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Sample records for gadolinium chelates contrast

  1. Gadolinium retention after administration of contrast agents based on linear chelators and the recommendations of the European Medicines Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkers, Ilona A; Roos, Rick; van der Molen, Aart J

    2018-04-01

    The Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) earlier this year recommended to suspend some marketing authorisations for Gadolinium Containing Contrast Agents (GCCAs) based on linear chelators due to the potential risk of gadolinium retention in the human body. These recommendations have recently been re-evaluated by EMA's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP), and confirmed the final opinion of the European Medicines Agency. This editorial provides an overview of the available GCCAs and summarises the recent evidence of gadolinium retention. Moreover, a critical appraisal of the strengths and limitations of the scientific evidence currently available on gadolinium retention is given. • EMA recommended suspension of some EU marketing authorisations of four linear GCCAs. • Brain MRI findings indicating gadolinium retention have been confirmed by mass spectrometry. • Current scientific evidence for gadolinium retention has several methodological limitations. • No clear clinical evidence exists indicating that gadolinium retention causes neurotoxicity. • Long-term safety of GCCAs, however, remains unclear.

  2. Increased Delay Between Gadolinium Chelate Administration and T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Acquisition Increases Contrast-Enhancing Tumor Volumes and T1 Intensities in Brain Tumor Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechotta, Paula L; Bonekamp, David; Sill, Martin; Wick, Antje; Wick, Wolfgang; Bendszus, Martin; Kickingereder, Philipp

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of delayed T1-weighted (T1-w) MRI acquisition after gadolinium chelate administration on brain tumor volumes and T1-w intensities. Fifty-five patients with histologically confirmed, contrast-enhancing intra-axial brain tumors were analyzed in this prospective test-retest study. Patients underwent 2 consecutive 3 T MRI scans (separated by a 1-minute break) during routine follow-up with contrast-enhanced T1 (ceT1-w), T2, and FLAIR acquisition. Macrocyclic gadolinium chelate-based contrast agent was only administered before the first ceT1-w acquisition; median latency to ceT1-w acquisition was 6.72 minutes (IQR, 6.53-6.92) in the first and 16.27 minutes (IQR, 15.49-17.26) in the second scan. Changes in tumor volumes and relative ceT1-w intensities between the 2 acquisitions were quantitatively assessed following semiautomated tumor segmentation (separately for contrast-enhancement [CE], necrosis [NEC], and nonenhancing [NE] tumor). Semiautomatically segmented CE tumor volumes were significantly larger in the second acquisition (median +32% [1.2 cm]; IQR, 16%-62%; P < 0.01), which corresponded to a 10% increase in CE tumor diameter (+0.3 cm). Contrarily, NEC and NE tumor volumes were significantly smaller (median -24% [IQR, -36% to -54%], P < 0.01 for NEC and -2% [IQR, -1% to -3%], P = 0.02 for NE tumor). Bland-Altman plots confirmed a proportional bias toward higher CE and lower NEC volumes for the second ceT1-w acquisition. Relative ceT1-w intensities for both early- (regions already enhancing in the first scan) and late-enhancing (newly enhancing regions in the second scan) tumor were significantly increased in the second acquisition (by 5.8% and 27.3% [P < 0.01, respectively]). Linear-mixed effects modeling confirmed that the increase in CE volumes and CE intensities is a function of the interval between contrast agent injection and ceT1-w acquisition (P < 0.01 each). Our study indicates that the maximum extent of CE

  3. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: first-pass arterial enhancement as a function of gadolinium-chelate concentration, and the saline chaser volume and injection rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husarik, Daniela B; Bashir, Mustafa R; Weber, Paul W; Nichols, Eli B; Howle, Laurens E; Merkle, Elmar M; Nelson, Rendon C

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of the contrast medium (CM) concentration and the saline chaser volume and injection rate on first-pass aortic enhancement characteristics in contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography using a physiologic flow phantom. Imaging was performed on a 3.0-T magnetic resonance system (MAGNETOM Trio, Siemens Healthcare Solutions, Inc, Erlangen, Germany) using a 2-dimensional fast low angle shot T1-weighted sequence (repetition time, 500 milliseconds; echo time, 1.23 milliseconds; flip angle, 8 degrees; 1 frame/s × 60 seconds). The following CM concentrations injected at 2 mL/s were used with 3 different contrast agents (gadolinium [Gd]-BOPTA, Gd-HP-DO3A, Gd-DTPA): 20 mL of undiluted CM (100%) and 80%, 40%, 20%, 10%, 5%, and 2.5% of the full amount, all diluted in saline to a volume of 20 mL to ensure equal bolus volume. The CM was followed by saline chasers of 20 to 60 mL injected at 2 mL/s and 6 mL/s. Aortic signal intensity (SI) was measured, and normalized SI versus time (SI/Tn) curves were generated. The maximal SI (SI(max)), bolus length, and areas under the SI/Tn curve were calculated. Decreasing the CM concentration from 100% to 40% resulted in a decrease of SI(max) to 86.1% (mean). Further decreasing the CM concentration to 2.5% decreased SI(max) to 5.1% (mean). Altering the saline chaser volume had no significant effect on SI(max). Increasing the saline chaser injection rate had little effect (mean increase, 2.2%) on SI(max) when using ≥40% of CM. There was a larger effect (mean increase, 19.6%) when ≤20% of CM were used. Bolus time length was significantly shorter (P < 0.001), and area under the SI/T(n) curve was significantly smaller (P < 0.01) for the CM protocols followed by a saline chaser injected at 6 mL/s compared with a saline chaser injected at 2 mL/s. With 40% of CM and a fast saline chaser, SImax close to that with undiluted CM can be achieved. An increased saline chaser injection rate has a more pronounced effect on

  4. Actual clinical use of gadolinium-chelates for non-MRI applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strunk, Holger M.; Schild, H. [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105, Bonn (Germany)

    2004-06-01

    For many years, alternatives to iodinated X-ray contrast media have been sought. Of the contrast media investigated to date, only CO{sub 2} and the gadolinium-chelates have been shown to be viable alternatives for selected X-ray examinations. Therefore, we have reviewed the general literature and that specific for gadopentetate (Magnevist) in particular, since this agent has been studied the most. This review indicates that diagnostic CT examinations can be achieved following the intravenous administration of gadolinium-containing contrast media (CM) for evaluation of aortic abnormalities. Gadolinium-containing CM at the dose approved for MR imaging are not useful for CT evaluation of the abdominal parenchymal organs. Intravenous/intraarterial injections have also been used in a variety of angiographic and interventional procedures. Image quality, however, is generally inferior to iodinated contrast media. Gadolinium-containing CM require no special handling and can be administered by hand injection or via conventional angiographic automated injectors with the same flow rates and pressures as are used with iodinated contrast media. For CT, a peripheral bolus injection of a diluted gadolinium agent (1:1 with saline) of 60-90 ml at 3-5 ml/s is usually performed. Similar to all other gadolinium-chelates, the non-MRI use of gadopentetate (Magnevist) is not approved by regulatory agencies. However, the literature suggests that a dose of 0.3-0.4 mmol/kg b.w. has been safely administered for CT as well as for angiography and interventional procedures intravenously and intraarterially. Even at this dose, though, this results in a relatively small overall volume to be injected, which limits utility somewhat. (orig.)

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid changes after intravenous injection of gadolinium chelate: assessment by FLAIR MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzao, Alessandro; Floris, Roberto; Fasoli, Fabrizio; Simonetti, Giovanni; Fantozzi, Luigi Maria; Colonnese, Claudio

    2003-01-01

    Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence is currently used in clinical practice. Some reports emphasize the possibility that, in pathologic conditions, intravenous injection of gadolinium chelates may lead to an increased signal inside the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of CSF signal changes in pathologic conditions causing blood-brain barrier disruption or neovascularization when imaging is performed after intravenous injection of gadolinium. We obtained FLAIR sequences after gadolinium injection from 33 patients affected by different intracranial pathologies and 10 control subjects. Patients were affected by ischemic stroke in the subacute phase, from 2 to 7 days from onset of symptoms (12 patients), meningiomas (8 patients), high-grade gliomas (5 patients), previous surgical procedures for intra-axial neoplasms (5 patients), and multiple sclerosis with active plaques (3 patients). Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in patients and controls using a 1.5-T magnet, using T2- and T1-weighted FLAIR sequences. The FLAIR sequence was acquired before and 1-3 h after injection of a standard dose of gadolinium. In those patients affected by ischemic lesions, FLAIR sequences were repeated the next days and 3-4 days later. The CSF signal was visually evaluated by two readers and scored from 0 to 3 depending by the degree of enhancement. The location of CSF signal changes (close to the lesion, hemispheric, or diffuse) was also considered. The CSF signal was markedly increased after 3 h from intravenous injection of gadolinium in all the patients with stroke, in those with previous surgery, and in those with high-grade gliomas whose neoplasm's surface was in contact with the subarachnoid spaces (SAS) or ventricles; a strong enhancement was also evident inside the necrotic component of the tumor. The CSF changes were more evident close to the pathology and/or in the hemisphere involved by the pathology. Moderate

  6. [MR imaging of lung ventilation with aerosolized gadolinium-chelates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haage, P; Karaagac, S; Spüntrup, E; Adam, G; Günther, R W

    2003-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance assessment of human lung ventilation with aerosolized Gd-chelates in healthy volunteers. Five healthy adults (mean age 37 years) were studied with a 1.5 T unit. The volunteers were instructed to inhale the aerosol through an airtight facial mask for 10 minutes. The aerosol was generated with a jet-type small particle nebulizer with attached heater. Ventilation imaging was performed using a respiration-gated dynamic T1-weighted turbo spin echo sequence (T(R) = 199 ms, T(E) = 8.5 ms, 12 signal averages, slice thickness 10 mm). Pulmonary signal intensity changes were calculated before and after nebulization. The investigation was successfully carried out in all volunteers. An acute or delayed allergic reaction to the aerosolized contrast medium was not observed. In 4 of 5 experiments (80 %), a homogeneous signal intensity increase was readily visualized with an average signal increase of 35 % after 10 minutes; in one experiment, the aerosol distribution was slightly heterogeneous. The results of the presented phase I clinical study demonstrate the feasibility of human ventilation imaging with aerosolized Gd-chelates for the first time. More trials with a larger number of healthy subjects and patients are needed before the clinical introduction of Gd-based ventilation MR imaging of the lungs.

  7. Contrast opacification for CT from iodine, gadolinium and ytterbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwicker, C.; Langer, M.; Ullrich, V.; Felix, R.

    1993-01-01

    The absorption of the elements iodine, gadolinium und ytterbium in various dilutions was studied in relation to CT. Regression analysis and specific CT density measurements showed that absorption decreases from gadolinium to ytterbium and iodine. These results were confirmed by experiments using ten dogs. Boli of 0.5 molar gadolinium used for angio-CT without table movement showed the largest increase in density in the aorta and liver with an average of 190 HU and 21 HU respectively compared with iodine which gave 157 HU and 12 HU respectively. The animal experimental studies suggest that gadolinium and ytterbium are suitable contrast media for dynamic CT investigations. (orig.) [de

  8. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and gadolinium-based contrast media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S; Morcos, Sameh K; Almén, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To update the guidelines of the Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) on nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and gadolinium-based contrast media. AREAS COVERED: Topics reviewed include the history, clinical features and prevalence...... of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and the current understanding of its pathophysiology. The risk factors for NSF are discussed and prophylactic measures are recommended. The stability of the different gadolinium-based contrast media and the potential long-term effects of gadolinium in the body have also been...... reviewed. KEY POINTS : • Clinical features, risk factors and prevention of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis are reviewed • Patients with GFR below 30 ml/min/1.73 m ( 2 ) have increased risk of developing NSF • Low stability gadolinium contrast media show the strongest association with NSF • Following...

  9. Gadolinium-based contrast agents in pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gale, Eric M.; Caravan, Peter [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, The Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Boston, MA (United States); Rao, Anil G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); McDonald, Robert J. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Winfeld, Matthew [University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Fleck, Robert J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Gee, Michael S. [MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Harvard Medical School, Division of Pediatric Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents can increase the accuracy and expediency of an MRI examination. However the benefits of a contrast-enhanced scan must be carefully weighed against the well-documented risks associated with administration of exogenous contrast media. The purpose of this review is to discuss commercially available gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) in the context of pediatric radiology. We discuss the chemistry, regulatory status, safety and clinical applications, with particular emphasis on imaging of the blood vessels, heart, hepatobiliary tree and central nervous system. We also discuss non-GBCA MRI contrast agents that are less frequently used or not commercially available. (orig.)

  10. Gadolinium-based contrast agents in pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, Eric M.; Caravan, Peter; Rao, Anil G.; McDonald, Robert J.; Winfeld, Matthew; Fleck, Robert J.; Gee, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents can increase the accuracy and expediency of an MRI examination. However the benefits of a contrast-enhanced scan must be carefully weighed against the well-documented risks associated with administration of exogenous contrast media. The purpose of this review is to discuss commercially available gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) in the context of pediatric radiology. We discuss the chemistry, regulatory status, safety and clinical applications, with particular emphasis on imaging of the blood vessels, heart, hepatobiliary tree and central nervous system. We also discuss non-GBCA MRI contrast agents that are less frequently used or not commercially available. (orig.)

  11. Biodegradable gadolinium-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers for gene transfection and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xiaolong; Wang, Gangmin; Shi, Ting; Shao, Zhihong; Zhao, Peng; Shi, Donglu; Ren, Jie; Lin, Chao; Wang, Peijun

    2016-01-01

    Theranostic nano-polyplexes containing gene and imaging agents hold a great promise for tumor diagnosis and therapy. In this work, we develop a group of new gadolinium (Gd)-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide)s for gene delivery and T 1 -weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Cationic poly(urethane amide)s (denoted as CPUAs) having multiple disulfide bonds, urethane and amide linkages were synthesized by stepwise polycondensation reaction between 1,4-bis(3-aminopropyl)piperazine and a mixture of di(4-nitrophenyl)-2, 2′-dithiodiethanocarbonate (DTDE-PNC) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) dianhydride at varied molar ratios. Then, Gd-chelated CPUAs (denoted as GdCPUAs) were produced by chelating Gd(III) ions with DTPA residues of CPUAs. These GdCPUAs could condense gene into nanosized and positively-charged polyplexes in a physiological condition and, however, liberated gene in an intracellular reductive environment. In vitro transfection experiments revealed that the GdCPUA at a DTDE-PNC/DTPA residue molar ratio of 85/15 induced the highest transfection efficiency in different cancer cells. This efficiency was higher than that yielded with 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine as a positive control. GdCPUAs and their polyplexes exhibited low cytotoxicity when an optimal transfection activity was detected. Moreover, GdCPUAs may serve as contrast agents for T 1 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The results of this work indicate that biodegradable Gd-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers have high potential for tumor theranostics. - Highlights: • Novel cationic gadolinium-chelated poly(urethane amide)s (GdCPUAs) are prepared. • GdCPUAs can induce a high transfection efficacy in different cancer cells. • GdCPUAs reveal good cyto-compatibility against cancer cells. • GdCPUAs may be applied as T 1 -contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. • GdCPUAs hold high potential for cancer theranostics.

  12. Combustion of gadolinium and dysprosium chelates as a cellular integrity marker in MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericsson, A.; Bach-Gansmo, T.; Niklasson, F.; Hemmingsson, A.

    1995-01-01

    A combination of gadolinium (Gd) and dysprosium (Dy) chelates was investigated as a potential marker of cell-membrane integrity by means of a double-contrast effect in MR imaging. Blood samples with varying hematocrit (Hct) levels containing intact or lysed cells were used as model systems. With intact cells, the agents were assumed to be distributed solely extracellularly and the highest Hct studied (69%) was assumed to mimic the ratio of extracellular to intracellular water in tissue. The combined effect on image intensity of Gd (in a concentration corresponding to 0.2 mmol/kg b.w. in humans) and Dy (0.6 mmol/kg b.w.) applied simultaneously was a marked difference in signal intensity between samples with intact and lysed cells in both the T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images with a corresponding increase in the contrast-to-noise ratio. This was the result of a T1 reduction caused by Gd with a negligible Dy susceptibility effect in areas with lysed cells. On the other hand, the Dy susceptibility effect (i.e. reduced apparent T2) dominated in areas with intact cells. Thus, the combination of Gd and Dy may serve as a marker of cell-membrane integrity in MR examinations. (orig.)

  13. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) and gadolinium-based contrast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), unknown before March 1997 and first described in 2000, is a systemic disorder characterised by widespread tissue fibrosis. The first known case occurred in 1997, after the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) at high doses in patients with renal failure had become routine.

  14. Biodegradable gadolinium-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers for gene transfection and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xiaolong [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200065 (China); Wang, Gangmin [Department of Urology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Shi, Ting [The Institute for Translational Nanomedicine, Shanghai East Hospital, Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nanoscience, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Shao, Zhihong [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200065 (China); Zhao, Peng; Shi, Donglu [The Institute for Translational Nanomedicine, Shanghai East Hospital, Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nanoscience, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Ren, Jie [Institute of Nano and Biopolymeric Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 4800 Caoan Road, Shanghai 201804 (China); Lin, Chao, E-mail: chaolin@tongji.edu.cn [The Institute for Translational Nanomedicine, Shanghai East Hospital, Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nanoscience, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang, Peijun, E-mail: tjpjwang@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200065 (China)

    2016-08-01

    Theranostic nano-polyplexes containing gene and imaging agents hold a great promise for tumor diagnosis and therapy. In this work, we develop a group of new gadolinium (Gd)-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide)s for gene delivery and T{sub 1}-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Cationic poly(urethane amide)s (denoted as CPUAs) having multiple disulfide bonds, urethane and amide linkages were synthesized by stepwise polycondensation reaction between 1,4-bis(3-aminopropyl)piperazine and a mixture of di(4-nitrophenyl)-2, 2′-dithiodiethanocarbonate (DTDE-PNC) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) dianhydride at varied molar ratios. Then, Gd-chelated CPUAs (denoted as GdCPUAs) were produced by chelating Gd(III) ions with DTPA residues of CPUAs. These GdCPUAs could condense gene into nanosized and positively-charged polyplexes in a physiological condition and, however, liberated gene in an intracellular reductive environment. In vitro transfection experiments revealed that the GdCPUA at a DTDE-PNC/DTPA residue molar ratio of 85/15 induced the highest transfection efficiency in different cancer cells. This efficiency was higher than that yielded with 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine as a positive control. GdCPUAs and their polyplexes exhibited low cytotoxicity when an optimal transfection activity was detected. Moreover, GdCPUAs may serve as contrast agents for T{sub 1}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The results of this work indicate that biodegradable Gd-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers have high potential for tumor theranostics. - Highlights: • Novel cationic gadolinium-chelated poly(urethane amide)s (GdCPUAs) are prepared. • GdCPUAs can induce a high transfection efficacy in different cancer cells. • GdCPUAs reveal good cyto-compatibility against cancer cells. • GdCPUAs may be applied as T{sub 1}-contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. • GdCPUAs hold high potential for cancer theranostics.

  15. Comparative in vivo dissociation of gadolinium chelates in renally impaired rats: a relaxometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fretellier, Nathalie; Idée, Jean-Marc; Dencausse, Anne; Karroum, Oussama; Guerret, Sylviane; Poveda, Nicolas; Jestin, Gaëlle; Factor, Cécile; Raynal, Isabelle; Zamia, Philippe; Port, Marc; Corot, Claire

    2011-05-01

    Investigation of dissociated versus chelated gadolinium (Gd) in plasma, skin, and bone of rats with impaired renal function after administration of ionic macrocyclic (gadoterate or Dotarem) or nonionic linear (gadodiamide or Omniscan) Gd chelates. Subtotally nephrectomized Wistar rats were subjected to receive daily injections of 2.5 mmol/kg of Omniscan, gadodiamide without excess ligand caldiamide, Dotarem, or saline (n = 7-10 rats/group) for 5 consecutive days. The Gd concentration was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer in skin, femur epiphysis, and plasma on completion of the study (day 11), and dissociated Gd(3+) was measured in the plasma at day 11 (liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). The r(1) relaxivity constant was measured in skin (at day 4 and day 11) and bone (day 11) to investigate the dissociated or chelated form of Gd found in tissue samples. Clinical and skin histopathologic studies were performed. Subtotal nephrectomy decreased creatinine clearance by 60%. No macroscopic skin lesions were observed in the Dotarem and Omniscan groups in contrast with the gadodiamide group (2 rats survived the study period and 4 of 10 rats showed skin ulcerations and scabs). Skin histopathologic lesions were in the range gadodiamide > Omniscan > Dotarem (similar to control rats). At day 11, the skin Gd concentration was lower in the Dotarem group (161.0 ± 85.5 nmol/g) as compared with the Omniscan (490.5 ± 223.2 nmol/g) and gadodiamide groups (mean value, 776.1 nmol/g; n = 2 survivors). The total Gd concentration in the femur was significantly higher in the Omniscan group than in the Dotarem group. At day 11, the dissociated Gd(3+) concentration in plasma was below the limit of detection in the Dotarem group and was 1.5 ± 0.7 μmol/L in the Omniscan group corresponding to 62% ± 15% of the total Gd concentration. The dissociated Gd(3+) concentration was 1.1 μmol/L in gadodiamide rats (n = 2 survivors). In the

  16. Immediate hypersensitivity reaction to gadolinium-based MR contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-Woo; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Min-Hye; Lee, Whal; Min, Kyung-Up; Han, Moon-Hee; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2012-08-01

    To determine the incidence and risk factors of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to gadolinium-based magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents. Institutional review board approval and a waiver of informed consent were obtained. A retrospective study of patients who had been given gadolinium-based MR contrast media between August 2004 and July 2010 was performed by reviewing their electronic medical records. In addition to data on immediate hypersensitivity reaction, the kinds of MR contrast media and demographic data including age, sex, and comorbidity were collected. To compare the groups, the χ(2) test, Fisher exact test, χ(2) test for trend, Student t test, analysis of variance test, and multiple logistic regression test were performed. A total of 112 immediate hypersensitivity reactions (0.079% of 141 623 total doses) were identified in 102 patients (0.121% of 84 367 total patients). Among the six evaluated MR contrast media, gadodiamide had the lowest rate (0.013%) of immediate hypersensitivity reactions, while gadobenate dimeglumine had the highest rate (0.22%). The rate for immediate hypersensitivity reactions was significantly higher in female patients (odds ratio = 1.687; 95% confidence interval: 1.143, 2.491) and in patients with allergies and asthma (odds ratio = 2.829; 95% confidence interval: 1.427, 5.610). Patients with a previous history of immediate hypersensitivity reactions had a higher rate of recurrence after reexposure to MR contrast media (30%) compared with the incidence rate in total patients (P immediate hypersensitivity reactions increased depending on the number of times patients were exposed to MR contrast media (P for trend = .036). The most common symptom was urticaria (91.1%), and anaphylaxis occurred in 11 cases (9.8%). The mortality rate was 0.0007% because of one fatality. The incidence of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to MR contrast media was 0.079%, and the recurrence rate of hypersensitivity reactions was 30% in

  17. High Relaxivity Gadolinium Hydroxypyridonate-Viral Capsid Conjugates: Nano-sized MRI Contrast Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meux, Susan C.; Datta, Ankona; Hooker, Jacob M.; Botta, Mauro; Francis, Matthew B.; Aime, Silvio; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-08-29

    High relaxivity macromolecular contrast agents based on the conjugation of gadolinium chelates to the interior and exterior surfaces of MS2 viral capsids are assessed. The proton nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles of the conjugates show up to a five-fold increase in relaxivity, leading to a peak relaxivity (per Gd{sup 3+} ion) of 41.6 mM{sup -1}s{sup -1} at 30 MHz for the internally modified capsids. Modification of the exterior was achieved through conjugation to flexible lysines, while internal modification was accomplished by conjugation to relatively rigid tyrosines. Higher relaxivities were obtained for the internally modified capsids, showing that (1) there is facile diffusion of water to the interior of capsids and (2) the rigidity of the linker attaching the complex to the macromolecule is important for obtaining high relaxivity enhancements. The viral capsid conjugated gadolinium hydroxypyridonate complexes appear to possess two inner-sphere water molecules (q = 2) and the NMRD fittings highlight the differences in the local motion for the internal ({tau}{sub RI} = 440 ps) and external ({tau}{sub RI} = 310 ps) conjugates. These results indicate that there are significant advantages of using the internal surface of the capsids for contrast agent attachment, leaving the exterior surface available for the installation of tissue targeting groups.

  18. Synergistic enhancement of iron oxide nanoparticle and gadolinium for dual-contrast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fan; Huang, Xinglu; Qian, Chunqi; Zhu, Lei; Hida, Naoki; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► MR contrast agents exert influence on T 1 or T 2 relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. ► Combined use of iron oxide and Gd-DTPA can improve the sensitivity/specificity of lesion detection. ► Dual contrast MRI enhances the delineation of tumor borders and small lesions. ► The effect of DC-MRI can come from the high paramagnetic susceptibility of Gd 3+ . ► The effect of DC-MRI can also come from the distinct pharmacokinetic distribution of SPIO and Gd-DTPA. -- Abstract: Purpose: The use of MR contrast agents allows accurate diagnosis by exerting an influence on the longitudinal (T 1 ) or transverse (T 2 ) relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. In this study, we combined the use of iron oxide (IO) particles and nonspecific extracellular gadolinium chelate (Gd) in order to further improve the sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection. Procedures: With a 7-Tesla scanner, pre-contrasted, IO-enhanced and dual contrast agent enhanced MRIs were performed in phantom, normal animals, and animal models of lymph node tumor metastases and orthotopic brain tumor. For the dual-contrast (DC) MRI, we focused on the evaluation of T 2 weighted DC MRI with IO administered first, then followed by the injection of a bolus of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Results: Based on the C/N ratios and MRI relaxometry, the synergistic effect of coordinated administration of Gd-DTPA and IO was observed and confirmed in phantom, normal liver and tumor models. At 30 min after administration of Feridex, Gd-DTPA further decreased T 2 relaxation in liver immediately after the injection. Additional administration of Gd-DTPA also immediately increased the signal contrast between tumor and brain parenchyma and maximized the C/N ratio to −4.12 ± 0.71. Dual contrast MRI also enhanced the delineation of tumor borders and small lesions. Conclusions: DC-MRI will be helpful to improve diagnostic accuracy and decrease the threshold size for

  19. Gadolinium-containing contrast media for radiographic examinations: a position paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, Henrik S.; Almen, Torsten; Morcos, Sameh K.

    2002-01-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that gadolinium-based contrast media could be used for radiological examinations in patients with significant renal impairment, previous severe generalized reaction to iodinated contrast media or thyroid disease about to undergo radioactive iodine treatment; however, the indications for and risks of using gadolinium agents in this way are not well known; hence, the Contrast Media Safety Committee of The European Society of Urogenital Radiology reviewed the literature to issue a position paper on this subject. A comprehensive literature review was performed and the resulting report was discussed at the Ninth European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Genoa, Italy, June 2002. Review of the literature indicates that according to experimental data on animals gadolinium-based contrast media have more nephrotoxic potential than iodinated contrast media in equivalent X-ray attenuating doses; therefore, gadolinium-based contrast media should not replace iodinated contrast media in patients with renal insufficiency for radiographic examinations. For patients with previous severe generalized reactions to iodinated contrast media, and in patients about to undergo thyroid treatment with radioactive iodine gadolinium-based contrast media in approved intravenous doses, up to 0.3 mmol/kg body weight will not give diagnostic radiographic information in most cases. Gadolinium-based contrast media are not approved for radiographic examinations. (orig.)

  20. Human Aortic Endothelial Cell Labeling with Positive Contrast Gadolinium Oxide Nanoparticles for Cellular Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 7 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir Loai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Positive T1 contrast using gadolinium (Gd contrast agents can potentially improve detection of labeled cells on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Recently, gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3 nanoparticles have shown promise as a sensitive T1 agent for cell labeling at clinical field strengths compared to conventional Gd chelates. The objective of this study was to investigate Gado CELLTrack, a commercially available Gd2O3 nanoparticle, for cell labeling and MRI at 7 T. Relaxivity measurements yielded r1 = 4.7 s−1 mM−1 and r2/r1 = 6.2. Human aortic endothelial cells were labeled with Gd2O3 at various concentrations and underwent MRI from 1 to 7 days postlabeling. The magnetic resonance relaxation times T1 and T2 of labeled cell pellets were measured. Cellular contrast agent uptake was quantified by inductively coupled plasma–atomic emission spectroscopy, which showed very high uptake compared to conventional Gd compounds. MRI demonstrated significant positive T1 contrast and stable labeling on cells. Enhancement was optimal at low Gd concentrations, attained in the 0.02 to 0.1 mM incubation concentration range (corresponding cell uptake was 7.26 to 34.1 pg Gd/cell. Cell viability and proliferation were unaffected at the concentrations tested and up to at least 3 days postlabeling. Gd2O3 is a promising sensitive and stable positive contrast agent for cellular MRI at 7 T.

  1. Targeted gadolinium-loaded dendrimer nanoparticles for tumor-specific magnetic resonance contrast enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D Swanson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Scott D Swanson1, Jolanta F Kukowska-Latallo2, Anil K Patri5, Chunyan Chen6, Song Ge4, Zhengyi Cao3, Alina Kotlyar3, Andrea T East7, James R Baker31Department of Radiology, The University of Michigan Medical School, 2Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Michigan Medical School, 3Michigan Nanotechnology Institute for Medicine and Biological Sciences, The University of Michigan, 4Applied Physics, The University of Michigan, MD, USA; 5Present address: National Cancer Institute at Frederick (Contractor, MD, USA; 6Present address: Intel Corporation, Chandler, AZ, USA; 7Present address: Stritch School of Medicine, Chicago, ILL, USAAbstract: A target-specific MRI contrast agent for tumor cells expressing high affinity folate receptor was synthesized using generation five (G5 of polyamidoamine (PAMAM dendrimer. Surface modified dendrimer was functionalized for targeting with folic acid (FA and the remaining terminal primary amines of the dendrimer were conjugated with the bifunctional NCS-DOTA chelator that forms stable complexes with gadolinium (Gd III. Dendrimer-DOTA conjugates were then complexed with GdCl3, followed by ICP-OES as well as MRI measurement of their longitudinal relaxivity (T1 s−1 mM−1 of water. In xenograft tumors established in immunodeficient (SCID mice with KB human epithelial cancer cells expressing folate receptor (FAR, the 3D MRI results showed specific and statistically significant signal enhancement in tumors generated with targeted Gd(III-DOTA-G5-FA compared with signal generated by non-targeted Gd(III-DOTA-G5 contrast nanoparticle. The targeted dendrimer contrast nanoparticles infiltrated tumor and were retained in tumor cells up to 48 hours post-injection of targeted contrast nanoparticle. The presence of folic acid on the dendrimer resulted in specific delivery of the nanoparticle to tissues and xenograft tumor cells expressing folate receptor in vivo. We present the specificity of the dendrimer

  2. The use of iodinated and gadolinium contrast media during pregnancy and lactation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Judith A.W. [St. Bartholomew' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Thomsen, Henrik S. [Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Diagnostic Radiology 54E2, Herlev (Denmark); Morcos, Sameh K. [Northern General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-01

    The use of iodinated or gadolinium-based contrast media in pregnant or lactating women often causes concerns in the radiology department because of the principle of not exposing a fetus or neonate to any drugs. Because of the uncertainty about the use of contrast media during pregnancy and lactation, the Contrast Media Safety Committee of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology decided to review the literature and draw up guidelines. An extensive literature search was carried out and summarized in a report. Based on the limited information available, simple guidelines have been drawn up. The report and guidelines were discussed at the 11th European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Santiago de Compostela, Spain. Mutagenic and teratogenic effects have not been described after administration of gadolinium or iodinated contrast media. Free iodide in radiographic contrast medium given to the mother has the potential to depress fetal/neonatal thyroid function. Neonatal thyroid function should be checked during the 1st week if iodinated contrast media have been given during pregnancy. No effect on the fetus has been seen after gadolinium contrast media. Only tiny amounts of iodinated or gadolinium-based contrast medium given to a lactating mother reach the milk, and only a minute proportion entering the baby's gut is absorbed. The very small potential risk associated with absorption of contrast medium may be considered insufficient to warrant stopping breast-feeding for 24 h following either iodinated or gadolinium contrast agents. (orig.)

  3. The use of iodinated and gadolinium contrast media during pregnancy and lactation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Judith A.W.; Thomsen, Henrik S.; Morcos, Sameh K.

    2005-01-01

    The use of iodinated or gadolinium-based contrast media in pregnant or lactating women often causes concerns in the radiology department because of the principle of not exposing a fetus or neonate to any drugs. Because of the uncertainty about the use of contrast media during pregnancy and lactation, the Contrast Media Safety Committee of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology decided to review the literature and draw up guidelines. An extensive literature search was carried out and summarized in a report. Based on the limited information available, simple guidelines have been drawn up. The report and guidelines were discussed at the 11th European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Santiago de Compostela, Spain. Mutagenic and teratogenic effects have not been described after administration of gadolinium or iodinated contrast media. Free iodide in radiographic contrast medium given to the mother has the potential to depress fetal/neonatal thyroid function. Neonatal thyroid function should be checked during the 1st week if iodinated contrast media have been given during pregnancy. No effect on the fetus has been seen after gadolinium contrast media. Only tiny amounts of iodinated or gadolinium-based contrast medium given to a lactating mother reach the milk, and only a minute proportion entering the baby's gut is absorbed. The very small potential risk associated with absorption of contrast medium may be considered insufficient to warrant stopping breast-feeding for 24 h following either iodinated or gadolinium contrast agents. (orig.)

  4. Use of gadolinium-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents and awareness of brain gadolinium deposition among pediatric providers in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mithal, Leena B. [Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Patel, Payal S. [University of Arizona College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Mithal, Divakar [Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Chicago, IL (United States); Palac, Hannah L. [Northwestern University, Biostatistics, Feinberg School of Medicine, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Rozenfeld, Michael N. [University of Arizona College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Numerous recent articles have reported brain gadolinium deposition when using linear but not macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). To determine the current landscape of gadolinium use among pediatric institutions and the knowledge base of radiologists and referring providers with regard to GBCAs and brain gadolinium deposition. We e-mailed voluntary closed surveys to 5,390 physicians in various pediatric professional societies between January 2016 and March 2016. We used chi-square and Fisher exact tests to compare response distributions among specialties. We found that 80% of surveyed pediatric hospitals use macrocyclic contrast agents. In the last year, 58% switched their agent, most commonly to gadoterate meglumine, with the most common reason being brain gadolinium deposition. Furthermore, surveys indicated that 23% of hospitals are considering switching, and, of these, 83% would switch to gadoterate meglumine; the most common reasons were brain gadolinium deposition and safety. Radiologists were more aware of brain gadolinium deposition than non-radiologist physicians (87% vs. 26%; P<0.0001). Radiologists and referring providers expressed similar levels of concern (95% and 89%). Twelve percent of radiologists and 2% of referring providers reported patients asking about brain gadolinium deposition. Radiologists were significantly more comfortable addressing patient inquiries than referring pediatric physicians (48% vs. 6%; P<0.0001). The number of MRIs requested by referring pediatric physicians correlated with their knowledge of brain gadolinium deposition, contrast agent used by their hospital, and comfort discussing brain gadolinium deposition with patients (P<0.0001). Since the discovery of brain gadolinium deposition, many pediatric hospitals have switched to or plan to switch to a more stable macrocyclic MR contrast agent, most commonly gadoterate meglumine. Despite this, there is need for substantial further education of radiologists and

  5. Novel high relaxivity colloidal particles based on the specific phase organisation of amphiphilic gadolinium chelates with cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gløgård, Christian; Stensrud, Gry; Klaveness, Jo

    2003-03-06

    To obtain high T(1)-relaxivity colloidal particles with a simultaneously high loading of amphiphilic Gd-chelates, a novel drug dosage form based on the phase organisation of amphiphilic gadolinium chelates with cholesterol was developed. In order to find a formulation, which exhibit both high T(1)-relaxivity and gives small particles a D-optimal mixture design (experimental design) was applied. Gadolinium 1,4,7-tris(carboxymethyl)-10-(2-hydroxyhexadecyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (Gd-HHD-DO3A) and cholesterol at approximately equimolar ratio proved to form thermodynamic stable disc-like colloidal particles as seen by cryo-electron micrographs. T(1)-relaxivity of these particles was typically around 20mM(-1)s(-1) and the size below 100 nm (photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS)). The particles do most probably not interact with blood components as no change in T(1)-relaxivity was observed when the particles were mixed with whole blood. The particles were stable at room temperature for at least 6 months.

  6. Gadolinium chloride as a contrast agent for imaging wood composite components by magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Chi-Leung So; Andrea Protti; Po-Wah So

    2009-01-01

    Although paramagnetic contrast agents have an established track record in medical uses of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), only recently has a contrast agent been used for enhancing MRI images of solid wood specimens. Expanding on this concept, wood veneers were treated with a gadolinium-based contrast agent and used in a model system comprising three-ply plywood...

  7. A case report on a severe anaphylaxis reaction to Gadolinium-based MR contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Juil; Kim, Tae Hyung; Park, Chang Min; Yoon, Soon Ho; Lee, Whal; Kang, Hye Ryun; Choi, Young Hun [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Acute hypersensitivity reactions to gadolinium-based magnetic resonance (MR) contrast media have been shown to have a much lower incidence and they are generally milder in terms of severity than acute adverse reactions associated with the use of iodinated contrast media for computed tomography scans. However, even though it is rare, a severe hypersensitivity reaction to MR contrast media can occur. Here we present the case of a 66-year-old woman who experienced a severe hypersensitivity reaction after administration of gadolinium-based contrast media without a previous history of allergies.

  8. Gadolinium-containing magnetic resonance imaging contrast and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallen, Alexander J; Jhung, Michael A; Cheng, Steven; Hess, Theresa; Turabelidze, George; Abramova, Liana; Arduino, Matthew; Guarner, Jeannette; Pollack, Brian; Saab, Georges; Patel, Priti R

    2008-06-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a newly described disorder occurring in persons with renal failure. Gadolinium-based contrast used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been suggested as a cause. A cluster of patients with NSF was investigated to identify risk factors. Limited preliminary findings from this investigation were presented in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Matched case-control. Dialysis patients with and without a diagnosis of NSF treated at an academic medical center. Exposure to gadolinium-based contrast. Laboratory and clinical characteristics of NSF. 19 of 28 cases identified at the hospital from December 2002 to August 2006 met inclusion criteria and were matched to 57 controls. In univariate analysis, receipt of gadolinium-containing MRI contrast in the preceding year (odds ratio [OR], 7.99; 95% confidence interval, 2.22 to 28.8) was associated with NSF; the measure of association increased as cumulative dose increased. Gadodiamide exposure (OR, 9.83; 95% confidence interval, 2.09 to 46.2) was associated more strongly with NSF than gadoversetamide (OR, 1.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.33 to 10.2). Although not statistically significant, cases were more likely than controls to have undergone primarily peritoneal dialysis in the preceding 6 months. There was no significant difference in receipt of high-dose recombinant erythropoietin between cases and controls. In multivariable analysis, gadolinium contrast exposure (OR, 8.97; 95% confidence interval, 1.28 to 63.0) remained significantly associated with NSF. Retrospective design, small sample size, inability to completely evaluate erythropoietin. Receipt of gadolinium-containing MRI contrast is associated with NSF in a dose-dependent manner. The risk associated with gadolinium may differ by contrast agent and dialysis modality. Use of gadolinium-based contrast agents should be avoided when possible in patients with renal failure.

  9. Gadolinium detection via in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis following gadolinium-based contrast agent injection: a pilot study in 10 human participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfe, J L; McNeill, F E; Noseworthy, M D; Chettle, D R

    2014-09-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) based contrast agents are routinely used as part of many magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures. The widespread use of these agents and concerns about Gd toxicity, motivated us to develop a monitoring procedure that could non-invasively measure quantitatively potential retention of toxic free Gd in tissues after use of the agent. We have been developing a method to measure Gd painlessly and non-invasively by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis. In this paper we present the results of a pilot study where we show that we can measure Gd, quantitatively in vivo, in the lower leg muscle of 10 participants. A series of three neutron leg scans were performed. The effective radiation dose for a single neutron leg scan was very low, 0.6 µSv, so multiple scans were possible. Calibration phantom and in vivo detection limits were determined to be identical: 0.58 ppm. Gd was not detectable in muscle prior to exposure to the contrast agent Gadovist(®). Gd was detected, at greater than 99% confidence, in 9 participants within 1 h of contrast administration and in 1 participant approximately 3.3 h post-contrast administration. The measured concentrations of Gd ranged from 2.0 to 17.3 ppm (6.9 to 56 uncertainties different from zero). No detectable Gd was measured in any participant in the third neutron scan (conducted 0.7 to 5.9 d post-contrast). The results of this study validate our new measurement technology. This technique could be used as a non-invasive monitoring procedure for exposure and retention of Gd from Gd-based chelates used in MRI.

  10. Chelator-Free and Biocompatible Melanin Nanoplatform with Facile-Loading Gadolinium and Copper-64 for Bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Su Hyun; Sun, Yao; Tang, Chu; Cheng, Kai; Zhang, Ruiping; Fan, Quli; Xu, Liying; Huang, Daijuan; Zhao, Anthony; Cheng, Zhen

    2017-07-19

    Development of a chelator-free and biocompatible platform for the facile construction of gadolinium 3+ (Gd 3+ )-loaded nanoparticle based probes for in vivo magentic resonance imaging (MRI) is still challenging. Herein, biocompatible Gd 3+ -loading melanin dots (Gd-M-dots) have been easily prepared and have exhibited good loading efficiency for Gd 3+ , high stability, and higher T 1 relaxivity compared to the commercial Gd-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) agent. Furthermore, Gd-M-dots showed unique photoacoustic (PA) properties, and a high PA imaging signal could be observed in vivo 1 h after injection. Compared to the traditional Gd 3+ -loaded nanoparticles for single-modal MRI, Gd-M-dots can also be radiolabeled with 64 Cu 2+ for positron emission tomography. Overall, these attractive properties of Gd-M-dots render them a promising imaging agent for various biomedical applications.

  11. Immediate Allergic Reactions to Gadolinium-based Contrast Agents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Ashkan Heshmatzadeh; Zhao, Yize; Farooq, Zerwa; Prince, Martin R

    2018-02-01

    Purpose To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine if there are differences in rates of immediate allergic events between classes of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). Materials and Methods PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched for studies in which rates of immediate adverse events to GBCAs were reported. The American College of Radiology classification system was used to characterize allergic-like events as mild, moderate, or severe, and the total number of administrations of each GBCA was recorded. Where necessary, authors of studies were contacted to clarify data and eliminate physiologic reactions. Relative risks of GBCA types were estimated by using the Mantel-Haenszel type method. Results Nine studies in which immediate reactions to GBCA were recorded from a total of 716 978 administrations of GBCA met the criteria for inclusion and exclusion. The overall and severe rates of GBCA allergic-like adverse events were 9.2 and 0.52 per 10 000 administrations, respectively: 81% (539 of 662) were mild, 13% (86 of 662) were moderate, and 6% (37 of 662) were severe reactions. The nonionic linear chelate gadodiamide had the lowest rate of reactions, at 1.5 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.74, 2.4) per 10 000 administrations, which was significantly less than that of linear ionic GBCAs at 8.3 (95% CI: 7.5, 9.2) per 10 000 administrations (relative risk, 0.19 [95% CI: 0.099, 0.36]; P < .00001) and less than that for nonionic macrocyclic GBCAs at 16 (95% CI: 14, 19) per 10 000 administrations (relative risk, 0.12 [95% CI: 0.05, 0.31]; P < .001). GBCAs known to be associated with protein binding had a higher rate of reactions, at 17 (95% CI: 15, 20) per 10 000 administrations compared with the same chelate classification without protein binding, at 5.2 (95% CI: 4.5, 6.0) per 10 000 administrations (relative risk, 3.1 [95% CI: 2.4, 3.8]; P < .0001). Conclusion These data show the lowest rate of immediate allergic adverse events with use

  12. N-acetylcysteine protects rats with chronic renal failure from gadolinium-chelate nephrotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Victor Barbosa Pereira

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Gd-chelate on renal function, iron parameters and oxidative stress in rats with CRF and a possible protective effect of the antioxidant N-Acetylcysteine (NAC. Male Wistar rats were submitted to 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx to induced CRF. An ionic-cyclic Gd (Gadoterate Meglumine was administrated (1.5 mM/KgBW, intravenously 21 days after Nx. Clearance studies were performed in 4 groups of anesthetized animals 48 hours following Gd- chelate administration: 1--Nx (n = 7; 2--Nx+NAC (n = 6; 3--Nx+Gd (n = 7; 4--Nx+NAC+Gd (4.8 g/L in drinking water, initiated 2 days before Gd-chelate administration and maintained during 4 days (n = 6. This group was compared with a control. We measured glomerular filtration rate, GFR (inulin clearance, ml/min/kg BW, proteinuria (mg/24 hs, serum iron (µg/dL; serum ferritin (ng/mL; transferrin saturation (%, TIBC (µg/dL and TBARS (nmles/ml. Normal rats treated with the same dose of Gd-chelate presented similar GFR and proteinuria when compared with normal controls, indicating that at this dose Gd-chelate is not nephrotoxic to normal rats. Gd-chelate administration to Nx-rats results in a decrease of GFR and increased proteinuria associated with a decrease in TIBC, elevation of ferritin serum levels, transferrin oversaturation and plasmatic TBARS compared with Nx-rats. The prophylactic treatment with NAC reversed the decrease in GFR and the increase in proteinuria and all alterations in iron parameters and TBARS induced by Gd-chelate. NAC administration to Nx rat did not modify the inulin clearance and iron kinetics, indicating that the ameliorating effect of NAC was specific to Gd-chelate. These results suggest that NAC can prevent Gd-chelate nephrotoxicity in patients with chronic renal failure.

  13. Breakthrough reactions of iodinated and gadolinium contrast media after oral steroid premedication protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingu, Akiko; Fukuda, Junya; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2014-10-06

    Adverse reactions to iodinated and gadolinium contrast media are an important clinical issue. Although some guidelines have proposed oral steroid premedication protocols to prevent adverse reactions, some patients may have reactions to contrast media in spite of premedication (breakthrough reaction; BTR).The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency, type and severity of BTR when following an oral steroid premedication protocol. All iodinated and gadolinium contrast-enhanced radiologic examinations between August 2011 and February 2013 for which the premedication protocol was applied in our institution were assessed for BTRs. The protocol was applied to a total of 252 examinations (153 patients, ages 15-87 years; 63 males, 90 females). Of these, 152 were for prior acute adverse reactions to contrast media, 85 were for a history of bronchial asthma, and 15 were for other reasons. There were 198 contrast enhanced CTs and 54 contrast enhanced MRIs. There were nine BTR (4.5%) for iodinated contrast media, and only one BTR (1.9%) for gadolinium contrast media: eight were mild and one was moderate. No patient who had a mild index reaction (IR) had a severe BTR. Incidence of BTRs when following the premedication protocol was low. This study by no means proves the efficacy of premedication, but provides some support for following a premedication protocol to improve safety of contrast-enhanced examinations when prior adverse reactions are mild, or when there is a history of asthma.

  14. Breakthrough reactions of iodinated and gadolinium contrast media after oral steroid premedication protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jingu, Akiko; Fukuda, Junya; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    Adverse reactions to iodinated and gadolinium contrast media are an important clinical issue. Although some guidelines have proposed oral steroid premedication protocols to prevent adverse reactions, some patients may have reactions to contrast media in spite of premedication (breakthrough reaction; BTR). The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency, type and severity of BTR when following an oral steroid premedication protocol. All iodinated and gadolinium contrast-enhanced radiologic examinations between August 2011 and February 2013 for which the premedication protocol was applied in our institution were assessed for BTRs. The protocol was applied to a total of 252 examinations (153 patients, ages 15–87 years; 63 males, 90 females). Of these, 152 were for prior acute adverse reactions to contrast media, 85 were for a history of bronchial asthma, and 15 were for other reasons. There were 198 contrast enhanced CTs and 54 contrast enhanced MRIs. There were nine BTR (4.5%) for iodinated contrast media, and only one BTR (1.9%) for gadolinium contrast media: eight were mild and one was moderate. No patient who had a mild index reaction (IR) had a severe BTR. Incidence of BTRs when following the premedication protocol was low. This study by no means proves the efficacy of premedication, but provides some support for following a premedication protocol to improve safety of contrast-enhanced examinations when prior adverse reactions are mild, or when there is a history of asthma

  15. Complications from the use of intravenous gadolinium-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias Junior, Jorge; Santos, Antonio Carlos dos; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Centro de Ciencias das Imagens e Fisica Medica]. E-mail: jejunior@fmrp.usp.br

    2008-07-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are much safer than the iodinated ones; however complications may occur and should be recognized for appropriate orientation and management. The total incidence of adverse reactions to contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging ranges between 2% and 4%. Cases of severe acute reactions to gadolinium, such as laryngospasm and anaphylactic shock, are rare. Chronic complications secondary to the use of gadolinium also can occur and, recently an association between its use and a rare dermatologic disease occurring in patients with renal failure has been reported. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis was the subject of an official health notification issued by the American Food and Drug Administration. This progressive disease is characterized by hardened skin with fibrotic nodules and plaques which may involve other parts of the body. Patients who have been affected by this disorder presented chronic renal failure, with metabolic acidosis and had been submitted to magnetic resonance angiography, probably involving exposure to large amounts of intravenous paramagnetic contrast. This review is aimed at presenting a succinct description of the gadolinium-based contrast agent types, possible secondary complications, their preventive measures and management. (author)

  16. Environmental behaviour und ecotoxiology of gadolinium-containing MRT contrast media; Umweltverhalten und Oekotoxikologie von gadoliniumhaltigen Magnetresonanztomographie-Kontrastmitteln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubert, Claudia

    2008-07-08

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an essential tool in noninvasive diagnostics. In order to improve the sensitivity and specificity of diagnoses, several contrast enhancing agents have been developed in the last few decades by various pharmaceutical manufacturers. Gadolinium (Gd), a lanthanide, is the most widely used metal in MRI contrast agents. Its ion has paramagnetic properties (seven unpaired electrons) and a very long electronic relaxation time. Due to the toxicity of free Gd, clinical use is only possible in a complexed form. Commonly used chelating agents are polyamino-polycarboxylic ligands such as DTPA. Due to the exceptional stability of these highly hydrophilic chelates and the lack of human metabolism, the contrast media are quantitatively excreted unchanged after the administration, and are subsequently emitted into the aquatic environment. Several studies have shown notable increases in Gd concentrations in surface or groundwaters receiving sewage effluents, an observation which has been termed ''Gd anomaly''. The Gd anomaly results from the use of MRI contrast agents for which the most significant entry route is the effluent from wastewater treatment works. Relatively little information on the aquatic toxicity of Gd or Gd-chelates has been published up to 2006. Therefore, in a first step, the acute aquatic toxicity of several MRI contrast agents was investigated in fish, daphnia and algae at high concentrations. Furthermore, chronic toxicity tests on fish and daphnia were conducted. The results showed that contrast enhancing agents containing Gd have no toxic effects on the tested organisms at concentrations being of relevance to the environment. At high concentrations growth inhibition of green algae was observed. The environmental fate and the biological degradation of the contrast media was studied in a model wastewater treatment plant and in aquatic sediment systems. The test compounds were neither biodegradable in the

  17. Application of extracellular gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents and the risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis; Anwendung von extrazellulaeren gadoliniumhaltigen MR-Kontrastmitteln und Risiko der Nephrogenen Systemischen Fibrose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heverhagen, J.T. [Univ. Hospital Bern (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Inselspital; Krombach, G.A. [Justus Liebig Univ. Hopsital Giessen (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Gizewski, E. [Medical Univ. Innsbruck (Austria). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2014-07-15

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a serious, sometimes fatal disease. Findings in recent years have shown that a causal association between gadolinium containing contrast media and NSF is most likely. Therefore, the regulatory authorities have issued guidelines on the use of gadolinium-containing contrast media which have reduced the number of new cases of NSF to almost zero. However, it is for precisely this reason that the greatest care must still be taken to ensure that these guidelines are complied with. The most important factors are renal function, the quantity of gadolinium administered and coexisting diseases such as inflammation. All of these factors crucially influence the quantity of gadolinium released from the chelat in the body. This free gadolinium is thought to be the trigger for NSF. Other important factors are the stability of the gadolinium complex and furthermore the route of its elimination from the body. Partial elimination via the liver might be an additional protective mechanism. In conclusion, despite the NSF risk, contrast-enhanced MRI is a safe diagnostic procedure which can be used reliably and safely even in patients with severe renal failure, and does not necessarily have to be replaced by other methods.

  18. Renal function, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and other adverse reactions associated with gadolinium-based contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canga, Ana; Kislikova, Maria; Martínez-Gálvez, María; Arias, Mercedes; Fraga-Rivas, Patricia; Poyatos, Cecilio; de Francisco, Angel L M

    2014-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a fibrosing disorder that affects patients with impaired renal function and is associated with the administration of gadolinium-based contrast media used in MRI. Despite being in a group of drugs that were considered safe, report about this potentially serious adverse reaction was a turning point in the administration guidelines of these contrast media. There has been an attempt to establish safety parameters to identify patients with risk factors of renal failure. The close pharmacovigilance and strict observation of current regulations, with special attention being paid to the value of glomerular filtration, have reduced the published cases involving the use of gadolinium-based contrast media. In a meeting between radiologists and nephrologists we reviewed the most relevant aspects currently and recommendations for its prevention.

  19. Biocompatible Polyhydroxyethylaspartamide-based Micelles with Gadolinium for MRI Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Hyo Jeong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Biocompatible poly-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl-d,l-aspartamide]-methoxypoly(ethyleneglycol-hexadecylamine (PHEA-mPEG-C16 conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecan-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-gadolinium (DOTA-Gd via ethylenediamine (ED was synthesized as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent. Amphiphilic PHEA-mPEG-C16-ED-DOTA-Gd forms micelle in aqueous solution. All the synthesized materials were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR. Micelle size and shape were examined by dynamic light scattering (DLS and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Micelles with PHEA-mPEG-C16-ED-DOTA-Gd showed higher relaxivities than the commercially available gadolinium contrast agent. Moreover, the signal intensity of a rabbit liver was effectively increased after intravenous injection of PHEA-mPEG-C16-ED-DOTA-Gd.

  20. MRI of acute cerebral infarcts: increased contrast enhancement with continuous infusion of gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merten, C.L.; Assheuer, J.; Bergmann-Kurz, B.; Bewermeyer, H.; Knitelius, H.O.; Hedde, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    We compared contrast enhancement on T1-weighted MRI of acute cerebral infarcts after conventional bolus administration and continuous infusion of gadolinium. We examined 12 patients with a history of acute stroke with contrast-enhanced MRI once a week for a 1 month. Only ischaemic lesions were investigated after cerebral haemorrhage had been excluded by CT. Each MRI study included T2- and proton density-weighted sequences for determination of the size and site of the infarct, immediate postinjection T1-weighted imaging after bolus administration of 0.1 mmol/kg gadolinium-DPTA and delayed T1-weighted imaging after additional continuous infusion of 0.1 mmol/kg over 2 h. A total of 42 MRI studies was performed. In the first week after the onset of stroke, most infarcts (8 of 10) did not enhance after bolus administration, whereas all showed distinct contrast enhancement after the infusion. In the following weeks all but two infarcts showed contrast enhancement after bolus administration; after continuous infusion contrast enhancement could be seen in all cases. While contrast enhancement after bolus administration showed the typical gyriform pattern, enhanced areas were more extensive after the infusion and usually covered the entire infarcted area shown on T2- and proton density-weighted images. We presume that the disturbed blood-brain barrier in ischaemic areas favours delivery of contrast medium to the infarcted tissue if it is offered continuously so that a steady state can develop. (orig.)

  1. Gadolinium Retention, Brain T1 Hyperintensity, and Endogenous Metals: A Comparative Study of Macrocyclic Versus Linear Gadolinium Chelates in Renally Sensitized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasschaert, Marlène; Emerit, Andréa; Fretellier, Nathalie; Factor, Cécile; Robert, Philippe; Idée, Jean-Marc; Corot, Claire

    2018-01-12

    This preclinical study was designed to compare gadolinium (Gd) brain uptake after repeated injections of a macrocyclic Gd-based contrast agent (GBCA) (gadoterate meglumine) or 2 linear GBCAs (L-GBCAs) (gadobenate dimeglumine or gadodiamide) on a translational model of moderate renal impairment in rats. The study was carried out in subtotally nephrectomized rats. Animals received 4 intravenous injections per week of GBCA (gadoterate meglumine, gadobenate dimeglumine, or gadodiamide) for 5 weeks, resulting in a cumulative dose of 12 mmol/kg, followed by a 1-month injection-free period. T1 hyperintensity in the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCNs) was investigated, and brain structures were carefully dissected to determine elemental Gd, iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) distribution by mass spectrometry. Urinary excretion of endogenous metals was also investigated soon after GBCA administration and several days later in order to assess a potential transmetalation phenomenon. Unlike gadoterate, repeated injections of L-GBCAs gadobenate and gadodiamide both induced T1 hyperintensity in the DCNs. Fine dissection of cerebral and cerebellar structures demonstrated very low levels or absence of Gd after repeated injections of gadoterate, in contrast to the two L-GBCAs, for which the highest total Gd concentration was demonstrated in the DCNs (Gd concentration in DCNs after 4.5 weeks of injection-free period: 27.1 ± 6.5 nmol/g for gadodiamide [P download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  2. Deep learning enables reduced gadolinium dose for contrast-enhanced brain MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Enhao; Pauly, John M; Wintermark, Max; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2018-02-13

    There are concerns over gadolinium deposition from gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) administration. To reduce gadolinium dose in contrast-enhanced brain MRI using a deep learning method. Retrospective, crossover. Sixty patients receiving clinically indicated contrast-enhanced brain MRI. 3D T 1 -weighted inversion-recovery prepped fast-spoiled-gradient-echo (IR-FSPGR) imaging was acquired at both 1.5T and 3T. In 60 brain MRI exams, the IR-FSPGR sequence was obtained under three conditions: precontrast, postcontrast images with 10% low-dose (0.01mmol/kg) and 100% full-dose (0.1 mmol/kg) of gadobenate dimeglumine. We trained a deep learning model using the first 10 cases (with mixed indications) to approximate full-dose images from the precontrast and low-dose images. Synthesized full-dose images were created using the trained model in two test sets: 20 patients with mixed indications and 30 patients with glioma. For both test sets, low-dose, true full-dose, and the synthesized full-dose postcontrast image sets were compared quantitatively using peak-signal-to-noise-ratios (PSNR) and structural-similarity-index (SSIM). For the test set comprised of 20 patients with mixed indications, two neuroradiologists scored blindly and independently for the three postcontrast image sets, evaluating image quality, motion-artifact suppression, and contrast enhancement compared with precontrast images. Results were assessed using paired t-tests and noninferiority tests. The proposed deep learning method yielded significant (n = 50, P 5 dB PSNR gains and >11.0% SSIM). Ratings on image quality (n = 20, P = 0.003) and contrast enhancement (n = 20, P < 0.001) were significantly increased. Compared to true full-dose images, the synthesized full-dose images have a slight but not significant reduction in image quality (n = 20, P = 0.083) and contrast enhancement (n = 20, P = 0.068). Slightly better (n = 20, P = 0.039) motion

  3. Signal effects of various radiographic contrast media and their interaction with gadolinium DTPA during MRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopka, L.; Funke, M.; Fischer, U.; Vosshenrich, R.; Schroeder, M.; Grabbe, E.

    1994-01-01

    T 1 and T 2 weighted signals dereived from various radiological contrast media were studied during MRT spin-echo sequences. In addition, the interaction between radiological contrast media and Gadolinium-DTPA concerning T 1 signals was evaluated. Ionic (ioxitalaminic acid) and non-ionic radiological contrast media (Iopromid, Iotrolan) were used in diagnostic concentrations. Measurements were carried out with a superconductive magnet of 1.5 Tesla. Radiological contrast media produced significantly higher signals than a physiological sodium chloride solution in T 1 -weighted spin-echo sequences. Evn small amounts (15% of total volume) of radiological contrast media during T 1 -weighted spin-echo sequences led to a significant reduction (about 25%) of the signal intensity of a 2 mM Gadolinium-DTPA solution. This may lead to diagnostic problems, as was shown in a series of 25 MR arthrograms of the shoulder. It is recommended than an interval of at least 6 hours should elapse between the use of a radiological contrst medium and an MRT examination. (orig.) [de

  4. The presence of the gadolinium-based contrast agent depositions in the brain and symptoms of gadolinium neurotoxicity - A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyprian Olchowy

    Full Text Available Gadolinium based contrast agents (GBCAs are widely used in magnetic resonance imaging, but recently, high signal intensity in the cerebellum structures was reported after repeated administrations of contrast- enhanced magnetic resonance images. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the association between increased signal intensity in the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus in the brain and repeated administrations of GBCAs. Additionally, we focused on possible short- and long-term consequences of gadolinium use in those patients.Systematic review of retrospective investigations in PubMed and Medline was performed in July 2016. Primary outcomes included the presence of increased signal intensity within the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted MR images in patients following administrations of GBCAs. Two independent reviewers were responsible for search and data extraction.25 publications satisfied inclusion criteria (19 magnetic resonance images analyses, 3 case reports; 3 autopsy studies. Magnetic resonance images of 1247 patients with increased signal intensity on unenhanced T1-weighted MR images were analyzed as well as tissue specimens from 27 patients. Signal intensity correlated positively with the exposure to GBCAs and was greater after serial administrations of linear nonionic than cyclic contrast agents. Gadolinium was detected in all tissue examinations.High signal intensity in the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were associated with previous administration of GBCAs. Signal intensity correlated negatively with stability of contrast agents. Clinical significance of gadolinium deposition in the brain remains unclear. There is a strong need for further research to identify type of gadolinium deposited in the brain as well as to gather knowledge about long-term consequences.

  5. Injection of gadolinium contrast through pediatric central venous catheters: a safety study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriarty, John M.; Ramos, Yanerys; Finn, J.P.; Kung, Geoffrey L.; Moghaddam, Abbas N.; Ennis, Daniel B.

    2012-01-01

    Catheter rupture during CT angiography has prompted policies prohibiting the use of electronic injectors with peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) not only for CT but also for MRI. Consequently, many institutions mandate hand injection for MR angiography, limiting precision of infusion rates and durations of delivery. To determine whether electronic injection of gadolinium-based contrast media through a range of small-caliber, single-lumen PICCs would be safe without risk of catheter rupture over the range of clinical protocols and determine whether programmed flow rates and volumes were realized when using PICCs for contrast delivery. Experiments were performed and recorded using the Medrad Spectris Solaris EP MR Injection System. PICC sizes, contrast media and flow rates were based on common institutional protocols. No catheters were damaged during any experiments. Mean difference between programmed and delivered volume was 0.07 ± 0.10 mL for all experiments. Reduced flow rates and prolonged injection durations were observed when the injector's pressure-limiting algorithm was triggered, only in protocols outside the clinical range. PICCs commonly used in children can withstand in vitro power injection of gadolinium-based contrast media at protocols significantly above clinical levels. (orig.)

  6. Injection of gadolinium contrast through pediatric central venous catheters: a safety study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, John M.; Ramos, Yanerys; Finn, J.P. [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kung, Geoffrey L. [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Program, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Moghaddam, Abbas N. [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ennis, Daniel B. [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Program, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Biomedical Physics Interdepartmental Program, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Catheter rupture during CT angiography has prompted policies prohibiting the use of electronic injectors with peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) not only for CT but also for MRI. Consequently, many institutions mandate hand injection for MR angiography, limiting precision of infusion rates and durations of delivery. To determine whether electronic injection of gadolinium-based contrast media through a range of small-caliber, single-lumen PICCs would be safe without risk of catheter rupture over the range of clinical protocols and determine whether programmed flow rates and volumes were realized when using PICCs for contrast delivery. Experiments were performed and recorded using the Medrad Spectris Solaris EP MR Injection System. PICC sizes, contrast media and flow rates were based on common institutional protocols. No catheters were damaged during any experiments. Mean difference between programmed and delivered volume was 0.07 {+-} 0.10 mL for all experiments. Reduced flow rates and prolonged injection durations were observed when the injector's pressure-limiting algorithm was triggered, only in protocols outside the clinical range. PICCs commonly used in children can withstand in vitro power injection of gadolinium-based contrast media at protocols significantly above clinical levels. (orig.)

  7. Gadolinium Contrast Agent is of Limited Value for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Synovial Hypertrophy in Hemophiliacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundin, B.; Berntorp, E.; Pettersson, H.; Wirestam, R.; Jonsson, K.; Staahlberg, F.; Ljung, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ Hospital of Lund, Lund (Sweden)

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To examine the influence of different doses of gadolinium contrast agent on synovial enhancement, to compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of synovial hypertrophy and radiographic joint changes in hemophiliacs, and to investigate the value of gadolinium in MRI assessment of synovial hypertrophy in hemophiliacs using dynamic MRI and MRI scoring. Material and Methods: Twenty-one hemophiliacs on prophylactic factor treatment without recent bleeds were subjected to radiography and gadolinium contrast-enhanced dynamic and static MRI of the knee using a standard dose of 0.1 mmol/kg b.w. gadoteridol. In 17 of the patients, the MRI procedure was repeated after a triple dose of gadoteridol. Results: MRI findings of synovial hypertrophy were significantly correlated with Pettersson radiographic scores. In 19 of the 21 MRI investigated joints, administration of contrast agent did not alter the result of the evaluation of synovial hypertrophy. Conclusion: The optimal time interval for volume assessment of synovial hypertrophy after injection of gadolinium contrast agent is dose dependent. Hemophiliacs without recent bleeds have minor to abundant synovial hypertrophy in joints with pronounced radiographic changes. Dynamic MRI is not useful for evaluating hemophilic arthropathy, and gadolinium contrast agent is not routinely indicated for MRI scoring of joints in hemophiliacs.

