolinium contrast from five patients with a single brain metastatic-lesion were used in this retrospective study. Among them, two were from primary breast cancer, two from primary melanoma cancer and one from primary prostate cancer. For each patient, two plans were generated in Leksell GammaPlan10.1.1 for radiosurgical treatment with a Leksell GammaKnife Perfexion machine: one with automatic filling, automatic sector configuration and inverse optimization (Method1); and the other with manual placement of shots, manual setup of collimator sizes, manual setup of sector blocking and inverse optimization (Method2). Dosimetric quality of the plans was evaluated with parameters of Coverage, Selectivity, Gradient-Index and DVH. Beam-on Time, Number-of-Shots and Tumor Control Probability(TCP) were compared for the two plans while keeping their dosimetric quality very similar. Relative reduction of Beam-on Time and Number-of-Shots were calculated as the ratios among the two plans and used for quantitative analysis. Results: With very similar dosimetric and radiobiological plan quality, plans created with Method 2 had significantly reduced treatment time. Relative reduction of Beam-on Time ranged from 20% to 51 % (median:29%,p=0.001), and reduction of Number-of-Shots ranged from 5% to 67% (median:40%,p=0.0002), respectively. Time of plan creation for Method1 and Method2 was similar, approximately 20 minutes, excluding the time for tumor delineation. TCP calculated for the tumors from differential DVHs did not show significant difference between the two plans (p=0.35). Conclusion: The method of manual setup combined with inverse optimization in LGP for treatment of brain

  14. A dosimetric comparison of fan-beam intensity modulated radiotherapy with gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery for treating intermediate intracranial lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Lijun; Xia Ping; Verhey, Lynn J.; Boyer, Arthur L.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate treatment plans for the fan-beam intensity modulated radiotherapy and the Gamma Knife radiosurgery for treating medium-size intracranial lesions (range 4-25 cm 3 ). Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were developed for the Leksell Gamma Knife and a fan-beam inverse treatment planning system for intensity modulated radiotherapy. Treatment plan comparisons were carried out using dose-volume histogram (DVH), tissue-volume ratio (TVR), and maximum dose to the prescription dose (MDPD) ratio. The study was carried out for both simulated targets and clinical targets with irregular shapes and at different locations. Results: The MDPD ratio was significantly greater for the Gamma Knife plans than for the fan-beam IMRT plans. The Gamma Knife plans produced equivalent TVR values to the fan-beam IMRT plans. Based on the DVH comparison, the fan-beam IMRT delivered significantly more dose to the normal brain tissue than the Gamma Knife. The results of the comparison were found to be insensitive to the target locations. Conclusion: The Gamma Knife is better than the fan-beam IMRT in sparing normal brain tissue while producing equivalent tumor dose conformity for treating medium-size intracranial lesions. However, the target dose homogeneity is significantly better for the fan-beam IMRT than for the Gamma Knife

  15. Gamma knife radiosurgery under general anesthesia in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Yoshinori; Serizawa, Toru; Nagano, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) is an important treatment option for pediatric intracranial diseases, such as arteriovenous malformations and brain tumors. To perform GKS in children, general anesthesia is required for placing a stereotactic frame around the head of the patient, who must remain supine for the entire procedure. This report describes the anesthetic management of children who have undergone GKS at our institution. Fifty-one GKS procedures were performed in 43 patients (age range, 2-15 years). Twenty-one patients had arteriovenous malformations, and 14 patients had brain tumors. Twenty-nine patients (67.4%) received general anesthesia. All children 10 years or younger were treated under general anesthesia. General anesthesia for GKS is performed outside of the operating room and involves unique conditions. First, the patients must be transported to multiple sites in the hospital (the neuroangiography suite, the department of radiology for magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography, and the gamma knife unit). Second, general anesthesia must be maintained in a high magnetic field. Third, medical staff, including anesthesiologists, must remain outside the room during irradiation. Safe and efficient general anesthesia is essential for performing GKS in children. (author)

  16. Shielding requirements on-site loading and acceptance testing on the Leksell gamma knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maitz, A.H.; Lunsford, L.D.; Wu, A.; Lindner, G.; Flickinger, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    On August 14, 1987, the first stereotactic radiosurgical procedure using the gamma knife was performed in North America. Located in a self-contained radiosurgical suite in the basement of Presbyterian-University Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This device uses 201 highly focused beams 60Co for the single-treatment closed-skull irradiation of brain lesions localized by stereotactic techniques (radiosurgery). One hundred and fifty-two patients with intracranial arteriovenous malformations or brain tumors were treated in the first year of operation. The Presbyterian University Hospital of Pittsburgh gamma knife is the first such unit in which the 60Co sources were loaded on-site. This effort required us to solve some difficult and unusual problems encountered during site preparation, delivery, and loading of the unit in a busy hospital setting. The solutions developed enabled installation and use of the gamma knife with minimal disruption of hospital activities while maintaining acceptable levels of exposure to radiation. Environmental surveys performed during the loading of the 201 radioactive sources (total, 219 TBq) confirmed that on-site loading is possible and practical. Our experience in the design, construction, and implementation of the first North American gamma knife supports the practicality and safety of on-site loading and may be of value in the planning and development of future gamma knife installations

  17. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Treatment for Metastatic Melanoma of the Trigeminal Nerve and Brainstem: A Case Report and a Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halloran E. Peterson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective and Importance. Brainstem metastases (BSMs are uncommon but serious complications of some cancers. They cause significant neurological deficit, and options for treatment are limited. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for BSMs that prolongs survival and can preserve or in some cases improve neurological function. This case illustrates the use of repeated SRS, specifically Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS for management of a unique brainstem metastasis. Clinical Presentation. This patient presented 5 years after the removal of a lentigo maligna melanoma from her left cheek with left sided facial numbness and paresthesias with no reported facial weakness. Initial MRI revealed a mass on the left trigeminal nerve that appeared to be a trigeminal schwannoma. Intervention. After only limited response to the first GKRS treatment, a biopsy of the tumor revealed it to be metastatic melanoma, not schwannoma. Over the next two years, the patient would receive 3 more GKRS treatments. These procedures were effective in controlling growth in the treated areas, and the patient has maintained a good quality of life. Conclusion. GKRS has proven in this case to be effective in limiting the growth of this metastatic melanoma without acute adverse effects.

  18. Feasibility of identification of gamma knife planning strategies by identification of pareto optimal gamma knife plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giller, C A

    2011-12-01

    The use of conformity indices to optimize Gamma Knife planning is common, but does not address important tradeoffs between dose to tumor and normal tissue. Pareto analysis has been used for this purpose in other applications, but not for Gamma Knife (GK) planning. The goal of this work is to use computer models to show that Pareto analysis may be feasible for GK planning to identify dosimetric tradeoffs. We define a GK plan A to be Pareto dominant to B if the prescription isodose volume of A covers more tumor but not more normal tissue than B, or if A covers less normal tissue but not less tumor than B. A plan is Pareto optimal if it is not dominated by any other plan. Two different Pareto optimal plans represent different tradeoffs between dose to tumor and normal tissue, because neither plan dominates the other. 'GK simulator' software calculated dose distributions for GK plans, and was called repetitively by a genetic algorithm to calculate Pareto dominant plans. Three irregular tumor shapes were tested in 17 trials using various combinations of shots. The mean number of Pareto dominant plans/trial was 59 ± 17 (sd). Different planning strategies were identified by large differences in shot positions, and 70 of the 153 coordinate plots (46%) showed differences of 5mm or more. The Pareto dominant plans dominated other nearby plans. Pareto dominant plans represent different dosimetric tradeoffs and can be systematically calculated using genetic algorithms. Automatic identification of non-intuitive planning strategies may be feasible with these methods.

  19. Gamma knife radiosurgery for medically refractory idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, J.H.; Yoon, Y.S.; Kang, D.W.; Chung, S.S.; Chang, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) has been generally considered as a viable therapeutic option for the management of medically refractory idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (TN). We reviewed our experience with GKS in patients with TN. Between Feb 1996 and May 2006. 77 patients with medical refractory idiopathic TN were treated using GKS. Thirty-six patients who had undergone other previous procedures, previous GKS, or had brain stem lesion, atypical symptoms, were excluded from this study. Pain improvement was achieved in 38 of the patients with TN (pain response rate 92.7 %). Twenty-three patients were pain free and 15 had reduced pain. There were no serious complications. We think that GKS is an effective treatment option for patients with medical refractory idiopathic TN. (author)

  20. Gamma knife radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformation in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Tatsuya [Komaki City Hospital, Aichi (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVM) of 38 children were treated by gamma knife radiosurgery. Their clinical courses and the effect of the treatment in 19 patients who had angiographies are described. There were 21 boys and 17 girls with a mean age of 11.2 years. The initial signs and symptoms were: intracranial hemorrhage in 32, seizures in 4, and headache in 2. Prior to the radiosurgery, craniotomy was performed in 10 patients, ventricular drainage, in 8, ventriculoperitoneal shunting in 4, and intravascular embolization in 3. The AVM was in the parietal lobe in 8 patients, in the thalamus in 7, in the occipital lobe in 5, in the temporal lobe in 4, in the basal ganglia in 4, in the corpus callosum in 3, and in other locations in 8. The mean diameter of the nidus was 18.9 mm. According to Spetzler`s classification of AVM, 23 (60.5%) were grade III, 10 were grade II, 3 were grade IV, and 2 were grade VI. The mean maximum dose was 36.3 Gy, and the mean peripheral dose was 20.2 Gy. Follow-up angiography was done in 19 patients during a mean follow-up period of 14.9 months. Complete occlusion of the nidus was obtained within 1 year in 10 of 15 patients (67%). All 6 patients who underwent angiography 2 years after treatment showed complete obliteration of the AVM. Only 1 patient developed hemiparesis due to radiation necrosis. It is considered that occlusion of AVMs by gamma knife radiosurgery is probably more effective and safer in children than in adults. (author).

  1. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Cushing's Disease and Nelson's Syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marek, J.; Ježková, J.; Hána, V.; Kršek, M.; Liščák, R.; Vladyka, V.; Pecen, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2015), s. 376-384 ISSN 1386-341X Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : Cushing's disease * Nelson's syndrome * Gamma knife surgery * Pituitary adenoma Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 3.407, year: 2015

  2. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for treatment of growing vestibular schwannomas in patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2: a matched cohort study with sporadic vestibular schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruyt, Ivo J; Verheul, Jeroen B; Hanssens, Patrick E J; Kunst, Henricus P M

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) is a tumor syndrome characterized by an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. The hallmark of NF2 is the development of bilateral vestibular schwannomas (VSs), generally by 30 years of age. One of the first-line treatment options for small to medium-large VSs is radiosurgery. Although radiosurgery shows excellent results in sporadic VS, its use in NF2-related VS is still a topic of dispute. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term tumor control, hearing preservation rates, and factors influencing outcome of optimally dosed, contemporary Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for growing VSs in patients with NF2 and compare the findings to data obtained in patients with sporadic VS also treated by means of GKRS. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 47 growing VSs in 34 NF2 patients who underwent GKRS treatment performed with either the Model C or Perfexion Leksell Gamma Knife, with a median margin dose of 11 Gy. Actuarial tumor control rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. For patient- and treatment-related factors, a Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify predictors of outcome. Trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerve function were assessed before and after treatment. NF2-related VS patients were matched 1:1 with sporadic VS patients who were treated in the same institute, and the same indications for treatment, definitions, and dosimetry were used in order to compare outcomes. RESULTS Actuarial tumor control rates in NF2 patients after 1, 3, 5, and 8 years were 98%, 89%, 87%, and 87%, respectively. Phenotype and tumor volume had significant hazard rates of 0.086 and 22.99, respectively, showing that Feiling-Gardner phenotype and a tumor volume not exceeding 6 cm 3 both were associated with significantly better outcome. Actuarial rates of serviceable hearing preservation after 1, 3, 5, and 7 years were 95%, 82%, 59%, and 33%, respectively. None of the patients

  3. Intractable trigeminal neuralgia: A single institution experience in 26 patients treated with stereotactic gamma knife radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, Rufus J.; Duma, Christopher M.; Jacques, Dean B.; Kopyov, Oleg V.; Copcutt, Brian

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: In patients with trigeminal neuralgia, severe pain can persist, or recur despite aggressive medical management and open surgery. Recently, Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used with promising results. We report on our series of 26 patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Materials and Methods: Between 1991 and 1995, 26 patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia were treated at our institution using stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Medical management had failed in all cases. In addition, 13 patients underwent a total of 20 open surgeries, with transient, or no pain relief. There were 19 females, and 7 males. Patient ages ranged from 37 to 87 years, with a median of 74 years. All patients were treated with a 201 source Cobalt-60 Gamma Knife unit. All patients underwent placement of the Leksell frame, followed by MRI scanning and computer treatment planning. The target in all patients was the fifth cranial nerve root entry zone into the brainstem. Twenty-five patients received between 64.3 to 70 Gy prescribed to Dmax in one shot. One patient received 120 Gy to Dmax in one shot. The 4 mm collimator was used in 22 cases, and the 8 mm in 4 cases. Follow-up ranged from 5 to 55 months, with a median of 19 months. Complete resolution (CR) of pain was scored when the patient reported being pain free off all medication. Partial resolution (PR) was scored when the patient reported > 50% pain reduction after Gamma Knife treatment. Results: At last follow-up, 84.6% ((22(26))) reported CR or PR of pain after Gamma Knife treatment. Forty-two percent ((11(26))) of patients reported CR, and 42%((11(26))) reported PR of pain. There was a dose response. In patients receiving < 70 Gy, 25% ((3(12))) reported CR, while 57% ((8(14))) of those receiving ≥ 70 Gy reported CR. Complications occurred in two (8%) patients. One patient developed transient numbness of the face after 70 Gy, and a second patient

  4. A new Gamma Knife registered radiosurgery paradigm: Tomosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, X.; Maciunas, R. J.; Dean, D.

    2007-01-01

    This study proposes and simulates an inverse treatment planning and a continuous dose delivery approach for the Leksell Gamma Knife registered (LGK, Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) which we refer to as 'Tomosurgery'. Tomosurgery uses an isocenter that moves within the irradiation field to continuously deliver the prescribed radiation dose in a raster-scanning format, slice by slice, within an intracranial lesion. Our Tomosurgery automated (inverse) treatment planning algorithm utilizes a two-stage optimization strategy. The first stage reduces the current three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning problem to a series of more easily solved 2D treatment planning subproblems. In the second stage, those 2D treatment plans are assembled to obtain a final 3D treatment plan for the entire lesion. We created Tomosurgery treatment plans for 11 patients who had already received manually-generated LGK treatment plans to treat brain tumors. For the seven cases without critical structures (CS), the Tomosurgery treatment plans showed borderline to significant improvement in within-tumor dose standard deviation (STD) (p 20 or V 30 (i.e., irradiated CS volume that receives ≥20% or ≥30% of the maximum dose) showed no significant improvement in the Tomosurgery treatment plans (p<0.345 and p<0.423, respectively). However, the overall CS dose volume histograms were improved in the Tomosurgery treatment plans. In addition, the LGK Tomosurgery inverse treatment planning required less time than standard of care, forward (manual) LGK treatment planning (i.e., 5-35 min vs 1-3 h) for all 11 cases. We expect that LGK Tomosurgery will speed treatment planning and improve treatment quality, especially for large and/or geometrically complex lesions. However, using only 4 mm collimators could greatly increase treatment plan delivery time for a large brain lesion. This issue is subject to further investigation

  5. Indications of Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Seiji; Takanashi, Masami; Hojyo, Atsufumi; Tanaka, Chiharu; Konishi, Masanori; Nakamura, Hirohiko

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the indication of gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas by analyzing tumor control and possible complications using low marginal doses and conformal multiple shots to fit irregular tumor shapes. The authors evaluated 223 patients with followed-up periods ranging from 5 years to 15 years (mean 7.7 years, median 7.4 years). Marginal doses were 9 to 15 Gy (mean 12.5 Gy, median 12 Gy) with corresponding treatment volumes being between 0.1 and 18.7 cm 3 (mean 2.6 cm 3 , median 1.8 cm 3 ). The number of isocenters varied from 2 to 24 shots (mean 9, median 9.2). The actuarial tumor control rates were 95% at 5 years and 94% at 7 years, respectively. Larger tumors (p=0.0068) and those in younger patients (p=0.093) tended to recur significantly. The preservation rates of useful hearing were 84%, 71%, and 64% at 2, 4, and 7 years, respectively. The most deterioration seemed to occur in cases with elderly patients (p=0.0048). Facial and trigeminal functions were preserved at 100%, and 97.8%, respectively. Amongst all patients, 20.6% developed transient dizziness, with persistent dizziness remaining in 1.5% of the total. Fifty-six other patients not in the long-term evaluation consecutively underwent caloric testing and static stabilometry as well as neurological examinations to evaluate vestibular function in detail, both before and after gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS). The results showed that 90% of the patients had already developed vestibular dysfunction before the treatment despite reported symptoms of dizziness. GKRS did not significantly affect vestibular function. Hydrocephalus was recognized in 5.5% of all patients, and seemed to occur primarily in cases with larger tumors (p=0.0189). GKRS provides a safe and effective therapy for small to medium sized tumors up to 8 cm 3 . Long-term hearing preservation rate may be affected by presbycusis in elderly patients. (author)

  6. Combined embolization and gamma knife radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, W.Y.; Wikholm, G.; Karlsson, B.; Lindquist, C.; Svendsen, P.; Ericson, K.

    1993-01-01

    In a study of 46 patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) the value of combining embolization and gamma knife radiosurgery was assessed. In 35 patients with large grade III to V AVMs (Spetzler-Martin system) staged combined treatment was planned. In 11 patients, radiosurgery complemented embolization for a residual AVM. The number of embolization sessions ranged from 1 to 7 (median 2). Twenty-six patients needed multiple embolization sessions. In 28 patients the grade of AVMs decreased as a result of embolization. In 16 patients collateral feeding vessels developed after embolization which made delineation of the residual nidus difficult. The time lag between the last embolization and radiosurgery ranged from 1 to 24 months (median 4). Nineteen of 35 large grade III to V AVMs were possible to treat by radiosurgery following embolization. In the 46 patients complications occurred in 9 from embolization and in 2 from radiosurgery. Two patients had transient and 9 had permanent neurologic deficits. It is concluded that embolization facilitates radiosurgery for some large AVMs and therefore this combined treatment has a role in the management of AVMs. (orig.)

  7. A simulation study on the dose distribution for a single beam of the gamma knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chin-cheng; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Lee, Chung-chi; Shiau, Cheng-Ying

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of the tissue heterogeneity on the dose distribution for a single beam of the gamma knife. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate both depth and radial profiles of the radiation dose in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms, respectively. The results are compared with the dose distribution calculated using the mathematical model of Gamma Plan, the treatment planning system of the gamma knife. The skull and sinus heterogeneity were simulated by a Teflon shell and an air shell, respectively. It was found that the tissue heterogeneity caused significant perturbation on the absolute depth dose at the focus as well as on the depth-dose distribution near the phantom surface and/or at the interface but little effect on the radial dose distribution. The effect of the beam aperture on the depth-dose distribution was also investigated in this study. (author)

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of the Leksell Gamma Knife: I. Source modelling and calculations in homogeneous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskvin, Vadim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)]. E-mail: vmoskvin@iupui.edu; DesRosiers, Colleen; Papiez, Lech; Timmerman, Robert; Randall, Marcus; DesRosiers, Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2002-06-21

    The Monte Carlo code PENELOPE has been used to simulate photon flux from the Leksell Gamma Knife, a precision method for treating intracranial lesions. Radiation from a single {sup 60}Co assembly traversing the collimator system was simulated, and phase space distributions at the output surface of the helmet for photons and electrons were calculated. The characteristics describing the emitted final beam were used to build a two-stage Monte Carlo simulation of irradiation of a target. A dose field inside a standard spherical polystyrene phantom, usually used for Gamma Knife dosimetry, has been computed and compared with experimental results, with calculations performed by other authors with the use of the EGS4 Monte Carlo code, and data provided by the treatment planning system Gamma Plan. Good agreement was found between these data and results of simulations in homogeneous media. Owing to this established accuracy, PENELOPE is suitable for simulating problems relevant to stereotactic radiosurgery. (author)

  9. Surgical Approaches in Refractory Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: From Leukotomy to Gamma Knife Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Altintas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD is a chronic and debilitating disorder that can cause significant distress and interference with daily functioning and impairment in quality of life, social and familial relationship. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and cognitive-behavioral therapy are currently viewed as the first line treatments of choice for OCD. Approximately 30-40% OCD patients fail to respond to these treatments. Anterior capsulotomy, cingulotomy, limbic leucotomy, subcaudate tractotomy are used for the treatment of refractory OCD. The studies suggested that gamma knife capsulotomy caused improvements in 55-70% refractory OCD patients. Many studies suggest that psychosurgery is a beneficial, well tolerated and safe method. This study aimed to report efficacy, adverse effects and long term effects of surgery techniques especially gamma knife and deep brain stimulation in refractory OCD patients . [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(2.000: 239-250

  10. Ruptured Pseudoaneurysm after Gamma Knife Surgery for Vestibular Schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Mamoru; Kawarabuki, Kentaro; Inoue, Yasuo; Ohta, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Ruptured aneurysms of anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) after radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma (VS) are rare, and no definite treatment has been established for distal AICA pseudoaneurysms. We describe a 61-year-old man who underwent Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for left VS. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed partial regression of the tumor. Twelve years after GKS, he suffered from subarachnoid hemorrhage. Initial angiogram showed no vascular lesions; second left vertebral angiogram, 10 days after admission, demonstrated a pseudoaneurysm in the lateral pontine segment of the left AICA. The proximal portion of the AICA was occluded by a coil. Postoperative MRI revealed an infarction on the left side of the pons and brachium pontis. Although the patient suffered from mild postoperative cerebellar ataxia and facial and abducens nerve palsy, he was discharged 1 month postoperatively requiring no assistance with activities of daily living. Twelve months later, he recovered satisfactorily with a modified Rankin Scale grade of 1, and no recanalization of the aneurysm was found on MR angiography. Endovascular parent artery occlusion for ruptured aneurysms at distal AICA carries the risk of brain stem infarction, but should be considered when no other option is available such as after radiotherapy for VS.

  11. Long-term quality of life and tumour control following gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wangerid, Theresa; Bartek, Jiri; Svensson, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has for the last decades been an established treatment option for patients with small- or medium-sized vestibular schwannomas (VS), although little data is reported on long-term outcome regarding quality of life (QOL) and tumour control in this patient category....... The objective of this study was to investigate long-term QOL and tumour control in GKRS-treated VS patients at our institution....

  12. The journey from proton to gamma knife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2014-01-01

    It was generally accepted by the early 1960s that proton beam radiosurgery was too complex and impractical. The need was seen for a new machine. The beam design had to be as good as a proton beam. It was also decided that a static design was preferable even if the evolution of that notion is no longer clear. Complex collimators were designed that using sources of cobalt-60 could produce beams with characteristics adequately close to those of proton beams. The geometry of the machine was determined including the distance of the sources from the patient the optimal distance between the sources. The first gamma unit was built with private money with no contribution from the Swedish state, which nonetheless required detailed design information in order to ensure radiation safety. This original machine was built with rectangular collimators to produce lesions for thalamotomy for functional work. However, with the introduction of dopamine analogs, this indication virtually disappeared overnight.

  13. Adaptive hypofractionated gamma knife radiosurgery for a large brainstem metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinclair, Georges; Bartek, Jiri; Martin, Heather

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To demonstrate how adaptive hypofractionated radiosurgery by gamma knife (GK) can be successfully utilized to treat a large brainstem metastasis - a novel approach to a challenging clinical situation. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 42-year-old woman, diagnosed with metastatic nonsmall cell lung...... in October 2013 revealed a growing brainstem lesion of 26 mm. Linear accelerator-based radiotherapy and microsurgery were judged contraindicated, why the decision was made to treat the patient with three separate radiosurgical sessions during the course of 1 week, with an 18% tumor volume reduction...

  14. Long-term effects of gamma knife radiosurgery for pediatric craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osuka, Koji; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Kida, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Takayuki; Yoshida, Kazuo; Hasegawa, Toshinori [Komaki City Hospital, Aichi (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    Twenty-one pediatric patients with craniopharyngioma have undergone gamma knife radiosurgery at our facility since May 1991, and we have followed up 10 of these patients for at least 24 months (mean 44.5 months). The patients' ages ranged from 6 to 12 years (mean 8.6 years). Initial presentations were headache in 7 patients, decreased visual acuity in 8, visual field deficit in 5, hypopituitarism in 7, and diabetes insipidus in 3. Prior to radiosurgery, surgical procedures had been performed in 8 patients, conventional radiotherapy in 1, and chemotherapy in 1. Mean tumor diameter was 17.4 mm, and treatment was by gamma knife, with mean maximum and marginal doses of 25.4 Gy and 13.3 Gy, respectively. Follow-up MRI revealed good tumor control (partial response+complete response) in 7 of the 10 patients, with neither further neurological nor endocrinological deterioration. Two patients showed tumor shrinkage for 60 months and 46 months, respectively, after radiosurgery, while, thereafter, tumor gradually recurred at the side of the optic nerve. In one patient, rapid growth of the cyst was observed 6 months after radiosurgery. Gamma knife radiosurgery for pediatric craniopharyngioma is considered to be a safe and effective treatment after microsurgical tumor removal. In cases in which total removal is impossible, it is important to detach the tumor from the optic nerve and to reduce the tumor volume for gamma knife radiosurgery after microsurgery. If the tumor has a cystic component, this should be removed at the time of surgery. (author)

  15. Three year results of stereotactic radiosurgery of large choroidal melanomas with the gamma-knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiel, M.J.; Mueller, A.J.; Schaller, U.; Talies, S.; Kampik, A.; Horstmann, G.A.; Wowra, B.

    2003-01-01

    Eye preserving surgery in patients with large choroidal melanomas includes local resection or radiosurgery. Brachytherapy can only be applied to small tumors in adequate localisation while radiosurgery (charged particles or gamma-knife) can be applied to all other tumors. We report 3-year results of 100 patients treated with gamma-knife radiosurgery. All patients received a single fraction gamma-knife treatment with a retrobulbar block. The radiation dose was 50 Gy and all tumors were within the 50 % isodosis range. Tumors were inaccessible for Ru 106 Brachy-therapy as they were either too large (max. height > 6.0 mm, basis diameter > 19 mm) or contact to optic disc exceeded 90 o or infiltration into the ciliary body was present. Of the 100 patients, 73 were followed for 1 year, 33 for 2 years and 17 for 3 years. Local tumor control was 98 % (2 recurrences). Complications following radiosurgery were rubeosis iridis (12 % of patients after l year, 15 % after 2 years and 6 % after 3 years) and secondary glaucoma (14 % of patients after 1 year, 9 % after 2 years, 6 % after 3 years). Total enucleation rate was 6.3 % per year. The tumors were found at the posterior pole (61 %), middle periphery (21 %) or ciliary body (18 %). Functional results depended on tumor localisation in the eye: after a mean of 1.9 years follow-up visual acuity was stable (± 3 lines) in 71 % of patients with a tumor in the middle periphery while 19 % of tumors with infiltration into the ciliary body and 0 % of tumors at the posterior pole showed stable visual acuity. Gamma-knife-radiosurgery offers a well tolerated, eye preserving treatment for patients with large choroidal melanoma in the middle periphery. Comparing our method to other radiosurgery therapies we can offer a fast technique which only requires a single visit. (author)

  16. Gamma knife radiosurgery for acoustic neurinomas. Pt. 1. The analysis of tumor control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Seiji; Seo, Yoshinobu; Nakagawara, Jyoji

    1997-01-01

    Forty-three patients with the unilateral type of acoustic neurinoma who were treated with gamma knife radiosurgery were analyzed from the viewpoint of tumor control. The follow-up period ranged from 22 to 55 months. The tumors were treated with marginal radiation doses of 9-15 Gy with multiple isocenters. The actuarial tumor reduction rates were 42% at one year, 75% at 2 years, and 92% at 3 years after gamma knife radiosurgery. Transient tumor expansion was seen in 33% of patients, which correlated with previous surgical cases. The present control rate was 91%. SPECT was performed on 15 selected patients before and 1 year and 2 years after gamma knife radiosurgery. 201 TlCl SPECT was used to determine tumor viability, and the early and delayed 99m Tc-DTPA-HSA-D SPECT images were used to assess tumor vascularity and permeability, respectively. The Tl index and HSA-D index of the delayed images were not significantly different from the respective preoperative values. However, there was a statistically significant decrease in the HSA-D index of the early images 1 year after treatment. A statistically significant reduction in tumor volume was seen 2 years after treatment in these 15 patients, meaning that a reduction in tumor vascularity was followed by a reduction in tumor size. One patient underwent surgical excision of the tumor 18 months after gamma knife radiosurgery because the tumor had expanded and resulted in cerebellar ataxia. Histopathologic investigation revealed the presence of some tumor cells with irregularly shaped nuclei and marked intimal thickening or obliteration of the tumor vessels. (K.H.)

  17. Risk analysis of Leksell Gamma Knife Model C with automatic positioning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetsch, Steven J.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This study was conducted to evaluate the decrease in risk from misadministration of the new Leksell Gamma Knife Model C with Automatic Positioning System compared with previous models. Methods and Materials: Elekta Instruments, A.B. of Stockholm has introduced a new computer-controlled Leksell Gamma Knife Model C which uses motor-driven trunnions to reposition the patient between isocenters (shots) without human intervention. Previous models required the operators to manually set coordinates from a printed list, permitting opportunities for coordinate transposition, incorrect helmet size, incorrect treatment times, missing shots, or repeated shots. Results: A risk analysis was conducted between craniotomy involving hospital admission and outpatient Gamma Knife radiosurgery. A report of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies dated November 29, 1999 estimated that medical errors kill between 44,000 and 98,000 people each year in the United States. Another report from the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System estimates that 2.1 million nosocomial infections occur annually in the United States in acute care hospitals alone, with 31 million total admissions. Conclusions: All medical procedures have attendant risks of morbidity and possibly mortality. Each patient should be counseled as to the risk of adverse effects as well as the likelihood of good results for alternative treatment strategies. This paper seeks to fill a gap in the existing medical literature, which has a paucity of data involving risk estimates for stereotactic radiosurgery

  18. Gamma knife thalamotomy for Parkinson's tremor: A 5-year experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duma, Christopher M.; Jacques, Deane B.; Kopyov, Oleg V.; Mark, Rufus J.; Copcutt, Brian G.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Elderly, high-risk surgical patients, may be unfit for radiofrequency thalamotomy for Parkinson's tremor. We have performed gamma knife radiosurgery in this select patient population, in lieu of open surgery, in an attempt at amelioration of disabling tremor. Materials and Methods: Radiosurgical nucleus ventralis intermedalis thalamotomy using gamma unit technique was performed on 38 patients (median age, 72 years; range: 50-88 years) over a period of 5 years. A median dose of 155 Gy (range: 110-160 Gy) was delivered using a single 4-mm collimator to 40 nuclei (2 patients underwent bilateral thalamotomy) using only anatomical atlas landmarks. The number of males and females were evenly divided, and their ages ranged from 50 to 88 years (median: 72 years). Two-thirds of the patients underwent left thalamotomy for right-sided trmor. Patients were followed-up for a median of 14 months (range: 6 to 43 months). Independent neurological evaluation of tremor as well as subjective patient evaluation were based on a 4-tiered scale: no improvement, mild improvement (0-33% effect), good improvement (33-66% effect), and excellent improvement (66-100%). Results: Eight thalamotomies (20%) failed, four (10%) gave mild improvement, and 28 (70%) gave good to excellent improvement of tremor (median time of onset of improvement was 3 months; range: 1-11 months). In 12 patients (32%) the tremor was eliminated completely. Concordance between independent neurologist evaluation and that of the patient was significant (p<0.001). Two patients in the failure group had an initial transient improvement. Two patients who underwent unilateral thalamotomy had bilateral improvement of their tremor. A permanent 5-6 mm lesion was seen on all follow-up MRIs and there were no radiological complications. A worsening of hand strength was seen in only patient. Conclusion: The safety and efficacy of gamma unit radiosurgical thalamotomy is on par with that of radiofrequency thalamotomy, and in a

  19. TH-A-9A-06: Inverse Planning of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Using Natural Physical Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Treatment-planning systems rely on computer intensive optimization algorithms in order to provide radiation dose localization. We are investigating a new optimization paradigm based on natural physical modeling and simulations, which tend to evolve in time and find the minimum energy state. In our research, we aim to match physical models with radiation therapy inverse planning problems, where the minimum energy state coincides with the optimal solution. As a prototype study, we have modeled the inverse planning of Gamma Knife radiosurgery using the dynamic interactions between charged particles and demonstrate the potential of the paradigm. Methods: For inverse planning of Gamma Knife radiosurgery: (1) positive charges are uniformly placed on the surface of tumors and critical structures. (2) The Gamma Knife dose kernels of 4mm, 8mm and 16mm radii are modeled as geometric objects with variable charges. (3) The number of shots per each kernel radii is obtained by solving a constrained integer-linear problem. (4) The shots are placed into the tumor volume and move under electrostatic forces. The simulation is performed until internal forces are zero or maximum iterations are reached. (5) Finally, non-negative least squares (NNLS) is used to calculate the beam-on times for each shot. Results: A 3D C-shaped tumor surrounding a spherical critical structure was used for testing the new optimization paradigm. These tests showed that charges spread out evenly covering the tumor while keeping distance from the critical structure, resulting in a high quality plan. Conclusion: We have developed a new paradigm for dose optimization based on the simulation of physical models. As prototype studies, we applied electrostatic models to Gamma Knife radiosurgery and demonstrated the potential of the new paradigm. Further research and fine-tuning of the model are underway. NSF CBET-0853157

  20. Gamma Knife Simulation Using the MCNP4C Code and the Zubal Phantom and Comparison with Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Gholami

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gamma Knife is an instrument specially designed for treating brain disorders. In Gamma Knife, there are 201 narrow beams of cobalt-60 sources that intersect at an isocenter point to treat brain tumors. The tumor is placed at the isocenter and is treated by the emitted gamma rays. Therefore, there is a high dose at this point and a low dose is delivered to the normal tissue surrounding the tumor. Material and Method: In the current work, the MCNP simulation code was used to simulate the Gamma Knife. The calculated values were compared to the experimental ones and previous works. Dose distribution was compared for different collimators in a water phantom and the Zubal brain-equivalent phantom. The dose profiles were obtained along the x, y and z axes. Result: The evaluation of the developed code was performed using experimental data and we found a good agreement between our simulation and experimental data. Discussion: Our results showed that the skull bone has a high contribution to both scatter and absorbed dose. In other words, inserting the exact material of brain and other organs of the head in digital phantom improves the quality of treatment planning. This work is regarding the measurement of absorbed dose and improving the treatment planning procedure in Gamma-Knife radiosurgery in the brain.

  1. Verification of gamma knife based fractionated radiosurgery with newly developed head-thorax phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisht, Raj Kishor; Kale, Shashank Sharad; Natanasabapathi, Gopishankar; Singh, Manmohan Jit; Agarwal, Deepak; Garg, Ajay; Rath, Goura Kishore; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Kumar, Pratik; Thulkar, Sanjay; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Purpose of the study is to verify the Gamma Knife Extend™ system (ES) based fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery with newly developed head-thorax phantom. Methods: Phantoms are extensively used to measure radiation dose and verify treatment plan in radiotherapy. A human upper body shaped phantom with thorax was designed to simulate fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery using Extend™ system of Gamma Knife. The central component of the phantom aids in performing radiological precision test, dosimetric evaluation and treatment verification. A hollow right circular cylindrical space of diameter 7.0 cm was created at the centre of this component to place various dosimetric devices using suitable adaptors. The phantom is made of poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA), a transparent thermoplastic material. Two sets of disk assemblies were designed to place dosimetric films in (1) horizontal (xy) and (2) vertical (xz) planes. Specific cylindrical adaptors were designed to place thimble ionization chamber inside phantom for point dose recording along xz axis. EBT3 Gafchromic films were used to analyze and map radiation field. The focal precision test was performed using 4 mm collimator shot in phantom to check radiological accuracy of treatment. The phantom head position within the Extend™ frame was estimated using encoded aperture measurement of repositioning check tool (RCT). For treatment verification, the phantom with inserts for film and ion chamber was scanned in reference treatment position using X-ray computed tomography (CT) machine and acquired stereotactic images were transferred into Leksell Gammaplan (LGP). A patient treatment plan with hypo-fractionated regimen was delivered and identical fractions were compared using EBT3 films and in-house MATLAB codes. Results: RCT measurement showed an overall positional accuracy of 0.265 mm (range 0.223 mm–0.343 mm). Gamma index analysis across fractions exhibited close agreement between LGP and film

  2. Stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife for acoustic neuromas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, Robert L.; Coffey, Robert J.; Swanson, Jerry W.; Harner, Stephen G.; Beatty, Charles W.; Kline, Robert W.; Stevens, Lorna N.; Hu, Theresa C.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife for acoustic neuromas. Methods and Materials: Between January 1990 and January 1993, 36 patients with acoustic neuromas were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife. The median maximum tumor diameter was 21 mm (range: 6-32 mm). Tumor volumes encompassed within the prescribed isodose line varied from 266 to 8,667 mm 3 (median: 3,135 mm 3 ). Tumors ≤ 20 mm in maximum diameter received a dose of 20 Gy to the margin, tumors between 21 and 30 mm received 18 Gy, and tumors > 30 mm received 16 Gy. The dose was prescribed to the 50% isodose line in 31 patients and to the 45%, 55%, 60%, 70%, and 80% isodose line in one patient each. The median number of isocenters per tumor was 5 (range: 1-12). Results: At a median follow-up of 16 months (range: 2.5-36 months), all patients were alive. Thirty-five patients had follow-up imaging studies. Nine tumors (26%) were smaller, and 26 tumors (74%) were unchanged. No tumor had progressed. The 1- and 2-year actuarial incidences of facial neuropathy were 52.2% and 66.5%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year actuarial incidences of trigeminal neuropathy were 33.7% and 58.9%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year actuarial incidence of facial or trigeminal neuropathy (or both) was 60.8% and 81.7%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the following were associated with the time of onset or worsening of facial weakness or trigeminal neuropathy: (a) patients five isocenters. The 1- and 2-year actuarial rates of preservation of useful hearing (Gardner-Robertson class I or II) were 100% and 41.7% ± 17.3, respectively. Conclusion: Stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife provides short-term control of acoustic neuromas when a dose of 16 to 20 Gy to the tumor margin is used. Preservation of useful hearing can be accomplished in a significant proportion of patients

  3. WE-A-304-02: Strategies and Technologies for Cranial Radiosurgery Planning: Gamma Knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, D.

    2015-01-01

    The high fractional doses, stringent requirements for accuracy and precision, and surgical perspective characteristic of intracranial radiosurgery create considerations for treatment planning which are distinct from most other radiotherapy procedures. This session will introduce treatment planning techniques specific to two popular intracranial SRS modalities: Gamma Knife and MLC-based Linac. The basic treatment delivery characteristics of each device will be reviewed with a focus on how those characteristics determine the paradigm used for treatment planning. Basic techniques for treatment planning will be discussed, including considerations such as isodose selection, target and organ-at-risk definition, quality indices, and protection of critical structures. Future directions for SRS treatment planning will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: Introduce the basic physical principles of intracranial radiosurgery and how they are realized in the treatment planning paradigms for Gamma Knife and Linac radiosurgery. Demonstrate basic treatment planning techniques. Discuss metrics for evaluating SRS treatment plan quality. Discuss recent and future advances in SRS treatment planning. D. Schlesinger receives research support from Elekta, AB

  4. Risk and dose assessment methods in gamma knife QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, W.W.; Jones, E.D.; Rathbun, P.

    1992-10-01

    Traditional methods used in assessing risk in nuclear power plants may be inappropriate to use in assessing medical radiation risks. The typical philosophy used in assessing nuclear reactor risks is machine dominated with only secondary attention paid to the human component, and only after critical machine failure events have been identified. In assessing the risk of a misadministrative radiation dose to patients, the primary source of failures seems to stem overwhelmingly, from the actions of people and only secondarily from machine mode failures. In essence, certain medical misadministrations are dominated by human events not machine failures. Radiological medical devices such as the Leksell Gamma Knife are very simple in design, have few moving parts, and are relatively free from the risks of wear when compared with a nuclear power plant. Since there are major technical differences between a gamma knife and a nuclear power plant, one must select a particular risk assessment method which is sensitive to these system differences and tailored to the unique medical aspects of the phenomena under study. These differences also generate major shifts in the philosophy and assumptions which drive the risk assessment (Machine-centered vs Person-centered) method. We were prompted by these basic differences to develop a person-centered approach to risk assessment which would reflect these basic philosophical and technological differences, have the necessary resolution in its metrics, and be highly reliable (repeatable). The risk approach chosen by the Livermore investigative team has been called the ''Relative Risk Profile Method'' and has been described in detail by Banks and Paramore, (1983)

  5. Frequency, pattern, and outcome of recurrences after gamma knife radiosurgery for pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa, Marco; Spatola, Giorgio; Albano, Luigi; Gandolfi, Alessandra; Del Vecchio, Antonella; Bolognesi, Angelo; Mortini, Pietro

    2017-06-01

    Gamma Knife radiosurgery is often used in pituitary adenomas. Aim of our study is to describe the characteristics and long-term outcome of patients with adenoma recurrence after Gamma Knife radiosurgery. We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with pituitary adenoma treated by Gamma Knife radiosurgery between 1994 and 2014. Tumor recurrence was labeled as "in field" when the tumor growth occurred adjacent or within the prescribed isodose, whereas it was classified as "out of field" when the tumor growth occurred outside the prescribed isodose. Five hundred forty-three patients were included, 272 (50.1 %) had a nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA) and 271 (49.9 %) patients had a hormone secreting-pituitary adenoma. The median follow-up after GKRS was 78 months (IQR, 36-125 months). Thirty-nine patients (7.2 %) had recurrence of disease and it was more frequent in patients with NFPA than in patients with hormone secreting adenomas (9.6 % vs. 4.8 %). The 10-yr progression-free survival in patients with NFPA was 78.7 % (95 % CI 69.5 - 87.9 %), as compared with 93.3 % (95 % CI 89.3 - 97.3 %; p < 0.01) in hormone secreting adenomas. Tumor recurrence was "in field" in 17 cases (43.6 %) and "out of field" in 22 cases (56.4 %). Seven of the 39 patients with recurrence died despite further treatments. Six of these patients had an "in field" recurrence. Recurrence of a pituitary adenoma after GKRS may occur several years after initial treatment. Distinction between "in field" and "out of field" tumor recurrence probably reflects two different pathophysiological mechanisms and may have prognostic importance.

  6. Association between neurovascular contact on MRI and response to gamma knife radiosurgery in trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbay, Sami H.; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A.; Gupta, Punita; O'Callaghan, Mark; Yun, Eric; Oljeski, Steven; Riesenburger, Ron

    2006-01-01

    Treatment with gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) provides adequate short-term pain control in about 70% of the patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether the presence of neurovascular contact (NVC) at the root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve on pre-gamma knife MR imaging predicts an increased likelihood of an adequate response to GKRS.We studied 40 consecutive patients who underwent GKRS for treatment of intractable TN. Two neuroradiologists blinded to the side of symptoms analyzed pre-treatment constructive interference in steady state (CISS) images to determine the presence of NVC by consensus. An adequate response was defined as freedom from pain with or without reduced need for medical therapy. Adequate short-term response to GKRS was seen in 29 (72.5%) of 40 patients. NVC was seen in 30 of the 40 patients. Twenty-five (83.3%) of 30 patients with NVC had adequate short-term response to GKRS. Only four (40%) of the 10 patients without NVC had adequate response to GKRS (X 2 =7.06; P<0.01). Patients with NVC were seven times more likely to have an adequate response to GKRS than those without NVC (odds ratio =7.5).The presence of NVC on pre-treatment MR imaging predicts an increased likelihood of an adequate response to GKRS. (orig.)

  7. Cerebral cavernous malformations. Serial magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with and without gamma knife surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon Pyeong-Ho; Kim, Dong-Ik; Jeon Pyoung; Ryu, Young-Hoon; Hwang, Geum-Joo; Park, Sang-Joon [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-10-01

    To classify the cerebral cavernous malformations and to investigate the natural history of cavernous malformations according to the classification, 41 patients with 61 cavernous malformations (40 cavernous malformations from 22 patients treated with gamma knife surgery) were regularly followed up using MR imaging for a mean period of 25.5 months in treated cavernous malformations and 20.7 months in untreated cavernous malformations, respectively. Cavernous malformations were classified into four types. Follow-up MR images were analyzed to evaluate changes in size, signal intensity, rebleeding, and perilesional adverse reaction of irradiation. A total of 61 cavernous malformations including 17 in type I, 23 in type II, 10 in type III, and 11 in type IV showed usual degradation of blood product in 22 cavernous malformations, no change in shape and signal intensity in 31 cavernous malformations, and eight cavernous malformations with rebleedings in the serial MR images. In these eight cavernous malformations with rebleedings, six occurred in type II and two in type III, but none in type I or IV. Rebleedings were more frequent in type II than in other types. Adverse reaction of irradiation was observed in five of 22 patients treated with gamma knife surgery. Although most cerebral cavernous malformations showed evolution of hemorrhage or no change in size or shape on follow-up MR images, cerebral cavernous malformations represented as mixture of subacute and chronic hemorrhage with hemosiderin rim (type II) have a higher frequency to rebleed than other types of cerebral cavernous malformations. Cerebral cavernous malformations represented as hemosiderin deposition without central core (type IV) have a lower tendency to rebleed than other types and do not need any treatment. Most of the adverse reaction of irradiation after gamma knife surgery around cavernous malformations are transient findings and are considered to be perilesional edema. (K.H)

  8. Gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgical thalamotomy for intractable tremor: A systematic review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, Allison M.; Glover, Janis; Chiang, Veronica L.S.; Gerrard, Jason; Yu, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Tremor markedly reduces quality of life and causes a significant psychological burden for patients who are severely affected by this movement disorder. Pharmacologic and surgical treatments for tremor exist, but for patients who have failed medical therapy and are not surgical candidates, stereotactic radiosurgery is the only available treatment option. Of available stereotactic radiosurgical techniques for intractable tremor, the authors chose to evaluate the safety and efficacy of gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgical thalamotomy. In order to qualitatively synthesize available data a systematic review was conducted by searching MEDLINE (OvidSP 1946–January Week 1 2014) and Embase (OvidSP 1974–2014 January). The search strategy was not limited by study design or language of publication. All searches were conducted on January 7, 2014. Treatment efficacy, adverse outcomes, and patient deaths were reviewed and tabulated. Complications appeared months to years post procedure and most commonly consisted of mild contralateral numbness and transient hemiparesis. Rarely, more severe complications were reported, including dysphagia and death. Though no data from randomized controlled trials are available, our analysis of the literature indicates that unilateral gamma knife thalamotomy using doses from 130 to 150 Gy appears safe and well tolerated

  9. Gamma Knife irradiation method based on dosimetric controls to target small areas in rat brains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constanzo, Julie; Paquette, Benoit; Charest, Gabriel; Masson-Côté, Laurence; Guillot, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Targeted and whole-brain irradiation in humans can result in significant side effects causing decreased patient quality of life. To adequately investigate structural and functional alterations after stereotactic radiosurgery, preclinical studies are needed. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust standardized method of targeted irradiation on small regions of the rat brain. Methods: Euthanized male Fischer rats were imaged in a stereotactic bed, by computed tomography (CT), to estimate positioning variations relative to the bregma skull reference point. Using a rat brain atlas and the stereotactic bregma coordinates obtained from CT images, different regions of the brain were delimited and a treatment plan was generated. A single isocenter treatment plan delivering ≥100 Gy in 100% of the target volume was produced by Leksell GammaPlan using the 4 mm diameter collimator of sectors 4, 5, 7, and 8 of the Gamma Knife unit. Impact of positioning deviations of the rat brain on dose deposition was simulated by GammaPlan and validated with dosimetric measurements. Results: The authors’ results showed that 90% of the target volume received 100 ± 8 Gy and the maximum of deposited dose was 125 ± 0.7 Gy, which corresponds to an excellent relative standard deviation of 0.6%. This dose deposition calculated with GammaPlan was validated with dosimetric films resulting in a dose-profile agreement within 5%, both in X- and Z-axes. Conclusions: The authors’ results demonstrate the feasibility of standardizing the irradiation procedure of a small volume in the rat brain using a Gamma Knife

  10. A prospective single-blind study of Gamma Knife thalamotomy for tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witjas, Tatiana; Carron, Romain; Krack, Paul; Eusebio, Alexandre; Vaugoyeau, Marianne; Hariz, Marwan; Azulay, Jean Philippe; Régis, Jean

    2015-11-03

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of unilateral Gamma Knife thalamotomy (GKT) for treatment of severe tremor with a prospective blinded assessment. Fifty patients (mean age: 74.5 years; 32 men) with severe refractory tremor (36 essential, 14 parkinsonian) were treated with unilateral GKT. Targeting of the ventral intermediate nucleus (Vim) was achieved with Leksell Gamma Knife with a single shot through a 4-mm collimator helmet. The prescription dose was 130 Gy. Neurologic and neuropsychological assessments including a single-blinded video assessment of the tremor severity performed by a movement disorders neurologist from another center were performed before and 12 months after treatment. MRI follow-up occurred at 3, 6, and 12 months. The upper limb tremor score improved by 54.2% on the blinded assessment (p < 0.0001). All tremor components (rest, postural, and intention) were improved. Activities of daily living were improved by 72.2%. Cognitive functions remained unchanged. Following GKT, the median delay of improvement was 5.3 months (range 1-12 months). The only side effect was a transient hemiparesis associated with excessive edema around the thalamotomy in one patient. This blinded prospective assessment demonstrates that unilateral GKT is a safe and efficient procedure for severe medically refractory tremor. Side effects were rare and transient in this study. This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with severe refractory tremor, GKT is well tolerated and effective in reducing tremor impairment. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Low dose gamma knife surgery for small cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serizawa, Toru; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Ono, Junichi; Nagano, Osamu; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2005-01-01

    We respectively evaluated the effectiveness of low-dose gamma knife surgery (GKS) for small cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in Chiba Cardiovascular Center. One-hundred consecutive cases with small (<10 cc) AVM treated with ≤20 Gy at the periphery were analyzed. The survival curves for angiographical complete occlusion, radiation-induced edema and latency period bleeding were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and the prognostic values of 9 covariates were obtained. The complete obliteration rate at 4 years was 91.6%. On multivariate analysis, the only significant prognostic factor was peripheral dose (p=0.0101). Radiation-induced edema was observed in 62.7%. Seven cases (12.5%) developed minor transient symptoms. The only permanent delayed radiation injury was cyst formation in 1 case. The significant prognostic factors for radiation-induced edema were peripheral dose (p=0.0387) and nidus volume (p=0.0161). Bleeding during the latency period was relatively rare (2.0%). In conclusion, our low-dose GKS using ≤20 Gy at the periphery provides excellent results for small AVMs. (author)

  12. Gamma knife radiosurgery for acoustic Schwannoma. Early effects and preservation of hearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirato, Masafumi; Inoue, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Masaru; Ohye, Chihiro; Hirato, Junko; Shibazaki, Tohru; Andou, Yoshitaka.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of relatively low dose gamma knife irradiation on acoustic Schwannoma were evaluated. The signal intensity change and tumor shrinkage on magnetic resonance (MR) images, change in hearing, and complications in 28 patients (mean age 47.0±13.6 yrs) were studied. Three patients had bilateral tumors. Six were already deaf when treated. The maximum tumor diameter was 35 mm. The mean dose delivered to the tumor was 12.1±1.6 Gy at the periphery, and 25.2±4.3 Gy at the center. The mean follow-up time was 16 months and the longest 24 months. Lowering of the MR signal intensity in the tumor center appeared after 3 months at earliest but generally after 6 months. Signs of tumor shrinkage appeared within 12 months on average. Cyst in the tumor enlarged rapidly after treatment in two patients. The percentage of hearing preservation was 85% (17/20) at 3 months, 80% (16/20) at 6 months, 72% (13/18) at 9 months, 75% (12/16) at 12 months, 67% (8/12) at 15 months, 60% (6/10) at 18 months, and 50% (2/4) at 24 months. Subtle changes in hearing were detected by speech tone audiometry. Temporary facial numbness and weakness was seen in one patient each. No patient had lower cranial nerve paresis. Relatively low dose gamma knife radiosurgery is effective in suppressing growth of acoustic Schwannoma with preservation of hearing. (author)

  13. Therapeutic profile of outpatient radiosurgery with the Gamma Knife system. Pt. 2. First clinical experiences; Profil der ambulanten Radiochirurgie mit dem Gamma-Knife-System. T. 2. Klinischer Erfahrungsbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wowra, B.; Horstmann, G.A.; Cibis, R.; Czempiel, H.

    1997-12-01

    Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) was applied in 500 consecutive treatments for 445 patients within 2 years. Indications were arterio-venous malformations (93 patients), schwannomas of cranial nerves (75 patients), meningiomas (70 patients; 73 of the tumors involving the skull base), pituitary adenomas (40 patients), cradiopharyngiomas (13 cases), gliomas (13 cases), rare indications (12 cases), and brain metastases (126 patients). The results obtained in patients with cerebral metastases emphasize that GKRS alone is as effective as the combined treatment of these lesions by surgery and fractionated radiotherapy. Our results demonstrated an attractively high therapeutic gain factor of Gamma Knife treatment in key indications of radiosurgery. (orig./mg) [Deutsch] In dieser Zwischenbilanz der klinischen Ergebnisse wird ueber the fortlaufende Serie der ersten 500 Behandlungen mit dem Gamma-Knife (GK)-System in Deutschland berichtet. In einem Zeitraum von 2 Jahren wurden 93 Patienten mit AV-Malformationen, 67 mit Akustikusneurinomen, 73 mit Meningeomen und 126 mit Hirnmetastasen behandelt. Der Anteil der kostenfreien Wiederholungsbehandlungen betrug bei Hirnmetastasen 33%. Zusammenfassend belegen die Ergebnisse bei Schluesselindikationen der Radiochirurgie die grosse therapeutische Breite dieses ambulanten und hochpraezisen Verfahrens; sie unterstreichen ihre Eigenstaendigkeit und den Bedarf an dieser Spezialmethode. Die Erfuellung hoher Qualitaetsstandards ist dabei essentiell. (orig./mg)

  14. WE-G-BRA-08: Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y; Bhatnagar, J; Bednarz, G; Flickinger, J; Arai, Y; Huq, M Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Vacsulka, J; Monaco, E; Niranjan, A; Lunsford, L Dade [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Feng, W [Dept of Radiation Oncology, New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia Univ Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To perform a failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) study for Gamma Knife (GK) radiosurgery processes at our institution based on our experience with the treatment of more than 13,000 patients. Methods: A team consisting of medical physicists, nurses, radiation oncologists, neurosurgeons at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and an external physicist expert was formed for the FMEA study. A process tree and a failure mode table were created for the GK procedures using the Leksell GK Perfexion and 4C units. Three scores for the probability of occurrence (O), the severity (S), and the probability of no detection (D) for failure modes were assigned to each failure mode by each professional on a scale from 1 to 10. The risk priority number (RPN) for each failure mode was then calculated (RPN = OxSxD) as the average scores from all data sets collected. Results: The established process tree for GK radiosurgery consists of 10 sub-processes and 53 steps, including a sub-process for frame placement and 11 steps that are directly related to the frame-based nature of the GK radiosurgery. Out of the 86 failure modes identified, 40 failure modes are GK specific, caused by the potential for inappropriate use of the radiosurgery head frame, the imaging fiducial boxes, the GK helmets and plugs, and the GammaPlan treatment planning system. The other 46 failure modes are associated with the registration, imaging, image transfer, contouring processes that are common for all radiation therapy techniques. The failure modes with the highest hazard scores are related to imperfect frame adaptor attachment, bad fiducial box assembly, overlooked target areas, inaccurate previous treatment information and excessive patient movement during MRI scan. Conclusion: The implementation of the FMEA approach for Gamma Knife radiosurgery enabled deeper understanding of the overall process among all professionals involved in the care of the patient and helped identify potential

  15. WE-G-BRA-08: Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y; Bhatnagar, J; Bednarz, G; Flickinger, J; Arai, Y; Huq, M Saiful; Vacsulka, J; Monaco, E; Niranjan, A; Lunsford, L Dade; Feng, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) study for Gamma Knife (GK) radiosurgery processes at our institution based on our experience with the treatment of more than 13,000 patients. Methods: A team consisting of medical physicists, nurses, radiation oncologists, neurosurgeons at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and an external physicist expert was formed for the FMEA study. A process tree and a failure mode table were created for the GK procedures using the Leksell GK Perfexion and 4C units. Three scores for the probability of occurrence (O), the severity (S), and the probability of no detection (D) for failure modes were assigned to each failure mode by each professional on a scale from 1 to 10. The risk priority number (RPN) for each failure mode was then calculated (RPN = OxSxD) as the average scores from all data sets collected. Results: The established process tree for GK radiosurgery consists of 10 sub-processes and 53 steps, including a sub-process for frame placement and 11 steps that are directly related to the frame-based nature of the GK radiosurgery. Out of the 86 failure modes identified, 40 failure modes are GK specific, caused by the potential for inappropriate use of the radiosurgery head frame, the imaging fiducial boxes, the GK helmets and plugs, and the GammaPlan treatment planning system. The other 46 failure modes are associated with the registration, imaging, image transfer, contouring processes that are common for all radiation therapy techniques. The failure modes with the highest hazard scores are related to imperfect frame adaptor attachment, bad fiducial box assembly, overlooked target areas, inaccurate previous treatment information and excessive patient movement during MRI scan. Conclusion: The implementation of the FMEA approach for Gamma Knife radiosurgery enabled deeper understanding of the overall process among all professionals involved in the care of the patient and helped identify potential

  16. Pathologic effects of gamma-knife radiosurgery on arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, B.F.; Eberhard, D.A.; Steiner, L.

    1995-01-01

    Objective: Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective method for treating many arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Hemodynamic changes and varying degrees of obliteration of an AVM nidus following radiosurgery have been described with angiography, but there have been no detailed reports describing histopathologic changes in AVM after radiation. The purpose of this study was to examine AVM at various times after gamma-knife radiosurgery in order to determine the mechanism of vessel occlusion after this procedure. Methods: Nine AVM specimens were obtained at autopsy or after surgical excision of residual nidus at times ranging from 10 months to more than 5 years after gamma knife radiosurgery. Formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded sections were examined using routine histopathologic stains: hematoxylin and eosin (H and E), Mallory's phosphotungstic acid-hematoxylin (PTAH), Elastic-van Gieson (EVG), and Hematoxylin-van Gieson (HVG). Additionally, immunohistochemical techniques were used to detect: smooth muscle actin (SMA), Factor VIII, and Type IV collagen. Results: Blood vessels within the AVM show progressive occlusion which correlated with the time interval after radiosurgery. The earliest changes after radiation appear to be damage to and loss of endothelial cells. At this early stage of vascular damage fibrin thrombi are sometimes apparent in the lumen of vessels. With time after radiation there is progressive thickening of the intimal layer, due to proliferation of smooth muscle cells. It is clearly demonstrated, immunohistochemically, that this accumulation of cells within the intimal layer reacts positively for smooth muscle actin, and negatively for Factor VIII (an endothelial cell marker). Using immunohistochemistry it is, also, apparent that these smooth muscle cells are surrounded by an extracellular matrix of Type I collagen, which increases in amount and density over time. Ultimately, vessels are completely occluded by an acellular, amorphous hyalin

  17. Gamma knife radio-surgery in meningiomas: decisive variables in the dose prescription during 14 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez O, X.; Diaz A, P.; Toledo B, V.; Zazueta L, F.

    2010-09-01

    A comparative study is presented among the variables of dose prescription in twelve cases of treated meningiomas from 1997 to 2009 in the Gamma Knife Unit of the Hospital San Javier. An evolution is observed in the definition of the treatment volumes, collimators election and matrix of dose calculation, this evolution has been due so much to the technological advance associated to the image acquisition systems: Computerized axial tomography, Images by magnetic resonance and Angiography by digital subtraction, as well as to the indexes adoption that are used to qualify among different treatment plans. The differences among the analyzed periods demonstrate a favorable learning curve that have influenced contributing to a treatment with a minor irradiated volume due to the application of theoretical models used in this installation, attenuating the risk of peripheral unexpected complications to the treated volume. (Author)

  18. Salvage Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Surgically Refractory Trigeminal Neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, Andrew S.; Shetter, Andrew G.; Shetter, Mary E.; Kakarla, Udaya K.; Rogers, C. Leland

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcome of patients with surgically refractory trigeminal neuralgia (TN) treated with rescue gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS). Methods and Materials: Seventy-nine patients with typical TN received salvage GKRS between 1997 and 2002 at the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI). All patients had recurrent pain following at least one prior surgical intervention. Prior surgical interventions included percutaneous destructive procedures, microvascular decompression (MVD), or GKRS. Thirty-one (39%) had undergone at least two prior procedures. The most common salvage dose was 80 Gy, although 40-50 Gy was typical in patients who had received prior radiosurgery. Pain outcome was assessed using the BNI Pain Intensity Score, and quality of life was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Results: Median follow-up after salvage GKRS was 5.3 years. Actuarial analysis demonstrated that at 5 years, 20% of patients were pain-free and 50% had pain relief. Pain recurred in patients who had an initial response to GKRS at a median of 1.1 years. Twenty-eight (41%) required a subsequent surgical procedure for recurrence. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model suggested that the strongest predictor of GKRS failure was a history of prior MVD (p=0.029). There were no instances of serious morbidity or mortality. Ten percent of patients developed worsening facial numbness and 8% described their numbness as 'very bothersome.' Conclusions: GKRS salvage for refractory TN is well tolerated and results in long-term pain relief in approximately half the patients treated. Clinicians may reconsider using GKRS to salvage patients who have failed prior MVD.