  8. Critical Questions Regarding Gadolinium Deposition in the Brain and Body After Injections of the Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents, Safety, and Clinical Recommendations in Consideration of the EMA's Pharmacovigilance and Risk Assessment Committee Recommendation for Suspension of the Marketing Authorizations for 4 Linear Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Val M

    2017-06-01

    For magnetic resonance, the established class of intravenous contrast media is the gadolinium-based contrast agents. In the 3 decades since initial approval, these have proven in general to be very safe for human administration. However, in 2006, a devastating late adverse reaction to administration of the less stable gadolinium-based contrast agents was identified, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. The result of actions taken by the European Medicines Agency and the US Food and Drug Administration, stratifying the agents by risk and contraindicating specific agents in severe renal dysfunction, has led to no new cases being identified in North America or Europe. Subsequently, in 2014, long-term deposition in the brain of gadolinium was first shown, after administration of 2 nonionic linear chelates, gadodiamide, and gadopentetate dimeglumine. This has led to an intense focus on the question of in vivo distribution, possible dechelation, and subsequent deposition of gadolinium, together with substantial clarification of the phenomenon as well as stratification of the agents on this basis. This review focuses on 8 critical questions regarding gadolinium deposition in the brain and body, with the answers and discussion therein important for future regulatory decisions and clinical practice. It is now clear that dechelation of gadolinium occurs in vivo with the linear agents and is responsible for this phenomenon, with key experts in the field recommending, except where there is no suitable alternative, a shift in clinical practice from the linear to macrocyclic agents. In addition, on March 10, 2017, the Pharmacovigilance and Risk Assessment Committee of the European Medicines Agency recommended suspension of the marketing authorization for 4 linear gadolinium contrast agents-specifically Omniscan, Optimark, Magnevist, and MultiHance (gadodiamide, gadoversetamide, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadobenate dimeglumine)-for intravenous injection. Cited in the report was

  9. In vivo dentate nucleus MRI relaxometry correlates with previous administration of Gadolinium-based contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedeschi, Enrico; Canna, Antonietta; Cocozza, Sirio; Russo, Carmela; Angelini, Valentina; Brunetti, Arturo [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Neuroradiology, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Palma, Giuseppe; Quarantelli, Mario [National Research Council, Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); Borrelli, Pasquale; Salvatore, Marco [IRCCS SDN, Naples (Italy); Lanzillo, Roberta; Postiglione, Emanuela; Morra, Vincenzo Brescia [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate changes in T1 and T2* relaxometry of dentate nuclei (DN) with respect to the number of previous administrations of Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA). In 74 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS) patients with variable disease duration (9.8±6.8 years) and severity (Expanded Disability Status Scale scores:3.1±0.9), the DN R1 (1/T1) and R2* (1/T2*) relaxation rates were measured using two unenhanced 3D Dual-Echo spoiled Gradient-Echo sequences with different flip angles. Correlations of the number of previous GBCA administrations with DN R1 and R2* relaxation rates were tested, including gender and age effect, in a multivariate regression analysis. The DN R1 (normalized by brainstem) significantly correlated with the number of GBCA administrations (p<0.001), maintaining the same significance even when including MS-related factors. Instead, the DN R2* values correlated only with age (p=0.003), and not with GBCA administrations (p=0.67). In a subgroup of 35 patients for whom the administered GBCA subtype was known, the effect of GBCA on DN R1 appeared mainly related to linear GBCA. In RR-MS patients, the number of previous GBCA administrations correlates with R1 relaxation rates of DN, while R2* values remain unaffected, suggesting that T1-shortening in these patients is related to the amount of Gadolinium given. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance tomography for focal lesions in the liver using the para-magnetic contrast medium gadolinium DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, B.; Roemer, T.; Felix, R.; Wolf, K.J.; Klinikum Charlottenburg, Berlin

    1986-01-01

    The use of the para-magnetic contrast medium gadolinium DTPA for magnetic resonance tomography of focal lesions in the liver was investigated in 31 patients. Two dosage schedules of the contrast medium (0.1 and 0.2 mmol/kg body weight) were used with field strengths of 0.35 and 0.5 Tesla. Using T 1 sequences, gadolinium DTPA showed increased signal intensity in the liver and in tumours, but this was significantly more marked in the tumour. On T 1 spin-echo sequences, previously iso-intense lesions became visible after administration of contrast. On the other hand, contrast-enhanced lesions were less well seen on inversion recovery sequences because of a reduction in the contrast between tumour and liver tissue. The contrast between tumour and liver tissue was not improved by gadolinium DTPA in comparison with precontrast inversion recovery sequences and T 2 spin-echo sequences. The perfusion of intra-hepatic tumours could be elucidated by magnetic resonance tomography after the administration of gadolinium DTPA. (orig.) [de

  11. Enhanced conjugation stability and blood circulation time of macromolecular gadolinium-DTPA contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenjob, Ratchapol [Department of New Drug Development, School of Medicine, Inha University, 2F A-dong, Jeongseok Bldg., Sinheung-dong 3-ga, Jung-gu, Incheon 400-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kun, Na [Department of Biotechnology, The Catholic University of Korea, 43 Jibong-ro, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon-si, Gyeonggi-do 420-743 (Korea, Republic of); Ghee, Jung Yeon [Utah-Inha DDS and Advanced Therapeutics, B-403 Meet-You-All Tower, SongdoTechnopark, 7–50, Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Shen, Zheyu; Wu, Xiaoxia [Division of Functional Materials and Nano-Devices, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology & Engineering (NIMTE), Chinese Academy of Sciences, 519 Zhuangshi Street, Zhenhai District, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315201 (China); Cho, Steve K., E-mail: scho@gist.ac.kr [Division of Liberal Arts and Science, GIST College, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Don Haeng [Utah-Inha DDS and Advanced Therapeutics, B-403 Meet-You-All Tower, SongdoTechnopark, 7–50, Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Inha University Hospital, Incheon 420-751 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Su-Geun, E-mail: Sugeun.Yang@Inha.ac.kr [Department of New Drug Development, School of Medicine, Inha University, 2F A-dong, Jeongseok Bldg., Sinheung-dong 3-ga, Jung-gu, Incheon 400-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we prepared macromolecular MR T1 contrast agent: pullulan-conjugated Gd diethylene triamine pentaacetate (Gd-DTPA-Pullulan) and estimated residual free Gd{sup 3+}, chelation stability in competition with metal ions, plasma and tissue pharmacokinetics, and abdominal MR contrast on rats. Residual free Gd{sup 3+} in Gd-DTPA-Pullulan was measured using colorimetric spectroscopy. The transmetalation of Gd{sup 3+} incubated with Ca{sup 2+} was performed by using a dialysis membrane (MWCO 100–500 Da) and investigated by ICP-OES. The plasma concentration profiles of Gd-DTPA-Pullulan were estimated after intravenous injection at a dose 0.1 mmol/kg of Gd. The coronal-plane abdominal images of normal rats were observed by MR imaging. The content of free Gd{sup 3+}, the toxic residual form, was less than 0.01%. Chelation stability of Gd-DTPA-Pullulan was estimated, and only 0.2% and 0.00045% of Gd{sup 3+} were released from Gd-DTPA-Pullulan after 2 h incubation with Ca{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+}, respectively. Gd-DTPA-Pullulan displayed the extended plasma half-life (t{sub 1/2,α} = 0.43 h, t{sub 1/2,β} = 2.32 h), much longer than 0.11 h and 0.79 h of Gd-EOB-DTPA. Abdominal MR imaging showed Gd-DTPA-Pullulan maintained initial MR contrast for 30 min. The extended plasma half-life of Gd-DTPA-Pullulan probably allows the prolonged MR acquisition time in clinic with enhanced MR contrast. - Highlights: • Macromolecule (pullulan) conjugated Gd contrast agent (Gd-DTPA-Pullulan) showed the extended plasma half-life (t{sub 1/2,α} = 0.43 h, t{sub 1/2,β} = 2.32 h) in comparison with Gd-EOB-DTPA • Gd-DTPA-pullulan T1 contrast agent exhibited strong chelation stability against Gd. • The extended blood circulation attributed the enhanced and prolonged MR contrast on abdominal region of rats. • The extended blood circulation may provide prolonged MR acquisition time window in clinics.

  12. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after the Use of Gadolinium Contrast Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihye; Byun, Il Hwan; Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Nam, Eun Ji; Park, Jung-Won

    2015-07-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a medical emergency that threatens life. To this day, ARDS is very rarely reported by iodine contrast media, and there is no reported case of ARDS induced by gadolinium contrast media. Here, we present a case with ARDS after the use of gadobutrol (Gadovist) as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast medium. A 26 years old female without any medical history, including allergic diseases and without current use of drugs, visited the emergency room for abdominal pain. Her abdominopelvic computed tomography with iodine contrast media showed a right ovarian cyst and possible infective colitis. Eighty-three hours later, she underwent pelvis MRI after injection of 7.5 mL (0.1 mL/kg body weight) of gadobutrol (Gadovist) to evaluate the ovarian cyst. She soon presented respiratory difficulty, edema of the lips, nausea, and vomiting, and we could hear wheezing upon auscultation. She was treated with dexamethasone, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Her chest X-ray showed bilateral central bat-wing consolidative appearance. Managed with mechanical ventilation, she was extubated 3 days later and discharged without complications.

  13. The use of innovative gadolinium-based contrast agent for MR-diagnosis of cancer in the experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, V.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Zelchan, R.; Grigorev, E.; Frolova, I.; Nam, I.

    2016-02-01

    The present study of the functional suitability and specific activity of the contrast agent gadolinium-based for magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that the investigated contrast agent intensively accumulates in organs and anatomical structures of the experimental animals. In the model of tumor lesions in animals, study have shown that investigational contrast agent accumulates in the tumor tissue and retained there in for a long enough time.

  14. High Signal Intensity in the Dentate Nucleus and Globus Pallidus on Unenhanced T1-Weighted MR Images: Comparison between Gadobutrol and Linear Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, F G; Watterson, C T; Weiss, S; Austin, M; Mirocha, J; Prasad, R; Wang, J

    2018-02-01

    In view of the recent observations that gadolinium deposits in brain tissue after intravenous injection, our aim of this study was to compare signal changes in the globus pallidus and dentate nucleus on unenhanced T1-weighted MR images in patients receiving serial doses of gadobutrol, a macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agent, with those seen in patients receiving linear gadolinium-based contrast agents. This was a retrospective analysis of on-site patients with brain tumors. Fifty-nine patients received only gadobutrol, and 60 patients received only linear gadolinium-based contrast agents. Linear gadolinium-based contrast agents included gadoversetamide, gadobenate dimeglumine, and gadodiamide. T1 signal intensity in the globus pallidus, dentate nucleus, and pons was measured on the precontrast portions of patients' first and seventh brain MRIs. Ratios of signal intensity comparing the globus pallidus with the pons (globus pallidus/pons) and dentate nucleus with the pons (dentate nucleus/pons) were calculated. Changes in the above signal intensity ratios were compared within the gadobutrol and linear agent groups, as well as between groups. The dentate nucleus/pons signal ratio increased in the linear gadolinium-based contrast agent group ( t = 4.215, P linear gadolinium-based contrast agent group ( t = 2.931, P linear gadolinium-based contrast agents. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  15. Severe thrombocytopenia induced by iodinated contrast after coronary angiography: The use of gadolinium contrast and intravascular ultrasound as an alternative to guide percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubero-Gómez, José María; Guerrero Márquez, Francisco J; Diaz-de la-Llera, Luis; Fernández-Quero, Mónica; Guisado-Rasco, Agustín; Villa-Gil-Ortega, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Acute contrast-induced thrombocytopenia is a rare event with the use of modern low osmolarity iodinated contrast media. The pathophysiological mechanism that causes platelet counts to drop has not been identified, but an immunological mechanism is suspected due to cytotoxicity after previous exposure to contrast. We report the case of a 47-year-old male patient with acute severe thrombocytopenia due to iodinated contrast media exposure. His platelet count after the procedure with the highest amount of contrast was zero, which is the lowest reported platelet count to date. Percutaneous coronary revascularization under both intravascular ultrasound and gadolinium contrast guidance was performed without complications. The most feared complication after the use of gadolinium is nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, especially in patients on hemodialysis. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. MRT of experimental liver abscesses - comparison of a new blood pool contrast agent with gadolinium-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, A.; Adam, G.; Spuentrup, E.; Prescher, A.; Muehler, A.; Guenther, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: In an experimental pyogenic liver abscess model, the signal intensities were compared intraindividually and interindividually after the application of a new blood pool contrast agent, 24-gadolinium-DTPA (diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid) cascade polymer, and after the application of gadopentetate dimeglumine. Methods: In 20 rabbits with experimentally induced liver abscesses, the relative signal intensities of the liver, abscess centre, abscess wall and portal vein were assessed before and between 30 seconds and 60 minutes after injection of a 25 μmol/kg dose of gadolinium polymer and of 100 μmol/kg of gadolinium-DTPA, respectively. Measurements were performed at 1.5 Tesla, using a head coil and a Flash-2-D sequence. Results: The interindividual comparison (unpaired T-test, p [de

  17. Effects of iodinated contrast agent, xylocaine and gadolinium concentration on the signal emitted in magnetic resonance arthrography: a samples study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvana Lopes Pinheiro da Silva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of dilution of paramagnetic contrast agent with iodinated contrast and xylocaine on the signal intensity during magnetic resonance arthrography, and to improve the paramagnetic contrast agent concentration utilized in this imaging modality. Materials and Methods: Samples specially prepared for the study with three different concentrations of paramagnetic contrast agent diluted in saline, iodinated contrast agent and xylocaine were imaged with fast spin echo T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation. The samples were placed into flasks and graphical analysis of the signal intensity was performed as a function of the paramagnetic contrast concentration. Results: As compared with samples of equal concentrations diluted only with saline, the authors have observed an average signal intensity decrease of 20.67% for iodinated contrast agent, and of 28.34% for xylocaine. However, the increased gadolinium concentration in the samples caused decrease in signal intensity with all the dilutions. Conclusion: Minimizing the use of iodinated contrast media and xylocaine and/or the use of a gadolinium concentration of 2.5 mmol/L diluted in saline will improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance arthrography.

  18. Arterial double-contrast dual-energy MDCT: in-vivo rabbit atherosclerosis with iodinated nanoparticles and gadolinium agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmi, Raz; Kafri, Galit; Altman, Ami; Goshen, Liran; Planer, David; Sosna, Jacob

    2010-03-01

    An in-vivo feasibility study of potentially improved atherosclerosis CT imaging is presented. By administration of two different contrast agents to rabbits with induced atherosclerotic plaques we aim at identifying both soft plaque and vessel lumen simultaneously. Initial injection of iodinated nanoparticle (INP) contrast agent (N1177 - Nanoscan Imaging), two to four hours before scan, leads to its later accumulation in macrophage-rich soft plaque, while a second gadolinium contrast agent (Magnevist) injected immediately prior to the scan blends with the aortic blood. The distinction between the two agents in a single scan is achieved with a double-layer dual-energy MDCT (Philips Healthcare) following material separation analysis using the reconstructed images of the different x-ray spectra. A single contrast agent injection scan, where only INP was injected two hours prior to the scan, was compared to a double-contrast scan taken four hours after INP injection and immediately after gadolinium injection. On the single contrast agent scan we observed along the aorta walls, localized iodine accumulation which can point on INP uptake by atherosclerotic plaque. In the double-contrast scan the gadolinium contributes a clearer depiction of the vessel lumen in addition to the lasting INP presence. The material separation shows a good correlation to the pathologies inferred from the conventional CT images of the two different scans while performing only a single scan prevents miss-registration problems and reduces radiation dose. These results suggest that a double-contrast dual-energy CT may be used for advanced clinical diagnostic applications.

  19. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: UK survey of the use of gadolinium-based contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, O., E-mail: owenrees1@gmail.co [Wrexham Maelor Hospital, Wrexham (United Kingdom); Agarwal, S.K. [Wrexham Maelor Hospital, Wrexham (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    Aim: To identify the current practice of administration of gadolinium-based contrast media (Gd-CM) within the UK with respect to the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) guidelines on nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Materials and methods: One hundred and fifty-two institutions were contacted to request details regarding the use of Gd-CM at their institution, their awareness of NSF, and of the ESUR guidelines, and their departmental policy on the administration of Gd-CM agents associated with NSF (high-risk agents) in patients with diminished renal function. Results: Of the 100 institutions that replied, 72% used a cyclic agent as a first-line Gd-CM. The majority of institutions used more than one Gd-CM, and 57% used a high-risk Gd-CM. Seventy percent were aware of the ESUR guidelines, and of the 57% that used a high-risk Gd-CM, 9% did not check renal function at all prior to administration. The course of action of the remaining 48% was varied in patients with diminished renal function with some changing to a low-risk Gd-CM and others electing not to use Gd-CM at all. Five percent continued to use a high-risk Gd-CM with an estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 ml/min. Conclusion: The present survey shows that the majority of institutions use a low-risk Gd-CM as a first-line agent; however, a number of institutions do use a high-risk Gd-CM and their course of action for patients with diminished renal function is varied. Given current evidence, it is advisable to use a low-risk Gd-CM, such as a cyclic agent, in patients with diminished renal function.

  20. Adverse allergic reactions to linear ionic gadolinium-based contrast agents: experience with 194, 400 injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aran, S; Shaqdan, K W; Abujudeh, H H

    2015-05-01

    To report the authors' experience with the administration of four gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA; gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadofosveset trisodium, gadoxetate disodium and gadobenate dimeglumine) in a large study population at a single, large academic medical centre. The institutional review board approved this retrospective study in which data in the electronic incident reporting system were searched. A total of 194, 400 intravenous administrations of linear ionic GBCAs were assessed for the incidence of adverse reactions and risk factors from 1 January 2007 to 14 January 2014. The severity of reactions (mild, moderate, and severe), patient type (outpatients, inpatients, and emergency), examination type, and treatment options were also investigated. In total, 204/194400 (0.1%) patients (mean age 45.7 ± 14.9) showed adverse reactions, consisting of 6/746 (0.80%), 10/3200 (0.31%), 14/6236 (0.22%) and 174/184218 (0.09%), for gadofosveset trisodium, gadoxetate disodium, gadobenate dimeglumine, and gadopentetate dimeglumine, respectively. An overall significant difference was found between different GBCAs regarding the total number of reactions (p reaction was higher in females (F: 146/113187, 0.13%/M: 58/81213, 0.07%; p reactions was higher in outpatient (180/158885, 0.11%), emergency (10/10413, 0.10%), and inpatients (14/25102, 0.05%), respectively (p reactions (0.17 versus 0.16 versus 0.15). The overall rate of adverse reaction to GBCAs was 0.1%. The rates of reactions were highest in gadofosveset trisodium with (0.80%), followed by gadoxetate disodium (0.31%), gadobenate dimeglumine (0.22%) and gadopentetate dimeglumine (0.09%). Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis associated with gadolinium based contrast agents: A summary of the medical literature reporting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broome, Dale R.

    2008-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a systemic fibrosing disorder that principally affects the skin, but can involve virtually any tissue in the human body and result in significant disability and even death. Since 2006 numerous retrospective case reports and case series have reported a very strong association of this disease with exposure to gadolinium-based contrast agents (Gd-CA) for MR imaging in the setting of severe or end-stage renal disease. The purpose of this report is to summarize the medical literature reporting of biopsy-proven NSF cases in which the authors specifically investigated patient exposure to Gd-CA. A Pub Med MEDLINE search was performed using the key words-nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy. All case reports and case series of NSF were reviewed to determine if patients had a preceding exposure to Gd-CA and which specific Gd-CA was involved. If the original reports did not clarify the specific Gd-CA, I reviewed follow-up letters to the editors or contacted the authors to clarify which specific Gd-CA were linked to the NSF cases. If several reports originated from the same institution, clarification was also obtained to avoid redundant reporting. As of February 1, 2008 there have been 190 biopsy-proven cases of NSF published in the peer-reviewed literature with the following associations: 157 gadodiamide (Omniscan, GE Healthcare), 8 gadopentetate (Magnevist, Bayer Healthcare), 3 gadoversetamide (OptiMARK, Covidien), and 18 unspecified Gd-CA, and 4 confounded cases with more than one Gd-CA. Five cases of NSF were unassociated with Gd-CA

  2. Importance of timing of post-contrast MRI in rheumatoid arthritis: what happens during the first 60 minutes after IV gadolinium-DTPA?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Klarlund, Mette

    2001-01-01

    threshold. Thereafter, the measured volumes remained practically unchanged. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that MR image acquisition in arthritic knee joints should be performed within the initial approximately 10 minutes after gadolinium contrast injection to achieve the most accurate distinction between...

  3. Gadolinium based contrast agents in current practice: Risks of accumulation and toxicity in patients with normal renal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Ranga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite being decked as the most prized compounds in the nugget box of contrast agents for clinical radiologists, and carrying an indisputable tag of safety of the US Food and Drug Administration for close to three decades, all may not be seemingly well with the family of gadolinium compounds. If the first signs of violations of primum non nocere in relation to gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs appeared in the millennium year with the first published report of skin fibrosis in patients with compromised renal function, the causal relationship between the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF and GBCAs, first proposed by two European groups in 2006, further precluded their use in renocompromised patients. The toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of GBCAs, however, has come under hawk-eyed scrutiny with recent reports that gadolinium tends to deposit cumulatively in the brain of patients with normal hepatobiliary function and intact blood–brain barrier. While the jury on the long-term hazard significance of this critical scientific finding is still out, the use of GBCAs must be guided by due clinical diligence, avoidance of repeated doses, and preferring GBCAs with the best safety profiles.

  4. A feasibility study to determine the potential of in vivo detection of gadolinium by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) following gadolinium-based contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafaei, F; McNeill, F E; Chettle, D R; Noseworthy, M D

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using a (109)Cd γ-ray induced K x-ray fluorescence (K-XRF) system for the in vivo detection of gadolinium (Gd) in bone has been investigated. The K-XRF bone measurement system employs an array of four detectors, and is normally used for the non-invasive study of bone lead levels. The system was used to measure bone simulating phantoms doped with varying levels of gadolinium and fixed amounts of sodium (Na), chlorine (Cl) and calcium (Ca). The detection limits for bare bone phantoms, using a source of activity 0.17 GBq, were determined to be 3.9 ppm and 6.5 ppm (µg Gd per gram phantom) for the Kα1 and Kα2 Gd x-ray peaks, respectively. This leads to an overall detection limit of 3.3 ppm (µg Gd per gram phantom). Layers of plastic were used to simulate overlying soft tissue and this permitted prediction of a detection limit, using the current strength of our radioisotope source, of 6.1 ppm to 8.6 ppm (µg Gd per gram phantom) for fingers with 2-4 mm of overlying tissue. With a new source of activity 5 GBq, we predict that this system could achieve a detection limit of 4-5.6 µg Gd g(-1) Ca. This is within the range of levels (2-30 µg Gd g(-1) Ca) previously found in the bone of patients receiving Gd based contrast imaging agents. The technique is promising and warrants further investigation.

  5. Safe use of iodinated and gadolinium-based contrast media in current practice in Japan: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, Yoshito; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Murakami, Takamichi; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Fukuda, Kunihiko; Korogi, Yukunori; Sugimoto, Hideharu; Takehara, Yasuo; Narumi, Yoshifumi; Arai, Yasuaki; Kuwatsuru, Ryohei; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Awai, Kazuo; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Takagi, Ryo

    2016-02-01

    To help establish consensus on the safe use of contrast media in Japan. Questionnaires were sent to accredited teaching hospitals with radiology residency programs. The reply rate was 45.4% (329/724). For contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN), chronic and acute kidney diseases were considered a risk factor in 96.7 and 93.6%, respectively, and dehydration in 73.9%. As preventive actions, intravenous hydration (89.1%) and reduction of iodinated contrast media dose (86.9%) were commonly performed. For nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), chronic and acute kidney diseases were considered risk factors in 98.5 and 90.6%, respectively, but use of unstable gadolinium-based contrast media was considered a risk factor in only 55.6%. A renal function test was always (63.5% in iodinated; 65.7% in gadolinium) or almost always (23.1; 19.8%) performed, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was the parameter most frequently used (80.8; 82.6%). For the patients with risk factors for acute adverse reaction (AAR), steroid premedication or/and change of contrast medium were frequent preventive actions, but intravenous steroid administration immediately before contrast media use was still performed. Our questionnaire survey revealed that preventive actions against CIN were properly performed based on patients' eGFR. Preventive actions against NSF and AAR still lacked consensus.

  6. Gd (III) chelates adsorbed on TiO2 nanoparticles - promising MRI contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehor, Ivan; Lukes, Ivan; Peters, Joop A.; Jirak, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The project deals with a new contrast agent (CA) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The CA consists of two main parts - diamagnetic core (TiO 2 nanoparticle) and Gd (III) chelates grafted on its surface. The presence of the nanoparticle core is responsible for significant increase of r1 millimolar relaxivity (which corresponds to the efficiency of the CA) due to the slowing down the rotation of the complex in solution. It also affects the biodistribution characteristics of the CA - the ability to penetrate through cell membranes is well known for nanoparticles, making them useful for cell labeling. The structure of the chelate is derived from DOTA ligand, whose Gd (III) complexes are commercially used as MRI CA in human medicine. The connection of the complex to the surface is realized via penylphosphonate, which is attached to the pendant arm of the ligand. Strong interaction of the phosphonate with the TiO 2 surface results in the full surface coverage. The complexation and MRI properties of Gd chelate were studied and exhibit analogy to the complexes of DOTA, The millimolar relaxivity (r1) of the Gd (III) complex significantly increases upon adsorption on the TiO 2 nanoparticles. PVA was added to the colloidal solutions of CA to stabilize them under biological conditions and such stabilized CA was utilized for MRI visualization of rat pancreatic islets (P1). The labeled islets were detected on MR images as hyperintense area and therefore our CA seems to be promising material for cellular MRI

  7. Trimodal Gadolinium-Gold Microcapsules Containing Pancreatic Islet Cells Restore Normoglycemia in Diabetic Mice and Can Be Tracked by Using US, CT, and Positive-Contrast MR Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifin, Dian R.; Long, Christopher M.; Gilad, Assaf A.; Alric, Christophe; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier; Link, Thomas W.; Arepally, Aravind; Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop microcapsules that immunoprotect pancreatic islet cells for treatment of type I diabetes and enable multimodal cellular imaging of transplanted islet cells. Materials and Methods: All animal experiments were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with DTDTPA (dithiolated diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid):gadolinium chelates (GG) were coencapsulated with pancreatic islet cells by using protamine sulfate as a clinical-grade alginate cross linker. Conventional poly-l-lysine–cross-linked microcapsules and unencapsulated islets were included as controls. The viability and glucose responsiveness of islet cells were assessed in vitro, and in vivo insulin (C-peptide) secretion was monitored for 6 weeks in (streptozotocin-induced) diabetic mice with (n = 7) or without (n = 8) intraabdominally engrafted islet cells. Five nondiabetic mice were included as controls. Differences between samples were calculated by using a nonparametric Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney method. To adjust for multiple comparisons, a significance level of P microcapsules could be readily visualized with positive-contrast high-field-strength MR imaging, micro-CT, and US both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: Cell encapsulation with GG provides a means of trimodal noninvasive tracking of engrafted cells. © RSNA, 2011 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.11101608/-/DC1 PMID:21734156

  8. Role of chelates in magnetic resonance imaging studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Laxmi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging studies are tests performed with a variety of techniques that produce pictures of the inside of a patient′s body. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is an imaging technique based on the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves, and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone, and virtually all other internal body structures. Chelates have a wide application in such imaging techniques. Chelates in imaging studies are used alone as radioactive agents or conjugated to monoclonal antibodies or to DNA as radioactive agents. Technetium chelates and gadolinium chelates are being widely used as magnetic resonance contrast media.

  9. MRI with intrathecal MRI gadolinium contrast medium administration: a possible method to assess glymphatic function in human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eide, Per Kristian; Ringstad, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the “glymphatic system” of the brain has been discovered in rodents, which is a paravascular, transparenchymal route for clearance of excess brain metabolites and distribution of compounds in the cerebrospinal fluid. It has already been demonstrated that intrathecally administered gadolinium (Gd) contrast medium distributes along this route in rats, but so far not in humans. A 27-year-old woman underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with intrathecal administration of gadobutrol, which distributed throughout her entire brain after 1 and 4.5 h. MRI with intrathecal Gd may become a tool to study glymphatic function in the human brain

  10. Successful balloon pulmonary angioplasty with gadolinium contrast media for a patient with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and iodine allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohisa Nakamura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old male was referred to our hospital with dyspnea. He was diagnosed as having chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and a pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA was performed. However, exertional dyspnea remained because of residual pulmonary hypertension; therefore, the patient was re-admitted to our hospital 1 year after PEA. We performed computed tomography and pulmonary angiography and found web and band lesions in the distal pulmonary artery with a high pulmonary artery pressure. Although further management was complicated because the patient had an anaphylactic shock to iodine-based contrast media, we eventually completed five sessions of balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA using gadolinium contrast medium. His symptoms and hemodynamics dramatically improved after a series of BPA. After 15 months, mean pulmonary arterial pressure reduced from 67 mmHg to 20 mmHg, and subjective symptoms improved from stage Ⅳ to I as per the WHO classification system. BPA is a potential procedure for residual pulmonary hypertension after PEA and could be safely performed using gadolinium contrast medium for patients with iodine allergy.

  11. Adverse allergic reactions to linear ionic gadolinium-based contrast agents: experience with 194, 400 injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aran, S.; Shaqdan, K.W.; Abujudeh, H.H.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To report the authors' experience with the administration of four gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA; gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadofosveset trisodium, gadoxetate disodium and gadobenate dimeglumine) in a large study population at a single, large academic medical centre. Materials and methods: The institutional review board approved this retrospective study in which data in the electronic incident reporting system were searched. A total of 194, 400 intravenous administrations of linear ionic GBCAs were assessed for the incidence of adverse reactions and risk factors from 1 January 2007 to 14 January 2014. The severity of reactions (mild, moderate, and severe), patient type (outpatients, inpatients, and emergency), examination type, and treatment options were also investigated. Results: In total, 204/194400 (0.1%) patients (mean age 45.7 ± 14.9) showed adverse reactions, consisting of 6/746 (0.80%), 10/3200 (0.31%), 14/6236 (0.22%) and 174/184218 (0.09%), for gadofosveset trisodium, gadoxetate disodium, gadobenate dimeglumine, and gadopentetate dimeglumine, respectively. An overall significant difference was found between different GBCAs regarding the total number of reactions (p < 0.0001). When comparing the GBCAs together, significant differences were found between gadofosveset trisodium versus gadopentetate dimeglumine (p < 0.0001), gadofosveset trisodium versus gadobenate dimeglumine (p = 0.0051), gadoxetate disodium versus gadopentetate dimeglumine (p < 0.0001) and gadopentetate dimeglumine versus gadobenate dimeglumine (p = 0.0013). Rate of reaction was higher in females (F: 146/113187, 0.13%/M: 58/81213, 0.07%; p < 0.0001). Rate of reactions was higher in outpatient (180/158885, 0.11%), emergency (10/10413, 0.10%), and inpatients (14/25102, 0.05%), respectively (p < 0.0001). Most of the patients had mild symptoms 171/204 (83.8%). Abdomen–pelvis, liver, and thoracic examinations had highest rates of reactions (0.17 versus 0

  12. In vitro comparison of intracranial stent visibility using various concentrations of gadolinium contrast agent under 1.5 T and 3 T MR angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chen-Hua; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Chen, Ai-Chi; Huang, Yen-Lin; Chen, David Yen-Ting; Chen, Chi-Jen; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Hsu, Hui-Ling

    2017-04-01

    MR angiography (MRA) is an increasingly used evaluation method following intracranial stenting. However, the various artifacts created by the stent limit this technique. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of various concentrations of gadolinium contrast agent on the visibility and signal characteristics of two stents using the a contrast enhanced MRA technique. Two intracranial stents (Enterprise and Helistent) were placed in polyvinyl chloride tubes as vascular phantoms. They were filled with six different doses of gadolinium contrast agent (1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 mmol/L dimeglumine gadopentetate, respectively) and imaged using 3 T and 1.5 T MR systems. Relative in-stent signal (RIS) was calculated and artificial luminal narrowing (ALN) was obtained using pixel by pixel analysis. The Enterprise stent, performed in both 1.5 T and 3 T MR systems, showed mean RIS values much less than those for the Helistent for all different doses of gadolinium solution. Increased gadolinium concentration resulted in a gradual reduction in RIS values in the Enterprise group. Also, ALN in the Enterprise group showed no or little change with various gadolinium doses. The Enterprise stent demonstrated good luminal visibility regardless of gadolinium concentration. The relative in-stent signals were more predictable in the Enterprise stent with various doses of gadolinium. Therefore, the Enterprise stent has been shown to provide better in-stent visibility compared with the Helistent using various gadolinium doses. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Comparison of blood pool and extracellular gadolinium chelate for functional MR evaluation of vascular thoracic outlet syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Ruth P., E-mail: ruthplim74@gmail.com [New York University School of Medicine, Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, 660 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Austin Health, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg, Victoria 3084 (Australia); The University of Melbourne, School of Medicine, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Bruno, Mary, E-mail: mary.bruno@nyumc.org [New York University School of Medicine, Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, 660 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Rosenkrantz, Andrew B., E-mail: Andrew.rosenkrantz@nyumc.org [New York University School of Medicine, Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, 660 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Kim, Danny C., E-mail: danny.kim@nyumc.org [New York University School of Medicine, Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, 660 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Mulholland, Thomas, E-mail: Thomas.mulholland@nyumc.org [New York University School of Medicine, Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, 660 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Kwon, Jane, E-mail: jane.kwon@nyumc.org [New York University School of Medicine, Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, 660 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Palfrey, Amy P., E-mail: amy.pastva10@stjohns.edu [St John' s University, Department of Psychology, 8000 Utopia Parkway, Jamaica-Queens, NY 11439 (United States); Ogedegbe, Olugbenga, E-mail: Olugbenga.Ogedegbe@nyumc.org [New York University School of Medicine, Clinical and Translational Science Institute, 227 E30th St, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10016 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: To compare performance of single-injection blood pool agent (gadofosveset trisodium, BPA) against dual-injection extracellular contrast (gadopentetate dimeglumine, ECA) for MRA/MRV in assessment of suspected vascular TOS. Materials and methods: Thirty-one patients referred for vascular TOS evaluation were assessed with BPA (n = 18) or ECA (n = 13) MRA/MRV in arm abduction and adduction. Images were retrospectively assessed for: image quality (1 = non-diagnostic, 5 = excellent), vessel contrast (1 = same signal as muscle, 4 = much brighter than muscle) and vascular pathology by two independent readers, with a separate experienced reader providing reference assessment of vascular pathology. Results: Median image quality was diagnostic or better (score ≥3) for ECA and BPA at all time points, with BPA image quality superior at abduction late (BPA 4.5, ECA 4, p = 0.042) and ECA image quality superior at adduction-early (BPA 4.5; ECA 4.0, p = 0.018). High qualitative vessel contrast (mean score ≥3) was observed at all time points with both BPA and ECA, with superior BPA vessel contrast at abduction-late (BPA 3.97 ± 0.12; ECA 3.73 ± 0.26, p = 0.007) and ECA at adduction-early (BPA 3.42 ± 0.52; ECA 3.96 ± 0.14, p < 0.001). Readers readily identified arterial and venous pathology with BPA, similar to ECA examinations. Conclusion: Single-injection BPA MRA/MRV for TOS evaluation demonstrated diagnostic image quality and high vessel contrast, similar to dual-injection ECA imaging, enabling identification of fixed and functional arterial and venous pathology.

  14. Comparison between immediate and delayed imaging after gadolinium chelate injection for detecting enhanced lesions in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, A.; Roudbari, A.; Heidarzadeh, A.; Kouhsari, M.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive and valuable method in the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis. Compared with other modalities, the sensitivity of Magnetic resonance imaging for detection of the lesion increases using magnetization transfer and delayed imaging. Our aim was to compare the two methods in detecting Multiple Sclerosis lesions. Patients and Methods: In this double-blind clinical trial, twenty-one patients with the definite diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis referred to Poursina Hospital, Rasht were included. Two radiologists evaluated all the images. First, images without contrast were conducted, then 0.1 mmol/kg contrast material (Dotarem, single dose) was injected and after 30 minutes, T1W and magnetization transfer images were obtained. Seventy-two hours later, T1W images were obtained immediately after injection of 0.2 mmol/kg contrast material (double dose). The data were analyzed using Fisher's and McNemar tests by SPSS for Windows. Results: Delayed magnetization transfer showed 44 enhanced lesions using magnetization transfer (69.84%) and 29 lesions using T1 (46.03%). In addition, the number of enhanced lesions in the delayed method were significantly more than those in the immediate method (p value=0.003). Conclusion: The use of single dose in combination with magnetization transfer and delayed images after 20-30 minutes enables us to detect more enhanced lesions.

  15. Gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast agents at 7 Tesla: in vitro T1 relaxivities in human blood plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris M; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Juras, Vladimír; Kraff, Oliver; Ladd, Mark E; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2010-09-01

    PURPOSE/INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to determine the T1 relaxivities (r1) of 8 gadolinium (Gd)-based MR contrast agents in human blood plasma at 7 Tesla, compared with 3 Tesla. Eight commercially available Gd-based MR contrast agents were diluted in human blood plasma to concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 mmol/L. In vitro measurements were performed at 37 degrees C, on a 7 Tesla and on a 3 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging scanner. For the determination of T1 relaxation times, Inversion Recovery Sequences with inversion times from 0 to 3500 ms were used. The relaxivities were calculated. The r1 relaxivities of all agents, diluted in human blood plasma at body temperature, were lower at 7 Tesla than at 3 Tesla. The values at 3 Tesla were comparable to those published earlier. Notably, in some agents, a minor negative correlation of r1 with a concentration of up to 2 mmol/L could be observed. This was most pronounced in the agents with the highest protein-binding capacity. At 7 Tesla, the in vitro r1 relaxivities of Gd-based contrast agents in human blood plasma are lower than those at 3 Tesla. This work may serve as a basis for the application of Gd-based MR contrast agents at 7 Tesla. Further studies are required to optimize the contrast agent dose in vivo.

  16. Gadolinium- and manganite-based contrast agents with fluorescent probes for both magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging of pancreatic islets: a comparative study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Berková, Z.; Jirák, D.; Zacharovová, K.; Lukeš, I.; Kotková, Z.; Kotek, J.; Kačenka, M.; Kaman, Ondřej; Řehoř, I.; Hájek, M.; Saudek, F.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2013), s. 614-621 ISSN 1860-7179 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : contrast agents * gadolinium * magnetic resonance imaging * manganite * pancreatic islets Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.046, year: 2013

  17. Histology and Gadolinium Distribution in the Rodent Brain After the Administration of Cumulative High Doses of Linear and Macrocyclic Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrke, Jessica; Frisk, Anna-Lena; Frenzel, Thomas; Schöckel, Laura; Rosenbruch, Martin; Jost, Gregor; Lenhard, Diana Constanze; Sieber, Martin A.; Nischwitz, Volker; Küppers, Astrid; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Retrospective studies in patients with primary brain tumors or other central nervous system pathologies as well as postmortem studies have suggested that gadolinium (Gd) deposition occurs in the dentate nucleus (DN) and globus pallidus (GP) after multiple administrations of primarily linear Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs). However, this deposition has not been associated with any adverse effects or histopathological alterations. The aim of this preclinical study was to systematically examine differences between linear and macrocyclic GBCAs in their potential to induce changes in brain and skin histology including Gd distribution in high spatial resolution. Materials and Methods Fifty male Wistar-Han rats were randomly allocated into control (saline, n = 10 rats) and 4 GBCA groups (linear GBCAs: gadodiamide and gadopentetate dimeglumine, macrocyclic GBCAs: gadobutrol and gadoteridol; n = 10 rats per group). The animals received 20 daily intravenous injections at a dose of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg body weight. Eight weeks after the last GBCA administration, the animals were killed, and the brain and skin samples were histopathologically assessed (hematoxylin and eosin; cresyl violet [Nissl]) and by immunohistochemistry. The Gd concentration in the skin, bone, brain, and skeletal muscle samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS, n = 4). The spatial Gd distribution in the brain and skin samples was analyzed in cryosections using laser ablation coupled with ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS, n = 3). For the ultra-high resolution of Gd distribution, brain sections of rats injected with gadodiamide or saline (n = 1) were assessed by scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Results No histological changes were observed in the brain. In contrast, 4 of 10 animals in the gadodiamide group but none of the animals in other groups showed macroscopic and histological

  18. Histology and Gadolinium Distribution in the Rodent Brain After the Administration of Cumulative High Doses of Linear and Macrocyclic Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrke, Jessica; Frisk, Anna-Lena; Frenzel, Thomas; Schöckel, Laura; Rosenbruch, Martin; Jost, Gregor; Lenhard, Diana Constanze; Sieber, Martin A; Nischwitz, Volker; Küppers, Astrid; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2017-06-01

    Retrospective studies in patients with primary brain tumors or other central nervous system pathologies as well as postmortem studies have suggested that gadolinium (Gd) deposition occurs in the dentate nucleus (DN) and globus pallidus (GP) after multiple administrations of primarily linear Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs). However, this deposition has not been associated with any adverse effects or histopathological alterations. The aim of this preclinical study was to systematically examine differences between linear and macrocyclic GBCAs in their potential to induce changes in brain and skin histology including Gd distribution in high spatial resolution. Fifty male Wistar-Han rats were randomly allocated into control (saline, n = 10 rats) and 4 GBCA groups (linear GBCAs: gadodiamide and gadopentetate dimeglumine, macrocyclic GBCAs: gadobutrol and gadoteridol; n = 10 rats per group). The animals received 20 daily intravenous injections at a dose of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg body weight. Eight weeks after the last GBCA administration, the animals were killed, and the brain and skin samples were histopathologically assessed (hematoxylin and eosin; cresyl violet [Nissl]) and by immunohistochemistry. The Gd concentration in the skin, bone, brain, and skeletal muscle samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS, n = 4). The spatial Gd distribution in the brain and skin samples was analyzed in cryosections using laser ablation coupled with ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS, n = 3). For the ultra-high resolution of Gd distribution, brain sections of rats injected with gadodiamide or saline (n = 1) were assessed by scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. No histological changes were observed in the brain. In contrast, 4 of 10 animals in the gadodiamide group but none of the animals in other groups showed macroscopic and histological nephrogenic systemic fibrosis-like skin

  19. Clinically useful dilution factors for iodine and gadolinium contrast material: an animal model of pediatric digital subtraction angiography using state-of-the-art flat-panel detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racadio, John M; Kashinkunti, Soumya R; Nachabe, Rami A; Racadio, Judy M; Johnson, Neil D; Kukreja, Kamlesh U; Patel, Manish N; Privitera, Mary Beth; Hales, Jasmine E; Abruzzo, Todd A

    2013-11-01

    Iodinated and gadolinium contrast agents pose some risk for certain pediatric patients, including allergic-like reactions, contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Digital flat-panel detectors enhance image quality during angiography and might allow use of more dilute contrast material to decrease risk of complications that might be dose-dependent, such as CIN and NSF. To assess the maximum dilution factors for iodine- and gadolinium-based contrast agents suitable for vascular imaging with fluoroscopy and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) on digital flat-panel detectors in an animal model. We performed selective catheterization of the abdominal aorta, renal artery and common carotid artery on a rabbit. In each vessel we performed fluoroscopy and DSA during contrast material injection using iodinated and gadolinium contrast material at 100%, 80%, 50%, 33% and 20% dilutions. An image quality score (0 to 3) was assigned by each of eight evaluators. Intracorrelation coefficient, paired t-test, one-way repeated analysis of variance, Spearman correlation and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis were applied to the data. Overall the image quality scores correlated linearly with dilution levels. For iodinated contrast material, the optimum cut-off level for DSA when a score of at least 2 is acceptable is above 33%; it is above 50% when a score of 3 is necessary. For gadolinium contrast material, the optimum cut-off for DSA images is above 50% when a score of at least 2 is acceptable and above 80% when a score of 3 is necessary. Knowledge of the relationship between image quality and contrast material dilution might allow a decrease in overall contrast load while maintaining appropriate image quality when using digital flat-panel detectors.

  20. Transient arterial phase respiratory motion-related artifact in MR imaging of the liver: an analysis of four different gadolinium-based contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mansi R; Flusberg, Milana; Paroder, Viktoriya; Rozenblit, Alla M; Chernyak, Victoria

    The purpose was to compare hepatic arterial phase (HAP) respiratory motion artifact (RMA) between gadoxetate, gadobutrol, gadopentetate, and gadobenate. Two hundred cases of each gadolinium agent were included. RMA was assigned using 5-point Likert scale (1=no motion, 5=extreme motion) on precontrast and HAP. RMA increase (increase ≥1 on HAP from precontrast) was the outcome in logistic regression. Odds of RMA increase for gadoxetate were 5.5 (P<.001), 3.6 (P=.034), and 9.5 (P<.001) times higher than gadobutrol, gadopentetate, and gadobenate, respectively. Gadolinium volume and dose were not independent predictors of RMA increase. Gadoxetate has increased odds of RMA compared with other gadolinium agents; tight contrast bolus is not a contributor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantification and Assessment of the Chemical Form of Residual Gadolinium in the Brain After Repeated Administration of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents: Comparative Study in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Thomas; Apte, Chirag; Jost, Gregor; Schöckel, Laura; Lohrke, Jessica; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2017-07-01

    Multiple clinical and preclinical studies have reported a signal intensity increase and the presence of gadolinium (Gd) in the brain after repeated administration of Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs). This bioanalytical study in rat brain tissue was initiated to investigate whether the residual Gd is present as intact GBCA or in other chemical forms by using tissue fractionation and chromatography. Rats were divided randomly in 6 groups of 10 animals each. They received 10 daily injections of 2.5 mmol/kg bodyweight of 1 of 5 different GBCAs: linear GBCAs such as gadodiamide (Omniscan; GE Healthcare), gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA, Magnevist; Bayer), or gadobenate dimeglumine (Multihance; Bracco) and macrocyclic GBCAs such as gadobutrol (Gadovist; Bayer) and gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA, Dotarem; Guerbet) or saline. On days 3 and 24 after the last injection (p.i.), 5 randomly chosen animals of each group were killed by exsanguination, and their brains were excised and divided into cerebrum, pons, and cerebellum. The brain sections were homogenized by sonication in ice-cold buffer at pH 7.4. Soluble and insoluble fractions were separated by centrifugation, and the soluble fractions were further separated by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The Gd concentration in all tissue fractions and in the GPC eluate was measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In a recovery control experiment, all GBCAs were spiked to blank brain tissue and more than 94% recovery of Gd in the tissue fractions was demonstrated. Only traces of the administered Gd were found in the rat brain tissue on day 3 and day 24 p.i. In the animals treated with macrocyclic GBCAs, Gd was found only in the soluble brain fraction and was present solely as low molecular weight molecules, most likely the intact GBCA. In the animals treated with linear GBCAs Gd was found to a large extent in the insoluble tissue fraction. The Gd concentration in the soluble fraction was comparable to the

  2. Gadolinium-porphyrins: new potential magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for melanoma detection

    OpenAIRE

    Daryoush Shahbazi-Gahrouei

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two new porphyrin-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, Gd-hematoporphyrin (Gd-H) and Gd-tetra-carboranylmethoxyphenyl-porphyrin (Gd-TCP) were synthesized and tested in nude mice with human melanoma (MM-138) xenografts as new melanoma contrast agents. METHODS: Subcutaneous xenografts of human melanoma cells (MM-138) were studied in 30 (five groups of six) nude mice. The effect of different contrast agents (Gd-TCP, Gd-H, GdCl3 and Gd-DTPA) on proton relaxatio...

  3. Immediate Adverse Reactions to Gadolinium-Based MR Contrast Media: A Retrospective Analysis on 10,608 Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Vincenza; Cascella, Marco; Fusco, Roberta; dell'Aprovitola, Nicoletta; Catalano, Orlando; Filice, Salvatore; Schiavone, Vincenzo; Izzo, Francesco; Cuomo, Arturo; Petrillo, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Contrast media (CM) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may determine the development of acute adverse reactions. Objective was to retrospectively assess the frequency and severity of adverse reactions associated with gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) injection in patients who underwent MRI. Material and Methods. At our center 10608 MRI examinations with CM were performed using five different GBCAs: Gd-BOPTA (MultiHance), Gd-DTPA (Magnevist), Gd-EOBDTPA (Primovist), Gd-DOTA (Dotarem), and Gd-BTDO3A (Gadovist). Results. 32 acute adverse reactions occurred, accounting for 0.3% of all administration. Twelve reactions were associated with Gd-DOTA injection (0.11%), 9 with Gd-BOPTA injection (0.08%), 6 with Gd-BTDO3A (0.056%), 3 with Gd-EOB-DTPA (0.028%), and 2 with Gd-DTPA (0.018%). Twenty-four reactions (75.0%) were mild, four (12.5%) moderate, and four (12.5%) severe. The most severe reactions were seen associated with use of Gd-BOPTA, with 3 severe reactions in 32 total reactions. Conclusion. Acute adverse reactions are generally rare with the overall adverse reaction rate of 0.3%. The most common adverse reactions were not severe, consisting in skin rash and hives.

  4. Immediate Adverse Reactions to Gadolinium-Based MR Contrast Media: A Retrospective Analysis on 10,608 Examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenza Granata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Contrast media (CM for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may determine the development of acute adverse reactions. Objective was to retrospectively assess the frequency and severity of adverse reactions associated with gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs injection in patients who underwent MRI. Material and Methods. At our center 10608 MRI examinations with CM were performed using five different GBCAs: Gd-BOPTA (MultiHance, Gd-DTPA (Magnevist, Gd-EOBDTPA (Primovist, Gd-DOTA (Dotarem, and Gd-BTDO3A (Gadovist. Results. 32 acute adverse reactions occurred, accounting for 0.3% of all administration. Twelve reactions were associated with Gd-DOTA injection (0.11%, 9 with Gd-BOPTA injection (0.08%, 6 with Gd-BTDO3A (0.056%, 3 with Gd-EOB-DTPA (0.028%, and 2 with Gd-DTPA (0.018%. Twenty-four reactions (75.0% were mild, four (12.5% moderate, and four (12.5% severe. The most severe reactions were seen associated with use of Gd-BOPTA, with 3 severe reactions in 32 total reactions. Conclusion. Acute adverse reactions are generally rare with the overall adverse reaction rate of 0.3%. The most common adverse reactions were not severe, consisting in skin rash and hives.

  5. Signal Increase on Unenhanced T1-Weighted Images in the Rat Brain After Repeated, Extended Doses of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Jost, Gregor; Lenhard, Diana Constanze; Sieber, Martin Andrew; Lohrke, Jessica; Frenzel, Thomas; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In this prospective preclinical study, we evaluated T1-weighted signal intensity in the deep cerebellar nuclei (CN) and globus pallidus (GP) up to 24 days after repeated administration of linear and macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) using homologous imaging and evaluation methods as in the recently published retrospective clinical studies. In a second part of the study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces were evaluated for contrast enhancement by fluid-attenuated m...

  6. Retrospective analysis of patients for development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis following conventional angiography using gadolinium-based contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, Hanno; Spagnuolo, Sara; Froehlich, Johannes M.; Thoeny, Harriet C. [University Hospital Bern, Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional, and Pediatric Radiology, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Nievergelt, Helga [University Hospital Bern, Clinic of Dermatology, Bern (Switzerland); Dinkel, Hans-Peter [Hospital Landshut, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Landshut (Germany); Gretener, Silvia [University Hospital of Bern, Division of Vascular Medicine, Swiss Cardiovascular Center, Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-03-15

    The purpose was to retrospectively review the data of 27 patients with renal insufficiency who underwent conventional angiography with gadolinium-based contrast agents (GDBCA) as alternative contrast agents and assess the occurrence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) together with associated potential risk factors. This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval, and informed consent was waived. Statistical analysis was performed for all available laboratory and clinical data, including dermatology reports. Type and amount of the GDBCA used were recorded for angiography and additional MRI studies, if applicable. Serum creatinine levels (SCr) pre- and post-angiography were recorded, and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) were calculated. Ten female and 17 male patients who underwent angiography with GDBCA were included. The mean amount of GDBCA administered was 44 {+-} 15.5 ml (range 15-60 ml) or 0.24 + 0.12 mmol/kg (range 0.1-0.53 mmol/kg). At the time of angiography all patients had renal insufficiency (eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2}). Mean eGFR pre-angiography was 26 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} and 33 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} post-angiography. The mean follow-up period covers 28 months, range 1-84 months. Additional MRI studies with GDBCA administration were performed in 15 patients. One patient with typical skin lesions had developed biopsy-confirmed NSF. Conventional arterial angiography with GDBCA may play a role in the development of NSF in patients with renal insufficiency. Alternative contrast agents, such as CO{sub 2} angiography or rather the use of low doses of iodinated contrast agents, should be considered in these patients. (orig.)

  7. Gadolinium-porphyrins: new potential magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for melanoma detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Shahbazi-Gahrouei

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two new porphyrin-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents, Gd-hematoporphyrin (Gd-H and Gd-tetra-carboranylmethoxyphenyl-porphyrin (Gd-TCP were synthesized and tested in nude mice with human melanoma (MM-138 xenografts as new melanoma contrast agents. METHODS: Subcutaneous xenografts of human melanoma cells (MM-138 were studied in 30 (five groups of six nude mice. The effect of different contrast agents (Gd-TCP, Gd-H, GdCl3 and Gd-DTPA on proton relaxation times was measured in tumors and other organs. T1 values, signal enhancement and the Gd concentration for different contrast agent solutions were also investigated. RESULTS: The porphyrin agents showed higher relaxivity compared to the clincal agent, Gd-DTPA. A significant 16% and 21% modification in T1 relaxation time of the water in human melanoma tumors grafted in the nude mice was revealed 24 hours after injection of Gd-TCP and Gd-H, respectively. The percentage of injected Gd localized to the tumor measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES was approximately 21% for Gd-TCP and 28% for Gd-H which were higher than that of Gd-DTPA (10%. CONCLUSIONS: The high concentration of Gd in the tumor is indicative of a selective retention of the compounds and indicates that Gd-TCP and Gd-H are promising MR imaging contrast agents for melanoma detection. Gd-porphyrins have considerable promise for further diagnostic applications in magnetic resonance imaging. KEY WORDS: MRI, porphyrin-based contrast agent, hematoporphyrin, melanoma.

  8. High-relaxivity gadolinium-modified high-density lipoproteins as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briley-Saebo, Karen C.; Geninatti-Crich, Simonetta; Cormode, David P.; Barazza, Alessandra; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Chen, Wei; Giovenzana, Giovanni B.; Fisher, Edward A.; Aime, Silvio; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2009-01-01

    There is an ongoing desire to produce high-relaxivity, Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. These may allow for lower doses to be used, which is especially important in view of the current safety concerns surrounding Gd in patients. Here we report the synthesis of a

  9. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography using gadolinium-EOB-DTPA. Preliminary experience and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzapfel, K.; Breitwieser, C.; Rummeny, E.J.; Gaa, J.; Prinz, C.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP) with heavily T2-weighted RARE and HASTE sequences has become an important imaging modality for the morphologic evaluation of intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts. However, for the diagnosis of functional biliary disorders, cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) and endoscopic manometry, two invasive techniques with considerable morbidity and mortality, remain the standard. Biliary scintigraphy, secretin-stimulated MRCP, and secretin-stimulated endoscopic ultrasound have not proven to be sufficient to replace these techniques as they lack diagnostic accuracy and correlate poorly with manometry results. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography (CE-MRC) uses hepatocyte specifically contrast agents that are eliminated by the biliary system. Therefore, these substances can serve as biliary contrast agents in T1-weighted MR imaging. This method makes a noninvasive functional evaluation of the hepatobiliary system possible. In the present article, our preliminar experience with Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRC is summarized and potential clinical applications of this method are discussed. Additionally, the article reviews publications evaluating a possible benefit of CE-MRC with other hepathobiliary contrast agents such as mangafodipir trisodium. (orig.)

  10. Gadolinium-based Contrast Agent Accumulates in the Brain Even in Subjects without Severe Renal Dysfunction: Evaluation of Autopsy Brain Specimens with Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Tomonori; Fukusato, Toshio; Matsuda, Megumi; Toyoda, Keiko; Oba, Hiroshi; Kotoku, Jun'ichi; Haruyama, Takahiro; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Furui, Shigeru

    2015-07-01

    To use inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) to evaluate gadolinium accumulation in brain tissues, including the dentate nucleus (DN) and globus pallidus (GP), in subjects who received a gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA). Institutional review board approval was obtained for this study. Written informed consent for postmortem investigation was obtained either from the subject prior to his or her death or afterward from the subject's relatives. Brain tissues obtained at autopsy in five subjects who received a linear GBCA (GBCA group) and five subjects with no history of GBCA administration (non-GBCA group) were examined with ICP-MS. Formalin-fixed DN tissue, the inner segment of the GP, cerebellar white matter, the frontal lobe cortex, and frontal lobe white matter were obtained, and their gadolinium concentrations were measured. None of the subjects had received a diagnosis of severely compromised renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate brain regions. Gadolinium was detected in all specimens in the GBCA agent group (mean, 0.25 µg per gram of brain tissue ± 0.44 [standard deviation]), with significantly higher concentrations in each region (P = .004 vs the non-GBCA group for all regions). In the GBCA group, the DN and GP showed significantly higher gadolinium concentrations (mean, 0.44 µg/g ± 0.63) than other regions (0.12 µg/g ± 0.16) (P = .029). Even in subjects without severe renal dysfunction, GBCA administration causes gadolinium accumulation in the brain, especially in the DN and GP.

  11. Gadolinium Contrast Enhancement Improves Confidence in Diagnosing Recurrent Soft Tissue Sarcoma by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shinn-Huey S; Hippe, Daniel S; Lee, Amie Y; Scherer, Kurt; Porrino, Jack A; Davidson, Darin J; Chew, Felix S; Ha, Alice S

    2017-05-01

    To determine how utilization of postgadolinium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) influenced reader accuracy and confidence at identifying postoperative soft tissue sarcoma (STS) recurrence among readers with various levels of expertise. This retrospective study was institutional review board approved and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant. Postoperative MRI from 26 patients with prior STS resection (13 patients with confirmed recurrence, 13 without recurrence) was reviewed. Four blinded readers of varying expertise (radiology resident, fellow, attending, and orthopedic oncologist) initially evaluated only the precontrast images and rated each MRI for recurrence on a 5-point confidence scale. Assessment was repeated with the addition of contrast-enhanced sequences. Diagnostic accuracy based on confidence ratings was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Changes in confidence ratings were calculated using Wilcoxon signed-rank test. All readers demonstrated good diagnostic accuracy both with and without contrast-enhanced images (AUC >0.98 for each reader). When contrast-enhanced images were made available, the resident recorded improved confidence with both assigning (P = 0.031) and excluding recurrence (P = 0.006); the fellow showed improved confidence only with assigning recurrence (P = 0.015); and the surgeon showed improved confidence in excluding recurrence (P = 0.003). The addition of contrast-enhanced images did not significantly influence the diagnostic confidence of the attending radiologist. Diagnostic accuracy of MRI was excellent in evaluating postoperative STS recurrence, and reader confidence improved depending on expertise when postgadolinium imaging was included in the assessment. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. T1 relaxivities of gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast agents in human whole blood at 1.5, 3, and 7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yaqi; Goerner, Frank L; Snyder, Christopher; Morelli, John N; Hao, Dapeng; Hu, Daoyu; Li, Xiaoming; Runge, Val M

    2015-05-01

    Calculation of accurate T1 relaxivity (r1) values for gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast agents (GBCAs) is a complex process. As such, often referenced r1 values for the GBCAs at 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T are based on measurements obtained in media that are not clinically relevant, derived from only a small number of concentrations, or available for only a limited number of GBCAs. This study derives the r1 values of the 8 commercially available GBCAs in human whole blood at 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T. Eight GBCAs were serially diluted in human whole blood, at 7 concentrations from 0.0625 to 4 mM. A custom-built phantom held the dilutions in air-tight cylindrical tubes maintained at 37 ± 0.5°C by a heat-circulating system. Images were acquired using inversion recovery sequences with inversion times from 30 milliseconds to 10 seconds at 1.5 T and 3 T as well as 60 milliseconds to 5 seconds at 7 T. A custom MATLAB program was used to automate signal intensity measurements from the images acquired of the phantom. SigmaPlot was used to calculate T1 relaxation times and, finally, r1. Measured r1 values in units of s⁻¹·mM⁻¹ at 1.5 T (3 T/7 T) were 3.9 ± 0.2 (3.4 ± 0.4/2.8 ± 0.4) for Gd-DOTA, 4.6 ± 0.2 (4.5 ± 0.3/4.2 ± 0.3) for Gd-DO3A-butrol, 4.3 ± 0.4 (3.8 ± 0.2/3.1 ± 0.4) for Gd-DTPA, 6.2 ± 0.5 (5.4 ± 0.3/4.7 ± 0.1) for Gd-BOPTA, 4.5 ± 0.1 (3.9 ± 0.2/3.7 ± 0.2) for Gd-DTPA-BMA, 4.4 ± 0.2 (4.2 ± 0.2/4.3 ± 0.2) for Gd-DTPA-BMEA, 7.2 ± 0.2 (5.5 ± 0.3/4.9 ± 0.1) for Gd-EOB-DTPA, and 4.4 ± 0.6 (3.5 ± 0.6/3.4 ± 0.1) for Gd-HP-DO3A. The agents can be stratified by relaxivity, with a significant additional dependency on field strength. This report quantifies, for the first time, T1 relaxivity for all 8 gadolinium chelates in common clinical use worldwide, at current relevant field strengths, in human whole blood at physiological temperature (37°C). The measured r1 values differ to a small degree from previously published values, where such

  13. Contrast enhanced renal MR angiography at 7 Tesla: How much gadolinium do we need?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiderwellen, Karsten, E-mail: karsten.beiderwellen@uni-due.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, Essen (Germany); Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Kraff, Oliver, E-mail: Oliver.kraff@uni-due.de [Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Laader, Anja, E-mail: anja.laader@uk-essen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, Essen (Germany); Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Maderwald, Stefan, E-mail: Stefan.maderwald@uni-due.de [Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Orzada, Stephan, E-mail: Stephan.orzada@uni-due.de [Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Ladd, Mark E., E-mail: mark.ladd@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Forsting, Michael, E-mail: Michael.forsting@uk-essen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, Essen (Germany); Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Lauenstein, Thomas C., E-mail: Thomas.Lauenstein@uni-due.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, Essen (Germany); Umutlu, Lale, E-mail: Lale.umutlu@uk-essen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, Essen (Germany); Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Objectives: To investigate whether a dose reduction of Gadobutrol for renal magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at 7 Tesla (T) is feasible while preserving diagnostic image quality. Methods: Ten healthy volunteers were enrolled for a renal MRA on a 7 T scanner. Fast low angle shot (FLASH) MRA data sets were obtained utilizing three different doses of Gadobutrol (0.1, 0.05 and 0.025 mmol/kg body weight [BW]). Contrast ratios (CR) were measured in the aorta as well as in the intra- and extraparenchymal arteries compared to the psoas muscle. Qualitative analysis regarding the delineation of vessel structures was performed using a four-point-scale. Results: All doses of Gadobutrol allowed for a good delineation of the aorta and renal arteries. For the extra- and intraparenchymal segmental arteries higher values were observed for full and half dose in comparison to quarter dose. No significant difference was observed for full and half dose. A lower CR was observed for quarter compared to half dose (p < 0.05) for the renal arteries. Conclusions: While best results were observed for half and full dose, a dose reduction to 0.025 mmol/kg BW is justifiable, maintaining a diagnostic image quality. This may be of high interest considering patients with renal impairment.

  14. Detection of anthropogenic gadolinium in the Brisbane River plume in Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Wastewater effluent is known to contain macro and micropollutants, which may be deleterious to environmental health. One such class of micropollutants is chelated gadolinium, which are used as MRI contrast agents. As these MRI contrast agents can be assumed to behave conservatively during estuarine mixing, it is possible to calculate how much wastewater is represented in any particular sample. In this study, the percentage contribution of wastewater at specific locations in Moreton Bay, Qld, were determined by calculating the additional anthropogenic gadolinium contribution to the total rare earth element concentrations. Wastewater contributions were measured at concentrations as low as 0.2%, demonstrating the applicability of this technique for wastewater effluent plume mapping.

  15. Temporal change of enhancement after gadolinium injection on contrast-enhanced CMR in reperfused acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hidenari; Matsuda, Tetsuya; Miyamoto, Kenichi; Shimada, Toshihiko; Ushimaru, Shunpei; Mikuri, Mikiko; Yamazaki, Taketoshi

    2015-01-01

    A recent report demonstrated that early enhancement on contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (CE-CMR) correlated with myocardial edema detected by T2-weighted CMR in reperfused acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, the time at which the enhancement in salvaged myocardium disappears is yet to be determined. We aimed to examine the time course of the enhancement with the use of different quantification techniques and to compare the extent of enhancement with the myocardial edema. CE-CMR was performed at 2-20 min after gadolinium administration in 32 AMI patients. The extent of enhancement (% myocardium) was quantified by manual delineation and the threshold methods of 2-5 SDs above remote myocardium. In subendocardial infarct, the enhancement was greatest at 2 min regardless of the quantification techniques and decreased with time, particularly in the first 6 min. In transmural infarct, the change in the size of enhancement was modest although the time course of enhancement varied according to the quantification techniques. The sizes of enhancement were not significantly different between 15 and 20 min regardless of the techniques and infarct transmurality. The best agreement with myocardial edema was found at 2 min with average differences of 0.5% and -1.2% and limits of agreement of ±20.2% and ±21.2% for the manual and 2-SD techniques, respectively. The optimal timing for delineation of salvaged myocardium on CE-CMR is at 2min when the manual or 2-SD technique was employed. Imaging needs to be completed in a short time (ideally within a minute) because of rapid reduction of enhancement in salvaged myocardium. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Correlation between gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid contrast enhancement and thallium-201 chloride uptake in pediatric brainstem glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, B L; Drane, W B; Quisling, R J; Hoang, K B

    1997-09-01

    We previously showed that thallium-201 (201Tl) chloride is accumulated in over 75% of brain tumors, including brainstem gliomas. The imaging of 201Tl with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) may require an abnormal increase in permeability of tumor vessels to allow penetration of the blood-brain barrier. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the correlation between gadolinium enhancement and the degree of 201Tl uptake on SPECT and the contributions of either gadolinium enhancement or 201Tl uptake to the prognosis in children with brainstem gliomas. Forty-two sets of paired SPECT scans and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained longitudinally in 13 cases. Altogether, 31 of 42 pairs (74%) of scans showed concordance between the presence of gadolinium enhancement and 201Tl uptake. There were no cases that demonstrated 201Tl uptake but lacked gadolinium enhancement. The results indicate that 201Tl SPECT is of value primarily when brainstem tumors have vessels that are demonstrably permeable to gadolinium, prior to or as a result of radiotherapy.

  17. Penetration and distribution of gadolinium-based contrast agents into the cerebrospinal fluid in healthy rats: a potential pathway of entry into the brain tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost, Gregor; Frenzel, Thomas; Lohrke, Jessica; Pietsch, Hubertus [MR and CT Contrast Media Research, Bayer Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Lenhard, Diana Constanze [Charite, Institute of Vegetative Physiology, Berlin (Germany); Naganawa, Shinji [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nagoya (Japan)

    2017-07-15

    Signal hyperintensity on unenhanced MRI in certain brain regions has been reported after multiple administrations of some, but not all, gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). One potential initial pathway of GBCA entry into the brain, infiltration from blood into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), was systematically evaluated in this preclinical study. GBCA infiltration and distribution in the CSF were investigated in healthy rats using repeated fluid-attenuated MRI up to 4 h after high-dose (1.8 mmol/kg) administration of six marketed and one experimental GBCA. Additionally, gadolinium measurements in CSF, blood and brain tissue samples (after 24 h) were performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Enhanced MRI signals in the CSF spaces with similar distribution kinetics were observed for all GBCAs. No substantial differences in the gadolinium concentrations among the marketed GBCAs were found in the CSF, blood or brain tissue. After 4.5 h, the concentration in the CSF was clearly higher than in blood but was almost completely cleared and lower than the brain tissue concentration after 24 h. In contrast to the brain signal hyperintensities, no differences in penetration and distribution into the CSF of healthy rats exist among the marketed GBCAs. (orig.)

  18. Behavior of gadolinium-based diagnostics in water treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cyris, Maike

    2013-04-25

    Wastewater treatment plants throughout Europe are retrofitted for a sufficient removal of micropollutants. Most target compounds are eliminated efficiently at reasonable costs by oxidation. Sorption processes, on the other hand, are favored as no transformation products are formed. For oxidation, ozone is preferred presently. Its action is divided in two main reaction pathways: Via ozone and via hydroxyl radicals formed by ozone-matrix reactions. Oxidation efficiency strongly depends on reaction rate constants. Sorption processes are usually characterized, including sorption strength, by determination of isotherms. Also, for description of filtration processes isotherm data are necessary. So far, gadolinium chelates, used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging, have not been investigated in both advanced wastewater treatment processes. The stable chelates are excreted without metabolization. Conventional wastewater treatment does not remove them substantially. They remain intact and no free Gd(III) is released. This may be changed due to oxidative treatment which potentially destroys the chelates, and Gd(III) ions which are toxic, contrary to the chelated form, may be liberated. Monitoring campaigns in wastewater and drinking water have been performed to demonstrate the relevance of gadolinium in such treatment steps. In a European monitoring campaign an average concentration of 118 ng L{sup -1} gadolinium has been determined for 75 wastewater treatment plants effluents, corresponding to a non-geogenic gadolinium concentration of 116 ng L{sup -1}. In drinking water in the Ruhr area, a densely populated region in Germany, gadolinium and the anomaly were measurable by a factor of five lower than the average in the investigated wastewater samples. The determined concentrations in drinking water are lower than acute toxic effect concentration. The speciation of gadolinium in the investigated samples is unknown, as only total element concentration has been

  19. Behavior of gadolinium-based diagnostics in water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyris, Maike

    2013-01-01

    Wastewater treatment plants throughout Europe are retrofitted for a sufficient removal of micropollutants. Most target compounds are eliminated efficiently at reasonable costs by oxidation. Sorption processes, on the other hand, are favored as no transformation products are formed. For oxidation, ozone is preferred presently. Its action is divided in two main reaction pathways: Via ozone and via hydroxyl radicals formed by ozone-matrix reactions. Oxidation efficiency strongly depends on reaction rate constants. Sorption processes are usually characterized, including sorption strength, by determination of isotherms. Also, for description of filtration processes isotherm data are necessary. So far, gadolinium chelates, used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging, have not been investigated in both advanced wastewater treatment processes. The stable chelates are excreted without metabolization. Conventional wastewater treatment does not remove them substantially. They remain intact and no free Gd(III) is released. This may be changed due to oxidative treatment which potentially destroys the chelates, and Gd(III) ions which are toxic, contrary to the chelated form, may be liberated. Monitoring campaigns in wastewater and drinking water have been performed to demonstrate the relevance of gadolinium in such treatment steps. In a European monitoring campaign an average concentration of 118 ng L -1 gadolinium has been determined for 75 wastewater treatment plants effluents, corresponding to a non-geogenic gadolinium concentration of 116 ng L -1 . In drinking water in the Ruhr area, a densely populated region in Germany, gadolinium and the anomaly were measurable by a factor of five lower than the average in the investigated wastewater samples. The determined concentrations in drinking water are lower than acute toxic effect concentration. The speciation of gadolinium in the investigated samples is unknown, as only total element concentration has been determined

  20. 77 FR 42317 - Establish a Patient-Based Registry To Evaluate the Association of Gadolinium Based Contrast...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... Quality Assurance (QA) registry of patients with renal failure who received GBCAs as the basis for a... of the development of a patient-based registry to evaluate the association of gadolinium based..., and a copy to Ira Krefting, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Division of Medical Imaging...

  1. The influence of collagen network integrity on the accumulation of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents in articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiener, Edzard; Schmidt, C.; Diederichs, G. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Settles, M. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Weirich, G. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie und Pathologische Anatomie

    2011-03-15

    Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of cartilage is used to quantify the proteoglycan loss in early osteoarthritis. It is assumed that T 1 after Gd-DTPA administration in the near equilibrium state reflects selective proteoglycan loss from cartilage. To investigate the influence of the collagen network integrity on contrast accumulation, the relaxation rates {delta}R1 and {delta}R2 were compared after Gd-DTPA administration in a well established model of osteoarthritis. Collagen or proteoglycan depletion was induced by the proteolytic enzymes papain and collagenase in healthy bovine patellar cartilage. Using a dedicated MRI sequence, T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} maps were simultaneously acquired before and 11 h after Gd-DTPA administration. Depth-dependent profiles of {delta}R1 and {delta}R2 were calculated in healthy, proteoglycan and collagen-depleted articular cartilage and the mean values of different cartilage layers were compared using the Mann-Whitney-U test. In superficial layers (1 mm) there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in either {delta}R1 or {delta}R2 between proteoglycan-depleted (16.6 {+-} 1.2 s{sup -1}, 15.9 {+-} 1.0 s{sup -1}) and collagen-depleted articular cartilage (15.3 {+-} 0.9 s{sup -1}, 15.5 {+-} 0.9 s{sup -1}). In deep layers (3 mm) both parameters were significantly higher (p = 0.005, 0.03) in proteoglycan-depleted articular cartilage (12.3 {+-} 1.1 s{sup -1}, 9.8 {+-} 0.8 s{sup -1}) than in collagen-depleted articular cartilage (9.1 {+-} 1.1 s{sup -1}, 8.7 {+-} 0.7 s{sup -1}). Both proteoglycan loss and alterations in the collagen network influence the accumulation of Gd-DTPA in articular cartilage with significant differences between superficial and deep cartilage layers. (orig.)

  2. High prevalence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in chronic renal failure patients exposed to gadodiamide, a gadolinium-containing magnetic resonance contrast agent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydahl, Casper; Thomsen, Henrik S; Marckmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    patients with stage 5 CKD at exposure (n = 102) was 18% (95% CI: 11%-27%). No cases were seen among 88 gadodiamide-exposed patients who had milder degrees of renal insufficiency (prevalence 0%, 95% CI: 0%-4%). CONCLUSIONS: The risk of NSF is unacceptably high among stage 5 CKD patients exposed......OBJECTIVE: Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a serious disease affecting renal failure patients. It may be caused by some gadolinium (Gd)-containing contrast agents, including gadodiamide. The study aimed at estimating the prevalence of NSF after gadodiamide exposure for patients with chronic...

  3. Survey of gadolinium-based contrast agent utilization among the members of the Society for Pediatric Radiology: a Quality and Safety Committee report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumfield, Einat; Moore, Michael M.; Drake, Mary K.; Goodman, Thomas R.; Lewis, Kristopher N.; Meyer, Laura T.; Ngo, Thang D.; Sammet, Christina; Stanescu, Arta Luana; Iyer, Ramesh S.; Swenson, David W.; Slovis, Thomas L.

    2017-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) have been used for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging over the last three decades. Recent reports demonstrated gadolinium retention in patients' brains following intravenous administration. Since gadolinium is a highly toxic heavy metal, there is a potential for adverse effects from prolonged retention or deposition, particularly in children. For this reason, the Society (SPR) for Pediatric Radiology Quality and Safety committee conducted a survey to evaluate the current status of GBCAs usage among pediatric radiologists. To assess the usage of GBCAs among SPR members. An online 15-question survey was distributed to SPR members. Survey questions pertained to the type of GBCAs used, protocoling workflow, requirement of renal function or pregnancy tests, and various clinical indications for contrast-enhanced MRI examinations. A total of 163 survey responses were compiled (11.1% of survey invitations), the majority of these from academic institutions in the United States. Ninety-four percent reported that MR studies are always or usually protocoled by pediatric radiologists. The most common GBCA utilized by survey respondents were Eovist (60.7%), Ablavar (45.4%), Gadovist (38.7%), Magnevist (34.4%) and Dotarem (32.5%). For several clinical indications, survey responses regarding GBCA administration were concordant with American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria, including seizures, headache and osteomyelitis. For other indications, including growth hormone deficiency and suspected vascular ring, survey responses revealed potential overutilization of GBCAs when compared to ACR recommendations. Survey results demonstrate that GBCAs are administered judiciously in children, yet there is an opportunity to improve their utilization with the goal of reducing potential future adverse effects. (orig.)

  4. Survey of gadolinium-based contrast agent utilization among the members of the Society for Pediatric Radiology: a Quality and Safety Committee report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumfield, Einat [Jacobi Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, South Bronx, NY (United States); Moore, Michael M. [The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Penn State Hershey Children' s Hospital, Hershey, PA (United States); Drake, Mary K. [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Goodman, Thomas R. [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, New Haven, CT (United States); Lewis, Kristopher N. [Augusta University, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Georgia, Augusta, GA (United States); Meyer, Laura T. [Wake Radiology, Raleigh, NC (United States); Ngo, Thang D. [Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Orlando, FL (United States); Sammet, Christina [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Stanescu, Arta Luana; Iyer, Ramesh S. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Swenson, David W. [Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Providence, RI (United States); Slovis, Thomas L. [Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) have been used for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging over the last three decades. Recent reports demonstrated gadolinium retention in patients' brains following intravenous administration. Since gadolinium is a highly toxic heavy metal, there is a potential for adverse effects from prolonged retention or deposition, particularly in children. For this reason, the Society (SPR) for Pediatric Radiology Quality and Safety committee conducted a survey to evaluate the current status of GBCAs usage among pediatric radiologists. To assess the usage of GBCAs among SPR members. An online 15-question survey was distributed to SPR members. Survey questions pertained to the type of GBCAs used, protocoling workflow, requirement of renal function or pregnancy tests, and various clinical indications for contrast-enhanced MRI examinations. A total of 163 survey responses were compiled (11.1% of survey invitations), the majority of these from academic institutions in the United States. Ninety-four percent reported that MR studies are always or usually protocoled by pediatric radiologists. The most common GBCA utilized by survey respondents were Eovist (60.7%), Ablavar (45.4%), Gadovist (38.7%), Magnevist (34.4%) and Dotarem (32.5%). For several clinical indications, survey responses regarding GBCA administration were concordant with American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria, including seizures, headache and osteomyelitis. For other indications, including growth hormone deficiency and suspected vascular ring, survey responses revealed potential overutilization of GBCAs when compared to ACR recommendations. Survey results demonstrate that GBCAs are administered judiciously in children, yet there is an opportunity to improve their utilization with the goal of reducing potential future adverse effects. (orig.)

  5. Ultrasound guidance to perform intra-articular injection of gadolinium-based contrast material for magnetic resonance arthrography as an alternative to fluoroscopy: the time is now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Carmelo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Aliprandi, Alberto; Mauri, Giovanni; Secchi, Francesco; Sardanelli, Francesco; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been definitively established as the reference standard in the evaluation of joints in the body. Similarly, magnetic resonance arthrography has emerged as a technique that has been proven to increase significantly the diagnostic performance if compared with conventional MR imaging, especially when dealing with fibrocartilage and articular cartilage abnormalities. Diluted gadolinium can be injected in the joint space using different approaches: under palpation using anatomic landmarks or using an imaging guidance, such as fluoroscopy, computed tomography, or ultrasound. Fluoroscopy has been traditionally used, but the involvement of ionizing radiation should represent a remarkable limitation of this modality. Conversely, ultrasound has emerged as a feasible, cheap, quick, and radiation-free modality that can be used to inject joints, with comparable accuracy of fluoroscopy. In the present paper, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using fluoroscopy or ultrasound in injecting gadolinium-based contrast agents in joints to perform magnetic resonance arthrography, also in view of the new EuroSAFE Imaging initiative promoted by the European Society of Radiology and the recent updates to the European Atomic Energy Community 2013/59 directive on the medical use of ionizing radiation. • Intra-articular contrast agent injection can be performed using different imaging modalities • Fluoroscopy is widely used, but uses ionizing radiation • Ultrasound is an accurate, quick, and radiation-free modality for joint injection • X-rays should be avoided when other radiation-free modalities can be used.

  6. Equilibrium-phase MR angiography: Comparison of unspecific extracellular and protein-binding gadolinium-based contrast media with respect to image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb-Eigner, Katharina; Taupitz, Matthias; Asbach, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare contrast and image quality of whole-body equilibrium-phase high-spatial-resolution MR angiography using a non-protein-binding unspecific extracellular gadolinium-based contrast medium with that of two contrast media with different protein-binding properties. 45 patients were examined using either 15 mL of gadobutrol (non-protein-binding, n = 15), 32 mL of gadobenate dimeglumine (weakly protein binding, n = 15) or 11 mL gadofosveset trisodium (protein binding, n = 15) followed by equilibrium-phase high-spatial-resolution MR-angiography of four consecutive anatomic regions. The time elapsed between the contrast injection and the beginning of the equilibrium-phase image acquisition in the respective region was measured and was up to 21 min. Signal intensity was measured in two vessels per region and in muscle tissue. Relative contrast (RC) values were calculated. Vessel contrast, artifacts and image quality were rated by two radiologists in consensus on a five-point scale. Compared with gadobutrol, gadofosveset trisodium revealed significantly higher RC values only when acquired later than 15 min after bolus injection. Otherwise, no significant differences between the three contrast media were found regarding vascular contrast and image quality. Equilibrium-phase high-spatial-resolution MR-angiography using a weakly protein-binding or even non-protein-binding contrast medium is equivalent to using a stronger protein-binding contrast medium when image acquisition is within the first 15 min after contrast injection, and allows depiction of the vasculature with high contrast and image quality. The protein-binding contrast medium was superior for imaging only later than 15 min after contrast medium injection. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Ultrasound guidance to perform intra-articular injection of gadolinium-based contrast material for magnetic resonance arthrography as an alternative to fluoroscopy: the time is now

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messina, Carmelo [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Milano (Italy); Banfi, Giuseppe [IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milano (Italy); Universita Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milano (Italy); Aliprandi, Alberto [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Milano (Italy); Mauri, Giovanni [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Milano (Italy); Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Unita di Radiologia Interventistica, Milano (Italy); Secchi, Francesco; Sardanelli, Francesco; Sconfienza, Luca Maria [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Milano (Italy); IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Servizio di Radiologia, San Donato, Milanese (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been definitively established as the reference standard in the evaluation of joints in the body. Similarly, magnetic resonance arthrography has emerged as a technique that has been proven to increase significantly the diagnostic performance if compared with conventional MR imaging, especially when dealing with fibrocartilage and articular cartilage abnormalities. Diluted gadolinium can be injected in the joint space using different approaches: under palpation using anatomic landmarks or using an imaging guidance, such as fluoroscopy, computed tomography, or ultrasound. Fluoroscopy has been traditionally used, but the involvement of ionizing radiation should represent a remarkable limitation of this modality. Conversely, ultrasound has emerged as a feasible, cheap, quick, and radiation-free modality that can be used to inject joints, with comparable accuracy of fluoroscopy. In the present paper, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using fluoroscopy or ultrasound in injecting gadolinium-based contrast agents in joints to perform magnetic resonance arthrography, also in view of the new EuroSAFE Imaging initiative promoted by the European Society of Radiology and the recent updates to the European Atomic Energy Community 2013/59 directive on the medical use of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  8. Ultrasound guidance to perform intra-articular injection of gadolinium-based contrast material for magnetic resonance arthrography as an alternative to fluoroscopy: the time is now

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messina, Carmelo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Aliprandi, Alberto; Mauri, Giovanni; Secchi, Francesco; Sardanelli, Francesco; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been definitively established as the reference standard in the evaluation of joints in the body. Similarly, magnetic resonance arthrography has emerged as a technique that has been proven to increase significantly the diagnostic performance if compared with conventional MR imaging, especially when dealing with fibrocartilage and articular cartilage abnormalities. Diluted gadolinium can be injected in the joint space using different approaches: under palpation using anatomic landmarks or using an imaging guidance, such as fluoroscopy, computed tomography, or ultrasound. Fluoroscopy has been traditionally used, but the involvement of ionizing radiation should represent a remarkable limitation of this modality. Conversely, ultrasound has emerged as a feasible, cheap, quick, and radiation-free modality that can be used to inject joints, with comparable accuracy of fluoroscopy. In the present paper, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using fluoroscopy or ultrasound in injecting gadolinium-based contrast agents in joints to perform magnetic resonance arthrography, also in view of the new EuroSAFE Imaging initiative promoted by the European Society of Radiology and the recent updates to the European Atomic Energy Community 2013/59 directive on the medical use of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of half-dose and full-dose gadolinium MR contrast on the enhancement of bone and soft tissue tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costelloe, Colleen M. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Murphy, William A.; Haygood, Tamara M.; Kumar, Rajendra; McEnery, Kevin W.; Madewell, John E. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Houston, Texas (United States); Stafford, R.J. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Imaging Physics, Houston, Texas (United States); Roy, Anjali [Cancer Treatment Centers of America Medical Diagnostic Imaging Group, Arizona (United States); Bassett, Roland L.; Harrell, Robyn K. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Biostatistics, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2011-03-15

    To evaluate the effect of half-dose intravenous gadolinium contrast on the enhancement of bone and soft tissue tumors. This study is HIPAA compliant and informed consent was waived by the institutional review board. An institutional database search was performed over a 1-year period for patients with full- and half-dose MR examinations performed for musculoskeletal oncologic indications. Examination pairs that were identical with regard to field strength and presence or absence of fat saturation were included, resulting in 29 paired examinations. When multiple, the lesion that was best delineated and enhanced well on the first examination in the pair was chosen, yielding 17 bone and 12 soft tissue. Five musculoskeletal radiologists blinded to dosages were asked to assess for a difference in enhancement when comparing the lesion on both examinations and to rate the degree of difference on a three-point scale. They were also asked to identify the examination on which the lesion enhanced less (tallied as low dose). Results were analyzed with the exact binomial test. The readers perceived an enhancement difference in 41% (59/145) of studies (p = 0.03) and the majority were rated as ''mild'' (66%, 39/59). The readers did not accurately identify the low-dose examinations (54% correctly identified, 32/59, p = 0.60). Half-dose gadolinium enhancement of lesions could not be accurately distinguished from full-dose enhancement upon review of the same lesion imaged at both concentrations. (orig.)

  10. Adenosine Stress and Rest T1 Mapping Can Differentiate Between Ischemic, Infarcted, Remote, and Normal Myocardium Without the Need for Gadolinium Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Alexander; Wijesurendra, Rohan S; Francis, Jane M; Robson, Matthew D; Neubauer, Stefan; Piechnik, Stefan K; Ferreira, Vanessa M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of T1 mapping at rest and during adenosine stress as a novel method for ischemia detection without the use of gadolinium contrast. In chronic coronary artery disease (CAD), accurate detection of ischemia is important because targeted revascularization improves clinical outcomes. Myocardial blood volume (MBV) may be a more comprehensive marker of ischemia than myocardial blood flow. T1 mapping using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is highly sensitive to changes in myocardial water content, including MBV. We propose that T1 mapping at rest and during adenosine vasodilatory stress can detect MBV changes in normal and diseased myocardium in CAD. Twenty normal controls (10 at 1.5-T; 10 at 3.0-T) and 10 CAD patients (1.5-T) underwent conventional CMR to assess for left ventricular function (cine), infarction (late gadolinium enhancement [LGE]) and ischemia (myocardial perfusion reserve index [MPRI] on first-pass perfusion imaging during adenosine stress). These were compared to novel pre-contrast stress/rest T1 mapping using the Shortened Modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery technique, which is heart rate independent. T1 values were derived for normal myocardium in controls and for infarcted, ischemic, and remote myocardium in CAD patients. Normal myocardium in controls (normal wall motion, MPRI, no LGE) showed normal resting T1 (954 ± 19 ms at 1.5-T; 1,189 ± 34 ms at 3.0-T) and significant positive T1 reactivity during adenosine stress compared to baseline (6.2 ± 0.5% at 1.5-T; 6.3 ± 1.1% at 3.0-T; all p Ischemic myocardium showed elevated resting T1 compared to normal (987 ± 17 ms; p stress can differentiate between normal, infarcted, ischemic, and remote myocardium with distinctive T1 profiles. Stress/rest T1 mapping holds promise for ischemia detection without the need for gadolinium contrast. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The T2-Shortening Effect of Gadolinium and the Optimal Conditions for Maximizing the CNR for Evaluating the Biliary System: a Phantom Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Mi Jung; Kim, Myung Joon [Severance Children' s Hospital, Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Choon Sik [Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Si Young [Severance Hospital, Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyung Soo [Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Sun [Seoul Nationa University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    Clear depiction of the common bile duct is important when evaluating neonatal cholestasis in order to differentiate biliary atresia from other diseases. During MR cholangiopancreatography, the T2-shortening effect of gadolinium can increase the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the bile duct and enhance its depiction. The purpose of this study was to confirm, by performing a phantom study, the T2-shortening effect of gadolinium, to evaluate the effect of different gadolinium chelates with different gadolinium concentrations and different magnetic field strengths for investigating the optimal combination of these conditions, and for identifying the maximum CNR for the evaluation of the biliary system. MR imaging using a T2-weighted single-shot fast spin echo sequence and T2 relaxometry was performed with a sponge phantom in a syringe tube. Two kinds of contrast agents (Gd-DTPA and Gd-EOB-DTPA) with different gadolinium concentrations were evaluated with 1.5T and 3T scanners. The signal intensities, the CNRs and the T2 relaxation time were analyzed. The signal intensities significantly decreased as the gadolinium concentrations increased (p < 0.001) with both contrast agents. These signal intensities were higher on a 3T (p < 0.001) scanner. The CNRs were higher on a 1.5T (p < 0.001) scanner and they showed no significant change with different gadolinium concentrations. The T2 relaxation time also showed a negative correlation with the gadolinium concentrations (p < 0.001) and the CNRs showed decrease more with Gd-EOB-DTPA (versus Gd-DTPA; p < 0.001) on a 3T scanner (versus 1.5T; p < 0.001). A T2-shortening effect of gadolinium exhibits a negative correlation with the gadolinium concentration for both the signal intensities and the T2 relaxation time. A higher CNR can be obtained with Gd-DTPA on a 1.5T MRI scanner.

  12. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of gadolinium cationic lipids as tools for biodistribution studies of gene delivery complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Francoise; Cohen-Ohana, Mirit; Mignet, Nathalie; Sbarbati, Andrea; Herscovici, Jean; Scherman, Daniel; Byk, Gerardo

    2003-01-01

    Gadolinium-chelating cationic lipids have been synthesized to obtain lipoplexes with MRI contrast properties. These compounds were designed to follow the biodistribution of synthetic DNA for gene delivery by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. The lipid MCO-I-68 was synthesized, and chelate complexes with gadolinium were formed and characterized in terms of physicochemical and DNA binding properties. The transfection activity of MCO-I-68-Gd/DNA complexes was assayed in vitro on NIH 3T3. Different formulations of the product were tested. When up to 5% of the gadolinium lipid complexes were co-formulated with the cationic lipid RPR120535 used as a reference, the transfection levels were maintained as compared to RPR120535 alone. To date, only a liposomal formulation of a gadolinium-cationic lipid chelate without DNA had been observed using magnetic resonance imaging. In vivo intratumoral administration of MCO-I-68-Gd/DNA lipoplexes to tumor model led to an important increase of the NMR signal. It was demonstrated that the new complexes also acted as transfection carriers when they were formulated from liposomes.

  13. Does the application of gadolinium-DTPA have an impact on magnetic resonance phase contrast velocity measurements? Results from an in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heverhagen, J.T.; Hoppe, M.; Klose, K.-J.; Wagner, H.-J.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction/objective: To evaluate the potential influence of various concentrations of gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA on magnetic resonance phase contrast (MR PC) velocimetry. Material and methods: Imaging was done with a 1.0 T scanner using a standard Flash 2D sequence and a circular polarized extremity coil. In a validated flow phantom with a defined 75% area stenosis different concentrations of Gd-DTPA, diluted in a 10:1 water-yogurt mixture, MR PC measurements were correlated with a Doppler guide wire as gold standard. Results: MR PC measurements correlated well with the Doppler derived data (r=0.99; P 0.05; Student's t-test) flow measurement changes were noted (maximum pre-stenotic velocity: 21.3±1.3 cm/s; maximum intra-stenotic velocity: 84.0±3.6 cm/s). However, delineation of the perfused lumen was enhanced after the application of Gd-DTPA. Discussions and conclusion: The application of Gd-DTPA does not affect MR PC velocimetry. However, the application of contrast media allowed a more accurate vessel segmentation. MR PC measurements can be reliably carried out after application of Gd-DTPA

  14. Visualization of endolymphatic hydrops in meniere's disease after single-dose intravenous gadolinium-based contrast medium. Timing of optimal enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Kawai, Hisashi; Bokura, Kiminori; Sone, Michihiko; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Visualization of endolymphatic hydrops (EH) in patients with Meniere's disease (MD) is now possible by heavily T 2 -weighted 3-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (h T 2 W-3D-FLAIR) obtained 4 hours after intravenous (IV) administration of single dose gadolinium-based contrast medium (GBCM). Although maximum enhancement has been reported 4 hours after contrast administration in healthy volunteers, the timing of optimal enhancement in patients with MD is not reported. We investigated if that optimal timing is earlier or later than 4 hours. We evaluated 10 consecutive patients with suspected MD whom we randomly divided into 2 groups. We obtained h T 2 W-3D-FLAIR before GBCM administration and 10 min, 3.5 hours, and 4 hours after GBCM administration in Group A and before and 10 min, 4 hours, and 4.5 hours after GBCM administration in Group B. We compared signal intensity ratio (SIR) values of the perilymph and pons between 3.5 and 4 hours in Group A and between 4 and 4.5 hours in Group B and evaluated grades of EH at 3.5 and 4 hours in Group A and at 4 and 4.5 hours in Group B. SIR values did not differ significantly between 3.5 and 4 hours in Group A and between 4 and 4.5 hours in Group B. However, SIR values at 4 hours were significantly higher in Group A than Group B. Grades of EH agreed between 3.5 and 4 hours in Group A and between 4 and 4.5 hours in Group B. The optimal timing of contrast enhancement in patients with suspected MD remains unclear, but evaluation of EH may be possible from 3.5 to 4.5 hours after contrast administration. (author)

  15. Iron Chelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Menu Donate Treatments Therapies Iron Chelation Iron chelation therapy is the main treatment ... have iron overload and need treatment. What is iron overload? Iron chelation therapy is used when you ...

  16. Gadolinium released from MR contrast agents is deposited in brain tumors: in situ demonstration using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Daniel; Davis, Richard L.; Crawford, Judith A.; Abraham, Jerrold L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Gadolinium (Gd)-containing MRI contrast agents (GdCA) are widely used in studies of brain tumors, and a number of reports suggest that under certain conditions, such as renal failure, Gd may be released from GdCA into patient's tissues. Whether this may happen in abnormal tissues in the absence of renal failure has not been studied. Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the local retention of GdCA resulting from brain tumor-associated alterations in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may result in the deposition of Gd released from the GdCA, depending on stability. Material and Methods: In this retrospective study, 30 selected brain tumor biopsies from 28 patients (taken before and after an institutional switch from a less stable to an intermediate stable GdCA) were searched for Gd-containing deposits using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). Relevant histories and laboratory results were obtained through institutional electronic records. Associations between the presence of deposits and other variables were tested for statistical significance using the two-tailed Fisher's exact test. Results: Insoluble deposits containing Gd associated with phosphorus and calcium were found in seven biopsies from five patients. These deposits were found in patients with estimated GFRs above 53 ml/min, and were detected more often in those receiving GdCA before the switch from a less stable to an intermediate stable GdCA (P = 0.04), and may be more frequent in patients receiving more than one contrast-enhanced MR scan (P = 0.15). Conclusion: Gd-containing deposits are present in brain tumors following contrast-enhanced MR scans in patients without severe renal disease. Further studies are needed to assess the clinical importance of the deposits we observed and to determine whether they are also found in other conditions that alter the integrity of the BBB

  17. The utility of gadoteric acid in contrast-enhanced MRI: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tartaro A

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Armando Tartaro, Marica Tina Maccarone Department of Neuroscience, Imaging and Clinical Sciences, and Institute for Advanced Biomedical Technologies (ITAB, “G d’Annunzio” University, Chieti-Pescara, Italy Abstract: Gadoteric acid (Dotarem® is a macrocyclic, paramagnetic, gadolinium-based contrast agent. It is used in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain, spine, and associated tissues. Particularly, it is able to detect and visualize areas with disruption of the blood–brain barrier and/or abnormal vascularity. Gadoteric acid has been also approved for MR angiography of supraaortic vessels, cardiac MR (to detect myocardial infarctions, as well as whole-body MRI including abdominal, renal, pelvic, breast, and osteoarticular diseases. Cyclic chelates are more stable compared to linear chelates, and ionic chelates are more stable compared to nonionic chelates. Linear chelates have a greater likelihood of releasing free Gd3+ compared to cyclic chelates. Non-ionic chelates are more likely, compared to ionic chelates, to release Gd3+ from their chelates. Gadoteric acid is a cyclic ionic chelate and has the greatest kinetic stability among gadolinium-based contrast agents. In patients with chronic reduced kidney function, the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents leads to acute kidney injury and dialysis. The risk of acute kidney injury may increase with increasing dose of the contrast agents. Therefore, it is recommended to administer the lowest dose necessary for adequate imaging. The dose reduction allows protection the patients form potential risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, a systemic reaction that is probably due to unbound Gd3+ ions deposited in body tissues. The dose of gadoteric acid should not exceed 0.1 mmol/kg body weight. More than one dose should not be used during a scan. Because of the lack of information on repeated administration, Dotarem® injections should not be repeated unless the interval between

  18. Is the transport of a gadolinium-based contrast agent decreased in a degenerated or aged disc? A post contrast MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Tibiletti

    Full Text Available A post contrast magnetic resonance imaging study has been performed in a wide population of low back pain patients to investigate which radiological and phenotypic characteristics influence the penetration of the contrast agent in lumbar discs in vivo. 37 patients affected by different pathologies (disc herniation, spondylolisthesis, foraminal stenosis, central canal stenosis were enrolled in the study. The selected population included 26 male and 11 female subjects, with a mean age of 42.4 ± 9.3 years (range 18-60. Magnetic resonance images of the lumbar spine were obtained with a 1.5 T scanner (Avanto, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany with a phased-array back coil. A paramagnetic non-ionic contrast agent was injected with a dose of 0.4 ml/kg. T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were subsequently acquired at 5 time points, 5 and 10 minutes, 2, 4 and 6 hours after injection. Endplates presented clear enhancement already 5 minutes after injection, and showed an increase in the next 2 hours followed by a decrease. At 5 and 10 minutes, virtually no contrast medium was present inside the intervertebral disc; afterwards, enhancement significantly increased. Highly degenerated discs showed higher enhancement in comparison with low and medium degenerated discs. Discs classified as Pfirrmann 5 showed a statistically significant higher enhancement than Pfirrmann 1, 2 and 3 at all time points but the first one, possibly due to vascularization. Disc height collapse and Modic changes significantly increased enhancement. Presence of endplate defects did not show any significant influence on post contrast enhancement, but the lack of a clear classification of endplate defects as seen on magnetic resonance scans may be shadowing some effects. In conclusion, disc height, high level of degeneration and presence of Modic changes are factors which increase post contrast enhancement in the intervertebral disc. The effect of age could not be demonstrated.

  19. Appearance of high signal intensity and gadolinium-DTPA contrast enhancement in hypertrophied myocardium by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Yamada, Naoaki; Nagata, Seiki (National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the potential role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluating myocardial tissue characterization in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). ECG-gated MRI images were acquired in 32 HCM patients and 30 patients with hypertensive heart disease (HHD), using a 1.5 T superconducting magnet system. The thickened areas were depicted as high signal intensities in the septum of 12 HCM patients (38%) and the endocardium of 5 HHD patients (17%). Echocardiography revealed that MRI appearance of high signal intensity was associated with more thickened myocardial wall. For evaluable 16 patients receiving i.v. injection of Gd-DTPA in a dose of 0.1 mM/kg, enhancement effects were observed in 10 patients (63%). High signal intensity appearing in the hypertrophied myocardium, as well as contrast enhancement, may not be characteristic of HCM, but reflect the likelihood of myocardial degeneration associated with the hypertrophied myocardium. Although MRI may not be capable of differentiating tissue characterization in HCM from that in HHD, it may provide different information about tissue characterization in the hypertrophied myocardium from that obtained by other techniques. (N.K.).

  20. The Choice of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents: A Radiologist’s Responsibility between Pharmaceutical Equivalence and Bioethical Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Cartocci

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Contrast Agents (CA are among the most commonly prescribed drugs worldwide, and are used, with a variety of techniques, to increase and intensify the differences between body tissues and to help radiologist make diagnoses in a fast and precise way. In recent decades, advancements in research have resulted in significant improvements in their composition, and have made them safer and better-tolerated by patients; this notwithstanding, although the currently available CA are generally considered to be safe, their use is not completely without risk. The use of CA faces the radiologist with economic considerations, bioethical dilemmas, and possible profiles of professional responsibility. In fact, to achieve the best results in diagnostic imaging, radiologists have to focus on making an appropriate choice of CA, in consideration of efficacy, safety and appropriateness. Moreover, besides by cost/benefit models widely introduced in health management, radiologists are also influenced by their responsibility of appropriate use for the various diagnostic tests and, finally, the choice of best CA to utilise for each individual patient. Thus, the dilemma of choosing between the best and the most cost-effective tests and procedures is occurring more frequently every day. Different variables, such as the patient, examinations, and technology available, can affect the choice of CA in terms of obtaining the highest diagnostic quality, minimum impact on higher-risk patients, and optimisation of used volumes and injection flows.

  1. MR imaging in recurrent pain after back surgery. A comparative study using standard and high doses of gadolinium contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakeson, P.; Jonsson, E.; Holtaas, S.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic results following injection of (a) a high dose (0.3 mmol/kg b.w.) of gadodiamide injection and (b) the standard dose (0.1 mmol/kg b.w.) of Gd-DTPA, in patients with recurrent symptoms after surgery for lumbar disc herniation. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with recurrent or sustained symptoms after surgery for lumbar disc herniations were examined. MR imaging (0.3 T) was first performed before and after Gd-DTPA at 0.1 mmol/kg b.w., and then within one month (17 patients) or within 3 months (3 patients) before and after gadodiamide injection at 0.3 mmol/kg b.w. The examinations were first evaluated by 2 neuroradiologists blinded to dose but not to patient as the images were presented in pairs. Six months later the same investigators evaluated the examinations again, this time blinded to both dose and patient. Results: At the evaluation in pairs (with the investigators blinded to dose only) the high-dose examinations were considered the most informative (p=0.05). However, at the later evaluation (with the investigators blinded both to dose and patient) no significant difference between high and standard dose was found regarding diagnosis or diagnostic certainty. Conclusion: In this study the high-dose contrast enhancement of MR imaging at 0.3 T did not increase the diagnostic information for differentiating between scar and recurrent hernia. The high-dose images were considered more informative when evaluated in pairs, but gave no additional or different information when evaluated separately. The study also indicated that comparisons in pairs should be interpreted with caution. (orig.)

  2. MR imaging in recurrent pain after back surgery. A comparative study using standard and high doses of gadolinium contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakeson, P. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Radiology; Annertz, M. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Radiology; Kristoffersen, D.T. [Nycomed Imaging AS, Oslo (Norway); Jonsson, E. [Nycomed AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Holtaas, S. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-11-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic results following injection of (a) a high dose (0.3 mmol/kg b.w.) of gadodiamide injection and (b) the standard dose (0.1 mmol/kg b.w.) of Gd-DTPA, in patients with recurrent symptoms after surgery for lumbar disc herniation. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with recurrent or sustained symptoms after surgery for lumbar disc herniations were examined. MR imaging (0.3 T) was first performed before and after Gd-DTPA at 0.1 mmol/kg b.w., and then within one month (17 patients) or within 3 months (3 patients) before and after gadodiamide injection at 0.3 mmol/kg b.w. The examinations were first evaluated by 2 neuroradiologists blinded to dose but not to patient as the images were presented in pairs. Six months later the same investigators evaluated the examinations again, this time blinded to both dose and patient. Results: At the evaluation in pairs (with the investigators blinded to dose only) the high-dose examinations were considered the most informative (p=0.05). However, at the later evaluation (with the investigators blinded both to dose and patient) no significant difference between high and standard dose was found regarding diagnosis or diagnostic certainty. Conclusion: In this study the high-dose contrast enhancement of MR imaging at 0.3 T did not increase the diagnostic information for differentiating between scar and recurrent hernia. The high-dose images were considered more informative when evaluated in pairs, but gave no additional or different information when evaluated separately. The study also indicated that comparisons in pairs should be interpreted with caution. (orig.).

  3. Development of a conjugated gadolinium and cisplatin-gelatin possessing properties as an intravascular contrast agent for MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoda, Akinaga [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)], E-mail: akinagasonoda@yahoo.co.jp; Nitta, Norihisa [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)], E-mail: r34nitta@yahoo.co.jp; Ohta, Shinichi [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)], E-mail: junryuhei@belle.shiga-med.ac.jp; Seko, Ayumi [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)], E-mail: sekoayumi@yahoo.co.jp; Jo, Jun-ichiro [Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawara-cho Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: jo@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Morikawa, Shigehiro [Biomedical MR Science Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)], E-mail: morikawa@belle.shiga-med.ac.jp; Tabata, Yasuhiko [Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawara-cho Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: yasuhiko@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Takahashi, Masashi [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)], E-mail: masashi@belle.shiga-med.ac.jp; Murata, Kiyoshi [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)], E-mail: murata@belle.shiga-med.ac.jp

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to create a Gd-DTPA-Gel-Cis compound, which made from gadolinum (Gd), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-dianhydride, cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (Cis) and bovine gelatin (Gel), that makes it possible to visualize Cis as intravascular agent under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: The amount of DTPA, Gd, and Cis were titrated to determine the new compound's conjugation ratio with gelatin. Considering these functions, Gd-DTPA-Gel-Cis was synthesized, and its stability in bovine serum was evaluated. In addition, the signal intensity of the diluted sample was measured under 1.5 Tesla MRI. Results: The synthesized 10 mg/ml of Gd-DTPA-Gel-Cis contained 42.84 {mu}g/ml of Gd and 1.53 {mu}g/ml of platinum. Gd-DTPA-Gel-Cis (100 mg/10 ml) enclosed into the cellulose dialysis tubing was placed in 90 ml of bovine serum and shaken reciprocally at 72 stroke/min at 37 deg. C. Partial release of free Pt was shown at 6 and 24 h, but no release of Gd occurred for a 24-h period. And high stability of Gd conjugated to DTPA-Gel-Cis. This result suggests possible anti-tumor effectiveness and high stability of Gd conjugated to DTPA-Gel-Cis. The diluted sample presented high signal intensity under 1.5 Tesla MRI. Conclusion: Gd-DTPA-Gel-Cis has been developed successfully and we have proven its stability and contrast ability in MRI.

  4. Prevalence of NSF following intravenous gadolinium-contrast media administration in dialysis patients with endstage renal disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz-Peer, Gertraud, E-mail: gertraud.heinz@meduniwien.ac.a [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Neruda, Anita [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Watschinger, Bruno; Vychytil, Andreas [Department of Nephrology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Geusau, Alexandra [Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Haumer, Markus [Department of Internal Medicine II, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Weber, Michael [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in a patient population being at highest risk for developing this disease and to evaluate possible risk factors. Materials and methods: The radiological records of 552 patients with ESRD being on hemodialysis (HD) or peritoneal dialysis (PD) were retrospectively reviewed to identify whether the patients underwent MR-examinations with or without intravenous administration of GBCA. In case of exposure to GBCA, the number of contrast injections, the benchmark and the cumulative doses of GBCA, and possible cofactors regarding pathogenesis of NSF were recorded. Diagnosis of NSF was confirmed either by deep skin biopsy or by review of medical and histopathological records. Data of NSF patients were compared with data of dialysis patients who did not develop NSF after MR-examinations. Results: 146 dialysis patients underwent MRI without i.v.-administration of GBCA. No case of NSF was observed in this patient population. 195/552 patients proved to have a total number of 325 well-documented exposures to GBCA. Seven different types of GBCA were used during these MR-examinations. NSF prevalence rate was 1.6%. One patient died of NSF. Three different types of GBCA were involved in 6 NSF cases. 4/6 proved to be confounded cases. The cumulative dose of GBCA, history of thrombosis, recent surgery, and the combination of HD and PD proved to be significant cofactors for the development of NSF (p < .05). No significant difference regarding residual renal clearance (p = .898) and residual urine volume (p = .083) was found between NSF and non-NSF patients. Conclusion: The prevalence of NSF proved to be much lower in this high risk patient group being exposed to GBCA compared to the literature. NSF was not observed in ESRD patients undergoing MRI without administration of GBCA. Our data support a positive association between cumulative dose of GBCA and development of NSF. No positive association was found

  5. Tissue-specific MR contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinmann, Hanns-Joachim E-mail: hannsjoachim.weinmann@schering.de; Ebert, Wolfgang; Misselwitz, Bernd; Schmitt-Willich, Heribert

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to outline recent trends in contrast agent development for magnetic resonance imaging. Up to now, small molecular weight gadolinium chelates are the workhorse in contrast enhanced MRI. These first generation MR contrast agents distribute into the intravascular and interstitial space, thus allowing the evaluation of physiological parameters, such as the status or existence of the blood-brain-barrier or the renal function. Shortly after the first clinical use of paramagnetic metallochelates in 1983, compounds were suggested for liver imaging and enhancing a cardiac infarct. Meanwhile, liver specific contrast agents based on gadolinium, manganese or iron become reality. Dedicated blood pool agents will be available within the next years. These gadolinium or iron agents will be beneficial for longer lasting MRA procedures, such as cardiac imaging. Contrast enhanced lymphography after interstitial or intravenous injection will be another major step forward in diagnostic imaging. Metastatic involvement will be seen either after the injection of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides or dedicated gadolinium chelates. The accumulation of both compound classes is triggered by an uptake into macrophages. It is likely that similar agents will augment MRI of atheriosclerotic plaques, a systemic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. Thrombus-specific agents based on small gadolinium labeled peptides are on the horizon. It is very obvious that the future of cardiovascular MRI will benefit from the development of new paramagnetic and superparamagnetic substances. The expectations for new tumor-, pathology- or receptor-specific agents are high. However, is not likely that such a compound will be available for daily routine MRI within the next decade.

  6. Usefulness of combining gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasound for diagnosing the macroscopic classification of small hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Tomoki; Aikata, Hiroshi; Hatooka, Masahiro; Morio, Kei; Morio, Reona; Kan, Hiromi; Fujino, Hatsue; Fukuhara, Takayuki; Masaki, Keiichi; Ohno, Atsushi; Naeshiro, Noriaki; Nakahara, Takashi; Honda, Yohji; Murakami, Eisuke; Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Tsuge, Masataka; Hiramatsu, Akira; Imamura, Michio; Kawakami, Yoshiiku; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Shoichi [Hiroshima University Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Hiroshima (Japan); Chayama, Kazuaki [Hiroshima University Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiroshima University, Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Non-simple nodules in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) correlate with poor prognosis. Therefore, we examined the diagnostic ability of gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI) and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) for diagnosing the macroscopic classification of small HCCs. A total of 85 surgically resected nodules (≤30 mm) were analyzed. HCCs were pathologically classified as simple nodular (SN) and non-SN. By evaluating hepatobiliary phase (HBP) of EOB-MRI and Kupffer phase of CEUS, the diagnostic abilities of both modalities to correctly distinguish between SN and non-SN were compared. Forty-six nodules were diagnosed as SN and the remaining 39 nodules as non-SN. The area under the ROC curve (AUROCs, 95 % confidence interval) for the diagnosis of non-SN were EOB-MRI, 0.786 (0.682-0.890): CEUS, 0.784 (0.679-0.889), in combination, 0.876 (0.792-0.959). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 64.1 %, 95.7 %, and 81.2 % in EOB-MRI, 56.4 %, 97.8 %, and 78.8 % in CEUS, and 84.6 %, 95.7 %, and 90.6 % in combination, respectively. High diagnostic ability was obtained when diagnosed in both modalities combined. The sensitivity was especially statistically significant compared to CEUS. Combined diagnosis by EOB-MRI and CEUS can provide high-quality imaging assessment for determining non-SN in small HCCs. (orig.)

  7. Effects of gadolinium-based contrast agents on thyroid hormone receptor action and thyroid hormone-induced cerebellar Purkinje cell morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Koibuchi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gadolinium (Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs are used in diagnostic imaging to enhance the quality of magnetic resonance imaging or angiography. After intravenous injection, GBCAs can accumulate in the brain. Thyroid hormones (THs are critical to the development and functional maintenance of the central nervous system. TH actions in brain are mainly exerted through nuclear TH receptors (TRs. We examined the effects of GBCAs on TR-mediated transcription in CV-1 cells using transient transfection-based reporter assay and thyroid hormone-mediated cerebellar Purkinje cell morphogenesis in primary culture. We also measured the cellular accumulation and viability of Gd after representative GBCA treatments in cultured CV-1 cells. Both linear (Gd-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid-bis methyl acid, Gd-DTPA-BMA and macrocyclic (Gd-tetraazacyclododecane tetraacetic acid, Gd-DOTA GBCAs were accumulated without inducing cell death in CV-1 cells. In contrast, Gd chloride (GdCl3 treatment induced approximately 100 times higher Gd accumulation and significantly reduced the number of cells. Low doses of Gd-DTPA-BMA (10−8–10−6 M augmented TR-mediated transcription, but the transcription was suppressed at higher dose (10−5 – 10−4 M, with decreased β-galactosidase activity indicating cellular toxicity. TR-mediated transcription was not altered by Gd-DOTA or GdCl3, but the latter induced a significant reduction in β-galactosidase activity at high doses, indicating cellular toxicity. In cerebellar cultures, the dendrite arborization of Purkinje cells induced by 10-9 M T4 was augmented by low-dose Gd-DTPA-BMA (10−7 M but was suppressed by higher dose (10−5 M. Such augmentation by low-dose Gd-DTPA-BMA was not observed with 10-9 M T3, probably because of the greater dendrite arborization by T3; however, the arborization by T3 was suppressed by a higher dose of Gd-DTPA-BMA (10-5 M as seen in T4 treatment. The effect of Gd-DOTA on dendrite arborization

  8. Signal Increase on Unenhanced T1-Weighted Images in the Rat Brain After Repeated, Extended Doses of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents: Comparison of Linear and Macrocyclic Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Gregor; Lenhard, Diana Constanze; Sieber, Martin Andrew; Lohrke, Jessica; Frenzel, Thomas; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2016-02-01

    In this prospective preclinical study, we evaluated T1-weighted signal intensity in the deep cerebellar nuclei (CN) and globus pallidus (GP) up to 24 days after repeated administration of linear and macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) using homologous imaging and evaluation methods as in the recently published retrospective clinical studies. In a second part of the study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces were evaluated for contrast enhancement by fluid-attenuated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sixty adult male Wistar-Han rats were randomly divided into a control and 5 GBCA groups (n = 10 per group). The administered GBCAs were gadodiamide, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadobenate dimeglumine (linear GBCAs) as well as gadobutrol and gadoterate meglumine (macrocyclic GBCAs) and saline (control). Over a period of 2 weeks, the animals received 10 intravenous injections at a dose of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg body weight, each on 5 consecutive days per week. Before GBCA administration, as well as 3 and 24 days after the last injection, a whole-brain MRI was performed using a standard T1-weighted 3-dimensional turbo spin echo sequence on a clinical 1.5 T scanner. The ratios of signal intensities in deep CN to pons (CN/Po) and GP to thalamus (GP/Th) were determined. For the evaluation of the CSF spaces, 18 additional rats were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 3 per group) that received the same GBCAs as in the first part of the study. After MR cisternography for anatomical reference, a fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence was performed before and 1 minute after intravenous injection of a dose of 1 mmol Gd/kg body weight GBCA or saline. A significantly increased signal intensity ratio of CN/Po was observed 3 and 24 days after the last injection of gadodiamide and gadobenate dimeglumine. No significant changes were observed between the 2 time points. Gadopentetate dimeglumine injection led to a moderately elevated but statistically not significant CN

  9. Nanoparticles of gadolinium-incorporated Prussian blue with PEG coating as an effective oral MRI contrast agent for gastrointestinal tract imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Vindya S; Chen, Guojun; Cai, Qing; Huang, Songping D

    2016-03-21

    Biocompatible nanoparticles of gadolinium-incorporated Prussian blue with the empirical formula K(0.94)Gd(0.02)Fe[Fe(CN)6] exhibit extremely high stability against the release of Gd(3+) and CN(-) ions under the acidic conditions similar to stomach juice. The high r1 relaxivity, low cytotoxicity and the ability of such nanoparticles to penetrate the cell membrane suggest that this coordination-polymer structural platform offers a unique opportunity for developing the next generation of T1-weighted oral cellular MRI probes for the early detection of tumors in the gastrointestinal tract.

  10. Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akine, Yasuyuki; Tokita, Nobuhiko; Tokuuye, Koichi; Satoh, Michinao; Churei, Hisahiko

    1993-01-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy makes use of photons and electrons produced by nuclear reactions between gadolinium and lower-energy neutrons which occur within the tumor. The results of our studies have shown that its radiation effect is mostly of low LET and that the electrons are the significant component in the over-all dose. The dose from gadolinium neutron capture reactions does not seem to increase in proportion to the gadolinium concentration, and the Gd-157 concentration of about 100 μg/ml appears most optimal for therapy. Close contact between gadolinium and the cell is not necessarily required for cell inactivation, however, the effect of electrons released from intracellular gadolinium may be significant. Experimental studies on tumor-bearing mice and rabbits have shown that this is a very promising modality though further improvements in gadolinium delivery to tumors are needed. (author)

  11. Study on the uptake and distribution of gadolinium based contrast agents in biological samples using laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy; Untersuchungen zur Aufnahme und Verteilung von gadoliniumbasierten Kontrastmitteln in biologischen Proben mittels Laserablation mit induktiv gekoppelter Plasma-Massenspektrometrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingott, Jana

    2016-01-05

    Gadolinium based contrast agents are used for magnetic resonance imaging. After their excretion by medicated patients they reach surface water passing waste water treatment plants where they are not removed sufficiently. The behavior of the contrast agents in the environment and the interaction with organisms was investigated in this work due to the toxicity of the free Gd{sup 3+} ion and the associated risks, such as accumulation in the human food chain. In this work, the two elemental analytical imaging methods laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis (SRXRF) have been used to investigate the uptake, distribution, and excretion of Gd-based contrast agents by various biological systems. Both methods were analytically characterized and compared for this application. The detection limits of gadolinium were determined under optimized conditions by LA-ICP-MS and SRXRF. With calibration by remains of dried elemental standard droplets detection limits of 0.78 pg absolute amount of gadolinium (LA-ICP-MS), respectively 89 pg (SRXRF) were reached. Based on filamentous algae as water plants the uptake and the excretion of Gd-based contrast agents were revealed. The dependence on concentration of the contrast agent in the exposition solution and the independence of temporal uptake within one to seven days were studied for duckweed. By LA-ICP-MS gadolinium was quantified in a leaf of cress plant. The verification of the results was performed by SRXRF and ICP-MS after digestion. Furthermore, the uptake and distribution of Gd-based contrast agents in higher organisms (water flea) were observed. The exact location of gadolinium was resolved by three-dimensional μ-computed tomography by the comparison of an exposed with a Gd-free water flea. In all studies, gadolinium was detected in the investigated exposed model organisms. It can be concluded that the contrast agents were taken from the

  12. Exact monitoring of aortic diameters in Marfan patients without gadolinium contrast: intraindividual comparison of 2D SSFP imaging with 3D CE-MRA and echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veldhoen, Simon; Behzadi, Cyrus; Derlin, Thorsten; Henes, Frank Oliver; Adam, Gerhard; Bannas, Peter; Rybczinsky, Meike; Kodolitsch, Yskert von; Sheikhzadeh, Sara; Bley, Thorsten Alexander

    2015-01-01

    To assess whether ECG-gated non-contrast 2D steady-state free precession (SSFP) imaging allows for exact monitoring of aortic diameters in Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients using non-ECG-gated contrast-enhanced 3D magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and echocardiography for intraindividual comparison. Non-ECG-gated CE-MRA and ECG-gated non-contrast SSFP at 1.5 T were prospectively performed in 50 patients. Two readers measured aortic diameters on para-sagittal images identically aligned with the aortic arch at the sinuses of Valsalva, sinotubular junction, ascending/descending aorta and aortic arch. Image quality was assessed on a three-point scale. Aortic root diameters acquired by echocardiography were used as reference. Intra- and interobserver variances were smaller for SSFP at the sinuses of Valsalva (p = 0.002; p = 0.002) and sinotubular junction (p = 0.014; p = 0.043). Image quality was better in SSFP than in CE-MRA at the sinuses of Valsalva (p < 0.0001), sinotubular junction (p < 0.0001) and ascending aorta (p = 0.02). CE-MRA yielded higher diameters than SSFP at the sinuses of Valsalva (mean bias, 2.5 mm; p < 0.0001), and comparison with echocardiography confirmed a higher bias for CE-MRA (7.2 ± 3.4 mm vs. SSFP, 4.7 ± 2.6 mm). ECG-gated non-contrast 2D SSFP imaging provides superior image quality with higher validity compared to non-ECG-gated contrast-enhanced 3D imaging. Since CE-MRA requires contrast agents with potential adverse effects, non-contrast SSFP imaging is an appropriate alternative for exact and riskless aortic monitoring of MFS patients. (orig.)

  13. Exact monitoring of aortic diameters in Marfan patients without gadolinium contrast: intraindividual comparison of 2D SSFP imaging with 3D CE-MRA and echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldhoen, Simon [University Medical Center Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Bavaria (Germany); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Behzadi, Cyrus; Derlin, Thorsten; Henes, Frank Oliver; Adam, Gerhard; Bannas, Peter [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Rybczinsky, Meike; Kodolitsch, Yskert von; Sheikhzadeh, Sara [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of General and Interventional Cardiology, Hamburg (Germany); Bley, Thorsten Alexander [University Medical Center Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Bavaria (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    To assess whether ECG-gated non-contrast 2D steady-state free precession (SSFP) imaging allows for exact monitoring of aortic diameters in Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients using non-ECG-gated contrast-enhanced 3D magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and echocardiography for intraindividual comparison. Non-ECG-gated CE-MRA and ECG-gated non-contrast SSFP at 1.5 T were prospectively performed in 50 patients. Two readers measured aortic diameters on para-sagittal images identically aligned with the aortic arch at the sinuses of Valsalva, sinotubular junction, ascending/descending aorta and aortic arch. Image quality was assessed on a three-point scale. Aortic root diameters acquired by echocardiography were used as reference. Intra- and interobserver variances were smaller for SSFP at the sinuses of Valsalva (p = 0.002; p = 0.002) and sinotubular junction (p = 0.014; p = 0.043). Image quality was better in SSFP than in CE-MRA at the sinuses of Valsalva (p < 0.0001), sinotubular junction (p < 0.0001) and ascending aorta (p = 0.02). CE-MRA yielded higher diameters than SSFP at the sinuses of Valsalva (mean bias, 2.5 mm; p < 0.0001), and comparison with echocardiography confirmed a higher bias for CE-MRA (7.2 ± 3.4 mm vs. SSFP, 4.7 ± 2.6 mm). ECG-gated non-contrast 2D SSFP imaging provides superior image quality with higher validity compared to non-ECG-gated contrast-enhanced 3D imaging. Since CE-MRA requires contrast agents with potential adverse effects, non-contrast SSFP imaging is an appropriate alternative for exact and riskless aortic monitoring of MFS patients. (orig.)

  14. Exact monitoring of aortic diameters in Marfan patients without gadolinium contrast: intraindividual comparison of 2D SSFP imaging with 3D CE-MRA and echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhoen, Simon; Behzadi, Cyrus; Derlin, Thorsten; Rybczinsky, Meike; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Sheikhzadeh, Sara; Henes, Frank Oliver; Bley, Thorsten Alexander; Adam, Gerhard; Bannas, Peter

    2015-03-01

    To assess whether ECG-gated non-contrast 2D steady-state free precession (SSFP) imaging allows for exact monitoring of aortic diameters in Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients using non-ECG-gated contrast-enhanced 3D magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and echocardiography for intraindividual comparison. Non-ECG-gated CE-MRA and ECG-gated non-contrast SSFP at 1.5 T were prospectively performed in 50 patients. Two readers measured aortic diameters on para-sagittal images identically aligned with the aortic arch at the sinuses of Valsalva, sinotubular junction, ascending/descending aorta and aortic arch. Image quality was assessed on a three-point scale. Aortic root diameters acquired by echocardiography were used as reference. Intra- and interobserver variances were smaller for SSFP at the sinuses of Valsalva (p = 0.002; p = 0.002) and sinotubular junction (p = 0.014; p = 0.043). Image quality was better in SSFP than in CE-MRA at the sinuses of Valsalva (p < 0.0001), sinotubular junction (p < 0.0001) and ascending aorta (p = 0.02). CE-MRA yielded higher diameters than SSFP at the sinuses of Valsalva (mean bias, 2.5 mm; p < 0.0001), and comparison with echocardiography confirmed a higher bias for CE-MRA (7.2 ± 3.4 mm vs. SSFP, 4.7 ± 2.6 mm). ECG-gated non-contrast 2D SSFP imaging provides superior image quality with higher validity compared to non-ECG-gated contrast-enhanced 3D imaging. Since CE-MRA requires contrast agents with potential adverse effects, non-contrast SSFP imaging is an appropriate alternative for exact and riskless aortic monitoring of MFS patients.

  15. MR imaging with metal artifact-reducing sequences and gadolinium contrast agent in a case-control study of periprosthetic abnormalities in patients with metal-on-metal hip prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Gunilla M.; Mueller, Markus F.; Ekberg, Olle [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Malmoe (Sweden); Maansson, Sven [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Malmoe (Sweden); Schewelov, Thord von [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Malmoe (Sweden); Nittka, Mathias [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany); Lundin, Bjoern [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Lund (Sweden)

    2014-08-15

    To apply and compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metal artifact reducing sequences (MARS) including subtraction imaging after contrast application in patients with metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses, investigate the prevalence and characteristics of periprosthetic abnormalities, as well as their relation with pain and risk factors. Fifty-two MoM prostheses (35 cases with pain and or risk factors, and 17 controls) in 47 patients were examined in a 1.5-T MR scanner using MARS: turbo spin echo (TSE) with high readout bandwidth with and without view angle tilting (VAT), TSE with VAT and slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC), short tau inversion recovery (STIR) with matched RF pulses, and post-contrast imaging. The relations of MRI findings to pain and risk factors were analyzed and in five revised hips findings from operation, histology, and MRI were compared. TSE VAT detected the highest number of osteolyses. Soft tissue mass, effusion, and capsular thickening were common, whereas osteolysis in acetabulum and femur were less frequent. Contrast enhancement occurred in bone, synovia, joint capsule, and the periphery of soft tissue mass. There was no significant relation between MRI findings and pain or risk factors. MARS and gadolinium subtraction imaging are useful for evaluation of complications to MoM prosthesis. TSE VAT had the highest sensitivity for osteolysis. Contrast enhancement might indicate activation of aseptic lymphocyte-dominated vasculitis-associated lesion (ALVAL). Pain, small head, or steep prosthesis inclination angle are not useful predictors of periprosthetic abnormalities, and wide indications for MR follow-up are warranted. (orig.)

  16. Incidental MRI findings of acute gadolinium hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amene, C; Yeh-Nayre, L A; Dory, C E; Crawford, J R

    2012-01-01

    A 13-year-old girl with a remote history of juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma developed acute onset flushing, tachycardia and shortness of breath immediately following administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine during routine brain MRI that subsided following intravenous diphenhydramine. A retrospective review of the MRI results revealed multiple areas of contrast enhancement of the face, consistent with observed urticaria. The patient received pretreatment medications prior to subsequent gadolinium injections without incident. Gadolinium allergy is extremely rare and has been reported in less than 0.1% of injections. However, in patients who undergo anesthesia for MRI studies, similar subtle extracranial MRI findings should alert the neuroradiologist to possible gadolinium allergy that may warrant premedication prior to future injections.

  17. Gadolinium recovery from aqueous pharmaceutical residuals by pulsed electrical discharge; Rueckgewinnung von Gadolinium aus pharmazeutischen Abwaessern mittels gepulster elektrischer Entladung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Tom; Froehlich, Peter [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Seifert, Martin; Jacob-Seifert, Karin [FNE Entsorgungsdienste GmbH, Freiberg (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Advanced oxidation process (AOP) is an oxidation step releasing reactive oxygen species by pulsed electrical discharge in aqueous systems. In contrast to processes generating ozone by external UV radiation this method is feasible for turbid liquids with solid particles. This method is currently used in particular in the field of purification of chemically polluted waste waters. In the present application AOP is applied for partial degradation of the organic ligand system of a gadolinium X-ray contrast agent to separate gadolinium subsequently by adding caustic soda to precipitate > 99% of gadolinium.

  18. On the Use of Molecular Weight Cutoff Cassettes to Measure Dynamic Relaxivity of Novel Gadolinium Contrast Agents: Example Using Hyaluronic Acid Polymer Complexes in Phosphate-Buffered Saline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasraie, Nima; Oviatt, Henry Wayne; Clarke, Geoffrey David

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether standard extracellular contrast agents of Gd(III) ions in combination with a polymeric entity susceptible to hydrolytic degradation over a finite period of time, such as Hyaluronic Acid (HA), have sufficient vascular residence time to obtain comparable vascular imaging to current conventional compounds and to obtain sufficient data to show proof of concept that HA with Gd-DTPA ligands could be useful as vascular imaging agents. We assessed the dynamic relaxivity of the HA bound DTPA compounds using a custom-made phantom, as well as relaxation rates at 10.72 MHz with concentrations ranging between 0.09 and 7.96 mM in phosphate-buffered saline. Linear dependences of static longitudinal relaxation rate (R1) on concentration were found for most measured samples, and the HA samples continued to produce high signal strength after 24 hours after injection into a dialysis cassette at 3T, showing superior dynamic relaxivity values compared to conventional contrast media such as Gd-DTPA-BMA

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents: A Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sahraei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI contrast agents most commonly agents used in diagnosing different diseases. Several agents have been ever introduced with different peculiar characteristics. They vary in potency, adverse reaction and other specification, so it is important to select the proper agent in different situations. We conducted a systematic literature search in MEDLINE/PUBMED, Web of Science (ISI, Scopus,Google Scholar by using keywords "gadolinium" and "MRI contrast Medias", "Gadofosvest", "Gadobenate" and "Gadoxetate". The most frequent contrast media agents made based on gadolinium (Gd. These are divided into two categories based on the structure of their chelating parts, linear agents and macrocyclic agents. All characteristics of contrast media factors, including efficiency, kinetic properties, stability, side effects and the rate of resolution are directly related to the structure of chelating part of that formulation.In vitro data has shown that the macrocyclic compounds are the most stable Gd-CA as they do not bind to serum proteins, they all possess similar and relatively low relaxivity and the prevalence of Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF has decreased by increasing the use of macrocyclic agents in recent years. No cases of NSF have been recorded after the administration of any of the high-relaxivity protein interacting agents, the vascular imaging agent gadofosveset trisodium (Ablavar, the hepatic imaging agent gadoxetate meglumine (Eovist, and the multipurpose agent gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance. In pregnancy and lactating women, stable macrocyclic agent is recommended.

  20. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkman, P.R.M. van; Wall, E.E. van der; Roos, A. de; Doornbos, J.; Laarse, A. van der; Voorthuisen, A.E. van; Bruschke, A.V.G.; Rossum, A.C. van

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate he usefulness of the paramagnetic contrast agent Gadolinium-DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) in Magnetic Resonance. Imaging of acute myocardial infarction, we studied a total of 45 patients with a first acute myocardial infarction by ECG-gated magnetic resonance imaging before and after intravenous administration of 0.1 mmol/kg Gadolinium-DTPA. All patients received thrombolytic treatment by intravenous streptokinase. The magnetic resonance imaging studies were preformed after a meam of 88 h (range 15-241) after the acute onset of acute myocardial infarction. Five patients without evidence of cardiac disease served as controls. Spin-echo measurements (TE 30 ms) were made using a Philips Gyroscan (0.5 Tesla) or a Teslacon II (0.6 Tesla). The 45 patients were divided into four groups of patients. In Group I( patients) Gadolinium-DTPA improved the detection of myocardial infarction by Gadolinium-DTPA. In Group II (20 patients) the magnetic resonance imaging procedure was repeated every 10 min for up to 40 min following administration of Gadolinium-DTPA. Optimal contrast enhancement was obtained 20-25 min after Gadolinium-DTPA. In Group III (27 patients) signal intensities were significantly higher in the patients who underwent the magnetic resonance imaging study more than 72 h (mean 120) after the acute event, suggesting increased acculumation of Gadolinium-DTPA in a more advanced stage of the infarction process. In Group IV (45 patients) Gadolinium-DTPA was administered in an attempt to distinguish between reperfused and nonreperfused myocardial areas after thrombolytic treatment for acute myocardial infarction. The signal intensities did not differ, but reperfused areas showed a more homogeneous aspect whereas nonreperfused areas were visualized as a more heterogeneous contrast enhancement. It is concluded that magnetic resonance imaging using the contrast agent Gadolinium-DTPA significantly improves the detection of infarcted myocardial areas

  1. Development of gadolinium based nanoparticles having an affinity towards melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlieras, Jessica; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Roux, Amandine; Heinrich-Balard, Laurence; Cohen, Richard; Tarrit, Sébastien; Truillet, Charles; Mignot, Anna; Hachani, Roxanne; Kryza, David; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Perriat, Pascal; Janier, Marc; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Tillement, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Small Rigid Platforms (SRPs) are sub-5 nanometre gadolinium based nanoparticles that have been developed for multimodal imaging and theranostic applications. They are composed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates. A covalent coupling with quinoxaline derivatives has been performed. Such derivatives have proven their affinity for melanin frequently expressed in primary melanoma cases. Three different quinoxaline derivatives have been synthesised and coupled to the nanoparticles. The affinity of the grafted nanoparticles for melanin has then been shown in vitro by surface plasmon resonance on a homemade melanin grafted gold chip.Small Rigid Platforms (SRPs) are sub-5 nanometre gadolinium based nanoparticles that have been developed for multimodal imaging and theranostic applications. They are composed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates. A covalent coupling with quinoxaline derivatives has been performed. Such derivatives have proven their affinity for melanin frequently expressed in primary melanoma cases. Three different quinoxaline derivatives have been synthesised and coupled to the nanoparticles. The affinity of the grafted nanoparticles for melanin has then been shown in vitro by surface plasmon resonance on a homemade melanin grafted gold chip. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33457g

  2. Gadolinium-153 line sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, V.M. E-mail: kar@orip.niiar.simbirsk.su; Gordeev, J.N.; Karelin, E.A.; Gavrilov, V.D

    2000-11-15

    The technology for Gd-153 line source production has been developed at SSC RIAR. The source active core is made of Al-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} composition by means of one of the following ways: either collecting pressed pellets or filling the source body with the composition followed by sintering. The composition is prepared by gadolinium salt thermal destruction on aluminium particles. The method allows setting gadolinium mass fraction (from 0.02 to 6%) with high accuracy and uniformity of distribution in the composition volume of more than 95%.

  3. Diffusion-weighted imaging for assessment of synovial inflammation in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A promising imaging biomarker as an alternative to gadolinium-based contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barendregt, Anouk M.; Gulik, E.C. van [Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lavini, Cristina; Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario [Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berg, J.M. van den; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Kuijpers, Taco W. [Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Reade, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis West, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis Oost, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-11-15

    To compare dynamic-contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in quantifying synovial inflammation in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Regions of interest (ROI) were drawn in the synovium of JIA patients on T1 DCE and T2 DWI, followed by extraction of the maximum enhancement (ME), maximum initial slope (MIS), time to peak (TTP), % of different time intensity curve shapes (TIC) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the ROIs. Mann-Whitney-U test was used for comparing parameters between MRI-active and -inactive patients (defined by the juvenile arthritis MRI scoring system). Spearman's rank was used to analyse the correlation between DCE and DWI. Thirty-five JIA patients (18 MRI active and 17 MRI inactive) were included. Median age was 13.1 years and 71% were female. ME, MIS, TTP, % TIC 5 and ADC were significantly different in MRI-active versus MRI-inactive JIA with median ADC 1.49 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in MRI-active and 1.25 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in MRI-inactive JIA, p = 0.001, 95% confidence interval of difference in medians =0.11-0.53 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s. ADC correlated to ME, MIS and TIC 5 shapes (r = 0.62, r = 0.45, r = -0.51, respectively, all p < 0.05). Similar to DCE parameters, DWI-derived ADC is significantly different in MRI-active JIA as compared to MRI-inactive JIA. The non-invasiveness of DWI combined with its possibility to detect synovial inflammation shows the potential of DWI. (orig.)

  4. Diffusion-weighted imaging for assessment of synovial inflammation in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A promising imaging biomarker as an alternative to gadolinium-based contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barendregt, Anouk M.; Gulik, E.C. van; Lavini, Cristina; Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario; Berg, J.M. van den; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Dolman, Koert M.

    2017-01-01

    To compare dynamic-contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in quantifying synovial inflammation in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Regions of interest (ROI) were drawn in the synovium of JIA patients on T1 DCE and T2 DWI, followed by extraction of the maximum enhancement (ME), maximum initial slope (MIS), time to peak (TTP), % of different time intensity curve shapes (TIC) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the ROIs. Mann-Whitney-U test was used for comparing parameters between MRI-active and -inactive patients (defined by the juvenile arthritis MRI scoring system). Spearman's rank was used to analyse the correlation between DCE and DWI. Thirty-five JIA patients (18 MRI active and 17 MRI inactive) were included. Median age was 13.1 years and 71% were female. ME, MIS, TTP, % TIC 5 and ADC were significantly different in MRI-active versus MRI-inactive JIA with median ADC 1.49 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s in MRI-active and 1.25 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s in MRI-inactive JIA, p = 0.001, 95% confidence interval of difference in medians =0.11-0.53 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. ADC correlated to ME, MIS and TIC 5 shapes (r = 0.62, r = 0.45, r = -0.51, respectively, all p < 0.05). Similar to DCE parameters, DWI-derived ADC is significantly different in MRI-active JIA as compared to MRI-inactive JIA. The non-invasiveness of DWI combined with its possibility to detect synovial inflammation shows the potential of DWI. (orig.)

  5. CONTRAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Krogsgaard

    2007-01-01

    Dette er en afrapportering fra den årlige CONTRAST workshop, der i 2007 blev afholdt i Yaoundé, Cameroon.......Dette er en afrapportering fra den årlige CONTRAST workshop, der i 2007 blev afholdt i Yaoundé, Cameroon....

  6. Signal intensity at unenhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance in the globus pallidus and dentate nucleus after serial administrations of a macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agent in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi Espagnet, Maria Camilla; Bernardi, Bruno; Figa-Talamanca, Lorenzo [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, IRCCS, Neuroradiology Unit, Imaging Department, Rome (Italy); Pasquini, Luca [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, IRCCS, Neuroradiology Unit, Imaging Department, Rome (Italy); University Sapienza, Neuroradiology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Sant' Andrea, Rome (Italy); Toma, Paolo [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, IRCCS, Department of Imaging, Rome (Italy); Napolitano, Antonio [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, IRCCS, Enterprise Risk Management, Medical Physics Department, Rome (Italy)

    2017-09-15

    Few studies have been conducted on the relations between T1-weighted signal intensity changes in the pediatric brain following gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) exposure. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of multiple administrations of a macrocyclic GBCA on signal intensity in the globus pallidus and dentate nucleus of the pediatric brain on unenhanced T1-weighted MR images. This retrospective study included 50 patients, mean age: 8 years (standard deviation: 4.8 years), with normal renal function exposed to ≥6 administrations of the same macrocyclic GBCA (gadoterate meglumine) and a control group of 59 age-matched GBCA-naive patients. The globus pallidus-to-thalamus signal intensity ratio and dentate nucleus-to-pons signal intensity ratio were calculated from unenhanced T1-weighted images for both patients and controls. A mixed linear model was used to evaluate the effects on signal intensity ratios of the number of GBCA administrations, the time interval between administrations, age, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. T-test analyses were performed to compare signal intensity ratio differences between successive administrations and baseline MR signal intensity ratios in patients compared to controls. P-values were considered significant if <0.05. A significant effect of the number of GBCA administrations on relative signal intensities globus pallidus-to-thalamus (F[8]=3.09; P=0.002) and dentate nucleus-to-pons (F[8]=2.36; P=0.021) was found. The relative signal intensities were higher at last MR examination than at baseline (P<0.001). Quantitative analysis evaluation of globus pallidus:thalamus and dentate nucleus:pons of the pediatric brain demonstrated an increase after serial administrations of macrocyclic GBCA. Further research is necessary to fully understand GBCA pharmacokinetic in children. (orig.)

  7. Light deflection in gadolinium molybdate ferroelastic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staniorowski, Piotr; Bornarel, Jean

    2000-01-01

    The deflection of a He-Ne light beam by polydomain gadolinium molybdate (GMO) crystals has been studied with respect to incidence angle α i on the sample at room temperature. The A and B deflected beams do not cross each other during the α i variation, in contrast to results and calculations previously published. The model using the Fresnel equation confirms this result. The model presented is more accurate for numerical calculation than that using the Huygens construction. (author)

  8. Using T2-Exchange from Ln3+DOTA-Based Chelates for Contrast-Enhanced Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer with MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    an exogenous contrast agent (4). These agents shorten the endogenous T1 and T2 relaxation times of tissue water to enhance the contrast and highlight...depends upon both the endogenous proton density and the T1 and T2 relaxation times (3). MRI tissue contrast can be further enhanced by introduc- ing... exogenous T2 contrast mechanism for MRI (23,24). How- ever, diamagnetic T2ex agents require high concentrations (e.g., 500 mM) to achieve significant bulk

  9. Comparison of gadolinium Cy2DOTA, a new hepatobiliary agent, and gadolinium HP-DO3A, an extracellular agent, in healthy liver and metastatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runge, V.M.; Wells, J.W.; Williams, N.M.