  19. Gamma knife surgery for pineal region tumors: an alternative strategy for negative pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Pineal region tumors (PRTs are uncommon, and treatments vary among neoplasm types. The authors report their experience with gamma knife surgery (GKS as an initial treatment in a series of PRT patients with unclear pathological diagnoses. Method : Seventeen PRT patients with negative pathology who underwent GKS were retrospectively studied. Nine patients had further whole-brain and spinal cord radiotherapy and chemotherapy 6–9 months after GKS. Results : Sixteen of 17 cases were followed up over a mean of 33.3 months. The total response rate was 75%, and the control rate was 81.3%. No obvious neurological deficits or complications were attributable to GKS. Conclusion : The findings indicate that GKS may be an alternative strategy in selected PRT patients who have negative pathological diagnoses, and that good outcomes and quality of life can be obtained with few complications.

  20. Gamma knife surgery for pineal region tumors: an alternative strategy for negative pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng [Department of Neurosurgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Department of Neurosurgery, The Fifth People' s Hospital of Chengdu, Chengdu (China); Mao, Qing; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Liang-Xue; Liu, Yan-Hui, E-mail: liuyanhui9@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2014-03-01

    Objective: pineal region tumors (PRTs) are uncommon, and treatments vary among neoplasm types. The authors report their experience with gamma knife surgery (GKS) as an initial treatment in a series of PRT patients with unclear pathological diagnoses. Method: seventeen PRT patients with negative pathology who underwent GKS were retrospectively studied. Nine patients had further whole-brain and spinal cord radiotherapy and chemotherapy 6-9 months after GKS. Results: Sixteen of 17 cases were followed up over a mean of 33.3 months. The total response rate was 75%, and the control rate was 81.3%. No obvious neurological deficits or complications were attributable to GKS. Conclusion: the findings indicate that GKS may be an alternative strategy in selected PRT patients who have negative pathological diagnoses, and that good outcomes and quality of life can be obtained with few complications. (author)

  1. Quality assurance of stereotactic alignment and patient positioning mechanical accuracy for robotized Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Lijun; Chiu, Joshua; Hoye, Jocelyn; McGuiness, Christopher; Perez-Andujar, Angelica

    2014-01-01

    The automatic patient positioning system and its alignment is critical and specified to be less than 0.35 mm for a radiosurgical treatment with the latest robotized Gamma Knife Perfexion (GKPFX). In this study, we developed a quantitative QA procedure to verify the accuracy and robustness of such a system. In particular, we applied the test to a unit that has performed >1000 procedures at our institution. For the test, a radiochromic film was first placed inside a spherical film phantom and then irradiated with a sequence of linearly placed shots of equal collimator size (e.g. 4 mm) via the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion system (PFX). The shots were positioned with either equal or unequal gaps of approximately 8 mm both at center and off-center positions of the patient positioning system. Two independent methods of localizing the irradiation shot center coordinates were employed to measure the gap spacing between adjacent shots. The measured distance was then compared with the initial preset values for the test. On average, the positioning uncertainty for the PFX delivery system was found to be 0.03  ±  0.2 mm (2σ). No significant difference in the positioning uncertainty was noted among measurements in the x-, y- and z-axis orientations. In conclusion, a simple, fast, and quantitative test was developed and demonstrated for routine QA of the submillimeter PFX patient positioning system. This test also enables independent verification of any patient-specific shot positioning for a critical treatment such as a tumor in the brainstem. (note)

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of the Leksell Gamma KnifeTM: II. Effects of heterogeneous versus homogeneous media for stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskvin, Vadim; Timmerman, Robert; DesRosiers, Colleen; Randall, Marcus; DesRosiers, Paul; Dittmer, Phil; Papiez, Lech

    2004-01-01

    The absence of electronic equilibrium in the vicinity of bone-tissue or air-tissue heterogeneity in the head can misrepresent deposited dose with treatment planning algorithms that assume all treatment volume as homogeneous media. In this paper, Monte Carlo simulation (PENELOPE) and measurements with a specially designed heterogeneous phantom were applied to investigate the effect of air-tissue and bone-tissue heterogeneity on dose perturbation with the Leksell Gamma Knife TM . The dose fall-off near the air-tissue interface caused by secondary electron disequilibrium leads to overestimation of dose by the vendor supplied treatment planning software (GammaPlan TM ) at up to 4 mm from an interface. The dose delivered to the target area away from an air-tissue interface may be underestimated by up to 7% by GammaPlan TM due to overestimation of attenuation of photon beams passing through air cavities. While the underdosing near the air-tissue interface cannot be eliminated with any plug pattern, the overdosage due to under-attenuation of the photon beams in air cavities can be eliminated by plugging the sources whose beams intersect the air cavity. Little perturbation was observed next to bone-tissue interfaces. Monte Carlo results were confirmed by measurements. This study shows that the employed Monte Carlo treatment planning is more accurate for precise dosimetry of stereotactic radiosurgery with the Leksell Gamma Knife TM for targets in the vicinity of air-filled cavities

  3. Is it possible to avoid hypopituitarism after irradiation of pituitary adenomas by the Leksell gamma knife

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marek, J.; Ježková, J.; Hána, V.; Kršek, M.; Bandúrová, Ľ.; Pecen, Ladislav; Vladyka, V.; Liščák, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 164, č. 2 (2011), s. 169-178 ISSN 0804-4643 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : hypopituitarism * pituitary adenomas * Leksell gamma knife * irradiation Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 3.423, year: 2011

  4. Gamma knife radiosurgery for uveal melanoma ineligible for brachytherapy by the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola G Ghazi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicola G Ghazi1, Christopher S Ketcherside1, Jason Sheehan2, Brian P Conway11Department of Ophthalmology and 2Neurosurgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USAPurpose: To report outcomes of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS in treating uveal melanoma lesions ineligible for standard brachytherapy.Methods: A retrospective interventional case series of uveal melanoma patients treated with GKRS between 1996 and 2004 was performed. The main outcome measures were local tumor control, metastasis, and death.Results: Four patients with uveal melanoma treated with GKS were identified. Three tumors involved the ciliary body and one was macular with its border within 2 mm of the optic disc. Adequate globe stabilization was achieved by retrobulbar anesthesia in all cases. Pretreatment mean visual acuity was 20/30. Tumor volume as determined by magnetic resonance imaging ranged from 0.05 to 0.30 cc. Ultrasonographic greatest tumor diameter and height ranged from 11 to 18 mm (mean 14.5 mm and 2.9 to 4.5 mm (mean 3.6 mm, respectively. The peripheral dose varied from 16.5 to 30 Gray. Local tumor control was achieved in all cases over a follow up period of 6 to 96 months. Mean final visual acuity was 20/50. One eye was enucleated for neovascular glaucoma and one patient died from liver and lung metastasis.Conclusions: GKRS for uveal melanoma appears to be safe and effective. The metastasis and mortality rates appear to be comparable to those following brachytherapy and enucleation. Moreover, local tumor control and enucleation rates are similar to those following brachytherapy. The findings in this small series suggest a role for GKRS in the treatment of selected cases of uveal melanomas.Keywords: gamma knife radiosurgery, radiation therapy, uveal melanoma

  5. Gamma knife radiosurgery for glomus jugulare tumors: therapeutic advantages of minimalism in the skull base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manish S; Gupta, A; Kale, S S; Agrawal, D; Mahapatra, A K; Sharma, B S

    2008-01-01

    Glomus jugulare (GJ) tumors are paragangliomas found in the region of the jugular foramen. Surgery with/without embolization and conventional radiotherapy has been the traditional management option. To analyze the efficacy of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) as a primary or an adjunctive form of therapy. A retrospective analysis of patients who received GKS at a tertiary neurosurgical center was performed. Of the 1601 patients who underwent GKS from 1997 to 2006, 24 patients with GJ underwent 25 procedures. The average age of the cohort was 46.6 years (range, 22-76 years) and the male to female ratio was 1:2. The most common neurological deficit was IX, X, XI cranial nerve paresis (15/24). Fifteen patients received primary GKS. Mean tumor size was 8.7 cc (range 1.1-17.2 cc). The coverage achieved was 93.1% (range 90-97%) using a mean tumor margin dose of 16.4 Gy (range 12-25 Gy) at a mean isodose of 49.5% (range 45-50%). Thirteen patients (six primary and seven secondary) were available for follow-up at a median interval of 24 months (range seven to 48 months). The average tumor size was 7.9 cc (range 1.1-17.2 cc). Using a mean tumor margin dose of 16.3 Gy (range 12-20 Gy) 93.6% coverage (range 91-97%) was achieved. Six patients improved clinically. A single patient developed transient trigeminal neuralgia. Magnetic resonance imaging follow-up was available for 10 patients; seven recorded a decrease in size. There was no tumor progression. Gamma knife radiosurgery is a safe and effective primary and secondary modality of treatment for GJ.

  6. SU-F-P-15: Report On AAPM TG 178 Gamma Knife Dosimetry and Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, S [San Diego Medical Physics, Solana Beach, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM Task Group 178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance was formed in August, 2008. The Task Group has 12 medical physicists, two physicians and two consultants. Methods: A round robin dosimetry intercomparison of proposed ionization chambers, electrometer and dosimetry phantoms was conducted over a 15 month period in 2011 and 2012 (Med Phys 42, 11, Nov, 2015). The data obtained at 9 institutions (with ten different Elekta Gamma Knife units) was analyzed by the lead author using several protocols. Results: The most consistent results were obtained using the Elekta ABS 16cm diameter phantom, with the TG-51 protocol modified as recommended by Alfonso et al (Med Phys 35, 11, Nov 2008). A key white paper (Med Phys, in press) sponsored by Elekta Corporation, was used to obtain correction factors for the ionization chambers and phantoms used in this intercomparison. Consistent results were obtained for both Elekta Gamma Knife Model 4C and Gamma Knife Perfexion units as measured with each of two miniature ionization chambers Conclusion: The full TG 178 report gives clinical history and background of gamma stereotactic radiosurgery, clinical examples and history, quality assurance recommendations and outline of possible dosimetry protocols. The report will be reviewed by the AAPM Working Group on Recommendations for Radiotherapy External Beam Quality Assurance and then by the AAPM Science Council before publication in Medical Physics. Consultant to Elekta, Inc.

  7. Radiosurgical lesion of the rat hippocampus using the Leksell gamma knife: relation between radiation dose and functional and structural damage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liščák, R.; Vladyka, V.; Novotný Jr., J.; Brožek, G.; Náměstková, Kateřina; Mareš, V.; Hájek, M.; Herynek, V.; Syková, Eva

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 5 (2002), s. 666-673 ISSN 0022-3085 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : radiosurgery * Leksell gamma knife Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.626, year: 2002

  8. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairbanks Robert K

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vestibular schwannomas, also called acoustic neuromas, are benign tumors of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Patients with these tumours almost always present with signs of hearing loss, and many also experience tinnitus, vertigo, and equilibrium problems. Following diagnosis with contrast enhanced MRI, patients may choose to observe the tumour with subsequent scans or seek active treatment in the form of microsurgery, radiosurgery, or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, definitive guidelines for treating vestibular schwannomas are lacking, because of insufficient evidence comparing the outcomes of therapeutic modalities. We present a contemporary case report, describing the finding of a vestibular schwannoma in a patient who presented with dizziness and a "clicking" sensation in the ear, but no hearing deficit. Audible clicking is a symptom that, to our knowledge, has not been associated with vestibular schwannoma in the literature. We discuss the diagnosis and patient's decision-making process, which led to treatment with Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Treatment resulted in an excellent radiographic response and complete hearing preservation. This case highlights an atypical presentation of vestibular schwannoma, associated with audible "clicks" and normal hearing. We also provide a concise review of the available literature on modern vestibular schwannoma treatment, which may be useful in guiding treatment decisions.

  9. MR imaging response of cerebral metastases and peritumoral edema after Gamma Knife surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Qi; Wang Congyin; Zhang Xuening; Zheng Jingjing; Xu Desheng; Zhang Yipei

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluation the treatment response of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for the control of cerebral metastases and peritumoral edema using standard MRI. Method: 42 consecutive patients with 75 metastatic lesions were recruited in this study (28 men, 14 women; mean age 60±12 years). Gadolinium enhancement T 1 WI scans were performed on one day before and three months after GKS. Treatment response was evaluated by calculating the changes of tumor volume and edema index before and after GKS. Results: Mean tumor volumes on the baseline and post treatment were 7.0 cm 3 and 3.3 cm 3 respectively. Mean peritumoral edema indexes were 9.9 and 4.3 respectively. Tumor growth control rate and peritumoral edema control rate were 91% and 85% respectively. Conclusion: GKS is effective for both brain metastasis and peritumoral edema, and the tumor volume influences GKS efficacy. Conventional MRI provides useful information to predict treatment response of GKS for cerebral metastasis. (authors)

  10. Determination of the 4 mm Gamma Knife helmet relative output factor using a variety of detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, J.-S.; Rivard, Mark J.; Engler, Mark J.; Mignano, John E.; Wazer, David E.; Shucart, William A.

    2003-01-01

    Though the 4 mm Gamma Knife helmet is used routinely, there is disagreement in the Gamma Knife users community on the value of the 4 mm helmet relative output factor. A range of relative output factors is used, and this variation may impair observations of dose response and optimization of prescribed dose. To study this variation, measurements were performed using the following radiation detectors: silicon diode, diamond detector, radiographic film, radiochromic film, and TLD cubes. To facilitate positioning of the silicon diode and diamond detector, a three-dimensional translation micrometer was used to iteratively determine the position of maximum detector response. Positioning of the films and TLDs was accomplished by manufacturing custom holders for each technique. Results from all five measurement techniques indicate that the 4 mm helmet relative output factor is 0.868±0.014. Within the experimental uncertainties, this value is in good agreement with results obtained by other investigators using diverse techniques

  11. Gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia: the initial experience of the Barrow Neurological Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, C. Leland; Shetter, Andrew G.; Fiedler, Jeffrey A.; Smith, Kris A.; Han, Patrick P.; Speiser, Burton L.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and complications of Gamma Knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods and Materials: The Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) Gamma Knife facility has been operational since March 17, 1997. A total of 557 patients have been treated, 89 for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). This report includes the first 54 TN patients with follow-up exceeding 3 months. Patients were treated with Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (RS) in uniform fashion according to two sequential protocols. The first 41 patients received 35 Gy prescribed to the 50% isodose via a single 4-mm isocenter targeting the ipsilateral trigeminal nerve adjacent to the pons. The dose was increased to 40 Gy for the remaining 13 patients; however, the other parameters were unvaried. Outcome was evaluated by each patient using a standardized questionnaire. Pain before and after RS was scored as level I-IV per our newly-developed BNI pain intensity scoring criteria (I: no pain; II: occasional pain, not requiring medication; III: some pain, controlled with medication; IV: some pain, not controlled with medication; V: severe pain/no pain relief). Complications, limited to mild facial numbness, were similarly graded by a BNI scoring system. Results: Among our 54 TN patients, 52 experienced pain relief, BNI score I in 19 (35%), II in 3 (6%), III in 26 (48%), and IV in 4 (7%). Two patients (4%) reported no relief (BNI score V). Median follow-up was 12 months (range 3-28). Median time to onset of pain relief was 15 days (range 0-192), and to maximal relief 63 days (range 0-253). Seventeen (31%) noted immediate improvement (≤ 24 h). Prior to RS, all patients were on pharmacologic therapy felt to be optimal or maximal. Twenty-two (41%) were able to stop medications entirely (BNI score I or II). Another 16 (30%), with BNI Score III relief, decreased medication intake by at least 50%. Patients with classical TN pain symptoms were more likely to stop medications than those with

  12. Investigation of dosimetric differences between the TMR 10 and convolution algorithm for Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Villabona, Alvaro; Kitchen, Neil; Paddick, Ian

    2016-11-08

    Since its inception, doses applied using Gamma Knife Radiosurgery (GKR) have been calculated using a simple TMR algorithm, which assumes the patient's head is of even density, the same as water. This results in a significant approximation of the dose delivered by the Gamma Knife. We investigated how GKR dose cal-culations varied when using a new convolution algorithm clinically available for GKR planning that takes into account density variations in the head compared with the established calculation algorithm. Fifty-five patients undergoing GKR and harboring 85 lesions were voluntarily and prospectively enrolled into the study. Their clinical treatment plans were created and delivered using TMR 10, but were then recalculated using the density correction algorithm. Dosimetric differences between the planning algorithms were noted. Beam on time (BOT), which is directly proportional to dose, was the main value investigated. Changes of mean and maximum dose to organs at risk (OAR) were also assessed. Phantom studies were performed to investigate the effect of frame and pin materials on dose calculation using the convolution algorithm. Convolution yielded a mean increase in BOT of 7.4% (3.6%-11.6%). However, approximately 1.5% of this amount was due to the head contour being derived from the CT scans, as opposed to measurements using the Skull Scaling Instrument with TMR. Dose to the cochlea calculated with the convolution algorithm was approximately 7% lower than with the TMR 10 algorithm. No significant difference in relative dose distribution was noted and CT artifact typically caused by the stereotactic frame, glue embolization material or different fixation pin materials did not systematically affect convolu-tion isodoses. Nonetheless, substantial error was introduced to the convolution calculation in one target located exactly in the area of major CT artifact caused by a fixation pin. Inhomogeneity correction using the convolution algorithm results in a

  13. Intratumoral hemorrhage in acoustic neurinoma after gamma knife therapy. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misaki, Toshinari; Arai, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Teruo; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Okuguchi, Taku; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Ogawa, Akira

    2005-01-01

    A patient who developed symptomatic intratumoral hemorrhage six years after gamma knife surgery for acoustic neurinoma is presented. The patient was a 72-year-old woman who was diagnosed with right acoustic neurinoma and underwent gamma knife surgery. Since symptomatic intratumoral hemorrhage was confirmed six years later, tumor resection was performed. Pathological analysis confirmed widespread hyaline thickening of the vascular endothelia. Symptomatic intratumoral hemorrhage is a relatively rare complication of schwannoma. The pathological features of spontaneous hemorrhage include such vascular anomalies as angioma, clusters of telangiectasia-like abnormal vessels, or numerous thin-walled, dilated vessels. In the present patient, hyaline thickening of vascular endothelia was noted. The association between this histological feature and spontaneous bleeding in neurinoma has not been previously reported in the literature. Delayed effects of radiation include hyaline thickening of the vascular endothelia and narrowing of the vascular lumen. These histological changes have been reported to occur in intratumoral hemorrhage in malignant brain tumors. In the present patient, as hyaline thickening of vascular endothelia due to the gamma knife surgery might have been implicated in symptomatic hemorrhage, the relationship between irradiation and symptomatic intratumoral hemorrhage was examined with reference to the relevant literature. (author)

  14. Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by Cerebellopontine Angle Arteriovenous Malformation Treated With Gamma Knife Radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işik, Semra; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Yilmaz, Baran; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Akakin, Akin; Kiliç, Türker

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a facial pain syndrome characterized as sudden onset and lightening-like sensation over somatosensorial branch(es) of fifth cranial nerve. Rarely, some underlying diseases or disorders could be diagnosed, such as multiple sclerosis, brain tumors, and vascular malformations. The authors present a 47-year-old man with trigeminal neuralgia over left V2 and V3 dermatomes. He had a previous transarterial embolization and long use of carbamazepine with partial response to treatment. Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR) was planned. A marginal dose of 15 Gy was given to 50% isodose line. His pain was relieved by GKR in 1.5 years. Treatment of posterior fossa arteriovenous malformations causing trigeminal neuralgia, with GKR has a very limited use in the literature. It, however, is obvious that success rate as pain relief, in a very challenging field of functional neurosurgery, is satisfactory. Large series, however, are in need to make a more comprehensive statement about efficacy and safety of the procedure in these pathologies.

  15. Communicating Hydrocephalus Associated with Intracranial Schwannoma Treated by Gamma Knife Radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang Kyu; Lee, Sung Ho; Choi, Man Kyu; Choi, Seok Keun; Park, Bong Jin; Lim, Young Jin

    2016-05-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has been established as an effective and safe treatment for intracranial schwannoma. However, serious complications can occur after GKRS, including hydrocephalus. The pathophysiology and risk factors of this disorder are not yet fully understood. The objective of the study was to assess potential risk factors for hydrocephalus after GKRS. We retrospectively reviewed the medical radiosurgical records of 244 patients who underwent GKRS to treat intracranial schwannoma. The following parameters were analyzed as potential risk factors for hydrocephalus after GKRS: age, sex, target volume, irradiation dose, prior tumor resection, treatment technique, and tumor enhancement pattern. The tumor enhancement pattern was divided into 2 groups: group A (homogeneous enhancement) and group B (heterogeneous or rim enhancement). Of the 244 patients, 14 of them (5.7%) developed communicating hydrocephalus. Communicating hydrocephalus occurred within 2 years after GKRS in most patients (92.8%). No significant association was observed between any of the parameters investigated and the development of hydrocephalus, with the exception of tumor enhancement pattern. Group B exhibited a statistically significant difference by univariate analysis (P = 0.002); this difference was also significant by multivariate analysis (P = 0.006). Because hydrocephalus is curable, patients should be closely monitored for the development of this disorder after GKRS. In particular, patients with intracranial schwannomas with irregular enhancement patterns or cysts should be meticulously observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Long-term outcomes of gamma knife surgery for posterior fossa arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, Shigeo; Shuto, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The long-term outcomes of gamma knife surgery (GKS) in patients with posterior fossa arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) were retrospectively analyzed in 82 patients followed up for more than 5 years to evaluate the efficacy and safety. The median AVM volume at GKS was 0.95 cm 3 . The prescribed dose to the AVM margin was median 18 Gy with 1-18 isocenters. The actual complete AVM obliteration rate was 58.5% at 3 years and 78.0% at 5 years. The significant factors for higher complete obliteration rate were younger patient age and smaller maximum/minimum nidus diameter ratio. Two patients experienced hemorrhage caused by residual AVM rupture at 4 and 49 months. Twenty patients developed peri-nidal edema as an adverse radiation-induced reaction at median 13 months. One patient developed radiation-induced necrosis at 6.8 years. Neurological complication was observed in 12 patients and 6 patients remained with neurological dysfunction permanently. Larger nidus volume and location adjacent to an eloquent area significantly increased the risk of neurological complication. Pittsburgh radiosurgery-based AVM grading scale was significantly correlated with the outcome of neurological symptoms after GKS. GKS achieved acceptable and complete obliteration rate for posterior fossa AVM with relatively low risk of morbidity on neuroimaging and neurological symptoms for the long-term period after treatment. We recommend conformable and selective treatment planning to achieve both obliteration of the AVM nidus and preservation of neurological function. (author)

  17. Adaptive fractionated stereotactic Gamma Knife radiotherapy of meningioma using integrated stereotactic cone-beam-CT and adaptive re-planning (a-gkFSRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieler, F.; Wenz, F.; Abo-Madyan, Y.; Schweizer, B.; Polednik, M.; Herskind, C.; Giordano, F.A.; Mai, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) allows frameless stereotactic treatment using a combination of cone beam computer tomography (CBCT), a thermoplastic mask system, and an infrared-based high-definition motion management (HDMM) camera system for patient tracking during treatment. We report on the first patient with meningioma at the left petrous bone treated with adaptive fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (a-gkFSRT). The first patient treated with Gamma Knife Icon at our institute received MR imaging for preplanning before treatment. For each treatment fraction, a daily CBCT was performed to verify the actual scull/tumor position. The system automatically adapted the planned shot positions to the daily position and recalculated the dose distribution (online adaptive planning). During treatment, the HDMM system recorded the intrafractional patient motion. Furthermore, the required times were recorded to define a clinical treatment slot. Total treatment time was around 20 min. Patient positioning needed 0.8 min, CBCT positioning plus acquisition 1.65 min, CT data processing and adaptive planning 2.66 min, and treatment 15.6 min. The differences for the five daily CBCTs compared to the reference are for rotation: -0.59 ± 0.49 /0.18 ± 0.20 /0.05 ± 0.36 and for translation: 0.94 ± 0.52 mm/-0.08 ± 0.08 mm/-1.13 ± 0.89 mm. Over all fractions, an intrafractional movement of 0.13 ± 0.04 mm was observed. The Gamma Knife Icon allows combining the accuracy of the stereotactic Gamma Knife system with the flexibility of fractionated treatment with the mask system and CBCT. Furthermore, the Icon system introduces a new online patient tracking system to the clinical routine. The interfractional accuracy of patient positioning was controlled with a thermoplastic mask and CBCT. (orig.) [de

  18. Adaptive fractionated stereotactic Gamma Knife radiotherapy of meningioma using integrated stereotactic cone-beam-CT and adaptive re-planning (a-gkFSRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stieler, F.; Wenz, F.; Abo-Madyan, Y.; Schweizer, B.; Polednik, M.; Herskind, C.; Giordano, F.A.; Mai, S. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) allows frameless stereotactic treatment using a combination of cone beam computer tomography (CBCT), a thermoplastic mask system, and an infrared-based high-definition motion management (HDMM) camera system for patient tracking during treatment. We report on the first patient with meningioma at the left petrous bone treated with adaptive fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (a-gkFSRT). The first patient treated with Gamma Knife Icon at our institute received MR imaging for preplanning before treatment. For each treatment fraction, a daily CBCT was performed to verify the actual scull/tumor position. The system automatically adapted the planned shot positions to the daily position and recalculated the dose distribution (online adaptive planning). During treatment, the HDMM system recorded the intrafractional patient motion. Furthermore, the required times were recorded to define a clinical treatment slot. Total treatment time was around 20 min. Patient positioning needed 0.8 min, CBCT positioning plus acquisition 1.65 min, CT data processing and adaptive planning 2.66 min, and treatment 15.6 min. The differences for the five daily CBCTs compared to the reference are for rotation: -0.59 ± 0.49 /0.18 ± 0.20 /0.05 ± 0.36 and for translation: 0.94 ± 0.52 mm/-0.08 ± 0.08 mm/-1.13 ± 0.89 mm. Over all fractions, an intrafractional movement of 0.13 ± 0.04 mm was observed. The Gamma Knife Icon allows combining the accuracy of the stereotactic Gamma Knife system with the flexibility of fractionated treatment with the mask system and CBCT. Furthermore, the Icon system introduces a new online patient tracking system to the clinical routine. The interfractional accuracy of patient positioning was controlled with a thermoplastic mask and CBCT. (orig.) [German] Das Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Schweden) ermoeglicht die stereotaktische Behandlung von Patienten mittels Cone-beam-Computertomographie (CBCT

  19. Long-Term Results for Trigeminal Schwannomas Treated With Gamma Knife Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Toshinori, E-mail: h-toshi@komakihp.gr.jp; Kato, Takenori; Iizuka, Hiroshi; Kida, Yoshihisa

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Surgical resection is considered the desirable curative treatment for trigeminal schwannomas. However, complete resection without any complications remains challenging. During the last several decades, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has emerged as a minimally invasive treatment modality. Information regarding long-term outcomes of SRS for patients harboring trigeminal schwannomas is limited because of the rarity of this tumor. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term tumor control and functional outcomes in patients harboring trigeminal schwannomas treated with SRS, specifically with gamma knife surgery (GKS). Methods and Materials: Fifty-three patients harboring trigeminal schwannomas treated with GKS were evaluated. Of these, 2 patients (4%) had partial irradiation of the tumor, and 34 patients (64%) underwent GKS as the initial treatment. The median tumor volume was 6.0 cm{sup 3}. The median maximum and marginal doses were 28 Gy and 14 Gy, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 98 months. On the last follow-up image, 7 patients (13%) had tumor enlargement, including the 2 patients who had partial treatment. Excluding the 2 patients who had partial treatment, the actuarial 5- and 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 90% and 82%, respectively. Patients with tumors compressing the brainstem with deviation of the fourth ventricle had significantly lower PFS rates. If those patients with tumors compressing the brainstem with deviation of the fourth ventricle are excluded, the actuarial 5- and 10-year PFS rates increased to 95% and 90%, respectively. Ten percent of patients had worsened facial numbness or pain in spite of no tumor progression, indicating adverse radiation effect. Conclusions: GKS can be an acceptable alternative to surgical resection in patients with trigeminal schwannomas. However, large tumors that compress the brainstem with deviation of the fourth ventricle should be surgically removed first and then

  20. SU-E-T-86: A Systematic Method for GammaKnife SRS Fetal Dose Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geneser, S; Paulsson, A; Sneed, P; Braunstein, S; Ma, L [UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Estimating fetal dose is critical to the decision-making process when radiation treatment is indicated during pregnancy. Fetal doses less than 5cGy confer no measurable non-cancer developmental risks but can produce a threefold increase in developing childhood cancer. In this study, we estimate fetal dose for a patient receiving Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) treatment and develop a method to estimate dose directly from plan details. Methods: A patient underwent GKSRS on a Perfexion unit for eight brain metastases (two infratentorial and one brainstem). Dose measurements were performed using a CC13, head phantom, and solid water. Superficial doses to the thyroid, sternum, and pelvis were measured using MOSFETs during treatment. Because the fetal dose was too low to accurately measure, we obtained measurements proximally to the isocenter, fitted to an exponential function, and extrapolated dose to the fundus of the uterus, uterine midpoint, and pubic synthesis for both the preliminary and delivered plans. Results: The R-squared fit for the delivered doses was 0.995. The estimated fetal doses for the 72 minute preliminary and 138 minute delivered plans range from 0.0014 to 0.028cGy and 0.07 to 0.38cGy, respectively. MOSFET readings during treatment were just above background for the thyroid and negligible for all inferior positions. The method for estimating fetal dose from plan shot information was within 0.2cGy of the measured values at 14cm cranial to the fetal location. Conclusion: Estimated fetal doses for both the preliminary and delivered plan were well below the 5cGy recommended limit. Due to Pefexion shielding, internal dose is primarily governed by attenuation and drops off exponentially. This is the first work that reports fetal dose for a GK Perfexion unit. Although multiple lesions were treated and the duration of treatment was long, the estimated fetal dose remained very low.

  1. Calibration of the Gamma Knife using a new phantom following the AAPM TG51 and TG21 protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drzymala, R. E.; Wood, R. C.; Levy, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare calibration of the Leksell Gamma Knife according to the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Groups 21 and 51 protocols. A new phantom was fabricated for this purpose. Its design, physical properties, and composition are described. Materials and methods: The Gamma Knife TG-51 calibration phantom is designed to be filled with water and support an ionization chamber positioned at its center. The phantom is thimble-shaped, with a 2 mm plastic wall to contain water. The phantom and chamber assembly was mounted in a LeksellTM stereotactic frame. The location of the chamber's sensitive volume was determined using computed tomography. The chamber-phantom assembly was attached to the 18 mm helmet in the Gamma Knife by the stereotactic frame. The phantom's geometry allowed radiation beams from each of the 201 Gamma Knife cobalt-60 sources to converge after an 8 cm path to the ionization chamber's sensitive volume. This is similar to the arrangement by which one calibrates the Gamma Knife using the manufacturer-supplied polystyrene phantom. Results: The phantom was attached to the Gamma Knife so that the ionization chamber was reproducibly positioned at the convergence of the radiation beams. Because of the phantom's design, the phantom could be affixed to either trunnions or the automatic patient positioning system, once mounted in the LeksellTM stereotectic frame. Comparisons using different phantoms and protocols resulted in the following calibration ratios for TG-21 in the polystyrene sphere phantom, TG-21 in the water phantom, and TG-51 in the water phantom, respectively: 1.000, 1.008, 0.986, when corrected for transmission through the plastic water reservoir wall and using the same ionization chamber. Transmission measurements using a 1 cm thickness of the same material in the Co-60 beam determined that the phantom's 2 mm plastic wall resulted in a reduction in the measured the output by 0.5%. Conclusions: Calibration of the Gamma

  2. Gamma knife radio-surgery in meningiomas: decisive variables in the dose prescription during 14 years; Radiocirugia gamma knife en meningiomas: variables determinantes en la prescripcion de dosis durante 14 anos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez O, X.; Diaz A, P.; Toledo B, V.; Zazueta L, F., E-mail: pdiaz@hospitalsanjavier.co [Hospital San Javier, Pablo Casals No. 640, Col. Prados Providencia, 44670 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    A comparative study is presented among the variables of dose prescription in twelve cases of treated meningiomas from 1997 to 2009 in the Gamma Knife Unit of the Hospital San Javier. An evolution is observed in the definition of the treatment volumes, collimators election and matrix of dose calculation, this evolution has been due so much to the technological advance associated to the image acquisition systems: Computerized axial tomography, Images by magnetic resonance and Angiography by digital subtraction, as well as to the indexes adoption that are used to qualify among different treatment plans. The differences among the analyzed periods demonstrate a favorable learning curve that have influenced contributing to a treatment with a minor irradiated volume due to the application of theoretical models used in this installation, attenuating the risk of peripheral unexpected complications to the treated volume. (Author)

  3. Interfraction and intrafraction performance of the Gamma Knife Extend system for patient positioning and immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, David; Xu, Zhiyuan; Taylor, Frances; Yen, Chun-Po; Sheehan, Jason

    2012-12-01

    The Extend system for the Gamma Knife Perfexion makes possible multifractional Gamma Knife treatments. The Extend system consists of a vacuum-monitored immobilization frame and a positioning measurement system used to determine the location of the patient's head within the frame at the time of simulation imaging and before each treatment fraction. The measurement system consists of a repositioning check tool (RCT), which attaches to the Extend frame, and associated digital measuring gauges. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of the Extend system for patient repositioning before each treatment session (fraction) and patient immobilization between (interfraction) and during (intrafraction) each session in the first 10 patients (36 fractional treatments) treated at the University of Virginia. The RCT was used to acquire a set of reference measurements for each patient position at the time of CT simulation. Repositioning measurements were acquired before each fraction, and the patient position was adjusted until the residual radial difference from the reference position measurements was less than 1 mm. After treatment, patient position measurements were acquired, and the difference between those measurements and the ones obtained for patient position before the fraction was calculated as a measure of immobilization capability. Analysis of patient setup and immobilization performance included calculation of the group mean, standard deviation (SD), and distribution of systematic (components affecting all fractions) and random (per fraction) uncertainty components. Across all patients and fractions, the mean radial setup difference from the reference measurements was 0.64 mm, with an SD of 0.24 mm. The distribution of systematic uncertainty (Σ) was 0.17 mm, and the distribution of random uncertainty (σ) was 0.16 mm. The root mean square (RMS) differences for each plate of the RCT were as follows: right = 0.35 mm; left = 0.41 mm; superior = 0.28 mm

  4. Evaluation of stability of stereotactic space defined by cone-beam CT for the Leksell Gamma Knife Icon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlDahlawi, Ismail; Prasad, Dheerendra; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2017-05-01

    The Gamma Knife Icon comes with an integrated cone-beam CT (CBCT) for image-guided stereotactic treatment deliveries. The CBCT can be used for defining the Leksell stereotactic space using imaging without the need for the traditional invasive frame system, and this allows also for frameless thermoplastic mask stereotactic treatments (single or fractionated) with the Gamma Knife unit. In this study, we used an in-house built marker tool to evaluate the stability of the CBCT-based stereotactic space and its agreement with the standard frame-based stereotactic space. We imaged the tool with a CT indicator box using our CT-simulator at the beginning, middle, and end of the study period (6 weeks) for determining the frame-based stereotactic space. The tool was also scanned with the Icon's CBCT on a daily basis throughout the study period, and the CBCT images were used for determining the CBCT-based stereotactic space. The coordinates of each marker were determined in each CT and CBCT scan using the Leksell GammaPlan treatment planning software. The magnitudes of vector difference between the means of each marker in frame-based and CBCT-based stereotactic space ranged from 0.21 to 0.33 mm, indicating good agreement of CBCT-based and frame-based stereotactic space definition. Scanning 4-month later showed good prolonged stability of the CBCT-based stereotactic space definition. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy of mesial temporal lobe epilepsies treated with Gamma knife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajek, Milan; Dezortova, Monika [MR Unit, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Videnska 1958/9, 140 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Center for Cell Therapy and Tissue Repair, V Uvalu 84, 150 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Liscak, Roman; Vymazal, Josef; Vladyka, Vilibald [Department of Stereotactic and Radiation Neurosurgery, Hospital Na Homolce, 151 19, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2003-05-01

    Proton MR spectroscopy was used to observe long-term post-irradiation metabolic changes in epileptogenic tissue and in the contralateral parts of the brain which are not available with conventional imaging methods. We studied these changes in the temporal lobe in six patients, following radiosurgery on the amygdala and hippocampus. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy at 1.5 T with short and long echo times (TE=10 and 135 ms) were used together with standard MR imaging sequences (T1-, T2-weighted). The treatment was performed by Leksell Gamma Knife with a dose of 50 Gy to the center and a 50% isodose to the margin of the target, represented by the mean volume of approximately 7.5 ml. Magnetic resonance imaging and MR spectroscopy examinations were performed at least once per year for 3 years. The most significant changes in spectra were observed approximately 1 year after the irradiation when edema in irradiated area was observed and strong signal of lipids was identified. Later, edema and lipid signals disappeared and follow-up was characterized by a decrease of NAA, Cr, and Cho concentrations in the ipsilateral region of the brain to the irradiation (LCModel calculation from voxel of interest 3.8-4.5 ml positioned into the centrum of target volume). The concentration of NAA, Cr, and Cho after radiosurgery was significantly different from control values (p<0.05) and also from concentrations in the contralateral part of the brain (p<0.05). In the contralateral part, the concentration of NAA was significantly increased (p<0.05) (NAA: before treatment 8.81, after treatment 11.33 mM). No radiotoxic changes were observed in the contralateral part of the brain or behind the area of target volume. The MR spectroscopy findings precluded MRI observation and MRS results completed data about the development of radiotoxic changes in the target volume. (orig.)

  6. GAFChromic film dosimetry with a flatbed color scanner for Leksell Gamma Knife therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Tominaga, T.; Nakamura, O.; Ueda, R.; Hoshi, M.

    2004-01-01

    GAFChromic films MD-55-2 have recently been established widely in industrial, scientific, and medical applications as radiation dosimeters. We applied these films to the dosimetry for Leksell Gamma Knife therapy. We used a flatbed image scanner to take digital images of irradiated MD-55-2, and the data were converted to Red, Green and Blue pixel values. The absorbed dose, as derived from the response curve of the Red pixel value, was consistent with the Leksell Gamma Plan dose planning system, for exposures using collimator sizes, 4 mm, 8 mm, and 14 mm. However, the maximum dose in the exposure of the 18 mm collimator was measured to be about 5% smaller than Gamma Plan due to the density effect of the compound material in the head phantom

  7. Radiologic evaluation of the therapeutic effect of gamma knife radiosurgery in cerebral vascular malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ig Dae; Kim, Il; Jeon, Young Seup; Lee, Jong Yuk; Lee, Young Jun; Cha, Seong Suk; Eun, Choong Ki; Kim, Mu Seong; Sim, Jae Hong

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic effect of gamma knife radiosurgery in cerebral vascular malformation using a radiologic imaging method such as MRI or angiography. We retrospectively reviewed MRIs, CT scans and angiograms of 29 cases of arteriovenous malformation and 15 of cavernous malformation before and after gamma knife radiosurgery. The patients underwent follow-up radiologic studies for between 6 and 35 months after radiosurgery. No patient underwent other surgery or embolization. Radiological imaging analysis focused on changes in the volume of the nidus or central core. Other findings of edema, cystic change, hemorrhage, signal intensity, enhancement and distributional vascular markings were also studied. The volume of the AVM nidus was measured and assigned to one of four groups: 4-10cc and >10cc. In arteriovenous malformation cases, the volume of the nidus decreased by mean 60.2%;reduction was greatest(68.1%) in the 1-4cc group. Three cases showed complete loss of the nidus at 9, 12 and 25 months after radiosurgery, respectively. In nine cases, decreased caliber or loss of draining vein was noted. High signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images, suggesting either edema or demyelination, was observed in four cases. In cavernous angioma cases, core volume was reduced by 36.8%. Transient cerebral edema and presumed radiation necrosis were observed in two cases and one, respectively. Gamma knife surgery was effective in nearly all cases of arteriovenous malformation and some cases of cavernous malformation. More than two years follow-up involving radiologic imaging such as MRI is needed for the evaluation of therapeutic effect and diagnosis of complications.=20

  8. Present situation and prospect of gamma knife radiosurgery for functional brain disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongquan; Zhao Xianjun; Liu Wenli

    2002-01-01

    With the evolution of imaging technology in the past two decades, currently anatomic targets including the trigeminal nerve (for trigeminal neuralgia), the thalamus (for tremor or pain), the cingulate gyrus, anterior internal capsule or amygdala (for pain or psychiatric illness), the globus pallidum (for symptoms of Parkinson's disease), and the hippocampus (for epilepsy) can be precisely located with computerized tomography, magnetic resonance image, single photon emission computerized tomography and positron emission tomography; stereotactic radiosurgery gradually tends to perfection. Gamma knife therapy for nervous functional disorders has become the focus of interest in clinical study

  9. Lesion evolution after gamma knife irradiation observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirák, D.; Náměstková, K.; Herynek, V.; Liščák, R.; Vymazal, J.; Mareš, Vladislav; Syková, Eva; Hájek, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 4 (2007), s. 237-244 ISSN 0955-3002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:EU(DE) 512146 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : Gamma knife * Rat brain * Magnetic resonance imaging Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.468, year: 2007

  10. Phantom positioning variation in the Gamma Knife® Perfexion dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Nathalia Almeida; Potiens, Maria da Penha Albuquerque; Saraiva, Crystian

    2015-01-01

    The use of small volume ionization chamber has become required for the dosimetry of equipment that use small radiation fields. A pinpoint ionization chamber is ideal for the dosimetry of a Gamma Knife® Perfexion (GKP) unit. In this work, this chamber was inserted into the phantom, and measurements were performed with the phantom in different positions, in order to verify if the change in the phantom positioning affects the dosimetry of the GKP. Three different phantom positions were performed. The variation in the result is within the range allowed for the dosimetry of a GKP equipment. (author)

  11. Phantom positioning variation in the Gamma Knife® Perfexion dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Nathalia Almeida; Potiens, Maria da Penha Albuquerque [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Saraiva, Crystian [Hospital do Coracao, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The use of small volume ionization chamber has become required for the dosimetry of equipment that use small radiation fields. A pinpoint ionization chamber is ideal for the dosimetry of a Gamma Knife® Perfexion (GKP) unit. In this work, this chamber was inserted into the phantom, and measurements were performed with the phantom in different positions, in order to verify if the change in the phantom positioning affects the dosimetry of the GKP. Three different phantom positions were performed. The variation in the result is within the range allowed for the dosimetry of a GKP equipment. (author)

  12. Prediction of complications in Gamma Knife radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lax, I.; Karlsson, B.

    1996-01-01

    The incidence of complications following radiosurgical treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVM) is presented. A simple relationship exists between average dose and risk of complications, and on this basis a model is presented that gives a qualitatively correct description of this relationship. The parameters of the model have been determined using a clinical material of 862 AVM treatments to give a quantitativley correct description of the risk of complications. The dose-response curve is described by a double-exponential function. An accurate description of the dose-response curve at high dose levels is shown to be very important in radiosurgery. (orig.)

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of the Leksell Gamma Knife{sup TM}: II. Effects of heterogeneous versus homogeneous media for stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskvin, Vadim; Timmerman, Robert; DesRosiers, Colleen; Randall, Marcus; DesRosiers, Paul; Dittmer, Phil; Papiez, Lech [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, 535 Barnhill Dr, RT041, IN 46202-5289 (United States)

    2004-11-07

    The absence of electronic equilibrium in the vicinity of bone-tissue or air-tissue heterogeneity in the head can misrepresent deposited dose with treatment planning algorithms that assume all treatment volume as homogeneous media. In this paper, Monte Carlo simulation (PENELOPE) and measurements with a specially designed heterogeneous phantom were applied to investigate the effect of air-tissue and bone-tissue heterogeneity on dose perturbation with the Leksell Gamma Knife{sup TM}. The dose fall-off near the air-tissue interface caused by secondary electron disequilibrium leads to overestimation of dose by the vendor supplied treatment planning software (GammaPlan{sup TM}) at up to 4 mm from an interface. The dose delivered to the target area away from an air-tissue interface may be underestimated by up to 7% by GammaPlan{sup TM} due to overestimation of attenuation of photon beams passing through air cavities. While the underdosing near the air-tissue interface cannot be eliminated with any plug pattern, the overdosage due to under-attenuation of the photon beams in air cavities can be eliminated by plugging the sources whose beams intersect the air cavity. Little perturbation was observed next to bone-tissue interfaces. Monte Carlo results were confirmed by measurements. This study shows that the employed Monte Carlo treatment planning is more accurate for precise dosimetry of stereotactic radiosurgery with the Leksell Gamma Knife{sup TM} for targets in the vicinity of air-filled cavities.

  14. Leksell gamma knife lesioning of the rat hippocampus: the relationship between radiation dose and functional and structural damage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liščák, R.; Vladyka, V.; Novotný ml., J.; Brožek, G.; Náměstková, K.; Mareš, Vladislav; Herynek, V.; Jirák, D.; Hájek, M.; Syková, E.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 97, Suppl. 5 (2002), s. 666-673 ISSN 0022-3085 R&D Projects: GA MZd NF5161 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Leksell gamma knife * rats * memory Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 2.626, year: 2002

  15. Gamma-knife radiosurgery in acromegaly: a 4-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasio, Roberto; Epaminonda, Paolo; Motti, Enrico; Giugni, Enrico; Ventrella, Laura; Cozzi, Renato; Farabola, Mario; Loli, Paola; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Arosio, Maura

    2003-07-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery by gamma-knife (GK) is an attractive therapeutic option after failure of microsurgical removal in patients with pituitary adenoma. In these tumors or remnants of them, it aims to obtain the arrest of cell proliferation and hormone hypersecretion using a single precise high dose of ionizing radiation, sparing surrounding structures. The long-term efficacy and toxicity of GK in acromegaly are only partially known. Thirty acromegalic patients (14 women and 16 men) entered a prospective study of GK treatment. Most were surgical failures, whereas in 3 GK was the primary treatment. Imaging of the adenoma and target coordinates identification were obtained by high resolution magnetic resonance imaging. All patients were treated with multiple isocenters (mean, 8; range, 3-11). The 50% isodose was used in 27 patients (90%). The mean margin dose was 20 Gy (range, 15-35), and the dose to the visual pathways was always less than 8 Gy. After a median follow-up of 46 months (range, 9-96), IGF-I fell from 805 micro g/liter (median; interquartile range, 640-994) to 460 micro g/liter (interquartile range, 217-654; P = 0.0002), and normal age-matched IGF-I levels were reached in 7 patients (23%). Mean GH levels decreased from 10 micro g/liter (interquartile range, 6.4-15) to 2.9 micro g/liter (interquartile range, 2-5.3; P < 0.0001), reaching levels below 2.5 micro g/liter in 11 (37%). The rate of persistently pathological hormonal levels was still 70% at 5 yr by Kaplan-Meier analysis. The median volume was 1.43 ml (range, 0.20-3.7). Tumor shrinkage (at least 25% of basal volume) occurred after 24 months (range, 12-36) in 11 of 19 patients (58% of assessable patients). The rate of shrinkage was 79% at 4 yr. In no case was further growth observed. Only 1 patient complained of side-effects (severe headache and nausea immediately after the procedure, with full recovery in a few days with steroid therapy). Anterior pituitary failures were observed in 2 patients

  16. Moyamoya syndrome associated with gamma knife surgery for cerebral arteriovenous molformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uozumi, Yoichi; Sumitomo, Masaki; Maruwaka, Mikio

    2012-01-01

    A 30-year-old female developed moyamoya syndrome after gamma knife surgery (GKS) for cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM), and was treated with bypass surgery. She suffered from flittering scotoma, right transient hemianopsia, and headache for 1 year. Cerebral angiography revealed a Spetzler-Martin grade III AVM located in the left occipital lobe. After staged embolization, GKS was performed with a minimum dose of 20 Gy to the periphery of the nidus at the 50% isodose level of the maximum target dose. Gradual nidus regression was achieved, and the clinical symptoms disappeared completely. However, at 30 months after GKS, the patient suffered transient ischemic attack. Cerebral angiography showed left middle cerebral artery occlusion with moyamoya vessels. The patient underwent direct and indirect bypass surgery. After surgery, the patient was free from ischemic symptoms. Chronic inflammation and long-term changes in expression of cytokines and growth factors after GKS may have triggered this case. (author)

  17. Endocrinological effects of gamma knife therapy on hormone-producing pituitary adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuzuki, Toshihide; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Tsunoda, Shigeru; Kawai, Shozo; Yoshino, Eiji.

    1997-01-01

    The gamma knife therapy for pituitary adenoma excessively producing hormones was evaluated from an endocrinological aspect. Subjects were 5 cases, all females aged 22-63y, who had received the therapy >1 years ago. Excessive hormones produced by the tumor were prolactin (PRL, 1 case), growth hormone (GH, 2 cases) and ACTH (2 cases). The PRL case received 40 Gy in the past and additionally received the maximal dose of 15 Gy. The maximal doses for 2 GH cases were 30 Gy and for 2 ACTH cases, 35 and 40 Gy. After the therapy, MRI examination and hormone monitoring were done periodically. No morphological change of the tumor was observed by MRI. Normalization of hormone levels was seen in 3 cases except for 1 PRL and 1 ACTH cases. (K.H.)

  18. Measurement of prompt gamma profiles in inhomogeneous targets with a knife-edge slit camera during proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priegnitz, M; Helmbrecht, S; Fiedler, F; Janssens, G; Smeets, J; Vander Stappen, F; Perali, I; Sterpin, E

    2015-01-01

    Proton and ion beam therapies become increasingly relevant in radiation therapy. To fully exploit the potential of this irradiation technique and to achieve maximum target volume conformality, the verification of particle ranges is highly desirable. Many research activities focus on the measurement of the spatial distributions of prompt gamma rays emitted during irradiation. A passively collimating knife-edge slit camera is a promising option to perform such measurements. In former publications, the feasibility of accurate detection of proton range shifts in homogeneous targets could be shown with such a camera. We present slit camera measurements of prompt gamma depth profiles in inhomogeneous targets. From real treatment plans and their underlying CTs, representative beam paths are selected and assembled as one-dimensional inhomogeneous targets built from tissue equivalent materials. These phantoms have been irradiated with monoenergetic proton pencil beams. The accuracy of range deviation estimation as well as the detectability of range shifts is investigated in different scenarios. In most cases, range deviations can be detected within less than 2 mm. In close vicinity to low-density regions, range detection is challenging. In particular, a minimum beam penetration depth of 7 mm beyond a cavity is required for reliable detection of a cavity filling with the present setup. Dedicated data post-processing methods may be capable of overcoming this limitation. (paper)

  19. Study of the heterogeneities effect in the dose distributions of Leksell Gamma Knife (R), through Monte Carlo simulation; Estudio del efecto de las heterogeneidades en las distribuciones de dosis del Leksell GammaKnife (R), mediante simulacion Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E.L. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Al-Dweri, F.M.O.; Lallena R, A.M. [Universidad de Granada, Granada (Spain)]. e-mail: elrc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2005-07-01

    In this work they are studied, by means of Monte Carlo simulation, the effects that take place in the dose profiles that are obtained with the Leksell Gamma Knife (R), when they are kept in account heterogeneities. The considered heterogeneities simulate the skull and the spaces of air that are in the head, like they can be the nasal breasts or the auditory conduits. The calculations were made using the Monte Carlo Penelope simulation code (v. 2003). The geometry of each one of the 201 sources that this instrument is composed, as well as of the corresponding channels of collimation of the Gamma Knife (R), it was described by means of a simplified model of geometry that has been recently studied. The obtained results when they are kept in mind the heterogeneities they present non worthless differences regarding those obtained when those are not considered. These differences are maximum in the proximities of the interfaces among different materials. (Author)

  20. Study of the heterogeneities effect in the dose distributions of Leksell Gamma Knife (R), through Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas C, E.L.; Al-Dweri, F.M.O.; Lallena R, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work they are studied, by means of Monte Carlo simulation, the effects that take place in the dose profiles that are obtained with the Leksell Gamma Knife (R), when they are kept in account heterogeneities. The considered heterogeneities simulate the skull and the spaces of air that are in the head, like they can be the nasal breasts or the auditory conduits. The calculations were made using the Monte Carlo Penelope simulation code (v. 2003). The geometry of each one of the 201 sources that this instrument is composed, as well as of the corresponding channels of collimation of the Gamma Knife (R), it was described by means of a simplified model of geometry that has been recently studied. The obtained results when they are kept in mind the heterogeneities they present non worthless differences regarding those obtained when those are not considered. These differences are maximum in the proximities of the interfaces among different materials. (Author)

  1. Refractory trigeminal neuralgia treatment outcomes following CyberKnife radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, Sana D; Tai, Alexander; Snider, James W; Bhatia, Shilpa; Bedrick, Edward J; Rashid, Abdul; Jay, Ann; Kalhorn, Christopher; Nair, Nathan; Harter, K William; Collins, Sean P; Jean, Walter

    2014-01-01

    A handful of studies have reported outcomes with CyberKnife radiosurgery (CKRS) for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. However, the follow-up has been short with no minimum follow-up required and have included patients with short duration of symptoms. Here we report our institutional experience on patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year and a median follow-up of 28 months (mean 38.84 months). Twenty-five patients with medically and surgically intractable TN received CKRS with a mean marginal radiation dose of 64 Gy applied to an average isodose line of 86% of the affected trigeminal nerve. Follow-up data were obtained by clinical examination and telephone questionnaire. Outcome results were categorized based on the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) pain scale with BNI I-III considered to be good outcomes and BNI IV-V considered as treatment failure. BNI facial numbness score was used to assess treatment complications. A large proportion of patients (42.9%) reported pain relief within 1 month following CKRS treatment. The mean time to recurrence of severe pain was 27.8 months (range 1–129 months). At median follow-up of 28 months (mean 38.84 months), actuarial rate of freedom from severe pain (BNI ≥ III) was 72%. At last follow-up 2 (8%) patients had freedom from any pain and no medications (BNI I) and the majority (48%) had some pain that was adequately controlled with medications. Seven patients (28%) had no response to treatment and continued to suffer from severe pain (BNI IV or V). Patient’s diabetic status and overall post-treatment BNI facial numbness scores were statistically significant predictors of treatment outcomes. CKRS represents an acceptable salvage option for with medically and/or surgically refractory patients. Even patients with severely debilitating symptoms may experience significant and sustained pain relief after CKRS. Particularly, CKRS remains an attractive option in patients who are not good surgical candidates or possibly

  2. Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by a Developmental Venous Anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Gillian; Lunsford, L Dade; Monaco Iii, Edward A

    2015-02-18

    Background: Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is mostly caused by vascular compression of the nerve's root entry zone due to an ectatic artery. Rarer causes include compression from tumors, vascular malformations or multiple sclerosis plaques. Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) are benign, aberrantly appearing venous structures that drain normal cerebral tissue. DVAs are a rare etiology of TN. The management of TN caused by a DVA is controversial as disruption of the DVA can be catastrophic. Methods: We report a case of a young man with severe medically refractory TN related to a brachium pontis DVA who was successfully treated by gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSR) to the trigeminal nerve. Results: Within 2 weeks of GKSR, the patient reported experiencing 60% pain relief; 5 years postoperatively, he remains completely pain free with some mild sensory loss in the V2 and V3 areas. Conclusions: GKSR has an established role in the management of TN. This is the first reported case of using GKSR to treat TN caused by a DVA. In the setting of a DVA, GKSR should be an initial consideration for TN therapy after medical failure because of the high surgical risk related to disrupting the DVA. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Characteristic and quality control test in sector collimator gamma knife perfexion at Siloam hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesly Manik, Jhon; Hidayanto, Eko; Sutanto, Heri

    2017-01-01

    In this study conducted to evaluate the collimator 4 mm, 8 mm, 16 mm to determine the level of precision Gamma Knife Perfexion there three years and eight months has not carried out measurements after the first year and verify the alignment of sector 1-8. Measurement with three axes (x-axis, y-axis, z-axis) using the film Gafcromic EBT-3, which will be signaled to a central point in the film to be measured and given a dose of 5 Gy for 10 minutes and then scanned and analyzed using ImageJ softwere 1.50 and dose rate in film comparison with measurent dose rate using electrometer. Alignment of Patient-Positioning System (PPS) with Radiation Focal Point (RFP) determination of quality control testing each collimator 4 mm in the standard test with 0.4 mm passive voice AAPM 54. The results of the standard are still in conformity item 0.21 mm for 4 mm and corelasi dose rate film and measurent using electrometer collimator 4 mm = 0.965, 8 mm = 0.964, 16 mm = 0.959.

  4. Dosimetric factors associated with pituitary function after Gamma Knife Surgery (GKS) of pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicignano, Gianluisa; Losa, Marco; Vecchio, Antonella del; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Picozzi, Piero; Bolognesi, Angelo; Mortini, Pietro; Calandrino, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Gamma Knife Surgery (GKS) can be an adjunctive option to surgery in the case of pituitary adenomas. The effect of dosimetric variables on the incidence of new anterior pituitary deficits after GKS requires better definition. Materials and methods: This retrospective study considered 130 patients with a follow up after GKS >6 months. The diagnosis was nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA) in 68 patients and secreting pituitary adenoma (SPA) in 62 patients. Median margin dose was 15/25 Gy for NFPA and SPA, respectively. The endocrinological median follow-up was 60 months. Hypopituitarism was defined as a new pituitary deficit in (at least) one of the three hormonal axes (hypogonadism, hypothyroidism and hypoadrenalism). The predictive value of clinical/dosimetric parameters was tested by univariate/multivariate analyses. Results: Sixteen patients (12.3%) showed a new pituitary deficit in one or more axes. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the mean dose to the stalk/pituitary and the amount of healthy tissue within the high dose region were strong independent predictors of pituitary dysfunction; their best cut-off values were around 15.7 Gy, 7.3 Gy and 1.4 cm 3 , respectively. Conclusions: Our data showed a dose-dependent incidence of new hormonal deficits after GKS for pituitary adenoma. During planning definition, the risk of hypopituitarism could be reduced using the outlined safe dose–volume values.

  5. Dosimetric factors associated with pituitary function after Gamma Knife Surgery (GKS) of pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicignano, Gianluisa; Losa, Marco; del Vecchio, Antonella; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Picozzi, Piero; Bolognesi, Angelo; Mortini, Pietro; Calandrino, Riccardo

    2012-07-01

    Gamma Knife Surgery (GKS) can be an adjunctive option to surgery in the case of pituitary adenomas. The effect of dosimetric variables on the incidence of new anterior pituitary deficits after GKS requires better definition. This retrospective study considered 130 patients with a follow up after GKS >6 months. The diagnosis was nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA) in 68 patients and secreting pituitary adenoma (SPA) in 62 patients. Median margin dose was 15/25 Gy for NFPA and SPA, respectively. The endocrinological median follow-up was 60 months. Hypopituitarism was defined as a new pituitary deficit in (at least) one of the three hormonal axes (hypogonadism, hypothyroidism and hypoadrenalism). The predictive value of clinical/dosimetric parameters was tested by univariate/multivariate analyses. Sixteen patients (12.3%) showed a new pituitary deficit in one or more axes. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the mean dose to the stalk/pituitary and the amount of healthy tissue within the high dose region were strong independent predictors of pituitary dysfunction; their best cut-off values were around 15.7 Gy, 7.3 Gy and 1.4 cm(3), respectively. Our data showed a dose-dependent incidence of new hormonal deficits after GKS for pituitary adenoma. During planning definition, the risk of hypopituitarism could be reduced using the outlined safe dose-volume values. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of Gafchromic EBT3 film calibration irradiated with gamma rays from different systems: Gamma Knife and Cobalt-60 unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Mohsen; Geraily, Ghazale; Shirazi, Alireza; Esfahani, Mahbod; Teimouri, Javad

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, Gafchromic films are used as an advanced instrument for dosimetry systems. The EBT3 films are a new generation of Gafchromic films. Our main interest is to compare the response of the EBT3 films exposed to gamma rays provided by the Theratron 780C as a conventional radiotherapy system and the Leksell Gamma Knife as a stereotactic radiotherapy system (SRS). Both systems use Cobalt-60 sources, thus using the same energy. However, other factors such as source-to-axis distance, number of sources, dose rate, direction of irradiation, shape of phantom, the field shape of radiation, and different scatter contribution may influence the calibration curve. Calibration curves for the 2 systems were measured and plotted for doses ranging from 0 to 40 Gy at the red and green channels. The best fitting curve was obtained with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Also, the component of dose uncertainty was obtained for any calibration curve. With the best fitting curve for the EBT3 films, we can use the calibration curve to measure the absolute dose in radiation therapy. Although there is a small deviation between the 2 curves, the p-value at any channel shows no significant difference between the 2 calibration curves. Therefore, the calibration curve for each system can be the same because of minor differences. The results show that with the best fitting curve from measured data, while considering the measurement uncertainties related to them, the EBT3 calibration curve can be used to measure the unknown dose both in SRS and in conventional radiotherapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Long-Term Survival of a Patient with Brainstem and Recurrent Brain Metastasis from Stage IV Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Multiple Gamma Knife Radiosurgeries and Craniotomies: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F. Lamm

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The prognosis of patients diagnosed with stage IV nonsmall cell lung cancer that have brain and brainstem metastasis is very poor, with less than a third surviving a year past their initial date of diagnosis. We present the rare case of a 57-year-old man who is a long-term survivor of brainstem and recurrent brain metastasis, after aggressive treatment. He is now five and a half years out from diagnosis and continues to live a highly functional life without evidence of disease. Four separate Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgeries in conjunction with two craniotomies were utilized since his initial diagnosis to treat recurrent brain metastasis while chemoradiation therapy and thoracic surgery were used to treat his primary disease in the right upper lung. In his situation, Gamma Knife radiosurgery proved to be a valuable, safe, and effective tool for the treatment of multiply recurrent brain metastases within critical normal structures.