    1995-01-01

    A new gadolinium (Gd) chelate with preferential hepatobiliary uptake, Gd Cy 2 DOTA, was compared in two animal species with Gd HP-DO3A (gadoteridol), a clinically approved contrast agent with extracellular distribution. Liver enhancement was evaluated for these two contrast agents using magnetic resonance imaging, whereas an experimental model of metastatic disease was used to evaluate the agents' efficacy for liver-lesion delineation. The two agents were compared in four healthy Rhesus monkeys (eight studies) and five New Zealand White rabbits with implanted VX-2 liver tumors (ten studies). The contrast dose was 0.1 mmol/kg, with the agents given in random order and at least 72 hours between contrast injections. Breathhold T1-weighted spin echo scans were obtained at 1.5 tesla (T) before and after contrast was administered. Postcontrast scans were obtained 1 to 90 minutes after injection in the monkeys and 1 to 240 minutes after injection in the rabbits. Prolonged hepatic enhancement, superior in degree to that with Gd HP-DO3A, was noted to both monkeys and rabbits after injection of Gd Cy 2 DOTA. Two minutes after contrast, liver SI was 1.94 ± 0.05 with Gd Cy 2 DOTA compared with 1.5 ± 0.05 with Gd HP-DO3A in monkeys. Sixty minutes after contrast, liver SI was 1.60 ± 0.09 compared with 1.20 ± 0.02. The difference between agents was significant at all times from 2 to 60 minutes after contrast injection (P 2 DOTA but not with Gd HP-DO3A. The maximum improvement in lesion conspicuity (rabbit) occurred 45 minutes after injection of Gd Cy 2 DOTA and 5 minutes after injection of Gd HP-DO3A. 22 refs., 12 figs

  10. An experimental phantom study of the effect of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents on PET attenuation coefficients and PET quantification in PET-MR imaging: application to cardiac studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O' Doherty, Jim; Schleyer, Paul

    2017-12-01

    Simultaneous cardiac perfusion studies are an increasing trend in PET-MR imaging. During dynamic PET imaging, the introduction of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents (GBCA) at high concentrations during a dual injection of GBCA and PET radiotracer may cause increased attenuation effects of the PET signal, and thus errors in quantification of PET images. We thus aimed to calculate the change in linear attenuation coefficient (LAC) of a mixture of PET radiotracer and increasing concentrations of GBCA in solution and furthermore, to investigate if this change in LAC produced a measurable effect on the image-based PET activity concentration when attenuation corrected by three different AC strategies. We performed simultaneous PET-MR imaging of a phantom in a static scenario using a fixed activity of 40 MBq [18 F]-NaF, water, and an increasing GBCA concentration from 0 to 66 mM (based on an assumed maximum possible concentration of GBCA in the left ventricle in a clinical study). This simulated a range of clinical concentrations of GBCA. We investigated two methods to calculate the LAC of the solution mixture at 511 keV: (1) a mathematical mixture rule and (2) CT imaging of each concentration step and subsequent conversion to LAC at 511 keV. This comparison showed that the ranges of LAC produced by both methods are equivalent with an increase in LAC of the mixed solution of approximately 2% over the range of 0-66 mM. We then employed three different attenuation correction methods to the PET data: (1) each PET scan at a specific millimolar concentration of GBCA corrected by its corresponding CT scan, (2) each PET scan corrected by a CT scan with no GBCA present (i.e., at 0 mM GBCA), and (3) a manually generated attenuation map, whereby all CT voxels in the phantom at 0 mM were replaced by LAC = 0.1 cm -1 . All attenuation correction methods (1-3) were accurate to the true measured activity concentration within 5%, and there were no trends in image

  11. Room temperature ferromagnetic gadolinium silicide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadimani, Magundappa Ravi L.; Gupta, Shalabh; Harstad, Shane; Pecharsky, Vitalij; Jiles, David C.

    2018-03-06

    A particle usable as T1 and T2 contrast agents is provided. The particle is a gadolinium silicide (Gd5Si4) particle that is ferromagnetic at temperatures up to 290 K and is less than 2 .mu.m in diameter. An MRI contrast agent that includes a plurality of gadolinium silicide (Gd.sub.5Si.sub.4) particles that are less than 1 .mu.m in diameter is also provided. A method for creating gadolinium silicide (Gd5Si4) particles is also provided. The method includes the steps of providing a Gd5Si4 bulk alloy; grinding the Gd5Si4 bulk alloy into a powder; and milling the Gd5Si4 bulk alloy powder for a time of approximately 20 minutes or less.

  12. Densely packed Gd(III)-chelates with fast water exchange on a calix[4]arene scaffold : a potential MRI contrast agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuhle, Daniel T.; Polasek, Miloslav; Lukes, Ivan; Chauvin, Thomas; Toth, Eva; Schatz, Juergen; Hanefeld, Ulf; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Peters, Joop A.

    2010-01-01

    A pyridine-N-oxide functionalized DOTA analogue has been conjugated to a calix[4]arene and the corresponding Gd-complex was characterized with respect to its suitability as MRI contrast agent. The compound forms spherical micelles in water with a cmc of 35 mu M and a radius of 8.2 nm. The relaxivity

  13. Densely packed Gd(III)-chelates with fast water exchange on a calix[4]arene scaffold : A potential MRI contrast agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schühle, D.T.; Polášek, M.; Lukeš, I.; Chauvin, T.; Tóth, E.; Schatz, J.; Hanefeld, U.; Stuart, M.C.A.; Peters, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    A pyridine-N-oxide functionalized DOTA analogue has been conjugated to a calix[4]arene and the corresponding Gd-complex was characterized with respect to its suitability as MRI contrast agent. The compound forms spherical micelles in water with a cmc of 35 mMand a radius of 8.2 nm. The relaxivity of

  14. Uranyl chelate lasers, realization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macheteau, Y.; Coste, A.; Luce, M.; Rigny, P.

    1975-01-01

    The absorption fluorescence and excitation spectra of uranyle chelates were determined. The corresponding fluorescence decay was measured at low temperature. The possibility of obtaining a stimulated emission with uranyl chelates is examined from the consideration made on the properties of Eu chelates (B 4 EuNa and B 4 Eu piperidine) which give the laser effect [fr

  15. Using T2-Exchange from Ln3+DOTA-Based Chelates for Contrast-Enhanced Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer with MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Tomography PSMA – Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen r2 – transverse relaxivity (sec-1mM-1) SCID – severe combined immunodeficiency SPECT – single...water molecule exchange rate. It was also recently demonstrated that T2- exchange contrast could be increased by several orders of magnitude...the water molecule exchange rate using several different DOTA sidearm structures (e.g., DOTA-, DOTA-(gly)2-, DOTA-(gly)4-). The maximum transverse

  16. Styrene-divinylbenzene copolymers loaded with organophosphorus chelating agents for rare earths separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Celina C.R.; Teixeira, Viviane G.; Coutinho, Fernanda M.B.

    1998-01-01

    Styrene-divinylbenzene copolymers used in extraction chromatography were synthesized in presence of selective chelating agents for rare earths: DEHPA, bis (2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid, and EHEHPA, bis (2-ethylhexyl) phosphonic acid. The copolymers were prepared by suspension polymerization technique using the pure chelating agents and its mixture with toluene (TOL) as diluents. The influence of synthesis conditions such as chelating agent/TOL ratios, dilution degree of monomers and amount of DVB on the porous structure of the copolymers were studied. The porous structure was characterized by the apparent density, fixed pore volume, surface area and by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The performance of the copolymers in the separation process of rare earths was evaluated. The total chelating capacity of each copolymer and the chelating kinetics in relation to gadolinium ion were determined. The chelating agent content of the copolymers depend on the amount of chelating agents employed in the synthesis. The highest amount of chelating agent that can be used in the synthesis in order to produce copolymers with high chelating capacity and good mechanical properties was determined. The total chelating capacity varied with the content of the chelating agents in the copolymer and the chelating kinetics was dependent mainly on the pore diameter, because this parameter determines the diffusion rate of the ions though the copolymer structure. (author)

  17. Heterogeneous intratumoral distribution of gadolinium nanoparticles within U87 human glioblastoma xenografts unveiled by micro-PIXE imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Asuncion; Roudeau, Stéphane; L'Homel, Baptiste; Pouzoulet, Frédéric; Bonnet-Boissinot, Sarah; Prezado, Yolanda; Ortega, Richard

    2017-04-15

    Metallic nanoparticles have great potential in cancer radiotherapy as theranostic drugs since, they serve simultaneously as contrast agents for medical imaging and as radio-therapy sensitizers. As with other anticancer drugs, intratumoral diffusion is one of the main limiting factors for therapeutic efficiency. To date, a few reports have investigated the intratumoral distribution of metallic nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to determine the quantitative distribution of gadolinium (Gd) nanoparticles after direct intratumoral injection within U87 human glioblastoma tumors grafted in mice, using micro-PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) imaging. AGuIX (Activation and Guiding of Irradiation by X-ray) 3 nm particles composed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates were used. PIXE results indicate that the direct injection of Gd nanoparticles in tumors results in their heterogeneous diffusion, probably related to variations in tumor density. All tumor regions contain Gd, but with markedly different concentrations, with a more than 250-fold difference. Also Gd can diffuse to the healthy adjacent tissue. This study highlights the usefulness of mapping the distribution of metallic nanoparticles at the intratumoral level, and proposes PIXE as an imaging modality to probe the quantitative distribution of metallic nanoparticles in tumors from experimental animal models with micrometer resolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Combined use of contrast media containing iodine and gadolinium for imaging and intervention. A hitherto widely ignored topic in radiological practice; Kombinierter zeitnaher Einsatz jod- und gadoliniumhaltiger Kontrastmittel in der diagnostischen und interventionellen Radiologie. Ein bisher vernachlaessigtes Kapitel der radiologischen Praxis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golder, W.

    2012-02-15

    The synchronous use of chemically different contrast media in the same body compartment is a challenge for the radiologist, whether it is scheduled or unexpected. However, to inject contrast media containing iodine and gadolinium at the same time can be a prerequisite for the examination of several organs or organ systems. Unlike other topics of contrast-enhanced imaging procedures, the difficulties encountered with double contrast injections have been widely ignored in the literature. In the absence of reliable data from experimental and clinical studies the radiologist is dependent on case reports, information provided by the contrast media manufacturers, personal communications, mostly scanty personal experiences and a skilful time management, in order to overcome the situation. Only the combination of X-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance arthrography can be performed without another thought. However, the more or less synchronous vascular application of contrast media containing iodine and gadolinium requires vigilance. The more seriously ill the patient is, the more caution is advised even if the decision on the combined administration has to be reached urgently. The following overview gives a description of the properties of contrast media containing iodine and gadolinium as far as interactions following simultaneous administration are concerned. Subsequently, the clinically relevant situations and constellations are outlined and analyzed. (orig.) [German] Die kombinierte Gabe zweier chemisch verschiedener Kontrastmittel stellt fuer den Radiologen eine Herausforderung dar. Der mehr oder weniger zeitgleiche Einsatz jod- und gadoliniumhaltiger Kontrastmittel kann sowohl geplant sein als auch bei der Untersuchung einer Reihe von Organen/Organsystemen unvorhergesehen notwendig werden. Im Gegensatz zu anderen Themen der kontrastverstaerkten Diagnostik ist dem Problem der Doppelinjektion in der Literatur bisher wenig Aufmerksamkeit geschenkt worden

  19. Cell-permeable Ln(III) chelate-functionalized InP quantum dots as multimodal imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiuk, Graeme J; Tamang, Sudarsan; Imbert, Daniel; Poillot, Cathy; Giardiello, Marco; Tisseyre, Céline; Barbier, Emmanuel L; Fries, Pascal Henry; de Waard, Michel; Reiss, Peter; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2011-10-25

    Quantum dots (QDs) are ideal scaffolds for the development of multimodal imaging agents, but their application in clinical diagnostics is limited by the toxicity of classical CdSe QDs. A new bimodal MRI/optical nanosized contrast agent with high gadolinium payload has been prepared through direct covalent attachment of up to 80 Gd(III) chelates on fluorescent nontoxic InP/ZnS QDs. It shows a high relaxivity of 900 mM(-1) s(-1) (13 mM(-1 )s(-1) per Gd ion) at 35 MHz (0.81 T) and 298 K, while the bright luminescence of the QDs is preserved. Eu(III) and Tb(III) chelates were also successfully grafted to the InP/ZnS QDs. The absence of energy transfer between the QD and lanthanide emitting centers results in a multicolor system. Using this convenient direct grafting strategy additional targeting ligands can be included on the QD. Here a cell-penetrating peptide has been co-grafted in a one-pot reaction to afford a cell-permeable multimodal multimeric MRI contrast agent that reports cellular localization by fluorescence and provides high relaxivity and increased tissue retention with respect to commercial contrast agents.

  20. Macromolecular and dendrimer-based magnetic resonance contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumb, Ambika; Brechbiel, Martin W. (Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)), e-mail: pchoyke@mail.nih.gov; Choyke, Peter (Molecular Imaging Program, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    2010-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging modality that can provide an assessment of function or molecular expression in tandem with anatomic detail. Over the last 20-25 years, a number of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents have been developed to enhance signal by altering proton relaxation properties. This review explores a range of these agents from small molecule chelates, such as Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA, to macromolecular structures composed of albumin, polylysine, polysaccharides (dextran, inulin, starch), poly(ethylene glycol), copolymers of cystamine and cystine with GD-DTPA, and various dendritic structures based on polyamidoamine and polylysine (Gadomers). The synthesis, structure, biodistribution, and targeting of dendrimer-based MR contrast agents are also discussed

  1. Chelation in Metal Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaran J.S. Flora

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Chelation therapy is the preferred medical treatment for reducing the toxic effects of metals. Chelating agents are capable of binding to toxic metal ions to form complex structures which are easily excreted from the body removing them from intracellular or extracellular spaces. 2,3-Dimercaprol has long been the mainstay of chelation therapy for lead or arsenic poisoning, however its serious side effects have led researchers to develop less toxic analogues. Hydrophilic chelators like meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid effectively promote renal metal excretion, but their ability to access intracellular metals is weak. Newer strategies to address these drawbacks like combination therapy (use of structurally different chelating agents or co-administration of antioxidants have been reported recently. In this review we provide an update of the existing chelating agents and the various strategies available for the treatment of heavy metals and metalloid intoxications.

  2. Anthropogenic gadolinium anomalies and rare earth elements in the water of Atibaia River and Anhumas Creek, Southeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Francisco Ferreira; Enzweiler, Jacinta

    2016-05-01

    The concentrations of rare earth elements (REE), measured in water samples from Atibaia River and its tributary Anhumas Creek, Brazil, present excess of dissolved gadolinium. Such anthropogenic anomalies of Gd in water, already described in other parts of the world, result from the use of stable and soluble Gd chelates as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. Atibaia River constitutes the main water supply of Campinas Metropolitan area, and its basin receives wastewater effluents. The REE concentrations in water samples were determined in 0.22-μm pore size filtered samples, without and after preconcentration by solid-phase extraction with bis-(2-ethyl-hexyl)-phosphate. This preconcentration method was unable to retain the anthropogenic Gd quantitatively. The probable reason is that the Gd chelates dissociate slowly in acidic media to produce the free ion that is retained by the phosphate ester. Strong correlations between Gd and constituents or parameters associated with effluents confirmed the source of most Gd in water samples as anthropogenic. The shale-normalized REE patterns of Atibaia River and Anhumas Creek water samples showed light and heavy REE enrichment trends, respectively. Also, positive Ce anomalies in many Atibaia River samples, as well as the strong correlations of the REE (except Gd) with terrigenous elements, imply that inorganic colloidal particles contributed to the REE measured values.

  3. Gd-based macromolecules and nanoparticles as magnetic resonance contrast agents for molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    As we move towards an era of personalized medicine, molecular imaging contrast agents are likely to see an increasing presence in routine clinical practice. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has garnered particular interest as a platform for molecular imaging applications due its ability to monitor anatomical changes concomitant with physiologic and molecular changes. One promising new direction in the development of MR contrast agents involves the labeling and/or loading of nanoparticles with gadolinium (Gd). These nanoplatforms are capable of carrying large payloads of Gd, thus providing the requisite sensitivity to detect molecular signatures within disease pathologies. In this review, we discuss some of the progress that has recently been made in the development of Gd-based macromolecules and nanoparticles and outline some of the physical and chemical properties that will be important to incorporate into the next generation of contrast agents, including high Gd chelate stability, high "relaxivity per particle" and "relaxivity density", and biodegradability.

  4. Chelating polymeric membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2015-01-22

    The present application offers a solution to the current problems associated with recovery and recycling of precious metals from scrap material, discard articles, and other items comprising one or more precious metals. The solution is premised on a microporous chelating polymeric membrane. Embodiments include, but are not limited to, microporous chelating polymeric membranes, device comprising the membranes, and methods of using and making the same.

  5. Chelation in metal intoxication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Skaug, Marit Aralt; Cao, yang

    2015-01-01

    The present review provides an update of the general principles for the investigation and use of chelating agents in the treatment of intoxications by metals. The clinical use of the old chelators EDTA (ethylenediamine tetraacetate) and BAL (2,3-dimercaptopropanol) is now limited due to the incon......The present review provides an update of the general principles for the investigation and use of chelating agents in the treatment of intoxications by metals. The clinical use of the old chelators EDTA (ethylenediamine tetraacetate) and BAL (2,3-dimercaptopropanol) is now limited due...... to the inconvenience of parenteral administration, their own toxicity and tendency to increase the neurotoxicity of several metals. The hydrophilic dithiol chelators DMSA (meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid) and DMPS (2,3-dimercapto-propanesulphonate) are less toxic and more efficient than BAL in the clinical treatment...... of heavy metal poisoning, and available as capsules for oral use. In copper overload, DMSA appears to be a potent antidote, although d-penicillamine is still widely used. In the chelation of iron, the thiols are inefficient, since iron has higher affinity for ligands with nitrogen and oxygen, but the new...

  6. The fate of Gd and chelate following intravenous injection of gadodiamide in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moerk Kindberg, Grete; Uran, Steinar; Friisk, Grete; Martinsen, Ivar; Skotland, Tore

    2010-01-01

    The biodistribution of gadolinium (Gd) and chelate was studied in rats injected intravenously with a commercially available gadodiamide magnetic resonance contrast agent spiked with trace amounts of 14 C-labelled GdDTPA-BMA. Biodistribution of the 14 C-labelled ligand in whole animals was visualised using quantitative whole-body autoradiography, and quantified in individual tissue samples by analysing for radioactivity using beta-counting. Biodistribution of Gd was measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SF-MS). The injected dose was rapidly excreted, with only 1.0% remaining in the body at 24 h. The radioactivity thereafter was mainly associated with kidney cortex, liver, lung, muscle and skin, with a similar rate of clearance for both ligand and Gd from these tissues. The ratio between 14 C-labelled substance and Gd was not significantly different from that of the injected substance in most tissue samples up to 24 h after injection; the ratio then slowly decreased. The data clearly show that measurements of Gd concentration alone in tissue samples from animals injected with Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs) cannot be used as a measure of Gd released from the ligand. To our knowledge, such measurements comparing Gd and ligand concentrations and distribution in tissue samples have not been published previously for any of the commercial GBCAs. (orig.)

  7. Comments on chelation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrenn, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    The primary purpose of actinide chelation is to decrease the risk from radiation-induced cancer. While occupational exposures in the past have mainly involved low specific activity 239 Pu, future exposures will increasingly involve high specific activity plutonium, americium, and curium - all of which clear more rapidly from the lung. This will tend to shift the cancer risk from lung to bone and liver. Although therapy with Ca- or Zn-DTPA rapidly removes 241 Am from the canine, the sub-human primate, and the human liver, improved methods for removal from bone and lung are needed. DTPA can remove 241 Am more easily from the growing skeleton of a child than from the mature skeleton of an adult. Investigators at Karlsruhe are developing chelation agents for oral administration and are investigating the reduction in local dose to bone resulting from chelation therapy

  8. Oral contrast media for MR imaging of the abdomen. Pt. 4. Clinical trail on safety and efficacy of gadopentetate-dimeglumine. Orale Kontrastmittel fuer die magnetische Resonanztomographie des Abdomens. T. 4. Klinische Pruefung der Vertraeglichkeit von Gadolinium-DTPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminsky, S.; Gogoll, M.; Kornmesser, W.; Felix, R. (Klinikum Rudolf Virchow, Berlin (Germany). Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik); Laniado, M. (Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik); Clauss, W. (Schering AG, Berlin (Germany))

    1992-01-01

    Safety and efficacy of gadopentetate-dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) as a MR bowel contrast agent were determined in 133 patients with CT-proved abdominal and retroperitoneal mass lesions using a buffered formulation (1 mmol/l Gd-DTPA, 15 g/l mannitol, 25 mmol/l sodium-citrate, 6- 17 ml/kg). Short-lived gastrointestinal side effects were noted in 32% of patients. Gd-DTPA provided uniform, hyperintense bowel labelling and contrast enhancement in the region of interest in 81% of patients. Among 78 patients with pre- and postcontrast images lesion delineation was improved in 62%. In 55 studies with postcontrast images only, Gd-DTPA proved useful in 65%. In 105 of 109 cases IV injection of scopolamine or glucagon eliminated image artifacts arising from peristaltis of opacified bowel. The authors conclude that Gd-DTPA is a safe and effective MR bowel contrast agent. (orig.).

  9. Radiolabeled antibody in tumor imaging and therapy: iodine and radiometal chelates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, W.T.A.

    1987-01-01

    The use of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody in tumor imaging and therapy was evaluated using the Rauscher murine erythroleukemia. Antibody labeled with radioiodine or with DTPA-based radiometal chelates was compared with respect to in vitro and in vivo chemical stability of isotope incorporation, tumor targeting and catabolism, and efficacy. The radiometals studied were: 47 scandium, for imaging and therapy; 67 gallium and 111 indium for imaging; and 90 yttrium and 212 bismuth for therapy. Experiments using 153 Gd-labeled antibody demonstrated that insufficient gadolinium could be targeted to the tumor for use as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging. Labeling was efficient and resulted in 70 to 90 percent incorporation of all isotopes except 67 Ga, which was only adventitiously bound to immunoglobulin. As assessed by reduction of splenomegaly, 90 Y-labeled specific antibody was 2- to 3-fold more potent in tumor therapy than control immunoglobulin whereas 131 I-labeled preparations were equipotent. Treatment with 90 Y-labeled antibody produced mild, reversible leukopenia, whereas marrow suppression limited the administrable dose of 131 I-labeled immunoglobulin. In vitro. 212 Bi-labeled specific antibody again appeared 2- to 3-fold more potent in cell killing than control antibody

  10. Gadolinium perturbs expression of skeletogenic genes, calcium uptake and larval development in phylogenetically distant sea urchin species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Chiara; Costa, Caterina; Roccheri, Maria Carmela; Koop, Demian; Scudiero, Rosaria; Byrne, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Chelates of Gadolinium (Gd), a lanthanide metal, are employed as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and are released into the aquatic environment where they are an emerging contaminant. We studied the effects of environmentally relevant Gd concentrations on the development of two phylogenetically and geographically distant sea urchin species: the Mediterranean Paracentrotus lividus and the Australian Heliocidaris tuberculata. We found a general delay of embryo development at 24h post-fertilization, and a strong inhibition of skeleton growth at 48h. Total Gd and Ca content in the larvae showed a time- and concentration-dependent increase in Gd, in parallel with a reduction in Ca. To investigate the impact of Gd on the expression of genes involved in the regulation of skeletogenesis, we performed comparative RT-PCR analysis and found a misregulation of several genes involved in the skeletogenic and left-right axis specification gene regulatory networks. Species-specific differences in the biomineralization response were evident, likely due to differences in the skeletal framework of the larvae and the amount of biomineral produced. Our results highlight the hazard of Gd for marine organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitative Molecular Imaging with a Single Gd-Based Contrast Agent Reveals Specific Tumor Binding and Retention in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Mette L; Gao, Ying; Hutnick, Melanie A; Craig, Sonya E L; Pokorski, Jonathan K; Flask, Chris A; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2017-06-06

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, especially cancer. However, the poor sensitivity of MRI relative to other imaging modalities, such as PET, has hindered the development and clinical use of molecular MRI contrast agents that could provide vital diagnostic information by specifically locating a molecular target altered in the disease process. This work describes the specific and sustained in vivo binding and retention of a protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPμ)-targeted, molecular magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent with a single gadolinium (Gd) chelate using a quantitative MRI T 1 mapping technique in glioma xenografts. Quantitative T 1 mapping is an imaging method used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time, the T 1 relaxation time, of protons in a magnetic field after excitation by a radiofrequency pulse. T 1 relaxation times can in turn be used to calculate the concentration of a gadolinium-containing contrast agent in a region of interest, thereby allowing the retention or clearance of an agent to be quantified. In this context, retention is a measure of molecular contrast agent binding. Using conventional peptide chemistry, a PTPμ-targeted peptide was linked to a chelator that had been conjugated to a lysine residue. Following complexation with Gd, this PTPμ-targeted molecular contrast agent containing a single Gd ion showed significant tumor enhancement and a sustained increase in Gd concentration in both heterotopic and orthotopic tumors using dynamic quantitative MRI. This single Gd-containing PTPμ agent was more effective than our previous version with three Gd ions. Differences between nonspecific and specific agents, due to specific tumor binding, can be determined within the first 30 min after agent administration by examining clearance rates. This more facile chemistry, when combined with quantitative MR techniques, allows for widespread adoption by academic

  12. Evaluation of a gadolinium-based nanoparticle (AGuIX) for contrast-enhanced MRI of the liver in a rat model of hepatic colorectal cancer metastases at 9.4 tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, P.; Morr, D.; Mueller, A.; Massmann, A.; Seidel, R.; Schneider, G.; Buecker, A. [Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg (Germany). Clinic of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Lux, F.; Tillement, O. [Universite Claude Bernard, Lyon (France). Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents; Schaefer, T. [Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg (Germany). Dept. of General, Visceral and Pediatric Surgery; Menger, M.D. [Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg (Germany). Inst. for Clinical and Experimental Surgery

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study was to compare a Gd-based nanoparticle (AGuIX) with a standard extracellular Gd-based contrast agent (Gd-DOTA) for MRI at 9.4 T in rats with hepatic colorectal cancer metastases. 12 rats with hepatic metastases were subjected to MRI using a 9.4 T animal scanner. T1w self-gated FLASH sequences (TR/TE=45/2.5 ms, alpha = 45 , TA=1: 23 min, FOV=5.12 x 5.12 cm{sup 2}, matrix = 256 x 256) were acquired before and at 10 time points after contrast injection. Each animal received 0.1 mmol/kg BW Gd-DOTA i.v. 2 days later AGuIX was applied at 0.01 mmol/kg BW (representing equal Gd doses). The SNR of normal liver (SNRliver), hyper- and hypoenhancing parts of tumors (SNRtumor, hyperenh/SNRtumor, hypoenhanc), erector spinae muscle (SNRmuscle), CNR and lesion enhancement (LE) were calculated based on ROI measurements. Mean SNRliver (Gd-DOTA: 14.6 ± 0.7; AGuIX: 28.2 ± 2.6, p < 0.001), SNRtumor, hyperenhanc (Gd-DOTA: 18.6 ± 1.2; AGuIX: 29.6 ± 2.8, p < 0.001), SNRtumor, hypoenhanc (Gd-DOTA: 12.0 ± 0.7; AGuIX: 15.4 ± 0.7, p < 0.001), SNRmuscle (Gd-DOTA: 12.3 ± 0.3; AGuIX: 14.0 ± 0.7, p < 0.001), mean CNR (Gd-DOTA: -2.5 ± 0.2; AGuIX: -7.5 ± 1.0, p < 0.001) and LE (Gd-DOTA: 3.8 ± 0.7; AGuIX: 14.9 ± 2.8, p=0.001) were significantly higher using AGuIX. Regardless of the larger molecular size, AGuIX demonstrates an early peak enhancement followed by a continuous washout. AGuIX provides better enhancement at 9.4 T compared to Gd-DOTA for equal doses of applied Gd. This is based on the molecule structure and the subsequent increased interaction with protons leading to a higher relaxivity. AGuIX potentially ameliorates the conspicuity of focal liver lesions and may improve the sensitivity in diagnostic imaging of malignant hepatic tumors.

  13. Chelated minerals for poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SL Vieira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Organic minerals have been subject of an increasing number of investigations recently. These compounds can be considered the most significant event regarding commercial forms of minerals targeting animal supplementation in the last decades. Minerals, especially metals, are usually supplemented in poultry feeds using cheap saline sources and have never required a lot of attention in terms of quality. On the other hand, definitions of organic minerals are very broad and frequently lead to confusion when decision-making becomes necessary. Organic minerals include any mineral bound to organic compounds, regardless of the type of existing bond between mineral and organic molecules. Proteins and carbohydrates are the most frequent candidates in organic mineral combinations. Organic fraction size and bond type are not limitations in organic mineral definition; however, essential metals (Cu, Fe, Zn, and Mn can form coordinated bonds, which are stable in intestinal lumen. Metals bound to organic ligands by coordinated bonds can dissociate within animal metabolism whereas real covalent bonds cannot. Chelated minerals are molecules that have a metal bound to an organic ligand through coordinated bonds; but many organic minerals are not chelates or are not even bound through coordinated bonds. Utilization of organic minerals is largely dependent on the ligand; therefore, amino acids and other small molecules with facilitated access to the enterocyte are supposed to be better utilized by animals. Organic minerals with ligands presenting long chains may require digestion prior to absorption. After absorption, organic minerals may present physiological effects, which improve specific metabolic responses, such as the immune response. Many studies have demonstrated the benefits of metal-amino acid chelates on animal metabolism, but the detection positive effects on live performance is less consistent.

  14. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonzi, Roberto [Marie Curie Research Wing, Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Rickmansworth Road, Northwood, Middlesex, HA6 2RN (United Kingdom)], E-mail: robertoalonzi@btinternet.com; Padhani, Anwar R. [Paul Strickland Scanner Centre, Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Rickmansworth Road, Northwood, Middlesex, HA6 2RN (United Kingdom); Synarc Inc. 575 Market Street, San Francisco, CA 94105 (United States)], E-mail: anwar.padhani@paulstrickland-scannercentre.org.uk; Allen, Clare [Department of Imaging, University College Hospital, London, 235 Euston Road, NW1 2BU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: clare.allen@uclh.nhs.uk

    2007-09-15

    Angiogenesis is an integral part of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), is associated with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and is key to the growth and for metastasis of prostate cancer. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using small molecular weight gadolinium chelates enables non-invasive imaging characterization of tissue vascularity. Depending on the technique used, data reflecting tissue perfusion, microvessel permeability surface area product, and extracellular leakage space can be obtained. Two dynamic MRI techniques (T{sub 2}*-weighted or susceptibility based and T{sub 1}-weighted or relaxivity enhanced methods) for prostate gland evaluations are discussed in this review with reference to biological basis of observations, data acquisition and analysis methods, technical limitations and validation. Established clinical roles of T{sub 1}-weighted imaging evaluations will be discussed including lesion detection and localisation, for tumour staging and for the detection of suspected tumour recurrence. Limitations include inadequate lesion characterisation particularly differentiating prostatitis from cancer, and in distinguishing between BPH and central gland tumours.

  15. Radiative lifetimes of neutral gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Hartog, E A; Bilty, K A; Lawler, J E

    2011-01-01

    The current work is part of an ongoing study of radiative properties of rare earth neutral atoms motivated by research needs in several disparate fields including astrophysics, laser chemistry and lighting technology. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on a slow atomic beam has been used to measure radiative lifetimes, accurate to ±5%, for 136 levels of neutral gadolinium. Of the 136 levels, 6 are odd parity ranging in energy from 32 929 to 36 654 cm -1 , and the remaining 130 are even parity ranging from 17 750 to 34 175 cm -1 . This set of Gd i lifetimes represents a significant extension to the available published data, with 93 of the 136 level lifetimes measured for the first time. These lifetimes will provide the absolute normalization for a large set of measured Gd i transition probabilities.

  16. Chelates for Micronutrient Nutrition among Crops

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    lated metals could supply many of the micronutrient require- ments of plants. These chelates find use in a wide variety of agricultural crops. Applications for chelates vary from fertilizer additives, seed dressing to foliar sprays and hydroponics. Chelates and Chelating Agents. A chelate describes a kind of organic chemical ...

  17. Production and characterization of quality gadolinium oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarika, Samiran; Mohanta, Dambarudhar

    2013-01-01

    Rare earth system Gadolinium (Gd), in either pure form or oxide form, is highly stable against environmental attack. It has immense potential as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices. Being mechanically and thermally stable it is always difficult to obtain Gd 2 O 3 nanopowders directly from its bulk counterpart using conventional top-down approach. Recently, we have reported production of Gd 2 O 3 nanopowders by first converting bulk Gd 2 O 3 into a nitrate compound and subsequently reduced into a hydroxide product and finally to the oxide product (nanopowder form)

  18. FBFC's gadolinium fuel assembly manufacturing experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Eynde, M.; Belvegue, P.

    1999-01-01

    The burnable poison used by Framatome is gadolinium oxide integrated in the pellet by blending with UO 2 . This is the integrated poison which provides the largest experience feedback world-wide. Its main advantages are design flexibility and its well-known rod in reactor behaviour. FBFC's manufacturing experience with gadolinium is extensive. The first pellets were produced in 1986, present production averages 10 tons/year and cumulated experience reaches 47 tons. In parallel Framatome acquired gadolinium irradiation experience with more then 2 000 fuel assemblies in 33 reactors in 5 countries. Taking into account the increasing needs, a new gadolinium shop has been implemented in the FBFC Dessel plant. This shop, with a production capacity of 30 tU/yr is to be commissioned in the second quarter of 1999. It implements the most recent technological developments to achieve top product quality, safety and environment protection. (authors)

  19. Gadolinium sheet converter for neutron radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, C.T.S. [Laboratorio de Neutrongrafia em Tempo Real (LNRTR/PEN/COPPE), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Crispim, V.R. [Laboratorio de Neutrongrafia em Tempo Real (LNRTR/PEN/COPPE), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); PEN/COPPE-DNC/Escola Politecnica CT, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: verginia@con.ufrj.br; Santos, W.M.S. [Laboratorio de Colisao Atomica e Molecular (LACAM/IF), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2007-12-15

    This work describes a methodology developed for the confection of gadolinium sheet converter for neutron radiography using the gadolinium chloride (GdCl{sub 3}) as material converter. Though manufactured at a relatively low cost, they are as good as the sheet converter on the market. Here, we present neutron radiography of the penetrameter, the edge spread function, the modulation transfer function and characteristic curves for each set sheet-AA400 Kodak film.

  20. Novel polycatecholamide chelating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitl, F.L.; Raymond, K.N.

    1981-08-24

    Novel polybenzamide compounds useful for in vitro or in vivo chelation are described. Formulas of the compounds are given. To prepare them polyamines are reacted with 2,3-dimethoxy benzoyl chloride unsubstituted or substituted with SO/sub 3/H, SO/sub 3/M, NO/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/H or CO/sub 2/M as desired is reacted with a polyamine in an inert solvent then demethylated with BBr/sub 3/ or BCl/sub 3/ in an inert solvent. Where compounds symmetrically substituted on the terminal N's are desired, the polyamine is first reductively alkylated by reaction with an aldehyde or ketone and the resulting Schiff base is hydrogenated.

  1. Complexation of trivalent lanthanide cations by different chelation sites of malic and tartric acid (composition, stability and probable structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Riri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation of colorless gadolinium complexes (x,y,z between x gadolinium ions, y ligands and z protons of some organic acids has been studied in aqueous solution. In this work we shall present the results of investigations on the interaction of the gadolinium ion (Gd3+ with different chelation sites of malic and tartric acid formed in dilute solution for pH values between 5.50 and 7.50. The structures of these new organometallic complexes are Gd3(C4H4O52·(NO33·nH2O and Gd3(C4H4O62·(NO33·nH2O (C4H4O52-: malate ions and C4H4O62-: tartrate ions. These colorless gadolinium complexes of malate and tartrate ions have no absorption band UV–visible, the indirect photometry detection (IPD study; have identified major tri-nuclear complexes of these dicarboxylic acids, giving for these colorless complexes a (3,2,2 and (3,2,3, respectively. Composition and apparent stability constant depends on the acidity of the medium. To complement previous results and to propose probable structures for these new complexes detected in solution FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopy have been conducted to identify the different chelation sites for both ligands.

  2. New MR contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, C.D.; Subramanian, G.; Schneider, R.; Szeverenyi, N.E.; Rosenbaum, A.M.; Gagne, G.; Tillapaugh-Fay, G.; Berlin, R.; Ritter-Hrncirik, C.; Yu, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates an MR contrast agent-meglumine tris-(2,6-dicarboxypyridine) gadolinium (III) or gadolinium dipicolinate (Gd-DPC)-produced in-house. Rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital. For renal imaging, bowel motion artifact was minimized with glucagon (0.014 mg/kg, intravenous (IV)). Enhanced images were generated on a 2-T chemical shift imaging system with a 31-cm horizontal bore magnet after IV injection of Gd-DPC (100 μM/kg). Coronal sections of the kidneys and sagittal sections of the brain, 2 mm thick, were made. Six to eight excitations and 128 or 356 phase-encoding steps were used for each image. Control animals were injected with equivalent doses of gadopentetate dimeglumine

  3. Early Gadolinium Enhancement for Determination of Area at Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer-Hansen, Sophia; Leung, Steve W; Hsu, Li-Yueh

    2017-01-01

    between 10 and 15 min after contrast injection. AAR was defined as myocardium with blood flow difference in the size...... requires pathological validation. METHODS: Eleven dogs underwent 2 h of coronary artery occlusion and 48 h of reperfusion before imaging at 1.5-T. EGE imaging was performed 3 min after contrast administration with coverage of the entire left ventricle. Late gadolinium enhancement imaging was performed...... of enhancement by EGE compared with the size of AAR by microspheres (44.1 ± 15.8% vs. 42.7 ± 9.2%; p = 0.61), with good correlation (r = 0.88; p difference in the size of enhancement by EGE compared with enhancement...

  4. Role of gadolinium in MR imaging of sinonasal masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzieri, C.F.; Shah, M.; Smith, A.S.; Tarr, R.; Van Dyke, C.; Kaufman, B.; Krauss, D.; Lavertu, P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines whether additional clinically useful information can be obtained with the use of contrast-enhanced MR imaging, compared with nonenhanced MR imaging and enhanced CT, in the evaluation of patients with sinonasal masses. Twenty-one patients with CT evidence of a sinonasal mass were imaged at 1.5 T with T1 and T2 weighting and without and with gadolinium injection. The studies were interpreted independently and correlated with the surgical and pathologic findings. The contrast-enhanced MR images yielded additional clinically useful information in 13 of 21 cases. It was the only way to separate tumor from a mucocele in four of 13 cases. In two of 13 instances, it was the only modality that identified encephalocele as distinct from a tumor. In the remaining seven cases, more accurate delineation of the tumor margins was obtained

  5. SWI enhances vein detection using gadolinium in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggi, Pietro; Mazzoni, Lorenzo N; Moretti, Marco; Grammatico, Matteo; Chiti, Stefano; Massacesi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) combined with the FLAIR sequence provides the ability to depict in vivo the perivenous location of inflammatory demyelinating lesions – one of the most specific pathologic features of multiple sclerosis (MS). In addition, in MS white matter (WM) lesions, gadolinium-based contrast media (CM) can increase vein signal loss on SWI. This report focuses on two cases of WM inflammatory lesions enhancing on SWI images after CM injection. In these lesions in fact the CM increased the contrast between the parenchyma and the central vein allowing as well, in one of the two cases, the detection of a vein not visible on the same SWI sequence acquired before CM injection

  6. A toxicological study of gadolinium nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    The sensitization study in the guinea pig did not show gadolinium nitrate to have potential sensitizing properties. Skin application studies in the rabbit demonstrated that it was cutaneously a severe irritant. This material was considered an irritant in the rabbit eye application studies. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Growth, characterization and dielectric studies of gadolinium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Gadolinium fumarate heptahydrate single crystals were grown by the single gel diffusion technique using silica gel as a medium of growth. Nucleation rate of these crystals was studied corresponding to the effect of various growth parameters. An attempt was made to relate the experimental results with the classical ...

  8. [Retention of contrast media in the history of radiology : Sequelae of the former use of thorotrast and new challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kaick, G; Delorme, S

    2016-12-01

    Detection of gadolinium deposits in patients who have repeatedly been administered intravenous gadolinium chelates have given rise to concern regarding the long-term safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast media. Nevertheless, negative long-term clinical effects have not yet been observed. In some publications parallels have been drawn to the sequelae of thorotrast that was formerly used for arterial angiography. In this article the history of thorotrast use is briefly described and in particular why, despite warnings, this substance was used frequently and worldwide. A brief summary of the results of the German Thorotrast Study revealed that high excess rates were only observed for primary malignant liver tumors after a 15-year or longer latency period and to a lesser degree of leukemias, as well as for severe local complications due to paravascular injections, particularly in the neck region. Based on this historical review, we will venture to take stock of the outcome from the "success story" of this contrast agent.

  9. Ab initio coordination chemistry for nickel chelation motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudan, R Jesu Jaya; Kumari, J Lesitha Jeeva; Sudandiradoss, C

    2015-01-01

    Chelation therapy is one of the most appreciated methods in the treatment of metal induced disease predisposition. Coordination chemistry provides a way to understand metal association in biological structures. In this work we have implemented coordination chemistry to study nickel coordination due to its high impact in industrial usage and thereby health consequences. This paper reports the analysis of nickel coordination from a large dataset of nickel bound structures and sequences. Coordination patterns predicted from the structures are reported in terms of donors, chelate length, coordination number, chelate geometry, structural fold and architecture. The analysis revealed histidine as the most favored residue in nickel coordination. The most common chelates identified were histidine based namely HHH, HDH, HEH and HH spaced at specific intervals. Though a maximum coordination number of 8 was observed, the presence of a single protein donor was noted to be mandatory in nickel coordination. The coordination pattern did not reveal any specific fold, nevertheless we report preferable residue spacing for specific structural architecture. In contrast, the analysis of nickel binding proteins from bacterial and archeal species revealed no common coordination patterns. Nickel binding sequence motifs were noted to be organism specific and protein class specific. As a result we identified about 13 signatures derived from 13 classes of nickel binding proteins. The specifications on nickel coordination presented in this paper will prove beneficial for developing better chelation strategies.

  10. Complications of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis following repeated exposure to gadolinium in a man with hypothyroidism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Arpita

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a condition that has recently been recognized in patients with chronic renal disease and is associated with use of gadolinium-based contrast agents of ubiquitous use in magnetic resonance imaging scans. The condition is believed to arise through inadequate renal clearance of the gadolinium-based contrast agents, resulting in bodily deposition of the gadolinium; this is most widely recognized in the skin, but also occurs in other tissues. Case presentation We report the case of a 52-year-old Caucasian man with hypothyroidism and chronic renal disease who developed nephrogenic systemic fibrosis upon repeated exposure to gadolinium, and who presented with a subsequent malabsorption of levothyroxine. This malabsorption resolved only partially upon amelioration of other conditions that might contribute to malabsorption, including edema and infectious diarrhea. The presence of gadolinium was quantified in specimens from his gastrointestinal tract. Our patient otherwise demonstrated adequate gastrointestinal nutritive absorption, objectively shown by normal albumin levels, resolution of diarrhea, and maintenance of his bodily weight. Conclusions Our observations suggest that nephrogenic systemic fibrosis can also affect tissue of the gastrointestinal tract, potentially contributing to partial malabsorption of levothyroxine in patients with hypothyroidism.

  11. Gadolinium and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: time to tighten practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendichovszky, Iosif A. [University College London, Radiology and Physics Unit, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Marks, Stephen D. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Department of Paediatric Nephrology, London (United Kingdom); Simcock, Clare M.; Olsen, Oeystein E. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a relatively new entity, first described in 1997. Few cases have been reported, but the disease has high morbidity and mortality. To date it has been seen exclusively in patients with renal dysfunction. There is an emerging link with intravenous injection of gadolinium contrast agents, which has been suggested as a main triggering factor, with a lag time of days to weeks. Risk factors include the severity of renal impairment, major surgery, vascular events and other proinflammatory conditions. There is no reason to believe that children have an altered risk compared to the adult population. It is important that the paediatric radiologist acknowledges emerging information on NSF but at the same time considers the risk:benefit ratio prior to embarking on alternative investigations, as children with chronic kidney disease require high-quality diagnostic imaging. (orig.)

  12. Gadolinium and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: time to tighten practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendichovszky, Iosif A.; Marks, Stephen D.; Simcock, Clare M.; Olsen, Oeystein E.

    2008-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a relatively new entity, first described in 1997. Few cases have been reported, but the disease has high morbidity and mortality. To date it has been seen exclusively in patients with renal dysfunction. There is an emerging link with intravenous injection of gadolinium contrast agents, which has been suggested as a main triggering factor, with a lag time of days to weeks. Risk factors include the severity of renal impairment, major surgery, vascular events and other proinflammatory conditions. There is no reason to believe that children have an altered risk compared to the adult population. It is important that the paediatric radiologist acknowledges emerging information on NSF but at the same time considers the risk:benefit ratio prior to embarking on alternative investigations, as children with chronic kidney disease require high-quality diagnostic imaging. (orig.)

  13. Overview of current chelation practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Aydinok

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Deferoxamine (DFO is reference standard therapy for transfusional iron overload since the 1980s. Although it is a highly effective iron chelator, the compliance problem to subcutaneous administration of DFO remains as the major problem. The oral chelator Deferiprone (DFP has no marketing licence in North America, however, it has been licensed in India since 1994 and the European Union (EU granted marketing approval for DFP in 1999, specifically for patients with thalassemia major when DFO is inadequate, intolerable or unacceptable. There are still limited data available on the use of DFP in children between 6 and 10 years of age, and no data on DFP use in children under 6 years of age. Subsequently the oral chelator Deferasirox (DFX was approved by FDA and EMA for the treatment of patients with transfusional iron overload -older than 2 years of age- as first line therapy, in 2005 and 2006 respectively. The primary objective of iron chelation is to maintain body iron at safe levels at all times but once iron is accumulated, the objective of iron chelation is to reduce tissue iron to safe levels which is a slow process. The chelation regimen, dose and frequency of administration, of the chelator(s are mainly determined based on body iron burden, presence of myocardial iron and the transfusional iron loading rate. A proper monitoring of chelation is of importance for measuring the response rate to a particular regimen and providing dose adjustments to enhance chelation efficacy and to avoid toxicity. Efficacy of a chelation regimen may exhibit individual variability resulting from factors such as absorbtion and metabolism of the chelator. Tolerability and compliance are also individual variables effecting the response to chelation. Understanding of advantages and limitations of chelators, accurately determining chelation needs of patients with iron overload and designing individualized chelation regimens with less toxicity but optimum efficacy

  14. Contrast enhancement by lipid-based MRI contrast agents in mouse atherosclerotic plaques; a longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Adel, Brigit; van der Graaf, Linda M.; Que, Ivo; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Löwik, Clemens W.; Poelmann, Robert E.; van der Weerd, Louise

    2013-01-01

    The use of contrast-enhanced MRI to enable in vivo specific characterization of atherosclerotic plaques is increasing. In this study the intrinsic ability of two differently sized gadolinium-based contrast agents to enhance atherosclerotic plaques in ApoE(-/-) mice was evaluated with MRI. We

  15. Iron Chelation and Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey J. Weigel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Histochemical and MRI studies have demonstrated that MS (multiple sclerosis patients have abnormal deposition of iron in both gray and white matter structures. Data is emerging indicating that this iron could partake in pathogenesis by various mechanisms, e.g., promoting the production of reactive oxygen species and enhancing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Iron chelation therapy could be a viable strategy to block iron-related pathological events or it can confer cellular protection by stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor 1α, a transcription factor that normally responds to hypoxic conditions. Iron chelation has been shown to protect against disease progression and/or limit iron accumulation in some neurological disorders or their experimental models. Data from studies that administered a chelator to animals with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of MS, support the rationale for examining this treatment approach in MS. Preliminary clinical studies have been performed in MS patients using deferoxamine. Although some side effects were observed, the large majority of patients were able to tolerate the arduous administration regimen, i.e., 6–8 h of subcutaneous infusion, and all side effects resolved upon discontinuation of treatment. Importantly, these preliminary studies did not identify a disqualifying event for this experimental approach. More recently developed chelators, deferasirox and deferiprone, are more desirable for possible use in MS given their oral administration, and importantly, deferiprone can cross the blood–brain barrier. However, experiences from other conditions indicate that the potential for adverse events during chelation therapy necessitates close patient monitoring and a carefully considered administration regimen.

  16. Inorganic nanocrystals as contrast agents in MRI:synthesis, coating and introducing multifunctionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic nanocrystals have myriad applications in medicine, which includes their use as drug or gene delivery complexes, therapeutic hyperthermia agents, in diagnostic systems and as contrast agents in a wide range of medical imaging techniques. For MRI, nanocrystals can produce contrast themselves, of which iron oxides have been most extensively explored, or be given a coating that generates MR contrast, for example gold nanoparticles coated with gadolinium chelates. These MR-active nanocrystals can be used in imaging of the vasculature, liver and other organs, as well as molecular imaging, cell tracking and theranostics. Due to these exciting applications, synthesizing and rendering these nanocrystals water-soluble and biocompatible is therefore highly desirable. We will discuss aqueous phase and organic phase methods for synthesizing inorganic nanocrystals such as gold, iron oxides and quantum dots. The pros and cons of the various methods will be highlighted. We explore various methods for making nanocrystals biocompatible, i.e. directly synthesizing nanocrystals coated with biocompatible coatings, ligand substitution, amphiphile coating and embedding in carrier matrices that can be made biocompatible. Various examples will be highlighted and their applications explained. These examples signify that synthesizing biocompatible nanocrystals with controlled properties has been achieved by numerous research groups and can be applied for a wide range of applications. Therefore we expect to see reports of preclinical applications of ever more complex MRI-active nanoparticles and their wider exploitation, as well as in novel clinical settings. PMID:23303729

  17. Theranostic liposomes as a bimodal carrier for magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and photosensitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skupin-Mrugalska, Paulina; Sobotta, Lukasz; Warowicka, Alicja; Wereszczynska, Beata; Zalewski, Tomasz; Gierlich, Piotr; Jarek, Marcin; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Kempka, Marek; Gapinski, Jacek; Jurga, Stefan; Mielcarek, Jadwiga

    2018-03-01

    The present study is focused on the development of liposomes bearing gadolinium chelate (GdLip) providing two functionalities for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photodynamic therapy of cancer. A lipid derivative of gadolinium(III) diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid salt (GdDTPA1) was inserted in the liposomal membrane and served as MRI contrast agent whereas a zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) was used as a model photosensitizer. In addition to conventional liposomes, pegylated lipids were used for the preparation of "stealth" liposomes. The characterization of different GdLip formulations involved evaluation of the liposomes size by nanoparticle tracking analysis, thermal phase behavior by differential scanning calorimetry and ZnPc-mediated singlet oxygen production. Furthermore, relaxivity measurements were performed as well as cytotoxicity and photodynamic activity against cancerous and normal cell lines was studied. Size and thermal behavior were only slightly influenced by GdLip composition, however it distinctly affected singlet oxygen production of ZnPc-loaded GdLip. The quantum yields of singlet oxygen generation by zinc phthalocyanine incorporated in GdLip containing cationic or/and pegylated lipids were smaller than those obtained for non-pegylated carriers with l-α-phosphatidylglycerol. In general, all formulations of GdLip, irrespectively of composition, were characterized by relaxivities higher than those of commercially used contrast agents (e.g. Magnevist®). NMR study has shown that the incorporation of ZnPc into the formulations of GdLip increases the relaxation parameters r 1 and r 2 , compared to the values for the non-loaded vesicles. GdDTPA1 did not influence the photodynamic activity of ZnPc against HeLa cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. MR imaging of hydrogel filament embolic devices loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide or gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killer, Monika; Schmitt, Anne [Paracelsus Medical University, Neuroscience Institute, Christian Doppler Clinic, Salzburg (Austria); Keeley, Edward M.; Cruise, Gregory M. [MicroVention Terumo, Tustin, CA (United States); McCoy, Mark R. [Paracelsus Medical University, Departments of Radiology and MRI, Christian Doppler Clinic, Salzburg (Austria)

    2011-06-15

    We evaluated hydrogel filaments loaded with barium sulphate and either gadolinium or superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) in an effort to develop an embolic material that is visible with fluoroscopic and magnetic resonance imaging. Hydrogel filaments were prepared with gadolinium and iron concentrations ranging from 1,500 to 7,500 and 500 to 2,500 ppm, respectively. The filaments were encased in agar and imaged using an MR scanner. Embolisation of eight aneurysms (seven bifurcation, one sidewall) in seven rabbits was performed using hydrogel filaments loaded with gadolinium (n = 4) or SPIO (n = 4). Angiographic evaluations occurred immediately post-treatment and at 13 weeks. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) evaluations occurred immediately post-treatment or 13 weeks post-treatment. Based on the in vitro results, we selected 4,500 and 2,000 ppm for gadolinium and iron loadings, respectively, for the in vivo experiments. Loading the filaments with gadolinium or SPIO did not affect the angiographic results, as embolic masses were readily evident with some distinguishing of individual filaments. In MRA, the hydrogel filaments loaded with SPIO were hypointense, and the hydrogel filaments loaded with Gd were hyperintense. The hyperintensity of the Gd-loaded filaments confounded the ability to distinguish between flow and the embolic devices. The hypointensity of the hydrogel filaments loaded with SPIO provided sufficient contrast between the embolic devices and the blood flow to allow of aneurysm occlusion evaluation using MRA. Based on these results, we are focusing on loading hydrogel filaments with SPIO in an effort to provide adequate visualisation for use in MR-guided interventions. (orig.)

  19. Determination of gadolinium by the method of derivative spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrova, N.N.; Mishchenko, V.T.; Poluehktov, N.S.; Mukomel', V.L.

    1988-01-01

    Technique for gadolinium determination at the presence of interfering rare earth elements, which is based on the derivative spectrophotometry method, is suggested. The technique is of increased selectivity and allows to determine gadolinium in the mixtures with elements, which presence in solution makes impossible to determine gadolinium directly. At binary mixtures analysis Sr relative standard deviation does not exceed 0.03, while at the analysis of more complex mixtures Sr increases up to 0.06

  20. Calculation qualification of gadolinium burnable poisons in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaucheprat, P.

    1988-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis constitutes the qualification on the one end of Appolo-Neptune scheme for the gadolinium burnable poison in a pressurized water reactor, and on the other end of basis nuclear data on natural gadolinium. This study has permitted to reduce by a factor 3 the actual incertitude on the gadolinium poison comparatively at precisions cited in international benchmarks calculations [fr

  1. Prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways in patients with portal hypertension: demonstration by gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldana, Rogerio Pedreschi; Bezerra, Alexandre Araujo Sergio; Cecin, Alexnadre Oliveira; Souza, Luis Ronan Marques Ferreira de; Goldman, Susan Menasce; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Szejnfeld, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    To demonstrate the usefulness of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in the evaluation of prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways. We reviewed the images from 40 patients with portal hypertension studied with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and selected illustrative cases of prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways. The scans were performed using high field equipment (1.5 Tesla) and a 3 D volume technique. Image were obtained after intravenous injection of paramagnetic contrast media using a power injector. Magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated with precision the porto-systemic collateral pathways, particularly when investigating extensive territories or large vessels. The cases presented show the potential of this method in the investigation of patients with portal hypertension. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is a useful method for the evaluation of patients with portal hypertension and prominent collateral pathways. (author)

  2. Thermal diffusivity of samarium-gadolinium zirconate solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, W.; Wan, C.L.; Xu, Q.; Wang, J.D.; Qu, Z.X.

    2007-01-01

    We synthesized samarium-gadolinium zirconate solid solutions and determined their thermal diffusivities, Young's moduli and thermal expansion coefficients, which are very important for their application in thermal barrier coatings. Samarium-gadolinium zirconate solid solutions have extremely low thermal diffusivity between 20 and 600 deg. C. The solid solutions have lower Young's moduli and higher thermal expansion coefficients than those of pure samarium and gadolinium zirconates. This combination of characteristics is promising for the application of samarium and gadolinium zirconates in gas turbines. The mechanism of phonon scattering by point defects is discussed

  3. Magnetic nano-particles, contrast agent for NMR imaging; Nanoparticules magnetiques, agents de contraste pour l'imagerie par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazeau, F.; Wilhelm, C.; Bacri, J.C. [Universite Paris 6 / associe a Paris 7, Lab. Milieux Desordonnes et Heterogenes (LMDH), 75 - Paris (France); Clement, O. [Hopital Necker-Enfants-Malades, Lab. Recherche en Imagerie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of contrast media in NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) imaging is to disturb the magnetization of surrounding protons by generating a local magnetic field. There are 2 types of contrast agents: paramagnetic molecular complexes and ferromagnetic nano-particles. Paramagnetic molecular complexes contain paramagnetic ions such as Gd{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 3+} or Mn{sup 2+}. Ferromagnetic nano-particles are monocrystals of iron oxide whose diameters have a magnitude of about ten nanometers, each particle acts as a little magnet of 10{sup 4} Bohr magnetons. These nano-particles have to be put in colloidal suspension in a bio-compatible solvent in order to be injected into the body. The effect of nano-particles on surrounding protons is far more important than that of paramagnetic complexes because their magnetic moment is increased by a factor 1000. Paramagnetic complexes (like gadolinium chelate) do not aggregate to plasma proteins and as a consequence they go easily through capillary blood vessels, and scatter quickly in the aqueous extra-cellular compartments, they are eliminated through kidneys in a matter of hours. Magnetic nano-particles have a different kinetics inside the body that depends strongly on their sizes and the nature of their surface. Clinical uses of magnetic nano-particles involve pathology in which liver, spleen, or bone marrow are concerned, or lymphography or the visualization of the piling-up of macrophages in any inflammatory zones. (A.C.)

  4. Dialysis and contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morcos, Sameh K.; Thomsen, Henrik S.; Webb, Judith A.W.

    2002-01-01

    In a previous survey we revealed uncertainty among responders about (a) whether or not to perform hemodialysis in patients with severely reduced renal function who had received contrast medium; and (b) when to perform hemodialysis in patients on regular treatment with hemodialysis or continuous ambulatory dialysis who received contrast medium. Therefore, the Contrast Media Safety Committee of The European Society of Urogenital Radiology decided to review the literature and to issue guidelines. The committee performed a Medline search. Based on this, a report and guidelines were prepared. The report was discussed at the Ninth European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Genoa, Italy. Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis safely remove both iodinated and gadolinium-based contrast media. The effectiveness of hemodialysis depends on many factors including blood and dialysate flow rate, permeability of dialysis membrane, duration of hemodialysis and molecular size, protein binding, hydrophilicity, and electrical charge of the contrast medium. Generally, several hemodialysis sessions are needed to removal all contrast medium, whereas it takes 3 weeks for continuous ambulatory dialysis to remove the agent completely. There is no need to schedule the dialysis in relation to the injection of iodinated or MR contrast media or the injection of contrast agent in relation to the dialysis program. Hemodialysis does not protect poorly functioning kidneys against contrast-medium-induced nephrotoxicity. Simple guidelines are given. (orig.)

  5. Dialysis and contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morcos, Sameh K. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Sheffield S5 7AU (United Kingdom); Thomsen, Henrik S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology 54E2, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, Herlev Ringvej 75, 2730 Herlev (Denmark); Webb, Judith A.W. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, London EC1A 7BE (United Kingdom)

    2002-12-01

    In a previous survey we revealed uncertainty among responders about (a) whether or not to perform hemodialysis in patients with severely reduced renal function who had received contrast medium; and (b) when to perform hemodialysis in patients on regular treatment with hemodialysis or continuous ambulatory dialysis who received contrast medium. Therefore, the Contrast Media Safety Committee of The European Society of Urogenital Radiology decided to review the literature and to issue guidelines. The committee performed a Medline search. Based on this, a report and guidelines were prepared. The report was discussed at the Ninth European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Genoa, Italy. Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis safely remove both iodinated and gadolinium-based contrast media. The effectiveness of hemodialysis depends on many factors including blood and dialysate flow rate, permeability of dialysis membrane, duration of hemodialysis and molecular size, protein binding, hydrophilicity, and electrical charge of the contrast medium. Generally, several hemodialysis sessions are needed to removal all contrast medium, whereas it takes 3 weeks for continuous ambulatory dialysis to remove the agent completely. There is no need to schedule the dialysis in relation to the injection of iodinated or MR contrast media or the injection of contrast agent in relation to the dialysis program. Hemodialysis does not protect poorly functioning kidneys against contrast-medium-induced nephrotoxicity. Simple guidelines are given. (orig.)

  6. Chelators for investigating zinc metalloneurochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Radford, Robert John; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    The physiology and pathology of mobile zinc signaling has become an important topic in metalloneurochemistry. To study the action of mobile zinc effectively, specialized tools are required that probe the temporal and positional changes of zinc ions within live tissue and cells. In the present article we describe the design and implementation of selective zinc chelators as antagonists to interrogate the function of mobile zinc, with an emphasis on the pools of vesicular zinc in the terminals o...

  7. Combination therapies in iron chelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Origa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The availability of oral iron chelators and new non-invasive methods for early detection and treatment of iron overload, have significantly improved the life expectancy and quality of life of patients with b thalassemia major. However, monotherapy is not effective in all patients for a variety of reasons. We analyzed the most relevant reports recently published on alternating or combined chelation therapies in thalassemia major with special attention to safety aspects and to their effects in terms of reduction of iron overload in different organs, improvement of complications, and survival. When adverse effects, such as gastrointestinal upset with deferasirox or infusional site reactions with deferoxamine are not tolerable and organ iron is in an acceptable range, alternating use of two chelators (drugs taken sequentially on different days, but not taken on the same day together may be a winning choice. The association deferiprone and deferoxamine should be the first choice in case of heart failure and when dangerously high levels of cardiac iron exist. Further research regarding the safety and efficacy of the most appealing combination treatment, deferiprone and deferasirox, is needed before recommendations for routine clinical practice can be made.

  8. Toxicity of contrast media: an update.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, MA ten; Wetzels, J.F.M.

    2008-01-01

    Renal toxicity of iodinated radiocontrast media (contrastinduced nephropathy; CIN) is a major cause of acute renal failure in hospitalised patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is applied as an alternative technique but the use of gadolinium (Gd) containing contrast media carries the risk of

  9. Recent hot topics in contrast media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S

    2011-01-01

    This editorial reviews the way in which the facts related to the safety of iodinated and gadolinium based contrast agents have emerged over the last two decades. This is especially important given their ever increasing usage in modern computed tomographic (CT) and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)...

  10. Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadjian, V.

    1987-01-01

    The origine of nuclear magnetic resonance signal is reminded and different ways for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging are presented, especially, modifications of tissus relaxation times. Investigations have focused on development of agents incorporating either paramagnetic ions or stable free radicals. Pharmacological and toxicological aspects are developed. The diagnostic potential of these substances is illustrated by the example of gadolinium complexes [fr

  11. Recent hot topics in contrast media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S

    2011-01-01

    This editorial reviews the way in which the facts related to the safety of iodinated and gadolinium based contrast agents have emerged over the last two decades. This is especially important given their ever increasing usage in modern computed tomographic (CT) and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI...

  12. Cost and availability of gadolinium for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, O.H.

    1985-06-01

    Gadolinium is currently planned for use as a soluble neutron poison in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants to prevent criticality of solutions of spent fuel. Gadolinium is relatively rare and expensive. The present study was undertaken therefore to estimate whether this material is likely to be available in quantities sufficient for fuel reprocessing and at reasonable prices. It was found that gadolinium, one of 16 rare earth elements, appears in the marketplace as a by-product and that its present supply is a function of the production rate of other more prevalent rare earths. The potential demand for gadolinium in a fuel reprocessing facility serving a future fast reactor industry amounts to only a small fraction of the supply. At the present rate of consumption, domestic supplies of rare earths containing gadolinium are adequate to meet national needs (including fuel reprocessing) for over 100 years. With access to foreign sources, US demands can be met well beyond the 21st century. It is concluded therefore that the supply of gadolinium will quite likely be more than adequate for reprocessing spent fuel for the early generation of fast reactors. The current price of 99.99% pure gadolinium oxide lies in the range $50/lb to $65/lb (1984 dollars). By the year 2020, in time for reprocessing spent fuel from an early generation of large fast reactors, the corresponding values are expected to lie in the $60/lb to $75/lb (1984 dollars) price range. This increase is modest and its economic impact on nuclear fuel reprocessing would be minor. The economic potential for recovering gadolinium from the wastes of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants (which use gadolinium neutron poison) was also investigated. The cost of recycled gadolinium was estimated at over twelve times the cost of fresh gadolinium, and thus recycle using current recovery technology is not economical. 15 refs., 4 figs., 11 tabs

  13. Gadolinium-DTPA: value in MR imaging of extraspinal musculoskeletal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, M.C.; Sharif, H.S.; Aabed, M.Y.; Al Shahed, M.S.; Sammak, B.M.; Clark, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    To determine if paramagnetic contrast agents can improve the detection, delineation, and characterization of extraspinal musculoskeletal infections (MSI) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, 42 patients with clinical suspicion of MSI underwent MR imaging before and after intravenous administration of gadolinium-DTPA. The lesions consisted of 27 proven infections and 15 noninfective conditions. Specificity and accuracy in identifying infective lesions averaged 80% and 84%, respectively, on precontrast studies and 80% and 89% on the enhanced examinations, with no statistically significant difference. Rim enhancement around abscess loculi was the only pathognomonic sign of infection seen in ten patients with chronic osteomyelitis and pyogenic or tuberculous infections. In 17 patients with acute osteomyelitis, brucellosis, or mycetoma, detection and delineation of the lesions were best on precontrast studies, while postcontrast examinations resulted in underestimation of the extent of abnormalities in all cases. We conclude that intravenous gadolinium-DTPA has limited usefulness in the MR evaluation of extraspinal MSI. (orig.)

  14. Gadolinium-DTPA: value in MR imaging of extraspinal musculoskeletal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, M.C. [Dept. of Radiology, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Sharif, H.S. [Dept. of Radiology, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Aabed, M.Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al Shahed, M.S. [Dept. of Radiology, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Sammak, B.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Clark, D.C. [Dept. of Radiology, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1993-12-01

    To determine if paramagnetic contrast agents can improve the detection, delineation, and characterization of extraspinal musculoskeletal infections (MSI) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, 42 patients with clinical suspicion of MSI underwent MR imaging before and after intravenous administration of gadolinium-DTPA. The lesions consisted of 27 proven infections and 15 noninfective conditions. Specificity and accuracy in identifying infective lesions averaged 80% and 84%, respectively, on precontrast studies and 80% and 89% on the enhanced examinations, with no statistically significant difference. Rim enhancement around abscess loculi was the only pathognomonic sign of infection seen in ten patients with chronic osteomyelitis and pyogenic or tuberculous infections. In 17 patients with acute osteomyelitis, brucellosis, or mycetoma, detection and delineation of the lesions were best on precontrast studies, while postcontrast examinations resulted in underestimation of the extent of abnormalities in all cases. We conclude that intravenous gadolinium-DTPA has limited usefulness in the MR evaluation of extraspinal MSI. (orig.)

  15. Liver nodules. MR imaging using extracellular gadolinium agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Honda, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular gadolinium (Gd)-containing contrast medium, including gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA), has been playing a main role in the diagnostic MR imaging of the liver. Its significance is two-fold: assessment of the degree of neovascularity or angiogenesis in its early dynamic phase, and that of bulk of interstitium in its equilibrium phase. With the advent of gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA), which can be used as a dynamic study agent by bolus injection in addition to its original use as a tissue-specific agent, some possibility has been suggested that extracellular Gd agent would be no longer available in the near future in the field of liver MR imaging. Neovascularity or arterial supply of a lesion may well be assessed by Gd-EOB-DTPA, when carefully selected pulse sequence and well designed injection protocol are used, as well as by Gd-DTPA. However, the pertinent assessment of interstitium or stroma can never be achieved by Gd-EOB-DTPA or any other contrast medium present. The interstitium of neoplasm, typically called as stromal fibrosis, is generated through the interaction between the neoplasm per se and its host, and its clinicopathological significance related to disease prognosis has well been established in some disease entities. Extracellular Gd agent is the only contrast medium that can provide information regarding the tumor stroma in a simple, easy, safe and non-invasive fashion, when properly used. This review article discusses, dynamic MR imaging features of representative liver diseases, including several recent topics. From technical point of view, 3D gradient-echo sequence with fat suppression should be used for dynamic studies along with tailored injection protocol using autoinjector and saline flush. Vascularity of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can now be properly assessed by dynamic MR with approximately 90% concordance with CT during hepatic arteriography. Portal phase images can be used to

  16. Facile Synthesis of Gd-Functionalized Gold Nanoclusters as Potential MRI/CT Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Le

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Multi-modal imaging plays a key role in the earlier detection of disease. In this work, a facile bioinspired method was developed to synthesize Gd-functionalized gold nanoclusters (Gd-Au NCs. The Gd-Au NCs exhibit a uniform size, with an average size of 5.6 nm in dynamic light scattering (DLS, which is a bit bigger than gold clusters (3.74 nm, DLS, while the fluorescent properties of Gd-Au NCs are almost the same as that of Au NCs. Moreover, the Gd-Au NCs exhibit a high longitudinal relaxivity value (r1 of 22.111 s−1 per mM of Gd in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, which is six times higher than that of commercial Magnevist (A complex of gadolinium with a chelating agent, diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid, Gd-DTPA, r1 = 3.56 mM−1·s−1. Besides, as evaluated by nano single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and computed tomography (CT the Gd-Au NCs have a potential application as CT contrast agents because of the Au element. Finally, the Gd-Au NCs show little cytotoxicity, even when the Au concentration is up to 250 μM. Thus, the Gd-Au NCs can act as multi-modal imaging contrast agents.

  17. Gadolinium Magnetic resonance with a diagnosis of Bell's facial palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira Canellas, A.; Sanchez Torres, C.; Navarrete, M.; Grive Isern, E.; Capellades Font, J.; Navarrete, M.