  8. CyberKnife radiosurgery for brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wowra, Berndt; Muacevic, Alexander; Tonn, Jörg-Christian

    2012-01-01

    Classic radiosurgery is a neurosurgical treatment concept for single-fraction irradiation of cerebral lesions not amenable to open surgery. Until recently it has been realized mainly by frame-based technologies (Gamma Knife; stereotactic linear accelerators). The CyberKnife described in 1997 is an image-guided frameless robotic technology for whole-body radiosurgery. It can be used for classic single-fraction radiosurgery and for hypofractionated treatments. The CyberKnife treatment procedure is completely non-invasive and can be repeated throughout the body if necessary. Brain metastases are an important and frequently treated indication of modern radiosurgery. Data concerning radiosurgical treatment of brain metastases with the CyberKnife are reviewed. Scientific evidence shows that the full-body applicability of the CyberKnife is not at the expense of an inferior intracranial treatment quality when compared to standard frame-based technology. The clinical results of CyberKnife single-fraction radiosurgery are in line with the published literature. The attractive therapeutic profile of CyberKnife radiosurgery is reflected by a high tumor control and a low toxicity and the repeatability of the treatments for recurrent metastases. Although hypofractionated treatments (in 3-5 fractions) of brain metastases have been performed with the CyberKnife to treat large metastases, the clinical significance of this new radiosurgical concept is unclear and requires further study. A new approach is to treat the resection cavity with radiosurgery after surgical removal of brain metastases. In this concept radiosurgery replaces fractionated radiation therapy as an adjunct to surgery. The initial results are very promising. The CyberKnife has been established as a modern non-invasive technology for intra- and extracranial radiosurgery. It adds to the oncological armamentarium and confers upon radiosurgery a greater emphasis as an oncological treatment concept. Copyright © 2012 S

  9. Gamma Knife radiosurgery of olfactory groove meningiomas provides a method to preserve subjective olfactory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gande, Abhiram; Kano, Hideyuki; Bowden, Gregory; Mousavi, Seyed H; Niranjan, Ajay; Flickinger, John C; Lunsford, L Dade

    2014-02-01

    Anosmia is a common outcome after resection of olfactory groove meningioma(s) (OGM) and for some patients represents a significant disability. To evaluate long term tumor control rates and preservation of subjective olfaction after Gamma Knife (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of OGM. We performed a retrospective chart review and telephone assessments of 41 patients who underwent GK SRS between 1987 and 2008. Clinical outcomes were stratified by full, partial or no subjective olfaction, whereas tumor control was assessed by changes in volume greater or lesser than 25%. The median clinical and imaging follow-up were 76 and 65 months, respectively. Prior to SRS, 19 (46%) patients had surgical resections and two (5%) had received fractionated radiation therapy. Twenty four patients (59%) reported a normal sense of smell, 12 (29%) reported a reduced sense of smell and five (12%) had complete anosmia. The median tumor volume was 8.5 cm(3) (range 0.6-56.1), the mean radiation dose at the tumor margin was 13 Gy (range 10-20) and the median estimated dose to the olfactory nerve was 5.1 Gy (range 1.1-18.1). At follow-up, 27 patients (66%) reported intact olfaction (three (7%) described return to a normal sense of smell), nine (22%) described partial anosmia, and five (12%) had complete anosmia. No patient reported deterioration in olfaction after SRS. Thirteen patients (32%) showed significant tumor regression, 26 (63%) had no further growth and two (5%) had progressed. The progression free tumor control rates were 97% at 1 year and 95% at 2, 10 and 20 years. Symptomatic adverse radiation effects occurred in three (7%) patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery provided both long term tumor control and preservation of olfaction.

  10. Efficacy and tolerability of gamma knife radiosurgery in acromegaly: a 10-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchi, Cristina L; Attanasio, Roberto; Verrua, Elisa; Cozzi, Renato; Ferrante, Emanuele; Loli, Paola; Montefusco, Laura; Motti, Enrico; Ferrari, Daniela I; Giugni, Enrico; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Arosio, Maura

    2009-12-01

    The long-term efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery by gamma knife (GK) still remain unknown. The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term efficacy and tolerability of GK in acromegalic patients. Retrospective analysis for a median follow-up of 10 years. Thirty-five acromegalic patients from two referral centres in Milan submitted to GK (median margin dose: 20 Gy, median % isodose: 50) between 1995 and 2004. GH/IGF-I secretion, anterior pituitary function, radiological imaging and ophthalmological data. Cure rate improved over time (up to 46% at 10 years), as did the proportion of patients achieving control on somatostatin analogues (from 12.5% at baseline to 50% at 10 years). Normal IGF-I values were observed in 82% of patients at their last visit. No visual impairment, disease recurrence, tumour growth or secondary cerebral tumour occurred. Half of the patients developed one or more new deficiencies, while two patients normalized their prior failures. In particular, new onset of clinical or subclinical hypoadrenalism occurred in 12/30 patients (40%), hypothyroidism in 3/28 (11%), hypogonadism in 2/15 (13%) and GH deficiency in 2/35 (6%). GH value at the time of GK was the best negative predictor of cure and margin dose was the best positive predictor of new hypopituitarism. Over a 10-year period after GK radiosurgery, an increasing percentage of patients achieve cure, or adequate control of the disease on pharmacological therapy, at the expense of increasing novel pituitary deficiencies. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Therapeutic efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy with gamma knife on early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer and life quality of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Zhengting; Cui Di; Ren Ye; Dai Zhuojie; Su Xiaoming; Fan Jingjing; Shen Yulong; Ma Huizhen; Wang Zongye

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with gamma knife on stage Ⅰ-Ⅱ non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)and the quality of life of the patients undergoing this therapy. Methods: Twenty NSCLC patients with the median age of 76, 10 at stage Ⅰ and 10 at stage Ⅱ who were unable or unwilling to undergo surgery were given SBRT with gamma knife at the doses of 3-6 Gy in 8-15 fractions,finished within 2 to 3 weeks. The prescription isodose line was 50%,the marginal dose was 39-56 Gy, the central dose was 78-112 Gy, and the total biologically effective dose was 51-83 Gy. The patients were observed after admission and followed up by chest CT 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment until progressive disease or death. EORTC QLQ-LC43 questionnaire was used to investigate the changes in quality of life. Results: The 20 patients were followed up for 24 (12-46) months. At six months after the treatment,the overall response rate was 80%, and the complete response rate was 35%. The 1, 2 and 3-year local control rates were 100%, 95% and 95%, respectively. The 1, 2 and 3-year overall survival rates were 95%, 80% and 50% respectively; The 1, 2, and 3-year progression free survival rates were 85%, 64% and 33%, respectively. The failure rate was 20% and the rate of progress within the planning target volume was 5%. No acute toxicity at grade 3 and over occurred in any patient during the treatment. 15% of the patients developed grade 1-2 radiation pneumonia. Age, gender, pathologic index or not were weakly correlated with the overall survival. The emotional function was improved significantly after treatment (P<0.05), dyspnea and cough were improved at different degrees, however, not significantly. There were no significant changes in the physical function and symptoms, such as fatigue,lack of appetite, insomnia, etc. Conclusions: Significantly improving the motional function and maintaining the quality of life, SBRT with gamma knife

  12. Target and peripheral dose from radiation sector motions accompanying couch repositioning of patient coordinates with the Gamma Knife® Perfexion™

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Tuan-Anh; Wu, Vincent; Malhotra, Harish; Steinman, James P.; Prasad, Dheerendra; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2011-01-01

    The GammaPlan ™ treatment planning system (TPS) does not fully account for shutter dose when multiple shots are required to deliver a patient’s treatment. The unaccounted exposures to the target site and its periphery are measured in this study. The collected data are compared to a similar effect from the Gamma Knife ® model 4C. A stereotactic head frame was attached to a Leksell ® 16 cm diameter spherical phantom; using a fiducial-box, CT images of the phantom were acquired and registered in the TPS. Measurements give the relationship of measured dose to the number of repositions with the patient positioning system (PPS) and to the collimator size. An absorbed dose of 10 Gy to the 50% isodose line was prescribed to the target site and all measurements were acquired with an ionization chamber. Measured dose increases with frequency of repositioning and with collimator size. As the radiation sectors transition between the beam on and beam off states, the target receives more shutter dose than the periphery. Shutter doses of 3.53±0.04 and 1.59±0.04 cGy/reposition to the target site are observed for the 16 and 8 mm collimators, respectively. The target periphery receives additional dose that varies depending on its position relative to the target. The radiation sector motions for the Gamma Knife ® Perfexion ™ result in an additional dose due to the shutter effect. The magnitude of this exposure is comparable to that measured for the model 4C

  13. Efficacy and Quality of Life Outcomes in Patients With Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia Treated With Gamma-Knife Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhople, Anil; Kwok, Young; Chin, Lawrence; Shepard, David Ph.D.; Slawson, Robert; Amin, Pradip; Regine, William

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess efficacy and quality of life (QOL) outcomes associated with gamma-knife radiosurgery (GK-RS) in treating atypical trigeminal neuralgia (ATN) compared with classic trigeminal neuralgia (CTN). Methods and Materials: Between September 1996 and September 2004, 35 cases of ATN were treated with GK-RS. Patients were categorized into two groups: Group I comprised patients presenting with ATN (57%); Group II consisted of patients presenting with CTN then progressing to ATN (43%). Median prescription dose 75 Gy (range, 70-80 Gy) was delivered to trigeminal nerve root entry zone. Treatment efficacy and QOL improvements were assessed with a standardized questionnaire. Results: With median follow-up of 29 months (range, 3-74 months), 72% reported excellent/good outcomes, with mean time to relief of 5.8 weeks (range, 0-24 weeks) and mean duration of relief of 62 weeks (range, 1-163 weeks). This rate of pain relief is similar to rate achieved in our previously reported experience treating CTN with GK-RS (p = 0.36). There was a trend toward longer time to relief (p = 0.059), and shorter duration of relief (p = 0.067) in patients with ATN. There was no difference in rate of, time to, or duration of pain relief between Groups I and II. Of the patients with ATN, 88% discontinued or decreased the use of pain medications. Among the patients with sustained pain relief, QOL improved an average of 85%. Conclusion: This is the largest reported GK-RS experience for the treatment of ATN. Patients with ATN can achieve rates of pain relief similar to those in patients with CTN. Further follow-up is necessary to assess adequately the durability of response

  14. Dosimetric and radiobiologic comparison of 103Pd COMS plaque brachytherapy and Gamma Knife radiosurgery for choroidal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorovets, Daniel; Gagne, Nolan L; Melhus, Christopher S

    Plaque brachytherapy (BT) and Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) are highly conformal treatment options for choroidal melanoma. This study objectively compares physical dose and biologically effective dose (BED) distributions for these two modalities. Tumor and organ-at-risk (OAR) dose distributions from a CT-defined reference right eye were compared between 103 Pd COMS (Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study Group) plaques delivering 70 Gy (plaque heterogeneity corrected) over 120 h to the tumor apex and GKRS plans delivering 22 Gy to the 40% isodose line for a representative sample of clinically relevant choroidal melanoma locations and sizes. Tumor and OAR biologically effective dose-volume histograms were generated using consensus radiobiologic parameters and modality-specific BED equations. Published institutional prescriptive practices generally lead to larger tumor and OAR physical doses from COMS BT vs. GKRS. Radiobiologic dose conversions, however, revealed variable BEDs. Medium and large tumors receive >1.3 times higher BEDs with COMS BT vs. GKRS. OAR BEDs have even greater dependence on tumor size, location, and treatment modality. For example, COMS BT maximum BEDs to the optic nerve are lower than from GKRS for large anterior and all posterior tumors but are higher for anterior small and medium tumors. BT and GKRS for choroidal melanoma have different physical dose and BED distributions with potentially unique clinical consequences. Using published institutional prescriptive practices, neither modality is uniformly favored, although COMS BT delivers higher physical doses and BEDs to tumors. These results suggest that lowering the physical prescription dose for COMS BT to more closely match the BED of GKRS might maintain equivalent tumor control with less potential morbidity. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Angled screw holes for anterior posts and a frame-positioning device for gamma knife radiosurgery: allowing for better targeting of intracranial lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; McDermott, Michael W

    2007-04-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery requires frame positioning so that the treatment target is as close to the center of the frame and as low as possible to cover all of the posterior fossa contents. In this study, we report the use of two devices developed by the senior author (MWM) that facilitate these two crucial objectives in the treatment of intracranial targets using the gamma knife. Custom front posts with threaded screw holes drilled at 5-, 10-, and 15-degree angles were created by the manufacturer at our request. A U-shaped metal device for frame positioning was designed in-house and fits into the holes at the 100-mm mark on the lateral sides of the Leksell stereotactic frame base. This allowed the positioning device to snap securely into the frame for use in positioning. The positioning device was constructed so that the lowest possible frame position would be achieved with each frame application, while avoiding collisions with the magnetic resonance imaging localizer box. Angled front posts allowed for pin contacts with the cranium anterior and/or superior to the superior temporal line despite a lateral or posterior position of the frame. This avoided penetration of the temporalis muscle and reduced discomfort for patients. The U-shaped metal device was used in place of the Velcro straps or ear bars routinely used for frame positioning in which the distance from the frame base to the top of the head must always be measured to avoid collisions with the localizer box. During the past 2 years, these devices have been used on a daily basis, achieving the desired results. In many cases, their use has avoided the need for frame repositioning and rescanning for targets that cannot be reached because of inexact frame positioning. A new design with angled screw holes in the front posts used for gamma knife radiosurgery allows surgeons to avoid penetration of the temporalis muscle and to maintain a perpendicular orientation of the fixation screw to the outer table of the

  16. Experimental Comparison of Knife-Edge and Multi-Parallel Slit Collimators for Prompt Gamma Imaging of Proton Pencil Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Julien; Roellinghoff, Frauke; Janssens, Guillaume; Perali, Irene; Celani, Andrea; Fiorini, Carlo; Freud, Nicolas; Testa, Etienne; Prieels, Damien

    2016-01-01

    More and more camera concepts are being investigated to try and seize the opportunity of instantaneous range verification of proton therapy treatments offered by prompt gammas emitted along the proton tracks. Focusing on one-dimensional imaging with a passive collimator, the present study experimentally compared in combination with the first, clinically compatible, dedicated camera device the performances of instances of the two main options: a knife-edge slit (KES) and a multi-parallel slit (MPS) design. These two options were experimentally assessed in this specific context as they were previously demonstrated through analytical and numerical studies to allow similar performances in terms of Bragg peak retrieval precision and spatial resolution in a general context. Both collimators were prototyped according to the conclusions of Monte Carlo optimization studies under constraints of equal weight (40 mm tungsten alloy equivalent thickness) and of the specificities of the camera device under consideration (in particular 4 mm segmentation along beam axis and no time-of-flight discrimination, both of which less favorable to the MPS performance than to the KES one). Acquisitions of proton pencil beams of 100, 160, and 230 MeV in a PMMA target revealed that, in order to reach a given level of statistical precision on Bragg peak depth retrieval, the KES collimator requires only half the dose the present MPS collimator needs, making the KES collimator a preferred option for a compact camera device aimed at imaging only the Bragg peak position. On the other hand, the present MPS collimator proves more effective at retrieving the entrance of the beam in the target in the context of an extended camera device aimed at imaging the whole proton track within the patient. PMID:27446802

  17. Clinical and pathological analysis of benign brain tumors resected after Gamma Knife surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ali; Wang, Jun-Mei; Li, Gui-Lin; Sun, Yi-Lin; Sun, Shi-Bin; Luo, Bin; Wang, Mei-Hua

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the clinical and pathological features of benign brain tumors that had been treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) followed by resection. In this retrospective chart review, the authors identified 61 patients with intracranial benign tumors who had undergone neurosurgical intervention after GKS. Of these 61 patients, 27 were male and 34 were female; mean age was 49.1 years (range 19-73 years). There were 24 meningiomas, 18 schwannomas, 14 pituitary adenomas, 3 hemangioblastomas, and 2 craniopharyngiomas. The interval between GKS and craniotomy was 2-168 months, with a median of 24 months; for 7 patients, the interval was 10 years or longer. For 21 patients, a craniotomy was performed before and after GKS; in 9 patients, pathological specimens were obtained before and after GKS. A total of 29 patients underwent GKS at the Beijing Tiantan Hospital. All specimens obtained by surgical intervention underwent histopathological examination. Most patients underwent craniotomy because of tumor recurrence and/or exacerbation of clinical signs and symptoms. Neuroimaging analyses indicated tumor growth in 42 patients, hydrocephalus in 10 patients with vestibular schwannoma, cystic formation with mass effect in 7 patients, and tumor hemorrhage in 13 patients, of whom 10 had pituitary adenoma. Pathological examination demonstrated that, regardless of the type of tumor, GKS mainly induced coagulative necrosis of tumor parenchyma and stroma with some apoptosis and, ultimately, scar formation. In addition, irradiation induced vasculature stenosis and occlusion and tumor degeneration as a result of reduced blood supply. GKS-induced vasculature reaction was rarely observed in patients with pituitary adenoma. Pathological analysis of tumor specimens obtained before and after GKS did not indicate increased tumor proliferation after GKS. Radiosurgery is effective for intracranial benign tumors of small size and deep location and for tumor recurrence

  18. The Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Image Guided Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Initial Clinical Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Winnie; Cho, Young-Bin [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ansell, Steve [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Laperriere, Normand; Ménard, Cynthia; Millar, Barbara-Ann [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zadeh, Gelareh [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Macfeeters-Hamilton Centre for Neuro-oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kongkham, Paul; Bernstein, Mark [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chung, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.chung.md@gmail.com [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: The present study used cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to measure the inter- and intrafraction uncertainties for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) using the Leksell Gamma Knife (GK). Methods and Materials: Using a novel CBCT system adapted to the GK radiosurgery treatment unit, CBCT images were acquired immediately before and after treatment for each treatment session within the context of a research ethics board–approved prospective clinical trial. Patients were immobilized in the Leksell coordinate frame (LCF) for both volumetric CBCT imaging and GK-SRS delivery. The relative displacement of the patient's skull to the stereotactic reference (interfraction motion) was measured for each CBCT scan. Differences between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans were used to determine the intrafraction motion. Results: We analyzed 20 pre- and 17 post-treatment CBCT scans in 20 LCF patients treated with SRS. The mean translational pretreatment setup error ± standard deviation in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudal directions was −0.19 ± 0.32, 0.06 ± 0.27, and −0.23 ± 0.2 mm, with a maximum of −0.74, −0.53, and −0.68 mm, respectively. After an average time between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans of 82 minutes (range 27-170), the mean intrafraction error ± standard deviation for the LCF was −0.03 ± 0.05, −0.03 ± 0.18, and −0.03 ± 0.12 mm in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudual direction, respectively. Conclusions: Using CBCT on a prototype image guided GK Perfexion unit, we were able to measure the inter- and intrafraction positional changes for GK-SRS using the invasive frame. In the era of image guided radiation therapy, the use of CBCT image guidance for both frame- and non–frame-based immobilization systems could serve as a useful quality assurance tool. Our preliminary measurements can guide the application of achievable thresholds for inter- and intrafraction

  19. Long-term stability of the Leksell Gamma Knife® Perfexion™ patient positioning system (PPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, J; Bhatnagar, J P; Xu, Y; Huq, M S

    2014-03-01

    To assess the long-term mechanical stability and accuracy of the patient positioning system (PPS) of the Leksell Gamma Knife(®) Perfexion™ (LGK PFX). The mechanical stability of the PPS of the LGK PFX was evaluated using measurements obtained between September 2007 and June 2011. Three methods were employed to measure the deviation of the coincidence of the radiological focus point (RFP) and the PPS calibration center point (CCP). In the first method, the onsite diode test tool with single diode detector was used together with the 4 mm collimator on a daily basis. In the second method, a service diode test tool with three diode detectors was used biannually at the time of the routine preventive maintenance. The test performed with the service diode test tool measured the deviations for all three collimators 4, 8, and 16 mm and also for three different positions of the PPS. The third method employed the conventional film pin-prick method. This test was performed annually for the 4 mm collimator at the time of the routine annual QA. To estimate the effect of the patient weight on the performance of the PPS, the focus precision tests were also conducted with varying weights on the PPS using a set of lead bricks. The average deviations measured from the 641 daily focus precision tests were 0.1 ± 0.1, 0.0 ± 0.0, and 0.0 ± 0.0 mm, respectively, for the 4 mm collimator in the X (left/right of the patient), Y (anterior/posterior of the patient), and Z (superior/inferior of the patient) directions. The average of the total radial deviations as measured during ten semiannual measurements with the service diode test tool were 0.070 ± 0.029, 0.060 ± 0.022, and 0.103 ± 0.028 mm, respectively for the central, long, and short diodes for the 4 mm collimator. Similarly, the average total radial deviations measured during the semiannual measurements for the 4, 8, and 16 mm collimators and using the central diode were 0.070 ± 0.029, 0.097 ± 0.025, 0.159 ± 0.028 mm

  20. Long-Term Survival and Improved Quality of Life following Multiple Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgeries for Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik W. Larson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is in most cases complex and must be specifically tailored to the needs of the patient with the goals of extended survival and improved quality of life. Despite advancements in therapy, treatment outcomes remain almost universally poor. Salvage treatment options for the recurrence of the disease is an area of intense study. The following case highlights the utility of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery (GKRS as a salvage treatment. In this clinical situation, three sequential GKRS treatments led to prolonged survival (beyond four years after diagnosis and improved quality of life in a patient who was unable to receive further chemotherapy regimens and was unwilling to undergo further aggressive resection. To date, there have been few reports of three or more sequential GKRS treatment sessions utilized as salvage therapy for recurrent GBM in patients who can no longer tolerate chemotherapy. This report provides evidence that aggressive local treatment with GKRS at the time of recurrence may be appropriate, depending on a patient’s individual clinical situation, and can lead to prolonged survival and improved quality of life.

  1. Initial results of CyberKnife treatment for recurrent previously irradiated head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himei, Kengo; Katsui, Kuniaki; Yoshida, Atsushi

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of CyberKnife for recurrent previously irradiated head and neck cancer. Thirty-one patients with recurrent previously irradiated head and neck cancer were treated with a CyberKnife from July 1999 to March 2002 at Okayama Kyokuto Hospital were retrospectively studied. The accumulated dose was 28-80 Gy (median 60 Gy). The interval between CyberKnife treatment and previous radiotherapy was 0.4-429.5 months (median 16.3 months). Primary lesions were nasopharynx: 7, maxillary sinus: 6, tongue: 5, ethmoid sinus: 3, and others: 1. The pathology was squamous cell carcinoma: 25, adenoid cystic carcinoma: 4, and others: 2. Symptoms were pain: 8, and nasal bleeding: 2. The prescribed dose was 15.0-40.3 Gy (median 32.3 Gy) as for the marginal dose. The response rate (complete response (CR)+partial response (PR)) and local control rate (CR+PR+no change (NC)) was 74% and 94% respectively. Pain disappeared for 4 cases, relief was obtained for 4 cases and no change for 2 cases and nasal bleeding disappeared for 2 cases for an improvement of symptoms. An adverse effects were observed as mucositis in 5 cases and neck swelling in one case. Prognosis of recurrent previously irradiated head and neck cancer was estimated as poor. Our early experience shows that CyberKnife is expected to be feasible treatment for recurrent previously irradiated head and neck cancer, and for the reduction adverse effects and maintenance of useful quality of life (QOL) for patients. (author)

  2. Time-resolved imaging of prompt-gamma rays for proton range verification using a knife-edge slit camera based on digital photon counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambraia Lopes, Patricia; Clementel, Enrico; Crespo, Paulo; Henrotin, Sebastien; Huizenga, Jan; Janssens, Guillaume; Parodi, Katia; Prieels, Damien; Roellinghoff, Frauke; Smeets, Julien; Stichelbaut, Frederic; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2015-08-01

    Proton range monitoring may facilitate online adaptive proton therapy and improve treatment outcomes. Imaging of proton-induced prompt gamma (PG) rays using a knife-edge slit collimator is currently under investigation as a potential tool for real-time proton range monitoring. A major challenge in collimated PG imaging is the suppression of neutron-induced background counts. In this work, we present an initial performance test of two knife-edge slit camera prototypes based on arrays of digital photon counters (DPCs). PG profiles emitted from a PMMA target upon irradiation with a 160 MeV proton pencil beams (about 6.5   ×   109 protons delivered in total) were measured using detector modules equipped with four DPC arrays coupled to BGO or LYSO : Ce crystal matrices. The knife-edge slit collimator and detector module were placed at 15 cm and 30 cm from the beam axis, respectively, in all cases. The use of LYSO : Ce enabled time-of-flight (TOF) rejection of background events, by synchronizing the DPC readout electronics with the 106 MHz radiofrequency signal of the cyclotron. The signal-to-background (S/B) ratio of 1.6 obtained with a 1.5 ns TOF window and a 3 MeV-7 MeV energy window was about 3 times higher than that obtained with the same detector module without TOF discrimination and 2 times higher than the S/B ratio obtained with the BGO module. Even 1 mm shifts of the Bragg peak position translated into clear and consistent shifts of the PG profile if TOF discrimination was applied, for a total number of protons as low as about 6.5   ×   108 and a detector surface of 6.6 cm  ×  6.6 cm.

  3. Long-Term Survival in a Patient with Multiple Brain Metastases from Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Gamma Knife Radiosurgery on Four Occasions: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameer L. Elaimy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastases are the most common cancerous neoplasm in the brain. The treatment of these lesions is challenging and often includes a multimodality management approach with whole-brain radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, and neurosurgery options. Although advances in biomedical imaging technologies and the treatment of extracranial cancer have led to the overall increase in the survival of brain metastases patients, the finding that select patients survive several years remains puzzling. For this reason, we present the case of a 70-year-old patient who was diagnosed with multiple brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer five years ago and is currently alive following treatment with chemotherapy for the primary cancer and whole-brain radiation therapy and Gamma Knife radiosurgery on four separate occasions for the neurological cancer. Since the diagnosis of brain metastases five years ago, the patient’s primary cancer has remained controlled. Furthermore, multiple repeat GKRS procedures provided this patient with high levels of local tumor control, which in combination with a stable primary cancer led to an extended period of survival and a highly functional life. Further analysis and clinical research will be valuable in assessing the durability of multiple GKRS for brain metastases patients who experience long-term survival.

  4. Ten-Year Survival of a Patient Treated with Stereotactic Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases from Colon Cancer with Ovarian and Lymph Node Metastases: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiro Morinaga

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastasis from colorectal cancer is infrequent and carries a poor prognosis. Herein, we present a patient alive 10 years after the identification of a first brain metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer. A 39-year-old woman underwent sigmoidectomy for sigmoid colon cancer during an emergency operation for pelvic peritonitis. The pathological finding was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Eleven months after the sigmoidectomy, a metastatic lesion was identified in the left ovary. Despite local radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy, the left ovarian lesion grew, so resection of the uterus and bilateral ovaries was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy with tegafur-uracil (UFT/calcium folinate (leucovorin, LV was initiated. Seven months after resection of the ovarian lesion, brain metastases appeared in the bilateral frontal lobes and were treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Cervical and mediastinal lymph node metastases were also diagnosed, and irradiation of these lesions was performed. After radiotherapy, 10 courses of oxaliplatin and infused fluorouracil plus leucovorin (FOLFOX were administered. During FOLFOX administration, recurrent left frontal lobe brain metastasis was diagnosed and treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In this case, the brain metastases were well treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and the systemic disease arising from sigmoid colon cancer has been kept under control with chemotherapies, surgical resection, and radiotherapy.

  5. Early versus late Gamma Knife radiosurgery following transsphenoidal surgery for nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenomas: a multicenter matched-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeraniec, I Jonathan; Kano, Hideyuki; Xu, Zhiyuan; Nguyen, Brandon; Siddiqui, Zaid A; Silva, Danilo; Sharma, Mayur; Radwan, Hesham; Cohen, Jonathan A; Dallapiazza, Robert F; Iorio-Morin, Christian; Wolf, Amparo; Jane, John A; Grills, Inga S; Mathieu, David; Kondziolka, Douglas; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Wu, Chih-Chun; Cifarelli, Christopher P; Chytka, Tomas; Barnett, Gene H; Lunsford, L Dade; Sheehan, Jason P

    2017-10-27

    OBJECTIVE Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) is frequently used to treat residual or recurrent nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenomas. There is no consensus as to whether GKRS should be used early after surgery or if radiosurgery should be withheld until there is evidence of imaging-defined progression of tumor. Given the high incidence of adenoma progression after subtotal resection over time, the present study intended to evaluate the effect of timing of radiosurgery on outcome. METHODS This is a multicenter retrospective review of patients with nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenomas who underwent transsphenoidal surgery followed by GKRS from 1987 to 2015 at 9 institutions affiliated with the International Gamma Knife Research Foundation. Patients were matched by adenoma and radiosurgical parameters and stratified based on the interval between last resection and radiosurgery. Operative results, imaging data, and clinical outcomes were compared across groups following early (≤ 6 months after resection) or late (> 6 months after resection) radiosurgery. RESULTS After matching, 222 patients met the authors' study criteria (from an initial collection of 496 patients) and were grouped based on early (n = 111) or late (n = 111) GKRS following transsphenoidal surgery. There was a greater risk of tumor progression after GKRS (p = 0.013) and residual tumor (p = 0.038) in the late radiosurgical group over a median imaging follow-up period of 68.5 months. No significant difference in the occurrence of post-GKRS endocrinopathy was observed (p = 0.68). Thirty percent of patients without endocrinopathy in the early cohort developed new endocrinopathies during the follow-up period versus 27% in the late cohort (p = 0.84). Fourteen percent of the patients in the early group and 25% of the patients in the late group experienced the resolution of endocrine dysfunction after original presentation (p = 0.32). CONCLUSIONS In this study, early GKRS was associated with a lower risk of

  6. Gamma knife radiosurgery for acoustic schwannomas. An analysis of the method of low dose and conformal multiple shots with smaller collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Seiji; Takanashi, Masami; Hojo, Atsufumi; Konishi, Masanori; Nakamura, Hirohiko

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tumor control and possible complications of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) in patients with acoustic schwannomas treated using low marginal dose and conformal multiple shots with smaller collimators to fit irregular tumor shapes. The authors evaluated 183 patients with follow-up periods ranging from 3 to 11 years. Marginal doses were 9 to 15 Gy (median 12 Gy), with corresponding treatment volumes being between 0.1 and 18.7 ml (median 1.8 ml). The number of isocenter varied from 2 to 24 shots (median 9 shots). The actuarial tumor control rate (resection-free survival) was 96.5%. Useful hearing, trigeminal and facial functions were preserved at 75%, 97.4%, and 100%, respectively. Hydrocephalus was recognized in 5.7% of all patients, and seems to occur in cases with medium sized tumors where mild ventricular enlargement is evident prior to treatment. GKRS proves to be a safe and effective therapy for small to medium sized tumors. However, the indication for larger sized tumors (diameter 3+ cm) should be carefully considered, larger tumors being less easy to control and liable to cause ataxia due to transient expansion. (author)

  7. Long-term follow-up results of combination therapy of surgery and gamma knife on pituitary tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hidetoshi; Yoshimoto, Takashi; Shirokura, Hideshi

    1997-01-01

    Usefulness of the combination therapy for invasive pituitary tumor with surgery and gamma knife (GK) was evaluated on 17 cases followed for >2 years. Tumors involved ACTH cell adenoma, GH cell adenoma, mixed GH and PRL, purihormonal adenoma, gonadotrophic cell adenoma, GH cell adenoma and null cell adenoma, which were divided into I and II group since adverse effects by GK on the normal pituitary tissues could be evaluated according to tumor growth and abnormal hormone secretion. Irradiation was carried out to make the marginal dose of around 30 (15-35) Gy and center dose of 25-70 Gy on the gland, and marginal dose of <10 Gy on optic nerve. After GK, follow-up was done by pituitary hormone values, tests for sight and visual field and MRI examination. Hypopituitarism was seen in 67% with 100% remission of Cushing's disease. MRI revealed that the adenoma changed to fibrosis (type 1) with increasing Gd-enhancement or to cystic necrosis (type 2) without Gd-enhancement. Values for GH, cortisol and ACTH turned to normal ones. Thus the combination therapy was found useful. (K.H.)

  8. A randomised trial to compare cognitive outcome after gamma knife radiosurgery versus whole brain radiation therapy in patients with multiple brain metastases: research protocol CAR-study B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmel, Wietske C M; Verhaak, Eline; Hanssens, Patrick E J; Gehring, Karin; Sitskoorn, Margriet M

    2018-02-21

    Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) is increasingly applied in patients with multiple brain metastases and is expected to have less adverse effects in cognitive functioning than whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Effective treatment with the least negative cognitive side effects is increasingly becoming important, as more patients with brain metastases live longer due to more and better systemic treatment options. There are no published randomized trials yet directly comparing GKRS to WBRT in patients with multiple brain metastases that include objective neuropsychological testing. CAR-Study B is a prospective randomised trial comparing cognitive outcome after GKRS or WBRT in adult patients with 11-20 newly diagnosed brain metastases on a contrast-enhanced MRI-scan, KPS ≥70 and life expectancy of at least 3 months. Randomisation by the method of minimization, is stratified by the cumulative tumour volume in the brain, systemic treatment, KPS, histology, baseline cognitive functioning and age. The primary endpoint is the between-group difference in the percentage of patients with significant memory decline at 3 months. Secondary endpoints include overall survival, local control, development of new brain metastases, cognitive functioning over time, quality of life, depression, anxiety and fatigue. Cognitive functioning is assessed by a standardised neuropsychological test battery. Assessments (cognitive testing, questionnaires and MRI-scans) are scheduled at baseline and at 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 months after treatment. Knowledge gained from this trial may be used to inform individual patients with BM more precisely about the cognitive effects they can expect from treatment, and to assist both doctors and patients in making (shared) individual treatment decisions. This trial is currently recruiting. Target accrual: 23 patients at 3-months follow-up in both groups. The Netherlands Trials Register number NTR5463. ClinicalTrials.gov registration number NCT02953717

  9. Thermal treatment planning for SonoKnife focused-ultrasound thermal treatment of head and neck cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Chen, Duo; Xia, Rongmin; Shafirstein, Gal; Corry, Peter; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2011-03-01

    The purpose is to develop a patient-specific treatment planning method for a cylindrically-focused (i.e., SonoKnife) ultrasound thermal therapy system to optimize the thermal treatment of locally-advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) and/or positive lymph nodes. To achieve a more efficient and effective treatment, a temperature-based treatment planning was devised, which was composed of : (1) a 3D acoustic-thermal model has been developed to simulate the acoustic field, temperature distribution, and thermal dose coverage induced by the SonoKnife applicator. (2) A 3D relevant anatomical structures (e.g. the H&N tumors, bones and cavities) were reconstructed based on multislice CT scans. A step-and-shoot strategy was devised to perform the treatment, in which the initial applied power levels, placement of the transducers, and sonication times per scan were determined by conducting a temperature-based forward simulation. The maximum temperature, thermal dose coverage of target, and thermal exposure to surrounding tissue were analyzed. For performance evaluation, the treatment planning was applied on representative examples obtained from the clinical radiation therapy of HNSCC and positive lymph nodes. This treatment planning platforms can be used to guide applicator placement, set-up configurations, and applied power levels prior to delivery of a treatment or for post-procedure analysis of temperature distributions.

  10. Gamma knife irradiation of injured sciatic nerve induces histological and behavioral improvement in the rat neuropathic pain model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Yagasaki

    Full Text Available We examined the effects of gamma knife (GK irradiation on injured nerves using a rat partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL model. GK irradiation was performed at one week after ligation and nerve preparations were made three weeks after ligation. GK irradiation is known to induce immune responses such as glial cell activation in the central nervous system. Thus, we determined the effects of GK irradiation on macrophages using immunoblot and histochemical analyses. Expression of Iba-1 protein, a macrophage marker, was further increased in GK-treated injured nerves as compared with non-irradiated injured nerves. Immunohistochemical study of Iba-1 in GK-irradiated injured sciatic nerves demonstrated Iba-1 positive macrophage accumulation to be enhanced in areas distal to the ligation point. In the same area, myelin debris was also more efficiently removed by GK-irradiation. Myelin debris clearance by macrophages is thought to contribute to a permissive environment for axon growth. In the immunoblot study, GK irradiation significantly increased expressions of βIII-tubulin protein and myelin protein zero, which are markers of axon regeneration and re-myelination, respectively. Toluidine blue staining revealed the re-myelinated fiber diameter to be larger at proximal sites and that the re-myelinated fiber number was increased at distal sites in GK-irradiated injured nerves as compared with non-irradiated injured nerves. These results suggest that GK irradiation of injured nerves facilitates regeneration and re-myelination. In a behavior study, early alleviation of allodynia was observed with GK irradiation in PSL rats. When GK-induced alleviation of allodynia was initially detected, the expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, a potent analgesic factor, was significantly increased by GK irradiation. These results suggested that GK irradiation alleviates allodynia via increased GDNF. This study provides novel evidence that GK

  11. MGMT promoter methylation status as a prognostic factor for the outcome of gamma knife radiosurgery for recurrent glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung Sup; Kong, Doo-Sik; Seol, Ho Jun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Lee, Jung-Il

    2017-07-01

    We conducted this study to determine whether the methylation status of the O 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter was a prognostic marker for positive outcomes of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). We retrospectively examined 61 patients, who underwent GKS for local recurrent GBM between 2004 and 2015; in all patients, the methylation status of the MGMT promoter was identified via methylation-specific quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. All patients underwent surgical resection and were diagnosed histopathologically with GBM. Prognostic factors associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were identified in univariate and multivariate analyses. Twenty-five (41%) had a methylated MGMT promoter, and 36 (59%) had an unmethylated MGMT promoter. The median age at GKS was 58 years. The median tumor volume at GKS was 7.0 cm 3 , and the median marginal dose was 16 Gy. The median follow-up period after GKS was 7.5 months. The median PFS time after GKS was 8.9 months (95% CI 4.3-13.5 months) in the methylated and 4.6 months (95% CI 3.7-5.5 months) in the unmethylated group (P = 0.016). The median OS time after GKS was 14.0 months (95% CI 9.3-18.7 months) in the methylated group and 9.0 months (95% CI 6.5-11.5 months) in the unmethylated group (P = 0.026). Methylation of the MGMT promoter correlated with better PFS and OS after GKS for recurrent GBM. Prospective comparative studies are required to determine whether MGMT methylation directly affects the efficiency of GKS.

  12. SU-E-T-14: A Comparative Study Between Forward and Inverse Planning in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuroma Tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopishankar, N; Agarwal, Priyanka; Bisht, Raj Kishor; Kale, S S; Rath, G K; Chander, S; Sharma, B S [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate forward and inverse planning methods for acoustic neuroma cases treated in Gamma Knife Perfexion. Methods: Five patients with acoustic neuroma tumour abutting brainstem were planned twice in LGP TPS (Version 10.1) using TMR10 algorithm. First plan was entirely based on forward planning (FP) in which each shot was chosen manually. Second plan was generated using inverse planning (IP) for which planning parameters like coverage, selectivity, gradient index (GI) and beam-on time threshold were set. Number of shots in IP was automatically selected by objective function using iterative process. In both planning methods MRI MPRAGE sequence images were used for tumour localization and planning. A planning dose of 12Gy at 50% isodose level was chosen. Results and Discussion: Number of shots used in FP was greater than IP and beam-on time in FP was in average 1.4 times more than IP. One advantage of FP was that the brainstem volume subjected to 6Gy dose (25% isodose) was less in FP than IP. Our results showed use of more number of shots as in FP results in GI less than or equal to 2.55 which is close to its lower limit. Dose homogeneity index (DHI) analysis of FP and IP showed average values of 0.59 and 0.67 respectively. General trend in GK for planning in acoustic neuroma cases is to use small collimator shots to avoid dose to adjacent critical structures. More number of shots and prolonged treatment time causes inconvenience to the patients. Similarly overuse of automatic shot shaping as in IP results in increased scatter dose. A compromise is required in shot selection for these cases. Conclusion: IP method could be used in acoustic neuroma cases to decrease treatment time provided the source sector openings near brainstem are shielded or adjusted appropriately to reduce brainstem dose.

  13. CyberKnife radiosurgery: Precision without incision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enja Siva Prasad Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery system is an innovative, effective, frameless, non-invasive substitute for conventional surgical treatment of cancer. It works on the principle of stereotaxy. It is used for the treatment of both cancerous and non-cancerous tumors, intracranial lesions, tumors of lung, spine, prostate, and kidney, recurrent cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma, arteriovenous malformation, and trigeminal neuralgia. It has an advantage over other systems like Gamma knife radiosurgery and linear accelerator (LINAC-based systems, as it is frameless, has submillimeter accuracy, does not affect the normal cells adjacent to the lesion, and tracks the lesion in synchronization with the patient′s respiratory rate. The future of CyberKnife encompasses possibilities such as incremental improvements in accuracy and better shaping of the field of radiation and would certainly allow extension of radiosurgery as an effective substitute for chemotherapy. This paper aims to review and highlight the immense potential that CyberKnife holds in the field of dentistry in treating disorders of the head and neck region, thereby ensuring enhanced longevity for the patients.

  14. Poster - 49: Assessment of Synchrony respiratory compensation error for CyberKnife liver treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ming; Cygler, Joanna; Vandervoort, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantify respiratory motion compensation errors for liver tumor patients treated by the CyberKnife system with Synchrony tracking, to identify patients with the smallest tracking errors and to eventually help coach patient’s breathing patterns to minimize dose delivery errors. The accuracy of CyberKnife Synchrony respiratory motion compensation was assessed for 37 patients treated for liver lesions by analyzing data from system logfiles. A predictive model is used to modulate the direction of individual beams during dose delivery based on the positions of internally implanted fiducials determined using an orthogonal x-ray imaging system and the current location of LED external markers. For each x-ray pair acquired, system logfiles report the prediction error, the difference between the measured and predicted fiducial positions, and the delivery error, which is an estimate of the statistical error in the model overcoming the latency between x-ray acquisition and robotic repositioning. The total error was calculated at the time of each x-ray pair, for the number of treatment fractions and the number of patients, giving the average respiratory motion compensation error in three dimensions. The 99 th percentile for the total radial error is 3.85 mm, with the highest contribution of 2.79 mm in superior/inferior (S/I) direction. The absolute mean compensation error is 1.78 mm radially with a 1.27 mm contribution in the S/I direction. Regions of high total error may provide insight into features predicting groups of patients with larger or smaller total errors.

  15. Evaluation The Result Of Treating 1200 Patients Brain Tumor And Some Intracranial Diseases By Rotating GAMMA Knife (RGK) At The Nuclear Medicine And Oncology Center, Bach Mai Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Trong Khoa; Nguyen Quang Hung; Tran Dinh Ha

    2011-01-01

    The paper is evaluating results of treating brain tumor and some intracranial diseases by rotating gamma knife (RGK) at The Nuclear Medicine and Oncology Center, Bach Mai Hospital, from July 2007 to August 2010, for 1200 patients treated with RGK. In 1200 patients - average age: 42.6 years old, Male/Female ratio:1/1.08 - pituitary tumors accounted for 19.8%, meningioma 18.3%, arteriovenous malformations (AVM) (16.7%), acoustic neuroma (8.7%), brain metastases (7.5%), craniopharyngeal tumor (5.0%), pineal tumor (3.5%), cavernoma (6%), astrocytoma (5.2%), meduloblastoma (2.9%), ependymoma (2.6%), others (3.8%). Average target volume: minimum 0.6cm 3 , maximum 27.6cm 3 , median 6.2 ± 4.6 cm 3 . Average radiosurgery dose changed depend on nature of the tumor: pituitary tumor (12.4 Gy), meningioma (18.8 Gy), AVM (18 Gy), acoustic neuroma (14.6 Gy), brain metastases (18.2 Gy), craniopharyngeal tumor (12.8 Gy), pineal tumor (16.3 Gy), cavernoma (17.5 Gy), astrocytoma (14.6 Gy), medulloblastoma (16.1 Gy), ependymoma (16.3 Gy), others (15 Gy). Conclusions: Almost case have improved clinical symptoms significantly: 80.2% after 1 month (complete response 20.2%), 100% at 36th month (complete response: 94%). Size of the tumor were reduced remarkably. Treatment were safe, no death or severe complications were observed within and after radiosurgery. (author)

  16. Gamma-Knife surgery (GKS) in patients with acromegaly: safety and efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, D.; Miragaya, K.; Tenca, E.; Margni, A.; Artes, C.; Antico, J.

    2007-01-01

    The acromegaly is associated with increased morbidity and mortality than the general population. Since the surgical and pharmacological treatment for acromegaly have specific limitations, the GKS has been used as a therapeutic option in selected patients. The object is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of GKS in patients with acromegaly [es

  17. Salvage gamma knife radiosurgery in the management of dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinclair, Georges; Martin, Heather; Shamikh, Alia

    2017-01-01

    at our institution in the context of current diagnostic and treatment options. CASE DESCRIPTIONS: We conducted a retrospective review of three consecutive adult patients (≥18 years) treated with salvage GKRS between 2002 and 2010 at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. The case series...

  18. SU-F-T-538: CyberKnife with MLC for Treatment of Large Volume Tumors: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bichay, T; Mayville, A [Mercy Health, Saint Mary’s, Grand Rapids, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: CyberKnife is a well-documented modality for SRS and SBRT treatments. Typical tumors are small and 1–5 fractions are usually used. We determined the feasibility of using CyberKnife, with an InCise multileaf collimator option, for larger tumors undergoing standard dose and fractionation. The intent was to understand the limitation of using this modality for other external beam radiation treatments. Methods: Five tumors from different anatomical sites with volumes from 127.8 cc to 1,320.5 cc were contoured and planned on a Multiplan V5.1 workstation. The target average diameter ranged from 7 cm to 13 cm. The dose fractionation was 1.8–2.0 Gy/fraction and 25–45 fractions for total doses of 45–81 Gy. The sites planned were: pancreas, head and neck, prostate, anal, and esophagus. The plans were optimized to meet conventional dose constraints based on various RTOG protocols for conventional fractionation. Results: The Multiplan treatment planning system successfully generated clinically acceptable plans for all sites studied. The resulting dose distributions achieved reasonable target coverage, all greater than 95%, and satisfactory normal tissue sparing. Treatment times ranged from 9 minutes to 38 minutes, the longest being a head and neck plan with dual targets receiving different doses and with multiple adjacent critical structures. Conclusion: CyberKnife, with the InCise multileaf collimation option, can achieve acceptable dose distributions in large volume tumors treated with conventional dose and fractionation. Although treatment times are greater than conventional accelerator time; target coverage and dose to critical structures can be kept within a clinically acceptable range. While time limitations exist, when necessary CyberKnife can provide an alternative to traditional treatment modalities for large volume tumors.

  19. Which level of treatment quality can be obtained by a robotized irradiation system conducted by image in radiotherapy (CyberKnifeTM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Khawaja, S.

    2011-01-01

    The CyberKnife TM consists of a 6 MV LINAC mounted on a robotic arm, with six degree of freedom and is coupled to an image guiding system, allowing us to guide the irradiation beams toward the target. The aim is to improve the treatment accuracy and to reduce the irradiation of critical surrounding organs. The treatment is realized by the isotropic convergence of hundreds of orientations for creating up to 1200 mini-beams, which are orientated to the target with sub-millimetric accuracy. This group is completed by a treatment couch, which is also mounted on a robotized arm, that offers 6 additional degrees of freedom, allowing an additional improvement of accuracy, and eliminates the possible limitations. Using its subsystem Synchrony TM , the CyberKnife TM is capable of treating the abdo-thoracic tumors, which move with respiration, by moving dynamically the LINAC to compensate the respiratory motion of the tumors. The high dose level, which is used in this kind of hypo-fractionated treatment, makes the smallest error unacceptable, and needs a very high geometric accuracy with keeping a maximal dosimetric accuracy. Our work is dedicated to evaluate the quality of treatment, in the terms of dosimetric and geometric accuracies. For the different modes of tracking, which are available in the system in static mode, and dynamic mode with respiratory motion tracking. By using different kinds of detectors (ionization chambers, radiochromic films) and three different platforms, which allow simulating simple respiratory motion, real respiratory motion coming from real treated patients, and finally complex motion with hysteresis. The results show clearly the high dosimetric accuracy of the system; this is accompanied by a sub-millimetric geometric accuracy. This geometric accuracy degrades slightly, when treating in dynamic mode with respiratory tracking by Synchrony TM , and especially when the respiratory cycles show a high variation in amplitudes, while the dosimetric

  20. SU-E-E-15: Design of a Water Calorimeter for Dual Use in An Integrated MRI-Linac and Gamma-Knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entezari, N; Renaud, J; Ly, D; Sarfehnia, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To design a water calorimeter for dual use in an integrated MRI-linac and Gamma-Knife. In calorimetry, dose to water is measured based on the assumption that energy absorbed in a sensitive volume is completely converted to temperature rise ( ΔΤ ) according to the specific heat capacity of the medium c: D=c*ΔT*k, where k is heat transfer correction factor and compensates for heat gain or loss at point of measurement due to conductive effects. Methods: A commercial finite element method software package was used to model four different water calorimeter designs. The long term (48 h) thermal stability of each design was accurately modeled, and the optimization of the final design was based on evaluation of the standard deviation of k for ten consecutive irradiation runs (lower standard deviation translates to greater thermal stability). Several insulator materials of varying thicknesses were investigated, and a sensitivity study of thermal stability to variations in ambient temperature fluctuations was undertaken. Specifically, we evaluated the effect of possible variations in coolant temperature circulating around the calorimeter tank in several scenarios (constant, slowly increasing, or fluctuating). Results: Due to MRI-compatibility requirements, the calorimeter is to be built entirely out of plastic. Among all insulation materials tested, solid state aerogel-based insulation resulted in least heat loss and thermal stability. The final design is cylindrical on top (to be used upright in MRI-linac) and semi-spherical at bottom (for use in GammaKnife). The range of k was found to be 1.002 ± 0.013 (k = 1), comparable with a k of 1.002 ± 0.014 for typical water calorimeters used in high energy beams. A long term stability of 0.36 µK/hr was evaluated. Conclusion: Optimization of a water calorimeter design for dual use in MRI-linac and Gamma-Knife has been completed and the device is currently in production. Supported by NSERC RGPIN 435608

  1. Analysis of dosimetry of a Gamma Knife Perfexion using polystyrene and solid water phantoms for small volume ionization chambers; Analise da dosimetria de um Gamma Knife Perfexion utilizando phantoms de poliestireno e de agua solida para camaras de ionizacao de volume pequeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, N.A.; Potiens, M.P.A., E-mail: nathaliaac@ymail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Saraiva, C.W.C. [Hospital do Coracao (HCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Benmakhlouf, H. [Stockholm University, Karolinska Hospital (Sweden)

    2016-07-01

    The Gamma Knife Perfexion (GKP) is a radiosurgery equipment that has been developed by Elekta. Its dose-rate calibration is performed using phantoms developed by Elekta and a small volume ionization chamber. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the collected charge values obtained in its dosimetry using two different phantoms, polystyrene and solid water and the ion chambers PTW Semiflex, volume 0,125 cm{sup 3}, model 31010 and PTW Pinpoint, volume 0,016 cm{sup 3}, model 31016. (author)

  2. A new strategy of CyberKnife treatment system based radiosurgery followed by early use of adjuvant bevacizumab treatment for brain metastasis with extensive cerebral edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Enmin; Pan, Li; Dai, Jiazhong; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Xin; Liu, Xiaoxia; Mei, Guanghai; Sheng, Xiaofang

    2014-09-01

    Bevacizumab blocks the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor in leakage-prone capillaries and has been suggested as a new treatment for cerebral radiation edema and necrosis. CyberKnife is a new, frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system. This work investigated the safety and efficacy of CyberKnife followed by early bevacizumab treatment for brain metastasis with extensive cerebral edema. The eligibility criteria of the patients selected for radiosurgery followed by early use of adjuvant bevacizumab treatment were: (1) brain tumors from metastasis with one solitary brain lesion and symptomatic extensive cerebral edema; (2) >18 years of age; (3) the patient refused surgery due to the physical conditions and the risk of surgery; (4) no contraindications for bevacizumab. (5) bevacizumab was applied for a minimum of 2 injections and a maximum of 6 injections with a 2-week interval between treatments, beginning within 2 weeks of the CyberKnife therapy; (6) Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥30. Tumor size and edema were monitored by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Dexamethasone dosage, KPS, adverse event occurrence and associated clinical outcomes were also recorded. Eight patients were accrued for this new treatment. Radiation dose ranged from 20 to 33 Gy in one to five sessions, prescribed to the 61-71 % isodose line. Bevacizumab therapy was administered 3-10 days after completion of CyberKnife treatment for a minimum of two cycles (5 mg/kg, at 2-week intervals). MRI revealed average reductions of 55.8 % (post-gadolinium) and 63.4 % (T2/FLAIR). Seven patients showed significant clinical neurological improvements. Dexamethasone was reduced in all patients, with five successfully discontinuing dexamethasone treatment 4 weeks after bevacizumab initiation. Hypertension, a bevacizumab-related adverse event, occurred in one patient. After 3-8 months, all patients studied were alive and primary brain metastases were under control, 2 developed new brain

  3. Knife-ovirt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-07-20

    Knife-ovirt is code building on the chef, knife-cloud, fog, rbovirt projects that allows deployment of virtual machines on an ovirt cluster, and immediately bootstrap them into a chef managed infrastructure. (similar to knife-openstack project).

  4. TH-AB-201-07: Filmless Treatment Localization QA for the CyberKnife System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gersh, J; Noll, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Accuray recommends daily evaluation of the treatment localization and delivery systems (TLS/TDS) of the CyberKnife. The vendor-provided solution is a Winston-Lutz-type test that evaluates film shadows from an orthogonal beam pair (known as AQA). Since film-based techniques are inherently inefficient and potentially inconsistent and uncertain, this study explores a method which provides a comparable test with greater efficiency, consistency, and certainty. This test uses the QAStereoChecker (QASC, Standard Imaging, Inc., Middleton, WI), a high-resolution flat-panel detector with coupled fiducial markers for automated alignment. Fiducial tracking is used to achieve high translational and rotational position accuracy. Methods: A plan is generated delivering five circular beams, with varying orientation and angular incidence. Several numeric quantities are calculated for each beam: eccentricity, centroid location, area, major-axis length, minor-axis length, and orientation angle. Baseline values were acquired and repeatability of baselines analyzed. Next, errors were induced in the path calibration of the CK, and the test repeated. A correlative study was performed between the induced errors and quantities measured using the QASC. Based on vendor recommendations, this test should be able to detect a TLS/TDS offset of 0.5mm. Results: Centroid shifts correlated well with induced plane-perpendicular offsets (p < 0.01). Induced vertical shifts correlated best with the absolute average deviation of eccentricities (p < 0.05). The values of these metrics which correlated with the threshold of 0.5mm induced deviation were used as individual pass/fail criteria. These were then used to evaluate induced offsets which shifted the CK in all axes (a clinically-realistic offset), with a total offset of 0.5mm. This test provided high and specificity and sensitivity. Conclusion: From setup to analysis, this filmless TLS/TDS test requires 4 minutes, as opposed to 15–20

  5. Correlation between AQP4 mRNA and PKC activity after gamma knife radiosurgery in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Guangjian; Xu Minhui; Gen Mingying; Tang Wenyuan; Sun Shanquan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the change of AQP4 mRNA expression and the correlation with PKC in rat brain irradiated by γ knife radiosurgery (GKS). Methods: 30 Wistar rats were used in the study. The experimental radiosurgery model was established by radiating rat left rotral caudate nucleus with GKS(one target, 100 Gy in isocenter dose and 4 mm in collimator), and was examined at 1,3,7,15,30 and 45 d post-irradiation. AQP4 mRNA expression, PKC activity and free intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ) of brain tissue were determined by RT-PCR, liquid scintillation counter and Fura-2/AM, respectively. Results: AQP4 mRNA expression increased gradually from 0.99 ± 0.05 in control group to 2.32 ± 0.10 at 30 d post-irradiation, and decreased to 2.21 ± 0.08 at 45 d post-irradiation. The PKC activity and the free [Ca 2+ ] i decreased gradually from 0.5896 ± 0.2101 and 455.82 ± 20.13 in control group to 0.0404 ± 0.0294 and 196.72 ± 9.87 at 30 d post- irradiation, and increased to 0.1050 ± 0.0607 and 219.26 ± 10.43 at 45 d post-irradiation, respectively. The significant differences were found between experimental group and control group except at 1 d post-irradiation (P 2+ ] i and the PKC activity was positive (P=0.001, r=0.959). Conclusions: The increased expression of AQP4 mRNA might result from the inhibition of PKC activity due to the reduction of free [Ca 2+ ] i after GKS. (authors)

  6. Lung tumor tracking during stereotactic radiotherapy treatment with the CyberKnife: Marker placement and early results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuyttens, J.J.; Prevost, J.B.; Praag, J.; Hoogeman, M.; Levendag, P.C.; Klaveren, R.J. van; Pattynama, P.M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Lung tumor tracking during stereotactic radiotherapy with the CyberKnife requires the insertion of markers in or close to the tumor. To reduce the risk of pneumothorax, three methods of marker placement were used: 1) intravascular coil placement, 2) percutaneous intrathoracal, and 3) percutaneous extrathoracal placement. We investigated the toxicity of marker placement and the tumor response of the lung tumor tracking treatment. Markers were placed in 20 patients with 22 tumors: 13 patients received a curative treatment, seven a palliative. The median Charlson Comorbidity Score was 4 (range: 1-8). Platinum fiducials and intravascular embolisation coils were used as markers. In total, 78 markers were placed: 34 intrathoracal, 23 intravascular and 21 extrathoracal. The PTV equaled the GTV + 5 mm. A median dose of 45 Gy (range: 30-60 Gy, in 3 fractions) was prescribed to the 70-85% isodose. The response was evaluated with a CTscan performed 6-8 weeks after the last treatment and routinely thereafter. The median follow-up was 4 months (range: 2-11). No severe toxicity due to the marker placement was seen. Pneumothorax was not seen. The local control was 100%. Four tumors in four patients showed a complete response, 15 tumors in 14 patients a partial response, and three tumors in two patients with metastatic disease had stable disease. No severe toxicity of marker placement was seen due to the appropriate choice of one of the three methods. CyberKnife tumor tracking with markers is feasible and resulted in excellent tumor response. Longer follow-up is needed to validate the local control

  7. Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery as Salvage Therapy After Failure of Whole-Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Sunit; Chan, Michael D.; Lovato, James F.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Munley, Michael T.; Guzman, Allan F. de; Shaw, Edward G.; Urbanic, James J.; McMullen, Kevin P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Radiosurgery has been successfully used in selected cases to avoid repeat whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in patients with multiple brain metastases of most solid tumor histological findings. Few data are available for the use of radiosurgery for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods and Materials: Between November 1999 and June 2009, 51 patients with SCLC and previous WBI and new brain metastases were treated with GammaKnife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). A median dose of 18 Gy (range, 10–24 Gy) was prescribed to the margin of each metastasis. Patients were followed with serial imaging. Patient electronic records were reviewed to determine disease-related factors and clinical outcomes after GKSRS. Local and distant brain failure rates, overall survival, and likelihood of neurologic death were determined based on imaging results. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine survival and local and distant brain control. Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to determine strength of association between disease-related factors and survival. Results: Median survival time for the entire cohort was 5.9 months. Local control rates at 1 and 2 years were 57% and 34%, respectively. Distant brain failure rates at 1 and 2 years were 58% and 75%, respectively. Fifty-three percent of patients ultimately died of neurologic death. On multivariate analysis, patients with stable (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.89) or progressive (HR = 6.98) extracranial disease (ECD) had worse overall survival than patients without evidence of ECD (p = 0.00002). Concurrent chemotherapy improved local control (HR = 89; p = 0.006). Conclusions: GKSRS represents a feasible salvage option in patients with SCLC and brain metastases for whom previous WBI has failed. The status of patients’ ECD is a dominant factor predictive of overall survival. Local control may be inferior to that seen with other cancer histological results, although the use of concurrent chemotherapy may help to

  8. Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery as Salvage Therapy After Failure of Whole-Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Sunit [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Chan, Michael D., E-mail: mchan@wfubmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Lovato, James F. [Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Bourland, J. Daniel; Munley, Michael T.; Guzman, Allan F. de; Shaw, Edward G.; Urbanic, James J.; McMullen, Kevin P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Radiosurgery has been successfully used in selected cases to avoid repeat whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in patients with multiple brain metastases of most solid tumor histological findings. Few data are available for the use of radiosurgery for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods and Materials: Between November 1999 and June 2009, 51 patients with SCLC and previous WBI and new brain metastases were treated with GammaKnife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). A median dose of 18 Gy (range, 10-24 Gy) was prescribed to the margin of each metastasis. Patients were followed with serial imaging. Patient electronic records were reviewed to determine disease-related factors and clinical outcomes after GKSRS. Local and distant brain failure rates, overall survival, and likelihood of neurologic death were determined based on imaging results. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine survival and local and distant brain control. Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to determine strength of association between disease-related factors and survival. Results: Median survival time for the entire cohort was 5.9 months. Local control rates at 1 and 2 years were 57% and 34%, respectively. Distant brain failure rates at 1 and 2 years were 58% and 75%, respectively. Fifty-three percent of patients ultimately died of neurologic death. On multivariate analysis, patients with stable (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.89) or progressive (HR = 6.98) extracranial disease (ECD) had worse overall survival than patients without evidence of ECD (p = 0.00002). Concurrent chemotherapy improved local control (HR = 89; p = 0.006). Conclusions: GKSRS represents a feasible salvage option in patients with SCLC and brain metastases for whom previous WBI has failed. The status of patients' ECD is a dominant factor predictive of overall survival. Local control may be inferior to that seen with other cancer histological results, although the use of concurrent chemotherapy may help to

  9. TU-D-207B-01: A Prediction Model for Distinguishing Radiation Necrosis From Tumor Progression After Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Based On Radiomics Features From MR Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z [Central South University Xiangya Hospital, Changsha, Hunan (China); MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ho, A [University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Wang, X; Brown, P; Guha-Thakurta, N; Ferguson, S; Fave, X; Zhang, L; Mackin, D; Court, L; Li, J; Yang, J [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate a prediction model using radiomics features extracted from MR images to distinguish radiation necrosis from tumor progression for brain metastases treated with Gamma knife radiosurgery. Methods: The images used to develop the model were T1 post-contrast MR scans from 71 patients who had had pathologic confirmation of necrosis or progression; 1 lesion was identified per patient (17 necrosis and 54 progression). Radiomics features were extracted from 2 images at 2 time points per patient, both obtained prior to resection. Each lesion was manually contoured on each image, and 282 radiomics features were calculated for each lesion. The correlation for each radiomics feature between two time points was calculated within each group to identify a subset of features with distinct values between two groups. The delta of this subset of radiomics features, characterizing changes from the earlier time to the later one, was included as a covariate to build a prediction model using support vector machines with a cubic polynomial kernel function. The model was evaluated with a 10-fold cross-validation. Results: Forty radiomics features were selected based on consistent correlation values of approximately 0 for the necrosis group and >0.2 for the progression group. In performing the 10-fold cross-validation, we narrowed this number down to 11 delta radiomics features for the model. This 11-delta-feature model showed an overall prediction accuracy of 83.1%, with a true positive rate of 58.8% in predicting necrosis and 90.7% for predicting tumor progression. The area under the curve for the prediction model was 0.79. Conclusion: These delta radiomics features extracted from MR scans showed potential for distinguishing radiation necrosis from tumor progression. This tool may be a useful, noninvasive means of determining the status of an enlarging lesion after radiosurgery, aiding decision-making regarding surgical resection versus conservative medical

  10. SU-E-T-366: Estimation of Whole Body Dose From Cranial Irradiation From C and Perfexion Series Gamma Knife Units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S; Andersen, A; Lulu, B; Das, I; Cheng, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The Leksell Gamma Knife (GK) B & C series contains 201 Cobalt-60 sources with a helmet. The new model, Perfexion uses 192 Cobalt-60 sources without a helmet; using IRIS system for collimation and stereotactic guidance to deliver SRS to brain tumors. Relative dose to extracranial organs at risk (OARs) is measured in phantom in this study for Perfexion and C-series GK. Materials & Methods: Measurements were performed in a Rando anthropomorphic phantom on both systems using a large ion chamber (Keithley-175) for each collimator. The Keithley-175 cc ion chamber was sandwiched between phantom slices at various locations in the phantom to correspond to different extracranial OARs (thyroid, heart, kidney, ovary and testis, etc.) The dose measurement was repeated with OSL detectors for each position and collimator. Results: A large variation is observed in the normalized dose between these two systems. The dose beyond the housing falls off exponentially for Perfexion. Dose beyond the C-series GK housing falls off exponentially from 0–20cm then remains relatively constant from 20–40cm and again falls off with distance but less rapidly. The variation of extracranial dose with distance for each collimator is found to be parallel to each other for both systems. Conclusion: Whole body dose is found to vary significantly between these systems. It is important to measure the extracranial dose, especially for young patients. It is estimated that dose falls off exponentially from the GK housing and is about 1% for large collimators at 75 cm. The dose is two-orders of magnitude smaller for the 4mm collimator. However, this small dose for patient may be significant radiologically

  11. Quality of radiosurgery for single brain metastases with respect to treatment technology: a matched-pair analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wowra, Berndt; Muacevic, Alexander; Tonn, Jörg-Christian

    2009-08-01

    A comparison of treatment parameters and quality of clinical outcome in patients with single brain metastases treated with two different technologies for radiosurgery (Gamma Knife and CyberKnife). Treatment parameters were statistically analyzed. Clinical outcome was assessed by matched-pair analysis based on the treatment device, differences in dose prescription, and the date of the treatment. Patients were matched according to their tumor size, age, gender, primary cancer, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group score. Survival post-radiosurgery, local and distant tumor control, and complications were analyzed. Predictive factors were investigated. 423 single brain metastases were treated with Gamma Knife and 73 with CyberKnife. Tumor volumes were similar. The parameters minimum tumor dose, maximum tumor dose, prescription isodose volume, conformality index, homogeneity index, volume of tissue receiving a dose of 10 Gy or more were significantly larger in Gamma Knife group. Sixty-three patients were good matches. These showed the same pattern in parameters. Concerning the outcome analysis, only overall survival differed significantly between groups, twice as long with CyberKnife (P new brain metastases, including whole brain radiation therapy. The most important result of this study was the finding that the obvious differences in treatment-related parameters between Gamma Knife and CyberKnife had no impact on the quality of the clinical outcome after radiosurgery. Survival time increased chronologically, presumably due to an intensified anti-cancer therapy in the more recent era of the CyberKnife treatments.

  12. SU-E-T-281: Reduction of Treatment Times in CyberKnife Prostate SBRT Using a Water Filled Rectal Balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, P; Caroprese, B; McKellar, H [East Texas Medical Center, Tyler, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To illustrate 25% reduction in CyberKnife prostate SBRT treatment times using a water filled rectal balloon. Methods: We perform prostate SBRT using a 3800cGy in 4 fraction regimen prescribed between 51% 59% iso-dose lines to 95% of PTV using a CyberKnife System. The resultant heterogeneous dosimetry is analogous to HDR dosimetry. Our patients are treated in a feet first supine position to decrease treatment couch sag and also to position the prostate anatomy closer to the robot. CT imaging is performed with a Radiadyne Immobiloc rectal balloon filled with 45-50cc water placed firmly inside the patient's rectum. A treatment plan is developed from this CT study using Multiplan. The patient is treated every other day for 4 days using the rectal balloon for each fraction. Gold fiducials previously implanted inside the prostate are used for tracking by the CyberKnife system. Results: Critical structures comprise the usual GU anatomy of bladder, rectum, urethra, femoral-heads along with emphasis on doses to anterior rectal wall and rectal mucosa. The water filled rectal balloon localizes the rectum, which enables the physician to accurately contour both anterior rectal wall, and rectal mucosa. The balloon also has a gas release valve enabling better patient comfort. Rectum localization enables the CyberKnife system to make fewer corrections resulting in fewer treatment interruptions and time lost to re-adjustment for rectal motion, bowel filling and gas creation. Effective treatment times are reduced by 25% to approximately 45 minutes. Adoption of the balloon has required minimal change to our planning strategy and plan evaluation process. Conclusion: Patient follow-up comparisons show no difference in effectiveness of treatment with and without balloons We conclude that rectal balloons enhance patient comfort and decrease effective treatment times.

  13. Residual water treatment for gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez, L.

    1990-01-01

    The treatment of residual water by means of gamma radiation for its use in agricultural irrigation is evaluated. Measurements of physical, chemical, biological and microbiological contamination indicators were performed. For that, samples from the treatment center of residual water of San Juan de Miraflores were irradiated up to a 52.5 kGy dose. The study concludes that gamma radiation is effective to remove parasites and bacteria, but not for removal of the organic and inorganic matter. (author). 15 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs

  14. Treatment of over 20 mm gastric cancer by endoscopic submucosal dissection using an insulation-tipped diathermic knife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirasaki, Shoji; Kanzaki, Hiromitsu; Matsubara, Minoru; Fujita, Kohei; Ikeda, Fusao; Taniguchi, Hideaki; Yumoto, Eiichiro; Suzuki, Seiyuu

    2007-08-07

    To evaluate the effectiveness of endoscopic submucosal dissection using an insulation-tipped diathermic knife (IT-ESD) for the treatment of patients with over 20 mm early gastric cancer (EGC). A total of 112 patients with over 10 mm EGC were treated with IT-ESD at Sumitomo Besshi Hospital and Shikoku Cancer Center in the 5 year period from January 2002 to December 2006, including 40 patients with over 20 mm EGC. We compared patient backgrounds, the one-piece resection rate, complete resection (CR) rate, operation time, bleeding rate, perforation rate between patients with over 20 mm EGC [over 20 mm group (21-40 mm)] and the remaining patients (under 20 mm group). We found no significant difference in the rate of underlying cardiopulmonary disease (over 20 mm group vs under 20 mm group, 5.0% vs 5.6%), one-piece resection rate (95% vs 96%), CR rate (85% vs 89%), operation time (72.3 min vs 66.5 min), bleeding rate (5% vs 4.2%), and perforation rate (0% vs 1.4%) between the 2 groups. Three patients in each group had submucosal invasion and two in each groups underwent additional surgery. There was no significant difference in the outcome resulting from IT-ESD between the 2 groups. Our study proves that IT-ESD is a feasible treatment for patients with over 20 mm mucosal gastric cancer although the long-term outcome should be evaluated in the future.

  15. Treatment of gastric remnant cancer post distal gastrectomy by endoscopic submucosal dissection using an insulation-tipped diathermic knife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirasaki, Shoji; Kanzaki, Hiromitsu; Matsubara, Minoru; Fujita, Kohei; Matsumura, Shuji; Suzuki, Seiyuu

    2008-04-28

    To evaluate the effectiveness of endoscopic submucosal dissection using an insulation-tipped diathermic knife (IT-ESD) for the treatment of patients with gastric remnant cancer. Thirty-two patients with early gastric cancer in the remnant stomach, who underwent distal gastrectomy due to gastric carcinoma, were treated with endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) or ESD at Sumitomo Besshi Hospital and Shikoku Cancer Center in the 10-year period from January 1998 to December 2007, including 17 patients treated with IT-ESD. Retrospectively, patient backgrounds, the one-piece resection rate, complete resection (CR) rate, operation time, bleeding rate, and perforation rate were compared between patients treated with conventional EMR and those treated with IT-ESD. The CR rate (40% in the EMR group vs 82% in the IT-ESD group) was significantly higher in the IT-ESD group than in the EMR group; however, the operation time was significantly longer for the IT-ESD group (57.6 +/- 31.9 min vs 21.1 +/- 12.2 min). No significant differences were found in the rate of underlying cardiopulmonary disease (IT-ESD group, 12% vs EMR group, 13%), one-piece resection rate (100% vs 73%), bleeding rate (18% vs 6.7%), and perforation rate (0% vs 0%) between the two groups. IT-ESD appears to be an effective treatment for gastric remnant cancer post distal gastrectomy because of its high CR rate. It is useful for histological confirmation of successful treatment. The long-term outcome needs to be evaluated in the future.

  16. Clinical implementation of stereotactic treatment for extracranial lesions with body frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, A.; Nehru, R.M.; Malhotra, H.K.; Saju Paul, Sherly; Deshpande, D.D.; Sharma, Vinay; Dinshaw, K.A.

    2000-01-01

    The technique of Stereotaxy has been very successfully carried out initially with gamma knife and further with the x-knife using linear accelerators for the treatment of tumours in the cranial lesions. This technique has now been extended to the lesions in the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic regions. The methodology adopted to implement this challenging technique and the dosimetry considerations are discussed

  17. Gamma knife radiosurgery in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumann, G. S.; Wara, W. M.; Larson, D. A.; Sneed, P. K.; Gutin, P. H.; Ciricillo, S. F.; McDermott, M. W.; Park, E.; Stalpers, L. J.; Verhey, L. J.; Smith, V.; Petti, P. L.; Edwards, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    52 pediatric patients were treated with radiosurgery at the University of California, San Francisco. Arteriovenous malformations were treated in 27 patients. Complete obliteration was noted in 4 of 12 patients imaged more than 2 years after radiosurgery. Arteriovenous malformation rebleed was noted

  18. Accelerated partial breast irradiation: Using the CyberKnife as the radiation delivery platform in the treatment of early breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra eVermeulen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the CyberKnife (Accuray, Incorporated, Sunnyvale, CA for non-invasive delivery of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI in early breast cancer patients. Between 6/2009 and 5/2011, 9 patients were treated with CyberKnife APBI. Normal tissue constraints were imposed as outlined in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 (NSABP/RTOG Protocol (Vicini and White, 2007. Patients received a total dose of 30 Gy in 5 fractions (group 1, n=2 or 34 Gy in 10 fractions (group 2, n=7 delivered to the planning treatment volume (PTV defined as the clinical target volume (CTV + 2 mm. The CTV was defined as either the lumpectomy cavity plus 10 mm (n=2 or 15 mm (n=7. The cavity was defined by a T2-weighted non-contrast breast MRI fused to a planning non-contrast thoracic CT. The CyberKnife Synchrony system tracked gold fiducials sutured into the cavity wall during lumpectomy. Treatments started 4-5 weeks after lumpectomy. The mean PTV was 100 cm3 (range, 92-108 cm3 and 105 cm3 (range, 49-241 cm3 and the mean PTV isodose prescription line was 70% for groups 1 and 2, respectively. The mean percent of whole breast reference volume receiving 100% and 50% of the dose (V100 and V50 for group 1 was 11% (range, 8-13% and 23% (range, 16-30% and for group 2 was 11% (range, 7-14% and 26% (range, 21- 35.0% , respectively. At a median 7 months follow-up (range, 4-26 months, no acute toxicities were seen. Acute cosmetic outcomes were excellent or good in all patients; for those patients with more than 12 months follow-up the late cosmesis outcomes were excellent or good. In conclusion, the lack of observable acute side effects and current excellent/good cosmetic outcomes is promising. We believe this suggests the CyberKnife is a suitable non-invasive radiation platform for delivering APBI with achievable normal tissue constraints.

  19. Gamma irradiation treatment of secondary sewage effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajdic, A.H.

    The operation and monitoring of a pilot scale Co-60 gamma irradiation unit treating secondary sewage effluent is described. The disinfecting efficiency of the unit is compared to that of an experimental 'ideal' chlorination unit and to the plant chlorination process. A cost estimate for disinfection by gamma irradiation on a full plant scale is included. (author)

  20. The impact of whole-brain radiation therapy on the long-term control and morbidity of patients surviving more than one year after gamma knife radiosurgery for brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlotto, John M.; Flickinger, John C.; Niranjan, Ajay; Bhatnagar, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To better analyze how whole-brain radiotherapy (WBXRT) affects long-term tumor control and toxicity from the initial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases, we studied these outcomes in patients who had survived at least 1 year from SRS. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the results of gamma knife radiosurgery for 160 brain metastases in 110 patients who were followed for a median of 18 months (range, 12-122 months) after SRS. Eighty-two patients had a solitary brain metastasis and 28 patients had multiple metastases. Seventy patients (116 tumors) were treated with initial radiosurgery and WBXRT, whereas 40 patients (44 lesions) initially received radiosurgery alone. Median treatment volume was 1.9 cc in the entire group, 2.3 cc in the WBXRT group, and 1.6 cc in the SRS alone group. Median tumor dose was 16 Gy (range, 12-21 Gy). Results: At 1, 3, and 5 years, local tumor control was 84.1% ± 5.5%, 68.6% ± 8.7%, and 68.6% ± 8.7% with SRS alone compared with 93.1% ± 2.4%, 87.7% ± 4.9%, and 65.7% ± 10.2%. with concurrent WBXRT and SRS (p = 0.0228, univariate). We found that WBXRT improved local control in patient subsets tumor volume ≥2 cc, peripheral dose ≤16 Gy, single metastases, nonradioresistant tumors, and lung cancer metastases (p = 0.0069, 0.0080, 0.0083, 0.0184, and 0.0348). Distal intracranial failure developed at 1, 3, and 5 years in 26.0% ± 7.1%, 74.5% ± 9.4%, and 74.5% ± 9.4% with SRS alone compared with 20.7% ± 4.9%, 49.0% ± 8.7%, and 61.8% ± 12.8% with concurrent WBXRT and SRS (p = 0.0657). We found a trend for improved distal intracranial control with WBXRT for only nonradioresistant tumors (p = 0.054). Postradiosurgery complications developed in 2.8% ± 1.2% and 10.7% ± 3.5% at 1 and 3-5 years and was unaffected by WBXRT (p = 0.7721). WBXRT did not improve survival in the entire series (p = 0.5027) or in any subsets. Conclusions: In this retrospective study of 1-year survivors of SRS for brain metastases, the

  1. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations in children/adolescents and adults. Part I: Differences in epidemiologic, morphologic, and clinical characteristics, permanent complications, and bleeding in the latency period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolato, Antonio; Lupidi, Francesco; Sandri, Marco F.; Foroni, Roberto; Zampieri, Piergiuseppe; Mazza, Carlo; Maluta, Sergio; Beltramello, Alberto; Gerosa, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the epidemiologic, morphologic, and clinical characteristics of 92 children/adolescents (Group A) and 362 adults (Group B) with cerebral arteriovenous malformations (cAVMs) considered suitable for radiosurgery; to correlate radiosurgery-related permanent complication and post-radiosurgery bleeding rates in the 75 children/adolescents and 297 adults available for follow-up. Methods and Materials: Radiosurgery was performed with a model C 201-source Co 6 Leksell Gamma Unit (Elekta Instruments, Stockholm, Sweden). Fisher exact two-tailed, Wilcoxon rank-sum, and two-sample binomial exact tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: There were significant differences between the two populations in sex (p = 0.015), clinical presentation (p = 0.001), and location (p = 0.008). The permanent complication rate was lower in younger (1.3%) than in older patients (5.4%), although the difference was not significant (p = 0.213). The postradiosurgery bleeding rate was lower in Group A (1.3%) than in Group B (2.7%) (p = 0.694), with global actuarial bleeding rates of 0.56% per year and 1.15% per year, respectively. Conclusions: The different characteristics of child/adolescent and adult cAVMs suggest that they should be considered two distinct vascular disorders. The similar rates of radiosurgery-related complications and latency period bleeding in the two populations show that gamma knife radiosurgery does not expose young patients to a higher risk of sequelae than that for older patients

  2. A treatment planning comparison between a novel rotating gamma system and robotic linear accelerator based intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fareed, Muhammad M.; Eldib, Ahmed; Weiss, Stephanie E.; Hayes, Shelly B.; Li, Jinsheng; C-M Ma, Charlie

    2018-02-01

    To compare the dosimetric parameters of a novel rotating gamma ray system (RGS) with well-established CyberKnife system (CK) for treating malignant brain lesions. RGS has a treatment head of 16 cobalt-60 sources focused to the isocenter, which can rotate 360° on the ring gantry and swing 35° in the superior direction. We compared several dosimetric parameters in 10 patients undergoing brain stereotactic radiosurgery including plan normalization, number of beams and nodes for CK and shots for RGS, collimators used, estimated treatment time, D 2 cm and conformity index (CI) among two modalities. The median plan normalization for RGS was 56.7% versus 68.5% (p  =  0.002) for CK plans. The median number of shots from RGS was 7.5 whereas the median number of beams and nodes for CK was 79.5 and 46. The median collimator’s diameter used was 3.5 mm for RGS as compared to 5 mm for CK (p  =  0.26). Mean D 2 cm was 5.57 Gy for CyberKnife whereas it was 3.11 Gy for RGS (p  =  0.99). For RGS plans, the median CI was 1.4 compared to 1.3 for the CK treatment plans (p  =  0.98). The average minimum and maximum doses to optic chiasm were 21 and 93 cGy for RGS as compared to 32 and 209 cGy for CK whereas these were 0.5 and 364 cGy by RGS and 18 and 399 cGy by CK to brainstem. The mean V12 Gy for brain predicting for radionecrosis with RGS was 3.75 cm3 as compared to 4.09 cm3 with the CK (p  =  0.41). The dosimetric parameters of a novel RGS with a ring type gantry are comparable with CyberKnife, allowing its use for intracranial lesions and is worth exploring in a clinical setting.

  3. Endoscopic submucosal dissection with a combination of small-caliber-tip transparent hood and flex knife is a safe and effective treatment for superficial esophageal neoplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Naoki; Horiki, Noriyuki; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Uemura, Masayo; Maruyama, Masataka; Suzuki, Shoko; Uchida, Shino; Izuka, Yusuke; Fukuda, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Yoshiyuki

    2010-02-01

    Superficial esophageal neoplasias resected in piecemeal manner with endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) sometimes recur locally, and additional treatments need to be developed. Efficacy and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for esophageal neoplasias are not sufficiently demonstrated, so we conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ESD for superficial esophageal neoplasias. Thirty-seven superficial esophageal neoplasias consisted of 34 squamous cell neoplasias and 3 columnar neoplasias in 35 patients were treated with ESD from May 2006 to July 2008. Patients were regularly followed up with endoscopy every 6 months, and with echoendoscope and computed tomography every year. Therapeutic efficacy, complications, and follow-up results were evaluated. The mean size of the resected neoplasias and that of the resected specimens were 22 mm (range 10-83 mm) and 41 mm (range 18-90 mm), respectively. The mean duration of the ESD procedures was 117 min (range 40-235 min). The overall rates of en bloc resection and of free margin resection were 100% (37/37) and 95% (35/37), respectively. The mean follow-up period of 19 months (range 7-32 months) revealed no local or distant recurrence. There were no complications such as bleeding or perforation in any case. In all nine cases, the strictures were successfully managed with prophylactic endoscopic balloon dilation. ESD with a combination of small-caliber-tip transparent hood and flex knife is a safe endoscopic treatment for superficial esophageal neoplasias and enables large en bloc resection.

  4. Gamma radiation treatment of waste waters from textile industries in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of gamma irradiation alone, and in combination with chemical treatment on color, odor, chemical oxyg-en demand (COD) and suspended solids in waste waters from textile industries in Ghana were studied to explore the potential of alternative and innovative processes for treatment of industrial waste waters. Waste ...

  5. SU-E-T-767: Treatment Planning Study of Prostate Cancer by CyberKnife with Respect to the Urethral Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, H; Mizuno, H; Sumida, I; Otani, Y; Yagi, M; Takashina, M; Suzuki, O; Yoshioka, Y; Koizumi, M; Ogawa, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Hypo-fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is nowadays one of the treatment strategies for prostate cancer. There are few reports on planning study of prostate cancer by CyberKnife with respect to the urethral dose because of the invisibility in CT. We have investigated a planning method using fixed collimators with considering dose homogeneity, conformity and urethral dose. Methods: Radiotherapy treatment planning of prostate cancer were under a clinical trial approved by the institutional review board. The prescription dose of 35 Gy were delivered to the PTV in five fractions with the urethral catheter. Urethra position was identified by pretreatment CT and catheter, which was inserted before treatment planning CT and released after the treatment. All plans agreed to the criteria as shown in table 1, and the following constraints were recommended as well: the prescribed iso-dose line should be from 70% to 90%; the total MU should be below 50,000 MU; the minimum MU per beam should be larger than 15 MU; the estimated delivery time (excluding patient setup time) by Multiplan with image time interval of 60 s should be less than 35 min. Collimator size and position were decided as shown in figure 1. Fixed collimator of 15 mm was positioned around urethra and PTV for avoiding high dose of urethra and achieving conformity, and fixed collimator of 30 or 40 were positioned around PTV for achieving dose homogeneity. Results: With this method, all constraints were achieved. (Table 1, Figure 2) Max dose of urethra was ranging from 103.9% to 114.2%, because urethra position was identified by pretreatment CT and urethral catheter. Conclusion: Hypo-fractionated SBRT with IMRT utilizing urethral catheter could be a promising new treatment option for prostate cancer. This work was supported by JSPS Core-to-Core program Number 23003

  6. Safety and efficacy of endovascular therapy and gamma knife surgery for brain arteriovenous malformations in China: Study protocol for an observational clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengwei Jin

    2017-09-01

    Discussion: The most confusion on BAVM treatment is whether to choose interventional therapy or medical therapy, and the choice of interventional therapy modes. This study will provide evidence for evaluating the safety and efficacy of microinvasive treatment in China, to characterize the microinvasive treatment strategy for BAVMs.

  7. Gamma irradiation for sewage treatment at US army facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Berg, A.J.; Hollis, H.D.; Musselman, H.D.; Woodbridge, D.D.

    1975-01-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers has been sponsoring research for many years on the use of gamma irradiation for disinfection and sterilization of sewage plant effluents. Initial research was directed to laboratory experiments using sterile solutions to determine the effects of gamma irradiation on E. coli, M-pyogenes and M-smegmatis organisms, and on the chemical constituents of sewage such as phenols, surfactants and pesticides. The results of the initial research warranted further study using municipal sewage secondary effluent as test samples. Current research is directed towards investigating the effects of radiation on the constituents of sewage sludge and on the cyst stage of the amoebic protozoa. Consideration has been given by the Corps to the management of waste-waters by disposal on land. Legal and medical reasons dictate that the plant effluents be sterilized before being used as fertilizers and soil conditioners. Gamma radiation from isotopic sources appears to be the best source of sterilizing energy for Army waste-water disposal. The Corps of Engineers is considering the construction of an experimental gamma irradiation pilot facility to validate laboratory experimental work and to establish design criteria for operating plants. The data obtained will provide a basis for performing detailed cost effectiveness studies on gamma irradiation as a method to treat secondary plant effluent. In addition, optimization work will be conducted to determine where in the sewage treatment cycle the use of gamma irradiation will produce the best results in meeting current and anticipated standards. (author)

  8. Induced polygenic variability using combination treatment of gamma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Induced mutation in plant improvement has been proven to be one of the alternative ways to generate new sources of genetic variation in blackgram. In this study, dry seeds of VBN 4 blackgram were treated with combination treatment of both gamma rays (400, 500 and 600 Gy) and ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS) (50, ...

  9. Treatment of coffee wastewater by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilera, Y.; Consuegra, R.; Rapado, M.

    1998-01-01

    Radiation energy can be an important resource in the treatment of wastewaters from different industries both directly and in combination with other processes to improve economics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an ionizing radiation on coffee wastewater in order to decompose chemical organic refractory substances which cannot be degradated by biological treatment. One of the approaches employed in the survey was the chemical treatment followed by the irradiation of the samples since no nuclear changes of the coagulant solution or wastewater samples were expected. Irradiation is a high cost treatment although it has increased its applications nowadays. The method is safe, fast and effective and it does not generate any pollution

  10. Slaughterhouse sewage treatment using gamma radiation - economical feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Rita; Botelho, M. Luisa [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem (Portugal). Dept. de Fisica]. E-mail: ritamelo@itn.pt; mlb@itn.pt; Branco, Joaquim [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem (Portugal). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: jbranco@itn.pt

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of a financial viability study for the implementation of gamma radiation technology on a slaughterhouse wastewater treatment industry. Five scenarios were studied, including the current practice, representing different types of treatments and goals, e.g.: water reuse and/or sludge add value as agriculture fertilizers. Cost-benefit analysis, including the net present value (NPV) of each scenario, was used as a technique to compare the relative value of various strategies. Taking in account that the initial investment is amortized after 20 years, the implementation of Co-60 treatment with 20% water reuse and sludge application as agriculture fertilizers represents the most profitable project with the highest NPV. Therefore, the implementation of gamma radiation technology on a slaughterhouse wastewater treatment industry is not only technically viable as well as economically feasible. (author)

  11. Independent Monte-Carlo dose calculation for MLC based CyberKnife radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackeprang, P.-H.; Vuong, D.; Volken, W.; Henzen, D.; Schmidhalter, D.; Malthaner, M.; Mueller, S.; Frei, D.; Stampanoni, M. F. M.; Dal Pra, A.; Aebersold, D. M.; Fix, M. K.; Manser, P.

    2018-01-01

    This work aims to develop, implement and validate a Monte Carlo (MC)-based independent dose calculation (IDC) framework to perform patient-specific quality assurance (QA) for multi-leaf collimator (MLC)-based CyberKnife® (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) treatment plans. The IDC framework uses an XML-format treatment plan as exported from the treatment planning system (TPS) and DICOM format patient CT data, an MC beam model using phase spaces, CyberKnife MLC beam modifier transport using the EGS++ class library, a beam sampling and coordinate transformation engine and dose scoring using DOSXYZnrc. The framework is validated against dose profiles and depth dose curves of single beams with varying field sizes in a water tank in units of cGy/Monitor Unit and against a 2D dose distribution of a full prostate treatment plan measured with Gafchromic EBT3 (Ashland Advanced Materials, Bridgewater, NJ) film in a homogeneous water-equivalent slab phantom. The film measurement is compared to IDC results by gamma analysis using 2% (global)/2 mm criteria. Further, the dose distribution of the clinical treatment plan in the patient CT is compared to TPS calculation by gamma analysis using the same criteria. Dose profiles from IDC calculation in a homogeneous water phantom agree within 2.3% of the global max dose or 1 mm distance to agreement to measurements for all except the smallest field size. Comparing the film measurement to calculated dose, 99.9% of all voxels pass gamma analysis, comparing dose calculated by the IDC framework to TPS calculated dose for the clinical prostate plan shows 99.0% passing rate. IDC calculated dose is found to be up to 5.6% lower than dose calculated by the TPS in this case near metal fiducial markers. An MC-based modular IDC framework was successfully developed, implemented and validated against measurements and is now available to perform patient-specific QA by IDC.

  12. SU-E-T-587: Monte Carlo Versus Ray-Tracing for Treatment Planning Involving CNS Tumors On the MultiPlan System for CyberKnife Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbang, R Teboh

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: MultiPlan, the treatment planning system for the CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery system offers two approaches to dose computation, namely Ray-Tracing (RT), the default technique and Monte Carlo (MC), an option. RT is deterministic, however it accounts for primary heterogeneity only. MC on the other hand has an uncertainty associated with the calculation results. The advantage is that in addition, it accounts for heterogeneity effects on the scattered dose. Not all sites will benefit from MC. The goal of this work was to focus on central nervous system (CNS) tumors and compare dosimetrically, treatment plans computed with RT versus MC. Methods: Treatment plans were computed using both RT and MC for sites covering (a) the brain (b) C-spine (c) upper T-spine (d) lower T-spine (e) L-spine and (f) sacrum. RT was first used to compute clinically valid treatment plans. Then the same treatment parameters, monitor units, beam weights, etc., were used in the MC algorithm to compute the dose distribution. The plans were then compared for tumor coverage to illustrate the difference if any. All MC calculations were performed at a 1% uncertainty. Results: Using the RT technique, the tumor coverage for the brain, C-spine (C3–C7), upper T-spine (T4–T6), lower T-spine (T10), Lspine (L2) and sacrum were 96.8%, 93.1%, 97.2%, 87.3%, 91.1%, and 95.3%. The corresponding tumor coverage based on the MC approach was 98.2%, 95.3%, 87.55%, 88.2%, 92.5%, and 95.3%. It should be noted that the acceptable planning target coverage for our clinical practice is >95%. The coverage can be compromised for spine tumors to spare normal tissues such as the spinal cord. Conclusion: For treatment planning involving the CNS, RT and MC appear to be similar for most sites but for the T-spine area where most of the beams traverse lung tissue. In this case, MC is highly recommended

  13. Olfactory Neuroblastoma Treated by Endoscopic Surgery Followed by Combined External Beam Radiation and Gamma Knife for Optic Nerve and Chiasm Sparing: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansi Z. Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the multimodality treatment regimen of a 53-year-old man diagnosed with olfactory neuroblastoma (Kadish stage C in the right nasal cavity extending into the ethmoid sinus and across the cribriform plate. Endoscopic surgery for tumor resection was followed by a combination of external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery boost with concurrent chemotherapy. The novel combination of dual radiation therapies allowed for the preservation of the nearby optic structures while providing an adequate dosage to a sufficient volume of the afflicted tissue.

  14. Performance of a novel repositioning head frame for gamma knife perfexion and image-guided linac-based intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschin, Mark; Nayebi, Nazanin; Carlsson, Per; Brown, Kevin; Tamerou, Messeret; Li, Winnie; Laperriere, Normand; Sahgal, Arjun; Cho, Young-Bin; Ménard, Cynthia; Jaffray, David

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the geometric positioning and immobilization performance of a vacuum bite-block repositioning head frame (RHF) system for Perfexion (PFX-SRT) and linac-based intracranial image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Patients with intracranial tumors received linac-based image-guided SRT using the RHF for setup and immobilization. Three hundred thirty-three fractions of radiation were delivered in 12 patients. The accuracy of the RHF was estimated for linac-based SRT with online cone-beam CT (CBCT) and for PFX-SRT with a repositioning check tool (RCT) and offline CBCT. The RCT's ability to act as a surrogate for anatomic position was estimated through comparison to CBCT image matching. Immobilization performance was evaluated daily with pre- and postdose delivery CBCT scans and RCT measurements. The correlation coefficient between RCT- and CBCT-reported displacements was 0.59, 0.75, 0.79 (Right, Superior, and Anterior, respectively). For image-guided linac-based SRT, the mean three-dimensional (3D) setup error was 0.8 mm with interpatient (Sigma) and interfraction (sigma) variations of 0.1 and 0.4 mm, respectively. For PFX-SRT, the initial, uncorrected mean 3D positioning displacement in stereotactic coordinates was 2.0 mm, with Sigma = 1.1 mm and sigma = 0.8 mm. Considering only RCT setups <1mm (PFX action level) the mean 3D positioning displacement reduced to 1.3 mm, with Sigma = 0.9 mm and sigma = 0.4 mm. The largest contributing systematic uncertainty was in the superior-inferior direction (mean displacement = -0.5 mm; Sigma = 0.9 mm). The largest mean rotation was 0.6 degrees in pitch. The mean 3D intrafraction motion was 0.4 +/- 0.3 mm. The RHF provides excellent immobilization for intracranial SRT and PFX-SRT. Some small systematic uncertainties in stereotactic positioning exist and must be considered when generating PFX-SRT treatment plans. The RCT provides reasonable surrogacy for internal anatomic displacement. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc

  15. Gamma radiation induced effects on slaughterhouse wastewater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, Rita; Cabo Verde, Sandra; Branco, Joaquim; Botelho, M. Luisa

    2008-01-01

    A preliminary study using gamma radiation on slaughterhouse wastewater samples was carried out. Chemical oxygen demand (COD), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and total suspended solids (TSS) results were obtained at a dose rate of 0.9 kGy h -1 . A decrease of COD, BOD and colour was observed after irradiation at high absorbed doses. The microbiological results, following irradiation in the same conditions, correlated with the BOD results. The results obtained highlight the potential of this technology for wastewater treatment

  16. Carbamazepine degradation by gamma irradiation coupled to biological treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shizong; Wang, Jianlong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbamazepine was removed by the combined gamma radiation and biodegradation. • The removal efficiency of carbamazepine increased with dose. • Irradiation could enhance the mineralization of carbamazepine significantly. • The combined irradiation and biodegradation was effective for carbamazepine removal. - Abstract: Carbamazepine is an emerging contaminant and resistant to biodegradation, which cannot be effectively removed by the conventional biological wastewater treatment processes. In this study, the combined gamma irradiation and biodegradation was employed to remove carbamazepine from wastewater. The effect of dose on the removal of carbamazepine was studied at different doses (300, 600 and 800 Gy). The results showed that the removal efficiency of carbamazepine increased with dose increasing during the irradiation process. The maximum removal efficiency was 99.8% at 800 Gy, while the removal efficiency of total organic carbon (TOC) was only 26.5%. The removal efficiency of TOC increased to 79.3% after the sequent biological treatment. In addition, several intermediates and organic acids were detected. The possible degradation pathway of carbamazepine during the integrated irradiation and biodegradation was proposed. Based on the overall analysis, the combined gamma irradiation and biological treatment process can be an alternative for removing the recalcitrant organic pollutants such as carbamazepine from wastewater.

  17. Carbamazepine degradation by gamma irradiation coupled to biological treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shizong [Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, INET, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Jianlong, E-mail: wangjl@tsinghua.edu.cn [Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, INET, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Radioactive Wastes Treatment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • Carbamazepine was removed by the combined gamma radiation and biodegradation. • The removal efficiency of carbamazepine increased with dose. • Irradiation could enhance the mineralization of carbamazepine significantly. • The combined irradiation and biodegradation was effective for carbamazepine removal. - Abstract: Carbamazepine is an emerging contaminant and resistant to biodegradation, which cannot be effectively removed by the conventional biological wastewater treatment processes. In this study, the combined gamma irradiation and biodegradation was employed to remove carbamazepine from wastewater. The effect of dose on the removal of carbamazepine was studied at different doses (300, 600 and 800 Gy). The results showed that the removal efficiency of carbamazepine increased with dose increasing during the irradiation process. The maximum removal efficiency was 99.8% at 800 Gy, while the removal efficiency of total organic carbon (TOC) was only 26.5%. The removal efficiency of TOC increased to 79.3% after the sequent biological treatment. In addition, several intermediates and organic acids were detected. The possible degradation pathway of carbamazepine during the integrated irradiation and biodegradation was proposed. Based on the overall analysis, the combined gamma irradiation and biological treatment process can be an alternative for removing the recalcitrant organic pollutants such as carbamazepine from wastewater.

  18. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) treatment decreases the inflammatory response in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Hougen, H P; Rygaard, J

    1996-01-01

    In a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis (CF), we studied whether the inflammatory response could be altered by intraperitoneal treatment with recombinant rat interferon-gamma (rrIFN-gamma). Rats were treated either before or after intratracheal...

  19. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) treatment decreases the inflammatory response in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Hougen, H P; Rygaard, J

    1996-01-01

    In a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis (CF), we studied whether the inflammatory response could be altered by intraperitoneal treatment with recombinant rat interferon-gamma (rrIFN-gamma). Rats were treated either before or after intratracheal ch...

  20. Measurement of doses delivered by the CyberKnife{sup R} imagery system during the treatment of brain lesions with respect to imagery frequency; Mesure de la dose delivree par le systeme d'imagerie du CyberKnife{sup R} lors du traitement de lesions de l'encephale en fonction de la frequence de l'imagerie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moan, G.; Palamini, G.; Bondiau, P.Y. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Nice (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the performance of measurements of doses delivered by the CyberKnife imagery system in order to include them in the patient's medical file. They also aimed at verifying the influence of imagery frequency modulation on the delivered dose. Input dose measurements have been performed in treatment conditions with an Unfors XI dosimeter and an anthropomorphic phantom. Measurements have been performed for different operating combinations. Delivered doses vary very much between one location and the other, from a patient to the other, but also from one session to the other for a same patient. Other parameters are also important (patient's movement, operator's expertise). Measurements allowed shot frequency to be modulated, and will allow the dose delivered by the imagery system to be included in the patient's medical file. Short communication

  1. Supernova hemorrhage: obliterative hemorrhage of brain arteriovenous malformations following γ knife radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Matthew D; Hetts, Steven W; Young, William L; Halbach, Van V; Dowd, Christopher F; Higashida, Randall T; English, Joey D

    2012-09-01

    Hemorrhage represents the most feared complication of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in both untreated patients and those treated with gamma knife radiosurgery. Radiosurgery does not immediately lead to obliteration of the malformation, which often does not occur until years following treatment. Post-obliteration hemorrhage is rare, occurring months to years after radiosurgery, and has been associated with residual or recurrent AVM despite prior apparent nidus elimination. Three cases are reported of delayed intracranial hemorrhage in patients with cerebral AVMs treated with radiosurgery in which no residual AVM was found on catheter angiography at the time of delayed post-treatment hemorrhage. That the pathophysiology of these hemorrhages involves progressive venous outflow occlusion is speculated and the possible mechanistic link to subsequent vascular rupture is discussed.

  2. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF TROCHANTERIC FRACTURES BY GAMMA3 NAIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Vukićević

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Fractures of the greater trochanter rank amongst severe injuries of bone tissue. They occur most frequently in patients over 65 years of age, nearly all of whom are diagnosed with osteoporosis. Non-surgical treatment does not prove to be satisfactory and results in high mortality rate. Surgical treatment is a method of fracture treatment of the trochanteric region, which enables early activation and thus prevents numerous complications in bedridden patients. Gamma3 nails are one of the most state-of-the-art implants for trochanteric fracture fixation. The implant is easy to embed, which does not require a large surgical team. This implant embedding requires the least invasive surgery and complications are rare.This paper describes 47 patients who received surgical treatment and is focused on the first nine months of 2009. The patients were treated at the Orthopaedics Ward of Health Centre Valjevo. They were in their seventies, average age: 72.21 years, with female sex prevailing (63.82%. The outcome was as follows: excellent in 65.96%, good in 17.02% and satisfactory in 4.25% of patients. Surface infections occurred in 6.38% of patients. One implant broke.We had one death outcome in the early post-surgical treatment.Surgical treatment of trochanteric fractures by Gamma3 implants proved very effective as it resulted in few complications and numerous excellent functional and anatomic outcomes. Thus we recommend it as an option when decision on treatment of this type of fractures is made.

  3. Gamma radiation induced effects on slaughterhouse wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Rita [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, Apartado 21, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)], E-mail: ritamelo@itn.pt; Cabo Verde, Sandra [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, Apartado 21, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Branco, Joaquim [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, Apartado 21, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Botelho, M. Luisa [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, Apartado 21, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

    2008-01-15

    A preliminary study using gamma radiation on slaughterhouse wastewater samples was carried out. Chemical oxygen demand (COD), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and total suspended solids (TSS) results were obtained at a dose rate of 0.9 kGy h{sup -1}. A decrease of COD, BOD and colour was observed after irradiation at high absorbed doses. The microbiological results, following irradiation in the same conditions, correlated with the BOD results. The results obtained highlight the potential of this technology for wastewater treatment.

  4. Treatment with anti-interferon-gamma monoclonal antibodies modifies experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in interferon-gamma receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C; Penkowa, M; Sáez-Torres, I

    2001-01-01

    antibodies (mAb) on day 8 postimmunization. Clinical scoring and both histological and immunohistochemical studies were undertaken for all groups. We hereby show that treatment with anti-IFN-gamma mAb worsened the disease course of 129Sv wild-type mice. However, it decreased the mean daily score in IFN......-gamma R(-/-) 129Sv and the incidence of the disease down to 50% in C57Bl/6x129Sv IFN-gamma R(-/-) mice. Moreover, after anti-IFN-gamma mAb treatment, oxidative stress levels, metallothionein I and II antioxidant protein expression, and apoptoticneuronal death were increased in wild-type mice while......(-/-)) mouse types: C57Bl/6x129Sv, with a disruption of the IFN-gamma receptor cytoplasmic domain, and 129Sv, homozygous for a disrupted IFN-gamma receptor gene. Mice were immunized with peptide 40-55 from rat myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. A subgroup of mice was treated with anti-IFN-gamma monoclonal...

  5. Brainstem injury by penetrating head trauma with a knife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Wellingson Silva; de Andrade, Almir Ferreira; Amorim, Robson Luis; Figueiredo, Eberval Gadelha; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2012-10-01

    The authors describe a rare case about a traumatic lesion of brain and brain stem with a knife. In this case the patient had good clinical condition, diagnosed with TBI by infectious complications. We have highlighted the unusual diagnosis, proximity of vascular structures, the technique used in the treatment and the good outcome of the injury.

  6. Gamma radiation treatment activates glucomoringin synthesis in Moringa oleifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsifhiwa Ramabulana

    Full Text Available Abstract Plants are a very rich source of pharmacologically relevant metabolites. However, the relative concentrations of these compounds are subject to the genetic make-up, the physiological state of the plant as well as environmental effects. Recently, metabolic perturbations through the use of abiotic stressors have proven to be a valuable strategy for increasing the levels of these compounds. Oxidative stress-associated stressors, including ionizing radiation, have also been reported to induce metabolites with various biological activities in plants. Hence, the aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of gamma radiation on the induction of purported anti-cancerous metabolites, glucomoringin and its derivatives, in Moringa oleifera Lam., Moringaceae. Here, an UHPLC-qTOF-MS-based targeted metabolic fingerprinting approach was used to evaluate the effect of gamma radiation treatment on the afore-mentioned health-beneficial secondary metabolites of M. oleifera. Following radiation, an increase in glucomoringin and three acylated derivatives was noted. As such, these molecules can be regarded as components of the inducible defense mechanism of M. oleifera as opposed to being constitutive components as it has previously been assumed. This might be an indication of a possible, yet unexplored role of moringin against the effects of oxidative stress in M. oleifera plants. The results also suggest that plants undergoing photo-oxidative stress could accumulate higher amounts of glucomoringin and related molecules.

  7. Topical Rosiglitazone Treatment Improves Ulcerative Colitis by Restoring Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-gamma Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, G.; Brynskov, Jørn

    2010-01-01

    for 14 days. RESULTS: PPAR gamma expression was fourfold reduced in epithelial cells from inflamed compared with uninflamed mucosa and controls. Adipophillin levels were decreased in parallel. Rosiglitazone induced a concentration-dependent increase in adipophillin levels and restored PPAR gamma activity...... in epithelial cells from inflamed mucosa in vitro. Rosiglitazone enema treatment was well tolerated and reduced the Mayo ulcerative colitis score from 8.9 to 4.3 (P ... gamma activation in vivo. CONCLUSIONS: Roziglitasone enemas improve impaired PPAR gamma activity in inflamed colonic epithelium and have beneficial clinical effect in patients with active distal ulcerative colitis. These findings raise interest in further studies of PPAR gamma ligands that exhibit...

  8. Gamma radiation and HZE treatment of seedlings in Arabidopsis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Plants exhibit a robust transcriptional response to gamma radiation which includes the induction of transcripts required for homologous recombination and the...

  9. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott; Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W.; Sloan, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm). A

  10. Comparative effects of gamma irradiation and ozone treatment on hygienic quality of Korean red ginseng powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Myung-Woo; Yook, Hong-Sun; Kang, Il-Jun; Chung, Cha-Kwon; Kwon, Joong-Ho; Choi, Kang-Ju

    1998-06-01

    For the purpose of improving hygienic quality of Korean red ginseng powder, the comparative effects of gamma irradiation and ozone treatment on the microbial and physicochemical properties were investigated. Gamma irradiation at 7.5 kGy resulted in sterilization of total aerobic bacteria, molds and coliforms below detective levels, while ozone treatment for 8 hours up to 18 ppm did not sufficiently eliminate the microorganisms of the red ginseng powder. Physicochemical properties including compositions of the red ginseng saponin (ginsenosides) and fatty acids, pH and hydrogen donating activity were not significantly changed by gamma irradiation, whereas, ozone treatment caused significant changes in fatty acid compositions, TBA value, pH, acidity and hydrogen donating activity. The results from this study led us to conclude that gamma irradiation was more effective than ozone treatment both for the improvement of hygienic quality and for the maintenance of physicochemical quality of red ginseng powder.

  11. Gamma radiation and ems treatment of black cumin cultivars for mutational bioassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, P.K.; Bhowmik, G.

    1997-01-01

    Ten different types of chlorophyll mutations were induced in two cultivars of black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) after gamma irradiation and EMS treatment. Mutation frequency was proportional to dose for gamma rays, but not for EMS. Higher doses of gamma rays and lower concentration/duration of EMS were most efficient. Difference in the response of both cultivars due to mutagenic treatment indicate variation in the genetic architecture of the two cultivars. Origin and use of black cumin cultivars for mutagen bioassays studies are discussed

  12. gamma delta T lymphocytes and their V gamma 9 and V delta 2 receptor expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of active tuberculosis patients before and after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruwatari, N

    2000-01-01

    It has been reported that gamma delta T cells are activated by bacterial infection, and the cells act in an antibacterial manner. We investigated the immunologic role of gamma delta T cells and their receptors in tuberculosis (TB) patients. We examined gamma delta T cells which express receptors composed of V gamma 9 or V delta 2 chains before and after anti-TB chemotherapy, in vitro changes in T cell receptor expression due to stimulation, and the relationship between the proliferative capability of gamma delta T cells and the clinical data before treatment (10 TB patients and 9 healthy volunteers). The ratio of V gamma 9-positive cells to gamma delta T cells decreased significantly in the 10 TB patients before treatment (p delta 9-positive cells had a significantly increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p gamma 9- and V delta 2-positive gamma delta T cells (p gamma 9-positive cells together with their growth index might help to further elucidate the disease process in patients with pulmonary TB.

  13. Quality assurance for gamma knives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, E.D.; Banks, W.W.; Fischer, L.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This report describes and summarizes the results of a quality assurance (QA) study of the Gamma Knife, a nuclear medical device used for the gamma irradiation of intracranial lesions. Focus was on the physical aspects of QA and did not address issues that are essentially medical, such as patient selection or prescription of dose. A risk-based QA assessment approach was used. Sample programs for quality control and assurance are included. The use of the Gamma Knife was found to conform to existing standards and guidelines concerning radiation safety and quality control of external beam therapies (shielding, safety reviews, radiation surveys, interlock systems, exposure monitoring, good medical physics practices, etc.) and to be compliant with NRC teletherapy regulations. There are, however, current practices for the Gamma Knife not covered by existing, formalized regulations, standards, or guidelines. These practices have been adopted by Gamma Knife users and continue to be developed with further experience. Some of these have appeared in publications or presentations and are slowly finding their way into recommendations of professional organizations.

  14. Quality assurance for gamma knives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.D.; Banks, W.W.; Fischer, L.E.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes and summarizes the results of a quality assurance (QA) study of the Gamma Knife, a nuclear medical device used for the gamma irradiation of intracranial lesions. Focus was on the physical aspects of QA and did not address issues that are essentially medical, such as patient selection or prescription of dose. A risk-based QA assessment approach was used. Sample programs for quality control and assurance are included. The use of the Gamma Knife was found to conform to existing standards and guidelines concerning radiation safety and quality control of external beam therapies (shielding, safety reviews, radiation surveys, interlock systems, exposure monitoring, good medical physics practices, etc.) and to be compliant with NRC teletherapy regulations. There are, however, current practices for the Gamma Knife not covered by existing, formalized regulations, standards, or guidelines. These practices have been adopted by Gamma Knife users and continue to be developed with further experience. Some of these have appeared in publications or presentations and are slowly finding their way into recommendations of professional organizations

  15. Structural evolution of defective graphene under heat treatment and gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifei; Shi, Jie; Chen, Cheng; Li, Nan; Xu, Zhiwei; Liu, Liangsen; Zhao, Lihuan; Li, Jing; Jing, Miaolei

    2018-03-01

    We have studied the structural change of defective graphene built by annealing in different temperature under the condition of gamma irradiation. Firstly, we found the heat treatment not only reduced but also striped the graphene. This behavior made defects become more firstly and then become less with the increase of temperature. And then gamma irradiation removed some oxygen-containing groups, by a simultaneous changed over carbon in the graphitic lattice from sp3 to sp2. Also, the gamma irradiation decreased the interlayer spacing between graphene lowest to 3.391 Å and made a crosslink which resulting in the size of the ordered gaining. A variation was detected by Raman spectroscopy that the amorphous carbon was declined after gamma irradiation. Furtherly we found the degree of this decline raised first and then diminished with the increase in the number of defects. The change in repair capacity of gamma irradiation presented a strategy for repairing the defects of graphene.

  16. The effect of CyberKnife therapy on pulmonary function tests used for treating non-small cell lung cancer: a retrospective, observational cohort pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Rishi; Saluja, Paramveer; Pham, Angela; Ledbetter, Karen; Bains, Sukhveer; Varghese, Seema; Clements, John; Kim, Young H

    2012-01-01

    The current standard for treating operable early stage non-small cell lung cancer is surgical resection and for inoperable cases it is external beam radiotherapy. Lung functions are adversely affected with both the above treatments. CyberKnife treatment limits radiation damage by tracking targets moving with each breath. The effect of CyberKnife treatment on pulmonary function tests has not been well documented. Lung cancer patients who underwent CyberKnife treatment and had pre- and post-treatment pulmonary function tests were included. Paired t-tests were conducted. We also conducted subgroup analysis. Thirty-seven patients were included. Median age was 73 years. No statistical difference between mean pre- and post-CyberKnife pulmonary function tests was found. We observed that CyberKnife better preserves lung function status compared to current standards of care. It has shown to have very minimal side effects

  17. An evaluation of the use of gamma radiation in sewage treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonhote, P.A.; Clouston, J.G.; Ford, G.W.K.; Gregory, J.N.

    1974-12-01

    Literature evaluating the potential use of gamma radiation for the treatment of sewage is critically reviewed. It is concluded that irradiation treatment cannot contribute significantly to the improvement of conventional processes for sewage water recovery. Irradiation methods at present have no cost or technical advantage, and no proven biological advantage over known treatment systems. (author)

  18. Orbitocerebral injury by a knife: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okay, O; Dağlioğlu, E; Ozdol, C; Uckun, O; Dalgic, A; Ergungor, F

    2009-10-01

    Orbital penetrating injuries may cause significant harm to the optic nerves and eyeball as well as to the brain and cerebral vessels. Management of orbital foreign bodies should include prompt recognition of the extent of the injury, broad-spectrum parenteral antibiotics, tetanus prophylaxis, anticonvulsant medication and early surgical intervention under direct vision to remove the foreign body and to avoid immediate and long-term complications. We report a penetrating orbital injury caused by a bread knife that extended from the orbit to the tegmental dura mater of the temporal bone. The knife's main trajectory coursed through the temporal lobe. Adjacent cerebral structures were explored before removal of the knife.

  19. Decreasing of the detection limit for gamma-ray Spectrometry with the influence of sample treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, M.; Sadighzadeh, A.; Asgharizadeh, F.; Sardari, D.; Tavassoli, A.; Arbabi, A.; Hochaghani, O.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: In this study the ash method has been applied for environmental sample treatment in order to decrease of the detection limit in gamma-ray spectrometry for low level radioactivity measurements. Detection limit in gamma ray spectrometry is the smallest expectation value of the net counting rate that can be detected on given probabilities. The environmental test samples have been changed into ash using a suitable oven. The heating were made under controlled temperature to avoid the escape of some radionuclides such as radiocaesium. The ash samples were measured by high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry system. (author)

  20. Effects of gamma irradiation as a quarantine treatment on development of codling moth larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burditt, A.K. Jr.; Moffitt, H.R.; Hungate, F.P.

    1985-03-01

    Codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), larvae were exposed to gamma radiation at doses upto 160 Gy. Following irradiation the larvae were permited further development, pupation and adult emergence. The number of adults emerging, mature larvae and pupae present were determined. Data from these studies will be used to predict doses of gamma irradiation required as a quarantine treatment to prevent emergence of codling moth adults from fruit infested by larvae. 5 refs., 1 tab

  1. Effects of gamma irradiation as a quarantine treatment on development of codling moth larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burditt, A.K. Jr.; Moffitt, H.R.; Hungate, F.P.

    1985-03-01

    Codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), larvae were exposed to gamma radiation at doses upto 160 Gy. Following irradiation the larvae were permited further development, pupation and adult emergence. The number of adults emerging, mature larvae and pupae present were determined. Data from these studies will be used to predict doses of gamma irradiation required as a quarantine treatment to prevent emergence of codling moth adults from fruit infested by larvae. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Albanian thikë 'knife'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric P. Hamp

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available In the volume of essays Languages and Areas: Studies presented to George V. Bobrinskoy (Chicago 1967 66--9, I struggled to find cognates and an Inda-European background for the obviously inherited Albanian thike, which is the ordinary word for a knife. I was exploring, without finding anything anything conclusive, the possibili­ ties of Indo-Iranian. It seemed to me then, and it still does, that lndo-Iranian assures us of an etymon *kika. 'sand, ravel'; I preferred then, in consideration of śitá- = Lat. catus etc., to trace this to *kǝ-kā., a zero-grade of*kō- (= *k'eH -, rather than to *ki-kā. I further discussed the problems and limitations of the Albanian vocalism and of a suffix in -k-.

  3. System and method for dose verification and gamma ray imaging in ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailescu, Lucian

    2017-12-26

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to ion beam therapy. In one aspect, a system includes a position sensitive detector and a collimator. The position sensitive detector configured to detect gamma rays generated by an ion beam interacting with a target. The collimator is positioned between the target and the position sensitive detector. The collimator includes a plurality of knife-edge slits, with a first knife-edge slit intersecting with a second knife-edge slit.

  4. Synergistic effect of green tea EGCG treatment with gamma radiation in leukemia cell necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hong Soo; Kim, Jae Man

    2006-01-01

    During cancer therapy, gamma-ray irradiation and treatment of anti-cancer chemicals destroy the normal cells as well as cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of epigallocathechin-gallate (EGCG) extracted from green tea, which is known to have anti-cancer and anti-oxident activities, in order to find out the feasible method to protect the normal cells and to kill the cancer cells efficiently. We investigated the effect of EGCG on the leukemia cell growth and cell necrosis, especially when treated along with gamma radiation. The EGCG inhibited the leukemia cell, HL-60, growth at the appropriate concentration while it exhibited no influence on the normal cell growth. More significantly, it enhanced leukemia cell necrosis when its treatment was combined with gamma irradiation. Simultaneous treatment of EGCG and gamma radiation increased leukemia cell necrosis up to 35% compared with separate treatments. These results suggest that drinking of green tea or co-treatment of EGCG during gamma irradiation therapy may result in better prognosis through enhancement of the tumor cell necrosis and protection of the normal cells

  5. Plan delivery quality assurance for CyberKnife: Statistical process control analysis of 350 film-based patient-specific QAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellec, J; Delaby, N; Jouyaux, F; Perdrieux, M; Bouvier, J; Sorel, S; Henry, O; Lafond, C

    2017-07-01

    Robotic radiosurgery requires plan delivery quality assurance (DQA) but there has never been a published comprehensive analysis of a patient-specific DQA process in a clinic. We proposed to evaluate 350 consecutive film-based patient-specific DQAs using statistical process control. We evaluated the performance of the process to propose achievable tolerance criteria for DQA validation and we sought to identify suboptimal DQA using control charts. DQAs were performed on a CyberKnife-M6 using Gafchromic-EBT3 films. The signal-to-dose conversion was performed using a multichannel-correction and a scanning protocol that combined measurement and calibration in a single scan. The DQA analysis comprised a gamma-index analysis at 3%/1.5mm and a separate evaluation of spatial and dosimetric accuracy of the plan delivery. Each parameter was plotted on a control chart and control limits were calculated. A capability index (Cpm) was calculated to evaluate the ability of the process to produce results within specifications. The analysis of capability showed that a gamma pass rate of 85% at 3%/1.5mm was highly achievable as acceptance criteria for DQA validation using a film-based protocol (Cpm>1.33). 3.4% of DQA were outside a control limit of 88% for gamma pass-rate. The analysis of the out-of-control DQA helped identify a dosimetric error in our institute for a specific treatment type. We have defined initial tolerance criteria for DQA validations. We have shown that the implementation of a film-based patient-specific DQA protocol with the use of control charts is an effective method to improve patient treatment safety on CyberKnife. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of treatment modality on the hypothalamic-pituitary function of patients treated with radiation therapy for pituitary adenomas: Hypothalamic dose and endocrine outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eElson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Both fractionated external beam radiotherapy and single fraction radiosurgery for pituitary adenomas are associated with the risk of hypothalamic-pituitary (HP axis dysfunction.Objective: To analyze the effect of treatment modality (Linac, TomoTherapy, or Gamma Knife on hypothalamic dose and correlate these with HP-Axis deficits after radiotherapy.Methods:Radiation plans of patients treated postoperatively for pituitary adenomas using Linac-based 3D Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT (n=11, TomoTherapy-based Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT (n=10, or Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS(n=12 were retrospectively reviewed. Dose to the hypothalamus was analyzed and postradiotherapy hormone function including growth hormone (GH, thyroid (TSH, adrenal (ACTH, prolactin (PRL, and gonadotropins (FSH/LH were assessed. Results:Post-radiation, 13 of 27 (48% patients eligible for analysis developed at least one new hormone deficit, of which 8 of 11 (72% occurred in the Linac group, 4 of 8 (50% occurred in the TomoTherapy group, and 1 of 8 (12.5% occurred in the Gamma Knife group. Compared with fractionated techniques, Gamma Knife showed improved hypothalamic sparing for DMax Hypo, and V12Gy. For fractionated modalities, TomoTherapy showed improved dosimetric characteristics over Linac-based treatment with hypothalamic DMean (44.8 Gy vs. 26.8 Gy p=0.02, DMax (49.8 Gy vs. 39.1 Gy p=0.04, and V12Gy (100% vs. 76% p=0.004.Conclusion:Maximal dosimetric avoidance of the hypothalamus was achieved using Gamma Knife-based radiosurgery followed by TomoTherapy-based IMRT, and Linac-based 3D conformal radiation therapy, respectively.