    1993-01-01

    The intratemporal pathway of the facial nerve has been prospectively studied by means of gadolinium MR in 12 patients with a diagnosis of Bell's facial palsy. All the cases presented total facial paralysis and were studied in the acute phase of the disease. With MR, the intratemporal pathway of the facial nerve has been viewed before and after the administration of a paramagnetic contrast medium, revealing uptake involving mainly the labyrinthine segment and the geniculate ganglion in every case. In no case did the MR findings influence the therapeutic approach, nor did they provide information of prognostic value. Therefore, this exploration is not considered necessary in the assessment of typical facial paralyses. The possible advantages of an MR study with contrast medium in facial paralysis specially apply to those cases with atypical clinical presentation, making it possible to establish a positive diagnosis, ruling out other lesions that may have a similar clinical presentantion. Thus, for the time being, a diagnosis of Bell's paralysis is not necessarily an exclusion diagnosis. (Author)

  18. Prevention of isoflurane-induced preconditioning by 5-hydroxydecanoate and gadolinium: possible involvement of mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium and stretch-activated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriou, V; Chiari, P; Knezynski, S; Bastien, O; Loufoua, J; Lehot, J J; Foëx, P; Annat, G; Ovize, M

    2000-09-01

    Both mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium (MKATP) channels (selectively blocked by 5-hydroxydecanoate) and stretch-activated channels (blocked by gadolinium) have been involved in the mechanism of ischemic preconditioning. Isoflurane can reproduce the protection afforded by ischemic preconditioning. We sought to determine whether isoflurane-induced preconditioning may involve MKATP and stretch-activated channels. Anesthetized open-chest rabbits underwent 30 min of coronary occlusion followed by 3 h of reperfusion. Before this, rabbits were randomized into one of six groups and underwent a treatment period consisting of either no intervention for 40 min (control group; n = 9) or 15 min of isoflurane inhalation (1.1% end tidal) followed by a 15-min washout period (isoflurane group; n = 9). The two groups received an intravenous bolus dose of either 5-hydroxydecanoate (5 mg/kg) or gadolinium (40 micromol/kg) before coronary occlusion and reperfusion (5-hydroxydecanoate, n = 9; gadolinium, n = 7). Two additional groups received 5-hydroxydecanoate or gadolinium before isoflurane exposure (isoflurane-5-hydroxydecanoate, n = 10; isoflurane-gadolinium, n = 8). Area at risk and infarct size were assessed by blue dye injection and tetrazolium chloride staining. Area at risk was comparable among the six groups (29 +/- 7, 30 +/- 5, 27 +/- 6, 35 +/- 7, 31 +/- 7, and 27 +/- 4% of the left ventricle in the control, isoflurane, isoflurane-5-hydroxydecanoate, 5-hydroxydecanoate, isoflurane-gadolinium, and gadolinium groups, respectively). Infarct size averaged 60 +/- 20% (SD) in untreated controls versus 54 +/- 27 and 65 +/- 15% of the risk zone in 5-hydroxydecanoate- and gadolinium-treated controls (P = nonsignificant). In contrast, infarct size in the isoflurane group was significantly reduced to 26 +/- 11% of the risk zone (P < 0.05 vs.control). Both 5-hydroxydecanoate and gadolinium prevented this attenuation: infarct size averaged 68 +/- 23 and 56 +/- 21

  19. The application of Anthropogenic Gadolinium as a tracer in ground and surface water: examples from France and the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaver, G.; Verheul, M.; Petelet-Giraud, E.; Negrel, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Gadolinium chelates have been used since 1988 as contrasts agents in medical imaging (MRI) and produce positive anthropogenic Gd anomalies in rare element shale normalized patterns (REEnasc) of river and lake waters. Both in the Netherlands and France the presence of a positive Gd anomaly in surface and groundwater is used as a common tool in complex surface-surface and surface-groundwater studies. In this poster 3 examples of this common practice are given. The "Ile du Chambon" catchment (100 ha) is located in the Allier Valley, within Oligocene alluvial formations (sand and gravel). The nitrate content in the wells of the drinking water supply is ≥ 50 mg/l and two sources for the origin of the nitrates are hypothesized: agriculture or wastewater from a waste water treatment plant. Widory et al. (2005), using a coupled chemical (Cl and NO3) and isotopic (nitrogen and boron) approach, could show that the wastewater was the main source of the nitrate pollution. The presence of a Gd anomaly in the shale normalized rare earth patterns of wells contaminated by the waste water confirms the findings of Widory et al. (2005). In the second case the Gd anomaly is used to follow the infiltration of river water into a small lake in the Netherlands. During dry periods in this small river, Meuse water with a distinct Gd anomaly is fed into this river. The REE were monitored in the river, in a piezometer installed in the dike between the river and the lake and in the lake before, during and after the Meuse water was fed into this river. With the time series analyses the infiltration of the Meuse water into the dike and the small lake could be clearly followed. In a third case, in the center of the Netherlands, the flow of inlet Meuse water with a distinct Gd anomaly into a polder and subsequently from the larger into the smaller ditches of this polder were followed by analyzing the REEs. In such dry periods the ditches in the polder are also fed by groundwater that does not

  20. Contrast-enhanced peripheral MRA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Yousef W; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2012-01-01

    -state MRA. Gadolinium(Gd)-based contrast agents are used for CE-MRA of the peripheral arteries. Extracellular Gd agents have a pharmacokinetic profile similar to iodinated contrast media. Accordingly, these agents are employed for first-pass MRA. Blood-pool Gd-based agents are characterized by prolonged......In the last decade contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) has gained wide acceptance as a valuable tool in the diagnostic work-up of patients with peripheral arterial disease. This review presents current concepts in peripheral CE-MRA with emphasis on MRI technique and contrast...... MRI contrast agent is injected intravenously and T1-weighted images are acquired in the subsequent arterial first-pass phase. In order to achieve high quality MR angiograms without interfering venous contamination or artifacts, a number of factors need to be taken into account. This includes magnetic...

  1. Characterization of antibody-chelator conjugates: Determination of chelator content by terbium fluorescence titration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, K.D.; Schnobrich, K.E.; Johnson, D.K. (Abbott Laboratories, Department 90M, Abbott Park, IL (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Fluorescence titrations were performed by adding varying mole ratios of terbium(III) to antibody conjugates formed by benzyl isothiocyanate derivatives of three different polyaminopolycarboxylate chelators (NTA, EDTA, and DTPA) and the results compared to values for average chelator content obtained by cobalt-57 binding assays. For two different murine monoclonal antibodies, the average chelator content obtained by terbium fluorescence titration correlated closely with that measured by the cobalt-57 binding assay. It is concluded that lanthanide fluorescence titrations provide a useful alternative to radiometal binding assays for the determination of chelator content in protein-chelator conjugates.

  2. Beliefs about chelation among thalassemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trachtenberg Felicia L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding patients’ views about medication is crucial to maximize adherence. Thalassemia is a congenital blood disorder requiring chronic blood transfusions and daily iron chelation therapy. Methods The Beliefs in Medicine Questionnaire (BMQ was used to assess beliefs in chelation in thalassemia patients from North America and London in the Thalassemia Longitudinal Cohort (TLC of the Thalassemia Clinical Research Network (TCRN. Chelation adherence was based on patient report of doses administered out of those prescribed in the last four weeks. Results Of 371 patients (ages 5-58y, mean 24y, 93% were transfused and 92% receiving chelation (26% deferoxamine (DFO; a slow subcutaneous infusion via portable pump, 63% oral, 11% combination. Patients expressed high “necessity” for transfusion (96%, DFO chelation (92% and oral chelation (89%, with lower “concern” about treatment (48%, 39%, 19% respectively. Concern about oral chelation was significantly lower than that of DFO (p Conclusions Despite their requirement for multimodal therapy, thalassemia patients have positive views about medicine, more so than in other disease populations. Patients may benefit from education about the tolerability of chelation and strategies to effectively cope with side effects, both of which might be beneficial in lowering body iron burden. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00661804

  3. Iron mobilization using chelation and phlebotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flaten, T. P.; Aaseth, J.; Andersen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    or subcutaneously, mostly on a daily basis. Thus, there is an obvious need to find and develop new effective iron chelators for oral use. In later years, particularly two such oral iron chelators have shown promise and have been approved for clinical use, namely deferiprone (Ferriprox) and deferasirox (Exjade...

  4. Removal of gadolinium nitrate from heavy water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W.

    2000-03-22

    Work was conducted to develop a cost-effective process to purify 181 55-gallon drums containing spent heavy water moderator (D2O) contaminated with high concentrations of gadolinium nitrate, a chemical used as a neutron poison during former nuclear reactor operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These drums also contain low level radioactive contamination, including tritium, which complicates treatment options. Presently, the drums of degraded moderator are being stored on site. It was suggested that a process utilizing biological mechanisms could potentially lower the total cost of heavy water purification by allowing the use of smaller equipment with less product loss and a reduction in the quantity of secondary waste materials produced by the current baseline process (ion exchange).

  5. Effect of organic bases on extraction of gadolinium carboxylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhan, V.V.; Frankovskij, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of pyridine, 2-aminopyridine, benzylamine, antipyrine and o-phenanthroline on the extraction of capronates and bromocapronates of gadolinium with chloroform is studied. Out of the studied organic bases benzylamine produces the highest synergetic effect. In the absence of organic bases gadolinium carboxylates, solvated by three molecules of carbonic acids, are extracted into organic phase. A possihility of extractional separation of gadolinium from comparable amounts of iron with the mixture of 1 M solutions of caproic or bromocaproic acids with 1 M benzylamine from 0.1 M solution of tartaric acids is shown [ru

  6. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  7. Indications and contraindications for contrast-enhanced MRI and CT during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkermann, H.

    2007-01-01

    There are no reports about negative effects on the fetus of the application of gadolinium-containing contrast media to pregnant mothers. Iodine-containing contrast media may lead to a transient hypothyroidism in the newborn. This will be detected with certainty by the neonatal TSH screening. Iodine- or gadolinium-containing contrast media may be used in pregnant women if indispensable. In the gut of breastfed children less than 1% of the recommended pediatric doses of contrast media are found after both types of contrast media have been given to their mothers. Therefore there are no reasons against the use of contrast media during the nursing period. (orig.) [de

  8. Contrast enhancement by differently sized paramagnetic MRI contrast agents in mice with two phenotypes of atherosclerotic plaque

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bochove, Glenda S.; Paulis, Leonie E. M.; Segers, Dolf; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Krams, Rob; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J.

    2011-01-01

    Interest in the use of contrast-enhanced MRI to enable in vivo specific characterization of atherosclerotic plaques is increasing. In this study the intrinsic ability of three differently sized gadolinium-based contrast agents to permeate different mouse plaque phenotypes was evaluated with MRI. A

  9. Exogenous contrast agents for thermoacoustic imaging: An investigation into the underlying sources of contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogunlade, Olumide; Beard, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Thermoacoustic imaging at microwave excitation frequencies is limited by the low differential contrast exhibited by high water content tissues. To overcome this, exogenous thermoacoustic contrast agents based on gadolinium compounds, iron oxide, and single wall carbon nanotubes have previously been suggested and investigated. However, these previous studies did not fully characterize the electric, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties of these agents thus precluding identification of the underlying sources of contrast. To address this, measurements of the complex permittivity, complex permeability, DC conductivity, and Grüneisen parameter have been made. These measurements allowed the origins of the contrast provided by each substance to be identified. Methods: The electric and magnetic properties of the contrast agents were characterized at 3 GHz using two rectangular waveguide cavities. The DC conductivity was measured separately using a conductivity meter. Thermoacoustic signals were then acquired and compared to those generated in water. Finally, 3D electromagnetic simulations were used to decouple the different contributions to the absorbed power density. Results: It was found that the gadolinium compounds provided appreciable electric contrast but not originating from the gadolinium itself. The contrast was either due to dissociation of the gadolinium salt which increased ionic conductivity or its nondissociated polar fraction which increased dielectric polarization loss or a combination of both. In addition, very high concentrations were required to achieve appreciable contrast, to the extent that the Grüneisen parameter increased significantly and became a source of contrast. Iron oxide particles were found to produce low but measurable dielectric contrast due to dielectric polarization loss, but this is attributed to the coating of the particles not the iron oxide. Single wall carbon nanotubes did not provide measurable contrast of any type

  10. Importance of iron chelation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Varoğlu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to remember that today patients have different options of chelation treatment, as desferrioxamine, deferiprone and deferasirox are available. However, a patient has to be compliant with treatments. They have always to remember that too much iron causes different complications and could be a barrier for a definitive cure from thalassemia. 由于出现了去铁胺、去铁酮和去铁斯若等药物,病人现在可以选择不同的螯合治疗方式。 然而,病人必须适应这几种治疗方式。 他们必须时刻记住太多的铁元素会引发多种并发症,并对地中海贫血的彻底治疗造成阻碍。

  11. Cell-permeable Ln(III) chelate-functionalized InP quantum dots as multimodal imaging agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stasiuk, Graeme J.; Tamang, Sudarsan; Imbert, Daniel; Poillot, Cathy; Giardiello, Marco; Tisseyre, Céline; Barbier, Emmanuel L.; Fries, Pascal Henry; de Waard, Michel; Reiss, Peter; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2011-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are ideal scaffolds for the development of multimodal imaging agents, but their application in clinical diagnostics is limited by the toxicity of classical CdSe QDs. A new bimodal MRI/optical nanosized contrast agent with high gadolinium payload has been prepared through direct

  12. Gadolinium EUV Multilayers for Solar Imaging Near 60 nm Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop and commercialize a new class of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) multilayer coatings containing the rare-earth element gadolinium (Gd), designed as...

  13. Detection of severe acute pancreatitis by contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piironen, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Tampere City Hospital (Finland); Kivisaari, R.; Poutanen, V.P.; Kivisaari, L. [Dept. of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Kemppainen, E. [Dept. of Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Laippala, P.; Koivisto, A.M. [School of Public Health, Biometry Unit, Tampere Univ. (Finland)

    2000-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the ability of MRI to differentiate between the two forms of severity of acute pancreatitis (AP), which is important for the detection of patients who require intensive monitoring and therapy. The second objective was to evaluate whether the distinction would be possible regardless of the MRI equipment. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed before and after intravenous administration of a gadolinium (Gd) chelate at 1.0 T using the breath-hold multislice rapid gradient-echo turbo fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence in 14 patients, and at 1.5 T with the 2D FLASH(50) sequence with fat saturation in 18 patients with acute pancreatitis early in the course of the disease. The patients were classified according to the Atlanta classification system as having the mild (MAP) or severe (SAP) form of the disease. At 1.0 T with use of a body coil, contrast-enhanced MRI failed to distinguish mild from severe pancreatitis. At 1.5 T with a phased-array body coil, the signal intensities of the patients with SAP were statistically significantly lower than those of the MAP group. Our initial clinical experience suggests that MRI with a sufficient magnetic field gradient strength may be useful for separating the two forms of acute pancreatitis in their early phases. (orig.)

  14. Morphological imaging and T2 and T2* mapping of hip cartilage at 7 Tesla MRI under the influence of intravenous gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazik-Palm, Andrea; Geis, Christina; Goebel, Juliane; Theysohn, Jens M. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Kraff, Oliver; Johst, Soeren [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Ladd, Mark E. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Medical Physics in Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Quick, Harald H. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, High-Field and Hybrid MR Imaging, Essen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    To investigate the influence of intravenous gadolinium on cartilage T2 and T2* relaxation times and on morphological image quality at 7-T hip MRI. Hips of 11 healthy volunteers were examined at 7 T. Multi-echo sequences for T2 and T2* mapping, 3D T1 volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) and double-echo steady-state (DESS) sequences were acquired before and after intravenous application of gadolinium according to a delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) protocol. Cartilage relaxation times were measured in both scans. Morphological sequences were assessed quantitatively using contrast ratios and qualitatively using a 4-point Likert scale. Student's t-test, Pearson's correlation (ρ) and Wilcoxon sign-rank test were used for statistical comparisons. Pre- and post-contrast T2 and T2* values were highly correlated (T2: acetabular: ρ = 0.76, femoral: ρ = 0.77; T2*: acetabular: ρ = 0.80, femoral: ρ = 0.72). Gadolinium enhanced contrasts between cartilage and joint fluid in DESS and T1 VIBE according to the qualitative (p = 0.01) and quantitative (p < 0.001) analysis. The delineation of acetabular and femoral cartilage and the labrum predominantly improved with gadolinium. Gadolinium showed no relevant influence on T2 or T2* relaxation times and improved morphological image quality at 7 T. Therefore, morphological and quantitative sequences including dGEMRIC can be conducted in a one-stop-shop examination. (orig.)

  15. Chelating agents in pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings contain 71 abstracts of papers. Fourteen abstracts were inputted in INIS. The topics covered include: the effects of chelating agents on the retention of 63 Ni, 109 Cd, 203 Hg, 144 Ce, 95 Nb and the excretion of 210 Po, 63 Ni, 48 V, 239 Pu, 241 Am, 54 Mn; the applications of tracer techniques for studies of the efficacy of chelation therapy in patients with heart and brain disorders; and the treatment of metal poisoning with chelating agents. (J.P.)

  16. Selective modification of NMR relaxation time in human colorectal carcinoma by using gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid conjugated with monoclonal antibody 19-9.

    OpenAIRE

    Curtet, C; Tellier, C; Bohy, J; Conti, M L; Saccavini, J C; Thedrez, P; Douillard, J Y; Chatal, J F; Koprowski, H

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody 19-9 (mAb 19-9) against human colon adenocarcinoma was conjugated with gadolinium X diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd X DTPA) and used as a contrast agent in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in an effort to improve tumor target selectivity in nude mice. The data indicate that Gd X DTPA-mAb 19-9 in solution decreased the T1 relaxation of water protons at 90 MHz in direct proportion to the gadolinium concentration, and this effect was greater than in Gd X DTPA solutions...

  17. Fat-saturated post gadolinium T1 imaging of the brain in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Saeed, Osama; Sheikh, Mehraj (Dept. of Radiology, Kuwait Univ. (Kuwait)), email: osamas@hsc.edu.kw; Ismail, Mohammed (Ibn Sina Hospital (Kuwait)); Athyal, Reji (Amiri Hospital (Kuwait))

    2011-06-15

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is of vital importance in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Imaging sequences better demonstrating enhancing lesions can help in detecting active MS plaques. Purpose To evaluate the role of fat-saturated gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1W) images of the brain in MS and to assess the benefit of performing this additional sequence in the detection of enhancing lesions. Material and Methods In a prospective study over a six-month period, 70 consecutive patients with clinically diagnosed MS were enrolled. These constituted 14 male and 56 female patients between the ages of 21 and 44 years. All the patients underwent brain MRIs on a 1.5 Tesla Magnet. Gadolinium-enhanced T1 images with and without fat saturation were compared and results were recorded and analyzed using a conspicuity score and McNemar test. Results There were a total of 157 lesions detected in 70 patients on post-contrast T1W fat-saturated images compared with 139 lesions seen on the post-contrast T1W fast spin-echo (FSE) images. This was because 18 of the lesions (11.5%) were only seen on the fat-saturated images. In addition, 15 lesions were more conspicuous on the fat saturation sequence (9.5%). The total conspicuity score obtained, including all the lesions, was 2.24 +/-0.60 (SD). Using the two-tailed McNemar test for quantitative analysis, the P value obtained was <0.0001. Conclusion T1W fat-saturated gadolinium-enhanced images show better lesion enhancement than T1W images without fat saturation

  18. The synthesis of a D-glucosamine contrast agent, Gd-DTPA-DG, and its application in cancer molecular imaging with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wei [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou, Sichuan 646000 (China); Chen Yue, E-mail: chenyue5523@126.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou, Sichuan 646000 (China); Guo Dajing [Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400010 (China); Huang Zhanwen; Cai Liang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou, Sichuan 646000 (China); He Ling [West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the synthesis of Gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-deoxyglucosamine (Gd-DTPA-DG) which is a D-glucosamine metabolic MR imaging contrast agent. We will also discuss its use in a pilot MRI study using a xenograft mouse model of human adenocarcinoma. Methods: This novel contrast agent was specifically studied because of its ability to 'target' metabolically active tumor tissues. In this study Gd-DTPA-DG is used to investigate how tumor tissues would react to a dose of 0.2 mmol Gd/kg over a 120 min exposure in a xenograft mouse model. These experiments used athymic mice implanted with human pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549) as demonstrated by dynamic MRI. Alternately, another contrast agent that is not specific for targeting, Gd-DTPA, was used as the control at a similar dose of gadolinium. Efficacy of the targeted contrast agent was assessed by measuring relaxation rate in vitro and signal intensity (SI) in vivo. Statistical differences were calculated using one-way analysis of variance. Results: The synthesized Gd-DTPA-DG was shown to improve the contrast of tumor tissue in this model. Gd-DTPA-DG was also shown to have a similar pharmacokinetic rate but generated a higher relaxation rate in tumor tissues relative to the control contrast Gd-DTPA. In comparison to the pre-contrast imaging, the SI of tumor tissue in the experimental group was shown to be significantly increased at 15 min after injection of Gd-DTPA-DG (p < 0.001). The enhanced signal intensity spread from the edge of the tumor to the center and seemed to strengthen the idea that MRI performance would be useful in different tumor tissues. Conclusion: This preliminary study shows that this new chelated contrast agent, Gd-DTPA-DG, can be specifically targeted to accumulation in tumor tissue as compared to normal tissues. This targeted paramagnetic contrast agent has potential for specific cancer molecular imaging with MRI.

  19. Evaluation of Novel 64Cu-Labeled Theranostic Gadolinium-Based Nanoprobes in HepG2 Tumor-Bearing Nude Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pengcheng; Cheng, Dengfeng; Huang, Tao; Banizs, Anna B.; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Guobing; Chen, Quan; Wang, Yuenan; He, Jiang; Shi, Hongcheng

    2017-09-01

    Radiation therapy of liver cancer is limited by low tolerance of the liver to radiation. Radiosensitizers can effectively reduce the required radiation dose. AGuIX nanoparticles are small, multifunctional gadolinium-based nanoparticles that can carry radioisotopes or fluorescent markers for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), fluorescence imaging, and even multimodality imaging. In addition, due to the high atomic number of gadolinium, it can also serve as a tumor radiation sensitizer. It is critical to define the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of these gadolinium-based nanoparticles to quantitate the magnitude and duration of their retention within the tumor microenvironment during radiotherapy. Therefore, in this study, we successfully labeled AGuIX with 64Cu through the convenient built-in chelator. The biodistribution studies indicated that the radiotracer 64Cu-AGuIX accumulates to high levels in the HepG2 xenograft of nude mice, suggesting that it would be a potential theranostic nanoprobe for image-guided radiotherapy in HCC. We also used a transmission electron microscope to confirm AGuIX uptake in the HepG2 cells. In radiation therapy studies, a decrease in 18F-FDG uptake was observed in the xenografts of the nude mice irradiated with AGuIX, which was injected 1 h before. These results provide proof-of-concept that AGuIX can be used as a theranostic radiosensitizer for PET imaging to guide radiotherapy for liver cancer.

  20. Effect of gadolinium on hepatic fat quantification using multi-echo reconstruction technique with T2* correction and estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Mingmei; Wu, Bing; Liu, Zhiqin; Song, Hai; Meng, Xiangfeng; Wu, Xinhuai [The Military General Hospital of Beijing PLA, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Zhang, Jing [The 309th Hospital of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China)

    2016-06-15

    To determine whether hepatic fat quantification is affected by administration of gadolinium using a multiecho reconstruction technique with T2* correction and estimation. Forty-eight patients underwent the investigational sequence for hepatic fat quantification at 3.0T MRI once before and twice after administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine (0.1 mmol/kg). A one-way repeated-measures analysis of variance with pairwise comparisons was conducted to evaluate the systematic bias of fat fraction (FF) and R2* measurements between three acquisitions. Bland-Altman plots were used to assess the agreements between pre- and post-contrast FF measurements in the liver. A P value <0.05 indicated statistically significant difference. FF measurements of liver, spleen and spine revealed no significant systematic bias between the three measurements (P > 0.05 for all). Good agreements (95 % confidence interval) of FF measurements were demonstrated between pre-contrast and post-contrast1 (-0.49 %, 0.52 %) and post-contrast2 (-0.83 %, 0.77 %). R2* increased in liver and spleen (P = 0.039, P = 0.01) after administration of gadolinium. Although under the impact of an increased R2* in liver and spleen post-contrast, the investigational sequence can still obtain stable fat quantification. Therefore, it could be applied post-contrast to substantially increase the efficiency of MR examination and also provide a backup for the occasional failure of FF measurements pre-contrast. (orig.)

  1. Acute and chronic tears of anterior cruciate ligament : role of gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Jung; Jee, Won Hee; Im, Soo A; Chun, Ho Jong; Jung, Hyun Seouk; Kim, Soo Young; Kwon, Tae An; Song, Sun Wha; Choi, Kyu Ho

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of fat-suppressed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging in differentiating acute from chronic ligament tears of anterior cruciate ligament. Materials and Methods : MR images of 22 patients with arthroscopically proven complete tear of the anterior cruciate ligament were retrospectively reviewed. The interval between injury and MR examination was one day to seven years. When ligament tear was detected on MR image with three months of injury, the case was considered acute;if detected after three months had elapsed, it was judged to be chronic. The extent of contrast enhancement was graded as 1, 2 or 3; grade 1, enhancement was confined to the expected ligament region; grade 2, enhancement extended to the joint capsule; grade 3, enhancement extended beyond the joint capsule. The grades of contrast enhancement correlated with the acute and chronic stages of ligament tears. Associated bone bruise and/or adjacent soft tissue edema were also evaluated. Results : Among 15 patients with acute ligament tear, nine (60%) showed grade 3 enhancement; among seven in whom tearing was chronic, four (57%) showed grade 1 enhancement. Bone bruising was present in 100% of acute tears (15/15) and 29 % of chronic tears (2/7). Soft tissue edema was associated in 87% of acute tears (13/15) and 29% of chronic tears(2/7). Conclusion : Fat-suppressed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging could help differentiate acute from chronic tears of anterior cruciate ligament, as well as bone bruising and tissue edema

  2. Utility of late gadolinium enhancement in pediatric cardiac MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etesami, Maryam; Gilkeson, Robert C; Rajiah, Prabhakar

    2016-07-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequence is increasingly used in the evaluation of pediatric cardiovascular disorders, and although LGE might be a normal feature at the sites of previous surgeries, it is pathologically seen as a result of extracellular space expansion, either from acute cell damage or chronic scarring or fibrosis. LGE is broadly divided into ischemic and non-ischemic patterns. LGE caused by myocardial infarction occurs in a vascular distribution and always involves the subendocardial portion, progressively involving the outer regions in a waveform pattern. Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies can have a mid-myocardial (either linear or patchy), subepicardial or diffuse subendocardial distribution. Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy can have a linear mid-myocardial pattern, while hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can have fine, patchy enhancement in hypertrophied and non-hypertrophied segments as well as right ventricular insertion points. Myocarditis and sarcoidosis have a mid-myocardial or subepicardial pattern of LGE. Fabry disease typically affects the basal inferolateral segment while Danon disease typically spares the septum. Pericarditis is characterized by diffuse or focal pericardial thickening and enhancement. Thrombus, the most common non-neoplastic cardiac mass, is characterized by absence of enhancement in all sequences, while neoplastic masses show at least some contrast enhancement, depending on the pathology. Regardless of the etiology, presence of LGE is associated with a poor prognosis. In this review, we describe the technical modifications required for performing LGE cardiac MR sequence in children, review and illustrate the patterns of LGE in children, and discuss their clinical significance.

  3. Utility of late gadolinium enhancement in pediatric cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etesami, Maryam; Gilkeson, Robert C.; Rajiah, Prabhakar

    2016-01-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequence is increasingly used in the evaluation of pediatric cardiovascular disorders, and although LGE might be a normal feature at the sites of previous surgeries, it is pathologically seen as a result of extracellular space expansion, either from acute cell damage or chronic scarring or fibrosis. LGE is broadly divided into ischemic and non-ischemic patterns. LGE caused by myocardial infarction occurs in a vascular distribution and always involves the subendocardial portion, progressively involving the outer regions in a waveform pattern. Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies can have a mid-myocardial (either linear or patchy), subepicardial or diffuse subendocardial distribution. Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy can have a linear mid-myocardial pattern, while hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can have fine, patchy enhancement in hypertrophied and non-hypertrophied segments as well as right ventricular insertion points. Myocarditis and sarcoidosis have a mid-myocardial or subepicardial pattern of LGE. Fabry disease typically affects the basal inferolateral segment while Danon disease typically spares the septum. Pericarditis is characterized by diffuse or focal pericardial thickening and enhancement. Thrombus, the most common non-neoplastic cardiac mass, is characterized by absence of enhancement in all sequences, while neoplastic masses show at least some contrast enhancement, depending on the pathology. Regardless of the etiology, presence of LGE is associated with a poor prognosis. In this review, we describe the technical modifications required for performing LGE cardiac MR sequence in children, review and illustrate the patterns of LGE in children, and discuss their clinical significance. (orig.)

  4. Extraction of gadolinium from high flux isotope reactor control plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohring, M.W.

    1987-04-01

    Gadolinium-153 is an important radioisotope used in the diagnosis of various bone disorders. Recent medical and technical developments in the detection and cure of osteoporosis, a bone disease affecting an estimated 50 million people, have greatly increased the demand for this isotope. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has produced 153 Gd since 1980 primarily through the irradiation of a natural europium-oxide powder followed by the chemical separation of the gadolinium fraction from the europium material. Due to the higher demand for 153 Gd, an alternative production method to supplement this process has been investigated. This process involves the extraction of gadolinium from the europium-bearing region of highly radioactive, spent control plates used at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) with a subsequent re-irradiation of the extracted material for the production of the 153 Gd. Based on the results of experimental and calculational analyses, up to 25 grams of valuable gadolinium (≥60% enriched in 152 Gd) resides in the europium-bearing region of the HFIR control components of which 70% is recoverable. At a specific activity yield of 40 curies of 153 Gd for each gram of gadolinium re-irradiated, 700 one-curie sources can be produced from each control plate assayed

  5. Engineering an antibody with picomolar affinity to DOTA chelates of multiple radionuclides for pretargeted radioimmunotherapy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orcutt, Kelly Davis; Slusarczyk, Adrian L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Cieslewicz, Maryelise [Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Ruiz-Yi, Benjamin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Bhushan, Kumar R. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Frangioni, John V. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Wittrup, K. Dane, E-mail: wittrup@mit.ed [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Introduction: In pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT), a bifunctional antibody is administered and allowed to pre-localize to tumor cells. Subsequently, a chelated radionuclide is administered and captured by cell-bound antibody while unbound hapten clears rapidly from the body. We aim to engineer high-affinity binders to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelates for use in PRIT applications. Methods: We mathematically modeled antibody and hapten pharmacokinetics to analyze hapten tumor retention as a function of hapten binding affinity. Motivated by model predictions, we used directed evolution and yeast surface display to affinity mature the 2D12.5 antibody to DOTA, reformatted as a single chain variable fragment (scFv). Results: Modeling predicts that for high antigen density and saturating bsAb dose, a hapten-binding affinity of 100 pM is needed for near-maximal hapten retention. We affinity matured 2D12.5 with an initial binding constant of about 10 nM to DOTA-yttrium chelates. Affinity maturation resulted in a 1000-fold affinity improvement to biotinylated DOTA-yttrium, yielding an 8.2{+-}1.9 picomolar binder. The high-affinity scFv binds DOTA complexes of lutetium and gadolinium with similar picomolar affinity and indium chelates with low nanomolar affinity. When engineered into a bispecific antibody construct targeting carcinoembryonic antigen, pretargeted high-affinity scFv results in significantly higher tumor retention of a {sup 111}In-DOTA hapten compared to pretargeted wild-type scFv in a xenograft mouse model. Conclusions: We have engineered a versatile, high-affinity, DOTA-chelate-binding scFv. We anticipate it will prove useful in developing pretargeted imaging and therapy protocols to exploit the potential of a variety of radiometals.

  6. The optimal use of contrast agents at high field MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Pinker, Kathia; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris-Melanie

    2006-01-01

    The intravenous administration of a standard dose of conventional gadolinium-based contrast agents produces higher contrast between the tumor and normal brain at 3.0 Tesla (T) than at 1.5 T, which allows reducing the dose to half of the standard one to produce similar contrast at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T. The assessment of cumulative triple-dose 3.0 T images obtained the best results in the detection of brain metastases compared to other sequences. The contrast agent dose for dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging at 3.0 T can be reduced to 0.1 mmol compared to 0.2 mmol at 1.5 T due to the increased susceptibility effects at higher magnetic field strengths. Contrast agent application makes susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) at 3.0 T clinically attractive, with an increase in spatial resolution within the same scan time. Whereas a double dose of conventional gadolinium-based contrast agents was optimal in SWI with respect to sensitivity and image quality, a standard dose of gadobenate dimeglumine, which has a two-fold higher T1-relaxivity in blood, produced the same effect. For MR-arthrography, optimized concentrations of gadolinium-based contrast agents are similar at 3.0 and 1.5 T. In summary, high field MRI requires the optimization of the contrast agent dose in different clinical applications. (orig.)

  7. Silica nanoparticles containing 159-Gadolinium as potential system for cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Andre Felipe de; Ferreira, Tiago Hilario; Sousa, Edesia Martins Barros de, E-mail: andrefelipe.oliveira88@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (SENAN/CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Nanotecnologia; Lacerda, Marco Aurelio [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (SERAS/CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico das Radiacoes Aplicadas a Saude

    2013-07-01

    Ordered silica nanoparticles are compounds highly organized which have very interesting textural characteristics, such as high thermal stability, well defined pore size, narrow size distribution and high area surface. Among the various types of nano materials ordered, the SBA-16 have a meso structure that can be considered very interesting due to the fact of the arrangement of mesoporous (tri dimensional as a cage) and spherical morphology, which make it in a promising material for a range of bioapplications such as incorporation of drugs and radioisotopes. In this study Gadodiamide® (Omniscan-General Electric Healthcare Company), a frequently non-ionic gadolinium complex contrasting used in MRI's was incorporated in the silica matrix SBA-16 as a carrier. From this gadolinium it is possible to obtain the isotope {sup 159}Gd by neutron irradiation, wherein the isotope {sup 158}Gd captures a neutron and becomes {sup 159}Gd [{sup 15}'8Gd(n,c){sup 1}'5{sup 9}Gd]. The {sup 159}Gd is a beta (endpoint energy of 970.6 keV) and gamma (main energy: 363.54 keV) emitter with a half-life of 18.59 hours. These characteristics are similar to that of other isotopes already used in nuclear medicine such as {sup 90}Y. In this work, the {sup 158}Gd incorporated in the Gd-silica was activated by the neutron flux generated by the cyclotron located in the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN) during the production of the {sup 18}FDG. Atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to confirm the presence of the gadolinium complex in the silica matrix. The antitumor activity of the complex after the irradiation was evaluated through cytotoxicity assay with T98 cell lines derived from a human glioblastoma multiform tumor. (author)

  8. Silica nanoparticles containing 159-Gadolinium as potential system for cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Andre Felipe de; Ferreira, Tiago Hilario; Sousa, Edesia Martins Barros de; Lacerda, Marco Aurelio

    2013-01-01

    Ordered silica nanoparticles are compounds highly organized which have very interesting textural characteristics, such as high thermal stability, well defined pore size, narrow size distribution and high area surface. Among the various types of nano materials ordered, the SBA-16 have a meso structure that can be considered very interesting due to the fact of the arrangement of mesoporous (tri dimensional as a cage) and spherical morphology, which make it in a promising material for a range of bioapplications such as incorporation of drugs and radioisotopes. In this study Gadodiamide® (Omniscan-General Electric Healthcare Company), a frequently non-ionic gadolinium complex contrasting used in MRI's was incorporated in the silica matrix SBA-16 as a carrier. From this gadolinium it is possible to obtain the isotope 159 Gd by neutron irradiation, wherein the isotope 158 Gd captures a neutron and becomes 159 Gd [ 15 '8Gd(n,c) 1 '5 9 Gd]. The 159 Gd is a beta (endpoint energy of 970.6 keV) and gamma (main energy: 363.54 keV) emitter with a half-life of 18.59 hours. These characteristics are similar to that of other isotopes already used in nuclear medicine such as 90 Y. In this work, the 158 Gd incorporated in the Gd-silica was activated by the neutron flux generated by the cyclotron located in the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN) during the production of the 18 FDG. Atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to confirm the presence of the gadolinium complex in the silica matrix. The antitumor activity of the complex after the irradiation was evaluated through cytotoxicity assay with T98 cell lines derived from a human glioblastoma multiform tumor. (author)

  9. Selective photoionization of gadolinium isotopes with a polarized laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guyadec, E.

    1990-06-01

    The aim of this study is the use of gadolinium 157 as burnable poison in nuclear reactors. Spectroscopic isotopic displacements between Gd 156 and Gd 157 are low and the separation method studied is based on differentiated behavior, concerning polarized light, of even and odd gadolinium isotopes coming from their difference of nuclear spin. On this principle is based the simplest photoionization scheme. Selective ionization of odd isotopes is realized from the fundamental state with three resonating photons colinearly polarized. The experimental study confirms the possibility of efficient photoionization. The measured selectivity between Gd 157 and even isotope is over 48 in defined conditions because it can be destroyed by a magnetic field or if photons are not well polarized. Calculations and observations are in good agreement. Odd gadolinium isotope separation is feasible and effects preventing separation are evidenced [fr

  10. MRI and CT contrast media extravasation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshmatzadeh Behzadi, Ashkan; Farooq, Zerwa; Newhouse, Jeffery H.; Prince, Martin R.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: This systematic review combines data from multiple papers on contrast media extravasation to identify factors contributing to increased extravasation risk. Methods: Data were extracted from 17 papers reporting 2191 extravasations in 1,104,872 patients (0.2%) undergoing computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: Extravasation rates were 0.045% for gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) and nearly 6-fold higher, 0.26% for iodinated contrast agents. Factors associated with increased contrast media extravasations included: older age, female gender, using an existing intravenous (IV) instead of placing a new IV in radiology, in-patient status, use of automated power injection, high injection rates, catheter location, and failing to warm up the more viscous contrast media to body temperature. Conclusion: Contrast media extravasation is infrequent but nearly 6 times less frequent with GBCA for MRI compared with iodinated contrast used in CT. PMID:29489663

  11. Use of gadolinium as neutron poison in 540 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, P.K.; Fernando, M.P.S.; Kumar, A.N.

    2006-01-01

    In Pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWRs), neutron poison in the moderator is used to compensate the excess reactivity present in the core on different occasions such as xenon decay during synchronization just after poison out period or start ups from xenon free conditions. It is also used in secondary shutdown system (SDS-2), where required amount of neutron poison is injected directly into the moderator within 2.5 seconds. Further, it is also used for over poisoning the moderator to achieve the guaranteed shutdown state when the regular shutdown systems are taken for maintenance. Generally, two types of moderator poisons are used in power reactors to balance the reactivity of the core and they are boron and gadolinium. Gadolinium is used in the form of gadolinium nitrate (Gd(NO 3 ) 3 .6H 2 O). The paper gives the details of estimation of reactivity coefficients of gadolinium for 540 MWe PHWR for different operating conditions. These neutron poisons are converted into non-absorbing elements and therefore their effective worth will decrease as reactor operation proceeds. The rate of burning of neutron absorbing isotopes depends on its magnitude of absorption cross-section and thermal flux seen by them. The present study discusses the burning characteristics of gadolinium during power operation in 540 MWe PHWR. It is established by detailed analysis that the rate of positive reactivity realized due to burning of neutron absorbing Gd isotopes almost match with the build up rate of xenon. The burning half lives of boron and gadolinium is worked out for different power levels. (author)

  12. Gadolinium Enhanced MR Coronary Vessel Wall Imaging at 3.0 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kelle

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We evaluated the influence of the time between low-dose gadolinium (Gd contrast administration and coronary vessel wall enhancement (LGE detected by 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. Materials and Methods. Four healthy subjects (4 men, mean age 29  ±  3 years and eleven CAD patients (6 women, mean age 61±10 years were studied on a commercial 3.0 Tesla (T whole-body MR imaging system (Achieva 3.0 T; Philips, Best, The Netherlands. T1-weighted inversion-recovery coronary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was repeated up to 75 minutes after administration of low-dose Gadolinium (Gd (0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA. Results. LGE was seen in none of the healthy subjects, however in all of the CAD patients. In CAD patients, fifty-six of 62 (90.3% segments showed LGE of the coronary artery vessel wall at time-interval 1 after contrast. At time-interval 2, 34 of 42 (81.0% and at time-interval 3, 29 of 39 evaluable segments (74.4% were enhanced. Conclusion. In this work, we demonstrate LGE of the coronary artery vessel wall using 3.0 T MRI after a single, low-dose Gd contrast injection in CAD patients but not in healthy subjects. In the majority of the evaluated coronary segments in CAD patients, LGE of the coronary vessel wall was already detectable 30–45 minutes after administration of the contrast agent.

  13. The effect of demagnetization on the magnetocaloric properties of gadolinium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein

    2009-01-01

    of gadolinium. The adiabatic temperature change DeltaTad of gadolinium sheets upon application of a magnetic field has been measured at a range of applied magnetic fields and sample orientations. A significant dependence of DeltaTad on the sample orientation is observed. This can be accounted...... for by the demagnetization factor. Also, the temperature dependence of DeltaTad has been measured experimentally and modeled by mean field theory. Corrections to mean field theory modeling due to the demagnetization field are proposed and discussed. ©2009 American Institute of Physics...

  14. The obtaining a high-grade gadolinium concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltysiak, I.; Ozga, W.

    1982-01-01

    Gadolinium concentrates obtained by the fractional precipitation of lanthanon-potassium double chromates were separated by ion exchange with 0,4 M lactic acid solution in the presence of 0,1 M ammonium nitrate at pH of the medium 2,95-3,4. It was found out, that using the fractional precipitation of lanthanon-potassium double chromates (as the fast and cheap method that does not need special equipment) together with ion exchange separation with lactic acid solution as the eluent gave a highgrade gadolinium concentrate in a quick and economical way. (author)

  15. Glioblastoma, gadolinium (III) and NCT. An in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercanti, D.; Casalbore, P.; Sanita, F.; Rosi, F.; Festinesi, A.; Pallini, R.; Gilbert, B.; Stasio, G. de

    2000-01-01

    We treated cultured human glioblastoma cells with gadolinium (III) [gadopentetic acid] and we found that: a) cells do internalise this element; b) gadolinium can be localised in the cells nuclei; c) exposure of the cultures to a neutron beam produced a significant and immediate cell death. Although cell survival was also influenced in the irradiated controls it was further reduced (about 50%) in cells pre-exposed to 10 mg/ml gadopentetic acid. We also found that Gd uptake, as measured by ICP-AES, was concentration dependent. (author)

  16. Thermal expansion studies on dysprosium and gadolinium titanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panneerselvam, G.; Antony, M.P.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2002-01-01

    Lanthanides and their oxides are considered potential candidates for the use in nuclear reactors as control rod. Dysprosium (Dy) and gadolinium (Gd) have very high absorption cross-section for neutrons. Dysprosium and gadolinium titanates were prepared by ceramic route as well as wet chemical route. The compounds were characterized chemically by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (ICPMS) technique and by x-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Thermal expansion coefficient was measured in the temperature range 573 to 1573 K by using high temperature x-ray diffraction technique. (author)

  17. Antioxidant and mercury chelating activity of Psidium guajava var. pomifera L. leaves hydroalcoholic extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Antonio Ivanildo; Oliveira, Cláudia Sirlene; Lovato, Fabricio Luís; Waczuk, Emily Pansera; Piccoli, Bruna Candia; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Leite, Nadghia Figueredo; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Posser, Thais; Da Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; Franco, Jeferson Luis

    2017-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is widely distributed in the environment and is known to produce several adverse effects in organisms. The aim of the present study was to examine the in vitro antioxidant activity and Hg chelating ability of the hydroalcoholic extract of Psidium guajava leaves (HEPG). In addition, the potential protective effects of HEPG against Hg(II) were evaluated using a yeast model (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). HEPG was found to exert significant antioxidant activity in 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl scavenger and inhibition of lipid peroxidation induced by Fe(II) assays in a concentration-dependent manner. The extract also exhibited significant Hg(II) chelating activity. In yeast, Hg(II) induced a significant decrease in cell viability. In contrast, HEPG partially prevented the fall in cell viability induced by Hg(II). In conclusion, HEPG exhibited protective effects against Hg(II)-mediated toxicity, which may be related to both antioxidant and Hg(II)-chelating activities.

  18. Four Gadolinium(III) Complexes Appended to a Porphyrin: A Water-Soluble Molecular Theranostic Agent with Remarkable Relaxivity Suited for MRI Tracking of the Photosensitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sour, Angélique; Jenni, Sébastien; Ortí-Suárez, Ana; Schmitt, Julie; Heitz, Valérie; Bolze, Frédéric; Loureiro de Sousa, Paulo; Po, Chrystelle; Bonnet, Célia S; Pallier, Agnès; Tóth, Éva; Ventura, Barbara

    2016-05-02

    A molecular theranostic agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) consisting of four [GdDTTA](-) complexes (DTTA(4-) = diethylenetriamine-N,N,N″,N″-tetraacetate) linked to a meso-tetraphenylporphyrin core, as well as its yttrium(III) analogue, was synthesized. A variety of physicochemical methods were used to characterize the gadolinium(III) conjugate 1 both as an MRI contrast agent and as a photosensitizer. The proton relaxivity measured in H2O at 20 MHz and 25 °C, r1 = 43.7 mmol(-1) s(-1) per gadolinium center, is the highest reported for a bishydrated gadolinium(III)-based contrast agent of medium size and can be related to the rigidity of the molecule. The complex displays also a remarkable singlet oxygen quantum yield of ϕΔ = 0.45 in H2O, similar to that of a meso-tetrasulfonated porphyrin. We also evidenced the ability of the gadolinium(III) conjugate to penetrate in cancer cells with low cytotoxicity. Its phototoxicity on Hela cells was evaluated following incubation at low micromolar concentration and moderate light irradiation (21 J cm(-2)) induced 50% of cell death. Altogether, these results demonstrate the high potential of this conjugate as a theranostic agent for MRI and PDT.

  19. Comparison between gadolinium-enhanced 2D T1-weighted gradient-echo and spin-echo sequences in the detection of active multiple sclerosis lesions on 3.0T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aymerich, F.X. [Hospital Universitari Vall d' Hebron, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, MR Unit. Department of Radiology (IDI), Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya - Barcelona Tech (UPC), Department of Automatic Control (ESAII), Barcelona (Spain); Auger, C.; Alcaide-Leon, P.; Pareto, D.; Huerga, E.; Corral, J.F.; Mitjana, R.; Rovira, A. [Hospital Universitari Vall d' Hebron, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, MR Unit. Department of Radiology (IDI), Barcelona (Spain); Sastre-Garriga, J.; Montalban, X. [Hospital Universitari Vall d' Hebron, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Centre d' Esclerosi Multiple de Catalunya (Cemcat), Department of Neurology/Neuroimmunology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-04-15

    To compare the sensitivity of enhancing multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions in gadolinium-enhanced 2D T1-weighted gradient-echo (GRE) and spin-echo (SE) sequences, and to assess the influence of visual conspicuity and laterality on detection of these lesions. One hundred MS patients underwent 3.0T brain MRI including gadolinium-enhanced 2D T1-weighted GRE and SE sequences. The two sets of contrast-enhanced scans were evaluated in random fashion by three experienced readers. Lesion conspicuity was assessed by the image contrast ratio (CR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The intracranial region was divided into four quadrants and the impact of lesion location on detection was assessed in each slice. Six hundred and seven gadolinium-enhancing MS lesions were identified. GRE images were more sensitive for lesion detection (0.828) than SE images (0.767). Lesions showed a higher CR in SE than in GRE images, whereas the CNR was higher in GRE than SE. Most misclassifications occurred in the right posterior quadrant. The gadolinium-enhanced 2D T1-weighted GRE sequence at 3.0T MRI enables detection of enhancing MS lesions with higher sensitivity and better lesion conspicuity than 2D T1-weighted SE. Hence, we propose the use of gadolinium-enhanced GRE sequences rather than SE sequences for routine scanning of MS patients at 3.0T. (orig.)

  20. Developing Targeted Hybrid Imaging Probes by Chelator Scaffolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summer, Dominik; Grossrubatscher, Leo; Petrik, Milos; Michalcikova, Tereza; Novy, Zbynek; Rangger, Christine; Klingler, Maximilian; Haas, Hubertus; Kaeopookum, Piriya; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Haubner, Roland; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2017-06-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) as well as optical imaging (OI) with peptide receptor targeting probes have proven their value for oncological applications but also show restrictions depending on the clinical field of interest. Therefore, the combination of both methods, particularly in a single molecule, could improve versatility in clinical routine. This proof of principle study aims to show that a chelator, Fusarinine C (FSC), can be utilized as scaffold for novel dimeric dual-modality imaging agents. Two targeting vectors (a minigastrin analogue (MG11) targeting cholecystokinin-2 receptor overexpression (CCK2R) or integrin α V β 3 targeting cyclic pentapeptides (RGD)) and a near-infrared fluorophore (Sulfo-Cyanine7) were conjugated to FSC. The probes were efficiently labeled with gallium-68 and in vitro experiments including determination of logD, stability, protein binding, cell binding, internalization, and biodistribution studies as well as in vivo micro-PET/CT and optical imaging in U-87MG α V β 3 - and A431-CCK2R expressing tumor xenografted mice were carried out. Novel bioconjugates showed high receptor affinity and highly specific targeting properties at both receptors. Ex vivo biodistribution and micro-PET/CT imaging studies revealed specific tumor uptake accompanied by slow blood clearance and retention in nontargeted tissues (spleen, liver, and kidneys) leading to visualization of tumors at early (30 to 120 min p.i.). Excellent contrast in corresponding optical imaging studies was achieved especially at delayed time points (24 to 72 h p.i.). Our findings show the proof of principle of chelator scaffolding for hybrid imaging agents and demonstrate FSC being a suitable bifunctional chelator for this approach. Improvements to fine-tune pharmacokinetics are needed to translate this into a clinical setting.

  1. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography with ultra-short echo times. Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehling, M.K.; Holzknecht, N.; Gauger, J.; Luboldt, W.; Smekal, A, von; Laub, G.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) using three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo sequences with ultra-short echotimes (USTE; 2 ms) and luminal enhancement of vessels with a gadolinium bolus affords the depiction of extended vascular territories with high spatial resolution within 20-60 s. Because of the ultra-short echo and repetition times, filling of the vascular lumen with gadolinium is depicted; the latter is relatively independent of the complex flow effects on which conventional MRA is based. MRA typical flow voids caused by turbulence or slow flow are thus significantly reduced and allow more reliable depiction of stenoses. After implementing the sequences on our scanner, we evaluated the potential of USTE-MRA for the delineation of various vascular territories in 56 patients. A total of 70 vascular territories were depicted and evaluated by two independent radiologists for image quality and obscuring the arteries because of the contrast of veins. Out of the 56 (4%) diagnostic angiographic quality could not be obtained in only 2 cases. In 13 patients (23%) the studies were judged suboptimal, but diagnostic. In only 3 cases (5%) was venous filling judged to obscure the arteries completely on MIPs (maximum intensity reconstructions), although the studies were diagnostic when evaluated with MRPs (multiplanar reconstructions). Venous superimposition occurred significantly more frequently in the neck than elsewhere. The greatest improvement over conventional MRA was obtained in the abdomen and thorax where USTE-MRAs can be obtained within a breath-hold without motional artifact. (orig.) [de

  2. Structural and Chemical Analysis of Gadolinium Halides Encapsulated within WS 2 Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Anumol, E A

    2016-05-18

    The hollow cavities of nanotubes could serve as templates for the growth of size- and shape-confined functional nanostructures, giving rise to novel materials and properties. In this work, considering their potential application as MRI contrast agents, gadolinium halides are encapsulated within the hollow cavities of inorganic nanotubes of WS2 by capillary filling to obtain GdX3@WS2 nanotubes (where X = Cl, Br or I and @ means encapsulated in). Aberration corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and spectroscopy is employed to understand the morphology and composition of the GdI3@WS2 nanotubes. The three dimensional morphology is studied with STEM tomography but understanding the compositional information is a non-trivial matter due to the presence of multiple high atomic number elements. Therefore, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) tomography was employed revealing the three dimensional chemical composition. Molecular dynamics simulations of the filling procedure shed light into the mechanics behind the formation of the confined gadolinium halide crystals. The quasi-1D system employed here serves as an example of a TEM-based chemical nanotomography method that could be extended to other materials, including beam-sensitive soft materials.

  3. Relationship among chelator adherence, change in chelators, and quality of life in thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtenberg, Felicia L; Gerstenberger, Eric; Xu, Yan; Mednick, Lauren; Sobota, Amy; Ware, Hannah; Thompson, Alexis A; Neufeld, Ellis J; Yamashita, Robert

    2014-10-01

    Thalassemia, a chronic blood disease, necessitates life-long adherence to blood transfusions and chelation therapy to reduce iron overload. We examine stability of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in thalassemia and adherence to chelation therapy over time, especially after changes in chelator choice. Thalassemia Longitudinal Cohort participants in the USA, UK, and Canada completed the SF-36v2 (ages 14+) and the PF-28 CHQ (parents of children life . Strategies to balance medical needs with family, work, and personal life may assist in adherence.

  4. Contrast media. Safety issues and ESUR guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    In 1994 the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) set up a committee to consider the safety of the contrast media used in radiology departments. Since then, the committee has questioned members, reviewed the literature, proposed guidelines, and discussed these proposals with participants at the annual symposia on urogenital radiology. This book represents the end result of this hard work. It contains all of the agreed guidelines, updated when necessary, and thereby comprehensively covers the many different safety issues relating to the diverse contrast media: barium contrast media, iodinated contrast media, MR contrast media (both gadolinium-based extracellular and organ-specific) and ultrasound contrast media. The prevention and treatment of both acute and delayed non-renal adverse reactions as well as the renal adverse reactions are covered in detail. The inclusion of all the ESUR guidelines within one book will offer an invaluable, unique and unparalleled resource. (orig.)

  5. Standard specification for sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This specification is for finished sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets for use in light-water reactors. It applies to gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets containing uranium of any 235U concentration and any concentration of gadolinium oxide. 1.2 This specification recognizes the presence of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle and consequently defines isotopic limits for gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets made from commercial grade UO2. Such commercial grade UO2 is defined so that, regarding fuel design and manufacture, the product is essentially equivalent to that made from unirradiated uranium. UO2 falling outside these limits cannot necessarily be regarded as equivalent and may thus need special provisions at the fuel fabrication plant or in the fuel design. 1.3 This specification does not include (1) provisions for preventing criticality accidents or (2) requirements for health and safety. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of the obligation to be aw...

  6. Burnup calculation and analysis of burnable poison gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wei

    1989-01-01

    The analysis and calculation of thermal group parameters of gadolinium oxide as burnable poison, and characteristics of energy spectrum with change of burnup are presented. At the same time the theoretical problems of this new type of burnable poison which is used in PWR design is discussed

  7. Low-lying (K ) states of gadolinium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    model can be identified with the fully symmetric states in the sdf interacting boson approxima- tion model. A systematic study of the sdf-IBA .... those found for other nuclei in this region. Again, the model is capable only of accounting .... π = 0+. ) states of gadolinium isotopes. A useful measure of collectivity is the R4/2 = E4. +.

  8. Purification of cerium, neodymium and gadolinium for low background experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boiko R.S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerium, neodymium and gadolinium contain double beta active isotopes. The most interesting are 150Nd and 160Gd (promising for 0ν2β search, 136Ce (2β+ candidate with one of the highest Q2β. The main problem of compounds containing lanthanide elements is their high radioactive contamination by uranium, radium, actinium and thorium. The new generation 2β experiments require development of methods for a deep purification of lanthanides from the radioactive elements. A combination of physical and chemical methods was applied to purify cerium, neodymium and gadolinium. Liquid-liquid extraction technique was used to remove traces of Th and U from neodymium, gadolinium and for purification of cerium from Th, U, Ra and K. Co-precipitation and recrystallization methods were utilized for further reduction of the impurities. The radioactive contamination of the samples before and after the purification was tested by using ultra-low-background HPGe gamma spectrometry. As a result of the purification procedure the radioactive contamination of gadolinium oxide (a similar purification efficiency was reached also with cerium and neodymium oxides was decreased from 0.12 Bq/kg to 0.007 Bq/kg in 228Th, from 0.04 Bq/kg to <0.006 Bq/kg in 226Ra, and from 0.9 Bq/kg to 0.04 Bq/kg in 40K. The purification methods are much less efficient for chemically very similar radioactive elements like actinium, lanthanum and lutetium.

  9. Joint electroreduction of lanthanum, gadolinium and boron in halide melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushkhov KH.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The joint electroreduction of La, Gd and B from chloride-fluoride melts has been studied by cyclic voltametry. Based on the analysis of voltamograms the possibility of electrosynthesis of lanthanum-gadolinium borides from chloride-fluoride melts has been shown.

  10. Kinetics of zigzag domain boundaries in gadolinium molybdate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, A.N.; Proklov, A.L.; Tikhomirova, N.A.; Shuvalov, L.A.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Kristallografii)

    1987-01-01

    Kinetics of zigzag domain boundaries (3DB) in ferroelectric gadolinium molybdate (GMO) crystal was investigated at different amplitude, duration and growth rate of external electric field. The results verify the difference between shifting rates of two 3DB constituents of wedge-shaped systems, growing with field change rate increase

  11. MR imaging of gestational trophoblastic tumor: role of gadolinium enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Si Young; Byun, Jae Young; Kim, Bum Su; Yun, Young Hyun; Mun, Kyung Mi; Park, Kyung Sin; Kim, Byung Kee; Bae, Seog Nyeon; Shinn, Kyung Sub.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of gadolinium enhanced MR imaging in the evaluation of gestational trophoblastic tumors (invasive mole and choriocarcinoma). Pre-enhanced T1-and T2-weighted images and gadolinium enhanced T1-weighted images of 34 gestational trophoblastic tumors (15 choriocarcinomas, 19 invasive moles) were retrospectively evaluated and enhancement patterns were analyzed. Morphologica differences and structural characteristics were analyzed by the evaluation of tumor margin, patterns of hemorrhagic necroses, the development of intratumoral vascularity, and molar villi. Graded scores of MR findings between pre- and gadolinium enhanced images were based on the following criteria : 1) visualization of tumor margin 2) distinction between tumor necrosis and zone of trophoblastic proliferation ; and 3) molar villi. Statistical differences between graded scores of pre- and post-enhanced images were analyzed. Gadolinium enhanced MR imaging was helpful for the visualization of tumor characteristics in gestational trophoblastic tumors and in differential diagnosis between invasive mole and choriocarcinoma. (author). 16 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  12. Importance of the use of gadolinium in neurocysticercosis diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado Junior, M.A.; Costa, G.; Barbosa, V.A.; Rubin, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT) features of neurocysticercosis are variable and depend fundamentally on the stage in evolution of the infection, location, number and size of the cysts. The authors retrospectively evaluated MRI obtained on O.5 Tesla superconducting unit in four neurocysticercosis patients and observed new MRI features only after Gadolinium enhancement. (author)

  13. Hypersensitivity to contrast media and dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockow, Knut; Sánchez-Borges, Mario

    2014-08-01

    This article updates current knowledge on hypersensitivity reactions to diagnostic contrast media and dyes. After application of a single iodinated radiocontrast medium (RCM), gadolinium-based contrast medium, fluorescein, or a blue dye, a hypersensitivity reaction is not a common finding; however, because of the high and still increasing frequency of those procedures, patients who have experienced severe reactions are nevertheless frequently encountered in allergy departments. Evidence on allergologic testing and management is best for iodinated RCM, limited for blue dyes, and insufficient for fluorescein. Skin tests can be helpful in the diagnosis of patients with hypersensitivity reactions to these compounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Contrast Enhanced MRI in the Diagnosis of HCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niendorf, Eric; Spilseth, Benjamin; Wang, Xiao; Taylor, Andrew

    2015-09-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 6th most common cancer worldwide. Imaging plays a critical role in HCC screening and diagnosis. Initial screening of patients at risk for HCC is performed with ultrasound. Confirmation of HCC can then be obtained by Computed Tomography (CT) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), due to the relatively high specificity of both techniques. This article will focus on reviewing MRI techniques for imaging HCC, felt by many to be the exam of choice for HCC diagnosis. MRI relies heavily upon the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents and while primarily extracellular gadolinium-based contrast agents are used, there is an emerging role of hepatobiliary contrast agents in HCC imaging. The use of other non-contrast enhanced MRI techniques for assessing HCC will also be discussed and these MRI strategies will be reviewed in the context of the pathophysiology of HCC to help understand the MR imaging appearance of HCC.

  15. Safe Use of Contrast Media: What the Radiologist Needs to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Katrina R; Moriarity, Andrew K; Langer, Jessica M

    2015-10-01

    Iodinated and gadolinium-based contrast media are used on a daily basis in most radiology practices. These agents often are essential to providing accurate diagnoses, and are nearly always safe and effective when administered correctly. However, reactions to contrast media do occur and can be life threatening. Therefore, it is critical for faculty and staff to know how reactions to contrast agents manifest and how to treat them promptly. The decline in renal function seen occasionally after intravenous administration of iodinated contrast agents is poorly understood and likely multifactorial, and its association with the contrast medium may be overemphasized. However, it is important that radiologists be aware of current understanding and strategies to decrease the incidence of renal dysfunction. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, a skin disease, is an adverse reaction related to use of some gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients with chronic renal failure. The types of gadolinium most often associated with this condition and the indications for withholding gadolinium are important and are discussed in this article. The use of enteric contrast agents and contrast agents during pregnancy and nursing are reviewed briefly. Current knowledge for safe use of contrast media and key concepts that all radiologists should know are summarized in this review. © RSNA, 2015.

  16. Recent developments centered on orally active iron chelators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hider

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past twenty years there has been a growing interest in the orally active iron chelators, deferiprone and deferasirox, both have been extensively studied. The ability of these compounds to mobilize iron from the heart and endocrine tissue has presented the clinician with some advantages over desferrioxamine, the first therapeutic iron chelator. Other orally active iron chelators are currently under development. The critical features necessary for the design of therapeutically useful orally active iron chelators are presented in this review, together with recent studies devoted to the design of such chelators. This newly emerging range of iron chelators will enable clinicians to apply iron chelation methodology to other disease states and to begin to design personalized chelation regimes.

  17. CHELATING LIGANDS: ENHANCERS OF QUALITY AND PURITY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nwokem et al.

    ABSTRACT. The quality of biogas depends largely on the percentage of methane and hydrogen sulphide gas present. High concentration of hydrogen sulphide results in low quality biogas. This work employed the use of chelating ligands in scrubbing hydrogen sulphide gas while improving the yield of methane gas.

  18. Chelates for Micronutrient Nutrition among Crops

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 7. Chelates for Micronutrient Nutrition among Crops. B S Sekhon. General Article Volume 8 Issue 7 July 2003 pp 46-53. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/008/07/0046-0053. Keywords.

  19. Chelates for Micronutrient Nutrition among Crops

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The three main classes of micronutrient sources are inorganic, synthetic chelates and organic complexes. Inorganic sources such as sulphates of Cu, Mn, Fe and Zn are the most common metallic salts used in the fertilizer industry because of their ready plant availability and water solubility. In the past 35-40 years, it has ...

  20. Retention of contrast media in the history of radiology. Sequelae of the former use of thorotrast and new challenges; Kontrastmittelretention in der Geschichte der Radiologie. Folgen der frueheren Thorotrastanwendungen und neue Herausforderungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaick, G. van; Delorme, S. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Detection of gadolinium deposits in patients who have repeatedly been administered intravenous gadolinium chelates have given rise to concern regarding the long-term safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast media. Nevertheless, negative long-term clinical effects have not yet been observed. In some publications parallels have been drawn to the sequelae of thorotrast that was formerly used for arterial angiography. In this article the history of thorotrast use is briefly described and in particular why, despite warnings, this substance was used frequently and worldwide. A brief summary of the results of the German Thorotrast Study revealed that high excess rates were only observed for primary malignant liver tumors after a 15-year or longer latency period and to a lesser degree of leukemias, as well as for severe local complications due to paravascular injections, particularly in the neck region. Based on this historical review, we will venture to take stock of the outcome from the ''success story'' of this contrast agent. (orig.) [German] Der Nachweis von Gadoliniumablagerungen im Koerper von Patienten nach mehrfacher Injektion von Gadoliniumchelaten hat Irritationen ausgeloest. Gleichwohl gibt es bislang keine Hinweise auf resultierende klinische Spaetfolgen. In verschiedenen Veroeffentlichungen wird auf moegliche Parallelen zu den Folgen der Anwendung des frueheren Roentgenkontrastmittels Thorotrast hingewiesen. In diesem Beitrag wird die Geschichte der Thorotrastanwendung dargelegt, insbesondere weshalb es trotz der Warnungen zur haeufigen, weltweiten Anwendung des Praeparats kam. Aus einer kurzen Zusammenfassung der Ergebnisse der Deutschen Thorotraststudie wird deutlich, dass erst nach einer ueber 15-jaehrigen Latenzzeit hohe Exzessraten an primaeren Lebertumoren und in geringerem Masse auch an Leukaemien auftraten und schwerwiegende Folgen paravasaler Injektionen v. a. im Halsbereich beobachtet wurden. In einem historischen

  1. Overview of chelation recommendations for thalassaemia and sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Kaya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The long term consequences of iron toxicity are mostly reversible with effective iron chelation therapy. Recommendations for use of chelation therapy in transfusion dependent thalassaemia (TDT, sickle cell disease (SCD and non transfusion dependent thalassaemia (NTDT continue to evolve as our knowledge and clinical experience increases. Improved chelation options including drug combinations and a better understanding of condition specific factors may help to improve efficiency of chelation regimens and meet the needs of patients more effectively.

  2. The use of new contrast media agents in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerbe, M.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the document is to present the importance of different categories of contrast media in radiography. Ionic and non-ionic contrast media are presented. Pharmacology and pathophysiology of Iodine contrast media with their effects on special organs of the body like the heart, vessels, lungs and nervous systems are explained. Paramagnetic contrast media used in NMR imaging are presented too. Emphasis is made on contrast media based on Gadolinium like Gd-DTPA, Gd-CL3, Gd-EDTA. Actions of Gd-DTPA applied to images in urography are pointed out

  3. Chelating agents as stationary phase in extraction chromatography, ch. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebesta, F.

    1975-01-01

    Chelating agents have been used largely in extraction chromatography for separations related to activation analysis, for concentration of metals from dilute solutions, and for preparation of radiochemically pure or carrier-free radionuclides. This review deals with the theory of extraction by chelating agents, the experimental technique, and the chelating agents and systems used (β-diketones, oximes, hydroxamic acid, dithizone and diethyldithiocarbamic acid)

  4. In vitro uptake of 153gadolinium and gadolinium complexes by hyaline articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, A.; Fleischmann, D.; Hamilton, G.; Hajek, P.

    1990-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated whether Gadolinium (Gd) penetrates into hyaline cartilage and would be incorporated into vital chondrocytes. Hyaline joint cartilage of rabbits was exposed to radioactive 153 GdCl 3 and to a radioactive 153 Gd-DTPA-BSA-complex (DTPA, diethylene-triaminepentaacetic acid; BSA, bovine serum albumine). In addition an exchange experiment with radioactive 153 GdCl 3 versus Gd-DTPA-di-N-methylglucamine (Magnevist) was performed. Incorporation of 153 GdCl 3 into neuroblastoma cells, connective tissue cells and chondrocytes was tested. The results showed that the depth and extent of incorporation of Gd depends on the molecular mass and time of exposure. 153 Gd-DTPA-BSA complexes exhibited an incorporation rate of maximal 11 per cent ± 2.8 per cent up to the middle third of the cartilage within 24 h with almost no incorporation (2 ± 1.9 per cent) for the deep layer. The exchange experiment revealed no uptake of Gd for the deep layer. The maximal incorporation rate of 153 GdCl 3 into vital chondrocytes was 6.3 per cent. These data indicate that under the condition of MR-arthrography, Gd-DTPA-di-N-methylglucamine will not be absorbed into the deep layers of hyaline cartilage and will not be incorporated into vital chondrocytes. (author). 8 refs.; 3 tabs

  5. First experiences with application of gadolinium-DTPA in infants and small children under two years of age. Erste Erfahrungen beim Einsatz von Gadolinium-DTPA bei Saeuglingen und Kleinkindern unter zwei Jahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, R.; Lausch, N.; Buecheler, E. (Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik); Grzyska, U. (Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Neurologische Klinik)

    1991-07-01

    The use of Gadolinium-DTPA as a paramagnetic contrast agent in MRI with adults and juveniles concerning brain and spinal cord pathology is well proven since years. In the FRG it is only introduced for children over two years of age. Therefore this report deales with the experience in four infants and small children under the age of two. They all were suffering from neurological tumors and got additional diagnostic information in three cases. Clinical side-effects like urticaria, vomiting or convulsions had not been observed nor had pathologic changes of the biochemical parameters been noticed. (orig./GDG).

  6. Chelation and stabilization of berkelium in oxidation state +IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deblonde, Gauthier J.-P.; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Rupert, Peter B.; An, Dahlia D.; Illy, Marie-Claire; Ralston, Corie Y.; Brabec, Jiri; de Jong, Wibe A.; Strong, Roland K.; Abergel, Rebecca J.

    2017-09-01

    Berkelium (Bk) has been predicted to be the only transplutonium element able to exhibit both +III and +IV oxidation states in solution, but evidence of a stable oxidized Bk chelate has so far remained elusive. Here we describe the stabilization of the heaviest 4+ ion of the periodic table, under mild aqueous conditions, using a siderophore derivative. The resulting Bk(IV) complex exhibits luminescence via sensitization through an intramolecular antenna effect. This neutral Bk(IV) coordination compound is not sequestered by the protein siderocalin—a mammalian metal transporter—in contrast to the negatively charged species obtained with neighbouring trivalent actinides americium, curium and californium (Cf). The corresponding Cf(III)-ligand-protein ternary adduct was characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. Combined with theoretical predictions, these data add significant insight to the field of transplutonium chemistry, and may lead to innovative Bk separation and purification processes.