  7. Gamma synchrony: towards a translational biomarker for the treatment resistant symptoms of schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandal, Michael J.; Edgar, J. Christopher; Klook, Kerstin; Siegel, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    The lack of efficacy for antipsychotics with respect to negative symptoms and cognitive deficits is a significant obstacle for the treatment of schizophrenia. Developing new drugs to target these symptoms requires appropriate neural biomarkers that can be investigated in model organisms, be used to track treatment response, and provide insight into pathophysiological disease mechanisms. A growing body of evidence indicates that neural oscillations in the gamma frequency range (30–80 Hz) are disturbed in schizophrenia. Gamma synchrony has been shown to mediate a host of sensory and cognitive functions, including perceptual encoding, selective attention, salience, and working memory – neurocognitive processes that are dysfunctional in schizophrenia and largely refractory to treatment. This review summarizes the current state of clinical literature with respect to gamma band responses (GBRs) in schizophrenia, focusing on resting and auditory paradigms. Next, preclinical studies of schizophrenia that have investigated gamma band activity are reviewed to gain insight into neural mechanisms associated with these deficits. We conclude that abnormalities in gamma synchrony are ubiquitous in schizophrenia and likely reflect an elevation in baseline cortical gamma synchrony (‘noise’) coupled with reduced stimulus-evoked GBRs (‘signal’). Such a model likely reflects hippocampal and cortical dysfunction, as well as reduced glutamatergic signaling with downstream GABAergic deficits, but is probably less influenced by dopaminergic abnormalities implicated in schizophrenia. Finally, we propose that analogous signal-to-noise deficits in the flow of cortical information in preclinical models are useful targets for the development of new drugs that target the treatment-resistant symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:21349276

  8. Treatment of trochanteric fractures using the Gamma nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botnaru V.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study on 2 years and 4 months (April 2012 - August 2014 on 430 patients admitted with trochanteric fractures in our Clinic. The surgical indications depended on the patients age, degree of osteoporosis, level activity, associated pathologies and the anatomo-clinical particularity of the fractures. The fractures were operated with gamma nail. The surgery was done in the first 24-72 hours, patients were followed clinically and radiographically at 2, 4, 6 months postoperative. The age of the patients were between 28-95 years, female sex was predominant in 65% of case. It was reported a case of a fracture produced intraoperatory during progression of the nail, 11 bronhopulmonary complications, 5 phlebitis, 7 cases of hematoma after surgery, a case of pseudarthrosis with loosening of implant and 4 dead. There were no septic complications. Fractures consolidate within 12- 14 weeks. The results were appreciated according to fracture reduction, stability of implant, consolidation time and possibility of walking and weight bearing on operated limb.

  9. Gamma irradiation as a quarantine treatment for sweet cherries against Queensland fruit fly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jessup, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The quality of 'Ron's Seedling', 'American Bing', and 'Lambert' sweet cherry drupes was not affected by irradiation doses up to 300 to 1000 gray. Peduncle discoloration increased in 'Ron's Seedling' cherries when irradiated at 600 and 1000 gray. A dose of 75 gray prevented adult eclosion of more than 1300 Queensland fruit fly (Dacus tryoni, Froggatt). Larvae treated at the third instar were the least susceptible to gamma irradiation. The results indicated that gamma irradiation is a feasible quarantine treatment against D. tryoni without impairment to the quality of cherries

  10. Combination treatment of gamma radiation and paraben in controlling spoilage of poultry meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, N.D.; Rege, D.V.

    1977-01-01

    With a view of controlling spoilage, combination treatment of poultry meat with gamma radiation and a chemical preservative has been investigated. Raw poultry pieces of about 25 g. weight were dipped in 0.1% propyl-paraben solution for two hours and were given a 0.1 Mrad dose from 60 Co gamma radiation. It was found that paraben was not affected by irradiation. The flavour evaluation scores indicated the shelf-life of poultry meat was prolonged by a couple of days as compared to untreated controls in refrigerated storage. (M.G.B.)

  11. Synergistic effect of the combined treatment with gamma irradiation and sodium dichloroisocyanurate to control gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) on paprika

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Minchul; Jung, Koo; Lee, Kwang-Youll; Jeong, Je-Yong; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Hae-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) is one of the most major fungal pathogens in paprika. Generally, gamma irradiation over 1 kGy is effective for the control of fungal pathogens; however, a significant change in fruit quality (physical properties) on paprika was shown from gamma irradiation at over 0.6 kGy (p<0.05). Therefore, in this study, the synergistic disinfection effect of the combined treatment with gamma irradiation and sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) was investigated to reduce the gamma irradiation dose. In an artificial inoculation experiment of B. cinerea isolated from naturally-infected postharvest paprika, fungal symptoms were observed in the stem and exocarp of paprika after conidial inoculation. From the sensitivity of gamma irradiation and NaDCC, B. cinerea conidia were fully inactivated by 4 kGy of gamma irradiation (D 10 value 0.99 kGy), and were fully inactivated by 50 ppm NaDCC treatment. The fungal symptoms were not detected by the dose-dependent gamma irradiation (>4 kGy) and NaDCC (>50 ppm). As a result of the combined treatment of gamma irradiation and NaDCC, the D 10 value was significantly reduced by 1.06, 0.88, 0.77, and 0.58 kGy (p<0.05). Moreover, fungal symptoms were more significantly reduced in combined treatment groups (gamma irradiation and NaDCC) than single treatment groups (gamma irradiation or NaDCC). These results suggest that combined treatment with irradiation and NaDCC treatment can be applied to preserve quality of postharvest paprika or other fruits. - Highlights: • Paprikas were treated with irradiation and NaDCC to control gray mold. • We confirmed that the combined treatment was synergistically affected. • The treatment can contribute to a reduction of postharvest losses caused by fungi. • This combined treatment can also reduce the doses of irradiation

  12. Treatment of Prostate Cancer Cells (DU145) with Gamma-Ray Radiation and Silver Nano Particles

    OpenAIRE

    A.R. Shams; S. Ebrahimi; A. Shamusi; Sh. Pahlevan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in America which causing great harm and waste cost. Furthermore almost more prostate cancer treatments are ineffective.  Purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of therapy and the rate of increase of the absorbed dose of gamma radiation with silver nano particles in treatment of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: DU145 cell line originating from Human prostate cancer was purchased from Pasteur Institute. Afte...

  13. Comparing effects of washing, thermal treatments and gamma irradiation on quality of spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farag Zaied, S.E.A.; Aziz, N.H.; Ali, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Samples of 5 selected spices, black pepper (Piper nigrum), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), coriander (Coriandrum sativum) and anise (Pimpinella anisum) seeds, and turmeric (Curcuma longa) rhizomes, obtained from the local market, were washed with pure tap water then dried at room temperature, subjected to a thermal treatment at 70 degrees C for 15 minutes or exposed to a gamma radiation source (5.0 or 10 kGy). The treatments were evaluated using microbiological and chemical studies

  14. Genome wide gene expression analysis of macrophages from ankylosing spondylitis patients under interferon-gamma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H; Ye, B; Wei, Q; Zhu, X D

    2013-10-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common and highly heritable arthropathy, but the pathogenesis of which is poorly understood, especially the mechanisms in genomics. Our work is aim to study the mechanisms of AS in genomics. we used microarray dataset GSE11886 from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). According to our GSEA approach on the microarray datasets related to AS, we have identified the significantly associated pathways with this disease respectively dependent and independent to the factor of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). As a result, we have identified 9 most significant pathways in the comparison of AS patients to control under none treatment, including 5 up-regulated and 4 down-regulated pathways in IFN-gamma-independent study. On the contrary, 11 most significantly up-regulated pathways such as renin-angiotensin system, O-Glycan biosynthesis and gap junction in the comparison of AS patients to control under the treatment of IFN in IFN-gamma-dependent study. These may be helpful for understanding the mechanisms of AS regulation under interferon-gamma treatment in genome wide.

  15. Mantle treatment of Hodkin's disease with 60Co gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svahn-Tapper, G.

    1979-01-01

    60 Co mantle beams were used in the radiation treatment of patients| with Hodgkin's disease. A technique using beam-flattening filters is described. The dosimetry was based on dose plans drawn up manually for each patient. The good dosimetric accuracy of the method was verified by in vivo measurements of absorbed dose at the oesophagi of 60 patients. Split-course treatment with 40 Gy was given in 27 fractions over 71 days. Results and side-effects in 90 patients are analyzed. The local recurrence rate was 3 %. (author)

  16. Application of Induced Mutation by Using Gamma Ray Treatment in Study Breeding for Orchid (Phalaenopsis) Varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do Khac Thinh; Nguyen Thanh Huyen; Pham Duc Tuan; Ngo Thi Bich

    2011-01-01

    Aim to breed new orchid varieties adapted to climate of Vietnam for domestic use and export, national orchid breeding program has been established for some years. In our study, application of induced mutation by using 60 Co. gamma ray treatment was set up to breed new varieties of Phalaenopsis orchid. Different dosages of 60 Co. gamma rays were 0, 20, 40, 60, 100 Gy doses with dose rate of 90 Gy/h. Three years after radiation treatment, result showed that the use of 60 Co. gamma rays for treatment had conspicuously influenced to growth, mutation frequencies in morphological and physiological traits of Phalaenopsis varieties. Survival rate and growth vigor of treated plants reduced while total variation ratio increased by higher doses. The useful variations were the highest in 20 Gy and next to 40 Gy radiation treatments. In this study, LD 50 dose in radiation treatment for Phalaenopsis orchid variety was at dose 40 Gy. Suitable doses in radiation treatment which made wide diversity for Phalaenopsis orchid was at doses 20-40 Gy. At present, selected Phalaenopsis lines are being conducted to research segregating mutated traits, mutation frequencies in inbred Phalaenopsis lines and multiplication of promising mutant lines. (author)

  17. Interferon-gamma treatment kinetics among patients with active ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is essential for defence against Mycobacterium tuberculosis; however, levels in patients with active tuberculosis (TB) and changes during treatment have not been documented in our tuberculosis patients in Nigeria, hence this study has been carried out. Objective: To determine variations, ...

  18. Synergistic effect of the combined treatment with gamma irradiation and sodium dichloroisocyanurate to control gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) on paprika

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Minchul; Jung, Koo; Lee, Kwang-Youll; Jeong, Je-Yong; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Hae-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) is one of the most major fungal pathogens in paprika. Generally, gamma irradiation over 1 kGy is effective for the control of fungal pathogens; however, a significant change in fruit quality (physical properties) on paprika was shown from gamma irradiation at over 0.6 kGy (pcinerea isolated from naturally-infected postharvest paprika, fungal symptoms were observed in the stem and exocarp of paprika after conidial inoculation. From the sensitivity of gamma irradiation and NaDCC, B. cinerea conidia were fully inactivated by 4 kGy of gamma irradiation (D10 value 0.99 kGy), and were fully inactivated by 50 ppm NaDCC treatment. The fungal symptoms were not detected by the dose-dependent gamma irradiation (>4 kGy) and NaDCC (>50 ppm). As a result of the combined treatment of gamma irradiation and NaDCC, the D10 value was significantly reduced by 1.06, 0.88, 0.77, and 0.58 kGy (p<0.05). Moreover, fungal symptoms were more significantly reduced in combined treatment groups (gamma irradiation and NaDCC) than single treatment groups (gamma irradiation or NaDCC). These results suggest that combined treatment with irradiation and NaDCC treatment can be applied to preserve quality of postharvest paprika or other fruits.

  19. Er:YAG Laser Versus Cold Knife Excision in the Treatment of Nondysplastic Oral Lesions: A Randomized Comparative Study for the Postoperative Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broccoletti, Roberto; Cafaro, Adriana; Gambino, Alessio; Romagnoli, Ercole; Arduino, Paolo Giacomo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to estimate the effects of Erbium substituted: Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Er:YAG) laser, compared with traditional scalpel, on the early postoperative sequelae of nondysplastic oral lesion removal. There is limited evidence that laser surgery could exhibit advantages over scalpel in oral mucosal surgery. The investigators studied a cohort of 344 patients; 394 lesions were randomized and treated. Outcome statistically evaluated variables were: age, gender, the site and size of investigated lesions, visual analogue score (VAS) of pain, the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP-14) and the Quality of Life test (QOL), and number of analgesics taken in the 1st week after surgery. Significant differences were found if considering the surgical time, VAS, and QOL and OHIP-14 questionnaires; regarding those data, the Er:YAG laser appeared to be faster and less painful than traditional scalpel (p < 0.05). For bigger lesions, patients statistically took more painkillers if they had undergone traditional surgery. Considering the site of the treated lesions, Er:YAG laser was less painful, especially in the gingiva and palate (p < 0.05). This is the first randomized controlled surgical trial reported for the management of nondysplastic oral lesions with the use of an Er:YAG laser. With many limitations, the present report identifies significant difference in the immediate postoperative surgical period between the two treatments, meaning that the Er:YAG laser seemed to be less painful, and better accepted by patients, than traditional scalpel.

  20. The Effects of Swedish Knife Model on Students' Understanding of the Digestive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrah Ozsevgec, Lale; Artun, Huseyin; Unal, Melike

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effect of Swedish Knife Model on students' understanding of digestive system. A simple experimental design (pretest-treatment-posttest) was used in the study and internal comparison of the results of the one group was made. The sample consisted of 40 7th grade Turkish students whose ages range from 13 to 15.…

  1. SU-E-J-64: Feasibility Study of Surgical Clips for Fiducial Tracking in CyberKnife System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H; Yoon, J; Lee, E; Cho, S; Park, K; Choi, W; Baek, J; Keum, K; Koom, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the ability of CyberKnife to track surgical clips used as fiducial markers. Methods: The Octavius 1000SRS detector and solid water (RW3) slab phantom were used with motion platform to evaluate the study. The RW3 slab phantom was set up to measure the dose distribution from coronal plane. It consists of 9 plates and the thickness of each plate is 10mm. Among them, one plate was attached with 3 surgical clips, which are orthogonally positioned on outer region of array. The length of attached clip was represented as 1cm on planning CT. The clip plate was placed on the 1000SRS detector and 3 slabs were stacked up on the plate to build the measuring depth. Below the detector, 5 slabs were set. The two-axis motion platform was programmed with 1D sinusoidal movement (20mm peak-to-peak, 3s period) toward superior/inferior and left/right directions to simulate target motion. During delivery, two clips were extracted by two X-ray imagers, which led to translational error correction only. Synchrony was also used for dynamic tracking. After the irradiation, the measured dose distribution of coronal plane was compared with the planar dose distribution calculated by the CyberKnife treatment planning system (Multiplan) for cross verification. The results were assessed by comparing the absolute Gamma (γ) index. Results: The dose distributions measured by the 1000SRS detector were in good agreements with those calculated by Multiplan. In the dosimetric comparison using γ-function criteria based on the distance-to-agreement of 3mm and the local dose difference of 3%, the passing rate with γ- parameter ≤1 was 91% in coronal plane. Conclusion: The surgical clips can be considered as new fiducials for robotic radiosurgery delivery by considering the target margin with less than 5mm

  2. Treatment of the lignocellulosic biomass by the gamma ray and its effect on lignin degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Abdi, Ines

    2009-01-01

    The development of alternative energies requires many research effort, with an aim of exploiting the lignocellulosic biomass. In fact, the stage of pretreatment makes it possible to facilitate the hydrolysis of the cellulose fractions, to give fermentable sugars by yeasts. However, several methods of pretreatment were identified, among them the treatment by the gamma rays. In this context, we have studied initially the effect of the gamma irradiation on the lignin degradation and on second place we added to the irradiation the treatment by dilute acid in order to optimize the rate of sugars. Thus, from 20 KGy there is a good degradation of lignins to give polyphenols components for about 4 Mg per gram of vegetable matter. However, the irradiation with 100KGy plus the acid treatment 1% has made possible to release 80% of fermentable sugars. (Author)

  3. Treatment of Prostate Cancer Cells (DU145 with Gamma-Ray Radiation and Silver Nano Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Shams

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in America which causing great harm and waste cost. Furthermore almost more prostate cancer treatments are ineffective.  Purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of therapy and the rate of increase of the absorbed dose of gamma radiation with silver nano particles in treatment of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: DU145 cell line originating from Human prostate cancer was purchased from Pasteur Institute. After thawing of defreezed samples, cells were incubated with DMEM medium and 15% FBS Confluency FBS serum was added. For preventing contamination amphotericin B in 25 μM/ml was added. Cells were incubated over a period of 3 to 5 days to reach a good Confluency Then cells divided into 4 groups . Tentatively assigned to the control group, the second experimental group treated with gamma irradiation at a doses of 2, 6 and 10 Gy, the third group treated with 53 μg/ml م g/mlµ 53 silver nano particles. The fourth group includes simultaneous treatment with gamma doses and silver nano particle.انکوبه و Cell groups studied by staining with trypan blue as well as by MTT assay (ELISA reader. Results: The results showed the use of gamma rays and silver nano particles caused a significant reduction in the number of cancer cells in the treated groups compared to the other treatment groups and a control group. Using of silver nano particles as a radio sensitizer and radiation therapy in prostate cancer cell lines DU145 resulted in the increase of the gamma-ray photon energies of 6 and 10 Gy. Discussion: The gamma photon radiation to the tumor cells were incubated nano particle probability Photoelectric process as a process when handling the extremely high energy gamma photons hitting the silver nano particles to cancer cells, photoelectron and Auger electrons (Auger Electrons and secondary electrons produced by secondary particles can be. It will not be very effective

  4. The SKED: speckle knife edge detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpies, S D; Light, R A; Achamfuo-Yeboah, S O; Clark, M; Somekh, M G

    2014-01-01

    The knife edge detector—also known as optical beam deflection—is a simple and robust method of detecting ultrasonic waves using a laser. It is particularly suitable for detection of high frequency surface acoustic waves as the response is proportional to variation of the local tilt of the surface. In the case of a specular reflection of the incident laser beam from a smooth surface, any lateral movement of the reflected beam caused by the ultrasonic waves is easily detected by a pair of photodiodes. The major disadvantage of the knife edge detector is that it does not cope well with optically rough surfaces, those that give a speckled reflection. The optical speckles from a rough surface adversely affect the efficiency of the knife edge detector, because 'dark' speckles move synchronously with 'bright' speckles, and their contributions to the ultrasonic signal cancel each other out. We have developed a new self-adapting sensor which can cope with the optical speckles reflected from a rough surface. It is inelegantly called the SKED—speckle knife edge detector—and like its smooth surface namesake it is simple, cheap, compact, and robust. We describe the theory of its operation, and present preliminary experimental results validating the overall concept and the operation of the prototype device

  5. Gamma-radiosurgery of angiographically occult vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kida, Yoshihisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Takayuki; Oyama, Hirofumi; Iwakoshi, Takayasu

    1995-01-01

    Since the installation of Gamma-knife, we have treated 26 cases of AOVM (angiographically occult vascular malformations), who had enough follow-up period more than 12 months. There were 16 males and 10 females, whose ages ranged from 3 to 58 years with an average of 32.7. Their clinical presentations at the onset were hemorrhage in 17, seizure in 7, and progressive neurological deficits in 2. Three cases had multiple lesions of AOVM. Among 26 symptomatic lesions, 15 were located supratentorially, 7 in brain stem and 4 in cerebellar hemisphere. AOVMs were treated with radiosurgery at the marginal doses between 15 to 20 Gy (mean 17.9 Gy). Follow-up studies revealed a rebleeding in one after the treatment in the mean follow-up period of 17.7 months. Among 7 cases presented with seizure, 5 were improved and the other 2 showed no change. Imaging studies with MRI showed a major shrinkage in 1, minor shrinkage in 7, and no obvious change in 18. Symptomatic perifocal edema occurred in 5 (19.2%), especially those who were treated at the marginal dose more than 18 Gy. In conclusion our preliminary clinical results indicate that the radiosurgery with Gamma-knife has positive effects to prevent the rebleeding and to control the seizures associated with symptomatic AOVMs. (author)

  6. Hematological and histopathological changes in female albino rats after gamma irradiation and /or piper nigrum treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.E.; Hanna, L.S.; Khattab, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effect of whole body gamma irradiation, at dose level of 6.0 Gy (single dose), and or daily treatment with P. nigrum (black pepper) at doses of 160 and 320 mg/kg body weight up to 36, 71 and 99 days on some hematological aspects as well as histopathological changes in lung, kidney and brain tissues of female albino rats. The results revealed that whole body gamma irradiation significantly elevated the values of red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs) and hematocrit percentage (HC %) but hemoglobin level was significantly decreased. These changes were ameliorated after treatment with P. nigrum. Non-significant changes were obtained regarding the effect of both doses of P. nigrum on red and white blood cell counts throughout the three time intervals. However, a dose of 160 mg/kg body weight of P. nigrum significantly reduced the hemoglobin contents throughput the experimental period. Histopathological examination revealed that lung, kidney and brain tissues showed marked to moderate pathological changes after irradiation and/or P.nigrum treatments. However, treatment with P. nigrum showed positive effect against the harmful effects of gamma irradiation, concerning kidney and brain. Although no malignant transformation could be detected, the resultant marked alveolar inflammation, bronchial wall hyperplasia and reactive astrocytic proliferation are important pathological changes that should be considered as pre-neoplastic changes

  7. Sterilization of ready-to-cook Bibimbap by combined treatment with gamma irradiation for space food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Nam; Song, Beom-Seok; Kim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Jong-il; Sung, Nak-Yun; Han, In-Jun; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2012-08-01

    Bibimbap, Korean traditional cooked rice mixed with various kinds of vegetables, together with mushrooms and a ground meat, and seasoned with red pepper paste, was developed as a ready-to-cook food by combined treatment with irradiation for the use in space. By gamma irradiation of 25 kGy, the total aerobic bacteria of Bibimbap that was initial by 6.3 log CFU/g decreased to below detection limit, but its sensory qualities were drastically decreased. To enhance the sensory quality, the effects of antioxidant in Bibimbap were evaluated. A treatment with 0.1% of vitamin C, vacuum packaging and gamma-irradiated at 25 kGy and -70 °C showed higher sensory scores than only the irradiation process. This result indicates that the radiation technology may be useful to produce a variety of space foods with high quality of taste and flavor, when combined with other methods.

  8. Seed yield of Cucurbita maxima Duch. depending on the presowing gamma irradiation and postradiational temperature treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goranov, A.

    1977-01-01

    In field experiments the seed yield of Cucurbita maxima Duch. of the Big White 48/4 cultivar was determined after presowing gamma irradiation with 4000 R and 50000 R and postradiational temperature treatment with 80deg and 90deg in the course of 30 minutes. The presowing gamma irradiation was carried out at the IRI-200O nuclear reactor with dose capacity of 630 R/min (1968 and 1969) and 504 R/min (1970), and the postradiational heating of the seeds in a drying oven at the laboratory. It is established that the presowing gamma radiation with 4000 R stimulates the seed yield of the large-fruited pumpkin (137.06%), and the 50000 R inhibits them (25.50%). The presowing temperature treatment with 80deg and 90deg in the course of 30 minutes is stimulating or indicates tendency towards seed yield stimulation. The postradiational presowing temperature treatment with 80deg and 9Odeg C in the course of 30 minutes of the 4000 R stimulative variant decrease the seed yield stimulation, and with the 50000 R inhibitive variant - repairs or displays tendency towards seed yield reparation. (author)

  9. Effect of gamma radiation and endodontic treatment on mechanical properties of human and bovine root dentin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novais, Veridiana Resende; Soares, Priscilla Barbosa Ferreira; Guimaraes, Carlla Martins; Schliebe, Lais Rani Sales Oliveira; Braga, Stella Sueli Lourenco; Soares, Carlos Jose, E-mail: carlosjsoares@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma radiation and endodontic treatment on the microhardness and flexural strength of human and bovine root dentin. Forty single rooted human teeth and forty bovine incisor teeth were collected, cleaned and stored in distilled water at 4 °C. The human and bovine teeth were divided into 4 groups (n=10) resulting from the combination of two study factors: first, regarding the endodontic treatment in 2 levels: with or without endodontic treatment; and second, radiotherapy in two levels: with or without radiotherapy by 60 Gy of Co-60 gamma radiation fractioned into 2 Gy daily doses five days per week. Each tooth was longitudinally sectioned in two parts; one-half was used for the three-point bending test and the other for the Knoop hardness test (KHN). Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (α=0.05). No significant difference was found for flexural strength values. The human dentin had significantly higher KHN than the bovine. The endodontic treatment and radiotherapy resulted in significantly lower KHN irrespective of tooth origin. The results indicated that the radiotherapy had deleterious effects on the microhardness of human and bovine dentin and this effect is increased by the interaction with endodontic therapy. The endodontic treatment adds additional negative effect on the mechanical properties of radiated tooth dentin; the restorative protocols should be designed taking into account this effect. (author)

  10. Stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of acoustic schwannomas: comparative observations of 125 patients treated at one institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, David W.; Suarez, Oscar; Goldman, H. Warren; Downes, M. Beverly; Bednarz, Greg; Corn, Benjamin W.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Rosenstock, Jeffrey; Curran, Walter J.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and, more recently, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) have been recognized as noninvasive alternatives to surgery for the treatment of acoustic schwannomas. We review our experience of acoustic tumor treatments at one institution using a gamma knife for SRS and the first commercial world installation of a dedicated linac for SRT. Methods: Patients were treated with SRS on the gamma knife or SRT on the linac from October 1994 through August 2000. Gamma knife technique involved a fixed-frame multiple shot/high conformality single treatment, whereas linac technique involved daily conventional fraction treatments involving a relocatable frame, fewer isocenters, and high conformality established by noncoplanar arc beam shaping and differential beam weighting. Results: Sixty-nine patients were treated on the gamma knife, and 56 patients were treated on the linac, with 1 NF-2 patient common to both units. Three patients were lost to follow-up, and in the remaining 122 patients, mean follow-up was 119±67 weeks for SRS patients and 115±96 weeks for SRT patients. Tumor control rates were high (≥97%) for sporadic tumors in both groups but lower for NF-2 tumors in the SRT group. Cranial nerve morbidities were comparably low in both groups, with the exception of functional hearing preservation, which was 2.5-fold higher in patients who received conventional fraction SRT. Conclusion: SRS and SRT represent comparable noninvasive treatments for acoustic schwannomas in both sporadic and NF-2 patient groups. At 1-year follow-up, a significantly higher rate of serviceable hearing preservation was achieved in SRT sporadic tumor patients and may therefore be preferable to alternatives including surgery, SRS, or possibly observation in patients with serviceable hearing

  11. Allogenic bone rods with freeze drying and gamma rays irradiation for treatment of fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zhenbin

    1999-01-01

    Opened reduction and internal fixation are the usual treatment of fracture, but both methods need a second operation for removal implants. The benefits of the bone rods are that they can avoid the removement of internal fixation and will be absorbed spontaneously. The bone rods are made of allogeneic compact bones with freeze-drying and gamma rays irradiation supplied by Shanxi Provincial Tissue Bank. The purpose of this study is to evaluate allograft reaction, the stability of the internal fixation, osteoinduction in the treatment of fracture using allogeneic bone rods with freeze drying and gamma rays irradiation. From May 1997 to May 1998, fourteen cases (male 12, female 2) of treatment were reviewed. The mean age was 37.3 (21-5 1). There were 3 medial malleolus fractures, 7 tibia and fibula fractures, 1 ulna and radius fracture, 1 lateral condyle of humerus fracture. The clinical results were satisfactory. Because the strength of the bone rods are weaker than that of screws, the bone rods are only indicated in the fixation of cancellous bones fracture and unloaded bone fracture. It can be used as a supplementary fixation of loaded bone. It is not indicated for fixation of comminuted fracture. More than two bone rods may be used in the fixation of fracture in order to get stability of the fracture and decrease stress between rods which will prevent the break of the bone rods. Allogeneic bone rods with freeze-drying and gamma rays irradiation can be used as implants of non-immunogenicity. There are no allograft reactions in all cases (including fever, leukocytosis, exudation or swelling in the wound). Although plenty of experimental studies have showed that freeze drying with gamma rays irradiation (below 50 KGy) would not destroy BMP of bone allograft, but there is no osteoinduction in our cases. The healing of a fracture and bridging external callus are similar as other operations. This new technique may have the following advantages compare with the screws: 1

  12. Radiation treatment of herb tea for the reduction of microbial contamination (Flores chamomillae). [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katusin-Razem, B.; Razem, D.; Dvornik, I. (Institut Rudjer Boskovic, Zagreb (Yugoslavia)); Matic, S. (Institute of Public Health of Croatia, Zagreb (Yugoslavia))

    1983-01-01

    A survey of microbiological contamination of dried chamomile flowers indicates the presence of thermophilic bacteria up to the level of 10/sup 4/ per gram. This material often contains insecticides which have been used to reduce post-harvest losses. This work was undertaken in order to study the feasibility of radiation treatment of dried chamomile flowers as the only acceptable process for reduction of microbial contamination and as an alternative to chemical treatment. The main microbial contaminants were identified and typical contamination levels established. Survival curves of the irradiated microflora were obtained as a function of gamma radiation dose. Chemical composition of chamomile oil was followed by spectroscopy, thin layer and gas chromatography. No untoward effects of radiation treatment on active components were found, which indicates the usefulness of radiation treatment of dry flowers.

  13. Interaction of post harvest disease control treatments and gamma irradiation on mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.I.; Cooke, A.W.; Boag, T.S.; Panitz, M.; Sangchote, S.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation and disease control treatments on disease severity and post harvest quality of several mango cultivars were investigated. In mangoes cv. Kensington Pride, irradiation doses ranging from 300-1200 Gy reduced disease, but the level of control was not commercially acceptable. Hot benomyl immediately followed by irradiation provided effective control of anthracnose (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides) and stem end rot (Dothiorella dominicana) during short-term storage (15 days at 20degC). The effects of the two treatments were additive. Satisfactory disease control was achieved during long-term controlled atmosphere storage when mangoes were treated with hot benomyl followed by prochloraz and then irradiated. Effects of fungicide treatment and irradiation were additive. Fungicide, or irradiation treatments alone, were unsatisfactory. Irradiation of cv. Kensington Pride at doses in excess of 600 Gy caused unacceptable surface damage. (author)

  14. Combined treatment of UV and gamma radiation of papaya for decay control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moy, J.H.; McElhaney, T.; Matsuzaki, C.; Piedrahita, C.

    1978-01-01

    An exploratory study was made to determine if combining u.v. and gamma radiation treatment at selective doses would decrease the fungal decay incidence in papaya (Carica papaya L. var. Solo), and thereby increase the marketable life of the fruit. Also studied was the effect of the combined treatment on the spores of Aschochyta spp., Colletotrichium spp. and Phytophthora spp., which are commonly found on papaya grown in Hawaii. This was to test the postulate that the combined treatment would prevent photoreactivation of the disrupted nuclei in microorganisms and lead to eventual death. Experimental results did not indicate a conclusive trend to effectiveness but suggested a number of problems to be resolved before the treatment can become useful in fungal decay control of fruits. (author)

  15. 78 FR 18318 - U.S. Healthcare Trade Mission to Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ..., Cancer treatment devices, Clinical chemistry and laboratory devices, Dental devices, Implants used in..., cardiovascular surgery, cyber knife and gamma knife treatments, ophthalmology, plastic surgery, dental services...

  16. Gamma irradiation as a quarantine treatment for carambolas infested with Caribbean fruit flies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, W.P.; Windeguth, D.L. von

    1991-01-01

    Carambolas infested with the Caribbean fruit fly Anastrepha suspensa (Loew), eggs and larvae were exposed to ionizing gamma radiation. Probit 9 was estimated to be 22.95 Gy (95% fiducial limits 16.68 Gy - 49.73 Gy). Over 100,000 immature A. suspensa infesting carambolas were treated at 50 Gy with no adult survivors. This dose did not cause any observable damage to the fruit. The 50 Gy dose satisfies quarantine requirements for treatment of fruits exposed from fruit fly infested areas. (author) [es

  17. Pharmacological treatment in gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) dependence: Detoxification and relapse prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamal, R.M.; Noorden, M.S. van; Wannet, W.; Beurmanjer, H.; Dijkstra, B.A.G.; Schellekens, A.F.A.

    2017-01-01

    The misuse of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) for recreational purposes has resulted in an increase in GHB-related problems such as intoxications, dependence and withdrawal in several countries in Europe, Australia and the US over the last decade. However, prevalence rates of misuse of GHB and its

  18. Combined treatment of solar energy and gamma irradiation to eliminate pathogenic bacteria in dewatered sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilmy, N.; Harsoyo, S.; Suwirma, S.

    1987-01-01

    Combined treatment of solar energy and gamma irradiation to eliminate pathogenic bacteria in dewatered sludge. A combined treatment of solar energy and gamma irradiation has been done to eliminate the pathogenic microbes contaminating dewatered sludge. Samples were collected during dry season, i.e. from June to September 1985. To reduce the water content from 70% to 20%, solar energy from sun rays was used, i.e. from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. for 4 days. Total bacterial count coliform bacteria Escherichia coli, Fecal Streptococcus, Enterobacteriaceae, and Pseudomonas sp were found to be 7.4x10 8 per g, 4.1x10 3 per g, 4.5x10 2 per g, 3.1x10 5 per g, 3.6x10 4 per g, and 5.4x10 3 per g of samples respectively. The combined treatment could reduce the irradiation dose needed to eliminate the pathogenic microbes of samples investigated from 6 to 2 kGy. (author). 5 figs, 11 refs

  19. Gamma nail in the treatment of closed trochanteric fractures. Results and indications of 121 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, I; Grosse, A; Taglang, G; Favreul, E

    2014-02-01

    The Gamma Nail is the latest advance in the treatment of trochanteric fractures based on intramedullary nailing principles during closed procedures. Its design is based on Küntscher's Y-nail and locking intramedullary (IM) nails. This paper reports the results from the first-ever series of 121 patients operated between 1988 and 1990. They were followed until bone union was achieved. The mean patient age was 75 years. Most patients were in poor general health and had unstable fractures. Anatomical preoperative reduction was achieved in 72% of cases. Fixation was good in 66% of cases and acceptable in 27% of cases. Intra-operative complications consisted of nine fractures without consequences. Of the treated patients, 83.4% resumed weight-bearing during the first week. There was one case of deep infection that resolved with treatment. The mortality rate was 12.3% at three months. We noted 7 alunions in varus, 3 in valgus, 2 in external rotation and 1 in internal rotation. There were no cases of non-union. In six cases, the screw had cut out of the femoral head. The drawbacks associated with surgical treatment methods for trochanteric fractures also apply to the Gamma nail. Nevertheless, one of its primary advantages is the possibility of using a closed procedure. When compared to Ender nailing, knee pain is absent and weight-bearing can be achieved in all patients, no matter the fracture type. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. SU-F-T-649: Dosimetric Evaluation of Non-Coplanar Arc Therapy Using a Novel Rotating Gamma Ray System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldib, A; Chibani, O; Jin, L; Fan, J; Veltchev, I; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mora, G [Universidade de Lisboa, Codex, Lisboa (Portugal); Li, J [Cyber Medical Inc, Xian, Shaanxi (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic intra and extra-cranial body radiation therapy has evolved with advances in treatment accuracy, effective radiation dose, and parameters necessary to maximize machine capabilities. Novel gamma systems with a ring type gantry were developed having the ability to perform oblique arcs. The aim of this study is to explore the dosimetric advantages of this new system. Methods: The rotating Gamma system is named CybeRay (Cyber Medical Corp., Xian, China). It has a treatment head of 16 cobalt-60 sources focused to the isocenter, which can rotate 360° on the ring gantry and swing 35° in the superior direction. Treatment plans were generated utilizing our in-house Monte Carlo treatment planning system. A cylindrical phantom was modeled with 2mm voxel size. Dose inside the cylindrical phantom was calculated for coplanar and non-coplanar arcs. Dosimetric differences between CybeRay cobalt beams and CyberKnife 6MV beams were compared in a lung phantom and for previously treated SBRT patients. Results: The full width at half maxima of cross profiles in the S-I direction for the coplanar setup matched the cone sizes, while for the non-coplanar setup, FWHM was larger by 2mm for a 10mm cone and about 5mm for larger cones. In the coronal and sagittal view, coplanar beams showed elliptical shaped isodose lines, while non-coplanar beams showed circular isodose lines. Thus proper selection of the oblique angle and cone size can aid optimal dose matching to the target volume. Comparing a single 5mm cone from CybeRay to that from CyberKnife showed similar penumbra in a lung phantom but CybeRay had significant lower doses beyond lung tissues. Comparable treatment plans were obtained with CybeRay as that from CyberKnife.ConclusionThe noncoplanar multiple source arrangement of CybeRay will be of great clinical benefits for stereotactic intra and extra-cranial radiation therapy.

  1. Effect of gamma irradiation and its convergent treatment for control of postharvest Botrytis cinerea of cut roses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Eun-Hee; Shin, Eun-Jung; Park, Hae-Jun; Jeong, Rae-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Postharvest diseases cause considerable losses to harvested crops. Among them, gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) is a major problem of exporting to cut rose flowers into Korea. Irradiation treatment is an alternative to phytosanitary purposes and a useful nonchemical approach to the control of postharvest diseases. Gamma irradiation was evaluated for its in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity against B. cinerea on cut rose varieties, 'Shooting Star' and 'Babe'. The irradiating dose required to reduce the population by 90%, D10, was 0.99 kGy. Gamma irradiation showed complete inhibition of spore germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea, especially 4.0 kGy in vitro. Antifungal activity of gamma irradiation on rose B. cinerea is a dose-dependent manner. A significant phytotoxicity such as bent neck in cut rose quality was shown from gamma irradiation at over 0.4 kGy (pcinerea. Intriguingly, only the combined treatment with 0.2 kGy of gamma irradiation and 70 ppm of NaDCC exhibited significant synergistic antifungal activity against blue mold decay in both varieties. Together, these results suggest that a synergistic effect of the combined treatment with gamma irradiation and NaDCC can be efficiently used to control the postharvest diseases in cut rose flowers, and will provide a promising technology for horticulture products for exportation.

  2. Preliminary shielding calculation for the system of CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery; Calculo de blindagem preliminar para o sistema de radiocirurgia robotica CyberKnife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toreti, Dalila; Xavier, Clarice; Moura, Fabio, E-mail: clarice.xavier@rem.ind.b, E-mail: fabio.moura@rem.ind.b [REM Industria e Comercio Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    The CyberKnife robotic system uses a manipulator with six grade of freedom for positioning a 6 MV Linac accelerator for treatment of lesions. This paper presents calculations for a standard room, with 200 cm of thickness walls primary, build for a CyberKnife system, and calculations for a room originally designed for a Linac conventional (with gantry), with secondary barriers of 107 cm thickness. After the realization of shielding for both rooms, the results shown that walls of standard room with 200 cm thickness are adequate for the secondary shield, and for a room with a conventional Linac, from all six evaluated points, two would require additional shielding of nine cm and four cm of concrete with 2.4 g/cubic cm. This shows that the CyberKnife system can be installed in a originally designed room for a conventional Linac with neither restrict nor any shielding, since no incidence of beams on the secondary barriers is existent

  3. Gamma irradiation as a quarantine treatment for spider mites (Acarina: tetranychidae) in horticultural products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatowicz, S.; Banasik-Solgala, K.

    1999-01-01

    The carmine spider mite, Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisd.), and the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch, are closely related species of tetranychid mites (Acarina, Tetranychidae) that respond to gamma irradiation in a similar way. Eggs of both species exposed to gamma radiation early in embryonic development were considerably more susceptible to irradiation than older eggs. The tolerance of eggs to gamma radiation increased in 3-4-day-old eggs, when eye-spots were formed. Nymphs were more resistant to gamma radiation than eggs and larvae. Deteriorative effects of irradiation treatment were reflected in the immatures by their mortality in subsequent developmental stages. A positive relationship between dosage and the percent egg mortality or the mortality of subsequent stages was usually found when the immature stages were irradiated. The sex ratio of adults developed from irradiated eggs, larvae, and nymphs was affected by the irradiation treatment; the ratio was usually skewed towards males. Irradiation of females resulted in increased mortality, lowered fecundity, reduced egg viability, and sex ratio distortion in their progeny. Two-day-old females of the carmine spider mite and the two-spotted spider mite irradiated with 200 or 300 Gy lived as long as the controls. Mortality occurred after 3 weeks. The number of eggs laid by irradiated females of spider mites was considerably lower than in the control, and it decreased as the absorbed dose increased. The higher the dose of gamma radiation applied to adults of the spider mites (the parental generation, P), the higher the mortality of the F1 mites during their embryonic development. Viability of eggs laid by irradiated females of spider mites mated with irradiated males was significantly reduced. Young females treated with a dose of 0.2 kGy produced 40-50% nonviable eggs, while control mites produced only 6.0-6.6% nonviable eggs. A dose of 0.3 kGy caused high mortality of eggs; 88% and 97% nonviable

  4. Application of gamma radiation for the treatment of laboratory animal diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley, F.J.

    1979-01-01

    The use of gamma radiation for the treatment of laboratory animal diets has proved particularly successful. The effective inactivation of microorganisms, insects and parasites etc. is well demonstrated and the absence of adverse effects on the dietary components is inferred from many years of practical use. Adequate packaging of the pelleted diets is essential to avoid recontamination after irradiation; this aspect needs particular attention. The economics of the process are such that it would not be warranted to invest in a 60 Co plant specifically for the treatment of laboratory diets. However, a throughput in the order of 1000 to 1500 tonnes per annum, as estimated to meet UK current demand, can be catered for adequately and economically in a large-scale general service facility. (author)

  5. Application of Gamma Irradiation and Its Convergent Treatments on Several Varieties of Oriental Hybrid Lily to Control Leaf Blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hoon Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to seek more eco-friend, economic and safer quarantine method than current methyl bromide fumigation, the convergent treatment with 200 Gy of gamma irradiation and several chemicals such as nano-siver particles (NSS, sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC was tried on the cuttings of lily in the packing of catonnage box for export. With 6 independent experiments of gamma irradiation on the three lily cultivars, cvs. Siberia, Le reve and Sorbonne, incidence and severity of lily leaf blight was investigated on leaves and petals at 8-d after infection. 200 Gy of gamma irradiation decreased at 13-25% of severity on the leaf of Sorbonne, but it increased at 2-5% of severity on the leaf of Siberia and Le reve. Chemical substitutes such as NSS and NaDCC were not effective to control of lily blight on cuttings. By 200 Gy of gamma irradiation treatment, chlorophyll contents were statistically significantly decreased at 12-d after irradiation and the longevities vaselife of fully open flower of Siberia and Sorbonne were increased at 0.4 to 1.2 days. In addition, the relative fresh weights of the gamma irradiated cuttings were severely dried compared to the non-irradiated control. On the other hands, the symptoms of phyto-toxicity of high dose gamma irradiation at 1 or 2 kGy on cv. Siberia were to be blight at the tip of bloom, bent necks of flower, and delayed the process of flowering.

  6. Effect of Gamma Irradiation and Its Convergent Treatments on Lily Leaf Blight Pathogen, Botrytis elliptica, and the Disease Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hoon Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Gamma irradiation and its convergence with nano-silver particles and sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC were investigated to inhibit germination and mycelial growth of Botrytis elliptica, the pathogen of lily leaf blight. In addition, the same treatments were studied on the process of disease development with detached leaf of lily cv. Siberia. Spray inoculation, which is closer to natural infection than wound inoculation, can be a way to investigate infection ability of the treated pathogen. The irradiating dose required to reduce the population by 90%, D10, was 526 Gy irradiating with 0-2000 Gy gamma ray on the conidial suspension as well as the growing mycelia. Even at 2000 Gy, the mycelium was not killed but just delayed its growth at 1–2 days behind. Convergent treatment with 40 mg/l of NaDCC just before 200 Gy gamma irradiation was the best way to decrease the conidial germination about 1/1000 times. The control values of gamma irradiation were 23% and 19.5% at wound inoculation and spray inoculation, respectively. On wound-inoculation, the control value of NaDCC only was 89%, and that of NaDCC convergent with 200 Gy gamma irradiation was 32%. On sprayinoculation, the highest control value was NaDCC at 50%, and that of NaDCC convergent with gamma irradiation was 24%.

  7. Prostate-specific antigen kinetics after primary stereotactic body radiation therapy using CyberKnife for localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Hyun Park

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: PSA decline occurred rapidly in the first month, and then the rate of PSA decline fell off steadily over time throughout 2 years after treatment. Also, SBRT using CyberKnife leads to long-term favorable BCR-free survival in localized prostate cancer.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of gammaCore (non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation) for acute treatment of episodic cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwamburi, Mkaya; Liebler, Eric J; Tenaglia, Andrew T

    2017-11-01

    Cluster headache is a debilitating disease characterized by excruciatingly painful attacks that affects 0.15% to 0.4% of the US population. Episodic cluster headache manifests as circadian and circannual seasonal bouts of attacks, each lasting 15 to 180 minutes, with periods of remission. In chronic cluster headache, the attacks occur throughout the year with no periods of remission. While existing treatments are effective for some patients, many patients continue to suffer. There are only 2 FDA-approved medications for episodic cluster headache in the United States, while others, such as high-flow oxygen, are used off-label. Episodic cluster headache is associated with comorbidities and affects work, productivity, and daily functioning. The economic burden of episodic cluster headache is considerable, costing more than twice that of nonheadache patients. gammaCore adjunct to standard of care (SoC) was found to have superior efficacy in treatment of acute episodic cluster headaches compared with sham-gammaCore used with SoC in ACT1 and ACT2 trials. However, the economic impact has not been characterized for this indication. We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis of gammaCore adjunct to SoC compared with SoC alone for the treatment of acute pain associated with episodic cluster headache attacks. The model structure was based on treatment of acute attacks with 3 outcomes: failures, nonresponders, and responders. The time horizon of the model is 1 year using a payer perspective with uncertainty incorporated. Parameter inputs were derived from primary data from the randomized controlled trials for gammaCore. The mean annual costs associated with the gammaCore-plus-SoC arm was $9510, and mean costs for the SoC-alone arm was $10,040. The mean quality-adjusted life years for gammaCore-plus-SoC arm were 0.83, and for the SoC-alone arm, they were 0.74. The gammaCore-plus-SoC arm was dominant over SoC alone. All 1-way and multiway sensitivity analyses were cost

  9. Minimally invasive carpal tunnel decompression using the KnifeLight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Peter Y K; Ho, Chi Long

    2007-02-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common condition causing hand pain, dysfunction, and paresthesia. Endoscopic carpal tunnel decompression offers many advantages compared with conventional open surgical decompression. However, it is equipment intensive and requires familiarity with endoscopic surgery. We review a minimally invasive technique to divide the flexor retinaculum by using a new instrument, the KnifeLight (Stryker, Kalamazoo, Michigan), which combines the advantages of the open and endoscopic methods, without the need for endoscopic set-up. Between July 2003 and April 2005, 44 consecutive patients (26 women [59%] and 18 men [36%]), with clinical signs and symptoms, as well as electrodiagnostic findings consistent with carpal tunnel syndrome, who did not respond to non-surgical treatment, underwent the new procedure. All patients were asked about scar hypertrophy, scar tenderness, and pillar pain. The Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ) was used to determine overall hand function, activities of daily living, work performance, pain, aesthetics, and satisfaction with hand function. Other preoperative testing included grip strength and lateral pinch strength. Grip strength was measured using the Jamar hand dynamometer (Asimov Engineering Co., Los Angeles, CA); lateral key pinch was measured using the Jamar hydraulic pinch gauge. Postoperative evaluations were scheduled at 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after the procedure. A small 10-mm incision was made in the wrist crease and a small opening was made at the transverse carpal ligament. The KnifeLight tool was inserted, and the ligament was incised completely. Follow-up evaluations with use of quantitative measurements of grip strength, pinch strength, and hand dexterity were performed at 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Fifty procedures were performed on 22 left hands (44%) and 28 right hands (56%). There were no complications related to the approach. All patients were able to use their hands

  10. Elimination of coliforms and Salmonella spp. in sheep meat by gamma irradiation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Luciana Salles Vasconcelos; da Costa Henry, Fábio; Barbosa, João Batista; Ladeira, Silvania Alves; de Faria Pereira, Silvia Menezes; da Silva Antonio, Isabela Maria; Teixeira, Gina Nunes; Martins, Meire Lelis Leal; de Carvalho Vital, Helio; dos Prazeres Rodrigues, Dália; dos Reis, Eliane Moura Falavina

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the bacteriological effects of the treatment of sheep meat contaminated with total coliforms, coliforms at 45 °C and Salmonella spp. by using irradiation at doses of 3 kGy and 5 kGy. Thirty sheep meat samples were collected from animals located in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, and then grouped in three lots including 10 samples: non-irradiated (control); irradiated with 3 kGy; and irradiated with 5 kGy. Exposure to gamma radiation in a (137)Cs source-driven irradiating facility was performed at the Nuclear Defense Section of the Brazilian Army Technological Center (CTEx) in Rio de Janeiro. The samples were kept under freezing temperature (-18 °C) until the analyses, which occurred in two and four months after irradiation. The results were interpreted by comparison with the standards of the current legislation and demonstrated that non-irradiated samples were outside the parameters established by law for all groups of bacteria studied. Gamma irradiation was effective in inactivating those microorganisms at both doses tested and the optimal dose was achieved at 3 kGy. The results have shown not only the need for sanitary conditions improvements in slaughter and processing of sheep meat but also the irradiation effectiveness to eliminate coliform bacteria and Salmonella spp.

  11. Elimination of coliforms and Salmonella spp. in sheep meat by gamma irradiation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Luciana Salles Vasconcelos; da Costa Henry, Fábio; Barbosa, João Batista; Ladeira, Silvania Alves; de Faria Pereira, Silvia Menezes; da Silva Antonio, Isabela Maria; Teixeira, Gina Nunes; Martins, Meire Lelis Leal; de Carvalho Vital, Helio; dos Prazeres Rodrigues, Dália; dos Reis, Eliane Moura Falavina

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the bacteriological effects of the treatment of sheep meat contaminated with total coliforms, coliforms at 45 °C and Salmonella spp. by using irradiation at doses of 3 kGy and 5 kGy. Thirty sheep meat samples were collected from animals located in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, and then grouped in three lots including 10 samples: non-irradiated (control); irradiated with 3 kGy; and irradiated with 5 kGy. Exposure to gamma radiation in a 137Cs source-driven irradiating facility was perfomed at the Nuclear Defense Section of the Brazilian Army Technological Center (CTEx) in Rio de Janeiro. The samples were kept under freezing temperature (−18 °C) until the analyses, which occurred in two and four months after irradiation. The results were interpreted by comparison with the standards of the current legislation and demonstrated that non-irradiated samples were outside the parameters established by law for all groups of bacteria studied. Gamma irradiation was effective in inactivating those microorganisms at both doses tested and the optimal dose was achieved at 3 kGy. The results have shown not only the need for sanitary conditions improvements in slaughter and processing of sheep meat but also the irradiation effectiveness to eliminate coliform bacteria and Salmonella spp. PMID:24688504

  12. Quarantine treatment for Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) through gamma radiation from Cobalt-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Amanda Cristina Oliveira; Potenza, Marcos Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Pests like beetles, moths, fungus and mites normally attack stored products such as grains, spices, flours, brans and tobacco in bale. Among these pests the Sitophilus zeamais is one of the most important pests due its elevated potential of reproduction, infesting a great number of products, inducing great damages. This work had as objective to determine the efficacy of gamma radiation from Cobalt-60 as quarantine treatment for S. zeamais. The insects used in this experiment were reared in maize grains, at the Laboratorio de Artropodes of the Instituto Biologico/SP, on climatic room with 27 ± 2 deg C of temperature and relative humidity of 70 ± 5%. Samples containing 25 adult insects were put in acrylic recipients measuring 2.8cm x 2.8cm. Each treatment had four repetitions, in a total of 100 insects for treatment. They were irradiated with growing doses of gamma radiation: 0 (control); 0,25; 0,5; 0,75; 1,0; 1,25; 1,5; 1,75; 2,0; 2,25 2,5; 2,75; 3,0; 3,5 e 4,0 kGy, in a experimental irradiator of Cobalt-60, model Gammacell-220, located at the Centro de Tecnologia da Radiacoes - CTR of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN/SP. After irradiation, the samples were transferred to plastic recipients measuring 3,5cm x 10cm, with perforated lids (to allow gaseous exchanges). After the irradiation the samples were kept in climatic room (27 ± 2 deg C and 70 ± 5%). The mortality of insects was evaluated 1 hour after the irradiation and also on the next 7 days. By the results obtained we can conclude that was the dose of 2.75 kGy that induced the immediate mortality for adult insects of the specie S. zeamais. (author)

  13. Quarantine treatment for Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) through gamma radiation from Cobalt-60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Amanda Cristina Oliveira, E-mail: amandaramos@usp.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Potenza, Marcos Roberto, E-mail: potenza@biologico.sp.gov.b [Instituto Biologico de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento de Sanidade Vegetal; Arthur, Valter, E-mail: varthur@cena.usp.b [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Pests like beetles, moths, fungus and mites normally attack stored products such as grains, spices, flours, brans and tobacco in bale. Among these pests the Sitophilus zeamais is one of the most important pests due its elevated potential of reproduction, infesting a great number of products, inducing great damages. This work had as objective to determine the efficacy of gamma radiation from Cobalt-60 as quarantine treatment for S. zeamais. The insects used in this experiment were reared in maize grains, at the Laboratorio de Artropodes of the Instituto Biologico/SP, on climatic room with 27 +- 2 deg C of temperature and relative humidity of 70 +- 5%. Samples containing 25 adult insects were put in acrylic recipients measuring 2.8cm x 2.8cm. Each treatment had four repetitions, in a total of 100 insects for treatment. They were irradiated with growing doses of gamma radiation: 0 (control); 0,25; 0,5; 0,75; 1,0; 1,25; 1,5; 1,75; 2,0; 2,25 2,5; 2,75; 3,0; 3,5 e 4,0 kGy, in a experimental irradiator of Cobalt-60, model Gammacell-220, located at the Centro de Tecnologia da Radiacoes - CTR of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN/SP. After irradiation, the samples were transferred to plastic recipients measuring 3,5cm x 10cm, with perforated lids (to allow gaseous exchanges). After the irradiation the samples were kept in climatic room (27 +- 2 deg C and 70 +- 5%). The mortality of insects was evaluated 1 hour after the irradiation and also on the next 7 days. By the results obtained we can conclude that was the dose of 2.75 kGy that induced the immediate mortality for adult insects of the specie S. zeamais. (author)

  14. Gamma irradiation as a quarantine treatment against mite (Tetranychidae) on cut flowers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainon Othman; Mohd Ridzuan Ismail; Hamidah Sulaiman; Mohd Shamsudin Osman

    2000-01-01

    Cut flower, an important export commodity of Malaysia in international trade, is often subjected to infestation by various pests such as mites, scales and thrips. The use of low ionising radiation has been suggested as an alternative to methyl bromide fumigation, the current pest disinfestation treatment for cut flower but which is being phased out due to environmental concerns. The criterion for efficacy of radiation as a quarantine treatment will be the inability of treated mites to reproduce at a new location rather than causing immediate mortality. Irradiating red spider mite Tetranychus piercie at a dose of 300 and 400 Gy produced sterile female adults from irradiated protonymph and deutonymph respectively. A lower dose of 200 Gy induced sterility in female adults developed from the less immature stages of irradiated egg and larva. Deteriorating effects caused by irradiation treatment were reflected in immatures by their reduced emergence rate/mortality in subsequent developmental stages. A dose of 240 Gy prevented reproduction in female adult of T piercie by inducing sterility while a much higher dose of 5 kGy is required to produce instant mortality. Based on the results obtained gamma irradiation of dose range 300-400 Gy may be applied as a quarantine treatment against Tetranychus piercie. However, this dose range is only suitable for chrysanthemum (in 4% sucrose solution) but not roses, carnations and orchids which showed phytotoxic symptoms at dose range of 100-300 Gy

  15. A Cryptographic Moving-Knife Cake-Cutting Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Manabe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a cake-cutting protocol using cryptography when the cake is a heterogeneous good that is represented by an interval on a real line. Although the Dubins-Spanier moving-knife protocol with one knife achieves simple fairness, all players must execute the protocol synchronously. Thus, the protocol cannot be executed on asynchronous networks such as the Internet. We show that the moving-knife protocol can be executed asynchronously by a discrete protocol using a secure auction protocol. The number of cuts is n-1 where n is the number of players, which is the minimum.

  16. Gamma radiation-induced preparation of some acrylamide polymers for treatment of waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siyam, T.; Hanna, E.

    1992-01-01

    Water-soluble acrylamide copolymers such as: poly (acrylamide-co-sodium) [P(AM-CO-AA Na)], (acrylamide-CO-diallylethylamine-hydrochloride) [P(AM-CO-DAEA-H Cl)] and poly (acrylamide-sodium acrylate-diallylethylamine-hydrochloride) [P(AM-AANa-DAEA-H Cl)] were prepared by gamma radiation-initiated polymerization of the corresponding co monomer or termonomer solutions. The prepared copolymers were used in the treatment of water (metal sulphate solutions). It was found that the polymer efficiency increases with increasing the PH-value and the polymer concentration. The efficiency of the different polymers compared in what concerns elimination of Cu++ and Mg++. The polymer dosage depends on the hydration sheath of the cation. The mechanism for interaction of each polymeric chains with the ions of waste water was also discussed. 3 figs, 1 tab

  17. Alteration of heterostyly in Solanum melongena L. through gamma-radiation and hormonal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handique, A.K.; Sarma, A.

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of seeds with 4 kR and 8 kR gamma radiation significantly altered heterostyly in Solanum melongena by way of reducing the frequency of short style (sterile) and enhancing the frequency of long style (fertile) flowers in the synthetic varieties. Both the concentrations of kinetin were highly effective in enhancing the proportion of long style flowers in all the cultivars; 40 ppm being more effective than 20 ppm. α-NAA at lower concentration was effective in only one local land race, whereas higher concentration (25 ppm) of α-NAA suppressed the frequency of long style and enhanced the frequency of short style flowers. (author). 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  18. Effect of gamma irradiation and its convergent treatment for control of postharvest Botrytis cinerea of cut roses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Eun-Hee; Shin, Eun-Jung; Park, Hae-Jun; Jeong, Rae-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Postharvest diseases cause considerable losses to harvested crops. Among them, gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) is a major problem of exporting to cut rose flowers into Korea. Irradiation treatment is an alternative to phytosanitary purposes and a useful nonchemical approach to the control of postharvest diseases. Gamma irradiation was evaluated for its in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity against B. cinerea on cut rose varieties, ‘Shooting Star’ and ‘Babe’. The irradiating dose required to reduce the population by 90%, D 10 , was 0.99 kGy. Gamma irradiation showed complete inhibition of spore germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea, especially 4.0 kGy in vitro. Antifungal activity of gamma irradiation on rose B. cinerea is a dose-dependent manner. A significant phytotoxicity such as bent neck in cut rose quality was shown from gamma irradiation at over 0.4 kGy (p<0.05) in both varieties. Although there is no significant difference in both varieties for fresh weight, in the case of flower rate, ‘Babe’ shows more sensitivity than ‘Shooting Star’. In vivo assays demonstrated that established doses in in vitro, over 4 kGy, could completely inactive fungal pathogens, but such high doses can cause severe flowers damage. Thus, to eliminate negative impact on their quality, gamma irradiation was evaluated at lower doses in combination with an eco-friendly chemical, sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) to examine the inhibition of B. cinerea. Intriguingly, only the combined treatment with 0.2 kGy of gamma irradiation and 70 ppm of NaDCC exhibited significant synergistic antifungal activity against blue mold decay in both varieties. Together, these results suggest that a synergistic effect of the combined treatment with gamma irradiation and NaDCC can be efficiently used to control the postharvest diseases in cut rose flowers, and will provide a promising technology for horticulture products for exportation. - Highlights: • Gamma irradiation and Na

  19. Gamma irradiation a potential quarantine treatment against mites on cut flowers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamidah Sulaiman; Mohd Shamsudin Osman; Zainon Othman; Mohd Ridzuan Ismail

    2002-01-01

    Cut flower, an important export commodity of Malaysia in international trade, is often subjected to infestation by various pests such as mites, scales and thrips. The use of low ionizing radiation has been suggested as an alternative to methyl bromide fumigation, the current pest disinfestations treatment for cut flower but which is being phased out due to environmental concerns. The criterion for efficacy of radiation as a quarantine treatment will be inability of treated mites to reproduce at a new location rather than causing immediate mortality. A dose of 200 Gy prevented reproduction in female adult of Tetranychus piercie by inducing sterility while a much higher dose of 5 kGy is required to produce instant mortality. Based on the results obtained gamma irradiation of dose range 300-500 Gy may be applied as a quarantine treatment for Tetranycus piercie. However, this dose range is only suitable for chrysanthemum (in 4% sucrose solution) but not roses, carnations and orchids which showed phytotoxic symptoms at dose range of 100-400 Gy. (Author)

  20. Treatment of opium alkaloid containing wastewater in sequencing batch reactor (SBR)-Effect of gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bural, Cavit B.; Demirer, Goksel N. [Middle East Technical University, Department of Environmental Engineering, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Kantoglu, Omer [Turkish Atomic Energy Authority, Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training Center, 06982, Kazan, Ankara (Turkey); Dilek, Filiz B., E-mail: fdilek@metu.edu.t [Middle East Technical University, Department of Environmental Engineering, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-04-15

    Aerobic biological treatment of opium alkaloid containing wastewater as well as the effect of gamma irradiation as pre-treatment was investigated. Biodegradability of raw wastewater was assessed in aerobic batch reactors and was found highly biodegradable (83-90% degradation). The effect of irradiation (40 and 140 kGy) on biodegradability was also evaluated in terms of BOD{sub 5}/COD values and results revealed that irradiation imparted no further enhancement in the biodegradability. Despite the highly biodegradable nature of wastewater, further experiments in sequencing batch reactors (SBR) revealed that the treatment operation was not possible due to sludge settleability problem observed beyond an influent COD value of 2000 mg dm{sup -3}. Possible reasons for this problem were investigated, and the high molecular weight, large size and aromatic structure of the organic pollutants present in wastewater was thought to contribute to poor settleability. Initial efforts to solve this problem by modifying the operational conditions, such as SRT reduction, failed. However, further operational modifications including addition of phosphate buffer cured the settleability problem and influent COD was increased up to 5000 mg dm{sup -3}. Significant COD removal efficiencies (>70%) were obtained in both SBRs fed with original and irradiated wastewaters (by 40 kGy). However, pre-irradiated wastewater provided complete thebain removal and a better settling sludge, which was thought due to degradation of complex structure by radiation application. Degradation of the structure was observed by GC/MS analyses and enhancement in filterability tests.

  1. Influence of gamma ray treatment on in vitro regenerated plants of Atropa Belladonna L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, E.; Onisei, T.; Amariei, D.

    1994-01-01

    Regenerated plants were obtained through callus organogenesis after gamma ray treatment with 1 to 9 Krad doses. Vigorous shoots were regenerated on MS (1962) medium supplemented with 2 mg/l 6-benzylaminopurine. Shoot growth was inhibited with increasing irradiation doses. At 2 Krad dose root Primordia were observed after 18 days while 32 days were necessary to produce roots at 7-9 Krad. As compared to the control, the survival percent during acclimatization was 80 to 85% at 2-3 Krad, 65-70% at 4-6 Krad and 60-62% at 7-9 Krad. Approximately 330 plants were transferred to field conditions. Morphological and biochemical parameters were measured and the data were statistically processed. Plant height was negatively influenced by higher doses of irradiation. A chlorophyll deficient plant arose from the 6 Krad treatment which showed a different pattern of isoperoxidase and isoesterase as compared to the control. A yellow-flower mutant was obtained from the 3 Krad treatment and is assumed to be Atropa belladonna var. Flava Pater. (author)

  2. Treatment of opium alkaloid containing wastewater in sequencing batch reactor (SBR)-Effect of gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bural, Cavit B.; Demirer, Goksel N.; Kantoglu, Omer; Dilek, Filiz B.

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic biological treatment of opium alkaloid containing wastewater as well as the effect of gamma irradiation as pre-treatment was investigated. Biodegradability of raw wastewater was assessed in aerobic batch reactors and was found highly biodegradable (83-90% degradation). The effect of irradiation (40 and 140 kGy) on biodegradability was also evaluated in terms of BOD 5 /COD values and results revealed that irradiation imparted no further enhancement in the biodegradability. Despite the highly biodegradable nature of wastewater, further experiments in sequencing batch reactors (SBR) revealed that the treatment operation was not possible due to sludge settleability problem observed beyond an influent COD value of 2000 mg dm -3 . Possible reasons for this problem were investigated, and the high molecular weight, large size and aromatic structure of the organic pollutants present in wastewater was thought to contribute to poor settleability. Initial efforts to solve this problem by modifying the operational conditions, such as SRT reduction, failed. However, further operational modifications including addition of phosphate buffer cured the settleability problem and influent COD was increased up to 5000 mg dm -3 . Significant COD removal efficiencies (>70%) were obtained in both SBRs fed with original and irradiated wastewaters (by 40 kGy). However, pre-irradiated wastewater provided complete thebain removal and a better settling sludge, which was thought due to degradation of complex structure by radiation application. Degradation of the structure was observed by GC/MS analyses and enhancement in filterability tests.

  3. Evaluation of DVH-based treatment plan verification in addition to gamma passing rates for head and neck IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, Ruurd; Wauben, David J.L.; Groot, Martijn de; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Bijl, Henk P.; Godart, Jeremy; Veld, Aart A. van’t; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Korevaar, Erik W.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Treatment plan verification of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is generally performed with the gamma index (GI) evaluation method, which is difficult to extrapolate to clinical implications. Incorporating Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) information can compensate for this. The aim of this study was to evaluate DVH-based treatment plan verification in addition to the GI evaluation method for head and neck IMRT. Materials and methods: Dose verifications of 700 subsequent head and neck cancer IMRT treatment plans were categorised according to gamma and DVH-based action levels. Fractionation dependent absolute dose limits were chosen. The results of the gamma- and DVH-based evaluations were compared to the decision of the medical physicist and/or radiation oncologist for plan acceptance. Results: Nearly all treatment plans (99.7%) were accepted for treatment according to the GI evaluation combined with DVH-based verification. Two treatment plans were re-planned according to DVH-based verification, which would have been accepted using the evaluation alone. DVH-based verification increased insight into dose delivery to patient specific structures increasing confidence that the treatment plans were clinically acceptable. Moreover, DVH-based action levels clearly distinguished the role of the medical physicist and radiation oncologist within the Quality Assurance (QA) procedure. Conclusions: DVH-based treatment plan verification complements the GI evaluation method improving head and neck IMRT-QA

  4. Microbial contamination and effects of combination treatments and gamma irradiation on reducing microbial contamination of dried cuttle fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, B.T.

    1989-01-01

    Dried cuttle fish is one of the most valuable sea products but it rapidly becomes mouldy and spoiled. To solve this problem, the studies on microbial contamination and effects of combination treatments and gamma irradiation for dried cuttle fish have been caried out base on IAEA Research Contracts No 4397/AG and 4397/R1/AG

  5. The Two Edge Knife of Decentralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Khoirul Umam

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A centralistic government model has become a trend in a number of developing countries, in which the ideosycretic aspect becomes pivotal key in the policy making. The situation constitutes authoritarianism, cronyism, and corruption. To break the impasse, the decentralized system is proposed to make people closer to the public policy making. Decentralization is also convinced to be the solution to create a good governance. But a number of facts in the developing countries demonstrates that decentralization indeed has ignite emerges backfires such as decentralized corruption, parochialism, horizontal conflict, local political instability and others. This article elaborates the theoretical framework on decentralization's ouput as the a double-edge knife. In a simple words, the concept of decentralization does not have a permanent relationship with the creation of good governance and development. Without substantive democracy, decentralization is indeed potential to be a destructive political instrument threating the state's future.

  6. Clinical outcomes of cases with cervical dysplasia absent in cold knife conization specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baser, Eralp; Ozgu, Emre; Erkilinc, Selcuk; Yalcin, Hakan; Cetinkaya, Nilufer; Sirvan, Levent; Erkaya, Salim; Gungor, Tayfun

    2014-01-01

    Cold knife conization is a surgical procedure that allows both diagnosis and treatment of cervical lesions at the same time. It is mainly performed for indications of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). In this study, we aimed to investigate the clinical outcome of cases without CIN in cold knife conization specimen, following a high-grade lesion (CIN2/3) in cervical biopsy. We performed a retrospective cohort study at a tertiary referral hospital between January 1st 2008 and August 1st 2012. Cases that underwent cold knife conization for CIN2/3 within the study period were included. Cone-negative (Group 1) and cone-positive (Group 2) cases were analyzed for various clinical parameters, and were compared in the 1-year post-conization period for histological recurrence and human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA status. A total of 173 women underwent cold knife conization for CIN2/3 within the study period. Twenty-two cases (12.7%) were included in Group 1 and 151 cases (87.3%) in Group 2. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of age, gravidity, parity, menopausal status and HPV-DNA status (pre-conization and 1 year post-conization) (p>0.05). Recurrence rates were also similar between the groups (9.1% vs 9.9%, p>0.05). Clinical outcomes were similar in terms of histological recurrence and HPV persistence after 1 year of follow-up between cone-negative and cone-positive cases. Clinical follow-up of cone-negative cases should therefore be performed similar to cone-positive cases.

  7. Preliminary shielding calculation for the system of CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toreti, Dalila; Xavier, Clarice; Moura, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    The CyberKnife robotic system uses a manipulator with six grade of freedom for positioning a 6 MV Linac accelerator for treatment of lesions. This paper presents calculations for a standard room, with 200 cm of thickness walls primary, build for a CyberKnife system, and calculations for a room originally designed for a Linac conventional (with gantry), with secondary barriers of 107 cm thickness. After the realization of shielding for both rooms, the results shown that walls of standard room with 200 cm thickness are adequate for the secondary shield, and for a room with a conventional Linac, from all six evaluated points, two would require additional shielding of nine cm and four cm of concrete with 2.4 g/cubic cm. This shows that the CyberKnife system can be installed in a originally designed room for a conventional Linac with neither restrict nor any shielding, since no incidence of beams on the secondary barriers is existent

  8. [Efficacy and safety of the endoscopic management of Zenker diverticulum with IT-Knife 2 device].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio, Laura; Palacios, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the endoscopic management of Zenker Diverticulum with IT-Knife 2 device. prospective and multicenter study (Edgardo Rebagliati Martins National Hospital and Golf Clinic). We included all patients with sintomatic Zenker Diverticulum that were treated with endoscopic cricopharyngeal miotomy from september 2013 until august 2016. the diverticulum septum was faced with a cap, and then it was cut by the IT-Knife 2 (ENDOCUT Q, effect 3-2-5) until its baseline. Disphagia score was compared before and 1 and 3 months after the procedure. 20 patients were included (11 men; average age: 71 years). The median size of Zenker Diverticulum was 40.5 mm. The median duration of the cricopharyngeal miotomy was 13.75 minutes. Clinical success was 100%. There was a significative decrease (pdisphagia score from 2+/-0.86 before the procedure to 0.05+/-0.22 one month after it. Recurrence after 3 months was 15% and it was completely solved after a second endoscopic treatment. Niether perforation nor bleeding was reported. Two patients had pneumonia. the endoscopic management of Zenker Diverticulum with IT-Knife 2 is highly effective, safe and less complex than previous technique experience.

  9. Quality assurance procedures based on dosimetric, gamma analysis as a fast reliable tool for commissioning brachytherapy treatment planning systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwierzchowski Grzegorz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fast and easily repeatable methods for commissioning procedures for brachytherapy (BT treatment planning systems (TPS are needed. Radiochromic film dosimetry with gamma analysis is widely used in external beam quality assurance (QA procedures and planar film dosimetry is also increasingly used for verification of the dose distribution in BT applications. Using the gamma analysis method for comparing calculated and measured dose data could be used for commissioning procedures of the newly developed TG-186 and MBDCA calculation algorithms. The aim of this study was dosimetric verification of the calculation algorithm used in TPS when the CT/MRI ring applicator is used.

  10. A method for studying knife tool marks on bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kai-Ping; Chung, Ju-Hui; Chung, Fang-Chun; Tseng, Bo-Yuan; Pan, Chih-Hsin; Yang, Kai-Ting; Yang, Chun-Pang

    2011-07-01

    The characteristics of knife tool marks retained on hard tissues can be used to outline the shape and angle of a knife. The purpose of this study was to describe such marks on bone tissues that had been chopped with knives. A chopping stage with a gravity accelerator and a fixed bone platform was designed to reconstruct the chopping action. A digital microscope was also used to measure the knife angle (θ) and retained V-shape tool mark angle (ψ) in a pig skull. The κ value (elasticity coefficient; θ/ψ) was derived and recorded after the knife angle (θ) and the accompanied velocity were compared with the proportional impulsive force of the knife and ψ on the bone. The constant impulsive force revealed a correlation between the V-shape tool mark angle (ψ) and the elasticity coefficient (κ). These results describe the tool marks--crucial in the medicolegal investigation--of a knife on hard tissues. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Gamma-irradiation synthesis of silver nanoparticles fixing in porous ceramic for application in water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Van Phu; Nguyen Quoc Hien; Nguyen Thuy Ai Trinh; Bui Duy Du

    2013-01-01

    The Ag nanoparticles in polyvinylpyrrolidone solution with concentration of 500 mg/L and their diameter of 10-15 nm were synthesized on a large scale up to 100 L/batch by gamma irradiation route. Porous ceramic candle samples were functionalized by treatment with a 3-amino-propyltriethoxysilane coupling agent and then impregnated in Ag nanoparticles solution for fixing Ag nanoparticles. The load Ag nanoparticles content on porous ceramic was of about 200-250 mg/kg. The average pore size of porous ceramic/Ag nanoparticles was about 48.2 Å. Owing to strong bonding of silver atoms to the wall of porous ceramic functionalized by 3-amino-propyltriethoxysilane, the contents of silver released from porous ceramic/Ag nanoparticles into filtrated water by test at a flow rate of about 5 L/h were less than 10 μg/L and was far below the required standard limit (<100 μg/L) for drinking water. Thus, porous ceramic/Ag nanoparticles candles can be potentially applied for point-of-use drinking water treatment. (author)

  12. Response of tissue lysosomes in Gamma-irradiated rats and possible modulation through diclofenac treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, S.H.S.; Abu-Ghadeer, A.R.M.; Osman, S.A.A.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of pre and post-irradiation treatment of rats with diclofenac (5 mg kg-1) for modulating the damaging effect of radiation on tissue lysosomes was investigated. The parameters used for this study were the activity level of acid phosphatase (ACP) and acid ribonuclease (RNase) activities, both being hydrolytic enzymes of lysosomes. The activities of ACP and RNase in liver, spleen, intestine, kidney, lung and brain were determined at different times up to 14 days after irradiation (4(Gy). Lysosomal affection was represented by time dependent significant increase in ACP activity in all the tissue homogenates of the investigated organs 3, 7 and 14 days after irradiation at 4 Gy. Gamma irradiation at 4 Gy resulted also in a significant rise in RNase activity of all the tissue organs 3 days post-irradiation. However, gradual decrease in the enzyme activity was recorded 7 and 14 days following irradiation. Diclofenac, pre (as prophylactic) and post (as therapeutic) irradiation treatment of rats successfully restored the increase in the enzymatic activities of ACP and RNase nearly to their normal levels in all the investigated organs. The beneficial effect of diclofenac inhibited completely the effect of irradiation at 14 days post-exposure. 2 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Gamma irradiation as a quarantine treatment for Neoleucinodes elegantalis in tomato fruit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Helbert S.F.; Fanaro, Gustavo B.; Araujo, Michel M.; Santillo, Amanda G.; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H.; Faria, Jose Tadeu de; Arthur, Valter

    2009-01-01

    In Brazil the tomato-fruit-borer is responsible up to 45% for the loss of the production. The objective of the present report is evaluate the effects of gamma radiation ( 60 Co) on life cycle (eggs and larvae) of Neoleucinodes elegantalis in tomato fruits. The insects were irradiated at doses of 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300 and 400 Gy, in a Gammacell 220 source at dose rate of 1.4 kGy/h. Each treatment consists of four repetitions containing 10 insects, totaling 50 insects. After irradiation, the insects were maintained under controlled conditions of 25±3 deg C and relative humidity from 65 to 75%. The evaluations were done daily, counted the number of died insects, eggs and emerged larvae. With the obtained results, we could determine the lethal and sterilizing doses for all phases of cycle life in N. elegantalis for a possible quarantine treatment to export tomato fruits. These results permit conclude that the dose capable to avoid further development of stage of eggs and larvae were doses of 100 and 200 Gy. (author)

  14. Disinfection of water and wastewater of Isfahan water and wastewater treatment plants by gamma irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Amin

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: At gamma doses used in this study, the coliforms were removed completely. But for wastewater samples, although the removal efficiencies were above 80%, the environmental standards related to microbial parameters were not satisfied. Therefore, it is necessary to use higher doses of gamma radiation.

  15. Intraosseous focal venous malformation of the mandibular body: Cone beam computed tomography planning followed by piezoelectric knife resection and free bone graft reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Živorad S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intraosseous vascular malformation could be life-threatening due to uncontrolled hemorrhage after tooth extraction. According to biological behavior of this lesion, adequate diagnostic and treatment strategies are necessary in order to avoid possible complications. We reported cone beam computed tomography (CBCT planning of an urgent en bloc resection of an intraosseous venous malformation by piezoelectric knife. Case report. A 55-year-old man was submitted to CBCT planning followed by piezoelectric knife resection of an intraosseous focal venous malformation of the mandibular body. Immediate reconstruction of the defect using iliac bone free graft was performed. The surgical treatment was uneventful and a 2-year follow-up revealed no signs of recurrence. Conclusion. Piezoelectric knife could provide precise, safe and bloodless procedure which is especially important in this pathology. Advantages of this technique are: lower risk of damaging soft tissue structures, precise osteotomy and bloodless surgery. Moreover, using piezosurgery bone knife, blood transfusion and blood transmitted diseases could be avoided. This case highlights the importance of CBCT as planning tool for resection of the mandible, using piezoelectric knife as safe method to achieve bloodless surgery. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 175075

  16. Bio-physicochemical effects of gamma irradiation treatment for naphthenic acids in oil sands fluid fine tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudens, Ryan; Reid, Thomas; VanMensel, Danielle; Sabari Prakasanm, M.R. [Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON (Canada); Ciborowski, Jan J.H. [Biological Sciences, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON (Canada); Weisener, Christopher G., E-mail: weisener@uwindsor.ca [Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON (Canada)

    2016-01-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are persistent compounds that are components of most petroleum, including those found in the Athabasca oil sands. Their presence in freshly processed tailings is of significant environmental concern due to their toxicity to aquatic organisms. Gamma irradiation (GI) was used to reduce the toxicity and concentration of NAs in oil sands process water (OSPW) and fluid fine tailings (FFT). This investigation systematically studied the impact of GI on the biogeochemical development and progressive reduction of toxicity using laboratory incubations of fresh and aged tailings under anoxic and oxic conditions. GI reduced NA concentrations in OSPW by up to 97% in OSPW and in FFT by 85%. The GI-treated FFT exhibited increased rates of biogeochemical change, dependent on the age of the tailings source. Dissolved oxygen (DO) flux was enhanced in GI-treated FFT from fresh and aged source materials, whereas hydrogen sulfide (HS{sup −}) flux was stimulated only in the fresh FFT. Acute toxicity to Vibrio fischeri was immediately reduced following GI treatment of fresh OSPW. GI treatment followed by 4-week incubation reduced toxicity of aged OSPW to V. fischeri. - Highlights: • Gamma irradiation substantially reduced concentrations of ecotoxic naphthenic acids • Acute toxicity was reduced in gamma irradiated process water • Gamma irradiated tailings exhibited increased rates of microbial respiration.

  17. Seed quality preservation advantage of gamma irradiation seed pre-treatment during long term storage in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guha, Sameer Kumar; Sumedha; Singh, Bhupinder

    2014-01-01

    The experiment was conducted to analyse the effect of gamma irradiation seed pre-treatment on insect damage and quality preservation of soybean seeds during long term storage at ambient temperature (27-42 ℃) and relative humidity (50-95%). Freshly harvested seeds of soybean (cv. Pusa-9814) were treated with control (0), 0.01, 0.05, 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0 kGy gamma radiation on a Gamma irradiator (Gamma Chamber 5000, 60 Co source, activity 12000 Ci, BRIT, Mumbai, India) at the Nuclear Research Laboratory, IARI, New Delhi and were stored over one year in cotton cloth bags under ambient conditions. Protein and oil per cent and fatty acid profile was measured in freshly harvested zero time unirradiated control, aged unirradiated control and other treatments of ionizing radiation. Seed oil was extracted through the soxhlet extraction method and oil profiling was done by gas chromatography. Change in saturated and unsaturated fatty acids like palmitic, stearic, oleic, linolic, linolenic acid and oleic to linoleic ratio was measured. Oil content of unirradiated stored seeds compared to that of the freshly harvested control was lower. However, radiation in general, helped in maintaining a higher seed oil during storage when compared with that of the aged unirradiated control and was insignificantly reduced over the fresh unirrradiated control. Further, gamma irradiation treatment did not yield any adverse affect on the seed protein even after prolonged storage. The results reveal a reduced rate of lipid degradation and improved seed hardness over untreated control with no significant change in fatty acid profile of the irradiated and the unirradiated seeds over a long term storage period. (author)

  18. FTIR study of aquamarines after gamma irradiation, heat treatment and electrodiffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkmim, Danielle Gomides; Almeida, Frederico Ozanan Tomaz de; Lameiras, Fernando Soares, E-mail: alkmia@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: fredufmg@gmail.com, E-mail: fsl@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-15

    Beryl, Be{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(SiO{sub 3}){sub 6}, is a natural gemstone with many colors. Some of these colors can be induced or modified by exposure to ionizing radiation, by heating, and maybe by electrodiffusion. Small contents of chromophore chemical elements are related to the colors of beryl, like iron, chromium, vanadium, manganese, and others. There is great interest in relation to methods of improving or inducing colors in beryl. There is evidence that infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) can contribute to foresee beryl behavior submitted to procedures for color change. It was observed that electrodiffusion with or without contaminant ions did not alter the FTIR spectrum of aquamarines, unlike heat treatment. Green samples have a higher content of type I water molecules, whereas blue samples have a higher content of type II water molecules. Significant changes in FTIR spectra of aquamarines were observed only in green samples after exposure to gamma rays or to heat. The vanishing of the band at 3633 cm{sup -1} may be related to the position of Na{sup +} ion in the crystal lattice of beryl. (author)

  19. Preservation of nile bolti fish (Tilapia nilotica) by combination treatments with gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Foult, M.Z.; Hammad, A.A.I.; Yousef, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    This study is dealing with the application of gamma radiation combined with some other treatments for prolonging the shelf life of fresh bolti fish under cold storage (4+or-1 degree C). Immersing of bolti fish saturated saline solution (25% w/v)containing 15 ppm of chloro tetracycline (CT C) for 15 minutes increased the shelf-life of fish for only two days more than the untreated (6 days). Exposuring the fish after dipping process to 0.5 kGy increased the shelf-life for 14 days while the dose level of 3 kGy gave less short life (11 days). Removing the fish head and intestinal canal instead of salt and CT C increased the shelf life for one week more than untreated ones. Meanwhile, irradiation of these prepared samples with 1.0, 2.5 and 3.5 kGy kept the fish acceptable for 21.24 and 28 days under the same cold storage

  20. Gamma irradiation as a quarantine treatment against eggs of Citrus black fly (Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H.; Araujo, Michel M.; Fanaro, Gustavo B.; Costa, Helbert H.S.F.; Silva, Priscila P.V.; Arthur, Valter

    2009-01-01

    The citrus black fruit fly (Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby) is an important pest of citrus originated in Southeast Asia and its first record in the new world was in Jamaica in 1913. In Brazil, it was detected in 2001 in the state of Para and more recently it was detected in Sao Paulo in 2008. This pest that attacks over 300 species of plants, but its main host are citrus. It is an A2 quarantine pest, because it is not spread throughout the country. The objective of this study was to test doses of 0 (control), 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, 175 and 200 Gy of gamma irradiation for disinfection of eggs of the citrus black fruit fly in leaves of citrus plants. Treatment consisted of 5 replicates with 60 eggs each. Evaluations were performed in the following periods: 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 days after irradiation. Under the conditions assayed, it could be concluded that a dose of 200 Gy caused 100% mortality of Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby eggs and could be recommended as a successful quarantine processing against infested plants. (author)

  1. Quarantine treatment of agricultural products for export and import by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Joong Ho; Roh, M.J.; Chung, H.W.; Lee, J.E.; Park, N.Y.; Kwon, Y.J.; Seo, S.J. [Kyungbuk National University, Taegu (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    To pre-establish an alternative technique to the toxic fumigant, methyl bromide which is the current quarantine measure of agricultural products for export and import, some selected agricultural products, such as chestnut, acorn, red bean and mung bean, were subjected to a preliminary study to confirm the comparative effects of gamma irradiation and MBr fumigant on their disinfestation and quality, thereby preparing the basic data for the practical approach. Current quarantine activities were examined and the related limitations were investigated. Quarantine-related pests were investigated on their radiosensitivity and disinfestation effects by both treatments. The pests in chestnut and acorn, Curculio skkimensis Heller, Curculio dentipes Roelofs, and Dichocrocis punctiferalis Guenee showed an increased mortality when exposed to above 0.5 kGy irradiation, resulting in 100% of mortality three weeks later. Callosobruchus chinensis Linne from both red and mung beans revealed a apparent mortality at around 10 days after irradiation of 1 to 3 kGy. Current fumigation was perfect in its disinfesting capability, but it caused the detrimental effects on physical quality of agricultural produce. Whereas, irradiation doses suitable for controlling the pests did not induce any significant changes in the quality of the samples. (author). 53 refs., 74 figs., 138 tabs.

  2. FTIR study of aquamarines after gamma irradiation, heat treatment and electrodiffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Gomides Alkmim

    Full Text Available Abstract Beryl, Be3Al2(SiO36, is a natural gemstone with many colors. Some of these colors can be induced or modified by exposure to ionizing radiation, by heating, and maybe by electrodiffusion. Small contents of chromophore chemical elements are related to the colors of beryl, like iron, chromium, vanadium, manganese, and others. There is great interest in relation to methods of improving or inducing colors in beryl. There is evidence that infrared spectroscopy (FTIR can contribute to foresee beryl behavior submitted to procedures for color change. It was observed that electrodiffusion with or without contaminant ions did not alter the FTIR spectrum of aquamarines, unlike heat treatment. Green samples have a higher content of type I water molecules, whereas blue samples have a higher content of type II water molecules. Significant changes in FTIR spectra of aquamarines were observed only in green samples after exposure to gamma rays or to heat. The vanishing of the band at 3633 cm-1 may be related to the position of Na+ ion in the crystal lattice of beryl.

  3. Gamma radiation use as a quarantine treatment alternative for cut flowers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Olivia Kimiko

    1999-01-01

    Methyl bromide is a broad spectrum pesticide to control insects, nematodes, weeds, pathogens and rodents It is effective to commodity treatment designed for exportation/importation, but is also toxic for human being. Besides, it is an ozone layer depleting substance and many countries are interested in finding other less damaging alternatives. The methyl bromide shall be banned until 2015 and one promising alternative is the radiation. It can be effective for some vegetables, like fresh cut flowers. The tolerance to gamma radiation was observed in some cut flowers. Dianthus (Caryophyllaceae), Gypsophyla (Caryophyllaceae), Gomphrena (Amarantaceae), Celosia (Amarantaceae) and Narcissus (Amaryllidaceae) were tolerant to 750 Gy. Heliconia and Strelitzia (Musaceae) were not tolerant, presenting a severe browning of the colored sepals. Anthurium (Araceae) was also sensitive to 750 Gy, presenting browning of the spike, discoloration and black spots on the sepals. The radiation inhibited the bud opening of Hemerocallis (Liliaceae) and Gladiolus (Iridaceae). Gerbera (Compositae) and Callistemon (Myrtaceae) wilted before the control flowers. Helianthus (Compositae) leaves wilted before the flowers because of the radiation. (author)

  4. Radioguided Parathyroidectomy with Portable Mini Gamma-Camera for the Treatment of Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Casella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A proper localisation of pathological parathyroid glands is essential for a minimally invasive approach in the surgical treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP. The recent introduction of portable mini gamma-cameras (pMGCs enabled intraoperative scintigraphic scanning. The aim of our study is to evaluate the efficacy of this new method and compare it with the preoperative localisation surveys. Methods. 20 patients were studied; they were evaluated preoperatively by neck ultrasound and Tc-sestaMIBI-scintigraphy and intraoperatively with the pMGC IP Guardian 2. The results obtained from the three evaluations were compared. Results. The pMGC presented a sensitivity of 95%, a specificity of 98.89%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 98.18%, which were higher than those of preoperative ultrasound (sensitivity 55%; specificity 95%; diagnostic accuracy 87% and scintigraphy with Tc-sestaMIBI (sensitivity 73.68%; specificity 96.05%; diagnostic accuracy 91.58%. Conclusions. The pMGC can be used effectively as an intraoperative method to find the correct location of the pathological parathyroid glands. The pMGC is more reliable than the currently used preoperative and intraoperative localisation techniques.

  5. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of preeclampsia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Fergus P

    2012-01-31

    Preeclampsia is a multisystemic disorder of pregnancy characterized by hypertension, proteinuria, and maternal endothelial dysfunction. It is a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality and is thought to be attributable, in part, to inadequate trophoblast invasion. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) is a ligand-activated transcription factor expressed in trophoblasts, and the vasculature of which activation has been shown to improve endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in hypertensive conditions. We investigated the effects of the administration of a PPAR-gamma agonist using the reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) rat model of preeclampsia. The selective PPAR-gamma agonist, rosiglitazone, was administered to pregnant rats that had undergone RUPP surgery. To investigate whether any observed beneficial effects of PPAR-gamma activation were mediated by the antioxidant enzyme, heme oxygenase 1, rosiglitazone was administered in combination with the heme oxygenase 1 inhibitor tin-protoporphyrin IX. RUPP rats were characterized by hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and elevated microalbumin:creatinine ratios. Rosiglitazone administration ameliorated hypertension, improved vascular function, and reduced the elevated microalbumin:creatinine ratio in RUPP rats. With the exception of microalbumin:creatinine ratio, these beneficial effects were abrogated in the presence of the heme oxygenase 1 inhibitor. Administration of a PPAR-gamma agonist prevented the development of several of the pathophysiological characteristics associated with the RUPP model of preeclampsia, via a heme oxygenase 1-dependent pathway. The findings from this study provide further insight into the underlying etiology of preeclampsia and a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of preeclampsia.

  6. The "Knife-Cut Sign" Revisited: A Distinctive Presentation of Linear Erosive Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in Immunocompromised Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R

    2015-10-01

    virus infection-related skin lesions clinically improve once systemic antiviral therapy is initiated. In immunosuppressed individuals, the "knife-cut sign" is a distinctive presentation of cutaneous linear erosive herpes simplex virus infection. Recognition of the linear ulcers in intertriginous areas and body folds should prompt the clinician to consider herpes simplex virus infection-associated skin lesions in an immunocompromised patient and to initiate systemic antiviral treatment while awaiting the results of laboratory evaluation to confirm the suspected diagnosis.

  7. Effect of gamma radiation on some materials used in wastewater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokker, H. H. El-Sayed.

    1997-01-01

    The treatment of wastewaters containing toxic pesticides poses a serious environmental problem. Many of the pesticides are not readily biodegradable and complete removal in many cases is a relatively expensive provess. On the other hand incomplete removal is a serious health hazard. Ionizing radiations proved to be more effective for the treatment of these wastewater than ordinary conventional methods. In the present study a try was made to explain the degradation kineti s due to irradiation of aqueous solutions of some active ingredient pesticides in the absence of other specific pollutants. These pesticides are: two organophosphorous pesticides; dimethoate and sunithion; two organochlorine pesticides: Aldrin and DDT, one carbamate pesticide; applaud. Also, a chlorimated fungicide: Chlorothalonil; and triazing herbicide: Ametryn. A combined treatment of gamma irradiationand conventional methods will be applied to some concentrated waste solutions in manageable volumes. Factors affecting the radiolysis of pesticides such as pesticide concentration, irradiation dose, dose rate and pH of the solutions will be studied. The effect of different additives such as nitrogen and oxygen on the degradation process were investigated. Experiments on the adsorption of pesticides on some polymeric materials and on activated carbon were carried out. The results may be summarized as follows: 1- The effect of irradiation dose in Gy on the different pesticide solutions all an initial concentration 5 mg/1 showed that chlorothalonil was almost completely destroyed at dose of 10kGy, while dimethoate, sunithion, DDT and applaud insecticides were degraded to lesser extent. 2- The pH influence has proved to vary according to the type of the pesticide. 3-Synergistic treatment of the pesticide solutions by irradiation and conventional methods showed that the saturation of the pesticide solutions with nitrogen enhanced the radiation degradation of these pesticides to a better extent than when

  8. Interaction of co-insult treatments wth cadmium chloride and gamma irradiation on lethality and blood indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were (1) to gain insight into sensitivities of vital organs systems after treatments with cadmium chloride (CdCl 2 ), gamma ( 60 Co) radiation, and combined CdCl 2 -gamma radiation; (2) to determine physiological and cellular/molecular changes after these same treatments; and (3) to develop a summary of biochemical/hematological indicators for each insult individually, as well as for the co-insult treatment. Three lethality studies, Acute CdCl 2 , Chronic CdCl 2 , and Acute Radiation, wwere used to determine sublethal doses for the fourth study (Co-insult), which utilized various combinations of CdCl 2 and gamma radiation and from which the hematological and biochemical data were derived. Radiation groups exhibited statistically significant decreases in the total number of leukocytes, lymphocytes, and polyneutrophils. Significant increases were seen in serum iron, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase, and triglycerides. Cadmium groups had increased total numbers of leukocytes, polyneutrophils, and serum glutamic oxaloacetate transminase (SGOT). Decreases were seen in lymphocytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit, total red blood cell counts, and total protein. When co-insult treatments were used, significant decreases were seen in the total number of leukocytes, polyneutrophils, lymphocytes, hemoglobin, total red blood cells, and serum iron

  9. [Treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome with gamma-hydroxybutyrate : A randomized controlled study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, E; Tafelski, S; Thieme, K; West, C; Haase, U; Beck, L; Schäfer, M; Spies, C

    2017-04-01

    The etiology of fibromyalgia syndrome is not yet fully understood. Current hypotheses suggest a potential role of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in influencing endocrinological abnormalities in patients with fibromyalgia. The aim of the study was to investigate whether low dose GHB as a growth-hormone releasing substance reduces pain intensity and improves depressive mood, physical impairment and sleep quality in outpatients with fibromyalgia. Additionally, adverse events were recorded. The pilot study was conducted in the outpatient clinic for pain at the clinic for anesthesiology and surgical intensive care of the Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin. In the study 25 female patients with fibromyalgia according to the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology were randomized into 2 groups. Over 15 weeks patients of the intervention group received 25 mg/kg body weight oral GHB before going to bed and were compared with a placebo control group. In addition, all patients participated in operant behavioral pain treatment in a group setting. Dependent variables were pain intensity, depressive mood, physical impairment and quality of sleep. There were no group differences in the course of pain intensity (p = 0.61), depressive mood (p = 0.16), physical impairment (p = 0.25) and quality of sleep (p = 0.44); however, all symptoms improved across the groups from pretherapy to posttherapy. Low dose GHB did not increase growth hormone blood concentrations. The number of adverse events that were reported more than two times was similar in both groups. Administration of low dose GHB did not yield clinical improvements in female outpatients with fibromyalgia. General improvement in the course of treatment may have resulted from operant behavioral pain therapy. Future studies on GHB should control hypothetical risk factors for identification of non-responders.

  10. Dosimetric analysis of trigeminal nerve, brain stem doses in CyberKnife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudahar, H.; Kurup, P.G.G.; Murali, V.; Velmurugan, J.

    2012-01-01

    CyberKnife radiosurgery treatment of Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is performed as a non-invasive image guided procedure. The prescription dose for TN is very high. The brainstem is the adjacent critical organ at risk (OAR) which is prone to receive the very high target dose of TN. The present study is to analyze the dose distribution inside the tiny trigeminal nerve target and also to analyze the dose fall off in the brain stem. Seven TN cases treated between November 2010 and January 2012 were taken for this study retrospectively. The treatment plans were analyzed for target dose conformity, homogeneity and dose coverage. In the brainstem the volume doses D 1% and D 2% were taken for analyzing the higher doses in the brain stem. The dose fall off was analyzed in terms of D 5% and D 10% . The mean value of maximum dose within the trigeminal nerve target was 73.5±2.1 Gy (P=0.0007) and the minimum dose was 50.0±4.1Gy (P=0.1315). The mean conformity index was 2.19 and the probable reason could be the smallest CyberKnife collimator of 5mm used in the treatment plan. The mean D 1% , of the brainstem was 10.5±2.1Gy(P=0.5316) and the mean value of the maximum point dose within the brainstem was 35.6±3.8Gy. This shows the degree of dose fall off within the brainstem. Though the results of the present study are showing superior sparing of brain stem and reasonable of target coverage, it is necessary to execute the treatment plan with greater accuracy in CyberKnife as the immobilization is noninvasive and frameless. (author)

  11. Clinical observation of the glaucoma trabeculectomy with tunnel knife making the double-deck scleral flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Fu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the trabeculectomy clinical effect of use tunnel knife to make double-deck scleral flap and to cut off the layer scleral flap of glaucoma.METHODS:Using the random grouping method to divide 46 cases(60 eyesof glaucoma into the treatment group of 24 cases(32 eyesand control group of 22 cases(28 eyes. The treatment group, tunnel knife was used to make double-deck sclera flap and superficial scleral flap about the size of 5mm×5.5mm,1/3 scleral thickness, under the sclera flap made another one about the size of 3.5mm×4mm, 1/3 scleral thickness, resected the middle layer of the sclera flap, removed 2mm×2mm trabecular tissue, underwent routine peripheral iridectomy, could adjust suture the superficial scleral flap, sutured Ball fascia and bulbar conjunctiva. In control group, routine glaucoma trabeculectomy was undergone.RESULTS:Patients were followed up for 1a, the vision in treatment group was obviously better than that in the control group, with a statistically significant difference(PP>0.05. But after 6 and 12mo, the intraocular pressure of the treatment group were significantly lower than that of the control group, with statistically significant difference(PPCONCLUSION:The trabeculectomy have a good effect to lower the intraocular pressure by use tunnel knife to make double-deck scleral flap and to cut off the layer scleral flap. The scleral flap have uniform thickness, smooth surface, and the function of the filtering bleb maintained for a long time, less postoperative complications, suitable for various types of glaucoma, so it is worthy of clinical promotion.

  12. A Retrospective Review of CyberKnife Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Adrenal Tumors (Primary and Metastatic): Winthrop University Hospital Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Amishi; Rai, Hema; Haas, Jonathan; Witten, Matthew; Blacksburg, Seth; Schneider, Jeffrey G

    2015-01-01

    The adrenal gland is a common site of cancer metastasis. Surgery remains a mainstay of treatment for solitary adrenal metastasis. For patients who cannot undergo surgery, radiation is an alternative option. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an ablative treatment option allowing larger doses to be delivered over a shorter period of time. In this study, we report on our experience with the use of SBRT to treat adrenal metastases using CyberKnife technology. We retrospectively reviewed the Winthrop University radiation oncology data base to identify 14 patients for whom SBRT was administered to treat malignant adrenal disease. Of the factors examined, the biological equivalent dose (BED) of radiation delivered was found to be the most important predictor of local adrenal tumor control. We conclude that CyberKnife-based SBRT is a safe, non-invasive modality that has broadened the therapeutic options for the treatment of isolated adrenal metastases.

  13. Effect of gamma irradiation and sulfur dioxide treatment on storability of some grape varieties (Vitis Vinifera L.) in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Bachir, M.

    1997-12-01

    The feasibility of using gamma irradiation and sulfur dioxide to control post-harvest diseases and to extend shelf life of table grapes in cold storage (1-2 C deg) was studied using two local varieties of grapes (Baladi and Helwani). The experiment was conducted for two years (1995 and 1996). In the first year, the clusters of both varieties were subjected to one of the following treatments: Irradiation with 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 kGy of gamma rays, sulfur dioxide (3 g Na 2 S 2 O 5 / 5 Kg clusters) or combination of both 1.0 KGy of gamma irradiation and sulfur dioxide. In the second year, two additional doses were applied: 0.1 and 0.25 KGy for Helwani and 2.0 and 2.5 KGy for Baladi. Clusters of both var. were treated with combined treatments (1.5 KGy and sulfur dioxide for Baladi) and (0.5 KGy and sulfur dioxide for Helwani). Treated and untreated clusters were kept in cold storage (temperature, 1 to 2 C deg). Weight loss, spoilage and total loss were evaluated every two and four weeks of storage for Baladi and Helwani, respectively. With the exception of Helwani var. produced in the first year and treated with sulfur dioxide, the results indicated that separate application of sulfur dioxide and gamma radiation reduced the rotting induced by (B. cinerea) and improved the storability of both varieties. Gamma irradiation in combination with sulfur dioxide preserved the two varieties of table grapes. (author)

  14. Radiolytic degradation of hexabromocyclododecane in waste water from thermal insulation-treatment factory with gamma ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xing-Zheng; Toriyama, Keisuke; Harii, Tomoaki; Katoh, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Tetsuo

    2008-01-01

    Radiolytic, and radiolytic/biological decompositions of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) in primary and ultimate waste waters from a thermal insulation-treatment process and a factory of polyester process are studied with gamma ray irradiation. Concentrations and degradation ratios of HBCD, and Br - concentrations are determined before and after gamma ray irradiation. Also, total organic carbon (TOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) are determined to evaluate the decomposition of total organic compounds. As a result, about 72.5% of HBCD in ultimate waste water were decomposed with dose of 100 kGy. Furthermore, about 98% of HBCD, nearly all organic compounds were removed after the combination of radiolytic/biological treatments. (author)

  15. Treatment of cosmetics ingredients with gamma radiation: a market development view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinwood, J.F.; Wilson, B.K.

    1990-01-01

    Nordion International Inc. launched a market development initiative in February, 1988, which focused on increased usage of gamma radiation for the reduction of microbial load in certain cosmetic raw materials. This paper will describe the methods used to determine target product groups, the extent of Canadian and U.S. regulatory involvement, and the results of testing carried out to date in support of the project. Recommendations are also made on some specific products which are economically suited to gamma processing. (author)

  16. Development of novel non agoinst PPAR-gamma ligands for lung cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    SUBJECT TERMS PPAR-gamma, lung cancer, gene expression , p53, thiazolidinedione 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF... expression data to show that a PPAR-gamma S273 phosphorylation signature is correlated with response to chemotherapy in lung cancer in publicly available... express mutant p53 (Appendix Figure 1B). In both of these cell types, we fail to see an increase in the DNA damage marker g-H2AX when cells are

  17. Tomotherapy treatment plan quality assurance: the impact of applied criteria on passing rate in gamma index method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, Sara; Di Dia, Amalia; Maggio, Angelo; Cutaia, Claudia; Miranti, Anna; Infusino, Erminia; Stasi, Michele

    2013-12-01

    Pretreatment patient plan verification with gamma index (GI) metric analysis is standard procedure for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the variability of the local and global gamma index obtained during standard pretreatment quality assurance (QA) measurements for plans performed with Tomotherapy unit. The QA measurements were performed with a 3D diode array, using variable passing criteria: 3%∕3 mm, 2%∕2 mm, 1%∕1 mm, each with both local and global normalization. The authors analyzed the pretreatment QA results for 73 verifications; 37 were prostate cancer plans, 16 were head and neck plans, and 20 were other clinical sites. All plans were treated using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art System. Pretreatment QA plans were performed with the commercially available 3D diode array ArcCHECK™. This device has 1386 diodes arranged in a helical geometry spaced 1 cm apart. The dose measurements were acquired on the ArcCHECK™ and then compared with the calculated dose using the standard gamma analysis method. The gamma passing rate (%GP), defined as the percentage of points satisfying the condition GI 0.1). Our findings showed that mean %GPs for local (or global) normalization for the entire study group were 93% (98%), 84% (92%), and 66% (61%) for 3%∕3 mm, 2%∕2 mm, and 1%∕1 mm criteria, respectively. DDT was equal to 2 cGy for the local normalization analysis cases. The authors observed great variability in the resulting %GP. With 3%∕3 mm gamma criteria, the overall passing rate with local normalization was 4.6% less on the average than with global one, as expected. The wide difference between %GP calculated with global or local approach is also confirmed by an unpaired t-test statistical analysis. The variability of %GP obtained confirmed the necessity to establish defined agreement criteria that could be universal and comparable between institutions. In particular, while the gamma passing rate does not

  18. Gamma-radiation treatment for disinfestation of the medfly in thirty-five varieties of California-grown fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneshiro, K.Y.; Ohta, A.T.; Kurihara, J.S.; Kanegawa, K.M.; Nagamine, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    Minimum absorbed dosages of gamma-radiation required to prevent egg hatch and eclosion of adults when fruits infested with mature larvae are treated with gamma-radiation were determined. Studies were conducted with 35 varieties of California-grown fruits including 10 varieties of nectarines; 5 of plums; 4 of apples; 2 of pears; 4 of grapes, and 1 each of cherries, apricots, oranges, lemons, tomatoes, persimmons, and kiwifruits. Egg hatchability studies indicated that fruit condition, i.e., ripeness, water content, etc. at the time of treatment can effect the amount of radiation reaching the target organism. Thus, there may be considerable differences in the dose levels required to prevent hatch of medfly eggs in the different varieties of fruits. Nevertheless, despite the need for higher dosages in certain fruits, in all cases, none of the larvae that did hatch survived to develop beyond the first or second larval instar. Similar results were obtained in the larval survival studies. That is, mature larvae infesting different varieties of fruits required different dosages of radiation to prevent pupation and/or emergence as adults. Again, at the 0.5-0.6 kGy dosages, varying rates of pupation occurred depending on the variety of fruit. However, in all cases, none of the individuals survived to emerge as adults. The studies indicate that postharvest treatment with gamma-radiation is certainly a potential alternative to treatment with chemical fumigants such as EDB. More research should be conducted in this area with special emphasis on the condition of the fruit with respect to dosage/mortality determinations. Also, the studies on the Navel oranges indicate that combination treatments, in conjunction with gamma radiation can have a synergistic effect, and this aspect should certainly be investigated for all varieties of fruits

  19. Increased quercetin formation by combination treatment of gamma ray and H2O2 from cyanidin-3-O-xylosylrutinoside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, Eun Mi; Hong, Sung Hyun; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Yoo, Sang Ho; Cho, Jae Young; Lee, In Chul

    2011-01-01

    The cyanidin-3-O-xylosylrutinoside (cya-3-O-xylrut) is one of the most abundant anthocyanin, which is responsible for the red, purple, and blue colors of most fruits and vegetable, in the fruit of Schisandra chinensis Baillon and raspberries. Especially the cya-3- O-xylrut is a major anthocyanin accounting for about 94% in the fruits of S. chinensis, which is a unique source of highly pure cya-3-O-xylrut, and exhibits high antioxidant activity. Previously, we reported that the red color of the S. chinensis fruit extract dramatically disappeared in a dose-dependent manner of gamma irradiation. The color of S. chinensis was effectively removed at 2 kGy of gamma irradiation, even at 1 kGy resulted in a 50% reduction. Interestingly, the destruction of cya-3-O-xylrut by gamma irradiation led to generate flavonoids such as quercetin and unknown compounds. Quercetin, a typical flavonoltype flavonoid, is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. It is ubiquitously present in fruits and vegetables. Quercetin exhibits various biological activities such as anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, vasodilating, and anti-cancer effects. In the present study our purpose is to develop a promising tool for bio-conversion of organic compounds by combination treatment of H 2 O 2 and gamma ray

  20. Morphological changes induced by thermal treatment and gamma irradiation on the males' hind legs of Spodoptera littoralis (Noctuidae; Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai S. EL-Degwi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available External morphology of males' hind legs of Spodoptera littoralis subjected to thermal treatment (33 °C and 37 °C or/and irradiated with substerilizing doses of gamma radiation (75, 100 and 150 Gy were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM in the parental generation. Five types of sensilla have been distinguished; three types of trichoid sensilla (T1,T2 and T3, sensilla basiconica and sensilla auricillica, which are considered as olfactory chemoreceptors. Moreover, sensilla chaetica are contact chemoreceptors, whereas sensilla styloconica are thermo–hygro/gustatory mechanoreceptors. The impact of thermal treatment or/and gamma irradiation reflect a clear morphological change in S. littoralis legs'sensilla, claws, spurs and scales. Otherwise, the degree of deformity was thermal and dose dependent, as it increased with an increase of the degree of temperature and dose of irradiation applied. Substerilizing doses 75 and 100 Gy, either alone or combined with thermal treatment 33 °C, have low undesirable effects on the hind legs with successful mobility or courtship behavior. Consequently, synergistic effect of gamma radiation and thermal stress induced successful application in the integrated pest management program for controlling S. littoralis.

  1. Initial Experience with the Extracorporeal HIFU Knife with 49 Patients: Japanese Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganaha, F.; Okuno, T.; Lee, C. O.; Shimizu, T.; Osako, K.; Oka, S.; Lee, K. H.; Chen, W. Z.; Zhu, H.; Park, S. H.; Qi, Z.; Shi, D.; Song, H. S.

    2005-03-01

    Forty nine patients with 63 tumours were treated with the Chongqing Haifu knife, as an adjunct to intra-arterial chemoinfusion. Treatment targets included breast (20 lesions), liver (16), bone (8), lymph-node (6), soft tissue (4), lung and pleura (4), pancreas (2), kidney (2) and adrenal gland (1). Follow-up contrast MRI was performed at 3 weeks to assess the effects of HIFU ablation. All cases completed the planned treatment. Of 25 lesions treated with the intention of complete tumour ablation, complete necrosis was obtained in 19 lesions (76%) including 4 secondary success cases. Among 32 lesions having partial and palliative treatment, tumour size was decreased in 6 lesions (21%), and good pain control was obtained in 6 out of 7 patients (86%). Skin injury was the most common complication after HIFU (16%), and was mostly a superficial dermal burn that did not necessitate any treatment. However, there was one patient with deep skin injury at an operation scar which resulted in skin perforation. Other adverse events included soft tissue swelling, prolonged fever, anorexia, persistent pain, shortness of the breath, sacroiliac joint fracture and prolonged diarrhoea. In our limited experience, superficial lesions (e.g. breast cancer, bone, soft tissue, lymph-node and pleural metastasis) appear to be good candidates for HIFU treatment. There appears to be a role for the HIFU knife in pain control for patients with bone metastasis and pancreatic cancer.

  2. Remediation of soil contaminated with pesticides by treatment with gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Janilson Silva

    2009-01-01

    The discharge of empty plastic packaging of pesticides can be an environmental concern mainly by soil contamination. Nowadays, Brazil figures in third place among the leading world pesticide markets. An understanding of the processes that affect the transport and fate of pesticides is crucial to assess their potential for contamination of soil and groundwater, and to develop efficient and cost-effective site management and soil remediation strategies. Due to its impact on soil remediation has made sorption a major topic of research on soil-pesticide interactions. The main objective of this study is the evaluation of the pesticides transferring from contaminated mixture of commercial polymeric packing of high-density polyethylene, HDPE, used in agriculture to soil and their removal by gamma irradiation. Two soil samples of argyles compositions and media composition were exposed to a mixture of commercial polymeric packing contaminated with the pesticides methomyl, dimethoate, carbofuran, methidathion, triazine, thiophos, atrazine, ametryne, endosulfan, chloropyrifos, thriazophos and trifluralin. The pesticides leaching from packaging to soil was homogeneous considering a experimental research. The radiation treatment presented high efficiency on removal pesticides from both soil, but it depends on the physical-chemical characteristics of the contaminated soil. The higher efficiency was obtained in soils with higher organic material and humidity. The higher efficiency was obtained for the medium texture soil, with 20 kGy all present pesticides were removed in all layers. In the case of argyles texture soil, it was necessary a 30 kGy to remove the totality of present pesticides. (author)

  3. Gamma Irradiation as a Phytosanitary Treatment of Bactrocera tau (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Pumpkin Fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guoping, Zhan; Lili, Ren; Ying, Shao; Qiaoling, Wang; Daojian, Yu; Yuejin, Wang; Tianxiu, Li

    2015-02-01

    The fruit fly Bactrocera tau (Walker) is an important quarantine pest that damages fruits and vegetables throughout Asian regions. Host commodities shipped from infested areas should undergo phytosanitary measures to reduce the risk of shipping viable flies. The dose-response tests with 1-d-old eggs and 3-, 5-, 7-, 8-d-old larvae were initiated to determine the most resistant stages in fruits, and the minimum dose for 99.9968% prevention of adult eclosion at 95% confidence level was validated in the confirmatory tests. The results showed that 1) the pupariation rate was not affected by gamma radiation except for eggs and first instars, while the percent of eclosion was reduced significantly in all instars at all radiation dose; 2) the tolerance to radiation increased with increasing age and developmental stage; 3) the estimated dose to 99.9968% preventing adult eclosion from late third instars was 70.9 Gy (95% CL: 65.6-78.2, probit model) and 71.8 Gy (95% CL: 63.0-87.3, logit model); and iv) in total, 107,135 late third instars cage infested in pumpkin fruits were irradiated at the target dose of 70 Gy (62.5-85.0, Gy measured), which resulted in no adult emergence in the two confirmatory tests. Therefore, a minimum dose of 85 and 72 Gy, which could prevent adult emergence at the efficacy of 99.9972 and 99.9938% at the 95% confidence level, respectively, can be recommended as a minimum dose for phytosanitary treatment of B. tau in any host fruits and vegetables under ambient atmospheres. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Clinical observation on the therapeutic efficacy of CyberKnife for primary or metastatic retroperitoneal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Hongqing; Yuan Zhiyong; Wang Ping

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the early response rate and radiation toxicity of CyberKnife in the treatment of primary or metastatic retroperitoneal tumors. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with retroperitoneal tumors were treated with CyberKnife. The total doses were 2000-6000 cGy (median 4500 cGy) and biological effective doses were 3750-10080 cGy (median 7680 cGy) in 2-10 fractions (median 5). Of all patients, 3 received three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost, 1 was treated as second-course radiotherapy, and others were treated with CyberKnife only. The survival rates were calculated by Kaplan-Meier method and compared with Logrank test. Results: The complete response, stable disease and progression disease rates were 43% (12/28), 6% (10/28), 18% (5/28), 4%, (1/28), respectively. The overall response rate was 96%. The number of patients who were followed up more than 1, 2, 3 years were 17, 9, 7, respectively. The 1-, 2- and 3-year local control rates were 92%, 86%, and 86%, respectively. The 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 60%, 49% and 49%, respectively. The difference between local progression-free survival and overall survival was not significant (median 9.5 and 12.0 months, χ 2 =0.17, P=0.680), Moreover, if the patients did not have metastasis elsewhere and local treatment was effective, there was no significant difference between local progression-free survival and progression free survival (median 17 and 11 months, χ 2 =0.13, P=0.720), Acute radiation-induced side effects (≥ 2 grade) such as fatigue, anorexia, nausea, vomiting and epigastric discomfort occurred in 9, 9, 7, 7 and 2 patients, respectively. Intestinal stenosis of 1 grade occurred in 1 patients. Conclusions: Radiotherapy for retroperitoneal tumors with CyberKnife has provided a high response rate with minimal side effects. It is a safe and effective local treatment method for retroperitoneal tumors. (authors)

  5. Low-Dose Aspirin Treatment Alleviates Gamma Irradiation Impaired Fertility in Female Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, M.F.

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental evidence suggests that Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), the extensively prescribed analgesic, can improve female fertility by suppressing the prostaglandin (PG) biosynthesis and modulating the uterine circulation. Aspirin has also been found to exhibit a protective ability on the radiation induced oxidative stress. Thus the present work aims to investigate the effect of oral low-dose Aspirin treatment on the radiation induced female reproductive disturbance. Adult female rats were used in the current experiment. All rat group treatments started at the onset of the proestrus phase and terminated at the diestrus encompassing 2 complete estrus cycles. Subsequently, the rats were divided into 4 equal groups: Group 1-Control: female rats receiving distilled water via an oral gavage; Group 2- Irradiation: female rats subjected to 6 Gy gamma rays at the proestrus cycle and receiving distilled water; Group 3-Aspirin: rats orally administered a daily dose of 7mg/kg body weight aspirin dissolved in distilled water via an oral gavage and Group 4- Irradiation + Aspirin: female rats irradiated as group 2 and receiving aspirin treatment. A number of rats from each experimental group were allowed to mate following every treatment to serve as Control mated (Subgroup 1), Irradiated mated (Subgroup 2), Aspirin administered mated (Subgroup 3) and Irradiated + Aspirin treated mated (Subgroup 4). At the assigned day of the second estrus cycle completion, blood was collected from Groups 1-4 for subsequent hormonal assay, lipid peroxides and glutathione (GSH) estimation whereas Subgroups 1-4 were carefully monitored for reproduction and infertility rates. Results have shown that the 6 Gy γ- irradiation of the rats at the proestrus cycle (Group 2) caused a decrease in follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL) and estradiol (E2) levels associated with a drastic increase in the progesterone levels in addition to the significant

  6. Quality Of Starking Apples After Exposure To Gamma Radiation As A Quarantine Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, M.; Mohamad, F.; Al-Bachir, M.

    2004-01-01

    Starking apples approaching physiological maturity were exposed, immediately after harvest, to gamma radiation doses ranging from 100 to 400 Gy. The irradiated fruit were stored for six months in a cold storage facility at 1±1 deg. C and 90±5 % RH. Effects of gamma radiation on weight loss, fruit firmness, pH of fruit juice, fruit taste, color and visible injuries were evaluated. The results showed that gamma irradiation increased weight loss, particularly in the first 45 days of storage. Doses higher than 200 Gy, on the other hand, reduced apple firmness after 45 days of storage while a 400 Gy dose decreased fruit pH immediately after irradiation. (Authors)

  7. Public acceptability of the use of gamma rays from spent nuclear fuel as a hazardous waste treatment process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincher, B.J.; Wells, R.P.; Reilly, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    Three methods were used to estimate public reaction to the use of gamma irradiation of hazardous wastes as a hazardous waste treatment process. The gamma source of interest is spent nuclear fuel. The first method is Benefit-Risk Decision Making, where the benefits of the proposed technology are compared to its risks. The second analysis compares the proposed technology to the other, currently used nuclear technologies and estimates public reaction based on that comparison. The third analysis is called Analysis of Public Consent, and is based on the professional methods of the Institute for Participatory Management and Planning. The conclusion of all three methods is that the proposed technology should not result in negative public reaction sufficient to prevent implementation.

  8. Effect of a topical treatment in organotypic culture of human breast skin after exposure to gamma-rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Gagliano

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The early radiation of epidermal reactions can lead to healing of the lesion or radiation necrosis. There is no general agreement for either the prevention and/or treatment of radiation skin response, also as little is known about the immediate phases of this phenomenon. We investigated the early effects exerted by Healing and Wound Emulsion (HWE on human skin response after ionizing radiation. Epidermal morphology, Heat Shock Protein (HSP 70, and Transforming Growth Factor-b1 (TGF-b1 gene expression were investigated in organotypic human skin cultures undergoing a double dose of gamma-rays (2 Gy. HSP70 gene expression tended to be induced in the HWE group 6 hours after cream administration and was significantly up-regulated after 48 hours, when epidermal morphological alterations were evident. TGF- b1 seems not affected in cream treated samples. HWE may stimulate skin to mount an early defensive response against damage induced by gamma rays.

  9. Public acceptability of the use of gamma rays from spent nuclear fuel as a hazardous waste treatment process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mincher, B.J.; Wells, R.P.; Reilly, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    Three methods were used to estimate public reaction to the use of gamma irradiation of hazardous wastes as a hazardous waste treatment process. The gamma source of interest is spent nuclear fuel. The first method is Benefit-Risk Decision Making, where the benefits of the proposed technology are compared to its risks. The second analysis compares the proposed technology to the other, currently used nuclear technologies and estimates public reaction based on that comparison. The third analysis is called Analysis of Public Consent, and is based on the professional methods of the Institute for Participatory Management and Planning. The conclusion of all three methods is that the proposed technology should not result in negative public reaction sufficient to prevent implementation

  10. A cross sectional review of patient information available in the World Wide Web on CyberKnife: fallacies and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Durgapoorna; Chelakkot, Prameela G; Sunil, Devika; Lakshmaiah, Ashwini

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the quality of videos available in YouTube on CyberKnife. The term "CyberKnife" was input into the search window of www.youtube.com on a specific date and the first 50 videos were assessed for technical and content issues. The data was tabulated and analysed. The search yielded 32,300 videos in 0.33 s. Among the first 50 analysed, most were professional videos, mostly on CyberKnife in general and for brain tumours. Most of the videos did not mention anything about patient selection or lesion size. The other technical details were covered by most although they seemed muffled by the animations. Many patient videos were recordings of one entire treatment, thus giving future patients an insight on what to expect. Almost half the videos projected glorified views about the treatment technique. The company videos were reasonably accurate and well presented as were many institutional videos, although there was a tendency to gloss over a few points. The glorification of the treatment technique was a disturbing finding. The profound trust of the patients on the health care system is humbling.

  11. Gamma radiation/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment of a nonylphenol ethoxylates: Degradation, cytotoxicity, and mutagenicity evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Munawar, E-mail: bosalvee@yahoo.com [National Center of Excellence in Physical Chemistry, University of Peshawar, Peshawar-25120 (Pakistan); Bhatti, Ijaz Ahmad [Department of Chemistry, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad-38040 (Pakistan)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Nonylphenol ethoxylates undergone gamma ray/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. • Treatment efficiency was evaluated on the basis of degradation and toxicity reduction. • A significant reductions in COD and TOC were achieved. • Radiolytic by-products were low carbon carboxylic acids. • AOP reduced the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity considerably. - Abstract: Gamma radiation/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment of nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPEO) was performed and treatment effect was evaluated on the basis of degradation, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon (TOC), and toxicity reduction efficiencies. The radiolytic by-products were determined by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), and Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS) techniques. Low mass carboxylic acids, aldehyde, ketone, and acetic acid were identified as the by-products of the NPEO degradation. NPEO sample irradiated to the absorbed dose of 15 kGy/4.58% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} showed more than 90% degradation. Allium cepa (A. cepa), brine shrimp, heamolytic tests were used for cytotoxicity study, while mutagenicity was evaluated through Ames test (TA98 and TA100 strains) of treated and un-treated NPEO. The reductions in COD and TOC were greater than 70% and 50%, respectively. Gamma radiation/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment revealed a considerable reduction in cytotoxicity and mutagenicity. A. cepa, heamolytic and shrimp assays showed cytotoxicity reduction up to 68.65%, 77%, and 94%, respectively. The mutagenicity reduced up to 62%, 74%, and 79% (TA98) and 68%, 78%, and 82% (TA100), respectively of NPEO-6, NPEO-9, and NPEO-30 irradiated to the absorbed dose of 15 kGy/4.58% H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. NPEO-6 detoxified more efficiently versus NPEO-9 and NPEO-30 and results showed that Gamma radiation/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment has the potential to mineralize and detoxify NPEO.