  7. Left Ventricular Function Evaluation on a 3T MR Scanner with Parallel RF Transmission Technique: Prospective Comparison of Cine Sequences Acquired before and after Gadolinium Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspar, Thibault; Schultz, Anthony; Schaeffer, Mickaël; Labani, Aïssam; Jeung, Mi-Young; Jurgens, Paul Thomas; El Ghannudi, Soraya; Roy, Catherine; Ohana, Mickaël

    To compare cine MR b-TFE sequences acquired before and after gadolinium injection, on a 3T scanner with a parallel RF transmission technique in order to potentially improve scanning time efficiency when evaluating LV function. 25 consecutive patients scheduled for a cardiac MRI were prospectively included and had their b-TFE cine sequences acquired before and right after gadobutrol injection. Images were assessed qualitatively (overall image quality, LV edge sharpness, artifacts and LV wall motion) and quantitatively with measurement of LVEF, LV mass, and telediastolic volume and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between the myocardium and the cardiac chamber. Statistical analysis was conducted using a Bayesian paradigm. No difference was found before or after injection for the LVEF, LV mass and telediastolic volume evaluations. Overall image quality and CNR were significantly lower after injection (estimated coefficient cine after > cine before gadolinium: -1.75 CI = [-3.78;-0.0305], prob(coef>0) = 0% and -0.23 CI = [-0.49;0.04], prob(coef>0) = 4%) respectively), but this decrease did not affect the visual assessment of LV wall motion (cine after > cine before gadolinium: -1.46 CI = [-4.72;1.13], prob(coef>0) = 15%). In 3T cardiac MRI acquired with parallel RF transmission technique, qualitative and quantitative assessment of LV function can reliably be performed with cine sequences acquired after gadolinium injection, despite a significant decrease in the CNR and the overall image quality.

  8. Nanosystem composed with MSNs, gadolinium, liposome and cytotoxic peptides for tumor theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yaqing; Zhang, Nengpan; Li, Chunlin; Pu, Kefeng; Ding, Chen; Zhu, Yimin

    2017-03-01

    A dual-functional delivery system, based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with the integration of Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging and therapeutic peptide delivery, is reported in this paper. A lipid bilayer is attached onto the surface of the nanoparticles, following the doping of Gadolinium (Gd), a paramagnetic lanthanide ion. The liposome-coated GdMSNs exhibit improved colloidal stability, better biocompatibility and more efficient cellular uptake. The Gd renders the nano carrier a potential T1 contrast agent, confirmed by the MR imaging. A pro-apoptotic peptide, KLA (HGGKLAKLAKKLAKLAK), is encapsulated into the GdMSNs-LP and enters into the cells successfully to induce mitochondrial swelling and apoptosis, while it is nontoxic outside the cells. The synthesis procedure is convenient and free of toxic organic reagents. The nanosystem we construct may contribute to a promising theranostic platform for therapeutic peptide delivery in cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nature of the bifunctional chelating agent used for radioimmunotherapy with yttrium-88 monoclonal antibodies: critical factors in determining in vivo survival and organ toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozak, R.W.; Raubitschek, A.; Mirzadeh, S.; Brechbiel, M.W.; Junghaus, R.; Gansow, O.A.; Waldmann, T.A. (Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1989-05-15

    One factor that is critical to the potential effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy is the design of radiometal-chelated antibodies that will be stable in vivo. Stability in vivo depends on the condition that both the chelate linkage and radiolabeling procedures not alter antibody specificity and biodistribution. In addition, synthesis and selection of the chelating agent is critical for each radiometal in order to prevent inappropriate release of the radiometal in vivo. In the present study, we compare the in vivo stability of seven radioimmunoconjugates that use different polyaminocarboxylate chelating agents to complex yttrium-88 to the mouse anti-human interleukin-2 receptor monoclonal antibody, anti-Tac. Chelate linkage and radiolabeling procedures did not alter the immunospecificity of anti-Tac. In order to assess whether yttrium was inappropriately released from the chelate-coupled antibody in vivo, iodine-131-labeled and yttrium-88 chelate-coupled antibodies were simultaneously administered to the same animals to correlate the decline in yttrium and radioiodinated antibody activity. The four stable yttrium-88 chelate-coupled antibodies studied displayed similar iodine-131 and yttrium-88 activity, indicating minimal elution of yttrium-88 from the complex. In contrast, the unstable yttrium-88 chelate-coupled antibodies had serum yttrium-88 activities that declined much more rapidly than their iodine-131 activities, suggesting loss of the radiolabel yttrium-88 from the chelate. Furthermore, high rates of yttrium-88 elution correlated with deposition in bone. Four chelating agents emerged as promising immunotherapeutic reagents: isothiocyanate benzyl DTPA and its derivatives 1B3M, MX, and 1M3B.

  10. High-dose contrast-enhanced MRI in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koudriavtseva, T.; Pozzilli, C.; Di Biasi, C.; Iannilli, M.; Trasimeni, G.; Gasperini, C.; Argentino, C.; Gualdi, G.F.

    1996-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced MRI is effective for assessing disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) and may provide an outcome measure for testing the efficacy of treatment in clinical trials. To compare the sensitivity of high-dose gadolinium-HP-DO3A with that of a standard dose of gadolinium-DTPA, we studied 16 patients with relapsing-remitting MS in the acute phase of the disease. Each underwent two MRI examinations within at most 48 h. The initial MRI study was with a standard dose of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg), and the second one an experimental dose of gadolinium-HP-DO3A (0.3 mmol/kg). No adverse effects were attributed to the contrast media. The high-dose study revealed more enhancing lesions than the standard-dose study (56 vs 38). This difference was found to be more relevant for infratentorial and small lesions. Furthermore, with the higher dose, there was a marked qualitative improvement in the visibility and delineation of the lesions. (orig.). With 4 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Metal chelates of N-alkylacetoacetanilides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thankarajan, N.; Sreeman, P. (Calicut Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1981-04-01

    Beryllium(II), copper(II) and iron(III) chelates of N-methylacetoacetanilide, and beryllium(II), copper(II), chromium(III), Iron(III) and dioxouranium(VI) chelates of N-methyl- and N-ethyl-acetoacetanilides have been prepared and characterised on the basis of their analytical, spectral (UV, IR, PMR) and other physicochemical data. Polarographic studies reveal that the copper(II) complexes of the above ligands are stabler than that of acetoacetanilide. Pentagonal-bipyramidal structure for the uranium complex, and square-pyramidal structure for 1:1 adducts of the copper complexes with pyridine, have been suggested on the basis of the spectral data.

  12. Laser spectroscopy and laser isotope separation of atomic gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y. W.; Yamanaka, C.; Nomaru, K.; Kou, K.; Niki, H.; Izawa, Y.; Nakai, S.

    1994-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a process which uses intense pulsed lasers to selectively photoionize one isotopic species of a chemical element, after which these ions are extracted electromagnetically. The AVLIS has several advantages over the traditional methods based on the mass difference, such as high selectivity, low energy consumption, short starting time and versatility to any atoms. The efforts for atomic vapor laser isotope separation at ILT and ILE, Osaka University have been concentrated into the following items: 1) studies on laser spectroscopy and laser isotope separation of atomic gadolinium, 2) studies on interaction processes including coherent dynamics, propagation effects and atom-ion collision in AVLIS system, 3) development of laser systems for AVLIS. In this paper, we present experimental results on the laser spectroscopy and laser isotope separation of atomic gadolinium.

  13. Microwave and optical diagnostics in a gadolinium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larousse, B.

    1997-01-01

    The optimization of the separation process of the gadolinium isotopes by Ion Cyclotron Resonance requires a precise knowledge of the physical characteristics of the plasma. Thus, two kinds of diagnostics have been developed: the first one to estimate the microwave power inside the source and the second one to measure the density of atomic and ionic of the gadolinium inside the plasma source and in front of the collector. Microwave diagnostic: A microstrip antenna has been designed and developed in order to characterize the microwave at 36 GHz frequency in the plasma source. The experimental results for different plasma regimes are presented. The measurements inside the plasma source show a maximum of microwave absorption for an argon pressure of 10 -4 mb (93% of absorption of the incident wave in the conditions of isotope separation). Laser absorption diagnostic: The theory of laser absorption in presence of a magnetic field is recalled and the first results are presented. In the spectral range between 560 and 620 nm, corresponding to high energy levels of gadolinium, no signal is obtained so that the density is below the detection limit 10 10 cm -3 . In the spectral range between 380 and 400 nm, two lines are observed, issue from the fundamental and metastable (633 cm -1 ) levels. The density of metastable level of gadolinium ions is about 10 10 cm -3 with a relative precision of 15 % and its variation is studied as a function of argon pressure, at different sections of the plasma column (source, collector). The achieved set of measurements has been performed in order to check the theoretical models. (author)

  14. Process for the manufacture of nuclear fuels containing gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sondermann, T.

    1980-01-01

    A uranyl nitrate solution containing the required gadolinium CO 2 gas and NH 3 gas is taken to a precipitator with an aqueous condensate containing ammonium carbonate with a pH value of 9. A pump circulates the suspension. The salt is precipitated by reducing the pH value to 8.2. After filtration and drying these crystals together with AUC are changed to the oxide form, which can be sintered. (RW) [de

  15. Laser ablation of Bi-substituted gadolinium iron garnet films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, N.; Hayashida, K.; Kawano, K.; Higuchi, K.; Ohkoshi, M.; Tsushima, K.

    1995-01-01

    Bi-substituted gadolinium iron garnet films were deposited by laser ablation. The composition, the structure and the magnetic properties of the films were found to be strongly dependent both on the compositions of the targets and on the pressure of oxygen. The highest values of Bi-substitution up to x=1.44 with uniform composition were obtained, after annealing in air. ((orig.))

  16. Growth and scintillation properties of gadolinium and yttrium orthovanadate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloshina, O.V.; Baumer, V.N.; Bondar, V.G.; Kurtsev, D.A.; Gorbacheva, T.E.; Zenya, I.M.; Zhukov, A.V.; Sidletskiy, O.Ts.

    2012-01-01

    Aiming to explore the possibility of using the undoped rare-earth orthovanadates as scintillation materials, we developed the procedure for growth of gadolinium (GdVO 4 ) and yttrium (YVO 4 ) orthovanadate single crystals by Czochralski method, and determined the optimal conditions of their after-growth annealing. Optical, luminescent, and scintillation properties of YVO 4 and GdVO 4 were discussed versus known literature data. Scintillation characteristics of GdVO 4 were determined for the first time.

  17. IRON CHELATION THERAPY IN THALASSEMIA SYNDROMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Cianciulli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Transfusional hemosiderosis is a frequent complication in patients with transfusion dependent chronic diseases such as  thalassemias and severe type of sickle cell diseases. As there are no physiological mechanisms to excrete the iron contained in transfused red cells (1 unit of blood contains approximately 200 mg of iron the excess of iron is stored in various organs. Cardiomyopathy is the most severe complication covering more than 70% of the causes of death of thalassemic patients. Although the current reference standard iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO has been used clinically for over four decades, its effectiveness is limited by a demanding therapeutic regimen that leads to poor compliance. Despite poor compliance, because of the inconvenience of subcutaneous infusion, DFO improved considerably the survival and quality of life of patients with thalassemia. Deferiprone since 1998 and Deferasirox since 2005 were licensed for clinical use. The oral chelators have a better compliance because of oral use, a comparable efficacy to DFO in iron excretion and probably a better penetration to myocardial cells. Considerable increase in iron excretion was documented with combination therapy of DFO and Deferiprone. The proper use of the three chelators will improve the prevention and treatment of iron overload, it will reduce  complications, and improve survival and quality of life of transfused patients

  18. Identification of the di-pyridyl ketone isonicotinoyl hydrazone (PKIH) analogues as potent iron chelators and anti-tumour agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Erika M; Lovejoy, David B; Greer, Judith M; Watts, Ralph; Richardson, Des R

    2003-01-01

    In an attempt to develop chelators as potent anti-tumour agents, we synthesized two series of novel ligands based on the very active 2-pyridylcarboxaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (PCIH) group. Since lipophilicity and membrane permeability play a critical role in Fe chelation efficacy, the aldehyde moiety of the PCIH series, namely 2-pyridylcarboxaldehyde, was replaced with the more lipophilic 2-quinolinecarboxaldehyde or di-2-pyridylketone moieties. These compounds were then systematically condensed with the same group of acid hydrazides to yield ligands based on 2-quinolinecarboxaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (QCIH) and di-2-pyridylketone isonicotinoyl hydrazone (PKIH). To examine chelator efficacy, we assessed their effects on proliferation, Fe uptake, Fe efflux, the expression of cell cycle control molecules, iron-regulatory protein-RNA-binding activity, and 3H-thymidine, 3H-uridine and 3H-leucine incorporation. Despite the high lipophilicity of the QCIH ligands and the fact that they have the same Fe-binding site as the PCIH series, surprisingly none of these compounds were effective. In contrast, the PKIH analogues showed marked anti-proliferative activity and Fe chelation efficacy. Indeed, the ability of these ligands to inhibit proliferation and DNA synthesis was similar or exceeded that found for the highly cytotoxic chelator, 311. In contrast to the PCIH and QCIH analogues, most of the PKIH group markedly increased the mRNA levels of molecules vital for cell cycle arrest. In conclusion, our studies identify structural features useful in the design of chelators with high anti-proliferative activity. We have identified a novel class of ligands that are potent Fe chelators and inhibitors of DNA synthesis, and which deserve further investigation. PMID:12642383

  19. Identification of the di-pyridyl ketone isonicotinoyl hydrazone (PKIH) analogues as potent iron chelators and anti-tumour agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Erika M; Lovejoy, David B; Greer, Judith M; Watts, Ralph; Richardson, Des R

    2003-03-01

    (1) In an attempt to develop chelators as potent anti-tumour agents, we synthesized two series of novel ligands based on the very active 2-pyridylcarboxaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (PCIH) group. Since lipophilicity and membrane permeability play a critical role in Fe chelation efficacy, the aldehyde moiety of the PCIH series, namely 2-pyridylcarboxaldehyde, was replaced with the more lipophilic 2-quinolinecarboxaldehyde or di-2-pyridylketone moieties. These compounds were then systematically condensed with the same group of acid hydrazides to yield ligands based on 2-quinolinecarboxaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (QCIH) and di-2-pyridylketone isonicotinoyl hydrazone (PKIH). To examine chelator efficacy, we assessed their effects on proliferation, Fe uptake, Fe efflux, the expression of cell cycle control molecules, iron-regulatory protein-RNA-binding activity, and (3)H-thymidine, (3)H-uridine and (3)H-leucine incorporation. (2) Despite the high lipophilicity of the QCIH ligands and the fact that they have the same Fe-binding site as the PCIH series, surprisingly none of these compounds were effective. In contrast, the PKIH analogues showed marked anti-proliferative activity and Fe chelation efficacy. Indeed, the ability of these ligands to inhibit proliferation and DNA synthesis was similar or exceeded that found for the highly cytotoxic chelator, 311. In contrast to the PCIH and QCIH analogues, most of the PKIH group markedly increased the mRNA levels of molecules vital for cell cycle arrest. (3) In conclusion, our studies identify structural features useful in the design of chelators with high anti-proliferative activity. We have identified a novel class of ligands that are potent Fe chelators and inhibitors of DNA synthesis, and which deserve further investigation.

  20. Safety of Contrast Material Use During Pregnancy and Lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puac, Paulo; Rodríguez, Andrés; Vallejo, Carina; Zamora, Carlos A; Castillo, Mauricio

    2017-11-01

    The use of contrast media to image patients who are pregnant has increased during the past decades worldwide. Their use in pregnancy and in patients who are lactating remains a challenging issue for radiologists and other physicians. This article addresses the different types of contrast media that may be used in such patients according to the imaging modality (iodinated contrast media, barium, gadolinium-based, and ultrasound contrast agents), focusing on their adverse effects, potential teratogenic effects, strategies to minimize risks, and current clinical recommendation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiation necrosis of the optic chiasm, optic tract, hypothalamus, and upper pons after radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma, detected by gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachibana, O.; Yamaguchi, N.; Yamashima, T.; Yamashita, J. (Univ. of Kanazawa School of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    A 26-year-old woman was treated for a prolactin secreting pituitary adenoma by surgery and radiotherapy (5860 rads). Fourteen months later, she developed right hemiparesis and dysarthria. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan using gadolinium contrast showed a small, enhanced lesion in the upper pons. Seven months later, she had a sudden onset of loss of vision, and radiation optic neuropathy was diagnosed. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan showed widespread gadolinium-enhanced lesions in the optic chiasm, optic tract, and hypothalamus. Magnetic resonance imaging is indispensable for the early diagnosis of radiation necrosis, which is not visualized by radiography or computed tomography.

  2. Radiation necrosis of the optic chiasm, optic tract, hypothalamus, and upper pons after radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma, detected by gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, O.; Yamaguchi, N.; Yamashima, T.; Yamashita, J.

    1990-01-01

    A 26-year-old woman was treated for a prolactin secreting pituitary adenoma by surgery and radiotherapy (5860 rads). Fourteen months later, she developed right hemiparesis and dysarthria. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan using gadolinium contrast showed a small, enhanced lesion in the upper pons. Seven months later, she had a sudden onset of loss of vision, and radiation optic neuropathy was diagnosed. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan showed widespread gadolinium-enhanced lesions in the optic chiasm, optic tract, and hypothalamus. Magnetic resonance imaging is indispensable for the early diagnosis of radiation necrosis, which is not visualized by radiography or computed tomography

  3. Aiming for a shorter rheumatoid arthritis MRI protocol: can contrast-enhanced MRI replace T2 for the detection of bone marrow oedema?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stomp, Wouter; Bloem, Johan L.; Reijnierse, Monique [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Krabben, Annemarie; Heijde, Desiree van der; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Helm-van Mil, Annette H.M. van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-10-15

    To determine whether T1 post-gadolinium chelate images (T1Gd) can replace T2-weighted images (T2) for evaluating bone marrow oedema (BME), thereby allowing a shorter magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In 179 early arthritis patients and 43 advanced RA patients, wrist and metacarpophalangeal joints were examined on a 1.5-T extremity MRI system with a standard protocol (coronal T1, T2 fat-saturated and coronal and axial T1 fat-saturated after Gd). BME was scored according to OMERACT RAMRIS by two observers with and without T2 images available. Agreement was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for semi-quantitative scores and test characteristics with T2 images as reference. Agreement between scores based on T2 and T1Gd images was excellent ICC (0.80-0.99). At bone level, sensitivity and specificity of BME on T1Gd compared to T2 were high for both patient groups and both readers (all ≥80 %). T1Gd and T2 images are equally suitable for evaluating BME. Because contrast is usually administered to assess (teno)synovitis, a short MRI protocol of T1 and T1Gd is sufficient in RA. (orig.)

  4. Microwave and optical diagnostics in a gadolinium plasma; Diagnostics hyperfrequence et optique dans un plasma magnetise de gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larousse, B. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. des Procedes d`Enrichissement]|[Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers (CNAM), 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    The optimization of the separation process of the gadolinium isotopes by Ion Cyclotron Resonance requires a precise knowledge of the physical characteristics of the plasma. Thus, two kinds of diagnostics have been developed: the first one to estimate the microwave power inside the source and the second one to measure the density of atomic and ionic of the gadolinium inside the plasma source and in front of the collector. Microwave diagnostic: A microstrip antenna has been designed and developed in order to characterize the microwave at 36 GHz frequency in the plasma source. The experimental results for different plasma regimes are presented. The measurements inside the plasma source show a maximum of microwave absorption for an argon pressure of 10{sup -4} mb (93% of absorption of the incident wave in the conditions of isotope separation). Laser absorption diagnostic: The theory of laser absorption in presence of a magnetic field is recalled and the first results are presented. In the spectral range between 560 and 620 nm, corresponding to high energy levels of gadolinium, no signal is obtained so that the density is below the detection limit 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}. In the spectral range between 380 and 400 nm, two lines are observed, issue from the fundamental and metastable (633 cm{sup -1}) levels. The density of metastable level of gadolinium ions is about 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} with a relative precision of 15 % and its variation is studied as a function of argon pressure, at different sections of the plasma column (source, collector). The achieved set of measurements has been performed in order to check the theoretical models. (author) 32 refs.

  5. Demonstration of flash K-edge angiography utilizing gadolinium-based contrast medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eiichi; Sagae, Michiaki; Obara, Haruo; Germer, Rudolf; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ichimaru, Toshio; Sato, Shigehiro; Ojima, Hidenori; Takayama, Kazuhiro; Ido, Hideaki

    2005-03-01

    The high-voltage condensers in a polarity-inversion two-stage Marx surge generator are charged from -50 to -70 kV by a power supply, and the electric charges in the condensers are discharged to an x-ray tube after closing gap switches in the surge generator with a trigger device. The x-ray tube is a demountable diode, and the turbomolecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Tungsten characteristic x rays can be produced, since the tube utilizes a disk cathode and a rod target, and bremsstrahlung rays are not emitted in the opposite direction to that of electron acceleration. At a charging voltage of -70 kV, the instantaneous tube voltage and current were 140 kV and 1.0 kA, respectively. The x-ray pulse widths were approximately 90 ns, and the estimated number of K photons was approximately 5×108 photons/cm2 per pulse at 0.5 m from the source of 3.0 mm in diameter.

  6. Prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways in patients with portal hypertension: demonstration by gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography; Vias colaterais porto-sistemicas exuberantes em portadores de hipertensao portal: demonstracao pela angiografia por ressonancia magnetica com gadolinio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldana, Rogerio Pedreschi; Bezerra, Alexandre Araujo Sergio; Cecin, Alexnadre Oliveira; Souza, Luis Ronan Marques Ferreira de; Goldman, Susan Menasce; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe; Szejnfeld, Jacob [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: rogercal@uol.com.br

    2003-03-01

    To demonstrate the usefulness of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in the evaluation of prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways. We reviewed the images from 40 patients with portal hypertension studied with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and selected illustrative cases of prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways. The scans were performed using high field equipment (1.5 Tesla) and a 3 D volume technique. Image were obtained after intravenous injection of paramagnetic contrast media using a power injector. Magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated with precision the porto-systemic collateral pathways, particularly when investigating extensive territories or large vessels. The cases presented show the potential of this method in the investigation of patients with portal hypertension. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is a useful method for the evaluation of patients with portal hypertension and prominent collateral pathways. (author)

  7. Utilization of gadolinium burnable poison for reactivity control of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galperin, A.; Segev, M.

    1985-01-01

    Summarized here is an attempt to utilize gadolinium as a burnable poison for total reactivity control of a PWR core equilibrium cycle, i.e., control without a soluble poison system. In the course of the research, a few design guidelines evolved: 1) gadolinium can be utilized well in the form of a lumped poison rod; 2) the optimal gadolinium rod is an annulus of gadolinium immersed in water; 3) BP rods are inserted into vacant thimble guide tubes; and 4) only fresh fuel assemblies are loaded with BP rods, thus avoiding insertion of the BP clusters into irradiated fuel assemblies

  8. [Studies of three-dimensional cardiac late gadolinium enhancement MRI at 3.0 Tesla].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Takeshi; Ishihara, Masaru; Ikeda, Takayuki; Kawakami, Momoe

    2008-12-20

    Cardiac late Gadolinium enhancement MR imaging has been shown to allow assessment of myocardial viability in patients with ischemic heart disease. The current standard approach is a 3D inversion recovery sequence at 1.5 Tesla. The aims of this study were to evaluate the technique feasibility and clinical utility of MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla in patients with myocardial infarction and cardiomyopathy. In phantom and volunteer studies, the inversion time required to suppress the signal of interests and tissues was prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. In the clinical study, the average inversion time to suppress the signal of myocardium at 3.0 Tesla with respect to MR viability imaging at 1.5 Tesla was at 15 min after the administration of contrast agent (304.0+/-29.2 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 283.9+/-20.9 at 1.5 Tesla). The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium was equal at both field strengths (4.06+/-1.30 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 4.42+/-1.85 at 1.5 Tesla). Even at this early stage, MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla provides high quality images in patients with myocardial infarction. The inversion time is significantly prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium at 3.0 Tesla are equal to 1.5 Tesla. Further investigation is needed for this technical improvement, for clinical evaluation, and for limitations.

  9. Implications of post-gadolinium MRI results in 13 cases with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugurel, Mehmet Sahin; Hayakawa, Minako

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is a relative lack of definitive information about the contrast-enhancement characteristics of lesions in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). Objective: Evaluation of contrast-enhanced MRI findings in PRES with a special emphasis on pathophysiology of post-gadolinium behavior of these lesions. Materials and methods: Contrast-enhanced 1.5 T MRI findings and relevant clinical data of the patients were retrospectively reviewed on 13 cases (six males, seven females; age range: 22-78; mean age 47). Although fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and diffusion-weighted MR images were considered for identification of the entity, primarily post-contrast T1-weighted MR images were searched for traces of enhancement in the lesions. Results: No definitely enhancing lesion was identified in the MR images obtained in 6-48 h after onset of symptoms (mostly headaches, seizures and cortical visual field deficits) in this series. Severity of disease indicated by small hemorrhages, confluence of lesions or progression to cytotoxic edema did not seem to alter this result. Typical lesion characteristics were consistent with vasogenic edema on FLAIR and diffusion MR images. Acute elevation of blood pressure on chronic hypertensive background was responsible in four, eclampsia in three, uremia with blood pressure fluctuations in three, and cyclosporine-toxicity in three cases. Conclusion: Although occasional enhancing brain lesions have been reported in the literature on PRES, contrast-enhancement of lesions may be a factor of scan timing and underlying etiology. Prospective studies with larger series on PRES are required for better evaluation of contrast-enhancement in MRI with respect to scan timing, which in turn may help understand its pathophysiology better

  10. Gadolinium-enhanced dynamic MRI of the fractured carpal scaphoid: Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munk, P.L.; Lee, M.J.; Janzen, D.; Connell, D.G.; Poon, P.Y.; Struk, D.; Munk, P.L.; Lee, M.; Janzen, D.L.; Connell, D.G.; Poon, P.Y.; Struk, D.; Munk, P.L.; Janzen, D.L.; Favero, K.J.; Poon, P.Y.; Vellet, A.D.; Logan, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present report was to evaluate the vascularity of fracture fragments of the fractured carpal scaphoid in the acute ( 3 months) phases using a gadolinium-enhanced dynamic MRI sequence. Eight patients with acute scaphoid fractures, six patients with chronic scaphoid fractures, and three control patients without fractures were evaluated using a T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient recalled acquisition (fSPGR) sequence with gadolinium-DTPA enhancement (0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight). Signal intensity over time plots were obtained using region of interest measurements from both fracture fragments. Enhancement factors (EF) were then calculated from the plots. No enhancement of the scaphoid was seen in control subjects (EF: distal scaphoid pole 1.04 + 0.01, proximal pole 1.07 + 0.08). In acute fracture patients, enhancement of the distal pole was greater than that of the proximal in all cases but one in which the two poles enhanced in a similar fashion (EF: distal 1.99 + 0.77, proximal 1.43 + 0.99). In chronic fracture patients the enhancement pattern was reversed, as the proximal pole enhanced to a greater degree than the distal with the exception of one case where both poles enhanced equally (EF: distal 1.74 + 0.52, proximal 2.64 + 0.50). Using a two-tailed non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test, the difference in enhancement of the proximal poles between the acute and chronic groups was found to be highly significant (P < 0.003). Dynamic contrast- enhanced (fSPGR) MRI demonstrates significant differences in the enhancement patterns of the scaphoid when chronic and acute fractures are compared. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  11. Gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography: comparison with MR urography using HASTE technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Gong Yong; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Cheong, Gyung Ho; Oh, Hee Sul; Kim, Chong Soo; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Young Gon [Medical School, Chungbuk National University, Chongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-01-01

    To compare the feasibility of gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography (GEMRU) and conventional MR urography using the half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequence in patients with hydronephrosis or non-visualized kidney. Fifteen patients with hydronephrosis or non-visualized kidney, as demonstrated by ultrasonography or intravenous urography, were enrolled in this study. Nine were men and six were women, and their age ranged from 18 to 77 (mean, 60.6) years. For all MR examinations, a 1.5T MR unit was employed. For breath-hold MR urography, the HASTE technique (MRU) was used, and reconstruction involved the use of a maximum intensity-projection (MIP) algorithm. For gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography, the fast low angle shot (FLASH) 3-D method was used and images were obtained at 5, 10, 20, and 30 minutes, and reconstruction again involved the use of MIP algorithm. In some cases, additional GEMRU was obtained 24 hour after contrast material injection, and an MIP algorithm was used for reconstruction. MRU and GEMRU were independently interpreted by two radiologists who for quantitative analysis compared SNR with CNR, and at each anatomic level qualitatively analyzed morphologic accuracy and diagnostic value of the lesions. In quantitative analysis, SNR and CNR differences between the two sequences at the renal pelvis and the level of the ureter were not significant (p greater than 0.05). In qualitative analysis, GEMRU was superior to MRU for the assessment of evaluated ureter at each level (p less than 0.05), anatomic anomaly and intrinsic tumor. Ureteral stones, however, were more easily diagnosed with MRU. For assessment of the ureter GEMRU is superior to MRU and has the advantage of evaluating renal function. We believe that for evaluation of the urinary tract, especially the distal ureter, GEMRU may be a valuable adjunct to routine MR urography. (author)

  12. Magnetic resonance urography enhanced by gadolinium and diuretics: a comparison with conventional urography in diagnosing the cause of ureteric obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, P; Brauers, A; Nolte-Ernsting, C A; Jakse, G; Günther, R W

    2000-12-01

    To compare the ability of magnetic resonance urography (MRU), enhanced using gadolinium and frusemide diuresis, and conventional intravenous urography (IVU) to diagnose the cause of ureteric obstruction. The study included 82 patients in whom IVU showed or suggested obstruction and who also underwent MRU. The images from both methods were interpreted by various investigators independently; two evaluated the IVU and two others the MRU, the latter being unaware of the diagnosis after IVU. If the diagnosis remained unclear, further investigations (e.g. computed tomography, retrograde pyelography or ureteroscopy) were conducted. The diagnoses were ureteric calculi in 72 patients, ureteric tumours in eight and extra-ureteric tumours in two. In those with urolithiasis, the diagnosis was correct with IVU in 49 patients and with MRU in 64. The diagnosis in this group was incorrect with MRU in only two patients. The main reason for the failure of IVU was absent contrast medium excretion. Three of eight patients with ureteric tumours were correctly diagnosed by IVU but in three patients the diagnosis was incorrect. MRU correctly diagnosed seven of the eight patients in this group, with no false diagnosis. IVU is currently likely to remain the standard procedure for imaging the upper urinary tract, but this study shows the potential of MRU when enhanced with gadolinium and frusemide. MRU may be helpful if there is a dilated system with no excretory function, in pregnant women, in children and in those with contrast medium allergy.

  13. Chelation therapy in intoxications with mercury, lead and copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, yang; Skaug, Marit Aralt; Andersen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    In the present review we provide an update of the appropriate use of chelating agents in the treatment of intoxications with compounds of mercury, lead and copper. The relatively new chelators meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and 2,3-dimercapto-propanesulphonate (DMPS) can effectively...... or tetrathiomolybdate may be more suitable alternatives today. In copper-toxicity, a free radical scavenger might be recommended as adjuvant to the chelator therapy...

  14. EDTA: the chelating agent under environmental scrutiny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Oviedo

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The chelating agent EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid is a compound of massive use world wide with household and industrial applications, being one of the anthropogenic compounds with highest concentrations in inland European waters. In this review, the applications of EDTA and its behavior once it has been released into the environment are described. At a laboratory scale, degradation of EDTA has been achieved; however, in natural environments studies detect poor biodegradability. It is concluded that EDTA behaves as a persistent substance in the environment and that its contribution to heavy metals bioavailability and remobilization processes in the environment is a major concern.

  15. Role of MRI T2-DRIVE in the Assessment of Pituitary Stalk Abnormalities without Gadolinium in Pituitary Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godano, Elisabetta; Morana, Giovanni; Di Iorgi, Natascia; Pistorio, Angela; Allegri, Anna Elsa Maria; Napoli, Flavia; Gastaldi, Roberto; Calcagno, Annalisa; Patti, Giuseppa; Gallizia, Annalisa; Notarnicola, Sara; Giaccardi, Marta; Noli, Serena; Severino, Mariasavina; Tortora, Domenico; Rossi, Andrea; Maghnie, Mohamad

    2018-04-12

    To investigate the role of T2-DRIVE MRI sequence in the accurate measurement of pituitary stalk (PS) size and the identification of PS abnormalities in patients with hypothalamic-pituitary disorders without the use of gadolinium. This was a retrospective study conducted on 242 patients who underwent MRI due to pituitary dysfunction between 2006 - 2015. Among 135 eligible patients, 102 showed eutopic posterior pituitary (PP) gland and 33 showed "ectopic" PP (EPP). Two readers independently measured the size of PS in patients with eutopic PP at the proximal, midpoint and distal levels on pre- and post-contrast T1-weighted as well as T2-DRIVE images; PS visibility was assessed on pre-contrast T1 and T2-DRIVE sequences in those with EPP. The length, height, width and volume of the anterior pituitary (AP), PP height and length, and PP area were analyzed. Significant agreement between the two readers was obtained for T2-DRIVE PS measurements in patients with "eutopic" PP; a significant difference was demonstrated between the Intraclass correlation coefficient calculated on the T2-DRIVE and the T1-pre- and post-contrast sequences. The percentage of PS identified by T2-DRIVE in EPP patients was 72.7% compared to 30.3% of T1 pre-contrast sequences. A significant association was found between the visibility of PS on T2-DRIVE and the height of AP. T2-DRIVE sequence is extremely precise and reliable for the evaluation of PS size and the recognition of PS abnormalities; the use of gadolinium-based contrast media does not add significant information and may thus be avoided.

  16. Dendrimer-based Macromolecular MRI Contrast Agents: Characteristics and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisataka Kobayashi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous macromolecular MRI contrast agents prepared employing relatively simple chemistry may be readily available that can provide sufficient enhancement for multiple applications. These agents operate using a ~100-fold lower concentration of gadolinium ions in comparison to the necessary concentration of iodine employed in CT imaging. Herein, we describe some of the general potential directions of macromolecular MRI contrast agents using our recently reported families of dendrimer-based agents as examples. Changes in molecular size altered the route of excretion. Smaller-sized contrast agents less than 60 kDa molecular weight were excreted through the kidney resulting in these agents being potentially suitable as functional renal contrast agents. Hydrophilic and larger-sized contrast agents were found better suited for use as blood pool contrast agents. Hydrophobic variants formed with polypropylenimine diaminobutane dendrimer cores created liver contrast agents. Larger hydrophilic agents are useful for lymphatic imaging. Finally, contrast agents conjugated with either monoclonal antibodies or with avidin are able to function as tumor-specific contrast agents, which also might be employed as therapeutic drugs for either gadolinium neutron capture therapy or in conjunction with radioimmunotherapy.

  17. Inhibition of warfarin anticoagulation associated with chelation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebe, Heidi Braun; Gregory, Philip J

    2002-08-01

    Chelation therapy originally was administered exclusively to patients with heavy metal poisoning. Now some physicians are administering this therapy for numerous conditions, most commonly coronary heart disease. A 64-year-old man experienced impaired warfarin anticoagulation after undergoing chelation therapy His international normalized ratio (INR) fell from 2.6 the day before to 1.6 the day after therapy was administered. Whether chelation therapy decreases the effectiveness of warfarin anticoagulation is uncertain. However, because of this potential interaction, clinicians should consider increased INR monitoring in patients undergoing chelation therapy.

  18. Metal regeneration of iron chelates in nitric oxide scrubbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Littlejohn, David; Shi, Yao

    1997-08-19

    The present invention relates to a process of using metal particles to reduce NO to NH.sub.3. More specifically, the invention concerns an improved process to regenerate iron (II) (CHELATE) by reduction of iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) complex, which process comprises: a) contacting an aqueous solution containing iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) with metal particles at between about 20.degree. and 90.degree. C. to reduce NO present, produce ammonia or an ammonium ion, and produce free iron (II) (CHELATE) at a pH of between about 3 and 8. The process is useful to remove NO from flue gas and reduce pollution.

  19. Contrast Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a red blood cell— and have a high degree of "echogenicity", or ability to reflect ultrasound waves. ... and radiologist to understand the potential risks and benefits of the contrast-enhanced scan. For MR imaging, ...

  20. Femtosecond laser excitation drives ferromagnetic gadolinium out of magnetic equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, Robert; Döbrich, Kristian; Frietsch, Björn; Gahl, Cornelius; Teichmann, Martin; Schwarzkopf, Olaf; Wernet, Philippe; Weinelt, Martin

    2012-08-03

    The temporal evolution of the exchange-split Δ(2)-like Σ valence bands of the 4f-ferromagnet gadolinium after femtosecond laser excitation has been studied using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy based on high-order harmonic generation. The ultrafast drop of the exchange splitting reflects the magnetic response seen in femtosecond magnetic dichroism experiments. However, while the minority valence band reacts immediately, the response of the majority counterpart is delayed by 1 picosecond and is only half as fast. These findings demonstrate that laser excitation drives the valence band structure out of magnetic equilibrium.

  1. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging in evaluation of Bell palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, A.M.; Wesolowski, D.P.; Bojrab, D.I.; Ernstoff, R.M.; Farah, J.

    1989-01-01

    Eight patients with Bell palsy were evaluated with Gd-DTPA (Magnevist)-enhanced MR imaging in a 1.0-T Siemen's Magnetom unit. Axial pre-and postcontrast and coronal postcontrast T1-weighted MR images of facial nerves were studied. Significant unilateral enhancement of the facial nerve within the internal auditory canal, with or without involvement of the geniculate ganglia, was found in six patients. Three of these patients without satisfactory response to medical treatment underwent surgical decompression, with excellent recovery of facial nerve function. The authors believe that gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is valuable in the evaluation and management of Bell palsy

  2. Gadolinium enhances the sensitivity of SW-1573 cells for thermal neutron irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, N. A. P.; Bergs, J. W. J.; Kok, T. T.; Kuperus, R. R. N.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.; Haveman, J.; van Bree, C.; Stalpers, L. J. A.

    2006-01-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (Gd-NCT) is an experimental cancer treatment based on the physical principal that neutron capture by gadolinium-157 ensures the release of focal high-dose radiation, such as gamma-rays and electrons. Survival and induction of chromosomal aberrations of human

  3. Studies on deposition of gadolinium from its nitrate solution of zircaloy-2 surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, G.C.; Unny, V.K.P.; Vartak, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    Gadolinium nitrate solution (25000 ppm) is proposed as a neutron poison in tertiary shut down system of R-5 reactor at Trombay, Bombay. The gadolinium nitrate solution when in contact with the zircaloy tube can get deposited and thus, affect the reactivity of the reactor during operation. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the rate of deposition of gadolinium on zircaloy-2 surfaces at various temperatures and at different periods of time. Studies were also conducted to determine the deposition of gadolinium when exposed to various 60 Co γ-ray irradiation doses. The studies indicated that deposition of gadolinium increases with increase in temperature while there was no increase in rate of deposition by 60 Co γ-ray irradiation upto 440 Mrads. (author)

  4. Psa study of ETRR-2 Gadolinium injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Messiry, A.M.; Moustafa, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    one of the main safety feature of ETRR-2, egypt test and reactor 3 2 (new reactor), is the use of a redundant and diverse shutdown systems, called second shutdown system SSS. This system operates through injection of a high absorbing material, gadolinium Gd solution, into four rectangular chambers surrounding the reactor core. In view of the fact that the core is super-moderated, the injected neutron poison between the core and the reflector will cause an immediate reactor shutdown. The SSS triggers due to: manual, seismic, fails of actuation of the first shutdown system FSS, or high power neutron flux signal. Because of safety importance of this new system design, the present probabilistic safety assessment PDA study is initiated. The study carried ou in view of the system acceptable unavailability together with the effects of failure probabilities of relevant parameters and basic events. The effect of system design modifications (remove of high power signal and addition of nitrogen filtering line) on reactor safety and system unavailability is analyzed. A new proposed PSA model which take into consideration all possible failure modes of the system components is developed. The results show that the modification done on the system improves its unavailability while increases the minimal cut sets. The proposed model unavailability is greater (bad) than the designer model (That contains many hypothesis). human error contribution on system unavailability is reflected on failure type of gadolinium concentration. The IAEA psa pack IV code is utilized for calculation purposes

  5. Chelated ruthenium catalysts for Z-selective olefin metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H

    2011-06-08

    We report the development of ruthenium-based metathesis catalysts with chelating N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands that catalyze highly Z-selective olefin metathesis. A very simple and convenient procedure for the synthesis of such catalysts has been developed. Intramolecular C-H bond activation of the NHC ligand, promoted by anion ligand substitution, forms the appropriate chelate for stereocontrolled olefin metathesis.

  6. Potentials and drawbacks of chelate-enhanced phytoremediation of soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römkens, P.F.A.M.; Bouwman, L.A.; Japenga, J.; Draaisma, C.

    2002-01-01

    Chelate-enhanced phytoremediation has been proposed as an effective tool for the extraction of heavy metals from soils by plants. However, side-effects related to the addition of chelates, e.g. metal leaching and effects on soil micro-organisms, were usually neglected. Therefore, greenhouse and

  7. Comparison of simple and chelated amberlite IR-120 for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study, the efficiency of simple and chelating Amberlite IR-120 with α-nitroso β-naphthol (IR-αNβN) and with 8-hydroxy quinoline (IR-8HQ) has been compared for the removal of Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. The chelation was confirmed using different characterization techniques like SEM, TGA and FTIR.

  8. MRI and CT contrast media extravasation: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshmatzadeh Behzadi, Ashkan; Farooq, Zerwa; Newhouse, Jeffery H; Prince, Martin R

    2018-03-01

    This systematic review combines data from multiple papers on contrast media extravasation to identify factors contributing to increased extravasation risk. Data were extracted from 17 papers reporting 2191 extravasations in 1,104,872 patients (0.2%) undergoing computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Extravasation rates were 0.045% for gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) and nearly 6-fold higher, 0.26% for iodinated contrast agents. Factors associated with increased contrast media extravasations included: older age, female gender, using an existing intravenous (IV) instead of placing a new IV in radiology, in-patient status, use of automated power injection, high injection rates, catheter location, and failing to warm up the more viscous contrast media to body temperature. Contrast media extravasation is infrequent but nearly 6 times less frequent with GBCA for MRI compared with iodinated contrast used in CT.

  9. MRI of spondylodiscities: contribution of gadolinium-DTPA and fat suppression sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cova, M.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste, Cattinara Hospital (Italy); Dalla Palma, L. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste, Cattinara Hospital (Italy); Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste, Cattinara Hospital (Italy); Ricci, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste, Cattinara Hospital (Italy)

    1993-12-01

    Twenty-six patients with a clinical diagnosis of spondylodiscitis were examined with non-contrast and contrast-enhanced MRI in order to define the contribution of gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) and different pulse sequences, including a fat suppression sequence (SPIR). Spin echo (SE) T1-weighted images before and after Gd-DTPA injection and SE T2-weighted images were obtained in all patients. Twelve patients were also examined using the SPIR sequence following Gd-DTPA injection. Signal intensity and morphological features of the disc and vertebral lesions were then evaluated. The SE T1-weighted sequence with Gd-DTPA was very effective in showing the pathological changes at the level of the disc as an area of low signal intensity surrounded by a peripheral rim of enhancement in 24 of 26 cases (92%). This feature was not visible on non-enhanced images. As regards contiguous vertebral lesions this sequence was less informative, since in 8 of 26 cases (31%) the vertebral lesions became isointense and therefore not detectable. In 12 cases there was extension into the surrounding structures (spinal canal and/or paravertebral tissues). An enhanced SE T1-weighted sequence provided good anatomical definition of the extension of the infection in the spinal canal in all cases with this type of involvement (7 of 12). Regarding the 7 cases with paravertebral extension, no extension was visible in 1 case due to the reduced contrast with the surrounding fat following Gd-DTPA injection. The enhanced SPIR sequence was very effective, particularly in detecting the lesions in the vertebral bodies, avoiding the limitation of the enhanced SE T1-weighted sequence. The SPIR sequence was also effective in showing the extension within the spinal canal and the paravertebral fat. On the basis of our results the combination of a SE T1-weighted sequence without contrast and SPIR sequence with Gd-DTPA seems to be the best approach in cases of spondylodiscitis. (orig.)

  10. Quantitative measurement of metal chelation by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika E. Miller

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nutritionally important minerals are more readily absorbed by living systems when complexed with organic acids, resulting in higher consumer demand and premium prices for these products. These chelated metals are produced by reaction of metal oxides and acids in aqueous solution. However, unreacted dry blends are sometimes misrepresented as metal chelates, when in reality they are only simple mixtures of the reactants typically used to synthesize them. This practice has increased interest in developing analytical methods that are capable of measuring the extent of metal chelation for quality control and regulatory compliance. We describe a novel method to rapidly measure the percent chelation of citric and malic acids with calcium, magnesium, and zinc. Utilization of attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR provides for the direct, rapid measurement of solid samples. The inclusion of an internal standard allows independent determination of either free or chelated acids from integrated areas in a single spectrum.

  11. Monte Carlo study of radiation dose enhancement by gadolinium in megavoltage and high dose rate radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G Zhang

    Full Text Available MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL would be needed.

  12. Treating Lead Toxicity: Possibilities beyond Synthetic Chelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shambhavi Tannir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead, a ubiquitous metal, is one of the most abundant elements present on earth. Its easy availability and cost effectiveness made it an extremely popular component in the industrial revolution. However, its hazardous health effects were not considered at the time. Over the last few decades, with the adverse effects of lead coming to the forefront, nations across the world have started to recognize and treat lead toxicity. The most reliable and used method until now has been chelation therapy. Recent research has suggested the use of natural products and sources to treat lead poisoning with minimal or no side effects. This review has tried to summarize a few of the natural products/sources being investigated by various groups.

  13. Chelating ionic liquids for reversible zinc electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Mega; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn; Forsyth, Maria; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2013-05-21

    Advanced, high energy-density, metal-air rechargeable batteries, such as zinc-air, are of intense international interest due to their important role in energy storage applications such as electric and hybrid vehicles, and to their ability to deal with the intermittency of renewable energy sources such as solar and wind. Ionic liquids offer a number of ideal thermal and physical properties as potential electrolytes in such large-scale energy storage applications. We describe here the synthesis and characterisation of a family of novel "chelating" ILs designed to chelate and solubilize the zinc ions to create electrolytes for this type of battery. These are based on quaternary alkoxy alkyl ammonium cations of varying oligo-ether side chains and anions such as p-toluene sulfonate, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and dicyanoamides. This work shows that increasing the ether chain length in the cation from two to four oxygens can increase the ionic conductivity and reduce the melting point from 67 °C to 15 °C for the tosylate system. Changing the anion also plays a significant role in the nature of the zinc deposition electrochemistry. We show that zinc can be reversibly deposited from [N(222(20201))][NTf2] and [N(222(202020201))][NTf2] beginning at -1.4 V and -1.7 V vs. SHE, respectively, but not in the case of tosylate based ILs. This indicates that the [NTf2] is a weaker coordinating anion with the zinc cation, compared to the tosylate anion, allowing the coordination of the ether chain to dominate the behavior of the deposition and stripping of zinc ions.

  14. Chelating impact assessment of biological ad chemical chelates on metal extraction from contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manwar, S.; Iram, S.

    2014-01-01

    Soil contamination is the result of uncontrolled waste dumping and poor practices by humans. Of all the pollutants heavy metals are of particular concern due to their atmospheric deposition, leaching capacity and non-biodegradability. Heavy metal containing effluent is discharged into the agricultural fields and water bodies. This results in the accumulation of heavy metals in soil and the crops grown on that soil. Studies have revealed detrimental impacts on soil fertility and the poor health of animals and humans. Phytoextraction is widely researched for remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of phytoextraction heavy metals have to be available to the plants in soluble form. In this study the potential of different chelating agents was assessed in solubilizing the heavy metals making easy for plants to uptake them. For this purpose efficient chemical and biological chelating agent had to be identified. Along with that an optimum dose and application time for chemical chelating agent was determined. Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), Nitriloacetic acid (NTA) were applied to the soil, containing Pb, Cr, Cu and Cd, at different concentrations and application time. Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus were incubated in soil for different time periods. In correspondence with findings of the study, Pb and Cr were best solubilized by 5mM EDTA. For Cd and Cu 5mM DTPA carried out efficient chelation. NTA showed relatively inadequate solubilisation, although for Cr it performed equal to EDTA. A. niger and A. flavus instead of solubilizing adsorbed the metals in their biomass. Adsorption was mainly carried out by A. niger. (author)

  15. BSA-Bioinspired Gadolinium Hybrid-Functionalized Hollow Gold Nanoshells for NIRF/PA/CT/MR Quadmodal Diagnostic Imaging-Guided Photothermal/Photodynamic Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Qing; Sun, Qi; Yu, Meng; Wang, Jinping; Wang, Siyu; Liu, Li; Cheng, Yu; Wang, Yidan; Song, Yilin; Tan, Fengping; Li, Nan

    2017-11-22

    Multimodal imaging-guided synergistic therapy promises a more accurate diagnosis and higher therapeutic efficiency than single imaging modality or their simple "mechanical" combination. In this research, we have constructed an innovative multifunctional drug delivery platform by gadolinium (Gd)-based bovine serum albumin (BSA) hybrid-coated hollow gold nanoshells (Au@BSA-Gd). The obtained nanoparticles exhibited excellent photothermal effect and computed tomography (CT)/photoacoustic (PA) activity. Besides, the BSA-bioinspired gadolinium complex endowed the nanoparticles with an excellent T 1 contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, the near-infrared (NIR) absorbing phototherapeutic agent [indocyanine green (ICG)] was loaded into the Au@BSA-Gd nanoparticles because of their unique, hollow, and porous structures, thus possessing photodynamic/photothermal property and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF)/PA imaging capability. As a result, a combined cancer therapy containing the photothermal therapy of Au@BSA-Gd and the synchronous photodynamic/photothermal therapy of ICG was constructed. Furthermore, the well-designed nanocomposites with multiple integrated modalities enabled them to be an ideal nanotheranostic agent for NIRF/PA/CT/MR quadmodal imaging. Therefore, the ICG-loaded albumin-bioinspired gadolinium hybrid-functionalized hollow gold nanoshells (ICG-Au@BSA-Gd) hold great promise as a theranostic platform for simultaneous therapeutic monitoring and precise cancer therapy.

  16. Gd2O3 nanoparticles in hematopoietic cells for MRI contrast enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedlund A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anna Hedlund1,2, Maria Ahrén3, Håkan Gustafsson1,2, Natalia Abrikossova3, Marcel Warntjes2,4, Jan-Ingvar Jönsson5, Kajsa Uvdal3, Maria Engström1,21Division of Radiology, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, 2Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, 3Division of Molecular Surface Physics and Nanoscience, Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology, 4Division of Clinical Physiology, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, 5Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Hematology Unit, Linköping University, Linköping, SwedenAbstract: As the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI broadens, the importance of having specific and efficient contrast agents increases and in recent time there has been a huge development in the fields of molecular imaging and intracellular markers. Previous studies have shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3 nanoparticles generate higher relaxivity than currently available Gd chelates: In addition, the Gd2O3 nanoparticles have promising properties for MRI cell tracking. The aim of the present work was to study cell labeling with Gd2O3 nanoparticles in hematopoietic cells and to improve techniques for monitoring hematopoietic stem cell migration by MRI. Particle uptake was studied in two cell lines: the hematopoietic progenitor cell line Ba/F3 and the monocytic cell line THP-1. Cells were incubated with Gd2O3 nanoparticles and it was investigated whether the transfection agent protamine sulfate increased the particle uptake. Treated cells were examined by electron microscopy and MRI, and analyzed for particle content by inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry. Results showed that particles were intracellular, however, sparsely in Ba/F3. The relaxation times were shortened with increasing particle concentration. Relaxivities, r1 and r2 at 1.5 T and 21°C, for Gd2O3 nanoparticles in different cell samples were 3.6–5.3 s-1 mM-1 and 9.6–17.2 s-1 mM-1

  17. Influence of the addition of gadolinium on the microstructure and mechanical properties of duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Ji-Ho; Jung, Hyun-Do; Im, Jae-Han; Jung, Ki Ho; Moon, Byung-Moon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of gadolinium addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of duplex stainless steel (DSS) fabricated using a normal casting method. The oxygen content in the cast DSS alloy with gadolinium decreased because of the high reactivity of gadolinium with oxygen. The area fraction and size of non-intermetallic inclusions in the alloy decreased from 0.80±0.12% to 0.58±0.04% and from 6.9±0.7 to 5.8±0.4 μm upon gadolinium addition, respectively. Notably, the ultimate tensile strength and strain at break of the cast alloy significantly increased with the addition of gadolinium from 919±25 to 969±8 MPa and from 24.8±1.9% to 28.4±1.1%, respectively. The hardness of the cast alloy with gadolinium increased from 23.6±1.3 to 25.0±1.2 HRC. A significant increase in the impact energy of the cast alloy was observed and the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature slightly decreased by approximately 10 °C with the addition of gadolinium.

  18. Glyphosate, a chelating agent-relevant for ecological risk assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Martha; Höss, Sebastian; Neumann, Günter; Afzal, Joshua; Reichenbecher, Wolfram

    2018-02-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs), consisting of glyphosate and formulants, are the most frequently applied herbicides worldwide. The declared active ingredient glyphosate does not only inhibit the EPSPS but is also a chelating agent that binds macro- and micronutrients, essential for many plant processes and pathogen resistance. GBH treatment may thus impede uptake and availability of macro- and micronutrients in plants. The present study investigated whether this characteristic of glyphosate could contribute to adverse effects of GBH application in the environment and to human health. According to the results, it has not been fully elucidated whether the chelating activity of glyphosate contributes to the toxic effects on plants and potentially on plant-microorganism interactions, e.g., nitrogen fixation of leguminous plants. It is also still open whether the chelating property of glyphosate is involved in the toxic effects on organisms other than plants, described in many papers. By changing the availability of essential as well as toxic metals that are bound to soil particles, the herbicide might also impact soil life, although the occurrence of natural chelators with considerably higher chelating potentials makes an additional impact of glyphosate for most metals less likely. Further research should elucidate the role of glyphosate (and GBH) as a chelator, in particular, as this is a non-specific property potentially affecting many organisms and processes. In the process of reevaluation of glyphosate its chelating activity has hardly been discussed.

  19. The effect of regioisomerism on the coordination chemistry and CEST properties of lanthanide(III) NB-DOTA-tetraamide chelates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Jacqueline R.; Woods, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) offers many advantages as a method of generating contrast in magnetic resonance images. However, many of the exogenous agents currently under investigation suffer from detection limits that are still somewhat short of what can be achieved with more traditional Gd3+ agents. To remedy this limitation we have undertaken an investigation of Ln3+ DOTA-tetraamide chelates (where DOTA is 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) that have unusually rigid ligand structures: the nitrobenzyl derivatives of DOTA-tetraamides with (2-phenylethyl)amide substituents. In this report we examine the effect of incorporating hydrophobic amide substituents on water exchange and CEST. The ligand systems chosen afforded a total of three CEST-active isomeric square antiprismatic chelates; each of these chelates was found to have different water exchange and CEST characteristics. The position of a nitrobenzyl substituent on the macrocyclic ring strongly influenced the way in which the chelate and Ln3+ coordination cage distorted. These differential distortions were found to affect the rate of water proton exchange in the chelates. But, by far the greatest effect arose from altering the position of the hydrophobic amide substituent, which, when forced upwards around the water binding site, caused a substantial reduction in the rate of water proton exchange. Such slow water proton exchange afforded a chelate that was 4.5 times more effective as a CEST agent than its isomeric counterparts in dry acetonitrile and at low temperatures and very low presaturation powers. PMID:24287873

  20. Characterization of chondroid matrix-forming sarcomas: gadolinium-enhanced and diffusion weighted MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Kebin; Zhang Jing; Qu Hui; Zhang Wei; Liang Wei; Li Xiaosong; Cheng Xiaoguang; Gong Lihua

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the Gadolinium-enhanced MRI and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) characteristics of the chondroid matrix-forming sarcomas. Methods: Contrast-enhanced MRI and DWI were performed in 14 cases of chondroid matrix-forming sarcomas (10 chondrosarcomas, 4 chondroblastic osteosarcomas) and 13 cases of other types of osteosarcomas. DWI was obtained with a single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence using a 1.5 T MR imager with two different b values of 0 and 700 s/mm 2 . The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were obtained in GE Functiontool software. The contrast-enhancement pattern was evaluated and the ADC values of chondroid matrix-forming sarcomas was compared with that of other types of osteosareoma. Independent sample t-test was performed to evaluate the difference of ADC values between the group of chondroid matrix-forming sarcoma and the group of other types of osteosarcoma. In addition, nonparametric test was used to assess the difference of ADC values between the chondrosarcoma and the chondroblastic osteosarcoma. P value less than 0.05 was considered to represent a statistical significance. Results: For 14 cases of chondroid matrix-forming sarcomas, peripheral enhancement was found in all cases, septonodular enhancement was identified in 12 cases. While 13 cases of other types of osteosarcomas demonstrated heterogeneous enhancement. The mean ADC value of chondroid matrix-forming sarcomas [(2.56±0.35) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s] was significantly higher than that of other types of osteosarcoma [(1.16 ± 0.20) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s] (t=12.704, P<0.01). There was no significant difference in the ADC value between the chondrosarcoma and the chondroblastic osteosarcoma (Z=0.507, P=0.959). Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced MRI and DWI can improve differentiation between chondroid matrix-forming sarcomas and other types of osteosarcomas. (authors)

  1. Magnetically Active and Coated Gadolinium-Filled Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Fidiani, Elok

    2013-08-15

    Gd-filled carbon nanotubes (which include the so-called gadonanotubes(1)) have been attracting much interest due to their potential use in medical diagnostic applications. In the present work, a vacuum filling method was performed to confine gadolinium(III) iodide in carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Filling yields in excess of 50% were obtained. Cleaning and dosing of the external walls was undertaken, as well as the study of the filled CNT magnetic properties. Overall, we found that the encapsulating procedure can lead to reduction of the lanthanide metal and induce disorder in the initial GdI3-type structure. Notwithstanding, the magnetic response of the material is not compromised, retaining a strong paramagnetic response and an effective magnetic moment of similar to 6 mu B. Our results may entice further investigation into whether an analogous Gd3+ to Gd2+ reduction takes place in other Gd-filled CNT systems.

  2. Self-consistent, relativistic, ferromagnetic band structure of gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, B.N.; Schirber, J.; Koelling, D.D.

    1977-01-01

    An initial self-consistent calculation of the ground state magnetic band structure of gadolinium is described. A linearized APW method was used which included all single particle relativistic effects except spin-orbit coupling. The spin polarized potential was obtained in the muffin-tin form using the local spin density approximation for exchange and correlation. The most striking and unorthodox aspect of the results is the position of the 4f spin-down ''bands'' which are required to float just on top of the Fermi level in order to obtain convergence. If the 4f states (l = 3 resonance) are removed from the occupied region of the conduction bands the magnetic moment is approximately .75 μ/sub B//atom; however, as the 4f spin-down states are allowed to find their own position they hybridize with the conduction bands at the Fermi level and the moment becomes smaller. Means of improving the calculation are discussed

  3. First results on study of gadolinium as burnable absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbate, Maximo J.; Sbaffoni, Maria M.

    2000-01-01

    Following on with the work included in the 'Burnable absorbers research plan' several experiments were carried out oriented to determine Ga 2 O 3 burn up. Cold tests were performed and samples were irradiated in the RA-3 reactor. In this paper, some calculated values are presented together with their comparisons with experimental ones. The parameters foreseen for performing the experiments were verified and also the predictions on burn up of uranium and gadolinium isotopes concentrations. These results imply that the nuclear data of these isotopes included in the library are satisfactory. Next steps will be to measure other isotopes concentrations, gamma spectrum, and the irradiation of one pellet to determine self shielding effects in order to obtain effective cross sections i.e. for CAREM geometry. (author)

  4. Nuclear orientation of 149Pm in gadolinium host

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badzhelidze, N.G.; Ehn, L.; Janout, Z.; Finger, M.; Lebedev, N.A.; Pavlov, V.N.; Prochazka, I.; Simecek, P.

    1983-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the anisotropy of the 285.9 keV gamma-ray following the decay of oriented 149 Pm was measured. The 149 Pm parent nuclei were oriented at low temperatures between 14 and 80 mK in a gadolinium host containing 1 At.% of neodymium admixture. The external magnetic field of 1.2 T was applied to polarize the domains of the host. Limits of experimental values of gamma-ray angular distribution coefficient A 2 varies in the region 0.097 2 (γ 285.9 keV) 2 =1.53 and the deorientation factor U 2 =0.925 were used. The result yields multipole mixing ratio, delta (E2/M1) lying in intervals 0.0 < delta < +0.11 or -19 < delta < -5.7

  5. Temperature profiles on the gadolinium surface during electron beam evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Hironori; Shibata, Takemasa

    1995-01-01

    The distributions of surface temperature of gadolinium in a water-cooled copper crucible during electron beam evaporation were measured by optical pyrometry. The surface temperatures were obtained from the radiation intensity ratio of the evaporating surface and a reference light source using Planck's law of radiation. The emitted radiation from the evaporating surface and a reference source was detected by a CCD sensor through a band pass filter of 650 nm. The measured surface temperature generally agreed with those estimated from the deposition rate and the data of the saturated vapor pressure. At high input powers, it was found that the measured value had small difference with the estimated one due to variation of the surface condition. (author)

  6. Gadolinium ring enhancement and mass effect in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyden, C.H. van der (Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of the Orange Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa)); Villiers, J.F.K. de (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of the Orange Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa)); Middlecote, B.D. (Dept. of Anatomical Pathology, Univ. of the Orange Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa)); Terblanche, J. (Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of the Orange Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa))

    1994-04-01

    A 9-year-old boy presented with a subacute history of optic neuritis followed by brainstem involvement, with fever and a lymphocytic pleocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluid. Gadolinium-enhancing ring lesions were demonstrated in the white matter of the cerebrum, brainstem and cerebellum on day 17 of the illness, all appearing simultaneously as part of a monophasic illmess. A parietal lesion exerted mass effect. Needling and biopsy yielded no evidence of a pyogenic lesion, tumour or tuberculosis and showed vasculitis. There was insufficient material for myelin staining. Dexamethasone therapy lead to rapid improvement of the radiological lesions: MRI and CT on day 34 of the illness showed complete clearing of the lesions except for residual abnormality at the biopsy site. (orig.)

  7. Micronutrient metal speciation is controlled by competitive organic chelation in grassland soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boiteau, Rene M.; Shaw, Jared B.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Koppenaal, David W.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2018-05-01

    Many elements are scarcely soluble in aqueous conditions found in high pH environments, such as calcareous grassland soils, unless complexed to strong binding organic ligands. To overcome this limitation, some plants and microbes produce chelators that solubilize micronutrient metals such as Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn from mineral phases. These complexes are taken up by organisms via specific membrane receptors, thereby differentially impacting the bioavailability of these metals to the plant and microbial community. Although the importance of these chelation strategies for individual organisms has been well established, little is known about which pathways coexist within rhizosphere microbiomes or how they interact and compete for metal binding. Identifying these metallo-organic species within natural ecosystems has remained a formidable analytical challenge due to the vast diversity of compounds and poorly defined metabolic processes in complex soil matrix. Herein, we employed recently developed liquid chromatography (LC) mass spectrometry (MS) methods to characterize the speciation of water-soluble dissolved trace elements (Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn) from Kansas Prairie soil. Both plant and fungal chelators were identified, revealing compound-specific patterns of chelation to biologically essential metals. Numerous metabolites typically implicated in plant iron acquisition and homeostasis, including mugineic acids, deoxymugineic acid, nicotianamine, and hydroxynicotianamine, dominated the speciation of divalent metals such as Ni, Cu, and Zn (2-57 pmol / g soil). In contrast, the fungal siderophore ferricrocine bound comparatively more trivalent Fe (9pmol / g soil). These results define biochemical pathways that underpin the regulation of metals in the grassland rhizosphere. They also raise new questions about the competition of these compounds for metal binding and their bioavailability to different members of the rhizosphere population. Even small structural differences

  8. Micronutrient metal speciation is driven by competitive organic chelation in grassland soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteau, R.; Shaw, J. B.; Paša-Tolić, L.; Koppenaal, D.; Jansson, J.

    2017-12-01

    Many elements are scarcely soluble in aqueous conditions found in high pH environments, such as calcareous grassland soils, unless complexed to strong binding organic ligands. To overcome this limitation, some plants and microbes produce chelators that solubilize micronutrient metals such as Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn from mineral phases. These complexes are taken up by organisms via specific membrane receptors, thereby differentially impacting the bioavailability of these metals to the plant and microbial community. Although the importance of these chelation strategies for individual organisms has been well established, little is known about which pathways coexist within rhizosphere microbiomes or how they interact and compete for metal binding. Identifying these metallo-organic species within natural ecosystems has remained a formidable analytical challenge due to the vast diversity of compounds and poorly defined metabolic processes in complex soil matrix. Herein, we employed recently developed liquid chromatography (LC) mass spectrometry (MS) methods to characterize the speciation of water-soluble dissolved trace elements (Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn) from Kansas Prairie soil. Both plant and fungal chelators were identified, revealing compound-specific patterns of chelation to biologically essential metals. Numerous metabolites typically implicated in plant iron acquisition and homeostasis, including mugineic acids, deoxymugineic acid, nicotianamine, and hydroxynicotianamine, dominated the speciation of divalent metals such as Ni, Cu, and Zn (2-57 pmol / g soil). In contrast, the fungal siderophore ferricrocine bound comparatively more trivalent Fe (9pmol / g soil). These results define biochemical pathways that underpin the regulation of metals in the grassland rhizosphere. They also raise new questions about the competition of these compounds for metal binding and their bioavailability to different members of the rhizosphere population.

  9. Characterization of FRO1, a Pea Ferric-Chelate Reductase Involved in Root Iron Acquisition1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Brian M.; Blevins, Dale G.; Eide, David J.

    2002-01-01

    To acquire iron, many plant species reduce soil Fe(III) to Fe(II) by Fe(III)-chelate reductases embedded in the plasma membrane of root epidermal cells. The reduced product is then taken up by Fe(II) transporter proteins. These activities are induced under Fe deficiency. We describe here the FRO1 gene from pea (Pisum sativum), which encodes an Fe(III)-chelate reductase. Consistent with this proposed role, FRO1 shows similarity to other oxidoreductase proteins, and expression of FRO1 in yeast conferred increased Fe(III)-chelate reductase activity. Furthermore, FRO1 mRNA levels in plants correlated with Fe(III)-chelate reductase activity. Sites of FRO1 expression in roots, leaves, and nodules were determined. FRO1 mRNA was detected throughout the root, but was most abundant in the outer epidermal cells. Expression was detected in mesophyll cells in leaves. In root nodules, mRNA was detected in the infection zone and nitrogen-fixing region. These results indicate that FRO1 acts in root Fe uptake and they suggest a role in Fe distribution throughout the plant. Characterization of FRO1 has also provided new insights into the regulation of Fe uptake. FRO1 expression and reductase activity was detected only in Fe-deficient roots of Sparkle, whereas both were constitutive in brz and dgl, two mutants with incorrectly regulated Fe accumulation. In contrast, FRO1 expression was responsive to Fe status in shoots of all three plant lines. These results indicate differential regulation of FRO1 in roots and shoots, and improper FRO1 regulation in response to a shoot-derived signal of iron status in the roots of the brz and dgl mutants. PMID:12011340

  10. Characterization of FRO1, a pea ferric-chelate reductase involved in root iron acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Brian M; Blevins, Dale G; Eide, David J

    2002-05-01

    To acquire iron, many plant species reduce soil Fe(III) to Fe(II) by Fe(III)-chelate reductases embedded in the plasma membrane of root epidermal cells. The reduced product is then taken up by Fe(II) transporter proteins. These activities are induced under Fe deficiency. We describe here the FRO1 gene from pea (Pisum sativum), which encodes an Fe(III)-chelate reductase. Consistent with this proposed role, FRO1 shows similarity to other oxidoreductase proteins, and expression of FRO1 in yeast conferred increased Fe(III)-chelate reductase activity. Furthermore, FRO1 mRNA levels in plants correlated with Fe(III)-chelate reductase activity. Sites of FRO1 expression in roots, leaves, and nodules were determined. FRO1 mRNA was detected throughout the root, but was most abundant in the outer epidermal cells. Expression was detected in mesophyll cells in leaves. In root nodules, mRNA was detected in the infection zone and nitrogen-fixing region. These results indicate that FRO1 acts in root Fe uptake and they suggest a role in Fe distribution throughout the plant. Characterization of FRO1 has also provided new insights into the regulation of Fe uptake. FRO1 expression and reductase activity was detected only in Fe-deficient roots of Sparkle, whereas both were constitutive in brz and dgl, two mutants with incorrectly regulated Fe accumulation. In contrast, FRO1 expression was responsive to Fe status in shoots of all three plant lines. These results indicate differential regulation of FRO1 in roots and shoots, and improper FRO1 regulation in response to a shoot-derived signal of iron status in the roots of the brz and dgl mutants.

  11. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on magnetic phase transitions and magnetization in gadolinium monocrystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, S.A.; Bezdushnyj, R.V.