  12. Modelization and treatment of signals issued of neutronic detectors: neutrons and gamma separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ousi Benomar, K.

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis we present an original methodology permitting to separate the neutron and the gamma response of a detector. This methodology use algorithms based on the utilisation of statistics of superior order (Campbell theorem generalization). 45 figs., 54 refs., 1 annexe

  13. Disinfection of Water and Wastewater Using Gamma Irradiation in Isfahan Water and Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Hashemi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on the disinfection of water and wastewater, water samples were collected from raw and filtered water and wastewater samples were taken from the effluent of the secondary sedimentation, polished effluent (1-day retention time, and also from filtered (rapid sand filter effluent. The samples were irradiated with gamma collimated beam in a batch system using a Co-60 therapeutic gamma radiation machine with a radioactive source emission rate of 405.38CGy/min at different doses of 20-160 Gy and 80-240 Gy, respectively. The samples were analyzed before and after irradiation for total and fecal coliforms. It was observed that nearly 100% reduction was achieved in total and fecal coliforms in water samples treated with a dose of 160 Gy. Depending on effluent quality, disinfection efficiencies achieved using 240 Gy gamma irradiation for inactivation of total coliforms in wastewater samples were 83, 64, and 56 percent for filtered, clarified, and secondary effluents, respectively. The same values were nearly 81, 58, and 46 percent, respectively, for inactivation of fecal coliforms. At lower doses of 120-240Gy, the coliform bacteria were successfully inactivated. It was concluded that a linear correlation holds between the dose delivered and the inactivation of microorganisms, so that inactivation increases with increasing irradiation time.

  14. Reactivation of Latent Epstein-Barr Virus; A Comparison After Gamma Rays and Proton Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Satish K.; Plante, Ianik; Bloom, David C.; Stowe, Raymond; Renner, Ashlie; Wu, Honglu; Crucian, Brian; Pierson, Duane L.

    2017-01-01

    Among different unique stressors astronauts are exposed to during spaceflight, cosmic radiation constitutes an important one that leads to various health effects. In particular, space radiation may contribute to decreased immunity, which has been observed in astronauts during short and long duration missions, as evidenced by several changes in cellular immunity and plasma cytokines levels. Reactivation of latent herpes viruses, either directly from radiation or resulting from perturbation in the immune system, is also observed in astronauts. While EBV is one of the eight human herpes viruses known to infect more than 90% human adults and stays latent for the life of the host without normally causing adverse effects of reactivation, increased reactivation in astronauts is well-documented, though the mechanism of this increase is not understood. In this work, we have studied the effect of two different types of radiations, Cs-137 gamma and 150-MeV proton on the reactivation rates of the Epstein - Barr virus (EBV) in vitro in EBV latent cell lines at doses of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Gy. While we find that both types of radiations reactivated latent EBV in vitro, we observe that at equivalent doses, early response is stronger for protons but with time, the reactivation induced by gamma rays is more persistent. These differences between the protons and gamma rays curves in latent virus reactivation challenge the common paradigm that protons and gamma rays have similar biological effects.

  15. Intravascular placement of metallic coils as lung tumor markers for CyberKnife stereotactic radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaman, Kutlay; Dokdok, A. Murat; Karadeniz, Okatay; Ceylan, Cemile; Engin, Kayihan [Anadolu Medical Center, Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2015-06-15

    To present our experience with placing endovascular coils in pulmonary arteries used as a fiducial marker for CyberKnife therapy and to describe the technical details and complications of the procedure. Between June 2005 and September 2013, 163 patients with primary or secondary lung malignancies, referred for fiducial placement for stereotactic radiosurgery, were retrospectively reviewed. Fourteen patients (9 men, 5 women; mean age, 70 years) with a history of pneumonectomy (n = 3), lobectomy (n = 3) or with severe cardiopulmonary co-morbidity (n = 8) underwent coil (fiducial marker) placement. Pushable or detachable platinum micro coils (n = 49) 2-3 mm in size were inserted through coaxial microcatheters into a small distal pulmonary artery in the vicinity of the tumor under biplane angiography/fluoroscopy guidance. Forty nine coils with a median number of 3 coils per tumor were placed with a mean tumor-coil distance of 2.7 cm. Forty three (87.7%) of 49 coils were successfully used as fiducial markers. Two coils could not be used due to a larger tumor-coil distance (> 50 mm). Four coils were in an acceptable position but their non-coiling shape precluded tumor tracking for CyberKnife treatment. No major complications needing further medication other than nominal therapy, hospitalization more than one night or permanent adverse sequale were observed. Endovascular placement of coil as a fiducial marker is safe and feasible during CyberKnife therapy, and might be an option for the patients in which percutaneous transthoracic fiducial placement might be risky.

  16. Intravascular placement of metallic coils as lung tumor markers for CyberKnife stereotactic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karaman, Kutlay; Dokdok, A. Murat; Karadeniz, Okatay; Ceylan, Cemile; Engin, Kayihan

    2015-01-01

    To present our experience with placing endovascular coils in pulmonary arteries used as a fiducial marker for CyberKnife therapy and to describe the technical details and complications of the procedure. Between June 2005 and September 2013, 163 patients with primary or secondary lung malignancies, referred for fiducial placement for stereotactic radiosurgery, were retrospectively reviewed. Fourteen patients (9 men, 5 women; mean age, 70 years) with a history of pneumonectomy (n = 3), lobectomy (n = 3) or with severe cardiopulmonary co-morbidity (n = 8) underwent coil (fiducial marker) placement. Pushable or detachable platinum micro coils (n = 49) 2-3 mm in size were inserted through coaxial microcatheters into a small distal pulmonary artery in the vicinity of the tumor under biplane angiography/fluoroscopy guidance. Forty nine coils with a median number of 3 coils per tumor were placed with a mean tumor-coil distance of 2.7 cm. Forty three (87.7%) of 49 coils were successfully used as fiducial markers. Two coils could not be used due to a larger tumor-coil distance (> 50 mm). Four coils were in an acceptable position but their non-coiling shape precluded tumor tracking for CyberKnife treatment. No major complications needing further medication other than nominal therapy, hospitalization more than one night or permanent adverse sequale were observed. Endovascular placement of coil as a fiducial marker is safe and feasible during CyberKnife therapy, and might be an option for the patients in which percutaneous transthoracic fiducial placement might be risky.

  17. Phase knife-edge laser Schlieren diffraction interferometry with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The use of phase knife-edge as viewing diaphragm in Schlieren diffraction interferometry not only enhances the fringe contrast but also avoids the loss in phase information as it lets through light from all parts of the test object and its thin interfacing makes the method suitable even for studying weak disturbances. Keywords.

  18. Patterns in abundance, population structure and biology of knife ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The deep-water trawl fishery along the KwaZulu-Natal coast of South Africa targets several crustacean species, with the knife (or pink) prawn Haliporoides triarthrus contributing most of the catch. Logbook data of fishing effort and catch between 1988 and 2010 were used to assess the distribution and abundance of H.

  19. Phase knife-edge laser Schlieren diffraction interferometry with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Schlieren techniques; diffraction; phase visualization; optical testing techniques. ... Broadening of the first diffraction fringe, instead of conventionally modifying the spatial frequency spectrum, enhances the sensitivity of the Schlieren system. The use of phase knife-edge as viewing diaphragm in Schlieren ...

  20. CyberKnife® enhanced conventionally fractionated chemoradiation for high grade glioma in close proximity to critical structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oermann Eric

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction With conventional radiation technique alone, it is difficult to deliver radical treatment (≥ 60 Gy to gliomas that are close to critical structures without incurring the risk of late radiation induced complications. Temozolomide-related improvements in high-grade glioma survival have placed a higher premium on optimal radiation therapy delivery. We investigated the safety and efficacy of utilizing highly conformal and precise CyberKnife radiotherapy to enhance conventional radiotherapy in the treatment of high grade glioma. Methods Between January 2002 and January 2009, 24 patients with good performance status and high-grade gliomas in close proximity to critical structures (i.e. eyes, optic nerves, optic chiasm and brainstem were treated with the CyberKnife. All patients received conventional radiation therapy following tumor resection, with a median dose of 50 Gy (range: 40 - 50.4 Gy. Subsequently, an additional dose of 10 Gy was delivered in 5 successive 2 Gy daily fractions utilizing the CyberKnife® image-guided radiosurgical system. The majority of patients (88% received concurrent and/or adjuvant Temozolmide. Results During CyberKnife treatments, the mean number of radiation beams utilized was 173 and the mean number of verification images was 58. Among the 24 patients, the mean clinical treatment volume was 174 cc, the mean prescription isodose line was 73% and the mean percent target coverage was 94%. At a median follow-up of 23 months for the glioblastoma multiforme cohort, the median survival was 18 months and the two-year survival rate was 37%. At a median follow-up of 63 months for the anaplastic glioma cohort, the median survival has not been reached and the 4-year survival rate was 71%. There have been no severe late complications referable to this radiation regimen in these patients. Conclusion We utilized fractionated CyberKnife radiotherapy as an adjunct to conventional radiation to improve the targeting

  1. [Efficacy comparison between needle-knife therapy and acupuncture-cupping for cervical spondylosis of cervical type].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Li; Wang, Fan

    2014-05-01

    To compare the efficacy differences between needle-knife therapy and acupuncture-cupping for treatment of cervical spondylosis (CS) of cervical type. Sixty cases of CS were randomly divided into a needle-knife group (30 cases) and an acupuncture-cupping group (30 cases). The needle-knife therapy was applied at points among superior nuchal line of occipital bone, bilateral neck muscle, neck centerline, trapezius and medial border scapula for only once. In the acupuncture-cupping group, acupuncture was applied at Fengchi (GB 20), Fengfu (GV 16), Tianzhu (BL 10), Dazhui (GV 14), Jianjing (GB 21), Jiaji (Ex-B2, from C4 to C6), Houxi (SI 3) and Ashi point, followed by cupping on local skin, once every other day for totally six times. The score of neck stiffness and visual analogue scale (VAS) were observed before and after treatment, in follow-up of 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment in the two groups, and the efficacy was compared. In the needle-knife group, 9 cases were cured, 12 cases were markedly effective, 8 cases were effective and 1 case was failed; the total effective rate was 96.7% (29/30) and the cured and markedly effective rate was 70.0% (21/30). In the acupuncture-cupping group, 8 cases were cured, 9 cases were markedly effective, 11 cases were effective and 2 cases were failed; the total effective rate was 93.3% (28/30) and the cured and markedly effective rate was 56.7% (17/30). The difference of total effective rate in the two groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05), but the cured and markedly effective rate of needle-knife group was significantly superior to that of acupuncture-cupping group (P therapy was significantly superior to acupuncture-cupping on improvement of neck stiffness in the follow-up of 1, 3, 6 months after treatment (P cupping group (both P therapy has better effects on neck stiffness and pain relief than acupuncture-cupping, and it is more treatment time saving.

  2. Morphology evolution of {gamma}' precipitates in GTD-111 Ni-based superalloy with heat treatment parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berahmand, Mohamad; Abdolkarim Sajjadi, Seyed [Ferdowsi Univ. of Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

    2013-03-15

    GTD-111 is an Ni-based superalloy used in manufacturing of gas turbine blades. The superalloy attains appropriate high temperature strength through precipitation hardening. In this research the effect of isothermal aging on the morphology evolution and characteristics of precipitates was investigated. Two different heat treatment cycles were applied to the specimens. In cycle I all samples were solution-treated at 1200 C for 4h and water quenched to obtain supersaturated solid solution. A microstructure containing fine {gamma}' precipitates was produced after heat treatment cycle I. The second heat treatment, cycle II, consisted of reheating of the specimens in the precipitate partial dissolution zone at 1150 C for 2h to get coarse primary precipitates, and then water quenching to obtain fine secondary precipitates. The precipitate coarsening in the fine and duplex size precipitate distribution was studied by means of aging of the specimens for various times at 1000 C. The results showed that during long-term annealing of the single size distribution (Cycle I), precipitates line up to reduce interactive free energy and grow to fairly coarse sizes along a direction. In cycle II, the precipitates were split into a group of eight small cuboids or pairs of parallel plates and a large number of {gamma}' particles were closely aligned along a direction. (orig.)

  3. Influences of gamma irradiation treatment on the molecular weight of chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luu Thi Tho; Nguyen Viet Thong; Tran Minh Quynh; Vu Thi Hong Khanh

    2013-01-01

    Effects of gamma radiation on molecular properties of shrimp and squid chitosan (MTV, Vietnam) have been studied with three kind chitosan that having degree of deacetylation 75% and different molecular molecular weight of 69, 187 and 345 kDa, Chitosan samples were irradiated at the same dose rate of 4.3 kGy per hour with various radiation dose of 25, 50, 75, 100, 200 and 500 kGy. The viscosity average molecular weight and degree of deacetylation (DD) of chitosan before and after irradiation have been investigated via their intrinsic viscosity and Furrier transform infra-red (FT-IR). The data revealed the chitosan backbone chains has been degraded by gamma radiation, resulting in the smaller fragments with reduced molecular weight to 3000 Da, whereas their DD have not much changed. (author)

  4. Gamma irradiation and heat treatment for sterilization of Mushroom Spent Compost (MSC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosnani Abdul Rashid; Hassan Hamdani Mutaat; Foziah Ali; Zainab Harun; Hoe, P.C.K.; Mohd Meswan Maskom; Khairuddin Abdul Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Mushroom spent compost (MSC) refers to substrate residue from mushroom cultivation. MSC can be used as a material to improve soil properties for farming. MSC is also suitable as a carrier or substrate to hold beneficial microorganisms in bio fertilizer products. The carrier for bio fertilizer products must be sterilized completely before inoculating with bacteria inoculum. In this study, the effects of gamma irradiation and heat on sterilization of MSC were evaluated by microbial enumeration technique. The MSC was packed into polyethylene bags. The packed MSC were irradiated at different doses of 0 (control), 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 kGy, and heat sterilized at different autoclaving time of 0 (control), 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes, separately. The irradiated and autoclaved samples were enumerated for viable colonies. The results showed that MSC was completely sterilized by gamma irradiation at the dose of 30 kGy whilst sterilization by heat required 30 minute autoclaving time. (author)

  5. Improving the nutritive value of the blocks using gamma irradiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M. R.

    1993-09-01

    The effects of 100 KGy of gamma irradiation on dry matter and organic matter digestibility determined in vitro to improve the nutritive value of three types of blocks containing different feed stuffs were investigated. The compositions of the blocks were type I (wheat bran 28%, dried poultry manure 31%, molasses 20%, urea 10%, Ca(OH)2 6%, salt 5%). Type II (wheat bran 22%, dried poultry manure 10%, sugarbeet 30%, molasses 20%, urea 8%, Ca(OH)2 6%, salt 4%). Type III (olive-oil cake 35%. Wheat bran 30%, urea 100%, cement 15%, salt 10%). The results indicate that there was a significant difference (0.05) between the treated samples and the control for NDF, dry matter and organic matter digestibility. Gamma irradiation resulted in a significant increase (P<0.05) in dry matter and organic matter digestibility and a significant decrease (P<0.05) in NDF contents for the three types of feed blocks. Dry matter digestibility increased by 5% for all block types whereas organic matter digestibility increased by 7%, and 10% for block types I, II and III respectively. The increase in organic matter digestibility was probably due to a decrease in NDF content resulting from gamma irradiation. NDF decreased by 25%, 19% and 16% for block types I, II and III respectively. (author). 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Gamma irradiation of pharmaceutical compounds, nitroimidazoles, as a new alternative for water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Polo, M; López-Peñalver, J; Prados-Joya, G; Ferro-García, M A; Rivera-Utrilla, J

    2009-09-01

    The main objectives of this study were: (1) to investigate the decomposition and mineralization of nitroimidazoles (Metronidazole [MNZ], Dimetridazole [DMZ], and Tinidazole [TNZ]) in waste and drinking water using gamma irradiation; (2) to study the decomposition kinetics of these nitroimidazoles; and (3) to evaluate the efficacy of nitroimidazole removal using radical promoters and scavengers. The results obtained showed that nitroimidazole concentrations decreased with increasing absorbed dose. No differences in irradiation kinetic constant were detected for any nitroimidazole studied (0.0014-0.0017 Gy(-1)). The decomposition yield was higher under acidic conditions than in neutral and alkaline media. Results obtained showed that, at appropriate concentrations, H(2)O(2) accelerates MNZ degradation by generating additional HO(); however, when the dosage of H(2)O(2) exceeds the optimal concentration, the efficacy of MNZ degradation is reduced. The presence of t-BuOH (HO() radical scavenger) and thiourea (HO(), H() and e(aq)(-) scavenger) reduced the MNZ irradiation rate, indicating that degradation of this pollutant can take place via two pathways: oxidation by HO() radicals and reduction by e(aq)(-) and H(). MNZ removal rate was slightly lower in subterranean and surface waters than in ultrapure water and was markedly lower in wastewater. Regardless of the water chemical composition, MNZ gamma irradiation can achieve i) a decrease in the concentration of dissolved organic carbon, and ii) a reduction in the toxicity of the system with higher gamma absorbed dose.

  7. Application of gamma radiation and physicochemical treatment to improve the bioactive properties of chitosan extracted from shrimp shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aktar Jesmin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to exploit a suitable chitosan extraction method from the chitin of indigenous shrimp shells by employing different physicochemical treatments and to improve different bioactive properties of this extracted chitosan (CS by applying gamma radiation. Chitin was prepared from shrimp shell by pretreatment (deproteination, demineralization and oxidation. Chitosan was extracted from chitin by eight different methods varying different physicochemical parameters (reagent concentration, temperature and time and assessed with respect to the degree of deacetylation, requirement of time and reagents. The method where chitin was repeatedly treated with 121°C for 30 min with 20 M NaOH, produced the highest degree of deacetylation (DD value (92% as measured by potentiometric titration, with the least consumption of time and chemicals, and thus, selected as the best suitable extraction method. For further quality improvement, chitosan with highest DD value was irradiated with different doses (i.e., 5, 10, 15, 20 and 50 kGy of gamma radiation from cobalt-60 gamma irradiator. As the radiation dose was increased, the molecular weight of the wet irradiated chitosan, as measured by the viscosimetric method, decreased from 1.16 × 105 to 1.786 × 103, 1.518 × 103, 1.134 × 103, 1.046 × 103 and 8.23 × 102 dalton, respectively. The radiation treatment of chitosan samples increased the antimicrobial activity significantly in concentration dependent manner on both gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative (Escherichia coli bacteria, as determined by the well-diffusion method. Four to five percent wet chitosan treated with a radiation dose range of 5.0–10.0 kGy rendered the highest antimicrobial activity with least energy and time consumption. Solubility, water binding capacity (WBC and fat binding capacity (FBC also improved due to irradiation of chitosan.

  8. Effects of Acupuncture Knife on Inflammatory Factors and Pain in Third Lumbar Vertebrae Transverse Process Syndrome Model Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Ni Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to explore the long-term effects and pain relief mechanism of acupuncture knife on third lumbar vertebrae (L3 transverse process syndrome. Forty SD rats were randomized into control, model, electroacupuncture (EA, and acupuncture knife (AK group. Except control rats, other rats were subjected to an operation to emulate L3 transverse process syndrome. Fourteen days after the operation, EA and AK rats were given electroacupuncture and acupuncture knife treatments, respectively. Fifty-six days after the operation, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure substance P (SP, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, interleukin-10 (IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β in peripheral blood. The tail flick test was used to observe pain threshold. We found that rats with the simulation operation had significantly higher levels of SP, 5-HT, IL-1, IL-10, TNF-α, and TGF-β, while the AK rats had lower levels. In addition, the pain threshold of AK rats was similar to that of control rats. AK pretreatment could alleviate pain through modulating inflammatory response.

  9. Gamma gamma technology group

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The gamma gamma community are concerned that in the rush to prepare for the e+e− machine, allowance is not being made for a future upgrade of the photon linear collider. References. [1] ECFA/DESY Photon Collider Working Group: B Badelek et al, TESLA Technical. Design Report, Part VI, Chapter 1: Photon collider at ...

  10. Penetrating brain injury with a metal bar and a knife: Report of two interesting cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabibkhooei, Alireza; Taheri, Morteza; Rohani, Sadra; Chanideh, Iran; Rahatlou, Hessam

    2018-04-01

    Introduction Penetrating brain injury (PBI) is uncommon among the civilian population. Here, we report two interesting cases of PBI. Case presentation The first patient was a 20-year-old male who sustained a penetrating head injury with a metal bar during an accident at work. The patient underwent early surgical intervention, and related meningitis was treated with antibiotics. The patient was discharged 45 days later with no deficit. The second patient was a 34-year-old male who was the victim of a violence attack and was admitted to hospital. He was struck by a knife to his right temporal bone. A brain computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated the tract of the knife within the brain parenchyma. The patient underwent conservative treatment. After several weeks, the patient was discharged in good health. Conclusion Although severe PBI has a poorer prognosis than a blunt brain injury, in treating of these patients, aggressive and timely surgical intervention, proper wide-spectrum antibiotic administration, stringent and diligent care in the intensive-care unit and careful management of the associated complications are mandated.

  11. Changes in antigenicity of porcine serum albumin in gamma-irradiated sausage extract by treatment with pepsin and trypsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Koth-Bong-Woo-Ri; Song, Eu-Jin [Department of Food Science and Technology/Institute of Food Science, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, So-Young [Traditional Food Research Group, Korea Food Research Institute, Seongnam 463-746 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Gyu [Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju-Woon [National Federation of Fisheries Cooperatives, Fisheries Economic Institute, Seoul 138-827 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Myung-Woo [Department of Culinary Nutrition, Woosong University, Daejon 300-718 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Dong-Hyun, E-mail: dhahn@pknu.ac.kr [Department of Food Science and Technology/Institute of Food Science, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Pork is known as an allergenic food with porcine serum albumin (PSA, 66 kDa) representing the major allergen. This study was conducted to investigate the change in antigenicity of PSA in gamma-irradiated sausage extract treated with pepsin and trypsin. Sausage products (A and B) were irradiated at 1, 3, 10, and 20 kGy. After irradiation, sausage proteins were extracted and digested with pepsin (1:200, 30 min) and trypsin (1:300, 5, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min). The binding ability of PSA in extracts of the irradiated sausages (A and B) decreased by over 3 kGy relative to the binding ability of PSA in extracts of intact sausages and showed no notable differences when the dose of radiation ranged from 3 to 20 kGy. After treatment with pepsin and trypsin, the binding ability of PSA in extracts of the irradiated sausages was decreased more relative to that of intact sausages and showed no significant differences when the period of trypsin treatment is increased or when the dose of irradiation is increased. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) results indicated that there was no visible change in the intensity of the PSA band in extracts of the irradiated sausages. After pepsin and trypsin treatment, the intensity of PSA band faded with increasing doses of irradiation. In conclusion, antigenicity of PSA in pork sausages could be reduced by gamma irradiation. - Highlights: > Change in antigenicity of PSA in irradiated sausage extract (ISE) was examined. > Binding ability of PSA in ISE was decreased compared to intact extract. > Binding ability of PSA in ISE after enzyme treatments was also further decreased. > Intensity of PSA band in ISE after enzyme treatments became weak.

  12. In Vitro Studies on Degradation of Gamma-L-Glutamyl-L-Cysteine and Gamma-L-Glutamyl-D-Cysteine in Blood: Implications for Treatment of Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikpa, Nsisong; Forman, Rachel; Garchow, Kendra; Sukowski, Ernest; Peterson, Darryl R

    2015-01-01

    Treatment for ischemic stroke involves a thrombolytic agent to re-establish blood flow in the brain. However, delayed reperfusion may cause injury to brain capillaries. Previous studies indicate that the antioxidant gamma-L-glutamyl-L-cysteine (γ-Glu-Cys) contributes to reducing reperfusion injury to the cerebral vasculature in rats, when administered intravascularly. To determine the stability of γ-Glu-Cys in blood, the peptide was incubated in rat serum in vitro, and its degradation was quantified by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The half-time (t1/2) for degradation of γ-Glu-Cys was 11 ± 1 minute (mean ± SD, n = 3). A similar pattern of degradation was observed when γ-Glu-Cys was incubated in the presence of human plasma (t1/2 = 17 ± 8 minutes, n = 3). In a second series of experiments, degradation of an analog (γ-Glu-D-Cys) was tested in rat serum and found to be more stable than the native molecule. The initial velocity for degradation of γ-Glu-D-Cys (0.12 ± 0.02 mM/min; mean ± SD, n = 3) was significantly (P = 0.006) less than that of γ-Glu-Cys (0.22 ± 0.03 mM/min; mean ± SD, n = 3). Furthermore, an in vitro assay indicated that the analog has as an oxidative capacity that equals that of the original peptide in the presence of rat serum and human plasma. Finally, both peptides were found to be similarly effective in preventing lysis of intact cells using in vitro assays. These studies show that γ-Glu-Cys remains intact in blood for several minutes, and the analog γ-Glu-D-Cys may be a more stable, but similarly effective antioxidant.

  13. Role Of SYNBIOTICS And Low Level GAMMA Irradiation Treatments In Improving Performance Of Japanese Quails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABU-TALEB, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    A total number of 800 Japanese quail eggs were obtained from a parent flock maintained the poultry research unit of the Biological Application Department, Nuclear Research Centre at Inshas, Egypt, and used in the present study. Before incubating the eggs, they were divided into two equal groups of 400 eggs each; the 1 st group was exposed to a low level of gamma irradiation at 50 rad before sitting while the 2 nd group did not exposed to gamma irradiation. After hatching of the two groups, fertility, hatchability, embryonic mortality and hatching weight were determined. Hatched quail chicks from each group (1 and 2) were divided into four identical subgroups and all fed the basal diet but with a different supplement. The diet of the 1 st subgroup was supplemented with 2.5% Lactobacilli, the 2 nd with 1.5% lactose, the 3 rd with 2.5% Lactobacilli plus 1.5% lactose, while the 4 th subgroup was fed the basal diet only and served as control. The results showed decreased embryonic mortality and increased hatchability and hatching weight due to exposing quail eggs to low level of gamma radiation as compared to non-exposed eggs. The average body weight and the relative weights of carcass, testis and oviduct, egg production, egg weight, serum total protein, albumin, globulins, RBC, WBC and Hb values were increased significantly (P th week due to adding Lactobacilli and lactose to the basal diet. Significant reduction (P<0.05) in the intestinal wall index was observed due to adding Lactobacilli and lactose to the basal diet of hatched quails. In conclusion, adding Lactobacilli and/or lactose to the basal diet of hatched Japanese quails improved performance as well as blood constituents and intestinal wall index. The magnitude of this improvement was even greater when both supplements were combined. In addition, the exposure of eggs to low level of gamma radiation (50 rad) improved hatchability and hatching weight of Japanese quail eggs, but no relationship to dietary

  14. Comparison of electron-irradiation and gamma-irradiation as a decontamination treatment of spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Toru; Todoriki, Setsuko; Mamun.

    1993-01-01

    Electron-irradiation at 10 kGy decontaminated all the eight kinds of spices (black pepper, white pepper, nutmeg, red pepper, parsley, paprika, laurel and onion powder) to the microbial levels lower than 10 2 /g. Similar sterilization effects by the irradiation were observed on heat-resistant bacterial spores. The 10 kGy irradiation did not significantly affect the contents of essential oils and colors of the spices. These results indicate that electron-irradiation at 10 kGy effectively decontaminates spices without notable adverse effect on the qualities. The disinfecting effect of electron beams on spices was smaller than that of gamma-rays. (author)

  15. Effect of chemical treatments and gamma rays on starch content of sweet potatoes and its properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roushdi, M.; Fahmy, A.A.; Sarhan, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of soaking sweet potatoe slices in citric acid, sodium bisulphite and SO 2 gas followed by drying, either in sun or in aerated oven, on starch content and its properties was investigated. The sweet potato tubers were also stored after irradiation with gamma rays. The starch was isolated and some of its poperties were studied. It was found that fuming with SO 2 , followed by sun drying and storing or irradiation of tubers at 5 krad gave very close results regarding yield of starch and its properties versus starch isolated from fresh tubers. (orig.) [de

  16. Determination of gamma radiation dose as a post-harvest treatment in mangos infested with the South American fruit fly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alama, D.

    1999-01-01

    Efforts are being made to determine a gamma radiation dose for mortality of third-instar larvae of Anastrepha fraterculus which infest mangos of the Haden variety of 400 g weight. Four radiation treatments were tested: 0.4 kGy, 0.6 kGy, 0.8 kGy and 1.0 kGy. Using as a criterium for mortality the interruption of the biological cycle between larva and pupa, the following results were achieved: 49.61%, 63.33%, 74.86% and 90.72%. The percentages obtained have been corrected using the Abbot formula. When the criterium was based on no adult emergence, 100% mortality was achieved for the four treatments. (author)

  17. Differential production of proteolytic enzymes by normal human fibroblasts and their counterparts transformed by treatment with 60Co gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishitani, Koji; Namba, Masayoshi; Ohkubo, Shigeki; Kimoto, Tetsuo

    1985-01-01

    Production of proteolytic enzymes by human fibroblasts in the process of transformation was investigated. The cells used were normal human fibroblasts (KSM-6) and their in vitro counterparts transformed by treatment with 60 Co gamma rays (KMST-6). Cells seeded by treatment with EDTA were cultured in a serum free medium. Proteolytic enzymes in the culture medium of cells were assayed using a synthetic substrate, N-α-(p-tosyl)-L-arginine ( 3 H) methyl ester hydrochloride. The transformed cells (KMST-6) produced a larger amount of enzymes than normal cells (KMS-6). The enzyme production in both cell lines was high in the exponential growth stage and then decreased as the cells reached confluency. The proteolytic enzymes produced by these cells were trypsin- and thrombin-like enzymes. Cell growth of KMST-6 or KMS-6 was not inhibited by the addition of protease inhibitors to the culture medium. (author)

  18. Dinitrosyl non-heme iron complexes at the gamma radiation treatment of animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, D.I.; Alieva, I.N.; Abilov, Z.G.; Gurbanov, I.S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: At the present time there are a great number investigations dedicated to revealing of mechanism formation of 2,03 complexes at the some pathologies in an organism. These complexes are represented weakly bounded form of non-heme iron, including into beside iron two nitrogen oxide molecules (NO) and two paired RS- groups of proteins or low-molecular compounds. 2,03 complexes are characterized by an axial symmetrical tensory of the g-factor with g=2,037, g=2,012 and g=2,03. In this study the data testifying 2,03 complexes formation into liver of animal treated by the fatal dose of gamma-radiation are reported. The changing of the ESR signal form was observed. It was shown that the form and intensity of the 2,03 signal in healthy and irradiated animals are differ from each other. The analysis of the 2,03 signal parameters is confirm this fact, too. The conclusion was made that 2,03 complexes ESR signal may be considered as an indicator of integrity of intracellular membranes of the gamma-irradiated animals

  19. Biochemical histological and histochemical changes induced in pregnant albino rats as affected by SILYMARIN treatment and/or gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, F.L.; Othman, A.

    2007-01-01

    Silymarin is a mixture of flavonoids extracted from seeds of milk thistle (Silybum marianum), that has been used in the treatment of liver diseases. Flavonoids are a large group of polycyclic phenols of plant origin that are displaying estrogenic effects. Silybum marianum has been traditionally used in Egypt for its antifertility effect. The objective of this study was to evaluate the side effects of silymarin administration and / or exposure to gamma radiation in pregnant rats. Silymarin at a dose level 75.6 mg/kg body weight was daily administered via an oral stomach tube to pregnant adult albino rats from the 1st to the 20th day of pregnancy while mothers were subjected to gamma radiation (1.5 Gy) as fractionated dose; 0.75 Gy on the 6th day and 0.75 Gy on 12th day of pregnancy. Experimental investigations carried out one day prior to parturition have demonstrated that silymarin intake throughout the whole gestational period induced biochemical, histopathological and histochemical disorders in irradiated mothers. The data obtained revealed that silymarin administration and/or gamma radiation exposure caused significant elevation in levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), the luteinizing hormone (LH) and estradiol in pregnant rats.Moreover, the histopathological results showed different distortions which varied from hyperemic blood vessels, fibroblasts in the ovary, degenerated uterine glands, erosion in the lining epithelia of the uterus and degenerated epithelial cells, necrosis in trophospongium, necrosis in the giant cells, massive blood in the labyrinth and cytoplasmic vacuolation in the placenta. In addition, the histochemical observations revealed various diminutions in each of the polysaccharides, total protein and DNA content. Conclusively, these findings proved that radiation exposure and/or silymarin intake could exert deleterious effect, therefore, it is recommended that radiation occupational workers especially females have to be careful toward

  20. TH-A-BRC-02: AAPM TG-178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, S. [San Diego Medical Physics (United States)

    2016-06-15

    AAPM TG-135U1 QA for Robotic Radiosurgery - Sonja Dieterich Since the publication of AAPM TG-135 in 2011, the technology of robotic radiosurgery has rapidly developed. AAPM TG-135U1 will provide recommendations on the clinical practice for using the IRIS collimator, fiducial-less real-time motion tracking, and Monte Carlo based treatment planning. In addition, it will summarize currently available literature about uncertainties. Learning Objectives: Understand the progression of technology since the first TG publication Learn which new QA procedures should be implemented for new technologies Be familiar with updates to clinical practice guidelines AAPM TG-178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance - Steven Goetsch Purpose: AAPM Task Group 178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance was formed in August, 2008. The Task Group has 12 medical physicists, two physicians and two consultants. Methods: A round robin dosimetry intercomparison of proposed ionization chambers, electrometer and dosimetry phantoms was conducted over a 15 month period in 2011 and 2012 (Med Phys 42, 11, Nov, 2015). The data obtained at 9 institutions (with ten different Elekta Gamma Knife units) was analyzed by the lead author using several protocols. Results: The most consistent results were obtained using the Elekta ABS 16cm diameter phantom, with the TG-51 protocol modified as recommended by Alfonso et al (Med Phys 35, 11, Nov 2008). A key white paper (Med Phys, in press) sponsored by Elekta Corporation, was used to obtain correction factors for the ionization chambers and phantoms used in this intercomparison. Consistent results were obtained for both Elekta Gamma Knife Model 4C and Gamma Knife Perfexion units as measured with each of two miniature ionization chambers. Conclusion: The full report gives clinical history and background of gamma stereotactic radiosurgery, clinical examples and history, quality assurance recommendations and outline

  1. CyberKnife frameless stereotactic radiosurgery for spinal lesions: clinical experience in 125 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerszten, Peter C; Ozhasoglu, Cihat; Burton, Steven A; Vogel, William J; Atkins, Barbara A; Kalnicki, Shalom; Welch, William C

    2004-07-01

    The role of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial lesions is well established. Its use for the treatment of spinal lesions has been limited by the availability of effective target-immobilizing devices. Conventional external beam radiotherapy lacks the precision to allow delivery of large doses of radiation near radiosensitive structures such as the spinal cord. The CyberKnife (Accuray, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) is an image-guided frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system that allows for the radiosurgical treatment of spinal lesions. This study evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of the treatment of spinal lesions with a single-fraction radiosurgical technique using the CyberKnife. The CyberKnife system uses the coupling of an orthogonal pair of x-ray cameras to a dynamically manipulated robot-mounted linear accelerator with six degrees of freedom that guides the therapy beam to the intended target without the use of frame-based fixation. Real-time imaging allows the tracking of patient movement. Cervical spine lesions were located and tracked relative to cranial bony landmarks; lower spinal lesions were tracked relative to fiducial bone markers. In this prospective cohort evaluation of a spine radiosurgery technique, 125 spinal lesions in 115 consecutive patients were treated with a single-fraction radiosurgery technique (45 cervical, 30 thoracic, 36 lumbar, and 14 sacral). There were 17 benign tumors and 108 metastatic lesions. All dose plans were calculated on the basis of computed tomographic images acquired from 1.25-mm slices with an inverse treatment planning technique. Radiosurgical circular cones ranging in diameter from 5 to 40 mm were used. Tumor volume ranged from 0.3 to 232 cm(3) (mean, 27.8 cm(3)). Seventy-eight lesions had received external beam irradiation previously. Tumor dose was maintained at 12 to 20 Gy to the 80% isodose line (mean, 14 Gy); canal volume receiving more than 8 Gy ranged from 0.0 to 1.7 cm(3) (mean, 0

  2. No need to change the skin knife in modern arthroplasty surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, C; Skovby, A; Troelsen, A

    2014-01-01

    to conflicting conclusions regarding discarding the skin knife or not. This study evaluates the prevalence of contamination of a separate skin knife using modern antiseptic technique in primary THA and TKA without laminar airflow. Three knives from each primary THA and TKA surgery in non-laminar airflow.......8 %) and contamination of the control knife in five patients (1.8 %). No patient developed an infection with 1-year follow-up. Our findings suggest a very low rate of contamination of the skin knife using modern antiseptic technique without laminar airflow and/or plastic adhesive draping and do not support the use...

  3. Low Doses of Gamma Rays Reduce the Sensitivity of Cervical Carcinoma Cells to Subsequent Treatment with Cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmak, M.; Brozovic, A.

    2003-01-01

    One of the major challenges of modern genetics is to apply recent advances in mutation research to improve the accuracy of the estimates of the genetic risk for humans. Because of the important implications for radiation protection, biological effects of low-dose radiation have been a focus of research in recent years. Previously we have found that human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells irradiated repeatedly with low doses of gamma rays (HeLa1500 cells) became resistant to cisplatin. In this study we examine whether this effect was caused by inhibition of apoptosis. In HeLa and HeLa1500 cells we determined the induction of apoptosis following the treatment with cisplatin (i) by counting apoptotic cells with characteristic morphological changes, (ii) by analysing the expression of apoptotic genes involved in cytochrome c/Apaf-1/caspase-9 and in Fas/FasL pathways by Western blot method, and (iii) by estimating the activities of caspases by commercial caspase detection kits. Our results show that low doses of gamma rays induced alterations in human cervical carcinoma cells that were reflected in inhibition of p53-independent cisplatin-induced apoptosis due to reduced activity of caspase 3. (author)

  4. Comparison of the microbiocidal effect of gamma- and electron beam treatment and ozone with respect to water disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pribil, W.

    2006-04-01

    The microbiocidal effect of ionizing radiation (gamma and electron beam radiation) and ozone with respect to water disinfection was investigated. Test organisms were spores of Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and the bacteriophages PHI X 174, MS 2 and B 40 8. Experiments were conducted in sterile deionized water, Vienna City tap water and water with TOC-concentrations of about 5 mg/L and 15 mg/L. In some selected experiments the DOC-, BDOC- and AOC concentrations of water containing humic substances were observed in the course of ozonization or treatment with ionizing radiation. Pilot tests for the gamma and electron beam irradiation were conducted to define reproducible test conditions for all test organisms, test waters and applied radiation doses. For all test organisms inactivation experiments were performed and applied doses were chosen to enable reductions between 0 and 6 log units. Spores of B. subtilis were more resistant to gamma and electron beam irradiation than the bacteriophages PHI X 174, B 40 8 und MS 2. The radiation sensitivity of E. coli was similar to that of the bacteriophages. The gamma inactivation behaviour of the bacteriophages was influenced by the composition of the test water. To reach identical levels of reduction, higher applied doses were necessary in Vienna City tap water compared to sterile deionized water. This effect was insignificant for spores of B. subtilis. For all test organisms with the exception of the bacteriophage B 40 8 a dose rate effect was observed and quantified. Inactivation experiments with ozone showed under the tested conditions (0,4 mg O3/L after 4 min und 0,1 mg O3/L after 10 min reaction time) a good virucidal and bactericidal effect, with the exception of spores of B. subtilis. Hydrogen peroxide, generated by ionizing radiation, did not affect the inactivation behaviour of the test organisms under the experimental conditions tested. It was shown that gamma and electron beam radiation reduced the

  5. The treatment of fish meal with gamma radiation - effect on protein fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchman, W.; Konieczny, P.; Zabielski, J.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was determination of the gamma radiation effect on changes of protein fraction of fish meal. For determination of the changes seven dose levels (0-20 kGy) were applied. The doses up to 5 kGy did not influence significantly on solubility, aminoacids composition, content of amino-nitrogen and enzymatic digestibility of proteins in vitro. For 5-10 kGy doses an insignificant decrease of the content of tryptophan was observed. The dose of 5 kGy is quite satisfactory in elimination of vegetative forms of most pathogens. For elimination of yeasts and moulds, the doses up to 10 kGy have to be applied. In this situation supplementation the fish meal with tryptophan is recommended

  6. Processing of gamma irradiated bone allografts for treatment of injuries in a nuclear scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Antaryami; Singh, Rita; Shah, Om

    2014-01-01

    Bone allografts fill an important void in the surgical practice of orthopaedic surgery, and their use to replace and reconstruct musculoskeletal structures following injury or disease has gained increasing acceptance by orthopaedic surgeons. Serious mechanical injuries in a nuclear scenario involving compression, displacement and missile hit will lead to high incidence of various kinds of bone fractures, spinal injuries and joint injuries apart from lethality, lung damage and eardrum rupture. Bone allografts can be employed for repairing fracture defects, filling in destroyed regions of bone, management of open fractures and joint injuries. Autologous bone grafts, though ideal, have the drawback of secondary surgery for autograft retrieval, complications of infection and donor site morbidity. Bone allografts eliminate additional incision necessary for acquiring an autograft and consequently reduce operating time, blood loss as well as hospital and medical costs. However, disease transmission and bacterial infection in bone allograft transplantation is of significant concern. Sterilization by gamma irradiation is a definitive method for eliminating microorganisms and can prevent life-threatening allograft associated infections. The present study was carried out with the aim of bioburden assessment, radiation sterilization and clinical evaluation of bone allografts processed from femoral heads obtained from living donors. Femoral heads were obtained during surgery at Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, SN Medical College, Jodhpur and processed as freeze-dried bone allografts. Bioburden of bone allografts was found to be in the range of 2.26 to 3.59 log CFU/g. Verification dose for different batches of processing was 7.24±1.27 kGy. Radiological data of processed gamma irradiated bone grafts used in clinical cases of trauma surgery was recorded and has shown successful graft incorporation in allogenic recipients. (author)

  7. Direct measures of mechanical energy for knife mill size reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitra, V.S.P. [University of Tennessee; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Miu, P.I [University of Tennessee; Yang, Y.T. [University of Tennessee; Smith, D.R. [University of Tennessee; Chevanan, Nehru [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2009-08-01

    Lengthy straw/stalk of biomass may not be directly fed into grinders such as hammer mills and disc refiners. Hence, biomass needs to be preprocessed using coarse grinders like a knife mill to allow for efficient feeding in refiner mills without bridging and choking. Size reduction mechanical energy was directly measured for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.), and corn stover (Zea mays L.) in an instrumented knife mill. Direct power inputs were determined for different knife mill screen openings from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, rotor speeds between 250 and 500 rpm, and mass feed rates from 1 to 11 kg/min. Overall accuracy of power measurement was calculated to be 0.003 kW. Total specific energy (kWh/Mg) was defined as size reduction energy to operate mill with biomass. Effective specific energy was defined as the energy that can be assumed to reach the biomass. The difference is parasitic or no-load energy of mill. Total specific energy for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover chopping increased with knife mill speed, whereas, effective specific energy decreased marginally for switchgrass and increased for wheat straw and corn stover. Total and effective specific energy decreased with an increase in screen size for all the crops studied. Total specific energy decreased with increase in mass feed rate, but effective specific energy increased for switchgrass and wheat straw, and decreased for corn stover at increased feed rate. For knife mill screen size of 25.4 mm and optimum speed of 250 rpm, optimum feed rates were 7.6, 5.8, and 4.5 kg/min for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively, and the corresponding total specific energies were 7.57, 10.53, and 8.87 kWh/Mg and effective specific energies were 1.27, 1.50, and 0.24 kWh/Mg for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. Energy utilization ratios were calculated as 16.8%, 14.3%, and 2.8% for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. These

  8. SU-E-T-516: Measurement of the Absorbed Dose Rate in Water Under Reference Conditions in a CyberKnife Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragon-Martinez, N; Hernandez-Guzman, A [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City, DF (Mexico); Gomez-Munoz, A [Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI, Mexico City, DF (Mexico); Massillon-JL, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to measure the absorbed-dose-rate in a CyberKnife unit reference-field (6cm diameter) using three ionization chambers (IC) following the new IAEA/AAPM formalism and Gafchromic film (MD-V3-55 and EBT3) protocol according to our work reported previously. Methods: The absorbed-dose-rates were measured at 90cm and 70cm SSD in a 10cmx10cm field and at 70cm SSD in a 5.4cmx5.4cm equivalent to 6cm diameter field using a linac Varian iX. All measurements were performed at 10cm depth in water. The correction factors that account for the difference between the IC response on the reference field and the CyberKnife reference field, k-(Q-msr,Q)^(f-msr,f-ref), were evaluated and Gafchromic film were calibrated using the results obtained above. Under the CyberKnife reference conditions, the factors were used to measure the absorbed-dose-rate with IC according to the new formalism and the calibrated film was irradiated in water. The film calibration curve was used to evaluate the absorbed-dose-rate in the CyberKnife unit. Results: Difference up to 2.56% is observed between dose-rate measured with IC in the reference 10cmx10cm field, depending where the chamber was calibrated, which was not reflected in the correction factor k-(Q-msr,Q)^(f-msr,f-ref ) where variations of ~0.15%-0.5% were obtained. Within measurements uncertainties, maximum difference of 1.8% on the absorbed-dose-rate in the CyberKnife reference field is observed between all IC and the films Conclusion: Absorbed-dose-rate to water was measured in a CyberKnife reference field with acceptable accuracy (combined uncertainties ~1.32%-1.73%, k=1) using three IC and films. The MD-V3-55 film as well as the new IAEA/AAPM formalism can be considered as a suitable dosimetric method to measure absorbed-dose-rate to water in small and non-standard CyberKnife fields used in clinical treatments However, the EBT3 film is not appropriated due to the high uncertainty provided (combined uncertainty ~9%, k=1

  9. Effects of gamma-radiation treatment in somatic cell culture of indica rice Basmati 370 selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Shaokai; Qi Xiufang; Xiong Zhenmin; Zhao Chengzhang

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Radiation treatment was applied at different doses to germinating embryo, callus, callus with green spots and callus with developing shoots. Results indicate: (1) induction rate of the callus was reduced with increased radiation dose applied to germinating embryos; (2) radiation effect on redifferentiation percentage and/or green plantlets percentage of the callus varied with different treatment dates in the order of callus treatment > treatment of callus with green spots > treatment of callus with developing shoots > treatment of germinating embryo; (3) in vitro irradiation reduced the fertility of regenerated plants, but was able to increase their exerted stigma rate and the frequency of early maturing variation in their progenies; (4) a number of promising mutants including 2 male sterile plants were obtained from the progenies of in vitro irradiation. The radiation treatment with 2.5-5.OkR to callus with green spots or shoots is a method worthy of adoption in rice improvement. (author)

  10. Changes in Protein Content and Urease Activity Due to Soaking Treatment of gamma irradiated Soybean Seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamel, H.A.; Aly, M.A.S.; Afifi, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    The total protein measurement revealed that both soaking time and radiation affected protein content of soybean seeds. Amount of protein content increased gradually with time up to 6 h. The amount recorded 388, 396 and 465 mg/g.d.wt in control, 10, 25, 50 Gy, respectively. Then the amount decreased at and 24 h whereas, protein content of cotyledonary leaves (120 h) increased by 25 and 50 Gy reaching 7305 and 80.6 mg/g.d.wt as compared to 68.5 mg/g.d wt in case on control. On comparison with control samples, 10 Gy appeared to have no effect on protein content while 25 and 50 Gy increased protein in a dose dependant matter. Maximum increase in urease activity was recorded at 6 h of soaking (1110, 1162 and 1200 unit/g f.wt in control, 10, 25 and 50 Gy respectively) Moreover, the 25 and 50 Gy increased urease activity at all time intervals. After sodium dodecyl sulfate- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was applied, bands could be segregated into high molecular weight bands they are represented from band No 1 with 200 KDa to band No 8 with 100 kDa. On the other hand low molecular weight are presented from band No 9 with 75 kDa to band No 14 with 10 kDa. Characteristic bands No 4 and 10 were common in all samples and several other bands were characteristic to the time or gamma-radiation applied. Calculated similarity index (SI) showed similarity between control and 25 Gy treated samples (except at 6 h). In contrast, the similarity index between control and 50 Gy decreased from zero up to 6 h then increased to 1 at 120 h (the same trend was also observed between 25 and 50 Gy). From similarity index study it could be concluded that at cotyledonary stage(120 h) there were no differences between different samples, thus indicating a recovery from the effect of gamma irradiation

  11. Effect of radio treatment with gamma radiation on the decontamination and cytotoxicity of a myco toxin: Ochratoxin A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrez, Amel

    2008-01-01

    solution. When irradiated on millet flour, the toxin level was significantly reduced by 48 and 62 % at a dose level of 2 and 4 KGy, respectively. However, in solution, OTA at concentrations of 1 and 5 ppm, was relatively stable even at dose level of 4 kGy and did not cause the formation of degradation products neither detectable by HPLC-FD nor by LC-MS . For toxicity evaluations, first preliminary cell culture assays were performed with the irradiated toxin. Using human hepatocytes Hep G2 cells, OTA-induced cytotoxicity is monitored at several levels in these cells after radio treatment. The irradiation of the toxin led to a non marked changes in its cytotoxicity. These findings indicate that the use of low dose gamma irradiation to destroy preformed toxins presents on grain does not appear to be a suitable method for the detoxification of grain contaminated with OTA. Therefore, the prevention of toxin formation still the best protection way against ochratoxin A contamination. (Author)

  12. Effect of gamma irradiation on pre-treatment on the drying characteristics and qualities of wheat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yong; Wang, Jun [Zhejiang University (China). Dept. of Biosystems Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Wheat, pretreated by {sup 60}Co gamma irradiation, was dried by hot-air with irradiation dosage 0-3 kGy, drying temperature 40-60 deg C, and initial moisture contents 19-25% (drying basis). The drying characteristics and dried qualities of wheat were evaluated based on drying time, average dehydration rate, wet gluten content (WGC), moisture content of wet gluten (MCWG)and titratable acidity (TA). A quadratic rotation-orthogonal composite experimental design, with three variables (at five levels) and five response functions, and analysis method were employed to study the effect of three variables on the individual response functions. The five response functions (drying time, average dehydration rate, WGC, MCWG, TA) correlated with these variables by second order polynomials consisting of linear, quadratic and interaction terms. A high correlation coefficient indicated the suitability of the second order polynomial to predict these response functions. The linear, interaction and quadratic effects of three variables on the five response functions were all studied. (author)

  13. Effect of gamma irradiation on pre-treatment on the drying characteristics and qualities of wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yong; Wang, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Wheat, pretreated by 60 Co gamma irradiation, was dried by hot-air with irradiation dosage 0-3 kGy, drying temperature 40-60 deg C, and initial moisture contents 19-25% (drying basis). The drying characteristics and dried qualities of wheat were evaluated based on drying time, average dehydration rate, wet gluten content (WGC), moisture content of wet gluten (MCWG)and titratable acidity (TA). A quadratic rotation-orthogonal composite experimental design, with three variables (at five levels) and five response functions, and analysis method were employed to study the effect of three variables on the individual response functions. The five response functions (drying time, average dehydration rate, WGC, MCWG, TA) correlated with these variables by second order polynomials consisting of linear, quadratic and interaction terms. A high correlation coefficient indicated the suitability of the second order polynomial to predict these response functions. The linear, interaction and quadratic effects of three variables on the five response functions were all studied. (author)

  14. Gamma irradiation used on adult Tetranychus urticae Koch as a quarantine treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osouli Shiva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of gamma radiation with 0, 200, 250, 300, 350, 400, and 450 Gy intensities on the longevity, total number of eggs, and the percent of hatched eggs laid by irradiated females of Tetranychus urticae Koch (Tetranychidae was evaluated. Two different groups (0–24 h old and 48–72 h old of adult females were irradiated. The results showed that 350 and 300 Gy doses significantly reduced the longevity of the 0–24 h old females and the 48–72 h old females. The younger females were more tolerant at lower dose rates than the older females. There was a quadratic relationship between dose rates and young females, while it was linear in older females. The total number of eggs laid by females of both ages was significantly reduced with a linear trend by 250 Gy irradiation. The eggs laid by females of both the 0–24 h olds and the 48–72 h olds lost their hatchability when the dose rate was 350 Gy. It was concluded, that applying a dose rate of 320 Gy on one of the mates (male or female before mating, or a 300 Gy on both of them, would be sufficient to cause sterility in adult mites.

  15. Organoleptic changes in the bovine and swine fats following treatment with gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordanov, I.

    1976-01-01

    Studied were bovine and swine fats that had been treated with gamma-rays at the rates of 0.10 to 2.00 Mrad, in the presence of oxygen and in an atmosphere containing no oxygen as well as under storage conditions at 2 to 4 deg C, and -18 and up to -20 deg C, for 45 and 90 days, respectively. When doses of 0.25 Mrad were used no changes in the organoleptic properties were observed. Fats that were treated at the rate of more than 0.25 Mrad in the presence of oxygen assumed 'side' smell and taste. If irradiation was carried out in the absence of oxygen no such deviations from the normal taste and odor were noted - at rates of up to 0.70 Mrad for the swine fats, and at rates of more than 0.50 Mrad for the bovine fats. Destruction of the yellow pigment in the bovine fats was observed with doses higher than 0.70 Mrad. The changes in the organoleptic properties corresponded to the changes taking place with the peroxides, the water soluble fatty acids, and the epihydrinaldehyde. Changes in the organoleptic properties (odor and taste) in the bovine fats took place at lower doses of irradiation that in the swine fats. (author)

  16. Gamma-Glutamylcyclotransferase: A Novel Target Molecule for Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Kageyama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-glutamylcyclotransferase (GGCT is one of the major enzymes involved in glutathione metabolism. However, its gene locus was unknown for many years. Recently, the gene for GGCT was found to be identical to C7orf24, which is registered as a hypothetical protein. Orthologs have been found in bacteria, plants, and nematodes as well as higher organisms, and the GGCT gene is highly preserved among a wide range of species. GGCT (C7orf24 was also reported as an upregulated protein in various cancers. Although the function of GGCT in cancer cells has not been determined, the following important activities have been reported: (1 high expression in various cancer tissues and cancer cell lines, (2 low expression in normal tissues, (3 inhibition of cancer cell proliferation via anti-GGCT RNAi, (4 inhibition of cancer cell invasion and migration via anti-GGCT RNAi, (5 an epigenetic transcriptional regulation in cancer cells, and (6 an antitumor effect in cancer-bearing xenograft mice. Therefore, GGCT is promising as a diagnostic marker and a therapeutic target for various cancers. This review summarizes these interesting findings.

  17. Treatment of unstable trochanteric fractures. Randomised comparison of the gamma nail and the proximal femoral nail.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, I.B.; Steyerberg, E.W.; Castelein, R.M.; Heijden, F.H. van der; Hoed, P.T. den; Kerver, A.J.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2004-01-01

    The proximal femoral nail (PFN) is a recently introduced intramedullary system, designed to improve treatment of unstable trochanteric fractures of the hip. In a multicentre prospective clinical study, the intra-operative use, complications and outcome of treatment using the PFN (n = 211) were

  18. Treatment of opium alkaloid containing wastewater in sequencing batch reactor (SBR)—Effect of gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bural, Cavit B.; Demirer, Goksel N.; Kantoglu, Omer; Dilek, Filiz B.

    2010-04-01

    Aerobic biological treatment of opium alkaloid containing wastewater as well as the effect of gamma irradiation as pre-treatment was investigated. Biodegradability of raw wastewater was assessed in aerobic batch reactors and was found highly biodegradable (83-90% degradation). The effect of irradiation (40 and 140 kGy) on biodegradability was also evaluated in terms of BOD 5/COD values and results revealed that irradiation imparted no further enhancement in the biodegradability. Despite the highly biodegradable nature of wastewater, further experiments in sequencing batch reactors (SBR) revealed that the treatment operation was not possible due to sludge settleability problem observed beyond an influent COD value of 2000 mg dm -3. Possible reasons for this problem were investigated, and the high molecular weight, large size and aromatic structure of the organic pollutants present in wastewater was thought to contribute to poor settleability. Initial efforts to solve this problem by modifying the operational conditions, such as SRT reduction, failed. However, further operational modifications including addition of phosphate buffer cured the settleability problem and influent COD was increased up to 5000 mg dm -3. Significant COD removal efficiencies (>70%) were obtained in both SBRs fed with original and irradiated wastewaters (by 40 kGy). However, pre-irradiated wastewater provided complete thebain removal and a better settling sludge, which was thought due to degradation of complex structure by radiation application. Degradation of the structure was observed by GC/MS analyses and enhancement in filterability tests.

  19. Treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in a patient with AIDS with antimony and gamma-interferon: remission and prevention of relapse by maintenance therapy with weekly pentamidine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lustig, V.; Kager, P. A.; Meenhorst, P. L.

    1995-01-01

    A 41-year-old AIDS patient with fever, nightly perspiration, diarrhoea, anaemia and leukopenia was diagnosed as having visceral leishmaniasis (VL). After 8 weeks of antimony treatment combined with gamma-interferon, given in 2 courses of 3 and 5 weeks, 12 weeks apart, the bone marrow revealed no

  20. Efficacy of integrated treatment of UV light and low dose gamma irradiation on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on grape tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efficacy of integrated treatment of UVC and low dose Gamma irradiation to inactivate mixed Strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica inoculated on whole Grape tomatoes was evaluated. A mixed bacterial cocktail composed of a three strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7 (C9490, E02128 an...

  1. CyberKnife boost for patients with cervical cancer unable to undergo brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Andrew Haas

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Standard radiation therapy for patients undergoing primary chemosensitized radiation for carcinomas of the cervix usually consists of external beam radiation followed by an intracavitary brachytherapy boost. On occasion, the brachytherapy boost cannot be performed due to unusual anatomy or because of coexisting medical conditions. We examined the safety and efficacy of using CyberKnife SBRT as a boost to the cervix after external beam radiation in those patients unable to have brachytherapy to give a more effective dose to the cervix than with conventional external beam radiation alone. Six consecutive patients with anatomic or medical conditions precluding a tandem and ovoid boost were treated with combined external beam radiation and CyberKnife boost to the cervix. Five patients received 45 Gy to the pelvis with serial IMRT boost to the uterus and cervix to a dose of 61.2 Gy. These 4 patients received an SBRT boost to the cervix to a dose of 20 Gy in 5 fractions of 4 Gy each. One patient was treated to the pelvis to a dose of 45 Gy with an external beam boost to the uterus and cervix to a dose of 50.4 Gy. This patient received an SBRT boost to the cervix to a dose of 19.5 Gy in 3 fractions of 6.5 Gy. Five percent volumes of the bladder and rectum were kept to < 75 Gy in all patients (i.e. V75Gy < 5%. All of the patients remain locally controlled with no evidence of disease following treatment. Grade 1 diarrhea occurred in 4/6 patients during the conventional external beam radiation. There has been no grade 3 or 4 rectal or bladder toxicity. There were no toxicities observed following SBRT boost. At a median follow-up of 14 months, CyberKnife radiosurgical boost is well tolerated and efficacious in providing a boost to patients with cervix cancer who are unable to undergo brachytherapy boost. Further follow-up is required to see if these results remain durable.

  2. CyberKnife Boost for Patients with Cervical Cancer Unable to Undergo Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Jonathan Andrew; Witten, Matthew R.; Clancey, Owen; Episcopia, Karen; Accordino, Diane; Chalas, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Standard radiation therapy for patients undergoing primary chemosensitized radiation for carcinomas of the cervix usually consists of external beam radiation followed by an intracavitary brachytherapy boost. On occasion, the brachytherapy boost cannot be performed due to unfavorable anatomy or because of coexisting medical conditions. We examined the safety and efficacy of using CyberKnife stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a boost to the cervix after external beam radiation in those patients unable to have brachytherapy to give a more effective dose to the cervix than with conventional external beam radiation alone. Six consecutive patients with anatomic or medical conditions precluding a tandem and ovoid boost were treated with combined external beam radiation and CyberKnife boost to the cervix. Five patients received 45 Gy to the pelvis with serial intensity-modulated radiation therapy boost to the uterus and cervix to a dose of 61.2 Gy. These five patients received an SBRT boost to the cervix to a dose of 20 Gy in five fractions of 4 Gy each. One patient was treated to the pelvis to a dose of 45 Gy with an external beam boost to the uterus and cervix to a dose of 50.4 Gy. This patient received an SBRT boost to the cervix to a dose of 19.5 Gy in three fractions of 6.5 Gy. Five percent volumes of the bladder and rectum were kept to ≤75 Gy in all patients (i.e., V75 Gy ≤ 5%). All of the patients remain locally controlled with no evidence of disease following treatment. Grade 1 diarrhea occurred in 4/6 patients during the conventional external beam radiation. There has been no grade 3 or 4 rectal or bladder toxicity. There were no toxicities observed following SBRT boost. At a median follow-up of 14 months, CyberKnife radiosurgical boost is well tolerated and efficacious in providing a boost to patients with cervix cancer who are unable to undergo brachytherapy boost. Further follow-up is required to see if these results remain durable.

  3. Influence of gamma rays and some pre and post harvest treatments on behavior of some fruits during cold storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, M.M.

    2008-01-01

    Apricot fruits usually harvested relatively mature but hard enough to withstand-post harvest handling through the marketing chain. These fruits have considerably lower edible quality than tree-ripened fruit. Fruit quality can be improved by delaying harvest least until physiological maturation is completed on the tree (Bonghi et al. 1999) Apricots containing 11% soluble solids concentration, or higher are in high demand by consumers, as fruit have developed considerable taste, aroma and handling for long distance markets. (Kader, 1999). These fruit will be highly perishable, so rapid cold storage to the lowest safe temperature and supplementary treatments (Mc Donald et al, 1999) such as irradiation with the recommend doses (Sillano et al, 1994) or pre-storage heat treatments will be necessary to retard ripening (mainly softening) during 1-2 weeks post harvest life necessary for distribution to distant markets (Mc Donald et al 1999). Therefore, one can conclude that spraying Canino apricot and Dessert Red peach trees with calcium chloride at 5% or Soya bean oil at 2% showed beneficial effects as pre harvest treatments where they increased fruit firmness and improved fruit quality and prolonged storage and marketing periods as well as decreasing weight loss and percentage of discarded fruits. In addition, spaying Manfaloti pomegrates trees with CaCl 2 solution at 7.5% or Soya bean oil at 4% gained the same results.As for the post harvest treatments, results indicated that subjecting Canino apricots and Dessert Red peaches to gamma radiation at 0.5 K.Gy and pomegrates to 1.0 K.Gy proved to be the best treatments where they reduced respiration rate and loss in fruit weight and improved fruit quality and prolonged both storage and marketing periods

  4. Detection of mixed-range proton pencil beams with a prompt gamma slit camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priegnitz, M; Helmbrecht, S; Fiedler, F; Janssens, G; Smeets, J; Vander Stappen, F; Perali, I; Sterpin, E

    2016-01-01

    With increasing availability of proton and particle therapy centers for tumor treatment, the need for in vivo range verification methods comes more into the focus. Imaging of prompt gamma rays emitted during the treatment is one of the possibilities currently under investigation. A knife-edge shaped slit camera was recently proposed for this task and measurements proved the feasibility of range deviation detection in homogeneous and inhomogeneous targets. In the present paper, we concentrate on laterally inhomogeneous materials, which lead to range mixing situations when crossed by one pencil beam: different sections of the beam have different ranges. We chose exemplative cases from clinical irradiation and assembled idealized tissue equivalent targets. One-dimensional emission profiles were obtained by measuring the prompt gamma emission with the slit camera. It could be shown that the resulting range deviations can be detected by evaluation of the measured data with a previously developed range deviation detection algorithm. The retrieved value, however, strongly depends on the target composition, and is not necessarily in direct relation to the ranges of both parts of the beam. By combining the range deviation detection with an analysis of the slope of the distal edge of the measured prompt gamma profile, the origin of the detected range deviation, i.e. the mixed range of the beam, is also identified. It could be demonstrated that range mixed prompt gamma profiles exhibit less steep distal slopes than profiles from beams traversing laterally homogeneous material. For future application of the slit camera to patient irradiation with double scattered proton beams, situations similar to the range mixing cases are present and results could possibly apply. (paper)

  5. Geology of the Knife River area, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, William Edward

    1953-01-01

    The Knife River area, consisting of six 15-minute quadrangles, includes the lower half of the Knife River valley in west-central North Dakota. The area, in the center of the Williston Basin, is underlain by the Tongue River member of the Fort Union formation (Paleocene) and the Golden Valley formation (Eocene). The Tongue River includes beds equivalent to the Sentinel Butte shale; the Golden Valley formation, which receives its first detailed description in this report, consists of two members, a lower member of gray to white sandy kaolin clay and an upper member of cross-bedded micaceous sandstone. Pro-Tongue River rocks that crop out in southwestern North Dakota include the Ludlow member of the Fort Union formation, the Cannonball marine formation (Paleocene) and the Hell Creek, Fox Hills, and Pierre formations, all upper Cretaceous. Post-Golden Valley rocks include the White River formation (Oligocene) and gravels on an old planation surface that may be Miocene or Pliocent. Surficial deposits include glacial and fluvial deposits of Pleistocene age and alluvium, dune sand, residual silica, and landslide blocks of Recent age. Three ages of glacial deposits can be differentiated, largely on the basis of three fills, separated by unconformities, in the Knife River valley. All three are of Wisconsin age and probably represent the Iowan, Tazewell, and Mankato substages. Deposits of the Cary substage have not been identified either in the Knife River area or elsewhere in southern North Dakota. Iowan glacial deposits form the outermost drift border in North Dakota. Southwest of this border are a few scattered granite boulders that are residual from the erosion of either the White River formation or a pre-Wisconsin till. The Tazewell drift border cannot be followed in southern North Dakota. The Mankato drift border can be traced in a general way from the South Dakota State line northwest across the Missouri River and through the middle of the Knife River area. The major

  6. Stereotactic treatment. Definitions and literature overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontenla, D.P.

    2008-01-01

    The topics discussed include, among others, the following: Radiosurgery definitions; Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT); Available uncertainties in SRS; Gamma knife; Linac-based SRS; Components of a radiosurgery system; Stereotactic hardware (brain lab); m3 linac attachment; Radiosurgery - clinical procedure; Cancer management; Rationale for SRT; Role of radiosurgery in the management of intracranial tumors; Indications for stereotactic SRS/SRT; Physical components required for SRS/SRT; Stereotactic patient set-up; Stereotactic CT scan for SRS; Physical components required for SRT: Relocatable head frame (GTC); Patient immobilization; Treatment planning system; Basic requirements for SRS dosimetry (Linac based); Stereotactic set-up QA (Linac); Stereotactic frames and QA; Beam dose measurements; Dose evaluation tools; Phantoms. (P.A.)

  7. CyberKnife with tumor tracking: An effective alternative to wedge resection for high-risk surgical patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean eCollins

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Published data suggests that wedge resection for stage I NSCLC results in improved overall survival compared to stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT. We report CyberKnife outcomes for high-risk surgical patients with biopsy-proven stage I NSCLC. PET/CT imaging was completed for staging. Three-to-five gold fiducial markers were implanted in or near tumors to serve as targeting references. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs were contoured using lung windows; the margins were expanded by 5 mm to establish the planning treatment volume (PTV. Treatment plans were designed using hundreds of pencil beams. Doses delivered to the PTV ranged from 42-60 Gy in 3 fractions. The 30-Gy isodose contour extended at least 1cm from the GTV to eradicate microscopic disease. Treatments were delivered using the CyberKnife system with tumor tracking. Examination and PET/CT imaging occurred at 3-month follow-up intervals. Forty patients (median age 76 with a median maximum tumor diameter of 2.6 cm (range, 1.4-5.0 cm and a mean post-bronchodilator percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 of 57% (range, 21 - 111% were treated. A mean dose of 50 Gy was delivered to the PTV over 3 to 13 days (median, 7 days. The 30-Gy isodose contour extended a mean 1.9 cm from the GTV. At a median 44 months (range, 12 -72 months follow-up, the 3-year Kaplan-Meier locoregional control and overall survival estimates compare favorably with contemporary wedge resection outcomes at 91% and 75% , respectively. CyberKnife is an effective treatment approach for stage I NSCLC that is similar to wedge resection, eradicating tumors with 1 to 2 cm margins in order to preserve lung function. Prospective randomized trials comparing CyberKnife with wedge resection are necessary to confirm equivalence.

  8. Real-time Cherenkov emission portal imaging during CyberKnife® radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussakis, Yiannis; Mason, Suzannah; Dehghani, Hamid; Zhang, Rongxiao; Heyes, Geoff; Webster, Gareth; Green, Stuart; Pogue, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of real-time portal imaging during radiation therapy, through the Cherenkov emission (CE) effect is investigated via a medical linear accelerator (CyberKnife ® ) irradiating a partially-filled water tank with a 60 mm circular beam. A graticule of lead/plywood and a number of tissue equivalent materials were alternatively placed at the beam entrance face while the induced CE at the exit face was imaged using a gated electron-multiplying-intensified-charged-coupled device (emICCD) for both stationary and dynamic scenarios. This was replicated on an Elekta Synergy ® linear accelerator with portal images acquired using the iViewGT ™ system. Profiles across the acquired portal images were analysed to reveal the potential resolution and contrast limits of this novel CE based portal imaging technique and compared against the current standard. The CE resolution study revealed that using the lead/plywood graticule, separations down to 3.4  ±  0.5 mm can be resolved. A 28 mm thick tissue-equivalent rod with electron density of 1.69 relative to water demonstrated a CE contrast of 15% through air and 14% through water sections, as compared to a corresponding contrast of 19% and 12% using the iViewGT ™ system. For dynamic scenarios, video rate imaging with 30 frames per second was achieved. It is demonstrated that CE-based portal imaging is feasible to identify both stationary and dynamic objects within a CyberKnife ® radiotherapy treatment field. (note)

  9. Treatment of the ventral intermediate nucleus for medically refractory tremor: A cost-analysis of stereotactic radiosurgery versus deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Shearwood; Jaboin, Jerry J

    2017-10-01

    Medically refractory tremor treatment has evolved over the past half-century from intraoperative thalamotomy to deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the thalamic ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM). Within the past 15years, unilateral radiosurgical VIM thalamotomy has emerged as a comparably efficacious treatment modality. An extensive literature search of VIM DBS series was performed; the total cost of VIM DBS was calculated from hospitals geographically representative of the entire United States using current procedural terminology and work relative value unit (RVU) codes. The 2016 Medicare Ambulatory Payment Classification for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was added to the work RVU to determine the total cost of VIM SRS for both Gamma Knife and linear accelerator SRS. Cost estimates assumed that VIM DBS was performed without intraoperative microelectrode recording. The mean unilateral VIM DBS cost was $17,932.41 per patient. For SRS VIM, the total costs for Gamma Knife ($10,811.77) and linear accelerator ($10,726.40) were 40% less expensive than for unilateral VIM DBS. Radiosurgery of the VIM is 40% less expensive than unilateral VIM DBS in treatment of medically refractory tremor, regardless of radiosurgical modality. This finding argues for increased radiation oncology involvement in the management of medically refractory tremor patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Gamma irradiation as a quarantine treatment for walnuts infested with codling moths (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burditt, A.K. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Irradiation may be a potential quarantine treatment for either diapausing or nondiapausing codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), larvae in walnuts. Exposure of larvae to 51.9 Gy from a 60 Co source significantly reduced emergence of normal adults. The dose required for quarantine security (99.9968% mortality) was 230 Gy based on emergence of adults from treated larvae. Normal adults did not emerge from larvae exposed to 177 Gy in walnuts

  11. Development of stereotactic radiosurgery using carbon beams (carbon-knife)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keawsamur, Mintra; Matsumura, Akihiko; Souda, Hikaru; Kano, Yosuke; Torikoshi, Masami; Nakano, Takashi; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this research is to develop a stereotactic-radiosurgery (SRS) technique using carbon beams to treat small intracranial lesions; we call this device the carbon knife. A 2D-scanning method is adapted to broaden a pencil beam to an appropriate size for an irradiation field. A Mitsubishi slow extraction using third order resonance through a rf acceleration system stabilized by a feed-forward scanning beam using steering magnets with a 290 MeV/u initial beam energy was used for this purpose. Ridge filters for spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) with widths of 5 mm, 7.5 mm, and 10 mm were designed to include fluence-attenuation effects. The collimator, which defines field shape, was used to reduce the lateral penumbra. The lateral-penumbra width at the SOBP region was less than 2 mm for the carbon knife. The penumbras behaved almost the same when changing the air gap, but on the other hand, increasing the range-shifter thickness mostly broadened the lateral penumbra. The physical-dose rates were approximate 6 Gy s‑1 and 4.5 Gy s‑1 for the 10  ×  10 mm2 and 5  ×  5 mm2 collimators, respectively.

  12. Quarantine treatment by gamma radiation for different development stages of Callosobruchus maculatus in bean Vigna sinensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, Valter; Machi, André R.; Franco, Suely S.H.

    2017-01-01

    The loss of stored grain caused by insects generates a problem of economic order of importance, due to concern about the increased supply of food for the world population is expanding. Associated with this fact, there is the problem of nutritional deficiency due to lack of protein, especially for the less privileged populations. The use of ionizing radiation in grains and products stored without a doubt can solve the problem of the losses in these products, since it does not induce resistance to insects and leaves no toxic residue in the products, and is considered an effective and safe method. The aim of the experiment was to determine the effect of ionizing radiation from cobalt-60 as a quarantine treatment for the different stages of development of Callosobruchus maculatus (Fabr., 1972) (Coleóptera, Chysomilidae) in bean Vigna sinensis. The experiment was conducted in the laboratory of Radiobiology and Environment CENA/USP, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil. Bean samples infested with eggs, larvae, pre-pupae and pupae C. maculatus, the experiment consisted of 4 replicates for each stage of the insect's life cycle, and each repetition consisted of 20 individuals (eggs, larvae, pre-pupae and pupae), a total of 200 subjects per treatment which were irradiated with doses of 0 (control), 25, 50, 75 and 100 Gy, a source of cobalt-60, Gammabeam-650 type, in a rate dose of 1.3 kGy / h. The experiment was conducted in a room with a relative of 25 ± 2 ° C temperature and humidity of 70 ± 5%. After 35 days of irradiation process were carried out evaluations of the number of insects emerged in each repetition within the treatments. From the results obtained it was concluded that the dose lethal to eggs and larvae was 25 Gy, while for pre-pupae was 50 Gy, to pupae 100 Gy was not sufficient to control the adult emergence. (author)

  13. Quarantine treatment by gamma radiation for different development stages of Callosobruchus maculatus in bean Vigna sinensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, Valter; Machi, André R.; Franco, Suely S.H., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). laboratório de Radiobiologia e Ambiente; Fontes, Lucia da Silva, E-mail: lsfontes@uol.com.br [Universidade Federal do Piauí (UFPI), Teresina, PI (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia; Harder, Márcia N.C., E-mail: marcia.harder@fatec.sp.gov.br [Faculdade de Tecnologia de Piracicaba (FATEC), SP (Brazil). Dep. Roque Trevisan; Rossi, Rodrigo S.; Arthur, Paula B.; Franco, José G., E-mail: paula.arthur@hotmail.com, E-mail: zegilmar60@gamil.com, E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The loss of stored grain caused by insects generates a problem of economic order of importance, due to concern about the increased supply of food for the world population is expanding. Associated with this fact, there is the problem of nutritional deficiency due to lack of protein, especially for the less privileged populations. The use of ionizing radiation in grains and products stored without a doubt can solve the problem of the losses in these products, since it does not induce resistance to insects and leaves no toxic residue in the products, and is considered an effective and safe method. The aim of the experiment was to determine the effect of ionizing radiation from cobalt-60 as a quarantine treatment for the different stages of development of Callosobruchus maculatus (Fabr., 1972) (Coleóptera, Chysomilidae) in bean Vigna sinensis. The experiment was conducted in the laboratory of Radiobiology and Environment CENA/USP, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil. Bean samples infested with eggs, larvae, pre-pupae and pupae C. maculatus, the experiment consisted of 4 replicates for each stage of the insect's life cycle, and each repetition consisted of 20 individuals (eggs, larvae, pre-pupae and pupae), a total of 200 subjects per treatment which were irradiated with doses of 0 (control), 25, 50, 75 and 100 Gy, a source of cobalt-60, Gammabeam-650 type, in a rate dose of 1.3 kGy / h. The experiment was conducted in a room with a relative of 25 ± 2 ° C temperature and humidity of 70 ± 5%. After 35 days of irradiation process were carried out evaluations of the number of insects emerged in each repetition within the treatments. From the results obtained it was concluded that the dose lethal to eggs and larvae was 25 Gy, while for pre-pupae was 50 Gy, to pupae 100 Gy was not sufficient to control the adult emergence. (author)

  14. Quality of 'Brightwell' and 'Tifblue' blueberries after gamma irradiation for quarantine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.R.; McDonald, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Blueberries must be subjected to a quarantine treatment of methyl bromide fumigation when shipped to certain domestic or export markets. The principle insects that inhibit distribution of blueberries are the apple maggot [Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh)], blueberry maggot (R. mendax Curran), and plum curculio [Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst)]. Methyl bromide fumigation is the only approved quarantine treatment for blueberries and it is scheduled to be phased out by the year 2001. Highbush blueberries’ tolerance to low-dose irradiation is cultivar-dependent (Eaton et al., 1970). Two main cultivars grown in Florida, ‘Climax’ and ‘Sharpblue’, will tolerate irradiation up to 0.75 kGy without loss of fruit market quality (Miller et al., 1994a, 1994b, 1995). A 1.0-kGy dose is the maximum allowed (U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 1986) for treatment of fresh fruit or vegetables, and reportedly (personal communications, J. Sharp and G. Hallman) »0.3 kGy is sufficient for control of blueberry insects requiring quarantine certification. Two or three times the minimum dose may, however, be required to assure that the minimum dose is absorbed by all berries during commercial application. Therefore, it is most important to determine the tolerance of berries to irradiation stress. The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of low-dose irradiation on the quality and condition of ‘Brightwell’ and ‘Tifblue’, two major rabbiteye cultivars grown in Georgia. The data were subjected to analysis of variance (P £ 0.05) on a split-block experimental design, with harvest dates for ‘Brightwell’, and randomized sample sets as replications for ‘Tifblue’ berries. The data were tested for the main effect of irradiation dosage on quality attributes

  15. Synergic effect of gamma radiation with thermal treatment for conserving natural apple juice from Gala variety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumer, L.; Domarco, R.E.; Spoto, M.H.F.; Walder, J.M.M.; Matraia, C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper aims at the feasibility of a new method for conserving natural apple juice using no chemicals. The apple juice was extract from Gala apple variety and was bottled in sterile 100 ml amber vials. The samples were treated by: heat at 60 0 C for 20 minutes; heat at 80 0 C for 20 minutes; radiation; radiation plus heat (60 0 ); radiation plus heat 80 0 C. The radiation doses were 0,2,4 and 6 kGy at the dose rate of 1.6 kGy/h. The juice quality control was carried out by chemical analysis (total soluble solids, pH, acidity, ascorbic acid) following the AOAC methodology. The samples were stored under refrigeration conditions 5±3 0 C) up to 180 days. It was observed an alteration of the total soluble solids and the pH during the storage period for all treatments. The pH was also affected by the combined treatments (radiation plus heat). The acidity was affected by the interaction of storage period and heat temperature. The ascorbic acid was affected by the synergic effect of heat and radiation and by the interaction radiation and storage period. (author). 8 refs, 6 figs

  16. Gamma irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment for fresh pome fruits produced in Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, J.; Lires, C.; Horak, C.; Pawlak, E.; Docters, A.; Kairiyama, E.

    2009-07-01

    Argentina produces 1.8 million tons/year of apples ( Malus domestica L.) and pears ( Pyrus communis L.) in the Patagonia region. Cydia pomonella, codling moth, and Grapholita molesta, Oriental fruit moth, ( Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) are quarantine pests in pome fruits. Irradiation is a promising phytosanitary treatment because a dose of 200 Gy completely prevents pest adult emergence. A pilot irradiation process of commercially packaged 'Red Delicious' apples and 'Packham's Triumph' pears was performed in an irradiation facility with a Cobalt 60 source. Quality analyses were carried out at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 months of storage (1 °C, RH 99%) to evaluate fruit tolerance at 200, 400 and 800 Gy. Irradiation at 200 and 400 Gy had no undesirable effects on fruit quality (pulp firmness, external colour, soluble solids content (SSC), titratable acidity (TA) and sensory evaluations). Irradiation of 'Red Delicious' apples and 'Packham's Triumph' pears can be applied as a commercial quarantine treatment with a minimum absorbed dose of 200 Gy (to control codling moth and Oriental fruit moth) and <800 Gy (according to quality results).

  17. Gamma irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment for fresh pome fruits produced in Patagonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, J.; Lires, C.; Horak, C.; Pawlak, E.; Docters, A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Ezeiza Presbitero Juan Gonzalez y Aragon No. 15, (B1802AYA) Ezeiza, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kairiyama, E. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Ezeiza Presbitero Juan Gonzalez y Aragon No. 15, (B1802AYA) Ezeiza, Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: kairiyam@cae.cnea.gov.ar

    2009-07-15

    Argentina produces 1.8 million tons/year of apples (Malus domestica L.) and pears (Pyrus communis L.) in the Patagonia region. Cydia pomonella, codling moth, and Grapholita molesta, Oriental fruit moth, (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) are quarantine pests in pome fruits. Irradiation is a promising phytosanitary treatment because a dose of 200 Gy completely prevents pest adult emergence. A pilot irradiation process of commercially packaged 'Red Delicious' apples and 'Packham's Triumph' pears was performed in an irradiation facility with a Cobalt 60 source. Quality analyses were carried out at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 months of storage (1 deg. C, RH 99%) to evaluate fruit tolerance at 200, 400 and 800 Gy. Irradiation at 200 and 400 Gy had no undesirable effects on fruit quality (pulp firmness, external colour, soluble solids content (SSC), titratable acidity (TA) and sensory evaluations). Irradiation of 'Red Delicious' apples and 'Packham's Triumph' pears can be applied as a commercial quarantine treatment with a minimum absorbed dose of 200 Gy (to control codling moth and Oriental fruit moth) and <800 Gy (according to quality results)

  18. Gamma irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment for fresh pome fruits produced in Patagonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, J.; Lires, C.; Horak, C.; Pawlak, E.; Docters, A.; Kairiyama, E.

    2009-01-01

    Argentina produces 1.8 million tons/year of apples (Malus domestica L.) and pears (Pyrus communis L.) in the Patagonia region. Cydia pomonella, codling moth, and Grapholita molesta, Oriental fruit moth, (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) are quarantine pests in pome fruits. Irradiation is a promising phytosanitary treatment because a dose of 200 Gy completely prevents pest adult emergence. A pilot irradiation process of commercially packaged 'Red Delicious' apples and 'Packham's Triumph' pears was performed in an irradiation facility with a Cobalt 60 source. Quality analyses were carried out at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 months of storage (1 deg. C, RH 99%) to evaluate fruit tolerance at 200, 400 and 800 Gy. Irradiation at 200 and 400 Gy had no undesirable effects on fruit quality (pulp firmness, external colour, soluble solids content (SSC), titratable acidity (TA) and sensory evaluations). Irradiation of 'Red Delicious' apples and 'Packham's Triumph' pears can be applied as a commercial quarantine treatment with a minimum absorbed dose of 200 Gy (to control codling moth and Oriental fruit moth) and <800 Gy (according to quality results).

  19. Effect of gamma irradiation and CIPC treatment- on processing quality of potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirsat, S.G.; Thomas, Paul; Nair, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The processing quality of 5 potato cultivars, after inhibition of sprouting by irradiation or chloroisopropyl phenyl carbamate (CIPC) treatment, was compared during storage at 20, 15 and 10 degC upto 9 months. Cultivars K. Jyoti, K Lavkar, Gujrat-S, and Talegaon, with initial reducing sugar levels of 120 to 240 mg/100 g. yielded light coloured chips and French fries. Neither of the treatments affected the processing quality of these cultivars, when stored at 15 and 20 degC up to 6 months, but the storage at 10 degC resulted in darker products, due to higher levels of reducing sugars. In tubers, stored for more than 6 months at 15 degC, reconditioning at 27-32 degC or blanching improved the colour of the products. Cultivars K. Badshah, with initial reducing sugar levels of 310 to 440 mg/100 g was not suitable for processing. In vitro infiltration studies showed that glucose contributed to browning more than fructose or sucrose. (author). 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  20. Novel design and sensitivity analysis of displacement measurement system utilizing knife edge diffraction for nanopositioning stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, ChaBum; Lee, Sun-Kyu; Tarbutton, Joshua A

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a novel design and sensitivity analysis of a knife edge-based optical displacement sensor that can be embedded with nanopositioning stages. The measurement system consists of a laser, two knife edge locations, two photodetectors, and axillary optics components in a simple configuration. The knife edge is installed on the stage parallel to its moving direction and two separated laser beams are incident on knife edges. While the stage is in motion, the direct transverse and diffracted light at each knife edge is superposed producing interference at the detector. The interference is measured with two photodetectors in a differential amplification configuration. The performance of the proposed sensor was mathematically modeled, and the effect of the optical and mechanical parameters, wavelength, beam diameter, distances from laser to knife edge to photodetector, and knife edge topography, on sensor outputs was investigated to obtain a novel analytical method to predict linearity and sensitivity. From the model, all parameters except for the beam diameter have a significant influence on measurement range and sensitivity of the proposed sensing system. To validate the model, two types of knife edges with different edge topography were used for the experiment. By utilizing a shorter wavelength, smaller sensor distance and higher edge quality increased measurement sensitivity can be obtained. The model was experimentally validated and the results showed a good agreement with the theoretically estimated results. This sensor is expected to be easily implemented into nanopositioning stage applications at a low cost and mathematical model introduced here can be used for design and performance estimation of the knife edge-based sensor as a tool.

  1. Gamma radiation treatment of pentachlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and 2-chlorophenol in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yongke; Liu Jun; Wu Jilan

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate γ radiation treatment of pentachlorophenol (PCP), 2,4- dichlorophenol (DCP) and o-chlorophenol (o-CP) in water. The dechlorination of PCP, DCP and o-CP has been studied using γ radiation as well as ozonization. G(CI-) is always much higher than the corresponding G(-PCP),this means that some primary radiolytic products are unstable during post irradiation. PCP is much easier to be decomposed under irradiation than that of simple chlorophenol. Some stable radiolytic intermediates were be detected. Primary analysis reveals some quinones among the final products with toxicity that remains unclear. In the pulse radiolytic experiment, it was determined that about 53% of radicals undergo electrotransfer and others undergo addition when OH radicals react with PCP. The values of COD(Mn) after irradiating PCP in dosage were determined. It is recommended to bubble ozone simultaneously when radiation (or electron beam) treat CPs contaminating water. (author)

  2. Comparison of pain and swelling after removal of oral leukoplakia with CO2 laser and cold knife: A randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Jornet, Pía

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare conventional surgery with carbon dioxide (CO2) laser in patients with oral leukoplakia, and to evaluate the postoperative pain and swelling. Study design: A total of 48 patients (27 males and 21 females) with a mean age of 53.7 ± 11.7 years and diagnosed with oral leukoplakia were randomly assigned to receive treatment either with conventional surgery using a cold knife or with a CO2 laser technique. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to score pain and swelling at different postoperative time points. Results: Pain and swelling reported by the patients was greater with the conventional cold knife than with the CO2 laser, statistically significant differences for pain and swelling were observed between the two techniques during the first three days after surgery. Followed by a gradual decrease over one week. In neither group was granuloma formation observed, and none of the patients showed malignant transformation during the period of follow-up. Conclusions: The CO2 laser causes only minimal pain and swelling, thus suggesting that it may be an alternative method to conventional surgery in treating patients with oral leukoplakia. Key words:Oral leukoplakia, treatment, laser surgery, cold knife, pain, swelling. PMID:23229239

  3. Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Personalized Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Emerging Role of Gamma-Glutamyltransferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Mokondjimobe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The objectives were (i to evaluate the impact of acute pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB and anti-TB therapy on the relationship between AST, ALT, and GGT levels in absence of conditions related to hepatotoxicity; (ii to evaluate the rate and the time of alterations of AST, ALT, and GGT. Design and Methods. A prospective followup of 40 adults (21 males; mean age of 34.7±5.8 years with active PTB on initial phase and continuation phase anti-TB. Results. Only 3% (n=1 developed a transient and benign ADR at day 30 without interruption of anti-TB treatment. Within normal ranges, GGT decreased significantly from day 0 to day 60, while AST and ALT increased significantly and respectively. During day 0–day 60, there was a significant, negative, and independent association between GGT and AST. Conclusion. The initial two months led to significant improvement of oxidative stress. Values of oxidative markers in normal ranges might predict low rate of ADR.

  4. Diffractive Photon Production in $\\gamma p$ and $\\gamma \\gamma$ Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Evanson, N G

    1999-01-01

    We study the diffractive production of photons in gamma-p and gamma-gamma collisions. We specifically compute the rates for gamma*-p -> gamma-X and for gamma*-gamma* -> gamma-gamma, where X denotes the proton dissociation. We focus on the rates at large momentum transfers, -t >> Lambda^2, where we are most confident in the use of QCD perturbation theory. However, our calculations do allow us to study the -t -> 0 behaviour of the gamma*-gamma*-> gamma-gamma process in the region where the incoming photons are sufficiently virtual.

  5. Increased quercetin formation by combination treatment of gamma ray and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} from cyanidin-3-O-xylosylrutinoside

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, Eun Mi; Hong, Sung Hyun; Chung, Byung Yeoup [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Sang Ho [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae Young [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Chul [Youngdong University, Youngdong (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The cyanidin-3-O-xylosylrutinoside (cya-3-O-xylrut) is one of the most abundant anthocyanin, which is responsible for the red, purple, and blue colors of most fruits and vegetable, in the fruit of Schisandra chinensis Baillon and raspberries. Especially the cya-3- O-xylrut is a major anthocyanin accounting for about 94% in the fruits of S. chinensis, which is a unique source of highly pure cya-3-O-xylrut, and exhibits high antioxidant activity. Previously, we reported that the red color of the S. chinensis fruit extract dramatically disappeared in a dose-dependent manner of gamma irradiation. The color of S. chinensis was effectively removed at 2 kGy of gamma irradiation, even at 1 kGy resulted in a 50% reduction. Interestingly, the destruction of cya-3-O-xylrut by gamma irradiation led to generate flavonoids such as quercetin and unknown compounds. Quercetin, a typical flavonoltype flavonoid, is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. It is ubiquitously present in fruits and vegetables. Quercetin exhibits various biological activities such as anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, vasodilating, and anti-cancer effects. In the present study our purpose is to develop a promising tool for bio-conversion of organic compounds by combination treatment of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and gamma ray

  6. In-line digital holography with double knife edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Claudio; Iemmi, Claudio; Campos, Juan

    2015-06-01

    We study and test a new technique for in-line digital holography which avoids the formation of the conjugate images. Inline digital holography is based in a common path configuration. In this case, the hologram is produced by the interference between the reference wave front and the diffracted wave front by an almost transparent object. Twin images are obtained with obscured rings that difficult the determination of the best focusing plane. To avoid the conjugated image, the information of the magnitude and phase of the wave front are needed. In a recent work a new in-line digital holography technique was proposed. In this method the object is illuminated with a collimated wave front. A plane, close to the particles distribution is imaged onto a CCD by means of a convergent lens and at the same time, a knife edge is placed in the focal plane of the lens in order to block half of spatial frequency spectrum. In this way, by means of a numerical processing performed on the Fourier plane, it is possible to eliminate one of the components (real or conjugate) of the reconstructed images nevertheless it is observed a tiny deformation of the resulting hologram image. To compensate this effect, we propose a new configuration in which we implement the knife edge technique on both parts of the spectrum at the same time. Finally in the computer, we process the holograms to build one complete without deformation. This hologram is used to recover the wave front at different planes without the influence of the conjugate image.

  7. CyberKnife Radiosurgery in the Multimodal Management of Patients with Cushing Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Justin M; Sala, Elisa; Amorin, Alvaro; Martinez, Hector; Bhowmik, Aprotim C; Chang, Steven D; Soltys, Scott G; Harsh, Griffith R; Katznelson, Laurence

    2018-04-01

    Surgery is the primary treatment for Cushing disease. When surgery is unsuccessful in normalizing hypercortisolism, adjuvant radiation, such as stereotactic radiosurgery, may be useful to improve biochemical control. This retrospective study included a cohort of consecutive patients treated with CyberKnife (CK) radiosurgery for active Cushing disease at Stanford Hospital and Clinics. As first-line treatment, all patients underwent transsphenoidal surgery with histologic demonstration of an adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing pituitary adenoma. CK was performed as adjuvant therapy for persistent or recurrent disease. The median time between surgery and CK was 14 ± 34 months. Before CK, median maximal diameter of tumors was 9 mm (range, 7-32 mm), with cavernous sinus invasion in all patients (100%) and abutment of the optic chiasm in 1 patient (14.2%). With an average follow-up of 55.4 months, normalization of hypercortisolism was achieved in 4 patients (57.1%): 2 patients (28.5%) achieved normalization of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis without glucocorticoid replacement, and 2 patients developed hypoadrenalism (28.5%). The median time to biochemical remission was 12.5 months. Hypopituitarism occurred in only 1 patient (14.2%), and no patients had visual complications. Time between surgery and radiotherapy of Cushing disease, we demonstrate that CK is an effective treatment with rare complications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of heat treatment in {beta} and {gamma} phases on the microscopic structure of uranium; Influence des traitements thermiques en phases {beta} et {gamma} sur la structure micrographique de l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robillard, A

    1958-06-02

    A new method of microscopic examination of uranium is described. Electrolytic polishing and etching are carried out in an acetic acid-chromic acid bath. Atmospheric or anodic oxidation of the polished surface produces films which follow exactly changes in the structure of the underlying metal. This method is very sensitive to small variations of orientation in polygonized crystals. Using this method of examination of uranium, it was found that annealing U in the {gamma} phase followed by a cooling at a rate dependent of the annealing temperature, causes the formation of substructures different from those due to the polygonization of {alpha}-U. The substructures are indicated by the concentration of impurities on the dislocations induced by the stresses accompanying the allotropic transformation {gamma} {yields} {beta}. Similar treatment of the U-1.4% Cr alloy in which the {beta} phase is stabilized at room temperature, confirms this explanation. In addition to the polygonization substructures, sharp discontinuities can be observed in the network of sub- boundaries as a fine white edging. The comparison of these with the structure revealed by thermal etching in vacuum suggest that there are traces of the grain boundaries of the {gamma} phase. The method of etching followed by oxidation shows a haloed phase identified as UH{sub 3}. The conditions of appearance and disappearance of this phase are studied. The sensitivity of this method of detecting the last traces of H in U is very high. The dependence of the hydrogen content on the tensile properties of uranium metal was also studied. (author) [French] Une methode nouvelle d'examen micrographique de l'uranium a ete mise au point. Le polissage electrolytique et le 'gravage' sont effectues dans un bain acide acetique-acide chromique. L'oxydation atmospherique ou anodique de la surface polie conduit a la formation de couches epitaxiques d'oxyde. Cette methode est particulierement sensible

  9. A novel technique of anesthesia induction in supine position with impaled knife in the back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current technique of airway management for impaled knife in the back includes putting the patient in lateral position and intubation. We present here a novel technique of anesthesia induction (intubation and central line insertion in a patient with impaled knife in the back which is simple and easily reproducible. This technique can be used for single lung ventilation using double lumen tube or bronchial blocker also if desired.

  10. The failure analysis of the holder of a crusher moving knife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pástor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deal s with the analysis of the causes of knife holder failure. The holder is a part of the car tyre shredding equipment. Based on the evaluation of the operating conditions of the machine, examination of the condition of the knife holder after the failure, analysis of the fractured surface, as well as the material properties of the examined structural elements, it was possible to draw conclusions as to the reasons of eventual failures.

  11. Lesion evolution observed by MRI volumetry in the rat brain after Leksell gamma knife irradiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirák, D.; Herynek, V.; Náměstková, Kateřina; Burian, M.; Lisčák, R.; Syková, Eva; Hájek, M.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 15, - (2002), s. 185-186 E-ISSN 1352-8661. [Annual Meeting of the European Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine and Biology /19./. Cannes - France, 22.08.2002-25.08.2002] R&D Projects: GA MZd NF5161; GA ČR GV309/97/K048; GA MŠk LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : irradiation * MRI volumetry Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  12. The effect of the combined treatment of gamma irradiation and heating on the aerobic bacterial load of white and black peppers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Khan Ayob; Ismail Bahari; Osman Hassan; Verumandy Kaleswaran

    1985-01-01

    The effect of combined heat-irradiation treatment on the aerobic bacterial load of black and white peppers were evaluated in comparison with that of heat or irradiation treatment only. The irradiation doses applied were 0 (control), 2, 4, 6 and 8 kGy and the heating temperatures were 28 (control), 50, 60, 70 and 80 deg C. Results indicated that gamma radiation of 7 kGy and 5 kGy were capable of reducing bacterial population from 3.6 x 10 6 /g and 2.9 x 10 5 /g to 3 /g black and white peppers, respectively. Heating at drying temperature could only reduce the bacterial contaminants to 1/2 log cycle. Combined treatment of irradiation followed by heating is more effective in reducing the bacterial load, and the combined treatment of heating followed by irradiation showed similar effects as in irradiation treatment alone. (author)

  13. Effect of treatment with gamma irradiation of hyoscyamus muticus seeds on alkaloids content in the induced plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissa, A.I.; Diab, M.A.; Ragab, M.A.; Abou El Seoud, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Seeds of Hyoscyamus muticus L. were irradiated with gamma rays at the irradiation doses of 0, 2, 4, 8 and 16 K-rad. The dry matter accumulation and alkaloids content were determined in the leaves, stems, flowers and fruits during three stages of plant growth, i.e. before flowering, during flowering and during fruiting. The concentration of the alkaloids reached the maximum during the flowering stage. The increase in the alkaloids percentage as a function of the gamma irradiation doses (4-16 K-rad) was about 16-21% in the leaves, 14-31% in the stems, 16-25% in the flowers and 5-6% in the fruits. The chromatographic analysis of the alkaloids showed that the hyoscyamine and hyosine were found in the different organs, but the hyoscyamine was the main alkaloid. The pre-sowing gamma irradiation of seeds did not affect on the nature of the alkaloids in the induced plants

  14. Lab of conservation and restoration of paper collections of CNEA: gamma radiation treatment of books and documents affected by microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfaro, Laura; Miranda, Maria V.; Gonzalez, Maria E.; Calvo, Ana M.

    2009-01-01

    In 2005 the CNEA's Laboratory of Conservation and Restoration of Paper Collections was inaugurated at the Ezeiza Atomic Centre. This lab takes advantage of the experience of CNEA in the utilization of the biocide effects of gamma radiation for decontamination and sterilization of different products, mainly medical products. In recent years the application of gamma radiation to the other goods was explored. Gamma radiation can be utilized for disinfection in the case of biological contamination, such as contamination of books and documents by fungi or insects, and in the case of some disasters (inundation or fire controlled with water in libraries and archives) to prevent the growing of fungi and pathogenic bacteria. (author) [es

  15. Gamma radiation use as a quarantine treatment for Ceratitis capitata (Wied., 1824) and Anastrepha fraterculus (Wied., 1830) in papaya fruits (Carica papaya, Linnaeus), cultivar sunrise solo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, J.T. de.

    1989-01-01

    The gamma irradiation as treatment for control of the immature stages of fruit flies, C. capitata and A. fraterculus in papaya fruits, cultivar Sunrise Solo is studied. The gamma rays attenuation was observed by one and two papaya fruits placed between source and infested fruit, and this changed the radiation doses required to obtain mortality in eggs and larvae of the Medfly. The efficacy of irradiation was higher when the infested papayas were packed in paper box. The radiation dose determined using the Probit 9 concept, for immature stages mortality of C. capitata was 107,74 Gy and for A. fraterculus was 50,82 Gy. The sterilizing doses for adults of C. capitata and D. fraterculus, irradiated as pupae, was 60 Gy and 40 Gy, respectively. (author)

  16. Variations observed in the respiratory activity of potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L.) after a treatment with gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazon Matanzo, M. P.; Fernandez Gonzalez, J.

    1976-01-01

    The present work studies the variations in the respiratory activity of irradiated and IPC treated potato tubers during a storage period of five months. By immediate effect of gamma radiation we can observe an increase in the oxygen consumption of the parenchyma in relation with the control tubers, such increase persists even fours months after gamma radiation. The respiratory activity is reduced in the IPC treated tubers. In the tissues cultivated in vitro the respiratory activity increases at the end of the cultivation period, not only in the control tissues but also in the irradiated ones, though this increase is greater in the control tissues. (Author) 15 refs

  17. Variations observed in the respiratory activity of potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L.) after a treatment with gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazon Matanzo, M.P.; Fernandez Gonzalez, J.

    1976-01-01

    The variations in the respiratory activity of irradiated and IPC treated potato tubers during a storage period of five months have been studied. By immediate effect of gamma radiation, an increase in the oxigen consumption of the parenchyma in relation with the control tubers has been observed. Such increase persits even four months after gamma radiation. The respiratory activity is reduced in the IPC treated tubers. In the tissues cultivated ''in vitro'' the respiratory activity increases at the end of the cultivation period, not only in the control tissues but also in the irradiated ones, though this increase is greater in the control tissues.(author) [es

  18. Certain aspects of the sensitivity and mutability of two beans varieties under the influence of gamma-irradiation and EMS treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yankulov, M.T.; Isasi, E.; Abreu, S.

    1979-01-01

    The relation between sensitivity and mutability of some beans varieties after treatment of their seeds with different gamma-ray doses and ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS) and the changes in their mutagenic effect with increasing the dose were studied. Seleccion 11 and Bolita 41 varieties were used. Seed irradiation (humidity 8,5%) was carried out with doses of 7500, 12500 and 17500 rad gamma-rays. EMS solutions of 0.05, 0,10 and 0,15% at 20 0 C for 12 hours were applied. Records of the percentages of germination and survival were kept in M 1 generation. All seeds from survived plants were sown, and in M 2 the type and number of chlorophyll mutations were reported. Survival of either variety decreased with increasing the case of gamma rays or of EMS. Gamma radiation injury was more severe and occurred even with lower doses. Seleccion 11 variety proved to be more sensitive. The comparison between plant survival in M 1 and the percentage of chlorophyll mutations in M 2 shows an inverse relation between them, i.e. the decrease in the percentage of survived plants was accompanied by an increase in the percentage of chlorophyll mutations. At a certain survival percentage the percentage of induced chlorophyll mutations was of the same order, regardless of the mutagen factor used. When hybrid forms were treated the mutation frequency was higher than the one following treatment of parent forms. A study of the mutation frequency, depending on the dose of the mutagenic factor shows that there is only a limited possibility to raise the percentage of induced mutations by the effects of higher doses. (A.B.)

  19. Observation of Phase Objects by Using an X-ray Microscope with a Foucault Knife-Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, N.; Sasaya, T.; Imai, Y.; Iwata, S.; Zama, K.; Aoki, S.

    2011-09-01

    An x-ray microscope with a zone plate was assembled at the synchrotron radiation source of BL3C, Photon Factory. A Foucault knife-edge was set at the back focal plate of the objective zone plate and phase retrieval was tested by scanning the knife-edge. A preliminary result shows that scanning the knife-edge during exposure was effective for phase retrieval. Phase-contrast tomography was investigated using differential projection images calculated from two Schlieren images with the oppositely oriented knife-edges. Fairly good reconstruction images of polystyrene beads and spores could be obtained.

  20. Observation of Phase Objects by Using an X-ray Microscope with a Foucault Knife-Edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, N.; Sasaya, T.; Imai, Y.; Iwata, S.; Zama, K.; Aoki, S.

    2011-01-01

    An x-ray microscope with a zone plate was assembled at the synchrotron radiation source of BL3C, Photon Factory. A Foucault knife-edge was set at the back focal plate of the objective zone plate and phase retrieval was tested by scanning the knife-edge. A preliminary result shows that scanning the knife-edge during exposure was effective for phase retrieval. Phase-contrast tomography was investigated using differential projection images calculated from two Schlieren images with the oppositely oriented knife-edges. Fairly good reconstruction images of polystyrene beads and spores could be obtained.

  1. Preliminary study of the quarantine treatment by gamma rays for codling moth (Cydia pomonella) in apples and pears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusef, Maria V.; Kaupert, Norma L.; Quintana, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    After irradiation, important variations have been observed in the behaviour and metabolism of the moth larvae that are clearly attributable to the effects of gamma rays. The variation includes the loss of the characteristic pink colour, partial or total loss of appetite, loss of turgidity, etc. (author)

  2. Furan formation from fatty acids as a result of storage, gamma irradiation, UV-C and heat treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furan is a possible human carcinogen that has been found in many thermally processed foods. The effects of thermal processing, gamma and UV-C irradiation on formation of furan from different fatty acids was studied. In addition, formation of furan from fatty acid emulsions during storage at 25C and...

  3. SU-F-T-293: Experimental Comparisons of Ionization Chambers with Different Volumes for CyberKnife Delivery Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, M [Kobe Minimally invasive Cancer Center, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Munetomo, Y; Ogata, T; Uehara, K; Tsudou, S; Nishimura, H; Mayahara, H [Kobe Minimally invasive Cancer Center, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Sasaki, R [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the practicality use of ionization chambers with different volumes for delivery quality assurance of CyberKnife plans, Methods: Dosimetric measurements with a spherical solid water phantom and three ionization chambers with volumes of 0.13, 0.04, and 0.01 cm3 (IBA CC13, CC04, and CC01, respectively) were performed for various CyberKnife clinical treatment plans including both isocentric and nonisocentric delivery. For each chamber, the ion recombination correction factors Ks were calculated using the Jaffe plot method and twovoltage method at a 10-cm depth for a 60-mm collimator field in a water phantom. The polarity correction factors Kpol were determined for 5–60-mm collimator fields in same experimental setup. The measured doses were compared to the doses for the detectors calculated using a treatment planning system. Results: The differences in the Ks between the Jaffe plot method and two-voltage method were −0.12, −0.02, and 0.89% for CC13, CC04, and CC01, respectively. The changes in Kpol for the different field sizes were 0.2, 0.3, and 0.8% for CC13, CC04, and CC01, respectively. The measured doses for CC04 and CC01 were within 3% of the calculated doses for the clinical treatment plans with isocentric delivery with collimator fields greater than 12.5 mm. Those for CC13 had differences of over 3% for the plans with isocentric delivery with collimator fields less than 15 mm. The differences for the isocentric plans were similar to those for the single beam plans. The measured doses for each chamber were within 3% of the calculated doses for the non-isocentric plans except for that with a PTV volume less than 1.0 cm{sup 3}. Conclusion: Although there are some limitations, the ionization chamber with a smaller volume is a better detector for verification of the CyberKnife plans owing to the high spatial resolution.

  4. Radon 222 permeation through different polymers (PVC, EVA, PE and PP) after exposure to gamma radiation or surface treatment by cold plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, D.; Tomasella, E.; Labed, V.; Meunier, C.; Cetier, Ph.; Robé, M. C.; Chambaudet, A.

    1997-08-01

    In order to limit radon emission during the storage of radioactive wastes and to comply with the different regulations in the storage facility, the packaging used for these types of wastes should include intermediate enclosures, such as polymer membranes used as radon barriers. However, the membrane would be subjected to different types of radiation during long periods of storage, it would have to be regularly monitored for damage. The first aim of this study is to check the efficiency and the continuity of such polymer membranes subjected to different accelerated ageing processes by exposure to gamma radiation. PolyVinyl Chloride (PVC) and Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA) membranes were studied after gamma exposures. Thus, we evaluated the effects of the gamma radiations on the radon permeation coefficient, and the degradation of these polymers due to this exposure. The second objective of this study is to evaluate the modifications of the polymer surface by cold plasma. PolyEthylene (PE) and PolyPropylene (PP) membranes were studied. Exposure of a polymer to a plasma creates reactive sites on the polymer's surface. Different modifications in the surface composition (chemical composition, molecular weight, etc.) can be obtained. The advantage of the plasma process is that it acts within seconds and does not produce any noticeable effects on the bulk properties. The obtained results show that this treatment increases the polymer's efficiency as a radon barrier.

  5. Californium-252 versus conventional gamma radiation in the brachytherapy of advanced cervical carcinoma: comparative treatment results of a 10-year, randomized study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tačev, Tačo; Strnad, Vratislav; Ptáčková, Blanka

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we have shown that the application of 252Cf, as a source of gamma/neutron radiation in brachytherapy, provides properties and new treatment modalities that help to overcome this factor. There were 117 patients with stages IIb and IIIb treated intracavitarily with 252Cf during the first week of therapy by 6 Gy (40 Gy-eq) of the neutron component. Supplementation by a 16 Gy dose of intracavitary gamma radiation was done in the fifth week. There were 110 patients with stages IIb and IIIb intracavitarily treated solely by gamma radiation. An intracavitary dose of 56 Gy was applied in two fractions at the third and fifth weeks, respectively. In all patients the same dose of 56 Gy-eq was applied intracavitarily, supported by an external radiation of 40 Gy. The total applied doses at points A (paracevical space) and B (pelvis wall) were 85 and 59 Gy, respectively. The importance of 252Cf application in the brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma by overcoming the tumor resistance to conventional photon irradiation has been confirmed.

  6. A short 2 week dose titration regimen reduces the severity of flu-like symptoms with initial interferon gamma-1b treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devane, John G; Martin, Mary L; Matson, Mark A

    2014-06-01

    Flu-like symptoms (FLS) are commonly experienced by patients receiving interferon gamma-1b which may cause discontinuation or disruption of dosing during initial therapy or on re-initiation following a break in therapy. In contrast to Type I interferons, the impact of dose-titration on FLS has not been reported and is not a practice described or included in the approved prescribing information for interferon gamma-1b.The objective of this study was to assess the effect of a 2 week titration regimen on the severity of FLS during the initial 3 weeks of therapy with three times weekly subcutaneous injections of interferon gamma-1b. Healthy men and women were randomized into a double-blind, two-period, crossover study. Each study period was 3 weeks in duration and there was a minimum 15 day washout between treatment periods. Two treatment regimens were compared: No Titration dosing (full 50 mcg/m(2) subcutaneously [s.c.] three times weekly for 3 weeks) and Titration (15 mcg/m(2) s.c. three times weekly during week 1, 30 mcg/m(2) s.c. three times weekly during week 2 followed by the full dose of 50 mcg/m(2) s.c. three times weekly during week 3). Subjects remained in the clinic for at least 12 hours following each injection. FLS was based on a composite score for fever, chills, tiredness and muscle aches assessed at baseline and 4, 8 and 12 hours following each injection. Acetaminophen was allowed at the discretion of the PI. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline in FLS severity at 8 hours averaged over the 3 weeks of treatment. Additional endpoints included FLS at 4 and 12 hours, individual flu-like symptoms, rates of discontinuation, incidence of FLS and acetaminophen use. NCT 01929382. Of the 40 subjects randomized, there were 15 (37.5%) discontinuations. Titration resulted in a significant reduction in FLS severity at 8 hours (p = 0.023) averaged over the 3 week treatment period. The difference in 3 week FLS severity reflects differences

  7. Fatal accidental asphyxia in a jack-knife position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benomran, F A

    2010-10-01

    Accidental death from postural or positional asphyxia takes place when the abnormal position of the victim's body compromises the process of respiration. Diagnosis is largely made by circumstantial evidence supported by absence of any other significant pathology or trauma explaining death. This case report is about a 50-year-old male who had been drinking the previous night and was found dead in the morning inside a tire repair shop. His jack-knifed body had been encompassed, buttocks-down, within the hollow core made by 3 big tires stacked on top of each other. The author was called to the scene of death and had hands-on encounter with the body in-situ where scene photographs were taken. Apart from a blood alcohol of 290 mg/100 ml, marked congestion of the face, petechial hemorrhages on the conjunctivae and lung edema and congestion, autopsy findings were unremarkable. Abrasions on shoulders, lateral aspects of arms and posterior aspects of lower legs indicated friction with internal rims of tires while slipping down. There were no other injuries or pathology to account for his death. Death was determined to be due to accidental postural asphyxia secondary to intoxication by alcohol. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficacy of gamma interferon and specific antibody for treatment of microsporidiosis caused by Encephalitozoon cuniculi in SCID mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Salát, Jiří; Jelínek, Jiří; Chmelař, Jindřich; Kopecký, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 6 (2008), s. 2169-2174 ISSN 0066-4804 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP524/03/D167; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : murine peritoneal-macrophages * IFN-gamma * immune-response * T-lymphocytes * infection * cells * therapy * AIDS * CD4+ Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 4.716, year: 2008

  9. Objective assessment of knife sharpness over a working day cutting meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savescu, Adriana; Cuny-Guerrier, Aude; Wild, Pascal; Reno, Gilles; Aublet-Cuvelier, Agnès; Claudon, Laurent

    2018-04-01

    Knife sharpness is one of multiple factors involved in musculoskeletal disorders in industrial meat cutting. The aim of this study was to objectively evaluate, in real working situations, how knife sharpness changed over a working day cutting meat, and to analyse the impact of sharpening, steeling and meat-cutting activities on these variations. Twenty-two meat-cutting workers from three different companies participated in the study. The methods included measurements of knife sharpness in relation to real work situations and consideration of the way meat-cutting and sharpening operations were organised. Results showed that the type of meat-cutting activities, the steeling strategy adopted by the worker, including the types of tool used, and the overall organisation of the sharpening task all had a significant influence on how knife sharpness evolved over a 2-h period and over an entire working day. To improve MSD prevention, sharpening and steeling operations should not be considered as independent activities, but taken into account as a continuity of working actions. Appropriate assessment of knife sharpness by meat cutters affects how they organise meat-cutting and sharpening tasks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of heat treatment on the thermoluminescence of naturally-occurring calcites and their use as a gamma-ray dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engin, Birol; Gueven, Olgun

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of using naturally-occurring calcite for gamma-ray dosimetry was investigated. Anneal treatment above 350 deg. C increased the sensitivity of all radiation-induced TL peaks except the glow peaks above 300 deg. C. On the other hand, annealing in air, at a temperature of 700 deg. C caused a collapse in the TL sensitivity. The increase in TL efficiency was found to depend on the annealing temperature and time. Heating at 600 deg. C for 5 h and quenching in ambient air are the optimum conditions for TL sensitivity enhancement in the calcite materials investigated. These results are explained using the energy scheme of the pre-dose model of and in terms of the impurity rearrangements in the crystal lattice induced by heating. It was found that the values of the kinetic parameters E, s and b for TL glow peaks remained unchanged for annealed samples. The TL dose-response curves for stable dosimetric peaks of annealed and unannealed calcite samples could be fitted to the same linear mathematical function. This implies that the annealing process probably does not change the nature of the trapping centers except the low temperature TL peaks at 125 and 160 deg. C of flowstone. The TL dosimetric parameters of calcite samples annealed, including glow curves, fading characteristics, dose-responses, dose-rate responses and energy responses, have also been studied in detail. The response to gamma-rays of annealed calcite samples was found to be linear from 0.05 to 10 4 Gy. The lower limit of observable doses for each calcite sample was about 0.05 Gy. This offers the possibility of applying the investigated materials for gamma-ray dosimetry within this useful range. These dosimeters can be used in various applications, such as, in industries related to chemical technology (polymerization), food processing and in determining the dose received by the patient during medical examination and treatment

  11. Influence on grip of knife handle surface characteristics and wearing protective gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudon, Laurent

    2006-11-01

    Ten subjects were asked to apply maximum torques on knife handles with either their bare hand or their hand wearing a Kevlar fibre protective glove. Four knife handles (2 roughnesses, 2 hardnesses) were tested. Surface electromyograms of 6 upper limb and shoulder muscles were recorded and subject opinions on both knife handle hardness and friction in the hand were also assessed. The results revealed the significant influence of wearing gloves (pgloves greatly increased the torque independently of the other two parameters. Under the bare hand condition, a 90 degrees ShA slightly rough handle provided the greatest torque. Subject opinion agreed with the observed effects on recorded torque values except for the hardness factor, for which a preference for the 70 degrees ShA value over the 90 degrees ShA value emerged.

  12. Comparison of Sparse and Jack-knife partial least squares regression methods for variable selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karaman, Ibrahim; Qannari, El Mostafa; Martens, Harald

    2013-01-01

    is often used by chemometricians. In order to evaluate the predictive ability of both methods, cross model validation was implemented. The performance of both methods was assessed using FTIR spectroscopic data, on the one hand, and a set of simulated data. The stability of the variable selection procedures......The objective of this study was to compare two different techniques of variable selection, Sparse PLSR and Jack-knife PLSR, with respect to their predictive ability and their ability to identify relevant variables. Sparse PLSR is a method that is frequently used in genomics, whereas Jack-knife PLSR...... was highlighted by the frequency of the selection of each variable in the cross model validation segments. Computationally, Jack-knife PLSR was much faster than Sparse PLSR. But while it was found that both methods have more or less the same predictive ability, Sparse PLSR turned out to be generally very stable...

  13. NOD/SCID-GAMMA mice are an ideal strain to assess the efficacy of therapeutic agents used in the treatment of myeloma bone disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A Lawson

    Full Text Available Animal models of multiple myeloma vary in terms of consistency of onset, degree of tumour burden and degree of myeloma bone disease. Here we describe five pre-clinical models of myeloma in NOD/SCID-GAMMA mice to specifically study the effects of therapeutic agents on myeloma bone disease. Groups of 7-8 week old female irradiated NOD/SCID-GAMMA mice were injected intravenously via the tail vein with either 1x106 JJN3, U266, XG-1 or OPM-2 human myeloma cell lines or patient-derived myeloma cells. At the first signs of morbidity in each tumour group all animals were sacrificed. Tumour load was measured by histological analysis, and bone disease was assessed by micro-CT and standard histomorphometric methods. Mice injected with JJN3, U266 or OPM-2 cells showed high tumour bone marrow infiltration of the long bones with low variability, resulting in osteolytic lesions. In contrast, mice injected with XG-1 or patient-derived myeloma cells showed lower tumour bone marrow infiltration and less bone disease with high variability. Injection of JJN3 cells into NOD/SCID-GAMMA mice resulted in an aggressive, short-term model of myeloma with mice exhibiting signs of morbidity 3 weeks later. Treating these mice with zoledronic acid at the time of tumour cell injection or once tumour was established prevented JJN3-induced bone disease but did not reduce tumour burden, whereas, carfilzomib treatment given once tumour was established significantly reduced tumour burden. Injection of U266, XG-1, OPM-2 and patient-derived myeloma cells resulted in less aggressive longer-term models of myeloma with mice exhibiting signs of morbidity 8 weeks later. Treating U266-induced disease with zoledronic acid prevented the formation of osteolytic lesions and trabecular bone loss as well as reducing tumour burden whereas, carfilzomib treatment only reduced tumour burden. In summary, JJN3, U266 or OPM-2 cells injected into NOD/SCID-GAMMA mice provide robust models to study anti

  14. Equivalence in Dose Fall-Off for Isocentric and Nonisocentric Intracranial Treatment Modalities and Its Impact on Dose Fractionation Schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Lijun; Sahgal, Arjun; Descovich, Martina; Cho, Y.-B.; Chuang, Cynthia; Huang, Kim; Laperriere, Normand J.; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Larson, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether dose fall-off characteristics would be significantly different among intracranial radiosurgery modalities and the influence of these characteristics on fractionation schemes in terms of normal tissue sparing. Methods and Materials: An analytic model was developed to measure dose fall-off characteristics near the target independent of treatment modalities. Variations in the peripheral dose fall-off characteristics were then examined and compared for intracranial tumors treated with Gamma Knife, Cyberknife, or Novalis LINAC-based system. Equivalent uniform biologic effective dose (EUBED) for the normal brain tissue was calculated. Functional dependence of the normal brain EUBED on varying numbers of fractions (1 to 30) was studied for the three modalities. Results: The derived model fitted remarkably well for all the cases (R 2 > 0.99). No statistically significant differences in the dose fall-off relationships were found between the three modalities. Based on the extent of variations in the dose fall-off curves, normal brain EUBED was found to decrease with increasing number of fractions for the targets, with α/β ranging from 10 to 20. This decrease was most pronounced for hypofractionated treatments with fewer than 10 fractions. Additionally, EUBED was found to increase slightly with increasing number of fractions for targets with α/β ranging from 2 to 5. Conclusion: Nearly identical dose fall-off characteristics were found for the Gamma Knife, Cyberknife, and Novalis systems. Based on EUBED calculations, normal brain sparing was found to favor hypofractionated treatments for fast-growing tumors with α/β ranging from 10 to 20 and single fraction treatment for abnormal tissues with low α/β values such as α/β = 2.

  15. Treatment of trigeminal neuralgia with radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latorzeff, I.; Redon, A.; Debono, B.; Sol, J.C.; Menegalli, D.; Mertens, P.; Muracciole, X.

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia is defined as brief paroxysms of pain limited to the facial distribution of the trigeminal nerve. Drug therapy is considered to be the first-line of treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. Unfortunately, medical treatment does not always provide satisfactory pain relief for 25% of the patients. Moreover, the relief provided by drug therapy generally decreases over time, and increased dosages of these medications are limited because of side effects. In this case, patients can be offered several surgical approaches, such as percutaneous techniques (thermo-coagulation, micro-compression, glycerol injection) or microvascular decompression in the cerebello-pontine angle (Gardner-Jannetta's technique). In this indication, stereotactic radiosurgery, driven by teams using Gamma Knife