    1989-01-01

    Effect of hydrostatic pressure on magnetization in gadolinium monocrystal (Δσ-effect) was investigated. Dependences of spesific magnetization, Δσ-effect and bulk magnetostriction of gadolinium monocrystal on temperatures were studied. Results of conducted investigation have shown that in gadolinium the change of specific magnetization under the hydrostatic pressure effect is caused in general case by three effects: a)change of spontaneous magnetization under the effect of hydrostatic pressure; b)change of magnetization within technical magnetization range due to the effect of hydrostatic pressure on magnetic anisotropy constants; c)change of magnetization due to the effect of hydrostatic pressure on temperature of spin-reoriented transition

  12. Saline as the sole contrast agent for successful MRI-guided epidural injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deli, Martin; Fritz, Jan; Mateiescu, Serban; Busch, Martin; Carrino, John A; Becker, Jan; Garmer, Marietta; Grönemeyer, Dietrich

    2013-06-01

    To assess the performance of sterile saline solution as the sole contrast agent for percutaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided epidural injections at 1.5 T. A retrospective analysis of two different techniques of MRI-guided epidural injections was performed with either gadolinium-enhanced saline solution or sterile saline solution for documentation of the epidural location of the needle tip. T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FLASH) images or T2-weighted single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images visualized the test injectants. Methods were compared by technical success rate, image quality, table time, and rate of complications. 105 MRI-guided epidural injections (12 of 105 with gadolinium-enhanced saline solution and 93 of 105 with sterile saline solution) were performed successfully and without complications. Visualization of sterile saline solution and gadolinium-enhanced saline solution was sufficient, good, or excellent in all 105 interventions. For either test injectant, quantitative image analysis demonstrated comparable high contrast-to-noise ratios of test injectants to adjacent body substances with reliable statistical significance levels (p < 0.001). The mean table time was 22 ± 9 min in the gadolinium-enhanced saline solution group and 22 ± 8 min in the saline solution group (p = 0.75). Sterile saline is suitable as the sole contrast agent for successful and safe percutaneous MRI-guided epidural drug delivery at 1.5 T.

  13. Saline as the Sole Contrast Agent for Successful MRI-guided Epidural Injections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deli, Martin, E-mail: martin.deli@web.de [University of Witten/Herdecke, Department of Radiology and Microtherapy, Groenemeyer Institute for Microtherapy (GIMT) (Germany); Fritz, Jan, E-mail: jfritz9@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Mateiescu, Serban, E-mail: mateiescu@microtherapy.de; Busch, Martin, E-mail: busch@microtherapy.de [University of Witten/Herdecke, Department of Radiology and Microtherapy, Groenemeyer Institute for Microtherapy (GIMT) (Germany); Carrino, John A., E-mail: jcarrin2@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Becker, Jan, E-mail: j.becker@microtherapy.de; Garmer, Marietta, E-mail: garmer@microtherapy.de; Groenemeyer, Dietrich, E-mail: dg@microtherapy.de [University of Witten/Herdecke, Department of Radiology and Microtherapy, Groenemeyer Institute for Microtherapy (GIMT) (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To assess the performance of sterile saline solution as the sole contrast agent for percutaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided epidural injections at 1.5 T. Methods. A retrospective analysis of two different techniques of MRI-guided epidural injections was performed with either gadolinium-enhanced saline solution or sterile saline solution for documentation of the epidural location of the needle tip. T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FLASH) images or T2-weighted single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images visualized the test injectants. Methods were compared by technical success rate, image quality, table time, and rate of complications. Results. 105 MRI-guided epidural injections (12 of 105 with gadolinium-enhanced saline solution and 93 of 105 with sterile saline solution) were performed successfully and without complications. Visualization of sterile saline solution and gadolinium-enhanced saline solution was sufficient, good, or excellent in all 105 interventions. For either test injectant, quantitative image analysis demonstrated comparable high contrast-to-noise ratios of test injectants to adjacent body substances with reliable statistical significance levels (p < 0.001). The mean table time was 22 {+-} 9 min in the gadolinium-enhanced saline solution group and 22 {+-} 8 min in the saline solution group (p = 0.75). Conclusion. Sterile saline is suitable as the sole contrast agent for successful and safe percutaneous MRI-guided epidural drug delivery at 1.5 T.

  14. Saline as the Sole Contrast Agent for Successful MRI-guided Epidural Injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deli, Martin; Fritz, Jan; Mateiescu, Serban; Busch, Martin; Carrino, John A.; Becker, Jan; Garmer, Marietta; Grönemeyer, Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the performance of sterile saline solution as the sole contrast agent for percutaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided epidural injections at 1.5 T. Methods. A retrospective analysis of two different techniques of MRI-guided epidural injections was performed with either gadolinium-enhanced saline solution or sterile saline solution for documentation of the epidural location of the needle tip. T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FLASH) images or T2-weighted single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images visualized the test injectants. Methods were compared by technical success rate, image quality, table time, and rate of complications. Results. 105 MRI-guided epidural injections (12 of 105 with gadolinium-enhanced saline solution and 93 of 105 with sterile saline solution) were performed successfully and without complications. Visualization of sterile saline solution and gadolinium-enhanced saline solution was sufficient, good, or excellent in all 105 interventions. For either test injectant, quantitative image analysis demonstrated comparable high contrast-to-noise ratios of test injectants to adjacent body substances with reliable statistical significance levels (p < 0.001). The mean table time was 22 ± 9 min in the gadolinium-enhanced saline solution group and 22 ± 8 min in the saline solution group (p = 0.75). Conclusion. Sterile saline is suitable as the sole contrast agent for successful and safe percutaneous MRI-guided epidural drug delivery at 1.5 T.

  15. Selectivity in extraction of copper and indium with chelate extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zivkovic, D.

    2003-01-01

    Simultaneous extraction of copper and indium with chelate extractants (LIX84 and D2E11PA) was described. Stechiometry of metal-organic complexes examined using the method of equimolar ratios resulted in CuR 2 and InR 3 forms of hydrophobic extracting species. A linear correlation was obtained between logarithm of distribution coefficients and chelate agents and pH, respectively. Selectivity is generally higher with higher concentrations of chelate agents in the organic phase, and is decreased with increase of concentration of hydrogen ions in feeding phase. (Original)

  16. Gadolinium deposition in the brain: association with various GBCAs using a generalized additive model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sohi; Lee, Ho-Joon; Han, Kyunghwa; Park, Yae-Won; Choi, Yoon Seong; Ahn, Sung Soo; Kim, Jinna; Lee, Seung-Koo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    To determine the relationship between the number of administrations of various gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) and increased T1 signal intensity in the globus pallidus (GP) and dentate nucleus (DN). This retrospective study included 122 patients who underwent double-dose GBCA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Two radiologists calculated GP-to-thalamus (TH) signal intensity ratio, DN-to-pons signal intensity ratio and relative change (R{sub change}) between the baseline and final examinations. Interobserver agreement was evaluated. The relationships between R{sub change} and several factors, including number of each GBCA administrations, were analysed using a generalized additive model. Six patients (4.9%) received linear GBCAs (mean 20.8 number of administration; range 15-30), 44 patients (36.1%) received macrocyclic GBCAs (mean 26.1; range 14-51) and 72 patients (59.0%) received both types of GBCAs (mean 31.5; range 12-65). Interobserver agreement was almost perfect (0.99; 95% CI: 0.99-0.99). R{sub change} (DN:pons) was associated with gadodiamide (p = 0.006) and gadopentetate dimeglumine (p < 0.001), but not with other GBCAs. R{sub change} (GP:TH) was not associated with GBCA administration. Previous administration of linear agents gadoiamide and gadopentetate dimeglumine is associated with increased T1 signal intensity in the DN, whereas macrocyclic GBCAs do not show an association. (orig.)

  17. Influence of acquired obesity on coronary vessel wall late gadolinium enhancement in discordant monozygote twins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makowski, Marcus R. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Wellcome Trust and EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, BHF Centre of Excellence, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Charite-Universitaetsmedizin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Jansen, Christian H.P. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Ebersberger, Ullrich; Spector, Tim D. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Schaeffter, Tobias; Razavi, Reza [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Wellcome Trust and EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, BHF Centre of Excellence, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Mangino, Massimo [King' s College London, Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, London (United Kingdom); National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at Guy' s and St. Thomas' Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Wellcome Trust and EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, BHF Centre of Excellence, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Greil, Gerald F. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Wellcome Trust and EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, BHF Centre of Excellence, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-11-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of BMI on late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) of the coronary artery wall in identical monozygous twins discordant for BMI. Coronary LGE represents a useful parameter for the detection and quantification of atherosclerotic coronary vessel wall disease. Thirteen monozygote female twin pairs (n = 26) with significantly different BMIs (>1.6 kg/m2) were recruited out of >10,000 twin pairs (TwinsUK Registry). A coronary 3D-T2prep-TFE MR angiogram and 3D-IR-TFE vessel wall scan were performed prior to and following the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg of Gd-DTPA on a 1.5 T MR scanner. The number of enhancing coronary segments and contrast to noise ratios (CNRs) of the coronary wall were quantified. An increase in BMI was associated with an increased number of enhancing coronary segments (5.3 ± 1.5 vs. 3.5 ± 1.6, p < 0.0001) and increased coronary wall enhancement (6.1 ± 1.1 vs. 4.8 ± 0.9, p = 0.0027) compared to matched twins with lower BMI. This study in monozygous twins indicates that acquired factors predisposing to obesity, including lifestyle and environmental factors, result in increased LGE of the coronary arteries, potentially reflecting an increase in coronary atherosclerosis in this female study population. (orig.)

  18. Sequential gadolinium-DTPA enhanced MRI studies in neuro-Behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazui, S.; Naritomi, H.; Ogawa, M.; Sawada, T.; Imakita, S.; Yamada, N.

    1991-01-01

    Sequential gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) enhanced MR images were obtained before and after steroid therapy in a case of neuro-Behcet's disease. Multiple scattered lesions, which could not be detected on pre- and post-contrast CT, were demonstrated mainly in the white matter of the pons and/or the cerebrum with both T1- and T2-weighted images. Some of these lesions, however, were not enhanced at all by infusion of Gd-DTPA. The Gd-DTPA infusion study demonstrated marked enhancement in the white matter of the pons and cerebrum. Some lesions not seen with T2-weighted images were also strongly enhanced by Gd-DTPA infusion at the acute stage. After steroid therapy, the symptoms and abnormal laboratory findings were resolved. The pontine and cerebral lesions on plain MR images remained unchanged even after resolution of the symptoms, suggesting that they were inactive old foci. On the other hand, the lesions detected in the enhancement study before steroid therapy disappeared with the repeat Gd-DTPA enhanced MR images which were performed after resolution of the symptoms. Some active inflammatory lesions in neuro-Behcet's disease may be demonstrated only on Gd-DTPA enhanced MR images. Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging appears to be potentially useful for detecting active inflammatory lesions in neuro-Behcet's disease and for evaluating the efficacy of treatment. (orig.)

  19. Rapid hydrothermal route to synthesize cubic-phase gadolinium oxide nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarika, Samiran; Paul, Nibedita; Mohanta, Dambarudhar

    2014-01-01

    An inexpensive fabrication route and growth mechanism is being reported for obtaining quality gadolinium oxide ( Gd 2 O 3 ) nanoscale rods. The elongated nanoscale systems, as produced via a hydrothermal process, were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), optical absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and magnetic hysteresis measurements. XRD patterns of the nanorods, as-prepared from independent precursors of different pH, depict a cubic crystal phase and an average crystallite size of 5-6.5 nm. As revealed from HRTEM micrographs, diameter of the nanorods prepared at pH = 13.3 (∼7 nm) was much smaller than the rods prepared at pH = 10.8 (∼19 nm). However, the aspect ratio was more than double in the former case than the latter case. PL response was found to be dominated by defect mediated emissions, whereas Raman spectrum of a given specimen (pH = 10.8) has revealed characteristic F g + A g modes of cubic phase of Gd 2 O 3 nanorods, apart from other independent modes. Furthermore, M ∼ H plot of the nanorod system (pH = 10.8) exhibited slight departure from the ideal superparamagnetic behaviour, with low remanence and coercive field values. The exploitation of one-dimensional Gd 2 O 3 nanorods have immense potential in the production of advanced contrast agents, smart drives and also in making novel ferrofluids of technological relevance. (author)

  20. Absence of magnetic ordering and field-induced phase diagram in the gadolinium aluminum garnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, O.; Lhotel, E.; Jacobsen, H.; Knee, C. S.; Deen, P. P.

    2017-12-01

    The robustness of spin liquids with respect to small perturbations, and the way magnetic frustration can be lifted by slight changes in the balance between competing magnetic interactions, remains a rich and open issue. We address this question through the study of the gadolinium aluminum garnet Gd3Al5O12 , a related compound to the extensively studied Gd3Ga5O12 . We report on its magnetic properties at very low temperatures. We show that despite a freezing at about 300 mK, no magnetic transition is observed, suggesting the presence of a spin-liquid state down to the lowest temperatures, similarly to Gd3Ga5O12 , in spite of a larger ratio between exchange and dipolar interactions. Finally, the phase diagram as a function of field and temperature is strongly reminiscent of the one reported in Gd3Ga5O12 . This study reveals the robust nature of the spin-liquid phase for Gd ions on the garnet lattice, in stark contrast to Gd ions on the pyrochlore lattice for which a slight perturbation drives the compound into a range of magnetically ordered states.

  1. Gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of symptomatic nerve roots in MRI of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyrrell, P.N.M.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N.; McCall, I.W. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Institute of Orthopaedics, The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital NHS Trust, Oswestry, Shropshire SY10 7AG (United Kingdom)

    1998-02-01

    Disc prolapse presenting with sciatica may be associated with enhancement of the symptomatic nerve root following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with intravenous gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA. Previous studies have shown, however, that this does not occur in all cases. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of nerve root enhancement in patients with sciatica and disc prolapse and to try to identify any specific features that might be associated with the phenomenon. A total of 227 patients presenting with low back pain and/or sciatica underwent a MRI study of the lumbar spine with intravenous contrast enhancement. Nineteen of 81 (23.5 %) patients with disc prolapse demonstrated nerve root enhancement. Nerve root enhancement had a highly significant association with sequestrated disc lesions (13/19, 68 %; P < 0.0005), and was primarily seen in the symptomatic ipsilateral nerve root (16/19, 84 %). The sensitivity of nerve root enhancement associated with disc prolapse was 23.5 % with a specificity of 95.9 %, a positive predictive value of 76 % and a negative predictive value of 69.3 %. Nerve root enhancement may be indicative of the symptomatic level but its poor sensitivity negates the routine use of Gd-DTPA in MRI for sciatica. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 37 refs.

  2. Influence of acquired obesity on coronary vessel wall late gadolinium enhancement in discordant monozygote twins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowski, Marcus R.; Jansen, Christian H.P.; Ebersberger, Ullrich; Spector, Tim D.; Schaeffter, Tobias; Razavi, Reza; Mangino, Massimo; Botnar, Rene M.; Greil, Gerald F.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of BMI on late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) of the coronary artery wall in identical monozygous twins discordant for BMI. Coronary LGE represents a useful parameter for the detection and quantification of atherosclerotic coronary vessel wall disease. Thirteen monozygote female twin pairs (n = 26) with significantly different BMIs (>1.6 kg/m2) were recruited out of >10,000 twin pairs (TwinsUK Registry). A coronary 3D-T2prep-TFE MR angiogram and 3D-IR-TFE vessel wall scan were performed prior to and following the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg of Gd-DTPA on a 1.5 T MR scanner. The number of enhancing coronary segments and contrast to noise ratios (CNRs) of the coronary wall were quantified. An increase in BMI was associated with an increased number of enhancing coronary segments (5.3 ± 1.5 vs. 3.5 ± 1.6, p < 0.0001) and increased coronary wall enhancement (6.1 ± 1.1 vs. 4.8 ± 0.9, p = 0.0027) compared to matched twins with lower BMI. This study in monozygous twins indicates that acquired factors predisposing to obesity, including lifestyle and environmental factors, result in increased LGE of the coronary arteries, potentially reflecting an increase in coronary atherosclerosis in this female study population. (orig.)

  3. Fabrication of gadolinium hydroxide nanoparticles using ion-exchange resin and their MRI property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kobayashi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method to fabricate gadolinium hydroxide (Gd(OH3 nanoparticles. An opaque solution was prepared by adding basic anion exchange resin (BAER to a Gd(NO33 aqueous solution at room temperature and aging the solution for 12–24 h; the solution became basic because of the exchange of H2O with OH−. The particles in the opaque solution have a needle structure, and their crystal structure was hexagonal Gd(OH3. Their longitudinal and lateral average particle sizes tend to increase in the ranges of 175.0–222.1 and 33.9–52.3 nm when the aging time increases from 12 to 24 h, respectively. The relaxivity value for T1-weighted imaging was 0.79 mM−1 s−1 for the solution that was prepared at the aging time of 18 h, which was ca. 20% of that for a commercial Gd complex contrast agent.

  4. Microwave-assisted polyol synthesis of gadolinium-doped green luminescent carbon dots as a bimodal nanoprobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ningqiang; Wang, Hao; Li, Shuai; Deng, Yunlong; Chen, Xiao'ai; Ye, Ling; Gu, Wei

    2014-09-16

    The development of multimodal nanoprobes is highly desired in medical imaging because it integrates the advantages of multiple imaging modes. In this study, the gadolinium-doped green luminescent carbon dots (Gd-CDs) were prepared by the simple one-step microwave-assisted polyol method. The obtained Gd-CDs emitted a unique green photoluminescence with a quantum yield of 5.4%. The Gd-CDs exhibited a low cytotoxicity and could optically label the C6 glioma cells. Meanwhile, the r1 relaxivity of Gd-CDs was measured to be 11.356 mM(-1) s(-1). This high r1 value together with the r2/r1 ratio close to 1 nominates Gd-CDs as an excellent T1 contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. These Gd-CDs combining two complementary imaging modalities are therefore a promising bimodal nanoprobe in medical imaging for a better diagnosis.

  5. Chelating ligands for nanocrystals' surface functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querner, Claudia; Reiss, Peter; Bleuse, Joël; Pron, Adam

    2004-09-22

    A new family of ligands for the surface functionalization of CdSe nanocrystals is proposed, namely alkyl or aryl derivatives of carbodithioic acids (R-C(S)SH). The main advantages of these new ligands are as follows: they nearly quantitatively exchange the initial surface ligands (TOPO) in very mild conditions; they significantly improve the resistance of nanocrystals against photooxidation because of their ability of strong chelate-type binding to metal atoms; their relatively simple preparation via Grignard intermediates facilitates the development of new bifunctional ligands containing, in addition to the anchoring carbodithioate group, a second function, which enables the grafting of molecules or macromolecules of interest on the nanocrystal surface. To give an example of this approach, we report, for the first time, the grafting of an electroactive oligomer from the polyaniline family-aniline tetramer-on CdSe nanocrystals after their functionalization with 4-formyldithiobenzoic acid. The grafting proceeds via a condensation reaction between the aldehyde group of the ligand and the terminal primary amine group of the tetramer. The resulting organic/inorganic hybrid exhibits complete extinction of the fluorescence of its constituents, indicating efficient charge or energy transfer between the organic and the inorganic semiconductors.

  6. Metal chelate process to remove pollutants from fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Ger T.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to improved methods using an organic iron chelate to remove pollutants from fluids, such as flue gas. Specifically, the present invention relates to a process to remove NO.sub.x and optionally SO.sub.2 from a fluid using a metal ion (Fe.sup.2+) chelate wherein the ligand is a dimercapto compound wherein the --SH groups are attached to adjacent carbon atoms (HS--C--C--SH) or (SH--C--CCSH) and contain a polar functional group so that the ligand of DMC chelate is water soluble. Alternatively, the DMC' is covalently attached to a water insoluble substrate such as a polymer or resin, e.g., polystyrene. The chelate is regenerated using electroreduction or a chemical additive. The dimercapto compound bonded to a water insoluble substrate is also useful to lower the concentration or remove hazardous metal ions from an aqueous solution.

  7. COMPARISON OF SIMPLE AND CHELATED AMBERLITE IR-120 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    13] have also been used. Many chelating ligands such as quinolone, ... synthesized by covalent bonds are much more resistant to external effects than those by simple adsorption [15]. Amberlite IR-120, a vinyl benzene polymer has good ...

  8. Chelation of di- and trivalent iron with some polyaminopolycarboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafez, M.B.; Sharabi, Nahid; Patti, Francois.

    1979-02-01

    The chelation of di- and trivalent iron with some polyaminopolycarboxylic acids was studied. The influence of pH on the formation of the complex was investigated, the molecular ratio and the stability constants were determined [fr

  9. 3-hydroxy-2(1H)-pyridinone chelating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, K.; Xu, J.

    1999-04-06

    Disclosed is a series of improved chelating agents and the chelates formed from these agents, which are highly effective upon both injection and oral administration. Several of the most effective are of low toxicity. These chelating agents incorporate within their structure 3-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (3,2-HOPO) moieties with a substituted carbamoyl group ortho to the hydroxy group of the hydroxypyridinone ring. The electron-withdrawing carbamoyl group increases the acidity, as well as the chemical stability towards oxidation and reduction, of the hydroxypyridinones. In the metal complexes of the chelating agents, the amide protons form very strong hydrogen bonds with the adjacent HOPO oxygen donor, making these complexes very stable at physiological conditions. The terminal N-substituents provide a certain degree of lipophilicity to the 3,2-HOPO, increasing oral activity. 2 figs.

  10. Cell assay using a two-photon-excited europium chelate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xudong; Haushalter, Jeanne P; Kotz, Kenneth T; Faris, Gregory W

    2011-08-01

    We report application of two-photon excitation of europium chelates to immunolabeling of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) cell surface proteins on A431 cancer cells. The europium chelates are excited with two photons of infrared light and emit in the visible. Europium chelates are conjugated to antibodies for EGFR. A431 (human epidermoid carcinoma) cells are labeled with this conjugate and imaged using a multiphoton microscope. To minimize signal loss due to the relatively long-lived Eu(3+) emission, the multiphoton microscope is used with scanning laser two-photon excitation and non-scanning detection with a CCD. The chelate labels show very little photobleaching (less than 1% during continuous illumination in the microscope for 20 minutes) and low levels of autofluorescence (less than 1% of the signal from labeled cells). The detection limit of the europium label in the cell assay is better than 100 zeptomoles.

  11. Gadolinium Deposition in Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis: An Examination of Tissue using Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    High, W.; Ranville, J; Brown, M; Punshon, T; Lanzirotti, A; Jackson, B

    2010-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a fibrosing disorder associated with gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents dosed during renal insufficiency. In two patients, Gd deposition in tissue affected by nephrogenic systemic fibrosis was quantified using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The presence of Gd was confirmed and mapped using synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Affected skin and soft tissue from the lower extremity demonstrated 89 and 209 ppm ({micro}g/g, dry weight, formalin fixed) in cases 1 and 2, respectively. In case 2, the same skin and soft tissue was retested after paraffin embedding, with the fat content removed by xylene washes, and this resulted in a measured value of 189 ppm ({micro}g/g, dry weight, paraffin embedded). Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed Gd in the affected tissue of both cases, and provided high-sensitivity and high-resolution spatial mapping of Gd deposition. A gradient of Gd deposition in tissue correlated with fibrosis and cellularity. Gd deposited in periadnexal locations within the skin, including hair and eccrine ducts, where it colocalized to areas of high calcium and zinc content. Because of the difficulty in obtaining synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy scans, tissue from only two patients were mapped. A single control with kidney disease and gadolinium-based contrast agent exposure did not contain Gd. Gd content on a gravimetric basis was impacted by processing that removed fat and altered the dry weight of the specimens. Gradients of Gd deposition in tissue corresponded to fibrosis and cellularity. Adnexal deposition of Gd correlated with areas of high calcium and zinc content.

  12. Synthesis of palladium(0) and -(II) complexes with chelating bis(N-heterocyclic carbene) ligands and their application in semihydrogenation

    OpenAIRE

    Sluijter, S.N.; Warsink, S.; Lutz, M.; Elsevier, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    A transmetallation route, using silver(I) precursors, to several zero-and di-valent palladium complexes with chelating bis(N-heterocyclic carbene) ligands bearing various N-substituents has been established. The resulting complexes have been characterized by NMR and mass spectroscopy. In addition, the structure of a representative compound, [Pd-0(bis-(Mes)NHC)(eta(2)-ma)] (3a), was confirmed by X-ray crystal structure determination. In contrast to the transfer semihydrogenation, in which only...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the Breast at 3T: Pre- and Post-Contrast Evaluation for Breast Lesion Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kousi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine whether in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3T can provide accurate breast lesion characterization, and to determine the effect of gadolinium on the resonance of tCho. Methods. Twenty-four positive-mammogram patients were examined on a 3T MR scanner. 1H-MRS was performed before and after gadolinium administration. tCho peak was qualitatively evaluated before and after contrast injection. Results. Fourteen out of 27 lesions proved to be malignant after histopathological diagnosis. Using 1H-MRS, before contrast injection, 6/14 confirmed malignancies and 11/13 benign lesions were correctly classified; while, after contrast injection, 11/14 confirmed malignancies and 12/13 benign processes were correctly classified. Post gadolinium 1H-MRS proved useful in picking up tCho signal, improving the overall accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity by 35%, 83%, and 9%, respectively. Conclusion. 1H-MRS overall accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity in detecting breast lesion’s malignancy were increased after gadolinium administration. It is prudent to perform 1H-MRS before contrast injection in large breast lesions to avoid choline underestimation. In cases of small or non-mass lesions, it is recommended to perform 1H-MRS after contrast injection for better voxel prescription to enable a reliable preoperative diagnosis.

  14. Luminescence study on Eu or Tb doped lanthanum-gadolinium pyrosilicate crystal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kurosawa, S.; Shishido, T.; Sugawara, T.; Nomura, A.; Yubuta, K.; Pejchal, Jan; Murakami, R.; Yokota, Y.; Shoji, Y.; Ohashi, Y.; Kamada, K.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 41, Mar (2015), s. 80-83 ISSN 0925-3467 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : scintillator * gadolinium pyrosilicate Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  15. Gadolinium EUV Multilayers for Solar Imaging Near 60 nm, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop and commercialize a new class of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) multilayer coatings containing the rare-earth element gadolinium (Gd), designed as...

  16. Standard test methods for analysis of sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the analysis of sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Section Carbon (Total) by Direct CombustionThermal Conductivity Method C1408 Test Method for Carbon (Total) in Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets By Direct Combustion-Infrared Detection Method Chlorine and Fluorine by Pyrohydrolysis Ion-Selective Electrode Method C1502 Test Method for Determination of Total Chlorine and Fluorine in Uranium Dioxide and Gadolinium Oxide Gadolinia Content by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry C1456 Test Method for Determination of Uranium or Gadolinium, or Both, in Gadolinium Oxide-Uranium Oxide Pellets or by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Hydrogen by Inert Gas Fusion C1457 Test Method for Determination of Total Hydrogen Content of Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets by Carrier Gas Extraction Isotopic Uranium Composition by Multiple-Filament Surface-Ioni...

  17. Chelated Ruthenium Catalysts for Z-Selective Olefin Metathesis

    OpenAIRE

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    We report the development of ruthenium-based metathesis catalysts with chelating N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands which catalyze highly Z-selective olefin metathesis. A very simple and convenient synthetic procedure of such a catalyst has been developed. An intramolecular C-H bond activation of the NHC ligand, which is promoted by anion ligand substitution, forms the appropriate chelate for stereo- controlled olefin metathesis.

  18. Clawing Back: Broadening the Notion of Metal Chelators in Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Franz, Katherine J.

    2013-01-01

    The traditional notion of chelation therapy is the administration of a chemical agent to remove metals from the body. But formation of a metal-chelate can have biological ramifications that are much broader than metal elimination. Exploring these other possibilities could lead to pharmacological interventions that alter the concentration, distribution, or reactivity of metals in targeted ways for therapeutic benefit. This review highlights recent examples that showcase four general strategies...

  19. Iron Chelation Adherence to Deferoxamine and Deferasirox in Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtenberg, Felicia; Vichinsky, Elliott; Haines, Dru; Pakbaz, Zahra; Mednick, Lauren; Sobota, Amy; Kwiatkowski, Janet; Thompson, Alexis A.; Porter, John; Coates, Thomas; Giardina, Patricia J.; Olivieri, Nancy; Yamashita, Robert; Neufeld, Ellis J.

    2015-01-01

    The Thalassemia Clinical Research Network collected adherence information from 79 patients on deferoxamine and 186 on deferasirox from 2007 to 2009. Chelation adherence was defined as percent of doses administered in the last 4 weeks (patient report) out of those prescribed (chart review). Chelation history since 2002 was available for 97 patients currently on deferoxamine and 217 on deferasirox, with crude estimates of adherence from chart review. Self-reported adherence to both deferoxamine and deferasirox were quite high, with slightly higher adherence to the oral chelator (97 vs. 92%). Ninety percent of patients on deferasirox reported at least 90% adherence, compared with 75% of patients on deferoxamine. Adherence to both chelators was highest in children, followed by adolescents and older adults. Predictors of lower deferoxamine adherence were smoking in the past year, problems sticking themselves (adults only), problems wearing their pump, and fewer transfusions in the past year. Predictors of lower deferasirox adherence were bodily pain and depression. Switching chelators resulted in increased adherence, regardless of the direction of the switch, although switching from deferoxamine to deferasirox was far more common. As adherence to deferoxamine is higher than previously reported, it appears beneficial for patients to have a choice in chelators. PMID:21523808

  20. Extraction of metals using supercritical fluid and chelate forming ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wai, C.M.; Laintz, K.E.

    1998-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated β-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated β-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated β-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated β-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 7 figs

  1. Interference of medical contrast media on laboratory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Daves, Massimo; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    The use of contrast media such as organic iodine molecules and gadolinium contrast agents is commonplace in diagnostic imaging. Although there is widespread perception that side effects and drug interactions may be the leading problems caused by these compounds, various degrees of interference with some laboratory tests have been clearly demonstrated. Overall, the described interference for iodinate contrast media include inappropriate gel barrier formation in blood tubes, the appearance of abnormal peaks in capillary zone electrophoresis of serum proteins, and a positive bias in assessment of cardiac troponin I with one immunoassay. The interference for gadolinium contrast agents include negative bias in calcium assessment with ortho-cresolphthalein colorimetric assays and occasional positive bias using some Arsenazo reagents, negative bias in measurement of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and zinc (colorimetric assay), as well as positive bias in creatinine (Jaffe reaction), total iron binding capacity (TIBC, ferrozine method), magnesium (calmagite reagent) and selenium (mass spectrometry) measurement. Interference has also been reported in assessment of serum indices, pulse oximetry and methaemoglobin in samples of patients receiving Patent Blue V. Under several circumstances the interference was absent from manufacturer-supplied information and limited to certain type of reagents and/or analytes, so that local verification may be advisable to establish whether or not the test in use may be biased. Since the elimination half-life of these compounds is typically lower than 2 h, blood collection after this period may be a safer alternative in patients who have received contrast media for diagnostic purposes.

  2. The time window of MRI of murine atherosclerotic plaques after administration of CB2 receptor targeted micelles: inter-scan variability and relation between plaque signal intensity increase and gadolinium content of inversion recovery prepared versus non-prepared fast spin echo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Boekhorst, B. C. M.; Bovens, S. M.; van de Kolk, C. W. A.; Cramer, M. J. M.; Doevendans, P. A. F. M.; ten Hove, M.; van der Weerd, L.; Poelmann, R.; Strijkers, G. J.; Pasterkamp, G.; van Echteld, C. J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Single fast spin echo scans covering limited time frames are mostly used for contrast-enhanced MRI of atherosclerotic plaque biomarkers. Knowledge on inter-scan variability of the normalized enhancement ratio of plaque (NER(plaque)) and relation between NER(plaque) and gadolinium content for

  3. The magnesium chelation step in chlorophyll biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, J.

    1990-11-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, the biogenesis of energy transducing membranes requires the coordinate synthesis of prosthetic groups, proteins, and various lipids. Two of the major prosthetic groups, chlorophyll and heme, share a common biosynthetic pathway that diverges at the point of metal insertion into protoporphyrin IX (Proto). Insertion of iron leads to the formation of hemes, while insertion of magnesium is the first step unique to chlorophyll formation. This project is directed toward identifying the enzyme(s) responsible for magnesium chelation and elucidating the mechanism which regulates the flux of precursors through the branch point enzymes in isolated chloroplasts. Using intact chloroplasts from greening cucumber cotyledons, we have confirmed the ATP requirement for Mg-Proto formation. Use of non-hydrolyzable ATP analogs, uncouplers and ionophores has led to the conclusions that ATP hydrolysis is necessary, but that this hydrolysis is not linked to the requirement for membrane intactness by transmembrane ion gradients or electrical potentials. The enzyme(s) are flexible with respect to the porphyrin substrate specificity, accepting porphyrins with -vinyl, -ethyl, or -H substituents at the 2 and 4 positions. The activity increases approximately four-fold during greening. Possible physiological feedback inhibitors such as heme, protochlorophyllide, and chlorophyllide had no specific effect on the activity. The activity has now been assayed in barely, corn and peas, with the system from peas almost ten-fold more active than the cucumber system. Work is continuing in pea chloroplasts with the development of a continuous assay and investigation of the feasibility of characterizing an active, organelle-free preparation. 6 figs.

  4. XAFS study of gadolinium and samarium bisporphyrinate complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agondanou, J H; Spyroulias, G A; Purans, J; Tsikalas, G; Souleau, C; Coutsolelos, A G; Bénazeth, S

    2001-11-19

    The comparative X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of gadolinium and samarium bisporphyrinate complexes represented by the formulas Gd(III)H(oep)(tpp), Gd(III)(oep)(2), Gd(III)H(tpp)(2) and Sm(III)H(oep)(tpp), Sm(III)(oep)(2), Sm(III)H(tpp)(2) is reported. The XAFS spectra are recorded on the LURE-DCI storage ring (Orsay, France) in transmission mode on the microcrystalline samples at the Gd and Sm L(3) edges. The local environment for Ln(3+) ions has been reconstructed applying one-shell and two-shell XAFS analysis procedures. The protonated and nonprotonated bisporphyrinate complexes present different XAFS features. After our analysis on the title derivatives, the gadolinium ion (at 80 K) is found to be bonded: (i) to eight nitrogen atoms at R(Gd-N) 2.50 A, for Gd(III)(oep)(2) [Debye-Waller (DW) factor 0.004 A(2)]; (ii) to seven nitrogen atoms at R(Gd-N) 2.49 A, for Gd(III)H(oep)(tpp) [DW factor 0.005 A(2)] and one nitrogen at long distance; and (iii) to six nitrogen atoms at R(Gd-N) 2.50 A [DW factor 0.006 A(2)] and two nitrogen atoms at long distance for Gd(III)H(tpp)(2). A similar coordination sphere has been detected for the corresponding Sm derivatives. So, the samarium ion (at room temperature) is bonded: (i) to eight nitrogen atoms at R(Sm-N) 2.53 A, for Sm(III)(oep)(2) [DW factor 0.006 A(2)]; (ii) to seven nitrogen atoms at R(Sm-N) 2.53 A, for Sm(III)H(oep)(tpp) [DW factor 0.006 A(2)] and one nitrogen at long distance; and (iii) to six nitrogen atoms at R(Sm-N) 2.50 A, for Sm(III)H(tpp)(2) [DW factor 0.006 A(2)] and two nitrogen atoms at long distance. As far as concerns Ln(III)(oep)(2) complexes, the increase of Ln-N distance in the series Gd(3+) Eu(3+) Eu(III)(oep)(2). Moreover, the protonated Ln(III)H(oep)(tpp) and Ln(III)H(tpp)(2) complexes possess systematically shorter distances of about 0.02 A between the XAFS and XRD data. This difference is attributed to the asymmetry of the distribution concerning Ln-N distances.

  5. Increased signal intensities in the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted images: evidence in children undergoing multiple gadolinium MRI exams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Houchun H.; Pokorney, Amber; Towbin, Richard B.; Miller, Jeffrey H. [Phoenix Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Recent reports have suggested residual gadolinium deposition in the brain in subjects undergoing multiple contrast-enhanced MRI exams. These findings have raised some concerns regarding gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) usage and retention in brain tissues. To summarize findings of hyperintense brain structures on precontrast T1-weighted images in 21 children undergoing multiple GBCA MRI exams. This retrospective study involved 21 patients, each of whom received multiple MRI examinations (range: 5-37 exams) with GBCA over the course of their medical treatment (duration from first to most recent exam: 1.2-12.9 years). The patients were between 0.9 and 14.4 years of age at the time of their first GBCA exam. Regions of interest were drawn in the dentate nucleus and the globus pallidus on 2-D fast spin echo images acquired at 1.5 T. The signal intensities of these two structures were normalized by that of the corpus callosum genu. Signal intensity ratios from these patients were compared to control patients of similar ages who have never received GBCA. Signal intensity ratios increased between the first and the most recent MRI exam in all 21 patients receiving GBCA, with an increase of 18.6%±12.7% (range: 0.5% to 47.5%) for the dentate nucleus and 12.4%±7.4% (range: -1.2% to 33.7%) for the globus pallidus (P<0.0001). Signal intensity ratios were also higher in GBCA patients than in controls (P<0.01). The degree of signal intensity enhancement did not correlate with statistical significance to the cumulative number or volume of GBCA administrations each patient received, the patient's age or the elapsed time between the first and most recent GBCA MRI exams. These results in children are consistent with recent findings in adults, suggesting possible gadolinium deposition in the brain. (orig.)

  6. REGIONAL SIDEROSIS: A NEW CHALLENGE FOR IRON CHELATION THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvi Ioav Cabantchik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The traditional role of iron chelation therapy has been to reduce body iron burden via chelation of excess metal from organs and fluids and its excretion via biliary-fecal and/or urinary routes. In their present use for hemosiderosis, chelation regimens might not be suitable for treating disorders of iron maldistribution, as those are characterized by toxic islands of siderosis appearing in a background of normal or subnormal iron levels (e.g. sideroblastic anemias, neuro- and cardio-siderosis in Friedreich ataxia- and neurosiderosis in Parkinson’s disease. We aimed at clearing local siderosis from aberrant labile metal that promotes oxidative damage, without interfering with essential local functions or with hematological iron-associated properties. For this purpose we introduced a conservative mode of iron chelation based on dual activity based on scavenging labile metal but also redeploying it to cell acceptors or to physiological transferrin. The scavenging and redeployment mode of action was designed both for correcting aberrant iron distribution and also for minimizing/preventing systemic loss of chelated metal. We first examine cell models that recapitulate iron maldistribution and associated dysfunctions identified with Friedreich ataxia and Parkinson’s disease and use them to explore the ability of the double-acting agent deferiprone, an orally active chelator, to mediate iron scavenging and redeployment and thereby causing functional improvement. We subsequently evaluate the concept in translational models of disease and finally assess its therapeutic potential in prospective double-blind pilot clinical trials. We claim that any chelator applied to diseases of regional siderosis, cardiac, neuronal or endocrine ought to preserve both systemic and regional iron levels. The proposed deferiprone-based therapy has provided a paradigm for treating regional types of siderosis without affecting hematological parameters and systemic

  7. Regional siderosis: a new challenge for iron chelation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabantchik, Zvi Ioav; Munnich, Arnold; Youdim, Moussa B; Devos, David

    2013-12-31

    The traditional role of iron chelation therapy has been to reduce body iron burden via chelation of excess metal from organs and fluids and its excretion via biliary-fecal and/or urinary routes. In their present use for hemosiderosis, chelation regimens might not be suitable for treating disorders of iron maldistribution, as those are characterized by toxic islands of siderosis appearing in a background of normal or subnormal iron levels (e.g., sideroblastic anemias, neuro- and cardio-siderosis in Friedreich ataxia- and neurosiderosis in Parkinson's disease). We aimed at clearing local siderosis from aberrant labile metal that promotes oxidative damage, without interfering with essential local functions or with hematological iron-associated properties. For this purpose we introduced a conservative mode of iron chelation of dual activity, one based on scavenging labile metal but also redeploying it to cell acceptors or to physiological transferrin. The "scavenging and redeployment" mode of action was designed both for correcting aberrant iron distribution and also for minimizing/preventing systemic loss of chelated metal. We first examine cell models that recapitulate iron maldistribution and associated dysfunctions identified with Friedreich ataxia and Parkinson's disease and use them to explore the ability of the double-acting agent deferiprone, an orally active chelator, to mediate iron scavenging and redeployment and thereby causing functional improvement. We subsequently evaluate the concept in translational models of disease and finally assess its therapeutic potential in prospective double-blind pilot clinical trials. We claim that any chelator applied to diseases of regional siderosis, cardiac, neuronal or endocrine ought to preserve both systemic and regional iron levels. The proposed deferiprone-based therapy has provided a paradigm for treating regional types of siderosis without affecting hematological parameters and systemic functions.

  8. MCNP analysis of the nine-cell LWR gadolinium benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkuszewski, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Monte Carlo results for a 9-cell fragment of the light water reactor square lattice with a central gadolinium-loaded pin are presented. The calculations are performed with the code MCNP-3A and the ENDF-B/5 library and compared with the results obtained from the BOXER code system and the JEF-1 library. The objective of this exercise is to study the feasibility of BOXER for the analysis of a Gd-loaded LWR lattice in the broader framework of GAP International Benchmark Analysis. A comparison of results indicates that, apart from unavoidable discrepancies originating from different data evaluations, the BOXER code overestimates the multiplication factor by 1.4 % and underestimates the power release in a Gd cell by 4.66 %. It is hoped that further similar studies with use of the JEF-1 library for both BOXER and MCNP will help to isolate and explain these discrepancies in a cleaner way. (author) 4 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs

  9. Gadolinium neutron capture therapy for brain tumors. Biological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagaki, Masao; Oda, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Masato; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Kobayashi, Tooru; Kanda, Keiji; Ujeno, Yowri.

    1994-01-01

    This study investigated the tumoricidal effect of gadolinium neutron capture therapy (Gd-NCT) in in vitro and in vivo systems using Gd-DTPA. In in vitro study, a certain amount of Gd-DTPA, yielding 5000 ppm Gd-n, was added to human glioma cells, T98G, upon which thermal neutrons were exposed. After irradiation, the cells were incubated and the colonies were counted 10 days later. In in vivo study, Fisher-344 rats with experimentally induced gliosarcoma cells (9L) were exposed to thermal neutrons at a fluence rate of 3E+9/s for 1 h immediately after iv injection of Gd-DTPA. Two weeks after irradiation, brain samples were histologically examined. Tumor clearance of Gd-DTPA was also determined. In vitro analysis showed that a 1% survival level was obtained at 3.75E+12 (n/cm 2 ) for the Gd (+) medium and 2.50E+13 (n/cm 2 ) for the Gd (-) medium. In in vivo analysis, the concentration of Gd in 9L-rat brain tumor after iv injection of 0.2 mg/kg Gd-DTPA was found to be less than 100 ppm, but Gd-NCT on 9L-rat brain tumor administered with a ten-fold dose showed a substantial killing effect on tumor without serious injury to the normal brain structure. The killing effect of Gd-NCT was confirmed in in vitro and in vivo systems. (N.K.)

  10. Ordered structures of defect clusters in gadolinium-doped ceria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Peng; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ye, Fei; Ou, Dingrong; Zou, Jin; Drennan, John

    2011-06-01

    The nano-domain, with short-range ordered structure, has been widely observed in rare-earth-doped ceria. Atomistic simulation has been employed to investigate the ordering structure of the nano-domain, as a result of aggregation and segregation of dopant cations and the associated oxygen vacancies in gadolinium-doped ceria. It is found that the binding energy of defect cluster increases as a function of cluster size, which provides the intrinsic driving force for the defect cluster growth. However, the ordered structures of the defect clusters are different from the chain model as previously reported. Adjacent oxygen vacancies prefer to locate along /2 lattice vector, which results in a unique stable structure (isosceles triangle) formation. Such isosceles triangle structure can act as the smallest unit of cluster growth to form a symmetric dumbbell structure. This unique dumbbell structure is hence considered as a building block for the development of larger defect clusters, leading to nano-domain formation in rare-earth-doped ceria.

  11. Magnetocaloric effect at cryogenic temperature in gadolinium oxide nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Rima, E-mail: rima.paul@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Paramanik, Tapas; Das, Kalipada [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sen, Pintu [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Satpati, B.; Das, I. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2016-11-01

    We have synthesized fascinating nano-structure of Gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) using controlled template-assisted electrochemical deposition technique which showed interesting anisotropic magnetic behavior. The nanotubes of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} with average diameter 200 nm, length 10 µm and wall thickness 20 nm are constituted of nanoclusters with average diameter 7.5 nm. The tubes are aligned and are almost uniform throughout their length. Detailed magnetic measurements of aligned Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotubes have been performed for both parallel and perpendicular magnetic field orientations with respect to the axis of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotube array. Significant differences in magnetization values have been observed between the parallel and perpendicular orientations. Experimental results indicate the superparamagnetic nature of the nanomaterial. Large magnetocaloric effect, associated with the sharp change in magnetization of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotubes, has been observed in the cryogenic temperature regime that shows anisotropic behavior. - Highlights: • Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotubes of diameter ~200 nm synthesized through electrochemical technique. • The nanotubes are superparamagnetic in nature. • At cryogenic temperature, the nanotubes exhibit large magnetocaloric anisotropic effect.

  12. Thermal stability of neodymium, samarium, europium and gadolinium thiocarbamide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakharova, Yu.G.; Borisova, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    The behaviour of thiocarbamide complexes of the composition Me(C 3 H 5 O 2 ) 3 x Cs(NH 2 ) 2 x 3H 2 O, where Me is Nd, Sm, Eu or Gd, has been studied in the process of heating by thermographic, thermogravimetric, and chemical analyses and by infrared spectroscopy. It has been established that thermolysis of complexes is accompanied by thermal effects which point to the fact that the processes take place both with absorption liberation of heat. Above 100 deg C dehydration of compounds begins. The weight of neodymium, samarium, europium, and gadolinium decreases by 11.43, 12.57, 12.57, and 11.48% which corresponds to the loss of water entering into the compounds. It has been proved experimentally that complete removal of water from complexes proceeds at 110 deg C. As main products of thermolysis of thiocarbomide compounds at 230 deg C, oxypropionates of the corresponding rare-earth elements are formed. The highest rate of decomposition of thiocarbamide complexes of rare-earth elements has been attained at 320 and 360 deg C. Qualitative and quantitative analyses as well as IR spectroscopy have shown that the main products of thermolysis at these temperatures are oxysulphates of rare-earth elements with a small impurity of oxysulphides and adsorbed ammonia

  13. Immunomodulation by gadolinium chloride-induced Kupffer cell phagocytosis blockade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazar, G.; Husztik, E.; Kiss, I.; Szakacs, J.; Olah, J.

    1998-01-01

    Gadolinium chloride (GdCl 3 ), a rare earth metal salt, depresses macrophage activity, and is commonly used to study the physiology of the reticuloendothelial system. In the present work, the effect of GdCl 3 -induced Kupffer cell blockade on the humoral immune response in mice to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) was investigated. Kupffer cell phagocytosis blockade was found to increase both the primary and secondary immune responses to SRBC. The primary immune response was significantly augmented in animals injected intravenously with GdCl 3 2, 3 or 4 days before injection of the cellular antigen, but GdCl 3 injected 7 days before the antigen did not modify the immune response. Increased secondary humoral immune responses were also observed. When GdCl 3 was injected 2 days before the second dose of antigen, the numbers of both IgM and IgG-producing plaque forming cells were augmented. GdCl 3 injected 2 days before the first dose of SRBC did not modify the humoral immune response. Earlier studies with 51 Cr-labelled foreign red blood cells suggested that the augmentation of the humoral immune response in GdCl 3 -pretreated mice is a consequence of the spillover of the antigen from the liver into the spleen and other extrahepatic reticuloendothelial organs. (orig.)

  14. Reverse microemulsion synthesis of layered gadolinium hydroxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yadong; Suthar, Jugal; Egbu, Raphael; Weston, Andrew J.; Fogg, Andrew M.; Williams, Gareth R.

    2018-02-01

    A reverse microemulsion approach has been explored for the synthesis of layered gadolinium hydroxide (LGdH) nanoparticles in this work. This method uses oleylamine as a multifunctional agent, acting as surfactant, oil phase and base. 1-butanol is additionally used as a co-surfactant. A systematic study of the key reaction parameters was undertaken, including the volume ratio of surfactant (oleylamine) to water, the reaction time, synthesis temperature, and the amount of co-surfactant (1-butanol) added. It proved possible to obtain pristine LGdH materials at temperatures of 120 °C or below with an oleylamine: water ratio of 1:4. Using larger amounts of surfactant or higher temperatures caused the formation of Gd(OH)3, either as the sole product or as a major impurity phase. The LGdH particles produced have sizes of ca. 200 nm, with this size being largely independent of temperature or reaction time. Adjusting the amount of 1-butanol co-surfactant added permits the size to be varied between 200 and 300 nm.

  15. Gadolinium-loaded gel scintillators for neutron and antineutrino detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddle, Catherine Lynn; Akers, Douglas William; Demmer, Ricky Lynn; Paviet, Patricia Denise; Drigert, Mark William

    2016-11-29

    A gadolinium (Gd) loaded scintillation gel (Gd-ScintGel) compound allows for neutron and gamma-ray detection. The unique gel scintillator encompasses some of the best features of both liquid and solid scintillators, yet without many of the disadvantages associated therewith. Preferably, the gel scintillator is a water soluble Gd-DTPA compound and water soluble fluorophores such as: CdSe/ZnS (or ZnS) quantum dot (Q-dot) nanoparticles, coumarin derivatives 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin-3-acetic acid, 7-hydroxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid, and Alexa Fluor 350 as well as a carbostyril compound, carbostyril 124 in a stable water-based gel, such as methylcellulose or polyacrylamide polymers. The Gd-loaded ScintGel allows for a homogenious distribution of the Gd-DTPA and the fluorophores, and yields clean fluorescent emission peaks. A moderator, such as deuterium or a water-based clear polymer, can be incorporated in the Gd-ScintGel. The gel scintillators can be used in compact detectors, including neutron and antineutrino detectors.

  16. Characterization of Gd loaded chitosan-TPP nanohydrogels by a multi-technique approach combining dynamic light scattering (DLS), asymetrical flow-field-flow-fractionation (AF4) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and design of positive contrast agents for molecular resonance imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigaux, G.; Gheran, C. V.; Callewaert, M.; Cadiou, C.; Voicu, S. N.; Dinischiotu, A.; Andry, M. C.; Vander Elst, L.; Laurent, S.; Muller, R. N.; Berquand, A.; Molinari, M.; Huclier-Markai, S.; Chuburu, F.

    2017-02-01

    Chitosan CS—tripolyphosphate TPP/hyaluronic acid HA nanohydrogels loaded with gadolinium chelates (GdDOTA ⊂ CS-TPP/HA NGs) synthesized by ionic gelation were designed for lymph node (LN) MRI. In order to be efficiently drained to LNs, nanogels (NGs) needed to exhibit a diameter ϕ TPP ratio (2 TPP TPP/HA nanohydrogels which, in turn, allowed to select formulations leading to NGs of suitable mean sizes showing good MRI efficiency and negligible toxicity.

  17. Low concentration of a Gd-chelate increases the signal-to-noise ratio in fast pulsing BEST experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, Nathalie; Bellot, Gaëtan; Wang, Jing; Déméné, Hélène

    2012-11-01

    Despite numerous developments in the past few years that aim to increase the sensitivity of NMR multidimensional experiments, NMR spectroscopy still suffers from intrinsic low sensitivity. In this report, we show that the combination of two developments in the field, the Band-selective Excitation Short-Transient (BEST) experiment [Schanda et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 128 (2006) 9042] and the addition of the nonionic paramagnetic gadolinium chelate gadodiamide into NMR samples, enhances the signal-to-noise ratio. This effect is shown here for four different proteins, three globular and one unfolded, of molecular weights ranging from 6.5 kDa to 40 kDa, using 2D BEST HSQC and 3D BEST triple resonance sequences. Moreover, we show that the increase in signal-to-noise ratio provided by the gadodiamide is higher for peak resonances with lower than average intensity in BEST experiments. It is interesting to note that these residues are on average the weakest ones in those experiments. In this case, the gadodiamide-mediated increase can reach a value of 60% for low and 30% for high molecular weight proteins respectively. An investigation into the origin of this “paramagnetic gain” in BEST experiments is presented.

  18. To chelate or not to chelate in MDS: That is the question!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, Amer M; Griffiths, Elizabeth A

    2018-03-08

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of hemopathies that exhibit physical manifestations with clinical consequences of bone marrow failure and inherent risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Iron overload (IO) is common in MDS due to chronic transfusion support and disease-related alterations in iron metabolism. IO has been conclusively associated with inferior outcomes among MDS patients. Despite lack of randomized trials showing a survival impact of iron chelation therapy (ICT), ICT is recommended by experts and guidelines for select MDS patients with IO and is often used. The availability of effective oral ICT agents has reignited the controversy regarding ICT use in patients with MDS and IO. Here we summarize the studies evaluating the value of ICT in MDS and suggest a practical approach for use of these therapies. We also highlight controversies regarding use of ICT in MDS and discuss some ongoing efforts to answer these questions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Metal Chelate: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xin; Liu, Qinli; Hou, Xiongpo; Fang, Tao

    2017-03-04

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), as a new green extraction technology, has been used in extracting various metal species. The solubilities of chelating agents and corresponding metal chelates are the key factors which influence the efficiency of SFE. Other main properties of them such as stability and selectivity are also reviewed. The extraction mechanisms of mainly used chelating agents are explained by typical examples in this paper. This is the important aspect of SFE of metal ions. Moreover, the extraction efficiencies of metal species also depend on other factors such as temperature, pressure, extraction time and matrix effect. The two main complexation methods namely in-situ and on-line chelating SFE are described in detail. As an efficient chelating agent, tributyl phosphate-nitric acid (TBP-HNO 3 ) complex attracts much attention. The SFE of metal ions, lanthanides and actinides as well as organometallic compounds are also summarized. With the proper selection of ligands, high efficient extraction of metal species can be obtained. As an efficient sample analysis method, supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is introduced in this paper. Recently, the extraction method combining ionic liquids (ILs) with supercritical fluid has been becoming a novel technology for treating metal ions. The kinetics related to SFE of metal species is discussed with some specific examples.

  20. Oxidation-Induced Degradable Nanogels for Iron Chelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Yan; Purro, Max; Xiong, May P.

    2016-02-01

    Iron overload can increase cellular oxidative stress levels due to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); untreated, it can be extremely destructive to organs and fatal to patients. Since elevated oxidative stress levels are inherent to the condition in such patients, oxidation-induced degradable nanogels for iron chelation were rationally designed by simultaneously polymerizing oxidation-sensitive host-guest crosslinkers between β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and ferrocene (Fc) and iron chelating moieties composed of deferoxamine (DFO) into the final gel scaffold in reverse emulsion reaction chambers. UV-Vis absorption and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to verify iron chelating capability of nanogels. These materials can degrade into smaller chelating fragments at rates proportional to the level of oxidative stress present. Conjugating DFO reduces the cytotoxicity of the chelator in the macrophage cells. Importantly, the nanogel can effectively reduce cellular ferritin expression in iron overloaded cells and regulate intracellular iron levels at the same time, which is important for maintaining a homeostatic level of this critical metal in cells.

  1. Toxicity evaluation of Gd2O3@SiO2 nanoparticles prepared by laser ablation in liquid as MRI contrast agents in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian XM

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Xiumei Tian,1,* Fanwen Yang,1,* Chuan Yang,2 Ye Peng,1 Dihu Chen,3 Jixiang Zhu,1 Fupo He,1 Li Li,2 Xiaoming Chen11Department of Biomedical Engineering, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, People’s Republic of China; 2State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Imaging Diagnosis and Interventional Center, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, People’s Republic of China; 3State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Poor toxicity characterization is one obstacle to the clinical deployment of Gd2O3@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles (Gd-NPs for use as magnetic resonance (MR imaging contrast agents. To date, there is no systematic toxicity data available for Gd-NPs prepared by laser ablation in liquid. In this article, we systematically studied the Gd-NPs’ cytotoxicity, apoptosis in vitro, immunotoxicity, blood circulation half-life, biodistribution and excretion in vivo, as well as pharmacodynamics. The results show the toxicity, and in vivo MR data show that these NPs are a good contrast agent for preclinical applications. No significant differences were found in cell viability, apoptosis, and immunotoxicity between our Gd-NPs and Gd in a DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid chelator. Biodistribution data reveal a greater accumulation of the Gd-NPs in the liver, spleen, lung, and tumor than in the kidney, heart, and brain. Approximately 50% of the Gd is excreted via the hepatobiliary system within 4 weeks. Furthermore, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images of xenografted murine tumors were obtained after intravenous administration of the Gd-NPs. Collectively, the single step preparation of Gd-NPs by laser ablation in liquid produces particles with satisfactory cytotoxicity

  2. Gadolinium chloride elicits apoptosis in human osteosarcoma U-2 OS cells through extrinsic signaling, intrinsic pathway and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yuh-Feng; Huang, Ching-Wen; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Hsiao, Chen-Yu; Yang, Jai-Sing

    2016-12-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) compounds are important as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, and are potential anticancer agents. However, no report has shown the effect of gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) on osteosarcoma in vitro. The present study investigated the apoptotic mechanism of GdCl3 on human osteosarcoma U-2 OS cells. Our results indicated that GdCl3 significantly reduced cell viability of U-2 OS cells in a concentration-dependent manner. GdCl3 led to apoptotic cell shrinkage and DNA fragmentation in U-2 OS cells as revealed by morphologic changes and TUNEL staining. Colorimetric assay analyses also showed that activities of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9 and caspase-4 occurred in GdCl3-treated U-2 OS cells. Pretreatment of cells with pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) and specific inhibitors of caspase-3/-8/-9 significantly reduced cell death caused by GdCl3. The increase of cytoplasmic Ca2+ level, ROS production and the decrease of mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm) were observed by flow cytometric analysis in U-2 OS cells after GdCl3 exposure. Western blot analyses demonstrated that the levels of Fas, FasL, cytochrome c, Apaf-1, GADD153 and GRP78 were upregulated in GdCl3-treated U-2 OS cells. In conclusion, death receptor, mitochondria-dependent and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathways contribute to GdCl3-induced apoptosis in U-2 OS cells. GdCl3 might have potential to be used in treatment of osteosarcoma patients.

  3. Assessment of myocardial infarction in mice by Late Gadolinium Enhancement MR imaging using an inversion recovery pulse sequence at 9.4T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herlihy Amy H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using an inversion recovery pulse sequence and to define the optimal inversion time (TI to assess myocardial infarction in mice by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE MRI at 9.4T, and to obtain the maximal contrast between the infarcted and the viable myocardium. Methods MRI was performed at 9.4T in mice, two days after induction of myocardial infarction (n = 4. For cardiovascular MR imaging, a segmented magnetization-prepared fast low angle shot (MP-FLASH sequence was used with varied TIs ranging from 40 to 420 ms following administration of gadolinium-DTPA at 0.6 mmol/kg. Contrast-to-noise (CNR and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR were measured and compared for each myocardial region of interest (ROI. Results The optimal TI, which corresponded to a minimum SNR in the normal myocardium, was 268 ms ± 27.3. The SNR in the viable myocardium was significantly different from that found in the infarcted myocardium (17.2 ± 2.4 vs 82.1 ± 10.8; p = 0.006 leading to a maximal relative SI (Signal Intensity between those two areas (344.9 ± 60.4. Conclusion Despite the rapid heart rate in mice, our study demonstrates that LGE MRI can be performed at 9.4T using a protocol similar to the one used for clinical MR diagnosis of myocardial infarction.

  4. Multiphase contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging features of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin-induced granulomatous prostatitis in five patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawada, Hiroshi; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Goshima, Satoshi; Kondo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Haruo; Noda, Yoshifumi; Tanahashi, Yukichi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki [Gifu University Hospital, Gifu (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    To evaluate the multiphase contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-induced granulomatous prostatitis (GP). Magnetic resonance images obtained from five patients with histopathologically proven BCG-induced GP were retrospectively analyzed for tumor location, size, signal intensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted images (DWI), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value, and appearance on gadolinium-enhanced multiphase images. MR imaging findings were compared with histopathological findings. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin-induced GP (size range, 9-40 mm; mean, 21.2 mm) were identified in the peripheral zone in all patients. The T2WI showed lower signal intensity compared with the normal peripheral zone. The DWIs demonstrated high signal intensity and low ADC values (range, 0.44-0.68 x 10(-3) mm2/sec; mean, 0.56 x 10(-3) mm2/sec), which corresponded to GP. Gadolinium-enhanced multiphase MR imaging performed in five patients showed early and prolonged ring enhancement in all cases of GP. Granulomatous tissues with central caseation necrosis were identified histologically, which corresponded to ring enhancement and a central low intensity area on gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. The findings on T2WI, DWI, and gadolinium-enhanced images became gradually obscured with time. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin-induced GP demonstrates early and prolonged ring enhancement on gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging which might be a key finding to differentiate it from prostate cancer.

  5. Functionalization of gadolinium metallofullerenes for detecting atherosclerotic plaque lesions by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dellinger Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hallmark of atherosclerosis is the accumulation of plaque in vessel walls. This process is initiated when monocytic cells differentiate into macrophage foam cells under conditions with high levels of atherogenic lipoproteins. Vulnerable plaque can dislodge, enter the blood stream, and result in acute myocardial infarction and stroke. Imaging techniques such as cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR provides one strategy to identify patients with plaque accumulation. Methods We synthesized an atherosclerotic-targeting contrast agent (ATCA in which gadolinium (Gd-containing endohedrals were functionalized and formulated into liposomes with CD36 ligands intercalated into the lipid bilayer. In vitro assays were used to assess the specificity of the ATCA for foam cells. The ability of ATCA to detect atherosclerotic plaque lesions in vivo was assessed using CMR. Results The ATCA was able to detect scavenger receptor (CD36-expressing foam cells in vitro and were specifically internalized via the CD36 receptor as determined by focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM and Western blotting analysis of CD36 receptor-specific signaling pathways. The ATCA exhibited time-dependent accumulation in atherosclerotic plaque lesions of ApoE −/− mice as determined using CMR. No ATCA accumulation was observed in vessels of wild type (C57/b6 controls. Non-targeted control compounds, without the plaque-targeting moieties, were not taken up by foam cells in vitro and did not bind plaque in vivo. Importantly, the ATCA injection was well tolerated, did not demonstrate toxicity in vitro or in vivo, and no accumulation was observed in the major organs. Conclusions The ATCA is specifically internalized by CD36 receptors on atherosclerotic plaque providing enhanced visualization of lesions under physiological conditions. These ATCA may provide new tools for physicians to non-invasively detect atherosclerotic disease.

  6. Inositol hexa-phosphate: a potential chelating agent for uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebrian, D.; Tapia, A.; Real, A.; Morcillo, M.A. [Radiobiology Laboratory, Radiation Dosimetry Unit, Department of Environment, CIEMAT, Avda Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Chelation therapy is an optimal method to reduce the radionuclide-related risks. In the case of uranium incorporation, the treatment of choice is so far i.v infusion of a 1.4% sodium bicarbonate solution, but the efficacy has been proved to be not very high. In this study, we examine the efficacy of some substances: bicarbonate, citrate, diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethidronate (EHBP) and inositol hexa-phosphate (phytic acid) to chelate uranium using a test developed by Braun et al. Different concentrations of phytic acid, an abundant component of plant seeds that is widely distributed in animal cells and tissues in substantial levels, were tested and compared to the same concentrations of sodium citrate, bicarbonate, EHBP and DTPA. The results showed a strong affinity of inositol hexa-phosphate for uranium, suggesting that it could be an effective chelating agent for uranium in vivo. (authors)

  7. Inositol hexa-phosphate: a potential chelating agent for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebrian, D.; Tapia, A.; Real, A.; Morcillo, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Chelation therapy is an optimal method to reduce the radionuclide-related risks. In the case of uranium incorporation, the treatment of choice is so far i.v infusion of a 1.4% sodium bicarbonate solution, but the efficacy has been proved to be not very high. In this study, we examine the efficacy of some substances: bicarbonate, citrate, diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethidronate (EHBP) and inositol hexa-phosphate (phytic acid) to chelate uranium using a test developed by Braun et al. Different concentrations of phytic acid, an abundant component of plant seeds that is widely distributed in animal cells and tissues in substantial levels, were tested and compared to the same concentrations of sodium citrate, bicarbonate, EHBP and DTPA. The results showed a strong affinity of inositol hexa-phosphate for uranium, suggesting that it could be an effective chelating agent for uranium in vivo. (authors)

  8. From chelating precursors to La0.05Sr0.95CoO3-y oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, L.; Guo, F.; Lin, J.

    1999-01-01

    Several La 0.05 Sr 0.95 CoO 3-y (LSCO-95) powders were synthesized by means of a chelated complex-based precursor approach, which involved pyrolysis of chelating precursors and subsequent calcination of the resulting oxides. This paper focuses on the coordination effects of the precursors on the formation of the crystalline phases of the LSCO-95 oxide, showing that when the precursor is composed of EDTA-metal complexes, the perovskite-type oxide LSCO-95, an electronic-ionic mixed conducting ceramic material, can be achieved. In contrast, those LSCO-95 powders obtained initially from the pyrolysis of the precursors containing other coordination ligands possess only the undesirable hexagonal structure

  9. Bifunctional chelates of Rh-105 and Au-199 as potential radiotherapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troutner, D.E.; Schlemper, E.O.

    1990-01-01

    Since last year we have: continued the synthesis of pentadentate bifunctional chelating agents based on diethylene triamine; studied the chelation Rh-105, Au-198 (as model for Au-199) and Tc-99m with these agents as well as chelation of Pd-109, Cu-67, In-111, and Co-57 with some of them; synthesized a new class of potential bifunctional chelating agents based on phenylene diamine; investigated the behavior of Au-198 as a model for Au-199; begun synthesis of bifunctional chelating agents based on terpyridly and similar ligands; and continued attempts to produce tetradentate bifunctional chelates based on diaminopropane. Each of these will be addressed in this report

  10. Study of burnable poisons and gadolinium qualification in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasr, Mohamed.

    1981-09-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a calculation procedure for analyzing light water moderated reactors utilizing gadolinium as a burnable poison. The main points of this work can be summarized as follows: the available cross section data of gadolinium were analysed and corrected whenever it was necessary. The processes which include required precautions for obtaining multigroup cross sections were defined; an exhaustive study of the assumptions used in multicell calculation methods allowed the definition of option to be used for obtaining good results without excessive calculation cost. This study was followed by the interpretation of experimental results; when gadolinium is used in grain structure, a problem of double heterogeneity is encountered. A new calculation method was developed for such situations. Its validity was confirmed by a comparison with the Monte Carlo method; the problems encountered in performing a study of burn up of fuel elements containing gadolinium were analysed and the necessary precautions were established. The effect of the initial charge and geometrical form of the gadolinium and the behavior of lattices during the burn up were examined [fr

  11. Compensated gadolinium-loaded plastic scintillators for thermal neutron detection (and counting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumazert, Jonathan; Coulon, Romain; Bertrand, Guillaume H. V.; Hamel, Matthieu; Sguerra, Fabien; Dehe-Pittance, Chrystele; Normand, Stephane [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs Architectures Electroniques, 99 Gif-sur-Yvette, (France); Mechin, Laurence [CNRS, UCBN, Groupe de Recherche en Informatique, Image, Automatique et Instrumentation de Caen, 4050 Caen, (France)

    2015-07-01

    Plastic scintillator loading with gadolinium-rich organometallic complexes shows a high potential for the deployment of efficient and cost-effective neutron detectors. Due to the low-energy photon and electron signature of thermal neutron capture by gadolinium-155 and gadolinium-157, alternative treatment to Pulse Shape Discrimination has to be proposed in order to display a trustable count rate. This paper discloses the principle of a compensation method applied to a two-scintillator system: a detection scintillator interacts with photon radiation and is loaded with gadolinium organometallic compound to become a thermal neutron absorber, while a non-gadolinium loaded compensation scintillator solely interacts with the photon part of the incident radiation. Posterior to the nonlinear smoothing of the counting signals, a hypothesis test determines whether the resulting count rate after photon response compensation falls into statistical fluctuations or provides a robust image of a neutron activity. A laboratory prototype is tested under both photon and neutron irradiations, allowing us to investigate the performance of the overall compensation system in terms of neutron detection, especially with regards to a commercial helium-3 counter. The study reveals satisfactory results in terms of sensitivity and orientates future investigation toward promising axes. (authors)

  12. Radio response of human lymphocytes pretreated with boron and gadoliniums assessed by the, comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. K.; Park, T. W.; Cebulska-Wasiewska, A.; Nili, M.

    2009-01-01

    Boron and gadolinium are among the nuclides that hold a unique property of being a neutron capture therapy agent. Neutron beams have often a considerable portion of gamma rays with fast neutrons. Gamma rays, as beam contaminants, can cause considerable damage to normal tissues even if such tissues do contain high boron concentrations. Materials and Methods: The modification of radio response in human lymphocytes pretreated with boron or gadolinium compound was studied by assessing the DNA damage using single cell gel electrophoresis, the comet assay. The lymphocytes from the human peripheral blood were irradiated with 0, 1, 2 and 4 Gy of gamma rays from a 60 Co isotopic source with or without pretreatment of boron or gadolinium compound for 10 minutes at 4 d egree C . Post-irradiation procedures included slide preparation, cell-lysing, unwinding and electrophoresis, neutralization, staining, and analytic steps, gel electrophoresis. Results: The results indicate that pretreatment with boron compound (50 n M or 250 n M of 10 B) is effective in reducing the radiosensitivity of the lymphocyte DNA. Conversely, pretreatment with gadolinium compound (50 n M) led to a dose-dependent increase in the radiosensitivity, most prominently with a dose of 4 Gy (P<0.001). Furthermore, when the lymphocytes were pretreated with a Combined mixture (1:1) of boron (250 n M) and gadolinium (50 n M) compounds, the reduced radiosensitivity was also observed.

  13. Protracted chelate therapy after incorporation of plutonium 239 in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemenetzis, E.

    1976-01-01

    The author has tested in how far 239 Pu can be mobilized by Ca and Zn, Desfenioxamin B(DFDA) and by combined doses of Ca-DTPA and DFDA. The pre-experiment covered the 239 Pu-metabolism in untreated male and female rats and the distribution in dependence of the way of application. If treatment is started immediately by multiple chelate doses, the first two injections play the main part in the decorporation of 239 Pu. The combination Ca-DTPA30 + DFDA30 μMol x kg -1 is proved to be the best means of decorporation for the whole body. The efficiency of another therapy depends essentially on the treatment used, a daily treatment showing the best effects. If treatment is started later with multiple chelate doses, the total decorporation efficiency is of less value, especially in the skeleton. Aequimolar doses of Ca-DTPA and Zn-DTPA have the same degree of efficiency. This indicates that during protracted chelate treatment starting later, Ca-DTPA could be substituted by the less toxic Zn-DTPA after incorporation of 239 Pu. These results show that intermittant administration of the week's dose is more efficient than a single chelate administration of the whole week's dose at once. Permanent chelate infusion does not seem necessary in any case since it has the same effect as 3 to 5 injections per week and is difficult to carry out in medical practice. Thus, it seems advisable to divide up the weekly dose into 3-5 injections. In case of a wound contamination, the efficiency of immediate intensive treatment depends on the 239 Pu compound used, on the chelate used, and on its dosage. (orig.) [de

  14. Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture: the quest for therapeutic actinide chelators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Patricia W

    2008-11-01

    All of the actinides are radioactive. Taken into the body, they damage and induce cancer in bone and liver, and in the lungs if inhaled, and U(VI) is a chemical kidney poison. Containment of radionuclides is fundamental to radiation protection, but if it is breached accidentally or deliberately, decontamination of exposed persons is needed to reduce the consequences of radionuclide intake. The only known way to reduce the health risks of internally deposited actinides is to accelerate their excretion with chelating agents. Ethylendiaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) were introduced in the 1950's. DTPA is now clinically accepted, but its oral activity is low, it must be injected as a Ca(II) or Zn(II) chelate to avoid toxicity, and it is structurally unsuitable for chelating U(VI) or Np(V). Actinide penetration into the mammalian iron transport and storage systems suggested that actinide ions would form stable complexes with the Fe(III)-binding units found in potent selective natural iron chelators (siderophores). Testing of that biomimetic approach began in the late 1970's with the design, production, and assessment for in vivo Pu(IV) chelation of synthetic multidentate ligands based on the backbone structures and Fe(III)-binding groups of siderophores. New efficacious actinide chelators have emerged from that program, in particular, octadentate 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) and tetradentate 5-LIO(Me-3,2-HOPO) have potential for clinical acceptance. Both are much more effective than CaNa3-DTPA for decorporation of Pu(IV), Am(III), U(VI), and Np(IV,V), they are orally active, and toxicity is acceptably low at effective dosage.

  15. Interaction of chelating agents with cadmium in mice and rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eybl, V.; Sykora, J.; Koutensky, J.; Caisova, D.; Schwartz, A.; Mertl, F.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of several chelating agents (CaDTPA, ZnDTPA, CaEDTA, ZnEDTA, DMSA, D-penicillamine and DMPS, DMP and DDC) on the acute toxicity of CdCl 2 and on the whole body retention and tissue distribution of cadmium after the IV application of /sup 115mCdCl 2 was compared in mice. The chelating agents were applied immediately after the application of cadmium. CaDTPA, ZnDTPA and DMSA appeared to be the most effective antidotes. However, DMSA increased the amount of cadmium retained in kidneys. The treatement of cadmium-poisoned mice with the combination of DMSA (IP) and ZnDTPA (SC) (all the compounds were injected in equimolar dose) decreased the toxicity of cadmium more than treatment with one chelating agents (given in a 2:1 dose). However, by studying the effect of these chelating agents and their combination application of the antidotes showed little or no improvement over the results obtained with the most effective of the individual components. In the urine of rats injected with CdCl 2 and treated with the chelating agents (CaDTPA, ZnDTPA, DMSA), the presence of cadmium complexes was demonstrated. The formation of mixed ligand chelates in vivo was not proved. Experiments in mice given a single injection of /sup 115m/Cd-labeled Cd complexes of DMPS, DMSA and DTPA showed a high retention of cadmium in the organisms after the IV application of CdDMPS and CdDMSA complexes

  16. Efficacy of chelation therapy to remove aluminium intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulgenzi, Alessandro; De Giuseppe, Rachele; Bamonti, Fabrizia; Vietti, Daniele; Ferrero, Maria Elena

    2015-11-01

    There is a distinct correlation between aluminium (Al) intoxication and neurodegenerative diseases (ND). We demonstrated how patients affected by ND showing Al intoxication benefit from short-term treatment with calcium disodium ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) (chelation therapy). Such therapy further improved through daily treatment with the antioxidant Cellfood. In the present study we examined the efficacy of long-term treatment, using both EDTA and Cellfood. Slow intravenous treatment with the chelating agent EDTA (2 g/10 mL diluted in 500 mL physiological saline administered in 2 h) (chelation test) removed Al, which was detected (using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) in urine samples collected from patients over 12 h. Patients that revealed Al intoxication (expressed in μg per g creatinine) underwent EDTA chelation therapy once a week for ten weeks, then once every two weeks for a further six or twelve months. At the end of treatment (a total of 22 or 34 chelation therapies, respectively), associated with daily assumption of Cellfood, Al levels in the urine samples were analysed. In addition, the following blood parameters were determined: homocysteine, vitamin B12, and folate, as well as the oxidative status e.g. reactive oxygen species (ROS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), oxidized LDL (oxLDL), and glutathione. Our results showed that Al intoxication reduced significantly following EDTA and Cellfood treatment, and clinical symptoms improved. After treatment, ROS, oxLDL, and homocysteine decreased significantly, whereas vitamin B12, folate and TAC improved significantly. In conclusion, our data show the efficacy of chelation therapy associated with Cellfood in subjects affected by Al intoxication who have developed ND.

  17. New luminescent oxygen-sensing and temperature-sensing materials based on gadolinium(III) and europium(III) complexes embedded in an acridone-polystyrene conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, Sergey M; Klimant, I

    2012-12-01

    New sensing materials have been developed which rely on the use of luminescent europium(III) and gadolinium(III) complexes with thenoylacetylacetonate embedded in an acridone-polystyrene conjugate. Acridone acts as an antenna which efficiently absorbs violet light. Covalent coupling to the polystyrene backbone prevents aggregation and enables very high antenna loading (16% w/w). Energy transfer from the antenna to the lanthanide complexes results in efficient red luminescence from the Eu(III) complex or green phosphorescence originating from the Gd(III) chelate. The luminescence of the material based on the Eu(III) complex is only slightly affected by oxygen but is highly sensitive to temperature under physiological conditions (20-40 °C). The Gd(III) complex has long phosphorescence decay times of approximately 1 ms and high sensitivity to oxygen. Ultra-thin (250 nm) sensing layers with sufficient absorption at the excitation wavelength enable monitoring of rapid oxygen changes virtually in real time. Immobilization of both complexes in a single matrix results in a dual-luminescence material with emissions almost ideally matching the red and green channels of a digital camera. Thus, oxygen imaging using a very simple and inexpensive set-up can be realized. Additionally, the material can be used for simultaneous sensing of oxygen and temperature.

  18. Copolímeros de estireno-divinilbenzeno impregnados com agentes complexantes organofosforados para separação de terras raras Styrene-divinylbenzene copolymers loaded with organophosphorus chelating agents for rare earths separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina C. R. Barbosa

    1998-12-01

    mixture with toluene (TOL as diluents. The influence of synthesis conditions such as chelating agent/TOL ratios, dilution degree of monomers and amount of DVB on the porous structure of the copolymers were studied. The porous structure was characterized by the apparent density, fixed pore volume, surface area and by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The performance of the copolymers in the separation process of rare earths was evaluated. The total chelating capacity of each copolymer and the chelating kinetics in relation to gadolinium ion were determined. The chelating agent content of the copolymers depended on the amount of chelating agents employed in the synthesis. The highest amount of chelating agent that can be used in the synthesis in order to produce copolymers with high chelating capacity and good mechanical properties was determined. The total chelating capacity varied with the content of the chelating agents in the copolymer and the chelating kinetics was dependent mainly on the pore diameter, because this parameter determines the diffusion rate of the ions through the copolymer structure.

  19. Biodegradation of synthetic chelates in subsurface sediments from the southeast coastal plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolton, H. Jr.; Li, S.W.; Workman, D.J.; Girvin, D.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    The codisposal of synthetic chelating agents [e.g., ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)] and radionuclides has been implicated in increased radionuclide transport in the subsurface environment. Microbial transformations of chelates in the subsurface are currently unknown, but could influence chelate persistence and thus alter the transport of radionuclides. Surface soil and subsurface sediments from five formations (36- to 376-m depth) were collected near Allendale, SC. Aerobic mineralization of [sup 14]C-labeled EDTA, DTPA, and NTA occurred in select sediments indicating that subsurface microorganisms can degrade chelates, whereas chelates may be relatively stable in strata where limited mineralization occurred. The chelates were not mineralized more rapidly or to a greater extent in the surface soil than in the subsurface sediments. The relative order of chelate persistence was EDTA > DTPA > NTA, with the maximum amount mineralized during 115 d at 15, 26, and 43%, respectively. Maximum mineralization of all three chelates did not occur in the same sediment, indicating that different microbial populations were responsible for the degradation of each chelate. Mineralization of chelates was minimal under denitrifying conditions and was reduced when additional soluble C was added. There was no relationship between chelate mineralization and the adsorption of chelates to sediments or the aqueous speciation of the chelates. 47 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Intravenous Calcium-/Zinc-Diethylene Triamine Penta-Acetic Acid in Patients With Presumed Gadolinium Deposition Disease: A Preliminary Report on 25 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semelka, Richard C; Ramalho, Miguel; Jay, Michael; Hickey, Lisa; Hickey, Joseph

    2018-02-06

    The aim of this study was to report the use of intravenous calcium (Ca)-/zinc (Zn)-diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) for the treatment of 25 symptomatic patients diagnosed with gadolinium deposition disease (GDD). Written informed consent was obtained. Twenty-five patients (18 women; mean age, 46.8 ± 15.3 years) with a diagnosis of GDD were included. All patients had received at least 1 administration of a gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent. Patients received 3 treatment sessions with Ca-/Zn-DTPA, 15 with treatments spaced 1 month apart, and 10 with treatments spaced 1 week apart. In all cases, every treatment consisted of an application of Ca-DTPA and Zn-DTPA separated by 24 hours. Measurements of 24-hour urine Gd content before dosing and on the first and second days of therapy were performed. Symptomatic improvement of patients was determined by use of a 10-point scale of patient symptoms. Serum electrolytes were quantified. Gadolinium content increased in the urine, with an overall mean of 30.3-fold increase in the monthly regimen (P < 0.001) and 12.9-fold in the weekly regimen (P < 0.001). Eleven patients experienced transient worsening of at least some of their symptoms, termed a "flare-up" phenomenon, in most of whom symptoms improved or receded. Overall, symptoms improved in 13 patients, unchanged in 10, and worse in 2. Significant clinical improvement was present for headache, brain fog, and bone pain for the monthly regimen and arm pain and leg pain for the weekly regimen. There were no significant changes in major serum electrolytes. Three courses of intravenous Ca-/Zn-DTPA therapy results in significantly increased urine content of Gd after treatment and moderate symptomatic improvement.

  1. Electric and magnetic properties of contrast agents for thermoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunlade, Olumide; Beard, Paul

    2014-03-01

    The endogenous contrast in thermoacoustic imaging is due to the water and ionic content in tissue. This results in poor tissue speci city between high water content tissues. As a result, exogenous contrast agents have been employed to improve tissue speci city and also increase the SNR. An investigation into the sources of contrast produced by several exogenous contrast agents is described. These include three gadolinium based MRI contrast agents, iron oxide particles, single wall carbon nanotubes, saline and sucrose solutions. Both the dielectric and magnetic properties of contrast agents at 3GHz have been measured using microwave resonant cavities. The DC conductivity of the contrast agents were also measured. It is shown that the measured increase in dielectric contrast, relative to water, is due to dipole rotational loss of polar non electrolytes, ionic loss of electrolytes or a combination of both. It is shown that for the same dielectric contrast, electrolytes make better thermoacoustic contrast agents than non-electrolytes, for thermoacoustic imaging.

  2. Characterization of composite metal-ceramic of nickel-oxide cerium doped gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.L.A. da; Varela, M.C.R.S.

    2016-01-01

    Composite nickel doped cerium oxide are used in SOFC anode materials. In this study we evaluated the effect of the presence of gadolinium on the properties of composite nickel and ceria and. The supports were synthesized by sol-gel method. The impregnation with nickel nitrate was taken sequentially, followed by calcination. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, measurement of specific surface area, temperature programmed reduction, Raman spectroscopy. The presence of gadolinium retained the fluorite structure of ceria by forming a solid solution, also not influencing significantly on the specific surface area of the support. On the other hand, there was a decrease in the area catalysts, which can be attributed to sintering of nickel. Furthermore, addition of gadolinium favored the formation of intrinsic and extrinsic vacancies in cerium oxide, which leads to an increase in the ionic conductivity of the solid, desirable property for an SOFC anode catalyst. (author)

  3. Biodistribution of ultra small gadolinium-based nanoparticles as theranostic agent: application to brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladi, Imen; Duc, Géraldine Le; Kryza, David; Berniard, Aurélie; Mowat, Pierre; Roux, Stéphane; Taleb, Jacqueline; Bonazza, Pauline; Perriat, Pascal; Lux, François; Tillement, Olivier; Billotey, Claire; Janier, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Gadolinium-based nanoparticles are novel objects with interesting physical properties, allowing their use for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles were imaged following intravenous injection in healthy rats and rats grafted with 9L gliosarcoma tumors using magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphic imaging. Quantitative biodistribution using gamma-counting of each sampled organ confirmed that these nanoparticles were rapidly cleared essentially by renal excretion. Accumulation of these nanoparticles in 9L gliosarcoma tumors implanted in the rat brain was quantitated. This passive and long-duration accumulation of gadolinium-based nanoparticles in tumor, which is related to disruption of the blood-brain barrier, is in good agreement with the use of these nanoparticles as radiosensitizers for brain tumors.

  4. The network formers role of gadolinium(III) ions in some zinc-borate glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosca, Maria; Pop, Lidia; Pascuta, Petru

    2017-12-01

    EPR and magnetic susceptibility measurements were performed on glass ceramics from the (Gd2O3)x.(B2O3)(60-x).(ZnO)40 system, with 0 ≤ x ≤ 15 mol%, in order to determine the role of gadolinium ions on structural and magnetic properties. At low Gd2O3 contents (x ≤ 1 mol%) the EPR spectra show four resonance lines with effective g-values of ˜ 6, 4.8, 2.8 and 2, typical for Gd3+ ions uniformly distributed in the glass and glass ceramic samples. For higher contents of gadolinium ions (x ≥ 3 mol%) the EPR spectra are dominated by a single broad line centered at g ˜ 2, which can be due to the magnetic clusters containing Gd3+ ions. The magnetic susceptibility data show that the gadolinium ions are involved in superexchange interactions in all the investigated glass ceramics, being antiferromagnetically coupled.

  5. Metal chelates of azo-pyridazine dyes Chelating tendencies of benzoylacetone-monohydrazone-3-hydrazino-4-benzyl-6-phenylpyridazine (bahp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, A A; Seada, M H; Rizkalla, E N

    1983-04-01

    The synthesis, acid-base equilibria and metal-ion chelating tendencies of BAHP are reported. From potentiometric equilibrium measurements of hydrogen-ion concentration at 30 degrees and ionic strength 0.10M (KNO(3)), in 75% dioxan-water medium, the values of the stability constants of some BAHP complexes with transition, non-transition and lanthanide ions have been evaluated. Probable structures of the metal chelates are inferred from the electronic absorption spectra and infrared examination of the solid copper complex. The use of BAHP as an analytical reagent for the spectrophotometric determination of copper, nickel and cobalt ions is discussed.

  6. Can unenhanced multiparametric MRI substitute gadolinium-enhanced MRI in the characterization of vertebral marrow infiltrative lesions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Z. Zidan

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Unenhanced-multiparametric MRI is compatible with gadolinium-enhanced MRI in reliable characterization of marrow infiltrative lesions. The routine MRI protocol of cancer patients should be altered to accommodate the evolving MRI technology and cost effectively substitute the need for a gadolinium enhanced scan.

  7. Evaluation of nitrogen-rich macrocyclic ligands for the chelation of therapeutic bismuth radioisotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Justin J; Ferrier, Maryline; Radchenko, Valery; Maassen, Joel R; Engle, Jonathan W; Batista, Enrique R; Martin, Richard L; Nortier, Francois M; Fassbender, Michael E; John, Kevin D; Birnbaum, Eva R

    2015-05-01

    The use of α-emitting isotopes for radionuclide therapy is a promising treatment strategy for small micro-metastatic disease. The radioisotope (213)Bi is a nuclide that has found substantial use for targeted α-therapy (TAT). The relatively unexplored aqueous chemistry of Bi(3+), however, hinders the development of bifunctional chelating agents that can successfully deliver these Bi radioisotopes to the tumor cells. Here, a novel series of nitrogen-rich macrocyclic ligands is explored for their potential use as Bi-selective chelating agents. The ligands, 1,4,7,10-tetrakis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (L(py)), 1,4,7,10-tetrakis(3-pyridazylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (L(pyd)), 1,4,7,10-tetrakis(4-pyrimidylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (L(pyr)), and 1,4,7,10-tetrakis(2-pyrazinylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (L(pz)), were prepared by a previously reported method and investigated here for their abilities to bind Bi radioisotopes. The commercially available and commonly used ligands 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and N-[(R)-2-amino-3-(p-isothiocyanato-phenyl)propyl]-trans-(S,S)- cyclohexane-1,2-diamine-N,N,N',N",N"-pentaacetic acid (CHX-A''-DTPA) were also explored for comparative purposes. Radio-thin-layer chromatography (TLC) was used to measure the binding kinetics and stabilities of the complexes formed. The long-lived isotope, (207)Bi (t(1/2)=32 years), was used for these studies. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were also employed to probe the ligand interactions with Bi(3+) and the generator parent ion Ac(3+). In contrast to DOTA and CHX-A''-DTPA, these nitrogen-rich macrocycles selectively chelate Bi(3+) in the presence of the parent isotope Ac(3+). Among the four tested, L(py) was found to exhibit optimal Bi(3+)-binding kinetics and complex stability. L(py) complexes Bi(3+) more rapidly than DOTA, yet the resulting complexes are of similar stability. DFT calculations

  8. Metal chelate conjugated monoclonal antibodies, wherein the metal is an α emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gansow, O.A.; Strand, M.

    1984-01-01

    Methods of manufacturing and purifying metal chelate conjugated monoclonal antibodies are described, wherein the chelated metal emits alpha radiation. The conjugates are suited for therapeutic uses being substantially free of nonchelated radiometal. (author)

  9. Comparison of predicted with observed biokinetics of inhaled plutonium nitrate and gadolinium oxide in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, A.; Shutt, A.L.; Etherington, G.; Hodgson, S.A.; Rance, E.; Stradling, G.N.; Youngman, M.J.; Ziesenis, A.; Kreyling, W.G.

    2003-01-01

    The absorption kinetics to blood of plutonium and gadolinium after inhalation as nitrate and oxide in humans and animals has been studied. For each material, values describing the time dependence of absorption were derived from the studies in animals and used with the ICRP human respiratory tract model to predict lung retention and cumulative amounts to blood for the volunteers inhaling the same materials. Comparison with the observed behaviour in the volunteers suggests that absorption of plutonium and gadolinium is reasonably species independent, and that data obtained from animal studies can be used to assess their biokinetic behaviour in humans. (author)

  10. Structural, morphological and optical investigations on Sm{sup 3+} doped gadolinium oxide nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boopathi, G.; Mohan, R. [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chennai - 600005 (India); Raj, S. Gokul [Materials Science Research Lab, Department of Physics, VEL TECH UNIVERSITY, Avadi, Chennai - 600062 (India); Kumar, G. Ramesh, E-mail: rameshvandhai@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, University College of Engineering Arni, Anna University Chennai, Arni-632317 (India)

    2014-04-24

    One dimensional uniform Sm{sup 3+} doped gadolinium hydroxide nanorods have been prepared via simple co– precipitation technique at 60 °C temperature for 1 hour. The samples were calcinated at 750 °C to obtain Sm{sup 3+} doped gadolinium oxide nanorods. The 1D nanorods were then subjected to different characterization techniques to ascertain its structural stability and its morphology were investigated using high–resolution transmission electron microscopy. Photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometry was investigated and the obtained results were discussed in detail.

  11. Structural and optical properties of Nd{sup 3+} doped gadolinium oxide 1D nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boopathi, G., E-mail: psixboopathi@gmail.com; Mohan, R. [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chennai - 600 005 (India); Raj, S. Gokul [Materials Science Research Lab, Department of Physics, Vel Tech University, Avadi, Chennai -62 (India); Kumar, G. Ramesh [Department of Physics, University College of Engineering Arni, Anna University Chennai, Arni - 632 317 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Neodymium doped gadolinium hydroxide [Nd:Gd(OH)3] nanorods were successfully synthesized at 60 °C through co-precipitation method. The dopant percentage was maintained at 5% and calcination was done at 750 °C temperature for 1 hour to form the respective neodymium doped gadolinium oxide [Nd:Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}] nanorods. The as-formed and annealed products were investigated in detail by using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDX), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometry.

  12. Gadolinium and fission neodymium isotopic analyses and determinations in irradiated nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, M.; Chevalier, C.

    1975-01-01

    A separation method of rare earths on an ion exchange resin is described: it enables the gadolinium and fission neodymium contained in irradiated nuclear fuels to be separated and analyzed by isotopic dilution and mass spectrometry. The principle of the chemical separation and its efficiency and reproducibility are reported. This technique was applied to a series of spent fuels from a pressurized water reactor, with an initial gadolinium content of 2% and final fission neodymium 148 concentrations of a few hundred ppm. These results confirm the validity of the separation method studied, which can be easily adapted to the determination of other rare earths in spent fuels [fr

  13. Targeted Iron Chelation Will Improve Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    for glial replacement after mid-thoracic contusion injury or cervical lateral hemi-section injury. Our pilot data reveal that iron levels do not...did not improve open field locomotion (Figure 1B). Intriguingly, rats receiving vehicle (grape juice ) performed significantly worse than those...cord injury in animals given the iron chelator Exjade, vehicle (grape juice ) or nothing (control). A

  14. Iron chelating activity, phenol and flavonoid content of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-17

    Sep 17, 2008 ... Thalassemia major is characterized by anemia, iron overload, further potentiation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and damage to major organs, especially the cardiovascular system. Antioxidant and other supportive therapies protect red blood cells (RBC) against antioxidant damage. Chelation therapy.

  15. Ruthenium complexes of chelating amido-functionalized N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ruthenium complexes of chelating amido-functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene ligands: Synthesis, structure and DFT studies. SACHIN KUMARa, ANANTHA NARAYANANa, MITTA NAGESWAR RAOa,. MOBIN M SHAIKHb and PRASENJIT GHOSHa,∗. aDepartment of Chemistry and bNational Single Crystal X-ray ...

  16. Studies on effect of Microbial Iron Chelators on Candida Albican

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehmani, Fouzia S.; Milicent, S.; Zaheer-Uddin

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential for the life of all microbe cells. It generally exists in the oxidized form Fe(III). Even under anaerobic reducing condition the metal appear to be taken up as Fe(III). Thus free-living microorganisms require specific and effective ferric ion transport system to cope with low availability of the metal. In iron deficient environment they produce a low molecular weight specific chelators called siderphores or microbial iron chelators. Siderphores compete for limited supplied of iron. These compounds came out of the cell but can not re-enter without iron due to high affinity of these siderphores often have more than one catechol/hydroxamate functions and are multidentate (usually hexadentate ligands). The aim of the present research is to check the effect of iron chelators, namely gallic acid and salisyl hydroxamate on the growth of Candida albican in vitro. C. albican is the opportunistic paltogen present as the normal flora inside human body. In vivo the growth of C. albican is distributed by the use of antibiotics and immuno suppressers. In cases of iron over-dosage in human being, the patients are treated with certain a-iron chelators. Hence an attempt is made to notice the effect that might be inhibition or enhancement of the organism in vitro. (author)

  17. Chelation of thallium by combining deferasirox and desferrioxamine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saljooghi, Amir Shokooh; Babaie, Maryam; Mendi, Fatemeh Delavar; Zahmati, Maliheh; Saljooghi, Zoheir Shokouh

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis that two known chelators deferasirox (4-[3,5-bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoic acid) and desferrioxamine (DFO) might be more efficient as combined treatment than as monotherapies in removing thallium from the body was tested in a new acute rat model. 7-week-old male Wistar rats received chelators: deferasirox (orally), DFO (intraperitoneal; i.p.), or deferasirox + DFO as 75 or 150 mg/kg dose half an hour after a single i.p. administration of 8 mg thallium/kg body weight in the form of chloride. Serum thallium concentration, urinary thallium, and iron excretions were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Both chelators were effective only at the higher dose level, while DFO was more effective than deferasirox in enhancing urinary thallium excretion, deferasirox was more effective than DFO in enhancing urinary iron excretion. In the combined treatment group, deferasirox did not increase the DFO effect on thallium and DFO did not increase the effect of deferasirox on iron elimination. Our results support the usefulness of this animal model for preliminary in vivo testing of thallium chelators. Urinary values were more useful because of the high variability of serum results. © The Author(s) 2013.

  18. Anti-inflammatory activity of some copper chelates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorenson, J.R.J.

    1974-01-01

    With the observation that cupric acetate had anti-inflammatory activity in the foot edema model of inflammation, it was felt that copper may play a role as a component of the active metabolite of anti-inflammatory agents used clinically. To test this hypothesis, various Cu chelates were made and tested in the foot edema, cotton-wad granuloma and polyarthritis models of inflammation. A marked increase in anti-inflammatory activity has been observed for the Cu chelates of chelating agents that had no anti-inflammatory activity as well as those that have been used clinically. Since ulcers may be viewed as inflammatory processes and often associated with the arthritic disease syndrome, the Cu chelates were evaluated as anti-ulcer agents. These compounds were demonstrated to have anti-ulcer activity in the Shay as well as the corticoid and stress induced rat ulcer models. Mechanistic considerations relevant to lysosomal and digestive proteolytic enzyme inhibition, anti-cholinergic activity, prostaglandin synthesis and wound healing are discussed. 9 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  19. Laccase Immobilization by Chelated Metal Ion Coordination Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingqing Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, amidoxime polyacrylonitrile (AOPAN nanofibrous membrane was prepared by a reaction between PAN nanofibers and hydroxylamine hydrochloride. The AOPAN nanofibrous membranes were used for four metal ions (Fe3+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Cd2+ chelation under different conditions. Further, the competition of different metal ions coordinating with AOPAN nanofibrous membrane was also studied. The AOPAN chelated with individual metal ion (Fe3+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Cd2+ and also the four mixed metal ions were further used for laccase (Lac immobilization. Compared with free laccase, the immobilized laccase showed better resistance to pH and temperature changes as well as improved storage stability. Among the four individual metal ion chelated membranes, the stability of the immobilized enzymes generally followed the order as Fe–AOPAN–Lac > Cu–AOPAN–Lac > Ni–AOPAN–Lac > Cd–AOPAN–Lac. In addition, the immobilized enzyme on the carrier of AOPAN chelated with four mixed metal ions showed the best properties.

  20. Chelating ligands: enhancers of quality and purity of biogas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality of biogas depends largely on the percentage of methane and hydrogen sulphide gas present. High concentration of hydrogen sulphide results in low quality biogas. This work employed the use of chelating ligands in scrubbing hydrogen sulphide gas while improving the yield of methane gas. Experimental ...

  1. Chelation of aluminum by combining deferasirox and deferiprone in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saljooghi, Amir Shokooh

    2012-09-01

    The hypothesis that two known chelators deferasirox and deferiprone (L1) might be more efficient as combined treatment than as single therapies in removing aluminum from the body was tested in a new acute rat model. Seven-week-old male Wistar rats received chelators: deferasirox (orally [p.o.]), L1 (p.o.) or deferasirox + L1 as 100 or 200 mg/kg dose half an hour after a single intraperitoneal administration of 6 mg Al/kg body weight in the form of chloride. Serum aluminum concentration, urinary aluminum and iron excretions were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Both chelators were effective only at the higher dose level. While deferasirox was more effective than L1 in enhancing urinary aluminum excretion, L1 was more effective than deferasirox in enhancing urinary iron excretion. In the combined treatment group, deferasirox did not increase the L1 effect on aluminum and L1 did not increase the effect of deferasirox on iron elimination. Our results support the usefulness of this animal model for preliminary in vivo testing of aluminum chelators. Urinary values were more useful due to the high variability of serum results.

  2. Anti-Oxidative, Metal Chelating and Radical Scavenging Effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate protein hydrolysates and membrane ultrafiltration fractions of blue-spotted stingray for metal chelating and radical scavenging activities, as well as protection against oxidative protein damage. Methods: Stingray protein isolates were hydrolysed with alcalase, papain and trypsin for 3 h. Alcalase.

  3. Sequestration of zinc oxide by fimbrial designer chelators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Kristian; Sørensen, Jack K; Schembri, Mark

    2000-01-01

    Type 1 fimbriae are surface organelles of Escherichia coli. By engineering a structural component of the fimbriae, FimH, to display a random peptide library, we were able to isolate metal-chelating bacteria. A library consisting of 4 x 10(7) independent clones was screened for binding to Zn...

  4. Bone marrow and chelatable iron in patients with protein energy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To examine the iron status of malnourished children by comparing bone marrow iron deposits in children with protein energy malnutrition with those in well-nourished controls, and measuring chelatable urinary iron excretion in children with kwashiorkor. Design: Bone marrow iron was assessed histologicaHy in ...

  5. Protective effect of some chelating agents and antioxidants on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Heavy metals that normally cause problems are mercury (HgCl2) and lead acetate (LA). Chelating and inhibitor agents are the target to treat and overcome metal toxicity. The current study has been carried out to evaluate the protective effects of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and meso 2,3 dimercaptosuccinic acid ...

  6. Spectral, Electrochemical, Fluorescence, Kinetic and Anti-microbial Studies of Acyclic Schiff-base Gadolinium(III) Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayaraj, A.; Prabu, R.; Suresh, R.; Narayanan, V.; Sangeetha Kumari, R.; Kaviyarasan, V. [Univ. of Madras, Madras (India)

    2012-11-15

    A new series of acyclic mononuclear gadolinium(III) complexes have been prepared by Schiff-base condensation derived from 5-methylsalicylaldehyde, diethylenetriamine, tris(2-aminoethyl) amine, triethylenetetramine, N,N-bis(3-aminopropyl)ethylene diamine, N,N-bis(aminopropyl) piperazine, and gadolinium nitrate. All the complexes were characterized by elemental and spectral analyses. Electronic spectra of the complexes show azomethine (CH=N) within the range of 410-420 nm. The fluorescence efficiency of Gd(III) ion in the cavity was completely quenched by the higher chain length ligands. Electrochemical studies of the complexes show irreversible one electron reduction process around -2.15 to -1.60 V. The reduction potential of gadolinium(III) complexes shifts towards anodic directions respectively upon increasing the chain length. The catalytic activity of the gadolinium(III) complexes on the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenylphosphate was determined. All gadolinium(III) complexes were screened for antibacterial activity.

  7. Concentration of gadolinium-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid in human kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Masayuki; Katayama, Yasushi; Tsutsui, Toshiki; Komeyama, Takeshi; Mizusawa, Takaki; Tanikawa, Toshiki; Sato, Shotaro

    1993-01-01

    Although gadolinium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) has been used as a contrast material in magnetic resonance imaging, it is known that contrast enhancement effect disappears if the concentration of Gd-DTPA increases beyond some levels. In this study, to evaluate the proper pulse sequences for dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the human kidney, the concentration of Gd-DTPA was quantitatively measured by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) emission spectrometry in human biological samples after administration of Gd-DTPA, and the signal intensity of MRI is the solution of several concentrations of Gd-DTPA was measured. In using a low magnetic field apparatus, signal intensity linearly correlated with the concentration of Gd-DTPA between 0 and 2.0 μmol/g under saturation recovery sequences (flip angle was 60deg or 90deg). Using a high magnetic field apparatus, signal intensity linearly correlated with the concentration of Gd-DTPA between 0 and 2.0 or 3.0 μmol/g under spin echo or gradient-echo sequences. Gd-DTPA concentration of the renal cortex ranged from 0.132 to 0.152 μmol/g tissue at 5 min after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA 0.05 mmol/kg body weight in 7 patients with adrenal tumor or renal cell cancer, and 1 patient with both urinary bladder cancer and prostatic cancer. Seven of them showed normal renal function and the other had renal insufficiency (GFR 25 ml/min/1.48 m 2 ). Gd-DTPA concentrations of renal medulla and renal cell cancer tissue were 0.123 and 0.108 μmol/g tissue, respectively, at 5 min after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA 0.05 mmol/kg body weight. These results suggest that the signal intensity of renal cortex, renal medulla, and renal cell cancer tissue may linearly correlate with Gd-DTPA concentration of tissues at 5 min after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA 0.5 mmol/kg body weight. (author)

  8. Chelator induced phytoextraction and in situ soil washing of Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kos, Bostjan; Lestan, Domen

    2004-11-01

    In a soil column experiment, we investigated the effect of 5 mmol kg{sup -1} soil addition of citric acid, ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA), diethylenetriamine-pentaacetate (DTPA) and [S,S]-stereoisomer of ethylenediamine-disuccinate (EDDS) on phytoextraction of Cu from a vineyard soil with 162.6 mg kg{sup -1} Cu, into the test plant Brassica rapa var. pekinensis. We also examined the use of a horizontal permeable barrier, composed of layers of nutrient enriched sawdust and apatite, for reduction of chelator induced Cu leaching. The addition of all chelators, except citric acid, enhanced Cu mobility and caused leaching of 19.5-23% of initial total Cu from the soil column. However, Cu plant uptake did not increase accordingly; the most effective was the EDDS treatment, in which plant Cu concentration reached 37.8{+-}1.3 mg kg{sup -1} Cu and increased by 3.3-times over the control treatment. The addition of none of the chelators in the concentration range from 5 to 15 mmol kg{sup -1} exerted any toxic effect on respiratory soil microorganisms. When EDDS was applied into the columns with horizontal permeable barriers, only 0.53{+-}0.32% of the initial total Cu was leached. Cu (36.7%) was washed from the 18 cm soil layer above the barrier and accumulated in the barrier. Our results indicate that rather than for a reduction of Cu leaching during rather ineffective chelate induced Cu phytoextraction, horizontal permeable barriers could be more effective in a new remediation technique of controlled in situ soil washing of Cu with biodegradable chelates.

  9. High-technology metals as emerging contaminants: Strong increase of anthropogenic gadolinium levels in tap water of Berlin, Germany, from 2009 to 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepe, N.; Romero, M.; Bau, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Monitoring study Berlin-2012 confirms tap water contamination with gadolinium. • Contamination confined to western districts of Berlin. • Strong increase of anthropogenic gadolinium from 2009 to 2012. • Anthropogenic gadolinium is tracer for wastewater-derived substances. - Abstract: The distribution of rare earth elements (REE) in tap water sampled in December 2012 in Berlin, Germany, is characterized by anomalously high levels of gadolinium (Gd). While the western districts of the city show strong anthropogenic positive Gd anomalies in REE distribution patterns, the eastern districts are (almost) unaffected. This contamination with anthropogenic Gd results from Gd-based contrast agents used in Magnetic Resonance Imaging, that enter rivers, groundwater and eventually tap water via the clear water effluent from wastewater treatment plants. While the spatial distribution of anthropogenic Gd in 2012 confirms results of an earlier study in 2009 (Kulaksiz and Bau, 2011a), anthropogenic Gd concentrations have increased between 1.5- and 11.5-fold in just three years. This confirms predictions based upon the increase of anthropogenic Gd concentrations in the Havel River over the past two decades and the time it takes the water to migrate from the Havel River to the groundwater production wells. Anomalously high levels of anthropogenic Gd in tap water, which are not confined to Berlin but have also been observed in London, U.K., and in German cities in the Ruhr area and along the Rhine River, reveal that high-technology metals have become emerging contaminants. While non-toxic at the observed concentrations, the anthropogenic Gd is a microcontaminant that may be used as a conservative pseudo-natural tracer for wastewater-derived xenobiotics such as pharmaceuticals, food additives and personal care products. Our results suggest that monitoring the concentrations of such substances in Berlin’s drinking water can be restricted to a few central and

  10. EVALUATION OF THE CHELATING EFFECT OF METHANOLIC EXTRACT OFCORIANDRUM SATIVUMAND ITS FRACTIONS ON WISTAR RATS POISONED WITH LEAD ACETATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez-López, Miguel Ángel; Mora-Tovar, Gabriela; Ceniceros-Méndez, Iromi Marlen; García-Lujan, Concepción; Puente-Valenzuela, Cristo Omar; Vega-Menchaca, María Del Carmen; Serrano-Gallardo, Luis Benjamín; Garza, Rubén García; Morán-Martínez, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The rate of lead poisoning has decreased in recent years due to increased health control in industries that use this metal. However, it is still a public health problem worldwide. The use of various plants with chelating properties has been a topic of research today. In traditional medicine, it is said that Coriandrum sativum has chelating properties, but there is no scientific evidence to support this fact. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the chelating effect of methanol extract of coriander and its fractions on Wistar rats intoxicated with lead. In this research, male Wistar rats were poisoned with 50 mg/kg of lead acetate and treated with 50 mg/kg of methanol extract and its fractions. The extract and its fractions were administered to four treatment groups. Positive and negative controls were established. Hemoglobin, hematocrit and lead concentrations were analyzed; liver was evaluated histologically in control and treatment groups. The methanol extract of coriander presented a LD 50 >1000 mg/dL. The group administered with the methanol extract showed significant difference in the levels of hemoglobin and hematocrit compared to the negative control group. Lead concentration in treatment groups showed a decrease compared to the positive control. Histological evaluation of tissue showed less damage in groups administered with methanolic extract and its fractions compared to the positive control which presented structural alterations. Coriander extracts protect liver and lower lead concentration in rats intoxicated with lead in contrast to the positive control group.

  11. Competitive removal of heavy metal ions from squid oil under isothermal condition by CR11 chelate ion exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Omid; Goodarzi, Vahabodin; Saeb, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoodi, Niyaz Mohammad; Borja, Rafael

    2017-07-15

    Heavy metal ions (HMIs) are serious threats to the environment. Sub-critical water treatment was used to mimic contamination of squid oil in aqueous, metal-soap and oil phases. Isothermal adsorption of HMIs (Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ , Cd 2+ and Zn 2+ ) was studied from aqueous phase to oil phase (493, 523, 548, and 573K) for solutions with different initial concentration of HMIs was studied. Decomposition of glycerides into fatty acids was favored at high subcritical temperatures, with metal-soap phase showing the highest chelation ability toward Cu 2+ (96%, isotherm 573K). The removal-ability of HMIs from contaminated oil was performed by CR11 chelate ion exchanger, showing facilitated removal from metal-soap and oil phases at low temperatures compared to general-purpose PEI-chitosan bead and PEI-chitosan fiber sorbents. The chelation behavior of Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ was the same in the OIL, with maximum values of 5.7×10 -3 (mol/l) and 5.0×10 -3 (mol/l) at 573K, respectively. By contrast, concentration of Zn 2+ ion showed a slight increase with increasing temperature due to electrostatic forces between Zn 2+ and active sites of glycerides in oil phase. For oil solution, the selectivity of adsorption for CR11, especially for Zn 2+ , was at least five-fold larger compared to PEI-chitosan bead and PEI-chitosan fiber adsorbents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Usefulness of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the evaluation of the viability of acute scaphoid fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larribe, Maud; Gay, Andre; Freire, Veronique; Bouvier, Corinne; Chagnaud, Christophe; Souteyrand, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for assessing the viability of the proximal pole of the scaphoid in patients with acute scaphoid fractures. Eighteen consecutive patients with acute scaphoid fracture who underwent dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MRI 7 days or less before surgery were prospectively included between August 2011 and December 2012. All patients underwent MR imaging with unenhanced images, enhanced images, and dynamic enhanced images. A radiologist first classified the MRI results as necrotic or viable based on T1- and T2-weighted images only, followed by a second blinded interpretation, this time including analysis of pre- and post-gadolinium administration images and a third blinded interpretation based on the time-intensity curve of the dynamic enhanced study. The standard of reference was the histologic assessment of a cylindrical specimen of the proximal pole obtained during surgery in all patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for unenhanced, enhanced, and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MRI studies. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 67, 67, 50, and 80 % for unenhanced images, 83, 100, 100, and 92 for enhanced images, and 83, 92, 83, and 92 for dynamic contrast-enhanced images. Our data are consistent with previously reported data supporting contrast-enhanced MRI for assessment of viability, and showing that dynamic imaging with time-intensity curve analysis does not provide additional predictive value over standard delayed enhanced imaging for acute scaphoid fracture. (orig.)

  13. Aloin: a natural antitumor anthraquinone glycoside with iron chelating and non-atherogenic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmat, Amr Y; Said, Mahmoud M; Khalil, Sally A

    2015-01-01

    The antitumor activity of aloin, the active anthraquinone of Aloe juice, against different murine and human tumors has been reported. In the present study, the impact of repeated aloin treatment at its maximum tolerated dose on serum levels of lipid profile, some elements, iron status and kidney function, compared with doxorubicin (a cardiotoxic anthracycline and inhibitor of erythropoiesis), was assessed. Rats were treated with a single dose of doxorubicin (30 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneal) or aloin (50 mg/kg body weight, intramuscular) twice weekly over 2 weeks. Acute doxorubicin treatment elevated serum levels of triacylglycerols (59.90%), total cholesterol (42.29%), cholesteryl esters (54.75%), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (230.16%), very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (56.42%), urea (287.53%), and creatinine (85.38%), whereas serum high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, sodium, and calcium levels were reduced (44.61, 9.61, and 9.76%, respectively), as compared with controls. In contrast, aloin treatment showed insignificant changes in all the aforementioned parameters. Both doxorubicin and aloin induced erythropoiesis impairment demonstrated by a reduction in blood hemoglobin concentration. While aloin treatment elevated serum iron level (30.28%), doxorubicin treatment reduced serum levels of iron (51.47%) and percent transferrin saturation (55.21%), and in contrast, increased serum total iron binding capacity (34.85%). The chelating affinities of iron-aloin and -doxorubicin complexes, which contain bidentate iron-binding moieties, have been shown in the infrared spectra. The non-cardiotoxic effect of aloin treatment was due to its non-atherogenic and iron-chelating activities, which might also contribute in part to its anti-proliferative activity.

  14. Magnetocaloric properties of distilled gadolinium: effects of structural inhomogeneity and hydrogen impurity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burkhanov, G.S.; Kolchugina, N.B.; Tereshina, Evgeniya; Tereshina, I. S.; Politova, G.A.; Chzhan, V.B.; Badurski, D.; Chistyakov, O.D.; Paukov, M.; Drulis, H.; Havela, L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 24 (2014), "242402-1"-"242402-5" ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0150 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : high-purity rare-earth metals * gadolinium * magnetocaloric effect * hydrogenation * structural studies Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.302, year: 2014

  15. Colloidal stabilization of cerium-gadolinium oxide (CGO) suspensions via rheology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marani, Debora; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Bentzen, Janet Jonna

    2015-01-01

    colloidally stable state. The method was applied to explore the ability of four commercial dispersants (acidic affine, neutral, basic affine, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)) to disperse cerium-gadolinium oxide (CGO) in ethanol. Only the acidic affine and the PVP dispersants were found to efficiently disperse...

  16. Measuring the effect of demagnetization in stacks of gadolinium plates using the magnetocaloric effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipsø, Hans Kasper Wigh; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Christensen, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    The effect of demagnetization in a stack of gadolinium plates is determined experimentally by using spatially resolved measurements of the adiabatic temperature change due to the magnetocaloric effect. The number of plates in the stack, the spacing between them and the position of the plate...

  17. International comparison calculations for a BWR lattice with adjacent gadolinium pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeder, C.; Wydler, P.

    1984-09-01

    The results of burnup calculations for a simplified BWR fuel element with two adjacent gadolinium rods are presented and discussed. Ten complete solutions were contributed by Denmark, France, Italy (3), Japan (3), Switzerland and the UK. Partial results obtained from Poland and the USA are included in an Appendix. (Auth.)

  18. Myocardial late gadolinium enhancement in specific cardiomyopathies by cardiovascular magnetic resonance: a preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Caterina; Moon, James C; Elkington, Andrew G; John, Anna S; Mohiaddin, Raad H; Pennell, Dudley J

    2007-12-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) can visualize myocardial interstitial abnormalities. The aim of this study was to assess whether regions of abnormal myocardium can also be visualized by late enhancement gadolinium CMR in the specific cardiomyopathies. A retrospective review of all referrals for gadolinium CMR with specific cardiomyopathy over 20 months. Nine patients with different specific cardiomyopathies were identified. Late enhancement was demonstrated in all patients, with a mean signal intensity of 390 +/- 220% compared with normal regions. The distribution pattern of late enhancement was unlike the subendocardial late enhancement related to coronary territories found in myocardial infarction. The affected areas included papillary muscles (sarcoid), the mid-myocardium (Anderson-Fabry disease, glycogen storage disease, myocarditis, Becker muscular dystrophy) and the global sub-endocardium (systemic sclerosis, Loeffler's endocarditis, amyloid, Churg-Strauss). Focal myocardial late gadolinium enhancement is found in the specific cardiomyopathies, and the pattern is distinct from that seen in infarction. Further systematic studies are warranted to assess whether the pattern and extent of late enhancement may aid diagnosis and prognostic assessment.

  19. Separation and purification of gadolinium and others rare earths, and yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awwal, M.A.; Filgueiras, S.A.C.

    1988-01-01

    The experimental works in laboratories for developing a solvent extraction process with the purpose of gadolinium separation and purification, and secondarily samarium, europium, lanthanum and yttrium are described. Using as solvent di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid (DEHPA) a preliminary flow chart for separation for these elements are developed. (author)

  20. Precipitation reactions in Magnesium-rare earth alloys containing Yttrium, Gadolinium or Dysprosium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apps, P.J.; Karimzadeh, H.; King, J.F.; Lorimer, G.W

    2003-04-14

    Precipitation reactions have been evaluated in three magnesium-rare earth alloys, containing yttrium, gadolinium or dysprosium. Differences have been noted in precipitate morphology, volume fraction and formation kinetics. These features have been combined with phase composition data and related to mechanical properties.

  1. Phase compositions in magnesium-rare earth alloys containing yttrium, gadolinium or dysprosium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apps, P.J.; Karimzadeh, H.; King, J.F.; Lorimer, G.W

    2003-03-03

    Phase compositions have been investigated, using thin foil energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, in three magnesium-rare earth alloys, containing yttrium, gadolinium or dysprosium. Compositions are suggested for the as-cast eutectic and {beta} precipitate phases and possible compositions for the {beta}{sub 1} precipitate phases are discussed.

  2. Fat saturation technique and gadolinium in MRI of lumbar spinal degenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aprile, P; Tarantino, A; Lorusso, V; Brindicci, D

    2006-11-30

    We evaluated the potential of MR sequences with Fat Saturation and gadolinium in patients with degenerative disease of the lumbar spine and low back pain, by studying both anterior and posterior elements of the lumbar spine. We examined 3323 patients (age range 15-78 years) presenting low back pain. We used T2-weighted sequences with Fat Saturation and in some selected cases (1063 patients, 32%) administered gadolinium using T1-weighted sequences with Fat Saturation. In particular we used gadolinium in the following cases: 1) presence of hyperintense areas on T2 weighted images with Fat Saturation in the osteo-articular and muscular-ligamentous structures of the lumbar spine; 2) Clinical-radiological discrepancy in patients without disc-root conflict and clinical suspicion of posterior vertebral compartment syndrome. We found degenerative-inflammatory changes in osteo-articular, ligamentous and muscular structures in 1063 patients: osteochondrosis, "aseptic discitis", facet joint effusion and synovitis, osteoarthritis, synovial cysts, spondylolysis, degenerative-inflammatory changes of the posterior ligaments (flava, interspinous and supraspinous ligaments) and posterior perispinal muscles. To improve diagnostic accuracy and allow correct therapeutic guidance, MR examination in patients with low back pain must evaluate both anterior and posterior elements of the lumbar spine. Our study indicates that T2 sequences with Fat Saturation and, in selected cases, gadolinium administration, better visualize or disclose degenerative-inflammatory changes in the lumbar spine, showing the active-inflammatory phase and extension of these processes which may not be depicted during a standard MR examination.

  3. Modified Gadonanotubes as a promising novel MRI contrasting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbakhsh, Rouzbeh; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed; Sobhani, Zahra; Adeli, Mohsen; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2013-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging drug and imaging carrier systems which show significant versatility. One of the extraordinary characteristics of CNTs as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrasting agent is the extremely large proton relaxivities when loaded with gadolinium ion (Gdn3+) clusters. In this study equated Gdn3+ clusters were loaded in the sidewall defects of oxidized multiwalled (MW) CNTs. The amount of loaded gadolinium ion into the MWCNTs was quantified by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) method. To improve water solubility and biocompatibility of the system, the complexes were functionalized using diamine-terminated oligomeric poly (ethylene glycol) via a thermal reaction method. Gdn3+ loaded PEGylated oxidized CNTs (Gdn3+@CNTs-PEG) is freely soluble in water and stable in phosphate buffer saline having particle size of about 200 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images clearly showed formation of PEGylated CNTs. MRI analysis showed that the prepared solution represents 10% more signal intensity even in half concentration of Gd3+ in comparison with commerciality available contrasting agent Magnevist®. In addition hydrophilic layer of PEG at the surface of CNTs could prepare stealth nanoparticles to escape RES. It was shown that Gdn3+@CNTs-PEG was capable to accumulate in tumors through enhanced permeability and retention effect. Moreover this system has a potential for early detection of diseases or tumors at the initial stages.

  4. Modified Gadonanotubes as a Promising Novel MRI Contrasting Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouzbeh Jahanbakhsh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose of the study:Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are emerging drug and imaging carrier systems which show significant versatility. One of the extraordinary characteristics of CNTs as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI contrasting agent is the extremely large proton relaxivities when loaded with gadolinium ion (Gdn3+ clusters.Methods:In this study equated Gdn3+ clusters were loaded in the sidewall defects of oxidized multiwalled (MW CNTs. The amount of loaded gadolinium ion into the MWCNTs was quantified by inductively coupled plasma (ICP method. To improve water solubility and biocompatibility of the system, the complexes were functionalized using diamine-terminated oligomeric poly (ethylene glycol via a thermal reaction method.Results:Gdn3+ loaded PEGylated oxidized CNTs (Gdn3+@CNTs-PEG is freely soluble in water and stable in phosphate buffer saline having particle size of about 200 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM images clearly showed formation of PEGylated CNTs. MRI analysis showed that the prepared solution represents 10% more signal intensity even in half concentration of Gd3+ in comparison with commerciality available contrasting agent Magnevist®. In addition hydrophilic layer of PEG at the surface of CNTs could prepare stealth nanoparticles to escape RES.Conclusion:It was shown that Gdn3+@CNTs-PEG was capable to accumulate in tumors through enhanced permeability and retention effect. Moreover this system has a potential for early detection of diseases or tumors at the initial stages.

  5. Criticality experiments with low enriched UO2 fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierman, S.R.; Murphy, E.S.; Clayton, E.D.; Keay, R.T.

    1984-02-01

    The results obtained in a criticality experiments program performed for British Nuclear Fuels, Ltd. (BNFL) under contract with the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) are presented in this report along with a complete description of the experiments. The experiments involved low enriched UO 2 and PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium, and are in direct support of BNFL plans to use soluble compounds of the neutron poison gadolinium as a primary criticality safeguard in the reprocessing of low enriched nuclear fuels. The experiments were designed primarily to provide data for validating a calculation method being developed for BNFL design and safety assessments, and to obtain data for the use of gadolinium as a neutron poison in nuclear chemical plant operations - particularly fuel dissolution. The experiments program covers a wide range of neutron moderation (near optimum to very under-moderated) and a wide range of gadolinium concentration (zero to about 2.5 g Gd/l). The measurements provide critical and subcritical k/sub eff/ data (1 greater than or equal to k/sub eff/ greater than or equal to 0.87) on fuel-water assemblies of UO 2 rods at two enrichments (2.35 wt % and 4.31 wt % 235 U) and on mixed fuel-water assemblies of UO 2 and PuO 2 -UO 2 rods containing 4.31 wt % 235 U and 2 wt % PuO 2 in natural UO 2 respectively. Critical size of the lattices was determined with water containing no gadolinium and with water containing dissolved gadolinium nitrate. Pulsed neutron source measurements were performed to determine subcritical k/sub eff/ values as additional amounts of gadolinium were successively dissolved in the water of each critical assembly. Fission rate measurements in 235 U using solid state track recorders were made in each of the three unpoisoned critical assemblies, and in the near-optimum moderated and the close-packed poisoned assemblies of this fuel

  6. Element-specific spectral imaging of multiple contrast agents: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panta, R. K.; Bell, S. T.; Healy, J. L.; Aamir, R.; Bateman, C. J.; Moghiseh, M.; Butler, A. P. H.; Anderson, N. G.

    2018-02-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of simultaneous discrimination of multiple contrast agents based on their element-specific and energy-dependent X-ray attenuation properties using a pre-clinical photon-counting spectral CT. We used a photon-counting based pre-clinical spectral CT scanner with four energy thresholds to measure the X-ray attenuation properties of various concentrations of iodine (9, 18 and 36 mg/ml), gadolinium (2, 4 and 8 mg/ml) and gold (2, 4 and 8 mg/ml) based contrast agents, calcium chloride (140 and 280 mg/ml) and water. We evaluated the spectral imaging performances of different energy threshold schemes between 25 to 82 keV at 118 kVp, based on K-factor and signal-to-noise ratio and ranked them. K-factor was defined as the X-ray attenuation in the K-edge containing energy range divided by the X-ray attenuation in the preceding energy range, expressed as a percentage. We evaluated the effectiveness of the optimised energy selection to discriminate all three contrast agents in a phantom of 33 mm diameter. A photon-counting spectral CT using four energy thresholds of 27, 33, 49 and 81 keV at 118 kVp simultaneously discriminated three contrast agents based on iodine, gadolinium and gold at various concentrations using their K-edge and energy-dependent X-ray attenuation features in a single scan. A ranking method to evaluate spectral imaging performance enabled energy thresholds to be optimised to discriminate iodine, gadolinium and gold contrast agents in a single spectral CT scan. Simultaneous discrimination of multiple contrast agents in a single scan is likely to open up new possibilities of improving the accuracy of disease diagnosis by simultaneously imaging multiple bio-markers each labelled with a nano-contrast agent.

  7. Experimental and thermodynamic study of the erbium-oxygen-zirconium and gadolinium-oxygen-zirconium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jourdan, J.

    2009-11-01

    This work is a contribution to the development of innovative concepts for fuel cladding in pressurized water nuclear reactors. This concept implies the insertion of rare earth (erbium and gadolinium) in the zirconium fuel cladding. The determination of phase equilibria in the systems is essential prior to the implementation of such a promising solution. This study consisted in an experimental determination of the erbium-zirconium phase diagram. For this, we used many different techniques in order to obtain diagram data such as solubility limits, solidus, liquidus or invariant temperatures. These data allowed us to present a new diagram, very different from the previous one available in the literature. We also assessed the diagram using the CALPHAD approach. In the gadolinium-zirconium system, we determined experimentally the solubility limits. Those limits had never been determined before, and the values we obtained showed a very good agreement with the experimental and assessed versions of the diagram. Because these alloys are subjected to oxygen diffusion throughout their life, we focused our attention on the erbium-oxygen-zirconium and gadolinium-oxygen-zirconium systems. The first system has been investigated experimentally. The alloys fabrication has been performed using powder metallurgy. In order to obtain pure raw materials, we fabricated powder from erbium and zirconium bulk metals using hydrogen absorption/desorption. The characterisation of the ternary pellets allowed the determination of two ternary isothermal sections at 800 and 1100 C. For the gadolinium-oxygen-zirconium system, we calculated the phase equilibria at temperatures ranging from 800 to 1100 C, using a homemade database compiled from literature assessments of the oxygen-zirconium, gadolinium-zirconium and gadolinia-zirconia systems. Finally, we determined the mechanical properties, in connexion with the microstructure, of industrial quality alloys in order to identify the influence of

  8. High sensitivity of late gadolinium enhancement for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Konno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myocardial scarring can be assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with late gadolinium enhancement and by endomyocardial biopsy. However, accuracy of late gadolinium enhancement for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens remains unknown in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We investigated whether late gadolinium enhancement in the whole heart reflects microscopic myocardial scarring in the small biopsied specimens in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-one consecutive patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who were examined both by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and by endomyocardial biopsy were retrospectively studied. The right interventricular septum was the target site for endomyocardial biopsy in all patients. Late gadolinium enhancement in the ventricular septum had an excellent sensitivity (100% with a low specificity (40% for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens. The sensitivity of late gadolinium enhancement in the whole heart remained 100% with a specificity of 27% for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens. Quantitative assessments of fibrosis revealed that the extent of late gadolinium enhancement in the whole heart was the only independent variable related to the microscopic collagen fraction in biopsied specimens (β  =  0.59, 95% confident interval: 0.15 - 1.0, p  =  0.012. CONCLUSIONS: Although there was a compromise in the specificity, the sensitivity of late gadolinium enhancement was excellent for prediction of microscopic myocardial scarring in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Moreover, the severity of late gadolinium enhancement was independently associated with the quantitative collagen fraction in biopsied specimens in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. These findings indicate that late gadolinium enhancement can reflect both the presence and the extent of microscopic myocardial scarring in the small

  9. Graphene Oxide as a Nanocarrier for a Theranostics Delivery System of Protocatechuic Acid and Gadolinium/Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sani Usman

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We have synthesized a graphene oxide (GO-based theranostic nanodelivery system (GOTS for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI using naturally occurring protocatechuic acid (PA as an anticancer agent and gadolinium (III nitrate hexahydrate (Gd as the starting material for a contrast agent,. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs were subsequently used as second diagnostic agent. The GO nanosheets were first prepared from graphite via the improved Hummer’s protocol. The conjugation of the GO and the PA was done via hydrogen bonding and π–π stacking interactions, followed by surface adsorption of the AuNPs through electrostatic interactions. GAGPA is the name given to the nanocomposite obtained from Gd and PA conjugation. However, after coating with AuNPs, the name was modified to GAGPAu. The physicochemical properties of the GAGPA and GAGPAu nanohybrids were studied using various characterization techniques. The results from the analyses confirmed the formation of the GOTS. The powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD results showed the diffractive patterns for pure GO nanolayers, which changed after subsequent conjugation of the Gd and PA. The AuNPs patterns were also recorded after surface adsorption. Cytotoxicity and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast tests were also carried out on the developed GOTS. The GAGPAu was significantly cytotoxic to the human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2 but nontoxic to the standard fibroblast cell line (3T3. The GAGPAu also appeared to possess higher T1 contrast compared to the pure Gd and water reference. The GOTS has good prospects of serving as future theranostic platform for cancer chemotherapy and diagnosis.

  10. Optimization of single injection liver arterial phase gadolinium enhanced MRI using bolus track real-time imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Puneet; Kalb, Bobby; Kitajima, Hiroumi D; Salman, Khalil N; Burrow, Bobbie; Ray, Gaye L; Martin, Diego R

    2011-01-01

    To measure contrast agent enhancement kinetics in the liver and to further evaluate and develop an optimized gadolinium enhanced MRI using a single injection real-time bolus-tracking method for reproducible imaging of the transient arterial-phase. A total of 18 subjects with hypervascular liver lesions were imaged with four dimensional (4D) perfusion scans to measure time-to-peak (TTP) delays of arterial (aorta-celiac axis), liver parenchyma, liver lesion, portal, and hepatic veins. Time delays were calculated from the TTP-aorta signal, and then related to the gradient echo (GRE) k-space acquisition design, to determine optimized timing for real-time bolus-track triggering methodology. As another measure of significance, 200 clinical patients were imaged with 3D-GRE using either a fixed time-interval or by individualized arterial bolus real-time triggering. Bolus TTP-aorta was calculated and arterial-phase acquisitions were compared for accuracy and reproducibility using specific vascular enhancement indicators. The mean bolus transit-time to peak-lesion contrast was 8.1 ± 2.7 seconds following arterial detection, compared to 32.1 ± 5.4 seconds from contrast injection, representing a 62.1% reduction in the time-variability among subjects (N = 18). The real-time bolus-triggered technique more consistently captured the targeted arterial phase (94%), compared to the fixed timing technique (73%), representing an expected improvement of timing accuracy in 28% of patients (P = 0.0001389). Our results show detailed timing window analysis required for optimized arterial real-time bolus-triggering acquisition of transient arterial phase features of liver lesions, with optimized arterial triggering expected to improve reproducibility in a significant number of patients. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. MULTIDENTATE TEREPHTHALAMIDATE AND HYDROXYPYRIDONATE LIGANDS: TOWARDS NEW ORALLY ACTIVE CHELATORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abergel, Rebecca J.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2011-07-13

    The limitations of current therapies for the treatment of iron overload or radioisotope contamination have stimulated efforts to develop new orally bioavailable iron and actinide chelators. Siderophore-inspired tetradentate, hexadentate and octadentate terephthalamidate and hydroxypyridonate ligands were evaluated in vivo as selective and efficacious iron or actinide chelating agents, with several metal loading and ligand assessment procedures, using {sup 59}Fe, {sup 238}Pu, and {sup 241}Am as radioactive tracers. The compounds presented in this study were compared to commercially available therapeutic sequestering agents [deferoxamine (DFO) for iron and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DPTA) for actinides] and are unrivaled in terms of affinity, selectivity and decorporation efficacy, which attests to the fact that high metal affinity may overcome the low bioavailability properties commonly associated to multidenticity.

  12. Treatment of some radioactive wastes by using new chelating membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegazy, S.A.; El-Adham, K.; Abdel Geleel, M.; Soliman, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    The preparation of chelating membranes containing nitrile and carboxylic acid as functional groups was investigated. The modification of such membranes by chemical treatments to produce significant changes in their properties was studied. This modification results in a higher rate of exchange and higher capacity. The applicability of such modified membranes in the removal of Co-60 and Cs-137 from their wastes were tested. The dependence of these radioactive nuclides uptake on the time and degree of grafting for H CI-, NH 2 OH-and KOH-treated membranes was investigated. It was found that the adsorption rate and capacity were higher for KOH-treated membrane than those for the NH 2 OH and H CI treated ones. The prepared grafted membranes have a good affinity towards the adsorption or chelation with Co-60 and Cs-137. This result may make such prepared materials acceptable for practicable use in some radioactive waste treatments and recovery

  13. Rapid hydrothermal route to synthesize cubic-phase gadolinium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Furthermore, ∼ plot of the nanorod system (pH = 10.8) exhibited slight departure from the ideal superparamagnetic behaviour, with low remanence and coercive field values. The exploitation of one-dimensional Gd2O3 nanorods have immense potential in the production of advanced contrast agents, smart drives and ...

  14. Iron chelators target both proliferating and quiescent cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Frykn?s, M?rten; Zhang, Xiaonan; Bremberg, Ulf; Senkowski, Wojciech; Olofsson, Maria H?gg; Brandt, Peter; Persson, Ingmar; D?Arcy, Padraig; Gullbo, Joachim; Nygren, Peter; Schughart, Leoni Kunz; Linder, Stig; Larsson, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Poorly vascularized areas of solid tumors contain quiescent cell populations that are resistant to cell cycle-active cancer drugs. The compound VLX600 was recently identified to target quiescent tumor cells and to inhibit mitochondrial respiration. We here performed gene expression analysis in order to characterize the cellular response to VLX600. The compound-specific signature of VLX600 revealed a striking similarity to signatures generated by compounds known to chelate iron. Validation exp...

  15. Acute Liver Failure During Deferasirox Chelation: A Toxicity Worth Considering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menaker, Nathan; Halligan, Katharine; Shur, Natasha; Paige, John; Hickling, Matthew; Nepo, Anne; Weintraub, Lauren

    2017-04-01

    This case report details a unique case of acute, reversible liver failure in a 12-year-old male with sickle cell anemia on chronic transfusion protocol and deferasirox chelation. There is substantial literature documenting deferasirox-induced renal injury, including Fanconi syndrome, but less documentation of hepatic toxicity and few reports of hepatic failure. The case highlights the importance of close monitoring of ferritin, bilirubin, and transaminases for patients on deferasirox.

  16. Self-assembled polymeric chelate nanoparticles as potential theranostic agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škodová, Michaela; Černoch, Peter; Štěpánek, Petr; Chánová, Eliška; Kučka, Jan; Kálalová, Zuzana; Kaňková, Dana; Hrubý, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 18 (2012), s. 4244-4250 ISSN 1439-4235 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP207/10/P054; GA ČR GA202/09/2078; GA ČR GAP304/12/0950 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : chelates * nanoparticles * polymers Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.349, year: 2012

  17. Mercury removal in utility wet scrubber using a chelating agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrhein, Gerald T.

    2001-01-01

    A method for capturing and reducing the mercury content of an industrial flue gas such as that produced in the combustion of a fossil fuel or solid waste adds a chelating agent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or other similar compounds like HEDTA, DTPA and/or NTA, to the flue gas being scrubbed in a wet scrubber used in the industrial process. The chelating agent prevents the reduction of oxidized mercury to elemental mercury, thereby increasing the mercury removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. Exemplary tests on inlet and outlet mercury concentration in an industrial flue gas were performed without and with EDTA addition. Without EDTA, mercury removal totaled 42%. With EDTA, mercury removal increased to 71%. The invention may be readily adapted to known wet scrubber systems and it specifically provides for the removal of unwanted mercury both by supplying S.sup.2- ions to convert Hg.sup.2+ ions into mercuric sulfide (HgS) and by supplying a chelating agent to sequester other ions, including but not limited to Fe.sup.2+ ions, which could otherwise induce the unwanted reduction of Hg.sup.2+ to the form, Hg.sup.0.

  18. Chelate forms of biometalls. Theoretical aspects of obtaining and characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kapustyan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of microelements bioavailability is highlighted and the correct ways of its solution are substantiated as a result of generalization of theoretical aspects of obtaining of the biometals chelate forms. The characteristics of the main biogenic elements, their physiological significance, electrochemical properties are presented. The main examples of the participation of biometals in various biological processes are given. The properties and the structure peculiarities of biometals coordination complexes are considered in detail. It is shown that in obtaining of biometals chelate forms, there is the mutual selectivity and the affinity of biometals and ligands. The main factors of obtaining a hard metal complex are given. Potential bioligands for obtaining bioavailable forms of microelements are detailed. Among them there are amino acids, peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates. The possible character of complexation depending on the nature of the bioligand is indicated. Practical examples of preparation of biometals mixed ligand complexes are given. The expediency of using metabolic products and processing of lactic acid bacteria as promising components of mixed ligand chelate complexes is substantiated. These substances contain in their composition a mass of potential donor atoms that are capable to form covalent and coordination bonds with biomethalles, and also possess high biological and immunotropic activities. The use of this system in the biocoordination compounds of the "metals of life" can provide a synergistic effect of the components, significantly to expand the range of their physiological activity and to increase the degree of assimilation by the body.

  19. Hydroxyurea could be a good clinically relevant iron chelator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushnooma Italia

    Full Text Available Our previous study showed a reduction in serum ferritin of β-thalassemia patients on hydroxyurea therapy. Here we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of hydroxyurea alone and in combination with most widely used iron chelators like deferiprone and deferasirox for reducing iron from experimentally iron overloaded mice. 70 BALB/c mice received intraperitonial injections of iron-sucrose. The mice were then divided into 8 groups and were orally given hydroxyurea, deferiprone or deferasirox alone and their combinations for 4 months. CBC, serum-ferritin, TBARS, sTfr and hepcidin were evaluated before and after iron overload and subsequently after 4 months of drug therapy. All animals were then killed. Iron staining of the heart and liver tissue was done using Perl's Prussian Blue stain. Dry weight of iron in the heart and liver was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Increased serum-ferritin, TBARS, hepcidin and dry weight of iron in the liver and heart showed a significant reduction in groups treated with iron chelators with maximum reduction in the group treated with a combination of deferiprone, deferasirox and hydroxyurea. Thus hydroxyurea proves its role in reducing iron from iron overloaded mice. The iron chelating effect of these drugs can also be increased if given in combination.

  20. Antibacterial and antibiofilm effects of iron chelators against Prevotella intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ji-Hoi; Kim, Cheul; Lee, Hee-Su; Kim, Sung-Woon; Lee, Jin-Yong

    2013-09-01

    Prevotella intermedia, a major periodontopathogen, has been shown to be resistant to many antibiotics. In the present study, we examined the effect of the FDA-approved iron chelators deferoxamine (DFO) and deferasirox (DFRA) against planktonic and biofilm cells of P. intermedia in order to evaluate the possibility of using these iron chelators as alternative control agents against P. intermedia. DFRA showed strong antimicrobial activity (MIC and MBC values of 0.16 mg ml(-1)) against planktonic P. intermedia. At subMICs, DFRA partially inhibited the bacterial growth and considerably prolonged the bacterial doubling time. DFO was unable to completely inhibit the bacterial growth in the concentration range tested and was not bactericidal. Crystal violet binding assay for the assessment